WorldWideScience

Sample records for nonmuscle tropomyosin resulted

  1. Tropomyosin IgE-positive results are a good predictor of shrimp allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, C; Sánchez-García, S; Ibáñez, M D; López, R; Aguado, E; López, E; Sastre, B; Sastre, J; del Pozo, V

    2011-10-01

    Shrimp is a common cause of food allergy. Our aims were to determine the value of IgE antibodies in the diagnosis of shrimp allergy and to study red shrimp (Solenocera melantho) tropomyosin both as a new allergen and as a cross-reactive IgE-binding protein. We have studied 45 subjects. Skin prick test (SPT) was carried out in all subjects, and specific IgE (sIgE) to shrimp, recombinant and natural shrimp tropomyosins rPen a 1 and nPen m 1, recombinant Der p 10, and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus was assessed by fluoroimmunoassay and/or immunoblotting. Double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges were carried out to confirm diagnosis of shrimp allergy. Also, in vitro inhibition tests were performed to evaluate cross-reactivity. Shrimp allergy was confirmed in 18 shrimp-allergic patients. Skin prick test and IgE antibodies to shrimp were positive in all shrimp-allergic patients; sIgE to rPen a 1 was detected in 98% of these patients. Of the 18 shrimp-tolerant patients, 61% had positive SPT to shrimp, 55% were IgE-positive to shrimp, and 33% showed IgE antibodies to rPen a 1. Determination of IgE to rPen a 1 yielded a positive predictive value of 0.72 and a negative predictive value of 0.91. IgE levels to rPen a 1 provided additional value to the diagnosis of shrimp allergy. Some allergens in mite extract are recognized by patients who are allergic to shrimp, though their clinical relevance remains unknown. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Tropomodulins and tropomyosins: working as a team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpan, Mert; Moroz, Natalia A; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2013-08-01

    Actin filaments are major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells and are involved in vital cellular functions such as cell motility and muscle contraction. Tmod and TM are crucial constituents of the actin filament network, making their presence indispensable in living cells. Tropomyosin (TM) is an alpha-helical, coiled coil protein that covers the grooves of actin filaments and stabilizes them. Actin filament length is optimized by tropomodulin (Tmod), which caps the slow growing (pointed end) of thin filaments to inhibit polymerization or depolymerization. Tmod consists of two structurally distinct regions: the N-terminal and the C-terminal domains. The N-terminal domain contains two TM-binding sites and one TM-dependent actin-binding site, whereas the C-terminal domain contains a TM-independent actin-binding site. Tmod binds to two TM molecules and at least one actin molecule during capping. The interaction of Tmod with TM is a key regulatory factor for actin filament organization. The binding efficacy of Tmod to TM is isoform-dependent. The affinities of Tmod/TM binding influence the proper localization and capping efficiency of Tmod at the pointed end of actin filaments in cells. Here we describe how a small difference in the sequence of the TM-binding sites of Tmod may result in dramatic change in localization of Tmod in muscle cells or morphology of non-muscle cells. We also suggest most promising directions to study and elucidate the role of Tmod-TM interaction in formation and maintenance of sarcomeric and cytoskeletal structure.

  3. Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin on actin during thin filament activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, William; Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-08-01

    Our thesis is that thin filament function can only be fully understood and muscle regulation then elucidated if atomic structures of the thin filament are available to reveal the positions of tropomyosin on actin in all physiological states. After all, it is tropomyosin influenced by troponin that regulates myosin-crossbridge cycling on actin and therefore controls contraction in all muscles. In addition, we maintain that a complete appreciation of thin filament activation also requires that the mechanical properties of tropomyosin itself are recognized and then related to the effect of myosin-association on actin. Taking the Gestalt-binding of tropomyosin into account, coupled with our electron microscopy structures and computational chemistry, we propose a comprehensive mechanism for tropomyosin regulatory movement over the actin filament surface that explains the cooperative muscle activation process. In fact, well-known point mutations of critical amino acids on the actin-tropomyosin binding interface disrupt Gestalt-binding and are associated with a number of inherited myopathies. Moreover, dysregulation of tropomyosin may also be a factor that interferes with the gatekeeping operation of non-muscle tropomyosin in the controlling interactions of a wide variety of cellular actin-binding proteins. The clinical relevance of Gestalt-binding is discussed in articles by the Marston and the Gunning groups in this special journal issue devoted to the impact of tropomyosin on biological systems.

  4. The flexibility of two tropomyosin mutants, D175N and E180G, that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaochuan; Suphamungmee, Worawit [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Janco, Miro; Geeves, Michael A. [School of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NJ (United Kingdom); Marston, Steven B. [National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London W12 0NN (United Kingdom); Fischer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.fischer@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de [Computational Biochemistry Group, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg D-69120 (Germany); Lehman, William, E-mail: wlehman@bu.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02118 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Well-known tropomyosin mutants, D175N and E180G are linked to cardiomyopathies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural mechanics of D175N and E180G tropomyosins have been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D175N and E180G mutations increase both local and global tropomyosin flexibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In muscle, this increased flexibility will enhance myosin interactions on actin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extra myosin interaction can alter cardiac Ca{sup 2+}-switching, leading to dysfunction. -- Abstract: Point mutations targeting muscle thin filament proteins are the cause of a number of cardiomyopathies. In many cases, biological effects of the mutations are well-documented, whereas their structural and mechanical impact on filament assembly and regulatory function is lacking. In order to elucidate molecular defects leading to cardiac dysfunction, we have examined the structural mechanics of two tropomyosin mutants, E180G and D175N, which are associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Tropomyosin is an {alpha}-helical coiled-coil dimer which polymerizes end-to-end to create an elongated superhelix that wraps around F-actin filaments of muscle and non-muscle cells, thus modulating the binding of other actin-binding proteins. Here, we study how flexibility changes in the E180G and D175N mutants might affect tropomyosin binding and regulatory motion on F-actin. Electron microscopy and Molecular Dynamics simulations show that E180G and D175N mutations cause an increase in bending flexibility of tropomyosin both locally and globally. This excess flexibility is likely to increase accessibility of the myosin-binding sites on F-actin, thus destabilizing the low-Ca{sup 2+} relaxed-state of cardiac muscle. The resulting imbalance in the on-off switching mechanism of the mutants will shift the regulatory equilibrium towards Ca{sup 2+}-activation of cardiac muscle, as is observed in affected

  5. Non-muscle contractile proteins in the organ of corti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalmann, I.; Giometti, C.S.; Thalmann, R. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (USA))

    1985-01-01

    Evidence indicates that an active contractile process exists in the outer hair cells of the mammalian cochlea. Proteins ordinarily associated with muscle contraction have been identified in the outer hair cells by immunohistologic techniques. On this basis a muscle-like mechanism of contraction/relaxation has been postulated by several investigators. The possibility must be considered, however, that the contractile proteins identified thus far in inner ear structures may be nonmuscle rather than muscle forms. In skeletal muscle, actin and myosin are responsible for the physical movement of the muscle fibers, and tropomyosin and troponin are involved in regulating this movement; these four proteins, as well as a variety of proteins involved with the normal cell maintenance functions are all of a muscle-specific type. Non-muscle-like motion also depends upon the interaction of actin with myosin; however, not only are these proteins structurally different from those specific to skeletal muscle but their proportions are also different. We have used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to study the proteins in freeze dried preparations of whole organ of Corti from the guinea pig. The identified proteins include non-muscle actin, three forms of non-muscle tropomyosin, alpha- and beta-tubulin, alpha-actinin, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH B). Myosin heavy and light chains were not detected in the organ of Corti preparation, but the levels of those proteins might be too low to be detected with the protein load used of those proteins might be too low to be detected with the protein load used for this analysis. Although troponin could not be detected, calmodulin was present. All of these findings tend to indicate that the contraction/relaxation processes that have been associated with the organ of Corti by others are of the non-muscle variety.

  6. Conditional deletion of nonmuscle myosin II-A in mouse tongue epithelium results in squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Mary Anne; Saleh, Anthony D; Brinster, Lauren R; Cheng, Hui; Chen, Zhong; Cornelius, Shaleeka; Liu, Chengyu; Ma, Xuefei; Van Waes, Carter; Adelstein, Robert S

    2015-09-15

    To investigate the contribution of nonmuscle myosin II-A (NM II-A) to early cardiac development we crossed Myh9 floxed mice and Nkx2.5 cre-recombinase mice. Nkx2.5 is expressed in the early heart (E7.5) and later in the tongue epithelium. Mice homozygous for deletion of NM II-A (A(Nkx)/A(Nkx)) are born at the expected ratio with normal hearts, but consistently develop an invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the tongue (32/32 A(Nkx)/A(Nkx)) as early as E17.5. To assess reproducibility a second, independent line of Myh9 floxed mice derived from a different embryonic stem cell clone was tested. This second line also develops SCC indistinguishable from the first (15/15). In A(Nkx)/A(Nkx) mouse tongue epithelium, genetic deletion of NM II-A does not affect stabilization of TP53, unlike a previous report for SCC. We attribute the consistent, early formation of SCC with high penetrance to the role of NM II in maintaining mitotic stability during karyokinesis.

  7. Kinetic characterization of the sole nonmuscle myosin-2 from the model organism Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M; Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Sellers, James R

    2015-04-01

    Nonmuscle myosin-2 is the primary enzyme complex powering contractility of the F-actin cytoskeleton in the model organism Drosophila. Despite myosin's essential function in fly development and homeostasis, its kinetic features remain elusive. The purpose of this in vitro study is a detailed steady-state and presteady-state kinetic characterization of the Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 motor domain. Kinetic features are a slow steady-state ATPase activity, high affinities for F-actin and ADP, and a low duty ratio. Comparative analysis of the overall enzymatic signatures across the nonmuscle myosin-2 complement from model organisms indicates that the Drosophila protein resembles nonmuscle myosin-2s from metazoa rather than protozoa, though modulatory aspects of myosin motor function are distinct. Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 is uniquely insensitive toward blebbistatin, a commonly used myosin-2 inhibitor. An in silico modeling approach together with kinetic studies indicate that the nonconsensus amino acid Met466 in the Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 active-site loop switch-2 acts as blebbistatin desensitizer. Introduction of the M466I mutation sensitized the protein for blebbistatin, resulting in a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 36.3 ± 4.1 µM. Together, these data show that Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 is a bona fide molecular motor and establish an important link between switch-2 and blebbistatin sensitivity.

  8. Guard Cell and Tropomyosin Inspired Chemical Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn K.S. Nagel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensors are an integral part of many engineered products and systems. Biological inspiration has the potential to improve current sensor designs as well as inspire innovative ones. This paper presents the design of an innovative, biologically-inspired chemical sensor that performs “up-front” processing through mechanical means. Inspiration from the physiology (function of the guard cell coupled with the morphology (form and physiology of tropomyosin resulted in two concept variants for the chemical sensor. Applications of the sensor design include environmental monitoring of harmful gases, and a non-invasive approach to detect illnesses including diabetes, liver disease, and cancer on the breath.

  9. Characterization of recombinant shrimp allergen Pen a 1 (tropomyosin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, G; Jeoung, B J; Daul, C B; Lehrer, S B

    1997-01-01

    Tropomyosin (Pen a 1) from brown shrimp, Penaeus aztecus, has been identified as the only major shrimp allergen. Since beef, pork and chicken are other tropomyosin-containing foods that are not very allergenic, tropomyosins can serve to investigate the contribution of the structural properties of a protein to its allergenicity. The aim of this study was to determine the primary structure of Pen a 1 and to identify IgE-binding epitopes. The screening of a unidirectional expression cDNA library from shrimp tail muscle with the Pen-a-1-specific monoclonal antibody 4.9.5 resulted in 4 positive Escherichia coli clones. Immunoblot analysis with human sera from shrimp-allergic subjects demonstrated IgE binding of all 4 recombinant shrimp proteins. Three of 4 expressed recombinant proteins have a molecular weight of approximately 36 kD, consistent with the molecular weight of natural Pen a 1. The DNA sequence analysis identified these recombinant shrimp proteins as tropomyosin and could be aligned with the sequence of greasyback shrimp (Metapenaeus ensis) tropomyosin (Met e 1). In order to characterize contiguous IgE-binding epitopes of Pen a 1, a peptide library (Novagen epitope mapping system) expressing 10-30 amino-acid-residue-long recombinant Pen a 1 peptides was constructed and screened with human IgE. Four recombinant, IgE-reactive Pen a 1 peptides were selected and sequenced. They show various degrees of sequence identity with tropomyosins of other arthropods, such as fruitfly and house dust mite, helminths and vertebrates.

  10. Cell elasticity is regulated by the tropomyosin isoform composition of the actin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Iman; Heu, Celine; Cheng, Hong; Freittag, Hannah; Desouza, Melissa; Stehn, Justine R; Bryce, Nicole S; Whan, Renee M; Hardeman, Edna C; Fath, Thomas; Schevzov, Galina; Gunning, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is the primary polymer system within cells responsible for regulating cellular stiffness. While various actin binding proteins regulate the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, the proteins responsible for regulating the mechanical properties of cells are still not fully understood. In the present study, we have addressed the significance of the actin associated protein, tropomyosin (Tpm), in influencing the mechanical properties of cells. Tpms belong to a multi-gene family that form a co-polymer with actin filaments and differentially regulate actin filament stability, function and organization. Tpm isoform expression is highly regulated and together with the ability to sort to specific intracellular sites, result in the generation of distinct Tpm isoform-containing actin filament populations. Nanomechanical measurements conducted with an Atomic Force Microscope using indentation in Peak Force Tapping in indentation/ramping mode, demonstrated that Tpm impacts on cell stiffness and the observed effect occurred in a Tpm isoform-specific manner. Quantitative analysis of the cellular filamentous actin (F-actin) pool conducted both biochemically and with the use of a linear detection algorithm to evaluate actin structures revealed that an altered F-actin pool does not absolutely predict changes in cell stiffness. Inhibition of non-muscle myosin II revealed that intracellular tension generated by myosin II is required for the observed increase in cell stiffness. Lastly, we show that the observed increase in cell stiffness is partially recapitulated in vivo as detected in epididymal fat pads isolated from a Tpm3.1 transgenic mouse line. Together these data are consistent with a role for Tpm in regulating cell stiffness via the generation of specific populations of Tpm isoform-containing actin filaments.

  11. Nonmuscle Myosin II helps regulate synaptic vesicle mobility at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Xinping

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the mechanistic details of the vesicle transport process from the cell body to the nerve terminal are well described, the mechanisms underlying vesicle traffic within nerve terminal boutons is relatively unknown. The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated but exactly how actin or actin-binding proteins participate in vesicle movement is not clear. Results In the present study we have identified Nonmuscle Myosin II as a candidate molecule important for synaptic vesicle traffic within Drosophila larval neuromuscular boutons. Nonmuscle Myosin II was found to be localized at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction; genetics and pharmacology combined with the time-lapse imaging technique FRAP were used to reveal a contribution of Nonmuscle Myosin II to synaptic vesicle movement. FRAP analysis showed that vesicle dynamics were highly dependent on the expression level of Nonmuscle Myosin II. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that Nonmuscle Myosin II is present presynaptically, is important for synaptic vesicle mobility and suggests a role for Nonmuscle Myosin II in shuttling vesicles at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. This work begins to reveal the process by which synaptic vesicles traverse within the bouton.

  12. An atomic model of the tropomyosin cable on F-actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzechowski, Marek; Li, Xiaochuan Edward; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2014-08-05

    Tropomyosin regulates a wide variety of actin filament functions and is best known for the role that it plays together with troponin in controlling muscle activity. For effective performance on actin filaments, adjacent 42-nm-long tropomyosin molecules are joined together by a 9- to 10-residue head-to-tail overlapping domain to form a continuous cable that wraps around the F-actin helix. Yet, despite the apparent simplicity of tropomyosin's coiled-coil structure and its well-known periodic association with successive actin subunits along F-actin, the structure of the tropomyosin cable on actin is uncertain. This is because the conformation of the overlap region that joins neighboring molecules is poorly understood, thus leaving a significant gap in our understanding of thin-filament structure and regulation. However, recent molecular-dynamics simulations of overlap segments defined their overall shape and provided unique and sufficient cues to model the whole actin-tropomyosin filament assembly in atomic detail. In this study, we show that these MD structures merge seamlessly onto the ends of tropomyosin coiled-coils. Adjacent tropomyosin molecules can then be joined together to provide a comprehensive model of the tropomyosin cable running continuously on F-actin. The resulting complete model presented here describes for the first time (to our knowledge) an atomic-level structure of αα-striated muscle tropomyosin bound to an actin filament that includes the critical overlap domain. Thus, the model provides a structural correlate to evaluate thin-filament mechanics, self-assembly mechanisms, and the effect of disease-causing mutations.

  13. Anti-adhesive properties of fish tropomyosins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Bernbom, Nete; Gram, Lone

    2008-01-01

    Aims: We have recently found that preconditioning of stainless steel surfaces with an aqueous fish muscle extract can significantly impede bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterize the primary components associated with this bacteria-repelling effect. Methods...... and Results: The anti-adhesive activity was assayed against Escherchia coli K-12, and bacterial adhesion was quantified by crystal violet staining and sonication methods. Proteolytic digestion, elution and fractionation experiments revealed that the anti-adhesive activity of the extract was linked...... to the formation of a proteinaceous conditioning film composed primarily of fish tropomyosins. These fibrous proteins formed a considerable anti-adhesive conditioning layer on and reduced bacterial adhesion to several different materials including polystyrene, vinyl plastic, stainless steel and glass. The protein...

  14. Tropomyosin is localized in the nuclear matrix and chromosome scaffold of physarum polycephalum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENGXIANLU; XIAOGUANGWANG; 等

    1999-01-01

    The nuclei and chromosomes were isolated from plasmodia of Physarum polycephalum.The nuclear matrix and chromosome scaffold were obtained after the DNA and most of the proteins were extracted with DNase I and 2 M NaCl.SD-PAGE analyses revealed that the nuclear matrix and chromosome scaffold contained a 37 kD polypeptide which is equivalent to tropomyosin in molecular weight.Immunofluorescence observations upon slide preparations labeled with anti-tropomyosin antibody showed that the nuclear matrix and chromosome scaffold emanated bright fluorescence,suggesting the presence of the antigen in them.Immunodotting results confirmed the presence of tropomyosin in the nuclear matrix and chromosome scaffold.Immunoelectron microscopic observations further demonstrated that tropomyosin was dispersively distributed in the interphase nuclei and metaphase chromosomes.

  15. Tropomyosin diffusion over actin subunits facilitates thin filament assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Fischer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coiled-coil tropomyosin binds to consecutive actin-subunits along actin-containing thin filaments. Tropomyosin molecules then polymerize head-to-tail to form cables that wrap helically around the filaments. Little is known about the assembly process that leads to continuous, gap-free tropomyosin cable formation. We propose that tropomyosin molecules diffuse over the actin-filament surface to connect head-to-tail to partners. This possibility is likely because (1 tropomyosin hovers loosely over the actin-filament, thus binding weakly to F-actin and (2 low energy-barriers provide tropomyosin freedom for 1D axial translation on F-actin. We consider that these unique features of the actin-tropomyosin interaction are the basis of tropomyosin cable formation.

  16. Tropomyosin diffusion over actin subunits facilitates thin filament assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Stefan; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Lehman, William

    2016-01-01

    Coiled-coil tropomyosin binds to consecutive actin-subunits along actin-containing thin filaments. Tropomyosin molecules then polymerize head-to-tail to form cables that wrap helically around the filaments. Little is known about the assembly process that leads to continuous, gap-free tropomyosin cable formation. We propose that tropomyosin molecules diffuse over the actin-filament surface to connect head-to-tail to partners. This possibility is likely because (1) tropomyosin hovers loosely over the actin-filament, thus binding weakly to F-actin and (2) low energy-barriers provide tropomyosin freedom for 1D axial translation on F-actin. We consider that these unique features of the actin-tropomyosin interaction are the basis of tropomyosin cable formation. PMID:26798831

  17. Immunoinformatics and Similarity Analysis of House Dust Mite Tropomyosin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Ranjbar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dermatophagoides farinae and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus are house dust mites (HDM that they cause severe asthma and allergic symptoms. Tropomyosin protein plays an important role in mentioned immune and allergic reactions to HDMs. Here, tropomyosin protein from Dermatophagoides spp. was comprehensively screened in silico for its allergenicity, antigenicity and similarity/conservation.Materials and Methods: The amino acid sequences of D. farinae tropomyosin, D. pteronyssinus and other mites were retrieved. We included alignments and evaluated conserved/ variable regions along sequences, constructed their phylogenetic tree and estimated overall mean distances. Then, followed by with prediction of linear B-cell epitope based on different approaches, and besides in-silico evaluation of IgE epitopes allergenicity (by SVMc, IgE epitope, ARPs BLAST, MAST and hybrid method. Finally, comparative analysis of results by different approaches was made.Results: Alignment results revealed near complete identity between D. farina and D. pteronyssinus members, and also there was close similarity among Dermatophagoides spp. Most of the variations among mites' tropomyosin were approximately located at amino acids 23 to 80, 108 to 120, 142 to 153 and 220 to 230. Topology of tree showed close relationships among mites in tropomyosin protein sequence, although their sequences in D. farina, D. pteronyssinus and Psoroptes ovis are more similar to each other and clustered. Dermanyssus gallinae (AC: Q2WBI0 has less relationship to other mites, being located in a separate branch. Hydrophilicity and flexibility plots revealed that many parts of this protein have potential to be hydrophilic and flexible. Surface accessibility represented 7 different epitopes. Beta-turns in this protein are with high probability in the middle part and its two terminals. Kolaskar and Tongaonkar method analysis represented 11 immunogenic epitopes between amino acids 7-16. From

  18. Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer:a primer on immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahir Maruf; Sam J. Brancato; Piyush K. Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has long been the gold standard treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Recently, there has been an emergence of novel immunotherapeutic agents, which have shown promise in the treatment of urothelial cell carcinoma. These agents aim to augment, modify, or enhance the immune response. Such strategies include recombinant BCG, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, gene therapy, and adoptive T-cell therapy. Here, we review the emerging immunotherapeutics in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

  19. Nonmuscle Myosin II helps regulate synaptic vesicle mobility at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu Xinping; Seabrooke Sara; Stewart Bryan A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Although the mechanistic details of the vesicle transport process from the cell body to the nerve terminal are well described, the mechanisms underlying vesicle traffic within nerve terminal boutons is relatively unknown. The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated but exactly how actin or actin-binding proteins participate in vesicle movement is not clear. Results In the present study we have identified Nonmuscle Myosin II as a candidate molecule important for synaptic ves...

  20. Tropomyosin structure and function new insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuchamy, M; Rethinasamy, P; Wieczorek, D F

    1997-05-01

    Cardiac muscle contraction is dependent upon a cooperative interaction between thick and thin filament sarcomeric proteins. Tropomyosin (TM), an essential thin filament protein, interacts with actin and the troponin complex to regulate contractile activity. During muscle contraction, an increase of calcium (Ca(2+)) in the myofilament space promotes binding of Ca(2+) to troponin C, which alters the conformational state of TM and facilitates acto-myosin interactions. By coupling classic genetic approaches with recent developments in transgenic animal model systems, new insights have been provided on the functional role of TM isoforms in both normal and disease states. The focus of this article is to review the current state of knowledge on TM structure and function, with a particular emphasis on myocardial expression in transgenic mouse model systems. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:124-128). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  1. Shrimp tropomyosin retains antibody reactivity after exposure to acidic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasekan, Adeseye; Cao, Hanjuan; Maleki, Soheila; Nayak, Balunkeswar Balu

    2017-08-01

    Although shrimp can be found in certain high acid food matrices, the allergenic capacity of shrimp tropomyosin exposed to low pH condition has not been fully clarified. Thus, a model marinade comprising white vinegar adjusted to different pH was used to determine the effects of acid-induced denaturation on the immunoreactivity of tropomyosin. Whole shrimp experienced either swelling or shrinkage after marination depending on the vinegar pH and the final muscle pH. The extractability of soluble myofibrillar proteins was reduced significantly among shrimp marinated in vinegar at pH 1.0-3.5, and a substantial amount of tropomyosin was retained in the insoluble pellets. Consequently, the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-binding capacity of tropomyosin was significantly lower in the soluble protein fraction of shrimp marinated at pH 1.0-3.5 compared with samples marinated at pH 4.8 and control. However, tropomyosin in the insoluble protein fraction of all marinated shrimp showed strong IgE-binding capacity at all marinating conditions. Thus, tropomyosin in shrimp exposed to low pH condition retained its allergenic capacity owing to the conservation of its linear epitopes. Analysis of the insoluble protein fraction was crucial for the accurate determination of the effect of low pH condition on the immunoreactivity of this allergen. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. The structural dynamics of α-tropomyosin on F-actin shape the overlap complex between adjacent tropomyosin molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, William; Li, Xiaochuan (Edward); Orzechowski, Marek; Fischer, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Coiled-coil tropomyosin, localized on actin filaments in virtually all eukaryotic cells, serves as a gatekeeper regulating access of the motor protein myosin and other actin-binding proteins onto the thin filament surface. Tropomyosin's modular pseudo-repeating pattern of approximately 39 amino acid residues is designed to allow binding of the coiled-coil to successive actin subunits along thin filaments. Even though different tropomyosin isoforms contain varying numbers of repeat modules, the pseudo-repeat length, in all cases, matches that of a single actin subunit. Thus, the seven pseudo-repeats of 42 nm long muscle tropomyosin bind to seven successive actin subunits along thin filaments, while simultaneously bending into a super-helical conformation that is preshaped to the actin filament helix. In order to form a continuous cable on thin filaments that is free of gaps, adjacent tropomyosin molecules polymerize head-to-tail by means of a short (∼9 residue) overlap. Several laboratories have engineered peptides to mimic the N- and C-terminal tropomyosin association and to characterize the overlap structure. All overlapping domains examined show a compact N-terminal coiled-coil inserting into a partially opened C-terminal partner, where the opposing coiled-coils at the overlap junction face each other at up to ∼90° twist angles. Here, Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to determine constraints on the formation of the tropomyosin overlap complex and to assess the amount of twisting exhibited by full-length tropomyosin when bound to actin. With the exception of the last 20 to 40 C- and N-terminal residues, we find that the average tropomyosin structure closely resembles a “canonical” model proposed in the classic work of McLachlan and Stewart, displaying perfectly symmetrical supercoil geometry matching the F-actin helix with an integral number of coiled-coil turns, a coiled-coil helical pitch of 137 Å, a superhelical pitch of 770

  3. Novel Simulation Model of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Sanjay R; Dinh, Tuan; Noah-Vanhoucke, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There have been no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the clinical or economic benefit of mitomycin C intravesical therapy vs. radical cystectomy in patients with high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). We used the Archimedes computational model to simulate...

  4. Myofibril-Inducing RNA (MIR) is essential for tropomyosin expression and myofibrillogenesis in axolotl hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, carries the naturally-occurring recessive mutant gene 'c' that results in a failure of homozygous (c/c) embryos to form hearts that beat because of an absence of organized myofibrils. Our previous studies have shown that a noncoding RNA, Myofibril-Inducing RNA (MIR), is capable of promoting myofibrillogenesis and heart beating in the mutant (c/c) axolotls. The present study demonstrates that the MIR gene is essential for tropomyosin (TM) expression in axolotl hearts during development. Gene expression studies show that mRNA expression of various tropomyosin isoforms in untreated mutant hearts and in normal hearts knocked down with double-stranded MIR (dsMIR) are similar to untreated normal. However, at the protein level, selected tropomyosin isoforms are significantly reduced in mutant and dsMIR treated normal hearts. These results suggest that MIR is involved in controlling the translation or post-translation of various TM isoforms and subsequently of regulating cardiac contractility. PMID:19728883

  5. Myofibril-Inducing RNA (MIR is essential for tropomyosin expression and myofibrillogenesis in axolotl hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemanski Sharon L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Mexican axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum, carries the naturally-occurring recessive mutant gene 'c' that results in a failure of homozygous (c/c embryos to form hearts that beat because of an absence of organized myofibrils. Our previous studies have shown that a noncoding RNA, Myofibril-Inducing RNA (MIR, is capable of promoting myofibrillogenesis and heart beating in the mutant (c/c axolotls. The present study demonstrates that the MIR gene is essential for tropomyosin (TM expression in axolotl hearts during development. Gene expression studies show that mRNA expression of various tropomyosin isoforms in untreated mutant hearts and in normal hearts knocked down with double-stranded MIR (dsMIR are similar to untreated normal. However, at the protein level, selected tropomyosin isoforms are significantly reduced in mutant and dsMIR treated normal hearts. These results suggest that MIR is involved in controlling the translation or post-translation of various TM isoforms and subsequently of regulating cardiac contractility.

  6. Identification of Tropomyosin and Its Immunological Properties from Larvae of Cattle Tick, Boophilus Annulatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Nabian

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Boophilus annulatus is an obligate blood feeder tick that can cause great losses in animals due to anemia and its ability to injure its host skin directly. The aim of this study was identification of cattle humoral immune response to some tick proteins during experimental infestation.Methods: Immune sera against tick were collected from experimentally infested cattle with ticks. One and two-dimensional electrophoresis and Western blotting methods were used for the detection of immunogenic proteins in larval tick extract and eight of these proteins were identified by MALDI-TOF and MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry.Results: In non-reducing one-dimensional SDS- PAGE, some bounds between 12 to more than 250-kDa appeared. In two-dimensional SDS-PAGE, numerous spot appeared and the identified immuno­genic proteins by parallel immunoblotting weighted between 14 and 97 kDa. Amino acid sequences of protein spot with 37-kDa molecular weight had identity to tropomyosin based on Mas­cot search in NCBI.Conclusion: Anti tropomyosin antibodies can be induced in experimentally infested hosts with ticks and it seems that tropomyosin can be useful for the development of anti tick vaccines.

  7. Detection of tropomyosin and determination of proteins in crustacean oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vang, Birthe; Mæhre, Hanne K; Jensen, Ida-J; Olsen, Ragnar L

    2013-11-01

    Tropomyosin is known to be the main allergen in crustaceans and the objective of this study was to investigate if this protein could be detected in commercial crustacean oils from Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) and the zooplankton Calanus finmarchicus. We also examined the possibility of determining the protein content in the oils by direct amino acid analysis. Western blotting showed that a commercial antibody against shrimp tropomyosin cross-reacted with a protein of similar size in Antarctic krill and C. finmarchicus. The protein tentatively identified as tropomyosin, was also detected in krill oil products, but not in oils from C. finmarchicus. The acetone-heptane method used for extracting proteins in the oils is however not optimal. Other extraction methods should therefore be considered when investigating the presence of allergenic proteins in oils. Direct amino acid analysis on oils should be further explored as a method for determining the total amount of proteins present.

  8. Obscurins: Goliaths and Davids take over non-muscle tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Maegen A; Shriver, Marey; Perry, Nicole A; Hu, Li-Yen R; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2014-01-01

    Obscurins comprise a family of proteins originally identified in striated muscles, where they play essential roles in myofibrillogenesis, cytoskeletal organization, and Ca(2+) homeostasis. They are encoded by the single OBSCN gene, and are composed of tandem adhesion domains and signaling motifs. To date, two giant obscurin isoforms have been described in detail that differ only at the extreme COOH-terminus; while obscurin-A (∼720 kDa) contains a non-modular COOH-terminus that harbors binding sites for the adaptor proteins ankyrins, obscurin-B (∼870 kDa) contains two COOH-terminal serine-threonine kinase domains preceded by adhesion motifs. Besides the two known giant obscurins, a thorough search of transcript databases suggests that complex alternative splicing of the obscurin transcript results in the generation of additional giant as well as small isoforms with molecular masses ranging between ∼50-970 kDa. These novel isoforms share common domains with the characterized isoforms, but also contain unique regions. Using a panel of highly specific antibodies directed against epitopes spanning the entire length of giant obscurins, we employed western blotting and immunohistochemistry to perform a systematic and comprehensive characterization of the expression profile of obscurins in muscle and non-muscle tissues. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that obscurins are not restricted to striated muscles, but are abundantly expressed in several tissues and organs including brain, skin, kidney, liver, spleen, and lung. While some obscurin isoforms are ubiquitously expressed, others are preferentially present in specific tissues and organs. Moreover, obscurins are present in select structures and cell types where they assume nuclear, cytosolic, and membrane distributions. Given the ubiquitous expression of some obscurins, along with the preferential expression of others, it becomes apparent that obscurins may play common and unique roles, respectively, in

  9. Tropomyosin - master regulator of actin filament function in the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Mulvihill, Daniel P

    2015-08-15

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) isoforms are the master regulators of the functions of individual actin filaments in fungi and metazoans. Tpms are coiled-coil parallel dimers that form a head-to-tail polymer along the length of actin filaments. Yeast only has two Tpm isoforms, whereas mammals have over 40. Each cytoskeletal actin filament contains a homopolymer of Tpm homodimers, resulting in a filament of uniform Tpm composition along its length. Evidence for this 'master regulator' role is based on four core sets of observation. First, spatially and functionally distinct actin filaments contain different Tpm isoforms, and recent data suggest that members of the formin family of actin filament nucleators can specify which Tpm isoform is added to the growing actin filament. Second, Tpms regulate whole-organism physiology in terms of morphogenesis, cell proliferation, vesicle trafficking, biomechanics, glucose metabolism and organ size in an isoform-specific manner. Third, Tpms achieve these functional outputs by regulating the interaction of actin filaments with myosin motors and actin-binding proteins in an isoform-specific manner. Last, the assembly of complex structures, such as stress fibers and podosomes involves the collaboration of multiple types of actin filament specified by their Tpm composition. This allows the cell to specify actin filament function in time and space by simply specifying their Tpm isoform composition.

  10. Nuclear tropomyosin and troponin in striated muscle: new roles in a new locale?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, P Bryant; Szczypinski, Mark P; Soto, Elliott P

    2013-08-01

    Tropomyosin and troponin have well known Ca(2+)-regulatory functions in the striated muscle sarcomere. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence that tropomyosin and troponin are localized, with as yet unidentified functional roles, in the striated muscle cell nucleus. We also apply bioinformatics approaches that predict localization of some tropomyosin and troponin to the nucleus, and that SUMOylation could be a covalent modification that modulates their nuclear localization and function. Further, we provide examples of cardiomyopathy mutations that alter the predicted likelihood of nuclear localization and SUMOylation of tropomyosin. These observations suggest novel mechanisms by which cardiomyopathy mutations in tropomyosin and troponin might alter not only cardiac contractility but also nuclear function.

  11. Shrimp Tropomyosin Retains Antibody Reactivity after Exposure to Acidic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although shrimp can be found in certain high acid food matrices, the allergenic capacity of shrimp tropomyosin exposed to low pH condition has not been fully clarified. Thus, a model marinade comprising white vinegar adjusted to different pH was used to determine the effects of acid-induced denatura...

  12. Tetratricopeptide repeat domain 9A is an interacting protein for tropomyosin Tm5NM-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Gay

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tetratricopeptide repeat domain 9A (TTC9A protein is a recently identified protein which contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs on its C-terminus. In our previous studies, we have shown that TTC9A was a hormonally-regulated gene in breast cancer cells. In this study, we found that TTC9A was over-expressed in breast cancer tissues compared with the adjacent controls (P Methods Breast samples from 25 patients including the malignant breast tissues and the adjacent normal tissues were processed for Southern blot analysis. Yeast-two-hybrid assay, GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation were used to identify and verify the interaction between TTC9A and other proteins. Results Tropomyosin Tm5NM-1 was identified as one of the TTC9A partner proteins. The interaction between TTC9A and Tm5NM-1 was further confirmed by GST pull-down assay and co-immunoprecipitation in mammalian cells. TTC9A domains required for the interaction were also characterized in this study. The results suggested that the first TPR domain and the linker fragment between the first two TPR domains of TTC9A were important for the interaction with Tm5NM-1 and the second and the third TPR might play an inhibitory role. Conclusion Since the primary function of tropomyosin is to stabilize actin filament, its interaction with TTC9A may play a role in cell shape and motility. In our previous results, we have found that progesterone-induced TTC9A expression was associated with increased cell motility and cell spreading. We speculate that TTC9A acts as a chaperone protein to facilitate the function of tropomyosins in stabilizing microfilament and it may play a role in cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

  13. Phase 2 study of adjuvant intravesical instillations of apaziquone for high risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendricksen, K.; Cornel, E.B.; Reijke, T.M. de; Arentsen, H.C.; Chawla, S.; Witjes, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: We studied the safety and efficacy of multiple adjuvant apaziquone instillations in patients with high risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with high risk nonmuscle invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder underwent transurethral resection of all bladd

  14. Identification of tropomyosins as major allergens in antarctic krill and mantis shrimp and their amino acid sequence characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Kanna; Suma, Yota; Ishizaki, Shoichiro; Nagashima, Yuji; Lu, Ying; Ushio, Hideki; Shiomi, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Tropomyosin represents a major allergen of decapod crustaceans such as shrimps and crabs, and its highly conserved amino acid sequence (>90% identity) is a molecular basis of the immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactivity among decapods. At present, however, little information is available about allergens in edible crustaceans other than decapods. In this study, the major allergen in two species of edible crustaceans, Antarctic krill Euphausia superba and mantis shrimp Oratosquilla oratoria that are taxonomically distinct from decapods, was demonstrated to be tropomyosin by IgE-immunoblotting using patient sera. The cross-reactivity of the tropomyosins from both species with decapod tropomyosins was also confirmed by inhibition IgE immunoblotting. Sequences of the tropomyosins from both species were determined by complementary deoxyribonucleic acid cloning. The mantis shrimp tropomyosin has high sequence identity (>90% identity) with decapod tropomyosins, especially with fast-type tropomyosins. On the other hand, the Antarctic krill tropomyosin is characterized by diverse alterations in region 13-42, the amino acid sequence of which is highly conserved for decapod tropomyosins, and hence, it shares somewhat lower sequence identity (82.4-89.8% identity) with decapod tropomyosins than the mantis shrimp tropomyosin. Quantification by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that Antarctic krill contains tropomyosin at almost the same level as decapods, suggesting that its allergenicity is equivalent to decapods. However, mantis shrimp was assumed to be substantially not allergenic because of the extremely low content of tropomyosin.

  15. Effect of trichloroacetic acid on the isolation of tropomyosin from sea urchin lantern muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoda-Takagi, T; Ozaki, S

    1983-03-01

    Sea urchin lantern muscle tropomyosin showed two components in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis in the presence of 5 M urea, although the molecular weights of these components were apparently identical. One of these components seemed to have been digested with an enzyme such as carboxypeptidase, and the tropomyosin had lost the abilities to polymerize and to bind to actin. A crude extract prepared from the lantern muscle treated with trichloroacetic acid (TCA) contained predominantly tropomyosin. Tropomyosin purified from TCA-treated lantern muscle seemed to be intact and retained the ability to bind to actin.

  16. Emerging intravesical therapies for management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Tomaszewski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey J Tomaszewski, Marc C SmaldoneDepartment of Urology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pennsylvania, USAAbstract: Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC is the second most common urologic malignancy, and 70% of patients present with superficial or nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG is the most effective agent for preventing disease recurrence, and the only therapy able to inhibit disease progression. However, recurrence rates as high as 30% and significant local and systemic toxicity have led to increased interest in alternative intravesical therapies. In patients refractory or intolerant to BCG, BCG-interferon α2b, gemcitabine, and anthracyclines (doxorubicin, epirubicin, valrubicin have demonstrated durable clinical responses. Phase I trials investigating alternative cytotoxic agents, such as apaziquone, taxanes (docetaxel, paclitaxel, and suramin are reporting promising data. Novel immunomodulating agents have demonstrated promise as efficacious alternatives in patients refractory to BCG. Optimization of existing chemotherapeutic regimens using hyperthermia, photodynamic therapy, magnetically-targeted carriers, and liposomes remains an area of active investigation. Despite enthusiasm for new intravesical agents, radical cystectomy remains the treatment of choice for patients with NMIBC who have failed intravesical therapy and selected patients with naïve T1 tumors and aggressive features. This report provides a comprehensive review of contemporary intravesical therapy for NMIBC and refractory NMIBC, with an emphasis on emerging agents and novel treatment modalities.Keywords: transitional cell carcinoma, nonmuscle, invasive, intravesical therapy, BCG

  17. Chromosomal imbalance in the progression of high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ørntoft Torben

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-muscle invasive bladder neoplasms with invasion of the lamina propria (stage T1 or high grade of dysplasia are at "high risk" of progression to life-threatening cancer. However, the individual course is difficult to predict. Chromosomal instability (CI is associated with high tumor stage and grade, and possibly with the risk of progression. Methods To investigate the relationship between CI and subsequent disease progression, we performed a case-control-study of 125 patients with "high-risk" non-muscle invasive bladder neoplasms, 67 with later disease progression, and 58 with no progression. Selection criteria were conservative (non-radical resections and full prospective clinical follow-up (> 5 years. We investigated primary lesions in 59, and recurrent lesions in 66 cases. We used Affymetrix GeneChip® Mapping 10 K and 50 K SNP microarrays to evaluate genome wide chromosomal imbalance (loss-of-heterozygosity and DNA copy number changes in 48 representative tumors. DNA copy number changes of 15 key instability regions were further investigated using QPCR in 101 tumors (including 25 tumors also analysed on 50 K SNP microarrays. Results Chromosomal instability did not predict any higher risk of subsequent progression. Stage T1 and high-grade tumors had generally more unstable genomes than tumors of lower stage and grade (mostly non-primary tumors following a "high-risk" tumor. However, about 25% of the "high-risk" tumors had very few alterations. This was independent of subsequent progression. Recurrent lesions represent underlying field disease. A separate analysis of these lesions did neither reflect any difference in the risk of progression. Of specific chromosomal alterations, a possible association between loss of chromosome 8p11 and the risk of progression was found. However, the predictive value was limited by the heterogeneity of the changes. Conclusion Chromosomal instability (CI was associated with "high risk

  18. Anesthesia for trans-sternal thymectomy: modified non-muscle relaxant technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baftiu, Nehat; Hadri, Burhan; Morina, Muharrem; Mustafa, Aziz

    2011-01-01

    Anesthesia for thymectomy in myasthenia gravis is challenging. Early surgical management is now considered to be an important therapeutic intervention for most of the patients of myasthenia gravis. The anesthetic experience of that technique is quite large. It involves either muscle relaxant or non-muscle relaxant techniques. However, the literature is deficient of standard anesthetic technique for thymectomy. Therefore we present in this report a modified non-muscle relaxant technique for thymectomy. We report one case with thymectomy under general anesthesia using fentanyl and propofol for induction and endotracheal intubation using non-muscle relaxant technique. The intubating, intraoperative and postoperative conditions were excellent.

  19. Natural biology and management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpato, Kristen R; Tyson, Mark D; Clark, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews the natural biology of noninvasive bladder cancer and its management strategies while summarizing the most recent advances in the field. RECENT FINDINGS: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a tendency to recur and progress. Risk stratification has...... treatment, especially in refractory high-risk cases, include the addition of intravesical hyperthermia, combination and sequential therapy with existing agents and the use of novel agents such as mycobacterial cell wall extract. New data are emerging regarding the potential role of active surveillance...... in low-risk patients. SUMMARY: NMIBC represents a variety of disease states and continues to pose management challenges. As our understanding of tumor biology improves and technology advances, achieving better outcomes through individualized care may be possible....

  20. Anesthesia for thoracoscopic thymectomy: modified non-muscle relaxant technique--case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dawlatly, Abdelazeem A

    2007-02-01

    Anesthesia for thymectomy in myasthenia gravis is challenging. The anesthetic experience of that technique is quite large. In involves either muscle relaxant or non-muscle relaxant techniques. However, the literature is deficient of standard anesthetic technique for thoracoscopic thymectomy. Therefore we present in this report a modified non-muscle relaxant technique for thoracoscopic thymectomy (TT). We report two cases who underwent TT under general anesthesia using sufentanil and propofol for induction and local anesthesia spray to the vocal cords to facilitate endobronchial intubation using non-muscle relaxant technique. The intubating, operating and postoperative conditions were excellent. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on modified non-muscle relaxant technique for TT in myasthenia gravis. Further cases have to be done to verify our technique.

  1. Oxidative modification of tropomyosin and myocardial dysfunction following coronary microembolization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Marcella; Skyschally, Andreas; Menabò, Roberta; Boengler, Kerstin; Gres, Petra; Schulz, Rainer; Haude, Michael; Erbel, Raimund; Di Lisa, Fabio; Heusch, Gerd

    2006-04-01

    We addressed a potential mechanism of myocardial dysfunction following coronary microembolization at the level of myofibrillar proteins. Anaesthetized pigs underwent intracoronary infusion of microspheres. After 6 h, the microembolized areas (MEA) had decreased systolic wall thickening to 38 +/- 7% of baseline and a 2.62 +/- 0.40-fold increase in the formation of disulphide cross-bridges (DCB) in tropomyosin relative to that in remote areas. The impairment in contractile function correlated inversely with DCB formation (r = -0.68; P = 0.015) and was associated with increased TNF-alpha content. DCB formation was reflected by increased tropomyosin immunoreactivity and abolished in vitro by dithiothreitol. Ascorbic acid prevented contractile dysfunction as well as increased DCB and TNF-alpha. In anaesthetized dogs, 8 h after intracoronary microspheres infusion, contractile function was reduced to 8+/-10% of baseline and DCB in MEA was 1.48+/-0.12 higher than that in remote areas. In conscious dogs, 6 days after intracoronary microspheres infusion, myocardial function had returned to baseline and DCB was no longer different between remote and MEA. Again contractile function correlated inversely with DCB formation (r = -0.83; P = 0.005). Myofibrillar protein oxidation may represent a mechanistic link between inflammation and contractile dysfunction following coronary microembolization.

  2. An ectromelia virus profilin homolog interacts with cellular tropomyosin and viral A-type inclusion protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Robert D

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profilins are critical to cytoskeletal dynamics in eukaryotes; however, little is known about their viral counterparts. In this study, a poxviral profilin homolog, ectromelia virus strain Moscow gene 141 (ECTV-PH, was investigated by a variety of experimental and bioinformatics techniques to characterize its interactions with cellular and viral proteins. Results Profilin-like proteins are encoded by all orthopoxviruses sequenced to date, and share over 90% amino acid (aa identity. Sequence comparisons show highest similarity to mammalian type 1 profilins; however, a conserved 3 aa deletion in mammalian type 3 and poxviral profilins suggests that these homologs may be more closely related. Structural analysis shows that ECTV-PH can be successfully modelled onto both the profilin 1 crystal structure and profilin 3 homology model, though few of the surface residues thought to be required for binding actin, poly(L-proline, and PIP2 are conserved. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry identified two proteins that interact with ECTV-PH within infected cells: alpha-tropomyosin, a 38 kDa cellular actin-binding protein, and the 84 kDa product of vaccinia virus strain Western Reserve (VACV-WR 148, which is the truncated VACV counterpart of the orthopoxvirus A-type inclusion (ATI protein. Western and far-western blots demonstrated that the interaction with alpha-tropomyosin is direct, and immunofluorescence experiments suggest that ECTV-PH and alpha-tropomyosin may colocalize to structures that resemble actin tails and cellular protrusions. Sequence comparisons of the poxviral ATI proteins show that although full-length orthologs are only present in cowpox and ectromelia viruses, an ~ 700 aa truncated ATI protein is conserved in over 90% of sequenced orthopoxviruses. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that ECTV-PH localizes to cytoplasmic inclusion bodies formed by both truncated and full-length versions of the viral ATI protein

  3. Regulation of endothelial permeability and transendothelial migration of cancer cells by tropomyosin-1 phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoneau Bryan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of endothelial cell integrity and selective permeability barrier is an early event in the sequence of oxidant-mediated injury and may result in atherosclerosis, hypertension and facilitation of transendothelial migration of cancer cells during metastasis. We already reported that endothelial cell integrity is tightly regulated by the balanced co-activation of p38 and ERK pathways. In particular, we showed that phosphorylation of tropomyosin-1 (tropomyosin alpha-1 chain = Tm1 at Ser283 by DAP kinase, downstream of the ERK pathway might be a key event required to maintain the integrity and normal functions of the endothelium in response to oxidative stress. Methods Endothelial permeability was assayed by monitoring the passage of Dextran-FITC through a tight monolayer of HUVECs grown to confluence in Boyden chambers. Actin and Tm1 dynamics and distribution were evaluated by immunofluorescence. We modulated the expression of Tm1 by siRNA and lentiviral-mediated expression of wild type and mutated forms of Tm1 insensitive to the siRNA. Transendothelial migration of HT-29 colon cancer cells was monitored in Boyden chambers similarly as for permeability. Results We provide evidence indicating that Tm1 phosphorylation at Ser283 is essential to regulate endothelial permeability under oxidative stress by modulating actin dynamics. Moreover, the transendothelial migration of colon cancer cells is also regulated by the phosphorylation of Tm1 at Ser283. Conclusion Our finding strongly support the role for the phosphorylation of endothelial Tm1 at Ser283 to prevent endothelial barrier dysfunction associated with oxidative stress injury.

  4. Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor-Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    cDNA. Lobular carcinoma - 2 A polyclonal pan-TM antibody that recognizes multiple TM Phyllodes tumor - 1 Not determined from the initial pathology...AD Award Number: DAMD17-98-1-8162 TITLE: Tropomyosin-1, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker of Human Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Tropomyosin-l, A Putative Tumor -Suppressor and a Biomarker DAMD17-98-1-8162 of Human Breast Cancer 6. A UTHOR

  5. Nonmuscle myosin II isoforms coassemble in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jordan R; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-19

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB, and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique as well as redundant cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear whether NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments or whether filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB, and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms coassemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly spread cells, arguing for the existence of a sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while coassembled with other NM II isoforms.

  6. Molecular mechanical differences between isoforms of contractile actin in the presence of isoforms of smooth muscle tropomyosin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennart Hilbert

    2013-10-01

    ]A-Tm[Formula: see text] - mechanical coupling between myosins is stronger, [Formula: see text]A-Tm[Formula: see text] - the secondary power stroke is decelerated and mechanical coupling between myosins is weaker. In summary, our results explain the different regulatory effects that specific combinations of actin and smooth muscle tropomyosin have on smooth muscle actin-myosin interaction kinetics.

  7. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  8. Defining and treating the spectrum of intermediate risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Brausi, M.; Soloway, M.; Lamm, D.; Persad, R.; Buckley, R.; Bohle, A.; Colombel, M.; Palou, J.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Low, intermediate and high risk categories have been defined to help guide the treatment of patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (Ta, T1, CIS). However, while low and high risk disease has been well classified, the intermediate risk category has traditionally comprised a heteroge

  9. Defining progression in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: it is time for a new, standard definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamm, D.; Persad, R.; Brausi, M.; Buckley, R.; Witjes, J.A.; Palou, J.; Bohle, A.; Kamat, A.M.; Colombel, M.; Soloway, M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite being one of the most important clinical outcomes in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, there is currently no standard definition of disease progression. Major clinical trials and meta-analyses have used varying definitions or have failed to define this end point altogether. A stand

  10. Predicting Effects of Tropomyosin Mutations on Cardiac Muscle Contraction through Myofilament Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Rakesh Sewanan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Point mutations to the human gene TPM1 have been implicated in the development of both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Such observations have led to studies investigating the link between single residue changes and the biophysical behavior of the tropomyosin molecule. However, the degree to which these molecular perturbations explain the performance of intact sarcomeres containing mutant tropomyosin remains uncertain. Here, we present a modeling approach that integrates various aspects of tropomyosin’s molecular properties into a cohesive paradigm representing their impact on muscle function. In particular, we considered the effects of tropomyosin mutations on (1 persistence length, (2 equilibrium between thin filament blocked and closed regulatory states, and (3 the crossbridge duty cycle. After demonstrating the ability of the new model to capture Ca-dependent myofilament responses during both dynamic and steady-state activation, we used it to capture the effects of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM related E180G and D175N mutations on skinned myofiber mechanics. Our analysis indicates that the fiber-level effects of the two mutations can be accurately described by a combination of changes to the three tropomyosin properties represented in the model. Subsequently, we used the model to predict mutation effects on muscle twitch. Both mutations led to increased twitch contractility as a consequence of diminished cooperative inhibition between thin filament regulatory units. Overall, simulations suggest that a common twitch phenotype for HCM-linked tropomyosin mutations includes both increased contractility and elevated diastolic tension.

  11. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekyarova, T.I.; Reedy, M.C.; Baumann, B.A.J.; Tregear, R.T.; Ward, A.; Krzic, U.; Prince, K.M.; Perz-Edwards, R.J.; Reconditi, M.; Gore, D.; Irving, T.C.; Reedy, M.K. (IIT); (EMBL); (Scripps); (Duke); (Prince); (FSU); (MRC); (U. Florence)

    2008-09-03

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the 'steric blocking' mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca{sup 2+} with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence that TM in insect flight muscle (IFM) moves in a manner consistent with the steric blocking mechanism. We find that both isometric contraction, at high [Ca{sup 2+}], and stretch activation, at lower [Ca{sup 2+}], develop similarly high x-ray intensities on the IFM fourth actin layer line because of TM movement, coinciding with x-ray signals of strong-binding cross-bridge attachment to helically favored 'actin target zones.' Vanadate (Vi), a phosphate analog that inhibits active cross-bridge cycling, abolishes all active force in IFM, allowing high [Ca{sup 2+}] to elicit initial TM movement without cross-bridge attachment or other changes from relaxed structure. However, when stretched in high [Ca{sup 2+}], Vi-'paralyzed' fibers produce force substantially above passive response at pCa {approx} 9, concurrent with full conversion from resting to active x-ray pattern, including x-ray signals of cross-bridge strong-binding and TM movement. This argues that myosin heads can be recruited as strong-binding 'brakes' by backward-sliding, calcium-activated thin filaments, and are as effective in moving TM as actively force-producing cross-bridges. Such recruitment of myosin as brakes may be the major mechanism resisting extension during lengthening contractions.

  12. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayraud Cyrielle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb. Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Results We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa… and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. Conclusion MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2 has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular

  13. Structural and protein interaction effects of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathic mutations in alpha-tropomyosin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey N. Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential alterations to structure and associations with thin filament proteins caused by the dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM associated tropomyosin (Tm mutants E40K and E54K, and the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM associated Tm mutants E62Q and L185R, were investigated. In order to ascertain what the cause of the known functional effects may be, structural and protein-protein interaction studies were conducted utilizing actomyosin ATPase activity measurements and spectroscopy. In actomyosin ATPase measurements, both HCM mutants and the DCM mutant E54K caused increases in Ca2+-induced maximal activities, while E40K caused a decrease. Investigation of Tm’s ability to inhibit actomyosin ATPase in the absence of troponin showed that HCM-associated mutant Tms did not inhibit as well as wildtype, whereas the DCM associated mutant E40K inhibited better. E54K did not inhibit the actomyosin ATPase activity at any concentration of Tm tested. Thermal denaturation studies by circular dichroism and molecular modeling of the mutations in Tm showed that in general, the DCM mutants caused destabilization within the Tm, while the HCM mutants resulted in increased stability. These findings demonstrate that the structural alterations in Tm observed here may affect the regulatory function of Tm on actin, thereby directly altering the ATPase rates of myosin.

  14. The nebulette repeat domain is necessary for proper maintenance of tropomyosin with the cardiac sarcomere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonzo, Jeremy R; Norris, Andrea A; Esham, Michael; Moncman, Carole L

    2008-11-15

    Nebulette is a cardiac-specific isoform of the giant actin-binding protein nebulin. Nebulette, having a mass of approximately 100 kDa, is only predicted to extend 150 nm from the edge of the Z-lines. Overexpression of the nebulette C-terminal linker and/or SH3 domains in chicken cardiomyocytes results in a loss of endogenous nebulette with a concomitant loss of tropomyosin (TPM) and troponin, as well as a shortening of the thin filaments. These data suggest that nebulette's position in the sarcomere is important for the maintenance of TPM, troponin and thin filament length. To evaluate this hypothesis, N-terminal nested truncations tagged with GFP were expressed in chicken cardiomyocytes and the cells were analyzed for the distribution of myofilament proteins. Minimal effects on the myofilaments were observed with N-terminal deletions of up to 10 modules; however, deletion of 15 modules replicated the phenotype observed with expression of the C-terminal fragments. Expression of internal deletions of nebulette verifies that a site between module 10 and 15 is important for TPM maintenance within the sarcomeric lattice. We have additionally isolated TPM cDNAs from a yeast two hybrid (Y2H) analysis. These data indicate the importance of the nebulette-TPM interactions in the maintenance and stability of the thin filaments.

  15. Comprehensive analysis of tropomyosin isoforms in skeletal muscles by top-down proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yutong; Peng, Ying; Lin, Ziqing; Chen, Yi-Chen; Wei, Liming; Hacker, Timothy A; Larsson, Lars; Ge, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles are heterogeneous in nature and are capable of performing various functions. Tropomyosin (Tpm) is a major component of the thin filament in skeletal muscles and plays an important role in controlling muscle contraction and relaxation. Tpm is known to consist of multiple isoforms resulting from different encoding genes and alternative splicing, along with post-translational modifications. However, a systematic characterization of Tpm isoforms in skeletal muscles is still lacking. Therefore, we employed top-down mass spectrometry (MS) to identify and characterize Tpm isoforms present in different skeletal muscles from multiple species, including swine, rat, and human. Our study revealed that Tpm1.1 and Tpm2.2 are the two major Tpm isoforms in swine and rat skeletal muscles, whereas Tpm1.1, Tpm2.2, and Tpm3.12 are present in human skeletal muscles. Tandem MS was utilized to identify the sequences of the major Tpm isoforms. Furthermore, quantitative analysis revealed muscle-type specific differences in the abundance of un-modified and modified Tpm isoforms in rat and human skeletal muscles. This study represents the first systematic investigation of Tpm isoforms in skeletal muscles, which not only demonstrates the capabilities of top-down MS for the comprehensive characterization of skeletal myofilament proteins but also provides the basis for further studies on these Tpm isoforms in muscle-related diseases.

  16. Distribution of tropomyosin isoforms in different types of single fibers isolated from bovine skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oe, M; Ojima, K; Nakajima, I; Chikuni, K; Shibata, M; Muroya, S

    2016-08-01

    To clarify the relationship between myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms and tropomyosin (TPM) isoforms in single fibers, 64 single fibers were isolated from each of bovine three muscles (masseter, semispinalis and semitendinosus). mRNA expressions of MyHC and TPM isoforms were analyzed by real-time PCR. All single fibers from the masseter expressed MyHC-slow. The fibers from the semispinalis expressed both MyHC-slow and 2a. The fibers from the semitendinosus expressed MyHC-slow, 2a and 2x. TPM-1 and TPM-2 were co-expressed in 2a and 2x type fibers, and TPM-2 and TPM-3 were co-expressed in slow type fibers. The expression pattern of TPM isoforms in each fiber type was similar between fibers isolated from different muscles. These results suggest that TPM-1 and TPM-3 isoforms correspond to the function of 2a or 2x type fibers and slow type fibers, respectively, with TPM-2 in common. Furthermore, the patterns of MyHC and TPM isoform combinations did not vary among single fibers isolated from the individual muscles examined.

  17. Tropomyosin-1 acts as a potential tumor suppressor in human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hao; Gu, Liqun; Liu, Binjie; Li, Yiping; Wang, Yuehong; Bai, Xinna; Li, Long; Wang, Baisheng; Peng, Qian; Yao, Zhigang; Tang, Zhangui

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a major contributor to the incidence and mortality of neck and head cancer. Tropomyosin-1 (TPM1), which is expressed at a low level, has been considered a prominent tumor-suppressing gene in a variety of solid tumors, although the precise mechanism of the TPM1 gene in OSCC progression remains unknown. We found that TPM1 expression levels decreased in OSCC patients and OSCC cell lines. The overall and cancer-specific survival of patients who exhibited low TPM1 levels were inferior to those of patients who had high TPM1 levels. It was also found that OSCC patients who suffered from disease stageⅠ-Ⅱ were more likely to have an up-regulated TPM1 expression level, and OSCC patients with lymph node metastasis had a higher probability of exhibiting reduced TPM1 expression. We show that overexpression of TPM1 can promote cell apoptosis and inhibit migration. Our results suggest that TPM1 can suppress tumors in OSCC, and the TPM1 expression level is related to OSCC patient prognosis. PMID:28182650

  18. A panel of prognostic protein markers for progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer - a multicenter tissue microarray validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Niels; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm

    2012-01-01

    Ta and T1 urothelial carcinomas. Transcripts from the five genes encoding these proteins were previously included in gene expression signatures for outcome prediction for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). As a training-set, we used primary NMIBC tissue-microarray specimens from a Danish...... cohort of 283 patients with long-term follow-up. For validation of the results we used three independent patient cohorts with long-term follow-up from Sweden, Spain, and Taiwan. In total 649 primary NMIBC tissue-microarray specimens from patients with long-term follow-up were used. Protein expression...

  19. Regulation of nonmuscle myosin II during 3-methylcholanthrene induced dedifferentiation of C2C12 myotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Sumit K.; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S., E-mail: bcssj@iacs.res.in

    2014-08-01

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) induces tumor formation at the site of injection in the hind leg of mice within 110 days. Recent reports reveal that the transformation of normal muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes for tumor formation, however the molecular mechanism behind this process is not well understood. Here, we show in an in vitro study that 3MC induces fragmentation of multinucleate myotubes into viable mononucleates. These mononucleates form colonies when they are seeded into soft agar, indicative of cellular transformation. Immunoblot analysis reveals that phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC{sub 20}) is 5.6±0.5 fold reduced in 3MC treated myotubes in comparison to vehicle treated myotubes during the fragmentation of myotubes. In contrast, levels of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myogenin and cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D, Cyclin E1 remain unchanged as assessed by real-time PCR array and reverse transcriptase PCR analysis, respectively. Interestingly, addition of the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7, enhances the fragmentation, whereas phosphatase inhibitor perturbs the 3MC induced fragmentation of myotubes. These results suggest that decrease in RLC{sub 20} phosphorylation may be associated with the fragmentation step of dedifferentiation. - Highlights: • 3-Methylcholanthrene induces fragmentation of C2C12-myotubes. • Dedifferentiation can be divided into two steps – fragmentation and proliferation. • Fragmentation is associated with rearrangement of nonmuscle myosin II. • Genes associated with differentiation and proliferation are not altered during fragmentation. • Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain is reduced during fragmentation.

  20. Are we following the guidelines on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Oliveira Reis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the clinical practice of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC treatment in Brazil in relation to international guidelines: Sociedade Brasileira de Urologia (SBU, European Association of Urology (EAU and American Urological Association (AUA. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional study using questionnaires about urological practice on treatment of NMIBC during the 32nd Brazilian Congress of Urology. A total of 650 question forms were answered. Results There were 73% of complete answers (total of 476 question forms. In total, 246 urologists (51.68% lived in the southeast region and 310 (65.13% treat 1 to 3 cases of NMIBC per month. Low risk cancer: Only 35 urologists (7.5% apply the single intravesical dose of immediate chemotherapy with Mitomicin C recommended by the above guidelines. Adjuvant therapy with BCG 2 to 4 weeks after TUR is used by 167 participants (35.1% and 271 urologists (56.9% use only TUR. High risk tumors: 397 urologists (83.4% use adjuvant therapy, 375 (78.8% use BCG 2 to 4 weeks after TUR, of which 306 (64.3% referred the use for at least one year. Intravesical chemotherapy with Mitomicin C (a controversial recommendation was used by 22 urologists (4.6%. BCG dose raised a lot of discrepancies. Induction doses of 40, 80 and 120mg were referred by 105 (22%, 193 (40.4% and 54 (11.3% respectively. Maintenance doses of 40, 80 and 120mg were referred by 190 (48.7%, 144 (37.0% and 32 (8.2% urologists, respectively. Schemes of administration were also varied and the one cited by SWOG protocol was the most used: 142 (29.8%. Conclusion SBU, EAU and AUA guidelines are partially respected by Brazilian urologists, particularly in low risk tumors. In high risk tumors, concordance rates are comparable to international data. Further studies are necessary to fully understand the reasons of such disagreement.

  1. Myosin 18A coassembles with nonmuscle myosin 2 to form mixed bipolar filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billington, Neil; Beach, Jordan R; Heissler, Sarah M; Remmert, Kirsten; Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Nagy, Attila; Takagi, Yasuharu; Shao, Lin; Li, Dong; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yingfan; Barzik, Melanie; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A; Sellers, James R

    2015-03-30

    Class-18 myosins are most closely related to conventional class-2 nonmuscle myosins (NM2). Surprisingly, the purified head domains of Drosophila, mouse, and human myosin 18A (M18A) lack actin-activated ATPase activity and the ability to translocate actin filaments, suggesting that the functions of M18A in vivo do not depend on intrinsic motor activity. M18A has the longest coiled coil of any myosin outside of the class-2 myosins, suggesting that it might form bipolar filaments similar to conventional myosins. To address this possibility, we expressed and purified full-length mouse M18A using the baculovirus/Sf9 system. M18A did not form large bipolar filaments under any of the conditions tested. Instead, M18A formed an ∼ 65-nm-long bipolar structure with two heads at each end. Importantly, when NM2 was polymerized in the presence of M18A, the two myosins formed mixed bipolar filaments, as evidenced by cosedimentation, electron microscopy, and single-molecule imaging. Moreover, super-resolution imaging of NM2 and M18A using fluorescently tagged proteins and immunostaining of endogenous proteins showed that NM2 and M18A are present together within individual filaments inside living cells. Together, our in vitro and live-cell imaging data argue strongly that M18A coassembles with NM2 into mixed bipolar filaments. M18A could regulate the biophysical properties of these filaments and, by virtue of its extra N- and C-terminal domains, determine the localization and/or molecular interactions of the filaments. Given the numerous, fundamental cellular and developmental roles attributed to NM2, our results have far-reaching biological implications.

  2. Are we following the guidelines on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Moro, Juliano Cesar; Ribeiro, Luis Fernando Bastos; Voris, Brunno Raphael Iamashita; Sadi, Marcos Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the clinical practice of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) treatment in Brazil in relation to international guidelines: Sociedade Brasileira de Urologia (SBU), European Association of Urology (EAU) and American Urological Association (AUA). Materials and Methods Cross-sectional study using questionnaires about urological practice on treatment of NMIBC during the 32nd Brazilian Congress of Urology. A total of 650 question forms were answered. Results There were 73% of complete answers (total of 476 question forms). In total, 246 urologists (51.68%) lived in the southeast region and 310 (65.13%) treat 1 to 3 cases of NMIBC per month. Low risk cancer: Only 35 urologists (7.5%) apply the single intravesical dose of immediate chemotherapy with Mitomicin C recommended by the above guidelines. Adjuvant therapy with BCG 2 to 4 weeks after TUR is used by 167 participants (35.1%) and 271 urologists (56.9%) use only TUR. High risk tumors: 397 urologists (83.4%) use adjuvant therapy, 375 (78.8%) use BCG 2 to 4 weeks after TUR, of which 306 (64.3%) referred the use for at least one year. Intravesical chemotherapy with Mitomicin C (a controversial recommendation) was used by 22 urologists (4.6%). BCG dose raised a lot of discrepancies. Induction doses of 40, 80 and 120mg were referred by 105 (22%), 193 (40.4%) and 54 (11.3%) respectively. Maintenance doses of 40, 80 and 120mg were referred by 190 (48.7%), 144 (37.0%) and 32 (8.2%) urologists, respectively. Schemes of administration were also varied and the one cited by SWOG protocol was the most used: 142 (29.8%). Conclusion SBU, EAU and AUA guidelines are partially respected by Brazilian urologists, particularly in low risk tumors. In high risk tumors, concordance rates are comparable to international data. Further studies are necessary to fully understand the reasons of such disagreement. PMID:27136464

  3. Identification of the major brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) allergen as the muscle protein tropomyosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daul, C B; Slattery, M; Reese, G; Lehrer, S B

    1994-09-01

    Shrimp, a major seafood allergen, was investigated as a model food allergen. Extracts from both shrimp (Penaeus aztecus) meat and cooking fluid contain a substantial and similar amount of allergenic activity. A 36-kD allergen, demonstrated in both extracts by SDS-PAGE/Western blot analysis, reacted with 28/34 (82%) sera from shrimp-sensitive, skin test and RAST-positive, individuals. This allergen, named Pen a I, was isolated by SDS-PAGE; its amino acid composition was rich in aspartic and glutamic acids. A 21-residue peptide, obtained from endoproteinase Lys-C digested Pen a I by high-performance liquid chromatography, demonstrated significant homology (60-87%) with the muscle protein tropomyosin from various species and origins. The greatest homology (87%) was noted with tropomyosin of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) reflecting the phylogenic relationship between these two arthropods. These studies demonstrate that tropomyosin is the major shrimp allergen. Although the amino acid sequence of this shrimp muscle protein shares considerable homology with tropomyosins of other species including man, significant differences remain in allergenic activity.

  4. The effects of boiling on the allergenic properties of tropomyosin of shrimp (litopenaeus vannamei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimp play an important role in human nutrition, and is responsible for severe hypersensitivity reactions. The thermal stability of raw and boiled shrimp tropomyosins (TM) has never been reported. The aims of the study were to compare the stability of raw and boiled shrimp TM of Litopenaeus vanname...

  5. Molecular and immunological approaches in quantifying the air-borne food allergen tropomyosin in crab processing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Sandip D; Thomassen, Marte R; Saptarshi, Shruti R; Nguyen, Hong M X; Aasmoe, Lisbeth; Bang, Berit E; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-09-01

    Tropomyosin is a cross-reactive allergenic protein present in ingested shellfish species. Exposure and sensitization to this protein via inhalation is particularly important in the crustacean processing industry where workers are continuously exposed to the aerosolized form of this allergen. The aim of this study was to develop an antibody-based immunoassay to enable the specific and sensitive quantification of aerosolized tropomyosin present in the environment of two crab processing facilities. Anti-tropomyosin antibody was generated in rabbits against tropomyosins from four different crustacean species. These antibodies were purified using recombinant tropomyosin using an immuno-affinity column. The recombinant tropomyosin was also used as an allergen standard for the sandwich ELISA. In order to quantify aerosolized tropomyosin, air collection was performed in the personal breathing zone of 80 workers during two crab processing activities, edible crab (Cancer pagurus) and king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus) using polytetrafluoroethylene filters. The purified antibody was able to detect tropomyosin selectively from different crustaceans but not from vertebrate sources. The limit of detection (LOD) for the developed sandwich ELISA was 60 picogram/m(3) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) 100 picogram/m(3). Immunoassay validation was based on linearity (R(2) 0.999), matrix interference test (78.8±6.5%), intra-assay CV (9.8%) and inter-assay CV (11%). The novel immunoassay was able to successfully identify working activities, which generated low, medium or high concentrations of the aerosolized food allergen. We describe an IgG antibody-based immunoassay for quantification of the major food allergen tropomyosin, with high sensitivity and specificity. This modified immunological approach can be adapted for the detection of other aerosolized food allergens, assisting in the identification of high-risk allergen exposure areas in the food industry.

  6. Structure-Function Analysis of the Non-Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase (nmMLCK) Isoform by NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling: Influence of MYLK Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kui; Ramirez, Benjamin; Mapes, Brandon; Shen, Grace R; Gokhale, Vijay; Brown, Mary E; Santarsiero, Bernard; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Dudek, Steven M; Wang, Ting; Garcia, Joe G N

    2015-01-01

    The MYLK gene encodes the multifunctional enzyme, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), involved in isoform-specific non-muscle and smooth muscle contraction and regulation of vascular permeability during inflammation. Three MYLK SNPs (P21H, S147P, V261A) alter the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the non-muscle isoform of MLCK (nmMLCK) and are highly associated with susceptibility to acute lung injury (ALI) and asthma, especially in individuals of African descent. To understand the functional effects of SNP associations, we examined the N-terminal segments of nmMLCK by 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy, a 2-D NMR technique, and by in silico molecular modeling. Both NMR analysis and molecular modeling indicated SNP localization to loops that connect the immunoglobulin-like domains of nmMLCK, consistent with minimal structural changes evoked by these SNPs. Molecular modeling analysis identified protein-protein interaction motifs adversely affected by these MYLK SNPs including binding by the scaffold protein 14-3-3, results confirmed by immunoprecipitation and western blot studies. These structure-function studies suggest novel mechanisms for nmMLCK regulation, which may confirm MYLK as a candidate gene in inflammatory lung disease and advance knowledge of the genetic underpinning of lung-related health disparities.

  7. Dynamics of tropomyosin in muscle fibers as monitored by saturation transfer EPR of bi-functional probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni F Rayes

    Full Text Available The dynamics of four regions of tropomyosin was assessed using saturation transfer electron paramagnetic resonance in the muscle fiber. In order to fully immobilize the spin probe on the surface of tropomyosin, a bi-functional spin label was attached to i,i+4 positions via cysteine mutagenesis. The dynamics of bi-functionally labeled tropomyosin mutants decreased by three orders of magnitude when reconstituted into "ghost muscle fibers". The rates of motion varied along the length of tropomyosin with the C-terminus position 268/272 being one order of magnitude slower then N-terminal domain or the center of the molecule. Introduction of troponin decreases the dynamics of all four sites in the muscle fiber, but there was no significant effect upon addition of calcium or myosin subfragment-1.

  8. Role of nonmuscle myosin IIB and N-RAP in cell spreading and myofibril assembly in primary mouse cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shajia; Horowits, Robert

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the role of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain (NMHC) IIB in cultured embryonic mouse cardiomyocytes by specific knockdown using RNA interference. NMHC IIB protein levels decreased 90% compared with mock-transfected cells by 3 days post transfection. NMHC IIB knockdown resulted in a slow decrease in N-RAP protein levels over 6 days with no change in N-RAP transcript levels. N-RAP is a scaffold for alpha-actinin and actin assembly during myofibrillogenesis, and we quantitated myofibril accumulation by morphometric analysis of alpha-actinin organization. Between 3 and 6 days, NMHC IIB knockdown was accompanied by the abolishment of cardiomyocyte spreading. During this period the rate of myofibril accumulation steadily decreased, correlating with the slowly decreasing levels of N-RAP. Between 6 and 8 days NMHC IIB and N-RAP protein levels recovered, and cardiomyocyte spreading and myofibril accumulation resumed. Inhibition of proteasome function using MG132 led to accumulation of excess N-RAP, and the secondary decrease in N-RAP that otherwise accompanied NMHC IIB knockdown was abolished. The results show that NMHC IIB knockdown led to decreased N-RAP levels through proteasome-mediated degradation. Furthermore, these proteins have distinct functional roles, with NMHC IIB playing a role in cardiomyocyte spreading and N-RAP functioning in myofibril assembly.

  9. Identification of C16orf74 as a marker of progression in primary non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Tae Kim

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Methylation-induced silencing of PRSS3 has been shown to be significantly associated with invasive bladder cancer, and expression of the C16orf74 gene locus has been shown to correlate positively with PRSS3. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between C16orf74 expression level and progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: C16orf74 mRNA levels were examined by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis of 193 tumor specimens from patients with primary NMIBC. Expression data were analyzed in terms of clinical and experimental parameters. Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression models, respectively, were used to determine progression-free survival and to identify independent predictive parameters of progression. RESULTS: Analysis using Kaplan-Meier curves revealed prolonged progression-free survival of high-C16orf74-expressors as compared to low-expressors (p<0.001. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that low C16orf74 mRNA expression levels are a significant risk factor for disease progression in patients with primary NMIBC (HR: 10.042, CI:2.699-37.360, p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Decreased expression of C16orf74 correlates significantly with progression in primary NMIBC. C16orf74 expression level represents a potentially useful marker for predicting progression in primary NMIBC patients.

  10. Identification of non-muscle myosin heavy chain as a substrate for Cdk5 and tool for drug screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiller Gösta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deregulated activation of cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (Cdk5 is implicated in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. One of the restricting factors for developing specific Cdk5 inhibitors is the lack of reproducible and well-characterized cellular in vitro assay systems. Methods HEK293 cells were transfected with Cdk5 and its activator p25 as a starting point for an assay to screen for Cdk5 kinase inhibitors. To identify suitable substrates for Cdk5 we utilized an antibody that recognizes phospho serine in a consensus motif for Cdk substrates. Results Western blot analysis of transfected cells detected a 200 kDa band that was identified, by mass spectrometry, as non-muscle myosin heavy chain, type B (NMHC-B. Phosphorylation of NMHC-B was evident only in cells that were double transfected with Cdk5/p25 and was dose-dependently inhibited by Roscovitine and other Cdk5 inhibitors. Cdk5 was found to phosphorylate NMHC-B also in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. Conclusion A novel Cdk5 substrate NMHC-B was identified in this study. A cellular assay for screening of Cdk5 inhibitors was established using NMHC-B phosphorylation as a read-out in Cdk5/p25 transfected HEK293 cells. A novel Cdk5 inhibitor was also pharmacologically characterized in this assay system.

  11. Rho-kinase regulates tissue morphogenesis via non-muscle myosin and LIM-kinase during Drosophila development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settleman Jeffrey

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Rho-kinases (ROCKs are major effector targets of the activated Rho GTPase that have been implicated in many of the Rho-mediated effects on cell shape and movement via their ability to affect acto-myosin contractility. The role of ROCKs in cell shape change and motility suggests a potentially important role for Rho-ROCK signaling in tissue morphogenesis during development. Indeed, in Drosophila, a single ROCK ortholog, DRok, has been identified and has been found to be required for establishing planar cell polarity. Results We have examined a potential role for DRok in additional aspects of tissue morphogenesis using an activated form of the protein in transgenic flies. Our findings demonstrate that DRok activity can influence multiple morphogenetic processes, including eye and wing development. Furthermore, genetic studies reveal that Drok interacts with multiple downstream effectors of the Rho GTPase signaling pathway, including non-muscle myosin heavy chain, adducin, and Diaphanous in those developmental processes. Finally, in overexpression studies, we determined that Drok and Drosophila Lim-kinase interact in the developing nervous system. Conclusion These findings indicate widespread diverse roles for DRok in tissue morphogenesis during Drosophila development, in which multiple DRok substrates appear to be required.

  12. Structure of the Tropomyosin Overlap Complex from Chicken Smooth Muscle: Insight into the Diversity of N-Terminal Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, Jeremiah; Klenchin, Vadim A.; Rayment, Ivan (UW)

    2010-09-08

    Tropomyosin is a stereotypical {alpha}-helical coiled coil that polymerizes to form a filamentous macromolecular assembly that lies on the surface of F-actin. The interaction between the C-terminal and N-terminal segments on adjacent molecules is known as the overlap region. We report here two X-ray structures of the chicken smooth muscle tropomyosin overlap complex. A novel approach was used to stabilize the C-terminal and N-terminal fragments. Globular domains from both the human DNA ligase binding protein XRCC4 and bacteriophage {phi}29 scaffolding protein Gp7 were fused to 37 and 28 C-terminal amino acid residues of tropomyosin, respectively, whereas the 29 N-terminal amino acids of tropomyosin were fused to the C-terminal helix bundle of microtubule binding protein EB1. The structures of both the XRCC4 and Gp7 fusion proteins complexed with the N-terminal EB1 fusion contain a very similar helix bundle in the overlap region that encompasses {approx}15 residues. The C-terminal coiled coil opens to allow formation of the helix bundle, which is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. These structures are similar to that observed in the NMR structure of the rat skeletal overlap complex [Greenfield, N. J., et al. (2006) J. Mol. Biol. 364, 80-96]. The interactions between the N- and C-terminal coiled coils of smooth muscle tropomyosin show significant curvature, which differs somewhat between the two structures and implies flexibility in the overlap complex, at least in solution. This is likely an important attribute that allows tropomyosin to assemble around the actin filaments. These structures provide a molecular explanation for the role of N-acetylation in the assembly of native tropomyosin.

  13. Proteomic analysis of urinary biomarker candidates for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, Mårten; Lind, Sara Bergström; Mayrhofer, Corina; Segersten, Ulrika; Wester, Kenneth; Lyutvinskiy, Yaroslav; Zubarev, Roman; Malmström, Per-Uno; Pettersson, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    Nonmuscle invasive tumors of the bladder often recur and thereby bladder cancer patients need regular re-examinations which are invasive, unpleasant, and expensive. A noninvasive and less expensive method, e.g. a urine dipstick test, for monitoring recurrence would thus be advantageous. In this study, the complementary techniques mass spectrometry (MS) and Western blotting (WB)/dot blot (DB) were used to screen the urine samples from bladder cancer patients. High resolving MS was used to analyze and quantify the urinary proteome and 29 proteins had a significantly higher abundance (pblot for four selected proteins; fibrinogen β chain precursor, apolipoprotein E, α-1-antitrypsin, and leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein 1. Dot blot analysis of an independent urine sample set pointed out fibrinogen β chain and α-1-antitrypsin as most interesting biomarkers having sensitivity and specificity values in the range of 66-85%. Exploring the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) also revealed that bladder cancer tumors are the likely source of these proteins. They have the potential of being useful in diagnosis, monitoring of recurrence and thus may improve the treatment of bladder tumors, especially nonmuscle invasive tumors.

  14. Phylogenetic analysis and expression patterns of tropomyosin in amphioxus%文昌鱼tropomyosin基因的克隆、进化分析及其胚胎发育与成体中的表达模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李忻怡; 林浴霜; 张红卫

    2012-01-01

    In amphioxus, we found a mesoderm related gene, tropomyosin, which encodes a protein comprising 284 amino acid residues, sharing high identities with other known Tropomyosin proteins both in vertebrates and invertebrates. Phylogenetically, amphioxus Tropomyosin fell outside the invertebrate clade and was at the base of the vertebrate protein family clade, indicating that it may represent an independent branch. From the early neurula to the larva stage, whole-mount in situ hybridization and histological sections found transcripts of amphioxus tropomyosin gene. Weak tropomyosin expression was first detected in the wall of the archenteron at about 10 hours-post-fertilization neurula stage, while intense expression was revealed in the differentiating presumptive notochord and the muscle. Transcripts of tropomyosin were then expressed in the formed notochord and somites. Gene expression seemed to continue in these developing organs throughout the neurular stages and remained till 72-hours, during the early larval stages. In situ study still showed tropomyosin was also expressed in the neural tube, hepatic diverticulum, notochord and the spaces between myotomes in adult amphioxus. Our results indicated that tropomyosin may play an important role in both embryonic development and adult life.%Tropomyosin是一种分布广泛而且在进化上十分保守的蛋白,是肌肉形成和收缩过程中重要的调节蛋白质.通过RT-PCR和RACE技术得到文昌鱼tropomyosin基因全长,编码一个含284个氨基酸残基的蛋白质,将文昌鱼Tropomyosin和在其他物种中的同源物进行比对建树,发现其在功能域上高度保守并且只有一个拷贝,符合动物分类学中各物种的进化地位.胚胎整体原位杂交实验得知,tropomyosin在文昌鱼早期发育的表达,最早从原肠胚末期神经胚早期开始,定位于分化中的中内胚层.到神经胚期,tropomyosin的表达出现在发育中的体节和脊索中.随着发育的进

  15. Tropomyosin and Actin Identified as Major Allergens of the Carpet Clam (Paphia textile and the Effect of Cooking on Their Allergenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zailatul Hani Mohamad Yadzir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To identify the major allergenic proteins of clam (Paphia textile and to investigate the effect of different cooking methods on the allergenicity of these identified proteins. Methods. Clam protein extracts were separated by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. IgE reactive proteins were then analyzed by immunoblotting with sera from patients with positive skin prick tests (SPT to the raw clam extract. Mass spectrometry was used to identify the major allergenic proteins of this clam. Results. Raw extract showed 12 protein bands (18–150 kDa. In contrast, fewer protein bands were seen in the boiled extract; those ranging from 40 to 150 kDa were denatured. The protein profiles were similarly altered by frying or roasting. The immunoblots of raw and boiled extracts yielded 10 and 2 IgE-binding proteins, respectively. The fried and roasted extracts showed only a single IgE-binding protein at 37 kDa. Mass spectrometry analysis of the 37 and 42 kDa major allergens indicated that these spots were tropomyosin and actin, respectively. Conclusion. The two major allergens of Paphia textile were identified as the thermostable tropomyosin and a new thermolabile allergen actin.

  16. Nucleotide and protein sequences for dog masticatory tropomyosin identify a novel Tpm4 gene product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Elizabeth A; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Reiser, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    Jaw-closing muscles of several vertebrate species, including members of Carnivora, express a unique, "masticatory", isoform of myosin heavy chain, along with isoforms of other myofibrillar proteins that are not expressed in most other muscles. It is generally believed that the complement of myofibrillar isoforms in these muscles serves high force generation for capturing live prey, breaking down tough plant material and defensive biting. A unique isoform of tropomyosin (Tpm) was reported to be expressed in cat jaw-closing muscle, based upon two-dimensional gel mobility, peptide mapping, and immunohistochemistry. The objective of this study was to obtain protein and gene sequence information for this unique Tpm isoform. Samples of masseter (a jaw-closing muscle), tibialis (predominantly fast-twitch fibers), and the deep lateral gastrocnemius (predominantly slow-twitch fibers) were obtained from adult dogs. Expressed Tpm isoforms were cloned and sequencing yielded cDNAs that were identical to genomic predicted striated muscle Tpm1.1St(a,b,b,a) (historically referred to as αTpm), Tpm2.2St(a,b,b,a) (βTpm) and Tpm3.12St(a,b,b,a) (γTpm) isoforms (nomenclature reflects predominant tissue expression ("St"-striated muscle) and exon splicing pattern), as well as a novel 284 amino acid isoform observed in jaw-closing muscle that is identical to a genomic predicted product of the Tpm4 gene (δTpm) family. The novel isoform is designated as Tpm4.3St(a,b,b,a). The myofibrillar Tpm isoform expressed in dog masseter exhibits a unique electrophoretic mobility on gels containing 6 M urea, compared to other skeletal Tpm isoforms. To validate that the cloned Tpm4.3 isoform is the Tpm expressed in dog masseter, E. coli-expressed Tpm4.3 was electrophoresed in the presence of urea. Results demonstrate that Tpm4.3 has identical electrophoretic mobility to the unique dog masseter Tpm isoform and is of different mobility from that of muscle Tpm1.1, Tpm2.2 and Tpm3.12 isoforms. We

  17. The Relaxation Properties of Myofibrils Are Compromised by Amino Acids that Stabilize α-Tropomyosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scellini, Beatrice; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Matyushenko, Alexander M; Levitsky, Dmitrii I; Poggesi, Corrado; Lehrer, Sherwin S; Tesi, Chiara

    2017-01-24

    We investigated the functional impact of α-tropomyosin (Tm) substituted with one (D137L) or two (D137L/G126R) stabilizing amino acid substitutions on the mechanical behavior of rabbit psoas skeletal myofibrils by replacing endogenous Tm and troponin (Tn) with recombinant Tm mutants and purified skeletal Tn. Force recordings from myofibrils (15°C) at saturating [Ca(2+)] showed that Tm-stabilizing substitutions did not significantly affect the maximal isometric tension and the rates of force activation (kACT) and redevelopment (kTR). However, a clear effect was observed on force relaxation: myofibrils with D137L/G126R or D137L Tm showed prolonged durations of the slow phase of relaxation and decreased rates of the fast phase. Both Tm-stabilizing substitutions strongly decreased the slack sarcomere length (SL) at submaximal activating [Ca(2+)] and increased the steepness of the SL-passive tension relation. These effects were reversed by addition of 10 mM 2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime. Myofibrils also showed an apparent increase in Ca(2+) sensitivity. Measurements of myofibrillar ATPase activity in the absence of Ca(2+) showed a significant increase in the presence of these Tms, indicating that single and double stabilizing substitutions compromise the full inhibition of contraction in the relaxed state. These data can be understood with the three-state (blocked-closed-open) theory of muscle regulation, according to which the mutations increase the contribution of the active open state in the absence of Ca(2+) (M(-)). Force measurements on myofibrils substituted with C-terminal truncated TnI showed similar compromised relaxation effects, indicating the importance of TnI-Tm interactions in maintaining the blocked state. It appears that reducing the flexibility of native Tm coiled-coil structure decreases the optimum interactions of the central part of Tm with the C-terminal region of TnI. This results in a shift away from the blocked state, allowing myosin binding and

  18. Memory Disrupting Effects of Nonmuscle Myosin II Inhibition Depend on the Class of Abused Drug and Brain Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Sherri B.; Blouin, Ashley M.; Young, Erica J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    Depolymerizing actin in the amygdala through nonmuscle myosin II inhibition (NMIIi) produces a selective, lasting, and retrieval-independent disruption of the storage of methamphetamine-associated memories. Here we report a similar disruption of memories associated with amphetamine, but not cocaine or morphine, by NMIIi. Reconsolidation appeared…

  19. Memory Disrupting Effects of Nonmuscle Myosin II Inhibition Depend on the Class of Abused Drug and Brain Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Sherri B.; Blouin, Ashley M.; Young, Erica J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    Depolymerizing actin in the amygdala through nonmuscle myosin II inhibition (NMIIi) produces a selective, lasting, and retrieval-independent disruption of the storage of methamphetamine-associated memories. Here we report a similar disruption of memories associated with amphetamine, but not cocaine or morphine, by NMIIi. Reconsolidation appeared…

  20. Position of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) mutations predicts the natural history of MYH9-related disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecci, A.; Panza, E.; Pujol-Moix, N.

    2008-01-01

    MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder caused by mutations in MYH9, the gene for the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMMHC-IIA). All patients present from birth with macrothrombocytopenia, but in infancy or adult life, some of them develop sensorineural deafness...

  1. Role of LARP6 and nonmuscle myosin in partitioning of collagen mRNAs to the ER membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    Full Text Available Type I collagen is extracellular matrix protein composed of two α1(I and one α2(I polypeptides that fold into triple helix. Collagen polypeptides are translated in coordination to synchronize the rate of triple helix folding to the rate of posttranslational modifications of individual polypeptides. This is especially important in conditions of high collagen production, like fibrosis. It has been assumed that collagen mRNAs are targeted to the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER after translation of the signal peptide and by signal peptide recognition particle (SRP. Here we show that collagen mRNAs associate with the ER membrane even when translation is inhibited. Knock down of LARP6, an RNA binding protein which binds 5' stem-loop of collagen mRNAs, releases a small amount of collagen mRNAs from the membrane. Depolimerization of nonmuscle myosin filaments has a similar, but stronger effect. In the absence of LARP6 or nonmuscle myosin filaments collagen polypeptides become hypermodified, are poorly secreted and accumulate in the cytosol. This indicates lack of coordination of their synthesis and retro-translocation due to hypermodifications and misfolding. Depolimerization of nonmuscle myosin does not alter the secretory pathway through ER and Golgi, suggesting that the role of nonmuscle myosin is primarily to partition collagen mRNAs to the ER membrane. We postulate that collagen mRNAs directly partition to the ER membrane prior to synthesis of the signal peptide and that LARP6 and nonmuscle myosin filaments mediate this process. This allows coordinated initiation of translation on the membrane bound collagen α1(I and α2(I mRNAs, a necessary step for proper synthesis of type I collagen.

  2. Identification of tropomyosin and arginine kinase as major allergens of Portunus pelagicus (blue swimming crab).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmilah, M; Shahnaz, M; Zailatul, H M Y; Noormalin, A; Normilah, I

    2012-09-01

    Crab is an important source of food allergen. Tropomyosin represents the main crab allergen and is responsible for IgE cross-reactivity between various species of crustaceans. Recently, other new crab allergens including arginine kinase have been identified. However, information on allergens of the local Portunidcrab is not available. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the major allergens of Portunus pelagicus (blue swimming crab) using the allergenomics approach. Raw and cooked extracts of the crab were prepared from the crab meat. Protein profile and IgE binding pattern were demonstrated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting using sera from 30 patients with crab allergy. The major allergens of the crab were then identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the peptide digests. The SDS-PAGE of raw extract revealed approximately 20 protein fractions over a wide molecular weight range, while cooked extract demonstrated fewer protein bands. The raw extract also demonstrated a higher number of IgE reactive bands than the cooked extract. A heat-resistant protein of 36 kDa has been identified as the major allergen in both raw and cooked extracts. In addition, a heat-sensitive protein of 41 kDa was also recognized as a major allergen in raw crab. The 2-DE gel profile of the raw extract demonstrated about >100 distinct proteins spots and immunoblotting of the 2-DE profile demonstrated at least 12 different major IgE reactive spots with molecular masses between 13 to 250 kDa and isoelectric point (pI) values ranging from 4.0 to 7.0. The 36 and 41 kDa proteins were identified as the crab tropomyosin and arginine kinase, respectively by mass spectrometry. Therefore, this study confirmed that tropomyosin and arginine kinase are the major allergens of the local Portunid crab, P. pelagicus.

  3. Identification of squamous cell carcinoma associated proteins by proteomics and loss of beta tropomyosin expression in esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferdous Rastgar Jazii; Zahra Najafi; Reza Malekzadeh; Thomas P Conrads; Abed Ali Ziaee; Christian Abnet; Mansour Yazdznbod; Ali Asghar Karkhane; Ghasem H Salekdeh

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the proteome of normal versus tumor tissue in squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus(SCCE) in Iranian patients and compare our results with former reports by using proteomics.METHODS: Protein was extracted from normal and tumor tissues. Two dimensional electrophoresis was carried out and spots with differential expression were identified with mass spectrometry. RNA extraction and RT-PCR along with immunodetection were performed.RESULTS: Fourteen proteins were found whose expression levels differed in tumor compared to normal tissues. Mass spectrometric analysis resulted in the identification of β-tropomyosin (TMβ), myosin light chain 2 (and its isoform), myosin regulatory light chain 2,peroxyredoxin 2, annexin I and an unknown polypeptide as the down regulated polypeptides in tumor tissue. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), TPM4-ALK fusion oncoprotein 2, myosin light polypeptide 6, keratin I, GH16431p and calreticulin were the up-regulated polypeptides found in tumor tissue. Several of these proteins, such as TMβ,HSP70, annexin I, calreticulin, TPM4-ALK and isoforms of myosins, have been well recognized in tumorigenesis of esophageal or other types of cancers.CONCLUSION: Our study not only supports the involvement of some of the formerly reported proteins in SCCE but also introduces additional proteins found to be lost in SCCF, including TMβ.

  4. Fluorescence cystoscopy in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Rusakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main challenge of treating non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is multifocal tumors. Current methods of diagnosis are failed to detect all superficial flat tumor lesions in bladder mucosa. The use of fluorescence imaging with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA allows to improve the sensibility of routine cystoscopy, but low specificity decreases its diagnostic accuracy. The method of fluorescence imaging combined with local fluorescence spectroscopy developed in P.A. Herzen MCRI has been shown to increase the specificity from 71% to 84%. Thus, local fluorescence spectroscopy in visible fluorescence of 5-ALA-induced protoporphyrin allows to perform guided biopsy and decrease the rate of diagnostic mistakes. 

  5. Optimal Treatment for Intermediate- and High-Risk, Nonmuscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.M. van der Meijden

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available According to clinical and pathological factors the prognosis of a patient with non-muscle invasive bladder tumors can be assessed. The prognosis is determined by the likelihood of recurrence(30-70% and/or progression to muscle invasive bladder cancer(1-15%.Trans urethral resection of bladder tumors remains the initial therapy but adjuvant intravesical instillations are necessary.All patients benefit from a single immediate post operative instillation with a chemotherapeutic agent and for low risk tumors this is the optimal therapy.Patients with intermediate and high risk tumors need more intravesical chemo-or immunotherapy. Chemotherapy reduces recurrences but not progression. Intravesical immunotherapy(BCG prevents or delays progression. Patients at high risk for progression may need upfront cystectomy.

  6. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkaiah eBetapudi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  7. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-07-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  8. Quality-of-life survey for patients diagnosed with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abáigar-Pedraza, I; Megías-Garrigós, J; Sánchez-Payá, J

    2016-05-01

    To determine the reliability and validity of a quality-of-life survey for patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer. A total of 180 patients were included in the study. We developed a survey with 21 questions grouped into 5 areas. The patients filled in this survey and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Bladder Cancer (FACT-BL) survey. To assess reliability, we calculated Cronbach's alpha coefficient and the kappa index. To determine criterion validity, we studied the association between the scores obtained from our survey and those from the FACT-BL survey using the Pearson correlation coefficient. To determine the construct validity (factorial and discriminatory), we performed a factor analysis, comparing it with Student's t-test for the scores obtained according to the tumour characteristics of reduced quality of life (e.g., malignancies located at the trigone of the bladder). Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient was .83, and the kappa index varied between .7 and 1. For the association study between the new survey and the FACT-BL survey, we measured an r=.82 for the overall score and between r=.68 (disease) and r=.97 (sex life) in the various measures. In the factor analysis, we measured a Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin index of .77 and performed the Barlett test (P<.001). The comparison between the scores, in the presence or absence of certain tumour characteristics, has shown a reduced quality of life when those characteristics are present, which was statistically significant (P<.05) in the majority of cases. Our survey to measure the quality of life of patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is reliable and valid. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutations of tropomyosin 3 (TPM3) are common and associated with type 1 myofiber hypotrophy in congenital fiber type disproportion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Michael W; Dechene, Elizabeth T; Roumm, Emily; Geggel, Amelia S; Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Beggs, Alan H

    2010-02-01

    Congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD) is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by hypotonia and generalized muscle weakness. Pathologic diagnosis of CFTD is based on the presence of type 1 fiber hypotrophy of at least 12% in the absence of other notable pathological findings. Mutations of the ACTA1 and SEPN1 genes have been identified in a small percentage of CFTD cases. The muscle tropomyosin 3 gene, TPM3, is mutated in rare cases of nemaline myopathy that typically exhibit type 1 fiber hypotrophy with nemaline rods, and recently mutations in the TPM3 gene were also found to cause CFTD. We screened the TPM3 gene in patients with a clinical diagnosis of CFTD, nemaline myopathy, and with undefined congenital myopathies. Mutations in TPM3 were identified in 6 out of 13 patients with CFTD, as well as in one case of nemaline myopathy. Review of muscle biopsies from patients with diagnoses of CFTD revealed that patients with a TPM3 mutation all displayed marked disproportion of fiber size, without type 1 fiber predominance. Several mutation-negative cases exhibited other abnormalities, such as central nuclei and central cores. These results support the utility of the CFTD diagnosis in directing the course of genetic testing. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Differences in the ionic interaction of actin with the motor domains of nonmuscle and muscle myosin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, J; Furch, M; Derancourt, J; Batra, R; Knetsch, M L; Manstein, D J; Chaussepied, P

    1999-03-01

    Changes in the actin-myosin interface are thought to play an important role in microfilament-linked cellular movements. In this study, we compared the actin binding properties of the motor domain of Dictyostelium discoideum (M765) and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 (S1). The Dictyostelium motor domain resembles S1(A2) (S1 carrying the A2 light chain) in its interaction with G-actin. Similar to S1(A2), none of the Dictyostelium motor domain constructs induced G-actin polymerization. The affinity of monomeric actin (G-actin) was 20-fold lower for M765 than for S1(A2) but increasing the number of positive charges in the loop 2 region of the D. discoideum motor domain (residues 613-623) resulted in equivalent affinities of G-actin for M765 and for S1. Proteolytic cleavage and cross-linking approaches were used to show that M765, like S1, interacts via the loop 2 region with filamentous actin (F-actin). For both types of myosin, F-actin prevents trypsin cleavage in the loop 2 region and F-actin segment 1-28 can be cross-linked to loop 2 residues by a carbodiimide-induced reaction. In contrast with the S1, loop residues 559-565 of D. discoideum myosin was not cross-linked to F-actin, probably due to the lower number of positive charges. These results confirm the importance of the loop 2 region of myosin for the interaction with both G-actin and F-actin, regardless of the source of myosin. The differences observed in the way in which M765 and S1 interact with actin may be linked to more general differences in the structure of the actomyosin interface of muscle and nonmuscle myosins.

  11. Identification and molecular cloning of the allergen tropomyosin from Ruditapes philippinarum%菲律宾蛤仔过敏原原肌球蛋白的鉴定与分子克隆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕良涛; 蔺海鑫; 高卿; 林洪; 李振兴

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解菲律宾蛤仔中过敏原的情况,对其主要过敏原进行鉴定和分子克隆。方法采用聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳和免疫印迹验证原肌球蛋白,双向电泳对蛋白等电点进一步确定。利用差示扫描量热法对蛋白的热性能测定以及蛋白克隆和测序来分析原肌球蛋白。结果菲律宾蛤仔原肌球蛋白的分子量在37 kDa左右,等电点为5.1,热稳定性较强。原肌球蛋白的基因序列全长为855 bp,编码284个氨基酸,对序列进行同源对比,相似性较高。结论本实验证实了原肌球蛋白为菲律宾蛤仔的过敏原,为认识菲律宾蛤仔过敏原提供基础数据。%ABSTRACT:Objective To investigate theRuditapes philippinarum allergen, and identify and clone the main allergens.MethodsTropomyosin was identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting, and isoelectric point was further analyzed by two dimensional electrophoresis. Thermal stability analysis was determined by differential scanning calorimetry, and tropomyosin was analyzed by cloning and sequencing of proteins. ResultsThe major allergen protein tropomyosin with the molecular weight 37 kDa was extracted. The isoelectric point was 5.1. Thetropomyosin ofR.philippinarumwas stable in the process of thermal treatment. The full-length cDNAs encoding tropomyosin was composed of 855 bp coding for 284 amino acid residues. The similarity of sequence was high through homologous comparison. ConclusionThe tropomyosin is the allergen of R.philippinarum. This research is helpful to provide the basic date to understandR.philippinarumallergen.

  12. Non-muscle myosin as target antigen for human autoantibodies in patients with hepatitis C virus-associated chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mühlen, C A; Chan, E K; Peebles, C L; Imai, H; Kiyosawa, K; Tan, E M

    1995-04-01

    Three patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related chronic liver disease were shown to have autoantibodies strongly reacting with cytoskeletal fibres of non-muscle cells. The heavy chain of non-muscle myosin microfilament was the main target for those autoantibodies, as determined by (i) cell and tissue immunofluorescence studies showing colocalization with an anti-myosin antibody prototype; (ii) primary reactivity in immunoblotting with a 200-kD protein, using either MOLT-4 cells, human platelets, or affinity-purified non-muscle myosin as antigen extract; and (iii) immunoblotting of similar immunoreactive fragments in papain-digested MOLT-4 cell extracts, by using those human sera and antibody prototype. Autoantibodies to non-muscle myosin heavy chain were not previously reported in patients with chronic liver diseases, especially in those associated with HCV infection.

  13. Mammalian 43-kD acetylcholine receptor-associated protein (RAPsyn) is expressed in some nonmuscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musil, L.S.; Frail, D.E.; Merlie, J.P. (Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (USA))

    1989-05-01

    Torpedo electric organ and vertebrate neuromuscular junctions contain the receptor-associated protein of the synapse (RAPsyn) (previously referred to as the 43K protein), a nonactin, 43,000-Mr peripheral membrane protein associated with the cytoplasmic face of postsynaptic membranes at areas of high nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR) density. Although not directly demonstrated, several lines of evidence suggest that RAPsyn is involved in the synthesis and/or maintenance of such AChR clusters. Microscopic and biochemical studies had previously indicated that RAPsyn expression is restricted to differentiated, AChR-synthesizing cells. Our recent finding that RAPsyn is also produced in undifferentiated myocytes led to to examine whether RAPsyn is synthesized in cell types that never express AChR (i.e., cells of other than skeletal muscle origin). Various primary and established rodent cell lines were metabolically labeled with (35S)methionine, and extracts were immunoprecipitated with a monospecific anti-RAPsyn serum. Analysis of these immunoprecipitates by SDS-PAGE revealed detectable RAPsyn synthesis in some (notably fibroblast and Leydig tumor cell lines and primary cardiac cells) but not all (hepatocyte- and lymphocyte-derived) cell types. These results were further substantiated by peptide mapping studies of RAPsyn immunoprecipitated from different cells and quantitation of RAPsyn-encoding mRNA levels in mouse tissues. RAPsyn synthesized in both muscle and nonmuscle cells was shown to be tightly associated with membranes. These findings demonstrate that RAPsyn is not specific to skeletal muscle-derived cells and imply that it may function in a capacity either in addition to or instead of AChR clustering.

  14. IgE recognition patterns of profilin, PR-10, and tropomyosin panallergens tested in 3,113 allergic patients by allergen microarray-based technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Scala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: IgE recognition of panallergens having highly conserved sequence regions, structure, and function and shared by inhalant and food allergen sources is often observed. METHODS: We evaluated the IgE recognition profile of profilins (Bet v 2, Cyn d 12, Hel a 2, Hev b 8, Mer a 1, Ole e 2, Par j 3, Phl p 12, Pho d 2, PR-10 proteins (Aln g 1, Api g 1, Bet v 1.0101, Bet v 1.0401, Cor a 1, Dau c 1 and Mal d 1.0108 and tropomyosins (Ani s 3, Der p 10, Hel as 1, Pen i 1, Pen m 1, Per a 7 using the Immuno-Solid phase Allergen Chip (ISAC microarray system. The three panallergen groups were well represented among the allergenic molecules immobilized on the ISAC. Moreover, they are distributed in several taxonomical allergenic sources, either close or distant, and have a route of exposure being either inhalation or ingestion. RESULTS: 3,113 individuals (49.9% female were selected on the basis of their reactivity to profilins, PR-10 or tropomyosins. 1,521 (48.8% patients were reactive to profilins (77.6% Mer a 1 IgE(+, 1,420 (45.6% to PR-10 (92.5% Bet v 1 IgE(+ and 632 (20.3% to tropomyosins (68% Der p 10 IgE(+. A significant direct relationship between different representative molecules within each group of panallergens was found. 2,688 patients (86.4% recognized only one out of the three distinct groups of molecules as confirmed also by hierarchical clustering analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Unless exposed to most of the allergens in the same or related allergenic sources, a preferential IgE response to distinct panallergens has been recorded. Allergen microarray IgE testing increases our knowledge of the IgE immune response and related epidemiological features within and between homologous molecules better describing the patients' immunological phenotypes.

  15. The nemaline myopathy-causing E117K mutation in β-tropomyosin reduces thin filament activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpicheva, Olga E; Robinson, Paul; Piers, Adam; Borovikov, Yurii S; Redwood, Charles S

    2013-08-01

    The effect of the nemaline myopathy-causing E117K mutation in β-tropomyosin (TM) on the structure and function of this regulatory protein was studied. The E117K mutant was found to have indistinguishable actin affinity compared with wild-type (WT) and similar secondary structure as measured by circular dichroism. However the E117K mutation significantly lowered maximum activation of actomyosin ATPase. To explain the molecular mechanism of impaired ATPase activation, WT and E117K TMs were covalently labeled at Cys-36 with 5-iodoacetimido-fluorescein and incorporated into ghost muscle fibers. The changes in the position and flexibility of tropomyosin strands on the thin filaments were observed at simulation of weak and strong binding states of actomyosin at high or low Ca(2+) by polarized fluorescence techniques. The E117K mutation was found to shift the tropomyosin strands towards the closed position and restrict the tropomyosin displacement during the transformation of actomyosin from weak to strong binding state thus leading to a reduction in thin filament activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cyclase-associated Protein 1 (CAP1) Promotes Cofilin-induced Actin Dynamics in Mammalian Nonmuscle CellsV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Bertling, Enni; Hotulainen, Pirta; Mattila, Pieta K.; Matilainen, Tanja; Salminen, Marjo; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2004-01-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved actin monomer binding proteins present in all eukaryotes. However, the mechanism by which CAPs contribute to actin dynamics has been elusive. In mammals, the situation is further complicated by the presence of two CAP isoforms whose differences have not been characterized. Here, we show that CAP1 is widely expressed in mouse nonmuscle cells, whereas CAP2 is the predominant isoform in developing striated muscles. In cultured NIH3T3 and B1...

  17. Persistence length of human cardiac α-tropomyosin measured by single molecule direct probe microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campion K P Loong

    Full Text Available α-Tropomyosin (αTm is the predominant tropomyosin isoform in adult human heart and constitutes a major component in Ca²+-regulated systolic contraction of cardiac muscle. We present here the first direct probe images of WT human cardiac αTm by atomic force microscopy, and quantify its mechanical flexibility with three independent analysis methods. Single molecules of bacterially-expressed human cardiac αTm were imaged on poly-lysine coated mica and their contours were analyzed. Analysis of tangent-angle (θ(s correlation along molecular contours, second moment of tangent angles (, and end-to-end length (L(e-e distributions respectively yielded values of persistence length (L(p of 41-46 nm, 40-45 nm, and 42-52 nm, corresponding to 1-1.3 molecular contour lengths (L(c. We also demonstrate that a sufficiently large population, with at least 100 molecules, is required for a reliable L(p measurement of αTm in single molecule studies. Our estimate that L(p for αTm is only slightly longer than L(c is consistent with a previous study showing there is little spread of cooperative activation into near-neighbor regulatory units of cardiac thin filaments. The L(p determined here for human cardiac αTm perhaps represents an evolutionarily tuned optimum between Ca²+ sensitivity and cooperativity in cardiac thin filaments and likely constitutes an essential parameter for normal function in the human heart.

  18. A Spatially Detailed Model of Isometric Contraction Based on Competitive Binding of Troponin I Explains Cooperative Interactions between Tropomyosin and Crossbridges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Land

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Biophysical models of cardiac tension development provide a succinct representation of our understanding of force generation in the heart. The link between protein kinetics and interactions that gives rise to high cooperativity is not yet fully explained from experiments or previous biophysical models. We propose a biophysical ODE-based representation of cross-bridge (XB, tropomyosin and troponin within a contractile regulatory unit (RU to investigate the mechanisms behind cooperative activation, as well as the role of cooperativity in dynamic tension generation across different species. The model includes cooperative interactions between regulatory units (RU-RU, between crossbridges (XB-XB, as well more complex interactions between crossbridges and regulatory units (XB-RU interactions. For the steady-state force-calcium relationship, our framework predicts that: (1 XB-RU effects are key in shifting the half-activation value of the force-calcium relationship towards lower [Ca(2+], but have only small effects on cooperativity. (2 XB-XB effects approximately double the duty ratio of myosin, but do not significantly affect cooperativity. (3 RU-RU effects derived from the long-range action of tropomyosin are a major factor in cooperative activation, with each additional unblocked RU increasing the rate of additional RU's unblocking. (4 Myosin affinity for short (1-4 RU unblocked stretches of actin of is very low, and the resulting suppression of force at low [Ca(2+] is a major contributor in the biphasic force-calcium relationship. We also reproduce isometric tension development across mouse, rat and human at physiological temperature and pacing rate, and conclude that species differences require only changes in myosin affinity and troponin I/troponin C affinity. Furthermore, we show that the calcium dependence of the rate of tension redevelopment k(tr is explained by transient blocking of RU's by a temporary decrease in XB-RU effects.

  19. Nuclei of non-muscle cells bind centrosome proteins upon fusion with differentiating myoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Fant

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In differentiating myoblasts, the microtubule network is reorganized from a centrosome-bound, radial array into parallel fibres, aligned along the long axis of the cell. Concomitantly, proteins of the centrosome relocalize from the pericentriolar material to the outer surface of the nucleus. The mechanisms that govern this relocalization are largely unknown. METHODOLOGY: In this study, we perform experiments in vitro and in cell culture indicating that microtubule nucleation at the centrosome is reduced during myoblast differentiation, while nucleation at the nuclear surface increases. We show in heterologous cell fusion experiments, between cultures of differentiating mouse myoblasts and human cells of non-muscular origin, that nuclei from non-muscle cells recruit centrosome proteins once fused with the differentiating myoblasts. This recruitment still occurs in the presence of cycloheximide and thus appears to be independent of new protein biosynthesis. CONCLUSIONS: Altogether, our data suggest that nuclei of undifferentiated cells have the dormant potential to bind centrosome proteins, and that this potential becomes activated during myoblast differentiation.

  20. Non-muscle myosin II in disease: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Newell-Litwa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The actin motor protein non-muscle myosin II (NMII acts as a master regulator of cell morphology, with a role in several essential cellular processes, including cell migration and post-synaptic dendritic spine plasticity in neurons. NMII also generates forces that alter biochemical signaling, by driving changes in interactions between actin-associated proteins that can ultimately regulate gene transcription. In addition to its roles in normal cellular physiology, NMII has recently emerged as a critical regulator of diverse, genetically complex diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancers and vascular disease. In the context of these disorders, NMII regulatory pathways can be directly mutated or indirectly altered by disease-causing mutations. NMII regulatory pathway genes are also increasingly found in disease-associated copy-number variants, particularly in neuronal disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Furthermore, manipulation of NMII-mediated contractility regulates stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, thus highlighting the key role of NMII-based pharmaceuticals in the clinical success of stem cell therapies. In this Review, we discuss the emerging role of NMII activity and its regulation by kinases and microRNAs in the pathogenesis and prognosis of a diverse range of diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancer and vascular disease. We also address promising clinical applications and limitations of NMII-based inhibitors in the treatment of these diseases and the development of stem-cell-based therapies.

  1. Nonmuscle Myosin IIA Regulates Platelet Contractile Forces Through Rho Kinase and Myosin Light-Chain Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghhi, Shirin; Tooley, Wes W; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-10-01

    Platelet contractile forces play a major role in clot retraction and help to hold hemostatic clots against the vessel wall. Platelet forces are produced by its cytoskeleton, which is composed of actin and nonmuscle myosin filaments. In this work, we studied the role of Rho kinase, myosin light-chain kinase, and myosin in the generation of contractile forces by using pharmacological inhibitors and arrays of flexible microposts to measure platelet forces. When platelets were seeded onto microposts, they formed aggregates on the tips of the microposts. Forces produced by the platelets in the aggregates were measured by quantifying the deflection of the microposts, which bent in proportion to the force of the platelets. Platelets were treated with small molecule inhibitors of myosin activity: Y-27632 to inhibit the Rho kinase (ROCK), ML-7 to inhibit myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), and blebbistatin to inhibit myosin ATPase activity. ROCK inhibition reduced platelet forces, demonstrating the importance of the assembly of actin and myosin phosphorylation in generating contractile forces. Similarly, MLCK inhibition caused weaker platelet forces, which verifies that myosin phosphorylation is needed for force generation in platelets. Platelets treated with blebbistatin also had weaker forces, which indicates that myosin's ATPase activity is necessary for platelet forces. Our studies demonstrate that myosin ATPase activity and the regulation of actin-myosin assembly by ROCK and MLCK are needed for the generation of platelet forces. Our findings illustrate and explain the importance of myosin for clot compaction in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  2. SLIT2/ROBO2 signaling pathway inhibits nonmuscle myosin IIA activity and destabilizes kidney podocyte adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xueping; Yang, Hongying; Kumar, Sudhir; Tumelty, Kathleen E.; Pisarek-Horowitz, Anna; Sharma, Richa; Chan, Stefanie; Tyminski, Edyta; Shamashkin, Michael; Belghasem, Mostafa; Henderson, Joel M.; Coyle, Anthony J.; Berasi, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    The repulsive guidance cue SLIT2 and its receptor ROBO2 are required for kidney development and podocyte foot process structure, but the SLIT2/ROBO2 signaling mechanism regulating podocyte function is not known. Here we report that a potentially novel signaling pathway consisting of SLIT/ROBO Rho GTPase activating protein 1 (SRGAP1) and nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMIIA) regulates podocyte adhesion downstream of ROBO2. We found that the myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC), a subunit of NMIIA, interacts directly with SRGAP1 and forms a complex with ROBO2/SRGAP1/NMIIA in the presence of SLIT2. Immunostaining demonstrated that SRGAP1 is a podocyte protein and is colocalized with ROBO2 on the basal surface of podocytes. In addition, SLIT2 stimulation inhibits NMIIA activity, decreases focal adhesion formation, and reduces podocyte attachment to collagen. In vivo studies further showed that podocyte-specific knockout of Robo2 protects mice from hypertension-induced podocyte detachment and albuminuria and also partially rescues the podocyte-loss phenotype in Myh9 knockout mice. Thus, we have identified SLIT2/ROBO2/SRGAP1/NMIIA as a potentially novel signaling pathway in kidney podocytes, which may play a role in regulating podocyte adhesion and attachment. Our findings also suggest that SLIT2/ROBO2 signaling might be a therapeutic target for kidney diseases associated with podocyte detachment and loss. PMID:27882344

  3. Nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer: what's changing and what has changed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Ramanitharan; Rodriguez, Oscar; Parada, Rubén; Palou Redorta, Joan

    2017-02-03

    Nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is a challenging disease to manage primarily due to its varied clinical course. The management of NMIBC has witnessed a widespread change with respect to its diagnosis and treatment. Although transurethral resection (TUR) and adjuvant bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) stills remain the cornerstone, newer protocols has come into vogue to achieve optimal care. On the basis of a literature review, we aimed to establish 'what changes has already occurred and what is expected in the future' in NMIBC. A Medline search was performed to identify the published literature with respect to diagnosis, treatment and future perspectives on NMIBC. Particular emphasis was directed to determinants such as the quality of TUR and the newer modifications, Re-TUR, current status of newer macroscopic and microscopic imaging, role of urinary biomarkers, clinical, histologic and molecular predictors of high-risk disease, administration of intravesical agents, salvage therapy in BCG recurrence and the current best practice guidelines were analyzed. Optimal TUR, restaging in select group, incorporation of newer endoscopic imaging and judicious administration of intravesical chemo-immunotherapeutic agents can contribute to better patient care. Although there is a plethora of urinary markers, there is insufficient evidence for their use in isolation. The future probably lies in identification of genetic markers to determine disease recurrence, nonresponders to standard treatment and early institution of alternative/targeted therapy.

  4. Comparison of Guidelines on Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (EAU, CUA, AUA, NCCN, NICE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Nicholas E; Izawa, Jonathan

    2016-01-07

    Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) represents a considerably diverse patient group and the management of this complex disease is debatable. A number of panels from Europe and North America have convened on the topic and recently released guideline documents. The purpose was to compare and contrast the NMIBC guideline recommendations from the EAU (Europe), CUA (Canada), NCCN (United States), AUA (United States), and NICE (United Kingdom). All unabridged guideline documents were reviewed by the authors and comparisons were completed according to major topics in NMIBC. Despite a paucity of high level evidence regarding the majority of management topics in NMIBC, there was general agreement among the various guideline panels. Differences mainly centered on the categories of evidence synthesized and grades of recommendations. Each document offers a unique presentation of the available literature and guideline recommendation. The guidelines for NMIBC from the EAU, CUA, AUA, NCCN, and NICE provide considerable consensus regarding the management of this often difficult disease. Clinicians are encouraged to familiarize themselves with all of the guidelines in order to determine which style of presentation would be most useful to their current practice.

  5. Structural and Functional Effects of Cardiomyopathy-Causing Mutations in the Troponin T-Binding Region of Cardiac Tropomyosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushenko, Alexander M; Shchepkin, Daniil V; Kopylova, Galina V; Popruga, Katerina E; Artemova, Natalya V; Pivovarova, Anastasia V; Bershitsky, Sergey Y; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2017-01-10

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a severe heart disease caused by missense mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins of cardiac muscle. Many of these mutations are identified in the gene encoding the cardiac isoform of tropomyosin (Tpm), an α-helical coiled-coil actin-binding protein that plays a key role in Ca(2+)-regulated contraction of cardiac muscle. We employed various methods to characterize structural and functional features of recombinant human Tpm species carrying HCM mutations that lie either within the troponin T-binding region in the C-terminal part of Tpm (E180G, E180V, and L185R) or near this region (I172T). The results of our structural studies show that all these mutations affect, although differently, the thermal stability of the C-terminal part of the Tpm molecule: mutations E180G and I172T destabilize this part of the molecule, whereas mutation E180V strongly stabilizes it. Moreover, various HCM-causing mutations have different and even opposite effects on the stability of the Tpm-actin complexes. Studies of reconstituted thin filaments in the in vitro motility assay have shown that those HCM-associated mutations that lie within the troponin T-binding region of Tpm similarly increase the Ca(2+) sensitivity of the sliding velocity of the filaments and impair their relaxation properties, causing a marked increase in the sliding velocity in the absence of Ca(2+), while mutation I172T decreases the Ca(2+) sensitivity and has no influence on the sliding velocity under relaxing conditions. Finally, our data demonstrate that various HCM mutations can differently affect the structural and functional properties of Tpm and cause HCM by different molecular mechanisms.

  6. Expression of sarcomeric tropomyosin in striated muscles in axolotl treated with shz-1, a small cardiogenic molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Changlong; Dube, Syamalima; Matoq, Amr; Mikesell, Lauren; Abbott, Lynn; Alshiekh-Nasany, Ruham; Chionuma, Henry; Huang, Xupei; Poiesz, Bernard J; Dube, Dipak K

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of shz-1, a cardiogenic molecule, on the expression of various tropomyosin (TM) isoforms in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) hearts. qRT-PCR data show a ~1.5-fold increase in cardiac transcripts of the Nkx2.5 gene, which plays a crucial role in cardiogenesis in vertebrates. Shz-1 augments the expression of transcripts of the total sarcomeric TPM1 (both TPM1α & TPM1κ) and sarcomeric TPM4α. In order to understand the mechanism by which shz-1 augments the expression of sarcomeric TPM transcription in axolotl hearts, we transfected C2C12 cells with pGL3.axolotl. We transfected C2C12 cells with pGL3-axolotl TPM4 promoter constructs containing the firefly luciferase reporter gene. The transfected C2C12 cells were grown in the absence or presence of shz-1 (5 μM). Subsequently, we determined the firefly luciferase activity in the extracts of transfected cells. The results suggest that shz-1 activates the axolotl TPM4 promoter-driven ectopic expression in C2C12 cells. Also, we transfected C2C12 cells with a pGL3.1 vector containing the promoter of the mouse skeletal muscle troponin-I and observed a similar increase in the luciferase activity in shz-1-treated cells. We conclude that shz-1 activates the promoters of a variety of genes including axolotl TPM4. We have quantified the expression of the total sarcomeric TPM1 and observed a 1.5-fold increase in treated cells. Western blot analyses with CH1 monoclonal antibody specific for sarcomeric isoforms show that shz-1 does not increase the expression of TM protein in axolotl hearts, whereas it does in C2C12 cells. These findings support our hypothesis that cardiac TM expression in axolotl undergoes translational control.

  7. Mutations of tropomyosin 3 (TPM3) are common and associated with type 1 myofiber hypotrophy in congenital fiber type disproportion

    OpenAIRE

    Lawlor, Michael W.; DeChene, Elizabeth T.; Roumm, Emily; Geggel, Amelia S.; Moghadaszadeh, Behzad; Beggs, Alan H.

    2010-01-01

    Congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD) is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by hypotonia and generalized muscle weakness. Pathologic diagnosis of CFTD is based on the presence of type 1 fiber hypotrophy of at least 12% in the absence of other notable pathological findings. Mutations of the ACTA1 and SEPN1 genes have been identified in a small percentage of CFTD cases. The muscle tropomyosin 3 gene, TPM3, is mutated in rare cases of nemaline myopathy that typically exhibit type 1 fi...

  8. Non-muscle Myosin II Isoforms Co-assemble in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jordan R.; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Non-muscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique, as well as redundant, cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear if NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments, or if filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently-tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms co-assemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly-spread cells, arguing for the existence of sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while co-assembled with other NM II isoforms. PMID:24814144

  9. Species Differences in the Distribution of the Nonmuscle Myosin Heavy Chain IIB Inserted Isoform in the Brain(Biochemistry)

    OpenAIRE

    Shin-ya, Hagiwara; MASAYUKI, TAKAHASHI; Akihiko, Yamagishi; Division of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University

    2001-01-01

    The alternatively spliced isoform of the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIB (MHC-IIB) with an insert of 21 amino acids near the actin-binding region, MHC-IIB (B2), is expressed specifically in the brain and spinal cord in Mammalia and Aves. We performed immunoblot analyses to elucidate the distribution of MHC-IIB (B2) in the brains of various animals. Nearly half of MHC-IIB existed as the B2 inserted isoform (MHC-IIB (B2)) in the cerebrum of the guinea-pig, rabbit and pig, while the non-B2 inse...

  10. Species Differences in the Distribution of the Nonmuscle Myosin Heavy Chain IIB Inserted Isoform in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Hagiwara, Shin-ya; Takahashi, Masayuki; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2001-01-01

    The alternatively spliced isoform of the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIB (MHC-IIB) with an insert of 21 amino acids near the actin-binding region, MHC-IIB(B2), is expressed specifically in the brain and spinal cord in Mammalia and Aves. We performed immunoblot analyses to elucidate the distribution of MHC-IIB(B2) in the brains of various animals. Nearly half of MHC-IIB existed as the B2 inserted isoform (MHC-IIB(B2)) in the cerebrum of the guinea-pig, rabbit and pig, while the non-B2 inserte...

  11. Absolute quantification method and validation of airborne snow crab allergen tropomyosin using tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Anas M. Abdel, E-mail: anasar@mun.ca [Department of Chemistry, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland A1B 3X7 (Canada); Lopata, Andreas L. [School of Applied Science, Marine Biomedical Sciences and Health Research Group, RMIT University, Bundoora, 3083 Victoria (Australia); Randell, Edward W. [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Eastern Health, St. John' s, Newfoundland and Labrador A1B 3V6 (Canada); Helleur, Robert J. [Department of Chemistry, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John' s, Newfoundland A1B 3X7 (Canada)

    2010-11-29

    Measuring the levels of the major airborne allergens of snow crab in the workplace is very important in studying the prevalence of crab asthma in workers. Previously, snow crab tropomyosin (SCTM) was identified as the major aeroallergen in crab plants and a unique signature peptide was identified for this protein. The present study advances our knowledge on aeroallergens by developing a method of quantification of airborne SCTM by using isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was developed for separation and analysis of the signature peptides. The tryptic digestion conditions were optimized to accomplish complete digestion. The validity of the method was studied using international conference on harmonization protocol, Where 2-9% for CV (precision) and 101-110% for accuracy, at three different levels of quality control. Recovery of the spiked protein from PTFE and TopTip filters was measured to be 99% and 96%, respectively. To further demonstrate the applicability and the validity of the method for real samples, 45 kg of whole snow crab were processed in an enclosed (simulated) crab processing line and air samples were collected. The levels of SCTM ranged between 0.36-3.92 {mu}g m{sup -3} and 1.70-2.31 {mu}g m{sup -3} for butchering and cooking stations, respectively.

  12. Mesalamine suppresses the expression of TC22, a novel tropomyosin isoform associated with colonic neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Koushik K; Bajpai, Manisha; Kong, Yingxin; Liu, Jianying; Geng, Xin; Das, Kiron M

    2009-07-01

    Although a protective role for mesalamine against colon cancer in ulcerative colitis has been shown epidemiologically, its molecular mechanism is unknown. We cloned and sequenced a novel human tropomyosin (hTM) isoform, TC22, which is an alternatively spliced variant of normal epithelial hTM isoform 5 (hTM5), identical apart from 25 C-terminal amino acids. TC22 is expressed in 100% of colorectal carcinoma but is not expressed in normal colon epithelial cells. To explore a molecular mechanism of chemoprevention, we examined the effect of mesalamine on TC22 expression using LS180 colon cancer cells. Expression of hTM5 and TC22 was investigated at the protein and gene levels by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Small interference RNA (siRNA) against the TC22 variant were transfected into LS180 colon cancer cells, reducing protein and transcript levels by 45 to 50%. Mesalamine or sulfasalazine (2 mM), but not sulfapyridine, significantly (p mesalamine, sulfasalazine, and rosiglitazone significantly reduced the cellular expression of TC22, implicating PPARgamma in this modulation. Similar suppression of TC22 by siRNA produced gene level changes on several critical carcinogenic pathways. These findings suggest a novel antineoplastic molecular effect of mesalamine.

  13. Morphological Modifications in Myofibrils by Suppressing Tropomyosin 4α in Chicken Cardiac Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Naoji; Fujitsuka, Chiaki; Ishibashi, Goushi; S Yoshida, Lucia; Takano-Ohmuro, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    Tropomyosin (TPM) localizes along F-actin and, together with troponin T (TnT) and other components, controls calcium-sensitive muscle contraction. The role of the TPM isoform (TPM4α) that is expressed in embryonic and adult cardiac muscle cells in chicken is poorly understood. To analyze the function of TPM4α in myofibrils, the effects of TPM4α-suppression were examined in embryonic cardiomyocytes by small interference RNA transfection. Localization of myofibril proteins such as TPM, actin, TnT, α-actinin, myosin and connectin was examined by immunofluorescence microscopy on day 5 when almost complete TPM4α-suppression occurred in culture. A unique large structure was detected, consisting of an actin aggregate bulging from the actin bundle, and many curved filaments projecting from the aggregate. TPM, TnT and actin were detected on the large structure, but myosin, connectin, α-actinin and obvious myofibril striations were undetectable. It is possible that TPM4α-suppressed actin filaments are sorted and excluded at the place of the large structure. This suggests that TPM4α-suppression significantly affects actin filament, and that TPM4α plays an important role in constructing and maintaining sarcomeres and myofibrils in cardiac muscle.

  14. Novel Simulation Model of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Platform for a Virtual Randomized Trial of Conservative Therapy vs. Cystectomy in BCG Refractory Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay; Dinh, Tuan; Noah-Vanhoucke, Joyce; Rengarajan, Badri; Mayo, Kevin; Clark, Peter E; Kamat, Ashish M; Lee, Cheryl T; Sexton, Wade J; Steinberg, Gary D

    2015-10-26

    Introduction: There have been no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the clinical or economic benefit of mitomycin C intravesical therapy vs. radical cystectomy in patients with high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). We used the Archimedes computational model to simulate RCT comparing radical cystectomy versus intravesical mitomycin C (MMC) therapy to evaluate the clinical and economic outcomes for BCG-refractory NMIBC as well demonstrate the utility of computer based models to simulate a clinical trial. Methods: The Archimedes model was developed to generate a virtual population using the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database, other clinical trials, and expert opinions. Patients selected were diagnosed with NMIBC (virtual patients were evaluation. Progression to MIBC in the MMC treatment arm was 30% over the lifetime. Disease specific death at 5 years was 1.6% and 8.7% for the immediate cystectomy and MMC treatment arms respectively; while, overall death was 17.8% and 23.8% at 5 years. Over a 5-year period the average cost of immediate cystectomy was $64,675 vs $68,517 in the MMC arm. Conclusion: Immediate radical cystectomy after BCG failure for NMIBC has improved survival and is more cost-effective when compared to those undergoing MMC. Simulation of clinical trials using computational models similar to the Archimedes model can overcome shortcomings of real-world clinical trials and may prove useful in the face of current medical cost-conscious era.

  15. The role of urine markers, white light cystoscopy and fluorescence cystoscopy in recurrence, progression and follow-up of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karaoglu, I.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Witjes, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) accounts for approximately 70 % of all bladder cancer cases and represents a heterogeneous pathological entity, characterized by a variable natural history and oncological outcome. The combination of cystoscopy and urine cytology is considered the gold stan

  16. Summary and Recommendations from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Trials Planning Meeting on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerner, S.P.; Bajorin, D.F.; Dinney, C.P.; Efstathiou, J.A.; Groshen, S.; Hahn, N.M.; Hansel, D.; Kwiatkowski, D.; O'Donnell, M.; Rosenberg, J.; Svatek, R.; Abrams, J.S.; Al-Ahmadie, H.; Apolo, A.B.; Bellmunt, J.; Callahan, M.; Cha, E.K.; Drake, C.; Jarow, J.; Kamat, A.; Kim, W.; Knowles, M.; Mann, B.; Marchionni, L.; McConkey, D.; McShane, L.; Ramirez, N.; Sharabi, A.; Sharpe, A.H.; Solit, D.; Tangen, C.M.; Amiri, A.T.; Allen, E. Van; West, P.J.; Witjes, J.A.; Quale, D.Z.

    2016-01-01

    The NCI Bladder Cancer Task Force convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) Workshop focused on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC). Meeting attendees included a broad and multi-disciplinary group of clinical and research stakeholders and included leaders from

  17. Analysis of molecular intra-patient variation and delineation of a prognostic 12-gene signature in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; technology transfer from microarrays to PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Reinert, Thomas; Novoradovsky, A;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple clinical risk factors and genetic profiles have been demonstrated to predict progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer; however, no easily clinical applicable gene signature has been developed to predict disease progression independent of disease stage and grade. Meth...

  18. Metastasis-associated protein Mts1 (S100A4) inhibits CK2-mediated phosphorylation and self-assembly of the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriajevska, M; Bronstein, I B; Scott, D J

    2000-01-01

    A role for EF-hand calcium-binding protein Mts1 (S100A4) in the phosphorylation and the assembly of myosin filaments was studied. The nonmuscle myosin molecules form bipolar filaments, which interact with actin filaments to produce a contractile force. Phosphorylation of the myosin plays...

  19. The Chinese herbal formula Tongluo Jiunao promotes expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B pathways in a rat model of ischemic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peiman Alesheikh; Yangyang Yan; Huiling Tang; Pengtao Li; Wei Zhang; Yanshu Pan; Arezou Mashoufi; Liyun Zhao; Runjun Wang; Bo Di

    2011-01-01

    The neurotrophin-Trk receptor pathway is an intrinsic pathway to relieve damage to the central nervous system. The present study observed the effects of Tongluo Jiunao (TLJN), which comprises Panax Notoginseng and Gardenia Jasminoides, on expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemic injury. Xue Sai Tong (XST), comprising Panax Notoginseng, served as the positive control. Mechanisms of neuroprotection were analyzed following TLJN injection. Following establishment of the middle cerebral artery occlusion models, TLJN and XST were intraperitoneally injected, and 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining results revealed that TLJN injection reduced infarct volume, suggesting that TLJN exerted a neuroprotective effect. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that TLJN elevated BDNF and growth associated protein-43 expression in ischemic brain tissues, as well as serum BDNF levels. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot results showed that TLJN injection did not affect TrkB expression in the ischemic brain tissues of rats. These results suggested that TLJN injection reduced damage to ischemic brain tissues and increased BDNF expression. In addition, TLJN injection resulted in better promoting effects on neurotrophic factor expression compared with XST.

  20. Cardiac troponin and tropomyosin: structural and cellular perspectives to unveil the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra de A. Marques

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Inherited myopathies affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle and are commonly associated with genetic dysfunctions, leading to the production of anomalous proteins. In cardiomyopathies, mutations frequently occur in sarcomeric genes, but the cause-effect scenario between genetic alterations and pathological processes remains elusive. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM was the first cardiac disease associated with a genetic background. Since the discovery of the first mutation in the β-myosin heavy chain, more than 1,400 new mutations in 11 sarcomeric genes have been reported, awarding HCM the title of the disease of the sarcomere. The most common macroscopic phenotypes are left ventricle and interventricular septal thickening, but because the clinical profile of this disease is quite heterogeneous, these phenotypes are not suitable for an accurate diagnosis. The development of genomic approaches for clinical investigation allows for diagnostic progress and understanding at the molecular level. Meanwhile, the lack of accurate in vivo models to better comprehend the cellular events triggered by this pathology has become a challenge. Notwithstanding, the imbalance of Ca2+ concentrations, altered signaling pathways, induction of apoptotic factors, and heart remodeling leading to abnormal anatomy have already been reported. Of note, a misbalance of signaling biomolecules, such as kinases and tumor suppressors (e.g., Akt and p53, seems to participate in apoptotic and fibrotic events. In HCM, structural and cellular information about defective sarcomeric proteins and their altered interactome is emerging but still represents a bottleneck for developing new concepts in basic research and for future therapeutic interventions. This review focuses on the structural and cellular alterations triggered by HCM-causing mutations in troponin and tropomyosin proteins and how structural biology can aid in the discovery of new platforms for therapeutics. We

  1. The impact of tropomyosins on actin filament assembly is isoform specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janco, Miro; Bonello, Teresa T; Byun, Alex; Coster, Adelle C F; Lebhar, Helene; Dedova, Irina; Gunning, Peter W; Böcking, Till

    2016-07-01

    Tropomyosin (Tpm) is an α helical coiled-coil dimer that forms a co-polymer along the actin filament. Tpm is involved in the regulation of actin's interaction with binding proteins as well as stabilization of the actin filament and its assembly kinetics. Recent studies show that multiple Tpm isoforms also define the functional properties of distinct actin filament populations within a cell. Subtle structural variations within well conserved Tpm isoforms are the key to their functional specificity. Therefore, we purified and characterized a comprehensive set of 8 Tpm isoforms (Tpm1.1, Tpm1.12, Tpm1.6, Tpm1.7, Tpm1.8, Tpm2.1, Tpm3.1, and Tpm4.2), using well-established actin co-sedimentation and pyrene fluorescence polymerization assays. We observed that the apparent affinity (Kd(app)) to filamentous actin varied in all Tpm isoforms between ∼0.1-5 μM with similar values for both, skeletal and cytoskeletal actin filaments. The data did not indicate any correlation between affinity and size of Tpm molecules, however high molecular weight (HMW) isoforms Tpm1.1, Tpm1.6, Tpm1.7 and Tpm2.1, showed ∼3-fold higher cooperativity compared to low molecular weight (LMW) isoforms Tpm1.12, Tpm1.8, Tpm3.1, and Tpm4.2. The rate of actin filament elongation in the presence of Tpm2.1 increased, while all other isoforms decreased the elongation rate by 27-85 %. Our study shows that the biochemical properties of Tpm isoforms are finely tuned and depend on sequence variations in alternatively spliced regions of Tpm molecules.

  2. Tropomyosin variants describe distinct functional subcellular domains in differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Cynthia; Appel, Sarah; Graceffa, Philip; Leavis, Paul; Lin, Jim Jung-Ching; Gunning, Peter W; Schevzov, Galina; Chaponnier, Christine; DeGnore, Jon; Lehman, William; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2011-06-01

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is known to be an important gatekeeper of actin function. Tm isoforms are encoded by four genes, and each gene produces several variants by alternative splicing, which have been proposed to play roles in motility, proliferation, and apoptosis. Smooth muscle studies have focused on gizzard smooth muscle, where a heterodimer of Tm from the α-gene (Tmsm-α) and from the β-gene (Tmsm-β) is associated with contractile filaments. In this study we examined Tm in differentiated mammalian vascular smooth muscle (dVSM). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS) analysis and Western blot screening with variant-specific antibodies revealed that at least five different Tm proteins are expressed in this tissue: Tm6 (Tmsm-α) and Tm2 from the α-gene, Tm1 (Tmsm-β) from the β-gene, Tm5NM1 from the γ-gene, and Tm4 from the δ-gene. Tm6 is by far most abundant in dVSM followed by Tm1, Tm2, Tm5NM1, and Tm4. Coimmunoprecipitation and coimmunofluorescence studies demonstrate that Tm1 and Tm6 coassociate with different actin isoforms and display different intracellular localizations. Using an antibody specific for cytoplasmic γ-actin, we report here the presence of a γ-actin cortical cytoskeleton in dVSM cells. Tm1 colocalizes with cortical cytoplasmic γ-actin and coprecipitates with γ-actin. Tm6, on the other hand, is located on contractile bundles. These data indicate that Tm1 and Tm6 do not form a classical heterodimer in dVSM but rather describe different functional cellular compartments.

  3. Roles of brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B (BDNF/TrkB) signalling in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Kang, Zhilong; Li, Wen; Xiao, Zhicheng; Zhou, Xinfu

    2012-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common causes of dementia in the elderly. It is characterized by extracellular deposition of the neurotoxic peptide, amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide fibrils, and is accompanied by extensive loss of neurons in the brains of affected individuals. However, the pathogenesis of AD is not fully understood. The aim of this review is to discuss the possible role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) signalling in the development of AD, focusing on BDNF/TrkB signalling in the production of Aβ, tau hyperphosphorylation and cognition decline, and exploring new possibilities for AD intervention.

  4. Differential effects of an expected actin-tropomyosin binding region of heat shock protein 20 on the relaxation in skinned carotid artery and taenia cecum from guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Ryo; Yumoto, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Masaru; Konishi, Masato; Haraoka, Jo; Miki, Tamotsu

    2009-02-01

    To explore the possible role of heat shock protein 20 (HSP20) -linked regulation of actin-myosin interaction in living vascular smooth muscle contraction, we studied the effects of HSP20p and TnIp, synthetic peptides originating from an actin tropomyosin binding region of human heat shock protein 20 [residues 110-121; GFVAREFHRRYR] and that of rabbit cardiac troponin I [residues 136-147; GKFKRPTLRRVR], respectively, on the active stress and phosphorylation level of myosin regulatory light chain (MLC(20)) during relaxation of skinned (cell membrane permeabilized) preparations from "tonic" carotid artery and "phasic" taenia cecum from guinea pig. Active stress of the skinned preparations, resulting from actin-myosin interaction, biphasically decayed following Ca(2+) removal (relaxation). Decay of MLC(20) phosphorylation level by Ca(2+) removal was much faster than active stress in an exponential manner. In skinned carotid artery, HSP20p did neither affect relaxation time course nor MLC(20) dephosphorylation, whereas, in skinned taenia cecum, the peptide slowed relaxation time course through inhibition of MLC(20) dephosphorylation and slowing "latch"-bridge dissociation. On the other hand, TnIp accelerated relaxation time course without affecting MLC(20) dephosphorylation in both skinned carotid artery and skinned taenia cecum. Our present results suggest that, HSP20p slows the relaxation processes through intracellular regulatory mechanisms such as Rho A/Rho-kinase mediated pathways, which are known to be dominant in "phasic" smooth muscles but to be recessive in "tonic" smooth muscles.

  5. Calorie restriction improves cognitive decline via up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor: tropomyosin-related kinase B in hippocampus ofobesity-induced hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Takuya; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Nagayama, Tomomi; Isegawa, Kengo; Katsuki, Masato; Takesue, Ko; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    In metabolic syndrome (MetS), previous studies have suggested that cognitive decline is worsened. Among the factors associated with cognition, decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus causes cognitive decline. We previously reported that exercise training with calorie restriction yielded protection against cognitive decline via BDNF in the hippocampus of hypertensive rats. The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not calorie restriction results in protection against cognitive decline via BDNF and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in the hippocampus of MetS model rats. We divided dietary-induced obesity-prone and hypertensive rats (OP), as metabolic syndrome model rats, into three groups, fed with a high fat diet (HF), treated with calorie restriction (CR) plus vehicle, and treated with CR and ANA-12 (a TrkB antagonist) (CR+A). After treatment for 28 days, body weight, insulin, fasting blood glucose, adiponectin, systolic blood pressure, and oxidative stress in the hippocampus were significantly lower, and BDNF expression in the hippocampus was significantly higher in CR and CR+A than in HF. Cognitive performance determined by the Morris water maze test was significantly higher in CR than in HF, whereas the benefit was attenuated in CR+A. In conclusion, calorie restriction protects against cognitive decline via up-regulation of BDNF/TrkB through an antioxidant effect in the hippocampus of dietary-induced obesity rats.

  6. Chinese herbal formula Tongluo Jiunao injection protects against cerebral ischemia by activating neurotrophin 3/tropomyosin-related kinase C pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Alesheikh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese herbal formula Tongluo Jiunao, containing the active components Panax notoginseng and Gardenia jasminoides, has recently been patented and is in use clinically. It is known to be neuroprotective in cerebral ischemia, but the underlying pathway remains poorly understood. In the present study, we established a rat model of cerebral ischemia by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, and administered Tongluo Jiunao, a positive control (Xuesai Tong, containing Panax notoginseng or saline intraperitoneally to investigate the pathway involved in the action of Tongluo Jiunao injection. 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC staining showed that the cerebral infarct area was significantly smaller in model rats that received Tongluo Jiunao than in those that received saline. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed significantly greater expression of neurotrophin 3 and growth-associated protein 43 in ischemic cerebral tissue, and serum levels of neurotrophin 3, in the Tongluo Jiunao group than in the saline group. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining showed that after treatment with Tongluo Jiunao or Xuesai Tong, tropomyosin-related kinase C gene expression and immunoreactivity were significantly elevated compared with saline, with the greatest expression observed after Tongluo Jiunao treatment. These findings suggest that Tongluo Jiunao injection exerts a neuroprotective effect in rats with cerebral ischemia by activating the neurotrophin 3/tropomyosin-related kinase C pathway.

  7. p53 Status correlates with the risk of recurrence in non-muscle invasive bladder cancers treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Zhou

    Full Text Available Published studies have yielded inconsistent results on the relationship between p53 status and the prognosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG intravesical therapy. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the prognostic value of p53 in NMIBC treated with BCG.We systematically searched for relevant literature in PubMed, EMBASE, CNKI, and Chinese Wanfang databases. Hazard ratios (HRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were combined as the effect size (ES across studies for recurrence-free survival (RFS and progression-free survival (PFS.A total of 11 studies, consisting of 1,049 participants, met the criteria. Overall, there was no clear relationship between p53 status and RFS or PFS for NMIBC patients treated with BCG (HR: 1.40, 95% CI: 0.91-2.16; HR: 1.37, 95% CI: 0.90-2.09, respectively. Obvious heterogeneity was observed across the studies (I2 = 69.5%, P = 0.001; I2 = 44.7%, P = 0.081, respectively. In stratified analysis by region, p53 overexpression was a predictor of poor RFS in Asian populations (HR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.08-2.27. In addition, after excluding the studies that possibly contributed to the heterogeneity by the Galbraith plot, the overall association for RFS became statistically significant (HR: 1.38 95% CI: 1.08-1.77 without evidence of heterogeneity (I2 = 0.0%, P = 0.499.This meta-analysis suggests that p53 overexpression in NMIBC patients treated with BCG may be associated with RFS, especially in Asian populations. Because of the heterogeneity and other limitations, further studies with rigid criteria and large populations are still warranted to confirm our findings.

  8. A meta-analysis of narrow band imaging for the diagnosis and therapeutic outcome of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, ShuJuan; Ge, Jing; Zhou, LiZhi; Li, Dongliang; Chen, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the additional detection rate (ADR) of within-patient comparisons of Narrow band imaging (NBI) and white light cystoscopy (WLC) for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) detection and compare the impact of NBI and WLC on bladder cancer recurrence risk. Methods We searched relevant studies from PubMed, Embase, Medline, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library database for all articles in English published beforeJuly26th, 2016. Pooled ADR, diagnostic accuracy, relative risk (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results Twenty-five studies including 17 full texts and eight meeting abstracts were included for analysis. Compared to WLC, pooled ADR of NBI for NMIBC diagnosis was 9.9% (95% CI: 0.05–0.14) and 18.6% (95% CI: 0.15–0.25) in per-patient and per-lesion analysis, respectively. Pooled ADR of NBI for carcinoma in situ (CIS) diagnosis was 25.1% (95% CI: 0.09–0.42) and 31.1% (95% CI: 0.24–0.39) for per-patient and per-lesion analyses, respectively. The pooled sensitivity of NBI was significantly higher than WLC both at the per-patient (95.8% vs. 81.6%) and per-lesion levels (94.8% vs. 72.4%). In addition, NBI significantly reduced the recurrence rate of bladder cancer with a pooled RR value of 0.43 (95% CI: 0.23–0.79) and0.81 (95% CI: 0.69–0.95) at month three and twelve, respectively. Conclusions NBI is a valid technique that improves the diagnosis of NMIBC and CIS compared to standard WLC either at per-patient or per-lesion level. It can reduce the recurrence rate of bladder cancer accordingly. PMID:28192481

  9. Polymorphisms in the non-muscle myosin heavy chain gene (MYH9 are associated with lower glomerular filtration rate in mixed ancestry diabetic subjects from South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandi Edith Matsha

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Though single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the non-muscle myosin gene (MYH9 have been reported to explain most of the excess risk of nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD, in African-Americans, some studies have also shown associations with diabetic end-stage renal disease. We investigated the association of MYH9 SNPs with renal traits in a mixed-ancestry South African population prone to diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Three SNPs known to be associated with CKD (rs4821480, rs5756152 and rs12107 were genotyped using Taqman assay in 716 adults (198 with diabetes from the Bellville-South community, Cape Town. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR assessed. Multivariable regressions were used to relate the SNPs with renal traits. RESULTS: Mean age was 53.6 years, with the expected differences observed in characteristics by diabetic status. Significant associations were found between rs575152 and serum creatinine, and eGFR in the total population, and in diabetic participants (all p≤0.003, but not in non-diabetics (all p≥0.16, with significant interactions by diabetes status (interaction-p≤0.009. The association with ACR was borderline in diabetic participants (p = 0.05 and non-significant in non-diabetics (p = 0.85, with significant interaction (interaction p = 0.02. rs12107 was associated with fasting-, 2-hour glucose and HbA1c in diabetic participants only (interaction-p≤0.003, but not with renal traits. CONCLUSION: MYH9 SNPs were associated with renal traits only in diabetic participants in this population. Our findings and other studies suggest that MYH9 may have a broader genetic risk effect on kidney diseases.

  10. An evaluation of morphological and functional multi-parametric MRI sequences in classifying non-muscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Valeria; De Berardinis, Ettore; Barchetti, Giovanni; Simone, Giuseppe; Leonardo, Constantino; Grompone, Marcello Domenico; Del Monte, Maurizio; Carano, Davide; Gallucci, Michele; Catto, James; Catalano, Carlo

    2017-09-01

    Our goal is to determine the ability of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to differentiate muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) from non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Patients underwent mpMRI before tumour resection. Four MRI sets, i.e. T2-weighted (T2W) + perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), T2W plus diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), T2W + DWI + PWI, and T2W + DWI + PWI + dif-fusion tensor imaging (DTI) were interpreted qualitatively by two radiologists, blinded to histology results. PWI, DWI and DTI were also analysed quantitatively. Accuracy was determined using histopathology as the reference standard. A total of 82 tumours were analysed. Ninety-six percent of T1-labeled tumours by the T2W + DWI + PWI image set were confirmed to be NMIBC at histopathology. Overall accuracy of the complete mpMRI protocol was 94% in differentiating NMIBC from MIBC. PWI, DWI and DTI quantitative parameters were shown to be significantly different in cancerous versus non-cancerous areas within the bladder wall in T2-labelled lesions. MpMRI with DWI and DTI appears a reliable staging tool for bladder cancer. If our data are validated, then mpMRI could precede cystoscopic resection to allow a faster recognition of MIBC and accelerated treatment pathways. • A critical step in BCa staging is to differentiate NMIBC from MIBC. • Morphological and functional sequences are reliable techniques in differentiating NMIBC from MIBC. • Diffusion tensor imaging could be an additional tool in BCa staging.

  11. Side population in human non-muscle invasive bladder cancer enriches for cancer stem cells that are maintained by MAPK signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia C Hepburn

    Full Text Available Side population (SP and ABC transporter expression enrich for stem cells in numerous tissues. We explored if this phenotype characterised human bladder cancer stem cells (CSCs and attempted to identify regulatory mechanisms. Focusing on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC, multiple human cell lines were used to characterise SP and ABC transporter expression. In vitro and in vivo phenotypic and functional assessments of CSC behaviour were undertaken. Expression of putative CSC marker ABCG2 was assessed in clinical NMIBC samples (n = 148, and a role for MAPK signalling, a central mechanism of bladder tumourigenesis, was investigated. Results showed that the ABCG2 transporter was predominantly expressed and was up-regulated in the SP fraction by 3-fold (ABCG2(hi relative to the non-SP (NSP fraction (ABCG2(low. ABCG2(hi SP cells displayed enrichment of stem cell markers (Nanog, Notch1 and SOX2 and a three-fold increase in colony forming efficiency (CFE in comparison to ABCG2(low NSP cells. In vivo, ABCG2(hi SP cells enriched for tumour growth compared with ABCG2(low NSP cells, consistent with CSCs. pERK was constitutively active in ABCG2(hi SP cells and MEK inhibition also inhibited the ABCG2(hi SP phenotype and significantly suppressed CFE. Furthermore, on examining clinical NMIBC samples, ABCG2 expression correlated with increased recurrence and decreased progression free survival. Additionally, pERK expression also correlated with decreased progression free survival, whilst a positive correlation was further demonstrated between ABCG2 and pERK expression. In conclusion, we confirm ABCG2(hi SP enriches for CSCs in human NMIBC and MAPK/ERK pathway is a suitable therapeutic target.

  12. 加工处理方式对蟹类原肌球蛋白的消化稳定性和过敏原性的影响%Effects of Processing Methods on Digestibility and Allergenicity of Crab Tropomyosin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘光明; 余惠琳; 黄秀秀; 蔡秋凤; 苏文金; 曹敏杰

    2011-01-01

    在超声波处理对拟穴青蟹(Scylla paramamosain)过敏原(原肌球蛋白,Tropomyosin,TM)影响的研究基础上,本文采用超声波、微波、超声波结合蒸煮处理拟穴青蟹蟹肉,提取其蛋白粗提液,通过模拟胃肠液消化及SDS-PAGE电泳、Western-blotting、抑制性ELISA等方法分析TM的消化稳定性及过敏原性.结果显示,与未经处理的样品及非过敏蛋白相比,TM在超声波(200W,30℃)处理后降解较快;微波处理后TM的消化稳定性及过敏原性没有明显变化,超声波处理、超声波结合蒸煮处理后TM的消化稳定性及过敏原性明显降低.该结果提示,超声波、超声波结合蒸煮等加工处理方式可降低蟹肉的致敏性.%Base on the study of the influence of ultrasound on crab (Scylla paramamosain) allergen- tropomyosin (TM), microwave treatment, ultrasonic treatment, ultrasonic assist cooking treatment were used for crab meat The crude proteins were extracted for the analysis of simulated gastrointestinal fluid digestion. SDS-PACE, Western-blotting, ELISA analysis of crude crab extracts were carried out to verify the effect of different processing methods on the anaphylaxis of crab meat The results showed that under ultrasonic treatment at 200 W, 30 T, the digestion of purified TM was faster than the other non-allergenic protein. In addition, the microwave treatment and untreated crab meat allergen showed no significant difference. The ultrasonic processing and ultrasonic assist cooking treatment made the crab allergens significantly lower than untreated crab meat Among the three treatments, ultrasonic assist cooking treatment of crab meat was an appropriate method to decrease the digestibility and allergenicity of crab tropomyosin.

  13. Synthetic peptides of actin-tropomyosin binding region of troponin I and heat shock protein 20 modulate the relaxation process of skinned preparations of taenia caeci from guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yasumasa; Sakurai, Wataru; Morimoto, Sachio; Watanabe, Masaru

    2005-12-01

    To explore the possible role of the thin filament-linked regulation of cross-bridge cycling in living smooth muscle contraction, we studied the effects of TnIp and HSP20p, a synthetic peptide originating from an actin tropomyosin binding region of rabbit cardiac troponin I (residues 136-147; GKFKRPTLRRVR), and that of human heat shock protein 20 (residues 110-121; GFVAREFHRRYR) on the relaxation of skinned (cell membrane ilized) preparations from guinea pig taenia caeci. An active stress of the skinned preparations, resulting from actin-myosin interaction, rapidly decayed following Ca(2+) removal (relaxation). TnIp accelerated the initial rapid phase and slowed the following slow phase of the relaxation. On the other hand, HSP20p only slowed the whole process of the relaxation. The relaxation time courses were well fitted in a double exponential manner, and the double exponential decay of the stress could be explained as a portion of fast-detaching cross bridges not to dissociate rapidly by Ca(2+) removal, but to transfer to latch bridges dissociating very slowly. Our present results suggested that (i) TnIp and HSP20p accelerated transferring from fast-detaching cross bridges to slow-detaching (latch) bridges, and (ii) TnIp accelerated dissociation of the fast-detaching cross bridges and the latch bridges, while HSP20p slowed dissociation the fast-detaching cross bridges. Since TnIp and HSP20p are thought to bind to actin and tropomyosin, but not to myosin, we concluded that through thin-filament-dependent mechanisms these peptides regulated the formation and/or deformation of latch bridges in smooth muscle. The thin-filament-dependent regulation might physiologically control the stress maintenance and relaxation in smooth muscle cells.

  14. Cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) promotes cofilin-induced actin dynamics in mammalian nonmuscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertling, Enni; Hotulainen, Pirta; Mattila, Pieta K; Matilainen, Tanja; Salminen, Marjo; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2004-05-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved actin monomer binding proteins present in all eukaryotes. However, the mechanism by which CAPs contribute to actin dynamics has been elusive. In mammals, the situation is further complicated by the presence of two CAP isoforms whose differences have not been characterized. Here, we show that CAP1 is widely expressed in mouse nonmuscle cells, whereas CAP2 is the predominant isoform in developing striated muscles. In cultured NIH3T3 and B16F1 cells, CAP1 is a highly abundant protein that colocalizes with cofilin-1 to dynamic regions of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Analysis of CAP1 knockdown cells demonstrated that this protein promotes rapid actin filament depolymerization and is important for cell morphology, migration, and endocytosis. Interestingly, depletion of CAP1 leads to an accumulation of cofilin-1 into abnormal cytoplasmic aggregates and to similar cytoskeletal defects to those seen in cofilin-1 knockdown cells, demonstrating that CAP1 is required for proper subcellular localization and function of ADF/cofilin. Together, these data provide the first direct in vivo evidence that CAP promotes rapid actin dynamics in conjunction with ADF/cofilin and is required for several central cellular processes in mammals.

  15. Dlc1 interaction with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9 and Rac1 activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Sabbir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Deleted in liver cancer 1 (Dlc1 gene codes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein that also acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Several studies have consistently found that overexpression leads to excessive cell elongation, cytoskeleton changes and subsequent cell death. However, none of these studies have been able to satisfactorily explain the Dlc1-induced cell morphological phenotypes and the function of the different Dlc1 isoforms. Therefore, we have studied the interacting proteins associated with the three major Dlc1 transcriptional isoforms using a mass spectrometric approach in Dlc1 overexpressing cells. We have found and validated novel interacting partners in constitutive Dlc1-expressing cells. Our study has shown that Dlc1 interacts with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9, plectin and spectrin proteins in different multiprotein complexes. Overexpression of Dlc1 led to increased phosphorylation of Myh9 protein and activation of Rac1 GTPase. These data support a role for Dlc1 in induced cell elongation morphology and provide some molecular targets for further analysis of this phenotype.

  16. Mammalian Skeletal Muscle Fibres Promote Non-Muscle Stem Cells and Non-Stem Cells to Adopt Myogenic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taryn Morash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle fibres are unique cells in large animals, often composed of thousands of post-mitotic nuclei. Following skeletal muscle damage, resident stem cells, called satellite cells, commit to myogenic differentiation and migrate to carry out repair. Satellite stem cells migrate on muscle fibres through amoeboid movement, which relies on dynamic cell membrane extension and retraction (blebbing. It is not known whether blebbing is due to the intrinsic properties of satellite cells, or induced by features of the myofibre surface. Here, we determined the influence of the muscle fibre matrix on two important features of muscle regeneration: the ability to migrate and to differentiate down a myogenic lineage. We show that the muscle fibre is able to induce amoeboid movement in non-muscle stem cells and non-stem cells. Secondly, we show that prolonged co-culture on myofibres caused amniotic fluid stem cells and breast cancer cells to express MyoD, a key myogenic determinant. Finally, we show that amniotic fluid stem cells co-cultured on myofibres are able to fuse and make myotubes that express Myosin Heavy Chain.

  17. 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone, a Tropomyosin-Kinase Related Receptor B Agonist, Produces Fast-Onset Antidepressant-Like Effects in Rats Exposed to Chronic Mild Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-An; Wang, Ying-Hsiu; Tung, Che-Se; Yeh, Chin-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its specific receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase (TrkB), play important roles in treating depression. In this experiment, we examined whether 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, a novel potent TrkB agonist, could reverse the behavioral and biochemical abnormalities induced by the chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm in rats. Methods SD rats were exposed to a battery of stressors for 56 days. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (5 and 20 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally during the last 28 days of the CMS paradigm. Rats were tested in sucrose consumption test (SCT), forced-swimming test (FST) and elevated T-maze (ETM). Serum corticosterone levels and hippocampal BDNF levels of the rats were measured. Results Four-week CMS on the rats induced their depression-like behavior in SCT. The CMS-reduced sucrose consumption was reversed starting from 7 days after the 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (20 mg/kg) treatment and remained across the subsequent treatment regime. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, when given at 5 mg/kg for 3 weeks, reduced the immobility time in the FST in the CMS-subjected rats. Additionally, the 4-week treatment with 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (20 mg/kg) attenuated the CMS-induced increase in anxiety-like behavior in the ETM. For the CMS-subjected rats, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone treatment dose-dependently reduced their serum corticosterone levels but increased their hippocampal BDNF levels only at 5 mg/kg. Conclusion 7,8-dihydroxyflavone was beneficial for both depression and anxiety-like behaviors, and may exert fast-onset antidepressant effects. This provides a new insight into the pharmacological management of depression.

  18. IgE Reactivity of Blue Swimmer Crab (Portunus pelagicus Tropomyosin, Por p 1, and Other Allergens; Cross-Reactivity with Black Tiger Prawn and Effects of Heating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie B Abramovitch

    Full Text Available Shellfish allergy is a major cause of food-induced anaphylaxis, but the allergens are not well characterized. This study examined the effects of heating on blue swimmer crab (Portunus pelagicus allergens in comparison with those of black tiger prawn (Penaeus monodon by testing reactivity with shellfish-allergic subjects' serum IgE. Cooked extracts of both species showed markedly increased IgE reactivity by ELISA and immunoblotting, and clinical relevance of IgE reactivity was confirmed by basophil activation tests. Inhibition IgE ELISA and immunoblotting demonstrated cross-reactivity between the crab and prawn extracts, predominantly due to tropomyosin, but crab-specific IgE-reactivity was also observed. The major blue swimmer crab allergen tropomyosin, Por p 1, was cloned and sequenced, showing strong homology with tropomyosin of other crustacean species but also sequence variation within known and predicted linear IgE epitopes. These findings will advance more reliable diagnosis and management of potentially severe food allergy due to crustaceans.

  19. Circulating tumor cells detection has independent prognostic impact in high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; de Berardinis, Ettore; Raimondi, Cristina; Gradilone, Angela; Busetto, Gian Maria; De Falco, Elena; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Giovannone, Riccardo; Gentile, Vincenzo; Cortesi, Enrico; Pantel, Klaus

    2014-10-15

    High-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) progresses to metastatic disease in 10-15% of cases, suggesting that micrometastases may be present at first diagnosis. The prediction of risks of progression relies upon EORTC scoring systems, based on clinical and pathological parameters, which do not accurately identify which patients will progress. Aim of the study was to investigate whether the presence of CTC may improve prognostication in a large population of patients with Stage I bladder cancer who were all candidate to conservative surgery. A prospective single center trial was designed to correlate the presence of CTC to local recurrence and progression of disease in high-risk T1G3 bladder cancer. One hundred two patients were found eligible, all candidate to transurethral resection of the tumor followed by endovesical adjuvant immunotherapy with BCG. Median follow-up was 24.3 months (minimum-maximum: 4-36). The FDA-approved CellSearch System was used to enumerate CTC. Kaplan-Meier methods, log-rank test and multivariable Cox proportional hazard analysis was applied to establish the association of circulating tumor cells with time to first recurrence (TFR) and progression-free survival. CTC were detected in 20% of patients and predicted both decreased TFR (log-rank p < 0.001; multivariable adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.92 [95% confidence interval: 1.38-6.18], p = 0.005), and time to progression (log-rank p < 0.001; HR 7.17 [1.89-27.21], p = 0.004). The present findings provide evidence that CTC analyses can identify patients with Stage I bladder cancer who have already a systemic disease at diagnosis and might, therefore, potentially benefit from systemic treatment.

  20. [Transurethral en bloc resection of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. What is the state of the art?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, M W; Wolters, M; Abdelkawi, I F; Merseburger, A S; Nagele, U; Gross, A; Bach, T; Kuczyk, M A; Herrmann, T R W

    2012-06-01

    Bladder cancer of the urothelium is the second most common malignancy among urological tumors. In view of a worldwide aging population and the fact that increased incidence rates are associated with higher age, new socioeconomic challenges will appear. Even nowadays the treatment of bladder cancer bears the highest lifetime treatment costs per patient among all forms of cancer. In conjunction with higher comorbidity rates among older patients urologists are facing new challenges in the treatment and care of patients with bladder cancer. The standard treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is monopolar transurethral resection using resection loops (TURB). Based on experience in the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, different concepts of en bloc resection of bladder tumors using alternative energy resources (e.g. holmium laser, thulium laser and the water-jet HybridKnife) have been developed. Goals of new treatment modalities are reduction of perioperative and postoperative comorbidities, better pathological work-up of the specimens and increased recurrence-free survival. Postulated advantages using laser devices are a more precise cutting line as well as better hemostasis. The evidential value of this review is limited due to the lack of randomized, prospective studies. However, there is a tendency towards a limitation of perioperative and postoperative morbidities as well as higher chance of well-preserved tissues for better pathohistological evaluation using en bloc resection methods. More studies with long-term follow-up periods and better randomization are needed to clarify whether en bloc strategies provide better long-term oncological survival.

  1. Identification of an FHL1 protein complex containing gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB by analysis of protein-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wang

    Full Text Available FHL1 is multifunctional and serves as a modular protein binding interface to mediate protein-protein interactions. In skeletal muscle, FHL1 is involved in sarcomere assembly, differentiation, growth, and biomechanical stress. Muscle abnormalities may play a major role in congenital clubfoot (CCF deformity during fetal development. Thus, identifying the interactions of FHL1 could provide important new insights into its functional role in both skeletal muscle development and CCF pathogenesis. Using proteins derived from rat L6GNR4 myoblastocytes, we detected FHL1 interacting proteins by immunoprecipitation. Samples were analyzed by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS. Dynamic gene expression of FHL1 was studied. Additionally, the expression of the possible interacting proteins gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB, which were isolated from the lower limbs of E14, E15, E17, E18, E20 rat embryos or from adult skeletal muscle was analyzed. Potential interacting proteins isolated from E17 lower limbs were verified by immunoprecipitation, and co-localization in adult gastrocnemius muscle was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. FHL1 expression was associated with skeletal muscle differentiation. E17 was found to be the critical time-point for skeletal muscle differentiation in the lower limbs of rat embryos. We also identified gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB as potential binding partners of FHL1, and both were expressed in adult skeletal muscle. We then demonstrated that FHL1 exists as part of a complex, which binds gamma-actin and non-muscle myosin IIB.

  2. Administration of a tropomyosin receptor kinase inhibitor attenuates sarcoma-induced nerve sprouting, neuroma formation and bone cancer pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloom Aaron P

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pain often accompanies cancer and most current therapies for treating cancer pain have significant unwanted side effects. Targeting nerve growth factor (NGF or its cognate receptor tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA has become an attractive target for attenuating chronic pain. In the present report, we use a mouse model of bone cancer pain and examine whether oral administration of a selective small molecule Trk inhibitor (ARRY-470, which blocks TrkA, TrkB and TrkC kinase activity at low nm concentrations has a significant effect on cancer-induced pain behaviors, tumor-induced remodeling of sensory nerve fibers, tumor growth and tumor-induced bone remodeling. Early/sustained (initiated day 6 post cancer cell injection, but not late/acute (initiated day 18 post cancer cell injection administration of ARRY-470 markedly attenuated bone cancer pain and significantly blocked the ectopic sprouting of sensory nerve fibers and the formation of neuroma-like structures in the tumor bearing bone, but did not have a significant effect on tumor growth or bone remodeling. These data suggest that, like therapies that target the cancer itself, the earlier that the blockade of TrkA occurs, the more effective the control of cancer pain and the tumor-induced remodeling of sensory nerve fibers. Developing targeted therapies that relieve cancer pain without the side effects of current analgesics has the potential to significantly improve the quality of life and functional status of cancer patients.

  3. KSHV MicroRNAs Repress Tropomyosin 1 and Increase Anchorage-Independent Growth and Endothelial Tube Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Kieffer-Kwon

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is characterized by highly vascularized spindle-cell tumors induced after infection of endothelial cells by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. In KS tumors, KSHV expresses only a few latent proteins together with 12 pre-microRNAs. Previous microarray and proteomic studies predicted that multiple splice variants of the tumor suppressor protein tropomyosin 1 (TPM1 were targets of KSHV microRNAs. Here we show that at least two microRNAs of KSHV, miR-K2 and miR-K5, repress protein levels of specific isoforms of TPM1. We identified a functional miR-K5 binding site in the 3' untranslated region (UTR of one TPM1 isoform. Furthermore, the inhibition or loss of miR-K2 or miR-K5 restores expression of TPM1 in KSHV-infected cells. TPM1 protein levels were also repressed in KSHV-infected clinical samples compared to uninfected samples. Functionally, miR-K2 increases viability of unanchored human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC by inhibiting anoikis (apoptosis after cell detachment, enhances tube formation of HUVECs, and enhances VEGFA expression. Taken together, KSHV miR-K2 and miR-K5 may facilitate KSHV pathogenesis.

  4. Pilot study of an association between a common variant in the non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 (MYH9 gene and type 2 diabetic nephropathy in a Taiwanese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hsun Hsieh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Chang-Hsun Hsieh1, Yi-Jen Hung1, Dee Pei2, Shi-Wen Kuo3, Eugene Lin41Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei; 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei County; 3Division of Endocrinology, Buddhist Xindian Tzu Chi General Hospital, Taipei; 4Vita Genomics Inc., Wugu Shiang, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Nowadays diabetic nephropathy (DN is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Recent studies have demonstrated that the myosin, heavy chain 9, non-muscle (MYH9 gene is associated with ESRD in African Americans. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a common single nucleotide polymorphism rs16996677 in the MYH9 gene may contribute to the etiology of DN in type 2 diabetes (T2D in a Taiwanese population with T2D. There were 180 T2D patients diagnosed with DN and 178 age- and sex-similar T2D without DN controls. Single locus analyses showed no significant main effects of MYH9 rs16996677 on the risk of DN in T2D. The results suggest that the rs16996677 SNP in MYH9 may not contribute to the risk of DN in T2D in Taiwanese T2D patients.Keywords: diabetic nephropathy, end-stage renal disease, single nucleotide polymorphisms, type 2 diabetes

  5. 日本血吸虫原肌球蛋白cDNA的克隆及其在大肠杆菌中表达%Cloning of cDNA encoding Schistosoma japonicum tropomyosin and its expression in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹建平; 刘述先; 宋光承; 徐馀信

    2002-01-01

    Objective To perform cloning of the gene encod ing Chinese Schistosoma japonicum tropomyosin (SjcTM) and its expression in Escherichia coli.Methods SjcTM cDNA fragment, except for 14 amino acids at the amino terminus, was obtained by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with total RNA extracted from adult worms of S. Japonicum . The RT-PCR product was cloned into T vector and sequenced. The SjcTM cDNA, derived from the constructed TA clone pGEM-SjcTM, was then subcloned into the expressing vector pBV220. After characterization by agarose gel electrophoresis, endonucleases digestion and PCR, the resultant recombinant plasmid was used for expression under the temperature-dependent condition. Results The RT-PCR product, cloned into a Tvector, was sequenced and shown to be 96.5% identical at the nuclei acid level and 98.1 % identical in deduced amino acid sequence to that of S. Mansoni tropomyosi n. The target DNA fragment was then subcloned into a prokaryotic vector pBV220 . Induced expression in E. Coli DH5α cells resulted in a constant level of recombinant protein production. The results of SDS-PAGE and Western blot rev ealed that the molecular weight of non-fusion recombinant protein (rSjcTM) was approximately 32 kDa and could be recognized specifically by a polyclonal antise rum specific for native S. Japonicum tropomyosin (SjcTM). Conclusion The engineering of the cDNA encodingS. Japonicum tropomyosin and its bacterial expression was successfully made.%目的克隆日本血吸虫原肌球蛋白编码基因,并在大肠杆菌中表达.方法抽提日本血吸虫(大陆株)成虫总RNA,经逆转录-聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)获得编码日本血吸虫原肌球蛋白的cDNA片段,该片段与全序列比较,缺氨基端14个氨基酸.该PCR产物克隆入T 载体并对插入片段进行序列测定后,亚克隆入表达载体pbV220,经琼脂糖凝胶电泳、限制性酶切反应和PCR鉴定后,选择克隆用于温控表达.结果 RT-PCR产物

  6. Inflammatory Adipokines Decrease Expression of Two High Molecular Weight Isoforms of Tropomyosin Similar to the Change in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, Helen F.; Harvey, John N.; Thomas, Trevor H.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease and cancer are increased in Type 2 diabetes. TPM1 and TPM4 genes encode proteins associated with cardiovascular and neoplastic disease. High (HMW) and low (LMW) molecular weight isoforms from TPM1 and TPM4 are altered in several cancer cells and the 3'UTR of TPM1 mRNA is tumour suppressive. Leukocytes influence cardiovascular and neoplastic disease by immunosurveillance for cancer and by chronic inflammation in Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The aim was to determine changes in expression of isoforms from TPM1 and TPM4 genes in leukocytes from Type 2 diabetic patients and to use the leukocyte cell line THP1 to identify possible mediators of changes in the patients. Gene expression was determined by RT-qPCR. In diabetes, expression of HMW isoforms from TPM1 were markedly decreased (0.55 v 1.00; p = 0.019) but HMW isoforms from TPM4 were not significantly different (0.76 v 1.00; p = 0.205). Within individual variance in expression of HMW isoforms was very high. The change in expression in HMW isoforms from TPM1 and TPM4 was replicated in THP1 cells treated with 1 ng/ml TNFα (0.10 and 0.12 v 1.00 respectively) or 10 ng/ml IL-1α (0.17 and 0.14 v 1.00 respectively). Increased insulin or glucose concentrations had no substantial effects on TPM1 or TPM4 expression. Decreased TPM1 mRNA resulted in decreases in HMW protein levels. Expression of HMW isoforms from TPM1 is decreased in Type 2 diabetes. This is probably due to increased levels of inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1α in Type 2 diabetes. Lower levels of TPM1 mRNA reduce tumour suppression and could contribute to increased cancer risk in Type 2 diabetes. Decreased HMW tropomyosin isoforms are associated with cancer. Decreased HMW isoforms give rise to cells that are more plastic, motile, invasive and prone to dedifferentiation resulting in leukocytes that are more invasive but less functionally effective. PMID:27649540

  7. 经尿道红激光汽化切除治疗非肌层浸润性膀胱癌30例疗效观察%Efficacy report of 30 cases about transurethral red laser vaporization resecting for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙浩洋; 李明; 李宝龙

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨经尿道红激光汽化切除治疗非肌层浸润性膀胱癌的疗效。方法对30例非肌层浸润性膀胱癌患者,采用980 nm 红激光治疗仪汽化切除包括肿瘤基底部及周围2 cm 范围的浅肌层膀胱组织,术后即刻进行膀胱灌注盐酸吡柔比星局部化疗。结果全部患者手术均获成功,平均出血量小于5 ml,无膀胱穿孔、闭孔神经反射及稀释性低钠血症的发生。随访6~20个月,7例患者术后复发,再次行经尿道红激光膀胱肿瘤汽化切除。结论经尿道红激光汽化切除治疗非肌层浸润性膀胱癌是一种安全、微创、出血量极少的治疗方法,疗效显著,并发症少。%Objective To investigate the effect of transurethral red laser vaporization resecting for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Methods 30 patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer were collected.Setting red laser resectoscope into the urethra,turning Germany 980 nm red laser treatment EVOLVE TM-HPD∗ (Hi-Power Diode)to power 120 w to resect the tumor vapor-izedly.Intravesical instillation of hydrochloric acid Pirarubicin was taken immediately after the sur-gery. Results All cases were successful surgery,no bladder perforation and obturator nerve reflex occurs.Follow-up during 6 to 20 months,7 patients recurrence,transurethral red laser vaporization resecting were taken again. Conclusions Transurethral red laser vaporization resecting for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is a safe,minimally invasive treatment with minimal blood loss and few complications.

  8. Shrimp allergy beyond Tropomyosin in Italy: clinical relevance of Arginine Kinase, Sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein and Hemocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, M G; Villalta, D; Mistrello, G; Amato, S; Asero, R

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the prevalence and clinical relevance of sensitization to shrimp allergens other than tropomyosin. We detected the prevalence of arginine kinase and sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein sensitization, and identified a high molecular weight allergen that is frequently recognized by Italian shrimp-allergic patients. Sera from 40 shrimp-allergic patients underwent the detection of IgE specific for arginine kinase (rPen m 2) and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (rPen m 4) by ISAC 112 Microarray platform and immunoblot analysis. A high molecular weight shrimp allergen was identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing. IgE to rPen m 2 and rPen m 4 were found in 4/40 (10%) and 6/40 (15%) sera, respectively; two sera reacted to both allergens. Clinically, 6/8 Pen m 2 and/or Pen m 4 reactors experienced severe allergies to shrimp. On immunoblot, 4/6 rPen m 4-positive sera showed IgE reactivity at about 20 kDa, whereas no rPen m 2-positive serum reacted at about 40 kDa. Nineteen (47%) sera showed IgE reactivity at molecular weights > 60 kDa. Such profile was not associated with IgE reactivity to rPen m 2 or rPen m 4. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the high molecular weight allergen led to the identification of hemocyanin. Shrimp arginine kinase and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein are minor allergens sensitizing only 10%-15% of Italian shrimp-allergic patients, but are clinically relevant. Hemocyanin is a clinically relevant high molecular weight shrimp allergen possibly cross-reacting to house dust mite.

  9. Blocking the tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) receptor inhibits pain behaviour in two rat models of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Lilian N; Mapp, Paul I; Chapman, Victoria; Walsh, David A

    2016-06-01

    Tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) mediates nociceptor sensitisation by nerve growth factor (NGF), but it is unknown whether selective TrkA inhibition will be an effective strategy for treating osteoarthritis (OA) pain. We determined the effects of a TrkA inhibitor (AR786) on pain behaviour, synovitis and joint pathology in two rat OA models. Knee OA was induced in rats by intra-articular monosodium-iodoacetate (MIA) injection or meniscal transection (MNX) and compared with saline-injected or sham-operated controls. Pain behaviour was assessed as weight-bearing asymmetry and paw withdrawal threshold to punctate stimulation. Oral doses (30 mg/kg) of AR786 or vehicle were administered twice daily in either preventive (day -1 to -27) or treatment (day 14-28) protocols. Effect maintenance was evaluated for 2 weeks after treatment discontinuation. Alterations in knee structure (cartilage, subchondral bone and synovium) were examined by macroscopic visualisation of articular surfaces and histopathology. Preventive AR786 treatment inhibited pain behaviour development and therapeutic treatment attenuated established pain behaviour. Weight-bearing asymmetry increased 1 week after treatment discontinuation, but remained less than in vehicle-treated arthritic rats, whereas paw withdrawal thresholds returned to levels of untreated rats within 5 days of treatment discontinuation. AR786 treatment reduced MIA-induced synovitis and did not significantly affect osteochondral pathology in either model. Blocking NGF activity by inhibiting TrkA reduced pain behaviour in two rat models of OA. Analgesia was observed both using preventive and treatment protocols, and was sustained after treatment discontinuation. Selective inhibitors of TrkA therefore hold potential for OA pain relief. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone, a chalcone derivative, inhibits glioma growth and invasion through regulation of the tropomyosin 1 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, Bo Mi [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Institute of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Hyung Won [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), EB-NCRC, Institute of Agriculture Life Science, Graduate School of Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yeon Kyung; Ryu, Jinhyun; Jeong, Joo Yeon; Choi, Jungil [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Institute of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hee Jun [Department of Microbiology, Research Institute of Life Science, College of Natureal Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ki Hun, E-mail: khpark@gnu.ac.kr [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), EB-NCRC, Institute of Agriculture Life Science, Graduate School of Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sang Soo, E-mail: kangss@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Institute of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) has anti-cancer property for glioma. {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) increased tropomyosin expreesion through activattion of PKA signaling. {yields} 4'-Acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion. {yields} In vivo administration of 4'-acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) reduced tumor growth. -- Abstract: Chalcones are precursors of flavonoids and have been shown to have anti-cancer activity. Here, we identify the synthetic chalcone derivative 4'-acetoamido-4-hydroxychalcone (AHC) as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of glioma. Treatment with AHC reduced glioma cell invasion, migration, and colony formation in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, AHC inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor-induced migration, invasion, and tube formation in HUVECs. To determine the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of AHC on glioma cell invasion and migration, we investigated the effect of AHC on the gene expression change and found that AHC affects actin dynamics in U87MG glioma cells. In actin cytoskeleton regulating system, AHC increased tropomyosin expression and stress fiber formation, probably through activation of PKA. Suppression of tropomyosin expression by siRNA or treatment with the PKA inhibitor H89 reduced the inhibitory effects of AHC on glioma cell invasion and migration. In vivo experiments also showed that AHC inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft mouse tumor model. Together, these data suggest that the synthetic chalcone derivative AHC has potent anti-cancer activity through inhibition of glioma proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis and is therefore a potential chemotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of glioma.

  11. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a novel regulator of central brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozek, Ceren; Kanoski, Scott E; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Grill, Harvey J; Bence, Kendra K

    2014-11-14

    Neuronal protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) deficiency in mice results in enhanced leptin signaling and protection from diet-induced obesity; however, whether additional signaling pathways in the brain contribute to the metabolic effects of PTP1B deficiency remains unclear. Here, we show that the tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) receptor is a direct PTP1B substrate and implicate PTP1B in the regulation of the central brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling. PTP1B interacts with activated TrkB receptor in mouse brain and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. PTP1B overexpression reduces TrkB phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling pathways, whereas PTP1B inhibition augments TrkB signaling. Notably, brains of Ptpn1(-/-) mice exhibit enhanced TrkB phosphorylation, and Ptpn1(-/-) mice are hypersensitive to central BDNF-induced increase in core temperature. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that PTP1B is a novel physiological regulator of TrkB and that enhanced BDNF/TrkB signaling may contribute to the beneficial metabolic effects of PTP1B deficiency.

  12. Chinese herbal formulaTongluo Jiunao injection protects against cerebral ischemia by activating neurotrophin 3/tropomyosin-related kinase C pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peiman Alesheikh; Arezou Mashouif; Hui-ling Tang; Wei Zhang; Bo Di; Yang-yang Yan; Peng-tao Li; Yan-shu Pan

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese herbal formulaTongluo Jiunao, containing the active componentsPanax notogin-seng andGardenia jasminoides, has recently been patented and is in use clinically. It is known to be neuroprotective in cerebral ischemia, but the underlying pathway remains poorly understood. In the present study, we established a rat model of cerebral ischemia by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery, and administeredTongluo Jiunao, a positive control (Xuesai Tong, containing Panax notoginseng) or saline intraperitoneally to investigate the pathway involved in the action ofTongluo Jiunao injection. 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining showed that the cerebral infarct area was signiifcantly smaller in model rats that receivedTongluo Jiunao than in those that received saline. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed significantly greater expression of neurotrophin 3 and growth-associated protein 43 in ischemic cerebral tissue, and serum levels of neurotrophin 3, in theTongluo Jiunao group than in the saline group. The reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining showed that after treatment withTongluo Jiunao orXuesai Tong, tropomyosin-related kinase C gene expression and immunoreactivity were signiifcantly elevated compared with saline, with the greatest expression observed afterTongluo Jiunao treatment. These ifndings suggest thatTongluo Jiunao injection exerts a neuroprotective effect in rats with cerebral ischemia by activating the neurotrophin 3/tropomyosin-related kinase C pathway.

  13. Efficacy and safety of photodynamic therapy for recurrent, high grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer refractory or intolerant to bacille Calmette-Guérin immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Yong; Diaz, Richilda Red; Cho, Kang Su; Lim, Meng Shi; Chung, Jae Seung; Kim, Won Tae; Ham, Won Sik; Choi, Young Deuk

    2013-10-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy using Radachlorin in patients with high grade, nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer refractory or intolerant to bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy who refused radical cystectomy. Between July 2009 and December 2011 photodynamic therapy was performed in 22 men and 12 women. Radachlorin (0.5 to 0.6 mg/kg) was injected intravenously 2 to 3 hours before photodynamic therapy. After complete transurethral resection, a diffuser using a 22Fr cystoscope was placed in the bladder for irradiation with a 662 nm laser. Output beam power was adjusted to 1.8 W and the light dose was 15 J/cm(2). Photodynamic therapy was performed for 16 to 30 minutes. Recurrence after photodynamic therapy was followed by regular cystoscopy at 1, 2 and 3 months, and at 3-month intervals thereafter for up to 2.8 years. Efficacy was assessed by cystoscopy, cytology and histology, and defined as the number of patients who were tumor free after initial photodynamic therapy. Mean ± SD patient age was 62.94 ± 8.71 years. Average followup was 26.74 ± 6.34 months (median 28.12). As the primary efficacy outcome, the recurrence-free rate was 90.9% at 12 months, 64.4% at 24 months and 60.1% at 30 months. As the secondary efficacy outcome, there was no statistical difference in mass size, carcinoma in situ, number of previous bacillus Calmette-Guérin administrations, number of transurethral bladder resections or tumor multiplicity on Kaplan-Meier analysis (each p >0.05). No evidence of severe adverse effects was detected after photodynamic therapy. Photodynamic therapy with Radachlorin is a safe, effective treatment for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer refractory or intolerant to bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy in select patients. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Alterations in ubiquitin ligase Siah-2 and its corepressor N-CoR after P-MAPA immunotherapy and anti-androgen therapy: new therapeutic opportunities for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patrick Vianna; Apolinário, Letícia Montanholi; Böckelmann, Petra Karla; da Silva Nunes, Iseu; Duran, Nelson; Fávaro, Wagner José

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes the role of the ubiquitin ligase Siah-2 and corepressor N-CoR in controlling androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) signaling in an appropriate animal model (Fischer 344 female rats) of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), especially under conditions of anti-androgen therapy with flutamide. Furthermore, this study describes the mechanisms of a promising therapeutic alternative for NMIBC based on Protein aggregate magnesium-ammonium phospholinoleate-palmitoleate anhydride (P-MAPA) intravesical immunotherapy combined with flutamide, involving the interaction among steroid hormone receptors, their regulators and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Our results demonstrated that increased Siah-2 and AR protein levels and decreased N-CoR, cytochrome P450 (CYP450) and estrogen receptors levels played a critical role in the urothelial carcinogenesis, probably leading to escape of urothelial cancer cells from immune system attack. P-MAPA immunotherapy led to distinct activation of innate immune system TLRs 2 and 4-mediated, resulting in increase of interferon signaling pathway, which was more effective in recovering the immunosuppressive tumor immune microenvironment and in recovering the bladder histology features than BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) treatments. The AR blockade therapy was important in the modulating of downstream molecules of TLR2 and TLR4 signaling pathway, decreasing the inflammatory cytokines signaling and enhancing the interferon signaling pathway when associated with P-MAPA. Taken together, the data obtained suggest that interferon signaling pathway activation and targeting AR and Siah-2 signals by P-MAPA intravesical immunotherapy alone and/ or in combination with AR blockade may provide novel therapeutic approaches for NMIBC.

  15. The clinical course of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer after transuretral resection of the tumor with or without subsequent intravesical application of bacillus Calmette-Guérin: The influence of patients gender and age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Radovan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. The therapy with intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG after transurethral resection (TUR of tumor is the gold standard of treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. The role and importance of BCG intravesical therapy in various shape of tumors, were confirmed by our previous investigation. The aim of this study was to examine whether incidence of recurrence and tumor regression differs depending on sex and age of patients. Methods. This study included a total of 899 patients suffering from NIMBC, treated at our institution from January 1, 2007 to March 1, 2013. Two groups of patients were formed: patients underwent TUR + BCG therapy (the group I and the group II with patients in whom TUR was performed as only therapy. These two groups of patients were divided into subgroups of respondents male and female, age 60 years or younger and older than 60 years. Statistical analysis was performed using χ2 test and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Results. This research suggests that if the frequency of recurrence is seen as the only parameter, considering all the subjects, the lowest recurrence rate was determined in the male subjects, aged 60 years and younger who had received BCG after TUR. A high statistical significance was found in the incidence of recurrence in patients younger than 60 years, depending on the response to the therapy, while in those older than 60 years, the difference was at the level of statistical significance. This can be attributed to a certain degree of infravesical obstruction in older men. Conclusions. Sex and age of patients may have a significant influence on the course and outcome of NMIBC. The disease has the most malignant and most aggressive behavior when present in males older than 60 years.

  16. Activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B signaling accompanying filial imprinting in domestic chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Shinji; Aoki, Naoya; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kitajima, Takaaki; Iikubo, Eiji; Katagiri, Sachiko; Matsushima, Toshiya; Homma, Koichi J

    2011-12-07

    Newly hatched domestic chicks serve as an important model for experimental studies of neural and behavioral plasticity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to play a critical role in synaptic plasticity, including long-term potentiation, which underlies learning and memory in rodents. Here we show that BDNF mRNA levels increased in the intermediate medial hyperpallium apicale (IMHA), which is the caudal area of the visual Wulst, of imprinted chick brains, and the upregulation of gene expression correlated with the strength of the learned preference to the training object. In addition, activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling was associated with filial imprinting. However, pharmacological deprivation of TrkB phosphorylation in IMHA did not impair memory formation, suggesting that activation of BDNF/TrkB signaling in IMHA is not involved in memory acquisition in filial imprinting.

  17. Transcription factors GATA/ELT-2 and forkhead/HNF-3/PHA-4 regulate the tropomyosin gene expression in the pharynx and intestine of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anokye-Danso, Frederick; Anyanful, Akwasi; Sakube, Yasuji; Kagawa, Hiroaki

    2008-05-30

    Gene regulation during development is an important biological activity that leads to synthesis of biomolecules at specific locations and specific times. The single tropomyosin gene of Caenorhabditis elegans, tmy-1/lev-11, produces four isoforms of protein: two from the external promoter and two from the internal promoter. We investigated the internal promoter of tropomyosin to identify sequences that regulate expression of tmy-1 in the pharynx and intestine. By promoter deletion of tmy-1 reporters as well as by database analyses, a 100-bp fragment that contained binding sequences for a GATA factor, for a chicken CdxA homolog, and for a forkhead factor was identified. Both the forkhead and CdxA binding sequences contributed to pharyngeal and intestinal expression. In addition, the GATA site also influenced intestinal expression of tmy-1 reporter. We showed that ELT-2 and PHA-4 proteins interact directly with the GATA and forkhead binding sequences, respectively, in gel mobility shift assays. RNA interference knockdown of elt-2 diminished tmy-1::gfp expression in the intestine. In contrast to RNA interference knockdown of pha-4, expression of tmy-1::gfp in pha-4;smg-1 mutants was slightly weaker than that of the wild type. Ectopic expression of PHA-4 and ELT-2 by heat shock was sufficient to elicit widespread expression of tmy-1::lacZ reporter in embryos. We found no indication of a synergistic relation between ELT-2 and PHA-4. Based on our data, PHA-4 and CdxA function as general transcription factors for pharyngeal and intestinal regulation of tmy-1. We present models by which ELT-2, PHA-4, and CdxA orchestrate expression from the internal promoter of tmy-1.

  18. Safrole oxide induces human umbilical vein endothelial cell transdifferentiation to 5-hydroxytryptaminergic neuron-like cells through tropomyosin receptor kinase A/cyclooxygenase 2/nuclear factor-kappa B/interleukin 8 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Le; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Bao Xiang; Zhang, Shang Li; Miao, Jun Ying

    2011-10-01

    The phenomenon of endothelial-neural transdifferentiation has been observed for a long time, but the mechanism is not clear. We previously found that safrole oxide induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell transdifferentiation into neuron-like cells. In this study, we first validated that these cells induced by safrole oxide were functional 5-hydroxytryptaminergic neuron-like cells. Then, we performed microarray analysis of safrole oxide-treated and -untreated human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Safrole oxide elevated the levels of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was accompanied by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation during the transdifferentiation. Blockade of tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA) by an inhibitor or short hairpin RNA inhibited the levels of COX-2/IL-8 and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB but did not suppress the increased ROS level. As a result, cells underwent apoptosis. Therefore, via TrkA, safrole oxide may induce endothelial cell transdifferentiation into functional neuron-like cells. During this process, the increased levels of COX-2/IL-8 and the subsequent elevation of ROS production induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and IL-8 secretion. With the activity of TrkA inhibited, the inactive NF-κB regulated the ROS level in a negative feedback manner. Finally, the transdifferentiation pathway was blocked and cells became apoptotic. The TrkA/COX-2/IL-8 signal pathway may have an important role in endothelial-neural transdifferentiation, and safrole oxide may trigger this process by activating TrkA.

  19. Downstream of tyrosine kinase/docking protein 6, as a novel substrate of tropomyosin-related kinase C receptor, is involved in neurotrophin 3-mediated neurite outgrowth in mouse cortex neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jian

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The downstream of tyrosine kinase/docking protein (Dok adaptor protein family has seven members, Dok1 to Dok7, that act as substrates of multiple receptor tyrosine kinase and non-receptor tyrosine kinase. The tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk receptor family, which has three members (TrkA, TrkB and TrkC, are receptor tyrosine kinases that play pivotal roles in many stages of nervous system development, such as differentiation, migration, axon and dendrite projection and neuron patterning. Upon related neurotrophin growth factor stimulation, dimerisation and autophosphorylation of Trk receptors can occur, recruiting adaptor proteins to mediate signal transduction. Results In this report, by using yeast two-hybrid assays, glutathione S-transferase (GST precipitation assays and coimmunoprecipitation (Co-IP experiments, we demonstrate that Dok6 selectively binds to the NPQY motif of TrkC through its phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB domain in a kinase activity-dependent manner. We further confirmed their interaction by coimmunoprecipitation and colocalisation in E18.5 mouse cortex neurons, which provided more in vivo evidence. Next, we demonstrated that Dok6 is involved in neurite outgrowth in mouse cortex neurons via the RNAi method. Knockdown of Dok6 decreased neurite outgrowth in cortical neurons upon neurotrophin 3 (NT-3 stimulation. Conclusions We conclude that Dok6 interacts with the NPQY motif of the TrkC receptor through its PTB domain in a kinase activity-dependent manner, and works as a novel substrate of the TrkC receptor involved in NT-3-mediated neurite outgrowth in mouse cortex neurons.

  20. 喉罩复合无肌松技术在老年患者股骨头置换术中的应用研究%Advantage analysis of Laryngeal mask combined with non-muscle relaxant technology for elderly patients with femoral head replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏仙; 顾颖红

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨喉罩复合无肌松麻醉方法在老年患者股骨头置换术中的临床价值.方法 该院2013年3月至2014年5月行股骨头置换手术的老年患者共50例 ,随机将其分为试验组和对照组各25例.试验组患者给予喉罩复合无肌松麻醉方法 ,对照组给予常规麻醉方法 ,比较2组患者各时间的心率(HR)、平均血压(MAP)和氧饱和度(SPO2 ) ,临床效果及肌松效果、辅助麻醉用药 ,不良反应率.结果 对照组患者各时间点的HR、MAP、SPO2比较 ,差异均有统计学意义(P0 .05).试验组患者的清醒时间、拔管时间和咽喉疼痛发生率显著低于对照组 ,差异均有统计学意义(P0 .05).试验组患者的肌松效果满意率显著高于对照组 ,差异有统计学意义(P0 .05).结论 喉罩复合无肌松技术应用于老年股骨头置换手术临床效果较好 ,且安全性高.%Objective To analyze the advantage of Laryngeal mask combined with non-muscle relaxant technology for elderly patients with Femoral head replacement .Methods A total of 50 consecutives from March 2013 to May 2014 for Femoral head replacement arriving at our hospital ,They were divided randomly into experiment and control groups ,and each of 25 cases .The patients in experiment group received Laryngeal mask combined with non-muscle relaxant technology ,the patients in control group received common anesthesia method ,then heart rate ,Mean arterial pressure ,Oxygen saturation at every times ,clinical effect and muscle relaxation effect ,assisted anesthesia drug ,adverse reaction rate were compared in two groupsResults The HR ,MAP and SPO2 at every times in control group were all significant differnces in different time(P0 .05) .The recovery time ,extubation time and throat pain rate in experiment group were all significant less than control group (P0 .05) .The satisfaction rate of muscle relaxation effect in experiment group was all significantly higher than that in control group (P0

  1. Summary and Recommendations from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Trials Planning Meeting on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Seth P; Bajorin, Dean F; Dinney, Colin P; Efstathiou, Jason A; Groshen, Susan; Hahn, Noah M; Hansel, Donna; Kwiatkowski, David; O'Donnell, Michael; Rosenberg, Jonathan; Svatek, Robert; Abrams, Jeffrey S; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Apolo, Andrea B; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Callahan, Margaret; Cha, Eugene K; Drake, Charles; Jarow, Jonathan; Kamat, Ashish; Kim, William; Knowles, Margaret; Mann, Bhupinder; Marchionni, Luigi; McConkey, David; McShane, Lisa; Ramirez, Nilsa; Sharabi, Andrew; Sharpe, Arlene H; Solit, David; Tangen, Catherine M; Amiri, Abdul Tawab; Van Allen, Eliezer; West, Pamela J; Witjes, J A; Quale, Diane Zipursky

    2016-04-27

    The NCI Bladder Cancer Task Force convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) Workshop focused on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC). Meeting attendees included a broad and multi-disciplinary group of clinical and research stakeholders and included leaders from NCI, FDA, National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), advocacy and the pharmaceutical and biotech industry. The meeting goals and objectives were to: 1) create a collaborative environment in which the greater bladder research community can pursue future optimally designed novel clinical trials focused on the theme of molecular targeted and immune-based therapies in NMIBC; 2) frame the clinical and translational questions that are of highest priority; and 3) develop two clinical trial designs focusing on immunotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Despite successful development and implementation of large Phase II and Phase III trials in bladder and upper urinary tract cancers, there are no active and accruing trials in the NMIBC space within the NCTN. Disappointingly, there has been only one new FDA approved drug (Valrubicin) in any bladder cancer disease state since 1998. Although genomic-based data for bladder cancer are increasingly available, translating these discoveries into practice changing treatment is still to come. Recently, major efforts in defining the genomic characteristics of NMIBC have been achieved. Aligned with these data is the growing number of targeted therapy agents approved and/or in development in other organ site cancers and the multiple similarities of bladder cancer with molecular subtypes in these other cancers. Additionally, although bladder cancer is one of the more immunogenic tumors, some tumors have the ability to attenuate or eliminate host immune responses. Two trial concepts emerged from the meeting including a window of opportunity trial (Phase 0) testing an FGFR3 inhibitor and a second multi-arm multi-stage trial testing combinations

  2. Summary and Recommendations from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Trials Planning Meeting on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Seth P.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Dinney, Colin P.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Groshen, Susan; Hahn, Noah M.; Hansel, Donna; Kwiatkowski, David; O’Donnell, Michael; Rosenberg, Jonathan; Svatek, Robert; Abrams, Jeffrey S.; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Apolo, Andrea B.; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Callahan, Margaret; Cha, Eugene K.; Drake, Charles; Jarow, Jonathan; Kamat, Ashish; Kim, William; Knowles, Margaret; Mann, Bhupinder; Marchionni, Luigi; McConkey, David; McShane, Lisa; Ramirez, Nilsa; Sharabi, Andrew; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Solit, David; Tangen, Catherine M.; Amiri, Abdul Tawab; Van Allen, Eliezer; West, Pamela J.; Witjes, J. A.; Quale, Diane Zipursky

    2016-01-01

    The NCI Bladder Cancer Task Force convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) Workshop focused on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC). Meeting attendees included a broad and multi-disciplinary group of clinical and research stakeholders and included leaders from NCI, FDA, National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), advocacy and the pharmaceutical and biotech industry. The meeting goals and objectives were to: 1) create a collaborative environment in which the greater bladder research community can pursue future optimally designed novel clinical trials focused on the theme of molecular targeted and immune-based therapies in NMIBC; 2) frame the clinical and translational questions that are of highest priority; and 3) develop two clinical trial designs focusing on immunotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Despite successful development and implementation of large Phase II and Phase III trials in bladder and upper urinary tract cancers, there are no active and accruing trials in the NMIBC space within the NCTN. Disappointingly, there has been only one new FDA approved drug (Valrubicin) in any bladder cancer disease state since 1998. Although genomic-based data for bladder cancer are increasingly available, translating these discoveries into practice changing treatment is still to come. Recently, major efforts in defining the genomic characteristics of NMIBC have been achieved. Aligned with these data is the growing number of targeted therapy agents approved and/or in development in other organ site cancers and the multiple similarities of bladder cancer with molecular subtypes in these other cancers. Additionally, although bladder cancer is one of the more immunogenic tumors, some tumors have the ability to attenuate or eliminate host immune responses. Two trial concepts emerged from the meeting including a window of opportunity trial (Phase 0) testing an FGFR3 inhibitor and a second multi-arm multi-stage trial testing combinations

  3. Origin and central projections of rat dorsal penile nerve: possible direct projection to autonomic and somatic neurons by primary afferents of nonmuscle origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, R; Gross, G H; Sachs, B D

    1986-05-22

    Cell number, size, and somatotopic arrangement within the spinal ganglia of the cells of origin of the rat dorsal penile nerve (DPN), and their spinal cord projections, were studied by loading the proximal stump of the severed DPN with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The DPN sensory cells were located entirely in the sixth lumbar (L6) dorsal root ganglia (DRG), in which a mean of 468 +/- 78 cells per side were observed, measuring 26.7 +/- 0.8 microns in their longest axis (range 10-65 microns) and distributed apparently randomly within the ganglia. Within the spinal cord, no retrograde label was found, i.e., no motoneurons were labeled, indicating that in the rat the DPN is formed exclusively of sensory nerve fibers. Although labeled fibers entered the cord only through L6, transganglionically transported HRP was evident in all spinal segments examined, i.e., T13-S2. Labeled fibers projected along the inner edge of the dorsal horn (medial pathway) throughout their extensive craniosacral distribution. However, laminar distribution varied with spinal segment. In the dorsal horn, terminals or preterminal axons were found in the dorsal horn marginal zone (lamina I), the substantia gelatinosa (lamina II), the nucleus proprius (laminae III and IV--the most consistent projection), Clarke's column (lamina VI), and the dorsal gray commissure. In the ventral horn, terminals were found in lamina VII and lamina IX. Label apposed to cell somas and dendrites in lamina VII may represent direct primary afferent projections onto sympathetic autonomic neurons. In lamina IX, labeled terminals delineated the somas and dendrites of cells that appeared to be motoneurons. This is the first description of an apparently monosynaptic contact onto motoneurons by a primary afferent of nonmuscle origin.

  4. Pilot study of an association between a common variant in the non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 (MYH9) gene and type 2 diabetic nephropathy in a Taiwanese population

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Hung, Yi-Jen; Pei, Dee; Kuo, Shi-Wen; Lin, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Recent studies have demonstrated that the myosin, heavy chain 9, non-muscle (MYH9) gene is associated with ESRD in African Americans. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a common single nucleotide polymorphism rs16996677 in the MYH9 gene may contribute to the etiology of DN in type 2 diabetes (T2D) in a Taiwanese population with T2D. There were 180 T2D patients diagnosed with DN and 178 age...

  5. Abnormal actin binding of aberrant β-tropomyosins is a molecular cause of muscle weakness in TPM2-related nemaline and cap myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marttila, Minttu; Lemola, Elina; Wallefeld, William; Memo, Massimiliano; Donner, Kati; Laing, Nigel G; Marston, Steven; Grönholm, Mikaela; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2012-02-15

    NM (nemaline myopathy) is a rare genetic muscle disorder defined on the basis of muscle weakness and the presence of structural abnormalities in the muscle fibres, i.e. nemaline bodies. The related disorder cap myopathy is defined by cap-like structures located peripherally in the muscle fibres. Both disorders may be caused by mutations in the TPM2 gene encoding β-Tm (tropomyosin). Tm controls muscle contraction by inhibiting actin-myosin interaction in a calcium-sensitive manner. In the present study, we have investigated the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying five disease-causing mutations in Tm. We show that four of the mutations cause changes in affinity for actin, which may cause muscle weakness in these patients, whereas two show defective Ca2+ activation of contractility. We have also mapped the amino acids altered by the mutation to regions important for actin binding and note that two of the mutations cause altered protein conformation, which could account for impaired actin affinity.

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced tropomyosin-related kinase B (Trk B) signaling is a potential therapeutic target for peritoneal carcinomatosis arising from colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Saigusa, Susumu; Kawamura, Mikio; Araki, Toshimitsu; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Tropomyosin-related receptor kinase B (TrkB) signaling, stimulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) ligand, promotes tumor progression, and is related to the poor prognosis of various malignancies. We sought to examine the clinical relevance of BDNF/TrkB expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues, its prognostic value for CRC patients, and its therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. Two hundred and twenty-three CRC patient specimens were used to determine both BDNF and TrkB mRNA levels. The expression of these proteins in their primary and metastatic tumors was investigated by immunohistochemistry. CRC cell lines and recombinant BDNF and K252a (a selective pharmacological pan-Trk inhibitor) were used for in vitro cell viability, migration, invasion, anoikis resistance and in vivo peritoneal metastasis assays. Tissue BDNF mRNA was associated with liver and peritoneal metastasis. Tissue TrkB mRNA was also associated with lymph node metastasis. The co-expression of BDNF and TrkB was associated with liver and peritoneal metastasis. Patients with higher BDNF, TrkB, and co-expression of BDNF and TrkB had a significantly poor prognosis. BDNF increased tumor cell viability, migration, invasion and inhibited anoikis in the TrkB-expressing CRC cell lines. These effects were suppressed by K252a. In mice injected with DLD1 co-expressing BDNF and TrkB, and subsequently treated with K252a, peritoneal metastatic nodules was found to be reduced, as compared with control mice. BDNF/TrkB signaling may thus be a potential target for treating peritoneal carcinomatosis arising from colorectal cancer.

  7. Regulation of jaw-specific isoforms of myosin-binding protein-C and tropomyosin in regenerating cat temporalis muscle innervated by limb fast and slow motor nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lucia H D; Hoh, Joseph F Y

    2010-11-01

    Cat jaw-closing muscles are a distinct muscle allotype characterized by the expression of masticatory-specific myofibrillar proteins. Transplantation studies showed that expression of masticatory myosin heavy chain (m-MyHC) is promoted by fast motor nerves, but suppressed by slow motor nerves. We investigated whether masticatory myosin-binding protein-C (m-MBP-C) and masticatory tropomyosin (m-Tm) are similarly regulated. Temporalis muscle strips were transplanted into limb muscle beds to allow innervation by fast or slow muscle nerve during regeneration. Regenerated muscles were examined postoperatively up to 168 days by peroxidase IHC using monoclonal antibodies to m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm. Regenerates in both muscle beds expressed fetal and slow MyHCs, m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm during the first 4 weeks. Longer-term regenerates innervated by fast nerve suppressed fetal and slow MyHCs, retaining m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm, whereas fibers innervated by slow nerve suppressed fetal MyHCs and the three masticatory-specific proteins, induced slow MyHC, and showed immunohistochemical characteristics of jaw-slow fibers. We concluded that expression of m-MBP-C and m-Tm is coregulated by m-MyHC and that neural impulses to limb slow muscle are capable of suppressing masticatory-specific proteins and to channel gene expression along the jaw-slow phenotype unique to jaw-closing muscle.

  8. PROKARYOTIC EXPRESSION OF TROPOMYOSIN GENE FROM SOUTH CULTURED SEA CUCUMBER APOSTICHOPUS JAPONICUS%南移养殖刺参(Apostichopus japonicus)原肌球蛋白基因的原核表达研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏长革; 崔静; 王中华; 李成华; 周君; 李晔; 张春丹; 李太武; 苏秀榕

    2013-01-01

    Regeneration is a vital physiological process in Apostichopus japonicus, and was considered to a good model for organ and tissues culture in vitro. In order to further understand the function of some key molecules in this process, the tropomyosin gene of A. japonicus was cloned and expressed. The full-length of tropomyosin gene was 1203bp including a 105bp of 5' untranslated region (UTR), a 240bp of 3' UTR and a 855bp of open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypep-tide of 284 amino acids. The estimated molecular mass of tropomyosin gene is 33.27kDa, and the theoretical isoelectric point is 4.56. The recombinant pET-Trp protein was successfully expressed in E. coli. The recombinant protein pET-Trp had clearly visible band in 38kDa. The polyclonal antibody could specifically bind to the recombinant TRP by Western blot.%本研究克隆和表达了刺参原肌球蛋白(Tropomyosin,TRP)基因,进一步研究刺参再生过程中重要分子的功能.结果表明,TRP基因序列总长为1203bp,5 ′非翻译区为105bp,3 ′非翻译区为240bp,该序列包含一个855bp的开放阅读框(open reading frame,ORF),编码284个氨基酸,分子量为33.27kDa,等电点为4.56.利用Escherichia coli对TRP进行了体外重组表达,在1mmol/L IPTG和37℃条件下诱导,能产生分子质量约为38kDa的重组蛋白,Western blot证明重组TRP与鼠抗刺参原肌球蛋白的多克隆抗体能特异性结合.

  9. Two distinct myosin II populations coordinate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath in the Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    The myoepithelial sheath in the somatic gonad of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has nonstriated contractile actomyosin networks that produce highly coordinated contractility for ovulation of mature oocytes. Two myosin heavy chains are expressed in the myoepithelial sheath, which are also expressed in the body-wall striated muscle. The troponin/tropomyosin system is also present and essential for ovulation. Therefore, although the myoepithelial sheath has smooth muscle–like contractile apparatuses, it has a striated muscle–like regulatory mechanism through troponin/tropomyosin. Here we report that the myoepithelial sheath has a distinct myosin population containing nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which is regulated by phosphorylation and essential for ovulation. MLC-4, a nonmuscle myosin regulatory light chain, localizes to small punctate structures and does not colocalize with large, needle-like myosin filaments containing MYO-3, a striated-muscle myosin isoform. RNA interference of MLC-4, as well as of its upstream regulators, LET-502 (Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase) and MEL-11 (a myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), impairs ovulation. Expression of a phosphomimetic MLC-4 mutant mimicking a constitutively active state also impairs ovulation. A striated-muscle myosin (UNC-54) appears to provide partially compensatory contractility. Thus the results indicate that the two spatially distinct myosin II populations coordinately regulate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath. PMID:26864628

  10. Two distinct myosin II populations coordinate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath in the Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-04-01

    The myoepithelial sheath in the somatic gonad of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has nonstriated contractile actomyosin networks that produce highly coordinated contractility for ovulation of mature oocytes. Two myosin heavy chains are expressed in the myoepithelial sheath, which are also expressed in the body-wall striated muscle. The troponin/tropomyosin system is also present and essential for ovulation. Therefore, although the myoepithelial sheath has smooth muscle-like contractile apparatuses, it has a striated muscle-like regulatory mechanism through troponin/tropomyosin. Here we report that the myoepithelial sheath has a distinct myosin population containing nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which is regulated by phosphorylation and essential for ovulation. MLC-4, a nonmuscle myosin regulatory light chain, localizes to small punctate structures and does not colocalize with large, needle-like myosin filaments containing MYO-3, a striated-muscle myosin isoform. RNA interference of MLC-4, as well as of its upstream regulators, LET-502 (Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase) and MEL-11 (a myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), impairs ovulation. Expression of a phosphomimetic MLC-4 mutant mimicking a constitutively active state also impairs ovulation. A striated-muscle myosin (UNC-54) appears to provide partially compensatory contractility. Thus the results indicate that the two spatially distinct myosin II populations coordinately regulate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath.

  11. Ki-67 is an independent indicator in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC); combination of EORTC risk scores and Ki-67 expression could improve the risk stratification of NMIBC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Weihong; Gou, Yuancheng; Sun, Chuanyu; Xia, Guowei; Wang, Hong; Chen, Zhongqing; Tan, Jun; Xu, Ke; Qiang, Ding

    2014-01-01

    To prove the predicting role of Ki-67 expression and to demonstrate that the combination of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) risk scores and Ki-67 staining status could improve the risk stratification in a large series of patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). From October 2002 to July 2010, in our cohort, 332 patients who were treated with transurethral resection of the bladder tumor were diagnosed with NMIBC by histopathologic analysis. Two experienced uropathologists rereviewed the slides. The EORTC risk scores for recurrence and progression were determined. Ki-67 expression was evaluated using immunohistochemical studies and scored for intensity and area of staining. We correlated Ki-67 expression scores with clinical and pathologic variables. We evaluated the prognosis role of EORTC risk scores, Ki-67 staining, and their combination on tumor recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival (PFS) by univariate analysis, multivariate analysis, and Kaplan-Meier survival curves. With a median follow-up of 47 (range, 2-124) months, 119 patients (35.8%) had tumor recurrence and 40 patients (12%) had tumor progression. Ki-67 positivity (Ki-67>25%) was reported in 108 tumors (32.5%), and it was significantly associated with high EORTC risk scores for both tumor recurrence and progression. In univariate analysis, multifocality, tumor size, tumor stage, tumor grade, and Ki-67 staining correlated with recurrence-free survival, whereas tumor size, tumor stage, tumor grade, concomitant CIS, and Ki-67 staining correlated with PFS. In multivariable analysis, Ki-67 expression was an independent risk factor for predicting tumor recurrence (hazard ratio, 2.14; PEORTC risk scores and Ki-67 staining led to more accurate prediction for tumor recurrence and progression (log-rank test; PEORTC risk scores with Ki-67 expression could improve the risk stratification for both recurrence and progression in NMIBC. Copyright

  12. 添加非肌肉蛋白对鱼糜制品品质影响的初步研究%Research of Optimum Recipe of Surimi with Non-muscle Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈康; 戴志远; 王宏海; 翁丽萍

    2011-01-01

    T The effects of soybean protein isolation (SPI), gluten powder (GP) and whey protein concentration ( WPC ) on the qualities of surimi were investigated by texture analysis, color analysis and sensory evaluation. The resuits indicated that the addition of three kinds of non-muscle proteins increased the breaking force, gel strength, moisture holding and sensory, while it displayed opposite changes in deformation and whiteness. The optimum recipe (9.7% SPI,9.9% GP,7.6% WPC) was determined by surface response methodology (RSM), and the actual gel strength was (3 855. 012 ± 260. 682) g· mm under this condition.%实验采用质构分析法、色差分析法及感官评价法研究了大豆分离蛋白(SPI)、谷朊粉(GP)、乳清浓缩蛋白(WPC)对鱼糜制品品质的影响。结果表明:添加一定量的3种非肌肉蛋白可以明显地提高鱼糜制品的破断强度、凝胶强度、持水性和口感,但均降低了制品的凹陷深度和自度。以凝胶强度为优化值对3种非肌肉蛋白进行响应面优化后,确定了鱼糜制品的蛋白添加条件为:SPI9.7%、GP9.9%、WPC7.6%,实际凝胶强度为(3855.012±260.682)g·mm。

  13. Do Standardised Prognostic Algorithms Reflect Local Practice? Application of EORTC Risk Tables for Non-Muscle Invasive (pTa/pT1 Bladder Cancer Recurrence and Progression in a Local Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Pillai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A risk calculator algorithm to allow prediction of probabilities of 1- and 5-year recurrence and progression rates in individuals with pTa/pT1 bladder cancer has been proposed by the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and was incorporated into the European Association of Urology guidelines in 2006. We attempted to validate this algorithm in a cohort of patients with known outcome. Prognostic data were collected from a consecutively presenting cohort of 109 patients with non-muscle invasive (pTa/pT1 transitional cell cancer (TCC at a single institution between 1983 and 1985. Using the same statistical models as in the EORTC original paper, predicted probabilities of 1- and 5-year recurrence and progression were calculated. Patients were divided into four risk groups for recurrence (Ir-IVr and progression (Ip-IVp, respectively, using six prognostic criteria. These were then compared to the probabilities predicted in the EORTC algorithm. The predicted 1- and 5-year probabilities of recurrence were significantly higher in the study population as compared to the original EORTC algorithm for all four risk groups. The predicted 1-year probabilities for progression in groups Ip/IIIp and at 5-years for groups Ip/IIp were in accordance with the original algorithm, but were higher for the other progression groups. The concordance for the model of prediction using the study group for recurrence at 1 and 5 years was 62 and 63%, respectively, and for progression was 65 and 67, respectively. We were unable to validate the proposed algorithm in our group of patients. Although our study has limitations that prevent firm conclusions on the validity of the algorithm, it does expose some of the drawbacks of standardised nomograms when applied to local clinical practice.

  14. Clinical significance of simultaneous transurethral resection of a bladder tumor and the prostate in the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer with benign prostatic hyperplasia%非肌层浸润性膀胱癌合并良性前列腺增生患者同期行经尿道电切手术的疗效和安全性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海昕; 张冠; 方自林; 王翔; 刘乃波

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical significance of simultaneous transurethral resection (TUR) of a bladder tumor and the prostate in the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).Methods Patients were divided into two groups.Group A contained 46 male patients who accepted TUR for the treatment of both bladder cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia.Group B contained 69 male patients who accepted TURBt only.Clinical data were retrospectively collected and analyzed to compare clinical outcomes and safety in these two groups.Results The bladder cancer recurrence rates in group A and B were 50.0% and 50.7%,the average recurrence free time was 20 and 18 months,and the progression rates were 6.5% and 7.2%,respectively.There were no significant differences between the two groups for either average recurrence free time or progression rates (P > 0.05).Recurrences in the prostatic urethra were found in two cases in group A and one case in group B and all three cases were in T1 G3.Conclusions Simultaneous TUR for bladder tumor and the prostate can be safely and effectively performed in terms of oncologica] control in patients who have non-muscle invasive and low grade bladder tumors ( T1G1 - G2 ) with lower urinary tract obstruction caused by BPH.But this procedure should be cautiously performed on patients with T1 G3 bladder tumors.%目的 探讨合并BPH的非肌层浸润性膀胱癌患者同期行经尿道电切(TUR)手术的疗效和安全性.方法 合并BPH的非肌层浸润性膀胱癌患者46例(A组)同期行TURBt和TURP治疗,非肌层浸润性膀胱癌仅行TURBt的男性患者69例(B组)作为对照组.A组年龄54~80岁,平均69岁;肿瘤单发37例、多发9例,肿瘤直径0.5 ~3.5 cm,平均2.8 cm.B组55~82岁,平均70岁;肿瘤单发54例、多发15例;肿瘤直径0.5~24.0 cm,平均2.9 cm;2组比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结果 2组均顺利完成手术.随访24 - 96个月,平均44

  15. Transmission of stability information through the N-domain of tropomyosin is interrupted by a stabilizing mutation (A109L) in the hydrophobic core of the stability control region (residues 97-118).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, J Paul; Hodges, Robert S

    2014-02-14

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is an actin-binding, thin filament, two-stranded α-helical coiled-coil critical for muscle contraction and cytoskeletal function. We made the first identification of a stability control region (SCR), residues 97-118, in the Tm sequence that controls overall protein stability but is not required for folding. We also showed that the individual α-helical strands of the coiled-coil are stabilized by Leu-110, whereas the hydrophobic core is destabilized in the SCR by Ala residues at three consecutive d positions. Our hypothesis is that the stabilization of the individual α-helices provides an optimum stability and allows functionally beneficial dynamic motion between the α-helices that is critical for the transmission of stabilizing information along the coiled-coil from the SCR. We prepared three recombinant (rat) Tm(1-131) proteins, including the wild type sequence, a destabilizing mutation L110A, and a stabilizing mutation A109L. These proteins were evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry. The single mutation L110A destabilizes the entire Tm(1-131) molecule, showing that the effect of this mutation is transmitted 165 Å along the coiled-coil in the N-terminal direction. The single mutation A109L prevents the SCR from transmitting stabilizing information and separates the coiled-coil into two domains, one that is ∼9 °C more stable than wild type and one that is ∼16 °C less stable. We know of no other example of the substitution of a stabilizing Leu residue in a coiled-coil hydrophobic core position d that causes this dramatic effect. We demonstrate the importance of the SCR in controlling and transmitting the stability signal along this rodlike molecule.

  16. Transmission of Stability Information through the N-domain of Tropomyosin Is Interrupted by a Stabilizing Mutation (A109L) in the Hydrophobic Core of the Stability Control Region (Residues 97–118)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, J. Paul; Hodges, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is an actin-binding, thin filament, two-stranded α-helical coiled-coil critical for muscle contraction and cytoskeletal function. We made the first identification of a stability control region (SCR), residues 97–118, in the Tm sequence that controls overall protein stability but is not required for folding. We also showed that the individual α-helical strands of the coiled-coil are stabilized by Leu-110, whereas the hydrophobic core is destabilized in the SCR by Ala residues at three consecutive d positions. Our hypothesis is that the stabilization of the individual α-helices provides an optimum stability and allows functionally beneficial dynamic motion between the α-helices that is critical for the transmission of stabilizing information along the coiled-coil from the SCR. We prepared three recombinant (rat) Tm(1–131) proteins, including the wild type sequence, a destabilizing mutation L110A, and a stabilizing mutation A109L. These proteins were evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry. The single mutation L110A destabilizes the entire Tm(1–131) molecule, showing that the effect of this mutation is transmitted 165 Å along the coiled-coil in the N-terminal direction. The single mutation A109L prevents the SCR from transmitting stabilizing information and separates the coiled-coil into two domains, one that is ∼9 °C more stable than wild type and one that is ∼16 °C less stable. We know of no other example of the substitution of a stabilizing Leu residue in a coiled-coil hydrophobic core position d that causes this dramatic effect. We demonstrate the importance of the SCR in controlling and transmitting the stability signal along this rodlike molecule. PMID:24362038

  17. Production of high quality brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) RNA from isolated populations of rat spinal cord motor neurons obtained by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Prachi; Premkumar, Brian; Morris, Renée

    2016-08-03

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is composed of multiple cellular elements, making it challenging to segregate one particular cell type to study their gene expression profile. For instance, as motor neurons represent only 5-10% of the total cell population of the spinal cord, meaningful transcriptional analysis on these neurons is almost impossible to achieve from homogenized spinal cord tissue. A major challenge faced by scientists is to obtain good quality RNA from small amounts of starting material. In this paper, we used Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) techniques to identify and isolate spinal cord motor neurons. The present analysis revealed that perfusion with paraformaldehyde (PFA) does not alter RNA quality. RNA integrity numbers (RINs) of tissue samples from rubrospinal tract (RST)-transected, intact spinal cord or from whole spinal cord homogenate were all above 8, which indicates intact, high-quality RNA. Levels of mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or for its tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) were not affected by rubrospinal tract (RST) transection, a surgical procedure that deprive motor neurons from one of their main supraspinal input. The isolation of pure populations of neurons with LCM techniques allows for robust transcriptional characterization that cannot be achieved with spinal cord homogenates. Such preparations of pure population of motor neurons will provide valuable tools to advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying spinal cord injury and neuromuscular diseases. In the near future, LCM techniques might be instrumental to the success of gene therapy for these debilitating conditions.

  18. Expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptor Tropomyosin-related kinase B in hepatocellular carcinoma and their roles in the apopcosis and invasion of hepatocellular cancer 97-H cells%脑源性神经营养因子及其受体原肌球蛋白相关激酶B在肝癌组织中的表达以及对肝癌细胞97-H凋亡和侵袭作用的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭大伟; 刘武; 孙文郁; 朱磊; 张弘彬; 侯学忠; 姜晓峰; 梁健

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究脑源性神经营养因子(brain-derived neurotrophic factor,BDNF)及其受体原肌球蛋白相关激酶B (Tropomyosin-related kinase B,TrkB)在人肝细胞癌(hepatocellular carcinoma,HCC)中的表达情况,并探讨2者在HCC发生、发展中的作用.方法:采用蛋白质印迹法检测BDNF和TrkB蛋白在30例HCC和癌旁组织中的表达情况.采用ELISA法检测BDNF在人HCC细胞系97-H培养液上清中的浓度;FCM和Transwell 小室法分别检测抗BDNF抗体或TrkB激酶活性抑制剂K252a对细胞凋亡和侵袭的影响.结果:30例配对组织标本中,BDNF和TrkB在HCC组织中的表达水平高于癌旁组织(P均<0.05).BDNF在97-H细胞培养液上清中的表达量为( 119.08±6.21) pg/mL.抗BDNF抗体或K252a都能有效诱导97-H细胞的凋亡,并抑制细胞的侵袭能力.结论:BDNF/TrkB可能对HCC细胞的存活和侵袭具有重要的支持作用,并促进HCC的发生及发展.%Objective: To investigate the expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its primary receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, and to evaluate the functions of both the proteins in the oncogenesis and progression of HCC. Methods: The expressions of BDNF and TrkB proteins in HCC tissues and their adjacent normal tissues from 30 patients were detected by Western blotting. The level of secretory BDNF from human HCC 97-H cells in culture supernatant was measured by ELISA. The effects of BDNF neutralizing antibody or Trk tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a on apoptosis and invasion were detected by flow cytometry (FCM) and Transwell assay, respectively. Results: The expression levels of BDNF and TrkB proteins in HCC tissues from 30 patients were significantly higher than those in the corresponding adjacent normal tissues (P<0.05). The concentration of BDNF in culture supernatant of 97-H cells was (119.08±6.21) pg/mL. Both of BDNF neutralizing antibody and K252a could effectively

  19. Urovysion™ testing can lead to early identification of intravesical therapy failure in patients with high risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared M. Whitson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this study, we investigated the ability of UroVysion™ to assess response to intravesical therapy in patients with high risk superficial bladder tumors. Materials and methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients undergoing intravesical therapy for high risk superficial bladder tumors. Urine specimens were collected for UroVysion™ analysis before and immediately after a course of intravesical therapy. Cytology and cystoscopy were performed six weeks after treatment, using either a positive cytology or visible abnormality on cystoscopy as a prompt for biopsy. The operating characteristics of the UroVysion™ test were then determined. Results: 41 patients were identified in whom 47 cycles of induction and 41 cycles of maintenance intravesical therapy were given during the study period. This yielded a total of 88 treatment and evaluation cycles. Median follow-up was 9 months per induction (range 1-21 months and 13 months per patient (range 1-25 months. A total of 133 urine samples were collected for UroVysion™ of which 40 were positive. Based upon standard clinical evaluation, 41 biopsies were performed which detected 20 recurrences. UroVysion™ testing performed immediately upon completion of therapy for the 41 patients undergoing biopsy yielded a sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 85%, 61%, and 71%. Conclusions: The use of UroVysion™ following intravesical therapy for high-risk superficial bladder tumors helps to identify patients at high risk of refractory or recurrent disease who should undergo immediate biopsy under anesthesia.

  20. The application of adjuvant autologous antravesical macrophage cell therapy vs. BCG in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: a multicenter, randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss Tamas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction While adjuvant immunotherapy with Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG is effective in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (BC, adverse events (AEs are considerable. Monocyte-derived activated killer cells (MAK are discussed as essential in antitumoural immunoresponse, but their application may imply risks. The present trial compared autologous intravesical macrophage cell therapy (BEXIDEM® to BCG in patients after transurethral resection (TURB of BC. Materials and methods This open-label trial included 137 eligible patients with TaG1-3, T1G1-2 plurifocal or unifocal tumours and ≥ 2 occurrences within 24 months and was conducted from June 2004 to March 2007. Median follow-up for patients without recurrence was 12 months. Patients were randomized to BCG or mononuclear cells collected by apheresis after ex vivo cell processing and activation (BEXIDEM. Either arm treatment consisted of 6 weekly instillations and 2 cycles of 3 weekly instillations at months 3 and 6. Toxicity profile (primary endpoint and prophylactic effects (secondary endpoint were assessed. Results Patient characteristics were evenly distributed. Of 73 treated with BCG and 64 with BEXIDEM, 85% vs. 45% experienced AEs and 26% vs. 14% serious AEs (SAE, respectively (p Discussion This initial report of autologous intravesical macrophage cell therapy in BC demonstrates BEXIDEM treatment to be safe. Recurrence rates were significantly lower with BCG however. As the efficacy of BEXIDEM remains uncertain, further data, e.g. marker lesions studies, are warranted. Trial registration The trial has been registered in the ISRCTN registry http://isrctn.org under the registration number ISRCTN35881130.

  1. 脑卒中后抑郁大鼠额前皮质脑源性神经营养因子和酪氨酸激酶受体B蛋白的表达变化%The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tropomyosin receptor kinase B protein in the prefrontal cortex of the post-stroke depression in the rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李云; 郭旭; 李永刚

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨脑卒中后抑郁(PSD)大鼠额前皮质脑源性神经营养因子(BDNF)和其高亲和力受体酪氨酸激酶B(TrkB)蛋白的表达变化.方法 利用线栓法制备局灶性脑缺血大鼠模型、加以慢性不可预见的中等应激刺激和孤养方法造成PSD动物模型,并与正常对照组、脑卒中组及抑郁组作比较.每组6只动物,应用免疫组化检测各组大鼠造模后第29天大脑额前皮质BDNF和TrkB阳性细胞数的表达变化.结果 PSD组额前皮质BDNF阳性细胞数最少[(21.00±12.41)个/视野];但各组相比差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).PSD组大鼠额前皮质TrkB阳性细胞数最少[(20.78±7.20)个/视野],抑郁组次之[(21.00±5.61)个/视野],脑卒中组最多[(31.67 ±7.38)个/视野];单因素方差分析结果显示PSD组和抑郁组与脑卒中组比较,均差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 PSD大鼠额前皮质TrkB蛋白的表达减少可能与PSD发病机制直接相关.%Objective To explore the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor(BDNF) and highaffinity receptors tropomyosin receptor kinase B(TrkB) protien in the prefrontal cortex of the post stroke depression in the rats.Methods Focal cerebral ischemic rat models were made with thread embolization method.Post stroke depression rat models were established with comprehensive separately breeding and chronic unpredicted mild stress (CUMS) on this basis.Normal control group,depression group and stroke group were used to compared with PSD group.6 rats were used in each group.Immunohistochemistry for detecting the expression of BDNF and TrkB in the prefrontal was used at 29th day since the CUMS.Results The number of BNDF immunopositive cells in PSD group was the least ((21.00 ± 12.41) per microscope field of vision) than other groups.Whereas there was no statistical difference among groups(P> 0.05).The number of TrkB immunopositive cells in the prefrontal cortex in PSD group was the least (20.78 ± 7.20) among

  2. Feasibility study of early localization diagnosis of THP (pirarubicin) on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer%THP定位诊断早期非肌层浸润性膀胱癌

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张万峰; 王贵平; 王洪杰; 丁晓晖; 刘会恩; 曲嘉林; 王百峰; 杨振涛

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究THP(吡柔比星)对非肌层浸润性膀胱癌早期的定位诊断效果.方法:选择35例已诊断膀胱癌或高度怀疑尿路上皮癌患者.病人术前及术后复查时,30mgTHP溶入50ml 5%葡萄糖液中,灌入已排空的膀胱中,保留15分钟,排出THP,彻底冲洗膀胱.普通膀胱镜检查,有THP吸收的非肿瘤区域取活检,无THP吸收的部位随机活检.结果:35例患者中存在非肌层浸润性膀胱癌早期的共6例.结论:THP对非肌层浸润性膀胱癌早期的定位诊断效果明确,安全性好.%Objective : To study the feasibility of early localization diagnosis of THP ( pirarubicin) on non - muscle invasive bladder cancer. Methods : For 35 patients that had the diagnosis of bladder cancer or was highly suspected had carcinoma of urethra epidermis,before or after surgery , integrate 30mg THP into the 50ml 5% glucose,pour the glucose into empty bladder and keep it for 15 minutes,drain and rinse the bladder thoroughly. With normal cystoscopy, the region with absorption of THP of non - tumor do biopsy and non - absorbed part of THP do random biopsy. Results : In 31 patients , there were 6 had early non - muscle invasive bladder cancer. Conclusion : For non - muscle invasive bladder cancer the early localization diagnosis of THP is clear and safe.

  3. Enceladus Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Here are some results from the Spectra Decomposition Algorithm on infrared spectral images of Saturn's moon Enceladus. Figure 1 is the spatial contribution of the...

  4. Oncologic Outcomes of Kidney-sparing Surgery Versus Radical Nephroureterectomy for Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinoma: A Systematic Review by the EAU Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Guidelines Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seisen, Thomas; Peyronnet, Benoit; Dominguez-Escrig, Jose Luis; Bruins, Harman M; Yuan, Cathy Yuhong; Babjuk, Marko; Böhle, Andreas; Burger, Maximilian; Compérat, Eva M; Cowan, Nigel C; Kaasinen, Eero; Palou, Joan; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Sylvester, Richard J; Zigeuner, Richard; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Rouprêt, Morgan

    2016-12-01

    There is uncertainty regarding the oncologic effectiveness of kidney-sparing surgery (KSS) compared with radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) for upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UTUC). To systematically review the current literature comparing oncologic outcomes of KSS versus RNU for UTUC. A computerised bibliographic search of the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases was performed for all studies reporting comparative oncologic outcomes of KSS versus RNU. Approaches considered for KSS were segmental ureterectomy (SU) and ureteroscopic (URS) or percutaneous (PC) management. Using the methodology recommended by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis guidelines, we identified 22 nonrandomised comparative retrospective studies published between 1999 and 2015 that were eligible for inclusion in this systematic review. A narrative review and risk-of-bias (RoB) assessment were performed using cancer-specific survival (CSS) as the primary end point. Seven studies compared KSS overall (n=547) versus RNU (n=1376). Information on the comparison of SU (n=586) versus RNU (n=3692), URS (n=162) versus RNU (n=367), and PC (n=66) versus RNU (n=114) was available in 10, 5, and 2 studies, respectively. No significant difference was found between SU and RNU in terms of CSS or any other oncologic outcomes. Only patients with low-grade and noninvasive tumours experienced similar CSS after URS or PC when compared with RNU, despite an increased risk of local recurrence following endoscopic management of UTUC. The RoB assessment revealed, however, that the analyses were subject to a selection bias favouring KSS. Our systematic review suggests similar survival after KSS versus RNU only for low-grade and noninvasive UTUC when using URS or PC. However, selected patients with high-grade and invasive UTUC could safely benefit from SU when feasible. These results should be interpreted with caution due to the risk of selection bias. We reviewed the studies that

  5. Significance Disscuss of Transurethral Resection Secondary Treatment of Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer%经尿道二次电切治疗非肌层浸润性膀胱肿瘤的意义探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴卫星

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study the muscular layer in invasive bladder cancer treatment,the clinical effect of transurethral secondary cutting treatment.Method:50 patients after transurethral plasmakentic vaporization of electricity cut for the first time were selected,and they were muscularis invasive bladder cancer by pathological diagnosis,all patients underwent secondary electricity cut method ofter 4-6 weeks,the cancer histopathological characteristics after the primary surgery and the second postoperative were compared.Result:After treatment for secondary,in 50 patients,21 cases of tumor survival,20 cases found tumor residual lesions,6 cases found tumor missed lesions,5 patients already exists residual lesions and missed lesions. After treatment from the pathological staging,21 cases of tumor survival,10 cases of Ta,11 cases of T1 phase,8 cases progressed to T2 stage. Through the clinical analyzed,single factor and multiple factors that T1 phase,high grade and tumor diameter>3 cm were secondary electric cut operation pathological staging to T2 stage independent risk factors.Conclusion:Transurethral secondary cutting treatment,which can effectively improve the patient’s quality of life,the T1 phase,high grade and tumor>3 cm in diameter is independent risk factors in the development of disease,clinical should take seriously.%目的:探讨非肌层浸润性膀胱肿瘤治疗中,经尿道二次电切治疗的临床效果。方法:选取本院50例初次行经尿道电切之后,病理诊断为非肌层浸润性膀胱癌患者,全部患者于术后4~6周行二次电切术,比较初次手术与二次术后的肿瘤组织病理学特点。结果:经二次治疗后,50例患者中,21例无肿瘤生存,20例发现肿瘤残余病灶,6例发现肿瘤遗漏病灶,5例既存在残留病灶又存在遗漏病灶。治疗后从病理分期看,21例无肿瘤生存,10例为Ta期,11例为T1期,8例进展至T2期。经临床单因素

  6. Proteomics Analysis of Differentially Expressed Tropomyosin, Vimentin and HSP 70 in Highly Metastatic Sub-line of Human Hepatoma Cells%原肌球蛋白、波形纤维蛋白和热休克蛋白70在肝癌转移亚细胞中表达上调

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶丽虹; 秦宵然; 张晓东; 齐众; 钱令嘉; 侯志波; 王洪辉; 徐少峰

    2005-01-01

    建立并应用人H7402肝癌细胞SCID鼠肿瘤转移模型,从转移肺组织经原代细胞培养,筛选并建立转移亚细胞系M-H7402,进而运用蛋白质组学技术筛选肿瘤转移相关蛋白.通过二维电泳技术检测,比较M-H7402细胞和亲本H7402细胞的总蛋白,从多个差异蛋白质点中选择出3个在M-H7402细胞中表达明显上调的蛋白质点进行ESI-QUAD-TOF质谱分析,并在MSDB公共蛋白数据库中进行同源比较和分析鉴定.初步确定这3个蛋白质分别为原肌球蛋白(tropomyosin),波形纤维蛋白(vimentin)和热休克蛋白70(heat shock 70 protein,HSP70).这些蛋白质参与细胞骨架构成、蛋白质折叠和蛋白质相互作用等许多正常生理活动,并有报道原肌球蛋白和波形纤维蛋白与肿瘤转移有关.利用蛋白质组学方法发现,在肝癌转移亚细胞M-H7402中,原肌球蛋白、波形纤维蛋白和热休克蛋白70表达明显上调,进一步揭示它们在肿瘤转移中具有重要的作用.

  7. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer risk stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Isharwal

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: EORTC and CUETO risk tables are the two best-established models to predict recurrence and progression in patients with NMIBC though they tend to overestimate risk and have poor discrimination for prognostic outcomes in external validation. Future research should focus on enhancing the predictive accuracy of risk assessment tools by incorporating additional prognostic factors such as depth of lamina propria invasion and molecular biomarkers after rigorous validation in multi-institutional cohorts.

  8. Vanillin and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol promotes cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus of mice via the increase of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tropomyosin-related kinase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Chul; Hwang, In Koo; Park, Seung Min; Ahn, Ji Yun; Kim, Dong Won; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Jong-Dai; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Kang, Il-Jun

    2016-04-01

    4-Hydroxy‑3-methoxybenzaldehyde (vanillin) and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (4-HBA) are well‑known phenolic compounds, which possess various therapeutic properties and are widely found in a variety of plants. In the present study, the effects of vanillin and 4‑HBA were first investigated on cell proliferation, as well as neuronal differentiation and integration of granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of adolescent mice using Ki‑67, doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry and 5‑bromo‑2'‑deoxyuridine (BrdU)/feminizing Locus on X 3 (NeuN) double immunofluorescence. In both the vanillin and 4‑HBA groups, the number of Ki‑67+ cells, DCX+ neuroblasts and BrdU+/NeuN+ neurons were significantly increased in the subgranular zone of the DG, as compared with the vehicle group. In addition, the levels of brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin‑related kinase B (TrkB), a BDNF receptor, were significantly increased in the DG in the vanillin and 4‑HBA groups compared with the vehicle group. These results indicated that vanillin and 4‑HBA enhanced cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and integration of granule cells in the DG of adolescent mice . These neurogenic effects of vanillin and 4‑HBA may be closely associated with increases in BDNF and TrkB.

  9. Novel deletion of lysine 7 expands the clinical, histopathological and genetic spectrum of TPM2-related myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Ann E.; Carlson, Heather A.; Moore, Brian E.; Love, Seth; Born, Donald E.; Roper, Helen; Majumdar, Anirban; Jayadev, Suman; Underhill, Hunter R.; Smith, Corrine O.; von der Hagen, Maja; Hubner, Angela; Jardine, Philip; Merrison, Andria; Curtis, Elizabeth; Cullup, Thomas; Jungbluth, Heinz; Cox, Mary O.; Winder, Thomas L.; Abdel Salam, Hossam; Li, Jun Z.; Moore, Steven A.; Dowling, James J.

    2013-01-01

    The β-tropomyosin gene encodes a component of the sarcomeric thin filament. Rod-shaped dimers of tropomyosin regulate actin-myosin interactions and β-tropomyosin mutations have been associated with nemaline myopathy, cap myopathy, Escobar syndrome and distal arthrogryposis types 1A and 2B. In this study, we expand the allelic spectrum of β-tropomyosin-related myopathies through the identification of a novel β-tropomyosin mutation in two clinical contexts not previously associated with β-tropomyosin. The first clinical phenotype is core-rod myopathy, with a β-tropomyosin mutation uncovered by whole exome sequencing in a family with autosomal dominant distal myopathy and muscle biopsy features of both minicores and nemaline rods. The second phenotype, observed in four unrelated families, is autosomal dominant trismus-pseudocamptodactyly syndrome (distal arthrogryposis type 7; previously associated exclusively with myosin heavy chain 8 mutations). In all four families, the mutation identified was a novel 3-bp in-frame deletion (c.20_22del) that results in deletion of a conserved lysine at the seventh amino acid position (p.K7del). This is the first mutation identified in the extreme N-terminus of β-tropomyosin. To understand the potential pathogenic mechanism(s) underlying this mutation, we performed both computational analysis and in vivo modelling. Our theoretical model predicts that the mutation disrupts the N-terminus of the α-helices of dimeric β-tropomyosin, a change predicted to alter protein–protein binding between β-tropomyosin and other molecules and to disturb head-to-tail polymerization of β-tropomyosin dimers. To create an in vivo model, we expressed wild-type or p.K7del β-tropomyosin in the developing zebrafish. p.K7del β-tropomyosin fails to localize properly within the thin filament compartment and its expression alters sarcomere length, suggesting that the mutation interferes with head-to-tail β-tropomyosin polymerization and with

  10. The oncological results of laparoscopic nephroureterectomy for upper urinary tract transitional cell cancer are equal to those of open nephroureterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldert, Matthias; Remzi, Mesut; Klingler, Hans Christoph; Mueller, Lukas; Marberger, Michael

    2009-01-01

    To compare the overall, tumour-specific, recurrence-free, and progression- free survival of patients with upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (UUT-TCC) treated with laparoscopic nephroureterectomy (LNU) or standard open NU (ONU). Clinical, pathological and follow-up data were analysed for 43 LNUs and 59 ONUs performed at our institution from 1999 to 2006. In LNU the kidney was removed laparoscopically as in radical nephrectomy, but without transecting the ureter. The specimen was then removed intact with the entire ureter and a bladder cuff through a nonmuscle-splitting supra-inguinal incision. ONU was performed through separate intercostal and supra-inguinal incisions with the entire specimen being removed intact with a bladder cuff through the latter. The mean (SD) follow-up was 41 (20) months for LNU and 41 (29) for ONU. Pathological staging was: pTa 26% vs 20%, pT1 21% vs 27%, pT2 12% vs 17%, pT3 42% vs 34% for LNU and ONU, respectively. In all, seven vs six patients had positive nodes on final histology. Recurrent tumours in the bladder were detected in 26% of patients after LNU and in 27% after ONU after the mean follow-up. There were no local recurrences after LNU but there was local recurrence in six patients after ONU. There were no port-site metastases during the follow-up. Five LNU patients and seven ONU patients developed distant or lymph node metastasis. The actuarial 5-year tumour free-survival rate was 79% in the LNU group vs 76% in the ONU group (P = 0.82). The actuarial disease-specific survival at 5-years was 85% for LNU and 80% for ONU patients (P = 0.62). The surgical approach did not influence recurrence or survival. Oncological results of LNU and ONU are comparable. The lower morbidity of LNU offers advantages for the patient.

  11. Clinical impact of bladder biopsies with TUR-BT according to cytology results in patients with bladder cancer: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsumoto Kazuhiro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There seems to be no consensus concerning taking bladder biopsies during transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT. We investigate the clinical significance of bladder biopsy with TUR-BT and the relationship between urinary cytology and the biopsy results. Methods We reviewed a total of 424 patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer treated with TUR-BT between 1998 and 2005. Of the total, 293 patients also underwent a bladder biopsy. Biopsies from suspicious-appearing urothelium (N = 59 and those from normal-appearing urothelium (N = 234 were evaluated separately. Results Bladder cancer was observed in 23 cases (39.0% who underwent a biopsy of suspicious-appearing urothelium. Among these 23 cases, 9 cases with visible tumor resection had carcinoma in situ (CIS only in the biopsies from suspicious-appearing urothelium. Urinary cytology was negative in 3 of the 9 cases. Bladder cancer was observed in 26 cases (11.1% who underwent a biopsy of normal-appearing urothelium. Of them, 5 cases with visible tumors had CIS only in the multiple biopsies from normal-appearing urothelium. Urinary cytology was positive in all of the 5 cases. No upstaging or upgrading cases were found in these patients by the addition of these two types of biopsy. Furthermore, therapy was not altered in these patients. With or without bladder biopsy was not a significant factor for tumor recurrence in either the univariate or multivariate analysis. Conclusions Based on the results, it is concluded the multiple biopsies from normal-appearing urothelium are not necessary in patients with negative cytology results because of the low detection rate and lack of influence on therapeutic decisions. Meanwhile, biopsy of suspicious-appearing urothelium is needed in patients with negative cytology results in order to detect CIS due to staging properties. This result supports a recent EAU guideline.

  12. Cholesterol testing and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholesterol test results; LDL test results; VLDL test results; HDL test results; Coronary risk profile results; Hyperlipidemia- ... Some cholesterol is considered good and some is considered bad. Different blood tests can be done to measure each ...

  13. OCD-like behavior is caused by dysfunction of thalamo-amygdala circuits and upregulated TrkB/ERK-MAPK signaling as a result of SPRED2 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, M; Weber, M; Post, A M; Popp, S; Grein, J; Zechner, M; Guerrero González, H; Kreis, A; Schmitt, A G; Üçeyler, N; Lesch, K-P; Schuh, K

    2017-01-10

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common neuropsychiatric disease affecting about 2% of the general population. It is characterized by persistent intrusive thoughts and repetitive ritualized behaviors. While gene variations, malfunction of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuits, and dysregulated synaptic transmission have been implicated in the pathogenesis of OCD, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we show that OCD-like behavior in mice is caused by deficiency of SPRED2, a protein expressed in various brain regions and a potent inhibitor of Ras/ERK-MAPK signaling. Excessive self-grooming, reflecting OCD-like behavior in rodents, resulted in facial skin lesions in SPRED2 knockout (KO) mice. This was alleviated by treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. In addition to the previously suggested involvement of cortico-striatal circuits, electrophysiological measurements revealed altered transmission at thalamo-amygdala synapses and morphological differences in lateral amygdala neurons of SPRED2 KO mice. Changes in synaptic function were accompanied by dysregulated expression of various pre- and postsynaptic proteins in the amygdala. This was a result of altered gene transcription and triggered upstream by upregulated tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB)/ERK-MAPK signaling in the amygdala of SPRED2 KO mice. Pathway overactivation was mediated by increased activity of TrkB, Ras, and ERK as a specific result of SPRED2 deficiency and not elicited by elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. Using the MEK inhibitor selumetinib, we suppressed TrkB/ERK-MAPK pathway activity in vivo and reduced OCD-like grooming in SPRED2 KO mice. Altogether, this study identifies SPRED2 as a promising new regulator, TrkB/ERK-MAPK signaling as a novel mediating mechanism, and thalamo-amygdala synapses as critical circuitry involved in the pathogenesis of OCD.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 10 January

  14. RESULTS RESULTING FROM AUTOFRETTAGE OF CYLINDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ruilin

    2008-01-01

    Autofrettage is used to introduce advantageous residual stresses into wall of a cylinder and to even distributions of total stresses. Basic theory on autofrettage has been functioning for several decades. It is necessary to reveal profound relations between parameters in the theory. Therefore, based on the 3rd strength theory, δei/δy, δei/δy, δei′/δy, δei′/δy and their relations, as well as p/δy, are studied under ideal conditions, where δei/δy is equivalent stress of total stresses at elastoplastic juncture/yield strength, δei/δy is equivalent stress of total stresses at inside surface/yield strength, δei′/δy is equivalent stress of residual stresses at elastoplastic juncture/yield strength, δei′/δy is equivalent stress of residual stresses at inside surface/yield strength, p/δy is load-bearing capacity of an autofrettaged cylinder/yield strength. Theoretical study on the parameters results in noticeable results and laws. The main idea is: to satisfy |δei′|=δy, the relation between kj and k is , where k is outside/inside radius ratio of a cylinder, kj is ratio of elastoplastic juncture radius to inside radius of a cylinder; when the plastic region covers the whole wall of a cylinder, for compressive yield not to occur after removing autofrettage pressure, the ultimate k is k=2.218 46, with k=2.218 46, a cylinder's ultimate load-bearing capacity equals its entire yield pressure, or =lnk; when kj≤=1.648 72, no matter how great k is, compressive yield never occurs after removing pa; the maximum and optimum load-bearing capacity of an autofrettaged cylinder is just two times the loading which an unautofrettaged cylinder can bear elastically, or , thus the limit of the load-bearing capacity of an autofrettaged cylinder is also just 2 times that of an unautofrettaged cylinder.

  15. Studies of muscle proteins in embryonic myocardial cells of cardiac lethal mutant mexican axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) by use of heavy meromyosin binding and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    In the Mexican axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum recessive mutant gene c, by way of abnormal inductive processes from surrounding tissues, results in an absence of embryonic heart function. The lack of contractions in mutant heart cells apparently results from their inability to form normally organized myofibrils, even though a few actin-like (60-A) and myosin-like (150-A) filaments are present. Amorphous "proteinaceous" collections are often visible. In the present study, heavy meromyosin (HMM) treatment of mutant heart tissue greatly increases the number of thin filaments and decorates them in the usual fashion, confirming that they are actin. The amorphous collections disappear with the addition of HMM. In addition, an analysis of the constituent proteins of normal and mutant embryonic hearts and other tissues is made by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoresis. These experiments are in full agreement with the morphological and HMM binding studies. The gels show distinct 42,000-dalton bands for both normal and mutant hearts, supporting the presence of normal actin. During early developmental stages (Harrison's stage 34) the cardiac tissues in normal and mutant siblings have indistinguishable banding patterns, but with increasing development several differences appear. Myosin heavy chain (200,000 daltons) increases substantially in normal hearts during development but very little in mutants. Even so the quantity of 200,000-dalton protein in mutant hearts is significantly more than in any of the nonmuscle tissues studied (i.e. gut, liver, brain). Unlike normal hearts, the mutant hearts lack a prominent 34,000-dalton band, indicating that if mutants contain muscle tropomyosin at all, it is present in drastically reduced amounts. Also, mutant hearts retain large amounts of yolk proteins at stages when the platelets have virtually disappeared from normal hearts. The morphologies and electrophoresis patterns of skeletal muscle from normal and mutant siblings are

  16. Resultative Predicates in Japanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Takamine

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Washio (1997; 1999 observes that resultative predicates are divided into two different groups, strong and weak resultatives, depending on ‘patienthood’ of the object. This typology of resultatives seems to capture a point of crosslinguistic variation in resultatives; Japanese has weak but not strong resultatives, while English has both. Washio also observes that there is another group of examples that bears a superficial resemblance to resultatives but constitutes a different phenomenon, hence spurious resultatives. The difference between weak and strong resultatives is made in terms of the ‘affectedness’ of the verb. Thus the typology of resultatives proposed by Washio is semantically grounded. In this paper, I propose: (i a fine-grained distinction for Washio’s weak resultatives: (ii a syntactic analysis of the different resultative types. On the basis of syntactic evidence, I argue that there are two types of weak resultatives, an adjunct of VP and a complement of VP within the vP projection. I also argue that spurious resultatives are structurally higher than weak resultatives in Japanese.

  17. Total 2004 results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-02-01

    This document presents the 2004 results of Total Group: consolidated account, special items, number of shares, market environment, adjustment for amortization of Sanofi-Aventis merger-related intangibles, 4. quarter 2004 results (operating and net incomes, cash flow), upstream (results, production, reserves, recent highlights), downstream (results, refinery throughput, recent highlights), chemicals (results, recent highlights), Total's full year 2004 results (operating and net income, cash flow), 2005 sensitivities, Total SA parent company accounts and proposed dividend, adoption of IFRS accounting, summary and outlook, main operating information by segment for the 4. quarter and full year 2004: upstream (combined liquids and gas production by region, liquids production by region, gas production by region), downstream (refined product sales by region, chemicals), Total financial statements: consolidated statement of income, consolidated balance sheet (assets, liabilities and shareholder's equity), consolidated statements of cash flows, business segments information. (J.S.)

  18. Unfavorable results in replantation

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham G Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Reattachment of amputated parts of the body (Replantation) has become a reality since the first arm replant was carried out six decades ago. Failures were not uncommon in the beginning, leading on to the analysis of the problem and refinements in technique. Improvements in sutures, instrumentation and better microscopes further helped the surgeons to do replantation with better finesse and functional results. Evaluation of results and particularly failure and long term results help the younge...

  19. Overview of ALICE results

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The ALICE detector was designed to study the physics of matter under extreme conditions of high energy density. Different results were reported by the experiment using data from the successful run I of the LHC. The goal of the present work is to present an overview of recent ALICE results. This comprises selected results from several analyses of pp, p-pb and Pb-Pb data at the LHC energies.

  20. The Arising of Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobisch, Jan-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Some Buddhist scholars have periodized the expected lifetime of the Buddha's teachings. According to them, these periods of 500 years each have different characteristics. The first is called 'the period of the results'. Therefore some scholars have claimed that only in the first 500 years after...... the Buddha results can arise. Kyobpa Jigten Sumgön has argued that results arise through practise as long as Dharma and Sangha exist....

  1. New results from COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Kabuß, Eva-Maria

    2015-01-01

    An overview on recent COMPASS results is given, including the extraction of the longitudinal spin structure functions interpreted with a NLO QCD fit, new results on the gluon polarisation and a measurement of pion and kaon multiplicities with a LO extraction of quark-to-hadron fragmentation functions

  2. Duration and Results (PECODR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Dawes

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions Results suggest a PECODR-related structure exists in medical abstracts and that there might be lexical patterns specific to these elements. More sophisticated computer-assisted lexical-semantic analysis might refine these results, and pave the way to automating PECODR indexing, and improve information retrieval in primary care.

  3. Recent results from TRISTAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enomoto, Ryoji [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-01-01

    TRISTAN results on {gamma}{gamma} physics from 1994 to 1995 are reviewed in this report. We have systematically investigated jet production, the {gamma}-structure function, and charm pair production in {gamma}{gamma} processes. The results are discussed, and future prospects are presented.

  4. Haiti DevResults

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — DevResults is a web-based portfolio management system that tracks program data for the Haiti Mission that was awarded in April of 2013. (The Mozambique and/or...

  5. Transacsys PLC - Final Results

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Final results from Transacsys PLC. A subsidary of this company was set up to develop the CERN EDH system into a commercial product but incurred too much financial loss so the project was cancelled (1/2 page).

  6. Ibis DDT test results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains test results from a study done to determine the organochlorine levels in the livers of white-faced ibis from Stillwater Wildlife Management...

  7. Arsenic speciation results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Linear combination fitting results of synchrotron data to determine arsenic speciation in soil samples. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  8. Microenterprise Results Reporting

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Microenterprise Results Reporting (MRR) is an annual report to the U.S. Congress providing funding and program data on USAID's microenterprise activities. The MRR...

  9. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Di Ciaccio, Anna; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    This talk presents recent ATLAS results on performances and physics concerning in particular: di-boson, single top cross-section measurements, Higgs measurement, SUSY and beyond Standard model searches.

  10. ATLAS physics results

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2074312

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been successfully taking data since the end of 2009 in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, and in heavy ion collisions. In these lectures, some of the most recent ATLAS results will be given on Standard Model measurements, the discovery of the Higgs boson, searches for supersymmetry and exotics and on heavy-ion results.

  11. SLD electroweak physics results

    CERN Document Server

    De Groot, N

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present three updates to heavy flavour results from the SLD detector at SLAC. These results are preliminary, based on our full 1993-1998 dataset of 550 000 hadronic Z0 decays produced with an average electron polarisation of 73%. The new measurements are of the hadronic branching fractions into heavy quarks (Rb, Rc), the b quark asymmetry (Ab) using jet charge, and the heavy quark asymmetries (Ab and Ac) using vertex charge and kaons.

  12. Higgs results from ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The updated Higgs measurements in various search channels with ATLAS Run 1 data are reviewed. Both the Standard Model (SM Higgs results, such as H → γγ, ZZ, WW, ττ, μμ, bb̄, and Beyond Standard Model (BSM results, such as the charged Higgs, Higgs invisible decay and tensor couplings, are summarized. Prospects for future Higgs searches are briefly discussed.

  13. Unfavorable results in replantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham G Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reattachment of amputated parts of the body (Replantation has become a reality since the first arm replant was carried out six decades ago. Failures were not uncommon in the beginning, leading on to the analysis of the problem and refinements in technique. Improvements in sutures, instrumentation and better microscopes further helped the surgeons to do replantation with better finesse and functional results. Evaluation of results and particularly failure and long term results help the younger surgeons to learn from the difficulties faced earlier to do better in the future. An attempt is made to list various aspects of replantation experienced by the author during the past 30 years, particularly in reference to unfavorable results, which had been occasionally total failure, or a partial failure, with poor function and cosmesis due to infection. An insensate limb with poor function is the result of inadequate or improper nerve coaptation or infection destroying the whole repair. It is apt to mention that infection is mostly the result of poor vascularity due to devitalized tissue. Difficulties arise often in identifying the viable tissue, particularly while debriding in the distal amputated part since there is no bleeding. Experience counts in this, specifically to identify the viable muscle. The factors that may lead to complications are listed with remarks to avoid them.

  14. Unfavorable results in replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Abraham G

    2013-05-01

    Reattachment of amputated parts of the body (Replantation) has become a reality since the first arm replant was carried out six decades ago. Failures were not uncommon in the beginning, leading on to the analysis of the problem and refinements in technique. Improvements in sutures, instrumentation and better microscopes further helped the surgeons to do replantation with better finesse and functional results. Evaluation of results and particularly failure and long term results help the younger surgeons to learn from the difficulties faced earlier to do better in the future. An attempt is made to list various aspects of replantation experienced by the author during the past 30 years, particularly in reference to unfavorable results, which had been occasionally total failure, or a partial failure, with poor function and cosmesis due to infection. An insensate limb with poor function is the result of inadequate or improper nerve coaptation or infection destroying the whole repair. It is apt to mention that infection is mostly the result of poor vascularity due to devitalized tissue. Difficulties arise often in identifying the viable tissue, particularly while debriding in the distal amputated part since there is no bleeding. Experience counts in this, specifically to identify the viable muscle. The factors that may lead to complications are listed with remarks to avoid them.

  15. New results from KLOE

    CERN Document Server

    Versaci, R; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, S; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Bowring, D; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finoc-, G; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Incagli, M; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Xu, G

    2007-01-01

    The most precise determination of Vus comes from semileptonic kaon decays. We have measured with the KLOE detector at DAFNE, the Frascati phi-factory, all the experimental inputs to Vus for both neutral and charged kaons. Using our results we extract the value of Vus with ~0.9% fractional error, which is dominated by the theoretical error on the form factor, f+(0). A new determination of the ratio Vus/Vud is also presented, based on our precise measurement of the absolute branching ratio for the decay K -> mu nu (gamma), combined with lattice results for the ratio f_K/f_pi. New results on CPT symmetry and quantum mechanics test have also been achieved, which are based on the first measurement of the charged asymmetry for KS -> pi e nu decay and on interferometry studies using the phi -> KL KS -> pi+ pi- pi+ pi-.

  16. NIH Research to Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) is researching treatments that can be given in the first hours after a TBI to prevent or reverse much of the brain damage resulting from the injury. A recently completed NINDS– ...

  17. Recent CDF results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2007-11-01

    As of November of 2007, the CDF detector has recorded approximately 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data. This contribution describes some of the most recent and most relevant results from the CDF collaboration in all areas of its wide physics program, as well as some insights into the Tevatron reach for Higgs searches within the next few years.

  18. Top Quark Results

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS collaboration; LHCb collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of top quarks from Run-I and Run-II of the LHC are presented. Results on differential and inclusive top quark production cross sections, measured by the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments, and measurements of top quark properties and mass are reported.

  19. Sharing Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    There are many ways to share a collection of data and students' thinking about that data. Explaining the results of science inquiry is important--working scientists and amateurs both contribute information to the body of scientific knowledge. Students can collect data about an activity that is already happening in a classroom (e.g., the qualities…

  20. Results of CPLEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickenbach, R. [Basel Univ. (Switzerland); Adler, R. [Basel Univ. (Switzerland); Alhalel, T.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Aslanides, E.; Backenstoss, G.; Bargassa, P.; Bee, C.P.; Behnke, O.; Benelli, A.; Bertin, V.; Blanc, F.; Bloch, P.; Carlson, P.; Carroll, M.; Carvalho, J.; Cawley, E.; Charalambous, S.; Chardin, G.; Chertok, M.B.; Cody, A.; Danielsson, M.; Dejardin, M.; Derre, J.; Ealet, A.; Eckart, B.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Evangelou, I.; Faravel, L.; Fassnacht, P.; Felder, C.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fetscher, W.; Fidecaro, M.; Filipcic, A.; Francis, D.; Fry, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Garreta, D.; Gerber, H.-J.; Go, A.; Guyot, C.; Haselden, A.; Hayman, P.J.; Henry-Couannier, F.; Hollander, R.W.; Hubert, E.; Jon-And, K.; Kettle, P.-R.; Kochowski, C.; Kokkas, P.; Kreuger, R.; Le Gac, R.; Leimgruber, F.; Liolios, A.; Machado, E.; Mandic, I.; Manthos, N.; Marel, G.; Mikuz, M.; Miller, J.; Montanet, F.; Nakada, T.; Pagels, B.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Policarpo, A.; Polivka, G.; Roberts, B.L.; Ruf, T.; Sakeliou, L.; Sanders, P.; Santoni, C.; Schaefer, M.; Schaller, L.A.; Schietinger, T.; Schopper, A.; Schune, P.; Soares, A.; Tauscher, L.; Thibault, C.; Touchard, F.; Touramanis, C.; Triantis, F.; Van Beveren, E.; Van Eijk, C.W.E.; Vlachos, S.; Weber, P.; Wigger, O.; Wolter, M.; Yeche, C.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimmerman, D.; CPLEAR Collaboration

    1997-06-01

    The CPLEAR experiment uses tagged K{sup 0} and K{sup 0} produced in pp annihilation at rest to measure CP-, T- and CPT-violation parameters in the neutral kaon system. The results of these measurements and some implications are reported. (orig.).

  1. Recent results from MAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAC Collaboration

    1982-05-01

    Some preliminary results from the MAC detector at PEP are presented. These include measurements of the angular distribution of ..gamma gamma.., ..mu mu.. and tau tau final states, a determination of the tau lifetime, a measurement of R, and a presentation of the inclusive muon p/sub perpendicular/ distribution for hadronic events.

  2. CPT Results from Ktev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hogan

    2002-02-01

    We present several preliminary measurements from KTeVREFID="9789812778123_0014FN001"> of the fundamental neutral K parameters, and their implications for CPT violation. A new limit is given on the sidereal time dependence of φ+-. The results are based on data collected in 1996-97.

  3. Recent results from INDRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chbihi A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results of the INDRA collaboration are presented in this contribution. They concern the evolution of reaction dynamics from the first stage of the collision to the production of fragments. Different probes are used to evidence the stopping/transparency, collective flow and the symmetry energy term of the nuclear equation of state.

  4. Roadmap of Infinite Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive summary of equivalence checking results for infinite-state systems. References to the relevant papers will be updated continuously according to the development in the area. The most recent version of this document is available from the web-page http://www.brics.dk/~srba/roadmap....

  5. Recent CMS Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorigo Tommaso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The CMS experiment obtained a large number of groundbreaking results from the analysis of 7- and 8-TeV proton-proton collisions produced so far by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In this brief summary only a few of those results will be discussed. The new scalar discovered in 2012 has been studied in detail and all its characteristics have been found in agreement with standard model predictions for a Brout-Englert-Higgs boson. The large sample of top quark events collected in 2011 and 2012 have allowed world-class measurements of its mass; the combination of those results is Mt = 173.49 ± 0.36 ± 0.91 GeV. The rare decay Bs0 → μμ has been observed and found in agreement with standard model predictions; the search for the rare decay B0 → μμ has allowed to set a 95% CL limit on the branching fraction at 1.1 × 10−9. These two results strongly constrain new physics models.

  6. Review of LEP results

    CERN Document Server

    Parodi, F

    2001-01-01

    I present a review of the results obtained during 10 years of activity in b-physics at LEP. Special emphasis is put on measurements that attained precisions not even envisaged at the beginning of the LEP programme (V/sub ub/ and Delta m/sub s/). Finally the impact of these measurements on the CKM parameters determination is presented. (16 refs).

  7. Results from ARGUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darden, C.

    1984-10-01

    The ARGUS collaboration reports results bearing on the fragmentation function for D*± mesons, the mass of the F± meson, the decays F±→φπ± and F±→φπ+π-π±, the decay γ'→π+π-γ and the radiative decay γ'→γΥ(3Pj).

  8. Your Kidney Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Less than 200 Your Result: HDL Cholesterol LDL Cholesterol Triglycerides Hemoglobin (Hgb) *Normal ranges may vary. Normal: More ... out of your arteries. LDL is the bad cholesterol and can clog your arteries. Triglyceride is a type of fat in the blood. ...

  9. Final results from the $\

    CERN Document Server

    Vidal-Sitjes, G

    2001-01-01

    An updated analysis of the full NOMAD data corresponding to approx 1.35 x 10 sup 6 charged current interactions has been performed to search for neutrino oscillations through nu subtau appearance. This document updates the recently published results on the nu submu -> nu subtau and nu submu -> nu sub e oscillations search in NOMAD with a unified analysis of the hadronic channels.

  10. Plan Merging: Experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Weerdt, M.M.; Van der Krogt, R.P.J.; Zutt, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the results of a plan merging algorithm. This algorithm coordinates the plans of multiple, autonomous agents, each able to independently find a plan. This algorithm is evaluated using realistic data from a taxi company. We show that when we allow passengers to be a few minut

  11. CLEO Results B Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Cassel, David G

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of many Standard Model constants are clouded by uncertainties in nonperturbative QCD parameters that relate measurable quantities to the underlying parton-level processes. Generally these QCD parameters have been obtained from model calculations with large uncertainties that are difficult to quantify. The CLEO Collaboration has taken a major step towards reducing these uncertainties in determining the CKM matrix elements Vcb and Vub using new measurements of the branching fraction and photon energy spectrum of B -> s gamma decays. This report includes: the new CLEO measurements of B -> s gamma decays, Vcb, and Vub; the first results from CLEO III data -- studies of B -> K pi, pi pi, and K Kbar decays; mention of some other recent CLEO B decay results; and plans for operating CESR and CLEO in the charm threshold region.

  12. RESULTS OF SLICE MEASUREMENTS

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, J

    2011-01-01

    The linear accelerator ELBE delivers high-brightness electron bunches to multiple user stations, including two IR-FEL oscillators [1], [2]. In the framework of an upgrade program the current thermionic injector is being replaced by a SRF-photoinjector [3], [4]. The SRF injector promises higher beam quality, especially required for future experiments with high power laser radiation. During the commissioning phase, the SRF-injector was running in parallel to the thermionic gun. After installation of a injection beamline (dogleg), beam from the SRF-injector can now be injected into the ELBE linac. Detailed characterization of the electron beam quality delivered by the new electron injector includes vertical slice emittance measurements in addition to measurements of projected emittance values. This report gives an overview of the status of the project and summarizes first measurement results as well as results of simulations performed with measurement settings.

  13. Early results from ISO

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    First findings by Europe's new space telescope ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) will be announced at a press conference to be held at ESA's satellite tracking station in Villafranca, Apartado 50727 - 28080-Madrid, on Wednesday 14 February 1996 Astronomers responsible for ISO's instruments will show results ranging from materials in the planet Saturn, through the birth and death of stars, to the behaviour of colliding galaxies. All instruments are working well and even their preliminary results confirm that ISO is a unique observatory making an unprecedented exploration of the universe by infrared rays. Parallel press conferences will be held at ESA Headquarters in Paris, ESTEC Noordwijk (the Netherlands) and ESOC Darmstadt (Germany) where a live television link will be established with Villafranca and from where the media can participate in the discussion.

  14. New Results from RENO

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    RENO (Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation) is an experiment dedicated to measure the smallest neutrino mixing angle {\\theta}_13 using reactor neutrinos in Korea. Our first result measured in 2012 using about 220 live days of data showed non-zero {\\theta}_13 value with 4.9 {\\sigma} significance. In March 2013 we updated our first result with improvements in both statistical and systematic errors using 403 live days of data. The measured value using rate-only analysis is sin^2(2{\\theta}_13) = 0.100 +/- 0.010 (stat) +/- 0.015 (sys.) corresponding to 6.3 {\\sigma} significance. RENO has been taking data almost continuously since August 2011 and we have reached more than 800 live days of data that is currently being analyzed.

  15. Final NOMAD results on $\

    CERN Document Server

    Astier, Pierre; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldo-Ceolin, Massimilla; Banner, M; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Benslama, K; Besson, N; Bird, I; Blumenfeld, B; Bobisut, F; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S; Bueno, A G; Bunyatov, S A; Camilleri, L L; Cardini, A; Cattaneo, Paolo Walter; Cavasinni, V; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Chukanov, A; Collazuol, G; Conforto, G; Conta, C; Contalbrigo, M; Cousins, R D; Daniels, D C; Degaudenzi, H M; Del Prete, T; De Santo, A; Dignan, T; Di Lella, L; do Couto e Silva, E; Dumarchez, J; Ellis, M; Feldman, G J; Ferrari, R; Ferrère, D; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Fraternali, M; Gaillard, Jean-Marc; Gangler, E; Geiser, A; Geppert, D; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S N; Godley, A; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gosset, J; Gössling, C; Gouanère, M; Grant, A; Graziani, G; Guglielmi, A M; Hagner, C; Hernando, J; Hubbard, D B; Hurst, P; Hyett, N; Iacopini, E; Joseph, C L; Juget, F R; Kirsanov, M M; Klimov, O L; Kokkonen, J; Kovzelev, A; Krasnoperov, A V; Kustov, D V; Kuznetsov, V E; Lacaprara, S; Lachaud, C; Lakic, B; Lanza, A; La Rotonda, L; Laveder, M; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Lévy, J M; Linssen, Lucie; Ljubicic, A; Long, J; Lupi, A; Marchionni, A; Martelli, F; Méchain, X; Mendiburu, J P; Meyer, J P; Mezzetto, Mauro; Mishra, S R; Moorhead, G F; Naumov, D V; Nédélec, P; Nefedov, Yu A; Nguyen-Mau, C; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Peak, L S; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Petti, R; Placci, Alfredo; Polesello, G; Pollmann, D; Polyarush, A Yu; Popov, B; Poulsen, C; Rico, J; Riemann, P; Roda, C; Rubbia, André; Salvatore, F; Schahmaneche, K; Schmidt, B; Schmidt, T; Sconza, A; Sevior, M E; Sillou, D; Soler, F J P; Sozzi, G; Steele, D; Stiegler, U; Stipcevic, M; Stolarczyk, T; Tareb-Reyes, M; Taylor, G N; Tereshchenko, V V; Toropin, A N; Touchard, A M; Tovey, Stuart N; Tran, M T; Tsesmelis, E; Ulrichs, J; Vacavant, L; Valdata-Nappi, M; Valuev, V Yu; Vannucci, François; Varvell, K E; Veltri, M; Vercesi, V; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Vieira, J M; Vinogradova, T G; Weber, F V; Weisse, T; Wilson, F F; Winton, L J; Yabsley, B D; Zaccone, Henri; Zuber, K; Zuccon, P; Krasnoperov, A V

    2001-01-01

    Results from the nu_tau appearance search in a neutrino beam using the full NOMAD data sample are reported. A new analysis unifies all the hadronic tau decays, significantly improving the overall sensitivity of the experiment to oscillations. The "blind analysis" of all topologies yields no evidence for an oscillation signal. In the two-family oscillation scenario, this sets a 90% C.L. allowed region in the sin^2(2theta)-Delta m^2 plane which includes sin^2(2theta)nu_tau oscillation hypothesis results in sin^2(2theta)<1.5 x 10^{-2} at large Delta m^2 and Delta m^2 < 5.9 eV^2/c^4 at sin^2(2theta)=1. We also derive limits on effective couplings of the tau lepton to nu_mu or nu_e.

  16. Recent results from LEP

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Gurtu

    2000-04-01

    Recent results from the LEP collider at CERN are presented: on the identification of +- → +- and the determination of the mass and width and limits on its anomalous couplings; the search for the Standard Model and non-minimal Higgs; search for SUSY and other new particles. Fits to all electroweak data leading to predictions of the Higgs mass within the Standard Model are presented.

  17. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has undertaken a broad physics program to probe and characterize the hot nuclear matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. This talk presents recent results based on Run 2 data on production of jet, electroweak bosons and quarkonium, electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions, and bulk particle collectivity from PbPb, pPb and pp collisions.

  18. Recent QCD Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lincoln, Don

    2009-01-01

    The study of the inelastic scattering of hadrons has progressed in the last decade. With the availability of high-statistics data sets from HERA and the Tevatron, our understanding of high energy and high jet multiplicity events has become rather precise. In this Proceedings, I present an overview of recent jet-only results, as well as measurements of events which combine both jets and a W or Z boson.

  19. Recent BABAR Results

    CERN Document Server

    Eigen, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    We present herein the most recent BABAR results on direct CP asymmetry measurements in B -> Xs gamma, on partial branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements in B -> Xs l+l-, on a search for B -> pi/eta l+l- decays, on a search for lepton number violation in B -> X-l+l'+ modes and a study of B-> omega omega and B-> omega phi decays.

  20. GIRAFFE test results summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokobori, S.; Arai, K.; Oikawa, H. [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    A passive system can provide engineered safety features enhancing safety system reliability and plant simplicity. Toshiba has conducted the test Program to demonstrate the feasibility of the SBWR passive safety system using a full-height, integral system test facility GIRAFFE. The test facility GIRAFFE models the SBWR in full height to correctly present the gravity driving head forces with a 1/400 volume scale. The GIRAFFE test Program includes the certification tests of the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) to remove the post-accident decay heat and the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) to replenish the reactor coolant inventory during a LOCA. The test results have confirmed the PCCS and GDCS design and in addition, have demonstrated the operation of the pCCS with the presence of a lighter-than-steam noncondensable as well as with the presence of a heavier-than-steam, noncondensable. The GIRAFFE test Program has also provided the database to qualify a best estimate thermal-hydraulic computer code TRAC. The post test analysis results have shown that TRAC can accurately predict the PCCS heat removal Performance and the containment pressure response to a LOCA. This paper summarizes the GIRAFFE test results to investigate post-LOCA PCCS heat removal performance and post-test analysis using TRAC.

  1. Explaining embodied cognition results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoff, George

    2012-10-01

    From the late 1950s until 1975, cognition was understood mainly as disembodied symbol manipulation in cognitive psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and the nascent field of Cognitive Science. The idea of embodied cognition entered the field of Cognitive Linguistics at its beginning in 1975. Since then, cognitive linguists, working with neuroscientists, computer scientists, and experimental psychologists, have been developing a neural theory of thought and language (NTTL). Central to NTTL are the following ideas: (a) we think with our brains, that is, thought is physical and is carried out by functional neural circuitry; (b) what makes thought meaningful are the ways those neural circuits are connected to the body and characterize embodied experience; (c) so-called abstract ideas are embodied in this way as well, as is language. Experimental results in embodied cognition are seen not only as confirming NTTL but also explained via NTTL, mostly via the neural theory of conceptual metaphor. Left behind more than three decades ago is the old idea that cognition uses the abstract manipulation of disembodied symbols that are meaningless in themselves but that somehow constitute internal "representations of external reality" without serious mediation by the body and brain. This article uniquely explains the connections between embodied cognition results since that time and results from cognitive linguistics, experimental psychology, computational modeling, and neuroscience.

  2. Pressure locking test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  3. Results of railgun experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Peterson, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    During the 1979 Megagauss II conference the hypervelocity potential of railguns and the pulsed power technology needed to power them were discussed. Since then, many laboratories have initiated railgun R and D projects for a variety of potential applications. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories initiated a collaborative experimental railgun project which resulted in several successes in accelerating projectiles to high velocities, emphasized the limits on railgun operation, and indicated that the numerical modeling of railgun operation was in good agreement with the experiments.

  4. Recent BABAR Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigen, Gerald [University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics

    2015-04-29

    We present herein the most recent BABAR results on direct CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xsγ, on partial branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xs+-, on a search for B → π/ηℓ+- decays, on a search for lepton number violation in B+ → X-+ℓ'+ modes and a study of B0 →ωω and B0 → ωφ decays.

  5. Results from AMANDA

    CERN Document Server

    Wiebusch, C; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Becka, T; Becker, K H; Bertrand, D; Bernadini, E; Binon, Freddy G; Biron, A; Boser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Bouhali, O; Burgess, T; Carius, S; Castermans, T; Chen, A; Chirkin, D; Conrad, J; Cooley, J; Cowen, D F; Davour, A; De Clercq, C; De Young, T R; Desiati, P; Dewulf, J P; Doksus, P; Ekstrom, P; Feser, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaug, M; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hardtke, R; Hauschildt, T; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hulth, P O; Hundertmark, S; Jacobsen, J; Karle, A; Koci, B; Köpke, L; Kowalski, M; Kühn, K; Lamoureux, J I; Leich, H; Leuthold, M J; Lindahl, P; Liubarsky, I; Madsen, J; Marciniewski, P; Matis, H S; McParland, C P; Minaeva, Y; Minocinovic, P; Mock, P C; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Neunhoffer, T; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ögelman, H B; Olbrechts, P; Pérez de los Heros, C; Pohl, A C; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richter, S; Rodríguez-Martino, J; Ross, D; Sander, H G; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Schwarz, R; Silvestri, A; Solarz, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Steele, D; Steffen, P; Stokstad, R G; Sudhoff, P; Sulanke, K H; Taboada, I; Thollander, L; Tilav, S; Walck, C; Weinheimer, C; Wiebusch, C; Wiedemann, C; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Yodh, G B; Young, S

    2002-01-01

    The Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) is a high- energy neutrino telescope operating at the geographic South Pole. It is a lattice of photomultiplier tubes buried deep in the polar ice. The primary goal of this detector is to discover astrophysical sources of high energy neutrinos. We describe the detector methods of operation and present results from the AMANDA-B10 prototype. We demonstrate the improved sensitivity of the current AMANDA-II detector. We conclude with an outlook to the envisioned sensitivity of the future IceCube detector. (37 refs).

  6. Latest LHCb results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinelli Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The LHCb experiment is one of the major research projects at the Large Hadron Collider. Its acceptance and instrumentation is optimised to perform high-precision studies of flavour physics and particle production in a unique kinematic range at unprecedented collision energies. Using large data samples accumulated in the years 2010-2012, the LHCb collaboration has conducted a series of measurements providing a sensitive test of the Standard Model and strengthening our knowledge of flavour physics, QCD and electroweak processes. The status of the experiment and some of its recent results are presented here.

  7. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The heavy-ion programme in the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider aims to probe and characterise hot and dense matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. Moreover, smaller collision systems involving nuclei and hadrons are of interest to disentangle initial- from final-state effects. This report presents new results based on lead-lead and proton-proton data collected at √sNN = 5.02 TeV in 2015, including measurements of bulk collectivity, charged-particle production, electroweak bosons, photon-jet correlations, and quarkonium suppression. First attempts to measure electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions are also discussed.

  8. Recent results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Dordevic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    The highlights of the most recent CMS results with 13 TeV data will be presented in this overview. The Standard Model precision measurements, including the top quark production, will be shown first. This will be followed by the presentation of Higgs boson studies with the early 13 TeV data. Then the focus will shift to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, including the searches for several Supersymmetric scenarios, using different analysis techniques. The talk will conclude with searches for the exotic resonances, with an emphasis on studies of the high-mass diphoton production.

  9. New results from CLEO

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovin, M S; Huang, G S; Lee, J; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Rangarajan, R; Sanghi, B; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Park, C S; Park, W; Thayer, J B; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Mountain, R; Muramatsu, H; Nandakumar, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; McGee, S; Bornheim, A; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Boisvert, V; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Magerkurth, A; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Richichi, S J; Riley, D; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Warburton, A; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Potlia, V; Stöck, H; Yelton, J; Benslama, K; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Gong, D T; Kubota, Y; Li, S Z; Poling, R A; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Zweber, P; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J; Jian, L; Saleem, M; Wappler, F; Arms, K; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Von Törne, E; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Dytman, S A; Müller, J A; Nam, S; Savinov, V

    2005-01-01

    We present recent results from the CLEO Collaboration. The data used were collected from 1995 untill now at the Cornell Electron-positron Storage Ring (CESR). Measurements of the leptonic branching fractions for $\\psi(2S) \\to e^+ e^-, \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $\\Upsilon(1,2,3S) \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$, search for $D^0-\\bar{D^0}$ mixing using time dependent Dalitz plot analyses of the decay $D^0 \\to K^0_S\\pi^+\\pi^-$, and search for the process $e^+e^- \\to \\Lambda_b \\bar{\\Lambda_b}$ near threshold are discussed.

  10. Recent CDF results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, J.S. [Rutgers--the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; CDF Collaboration

    1996-07-01

    Preliminary results form the CDF detector, based on analysis of data collected in Run 1a and Run 1b at the Tevatron, totaling 110 pb{sup - 1} integrated luminosity, place new limits on the masses and couplings of new particles including charged Higgs bosons, supersymmetric gauge particles and quarks, and new vector bosons. One of the observed events, having an {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup -} pair, two photons, and large missing energy would not occur with significant rate in the Standard Model, leading to speculation regarding its origin and the possible existence of related events.

  11. First LHC Results

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, Claus; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since four month the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is producing proton-proton collisions with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV offering the potential of directly producing dark matter particles in an energy range never reached before in accelerator-based particle physics. First the performance and first Standard Model measurements of the general purpose experiments CMS and ATLAS is presented. This talk then focuses on their potential to detect dark matter candidates. Results from ongoing physics analyzes are presented and expectations for possible future discoveries are discussed.

  12. Recent results from SELEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, J.S. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The SELEX experiment (E781) is 3-stage magnetic spectrometer for the study of charm hadroproduction at large x{sub F} using 600 Gev {sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams. New precise measurements of the {lambda}{sub c}, D{sup 0}, and D{sub s} lifetimes are presented. We also report results on {lambda}{sub c} and D{sub s} production by {sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams at x{sub F}>0.2. The data agree with expectations from color -drag models to explain charm particle/antiparticle production asymmetries. (author)

  13. Recent Results from SELEX

    CERN Document Server

    Russ, J

    2001-01-01

    The SELEX experiment (E781) is 3-stage magnetic spectrometer for the study of charm hadroproduction at large xF using 600 Gev Sigma-, pi- and p beams. New precise measurements of the Lambda_c, D0, and Ds lifetimes are presented. We also report results on Lambda_c and Ds production by Sigma-, pi- and p beams at xF>0.2. The data agree with expectations from color-drag models to explain charm particle/antiparticle production asymmetries.

  14. Recent results from selex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iori, M.; SEL. E. X. Collaboration

    2001-03-01

    The SELEX experiment (E781) is a 3-stage magnetic spectrometer for a high statistics study of hadroproduction of charm baryons out to large x F using 650 GeV Σ -, π - and p beams. The main features of the spectrometer are: a high precision silicon vertex system; powerful particle identification provided by TRD and RICH; forward Λ s decay spectrometer; and 3-stage lead glass photon detector. Preliminary results on asymmetry for Λ c produced by Σ -, π - and p beams at x F > 0.2 and precise measurements of the Λ c, D0, and preliminary D s lifetimes are presented.

  15. Overview of ALICE results

    CERN Document Server

    Gagliardi, M

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC studies the hot and dense medium formed in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and the transition to Quark Gluon Plasma. Several observables are used to characterise the medium. In this contribution we report on the main ALICE results on global properties, particle spectra, anisotropies, heavy flavour and quarkonium production, obtained in Pb-Pb collisions at √ s rmNN =2 . 76 TeV. Measurements performed in p-Pb and pp collisions are also part of the ALICE physics program: selected highlights from such measurements are discussed.

  16. Organic Separation Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  17. Recent Results from ARGUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Henning

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e+e- storage ring DORIS II at DESY new results on beauty and τ physics have been obtained. In particular, new measurements on fundamental constants in the Yukawa sector of the Standard Model are presented. These comprise measurements of CKM matrix elements from the study of B decays as well as determinations of properties of the τ lepton and its neutrino vτ. From semileptonic B decays ARGUS finds |Vcb|=0.050±0.008±0.007 and from B0 bar B0 mixing |Vtd|= 0.007±0.002. An analysis of the decay type τ-→π-π-π+ντ yields a τ mass of mτ=(1776.3±2.4±1.4) MeV/c2. This result also leads to an improvement of the upper limit on the m{ν r } < 31 {{{MeV}} {/ {{{MeV}} {{c}{2} }}} ; } {{c}{2} }} at the 95% confidence level.

  18. Double Chooz: Latest results

    CERN Document Server

    Crespo-Anadón, J I

    2014-01-01

    The latest results from the Double Chooz experiment on the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ are presented. A detector located at an average distance of 1050 m from the two reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant has accumulated a live time of 467.90 days, corresponding to an exposure of 66.5 GW-ton-year (reactor power $\\times$ detector mass $\\times$ live time). A revised analysis has boosted the signal efficiency and reduced the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties compared to previous publications, paving the way for the two detector phase. The measured $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13} = 0.090^{+0.032}_{-0.029}$ is extracted from a fit to the energy spectrum. A deviation from the prediction above a visible energy of 4 MeV is found, being consistent with an unaccounted reactor flux effect, which does not affect the $\\theta_{13}$ result. A consistent value of $\\theta_{13}$ is measured in a rate-only fit to the number of observed candidates as a function of the reactor power, confirming the robustness of the ...

  19. Unfavourable results in pollicisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollicisation of the index finger is perhaps one of the most complex and most rewarding operations in hand and plastic surgery. It however has a steep learning curve and demands very high skill levels and experience. There are multiple pitfalls and each can result in an unfavourable result. In essence we need to: Shorten the Index, recreate the carpo metacarpal joint from the metacarpo phalangeal (MP joint, rotate the digit by about 120° for pulp to pulp pinch, palmarly abduct by 40-50° to get a new first web gap, Shorten and readjust the tension of the extensors, re attach the intrinsics to form a thenar eminence capable of positioning the new thumb in various functional positions and finally close the flaps forming a new skin envelope. The author has performed over 75 pollicisations personally and has personal experience of some of the issues raised there. The steps mentioned therefore are an algorithm for helping the uninitiated into these choppy waters.

  20. Maquet Osteotomy, Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Jorge Luis; Vega, Marcelo; Matesevach, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives are to assess the results and to discuss the indications for Maquet osteotomy in patients with patellofemoral osteoarthritis. Methods: Retrospective study of a series of 32 patients (4 bilateral, that is to say, 36 knees) operated between March 1999 and October 2013 in " Arthroscopy Private Center ", 12 male and 20 female, average age 59 years with an average postoperative surgery outcomes of 53 months. The technique consists of an arthroscopic procedure to treat joint lesions and a tibial tuberosity osteotomy of 5 cm long, by embedding a 1cm subsequent graft taken from the same metaphysis and fixed with 2 screws. Results: All patients had significant improvement, evaluated with Kujala’s score (54 points preop to 86 points postop) and Guillamon Ferguson’s criteria (27.2 very good and 60.7 good). The complication rate was acceptable. Conclusion: The available technics are surgeries on proximal soft structures, osteotomies of tibial tuberosity and patellofemoral arthroplasty. Maquet osteotomy is an excellent procedure when the patient’s selection is right. Obtaining the graft from the same metaphysis simplified the procedure.

  1. Recent Results from Borexino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, D.; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Atroshchenko, V.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Carlini, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jany, A.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Jeschke, D.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Semenov, D.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Borexino experiment is taking data since 2007 at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy accomplishing outstanding achievements in the field of neutrino physics. Its success is strongly based on the unprecedented ultra-high radio-purity of the inner scintillator core. The main features of the detector and the impressive results for solar and geo-neutrinos obtained by Borexino so far are summarized. The main focus is laid on the most recent results, i.e. the first real-time measurement of the solar pp neutrino flux and the detection of the signal induced by geo-neutrinos with a significance as high as 5.9σ. The measurement of the pp neutrino flux represents a direct probe of the major mechanism of energy production in the Sun and its observation at a significance of 10σ proves the stability of the Sun over a time of at least 105 years. It further puts Borexino in the unique position of being capable to test the MSW-LMA paradigm across the whole solar energy range. The geo-neutrino data allow to infer information concerning important geophysical properties of the Earth that are also discussed. The perspectives of the final stage of the Borexino solar neutrino program that are centered on the goal of measuring the CNO neutrinos that so far escaped any observation are outlined.

  2. Latest results from ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Scapparone, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    In this paper selected results obtained by the ALICE experiment at the LHC will be presented. Data collected during the pp runs taken at sqrt(s)=0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV and Pb-Pb runs at sqrt(s_NN)=2.76 TeV allowed interesting studies on the properties of the hadronic and nuclear matter: proton runs gave us the possibility to explore the ordinary matter at very high energy and up to very low pt, while Pb-Pb runs provided spectacular events where several thousands of particles produced in the interaction revealed how a very dense medium behaves, providing a deeper picture on the quark gluon plasma(QGP) chemical composition and dynamics.

  3. Overview of HERMES results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Hulse Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The HERMES experiment has collected a wealth of deep-inelastic scattering data using the 27.6 GeV polarized lepton beam at HERA and various pure gas targets, both unpolarized and polarized. This allowed for a series of diverse and unique measurements. Among them are measurements that provide information on the threedimensional structure of the nucleon, both in momentum space and in position space. Results of measurements of exclusive ω production on an unpolarized and transversely polarized nucleon target, sensitive to the distribution in transverse-position and longitudinalmomentum space, are discussed as well as the three-dimensional extraction of azimuthal asymmetries measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, sensitive to twist-2 and twist-3 distributions in three-dimensional momentum space.

  4. ATLAS Top Quark Results

    CERN Document Server

    Black, Kevin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. As it is the only quark that decays before it hadronizes, this gives us the unique opportunity to probe the properties of bare quarks at the Large Hadron Collider. This talk will present highlights of a few recent precision measurements by the ATLAS Collaboration of the top quark using 13 TeV and 8 TeV collision data: top-quark pair and single top production cross sections including differential distributions will be presented alongside top quark properties measurements. These measurements, including results using boosted top quarks, probe our understanding of top quark production in the TeV regime. Measurements of the top quark mass and searches for rare top quark decays are also presented.

  5. Payment by Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan A. Rapple

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Today the public is demanding that it exercise more control over how tax dollars are spent in the educational sphere, with multitudes also canvassing that education become closely aligned to the marketplace's economic forces. In this paper I examine an historical precedent for such demands, i.e. the comprehensive 19th century system of accountability, "Payment by Results," which endured in English and Welsh elementary schools from 1862 until 1897. Particular emphasis is focused on the economic market-driven aspect of the system whereby every pupil was examined annually by an Inspector, the amount of the governmental grant being largely dependent on the answering. I argue that this was a narrow, restrictive system of educational accountability though one totally in keeping with the age's pervasive utilitarian belief in laissez-faire. I conclude by observing that this Victorian system might be suggestive to us today when calls for analogous schemes of educational accountability are shrill.

  6. Recent results from ANTARES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trovato Agata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating 40 km off the coast of France since 2007, the ANTARES detector is the largest deep-sea neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere with an instrumented volume of more than 0.01 cubic kilometers. It consists of an array of 885 photomultipliers detecting the Cherenkov light induced by charged leptons produced by neutrino interactions in and around the detector. The primary goal of ANTARES is to search for astrophysical neutrinos in the TeV–PeV range. This comprises generic searches for any diffuse cosmic neutrino flux as well as more specific searches for astrophysical galactic and extragalactic sources. The search program also includes multi-messenger analyses based on time and/or space coincidences with other cosmic probes. The ANTARES observatory is sensitive to a wide-range of other phenomena, from atmospheric neutrino oscillations to dark matter annihilation. In this contribution, recent results from the ANTARES neutrino telescope will be presented.

  7. 2012 election results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Robert; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2012-10-01

    On 4 October 2012, AGU members completed voting for the 2013-2014 leadership term. Union officers, Board members, section and focus group officers, and student and early career representatives to the Council were elected. All members who joined or renewed their membership by 1 July 2012 were eligible to vote in this year's leadership election. The vote was held electronically, and access to voting was provided to all eligible voters for a period of 31 days. The voting was conducted by Survey and Ballot Systems, Inc. (SBS). SBS, which offers election planning and management services, provided unique login credentials and other support services for eligible voters throughout the election. Voting results were certified by SBS on 8 October and by the AGU Tellers Committee on 9 October. The overall participation rate was 21.9%, an increase over previous AGU elections.

  8. Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gail Heath

    2012-07-01

    Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

  9. Emittance exchange results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliller, R.P., III; /Brookhaven; Koeth, T.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2009-09-01

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  10. Emittance Exchange Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliller III,R.; Koeth, T.

    2009-05-04

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  11. Recent results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With the increase in center-of-mass energy, a new energy frontier has been opened by the Large Hadron Collider. More than 25 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=13 TeV have been delivered to both ATLAS and CMS experiments during 2016. This enormous dataset can be used to test the Standard Model in a complete new regime with tremendous precision and it has the potential to unveil new physics or set strong bounds on it. In this talk some of the most recent results made public by the CMS Collaboration will be presented. The focus will mainly be on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, with particular emphasis on searches for dark matter candidates.

  12. Recent results from SELEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iori, M

    2001-03-01

    The SELEX experiment (E781) is a 3-stage magnetic spectrometer for a high statistics study of hadroproduction of charm baryons out to large x{sub F} using 650 GeV {sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams. The main features of the spectrometer are: a high precision silicon vertex system; powerful particle identification provided by TRD and RICH; forward {lambda}{sub s} decay spectrometer; and 3-stage lead glass photon detector. Preliminary results on asymmetry for {lambda}{sub c} produced by {sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams at x{sub F} > 0.2 and precise measurements of the {lambda}{sub c}, D{sup 0}, and preliminary D{sub s} lifetimes are presented.

  13. FIRE Science Results 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdougal, David S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) is a U.S. cloud-radiation research program formed in 1984 to increase the basic understanding of cirrus and marine stratocumulus cloud systems, to develop realistic parameterizations for these systems, and to validate and improve ISCCP cloud product retrievals. Presentations of results culminating the first 5 years of FIRE research activities were highlighted. The 1986 Cirrus Intensive Field Observations (IFO), the 1987 Marine Stratocumulus IFO, the Extended Time Observations (ETO), and modeling activities are described. Collaborative efforts involving the comparison of multiple data sets, incorporation of data measurements into modeling activities, validation of ISCCP cloud parameters, and development of parameterization schemes for General Circulation Models (GCMs) are described.

  14. Report on Results 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report discusses work being carried out in Norway to promote energy efficiency and the production of new renewable energy. An overall review of the quantifiable results of last year's activities at national level is available. It will serve to initiate an annual reporting tradition. The report represents a step towards an ongoing process for improved targeting and management of national efforts. During the course of the year 2000, NVE has evaluated and adjusted its activities and established a system involving indicators and reporting procedures. It is also important to take notice of the long-term work being undertaken to influence people's attitudes, even though this work is difficult to assess. NVE is investing in i.a. measures aimed at children and young people. Apart from directly influencing future energy users, this investment is also having an effect due to the children's encouragement of their parents to engage in more energy and environment-friendly behaviour. Published in 2000, the IEA report ''Trends in Norwegian Stationary Energy Use'' shows that total Norwegian energy consumption per GDP is not much higher than in other IEA countries, when adjusted for cold climate and industrial structure. However, Norwegians do stand out as intensive users of electricity. The IEA report shows a reduction of 10 TWh in energy usage when compared to the projected post 1990 figures. Energy efficiency activities have contributed towards this reduction. However, the potential for a more rational use of energy in Norway is still substantial and well documented. Based on experience most enterprises could save around 10% of energy used just by making changes to their operations, i.e. without major investments. Furthermore, the potential is growing because of massive technological developments in respect of energy usage, production and distribution. With this in mind, it is necessary to take full advantage of the extensive knowledge

  15. Simpler images, better results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Britton

    1999-03-01

    The very rapid development of optical technology has followed a pattern similar to that of nuclear magnetic resonance: first, spectroscopy and then imaging. The accomplishments in spectroscopy have been significant--among them, early detection of hematomas and quantitative oximetry (assuming that time and frequency domain instruments are used). Imaging has progressed somewhat later. The first images were obtained in Japan and USA a few years ago, particularly of parietal stimulation of the human brain. Since then, rapid applications to breast and limb, together with higher resolution of the brain now make NIR imaging of functional activation and tumor detection readily available, reliable and affordable devices. The lecture has to do with the applications of imaging to these three areas, particularly to prefrontal imaging of cognitive function, of breast tumor detection, and of localized muscle activation in exercise. The imaging resolution achievable in functional activation appears to be FWHM of 4 mm. The time required for an image is a few seconds or even much less. Breast image detection at 50 microsecond(s) ec/pixel results in images obtainable in a few seconds or shorter times (bandwidths of the kHz are available). Finally, imaging of the body organs is under study in this laboratory, particularly in the in utero fetus. It appears that the photon migration theory now leads to the development of a wide number of images for human subject tissue spectroscopy and imaging.

  16. ALICE TPC commissioning results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, D.T., E-mail: dagtl@ift.uib.n [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-05-21

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy-ion experiment at CERN LHC aiming to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. A lead-lead collision might produce several 10 00 new particles. Detailed study of the event requires precise measurements of the particle tracks. A 90m{sup 3} Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with more than 500 000 read-out pads was built as the main central barrel tracker. Collisions can be recorded at a rate of up to about 1 kHz. The front-end electronics, designed from FPGAs and custom ASICs, performs shaping, amplification, digitisation and digital filtering of the signals. The data are forwarded to DAQ via 216 1.25 Gb/s fibre-optical links. Configuration, control and monitoring is done by an embedded Linux system on the front-end electronics. Before production runs with beam, extensive commissioning using tracks from cosmics and from the laser system as well as clusters from radioactive krypton gas is needed. Extensive results have been obtained with respect to the performance of the TPC including its sub-systems.

  17. Results of hip resurfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favetti, Fabio; Casella, Filippo; Papalia, Matteo; Panegrossi, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background The renewed popularity of resurfacing hip arthroplasty in the last 10 years has generated a remarkable quantity of scientific contributions based on mid- and short-term follow-up. More than one paper has reported a consistent early revision rate as a consequence of biological or biomechanical failure. Two major complications are commonly described with resurfacing implants: avascular necrosis and femoral-neck fracture. A close relationship between these two events has been suggested, but not firmly demonstrated, whereas cementing technique seems to be better understood as potential cause of failure. Methods We performed an in vitro study in which four different resurfacing implants were evaluated with a simulated femoral head, two types of cement, (low and high viscosity) and two cementing techniques: direct (cement apposition directly on the femoral head) and indirect (cement poured into the femoral component). Results High-viscosity cement showed homogeneous distribution over the entire femoral head. Low-viscosity cement showed a massive polar concentration with insufficient, if not absent, distribution in the equatorial zone. Conclusion Polar cement concentration could be a risk factor for early implant failure due to two effects on the femoral head: biological (excessive local exothermic reaction could cause osteocyte necrosis) and biomechanical (which could lead to uneven load distribution on the femoral head). PMID:21234563

  18. Results from SNO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Yuen-dat

    2001-10-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is an underground heavy water Cherenkov detector for studying solar neutrinos. SNO is capable of performing both flavor sensitive and flavor blind measurements of the solar neutrino flux. The first charged current (CC) measurement is found to be: {psi}{sub SNO}{sup CC}({nu}{sub e}) = 1.75 {+-} 0.07(stat.){sub -0.11}{sup +0.12}(sys.) {+-} 0.05 (theor.) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and the elastic scattering fluxes (ES) is: {psi}{sub SNO}{sup ES}({nu}{sub x}) = 2.39 {+-} 0.34(stat.){sub -0.14}{sup +0.16} (sys.) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The {psi}{sub SNO}{sup CC}({nu}{sub e}) result, when combined with the high statistics elastic scattering (ES) measurement from Super-Kamiokande, provide a strong evidence for solar neutrino flavor transformation (3.3{sigma}). The deduced total solar neutrino flux is in good agreement with standard solar model predictions. No significant distortion in the energy spectrum is observed.

  19. LEARNING RESULTS TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Polo Martínez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the changes to education norms in our country in the last ten years, where we have tried to integrate the different curriculum components in teaching and learning design, it is still typical to detect (1 curriculum plans that encourage rote learning and (2 teachers that continue teaching in the same style in which they were taught as students, and/or simply copying the textbook, even though sometimes it doesn´t provide the appropriate teaching and reliable assessment which meets the needs of our society. The insufficient academic training of (1 teachers, superintendents, and education authority members and (2 staff assessment that assures the best teaching practices in the classrooms, may be contributing to the inability to improve our education system. With respect to these deficiencies, we may come to the conclusion that the inclusion of these competencies in the curriculum and evaluation is a superficial action to fullfill European education requirements, more than a real plan to improve teaching and learning processes, and therefore, learning results in our country.

  20. SAA drift: Experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  1. Results from LHCf Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tricomi Alessia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The LHCf experiment has taken data in 2009 and 2010 p-p collisions at LHC at √s = 0.9 TeV and √s = 7 TeV. The measurement of the forward neutral particle spectra produced in proton-proton collisions at LHC up to an energy of 14 TeV in the center of mass system are of fundamental importance to calibrate the Monte Carlo models widely used in the high energy cosmic ray (HECR field, up to an equivalent laboratory energy of the order of 1017 eV. In this paper the first results on the inclusive photon spectrum measured by LHCf is reported. Comparison of this spectrum with the model expectations show significant discrepancies, mainly in the high energy region. In addition, perspectives for future analyses as well as the program for the next data taking period, in particular the possibility to take data in p-Pb collisions, will be discussed.

  2. New results from VES

    CERN Document Server

    Dorofeev, V A

    1999-01-01

    The results of the patial wave analysis(PWA) of the pi+pi-pi- and omegapi-pi0 systems are presented. The a3 and a4(2040) signals are observed in the rho(770)pi and f2(1270)pi channels. Indications of the a1' meson existence was found in the 1+0+ rhopi S-wave. The decay branching ratio of the a2(1320)- to omegapi-pi0 was measured. The 2+1+ wave shows a broad bump at M~1.7GeV. The decays of the pi2(1670), a4(2040) and pi(1740) into omegarho- were found. The resonance in the b1(1235)pi wave with exotic quantum numbers jpc=1-+ at M~1.6 is observed and the simultaneous analysis of the 1-+ wave in the b1(1235)pi, etha'pi and rhopi final states is presented.

  3. ALOS-2 initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaku, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Shinichi; Shimada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2) was launched from Tanegashima Space Center by H-IIA rocket successfully on 24th May 2014. ALOS-2 carries the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) as the state-of-the-art L-band SAR system which succeeds to PALSAR onboard ALOS. PALSAR-2 uses almost whole bandwidth allocated for L-band active sensor of Earth Exploration Satellites Service specified by the Radio Regulation in order to realize the high resolution observation, and also, it transmits more than 6 kW power for lower Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero using 180 TRMs driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN) amplifier which is the first use in space. Furthermore, because ALOS-2 carries the SAR system only, PALSAR-2 antenna can be mounted under the satellite body. It enables to observe right-/left-looking observation by satellite maneuvering. And the high accuracy orbit control to maintain the satellite within 500 m radius tube against the reference orbit enables high coherence for the InSAR processing. Using these new technologies, ALOS-2 has been operating to fulfill the mission requirements such as disaster monitoring and so on. This document introduces the initial result of ALOS-2 from the first year operation.

  4. esophageal cancer: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Maddah Safaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Dysphagia is a common initial presentation in locally advanced esophageal cancer and negatively impacts patient quality of life and treatment compliance. To induce fast relief of dysphagia in patients with potentially operable esophageal cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy was applied prior to definitive radiochemotherapy. Material and methods : In this single arm phase II clinical trial between 2013 to 2014 twenty patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (17 squamous cell and 3 adenocarcinoma were treated with upfront 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy, followed by 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. Results : Tumor response, as measured by endoscopy and/or computed tomography scan, revealed complete remission in 16 and partial response in 4 patients (overall response rate 100%. Improvement of dysphagia was induced by brachytherapy within a few days and maintained up to the end of treatment in 80% of patients. No differences in either response rate or dysphagia resolution were found between squamous cell and adenocarcinoma histology. The grade 2 and 3 acute pancytopenia or bicytopenia reported in 4 patients, while sub-acute adverse effects with painful ulceration was seen in five patients, occurring after a median of 2 months. A perforation developed in one patient during the procedure of brachytherapy that resolved successfully with immediate surgery. Conclusions : Brachytherapy before EBRT was a safe and effective procedure to induce rapid and durable relief from dysphagia, especially when combined with EBRT.

  5. [SENTIERI Project: results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Pirastu, Roberta; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Minelli, Giada; Manno, Valerio; Bruno, Caterina; Fazzo, Lucia; Iavarone, Ivano; Pasetto, Roberto; Ricci, Paolo; Zona, Amerigo; Conti, Susanna; Comba, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Of the 18 National Priority Contaminated Sites (NPCSs) analysed in this Report, some have a single source of environmental contamination (such as fluoro-edenite in Biancavilla). In most cases, however, we are looking at multiple heterogeneous sources of contamination. In this respect, the a priori causal evaluation of the association between diseases and environmental exposures in NPCSs, based on epidemiological evidence, can help trace the health impact back to specific types of environmental exposure. There are several cases in which the project's findings have been consistent with a priori evidence: stomach cancer (both genders, excess cancer incidence) in the Fidenza NPCS; stomach cancer (women, excess mortality, cancer incidence and hospital discharges) in the Laguna di Grado e Marano NPCS; excess hospitalisation from respiratory diseases in Brescia-Caffaro, Milazzo and Terni Papigno NPCSs; excesses for non-Hodgkin lymphomas and melanoma (incidence and hospitalisation in men and women) and breast cancer (incidence and hospital discharges, women) in Brescia-Caffaro NPCS. In preorder to properly evaluate the population's health profile, we must also observe whether results remain consistent for all three health outcomes or in both genders. The first is the case of excess mortality, cancer incidence and hospital discharges for bladder cancer (men) in Porto Torres and diseases of the urinary tract in the Basso bacino del fiume Chienti NPCS). Gender consistency is observed, for instance, for all cancer in Bolzano, Porto Torres, Venice, Litorale Domizio Flegreo, Priolo, and Taranto, for all causes in Taranto, Litorale Domizio Flegreo and Trieste. The health impact in the various NPCSs needs to be considered carefully and used as a springboard for further analytical research that could confirm and explain causal links to specific environmental exposures. The observations can, however, already be considered as a basis for mandatory primary prevention measures.

  6. Overview of MAST results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, I. T.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bigelow, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Carr, M.; Caughman, J.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Diallo, A.; Dickinson, D.; Diem, S.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fox, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K.; Graves, J.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawke, J.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Holgate, J.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Leggate, H.; Lilley, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; Ono, Y.; Oliver, H.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Podesta, M.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Roach, C.; Robinson, J.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Storrs, J.; Takase, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Walkden, N.; Wilson, H.; van Wyk, F.; Yamada, T.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST; MAST Upgrade Teams

    2015-10-01

    The Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) programme is strongly focused on addressing key physics issues in preparation for operation of ITER as well as providing solutions for DEMO design choices. In this regard, MAST has provided key results in understanding and optimizing H-mode confinement, operating with smaller edge localized modes (ELMs), predicting and handling plasma exhaust and tailoring auxiliary current drive. In all cases, the high-resolution diagnostic capability on MAST is complemented by sophisticated numerical modelling to facilitate a deeper understanding. Mitigation of ELMs with resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode number nRMP = 2, 3, 4, 6 has been demonstrated: at high and low collisionality; for the first ELM following the transition to high confinement operation; during the current ramp-up; and with rotating nRMP = 3 RMPs. nRMP = 4, 6 fields cause less rotation braking whilst the power to access H-mode is less with nRMP = 4 than nRMP = 3, 6. Refuelling with gas or pellets gives plasmas with mitigated ELMs and reduced peak heat flux at the same time as achieving good confinement. A synergy exists between pellet fuelling and RMPs, since mitigated ELMs remove fewer particles. Inter-ELM instabilities observed with Doppler backscattering are consistent with gyrokinetic simulations of micro-tearing modes in the pedestal. Meanwhile, ELM precursors have been strikingly observed with beam emission spectroscopy (BES) measurements. A scan in beta at the L-H transition shows that pedestal height scales strongly with core pressure. Gyro-Bohm normalized turbulent ion heat flux (as estimated from the BES data) is observed to decrease with increasing tilt of the turbulent eddies. Fast ion redistribution by energetic particle modes depends on density, and access to a quiescent domain with ‘classical’ fast ion transport is found above a critical density. Highly efficient electron Bernstein wave current drive (1 A W-1) has been achieved

  7. Overview of MAST results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counsell, G. F.; Akers, R. J.; Appel, L. C.; Applegate, D.; Axon, K. B.; Baranov, Y.; Brickley, C.; Bunting, C.; Buttery, R. J.; Carolan, P. G.; Challis, C.; Ciric, D.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Cunningham, G.; Darke, A.; Dnestrovskij, A.; Dowling, J.; Dudson, B.; Dunstan, M. R.; Delchambre, E.; Field, A. R.; Foster, A.; Gee, S.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Helander, P.; Hender, T. C.; Hole, M.; Howell, D. H.; Joiner, N.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Lehane, I. P.; Lisgo, S.; Lloyd, B.; Lott, F.; Maddison, G. P.; Manhood, S. J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McClements, K. G.; Meyer, H.; Morris, A. W.; Nelson, M.; O'Brien, M. R.; Patel, A.; Pinfold, T.; Preinhaelter, J.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Sharapov, S.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stammers, K.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tabasso, A.; Tallents, S.; Taylor, D.; Tournianski, M. R.; Turner, A.; Turri, G.; Valovic, M.; Volpe, F.; Voss, G.; Walsh, M. J.; Watkins, J. R.; Wilson, H. R.; Wisse, M.; MAST, the; NBI; ECRH Teams

    2005-10-01

    . Early edge localized mode activity on MAST is associated with the formation of narrow filamentary structures following field lines in the edge. These filaments rotate toroidally with the edge plasma and, away from the X-points, accelerate radially outwards from the edge up to 20 cm. Studies of disruptions on MAST demonstrate a complex evolution of core energy loss and resultant divertor power loads, including phases where the target heat flux width is broadened by a factor of 8. Observations of energetic particle modes driven by super-Alfvénic beam ions provide support for a model for the non-linear evolution of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) forming Bernstein-Green-Krushal waves. The AE activity reduces to low levels with increasing β. Plasma start-up without a central solenoid and in a manner compatible with future large spherical tokamak (ST) devices has been demonstrated using breakdown at a quadrupole magnetic null. Closed flux surface plasmas with peak plasma currents up to 370 kA have been generated and sustained for 0.3 s. New error field correction coils have extended the operational space for low density plasmas and enabled scaling studies of error field induced locked mode formation in the ST.

  8. GAUSS Project Trials Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fazio, Antonella; Vernucci, Antonio; Rossini, Eugenio

    2003-07-01

    , specifically operating in inland- waterways and roads. Safety-of-life applications for assisted vessel navigation and for management of hazardous goods (gas) transhipment over the Po river were thoroughly tested and assessed. Applications for emergency assistance, Point of Interest inquiry, localisation of commercial fleet were also proven.GAUSS successfully demonstrated integrated GNSS1 precise positioning based on EGNOS and satellite UMTS packet communication. The new technology with respect to the current state-of the art, developed within the project, was validated during the trial campaign, including the implemented broadcasting and multicasting communication of data packet compliant to 3GPP standard (current release 4). Horizontal accuracy better than 3-m was achieved in the trial area (Northern Italy - Lario - Como Lake, Parma and Po river areas), thanks to the navigation functions based on GPS signals augmented with SBAS techniques. The MTB (Mediterranean Test Bed) was utilised because of the poor performance coverage of the ESTB system over the Italian regions.In this paper, the results of the GAUSS trial campaign are reported, along with their assessment and evaluation in terms of possible enhancements and future exploitations.

  9. Watershed Assessment, Tracking & Environmental ResultS (WATERS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Watershed Assessment, Tracking & Environmental Results (WATERS) is an integrated information system for the nation's surface waters connecting Office of...

  10. Aesthetic rhinoplasty: Avoiding unfavourable results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulwant S Bhangoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoplasty is one of the most challenging surgical procedures in plastic surgery. It is not surprising that a significant number of patients end up with unfavourable outcomes. Many of these unfavourable outcomes could be the result of poor judgment and wrong decision making. Most frequently, the unfavourable outcome is the result of errors in surgical technique. In this paper, unfavourable outcomes resulting from errors in surgical technique are discussed under the heading of each operative step. Poor placement of intra-nasal incision can result in internal valve obstruction. Bad columellar scars can result from errors during open rhinoplasty. Unfavourable results associated with skeletonisation are mentioned. Tip plasty, being the most difficult part of rhinoplasty, can result in lack of tip projection, asymmetry and deformities associated with placement of tip grafts. Over-resection of the lower lateral cartilages during tip plasty can also result in pinched nose, alar collapse causing external valve obstruction and other alar rim deformities. Humpectomy can result in open roof deformity, inverted V deformity and over-resection resulting in saddle nose. The so-called poly beak deformity is also a preventable unfavourable outcome when dealing with a large dorsal hump. Complications resulting from osteotomies include narrowing of nasal airway, open roof deformity, inverted V deformity and asymmetry of the bony wall resulting from incomplete or green stick fractures. Judicious use of grafts can be very rewarding. By the same token, grafts also carry with them the risk of complications. Allografts can result in recurrent infection, atrophy of the overlying skin and extrusion resulting in crippling deformities. Autografts are recommended by the author. Unfavourable results from autografts include displacement of graft, visibility of the graft edges, asymmetry, warping, and resorption.

  11. Testbeam Results of Endcap RPC's

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Ijaz; Hoorani, Hafeez; Aftab, Zia; Jan, J. A; Shariq Khan, M; Solaija, Tariq

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, results are presented from the beamtest in 2002 of the full-scale RE-2/2 prototype RPC chamber assembled in Pakistan. The results are mainly related with the efficiency, time resolution, and rate capability of this non-oiled RPC. The CMS collaboration has imposed strict criteria on the performance parameters for RPC's. These results show that prototype RPC's meet with all the CMS criteria and are suitable for installation in CMS detector.

  12. ISOCAM experiment cryogenic test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sa, L.; Collaudin, B.

    The thermal requirements for ISOCAM, an IR camera to be mounted aboard the ISO satellite, are reviewed, and model predictions are matched with test results. The degree of model validation suggested by analytical prediction vs test results is described. Predictions of thermal conduction through mounting screws, from ball bearings, and of the heat distribution in the rotor and stator of a cryogenic stepper motor correlate well with actual test results. It is shown that ISOCAM meets the thermal requirements necessary for successful on-orbit operation. The model predicted such phenomena as 'chopped' motor function and the twofold increase in temperature resulting from continuous motor operation.

  13. Quadriceps tendon rupture - treatment results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Iva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare but rather serious injury. If this injury is not promptly recognized and early operated, it may lead to disability. This research was aimed at pointing out the results and complications of the quadriceps tendon rupture surgical treatment. Material and Methods. This retrospective multicentric study was conducted in a group of 29 patients (mostly elderly men. Lysholm knee scoring scale was used to evaluate the surgical results. The post-operative results were compared in relation to the type of tendon rupture reconstructions (acute or chronic, various surgical techniques, type of injuries (unilateral or bilateral as well as the presence or absence of comorbid risk factors in the patients. Results. The average value of a Lysholm score was 87.6. Excellent and satisfactory Lysholm score results dominated in our sample of patients. Better post-operative results were recorded in the group of patients without risk factors, in case of a bilateral injury, and in case of an acute injury. The best result was obtained after performing the reconstruction using anchors, and the worst result came after using Codivilla technique. Discussion and Conclusion. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment are an absolute imperative in management of this injury. We have not proven that a certain surgical technique has an advantage over the others. A comorbid risk factor is related to a lower Lysholm score. Despite a few cases of complications, we can conclude that the surgical treatment yields satisfactory results.

  14. Retirement Applicant Satisfaction Survey Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset contains information about the Retirement Applicant Survey (RAS). The survey measured satisfaction results with the retirement application process. The...

  15. New results from NA49

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, S V; Bächler, J; Barna, D; Barnby, L S; Bartke, Jerzy; Barton, R A; Behler, M; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Blyth, C O; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Brady, F P; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncic, P; Carr, L; Cebra, D; Cerny, V; Cooper, G E; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Eckhardt, F; Ferenc, D; Filip, P; Fischer, H G; Foder, Z; Foka, P Y; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Ganz, R E; Gazdzicki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Harris, J W; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jones, P G; Kadija, K; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Lasiuk, B; Van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, Peter; Malakhov, A I; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Mischke, A; Molnár, J; Nelson, J M; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Oldenburg, M; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Perl, K; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Poskanzer, A M; Prindle, D J; Pühlhofer, F; Putschke, J; Reid, J G; Renfordt, A; Retyk, W; Ritter, H G; Röhrich, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybicki, A; Sammer, T; Sann, H; Schäfer, E; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Snellings, R; Squier, G T A; Stock, Reinhard; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Toy, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Ullrich, T S; Varga, D; Vassiliou, Maria; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Voloshin, S A; Vranic, D; Wang, F; Weerasundara, D D; Wenig, S; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Xu, N; Yates, T A; Koo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J

    2002-01-01

    Recent results of the NA49 experiment are presented. These cover first results on pion and kaon production, HBT, and charge fluctuations from Pb+Pb reactions at 40 AGeV and their comparison to 158 AGeV beam energy. Furthermore a study on baryon number transfer in p+p, centrality selected p+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions at 158 AGeV and new results on the system size dependence of kaon yields, including C+C and Si+Si data, are presented. Additionally, a first result on Lambda Lambda correlations is shown. (11 refs).

  16. Top physics results at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-05-01

    The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

  17. Complexity Results in Epistemic Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolander, Thomas; Jensen, Martin Holm; Schwarzentruber, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Epistemic planning is a very expressive framework that extends automated planning by the incorporation of dynamic epistemic logic (DEL). We provide complexity results on the plan existence problem for multi-agent planning tasks, focusing on purely epistemic actions with propositional preconditions......-hardness of the plan verification problem, which strengthens previous results on the complexity of DEL model checking....

  18. Some Results behind Dividend Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zhou; Li Wei; Jun-yi Guo

    2006-01-01

    We consider the basic dividend problem of the compound Poisson model with constant barrier strategy. Some results concealed behind the dividend problem are made explicit in the present work. Different methods and some of which are firstly given in this paper. All these results presented certain direct relationship between some important actuary variables in classical risk theory is also revealed.

  19. Heavy Ion Results from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Jiangyong; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings provide an overview of the new results obtained with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC, which are presented in the Quark Matter 2017 conference. These results are covered in twelve parallel talks, one flash talk and eleven posters, and they are grouped into five areas: initial state, jet quenching, quarkonium production, longitudinal flow dynamics, and collectivity in small systems.

  20. Top physics results at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-05-01

    The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

  1. Latest Electroweak Results from CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The latest results in electroweak physics from proton anti-proton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron recorded by the CDF detector are presented. The results provide constraints on parton distribution functions, the mass of the Higgs boson and beyond the Standard Model physics.

  2. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2013-01-01

    spectrum. The Planck values for some of these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large scale anomalies in the CMB temperature distribution detected earlier by WMAP are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits...... on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at 25 sigma. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussian statistics of the CMB anisotropies. There is some tension between Planck and WMAP results; this is evident in the power spectrum and results for some...... the robust detection of the E-mode polarization signal around CMB hot- and cold-spots....

  3. Spacelab Life Sciences 1 results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Rhea

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from the experiments conducted by the first Shuttle/Spacelab mission dedicated entirely to the life sciences, the Spacelab Life Sciences 1, launched on June 5, 1991. The experiments carried out during the 9-day flight included investigations of changes in the human cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal/endocrine, blood, and vestibular systems that were brought about by microgravity. Results were also obtained from the preflight and postflight complementary experiments performed on rats, which assessed the suitability of rodents as animal models for humans. Most results verified, or expanded on, the accepted theories of adaptation to zero gravity.

  4. Customer interruption cost and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eua-Arporn, B.; Bisarnbutra, S. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand)

    1997-12-31

    Results of a comprehensive study on short-term direct impacts and consumer interruption costs, incurred as a result of power supply interruption, were discussed. The emphasis was on questionnaire development, general responses and the average customer damage function of some selected sectors. The customer damage function was established for each category of customers (agriculture, industry, mining, wholesale, retail merchandising, residential, etc) as well as for different locations. Results showed that the average customer damage function depended mostly on customer category. Size and location were not significant factors. 5 refs., 7 tabs.

  5. PHENIX recent heavy flavor results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sanghoon

    2014-06-15

    Cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects provide an important ingredient to interpret the results from heavy-ion collisions. Such effects include nuclear shadowing, intrinsic parton transverse momentum broadening, and initial patron energy loss. The measurement of heavy quark production is a good probe to study the CNM effects particularly on gluons, since heavy quarks are mainly produced via gluon fusions at RHIC energy. The PHENIX experiment has an ability to study the CNM effects by measuring leptons from heavy-flavor decay in a broad kinematic range. Comparisons of the results measured in different rapidity regions allow us to study modification of gluon density function in the Au nucleus depending on parton fractional momentum x. In addition, comparisons to the results from heavy-ion collisions (Au + Au and Cu + Cu) measured by PHENIX provide an insight into the role of CNM effects in such collisions. Recent PHENIX results on heavy quark production are discussed in this presentation.

  6. Retrospective Evaluation of Colonoscopy Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar M et al.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is the retrospective evaluation of colonoscopy results between 2005 January- 2009 December in General Surgery Department of Düzce University.Materials and Methods: Admitted to our department with lower gastrointestinal symptoms, and colonoscopy is indicated 500 male and 538 female total 1038 patients were performed flexible colonoscopic examinations after bowel cleansing.Results: According to results of colonoscopic findings, 42.9% No pathology, 32.5% Hemorrhoids, 17.6% Anal fissures were detected.Conclusion: As a result of this study, half of patients admitted to our surgical clinic with lower gastrointestinal complaints have no pathology and in the other half of patients have various pathologies such as hemorrhoids and anal fissures.

  7. Electroweak phase transition recent results

    CERN Document Server

    Csikor, Ferenc

    2000-01-01

    Recent results of four-dimensional (4d) lattice simulations on the finite temperature electroweak phase transition (EWPT) are discussed. The phase transition is of first order in the SU(2)-Higgs model below the end point Higgs mass 66.5$\\pm$1.4 GeV. For larger masses a rapid cross-over appears. This result completely agrees with the results of the dimensional reduction approach. Including the full Standard Model (SM) perturbatively the end point is at 72.1$\\pm$1.4 GeV. Combined with recent LEP Higgs mass lower bounds, this excludes any EWPT in the SM. A one-loop calculation of the static potential makes possible a precise comparison of the lattice and perturbative results. Recent 4d lattice studies of the Minimal Supersymmetric SM (MSSM) are also mentioned.

  8. Results from NA61/SHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we summarize recent results from NA61/SHINE relevant for heavy ion physics, neutrino oscillations and the interpretation of air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays.

  9. Selection of LHCb Physics Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Burkhard

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available LHCb is a dedicated flavour physics experiment at the LHC searching for physics beyond the Standard Model through precision measurements of CP-violating observables and the study of very rare decays of beauty- and charm-flavoured hadrons. In this article a selection of recent LHCb results is presented. Unless otherwise stated, the results are based on an integrated luminosity of 1 fb−1 accumulated during the year 2011 at √s = 7 TeV.

  10. New CDF results on diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesropian, Christina; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-12-01

    We report new diffraction results obtained by the CDF collaboration in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s=1.96 TeV. The first experimental evidence of exclusive dijet and diphoton production is presented. The exclusive results are discussed in context of the exclusive Higgs production at LHC. We also present the measurement of the Q{sup 2} and t dependence of the diffractive structure function.

  11. Heavy flavour results from ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell P. J.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A selection of heavy-flavour physics results from the ATLAS experiment is presented, based on data collected in proton-proton collisions at the LHC during 2010. Differential cross-sections for the production of heavy flavours, charmonium and bottomonium states and D-mesons are presented and compared to various theoretical models. Results of B-hadron lifetime measurements are also reported.

  12. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  13. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bowyer, J.W.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.F.; Carr, R.; Casale, M.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Gaier, T.C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Haissinski, J.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I.J.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Smoot, G.F.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Taylor, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Turler, M.; Tuttlebee, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Watson, C.; White, M.; White, S.D.M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    The ESA's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early universe, was launched on May 2009 and has been surveying the microwave and submillimetre sky since August 2009. In March 2013, ESA and the Planck Collaboration publicly released the initial cosmology products based on the first 15.5 months of Planck operations, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper describes the mission and its performance, and gives an overview of the processing and analysis of the data, the characteristics of the data, the main scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. Scientific results include robust support for the standard, six parameter LCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements for the parameters that define this model, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for some of these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different fr...

  14. Planck 2015 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Alves, M. I. R.; Argüeso, F.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chluba, J.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Farhang, M.; Feeney, S.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Florido, E.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Giusarma, E.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jin, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; Liu, H.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamaie, M.; Oppermann, N.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Said, N.; Salvatelli, V.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Sanghera, H. S.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Shiraishi, M.; Smith, K.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tramonte, D.; Tristram, M.; Troja, A.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vassallo, T.; Vibert, L.; Vidal, M.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Walter, B.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, which is dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched on 14 May 2009. It scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12 August 2009 and 23 October 2013. In February 2015, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based ondata from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data and the data products in the release, as well as the associated cosmological and astrophysical science results and papers. The data products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, diffuse foregrounds in temperature and polarization, catalogues of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic cold clumps), and extensive simulations of signals and noise used in assessing uncertainties and the performance of the analysis methods. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data is described, along with a CMB lensing likelihood. Scientific results include cosmological parameters derived from CMB power spectra, gravitational lensing, and cluster counts, as well as constraints on inflation, non-Gaussianity, primordial magnetic fields, dark energy, and modified gravity, and new results on low-frequency Galactic foregrounds.

  15. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bourdin, H.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carr, R.; Carvalho, P.; Casale, M.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Falgarone, E.; Falvella, M. C.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Frommert, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Galli, S.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jasche, J.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matsumura, T.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A.; Räth, C.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Riazuelo, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schiavon, F.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Smith, K.; Smoot, G. F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Taylor, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Tuttlebee, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vibert, L.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, C.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Winkel, B.; Xia, J.-Q.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14 May 2009 and has been scanning the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously since 12 August 2009. In March 2013, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the initial cosmology products based on the first 15.5 months of Planck data, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the mission and its performance, the processing, analysis, and characteristics of the data, the scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and diffuse extragalactic foregrounds, a catalogue of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources, and a list of sources detected through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data and a lensing likelihood are described. Scientific results include robust support for the standard six-parameter ΛCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements of its parameters, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large-scale anomalies in the temperature distribution of the CMB, first detected by WMAP, are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at greater than 25σ. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussianity in the CMB. Planck's results agree well with results from the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. Planck finds a lower Hubble constant than found in some more local measures. Some tension is also present between the amplitude of matter fluctuations (σ8) derived from

  16. Overview of recent ALICE results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldi Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ALICE is the LHC experiment devoted to the study of heavy-ion collisions. While results from Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV provide insight on the properties of the plasma of quarks and gluons, formed in nucleus-nucleus interactions, the study of p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV allows a deeper understanding of cold nuclear matter effects. Therefore, p-Pb results turn out to be a powerful tool to provide a baseline for Pb-Pb, to correctly quantify how the various observables are affected by genuine hot medium effects. In this proceeding, a selection of the most recent ALICE results on the medium global properties and on heavy-flavour and quarkonium production will be discussed.

  17. Result-Based Public Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    the performance measure that guides the inspectors’ inspection (or nudging) of the businesses. The analysis shows that although a result-based governance system is advocated on a strategic level, performance measures which are not ‘result-based’ are developed and used in the daily coordination of work. The paper......Within the public sector, many institutions are either steered by governance by targets or result-based governance. The former sets up quantitative internal production targets, while the latter advocates that production is planned according to outcomes which are defined as institution......-produced effects on individuals or businesses in society; effects which are often produced by ‘nudging’ the citizenry in a certain direction. With point of departure in these two governance-systems, the paper explores a case of controversial inspection of businesses’ negative VAT accounts and it describes...

  18. Complexity Results in Epistemic Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolander, Thomas; Jensen, Martin Holm; Schwarzentruber, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Epistemic planning is a very expressive framework that extends automated planning by the incorporation of dynamic epistemic logic (DEL). We provide complexity results on the plan existence problem for multi-agent planning tasks, focusing on purely epistemic actions with propositional preconditions....... We show that moving from epistemic preconditions to propositional preconditions makes it decidable, more precisely in EXPSPACE. The plan existence problem is PSPACE-complete when the underlying graphs are trees and NP-complete when they are chains (including singletons). We also show PSPACE......-hardness of the plan verification problem, which strengthens previous results on the complexity of DEL model checking....

  19. Impossibility results for distributed computing

    CERN Document Server

    Attiya, Hagit

    2014-01-01

    To understand the power of distributed systems, it is necessary to understand their inherent limitations: what problems cannot be solved in particular systems, or without sufficient resources (such as time or space). This book presents key techniques for proving such impossibility results and applies them to a variety of different problems in a variety of different system models. Insights gained from these results are highlighted, aspects of a problem that make it difficult are isolated, features of an architecture that make it inadequate for solving certain problems efficiently are identified

  20. Recent Beijing Spectroscopy (BES) results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI WeiGuo

    2008-01-01

    Recent experimental results from Beijing Spectroscopy (BES) are reviewed,in-cluding the hadron spectroscopy from J/ψdecays,and a number of new states are found or confirmed,including σ,κ;X(1835),ωψ threshold enhancement in J/ψ→γωψ,a broad resbnance in J/ψ→K+K-π0,decay studies of ψ(2S) and χCJ,as well as the results of ψ(3770) non-DD decays.The current status of BEPCⅡ/BESⅢ,the major upgrade of BEPC/BESⅡ,is also reported.

  1. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  2. Recent QCD Results from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sinervo, Pekka; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has performed studies of a wide range of QCD phenomena, from soft particle to hard photon and jet production. Among recent results are the measurement of Z event shape observables sensitive to the modelling of the underlying event, and the measurement of diffractive dijet production with a large rapidity gap, which tests the interplay of soft and hard phenomena. The inelastic pp cross section, a fundamental property of the strong interaction, is measured. Precision measurements of the isolated high pT inclusive photon cross section at cms energies of 8TeV test the theoretical predictions and constrain parton density functions. An overview of these results is given.

  3. Supersymmetry results at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manca, Giulia; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    The Run II physics programme of the Tevatron is proceeding with more than 300 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data, collected at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Searches for supersymmetric particles are starting to set new limits, improving over the LEP and Run I results and exploring new regions of parameter space. They present recent results in Supersymmetry with the upgraded CDF and D0 detectors and give some prospects for the future of these searches.

  4. ATLAS H(125) difermion results

    CERN Document Server

    Shabalina, Elizaveta; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present a summary of the recent measurements of the Standard Model Higgs production in fermionic decay modes. New results are presented for the dimuon Higgs decays, for Higgs decaying in a $b\\bar{b}$ pair in the VH and ttH production modes and in the VBF channel with photon production.

  5. Results from the AMANDA telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S.W.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Biron, A.; Boeser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouhali, O.; Burgess, T.; Carius, S.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Cowen, D.F.; Davour, A.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Ekstroem, P.; Feser, T.; Gaisser, T.K.; Ganupati, R.; Gaug, M.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, Ph.; Hill, G.C.; Hulth, P.O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Koepke, L.; Kuehn, K.; Kowalski, M.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Madsen, J.; Mandli, K.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Messarius, T.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Neunhoeffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schinarakis, K.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Sudoff, P.; Sudoff, K.-H.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedemann, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Yodh, G.; Young, S

    2003-06-30

    We present results from the AMANDA high energy neutrino telescope located at the South Pole. They include measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux, search for UHE point sources, and diffuse sources producing electromagnetic/hadronic showers at the detector or close to it.

  6. HADES results in elementary reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramstein B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results obtained with the HADES experimental set-up at GSI are presented with a focus on dielectron production and strangeness in pp and quasi-free np reactions. Perspectives related to the very recent experiment using the pion beam at GSI are also discussed.

  7. FFTF startup: status and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordhoff, B.H.; Moore, C.E.

    1980-03-01

    Startup testing on the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during the past three years has progressed beyond initial criticality toward the principal goal of power demonstration in 1980. An overview is presented of technical results to date and project plans to achieve power demonstration and complete the startup test program.

  8. Latest results from B factories

    CERN Document Server

    Ben Haim, Eli

    2015-01-01

    I will briefly review recent results from Babar and Belle. For example, I will discuss probes for new physics in radiative penguin decays and the CP asymmetry in B0-B0bar mixing. I will also discuss direct searches for new physics, such as a light Higgs resonance or long lived particles.

  9. Recent results from KLOE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Archilli, F; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, S; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Cesario, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Crucianelli, F; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Primavera, M; Santangelo, P; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Sibidanov, A; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Xu, G

    2008-01-01

    We report the newest results from the KLOE experiment on hadronic physics, such as the parameters of scalars f0 and a0, the eta meson mass measurements and dynamics, the first observation of the eta -> p+p-e+e- rare decay, and study of e+e- -> omega p0 cross section around the phi resonance.

  10. HADES results in elementary reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstein, B.; Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Arnold, O.; Atomssa, E. T.; Behnke, C.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Biernat, J.; Blanco, A.; Blume, C.; Böhmer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Chernenko, S.; Deveaux, C.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Fonte, P.; Franco, C.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gill, K.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Harabasz, S.; Hennino, T.; Hlavac, S.; Höhne, C.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kardan, K.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Korcyl, G.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krebs, E.; Kuc, H.; Kugler, A.; Kunz, T.; Kurepin, A.; Kurilkin, A.; Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Mahmoud, T.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michel, J.; Müntz, C.; Münzer, R.; Naumann, L.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Petousis, V.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Rehnisch, L.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Scheib, T.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Schuldes, H.; Sellheim, P.; Siebenson, J.; Silva, L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Strzempek, P.; Sturm, C.; Svoboda, O.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Wendisch, C.; Wirth, J.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Zanevsky, Y.; Zumbruch, P.

    2014-11-01

    Recent results obtained with the HADES experimental set-up at GSI are presented with a focus on dielectron production and strangeness in pp and quasi-free np reactions. Perspectives related to the very recent experiment using the pion beam at GSI are also discussed.

  11. Electroweak results from hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcel Demarteau

    1999-09-02

    A very brief summary of recent electroweak results from hadron colliders is given. The emphasis is placed on inclusive W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} production, the measurement of the mass of the W boson and the measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings.

  12. Superconductivity resulting from antiferromagnetic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Shi-Ping (Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University (CN))

    1989-09-01

    When the dopping is low enough, the holes obey Bose statistics, Bose-Einstein condensation of these holes may lead to occurance of superconductivity. In this framework, we have calculated some physical quantities, the results are in qualitative agreement with experiments.

  13. Recent results from DORIS II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a brief review of recent results from the ARGUS and Crystal Ball experiments at DORIS II, concentrating on UPSILON(1S) and UPSILON(2S) spectroscopy with a short foray into ..gamma gamma.. physics. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Results from the AMANDA telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Bouhali, O

    2003-01-01

    We present results from the AMANDA high energy neutrino telescope located at the South Pole. They include measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux, search for UHE point sources, and diffuse sources producing electromagnetic/hadronic showers at the detector or close to it. (4 refs).

  15. Heavy flavor results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ronchese, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Heavy flavor particles produced in LHC $pp$ collisions at $7, 8,$ and $13~\\mathrm{TeV}$ constitute an excellent opportunity to test the standard model and probe for new physics effects. Recent results by the CMS Collaboration on heavy flavor production and decays are presented.

  16. Perseids 2006 results in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigore, Valentin; Berinde, Stefan; Conu, Alexandru

    2007-12-01

    The results of 14th edition of the Perseide (Perseid) project organized by SARM are presented. PERSEIDE 2006 - the national astronomical camp for yought had two distinct parts: a summer astronomical school and a national Perseid network. Over 60 persons attended this event which lasted for four weeks and had both a training and observing component.

  17. B0s Oscillation Results

    CERN Document Server

    Willocq, S

    2002-01-01

    We review new studies of the time dependence of B0s - B0s-bar mixing by the ALEPH, DELPHI and SLD Collaborations, with an emphasis on the different analysis methods used. Combining all available results yields a preliminary lower limit on the oscillation frequency of dms > 14.4 ps-1 at the 95% C.L.

  18. Results-based management - Developing one's key results areas (KRAs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Om Prakash; Goel, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    In spite of aspiring to be a good manager, we public health experts fail to evaluate ourselves against our personal and professional goals. The Key Result Areas (KRAs) or key performance indicators (KPIs) help us in setting our operational (day-to-day) and/or strategic (long-term) goals followed by grading ourselves at different times of our careers. These shall help in assessing our strengths and weaknesses. The weakest KRA should set the maximum extent to which one should use his/her skills and abilities to have the greatest impact on his/her career.

  19. Basic results on braid groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Meneses, Juan

    2010-01-01

    These are Lecture Notes of a course given by the author at the French-Spanish School "Tresses in Pau", held in Pau (France) in October 2009. It is basically an introduction to distinct approaches and techniques that can be used to show results in braid groups. Using these techniques we provide several proofs of well known results in braid groups, namely the correctness of Artin's presentation, that the braid group is torsion free, or that its center is generated by the full twist. We also recall some solutions of the word and conjugacy problems, and that roots of a braid are always conjugate. We also describe the centralizer of a given braid. Most proofs are classical ones, using modern terminology. I have chosen those which I find simpler or more beautiful.

  20. Forget about data, deliver results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Roland

    2015-12-01

    High-energy astrophysics space missions have pioneered and demonstrated the power of legacy data sets for generating new discoveries, especially when analysed in ways original researchers could not have anticipated. The only way to ensure that the data of present observatories can be effectively used in the future is to allow users to perform on-the-fly data analysis to produce straightforwardly scientific results for any sky position, time and energy intervals without requiring mission specific software or detailed instrumental knowledge. Providing a straightforward interface to complex data and data analysis makes the data and the process of generating science results available to the public and higher education and promotes the visibility of the investment in science to the society. This is a fundamental step to transmit the values of science and to evolve towards a knowledge society.

  1. Results from the NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lupi, A

    2000-01-01

    he NOMAD experiment has been searching for νμ ↔ ντ oscillations by looking for the appearance of τ− in events from the CERN-SPS neutrino beam. With some improvements in the analysis techniques with respect to the previous published results and including data from 1995 to 1997, no evidence for oscillations is found, resulting in an updated limit in the oscillation probability of P(νμ↔ντ) < 0.6 × 10−3 at 90% C.L. This corresponds to a limit on the oscillation mixing angle of sin22θμτ < 1.2 × 10−3 for large Δm2.

  2. First Physics Results from ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peressounko, Dmitri [Russian Research Centre - RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Kurchatov sq.1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Castillo Castellanos, Javier [service de physique nucleaire - SPhN, IRFU, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Belikov, Iouri [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien - IPHC, 23 rue du loess - BP28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 2 (France)

    2010-07-01

    ALICE is the LHC experiment dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The main purpose of ALICE is to investigate the properties of a state of deconfined nuclear matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma. Heavy flavour measurements will play a crucial role in this investigation. The physics programme of ALICE has started by studying proton-proton collisions at unprecedented high energies. We will present the first results on open heavy flavour and quarkonia in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV measured by the ALICE experiment at both mid- and forward-rapidities. We will conclude with the prospects for heavy flavour and quarkonium measurements in both proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Also presented are first results of neutral meson reconstruction and its perspectives, as well as further physics studies. (author)

  3. Results from PLUTO at PETRA

    CERN Document Server

    Blobel, Volker

    1979-01-01

    Results obtained at the e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring PETRA by the PLUTO collaboration at c.m. energies of 13, 17 and 27.4 GeV are presented. New limits on QED cut-off parameters are determined from Bhabha scattering; at 27.4 GeV the limits are Lambda /sub +/>38 GeV and Lambda /sub -/>60 GeV. The measured values of the total hadronic cross section, and the study of the jet character of the hadronic events are well consistent with the expected production of b mesons (with q/sub b/=1/3), but do not require additional new quarks with charge 2/3. Hadronic events from two-photon exchange processes are observed with comparable rates as events from one-photon exchange. First results on the hadronic cross section in gamma gamma collisions are given. (8 refs).

  4. Audit result and its users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalimova Nataliya S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article identifies essence of the “audit result” and “users of audit result” notions and characteristics of the key audit results user. It shows that in order to give a wide characteristic of users it is expedient to unite all objects, which could be used (audit report, fact of refusal to conduct audit and information that is submitted to managers in the process of audit with the term “audit result” and classify it depending on the terms of submission by final and intermediate result. The article offers to define audit results user as a person, persons or category of persons for whom the auditor prepares the audit report and, in cases, envisaged by international standards of the audit and domestic legislative and regulatory acts, provides other additional information concerning audit issues. In order to identify the key audit results user the article distributes all audit tasks into two groups depending on possibilities of identification of users. The article proves that the key user should be identified especially in cases of a mandatory audit and this process should go in interconnection with the mechanism of allocation of a key user of financial reports. It offers to consider external users with direct financial interests, who cannot request economic subjects directly to provide information and who should rely on general financial reports and audit report when receiving significant portion of information they need, as the key user. The article makes proposals on specification of the categorical mechanism in the sphere of audit, which are the basis for audit quality assessment, identification of possibilities and conditions of appearance of the necessary and sufficient trust to the auditor opinion.

  5. Top physics results with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Massa, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains some of the most recent results on top-quark physics obtained by the ATLAS collaboration from the analysis of $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. Measurement of total and differential top-quark pair ($t\\bar{t}$), single top and $t\\bar{t}+\\gamma$ production cross sections and some top properties like mass, charge asymmetry and spin correlation are presented.

  6. SPQR -- Spectroscopy: Prospects, Questions & Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, Michael R. [JLAB

    2014-06-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in mapping out the spectrum of hadrons over the past decade with plans to make further advances in the decade ahead. Baryons and mesons, both expected and unexpected, have been found, the results of precision experiments often with polarized beams, polarized targets and sometimes polarization of the final states. All these hadrons generate poles in the complex energy plane that are consequences of strong coupling QCD. They reveal how this works.

  7. Results of the BSE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Kurakake, Y.; Kinoshita, S.

    Results of satellite broadcasting experiments carried out using the BSE (Japan's Medium-scale Broadcasting Satellite for Experimental Purpose) are described. Consideration is given to the following experiments: the reception of radio waves from the satellite, radio wave attenuation and scattering, the uplink power control experiment, experiments with transportable earth stations, the transmission of FM-TV signals, and frequency sharing between the broadcasting satellite and broadcasting services in the 12 GHz band.

  8. PHENIX Spin Program, Recent Results

    CERN Document Server

    Bazilevsky, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, Alberto; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Yu A; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S R; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; D'Enterria, D G; Dávid, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, Abhay A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Chenawi, K F; Enokizono, A; Enyo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L A; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Zeev; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E P; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Bösing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V P; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A G; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Martínez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E A; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Muhlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V A; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sørensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarjan, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torie, H A; Towell, R S; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjo, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszpremi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E A; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L S; Adler, S S; Bazilevsky, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Acceleration of polarized protons in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides unique tool to study the spin structure of the nucleon. We give a brief overview of the PHENIX program to investigate poorly known gluon and flavor decomposed see quark polarization in the proton, utilizing polarized proton collisions at RHIC. We report PHENIX first results on transverse single-spin asymmetry in pi0 and charged hadron production and longitudinal double-spin asymmetry in pi0 production at mid-rapidity.

  9. LHC Results Highlights (CLASHEP 2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, O

    2015-01-01

    The good performance of the LHC provided enough data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV to allow the experiments to perform very competitive measurements and to expand the knowledge about the fundamental interaction far beyond that from previous colliders. This report summarizes the highlights of the results obtained with these data samples by the four large experiments, covering all the topics of the physics program and focusing on those exploiting the possibilities of the LHC.

  10. Which Reconstruction Results are Significant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    other significant result is due to Tutte [17]. Tutte’s Theorem: The characteristic polynomial of a graph can be reconstructed. Equivalently, two...hypomorphic graphs must have the same characteristic polynomial . Several points should be noted concerning this theorem: 1. The derivative of the...characteristic polynomial is the sum of the char- acteristic polynomials of the vertex-deleted subgraphs. Thus the characteristic polynomials of hypomorphic

  11. Recent results from ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Sergei; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The 2nd LHC run has started in 2015 with a pp centre-of-mass collision energy of 13 TeV and ATLAS has taken more than 20 fb-1 of data at the new energy by 2016 summer. In this talk, an overview is given on the ATLAS data taking and the improvements made to the ATLAS experiment during the 2-year shutdown 2013/2014. Selected new results from the recent data analysis from ATLAS is also presented.

  12. Open cherry picker simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The simulation program associated with a key piece of support equipment to be used to service satellites directly from the Shuttle is assessed. The Open Cherry Picker (OCP) is a manned platform mounted at the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) and is used to enhance extra vehicular activities (EVA). The results of simulations performed on the Grumman Large Amplitude Space Simulator (LASS) and at the JSC Water Immersion Facility are summarized.

  13. Results from the B Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevan, A.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2009-01-08

    These proceedings are based on lectures given at the Helmholtz International Summer School Heavy Quark Physics at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna, Russia, during August 2008. I review the current status of CP violation in B meson decays from the B factories. These results can be used, along with measurements of the sides of the Unitarity Triangle, to test the CKM mechanism. In addition I discuss experimental studies of B decays to final states with 'spin-one' particles.

  14. Results from the B Factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevan, A.; /Queen Mary, U. of London

    2009-01-08

    These proceedings are based on lectures given at the Helmholtz International Summer School Heavy Quark Physics at the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna, Russia, during August 2008. I review the current status of CP violation in B meson decays from the B factories. These results can be used, along with measurements of the sides of the Unitarity Triangle, to test the CKM mechanism. In addition I discuss experimental studies of B decays to final states with 'spin-one' particles.

  15. Results from the FDIRC prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, D.A., E-mail: roberts@umd.edu [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Arnaud, N. [Laboratoire de l’Accélérateur Linéaire, Centre Scientifique d’Orsay, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Dey, B. [University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Borsato, M. [Laboratoire de l’Accélérateur Linéaire, Centre Scientifique d’Orsay, F-91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Leith, D.W.G.S.; Nishimura, K.; Ratcliff, B.N. [SLAC, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94309 (United States); Varner, G. [University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Va’vra, J. [SLAC, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA 94309 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We present results from a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC). This detector was designed as a prototype of the particle identification system for the SuperB experiment, and comprises 1/12 of the SuperB barrel azimuthal coverage with partial electronics implementation. The prototype was tested in the SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope (CRT) which provides 3-D muon tracking with an angular resolution of ∼1.5 mrad, track position resolution of 5–6 mm, start time resolution of 70 ps, and a muon low-energy cutoff of ∼2 GeV provided by an iron range stack. The quartz focusing photon camera couples to a full-size BaBar DIRC bar box and is read out by 12 Hamamatsu H8500 MaPMTs providing 768 pixels. We used IRS2 waveform digitizing electronics to read out the MaPMTs. We present several results from our on-going development activities that demonstrate that the new optics design works very well, including: (a) single photon Cherenkov angle resolutions with and without chromatic corrections, (b) S/N ratio between the Cherenkov peak and background, which consists primarily of ambiguities in possible photon paths to a given pixel, (c) dTOP=TOP{sub measured}–TOP{sub expected} resolutions, and (d) performance of the detector in the presence of high-rate backgrounds. We also describe data analysis methods and point out limits of the present performance. - Highlights: • We present results from a novel Cherenkov imaging detector called the Focusing DIRC (FDIRC). • The prototype was tested in the SLAC Cosmic Ray Telescope (CRT) which provides 3-D muon tracking. • We present several results from our on-going development activities that demonstrate that new optics design works very well. • We describe data analysis methods and point out limits of the present performance.

  16. Planck 2015 results: I. Overview of products and scientific results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based ondata from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data...... Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic cold clumps), and extensive simulations of signals and noise used in assessing uncertainties and the performance of the analysis methods. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models...... against the Planck data is described, along with a CMB lensing likelihood. Scientific results include cosmological parameters derived from CMB power spectra, gravitational lensing, and cluster counts, as well as constraints on inflation, non-Gaussianity, primordial magnetic fields, dark energy...

  17. Planck 2015 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Alves, M.I.R.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.F.; Carvalho, P.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chiang, H.C.; Chluba, J.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P.R.M.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Farhang, M.; Feeney, S.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Florido, E.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Genova-Santos, R.T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Giusarma, E.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Grainge, K.J.B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Ilic, S.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jin, T.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J.P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lindholm, V.; Liu, H.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Ma, Y.Z.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Mak, D.S.Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McEwen, J.D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamaie, M.; Oppermann, N.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H.V.; Pelkonen, V.M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y.C.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; d'Orfeuil, B.Rouille; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Said, N.; Salvatelli, V.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Sanghera, H.S.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R.D.E.; Sauve, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B.M.; Schammel, M.P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Shimwell, T.W.; Shiraishi, M.; Smith, K.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L.D.; Spinelli, M.; Stanford, S.A.; Stern, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A.W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tristram, M.; Troja, A.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Turler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vassallo, T.; Vidal, M.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Walter, B.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I.K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S.D.M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J.P.; Zonca, A.

    2015-01-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14~May 2009 and scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12~August 2009 and 23~October 2013. In February~2015, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based on data from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data and the data products in the release, as well as the associated cosmological and astrophysical science results and papers. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, and diffuse foregrounds in temperature and polarization, catalogues of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic col...

  18. Digital coincidence counting - initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, K. S. A.; Watt, G. C.; Alexiev, D.; van der Gaast, H.; Davies, J.; Mo, Li; Wyllie, H. A.; Keightley, J. D.; Smith, D.; Woods, M. J.

    2000-08-01

    Digital Coincidence Counting (DCC) is a new technique in radiation metrology, based on the older method of analogue coincidence counting. It has been developed by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), in collaboration with the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) of the United Kingdom, as a faster more reliable means of determining the activity of ionising radiation samples. The technique employs a dual channel analogue-to-digital converter acquisition system for collecting pulse information from a 4π beta detector and an NaI(Tl) gamma detector. The digitised pulse information is stored on a high-speed hard disk and timing information for both channels is also stored. The data may subsequently be recalled and analysed using software-based algorithms. In this letter we describe some recent results obtained with the new acquistion hardware being tested at ANSTO. The system is fully operational and is now in routine use. Results for 60Co and 22Na radiation activity calibrations are presented, initial results with 153Sm are also briefly mentioned.

  19. Results Evaluation in Reduction Rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arima, Lisandra Megumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Final results evaluation after rhinoplasty is a not a topic widely studied from the patient's viewpoint. Objective:Evaluate the satisfaction of the patients submitted to reduction rhinoplasty, from the questionnaire Rhinoplasty Outcomes Evaluation (ROE. Method: Longitudinal study, retrospective cut type, of the preoperative and postoperative satisfaction. The sample was composed by 28 patients who were submitted to rhinoplasty and answered the ROE questionnaire. Three variables were obtained: satisfaction note that the patient had with his/her image before the surgery; note of satisfaction with the current appearance; the difference of the average satisfaction notes between postoperative and preoperative approaches. Results: The postoperative note was higher than the preoperative in all patients. We noticed a difference between the average of the postoperative and preoperative of 48.3 (p75 considered to be an excellent outcome (67.9%. Conclusions: The ROE questionnaire is a helpful tool to show the satisfaction of the patient submitted to reduction rhinoplasty. About 92% of the patients submitted to reduction rhinoplasty consider the postoperative result to be good or excellent.

  20. ISO: highlights of recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, L.; Salama, A.

    ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) mission, operating in the wavelength range from 2.5 to 240 microns, made over 26000 scientific observations during its 2.5 year operational lifetime. ISO's results broke new ground on all scales. New asteroid counts and improved asteroid thermophysical models augmented important advances in Solar System chemistry to comprise a striking body of results addressing our planetary system. In turn, parallels between the chemical composition of Solar System dust and dust around other stars revealed by the comparison of stellar spectra with cometary spectra, together with results on the incidence and stability of stellar disks, recall the birth of our Solar System and point to fundamental similarities with other star systems. Numerous important facts concerning the chemistry of the ISM have unfolded, such as the ubiquity of water and of the probably-organic carriers of the Unidentified Infrared Bands (UIBs). The large systematic body of data on galactic stars has permitted fascinating advances in the characterisation of important aspects of stellar evolution. Investigations of nearby normal galaxies complement template specimens of interacting galaxies. These in turn exemplify galaxy evolutionary processes in the early Universe associated with a huge burst of dust-obscured star formation at redshifts of just below one. This global surge of star formation has vital implications for the interpretation and explanation of major components of the Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) and for charting the global history of star formation and the relative importance of sources which derive their energy from accretion processes. Representative examples of key aspects of ISO's recent scientific output will be presented, once again affirming ISO's place at the forefront of successful space-borne astronomy missions.

  1. Data bases for LDEF results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried 57 experiments and 10,000 specimens for some 200 LDEF experiment investigators. The external surface of LDEF had a large variety of materials exposed to the space environment which were tested preflight, during flight, and post flight. Thermal blankets, optical materials, thermal control paints, aluminum, and composites are among the materials flown. The investigations have produced an abundance of analysis results. One of the responsibilities of the Boeing Support Contract, Materials and Systems Special Investigation Group, is to collate and compile that information into an organized fashion. The databases developed at Boeing to accomplish this task is described.

  2. ATLAS Run II Exotics Results

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    While Standard Model is in a good shape especially after Higgs boson discovery, there are a lot of questions beyond SM. The ATLAS detector is performing about 50 Exotics searches addressed these questions. This talk is discussing some of them with datasets collected during the 2015-2016 LHC run from 3 fb^-1 to 18 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV centre of mass energy . Results on searches for resonances decaying into vector boson or fermions, for vector like quarks, for dark matter, and for other new phenomena using these data will be presented.

  3. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  4. Overview of recent ALICE results

    CERN Document Server

    Gunji, Taku

    2016-01-01

    The ALICE experiment explores the properties of strongly interacting QCD matter at extremely high temperatures created in Pb-Pb collisions at LHC and provides further insight into small-system physics in (high-multiplicity) pp and p-Pb collisions. The ALICE collaboration presented 27 parallel talks, 50 posters, and 1 flash talk at Quark Matter 2015 and covered various topics including collective dynamics, correlations and fluctuations, heavy flavors, quarkonia, jets and high $p_{\\rm T}$ hadrons, electromagnetic probes, small system physics, and the upgrade program. This paper highlights some of the selected results.

  5. LHCb results with vector bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Lucchesi, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of electroweak bosons production provide an important test of the Standard Model at the LHC energies and allow the partonic content of the proton to be constrained. The LHCb forward acceptance is suited for measurements complementary to the other LHC experiments. W and Z bosons are reconstructed in e and μ leptonic final states using data samples collected at energies in the center of mass frame of √ s = 7 , 8 , 13 TeV corresponding to integrated luminosities of 1 , 2 , 0 . 29 fb − 1 respectively. Results on W + b / c quark and on W / Z + jets are also presented.

  6. Results from IceCube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeYoung Tyce

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory have revealed the existence of a flux of high energy neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin, which is observed in a number of analyses spanning different energy ranges, fields of view, and neutrino flavors. The current data are consistent with an isotropic, equal-flavor flux described by a simple power law spectrum, but deviations from this simple model cannot yet be constrained with high precision. The existing observations in this area are reviewed, along with recent results on dark matter searches and observations of cosmic rays.

  7. Recent photon results from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Glasman, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The production of prompt isolated photons at hadron colliders provides a stringent test of perturbative QCD and can be used to probe the gluon density function of the proton. The ATLAS collaboration has performed precise measurements of the inclusive production o f isolated prompt photons at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, differential in both rap idity and the photon transverse momentum. In addition, the integrated and differential c ross sections for isolated photon pair production 8 TeV have been measured. The results are compared with state-of-the-art theory predictions at NLO in QCD and with predictions of several MC generators.

  8. Charm hadroproduction results from Selex

    CERN Document Server

    Iori, M

    2000-01-01

    The SELEX experiment (E781) is 3-stage magnetic spectrometer for a high statistics study of hadroproduction of charm baryons out to large x_F using 650 Gev Sigma-, pi- and p beams. The main features of the spectrometer are: a high precision silicon vertex system, powerful particle identification provided by TRD and RICH, forward Lambda decay spectrometer and 3-stage lead glass photon detector. An experiment overview and spectrometer features are shown. Reconstructed charm states and results on Lambda_c, D+ particles and antiparticles produced by Sigma-, pi- and p beams at x_F>0.3 and asymmetry for Lambda_c are presented.

  9. Hyperon Physics Results from SELEX

    CERN Document Server

    Eschrich, I; Andreev, V A; Atamanchuk, A G; Aykac, M; Balatz, M Y; Bondar, N F; Bravar, A; Chen Sheng Mei; Cooper, P S; Dauwe, L J; Davidenko, G V; Dersch, U; Dolgolenko, A G; Dreossi, D; Dzyubenko, G B; Edelstein, R; Endler, A M F; Engelfried, J; Escobar, C O; Evdokimov, A V; Ferbel, T; Filimonov, I S; García, F; Gaspero, M; Gerzon, S; Giller, I; Ginther, G; Golovtsov, V L; Goncharenko, Yu M; Gottschalk, E; Gouffon, P; Grachov, O A; Gülmez, E; Hammer, C; Iori, M; Jun, S Y; Kamenskii, A D; Kangling, H; Kaya, M; Kenney, C; Kilmer, J; Kim, V T; Kochenda, L M; Königsmann, K C; Konorov, I; Kozhevnikov, A A; Krivshich, A G; Krüger, H; Kubantsev, M A; Kubarovskii, V P; Kulyavtsev, A I; Kuropatkin, N P; Kurshetsov, V F; Kushnirenko, A; Kwan, S; Lach, J; Lamberto, A; Landsberg, L G; Larin, I; Leikin, E M; Luksys, M; Lungov, T; Magarrel, D; Maleev, V P; Mao, D; Masciocchi, S; Mathew, P; Mattson, M; Matveev, V; McCliment, E; McKenna, S L; Moinester, M A; Molchanov, V V; Morelos, A; Mukhin, V A; Nelson, K; Nemitkin, A V; Neoustroev, P V; Newsom, C; Nilov, A P; Nurushev, S B; Ocherashvili, A; Oleynik, G; Önel, Y M; Ozel, E; Ozkorucuklu, S; Parker, S; Patrichev, S; Penzo, Aldo L; Pogodin, P I; Povh, B; Procario, M; Prutskoi, V A; Ramberg, E; Rappazzo, G F; Razmyslovich, B V; Rud, V; Russ, J; Schiavon, Paolo; Semyatchkin, V K; Shuchen, Z; Simón, J; Sitnikov, A I; Skow, D; Slattery, P F; Smith, V J; Srivastava, M; Steiner, V; Stepanov, V; Stutte, L; Svoiski, M; Terentyev, N K; Thomas, G P; Uvarov, L N; Vasilev, A N; Vavilov, D V; Verebryusov, V S; Victorov, V A; Vishnyakov, V E; Vorobyov, A A; Vorwalter, K; Wenheng, Z; You, J; Yunshan, L; Zhenlin, M; Zhigang, L; Zielinski, M; Zukanovich-Funchal, R; Eschrich, Ivo

    1999-01-01

    In parallel to charm hadroproduction the experiment SELEX (E781) at Fermilab is pursuing a rich hyperon physics program. SELEX employs a 600 GeV/c beam consisting of 50% \\Sigma^- and \\pi^- each. The three-stage magnetic spectrometer covering 0.1 <= x_F <= 1.0 features a high-precision silicon vertex system, broad-coverage particle identification using TRD and RICH, and a three-stage lead glass photon calorimeter. First results for the \\Sigma^- charge radius, total (\\Sigma^-)-nucleon cross sections, and a new upper limit for the radiative width of the \\Sigma^-*(1385) are presented.

  10. Hyperon physics results from SELEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschrich, Ivo

    1999-02-01

    In parallel to charm hadroproduction the experiment SELEX (E781) at Fermilab is pursuing a rich hyperon physics program. SELEX employs a 600 GeV/c beam consisting of 50% Σ- and π- each. The three-stage magnetic spectrometer covering 0.1⩽xF⩽1.0 features a high-precision silicon vertex system, broad-coverage particle identification using TRD and RICH, and a three-stage lead glass photon calorimeter. First results for the Σ- charge radius, total Σ--nucleon cross sections, and a new upper limit for the radiative width of the Σ(1385)- are presented.

  11. Charm physics results from SELEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnirenko, Alexander Y.

    1999-02-01

    The SELEX experiment (ET781) [1] at Fermilab is a new fixed target multistage spectrometer with high acceptance for forward interactions and decays. It took data in 1996-97 with 600 GeV Σ-, π- and 540 GeV p beams, collecting large sample of charm decays. Preliminary results on charm—anticharm production asymmetries, Λc+ production xF dependence in different beams, Λc+ lifetime, and the first observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed decay Ⅺc+→pK-π+ are presented.

  12. Treasury, the Resultant Flow Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Spineanu-Georgescu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Treasury expresses the result of all activities of the enterprise and how to comply with the requirements of financial balance. All operations which the undertaking is found out immediately and forward the form of cash flow. The enterprise is a system which, in turn, is characterized by economic, social and financial structure. Inside and outside the company are born a lot of flows, a point mentioned in the previous chapter, from which the money have a role and an important place.

  13. Overview of recent ALICE results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunji, Taku

    2016-12-01

    The ALICE experiment explores the properties of strongly interacting QCD matter at extremely high temperatures created in Pb-Pb collisions at LHC and provides further insight into small-system physics in (high-multiplicity) pp and p-Pb collisions. The ALICE collaboration presented 27 parallel talks, 50 posters, and 1 flash talk at Quark Matter 2015 and covered various topics including collective dynamics, correlations and fluctuations, heavy flavors, quarkonia, jets and high pT hadrons, electromagnetic probes, small system physics, and the upgrade program. This paper highlights some of the selected results.

  14. Unfavourable results following reduction mammoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Saleem

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast reduction is a common cosmetic surgical procedure. It aims not only at bringing down the size of the breast proportionate to the build of the individual, but also to overcome the discomfort caused by massive, ill-shaped and hanging breasts. The operative procedure has evolved from mere reduction of breast mass to enhanced aesthetic appeal with a minimum of scar load. The selection of technique needs to be individualised. Bilateral breast reduction is done most often. Haematoma, seroma, fat necrosis, skin loss, nipple loss and unsightly, painful scars can be the complications of any procedure on the breast. These may result from errors in judgement, wrong surgical plan and imprecise execution of the plan. Though a surfeit of studies are available on breast reduction, very few dwell upon its complications. The following article is a distillation of three decades of experience of the senior author (L.S. in reduction mammoplasty. An effort is made to understand the reasons for unfavourable results. To conclude, most complications can be overcome with proper selection of procedure for the given patient and with gentle tissue handling.

  15. Toxocariasis Resulting in Seeming Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Qualizza

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxocara canis is an intestinal nematode affecting dogs and cats that causes human infestations by ingestion of embryonated eggs excreted in dogs' faeces. Humans are transport hosts, in whom the larvae do not develop to adult worms, but may migrate to various tissues and organs, and survive for several years, giving rise to several clinical symptoms, which include allergy-like presentations. We report three cases presenting as dermatitis, rhinitis, asthma, and conjunctivitis which were diagnosed and unsuccessfully treated as allergy. The correct diagnosis was established after detecting anti-Toxocara antibodies by Western blotting. All clinical symptoms showed improvement after starting treatment with mebendazole and subsequent courses of the antiparasitic drug resulted in full recovery. This suggests the possible role of Toxocara canis in inducing chronic symptoms of allergic type. This is particularly important for asthma, where it has been demonstrated that Toxocara canis infection causes allergic inflammation in the lungs associated with bronchial hyperreactivity. On the other hand, in our patients with asthma and with dermatitis the positive results from allergy tests were a confounding factor in delaying the correct diagnosis, which was finally obtained by the detection of antibodies to Toxocara canis.

  16. REMS Wind Sensor Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Torre Juarez, M.; Gomez-Elvira, J.; Navarro, S.; Marin, M.; Torres, J.; Rafkin, S. C.; Newman, C. E.; Pla-García, J.

    2015-12-01

    The REMS instrument is part of the Mars Science Laboratory payload. It is a sensor suite distributed over several parts of the rover. The wind sensor, which is composed of two booms equipped with a set of hot plate anemometers, is installed on the Rover Sensing Mast (RSM). During landing most of the hot plates of one boom were damaged, most likely by the pebbles lifted by the Sky Crane thruster. The loss of one wind boom necessitated a full review of the data processing strategy. Different algorithms have been tested on the readings of the first Mars year, and these results are now archived in the Planetary Data System (PDS), The presentation will include a description of the data processing methods and of the resulting products, including the typical evolution of wind speed and direction session-by-session, hour-by-hour and other kinds of statistics . A review of the wind readings over the first Mars year will also be presented.

  17. Results of Austin Moore replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadhav A

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Forty cases of Austin Moore Replacement done for transcervical fractures of the femur in patients were reviewed after a period of 12 to 48 months postoperatively (mean 26 mth. 30 cases (75% had mild to severe pain of non-infective origin, starting as early as 6 months postoperatively. This was irrespective of the make, size or position (varus/valgus of the prosthesis. Though the Aufranc and Sweet clinical scoring was satisfactory in 65% cases, radiological evidence of complications like sinking, protrusion, etc. were seen in majority of the cases. Calcar resorption was seen in 34 cases (85% as early as 4 months postoperatively. Results of THR and bipolar replacement done for transcervical fractures in recent literature show 85% pain-free cases at 5 years. We feel that Austin Moore Replacement should be reserved for patients more than 65 years of age and those who are less active or debilitated because of other factors, because of increased acetabular wear with time in the younger individual. This is corroborated by unsatisfactory results in patients less than 65 years of age (p < 0.05.

  18. Heel pain--operative results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, D E; Thigpen, C M

    1984-01-01

    In 6 years through 1982, the authors performed 34 operative cases in 26 patients with recalcitrant heel pain. The operative procedure involves an isolated neurolysis of the mixed nerve supplying the abductor digiti quinti muscle as it passes beneath the abductor hallucis muscle and beneath the medial ridge of the calcaneus. The deep fascia of the abductor hallucis muscle is released routinely, and an impinging heel spur or tight plantar fascia is partially removed or released if it is causing entrapment of the nerve. The biomechanical pathogenesis of heel pain in relation to pes planus and pes cavus predisposing to an entrapment neuropathy is described, and the anatomy of the heel in relation to the nerve distribution is clarified and well illustrated. Of the 34 operated heels, 32 had good results and two had poor results. Heel pain can cause total disability in the working population and may jeopardize one's employment or professional athletic career. The authors believe operative treatment has a place in the care of recalcitrant heel pain and that an entrapment neuropathy is an etiological factor in heel pain.

  19. Indication and results of xeromammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willgeroth, F.

    1982-12-01

    The prognosis of breast cancer depends decisively on the time of the diagnosis. So far, survival rates could not be significantly improved. One can expect the best results from an earlier diagnosis. Above all film and Xero-mammography and enforced self examination can contribute to discover carcinoma in an earlier stage. The number of cancer cases that can be discovered this way is low. Film-mammography is preferred in Germany, Xero-mammography in the USA. Both techniques are equal with respect to their diagnostic power, if they are used under optimal technical conditions. The dose load in Xero-mammography is lower compared with mammography with foil-less materal test films. Low-dose film mammographies with and without screen are techniques with an even lower exposure. They do not appear mature in a technological sense. It is not clear whether the high filtration Xero-mammography with negative development technique can yield the same diagnostic results with a radiation exposure of the same order because larger comparative tests are still lacking.

  20. Results from ISTC frame work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukahori, Tokio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Under International Science Research Center (ISTC) projects, JAERI Nuclear Data Center has been taking a role of collaborator and monitor for following items; (1) Measurement of the Fission Neutron Spectra of the Minor Actinides and Spontaneous Fission of Curium Isotopes (ISTC no. 183: V.I. Khlopin Radium Institute, KRI, St. Petersburg, Russia), (2) Measurement and Analysis of the Basic Nuclear Data for Minor Actinides (ISTC no. 304: Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, IPPE, Obninsk, Russia), and Evaluation of Actinide Nuclear Data (ISTC no. CIS-3: Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute, RPCPI, Minsk, Belarus). These are related to the Japanese OMEGA Project and expected to supply minor actinide (MA) nuclear data, since Russia has good quality MA samples, experimental technique and nuclear data evaluation experiences. In this report, out-line and some results of above three projects are reviewed. (author)

  1. Selected recent results from AMANDA

    CERN Document Server

    Andrés, E; Bai, X; Barouch, G; Barwick, S W; Bay, R C; Becker, K H; Bergström, L; Bertrand, D; Bierenbaum, D; Biron, A; Booth, J; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Boyce, M M; Carius, S; Chen, A; Chirkin, D; Conrad, J; Cooley, J; Costa, C G S; Cowen, D F; Dailing, J; Dalberg, E; De Young, T R; Desiati, P; Dewulf, J P; Doksus, P; Edsjö, J; Ekstrom, P; Erlandsson, B; Feser, T; Gaug, M; Goldschmidt, A; Goobar, A; Gray, L; Haase, H; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hardtke, R; He, Y D; Hellwig, M; Heukenkamp, H; Hill, G C; Hulth, P O; Hundertmark, S; Jacobsen, J; Kandhadai, V; Karle, A; Kim, J; Koci, B; Köpke, L; Kowalski, M; Leich, H; Leuthold, M; Lindahl, P; Liubarsky, I; Loaiza, P; Lowder, D M; Ludvig, J; Madsen, J; Marciniewski, P; Matis, H S; Mihályi, A; Mikolajski, T; Miller, T C; Minaeva, Y; Miocinovic, P; Mock, P C; Morse, R; Neunhoffer, T; Newcomer, F M; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogelman, H; Heros, C P D L; Porrata, R; Price, P B; Rawlins, K; Reed, C; Rhode, W; Richards, A; Richter, S; Martino, J R; Romenesko, P; Ross, D; Rubinstein, H; Sander, H G; Scheider, T; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Schneider, E; Schwarzl, R; Silvestri, A; Solarz, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Starinsky, N; Steele, D; Steffen, P; Stokstad, R G; Streicher, O; Sun, A; Taboada, I; Thollander, L; Thon, T; Tilav, S; Usechak, N; Donckt, M V; Walck, C; Weinheimer, C; Wiebusch, C; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Wu, W; Yodh, G; Young, S

    2001-01-01

    We present a selection of results based on data taken in 1997 with the 302-PMT Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array-B10 ("AMANDA-B10") array. Atmospheric neutrinos created in the northern hemisphere are observed indirectly through their charged current interactions which produce relativistic, Cherenkov-light-emitting upgoing muons in the South Pole ice cap. The reconstructed angular distribution of these events is in good agreement with expectation and demonstrates the viability of this ice-based device as a neutrino telescope. Studies of nearly vertical upgoing muons limit the available parameter space for WIMP dark matter under the assumption that WIMPS are trapped in the earth's gravitational potential well and annihilate with one another near the earth's center.

  2. Results from KASCADE-Grande

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertaina, M., E-mail: bertaina@to.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, KIT - Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Arteaga-Velazquez, J.C. [Universidad Michoacana, Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Morelia (Mexico); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, KIT - Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, KIT - Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, KIT - Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, KIT - Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, KIT - Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); and others

    2012-11-11

    The KASCADE-Grande experiment, located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany) is a multi-component extensive air-shower experiment devoted to the study of cosmic rays and their interactions at primary energies 10{sup 14}-10{sup 18} eV. Main goals of the experiment are the measurement of the all-particle energy spectrum and mass composition in the 10{sup 16}-10{sup 18} eV range by sampling charged (N{sub ch}) and muon (N{sub {mu}}) components of the air shower. The method to derive the energy spectrum and its uncertainties, as well as the implications of the obtained result, is discussed. An overview of the analyses performed by KASCADE-Grande to derive the mass composition of the measured high-energy comic rays is presented as well.

  3. Initial Blackbeard power survey results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, T.; Devenport, J.; Holden, D.

    1996-06-01

    The Blackbeard broadband VHF radio receiver is in low-earth orbit aboard the ALEXIS satellite. The receiver has been used to measure the transmitted power in four VHF bands (55.2-75.8, 28.0-94.8, 132.3-152.2, and 107.7-166.0 MHz) over quiet and noisy parts of the earth. The authors present the results of the survey and discuss their implications. They find that there are remote ocean areas over which the observed spectrum is largely free of man-made interference, but that the spectrum over most of the earth is dominated by broadcast VHF signals. The signal characteristics observed over a given area are quite constant when observed at different times of day and at intervals of several weeks to months. It appears that in many cases the bulk of the signal power is coming from a small number of sources.

  4. Airfreight forecasting methodology and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    A series of econometric behavioral equations was developed to explain and forecast the evolution of airfreight traffic demand for the total U.S. domestic airfreight system, the total U.S. international airfreight system, and the total scheduled international cargo traffic carried by the top 44 foreign airlines. The basic explanatory variables used in these macromodels were the real gross national products of the countries involved and a measure of relative transportation costs. The results of the econometric analysis reveal that the models explain more than 99 percent of the historical evolution of freight traffic. The long term traffic forecasts generated with these models are based on scenarios of the likely economic outlook in the United States and 31 major foreign countries.

  5. Recent Results from Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Fukushima, M

    2015-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) is an experiment to observe Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). TA's recent results, the energy spectrum and anisotropy based on the 6-year surface array data, and the primary composition obtained from the shower maximum Xmax are reported. The spectrum demonstrates a clear dip and cutoff. The shape of the spectrum is well described by the energy loss of extra-galactic protons interacting with the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Above the cutoff, a medium-scale (20 degrees radius) flux enhancement was observed near the Ursa-Major. A chance probability of creating this hotspot from the isotropic flux is 4.0 sigma. The measured Xmax is consistent with the primary being proton or light nuclei for energies 10^18.2 eV - 10^19.2 eV.

  6. Latest results from KLOE-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloise Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The KLOE experiment at the Frascati φ–factory recently obtained results on i CPT and Lorentz invariance tests from the study of quantum interference of the neutral kaon pairs; ii precision measurement of the branching fraction, BR(K+ → π+π−π+(γ = 0.05565 ± 0.00031stat ± 0.00025syst, and iii on dark photon searches with the analysis of the e+e− → µµγ final state. We have also studied the transition form factors of the φ meson to the pseudoscalars, π0 and η, that is presented in a separate contribution to this volume.

  7. First results on fast baking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visentin, B. [CEA-Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA/SACM - 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France)]. E-mail: bvisentin@cea.fr; Gasser, Y. [CEA-Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA/SACM - 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Charrier, J.P. [CEA-Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA/SACM - 91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France)

    2006-07-15

    High gradient performances of bulk niobium cavities go through a low-temperature baking during one or two days, the temperature parameter is adjusted in a narrow tuning range around 110 or 120deg, C. With such treatment, the intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0} is improved at high fields. Assuming the oxygen diffusion is involved in this phenomenon, we have developed the 'fast baking' (145deg, C/3h) as an alternative method. Similar results have been achieved with this method compared to standard baking. Consequently, for the first time, a link between oxygen diffusion and high field Q-slope has been demonstrated. Furthermore, this method open the way to a simpler and better baking procedure for the large-scale cavity production due to:*time reduction and *possibility to combine baking and drying during cavity preparation.

  8. First results on fast baking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, B.; Gasser, Y.; Charrier, J. P.

    2006-07-01

    High gradient performances of bulk niobium cavities go through a low-temperature baking during one or two days, the temperature parameter is adjusted in a narrow tuning range around 110 or 120 °C. With such treatment, the intrinsic quality factor Q0 is improved at high fields. Assuming the oxygen diffusion is involved in this phenomenon, we have developed the “fast baking” (145 °C/3 h) as an alternative method. Similar results have been achieved with this method compared to standard baking. Consequently, for the first time, a link between oxygen diffusion and high field Q-slope has been demonstrated. Furthermore, this method open the way to a simpler and better baking procedure for the large-scale cavity production due to: time reduction and possibility to combine baking and drying during cavity preparation.

  9. CMS results on exclusive production

    CERN Document Server

    Khakzad, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    A search for exclusive or quasi-exclusive $\\gamma\\gamma \\rightarrow W^{+}W^{-}$ production, ${\\rm pp} \\rightarrow {\\rm p}^{(*)} W^{+}W^{-} {\\rm p}^{(*)} \\rightarrow {\\rm p}^{(*)} \\mu^{\\pm} {\\rm e}^{\\mp} {\\rm p}^{(*)}$, at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV (7 TeV) are reported using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 $\\rm {fb}^{-1}$ (5.5$\\rm {fb}^{-1}$), respectively. In this study, we look for any deviations that there might be from the Standard Model, and the results are used to set limits on the Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings. We also report a measurement of the exclusive production of pairs of charged pions in proton-proton collisions. The differential cross sections for $\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ pairs as a function of the pion pair invariant mass is measured and compared to several phenomenological predictions.

  10. Hyperon physics results from SELEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selex Collaboration

    1999-02-01

    In parallel to charm hadroproduction the experiment SELEX (E781) at Fermilab is pursuing a rich hyperon physics program. SELEX employs a 600 GeV/c beam consisting of 50{percent}thinsp{Sigma}{sup {minus}} and {pi}{sup {minus}} each. The three-stage magnetic spectrometer covering 0.1{le}x{sub F}{le}1.0 features a high-precision silicon vertex system, broad-coverage particle identification using TRD and RICH, and a three-stage lead glass photon calorimeter. First results for the {Sigma}{sup {minus}} charge radius, total {Sigma}{sup {minus}}-nucleon cross sections, and a new upper limit for the radiative width of the {Sigma}(1385){sup {minus}} are presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Charm physics results from SELEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SELEX Collaboration

    1999-02-01

    The SELEX experiment (ET781) [1] at Fermilab is a new fixed target multistage spectrometer with high acceptance for forward interactions and decays. It took data in 1996{endash}97 with 600 GeV {Sigma}{sup {minus}}, {pi}{sup {minus}} and 540 GeV {ital p} beams, collecting large sample of charm decays. Preliminary results on charm{emdash}anticharm production asymmetries, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} production x{sub F} dependence in different beams, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} lifetime, and the first observation of the Cabibbo-suppressed decay {Xi}{sub c}{sup +}{r_arrow}pK{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +} are presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Cassini at Saturn Huygens results

    CERN Document Server

    Harland, David M

    2007-01-01

    "Cassini At Saturn - Huygens Results" will bring the story of the Cassini-Huygens mission and their joint exploration of the Saturnian system right up to date. Cassini is due to enter orbit around Saturn on the 1 July 2004 and the author will have 8 months of scientific data available for review, including the most spectacular images of Saturn, its rings and satellites ever obtained by a space mission. As the Cassini spacecraft approached its destination in spring 2004, the quality of the images already being returned by the spacecraft clearly demonstrate the spectacular nature of the close-range views that will be obtained. The book will contain a 16-page colour section, comprising a carefully chosen selection of the most stunning images to be released during the spacecraft's initial period of operation. The Huygens craft will be released by Cassini in December 2004 and is due to parachute through the clouds of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, in January 2005.

  13. Energy 21. Preconditions and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In 1988 the Danish government adopted an action plan for the environment and sustainable development. In 1990, the energy aspects of this plan were embodied in Energy 2000 and, in 1993, in Energy 2000 follow-up. The objective is a 20% reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions by the year 2005, compared with the level in 1988. Various measures are therefore being taken as time passes to help achieve this objective. As part of the monitoring of developments in the energy sector, it is necessary to take stock from time to time and to assess the direction in which the sector is moving. The government has therefore drawn up a new energy action plan, Energy 21, both to ensure that the overall objectives in the current plan are actively followed up on and to look ahead at the possibilities for action after the year 2005. The Danish Energy Agency has previously carried out a number of analyses of the technological and behavioural possibilities for reducing energy consumption in the short and the long term, for improving the efficiency of energy supply installations, and for using new and sustainable energy technologies. The results of this work are described in the report Denmark`s Energy Futures. The calculations in the report itself and its appendices. The more detailed assumptions and a description of the methods of analysis etc. are given in Basis for Analysis of Denmark`s Energy Futures. This report contains the assumptions, a description of methods and some of the results of the work on Energy 21. (au)

  14. TFTR D-T results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meade, D.M.

    1995-03-01

    Temperatures, densities and confinement of deuterium plasmas confined in tokamaks have been achieved within the last decade that are approaching those required for a D-T reactor. As a result, the unique phenomena present in a D-T reactor plasma can now be studied in the laboratory. Recent experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been the first magnetic fusion experiments to study plasmas with reactor fuel concentrations of tritium. The injection of {approximately} 20 MW of tritium and 14 MW of deuterium neutral beams into the TFTR produced a plasma with a T/D density ratio of {approximately} 1 and yielded a maximum fusion power of {approximately} 9.2 MW. The fusion power density in the core of the plasma was {approximately} 1.8 MW m{sup {minus}3} approximating that expected in a D-T fusion reactor. A TFTR plasma with T/D density ratio of {approximately} 1 was found to have {approximately} 20% higher energy confinement time than a comparable D plasma, indicating a confinement scaling with average ion mass, A, of {tau}{sub E} {approximately} A{sup 0.6}. The core ion temperature increased from 30 keV to 37 keV due to a 35% improvement of ion thermal conductivity. Using the electron thermal conductivity from a comparable deuterium plasma, about 50% of the electron temperature increase from 9 keV to 10.6 keV can be attributed to electron heating by the alpha particles. The {approx} 5% loss of alpha particles was consistent with classical first orbit loss without anomalous effects. Initial measurements have been made of the confined energetic alphas and the resultant alpha ash density.

  15. Interleukin-6 markedly decreases skeletal muscle protein turnover and increases nonmuscle amino acid utilization in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit; Steensberg, Adam; Fischer, Christian

    2008-01-01

    : There were 12 healthy men infused for 3 h with saline (saline, n = 6) or recombinant human IL (rhIL)-6 (n = 6). Systemic and muscle protein turnover was determined with a combination of tracer dilution methodology, primed constant infusion of L-[ring-(2)H(5)]phenylalanine, and femoral arterial-venous blood...

  16. Reduction of recurrence in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer using photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-TUR-B chemoprophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Malene Bøg

    2013-01-01

    (TUR-B), and one single instillation of 40 mg Mitomycin C (MMC) within 24 hours post-TUR-B were introduced at our institution by March 2008. For the study, patients were identified retrospectively using procedure codes for TUR-B and cystoscopy with biopsy and fulguration. Patients with muscle...

  17. Structure and calcium-binding studies of calmodulin-like domain of human non-muscle alpha-actinin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Drmota Prebil; Urška Slapšak; Miha Pavšič; Gregor Ilc; Vid Puž; Euripedes De Almeida Ribeiro; Dorothea Anrather; Markus Hartl; Lars Backman; Janez Plavec; Brigita Lenarčič; Kristina Djinović-Carugo

    2016-01-01

    The activity of several cytosolic proteins critically depends on the concentration of calcium ions. One important intracellular calcium-sensing protein is alpha-actinin-1, the major actin crosslinking protein in focal adhesions and stress fibers. The actin crosslinking activity of alpha-actinin-1 has been proposed to be negatively regulated by calcium, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, we determined the first high-resolution NMR structure of its f...

  18. Gene expression signatures predict outcome in non-muscle invasive bladder carcinoma - a multi-center validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Zieger, Karsten; Real, Francisco X.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Clinically useful molecular markers predicting the clinical course of patients diagnosed with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer are needed to improve treatment outcome. Here, we validated four previously reported gene expression signatures for molecular diagnosis of disease stage and ca...

  19. RESULTS OF SUPPLEMENTAL MST STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T; David Hobbs, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-07-24

    The current design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) includes an auxiliary facility, the Actinide Finishing Facility, which provides a second contact of monosodium titanate (MST) to remove soluble actinides and strontium from waste if needed. This treatment will occur after cesium removal by Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). Although the process changes and safety basis implications have not yet been analyzed, provisions also exist to recover the MST from this operation and return to the initial actinide removal step in the SWPF for an additional (third) contact with fresh waste. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) request identified the need to study the following issues involving this application of MST: Determine the effect of organics from the solvent extraction (CSSX) process on radionuclide sorption by MST; Determine the efficiency of re-using MST for multiple contacts; and Examine fissile loading on MST under conditions using a waste containing significantly elevated concentrations of plutonium, uranium, neptunium, and strontium. This report describes the results of three experimental studies conducted to address these needs: (1) Addition of high concentrations of entrained CSSX solvent had no noticeable effect, over a two week period, on the sorption of the actinides and strontium by MST in a direct comparison experiment. (2) Test results show that MST still retains appreciable capacity after being used once. For instance, reused MST--in the presence of entrained solvent--continued to sorb actinides and strontium. (3) A single batch of MST was used to sequentially contact five volumes of a simulant solution containing elevated concentrations of the radionuclides of interest. After the five contacts, we measured the following solution actinide loadings on the MST: plutonium: 0.884 {+-} 0.00539 wt % or (1.02 {+-} 0.0112) E+04 {micro}g/g MST, uranium: 12.1 {+-} 0.786 wt % or (1.40 {+-} 0.104) E+05 {micro}g/g MST, and neptunium: 0.426 {+-} 0

  20. J-PARC Commissioning Results

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    The J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex)comprises a 400-MeV linac, a 3-GeV rapid-cycling synchrotron (RCS), a 50-GeV main ring synchrotron (MR) and experimental facilities. A peak current of 30 mA was accelerated up to 20 MeV of the DTL beam commissioning at the KEK site. The buildings and conventional facilities will be completed in succession in the Japanese Fiscal Year 2005, when the installation of the accelerator components will be actually started at Tokai site. The beam commissioning of the 181 MeV linac will be started in September, 2006, followed by the RCS and MR beam commissioning. To achieve the high beam power with low beam loss, the J-PARC accelerators are based on many newly developed technologies; pi-mode stabilizing loops in the RFQ, RF choppers in the medium energy beam transport, magnetic alloy loaded RF cavities in the synchrotrons, etc. The recent results of the developments of these new technologies, the present construction status and the commissioning schedule will be pre...

  1. Recent QCD results from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Pleskot, Vojtech; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    ATLAS has has performed several measurements of phenomena connected to QCD at soft scales or at the transition to the hard regime. These include the measurements at different centre-of-mass energies in Run-1 and Run-2 of the elastic, inelastic and total cross sections in pp collisions, the properties of minimum bias and the underlying event interactions, particle production and their correlations, as well as of diffractive and exclusive events. These results are sensitive to non-perturbative models of soft QCD. Jet and photon production cross sections have been measured differentially for inclusive and multi-object final states at 7, 8 and 13 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector and are compared to expectations based on next-to-leading order QCD calculations as well as Monte Carlo simulations. Further studies of jet production properties include the measurements of jet properties, and the determination of the strong coupling constant alpha_s. These measurements provide direct probes of short-distance phy...

  2. Assisted Common Information: Further Results

    CERN Document Server

    Prabhakaran, Vinod M

    2011-01-01

    We presented assisted common information as a generalization of G\\'acs-K\\"orner (GK) common information at ISIT 2010. The motivation for our formulation was to improve upperbounds on the efficiency of protocols for secure two-party sampling (which is a form of secure multi-party computation). Our upperbound was based on a monotonicity property of a rate-region (called the assisted residual information region) associated with the assisted common information formulation. In this note we present further results. We explore the connection of assisted common information with the Gray-Wyner system. We show that the assisted residual information region and the Gray-Wyner region are connected by a simple relationship: the assisted residual information region is the increasing hull of the Gray-Wyner region under an affine map. Several known relationships between GK common information and Gray-Wyner system fall out as consequences of this. Quantities which arise in other source coding contexts acquire new interpretatio...

  3. Results of the 2009 elections

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    The elections to renew the Staff Council for the 2010-2011 period are now behind us and we are very pleased to have had at least as many candidates as posts in five of the six electoral colleges. Furthermore, the average rate of participation of 56.8% in these elections is a very good result compared to previous years. We thank the candidates who have committed themselves to actively defending the interests of the staff, and all our members have shown, by voting, their full support of the candidates in their college and Department. This newly-elected Staff Council (see its composition on the following page) will therefore be truly representative of all the sectors and professions of the Organization, which will be a major asset when the Staff Association representatives begin discussions with the Management and Member States in 2010 on the key issues of the five-yearly review and the measures to be taken to absorb the deficit of our Pension Fund. Armed with this vote of confidence, we know that we can count o...

  4. Experimental results on evaporation waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grana Otero, Jose; Parra Fabian, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    A liquid contained in a vertical glass tube is suddenly depressurized from a high initial pressure down to one for which the stable state is vapour, so vaporization sets off at the free surface. For large enough evaporation rates, the planar vapour-liquid interface is Darrieus-Landau unstable [1], leading to the interface surface rippling close to the instability threshold. Further increasing the initial to final pressure ratio brings about evaporation waves [2,3], in which a highly corrugated front propagates downwards into the liquid. A new experimental method is presented as well as some experimental results obtained by tracking the evolution of the front with a high speed camera. In addition, a number of new phenomena related to the dynamics of bubbles growth at the walls has been uncovered. In particular, a new mode of propagation of the evaporation front is found. In this mode the front originates from below the interface, so the propagation is upwards against gravity with a curved but smooth front.[4pt] [1] F. J. Higuera, Phys. Fluids, V. 30, 679 (1987).[0pt] [2] J.E.Shepherd and B.Sturtevant, J.Fluid Mech., V.121,379 (1982).[0pt] [3] P.Reinke and G.Yadigaroglu, Int.J.Multiph. Flow, V.27,1487 (2001).

  5. Unfavourable results in craniofacial surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial surgery is one of the newer subspecialties of plastic surgery and owes its birth to the pioneering work of Paul Tessier in the late sixties. Since then this challenging specialty work has been taken up by many centres around the word including India. Initial reports in late eighties and early nineties showed morbidity and mortality ranging from 1.6% to 4.3%. However over past few decades, with improved instrumentations, safer anaesthesia and cumulative experience of surgeons the morbidity and mortality has been brought down to as low as 0.1% in many centres in USA. In our centre at Post-graduate Institute, Chandigarh, the mortality rate is about 0.8% (4 out of 480 cases. The learning curve in this surgery is rather steep but with experience and a well-coordinated team work, results in this complex subspecialty can be improved. The infection is a major cause for worry but can be easily prevented by sound surgical principles and placing a vascularised tissue barrier between the extradural space and the nasopharynx/sinus mucosa.

  6. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2010-12-17

    Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

  7. EUPORIAS: plans and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buontempo, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in our understanding and ability to forecast climate variability have meant that skilful predictions are beginning to be routinely made on seasonal to decadal (s2d) timescales. Such forecasts have the potential to be of great value to a wide range of decision-making, where outcomes are strongly influenced by variations in the climate. In 2012 the European Commission funded EUPORIAS, a four year long project to develop prototype end-to-end climate impact prediction services operating on a seasonal to decadal timescale, and assess their value in informing decision-making. EUPORIAS commenced on 1 November 2012, coordinated by the UK Met Office leading a consortium of 24 organisations representing world-class European climate research and climate service centres, expertise in impacts assessments and seasonal predictions, two United Nations agencies, specialists in new media, and commercial companies in climate-vulnerable sectors such as energy, water and tourism. The poster describes the setup of the project, its main outcome and some of the very preliminary results.

  8. LSND results and their implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, D.O. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-11-01

    The combined 1993, 1994, and 1995 data from the LSND experiment shows a statistically compelling excess of events of the type expected for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields}{nu}{sub e} neutrino oscillations. An electron between 36 and 60 MeV is identified by Cherenkov and scintillation light from {nu}{sub e}p{yields}e{sup +}n, and if a {gamma} is tightly constrained to be correlated with it from np{yields}d{gamma} (2.2 MeV), then 22 such events are observed, but only 4.6{+-}0.6 are expected from background. The probability that this is a fluctuation is <10{sup -7}. If subsequent analysis shows a similar effect from the independent channel {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e}, then this would imply a neutrino mass difference which would contribute significantly to the dark matter of the universe. Explaining also the solar and atmospheric neutrino deficits results in a neutrino mass pattern which gives a cold + hot dark matter which fits the structure of the universe on all scales and requires a critical density universe and an universe age compatible with that of the oldest stars. This mass pattern involves a sterile neutrino, evidence for which may come from the need for it in producing heavy elements by supernovae and for blowing off the supernova mantle. (author) 3 figs., 18 refs.

  9. Drillhole results to be discussed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    Vattenfall, the Swedish State Power Board, is searching for a predicted reservoir of abiogenic methane beneath the floor of a meteorite crater in central Sweden. Some of the early scientific results from the drilling project at the Siljan Ring impact structure will be presented on Thursday, May 21, at the 1987 AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore, Md.Thomas Gold of Cornell University (Ithaca, N.Y.) has predicted that large amounts of methane from deep within the earth may move closer to the surface beneath sites where large meteorites have hit the earth, such as the Siljan Ring structure (Eos, July 9, 1985, p. 537). The site is known for its gas seeps, according to Paul Westcott of the Gas Research Institute (GRI, in Chicago, Ill.). The institute is putting up 15% of the costs of the drillhole in return for access to samples and data. Seismic surveys at the site revealed horizontal structures in the granite, which may suggest the presence of gas-liquid interfaces, Westcott said.

  10. Results from the NEXT prototypes

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, C A B

    2013-01-01

    NEXT-100 is an electroluminescent high pressure Time Projection Chamber currently under construction. It will search for the neutrino-less double beta decay in 136Xe at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. NEXT-100 aims to achieve nearly intrinsic energy resolution and to highly suppress background events by taking advantage of the unique properties of xenon in the gaseous phase as the detection medium. In order to prove the principle of operation and to study which are the best operational conditions, two prototypes were constructed: NEXT-DEMO and NEXT-DBDM. In this paper we present the latest results from both prototypes. We report the improvement in terms of light collection (?~3x?) achieved by coating the walls of NEXT-DEMO with tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB), the outstanding energy resolution of 1 % (Full Width Half Maximum) from NEXT-DBDM as well as the tracking capabilities of this prototype (2.1 mm RMS error for point-like depositions) achieved by using a square array of 8x8 SiPMs.

  11. Preliminary results of ANAIS-25

    CERN Document Server

    Amaré, J; Cuesta, C; García, E; Ginestra, C; Martínez, M; Oliván, M A; Ortigoza, Y; de Solórzano, A Ortiz; Pobes, C; Puimedón, J; Sarsa, M L; Villar, P; Villar, J A

    2013-01-01

    The ANAIS (Annual Modulation with NaI(Tl) Scintillators) experiment aims at the confirmation of the DAMA/LIBRA signal using the same target and technique at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. 250 kg of ultrapure NaI(Tl) crystals will be used as a target, divided into 20 modules, each coupled to two photomultipliers. Two NaI(Tl) crystals of 12.5 kg each, grown by Alpha Spectra from a powder having a potassium level under the limit of our analytical techniques, form the ANAIS-25 set-up. The background contributions are being carefully studied and preliminary results are presented: their natural potassium content in the bulk has been quantified, as well as the uranium and thorium radioactive chains presence in the bulk through the discrimination of the corresponding alpha events by PSA, and due to the fast commissioning, the contribution from cosmogenic activated isotopes is clearly identified and their decay observed along the first months of data taking. Following the procedures established with ANAIS-0 and ...

  12. [Reprodcutive results of radical trachelectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Chapa, Arnulfo; Alonso-Reyes, Nelly; Luna-Macías, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Historically, cervical cancer in early stages has been treated with radical hysterectomy and radiotherapy with no option in keeping the uterine-ovarian function. Since two decades ago, evidence shows these cases are candidates for radical trachelectomy, a procedure capable of preserving the fertility without affecting the oncological outcome. To analyze reproductive results among patients treated with radical trachelectomy, in a reference center from the northeast of Mexico. Between March 1999 and December 2013, 27 cases with cervical cancer in early stages were treated with vaginal or abdominal radical trachelectomy in the ISSSTE Regional Hospital in Monterrey, NL (Mexico). We obtained the gynecological, medical and surgical clinical history. Plan of analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Age range was 27-39 years. Main complications were cervical stenosis (n=1) and erosion of cerclaje (n=2). Eighteen patients tried to get pregnant, 8 of them got a spontaneous pregnancy; 1 more patient required assisted reproduction technics and did not succeed. All pregnancies were delivered by cesarean section and were preterm births; 3 underwent premature rupture of membranes. Two pregnancies ended in abortion, one at 10 weeks with severe hemorrhage that needed hysterectomy; the second one, at 1 7 weeks, received a fine uterine curettage. Only 6 cases (33%) got a live birth. Only one third of the attempted pregnancies got a live birth. Assisted reproduction technics play an important role and should be offer to all cases. Cerclaje is an important factor to carry a pregnancy up to the third trimester.

  13. Excellent results for CERN runners

    CERN Multimedia

    Hervé Cornet, CERN Running club

    2015-01-01

    As in previous years, thirty or so runners from CERN took part in the Tour du Canton de Genève (more information here, in French only).   The men’s team that won the corporate challenge prize in the Tour du Canton de Genève: (standing, left to right) Patrick Villeton, Phil Hebda, Mika Vesterinen, Steffen Doebert; (sitting, left to right) Guillaume Michet and Camille Ruiz-Llamas. The Laboratory was represented in the corporate challenge by five teams, one of which came first in the men’s category. CERN’s other teams also put in good performances, with one finishing fourth in the men's category and another seventh in the mixed category. Runners from CERN did well in the individual classifications too. All the results can be found here. The Maxi Race team: (left to right) Sebastien Ponce, Alain Cauphy, Klaus Hanke and Christophe Biot. Elsewhere, four CERN runners competed in the finals of the Annecy Maxi Race (site in French only...

  14. VERITAS: Performance and Latest Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Rene A.; VERITAS Collaboration

    2008-03-01

    VERITAS (Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) is a major, newly-comissioned observatory for gamma-ray astronomy in the 100 GeV - 50 TeV energy band. The observatory, located on Mt. Hopkins, AZ, consists of four 12m-diameter telescopes that detect very high-energy gamma rays via the imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique. VERITAS became fully operational in Spring 2007 and has embarked on a broad program of observations of galactic and extragalactic sources of interest, particularly pulsar nebulae, SNRs, X-ray binaries, AGN, and GRBs. In addition, VERITAS is carrying out sensitive studies of signatures for new physics, such as dark matter annihilations. This talk will outline the main characteristics and performance attributes of VERITAS and will summarize the major results from the observatory in the last six months. VERITAS is operated by a collaboration of scientists from institutions in the U.S., Canada, the U.K., and Ireland. Funding is provided by the NSF, DOE, and Smithsonian Institution in the U.S., NSERC in Canada, PPARC in the U.K. and National Science Foundation Ireland.

  15. CALICE results and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laktineh, Imad [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon - IPNL, UCB Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Domaine scientifique de la Doua, Bat. Paul Dirac, 4, Rue Enrico Fermi, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    The CALICE Collaboration is carrying out R for a highly granular calorimeter system, optimised for particle flow calorimetry at a future linear collider. Starting in 2006, a complete calorimeter chain (ECAL, HCAL and tail catcher) has been tested in muon, electron and hadron beams at CERN and Fermilab. Two electromagnetic calorimeters were tested, both based on tungsten absorber - one using {approx}10000 1x1 cm{sup 2} silicon diode pads as the sensitive medium, and the other using small (1x4 cm{sup 2}) scintillator strips. The hadron calorimeter had an iron-scintillator sandwich structure, using {approx}10000 scintillator tiles read out using silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). We report here on the analysis of shower data, and the comparison of the results with GEANT4 simulations. Muons are used to calibrate all the detectors, and the study of the response to electrons is a crucial first step in the understanding of all the detectors. One of the main objectives of the analysis is the study of the hadron response, since this can be more difficulty to simulate reliably. Amongst the topics discussed will be the energy response of the system to hadrons, and the use of techniques of software compensation to improve the energy resolution. The high granularity of the calorimeters permit the comparison between data and simulations in unprecedented resolution; for example, individual tracks within the shower can be reconstructed, the start of the shower can be identified with high precision, and the longitudinal and transverse distributions of energy studied. These measurements provide interesting new ways of assessing the accuracy of the various physics models available in GEANT4. We also use the data to test features of the showers which are important for particle flow algorithms. Much of the current work is now directed towards second generation prototypes in which more realistic mechanical designs and readout systems are employed. In 2010-11 a cubic prototype of a

  16. Public Administration reforms and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Helgi Kristinsson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on administrative reforms during the past thirty years indicates that reform efforts of countries differ. The Anglo Saxon states were at the forefront of the New Public Management movement while countries on mainland Europe were more hesitant and moved further towards the Neo-Weberian state. Academics have tried to explain different reform efforts within countries by looking at political, historical and cultural issues, values and economic factors to name just a few. Three hypotheses are put forward to explain reform efforts in different states. This research involves analysing the implementation of two different reform trends, New Public Management and the Neo-Weberian tradition. The analysis indicates that countries vary in their commitment to reform rather than in the emphasis on either New Public Management or the Neo-Weberian State. Decentralization, clear objectives and consultation with communities and experts are closely related to national reform efforts. However, Iceland does distinguish itself from Europe and the Nordic countries. The analysis reveals that although decentralization is high in the Icelandic system, autonomy of agencies does not have a strong relation to a varied use of administrative instruments. The second part of the article focuses on the results and achievements of reform programmes. The achievement of reform programmes are examined in relation to theories of bounded rationality, street level bureaucracy (bottom up and consensus decision making. Three hypotheses are presented and tested to explain what causes reforms programmes to be successful in some countries and not in others. The analysis reveals that countries are more likely to succeed if bounded rationality is applied with careful preparation and when stakeholders are consulted.

  17. Corral Monitoring System assessment results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filby, E.E.; Haskel, K.J.

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the results of a functional and operational assessment of the Corral Monitoring Systems (CMS), which was designed to detect and document accountable items entering or leaving a monitored site. Its development was motivated by the possibility that multiple sites in the nuclear weapons states of the former Soviet Union might be opened to such monitoring under the provisions of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The assessment was performed at three levels. One level evaluated how well the planned approach addressed the target application, and which involved tracking sensitive items moving into and around a site being monitored as part of an international treaty or other agreement. The second level examined the overall design and development approach, while the third focused on individual subsystems within the total package. Unfortunately, the system was delivered as disassembled parts and pieces, with very poor documentation. Thus, the assessment was based on fragmentary operating data coupled with an analysis of what documents were provided with the system. The system design seemed to be a reasonable match to the requirements of the target application; however, important questions about site manning and top level administrative control were left unanswered. Four weaknesses in the overall design and development approach were detected: (1) poor configuration control and management, (2) inadequate adherence to a well defined architectural standard, (3) no apparent provision for improving top level error tolerance, and (4) weaknesses in the object oriented programming approach. The individual subsystems were found to offer few features or capabilities that were new or unique, even at the conceptual level. The CMS might possibly have offered a unique combination of features, but this level of integration was never realized, and it had no unique capabilities that could be readily extracted for use in another system.

  18. NCV Flow Diagnostic Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuccio, Mina

    1999-01-01

    There were two objectives for this test. First, was to assess the reasons why there is approximately 1.5 drag counts (cts) discrepancy between measured and computed drag improvement of the Non-linear Cruise Validation (NCV) over the Technology Concept Airplane (TCA) wing body (WB) configurations. The Navier-Stokes (N-S) pre-test predictions from Boeing Commercial Airplane Group (BCAG) show 4.5 drag cts of improvement for NCV over TCA at a lift coefficient (CL) of 0. I at Mach 2.4. The pre-test predictions from Boeing Phantom Works - Long Beach, BPW-LB, show 3.75 drag cts of improvement. BCAG used OVERFLOW and BPW-LB used CFL3D. The first test entry to validate the improvement was held at the NASA Langley Research Center (LARC) UPV;T, test number 1687. The experimental results showed that the drag improvement was only 2.6 cts, not accounting for laminar run and trip drag. This is approximately 1.5 cts less than predicted computationally. In addition to the low Reynolds Number (RN) test, there was a high RN test in the Boeing Supersonic Wind Tunnel (BSWT) of NCV and TCA. BSV@T test 647 showed that the drag improvement of NCV over TCA was also 2.6 cts, but this did account for laminar run and trip drag. Every effort needed to be done to assess if the improvement measured in LaRC UPWT and BSWT was correct. The second objective, once the first objective was met, was to assess the performance increment of NCV over TCA accounting for the associated laminar run and trip drag corrections in LaRC UPWT. We know that the configurations tested have laminar flow on portions of the wing and have trip drag due to the mechanisms used to force the flow to go from laminar to turbulent aft of the transition location.

  19. Our Results in Penile Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufan Süelözgen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Penile fracture is a urological emergency caused by direct trauma to an erected penis, tearing the tunica albuginea in the corpus cavernosum. The preferred treatment method is draining the hematoma and surgical repair of tunica albuginea tear as soon as possible following diagnosis. Materials and Methods Forty-nine patients who were diagnosed with penile fracture between January 2009 and December 2014 were reviewed. Physical examination was performed to see the extent of penile hematoma, the side of the penile curvature and the presence of blood in the external meatus. Two patients who were diagnosed with urethrorrhagia underwent retrograde urethrogram for urethral injury. In all patients, penile skin was peeled using a circular subcoronal degloving incision and tunica tear was repaired using absorbable suture materials. The patients were then followed for painful erections, penile deformities and erection angles. Results The average age of the 49 patients, who were included in the study, was 36.5 years (21-65. In their etiological questioning, most patients reported the fracture occurring during sexual intercourse. Retrograde urethrography was indicated in 2 patients with blood in the external meatus and were diagnosed with urethral injury. The patients were taken to emergency surgery. Tunica defects varied between 1 and 2 cm. Incomplete urethral injuries were primarily repaired around 18 French Foley catheter. None of the patients reported penile deformity or painful erections. Their erection angles were found to be within the normal range. Conclusion Even though it is a relatively rare condition, penile fractures are so important that might cause serious complications when not treated surgically. A thorough anamnesis and physical examination suffice for diagnosis.

  20. FIRST RESULTS FROM OEDOTENSIOMETRIC TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Cavazza

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available An oedotensiometer was used to examine to examine the behaviour of sieved sample of a swelling soil (a vertisol as well as of the same soils treated with solution of Na+ + Ca2+ to simulate the soil changes from excessive irrigation with brackish water. The oedometer test consisted in an infiltration of water from below through a ceramic porous plate at a feeding pressure of +10 cm water and successive drainage under a depression mostly of -112 cm of water. The rate of water entry as well as the swelling rate of the sample were monitored. Preliminary considerations regards the domains in which the shrinkage curve of a swelling soil is subdivided and make hypothesis on the swelling process expected when the infiltration from below of the sample is applied. The results support the hypothesis that when the water pressure is applied some water enters rather rapidly in the larger structural pores and is followed later by the swelling in the smaller pores, responsible for the basic domain. This first conclusion demonstrates that the assumption of a simultaneous movement of solid and liquid components in the sample, which is the base of most theoretical developments for swelling soils, cannot be accepted for the tested samples. Some cases with water clogging on the sample surface confirm a late final swelling of the soil and permitted to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of the swollen soil. These manifestations are more evident in sodicated soils. The loading of the sample reduces the swelling of the sample and seems to reduce its permeability. The reduction of the feeding water pressure further reduces the sample swelling. The draining process from saturated soil sample shows that most of the process occurs in the large pores of the structural domain. This gives the possibility to evaluate the water diffusivity coefficient for the structural domain of the sample. In draining the soil with the highest sodication there was a variation of soil volume

  1. Results of nonendoscopic endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preechawai P

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Passorn PreechawaiDepartment of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, ThailandBackground: Surgical scarring on the face and disrupted anatomy in the medial canthal area following external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR can be avoided by an endonasal approach. This study examined the outcome of direct visualization endonasal DCR, performed by young surgeons and residents.Methods: A retrospective case series of 75 consecutive endonasal DCRs performed under direct visualization from July 2002 to July 2004 were reviewed. Surgery was performed by surgeons and residents who had received no special training in the procedure. Full success was defined as no symptoms of tearing after surgery and anatomical patency with fluorescein flow on nasal endoscopy or patency to lacrimal syringing. Partial success was defined as a tearing decrease compared with prior to surgery and with anatomical patency, and failure was defined as no significant improvement in persistent tearing. The average follow-up duration was 26.83 ± 16.26 (range 6–55 months.Results: Seventy-five DCRs were performed on 63 patients (four male, 59 female of mean age 49.44 ± 16.63 (range 21–85 years. The surgery was successful in 54/75 eyes (72%, 37/54 eyes (68.5%, and 30/42 eyes (71.4% at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. Partial success was achieved in 13/75 (17.3%, 9/54 (16.7%, and 9/42 (21.4%, and the failure rates were 10.7%, 14.8%, and 7.1% at 6, 12, and 24 months, respectively. The overall functional success with this technique was 74.7% and the overall anatomical patency was 92.0%. There were no serious complications arising from the surgery; three minor complications were documented, ie, an incorrectly placed silicone tube in the lower canaliculus, tube prolapse, and postoperative bleeding which needed nasal packing and eventually a developed retention cyst in the nasal cavity.Conclusion: Endonasal DCR under direct visualization is a

  2. K7del is a common TPM2 gene mutation associated with nemaline myopathy and raised myofibre calcium sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokbel, Nancy; Ilkovski, Biljana; Kreissl, Michaela; Memo, Massimiliano; Jeffries, Cy M; Marttila, Minttu; Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Lemola, Elina; Grönholm, Mikaela; Yang, Nan; Menard, Dominique; Marcorelles, Pascale; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Reimann, Jens; Vainzof, Mariz; Monnier, Nicole; Ravenscroft, Gianina; McNamara, Elyshia; Nowak, Kristen J; Laing, Nigel G; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina; Trewhella, Jill; Marston, Steve; Ottenheijm, Coen; North, Kathryn N; Clarke, Nigel F

    2013-02-01

    Mutations in the TPM2 gene, which encodes β-tropomyosin, are an established cause of several congenital skeletal myopathies and distal arthrogryposis. We have identified a TPM2 mutation, p.K7del, in five unrelated families with nemaline myopathy and a consistent distinctive clinical phenotype. Patients develop large joint contractures during childhood, followed by slowly progressive skeletal muscle weakness during adulthood. The TPM2 p.K7del mutation results in the loss of a highly conserved lysine residue near the N-terminus of β-tropomyosin, which is predicted to disrupt head-to-tail polymerization of tropomyosin. Recombinant K7del-β-tropomyosin incorporates poorly into sarcomeres in C2C12 myotubes and has a reduced affinity for actin. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of patient muscle and primary patient cultured myotubes showed that mutant protein is expressed but incorporates poorly into sarcomeres and likely accumulates in nemaline rods. In vitro studies using recombinant K7del-β-tropomyosin and force measurements from single dissected patient myofibres showed increased myofilament calcium sensitivity. Together these data indicate that p.K7del is a common recurrent TPM2 mutation associated with mild nemaline myopathy. The p.K7del mutation likely disrupts head-to-tail polymerization of tropomyosin, which impairs incorporation into sarcomeres and also affects the equilibrium of the troponin/tropomyosin-dependent calcium switch of muscle. Joint contractures may stem from chronic muscle hypercontraction due to increased myofibrillar calcium sensitivity while declining strength in adulthood likely arises from other mechanisms, such as myofibre decompensation and fatty infiltration. These results suggest that patients may benefit from therapies that reduce skeletal muscle calcium sensitivity, and we highlight late muscle decompensation as an important cause of morbidity.

  3. Recent Opportunity Microscopic Imager Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Yingst, R.; Team, A.

    2013-12-01

    Opportunity. The extremely soft bedrock exposed at a Whitewater Lake outcrop target dubbed 'Azilda' is mostly fine-grained, with dispersed 2-5 mm-diameter spherules and resistant veins. This target was easily abraded by the RAT, exposing a sandstone-like texture, but the sorting of grains is difficult to determine at MI resolution. Darker, erosion-resistant veneers, similar to desert varnishes on Earth, appear to record aqueous alteration that post-dates the formation of the Ca sulfate veins; they likely contain the nontronite that is observed by CRISM in this area. The inferred neutral pH and relatively low temperature of the fluids involved in these phases of alteration would have provided a habitable environment for life if it existed on Mars at that time. Because Opportunity can no longer directly sense phyllosilicate mineralogy with the MiniTES or Mössbauer spectrometers, it is focusing on characterizing the chemistry with the APXS and texture with the MI of potential phyllosilicate host rocks. The Athena MI continues to return useful images of Mars that are being used to study the textures of rocks and soils at Endeavour crater. Exploration by Opportunity continues, with the rover approaching 'Solander Point' and more exposures of phyllosilicates detected from orbit; the latest MI results will be presented at the conference.

  4. Expression of Neurotrophins and Their Receptors Tropomyosin-related kinases (Trk under Tension-stress during Distraction Osteogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiga,Ayako

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The localization and expression of neurotrophins and their receptors during distraction osteogenesis was investigated in 72 male rat femurs (11 weeks old to further clarify the concurrence of cellular and molecular events of new bone formation. After osteotomy, a 7-day lag phase was followed by distraction at the rate of 0.25 mm/12 h for 21 days (distraction phase, and a 7-day consolidation phase. The localization of neurotrophins (NGF, BDNF and NT-3 and their receptors tropomyosinrelated kinases (TRKA, TRKB and TRKC by immunostaining showed positive staining in bone forming cells in each stage, although the presence and staining intensity varied by cell type and phase. The expressions of NGF, BDNF and NT-3 by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR showed that the peak of the mRNA expression of NGF occurred 10 days after distraction. NT-3 increased during bone extension, but decreased when distraction stopped. In contrast, BDNF continued to increase gradually throughout the distraction and consolidation phases. These findings suggest that neurotrophins and their receptors may play different roles in endochondral and intramembranous ossification in distraction osteogenesis. The tension stress caused by distraction may stimulate the expression of neurotrophins and their receptors, and promote osteogenesis.

  5. Shrimp allergy beyond Tropomyosin in Italy: clinical relevance of Arginine Kinase, Sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein and Hemocyanin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giuffrida, M G; Villalta, D; Mistrello, G; Amato, S; Asero, R

    2014-01-01

    .... We detected the prevalence of arginine kinase and sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein sensitization, and identified a high molecular weight allergen that is frequently recognized by Italian shrimp-allergic patients...

  6. Pulsed Ultraviolet Light Reduces Immunoglobulin E Binding to Atlantic White Shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yin Chung

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV, a novel food processing and preservation technology, has been shown to reduce allergen levels in peanut and soybean samples. In this study, the efficacy of using PUV to reduce the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin (36-kDa, and to attenuate immunoglobulin E (IgE binding to shrimp extract was examined. Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus extract was treated with PUV (3 pulses/s, 10 cm from light source for 4 min. Tropomyosin was compared in the untreated, boiled, PUV-treated and [boiled+PUV]-treated samples, and changes in the tropomyosin levels were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. IgE binding of the treated extract was analyzed via immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using pooled human plasma containing IgE antibodies against shrimp allergens. Results showed that levels of tropomyosin and IgE binding were reduced following PUV treatment. However, boiling increased IgE binding, while PUV treatment could offset the increased allergen reactivity caused by boiling. In conclusion, PUV treatment reduced the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin, and decreased the IgE binding capacity of the shrimp extract.

  7. Pulsed ultraviolet light reduces immunoglobulin E binding to Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus) extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, Sandra; Yang, Wade; Chung, Si-Yin; Percival, Susan

    2011-07-01

    Pulsed ultraviolet light (PUV), a novel food processing and preservation technology, has been shown to reduce allergen levels in peanut and soybean samples. In this study, the efficacy of using PUV to reduce the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin (36-kDa), and to attenuate immunoglobulin E (IgE) binding to shrimp extract was examined. Atlantic white shrimp (Litopenaeus setiferus) extract was treated with PUV (3 pulses/s, 10 cm from light source) for 4 min. Tropomyosin was compared in the untreated, boiled, PUV-treated and [boiled+PUV]-treated samples, and changes in the tropomyosin levels were determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). IgE binding of the treated extract was analyzed via immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using pooled human plasma containing IgE antibodies against shrimp allergens. Results showed that levels of tropomyosin and IgE binding were reduced following PUV treatment. However, boiling increased IgE binding, while PUV treatment could offset the increased allergen reactivity caused by boiling. In conclusion, PUV treatment reduced the reactivity of the major shrimp allergen, tropomyosin, and decreased the IgE binding capacity of the shrimp extract.

  8. Ranking XPaths for extracting search result records

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trieschnigg, Rudolf Berend; Tjin-Kam-Jet, Kien; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2012-01-01

    Extracting search result records (SRRs) from webpages is useful for building an aggregated search engine which combines search results from a variety of search engines. Most automatic approaches to search result extraction are not portable: the complete process has to be rerun on a new search result

  9. 16 CFR 1610.8 - Reporting results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.8 Reporting results. (a) The reported result shall be the classification before or after refurbishing, whichever is the more severe; and based on this result, the textile... results for each specimen that is burned. (1) For Plain Surface Textile Fabrics: DNIDid not...

  10. Benchmarking result diversification in social image retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ionescu, Bogdan; Popescu, Adrian; Müller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of retrieval result diversification in the context of social image retrieval and discusses the results achieved during the MediaEval 2013 benchmarking. 38 runs and their results are described and analyzed in this text. A comparison of the use of expert vs....... crowdsourcing annotations shows that crowdsourcing results are slightly different and have higher inter observer differences but results are comparable at lower cost. Multimodal approaches have best results in terms of cluster recall. Manual approaches can lead to high precision but often lower diversity....... With this detailed results analysis we give future insights on this matter....

  11. Presidential General Election Results - 2012 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer portrays Presidential general election results for 2012, with results reported by county or county equivalent, for the 50 United States and the...

  12. Results of Evolution Supervised by Genetic Algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Jäntschi, Lorentz; Bălan, Mugur C; Sestraş, Radu E

    2010-01-01

    A series of results of evolution supervised by genetic algorithms with interest to agricultural and horticultural fields are reviewed. New obtained original results from the use of genetic algorithms on structure-activity relationships are reported.

  13. NEW RESULTS ON ESTIMATES FOR SINGULAR VALUES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    New results are provided to estimate matrix singular values in terms of partial absolute deleted row sums and column sums. Illustrative examples are presented to show comparisons with results in literature.

  14. Some Oscillation Results for Linear Hamiltonian Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Wang

    2012-01-01

    oscillation criteria are established for the system. These criteria extend and improve some results that have been required before. An interesting example is included to illustrate the importance of our results.

  15. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test results? • ...

  16. 40 CFR 799.12 - Test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Test results. 799.12 Section 799.12... results. Except as set forth in specific chemical test rules in subpart B of this part, a positive or negative test result in any of the tests required under subpart B is defined in the TSCA test guidelines...

  17. A Brief Syntactic Research on Resultative Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱林林

    2008-01-01

    <正>This article will deal with Resultative Construction syntactically.First of all,the Unaccusative Hypothesis will be introduced,and the ideas of different scholars(mainly Levin and Rappaport) towards the question--whether the resultative construction can serve as diagnostic test to tell unergative verbs and unaccusative verbs apart--will be presented.The second focus of the article is about the differences that tell resultative constructions apart from depicitive construction and secondary predication construction.

  18. New results on jet fragmentation at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jindariani, Sergo; /Florida U.

    2006-12-01

    Presented are the latest results of jet fragmentation studies at the Tevatron using the CDF Run II detector. Studies include the distribution of transverse momenta (Kt) of particles jets, two-particle momentum correlations, and indirectly global event shapes in p{bar p} collisions. Results are discussed within the context of recent Next-to-Leading Log calculations as well as earlier experimental results from the Tevatron and e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders.

  19. Recent Results from the ZEUS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, W H; Abramowicz, H; Adamczyk, L; Adamus, M; Adler, V; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Antonioli, P; Antonov, A; Arneodo, M; Bailey, D S; Bamberger, A; Barakbaev, A N; Barbagli, G; Barbi, M; Bari, G; Barreiro, F; Bartsch, D; Basile, M; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Bell, M; Bellagamba, L; Benen, A; Bertolin, A; Bhadra, S; Bloch, I; Bodmann, B; Bold, T; Boos, E G; Borras, K; Boscherini, D; Brock, I; Brook, N H; Brugnera, R; Brümmer, N; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bussey, P J; Butterworth, J M; Bylsma, B; Caldwell, A; Capua, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carli, T; Carlin, R; Catterall, C D; Chekanov, S; Chiochia, V; Chwastowski, J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Cloth, P; Cole, J E; Collins-Tooth, C; Contin, A; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Coppola, N; Cormack, C; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Cottrell, A; D'Agostini, Giulio; Dal Corso, F; Danilov, P; Dannheim, D; De Pasquale, S; Dementiev, R K; Derrick, M; Deshpande, Abhay A; Devenish, R C E; Dhawan, S; Dolgoshein, B A; Doyle, A T; Drews, G; Durkin, L S; Dusini, S; Eisenberg, Y; Ermolov, P F; Eskreys, Andrzej; Ferrando, J; Ferrero, M I; Figiel, J; Filges, D; Foster, B; Foudas, C; Fourletov, S; Fourletova, J; Fricke, U; Fusayasu, T; Gabareen, A; Gallo, E; Garfagnini, A; Geiser, A; Genta, C; Gialas, I; Giusti, P; Gladilin, L K; Gladkov, D; Glasman, C; Gliga, S; Goers, S; Golubkov, Yu A; Goncalo, R; González, O; Göttlicher, P; Grabowska-Bold, I; Grijpink, S; Grzelak, G; Gutsche, O; Gwenlan, C; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hall-Wilton, R; Hamatsu, R; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Hart, J C; Hartmann, H; Hartner, G; Hartner, G F; Heaphy, E A; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Helbich, M; Heusch, C A; Hilger, E; Hillert, S; Hirose, T; Hochman, D; Holm, U; Iacobucci, G; Iga, Y; Inuzuka, M; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Jones, T W; Kagawa, S; Kahle, B; Kaji, H; Kananov, S; Kappes, A; Kataoka, Y; Yamazaki, M; Katkov, I I; Katz, U F; Kcira, D; Khein, L A; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Kind, O; Kisielewska, D; Kitamura, S; Klimek, K; Koffeman, E; Kohno, T; Kooijman, P; Koop, T; Korzhav, I A; Kotanski, A; Kötz, U; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, H; Kowalski, T; Krakauer, D; Kramberger, G; Kreisel, A; Krumnack, N; Kuze, M; Kuzmin, V A; Labarga, L; Labes, H; Lainesse, J; Lammers, S; Lee, J H; Lee, S W; Lelas, D; Levchenko, B B; Levman, G M; Levy, A; Li, L; Lightwood, M S; Lim, H; Lim, I T; Limentani, S; Ling, T Y; Liu, X; Löhr, B; Lohrmann, E; Loizides, J H; Long, K R; Longhin, A; Lukina, O Yu; Lupi, A; Luzniak, P; Maddox, E; Magill, S; Mankel, R; Margotti, A; Marini, G; Martin, J F; Mastroberardino, A; Matsuzawa, K; Mattingly, M C K; McCubbin, N A; Mellado, B; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Menary, S R; Metlica, F; Meyer, U; Milite, M; Mirea, A; Monaco, V; Montanari, A; Moritz, M; Musgrave, B; Nagano, K; Nania, R; Nguyen, C N; Nigro, A; Ning, Y; Nishimura, T; Notz, D; Nowak, R J; Oh, B Y; Olkiewicz, K; Pac, M Y; Padhi, S; Paganis, S; Palmonari, F; Parenti, A; Park, I H; Patel, S; Paul, E; Pavel, N; Pawlak, J M; Pelfer, P G; Pellegrino, A; Pesci, A; Petrucci, M C; Piotrzkowski, K; Plucinsky, P P; Pokrovskiy, N S; Polini, A; Posocco, M; Proskuryakov, A S; Przybycien, M B; Rautenberg, J; Raval, A; Reeder, D D; Ren, Z; Renner, R; Repond, J; Riveline, U; Karshon, M; Robins, S; Rodrigues, E; Rosin, M; Rurua, L; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Salehi, H; Sartorelli, G; Savin, A A; Saxon, D H; Schagen, S; Schioppa, M; Schlenstedt, S; Schmidke, W B; Schneekloth, U; Sciulli, F; Scott, J; Selonke, F; Shcheglova, L M; Skillicorn, I O; Slominski, W; Soares, M; Solano, A; Son, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Stairs, D G; Stanco, L; Standage, J; Stifutkin, A; Stoesslein, U; Stonjek, S; Stopa, P; Straub, P B; Suchkov, S; Susinno, G; Suszycki, L; Sutton, M R; Sztuk, J; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Tandler, J; Tapper, A D; Tapper, R J; Tassi, E; Tawara, T; Terron, J; Tiecke, H G; Tokushuku, K; Tsurugai, T; Turcato, M; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Vázquez, M; Velthuis, J J; Vlasov, N N; Voss, K C; Walczak, R; Walsh, R; Wang, M; Weber, A; Wessoleck, H; West, B J; Whitmore, J J; Wick, K; Wiggers, L; Wills, H H; Wing, M; Wolf, G; Yamada, S; Yamashita, T; Yoshida, R; Youngman, C; Zawiejski, L; Zeuner, W; Zhautykov, B O; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, A; Zotkin, S A; De Wolf, E; Del Peso, J

    2004-01-01

    A summary of recent results from ZEUS is presented. New ZEUS results from HERA-1 data include Structure Functions, QCD fits, analysis of hadronic final states, precision measurements of alpha_s, production of heavy flavor mesons and baryons and studies of diffraction. Results from the new HERA-II running include the measurement of the cross section for polarized charged current events and charm events tagged with the new ZEUS vertex detector.

  20. Setting Priorities Personal Values, Organizational Results

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership

    2011-01-01

    To be a successful leader, you need to get results. To get results, you need to set priorities. This book can help you do a better job of setting priorities, recognizing the personal values that motivate your decision making, the probable trade-offs and consequences of your decisions, and the importance of aligning your priorities with your organization's expectations. In this way you can successfully meet organizational objectives and consistently produce results.

  1. Review of Tevatron Results: Top quark physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gerber, Cecilia E

    2014-01-01

    We present results on top quark physics from the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron proton anti-proton collider. These include legacy results from Run II that were published or submitted for publication before mid-2014, as well as a summary of Run I results. The historical perspective of the discovery of the top quark in Run I is also described.

  2. Reproducibility of AMPLICOR enterovirus PCR test results.

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    The reproducibility of AMPLICOR enterovirus PCR test results was determined with clinical samples of cerebrospinal fluid, serum, urine, and throat and rectal swabs. Among 608 samples from which duplicate aliquots were run simultaneously, only seven pairs gave discordant results. Among 104 samples from which duplicate aliquots were run in separate assays, no discordance was seen. Overall, the reproducibility of test kit results was 99% (705 of 712).

  3. GNO Solar Neutrino Observations: Results for GNOI

    OpenAIRE

    GNO Collaboration; Altmann, M; Balata, M.; Belli, P.; Bellotti, E.(Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Milano Bicocca, Milan, Italy); Bernabei, R.; Burkert, E; Cattadori, C.; Cerichelli, G.; Chiarini, M; Cribier, M.; D'Angelo, S; Del Re, G.; Ebert, K.H.; Feilitzsch, F. v.

    2000-01-01

    We report the first GNO solar neutrino results for the measuring period GNOI, solar exposure time May 20, 1998 till January 12, 2000. In the present analysis, counting results for solar runs SR1 - SR19 were used till April 4, 2000. With counting completed for all but the last 3 runs (SR17 - SR19), the GNO I result is [65.8 +10.2 -9.6 (stat.) +3.4 -3.6 (syst.)]SNU (1sigma) or [65.8 + 10.7 -10.2 (incl. syst.)]SNU (1sigma) with errors combined. This may be compared to the result for Gallex(I-IV)...

  4. Experimental results on quadratic assignment problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.P. Nikolov

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental results on quadratic assignment problem. The "scanning area" method formulated for radioelectronic equipment design is applied. For all more complex tests ours results are better or coincident with the ones known in literature. Conclusion concerning the effectiveness of method are given.

  5. Recent Results from the Belle Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Z.; Schwartz, A. J.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    We review recent results from the Belle experiment, which took data at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider in Japan. The experiment recorded about 1000 fb-1 of data running mainly at the ϒ(4S) and ϒ(5S) resonances. The results presented here are obtained from the full data set.

  6. Physics Results from the AMANDA Neutrino Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ahrens, J; Bai, X; Barouch, G; Barwick, S W; Bay, R C; Becka, T; Becker, K; Bertrand, D; Biron, A; Boser, S; Booth, J R A; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Boyce, M M; Carius, S; Chen, A; Chirkin, D; Conrad, J; Cooley, J; Costa, C G S; Cowen, D F; De Clercq, C; De Young, T; Desiati, P; Dewulf, J P; Doksus, P; Edsjö, J; Ekstrom, P; Feser, T; Frère, J M; Gaug, M; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hardtke, R; Hauschildt, T; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, C G; Hulth, P O; Hundertmark, S; Jacobsen, J; Karle, A; Kim, J; Koci, B; Köpke, L; Kühn, K; Lamoureux, J I; Leich, H; Leuthold, M; Lindahl, P; Madsen, J; Marciniewski, P; Matis, H S; Minaeva, Y; Miocinovic, P; Morse, R; Neunhoffer, T; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogelman, H; Olbrechts, P; Perez de los Heros, C; Pohl, A; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Reed, C; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richter, S; Martino, J R; Romenesko, P; Ross, D; Sander, H G; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Silvestri, A; Solarz, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Starinsky, N; Steele, D; Steffen, P; Stokstad, R G; Sudhoff, P; Sulanke, K H; Taboada, I; Donckt, M V; Walck, C; Weinheimer, C; Wiebusch, C H; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Yodh, G; Young, S

    2001-01-01

    In the winter season of 2000, the AMANDA (Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array) detector was completed to its final state. We report on major physics results obtained from the AMANDA-B10 detector, as well as initial results of the full AMANDA-II detector.

  7. Annual results 2004; Resultats annuels 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This 2004 annual evaluation of the french RTE company (electric power transport network) provides information on the 2004 results on: institutional information, financial results, customers and market, industrial resources, environment and consultation, human resources and international aspects. (A.L.B.)

  8. Recent Electroweak Results from the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Helary, Louis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Slides for conference Aspen 2016. The talk is about recent Electroweak results at the LHC. It is focused on multi-boson physics and boson EWK production. It is supposed to summarize results from ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, but given the topic it contains only material from ATLAS and CMS.

  9. Two convergence results for continuous descent methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeon Reich

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available We consider continuous descent methods for the minimization of convex functionals defined on general Banach space. We establish two convergence results for methods which are generated by regular vector fields. Since the complement of the set of regular vector fields is $sigma$-porous, we conclude that our results apply to most vector fields in the sense of Baire's categories.

  10. Students' Homework and TIMSS 2003 Mathematics Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikk, Jaan

    2006-01-01

    An aspect of the complex relationship between students homework and academic achievement (Cooper, Robinson, and Patall, 2006) was examined by correlating TIMSS 2003 mathematics results with the data about homework in 46 countries of the TIMSS study. The TIMSS results had no statistically significant correlation with the teachers' emphasis on…

  11. Modeling clicks beyond the first result page

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuklin, A.; Serdyukov, P.; de Rijke, M.

    2013-01-01

    Most modern web search engines yield a list of documents of a fixed length (usually 10) in response to a user query. The next ten search results are usually available in one click. These documents either replace the current result page or are appended to the end. Hence, in order to examine more

  12. IPE results as compared with NUREG-1150

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, W.T.; Lehner, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Camp, A. [Sandia National Lab., Albuqurque, NM (United States); Chow, E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In 1990, the NRC published NUREG-1150 which assessed the risks for five U.S. nuclear power plants. This paper provides a comparison of the results and perspectives obtained from the NUREG-1150 study to those obtained form the Individual Plant Examination (IPE) program. Specifically, results and perspectives on core damage frequency and containment performance are compared.

  13. Generalized Common Fixed Point Results with Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Amin Kutbi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtained some generalized common fixed point results in the context of complex valued metric spaces. Moreover, we proved an existence theorem for the common solution for two Urysohn integral equations. Examples are presented to support our results.

  14. ANISOTROPIC BIQUADRATIC ELEMENT WITH SUPERCLOSE RESULT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongyang SHI; Shipeng MAO; Hui LIANG

    2006-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to study the convergence of biquadratic finite element for the second order problem on anisotropic meshes. By using some novel approaches and techniques, the optimal error estimates are obtained. At the same time, the anisotropic superclose results are also achieved. Furthermore, the numerical results are given to demonstrate our theoretical analysis.

  15. Modeling clicks beyond the first result page

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuklin, A.; Serdyukov, P.; de Rijke, M.

    2013-01-01

    Most modern web search engines yield a list of documents of a fixed length (usually 10) in response to a user query. The next ten search results are usually available in one click. These documents either replace the current result page or are appended to the end. Hence, in order to examine more docu

  16. Review of Recent Results in Charm Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Engelfried, J

    2003-01-01

    A biased review of recent results in charm physics is presented. New results on D0 anti-D0 mixing, rare decays of D0 and D+/-, scalar resonances in D+ and Ds decays, and new decay modes and mass measurements in Lambda_c, Xi_c, Omega_c, and Xi_cc are discussed.

  17. Top Quark Results from D0

    CERN Document Server

    Greenlee, H B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Baldin, B Yu; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Böhnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Butler, J M; Bystrický, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clement, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cristetiu, M; Cutts, D; Da Motta, H; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Dean, S; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, D; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Abazov, V M; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhev, S N; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Kharzheev, Yu M; Kim, H; Klima, B; Klute, M; Kohli, J M; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G L; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Lévêque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J T; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A S; Mendes, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Mitrevski, J; Mokhov, N V; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Nöding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Perea, P M; Pérez, E; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Phaf, L; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pope, B G; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F K; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A F S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sen-Gupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V I; Skubic, P L; Slattery, P F; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Thomas, E; Thooris, B; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A H; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vlimant, J R; Von Törne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu-Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Walker, R; Wang, L; Wang, Z M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wegner, M; Wermes, N; White, A; White, V; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S Y; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2005-01-01

    In this talk I will present recent preliminary results from the D0 experiment from Tevatron Run II ($p\\bar p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV). The results presented in this talk include top quark pair production cross section, top quark mass, and upper limits on single top quark production.

  18. Tablet PCs, Academic Results and Educational Inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Ferran; Belvis, Esther; Pamies, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    This article is the result of a study carried out in 2008 and 2009 by a team from the Autonomous University of Barcelona in order to evaluate the implementation of the Digital Whiteboard Program in public schools in the region of Aragon (Spain). The following pages present some of the results obtained during the study. More specifically, this…

  19. On degree phrases and result clauses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkhoek, Paulien Dea

    1998-01-01

    This dissertation consists of two parts, one on degree phrases and one on result clauses. Sentence (1) below exemplifies a result clause construction: (1) Zij had zo mooi gezongen dat het publiek er stil van was she has so beautifully sang that the audience there silent of was ‘She had sung so beaut

  20. GNO Solar Neutrino Observations Results for GNOI

    CERN Document Server

    Altmann, M; Belli, P; Bellotti, E; Bernabei, R; Burkert, E; Cattadori, C; Cerichelli, G; Chiarini, M; Cribier, Michel; Re, G D; Ebert, K H; Von Feilitzsch, F; Ferrari, N; Hampel, W; Handt, J; Henrich, E; Heusser, G; Kiko, J; Kirsten, T; Lachenmaier, T; Lanfranchi, J; Laubenstein, M; Motta, D; Rau, W; Richter, H; Wänninger, S; Wójcik, M; Zanotti, L

    2000-01-01

    We report the first GNO solar neutrino results for the measuring period GNOI, solar exposure time May 20, 1998 till January 12, 2000. In the present analysis, counting results for solar runs SR1 - SR19 were used till April 4, 2000. With counting completed for all but the last 3 runs (SR17 - SR19), the GNO I result is [65.8 +10.2 -9.6 (stat.) +3.4 -3.6 (syst.)]SNU (1sigma) or [65.8 + 10.7 -10.2 (incl. syst.)]SNU (1sigma) with errors combined. This may be compared to the result for Gallex(I-IV), which is [77.5 +7.6 -7.8 (incl. syst.)] SNU (1sigma). A combined result from both GNOI and Gallex(I-IV) together is [74.1 + 6.7 -6.8 (incl. syst.)] SNU (1sigma).

  1. Format SPARQL Query Results into HTML Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Sunitha Abburu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available SPARQL is one of the powerful query language for querying semantic data. It is recognized by the W3C as a query language for RDF. As an efficient query language for RDF, it has defined several query result formats such as CSV, TSV and XML etc. These formats are not attractive, understandable and readable. The results need to be converted in an appropriate format so that user can easily understand. The above formats require additional transformations or tool support to represent the query result in user readable format. The main aim of this paper is to propose a method to build HTML report dynamically for SPARQL query results. This enables SPARQL query result display, in HTML report format easily, in an attractive understandable format without the support of any additional or external tools or transformation.

  2. Results Processing in Heterogeneous Digital Libraries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the heterogeneous digital libraries, users are allowed to have access to data of different modalities, from different information sources, and ranked by different criteria. This paper,which assumes that each information retrieval model is satisfactory in its own context, proposes two results processing methods: Ranking by Sources (RBS) and Simply Merging Results (SMR). It defines satisfied ranking, which satisfies most source rankings, and satisfied distance to indicate how a specific source ranking suits the satisfied ranking. RBS ranks sources by their satisfied distances and groups the results by sources. SMR, using source scoring function distributions, substitutes normalized scores for original scores from sources, and then merges the results using these normalized scores. The results show they are very feasible and efficient in the heterogeneous environment

  3. Explicit Optimal Hardness via Gaussian stability results

    CERN Document Server

    De, Anindya

    2012-01-01

    The results of Raghavendra (2008) show that assuming Khot's Unique Games Conjecture (2002), for every constraint satisfaction problem there exists a generic semi-definite program that achieves the optimal approximation factor. This result is existential as it does not provide an explicit optimal rounding procedure nor does it allow to calculate exactly the Unique Games hardness of the problem. Obtaining an explicit optimal approximation scheme and the corresponding approximation factor is a difficult challenge for each specific approximation problem. An approach for determining the exact approximation factor and the corresponding optimal rounding was established in the analysis of MAX-CUT (KKMO 2004) and the use of the Invariance Principle (MOO 2005). However, this approach crucially relies on results explicitly proving optimal partitions in Gaussian space. Until recently, Borell's result (Borell 1985) was the only non-trivial Gaussian partition result known. In this paper we derive the first explicit optimal...

  4. Uniform dimension results for Gaussian random fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Let X = {X(t),t ∈ RN} be a Gaussian random field with values in Rd defined by X(t) =(X1(t),...,Xd(t)), t ∈ RN.(1) The properties of space and time anisotropy of X and their connections to uniform Hausdorff dimension results are discussed.It is shown that in general the uniform Hausdorff dimension result does not hold for the image sets of a space-anisotropic Gaussian random field X.When X is an(N,d)-Gaussian random field as in(1),where X1,...,Xd are independent copies of a real valued,centered Gaussian random field X0 which is anisotropic in the time variable.We establish uniform Hausdorff dimension results for the image sets of X.These results extend the corresponding results on one-dimensional Brownian motion,fractional Brownian motion and the Brownian sheet.

  5. Distinct functional interactions between actin isoforms and nonsarcomeric myosins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Müller

    Full Text Available Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments.

  6. Semantic Clustering of Search Engine Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Sara Saad; El-Sayed, Maged F; Hassan, Yasser F

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for search engine results clustering that relies on the semantics of the retrieved documents rather than the terms in those documents. The proposed approach takes into consideration both lexical and semantics similarities among documents and applies activation spreading technique in order to generate semantically meaningful clusters. This approach allows documents that are semantically similar to be clustered together rather than clustering documents based on similar terms. A prototype is implemented and several experiments are conducted to test the prospered solution. The result of the experiment confirmed that the proposed solution achieves remarkable results in terms of precision.

  7. IceCube Results and PINGU Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koskinen, David Jason

    2015-01-01

    The last three years of IceCube operation with the completed detector have resulted in a plethora of results, including the first observation of high energy astrophysical neutrinos, tests of a possible neutrino flux from atmospheric charm meson decay, and competitive results of neutrino oscillati...... from atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance. Based on the success of IceCube, a new low energy in-fill, known as the Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade, is being proposed with the primary physics goal of resolving the ordering of the neutrino mass hierarchy....

  8. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandurin, D. [Virginia U.; Bernardi, G. [Paris U., VI-VII; Gerber, C. [Chicago U., EFI; Junk, T. [Fermilab; Juste, A. [Barcelona, IFAE; Kotwal, A. [Duke U.; Lewis, J. [Fermilab; Mesropian, C. [Rockefeller U.; Schellman, H. [Northwestern U.; Sekaric, J. [Kansas U.; Toback, D. [Texas A-M; Van Kooten, R. [Indiana U.; Vellidis, C. [Fermilab; Zivkovic, L. [Clemson U.

    2015-02-27

    We present a comprehensive review of the physics results obtained by the CDF and D0 collaborations up to summer 2014, with emphasis on those achieved in the Run II of the Tevatron collider which delivered a total integrated luminosity of ~10 fb$^{-1}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96~{\\rm TeV}$. The results are presented in six main physics topics: QCD, Heavy Flavor, Electroweak, Top quark, Higgs boson and searches for New Particles and Interactions. The characteristics of the accelerator, detectors, and the techniques used to achieve these results are also briefly summarized.

  9. Semantic Clustering of Search Engine Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Saad Soliman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel approach for search engine results clustering that relies on the semantics of the retrieved documents rather than the terms in those documents. The proposed approach takes into consideration both lexical and semantics similarities among documents and applies activation spreading technique in order to generate semantically meaningful clusters. This approach allows documents that are semantically similar to be clustered together rather than clustering documents based on similar terms. A prototype is implemented and several experiments are conducted to test the prospered solution. The result of the experiment confirmed that the proposed solution achieves remarkable results in terms of precision.

  10. First scientific results from the Estonian Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Skaburskas, K; Teder, H; Hektor, Andi; Anton, Lauri; Kadastik, Mario; Skaburskas, Konstantin; Teder, Hardi

    2004-01-01

    We present first scientific results, technical details and recent developments in the Estonian Grid. Ideas and concepts behind Grid technology are described. We mention some most crucial parts of a Grid system, as well as some unique possibilities in the Estonian situation. Scientific applications currently running on Estonian Grid are listed. We discuss the first scientific computations and results the Estonian Grid. The computations show that the middleware is well chosen and the Estonian Grid has remarkable stability and scalability. The authors present the collected results and experiences of the development of the Estonian Grid and add some ideas of the near future of the Estonian Grid.

  11. Unfavourable results with distraction in craniofacial skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis has revolutionised the management of craniofacial abnormalities. The technique however requires precise planning, patient selection, execution and follow-up to achieve consistent and positive results and to avoid unfavourable results. The unfavourable results with craniofacial distraction stem from many factors ranging from improper patient selection, planning and use of inappropriate distraction device and vector. The present study analyses the current standards and techniques of distraction and details in depth the various errors and complications that may occur due to this technique. The commonly observed complications of distraction have been detailed along with measures and suggestions to avoid them in clinical practice.

  12. Unfavourable results in skull base surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemen Jaju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of skull base tumors involves multiple specialities. The lesions are usually advanced and the treatment is often associated with unfavorable results, which may be functional and/or aesthetic. Here we have done an analysis for the complications and unfavorable results of 546 cases treated surgically by a single craniofacial surgeon over a period of 14 years. The major morbidity ranges from death to permanent impairment of vital organ functions (brain, eye, nose, infections, tissue losses, flap failures, treatment associated complications, psychosocial issues, and aesthesis besides others. This article is aimed at bringing forth these unfavorable results and how to avoid them.

  13. Exact Results for the BTZ Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Birmingham, Daniel; Sen, S; Birmingham, Danny; Sachs, Ivo; Sen, Siddhartha

    2001-01-01

    In this review, we summarize exact results for the three-dimensional BTZ black hole. We use rigorous mathematical results to clarify the general structure and properties of this black hole spacetime and its microscopic description. In particular, we study the formation of the black hole by point particle collisions, leading to an exact analytic determination of the Choptuik scaling parameter. We also show that a `No Hair Theorem' follows immediately from a mathematical theorem of hyperbolic geometry, due to Sullivan. A microscopic understanding of the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, and decay rate for massless scalars, is shown to follow from standard results of conformal field theory.

  14. Recent CP violation results from Belle

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, Gagan B

    2012-01-01

    We summarize recent results on an array of CP violation measurements performed by the Belle experiment using the data collected near the Y(4S) and Y(5S) resonances at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  15. Zbrowse: an interactive GWAS results browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg R. Ziegler

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The growing number of genotyped populations, the advent of high-throughput phenotyping techniques and the development of GWAS analysis software has rapidly accelerated the number of GWAS experimental results. Candidate gene discovery from these results files is often tedious, involving many manual steps searching for genes in windows around a significant SNP. This problem rapidly becomes more complex when an analyst wishes to compare multiple GWAS studies for pleiotropic or environment specific effects. To this end, we have developed a fast and intuitive interactive browser for the viewing of GWAS results with a focus on an ability to compare results across multiple traits or experiments. The software can easily be run on a desktop computer with software that bioinformaticians are likely already familiar with. Additionally, the software can be hosted or embedded on a server for easy access by anyone with a modern web browser.

  16. Secondary Analysis for Results Tracking Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Secondary Analysis and Results Tracking (SART) activity provides support for the development of two databases to manage secondary and third-party data, data...

  17. The journal of irreproducible results II

    CERN Document Server

    Scherr, George H

    1997-01-01

    Compilation of offbeat science papers from the Journal of Irreproducible Results, including: Emotion in the Rat Face; Foamy Beer; Cooking with Potential Energy; The Large-Cake Cutting Problem; Siamese Twinning in Gummy Bears; much more.

  18. Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-07-01

    The Innovation Impact brochure captures key breakthrough results across NREL's primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: solar, wind, bioenergy, transportation, buildings, analysis, and manufacturing technologies.

  19. Focus on Communication: NIH Research to Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Fall 2008 ... grew new hair cells. Read More "Focus on Communication" Articles Living with Hearing Loss / Anatomy of the ...

  20. Some Results on the Simultaneous Approximation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. R. Haddadi∗

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we give some result on the simultaneous proximinal subset and simultaneous Chebyshev in the uniformly convex Banach space. Also we give relation between fixed point theory and simultaneous proximity.

  1. ATLAS @ LHC: status and recent results

    CERN Document Server

    McPherson, Robert; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The status and data taking summary of the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is reviewed. Recent physics analysis results are presented, and the detector upgrade program is briefly summarized.

  2. Pb speciation results in amended soils

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset shows the distribution of Pb phases resulting from various amendments to change Pb speciation. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  3. Results from CMS on Higgs boson physics

    CERN Document Server

    Azzurri, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    A selection of measurements and results of Higgs physics obtained by the CMS experiment are presented, obtained with proton collision data collected in 2015 and 2016 at the center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV.

  4. Melanoma Biopsy Results Can Differ, Worrying Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166955.html Melanoma Biopsy Results Can Differ, Worrying Patients Doctor discovers ... her dermatologist said her skin biopsy indicated possible melanoma, she knew just what to do -- get a ...

  5. Innovation Impact: Breakthrough Research Results (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-07-01

    The Innovation Impact brochure captures key breakthrough results across NREL's primary areas of renewable energy and energy efficiency research: solar, wind, bioenergy, transportation, buildings, analysis, and manufacturing technologies.

  6. Communicating for results | Okhakhu | EJOTMAS: Ekpoma Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... human communication; principles, contexts and skills; audience communication, etc. ... This is however referent to business communication. ... This study therefore, attempts to provide the balance for achieving results in this sphere of our ...

  7. CRUMP 2003 Selected Water Sample Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point locations and water sampling results performed in 2003 by the Church Rock Uranium Monitoring Project (CRUMP) a consortium of organizations (Navajo Nation...

  8. Highlights of Recent Results with Clas

    CERN Document Server

    Burkert, V D

    2005-01-01

    Recent results on the study of the electromagnetic structure of nucleon resonances, the spin structure of proton and neutrons at small and intermediate photon virtualities, and the search for exotic pentaquark baryons are presented.

  9. Search Result Diversification Based on Query Facets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡莎; 窦志成; 王晓捷; 继荣

    2015-01-01

    In search engines, different users may search for different information by issuing the same query. To satisfy more users with limited search results, search result diversification re-ranks the results to cover as many user intents as possible. Most existing intent-aware diversification algorithms recognize user intents as subtopics, each of which is usually a word, a phrase, or a piece of description. In this paper, we leverage query facets to understand user intents in diversification, where each facet contains a group of words or phrases that explain an underlying intent of a query. We generate subtopics based on query facets and propose faceted diversification approaches. Experimental results on the public TREC 2009 dataset show that our faceted approaches outperform state-of-the-art diversification models.

  10. Analytic results for the Tsallis thermodynamic variables

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Mogliacci, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    We analytically investigate the thermodynamic variables of a hot and dense system, in the framework of the Tsallis non-extensive classical statistics. After a brief review, we start by recalling the corresponding massless limits for all the thermodynamic variables. We then present the detail of calculation for the exact massive result regarding the pressure -- valid for all values of the $q$-parameter -- as well as the Tsallis $T$-, $\\mu$- and $m$- parameters, the former characterizing the non-extensivity of the system. The results for other thermodynamic variables, in the massive case, readily follow from appropriate differentiations of the pressure, for which we provide the necessary formulas. For the convenience of the reader, we tabulate all of our results. A special emphasis is put on the method used in order to perform these computations, which happens to reduce cumbersome momentum integrals into simpler ones. Numerical consistency between our analytic results and the corresponding usual numerical integ...

  11. MedlinePlus Survey Results 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/survey/index.html MedlinePlus Survey Results 2015 To use the sharing features on ... government sites in the "Information/News" category. Other survey question responses: What best describes your role in ...

  12. Skin Cancer: NIH Research to Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Summer 2013 ... making a person immune to his or her skin cancer cells. Another method is to train a person's ...

  13. [Water Sample Results : Rocky Mountain Arsenal : 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A memorandum, from sample collector (organization unknown) Cathy H. to Rocky Mountain Arsenal staff, prefaces tabular water sample results collected from various...

  14. Bent functions results and applications to cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Tokareva, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Bent Functions: Results and Applications to Cryptography offers a unique survey of the objects of discrete mathematics known as Boolean bent functions. As these maximal, nonlinear Boolean functions and their generalizations have many theoretical and practical applications in combinatorics, coding theory, and cryptography, the text provides a detailed survey of their main results, presenting a systematic overview of their generalizations and applications, and considering open problems in classification and systematization of bent functions. The text is appropriate for novices and advanced

  15. Quantum chromodynamics results from HERA and JLAB

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Katja Krüger

    2012-10-01

    Recent QCD results from electron–proton interactions at HERA and JLAB are presented. Inclusive cross-section measurements as well as studies of the hadronic final state like jet production or the production of heavy quarks are discussed. The results are compared with perturbative QCD predictions and their impact on the determination of the parton density functions of the proton as well as of the strong coupling α s is discussed.

  16. Rare earth optogalvanic spectroscopy: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destro, Marcelo G.; Neri, Jose W.; Rodrigues, Nicolau A.S.; Silveira, Carlos A.B.; Riva, Rudimar [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/EFO), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Fotonica]. E-mail: destro@ieav.cta.br; Victor, Alessandro R. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The IEAv has special interest in the studies of rare earth isotope applications in laser medium and integrated optics as well as aerospace research. We are starting to work with Ytterbium, Erbium, Dysprosium and Neodymium laser selective photoionization research. This paper describes the preliminary results of emission and optogalvanic spectroscopy obtained from a Neodymium hollow cathode lamps. Furthermore these results were used to setup our laser systems to work to leads a Nd isotopes selective laser photoionization. (author)

  17. Some results on stability of difference systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Song Yang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some new results on existence and stability of equilibrium or periodic points for difference systems. First sufficient conditions of existence of asymptotically stable equilibrium point as well as the asymptotic stability of given equilibrium point are given for second order or delay difference systems. Then some similar results on existence of asymptotically stable periodic (equilibrium points to general difference systems are presented.

  18. On a result of Imin Chen

    CERN Document Server

    Edixhoven, B

    1996-01-01

    We give another proof of Imin Chen's result that the jacobian of the modular curve X(p)_{non-split}, for p a prime number, is isogeneous to the new part of the jacobian of X_0(p^2), using only the representation theory of the group GL_2(Z/pZ). In fact, we prove a generalization of Chen's result for objects with an action by GL_2(Z/pZ) in any pseudo-abelian Q-linear category.

  19. Results from STAR experiment at RHIC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bedangadas Mohanty; STAR Collaboration

    2006-11-01

    We present some of the important experimental results from nucleus–nucleus collision studies carried out by the STAR experiment at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The results suggests that central Au+Au collisions at RHIC has produced a dense and rapidly thermalizing matter with initial energy densities above the critical values predicted by lattice QCD for establishment of a quark-gluon plasma (QGP).

  20. Preliminary results of noise radar experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanowski, Mateusz; Contartese, Clara; Maslikowski, Lukasz; Baczyk, Marcin; Kulpa, Krzysztof

    2009-06-01

    The paper describes the first results of noise radar experiments carried out at Warsaw University of Technology. The radar system was built with Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components: log-periodic antennas, an arbitrary waveform generator and a two-channel spectrum analyzer. The radar operated in the continuous-wave mode, and the aim was to detect moving targets in the received signal. The paper shows the system setup as well as the numerical results obtained from the recorded signals.