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Sample records for nonmalignant neoplasm paroxysmal

  1. Paroxysmal Hemicrania

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Headache Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Paroxysmal hemicrania is a rare form of headache that usually begins in adulthood. Patients experience severe throbbing, claw-like, or boring pain usually ...

  2. Paroxysmal Hemicrania

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics of paroxysmal hemicrania (PH are reported in a series of 31 patients, ages 5-68 years (mean age 37, identified and followed prospectively at the National Hospital and the Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street, London, UK from May 1995 to January 2007.

  3. Left atrial myxoma presenting as paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Doo-Il; Jang, Jae-Sik; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Kyeong; Kim, Dong-Soo

    2014-02-01

    Cardiac myxomas are benign intracavitary neoplasms. Their incidence in cardiac surgery is approximately 0.3%. Symptoms of cardiac myxomas are typically variable, from obstruction of mitral valve to coronary embolism resulting in acute myocardial infarction. In this case, left atrial myxoma is presented as paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

  4. Paroxysmal Nonepileptic Events

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal events that mimic epilepsy, and their precipitants, prodromes, and distinguishing features are reviewed by researchers at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, and American University of Beirut, New York.

  5. Paroxysmal Nonkinesigenic Dyskinesia

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A Canadian family of European descent with paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD, and a gene locus that links to a distinct region on chromosome 2q31, is reported by researchers at University of British Columbia, Canada.

  6. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rated Nonprofit! Volunteer. Donate. Review. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) BPPV is the most common vestibular disorder. Benign ... al. Diagnosis and management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). CMAJ. 2003 169(7):681-693. Nuti D, ...

  7. Dynamics of Paroxysmal Tachycardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Leon

    2004-03-01

    Parosxysmal tachycardia refers to abnormally fast cardiac arrhythmias that suddenly start and stop. Paroxysmal tachycardias can occur in many regions of the heart and may be associated with many different mechanisms. In order to study paroxysmal tachycardias, we have analyzed tissue cultures of cells from embryonic chick heart that are imaged using calcium and voltage sensitive dyes. This model system displays a number of different types of dynamics including dynamics originating from pacemakers, triggered dynamics in which an excitation leads to the initiation of a sequence of waves originating from a single source, and spontaneously iniitiating and terminating rotating spiral waves. Theoretical models that include heterogeneity, spontaneous pacemaker activity, and fatigue or reduced excitability arising as a consequence of rapid excitation can be used to account for these behaviors.

  8. Surfactant apoprotein in nonmalignant pulmonary disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lungs exhibiting a variety of nonmalignant disorders were studied by immunoperoxidase staining using antibodies specific for surfactant apoprotein, IgG, IgM, IgA, albumin, fibrinogen, and lysozyme. Normal Type II pneumocytes showed staining for surfactant apoprotein in the perinuclear region only. The extent and intensity of staining for apoprotein was markedly increased in reactive Type II pneumocytes. This increase appeared to be a nonspecific reaction to l...

  9. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanbhag, Satish; Spivak, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria is a rare cause of autoimmune hemolytic anemia predominantly seen as an acute form in young children after viral illnesses and in a chronic form in some hematological malignancies and tertiary syphilis. It is a complement mediated intravascular hemolytic anemia associated with a biphasic antibody against the P antigen on red cells. The antibody attaches to red cells at colder temperatures and causes red cell lysis when blood recirculates to warmer parts of the body. Treatment is mainly supportive and with red cell transfusion, but immunosuppressive therapy may be effective in severe cases.

  10. Opioid Therapy for Chronic Nonmalignant Pain

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    Russell K Portenoy

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term administration of an opioid drug for chronic nonmalignant pain continues to be controversial, but is no longer uniformly rejected by pain specialists. This is true despite concerns that the regulatory agencies that oversee physician prescribing of opioid drugs continue to stigmatize the practice. The changing clinical perspective has been driven, in part, by widespread acknowledgement of the remarkably favourable outcomes achieved during opioid treatment of cancer pain. These outcomes contrast starkly with popular teaching about chronic opioid therapy and affirm the potential for prolonged efficacy, tolerable side effects, enhanced function associated with improved comfort and minimal risk of aberrant drug-related behaviours consistent with addiction. A large anecdotal experience in populations with nonmalignant pain suggests that these patients are more heterogeneous and that opioid therapy will greatly benefit some and will contribute to negative outcomes for others. The few controlled clinical trials that have been performed support the safety and efficacy of opioid therapy, but have been too limited to ensure generalization to the clinical setting. A critical review of the medical literature pertaining to chronic pain, opioid pharmacology and addiction medicine can clarify misconceptions about opioid therapy and provide a foundation for patient selection and drug administration. The available data support the view that opioids are no panacea for chronic pain, but should be considered in carefully selected patients using clinically derived guidelines that stress a structured approach and ongoing monitoring of efficacy, adverse effects, functional outcomes and the occurrence of aberrant drug-related behaviours.

  11. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

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    Guo Xiang-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a common clinical disorder characterized by brief recurrent spells of vertigo often brought about by certain head position changes as may occur with looking up, turning over in bed, or straightening up after bending over. It is important to understand BPPV not only because it may avert expensive and often unnecessary testing, but also because treatment is rapid, easy, and effective in >90% of cases. The diagnosis of BPPV can be made based on the history and examination. Patients usually report episodes of spinning evoked by certain movements, such as lying back or getting out of bed, turning in bed, looking up, or straightening after bending over. At present, the generally accepted recurrence rate of BPPV after successful treatment is 40%-50% at 5 years of average follow-up. There does appear to be a subset of individuals prone to multiple recurrences.

  12. Transdermal fentanyl in chronic nonmalignant pain

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    Vittorio Iorno

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic non malignant pain is always a therapeutic challenge of great significance because a inappropriate and insufficient treatment is able to reduce the life’s quality of the patients. Many therapeutic strategies were used to solve these issues, no one exhaustive. In the treatment of cancer pain, opiates use is common, is not the same for the chronic non-malignant pain. The fear of possible side effects (addiction, tolerance, respiratory depression restrain the therapist to apply this remedy. The aim of our work is to demonstrate how a correct application of the opiates in patients with chronic benign pain is not only possible but also desirable to relieving the pain and improving the quality of life.

  13. Nonepileptic paroxysmal sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenette, Eric; Guilleminault, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Events occurring during nighttime sleep in children can be easily mislabeled, as witnesses are usually not immediately available. Even when observers are present, description of the events can be sketchy, as these individuals are frequently aroused from their own sleep. Errors of perception are thus common and can lead to diagnosis of epilepsy where other sleep-related conditions are present, sometimes initiating unnecessary therapeutic interventions, especially with antiepileptic drugs. Often not acknowledged, paroxysmal nonepileptic behavioral and motor episodes in sleep are encountered much more frequently than their epileptic counterpart. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD) 2nd edition displays an extensive list of such conditions that can be readily mistaken for epilepsy. The most prevalent ones are reviewed, such as nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias, comprised of sleepwalking, confusional arousals and sleep terrors, periodic leg movements of sleep, repetitive movement disorders, benign neonatal myoclonus, and sleep starts. Apnea of prematurity is also briefly reviewed. Specific issues regarding management of these selected disorders, both for diagnostic consideration and for therapeutic intervention, are addressed.

  14. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Takahisa; Delchier, Jean-Charles

    2009-09-01

    It is well known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with many nonmalignant disorders such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastric polyp, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)/aspirin-induced gastric injury, and functional dyspepsia. In 2008, interesting articles on the association of H. pylori infection with these disorders were presented, some of which intended to reveal the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in response to H. pylori infection, and have demonstrated that genetic differences in host and bacterial factors as well as environmental factors account for these differences. A decline in the occurrence of peptic ulcer related to H. pylori was confirmed. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and GERD was also confirmed but the impact of gastric atrophy on the prevention of GERD remained debatable. For NSAID-induced gastric injury, eradication of H. pylori infection has been recommended. During this year, eradication of H. pylori infection was recommended for patients treated with antiplatelet therapy as well as aspirin and NSAID. It was also reported that for patients with functional dyspepsia, eradication of H. pylori offers a modest but significant benefit.

  15. Surfactant apoprotein in nonmalignant pulmonary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lungs exhibiting a variety of nonmalignant disorders were studied by immunoperoxidase staining using antibodies specific for surfactant apoprotein, IgG, IgM, IgA, albumin, fibrinogen, and lysozyme. Normal Type II pneumocytes showed staining for surfactant apoprotein in the perinuclear region only. The extent and intensity of staining for apoprotein was markedly increased in reactive Type II pneumocytes. This increase appeared to be a nonspecific reaction to lung injury. The intra-alveolar material in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis stained intensely for surfactant apoprotein, indicating that the accumulated proteinaceous material contained pulmonary surfactant. Type II pneumocytes in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis exhibited hyperplasia as well as hypertrophy. The few macrophages in lung affected by pulmonary alveolar proteinosis stained intensely for lysozyme. The excessive intraalveolar accumulation of proteinaceous material in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis may be the result of both an over-production as well as a deficient removal of pulmonary surfactant. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 p[57]-a PMID:7004201

  16. 5. Nonmalignant diseases after the Chernobyl catastrophe.

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    Yablokov, Alexey V

    2009-11-01

    This section describes the spectrum and the scale of the nonmalignant diseases that have been found among exposed populations. Adverse effects as a result of Chernobyl irradiation have been found in every group that has been studied. Brain damage has been found in individuals directly exposed--liquidators and those living in the contaminated territories, as well as in their offspring. Premature cataracts; tooth and mouth abnormalities; and blood, lymphatic, heart, lung, gastrointestinal, urologic, bone, and skin diseases afflict and impair people, young and old alike. Endocrine dysfunction, particularly thyroid disease, is far more common than might be expected, with some 1,000 cases of thyroid dysfunction for every case of thyroid cancer, a marked increase after the catastrophe. There are genetic damage and birth defects especially in children of liquidators and in children born in areas with high levels of radioisotope contamination. Immunological abnormalities and increases in viral, bacterial, and parasitic diseases are rife among individuals in the heavily contaminated areas. For more than 20 years, overall morbidity has remained high in those exposed to the irradiation released by Chernobyl. One cannot give credence to the explanation that these numbers are due solely to socioeconomic factors. The negative health consequences of the catastrophe are amply documented in this chapter and concern millions of people.

  17. Paroxysmal Nonepileptic Events in Glut1 Deficiency.

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    Klepper, Joerg; Leiendecker, Baerbel; Eltze, Christin; Heussinger, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    View Supplementary Video Movement disorders are a major feature of Glut1 deficiency. As recently identified in adults with paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia, similar events were reported in pediatric Glut1 deficiency. In a case series, parent videos of regular motor state and paroxysmal events were requested from children with Glut1 deficiency on clinical follow-up. A questionnaire was sent out to 60 families. Videos of nonparoxysmal/paroxysmal states in 3 children illustrated the ataxic-dystonic, choreatiform, and dyskinetic-dystonic nature of paroxysmal events. Fifty-six evaluated questionnaires confirmed this observation in 73% of patients. Events appeared to increase with age, were triggered by low ketosis, sleep deprivation, and physical exercise, and unrelated to sex, hypoglycorrhachia, SLC2A1 mutations, or type of ketogenic diet. We conclude that paroxysmal events are a major clinical feature in Glut1 deficieny, linking the pediatric disease to adult Glut1D-associated exercise-induced paroxysmal dyskinesias.

  18. Infantile masturbation and paroxysmal disorders.

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    Omran, Mohammadreza Salehi; Ghofrani, Mohammad; Juibary, Ali Ghabeli

    2008-02-01

    A recurrent paroxysmal presentation in children leads to different diagnoses and among them are neurologic and cardiac etiologies. Infantile masturbation is not a well known entity and cannot be differentiated easily from other disorders. Aim of this study is to elucidate and differentiate this condition from epileptic seizures. We report 3 cases of 10 to 30 mth old girls of infantile masturbation that their symptoms initiated at 2, 3 and 8 mth of age. These present with contraction and extension of lower extremities, scissoring of legs, perspiration, changing face color. In 2 cases body rocking and legs rubbing initiated then there after. Masturbation is one of the paroxysmal non-epileptic conditions of early infancy and is in differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures.

  19. Paroxysmal upgaze deviation: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Echeverría-Palacio CM; Benavidez-Fierro MA

    2012-01-01

    The paroxysmal upgaze deviation is a syndrome that described in infants for first time in 1988; there are just about 50 case reports worldwide ever since. Its etiology is unclear and though it prognosis is variable; most case reports indicate that during growth the episodes tend to decrease in frequency and duration until they disappear. It describes a 16-months old male child who since 11-months old presented many episodes of variable conjugate upward deviation of the eyes, compensatory neck...

  20. Paroxysmal kinesigenic choreoathetosis in hyperthyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, M. E.

    1987-01-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic choreoathetosis is an unusual movement disorder often triggered by attempts to use the limbs, and has sometimes been associated with diffuse or focal brain injury. We report its occurrence in hyperthyroidism, with which choreoathetosis has rarely been described in the past without known cause. Choreoathetosis has also occurred with other metabolic and toxic disorders, and the mechanism is uncertain. The development of involuntary movements activated by limb motion durin...

  1. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: rare cause of acute renal failure

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    Vilma Takayasu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is a rare acquired disease, characterized by hemolytic anemia, recurrent infections, cytopenias, and vascular thrombosis. It occurs by non-malignant clonal expansion of one or more hematopoietic stem cells that acquired somatic mutations in PIG-A gene linked to chromosome X. This mutation results in lower erythrocyte expression of CD55 and CD59 surface proteins and consequently increased susceptibility to the complement system. The renal involvement is generally benign, resulting in mild impairment in urinary concentration. Acute renal failure requiring hemodialytic support accompanying PNH is rarely observed. The authors report a case of a 37-year-old male who presented with bicytopenia (hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia associated with acute renal failure requiring dialysis. Diagnosis was challenging because of the rarity and unfamiliarity with this entity, but was confirmed by flow cytometry. In the course of the disease, acute pyelonephritis with multiple renal abscesses was diagnosed requiring prolonged antibiotic therapy. Patient outcome was favorable after the control of hemolysis and the infection treatment.

  2. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensen, E. van; Leeuwen, R.B. van; Zaag-Loonen, H.J. van der; Masius-Olthof, S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dizziness is a frequent complaint of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and orthostatic hypotension (OH) is often thought to be the cause. We studied whether benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) could also be an explanation. AIM: To assess the prevalence of benign paroxysmal

  3. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensen, E. van; Leeuwen, R.B. van; Zaag-Loonen, H.J. van der; Masius-Olthof, S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dizziness is a frequent complaint of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and orthostatic hypotension (OH) is often thought to be the cause. We studied whether benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) could also be an explanation. AIM: To assess the prevalence of benign paroxysmal

  4. Unipolar Depression in Paroxysmal Schizophrenia

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    Alexander S. Bobrov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the current study, the clinical characteristics of unipolar depression in the clinical picture of schizophrenia with the paroxysmal type of disease course are presented. Given the concomitant depression with phobic symptoms, the following clinical variants are marked: depression with generalized social phobia and/or anthropophobia and depression with generalized pathological body sensations and hypochondriacal phobias. In other words, we are talking about a necessity to allocate a special type of schizophrenia with affective structure episodes and comorbid neurosis-like symptoms. Information on the basic treatment strategy of schizophrenia with depressive structure episodes and comorbid neurosis-like symptoms in everyday psychiatric practice is also provided.

  5. Factitious psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes

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    Alissa Romano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mistaking psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes (PNEPEs for epileptic seizures (ES is potentially dangerous, and certain features should alert physicians to a possible PNEPE diagnosis. Psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes due to factitious seizures carry particularly high risks of morbidity or mortality from nonindicated emergency treatment and, often, high costs in wasted medical treatment expenditures. We report a case of a 28-year-old man with PNEPEs that were misdiagnosed as ES. The patient had been on four antiseizure medications (ASMs with therapeutic serum levels and had had multiple intubations in the past for uncontrolled episodes. He had no episodes for two days of continuous video-EEG monitoring. He then disconnected his EEG cables and had an episode of generalized stiffening and cyanosis, followed by jerking and profuse bleeding from the mouth. The manifestations were unusually similar to those of ES, except that he was clearly startled by spraying water on his face, while he was stiff in all extremities and unresponsive. There were indications that he had sucked blood from his central venous catheter to expel through his mouth during his PNEPEs while consciously holding his breath. Normal video-EEG monitoring; the patient's volitional and deceptive acts to fabricate the appearance of illness, despite pain and personal endangerment; and the absence of reward other than remaining in a sick role were all consistent with a diagnosis of factitious disorder.

  6. Myeloid neoplasms with eosinophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Andreas; Gotlib, Jason

    2017-02-09

    Molecular diagnostics has generated substantial dividends in dissecting the genetic basis of myeloid neoplasms with eosinophilia. The family of diseases generated by dysregulated fusion tyrosine kinase (TK) genes is recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) category, "Myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and rearrangement of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or FGFR1, or with PCM1-JAK2" In addition to myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), these patients can present with myelodysplastic syndrome/MPN, as well as de novo or secondary mixed-phenotype leukemias or lymphomas. Eosinophilia is a common, but not invariable, feature of these diseases. The natural history of PDGFRA- and PDGFRB-rearranged neoplasms has been dramatically altered by imatinib. In contrast, patients with FGFR1 and JAK2 fusion TK genes exhibit a more aggressive course and variable sensitivity to current TK inhibitors, and in most cases, long-term disease-free survival may only be achievable with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Similar poor prognosis outcomes may be observed with rearrangements of FLT3 or ABL1 (eg, both of which commonly partner with ETV6), and further investigation is needed to validate their inclusion in the current WHO-defined group of eosinophilia-associated TK fusion-driven neoplasms. The diagnosis chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified (CEL, NOS) is assigned to patients with MPN with eosinophilia and nonspecific cytogenetic/molecular abnormalities and/or increased myeloblasts. Myeloid mutation panels have identified somatic variants in patients with a provisional diagnosis of hypereosinophilia of undetermined significance, reclassifying some of these cases as eosinophilia-associated neoplasms. Looking forward, one of the many challenges will be how to use the results of molecular profiling to guide prognosis and selection of actionable therapeutic targets. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, R; Capone, F; Plantone, D; Batocchi, A P

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria are part of the spectrum of transient neurological disturbances that can be frequently encountered in multiple sclerosis (MS). Prompt recognition of these symptoms is important because they can be the only manifestation of a MS relapse and symptomatic therapy is often beneficial. We report a patient who developed paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria, documented by video imaging, while he was recovering from a MS relapse. Treatment with carbamazepine resulted in the complete reversal of the paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Peroxiredoxins in colorectal neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, X.Y.; Fu, X.Z.; Wang, X. H.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are novel group proteins with efficient antioxidant capacity, and some of them also have effects on cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance. Altogether six distinct Prxs expressions were investigated in histological samples of colorectal neoplasm and the distant normal tissues and investigated associatedly with parameters such as clinical stage and lymphnodes metastasis. Normal colorectal tis...

  9. Treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

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    I. A. Lisukov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare, life‑threatening clonal hematological disorder caused by an acquired mutation in the phosphatidylinositol glucan (PIG-A gene. PNH is characterized by chronic intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, thrombophilia and other severe clinical syndromes. Until recently, the treatment of PNH has been symptomatic with blood transfusions, anticoagulation and supplementation with folic acid or iron. The only potentially curative treatment is allogeneic stem cell transplantation, but this has severe complications with high mortality rates. A new targeted treatment strategy is the inhibition of the terminal complement cascade with anti‑C5 monoclonal antibody (eculizumab. Eculizumab has shown significant efficacy in controlling of intravascular hemolysis resulting in improving quality of life and survival.

  10. Treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Lisukov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare, life‑threatening clonal hematological disorder caused by an acquired mutation in the phosphatidylinositol glucan (PIG-A gene. PNH is characterized by chronic intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, thrombophilia and other severe clinical syndromes. Until recently, the treatment of PNH has been symptomatic with blood transfusions, anticoagulation and supplementation with folic acid or iron. The only potentially curative treatment is allogeneic stem cell transplantation, but this has severe complications with high mortality rates. A new targeted treatment strategy is the inhibition of the terminal complement cascade with anti‑C5 monoclonal antibody (eculizumab. Eculizumab has shown significant efficacy in controlling of intravascular hemolysis resulting in improving quality of life and survival.

  11. Cisplatin induced paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia

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    Waseem Raja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP is the first member of a class of platinum-containing anti-cancer drugs that act by binding to and causing cross-linking of deoxyribonucleic acid, which ultimately triggers apoptosis. Cisplatin has a broad-spectrum antineoplastic activity against various types of human tumors. Unfortunately, the optimal usefulness of Cisplatin is limited secondary to its dose related toxicity especially nephrotoxicity. Cisplatin chemotherapy is also associated with cardiotoxic effects that may range from silent arrhythmias to heart failure and even sudden cardiac death. These effects are more pronounced when cisplatin is combined with other cardiotoxic drugs. Here, we report a case of patient of cancer lung who developed paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia following administration of Cisplatin. A brief review of the literature follows.

  12. Cisplatin induced paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Waseem; Mir, M Hussain; Dar, Imtiyaz; Banday, Muzamil Ahmad; Ahmad, Irfan

    2013-10-01

    Cisplatin or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP) is the first member of a class of platinum-containing anti-cancer drugs that act by binding to and causing cross-linking of deoxyribonucleic acid, which ultimately triggers apoptosis. Cisplatin has a broad-spectrum antineoplastic activity against various types of human tumors. Unfortunately, the optimal usefulness of Cisplatin is limited secondary to its dose related toxicity especially nephrotoxicity. Cisplatin chemotherapy is also associated with cardiotoxic effects that may range from silent arrhythmias to heart failure and even sudden cardiac death. These effects are more pronounced when cisplatin is combined with other cardiotoxic drugs. Here, we report a case of patient of cancer lung who developed paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia following administration of Cisplatin. A brief review of the literature follows.

  13. Paroxysmal upgaze deviation: case report

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    Echeverría-Palacio CM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paroxysmal upgaze deviation is a syndrome that described in infants for first time in 1988; there are just about 50 case reports worldwide ever since. Its etiology is unclear and though it prognosis is variable; most case reports indicate that during growth the episodes tend to decrease in frequency and duration until they disappear. It describes a 16-months old male child who since 11-months old presented many episodes of variable conjugate upward deviation of the eyes, compensatory neck flexion and down-beat saccades in attempted downgaze. These events are predominantly diurnal, and are exacerbated by stressful situations such as fasting or insomnia, however and improve with sleep. They have normal neurologic and ophthalmologic examination, and neuroimaging and EEG findings are not relevant.

  14. Benign paroxysmal torticollis in infancy

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    Dimitrijević Lidija

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Benign paroxysmal torticollis (BPT is an episodic functional disorder of unknown etiology, characterized by the periods of torticollic posturing of the head, that occurs in the early months of life in healthy children. Case report. We reported two patients with BPT. In the first patient the symptoms were observed at the age of day 20, and disappeared at the age of 3 years. There were 10 episodes, of which 2 were followed by vomiting, pallor, irritability and the abnormal trunk posture. In the second patient, a 12-month-old girl, BPT started from day 15. She had 4 episodes followed by vomiting in the first year. Both girls had the normal psychomotor development. All diagnostical tests were normal. Conclusion. The recognition of BPT, as well as its clinical course may help to avoid not only unnecessary tests and the treatment, but also the anxiety of the parents.

  15. Functional jerks, tics, and paroxysmal movement disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreissen, Y. E. M.; Cath, D C; Tijssen, M A J; Hallet, Mark; Stone, Jon; Carson, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Functional jerks are among the most common functional movement disorders. The diagnosis of functional jerks is mainly based on neurologic examination revealing specific positive clinical signs. Differentiation from other jerky movements, such as tics, organic myoclonus, and primary paroxysmal

  16. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative ...

  17. Familial PRRT2 mutation with heterogeneous paroxysmal disorders including paroxysmal torticollis and hemiplegic migraine.

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    Dale, Russell C; Gardiner, Alice; Antony, Jayne; Houlden, Henry

    2012-10-01

    PRRT2 is the gene recently associated with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), benign familial infantile epilepsy, and choreoathetosis infantile convulsions. We report four family members with PRRT2 mutations who had heterogeneous paroxysmal disorders. The index patient had transient infantile paroxysmal torticollis, then benign infantile epilepsy that responded to carbamazepine. The index patient's father had PKD and migraine with aphasia, and his two brothers had hemiplegic migraine with onset in childhood. All four family members had the same PRRT2 c.649dupC mutation. We conclude that heterogeneous paroxysmal disorders are associated with PRRT2 mutations and include paroxysmal torticollis and hemiplegic migraine. We propose that PRRT2 is a new gene for hemiplegic migraine. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  18. BACTERIAL INFECTIONS FOLLOWING SPLENECTOMY FOR MALIGNANT AND NONMALIGNANT HEMATOLOGIC DISEASES

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    Giuseppe Leone

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Splenectomy, while often necessary in otherwise healthy patients after major trauma, find its primary indication for patients with an underlying malignant or nonmalignant hematologic diseases. Indications of splenectomy for hematologic diseases have been reducing in the last few years, due to improved diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In high-income countries, there is a clear decrease over calendar time in the incidence of all indication splenectomy except nonmalignant hematologic diseases. However, splenectomy, even if with different modalities including laparoscopic splenectomy and partial splenectomy, continue to be a current surgical practice both in nonmalignant hematologic diseases, such as Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP, Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA, Congenital Hemolytic Anemia such as Spherocytosis, Sickle Cell Anemia and Thalassemia and Malignant Hematological Disease, such as lymphoma. Today millions of people in the world are splenectomized. Splenectomy, independently of its cause, induces an early and late increase in the incidence of venous thromboembolism and infections. Infections remain the most dangerous complication of splenectomy. After splenectomy, the levels of antibody are preserved but there is a loss of memory B cells against pneumococcus and tetanus, and the loss of marginal zone monocytes deputed to immunological defense from capsulated bacteria. Commonly, the infections strictly correlated to the absence of the spleen or a decreased or absent splenic function are due to encapsulated bacteria that are the most virulent pathogens in this set of patients. Vaccination with polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines again Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis should be performed before the splenectomy. This practice reduces but does not eliminate the occurrence of overwhelming infections due to capsulated bacteria. At present, most of infection found in splenectomized patients

  19. Paroxysmal discharges triggered by hearing spoken language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, H; Kasuga, I

    1978-04-01

    We examined the modality of EEG activation by various kinds of acoustic stimulation in a middle-aged Japanese female with epilepsy. Paroxysmal discharges were triggered in the right frontal area (F4) by verval stimulation. For the activation of EEG, concentration of attention on the stimulation was essential; therefore paroxysmal discharges were triggered most easily by verbal stimuli when someone spoke to the patient directly. Stronger responses than usual were triggered by specific words, and apparently reflected the interest and concern of the patient. The latency from stimulation to paroxysmal discharges ranged from 230 to 1,300 msec, suggesting that the responses may have been a function of the perception and recognition of acoustic stimuli. "Heard-word epilepsy" or "Angesprochene Epilepsie" is suggested in this case.

  20. The outcome of thirteen patients with nonmalignant hematologic diseases treated with HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶媛

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of human leukocyte antigen(HLA)haploidentical stem cell transplantation in nonmalignant hematologic diseases.Methods To analyze the outcome of 13 patients with nonmalignant hematologic diseases who underwent HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation from September

  1. Neuropsychological assessment of chronic non-malignant pain patients treated in a multidisciplinary pain centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgren, Per; Christrup, Lona Louring; Petersen, Morten Aa

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of pain, sedation, pain medications and socio-demographics on cognitive functioning in chronic non-malignant pain patients. Chronic non-malignant pain patients (N=91) treated in a multidisciplinary pain centre were compared with age and sex ma...

  2. Obesity and gastrointestinal neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Binkowska-Borgosz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Being overweight or obese is a significant public health problem in the 21st century due to its scale, common existence and its cause-effect association with multiple diseases. Excessive accumulation of adipose tissue in humans is regarded as a major risk factor for development of cardiovascular and skeletal diseases. However, data from recent years have revealed that obesity is also strongly associated with increased risk of the majority of cancers in humans, including those originating from the gastrointestinal tract. During the last few year this association has been thoroughly proven and supported by several epidemiological analyses. The authors present i the current state of knowledge regarding key (pathomechanisms that link metabolism of human adipose tissue to development/progression of neoplasms (especially in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as ii the results of selected clinical studies in which the influence of obesity on risk of gastrointestinal cancer development has been addressed.

  3. Obesity and gastrointestinal neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Binkowska-Borgosz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Being overweight or obese is a significant public health problem in the 21st century due to its scale, common existence and its cause-effect association with multiple diseases. Excessive accumulation of adipose tissue in humans is regarded as a major risk factor for development of cardiovascular and skeletal diseases. However, data from recent years have revealed that obesity is also strongly associated with increased risk of the majority of cancers in humans, including those originating from the gastrointestinal tract. During the last few year this association has been thoroughly proven and supported by several epidemiological analyses. The authors present i the current state of knowledge regarding key (pathomechanisms that link metabolism of human adipose tissue to development/progression of neoplasms (especially in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as ii the results of selected clinical studies in which the influence of obesity on risk of gastrointestinal cancer development has been addressed.

  4. Male Infertility and Risk of Nonmalignant Chronic Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glazer, Clara Helene; Bonde, Jens Peter; Eisenberg, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    The association between male infertility and increased risk of certain cancers is well studied. Less is known about the long-term risk of nonmalignant diseases in men with decreased fertility. A systemic literature review was performed on the epidemiologic evidence of male infertility...... as a precursor for increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and all-cause mortality. PubMed and Embase were searched from January 1, 1980, to September 1, 2016, to identify epidemiological studies reporting associations between male infertility and the outcomes of interest. Animal studies, case...... reports, reviews, studies not providing an accurate reference group, and studies including infertility due to vasectomy or malignancy were excluded. The literature search resulted in 2,485 references among which we identified seven articles fulfilling the eligibility criteria. Of these, four articles were...

  5. PAROXYSMAL ATRIAL FIBRILLATION: CHOICE OF CARDIOVERSION THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Tatarskii

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics and classification of different patterns of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation are presented. Main indications to restoration of sinus rhythm are discussed. The features of main medications used to terminate of atrial fibrillation are given. The choice of antiarrhythmic drug is considerate. Necessity of individual approach to therapy tactics is proved.

  6. Repositioning chairs in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Niels; Hansen, Søren; Møller, Martin Nue

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the clinical value of repositioning chairs in management of refractory benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and to study how different BPPV subtypes respond to treatment. We performed a retrospective chart review of 150 consecutive cases with refractory vertigo...

  7. Clinical Practice Guidelines for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandy Viera Valdés

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. These are arrhythmias in which structures placed above the bifurcation of the bundle of His are involved; characterized by tachycardia with abrupt starting and ending. We comment its classification, common characteristics, general treatment and specific conduct for its different variables. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  8. Genomics of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoi, Katerina; Cross, Nicholas C P

    2017-03-20

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a group of related clonal hematologic disorders characterized by excess accumulation of one or more myeloid cell lineages and a tendency to transform to acute myeloid leukemia. Deregulated JAK2 signaling has emerged as the central phenotypic driver of BCR -ABL1-negative MPNs and a unifying therapeutic target. In addition, MPNs show unexpected layers of genetic complexity, with multiple abnormalities associated with disease progression, interactions between inherited factors and phenotype driver mutations, and effects related to the order in which mutations are acquired. Although morphology and clinical laboratory analysis continue to play an important role in defining these conditions, genomic analysis is providing a platform for better disease definition, more accurate diagnosis, direction of therapy, and refined prognostication. There is an emerging consensus with regard to many prognostic factors, but there is a clear need to synthesize genomic findings into robust, clinically actionable and widely accepted scoring systems as well as the need to standardize the laboratory methodologies that are used.

  9. [The spleen in non-malignant haematological disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüfer, Axel; Wuillemin, Walter A

    2013-03-01

    The spleen functions as a filter of the circulating blood, removing aging or abnormal red blood cells, intraerythrocyte inclusions as well as foreign particals. As the spleen is composed of lymphocytic tissue, circulatory elements and mononuclear phagocytic cells it plays an important role in the nonspecific as well as the specific immune response. Additionally, the spleen serves as a reservoir for circulating blood cells, especially platelet sequestration by the spleen is well do cumented. The spleen produces blood cells during fetal development and in certain haematological disorders such as myelofibrosis. The destruction of red blood cells within the splenic cords releases iron in the circulation, which is recycled and used to manufacture new erythrocytes in the bone marrow. In several non-malignant haematological disorders antibody-coated cells are cleared from the circulation by phagocytic cells of the spleen. This involves erythrocytes in autoimmunhaemolytic anaemias, platelets in immunthrombocytopenia and neutrophils in Felty syndrome. In hereditary spherocytosis the spleen destroys the resulting defective, spherical red cells. In pyruvate kinase deficiency impaired production of adenosine triphosphate leads to destruction of red blood cells in the spleen or in the liver. In sickle cell anaemia the defective erythrocytes cause sludging and thrombosis in small vessels with infarcts for instance in the spleen, which over time can result in autosplenectomy. In thalassaemia major abnormal haemoglobin forms protein precipitates in the red cells with development of a severe hypochromic anaemia with haemolysis and intramedullary inef fective erythropoiesis. Therapeutic splenectomy can be an option in all of these mentioned non-malignant haematological disorders. The rationale and the pathophysiology of its role in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is probably at least well understood. The use of new and effective drugs such as the monoclonal antibody rituximab or

  10. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo following septorhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Eltaf Ayca Ozbal; Koc, Bulent; Eryaman, Esra; Ozluoglu, Levent N

    2013-01-01

    We present 2 cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) following septorhinoplasty. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo following septorhinoplasty is an unusual entity. Two young women who had difficulty in breathing and nasal deformity underwent septorhinoplasty. On the second and the third postoperative days, the patients experienced vertigo that was induced by position changes. Both patients had neither preexisting ear disease nor vertigo before the surgery. All the examinations were normal. With Dix-Hallpike maneuver, which is the criterion-standard test, the characteristic nystagmus was observed. Right posterior canal BPPV was diagnosed, and they were both treated with Epley canalith repositioning maneuver. Publications related to postsurgical vertigo are available in literature, but it is still an underdiagnosed disorder. We would like to mention about this rare entity and inform the surgeons that they must keep in mind that a patient who is complaining about vertigo or dizziness after the surgery should be observed and investigated for BPPV.

  11. Paroxysmal Hypnogenic Dyskinesia Responsive to Doxylamine: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia is a rare clinical entity characterized by intermittent dystonia and choreoathetoid movements that begin exclusively during sleep, often with consciousness preserved once the patient is awakened during the episodes. They occur almost every night and are often misdiagnosed as sleeping disorders. Paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia is currently known to be a form of frontal lobe epilepsy, but not in all cases. We present a 19-year-old male patient with paroxysmal h...

  12. [Initial evaluation and management of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rujic, Dragana; Sundbøll, Jens; Tofig, Bawer Jalal; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Pareek, Manan

    2016-01-18

    The paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias (SVT) are commonly encountered arrhythmias and include atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia, atrioventricular reciprocating tachycardia, and focal atrial tachycardia. These tachycardias share several clinical features as well as similar management strategies. The probable mechanism of paroxysmal SVT can often be diagnosed from the clinical findings and a 12-lead ECG. This review describes the initial evaluation and treatment of patients with paroxysmal SVT, including distinctive features from the most important differential diagnoses.

  13. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo recurrence and persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo S. Dorigueto; Mazzetti,Karen R; Gabilan,Yeda Pereira L; Ganança, Fernando Freitas [UNIFESP

    2009-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common vestibular disorders. AIM: To study the recurrence and persistence of BPPV in patients treated with canalith repositioning maneuvers (CRM) during the period of one year. STUDY DESIGN: longitudinal contemporary cohort series. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred patients with BPPV were followed up during 12 months after a treatment with CRM. Patients were classified according to disease evolution. Aquatic physiotherapy for ves...

  14. [Surgical treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, Y; Grosjean, P; Maire, R

    2012-10-03

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common disorder that presents to the general practitioner. This condition represents one of the most common causes of peripheral vertigo. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds. The treatment relies on repositioning maneuvers with relief of symptoms that occur in a few weeks in the majority of the cases. Rarely, patients are incapacitated by persistent or recurrent BPPV despite multiple repositioning maneuvers. In these cases, surgical therapies are available which provide excellent results.

  15. An update on the role of opioids in the management of chronic pain of nonmalignant origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, Jette; Sjøgren, Per

    2007-01-01

    To summarize and reflect over primarily recent epidemiological and randomized controlled trials in opioid-treated chronic nonmalignant pain patients, focusing on effects, side effects, risks and long-term consequences of the treatment....

  16. Radiofrequency ablation as initial therapy in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosedis Nielsen, Jens; Johannessen, Arne; Raatikainen, Pekka;

    2012-01-01

    There are limited data comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation with antiarrhythmic drug therapy as first-line treatment in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.......There are limited data comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation with antiarrhythmic drug therapy as first-line treatment in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation....

  17. [Expressive language disorder and focal paroxysmal activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdizán, José R; Rodríguez-Mena, Diego; Díaz-Sardi, Mauricio

    2011-03-01

    In cases of expressive language disorder (ELD), the child is unable to put his or her thoughts into words. Comorbidity is present with difficulties in repeating, imitating or naming. There are no problems with pronunciation, as occurs in phonological disorder, it may present before the age of three years and is crucial between four and seven years of age. Electroencephalogram (EEG) studies have been carried out not only in ELD, but also in clinical pictures where the language disorder was the main symptom or was associated to another neurodevelopmental pathology. We conducted a retrospective study involving a review of 100 patient records, with patients (25 girls and 75 boys) aged between two and six years old who had been diagnosed with ELD (according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revised) and were free of seizures and not receiving treatment. They were submitted to an EEG and received treatment with valproic acid if EEG findings were positive. Only six patients (males) presented localised spike-wave paroxysmal EEG activity in the frontotemporal region. This 6% is a percentage that is higher than the one found in the normal children's population (2%), but lower than the value indicated in the literature for language disorders, which ranges between 20% and 50%. These patients responded positively to the treatment and both expressive language and EEG findings improved. It is possible that in ELD without paroxysms there may be a dysfunction in the circuit made up of the motor cortex-neostriatum prior to grammatical learning, whereas if there are paroxysms then this would point to neuronal hyperactivity, perhaps associated to this dysfunction or not, in cortical areas. In our cases valproic acid, together with speech therapy, helped the children to recover their language abilities.

  18. Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zaiti, Salah S; Magdic, Kathy S

    2016-09-01

    Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) is a well-known and thoroughly studied clinical syndrome, characterized by regular tachycardia rhythm with sudden onset and abrupt termination. Most patients present with palpitations and dizziness, and their electrocardiogram demonstrates a narrow QRS complex and regular tachycardia with hidden or inverted P waves. PSVT is caused by re-entry due to the presence of inhomogeneous, accessory, or concealed conducting pathways. Hemodynamically stable patients are treated by vagal maneuvers, intravenous adenosine, diltiazem, or verapamil, hemodynamically unstable patients are treated by cardioversion. Patients with symptomatic and recurrent PSVT can be treated with long-term drug treatment or catheter ablation.

  19. The polyuria of paroxysmal atrial tachycardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, M. J.; Stein, R. M.; Discala, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    Two patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and an associated polyuria were studied to delineate the mechanism of the increase in urine flow. A striking saluresis was noted in both patients. The increased sodium excretion was probably due to decreased sodium reabsorption, perhaps at proximal tubular nephron sites. This inhibition of sodium reabsorption could explain both the saluresis and some part or all of the polyuria. Re-evaluation of earlier case reports reveals patterns of concomitant salt and water excretion consistent with this mechanism. The saluresis cannot be explained by the previously favored hypothesis of antidiuretic hormone inhibition.

  20. Hemicrania continua evolving from episodic paroxysmal hemicrania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Pinedo, F; Zurdo, M; Martínez-Acebes, E

    2006-09-01

    A 45-year-old woman, who had been diagnosed in our unit with episodic paroxysmal hemicrania, was seen 2 years later for ipsilateral hemicrania continua in remitting form. Both types of headache had a complete response to indomethacin and did not occur simultaneously. The patient had a previous history of episodic moderate headaches that met criteria for probable migraine without aura and also had a family history of headache. The clinical course in this case suggests a pathogenic relationship between both types of primary headache.

  1. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myeloproliferative neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Differentiating malignant vertebral tumours from non-malignancies with CT spectral imaging: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Yuan; Zhang, Yan; Lang, Ning; Yuan, Huishu [Peking University Third Hospital, No.49 North Garden Street, Haidian District, Beijing (China); Li, Jianying [GE Healthcare, CT imaging Research Center, Beijing (China)

    2015-10-15

    To investigate the value of dual-energy spectral computed tomography (DESCT) for differentiating malignant vertebral tumours from non-malignancies during venous phase. This study was institutional review board-approved, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Thirty-seven patients were examined by DESCT during venous phase. Twenty patients had malignant vertebral tumours, 17 had non-malignant vertebral tumours. The iodine/water densities for the lesion, the lesion-to-muscle ratio, and lesion-to-artery ratio for iodine density measurements were calculated and compared between the two groups with the two-tailed Student t test. A p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Sensitivity and specificity were compared between the qualitative and quantitative studies. The iodine density, lesion-to-muscle ratio, and lesion-to-artery ratio of the iodine density measurement for malignant vertebral tumours were significantly different from the respective values for non-malignancies (all p < 0.05). Using 0.52 as the threshold value for the lesion-to-artery iodine density ratio, one could obtain sensitivity of 85 % and specificity of 100 % for differentiating malignant vertebral tumours from non-malignancies, significantly higher than the qualitative diagnosis. DESCT imaging enables analysis of a number of additional quantitative CT parameters to improve the accuracy for differentiating malignant vertebral tumours from non-malignancies during venous phase. (orig.)

  3. Imaging of pediatric ovarian neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelman, Monica; Chikwava, Kudakwashe R; Chauvin, Nancy; Servaes, Sabah

    2011-09-01

    We review the clinical and imaging characteristics of the most common ovarian neoplasms in children and adolescents. Because of the widespread use of diagnostic imaging, incidental ovarian neoplasms might be encountered during the evaluation of abdominal pain, trauma or other indications and might pose a diagnostic dilemma. Conducting adequate imaging studies under these conditions is important, as management strategies differ according to the size and appearance of the lesion as well as the age of the patient. US dominates in gynecological imaging because of its excellent visualization, absence of ionizing radiation and sedation risks and comparatively low cost. For further examination of indeterminate lesions found using US, MRI is being used more progressively in this field, particularly for the evaluation of complex pelvic masses with the aim of distinguishing benign and malignant conditions and conditions requiring surgical intervention. CT is reserved primarily for tumor staging and follow-up and for emergency situations.

  4. MR angiography in abdominal neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squillaci, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Rome-2 Univ., Hospital S. Eugenio, Rome (Italy); Crecco, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Inst. (Regina Elena), Rome (Italy); Grandinetti, M.L. [Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Inst. (Regina Elena), Rome (Italy); Maspes, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Rome-2 Univ., Hospital S. Eugenio, Rome (Italy); Lo Presti, G. [Dept. of Radiology, Rome-2 Univ., Hospital S. Eugenio, Rome (Italy); Squillaci, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Cancer Research Inst. (Regina Elena), Rome (Italy); Simonetti, G. [Dept. of Radiology, Rome-2 Univ., Hospital S. Eugenio, Rome (Italy)

    1994-10-01

    The role of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the evaluation of vascular involvement was studied in 55 patients with abdominal neoplasms. A 2-D time-of-flight (TOF) technique was used in all patients. All patients underwent CT and MR examinations before MRA. Also, MR angiograms were compared with digital subtraction angiography in 22 cases, with Doppler US in 13 cases, and with surgical findings in 20 cases. In all patients with liver neoplasms (n=29) MRA demonstrated the absence of flow in the infiltrated segments. Pericapsular neovascularization was observed in 12 patients. Portal vein involvement was correctly detected in 27 patients. In all cases MRA demonstrated in relationship between the tumor and venous structures. Portosystemic shunts were visualized in 20 of 21 patients with portal hypertension. Vena cava thrombosis (3 cases), compression (5 cases), and displacement (2 cases) were correctly demonstrated. In renal (n=6) and adrenal gland (n=3) tumors renal vein compression was correctly detected in 2 cases, displacement in 1 case, and thrombosis in 3 cases, with only 1 false-positive finding. In 7 patients with pancreatic tumors MRA demonstrated splenic vein thrombosis in 2 cases and compression in 2 cases, with one false-positive finding. Our results indicate that MRA provides precise information regarding venous vascular involvement in abdominal neoplasms, but preoperative arterial mapping is still problematic. (orig.)

  5. [Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlauf, M; Neumann, M; Bomberg, S; Luczak, K; Heikaus, S; Gustmann, C; Antke, C; Ezziddin, S; Fottner, C; Pavel, M; Pape, U-F; Rinke, A; Lahner, H; Schott, M; Cremer, B; Hörsch, D; Baum, R P; Groh, U; Alkatout, I; Rudlowski, C; Scheler, P; Zirbes, T K; Hoffmann, J; Fehm, T; Gabbert, H E; Baldus, S E

    2015-05-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the breast are specific tumor entities. According to the literature up to 5% of breast neoplasms are malignant epithelial neoplasms of the breast. They are defined by a neuroendocrine (NE) architecture and cytology combined with an expression of the neuroendocrine vesicle markers chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin. The diagnosis is supplemented by the receptor status and the proliferative activity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of 2012 the following groups of NEN are distinguished: (1) invasive breast carcinoma with NE differentiation, (2) well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and (3) poorly differentiated small cell carcinoma (NEC). This review article focuses on (1) the definition and basic principles of diagnostics, (2) the history, nomenclature and WHO classification from 2003 and 2012, (3) the frequency of breast NEN, (4) the hereditary background and functional activity, (5) the expression of receptors and (6) the possible clinical implications. In addition, the first results of a retrospective single center study (n = 465 patients with breast cancer over a time period of 4 years) on the frequency of NEN of the breast at the Breast Center of the University Hospital Düsseldorf are presented. In this study a frequency of 4.5% of NEN was found based on a diagnostic cut-off of > 50% Chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin positive tumor cells.

  6. Syncope and Idiopathic (Paroxysmal) AV Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignole, Michele; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Guieu, Regis

    2015-08-01

    Syncope due to idiopathic AV block is characterized by: 1) ECG documentation (usually by means of prolonged ECG monitoring) of paroxysmal complete AV block with one or multiple consecutive pauses, without P-P cycle lengthening or PR interval prolongation, not triggered by atrial or ventricular premature beats nor by rate variations; 2) long history of recurrent syncope without prodromes; 3) absence of cardiac and ECG abnormalities; 4) absence of progression to persistent forms of AV block; 5) efficacy of cardiac pacing therapy. The patients affected by idiopathic AV block have low baseline adenosine plasma level values and show an increased susceptibility to exogenous adenosine. The APL value of the patients with idiopathic AV block is much lower than patients affected by vasovagal syncope who have high adenosine values. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Climatic variations and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basil M.N. Saeed; Alyaa Farouk Omari

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is probably the most common diagnosis at vertigo clinics. Seasonal cycles of several human illnesses could be attributed variously to changes in atmospheric or weather conditions. In this retrospective study, patients with BPPV from January 2010 to December 2012 were studied, and their charts were reviewed. Statistical analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in patients' numbers among different months of the year. Also there is a significant statistical correlation between the numbers of patients with climatic variations especially the temperature. The present paper discusses the possible explanations for these results which confirms the seasonal variations in BPPV, together with a review of literature to view the possible associations with other disorders that causes such sea-sonality.

  8. Menopause and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogun, Oluwaseye Ayoola; Büki, Bela; Cohn, Edward S; Janky, Kristen L; Lundberg, Yunxia Wang

    2014-08-01

    This study was designed to examine the age and sex distribution and the effects of menopause in a large cohort of participants diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). We analyzed 1,377 BPPV patients and surveyed 935 women from this group-all diagnosed at the Boys Town National Research Hospital in the last decade. A detailed age and sex distribution analysis of BPPV onset showed that aging had a profound impact on BPPV occurrence in both sexes, and that perimenopausal women were especially susceptible to BPPV (3.2:1 female-to-male ratio). The latter is a novel finding and was confirmed by a direct survey of female BPPV patients (168 participated). In addition, there was a pronounced female preponderance (6.8:1 female-to-male ratio) in BPPV in the teenage group despite its low prevalence in this age group. Data suggest that hormonal fluctuations (especially during menopause) may increase the tendency to develop BPPV.

  9. Paroxysmal movement disorders and episodic ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alvarez, Emilio; Perez-Dueñas, Belén

    2013-01-01

    This chapter summarizes clinical symptoms of some paroxysmal dyskinesias (PDs) of infancy and childhood, as well as episodic ataxias. PDs refer to a complex group of disorders whose main feature is the occurrence of sudden, intermittent attacks of abnormal postures and involuntary movements. PDs can sometimes be symptomatic (secondary PDs), but usually an underlying cerebral lesion is not present (primary PDs). Some of the primary PDs are transient, such as benign paroxysmal torticollis of infancy. Chronic PDs are subdivided into nonkinesigenic (Mount and Reback type), kinesigenic (Kertesz type), and exercise-induced (Lance type) but cases that overlap with these types are on record. They are autosomal dominant inherited conditions. The myofibrillogenesis regulator-1 gene is responsible for nonkinesigenic PDs. To date, the genetic basis of kinesigenic PDs remains unknown. Several clinical entities associated epilepsy with PDs, such as infantile convulsions and choreoathetosis (ICCA). Exercise-induced PD type can be produced by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene that encodes Glut1 (glucose transporter type1). Episodic ataxias are inherited disorders of intermittent ataxia. The attacks are brief and triggered by abrupt exercise and emotional stimulus. Between attacks, palpebral and hand muscle myokymia is often seen in episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1). In episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) interictal nystagmus is usually present. Some of these latter patients develop progressive ataxia with vermian atrophy. This disorder is associated with mutations in the human Ca channel alfa 1 subunit CACN1A4 gene. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Topiramate antagonism of L-glutamate-induced paroxysms in planarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Robert B.; Finno, Kristin E.; Tallarida, Christopher S.; Rawls, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported that NMDA (N-Methyl-D-aspartate) and AMPA (α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid) induce concentration-dependent paroxysms in planarians (Dugesia dorotocephala). Since the postulated mechanisms of action of the sulfamate-substituted monosaccharide antiepileptic drug topiramate include inhibition of glutamate-activated ion channels, we tested the hypothesis that topiramate would inhibit glutamate-induced paroxysms in our model. We demonstrate that: (1) L-glutamate (1–10 mM), but not D-glutamate, induced dose-related paroxysms, and that (2) topiramate dose-relatedly (0.3–3 mM) inhibited L-glutamate-induced paroxysms. These results provide further evidence of a topiramate-sensitive glutamate receptor-mediated activity in this model. PMID:20863783

  11. Idiopathic Paroxysmal Ventricular Tachycardia in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Antonio; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Laboratory tests including blood count serum electrolyte measures, and electroencephalograms were performed on seven children ages 1 day to 18 years with recurrent attacks of rapid heart action known as idiopathic paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia. (CL)

  12. Isolated paroxysmal dysarthria caused by a single demyelinating midbrain lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codeluppi, Luca; Bigliardi, Guido; Chiari, Annalisa; Meletti, Stefano

    2013-10-16

    Paroxysmal dysarthria is an unusual condition characterised by brief episodes of dysarthria with the sudden onset and frequent recurrence. It has been mainly reported in multiple sclerosis and an association with midbrain lesions has been claimed; however, most of the reported patients had multiple brain alterations so it was difficult to associate this symptom with a specific lesion site. We illustrate the cases of two patients with an isolated demyelinating midbrain lesion presenting paroxysmal dysarthria as the only symptom; both participants had oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid and an unremarkable follow-up. Both patients had benefit from carbamazepine treatment, similarly to previously reported cases. Our report confirms that a demyelinating midbrain lesion is sufficient to provoke paroxysmal dysarthria. It is noteworthy that an erroneous diagnosis of psychogenic disorders was initially made in both cases, highlighting the importance not to underestimate isolated paroxysmal symptoms in clinical practice.

  13. Plasmodium vivax: paroxysm-associated lipids mediate leukocyte aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendis Kamini

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paroxysms are recurrent febrile episodes, characteristic of Plasmodium vivax infections, which coincide with the rupture of schizont-infected erythrocytes in the patients' circulation. The present study describes the formation of prominent aggregates of leukocytes in vitro in the presence of parasite and host factors released during paroxysms. Methods Whole blood cells from uninfected malaria-naïve donors were incubated with plasma taken during a paroxysm or normal human plasma as a control and cell smears were observed under the microscope for the presence of leukocyte aggregates. Plasma factors involved in mediating the leukocyte aggregation were identified using immune depletion and reconstitution experiments. Furthermore, biochemical characterization was carried out to determine the chemical nature of the active moieties in plasma present during paroxysms. Results Leukocyte aggregates were seen exclusively when cells were incubated in plasma collected during a paroxysm. Immune depletion and reconstitution experiments revealed that the host cytokines TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, IL-6 and IL-10 and two lipid fractions of paroxysm plasma comprise the necessary and sufficient mediators of this phenomenon. The two lipid components of the paroxysm plasmas speculated to be of putative parasite origin, were a phospholipid-containing fraction and another containing cholesterol and triglycerides. The phospholipid fraction was dependent upon the presence of cytokines for its activity unlike the cholesterol/triglyceride-containing fraction which in the absence of added cytokines was much more active than the phospholipids fraction. The biological activity of the paroxysm plasmas from non-immune patients who presented with acute P. vivax infections was neutralized by immune sera raised against schizont extracts of either P. vivax or Plasmodium falciparum. However, immune sera against P. vivax were more effective than that against P. falciparum

  14. Cryoballoon or Radiofrequency Ablation for Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation.

    OpenAIRE

    Chun, KR; Bestehorn, K; Pocock, SJ; FIRE AND ICE Investigators; , COLLABORATORS; Kuck, KH; Metzner, A; Ouyang, F; Chun, J; Fürnkranz, A; Elvan, A.; Arentz, T.; Kühne, M.; Sticherling, C; Gellér, L

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend pulmonary-vein isolation by means of catheter ablation as treatment for drug-refractory paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Radiofrequency ablation is the most common method, and cryoballoon ablation is the second most frequently used technology. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter, randomized trial to determine whether cryoballoon ablation was noninferior to radiofrequency ablation in symptomatic patients with drug-refractory paroxysmal atrial fibrillatio...

  15. [Renal vein infarction, a complication of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Charry, Charlotte; de Charry, Félicité; Lemoigne, François; Lamboley, Jean-Laurent; Pasquet, Florian; Pavic, Michel

    2012-12-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (Marchiafava-Micheli disease) is a rare acquired clonal disorder of the hematopoietic cell, to a somatic mutation in the phosphatidylinositol glycan (PIG-A). The most frequent clinical manifestations are hemolytic crisis and venous thrombosis of the mesenteric, hepatic, portal or cerebral territories. We report a case of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria with renal vein thrombosis, a rare complication of this disease.

  16. Benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood: A review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Batson, Glenna

    2004-01-01

    Childrens’ complaints of headache and dizziness merit careful evaluation to differentially diagnose a vestibular disorder. Children can manifest with a syndrome mimicking certain classic signs and symptoms of adult vestibular disorders, such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, usually associated with aging. Benign paroxysmal vertigo of childhood in which migraine is a key manifestation along with sudden onset of dizziness, is a rare peripheral vestibular disorder in children that is comm...

  17. Primary Care Management of Chronic Nonmalignant Pain in Veterans: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jorge G.; Qadri, S. Sobiya; Nader, Samir; Wang, Jia; Lawler, Timothy; Hagenlocker, Brian; Roos, Bernard A.

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians managing older patients with chronic pain play an important role. This paper explores the attitudes of primary care clinicians (PCPs) toward chronic nonmalignant pain management and their experiences using a clinical decision support system. Our investigation followed a qualitative approach based on grounded theory. Twenty-one PCPs…

  18. Advances in unrelated and alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for nonmalignant disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shenoy, Shalini; Boelens, Jaap J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The role of hematopoietic cell transplantation in non-malignant disorders has increased exponentially with the recognition that multiple diseases can be controlled or cured if engrafted with donor-derived cells. This review provides an overview of advances made in alternative

  19. Clinician beliefs about opioid use and barriers in chronic nonmalignant pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahmann, Paula H; Jackson, Kenneth C; Lipman, Arthur G

    2004-01-01

    A survey of the medical directors of multidisciplinary pain clinics and multidisciplinary pain centers listed in the American Pain Society Pain Facilities Directory was conducted to define those pain specialists' beliefs about the role of opioid analgesia in 14 types of chronic nonmalignant pain. Respondents also reported their perceptions of barriers to their prescribing opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain and what they perceived as barriers to opioid prescribing for chronic nonmalignant pain by other, non-pain specialist clinicians in their communities. The respondents are characterized by demographics, disciplines, specialties, and time in practice. The percentage of time that a pharmacist was available in the pain programs also is reported. There is increasing acceptance of opioids for most of the listed types of chronic nonmalignant pain, but the acceptance varies by types of pain syndromes. Opioids were most consistently accepted for sickle cell disease pain and least commonly endorsed for headaches, myofascial pain, and fibromyalgia. Factors that may influence clinicians' perceptions about opioids are discussed.

  20. Advances in unrelated and alternative donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for nonmalignant disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shenoy, Shalini; Boelens, Jaap J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The role of hematopoietic cell transplantation in non-malignant disorders has increased exponentially with the recognition that multiple diseases can be controlled or cured if engrafted with donor-derived cells. This review provides an overview of advances made in alternative dono

  1. Different Cytokine and Chemokine Expression Patterns in Malignant Compared to Those in Nonmalignant Renal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Gelbrich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Cytokines and chemokines are widely involved in cancer cell progression and thus represent promising candidate factors for new biomarkers. Methods. Four renal cell cancer (RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, RCC4, and A498 and a nonmalignant renal cell line (RC-124 were examined with respect to their proliferation. The cytokine and chemokine expression pattern was examined by a DNA array (Human Cytokines & Chemokines RT2 Profiler PCR Array; Qiagen, Hilden, Germany, and expression profiles were compared. Results. Caki-1 and 786-O cells exhibited significantly increased proliferation rates, whereas RCC4 and A498 cells demonstrated attenuated proliferation, compared to nonmalignant RC-124 cells. Expression analysis revealed 52 cytokines and chemokines primarily involved in proliferation and inflammation and differentially expressed not only in malignant and nonmalignant renal cells but also in the four RCC cell lines. Conclusion. This is the first study examining the expression of 84 cytokines and chemokines in four RCC cell lines compared to that in a nonmalignant renal cell line. VEGFA, NODAL, and BMP6 correlated with RCC cell line proliferation and, thus, may represent putative clinical biomarkers for RCC progression as well as for RCC diagnosis and prognosis.

  2. Air Pollution and Nonmalignant Respiratory Mortality in 16 Cohorts within the ESCAPE Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina; Samoli, Evangelia; Beelen, Rob|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30483100X; Stafoggia, Massimo; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Hoffmann, Barbara; Fischer, Paul; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Vineis, Paolo; Xun, Wei; Hoek, Gerard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069553475; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Oudin, Anna; Forsberg, Bertil; Modig, Lars; Jousilahti, Pekka; Lanki, Timo; Turunen, Anu; Oftedal, Bente; Nafstad, Per; Schwarze, Per E.; Penell, Johanna; Fratiglioni, Laura; Andersson, Niklas; Pedersen, Nancy; Korek, Michal; De Faire, Ulf; Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup; Tjonneland, Anne; Becker, Thomas; Wang, Meng; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Eeftens, Marloes|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315028300; Peeters, Petra H.; Meliefste, Kees; Marcon, Alessandro; Kramer, Ursula; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.; Vossoughi, Mohammad; Key, Timothy; de Hoogh, Kees; Hampel, Regina; Peters, Annette; Heinrich, Joachim; Weinmayr, Gudrun; Concin, Hans; Nagel, Gabriele; Ineichen, Alex; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Stempfelet, Morgane; Vilier, Alice; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Pedeli, Xanthi; Katsoulis, Michalis; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Brunekreef, Bert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; Katsouyanni, Klea

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Prospective cohort studies have shown that chronic exposure to particulate matter and traffic-related air pollution is associated with reduced survival. However, the effects on nonmalignant respiratory mortality are less studied, and the data reported are less consistent. Objectives: We h

  3. Air Pollution and Nonmalignant Respiratory Mortality in 16 Cohorts within the ESCAPE Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina; Samoli, Evangelia; Beelen, Rob; Stafoggia, Massimo; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Hoffmann, Barbara; Fischer, Paul; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Vineis, Paolo; Xun, Wei; Hoek, Gerard; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Oudin, Anna; Forsberg, Bertil; Modig, Lars; Jousilahti, Pekka; Lanki, Timo; Turunen, Anu; Oftedal, Bente; Nafstad, Per; Schwarze, Per E.; Penell, Johanna; Fratiglioni, Laura; Andersson, Niklas; Pedersen, Nancy; Korek, Michal; De Faire, Ulf; Eriksen, Kirsten Thorup; Tjonneland, Anne; Becker, Thomas; Wang, Meng; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Eeftens, Marloes; Peeters, Petra H.; Meliefste, Kees; Marcon, Alessandro; Kramer, Ursula; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A. J.; Vossoughi, Mohammad; Key, Timothy; de Hoogh, Kees; Hampel, Regina; Peters, Annette; Heinrich, Joachim; Weinmayr, Gudrun; Concin, Hans; Nagel, Gabriele; Ineichen, Alex; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Stempfelet, Morgane; Vilier, Alice; Ricceri, Fulvio; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Pedeli, Xanthi; Katsoulis, Michalis; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Brunekreef, Bert; Katsouyanni, Klea

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Prospective cohort studies have shown that chronic exposure to particulate matter and traffic-related air pollution is associated with reduced survival. However, the effects on nonmalignant respiratory mortality are less studied, and the data reported are less consistent. Objectives: We h

  4. [Non-epileptic motor paroxysmal phenomena in wakefulness in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggieri, Víctor L; Arberas, Claudia L

    2013-09-06

    Paroxysmal events in childhood are a challenge for pediatric neurologists, given its highly heterogeneous clinical manifestations, often difficult to distinguish between phenomena of epileptic seizure or not. The non-epileptic paroxysmal episodes are neurological phenomena, with motor, sensory symptoms, and/or sensory impairments, with or without involvement of consciousness, epileptic phenomena unrelated, so no electroencephalographic correlative expression between or during episodes. From the clinical point of view can be classified into four groups: motor phenomena, syncope, migraine (and associated conditions) and acute psychiatric symptoms. In this paper we analyze paroxysmal motor phenomena in awake children, dividing them according to their clinical manifestations: extrapyramidal episodes (paroxysmal kinesiogenic, non kinesiogenic and not related to exercise dyskinesias, Dopa responsive dystonia) and similar symptoms of dystonia (Sandifer syndrome); manifestations of startle (hyperekplexia); episodic eye and head movements (benign paroxysmal tonic upward gaze nistagmus deviation); episodic ataxia (familial episodic ataxias, paroxysmal benign vertigo); stereotyped and phenomena of self-gratification; and myoclonic events (benign myoclonus of early infancy). The detection of these syndromes will, in many cases, allow an adequate genetic counseling, initiate a specific treatment and avoid unnecessary additional studies. Molecular studies have demonstrated a real relationship between epileptic and non-epileptic basis of many of these entities and surely the identification of the molecular basis and understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms in many of them allow us, in the near future will benefit our patients.

  5. Long-term opioid treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain: unproven efficacy and neglected safety?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kissin I

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Igor Kissin Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA Background: For the past 30 years, opioids have been used to treat chronic nonmalignant pain. This study tests the following hypotheses: (1 there is no strong evidence-based foundation for the conclusion that long-term opioid treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain is effective; and (2 the main problem associated with the safety of such treatment – assessment of the risk of addiction – has been neglected. Methods: Scientometric analysis of the articles representing clinical research in this area was performed to assess (1 the quality of presented evidence (type of study; and (2 the duration of the treatment phase. The sufficiency of representation of addiction was assessed by counting the number of articles that represent (1 editorials; (2 articles in the top specialty journals; and (3 articles with titles clearly indicating that the addiction-related safety is involved (topic-in-title articles. Results: Not a single randomized controlled trial with opioid treatment lasting >3 months was found. All studies with a duration of opioid treatment ≥6 months (n = 16 were conducted without a proper control group. Such studies cannot provide the consistent good-quality evidence necessary for a strong clinical recommendation. There were profound differences in the number of addiction articles related specifically to chronic nonmalignant pain patients and to opioid addiction in general. An inadequate number of chronic pain-related publications were observed with all three types of counted articles: editorials, articles in the top specialty journals, and topic-in-title articles. Conclusion: There is no strong evidence-based foundation for the conclusion that long-term opioid treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain is effective. The above identified signs indicating neglect of addiction associated with the

  6. NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    2003172 Impact of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 on resistance of ovarian cancer multicellular spheroids to taxol. XING Hui(刑辉), et al. Dept Ob-stetr Gynecol.Tongji Hosp.Tongiji Med Coll, Huazhong Univ Sci & Technol, Wuhan 430030. Nad Med J China 2003;83(1):37-43.

  7. NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950253 The characteristics of bone metastatic tumorsin the elderly-a report of 163 cases.LI Xiaoying(李小鹰),et al.General Hosp,PLA,Beijing,100853.ChinJ Geriatr 1994;13(6):333-334.A study of bone metastatic tumors(BMT) was car-ried out in 163 cases with age of 60 years and over.The characteristics of BMT in the elderly were as fol-lows:1.the elderly patients with BMT made up 7.9percent of all the patients with primary malignant tu-

  8. NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    2004193 Quantitation and detection of deletion in tumor mitochondrial DNA by microarray technique.HAN Chengbo (韩琤波), et al. Tumor Instit, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Univ, Shenyang 110001. Chin J Oncol 2004;26(1):10-13.Objective: To develop a method to rapidly quanti-tate and detect deletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtD-

  9. NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    970246 Detection of point mutations of p53 gene bynon-isotopic PCR-SSCP in paraffin-embedded malig-nant mesothelioma tissue. LUO Suqiong(罗素琼), etal. Pneumoconiosis Res Unit, Public Health Sch,West-China Med Univ, Chengdu, 610041. Chin J Ind

  10. NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    920632 Phenotypic analysis of T lympho-cytes from the patient with thymoma com-plicated with pure red cell aplasia. LIUBai(刘白), et al. Beijing Med Univ. Chin J Hema-tol 1992; 13(5): 244-246. The thymocytes in thymoma tissue and mono-nuclear cells in peripheral blood and bone marrowwere obtained from a patient with thymomacomplicated with pure red cell aplasia. The

  11. NEOPLASMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    2003034 NOEY2 gene mRNA expression in breast cancer tissue and its relation to clinicopathological parameters. SHI Zonggao ( 施宗高 ), et al. Molec Pathol Lab, Fudan Univ Cancer Hosp, Shanghai 200032. Chin J Oncol 2002;24(5) :475 - 478.Objective: To investigate the expression of NOEY2 gene in breast cancer tissue and its relation to clinico-

  12. Gastrointestinal Surgery of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carsten Palnæs; Olsen, Ingrid Marie Holst; Knigge, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Surgery is the only treatment that may cure the patient with gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) and should always be considered as the first-line treatment if radical resection can be achieved. Even in cases where radical surgery is not possible, palliative resection may...... be performed to reduce local or hormone-induced symptoms and to improve quality of life. The surgical procedures for GEP-NENs are accordingly described below. In most patients life-long follow-up is required, even following radical surgery, as recurrence may occur several years later....

  13. Less common neoplasms of the pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abby L Mulkeen; Peter S Yoo; Charles Cha

    2006-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increased recognition of neoplasms of the pancreas other than ductal adenocarcinoma. Although not as well studied or characterized as pancreatic adenocarcinoma there are many distinct lesions which exhibit diverse biological behaviors and varying degrees of malignancy. These lesions include: endocrine neoplasms, cystic tumors, solid pseudopapillary tumors, acinar cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, primary lymphoma of the pancreas, and metastatic lesions to the pancreas. These less common neoplasms are being diagnosed more frequently as the number and sensitivity of diagnostic imaging studies increase. This review article discusses the clinical course,diagnosis, and treatment of these less common, but quite relevant, neoplasms of the pancreas.

  14. Radiofrequency catheter ablation maintains its efficacy better than antiarrhythmic medication in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raatikainen, M J Pekka; Hakalahti, Antti; Uusimaa, Paavo;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) is a randomized trial comparing radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) to antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) as first-line treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). In order...

  15. Benign infantile seizures and paroxysmal dyskinesia caused by an SCN8A mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardella, Elena; Becker, Felicitas; Møller, Rikke S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS), paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), and their combination-known as infantile convulsions and paroxysmal choreoathetosis (ICCA)-are related autosomal dominant diseases. PRRT2 (proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 gene) has been identified...

  16. Necrotizing Fasciitis in Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pusem Patir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare, progressive, and life-threatening hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by complement-mediated intravascular hemolysis and a prothrombotic state. Patients with PNH might have slightly increased risk of infections due to complement-associated defects subsequent to CD59 deficiency. Here, we report a rare case of a 65-year-old male patient with necrotic ulcers on both legs, where the recognition of pancytopenia and microthrombi led to the diagnosis of PNH based on FLAER (FLuorescent AERolysin flow cytometric analysis. He was subsequently started on eculizumab therapy, with starting and maintenance doses set as per drug labelling. Progression of the patient’s leg ulcers during follow-up, with fulminant tissue destruction, purulent discharge, and necrotic patches, led to a later diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia infection. Courses of broad-spectrum antibiotics, surgical debridement, and superficial skin grafting were applied with successful effect during ongoing eculizumab therapy. This case highlights the point that it is important to maintain treatment of underlying disorders such as PNH in the presence of life-threatening infections like NF.

  17. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: An Integrated Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Parham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, the most common cause of dizziness, occurs in all age groups. It presents with vertigo on head movement, but in older patients presentation may be typical and thus accounting for a low recognition rate in the primary care setting. It may be recurrent in up to 50% of cases. BPPV is associated with displacement of fragments of utricular otoconia into the semicircular canals, most commonly the posterior semicircular canal. Otoconia are composed of otoconin and otolin forming the organic matrix on which calcium carbonate mineralizes. Otoconia may fragment with trauma, age, or changes in the physiology of endolymph (e.g., pH and calcium concentration. Presentation varied because otoconia fragments can be displaced into any of the semicircular canals on either (or both side and may be free floating (canalolithiasis or attached to the cupula (cupulolithiasis. Most cases of BPPV are idiopathic, but head trauma, otologic disorders, and systemic disease appear to be contributory in a subset. Positional maneuvers are used to diagnose and treat the majority of cases. In rare intractable cases surgical management may be considered. A strong association with osteoporosis suggests that idiopathic BPPV may have diagnostic and management implications beyond that of a purely otologic condition.

  18. Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity in neurological critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH is a clinical disorder mainly caused by traumatic brain injury, stroke, encephalitis and other types of brain injury. The clinical features are episodes of hypertension, tachycardia, tachypnea, fever and dystonic postures. In this study, we described clinical profile and outcome of six patients of PSH admitted in neurocritical care unit. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study conducted at neurology critical care unit of a tertiary care center. All patients admitted at neurology critical unit during 6-month period from August 2013 to January 2014 were screened for the occurrence of PSH. The clinical details and outcome was documented. Results: PSH was observed in 6 patients. Male to female ratio was 5:1. Mean age ± SD was 36.67 ± 15.19 years. The leading causes were traumatic brain injury (two patients, stroke (two patients and Japanese encephalitis (JE (one patient and tuberculous meningitis (one patient. Conclusion: PSH is an unusual complication in neurocritical care. It prolonged the hospitalization and hampers recovery. The other life-threatening conditions that mimic PSH should be excluded. The association with JE and tuberculous meningitis was not previously described in literature.

  19. Smoking history, nicotine dependence and opioid use in patients with chronic non-malignant pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plesner, K; Jensen, H I; Højsted, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated a positive association between smoking and addiction to opioids in patients with chronic non-malignant pain. This could be explained by a susceptibility in some patients to develop addiction. Another explanation could be that nicotine influences both...... pain and the opioid system. The objective of the study was to investigate whether smoking, former smoking ± nicotine use and nicotine dependence in patients with chronic non-malignant pain were associated with opioid use and addiction to opioids. METHODS: The study was a cross-sectional study carried...... as in the general population. The prevalence of patients using opioids was 54% and the prevalence of addiction to opioids was 6%. No significant differences in addiction were found between the different smoking groups, but smokers and former smokers using nicotine tended to use opioids more frequently and at higher...

  20. Air Pollution and Nonmalignant Respiratory Mortality in 16 Cohorts within the ESCAPE Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimakopoulou, Konstantina; Samoli, Evangelia; Beelen, Rob

    2014-01-01

    have investigated the relationship of long-term exposure to air pollution and non-malignant respiratory mortality in 16 cohorts with individual level data within the multi center European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE). Methods: Data from 16 ongoing cohort studies from Europe were......Rationale: Prospective cohort studies have shown that chronic exposure to particulate matter and traffic related air pollution is associated with reduced survival. However, the effects on non-malignant respiratory mortality are less studied and those reported are less consistent. Objectives: We...... used. The total number of subjects was 307,553. There were 1,559 respiratory deaths during follow-up. Measurements: Air pollution exposure was estimated by land use regression models at the baseline residential addresses of study participants and traffic-proximity variables were derived from...

  1. Health care costs, work productivity and activity impairment in non-malignant chronic pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronborg, Christian; Handberg, Gitte; Axelsen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the costs of non-malignant chronic pain in patients awaiting treatment in a multidisciplinary pain clinic in a hospital setting. Health care costs due to chronic pain are particular high during the first year after pain onset, and remain high compared with health care costs...... before pain onset. The majority of chronic pain patients incur the costs of alternative treatments. Chronic pain causes production losses at work, as well as impairment of non-work activities....

  2. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  3. Diagnosis and Treatment of Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Dagkiran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the cause of peripheral vertigo, which only takes seconds posed by certain head and body position and led to severe attacks of vertigo. Therefore, it is a disturbance that causes a continuous fear of fall and anxiety in some patients. Although benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most common cause of peripheral vertigo, it may cause unnecessary tests, treatment costs and the loss of labor due to the result of the delay in the diagnosis and treatment stages. Diagnosis and treatment of this disease is easy. High success rates can be achieved with appropriate repositioning maneuvers after taking a detailed medical history and accurate assessment of accompanying nystagmus. The aim of this paper was to review the updated information about benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 555-564

  4. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo secondary to laparoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xizheng; Wang, Amy; Wang, Entong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a common vestibular disorder and it may be idiopathic or secondary to some conditions such as surgery, but rare following laparoscopic surgery. Methods: We report two cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo secondary to laparoscopic surgery, one after laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a 51-year-old man and another following laparoscopic hysterectomy in a 60-year-old woman. Results: Both patients were treated successfully with manual or device-assisted canalith repositioning maneuvers, with no recurrence on the follow-up of 6 -18 months. Conclusions: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a rare but possible complication of laparoscopic surgery. Both manual and device-assisted repositioning maneuvers are effective treatments for this condition, with good efficacy and prognosis. PMID:28255446

  5. Paroxysmal Hypnogenic Dyskinesia Responsive to Doxylamine: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Williams

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia is a rare clinical entity characterized by intermittent dystonia and choreoathetoid movements that begin exclusively during sleep, often with consciousness preserved once the patient is awakened during the episodes. They occur almost every night and are often misdiagnosed as sleeping disorders. Paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia is currently known to be a form of frontal lobe epilepsy, but not in all cases. We present a 19-year-old male patient with paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia who responded to antihistamines. This supports an alternative theory from 1977 (before the cases had been adequately described that the disorder lies in dysregulation in the basal ganglia. This description now appears similar to acute dystonic reactions such as extrapyramidal symptoms from antipsychotic medications, which also respond to antihistamines.

  6. Paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia responsive to doxylamine: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia is a rare clinical entity characterized by intermittent dystonia and choreoathetoid movements that begin exclusively during sleep, often with consciousness preserved once the patient is awakened during the episodes. They occur almost every night and are often misdiagnosed as sleeping disorders. Paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia is currently known to be a form of frontal lobe epilepsy, but not in all cases. We present a 19-year-old male patient with paroxysmal hypnogenic dyskinesia who responded to antihistamines. This supports an alternative theory from 1977 (before the cases had been adequately described) that the disorder lies in dysregulation in the basal ganglia. This description now appears similar to acute dystonic reactions such as extrapyramidal symptoms from antipsychotic medications, which also respond to antihistamines.

  7. Neurally mediated syncope presenting with paroxysmal positional vertigo and tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Fumiyuki; Tsutsumi, Tomoko; Nakamura, Iwao; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2012-10-01

    A 72-year-old man with positional vertigo and tinnitus was referred to us. He did not want to perform provoking test except once due to his fear. No positional nystagmus was provoked. He found that his attacks usually occurred when he lay on his right ear. From his clinical history, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo was suspected. Conventional pharmacotherapy as well as non-specific physical therapy did not have significant effect. His feeling of positional vertigo with pyrosis was actually presyncope. We suspected cardiovascular disorders, and referred him to a cardiologist. Portable cardiogram monitoring revealed paroxysmal bradycardia. He was diagnosed with neurally mediated syncope, and a pacemaker was implanted. His paroxysmal dizziness soon disappeared. It is important to study the clinical history of the patients in detail, as they are not always able to accurately explain their symptoms. We should carefully rule out cardiovascular disorders, especially when we see the patients with suspected BPPV without the characteristic positional nystagmus.

  8. A case of congenital myopathy masquerading as paroxysmal dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux (GER disease is a significant comorbidity of neuromuscular disorders. It may present as paroxysmal dyskinesia, an entity known as Sandifer syndrome. A 6-week-old neonate presented with very frequent paroxysms of generalized stiffening and opisthotonic posture since day 22 of life. These were initially diagnosed as seizures and he was started on multiple antiepileptics which did not show any response. After a normal video electroencephalogram (VEEG was documented, possibility of dyskinesia was kept. However, when he did not respond to symptomatic therapy, Sandifer syndrome was thought of and GER scan was done, which revealed severe GER. After his symptoms got reduced to some extent, a detailed clinical examination revealed abnormal facies with flaccid quadriparesis. Muscle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of a specific congenital myopathy. On antireflux measures, those episodic paroxysms reduced to some extent. Partial response to therapy in GER should prompt search for an underlying secondary etiology.

  9. Effectiveness of Massage Therapy for Chronic, Non-Malignant Pain: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reviews of massage therapy for chronic, non-malignant pain have focused on discrete pain conditions. This article aims to provide a broad overview of the literature on the effectiveness of massage for a variety of chronic, non-malignant pain complaints to identify gaps in the research and to inform future clinical trials. Computerized databases were searched for relevant studies including prior reviews and primary trials of massage therapy for chronic, non-malignant pain. Existing research provides fairly robust support for the analgesic effects of massage for non-specific low back pain, but only moderate support for such effects on shoulder pain and headache pain. There is only modest, preliminary support for massage in the treatment of fibromyalgia, mixed chronic pain conditions, neck pain and carpal tunnel syndrome. Thus, research to date provides varying levels of evidence for the benefits of massage therapy for different chronic pain conditions. Future studies should employ rigorous study designs and include follow-up assessments for additional quantification of the longer-term effects of massage on chronic pain.

  10. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  11. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  12. Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia: physiopathology and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Neroni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT is the most frequent arrhythmia in newborns and infants. Most supraventricular tachycardias affect structurally healthy hearts. Apart from occasional detection by parents, most tachycardias in this age group are revealed by heart failure signs, such as poor feeding, sweating and shortness of breath. The main symptom reported by school-age children is palpitations. The chronic tachycardia causes a secondary form of dilative cardiomyopathy. Treatment of acute episode usually has an excellent outcome. Vagal manoeuvres are effective in patients with atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia. Adenosine is the drug of choice at all ages for tachycardias involving the atrioventricular node. Its key advantage is its short half life and minimum or no negative inotropic effects. Verapamil is not indicated in newborns and children as it poses a high risk of electromechanical dissociation. Antiarrhythmic prophylaxis of PSVT recurrence is usually recommended in the first year of life, because the diagnosis of tachycardia may be delayed up to the appearance of symptoms. Digoxin can be administered in all forms of PSVT involving the atrioventricular node, except for patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome below one year of age. Patients with atrioventricular reentrant PSVT can be treated effectively by class Ic drugs, such as propaphenone and flecainide. Amiodarone has the greatest antiarrhythmic effect, but should be used with caution owing to the high incidence of side effects. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  13. Direction-fixed paroxysmal nystagmus lateral canal benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV): another form of lateral canalolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, L; Vassallo, A; Melillo, M G; Mazzone, S; Salafia, F

    2013-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV) is the most frequent vertiginous syndrome. It is caused either by free-floating otoliths in the semicircular canals (canalolithiasis) or by otoconial debris adhering to a canal cupula (cupulolithiasis). The posterior canal is the most frequently involved (80%), while the lateral canal is involved less frequently (15%), and the rarest conditions are anterior canalolithiasis and apogeotropic posterior canalolithiasis (5%). The main diagnostic sign of lateral canal BPPV is paroxysmal horizontal bidirectional positioning nystagmus evoked through Pagnini-McClure's test (head roll in the yaw plane in supine position). In the geotropic variant, which is more frequent, the fast phase of the nystagmus is directed towards the lowermost ear, when the patient lies on the affected side or on the healthy side; in the apogeotropic variant, which is less frequent, the fast phase is directed always toward the uppermost ear, regardless of which side the patient lies on. Paroxysmal nystagmus is more intense on the affected side in the geotropic form, and more intense on the healthy side in the apogeotropic form. The authors describe five cases of another primitive and rare form of lateral BPPV, defined as "direction-fixed paroxysmal nystagmus lateral canal BPPV", which has previously been described by other authors as a transitory step observed during the transformation from an apogeotropic into a geotropic form. It is characterized by typical BPPV symptoms and diagnosed by the presence of a paroxysmal horizontal unidirectional positioning nystagmus, evoked through Pagnini-McClure's test, which is apogeotropic on the affected side and geotropic on the healthy side. In the reported cases, direction-fixed horizontal paroxysmal nystagmus was always transformed into a typical geotropic form. The clinical features and pathophysiology of direction-fixed nystagmus lateral canal BPPV are discussed.

  14. Mucinous Cystic Neoplasms of Pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveed, Shah; Qari, Hasina; Banday, Tanveer; Altaf, Asma; Para, Mah

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the actual management of mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN) of the pancreas. A systematic review was performed in December 2009 by consulting PubMed MEDLINE for publications and matching the key words “pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic tumor”, “pancreatic mucinous cystic mass”, “pancreatic cyst” and “pancreatic cystic neoplasm” to identify English language articles describing the diagnosis and treatment of the MCN of the pancreas. In total, 16,322 references ranging from January 1969 to December 2009 were analyzed and 77 articles were identified. No articles published before 1996 were selected because MCNs were not previously considered to be a completely autonomous disease. Definition, epidemiology, anatomopathological findings, clinical presentation, preoperative evaluation, treatment and prognosis were reviewed. MCNs are pancreatic mucin-producing cysts with a distinctive ovarian-type stroma localized in the body-tail of the gland and occurring in middle-aged females. The majority of MCNs are slow growing and asymptomatic. The prevalence of invasive carcinoma varies between 6% and 55%. Preoperative diagnosis depends on a combination of clinical features, tumor markers, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasound with cyst fluid analysis and positron emission tomography-CT. Surgery is indicated for all MCNs.

  15. Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in a Mission-Assigned Astronaut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Peter A.; Polk, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation will explore the clinical and administrative conundrums faced by the flight surgeon upon discovering asymptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation seven months prior to scheduled long duration spaceflight. The presenter will discuss the decision-making process as well as the clinical and operational outcomes.

  16. Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia : Cortical or non-cortical origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Strien, Teun W.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Hilgevoord, Anthony A. J.; Linssen, Wim H. J. P.; Groffen, Alexander J. A.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is characterized by involuntary dystonia and/or chorea triggered by a sudden movement. Cases are usually familial with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis of PKD focus on the controversy whether PKD has a cortical or non-co

  17. Paroxysmal Tonic Upgaze: Age of Onset and Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Six children who developed paroxysmal tonic upgaze (PTU at 2.6 to 7.4 years of age were examined at least once per year for a 10 year period of follow-up at the Departments of Paediatrics and Ophthalmology, University of Chieti, Italy.

  18. Morphine-sensitive paroxysmal sympathetic storm in pontine intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sang-Bae; Kim, Chi Kyung; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Bae, Hee-Joon; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2010-11-01

    Paroxysmal sympathetic storm (PSS) is a rare complication of severe traumatic brain injury or cerebrovascular disease. Various medications have been tried in patients with PSS, but the clinical responses of the patients were variable. We report a classic case of PSS after spontaneous pontine hemorrhage in which the patient's fluctuating blood pressure and body temperature were dramatically stabilized using morphine.

  19. Eculizumab in Pregnant Patients with Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelly, R.J.; Hochsmann, B.; Szer, J.; Kulasekararaj, A.; Guibert, S. de; Roth, A.; Weitz, I.C.; Armstrong, E.; Risitano, A.M.; Patriquin, C.J.; Terriou, L.; Muus, P.; Hill, A.; Turner, M.P.; Schrezenmeier, H.; Peffault de Latour, R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against complement protein C5 that inhibits terminal complement activation, has been shown to prevent complications of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and improve quality of life and overall survival, but data on the use of eculizumab

  20. Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia in antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelen, M; Tijssen, MAJ

    2005-01-01

    We report on a patient with a mixed movement disorder classifiable as a paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia, occurring as the first manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS). Possible pathophysiology is discussed based on recent literature, and we stress that PAPS must be considered

  1. Paroxysmal extreme pain disorder: a molecular lesion of peripheral neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, J.S.; Boralevi, F.; Brissaud, O.; Sanchez-Martin, J.; Morsche, R.H. te; Dib-Hajj, S.D.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Waxman, S.G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: a 3-month-old male infant presented, beginning on the second day of life, with paroxysmal painful events that started with tonic contraction of the whole body followed by erythematous harlequin-type color changes. INVESTIGATIONS: screening of the SCN9A gene, which encodes the voltage-gat

  2. Cryotherapy in the management of paroxysmal trigeminal neuralgia.

    OpenAIRE

    Zakrzewska, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Cryotherapy for the relief of pain is widely used in many conditions. The results of 83 cryotherapy sessions in 29 patients with paroxysmal trigeminal neuralgia are reviewed over a five year period. Sixty three per cent of treated nerves, 41% of patients were pain free over one year and there was no permanent sensory loss.

  3. Cytokeratins in epithelia of odontogenic neoplasms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crivelini, MM; de Araujo, VC; de Sousa, SOM; de Araujo, NS

    Neoplasms and tumours related to the odontogenic apparatus may be composed only of epithelial tissue or epithelial tissue associated with odontogenic ectomesenchyme. The immunohistochemical detection of different cytokeratins (CKs) polypeptides and vimentin has made it easier to explain the

  4. Premalignant cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudeja, Vikas; Allen, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Due to increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, asymptomatic pancreatic cysts are frequently being diagnosed. Many of these cysts have premalignant potential and offer a unique opportunity for cancer prevention. Mucinous cystic neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm are the major premalignant cystic neoplasms of pancreas. The prediction of the risk of malignancy (incidental and future risk of malignant transformation) and balancing the risks of watchful waiting with that of operative management with associated mortality and morbidity is the key to the management of these lesions. We review the literature that has contributed to the development of our approach to the management of these cystic neoplasms. We provide an overview of the key features used in diagnosis and in predicting malignancy. Particular attention is given to the natural history and management decision making.

  5. Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    present two cases in young female patients. Both tumours were surgically ... cases was consistent with solid pseudopapillary neoplasm. .... study and literature review. BMJ Case Rep. 2012 ... Orlando CA, Bowman RL, Loose JH. Multicentric ...

  6. WHO classification 2008 of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madelung, Ann B; Bondo, Henrik; Stamp, Inger

    2015-01-01

    We examined the learning effect of a workshop for Danish hematopathologists led by an international expert regarding histological subtyping of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Six hematopathologists evaluated 43 bone marrow (BM) biopsies according to the WHO description (2008), blinded...

  7. Cytokeratins in epithelia of odontogenic neoplasms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crivelini, MM; de Araujo, VC; de Sousa, SOM; de Araujo, NS

    2003-01-01

    Neoplasms and tumours related to the odontogenic apparatus may be composed only of epithelial tissue or epithelial tissue associated with odontogenic ectomesenchyme. The immunohistochemical detection of different cytokeratins (CKs) polypeptides and vimentin has made it easier to explain the histogen

  8. Computerized tomography in evaluation of hepatic neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, R.F.; Resende, C.; Tishler, J.M.A.; Aldrete, J.S.; Shin, M.S.; Rubin, E.; Rahn, N.H.

    1984-08-01

    The authors reviewed their experience with computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen in 212 patients with histologically documented liver neoplasms seen during a 30-month period. The CT findings in cavernous hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia were specific, and permitted accurate diagnosis of this lesion before biopsy. The CT appearance of all other lesions was variable. CT is useful in providing an accurate evaluation of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic extent of the neoplasm.

  9. [Primary nontransitional neoplasms of the bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varo Solís, C; Soto Delgado, M; Hens Pérez, A; Baez Perea, J M; Estudillo González, F; Juárez Soto, A; Bachiller Burgos, J; Beltrán Aguilar, V

    1999-01-01

    Revision of all primitive tumours of the bladder diagnosed in our Service between July 1990 and July 1998. Among a total of 703 neoplasms of the bladder only 14 were non-transitional primitive tumours, accounting for just 1.98%. Eleven were malignant neoplasms with a diagnosis of epidermoid carcinoma in nine cases, one adenocarcinoma and one bladder adenocarcinoma. The other three were benign tumours: one haemangioma and two leiomyomas. From a clinical perspective, the predominant symptom was haematuria, followed by irritative symptoms. The two leiomyomas were accidental findings during a gynaecological examination (ultrasound) and a diagnostic examination for a nephritic colic (urography). The diagnostic means used and the extension studies were the same as used for transitional neoplasms. In general, treatment of benign neoplasms was partial cystectomy or transurethral resection while it was radical surgery for the malignant tumours when the existing criteria were an indication for that type of surgery (cystoprostatectomy with bypass), since there are no definite criteria with regards to therapy due to the low incidence of these tumours. Only three of the 11 patients with malignant neoplasms are still alive. All the others died within one year of diagnosis, an evidence of the aggressiveness of these tumours. These cases were considered primitive bladder tumours once it was concluded that there was no relation with any previous or simultaneous transitional neoplasms and that there had been no primitive tumour in a different organ.

  10. Neoplasms derived from plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchetti, Fabio; Cigognetti, Marta; Fisogni, Simona; Rossi, Giuseppe; Lonardi, Silvia; Vermi, William

    2016-02-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms manifest in two clinically and pathologically distinct forms. The first variant is represented by nodular aggregates of clonally expanded plasmacytoid dendritic cells found in lymph nodes, skin, and bone marrow ('Mature plasmacytoid dendritic cells proliferation associated with myeloid neoplasms'). This entity is rare, although likely underestimated in incidence, and affects predominantly males. Almost invariably, it is associated with a myeloid neoplasm such as chronic myelomonocytic leukemia or other myeloid proliferations with monocytic differentiation. The concurrent myeloid neoplasm dominates the clinical pictures and guides treatment. The prognosis is usually dismal, but reflects the evolution of the associated myeloid leukemia rather than progressive expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. A second form of plasmacytoid dendritic cells tumor has been recently reported and described as 'blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm'. In this tumor, which is characterized by a distinctive cutaneous and bone marrow tropism, proliferating cells derive from immediate CD4(+)CD56(+) precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The diagnosis of this form can be easily accomplished by immunohistochemistry, using a panel of plasmacytoid dendritic cells markers. The clinical course of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is characterized by a rapid progression to systemic disease via hematogenous dissemination. The genomic landscape of this entity is currently under intense investigation. Recurrent somatic mutations have been uncovered in different genes, a finding that may open important perspectives for precision medicine also for this rare, but highly aggressive leukemia.

  11. The Effects of Non-Invasive Radiofrequency Treatment and Hyperthermia on Malignant and Nonmalignant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Curley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure of biological subjects to electromagnetic fields with a high frequency is associated with temperature elevation. In our recent studies, we reported that non-invasive radiofrequency (RF treatment at 13.56 MHz with the field ranging from 1 KeV to 20 KeV/m2 inhibits tumor progression in animals with abdominal tumor xenografts and enhances the anticancer effect of chemotherapy. The RF treatment was followed by temperature elevation in tumors to approximately 46 °C during 10 min of exposure. In contrast, the temperature of normal tissues remained within a normal range at approximately 37 °C. Whether all biological effects of RF treatment are limited to its hyperthermic property remains unclear. Here, we compared how RF and hyperthermia (HT treatments change the proliferation rate, oxygen consumption and autophagy in malignant and nonmalignant cells. Methods: In the current study, cancer and nonmalignant cells of pancreatic origin were exposed to the RF field or to conventional HT at 46 °C, which was chosen based on our previous in vivo studies of the tumor-specific RF-induced hyperthermia. Results: Only RF treatment caused declines in cancer cell viability and proliferation. RF treatment also affected mitochondrial function in cancer cells more than HT treatment did and, unlike HT treatment, was followed by the elevation of autophagosomes in the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Importantly, the effects of RF treatment were negligible in nonmalignant cells. Conclusion: The obtained data indicate that the effects of RF treatment are specific to cancer cells and are not limited to its hyperthermic property.

  12. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Lavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review.

  13. Prognostic factors for disability and sick leave in patients with subacute non-malignant pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Gitte H; Pilegaard, Marc S; Vaegter, Henrik B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aims to identify generic prognostic factors for disability and sick leave in subacute pain patients. SETTING: General practice and other primary care facilities. PARTICIPANTS: Adults (>18 years) with a subacute (≤3-month) non-malignant pain condition. Eligibility......: Multiple site pain, high pain severity, older age, baseline disability and longer pain duration were identified as potential prognostic factors for disability across pain sites. There was limited evidence that anxiety and depression were associated with disability in patients with subacute pain, indicating...

  14. Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in the Course of Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Clinical Significance and Impact on Prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Krajewska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship and clinical implications of atrial fibrillation (AF in acute pulmonary embolism (PE are poorly investigated. We aimed to analyze clinical characteristics and prognosis in PE patients with paroxysmal AF episode. Methods. From the 391 patients with PE 31 subjects with paroxysmal AF were selected. This group was compared with patients with PE and sinus rhythm (SR and 32 patients with PE and permanent AF. Results. Paroxysmal AF patients were the oldest. Concomitant DVT varies between groups: paroxysmal AF 32.3%, SR 49.5%, and permanent AF 28.1% (p=0.02. The stroke history frequency was 4.6% SR, 12.9% paroxysmal AF, and 21.9% permanent AF (p<0.001. Paroxysmal AF comparing to permanent AF and SR individuals had higher estimated SPAP (56 versus 48 versus 47 mmHg, p=0.01 and shorter ACT (58 versus 65 versus 70 ms, p=0.04. Patients with AF were more often classified into high-risk group according to revised Geneva score and sPESI than SR patients. In-hospital mortality was lower in SR (5% and paroxysmal AF (6.5% compared to permanent AF group (25% (p<0.001. Conclusions. Patients with PE-associated paroxysmal AF constitute a separate population. More severe impairment of the parameters reflecting RV afterload may indicate relation between PE severity and paroxysmal AF episode. Paroxysmal AF has no impact on short-term mortality.

  15. Clinical phenotype analysis of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wo-tu TIAN

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD is a disorder characterized by recurrent and brief dystonic or choreoathetoid attacks that are induced by sudden voluntary movement with highly clinical and genetic heterogeneity. We aimed to investigate the clinical features of PKD in a large Chinese population. Methods One hundred and ninety five patients diagnosed as primary PKD were recruited. For all of the participants, neurological examinations were conducted and clinical manifestations were recorded and summarized in self - made uniform registration form for PKD patients. Clinical characteristics were statistically analyzed and compared between familial and sporadic PKD patients.  Results Among all of the 195 PKD patients in the present study, the gender ratio was 4.42∶1 (male∶ female. The average age of onset was (12.32 ± 3.49 years. There were 162 patients (83.08% manifestated with pure form and 33 (16.92% with complicated form of PKD. Among them 16 patients (8.21% had essential tremor (ET, and 144 patients (73.85% had premonitory symptom. The percentage of patients manifested as dystonia, chorea and mixed form during episodic attacks were 68.72% (134/195, 4.10% (8/195 and 27.18% (53/195 repectively. There were 134 cases (68.72% had facial involvement. It was recorded that 115 (58.97%, 54 (27.69% and 26 (13.33% patients had frequency of attack < 10 times/d, 10-20 times/d and > 20-30 times/d respectively. The percentages of patients whose duration of attack <10 s, 10-30 s and > 30-60 s were 60% (117/195, 29.74% (58/195 and 10.26% (20/195 respectively. There were 64 patietns (32.82% with family history of PKD and 131 (67.18% were sporadic PKD patients. Up to 40% (78/195 of patients did not require/take medications, as they had minor clinical manifestations or concerns about the side effects of anticonvulsants. Among 117 patients (60% prescribed with anticonvulsants, 114 patients showed a good response, including complete control (N

  16. Cultural cues: review of qualitative evidence of patient-centered care in patients with nonmalignant chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Diane B; Engebretson, Joan C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine published qualitative studies that explored the beliefs, values, and behaviors of patients with nonmalignant chronic pain during their interactions with the healthcare system. The findings were used as "cultural cues" to create patient-centered care. A literature review of primary qualitative studies that focused on beliefs, values, or behaviors of patients with chronic nonmalignant pain in the formal healthcare setting was conducted. CINAHL, Medline, Pubmed, PsychInfo, Sociology Abstracts, Cochrane Library Database, Proquest Dissertation and Thesis, and EmBase served as the database for the research. The findings from the studies fell into two categories: beliefs and expectations about appropriate treatment and the behaviors patients may exhibit if they perceive they are not receiving appropriate treatment. Qualitative findings showed that the beliefs, values, and behaviors of patients with nonmalignant chronic pain exhibited during their interactions with the healthcare system created a set of "cultural cues" for providers.

  17. Sorghum phenolics demonstrate estrogenic action and induce apoptosis in nonmalignant colonocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liyi; Allred, Kimberly F; Geera, Bhimalingeswarappa; Allred, Clinton D; Awika, Joseph M

    2012-04-01

    Evidence indicates sorghum may be protective against colon cancer; however, the mechanisms are unknown. Estrogen is believed to protect against colon cancer development by inducing apoptosis in damaged nonmalignant colonocytes. Three sorghum extracts (white, red, and black) were screened for estrogenic activity using cell models expressing estrogen receptor α (ER-α; MCF-7 breast cancer cells) and β [ER-β; nonmalignant young adult mouse colonocytes (YAMC)]. Black and white sorghum extracts had significant estrogenic activity mediated through both estrogen receptors at 1-5 and 5-10 μg/mL, respectively; but red sorghum did not. Activation of ER-β in YAMC reduced cell growth via induction of apoptosis. Only the black and red sorghums contained 3-deoxyanthocyanins; however, these compounds were non-estrogenic. Flavones with estrogenic properties, luteolin (0.41-2.12 mg/g) and apigenin (1.1-1.4 mg/g), and their O-methyl derivatives (0.70-0.95 mg/g) were detected in white and black sorghums, but not in the red sorghum. On the other hand, naringenin, a flavanone known to interfere with transcriptional activities of estrogen, was only detected in the red sorghum extract (as its 7-O-glycoside) at relatively high concentration (11.8 mg/g). Sorghum flavonoid composition has important implications on possible modes of chemoprotection by sorghum against colon carcinogenesis.

  18. Multicultural influences on pain medication attitudes and beliefs in patients with nonmalignant chronic pain syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Diane; McNeill, Jeanette

    2007-06-01

    The objective was to develop an integrated review of quantitative and qualitative research regarding the influence of patients' beliefs and attitudes toward pain medication prescribed for the treatment of nonmalignant chronic pain on use of the pain medication. Studies involving patients at least 18 years old with nonmalignant chronic pain were included. Studies of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome, cancer, and acute pain were excluded. Medline, CINAHL, PsychInfo, and Cochrane databases from 1985 to 2005 were searched. Reference lists were screened for relevant articles. Abstracts were screened for compliance with the study criteria, and the articles were obtained for those that met criteria. By using a systematic process, each article was subjected to repeated review and data abstracted to the collection sheets. Evidence tables were created to assist with data review. High levels of concern positively correlate with nonadherence, preconceived ideas about when the drug should start working can cause the patient to discontinue it before it begins to work, and patients may perceive that if medication is taken on a regular basis to control pain it may not be effective in the future if the pain increases. Research also showed that if patients perceived the benefits of taking the pain medication to be high, they were willing to risk the side effects.

  19. Bone marrow transplantation for non-malignant diseases using treosulfan-based conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinur-Schejter, Yael; Krauss, Aviva C; Erlich, Odeya; Gorelik, Natan; Yahel, Anat; Porat, Iris; Weintraub, Michael; Stein, Jerry; Zaidman, Irina; Stepensky, Polina

    2015-02-01

    Treosulfan (treo) is an alkylating agent with a low acute toxicity profile that is increasingly used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, predominantly in non-malignant diseases. Treosulfan is usually combined with additional agents, but there is scant evidence to allow comparison between different conditioning protocols using treosulfan. We present the experience of three pediatric transplantation centers in Israel using different treosulfan-based conditioning regimens. Data were collected retrospectively on 44 children who underwent 45 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations using treosulfan in combination with either fludarabine (flu) and thiotepa (tt) (n = 20), cyclophosphamide (cy) (n = 6) or fludarabine alone (n = 19). Overall survival (OS) was 70.5%. Disease free survival (DFS) was 54.6%. There was no statistically significant difference between treatment groups in either OS or DFS. Overall survival in patients younger than one year was higher (88.2%). There were significantly more patients with 100% donor chimerism transplanted with flu/treo/tt compared with flu/treo or treo/cy (94.7% compared to 66.7% and 16.7%, respectively). Further prospective studies are required to determine the optimal treosulfan-based preparative regimen for children with non-malignant diseases. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:299-304. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Nonnarcotic analgesics and tricyclic antidepressants for the treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richlin, D M

    1991-05-01

    Chronic nonmalignant pain is often characterized by multiple treatment failures, a pattern of maladaptive behavior, and depression. Often there is a history of inappropriate and excessive use of medications for pain. Prior and ongoing use of narcotics and sedatives acts to compound and aggravate the chronic pain syndrome. A first step in treatment is controlled withdrawal of these agents. Nonnarcotic analgesics, NSAIDs, and tricyclic antidepressants are commonly employed in patients with chronic pain. Effective use of these agents requires understanding of their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Use of a fixed-time schedule is necessary to achieve an effective, sustained therapeutic response. Careful patient education and monitoring for side effects and toxicity are necessary, particularly in the elderly and patients with coexisting medical disorders. Incidence of side effects and toxicity may be reduced by choice of drug and modification of dosing regimen. Nonnarcotic analgesics, TCAs, and NSAIDs are seldom effective by themselves in resolving the pain and distress of patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. This is particularly true when maladaptive behavior coexists. A comprehensive multimodal pain management program encompassing additional pain-relieving strategies and behavior-modifying techniques should be considered and utilized in conjunction with medication.

  1. INTRAOPERATIVE ULTRASOUND FOR HEPATIC NEOPLASM DURING SURGERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Objective.Th purpose of this study was to determine the impact of intraoperative ultrasound(IOUS)on the management of patients with neoplasms of the liver.Methods.Forty-nine patients operated on for liver or other pathologic processes were examined intraopertively with 5.0 MHz special ultrasound transducers during surgical exploration of the abdomen.Subjects were evaluated because of known or suspected disease of the liver.Preoperative imaging studies included percutaneous ultrasound(n=49),magnetic resonance imaging(n=11),and computed tomography(n=34).Intraoperative evaluation on all patients included inspection,bimanual palpation,and ultrasnography.Comparison between preoperative imagings and IOUS were analysed.Results.Sensitivity for detection of hepatic neoplasms showed in intraoperative ultrasound,percutaneous ultrasound,magnetic resonance imaging andcomputed tomography as 100%(23/23),74%(17/23),74%(14/19) and 75%(6/8).Specificity showed 100%(26/26),100%(26/26),93%(14/15) and 67(2/3).In seven patients(14%),the neoplasms were not found by inspection,bimanual palpation,and identified only by IOUS.Conclusions.Intraoperative ultrasound is the most sensitive and specific method for detection and surgery of liver neoplasms,especially the occult neoplasms and small size lesion(<2cm).

  2. Mental Development of Children with Non-epileptic Paroxysmal States in Medical History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turovskaya N.G.,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The author studied mental functions disorders in children with a history of paroxysmal states of various etiologies and compared mental development disorder patterns in patients with epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysms. Study sample were 107 children, aged 6 to 10 years. The study used experimental psychological and neuropsychological techniques. According to the empirical study results, non-epileptic paroxysms unlike epileptic much less combined with a number of mental functions disorders and intelligence in general. However, non-epileptic paroxysmal states as well as epileptic seizure associated with increasing activity exhaustion and abnormal function of the motor analyzer (dynamic and kinesthetic dyspraxia. Visual memory disorders and modal-nonspecific memory disorders have more pronounced importance in the mental ontogenesis structure in children with convulsive paroxysms compared to children with cerebral pathology without paroxysms history

  3. Propranolol for Paroxysmal Sympathetic Hyperactivity with Lateralizing Hyperhidrosis after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W. Siefferman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain injury can lead to impaired cortical inhibition of the hypothalamus, resulting in increased sympathetic nervous system activation. Symptoms of paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity may include hyperthermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, vasodilation, and hyperhidrosis. We report the case of a 41-year-old man who suffered from a left middle cerebral artery stroke and subsequently developed central fever, contralateral temperature change, and hyperhidrosis. His symptoms abated with low-dose propranolol and then returned upon discontinuation. Restarting propranolol again stopped his symptoms. This represents the first report of propranolol being used for unilateral dysautonomia after stroke. Propranolol is a lipophilic nonselective beta-blocker which easily crosses the blood-brain barrier and may be used to treat paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity.

  4. The treatment of horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babac S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to assess the outcome of treatment of horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and to analyze the influence of the different prognostic factors on treatment failure. Fifty-nine patients with horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were included in the study. They were divided into two groups according to the treatment protocol, randomly. The first group, after treatment with the barbecue maneuver or inverted Gufoni, depending on the nystagmus form, was instructed to sleep on the side with weaker nystagmus, and the second group did not. In the first group, 88.9% of patients were cured and 91.3% in the second one. There was no significant difference between the two groups. Migraine and the apogeotropic form of nystagmus had a significant effect on treatment outcome, while other variables had no effect.

  5. New therapeutic maneuver for anterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacovino, Dario A; Hain, Timothy C; Gualtieri, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    This article describes the clinical features of anterior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (AC-BPPV) and a new therapeutic maneuver for its management. Our study was a retrospective review of cases from an ambulatory tertiary referral center. Thirteen patients afflicted with positional paroxysmal vertigo exhibiting brief positional down-beating nystagmus in positional tests (Dix-Hallpike and head-hanging position) were treated with a maneuver comprised of the following movements: Sequential head positioning beginning supine with head hanging 30 degrees dependent with respect to the body, then supine with head inclined 30 degrees forward, and ending sitting with head 30 degrees forward. All cases showed excellent therapeutic response to our repositioning procedure, i.e. relief of vertigo and elimination of nystagmus. The maneuver described is an option for AC-BPPV treatment.

  6. Paroxysmal hemicrania as the clinical presentation of giant cell arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Beams

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Head pain is the most common complaint in patients with giant cell arteritis but the headache has no distinct diagnostic features. There have been no published reports of giant cell arteritis presenting as a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia. We describe a patient who developed a new onset headache in her fifties, which fit the diagnostic criteria for paroxysmal hemicrania and was completely responsive to corticosteroids. Removal of the steroid therapy brought a reemergence of her headaches. Giant cell arteritis should be considered in the evaluation of secondary causes of paroxysmal hemicrania; in addition giant cell arteritis needs to be ruled out in patients who are over the age of 50 years with a new onset trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia.

  7. Left Atrial Linear Ablation of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation Guided by Three-dimensional Electroanatomical System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Dai-Fu; Li, Ying; Qi, Wei-Gang

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the safety and efficacy of Left atrial linear ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation guided by three-dimensional electroanatomical system. Methods 29 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in this study. A nonfluoroscopic mapping system was used to generate a 3D...... attacks unchanged. No pulmonary vein narrowing was observed. Conclusion Left atrial linear ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation guided by three-dimensional electroanatomical system was safe and effective....

  8. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallen, Michael E; Naini, Bita V

    2016-09-01

    Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms (IOPNs) are cystic neoplasms with intraductal growth and complex papillae composed of oncocytic cells. IOPNs have been reported both in the pancreas and biliary tree, and are most likely closely related in these 2 locations. In the pancreas, these rare tumors are now considered 1 of the 4 histologic subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Significant differences in histology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetics have been reported between IOPNs and other IPMN subtypes. However, there are limited data regarding the clinical behavior and prognosis of IOPNs in comparison to other subtypes of IPMN. We review features of pancreatic IOPNs and discuss the differential diagnosis of other intraductal lesions in the pancreas.

  9. Conventional radiological strategy of common gastrointestinal neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Zhuo; Li; Pei-Hong; Wu

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes the clinical characteristics and imaging features of common gastrointestinal(GI) neoplasms in terms of conventional radiological imaging methods. Barium studies are readily available for displaying primary malignancies and are minimallyor not at all invasive. A neoplasm may be manifested as various imaging findings, including mucosal disruption, soft mass, ulcer, submucosal invasion and lumen stenosis on barium studies. Benign tumors typically appear as smoothly marginated intramural masses. Malignant neoplasms most often appear as irregular infiltrative lesions on barium examination. Tumor extension to adjacent GI segments may be indistinct on barium images. Cross-sectional images such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging may provide more accurate details of the adjacent organ invasion, omental or peritoneal spread.

  10. Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania and hemicrania continua. Parenteral indomethacin: the 'indotest'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonaci, F; Pareja, J A; Caminero, A B; Sjaastad, O

    1998-02-01

    The interval between indomethacin administration and clinical response may be clinically relevant in the assessment of chronic paroxysmal hemicrania and hemicrania continua and other unilateral headache disorders with which they can be confounded. Eight patients with chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (6 women and 2 men) and 12 patients with hemicrania continua (8 women and 4 men) were entered into the study. The patients were given 50 mg of indomethacin intramuscularly (i.m.) on day 1 and some of them 100 mg IM on day 2 in an open fashion. The usual attack pattern was reestablished prior to the second test. The mean interval between attacks before the two injections (51 +/- 18 minutes) in chronic paroxysmal hemicrania was significantly shorter than the mean after each of the two indomethacin injections (50 mg = 493 +/- 251 minutes; 100 mg = 668 +/- 211 minutes; P hemicrania continua, the time between 50-mg indomethacin injection and complete pain relief was 73 +/- 66 minutes. The pain-free period after indomethacin injection was around 13 hours (i.e., 13 +/- 8 hours after 50 mg and 13 +/- 10 hours after 100 mg). The use of a test dosage of 50 mg of indomethacin IM ('indotest') gives a clear-cut answer and may be a useful tool in the diagnostic arsenal in every unilateral headache for a proper clinical assessment. A diagnosis of chronic paroxysmal hemicrania or hemicrania continua is a serious matter because it may imply life-long treatment with a potentially noxious drug. It is, therefore, of the utmost importance that an 'indotest' is carried out in a standard fashion. In the future, the rules set forth in the present context should be followed, at least in scientific studies. Pain pressure thresholds at cranial and extracranial levels were not significantly modified after indomethacin injection in any of the headaches.

  11. Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm of the pancreas: a case of a second neoplasm in a pancreas cancer survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Mrinal S; Schuerle, Theresa; Liu, Yulin; Thakkar, Shyam J

    2015-01-31

    Cystic neoplasms, which are less common forms of exocrine pancreatic neoplasms, consist of mainly intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) and mucinous cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasms, unlike IPMN, are not associated with ductal growth, are usually multilocular in nature, and have ovarian type stroma. Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is a type of mucinous cystic neoplasm more commonly found in women. Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms of the pancreas are the least common variant of IPMN. Despite this classification, intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms have been compared to mucinous cystic neoplasms in previous studies and the classification is still questioned. We report a rare case of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm of the pancreas occurring in a 52-year-old male with a prior history of surgically excised mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. This is the first known case of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm occurring after a prior pancreatic neoplasm. As the diagnosis of intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms are rare, having only a few case reports and small series on which to understand its disease process, it is imperative to discuss each case and detail possible correlations with other pancreatic cystic neoplasms as well as distinctions from its current association within IPMN.

  12. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas: A Case of a Second Neoplasm in a Pancreas Cancer Survivor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrinal S Garg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Cystic neoplasms, which are less common forms of exocrine pancreatic neoplasms, consist of mainly intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN and mucinous cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasms, unlike IPMN, are not associated with ductal growth, are usually multilocular in nature, and have ovarian type stroma. Mucinous cystadenocarcinoma is a type of mucinous cystic neoplasm more commonly found in women. Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms of the pancreas are the least common variant of IPMN. Despite this classification, intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms have been compared to mucinous cystic neoplasms in previous studies and the classification is still questioned. Case report We report a rare case of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm of the pancreas occurring in a 52-year-old male with a prior history of surgically excised mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. This is the first known case of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm occurring after a prior pancreatic neoplasm. Conclusion As the diagnosis of intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms are rare, having only a few case reports and small series on which to understand its disease process, it is imperative to discuss each case and detail possible correlations with other pancreatic cystic neoplasms as well as distinctions from its current association within IPMN.

  13. Paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis: Tight linkage to chromosome 2q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.K.; Rainier, S.; Wilkowski, J.; Jones, S.M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Paroxysmal dystonic choreoathetosis (PDC) is characterized by attacks of involuntary movements that last up to several hours and occur at rest both spontaneously and following caffeine or alcohol consumption. We analyzed a Polish-American kindred with autosomal dominant PDC and identified tight linkage between the disorder and microsatellite markers on chromosome 2q (maximum two-point LOD score 4.77; recombination fraction 0). Our results clearly establish the existence of a locus for autosomal dominant PDC on distal chromosome 2q. The fact that three other paroxysmal neurological disorders (periodic ataxia with myokymia and hypo- and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis) are due to mutation in ion-channel genes raises the possibility that PDC is also due to an ion-channel gene mutation. It is noteworthy that a cluster of sodium-channel genes is located on distal chromosome 2q, near the PDC locus. Identifying the PDC locus on chromosome 2q will facilitate discovery whether PDC is genetically homogeneous and whether other paroxysmal movement disorders are also genetically linked to the PDC locus. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Dopamine-secreting adrenal ganglioneuroma presenting with paroxysmal hypertension attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erem, Cihangir; Kocak, Mustafa; Cinel, Akif; Erso, Halil O; Reis, Abdulkadir

    2008-01-01

    Adrenal ganglioneuromas are rare tumors originating from the neural crest tissue of the sympathetic nervous system. The clinical presentation for most patients is asymptomatic, and most of these tumors are hormone silent. We report a case of dopamine-secreting adrenal ganglioneuroma associated with paroxysmal hypertensive attacks in an adult patient. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a 2-month history of right flank pain, and a 2-year history of paroxysmal hypertensive attacks associated with headaches, palpitations, nervousness, and sweating. Abdominal CT and MRI revealed a solid round tumor approximately 4 cm in diameter on the upper pole of the right kidney. Urinary levels of dopamine and homovanillic acid were slightly elevated, although urinary levels of metanephrine and normetanephrine were suppressed. The urinary levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vanillylmandelic acid were within normal limits. Right adrenalectomy was performed for treatment purposes. Histological diagnosis of the tumor was a ganglioneuroma originating from the adrenal medulla. In conclusion, this is a case of dopamine-secreting adrenal ganglioneuroma associated with paroxysmal hypertensive attacks in an adult patient.

  15. Subjective visual vertical after treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maristela Mian; Ganança, Maurício Malavasi; Caovilla, Heloisa Helena

    2016-09-28

    Otolith function can be studied by testing the subjective visual vertical, because the tilt of the vertical line beyond the normal range is a sign of vestibular dysfunction. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is a disorder of one or more labyrinthine semicircular canals caused by fractions of otoliths derived from the utricular macula. To compare the subjective visual vertical with the bucket test before and immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. We evaluated 20 patients. The estimated position where a fluorescent line within a bucket reached the vertical position was measured before and immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver. Data were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Before repositioning maneuver, 9 patients (45.0%) had absolute values of the subjective visual vertical above the reference standard and 2 (10.0%) after the maneuver; the mean of the absolute values of the vertical deviation was significantly lower after the intervention (pvertical, evaluated by the bucket test, immediately after the particle repositioning maneuver in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Can non-malignant biopsy features identify men at increased risk of biopsy-detectable prostate cancer at re-screening after 4 years?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Tineke; Roobol, Monique J.; Schroder, Fritz H.; van der Kwast, Theodorus H.; Roemeling, Stijn; van der Cruijsen-Koeter, Ingrid W.; Bangma, Chris H.; van Leenders, Geert J. L. H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To identify pathological features in non-malignant sextant prostate needle biopsies and assess their predictive value for detecting prostate cancer on biopsy 4 years later. PATIENTS AND METHODS We selected and reviewed the biopsy specimens of 121 men that were diagnosed as non-malignant d

  17. Recently described neoplasms of the sinonasal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Justin A

    2016-03-01

    Surgical pathology of the sinonasal region (i.e., nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses) is notoriously difficult, due in part to the remarkable diversity of neoplasms that may be encountered in this area. In addition, a number of neoplasms have been only recently described in the sinonasal tract, further compounding the difficulty for pathologists who are not yet familiar with them. This manuscript will review the clinicopathologic features of some of the recently described sinonasal tumor types: NUT midline carcinoma, HPV-related carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features, SMARCB1 (INI-1) deficient sinonasal carcinoma, biphenotypic sinonasal sarcoma, and adamantinoma-like Ewing family tumor.

  18. Natriuretic peptides for the detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegers, Joachim; Zabel, Markus; Grüter, Timo; Ammermann, Antje; Weber-Krüger, Mark; Edelmann, Frank; Gelbrich, Götz; Binder, Lutz; Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Gröschel, Klaus; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Feltgen, Nicolas; Pieske, Burkert; Wachter, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Silent atrial fibrillation (AF) and tachycardia (AT) are considered precursors of ischaemic stroke. Therefore, detection of paroxysmal atrial rhythm disorders is highly relevant, but is clinically challenging. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic value of natriuretic peptide levels in the detection of paroxysmal AT/AF in a pilot study. Methods Natriuretic peptide levels were analysed in two independent patient cohorts (162 patients with arterial hypertension or other cardiovascular risk factors and 82 patients with retinal vessel disease). N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and BNP were measured before the start of a 7-day Holter monitoring period carefully screened for AT/AF. Results 244 patients were included; 16 had paroxysmal AT/AF. After excluding patients with a history of AT/AF (n=5), 14 patients had newly diagnosed AT/AF (5.8%) NT-proBNP and BNP levels were higher in patients with paroxysmal AT/AF in both cohorts: (1) 154.4 (IQR 41.7; 303.6) versus 52.8 (30.4; 178.0) pg/mL and 70.0 (31.9; 142.4) versus 43.9 (16.3; 95.2) and (2) 216.9 (201.4; 277.1) versus 90.8 (42.3–141.7) and 96.0 (54.7; 108.2) versus 29.1 (12.0; 58.1). For the detection of AT/AF episodes, NT-proBNP and BNP had an area under the curve in receiver operating characteristic analysis of 0.76 (95% CI, 0.64 to 0.88; p=0.002) and 0.75 (0.61 to 0.89; p=0.004), respectively. Conclusions NT-proBNP and BNP levels are elevated in patients with silent AT/AF as compared with sinus rhythm. Thus, screening for undiagnosed paroxysmal AF using natriuretic peptide level initiated Holter monitoring may be a useful strategy in prevention of stroke or systemic embolism. PMID:26288739

  19. General Information about Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  20. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  1. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  3. INTRACRANIAL NEOPLASMS IN IBADAN, NIGERIA B.J. OLASODE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-01-01

    Jan 1, 2000 ... The definitive neurons, glial cells and ... indicate neoplasms arising from these primitive cells(1). .... adults, there was an equal sex distribution. All eight .... of the total number of secondary intracranial neoplasms. Burkitt's ...

  4. Clinical experience in appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelik, Caglar K.; Bozdogan, Nazan; Dibekoglu, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study To analyse the incidence of appendiceal neuroendocrine neoplasms in appendectomy specimens and establish the epidemiological and histopathological features, treatment, and clinical course. Material and methods Between 2004 and 2013, 975 patients who underwent appendectomy in Ankara Oncology Education and Research Hospital were retrospectively analysed. Results Neuroendocrine neoplasm was detected in the nine of 975 (0.9%) patients. Neuroendocrine neoplasms were diagnosed in eight patients by appendectomy, which was performed because of the prediagnosis of acute appendicitis, and in one patient by the suspicious mass detection during surgical procedures that were done in the appendix for a different reason. Eight of the patients’ tumours were in the tip of the appendix, and one of the patients’ tumours was at the base of appendix. Tumour size in 77.8% of patients was equal or less than 1 cm, in 22.2% patients it was 1–2 cm. There was tumour invasion in the muscularis propria layer in four patients, in the serosa layer in three patients, and in the deep mesoappendix in two patients. Patients were followed for a median of 78 months. In the follow-up of patients who were operated because of colon cancer, metachronous colon tumour evolved. This patient died due to progressive disease. Other patients are still disease-free. Conclusions The diagnosis of neuroendocrine neoplasm is often incidentally done after appendectomy. Tumour size is important in determining the extent of disease and in the selection of the surgical method during operation. PMID:26793027

  5. Myeloproliferative neoplasms in five multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2013-01-01

    The concurrence of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) is unusual. We report five patients from a localized geographic area in Denmark with both MS and MPN; all the patients were diagnosed with MPNs in the years 2007-2012. We describe the patients' history and treatment...

  6. The new WHO nomenclature: lymphoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Susan J; Rodak, Bernadette F

    2002-01-01

    The development of the WHO classification of lymphoid neoplasms is a remarkable example of cooperation and communication between pathologists and oncologists from around the world. Joint classification committees of the major hematopathology societies will periodically review and update this classification, facilitating further progress in the understanding and treatment of hematologic malignancies.

  7. Delusional Disorder Arising From a CNS Neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupinski, John; Kim, Jihye; Francois, Dimitry

    2017-01-01

    Erotomania arising from a central nervous system (CNS) neoplasm has not been previously described. Here, we present the first known case, to our knowledge, of erotomania with associated persecutory delusions arising following diagnosis and treatment of a left frontal lobe brain tumor.

  8. Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Isabel Bittencourt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloproliferative diseases without the Philadelphia chromosome marker (Ph-, although first described 60 years ago, only became the subject of interest after the turn of the millennium. In 2001, the World Health Organization (WHO defined the classification of this group of diseases and in 2008 they were renamed myeloproliferative neoplasms based on morphological, cytogenetic and molecular features. In 2005, the identification of a recurrent molecular abnormality characterized by a gain of function with a mutation in the gene encoding Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 paved the way for greater knowledge of the pathophysiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms. The JAK2 mutation is found in 90-98% of polycythemia vera and in about 50% essential thrombocytosis and primary myelofibrosis. In addition to the JAK2 mutation, other mutations involving TET2 (ten-eleven translocation, LNK (a membrane-bound adaptor protein; IDH1/2 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 enzyme; ASXL1 (additional sex combs-like 1 genes were found in myeloproliferative neoplasms thus showing the importance of identifying molecular genetic alterations to confirm diagnosis, guide treatment and improve our understanding of the biology of these diseases. Currently, polycythemia vera, essential thrombocytosis, myelofibrosis, chronic neutrophilic leukemia, chronic eosinophilic leukemia and mastocytosis are included in this group of myeloproliferative neoplasms, but are considered different situations with individualized diagnostic methods and treatment. This review updates pathogenic aspects, molecular genetic alterations, the fundamental criteria for diagnosis and the best approach for each of these entities.

  9. SNP Array in Hematopoietic Neoplasms: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinming Song

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analysis is essential for the diagnosis and prognosis of hematopoietic neoplasms in current clinical practice. Many hematopoietic malignancies are characterized by structural chromosomal abnormalities such as specific translocations, inversions, deletions and/or numerical abnormalities that can be identified by karyotype analysis or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH studies. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays offer high-resolution identification of copy number variants (CNVs and acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH/uniparental disomy (UPD that are usually not identifiable by conventional cytogenetic analysis and FISH studies. As a result, SNP arrays have been increasingly applied to hematopoietic neoplasms to search for clinically-significant genetic abnormalities. A large numbers of CNVs and UPDs have been identified in a variety of hematopoietic neoplasms. CNVs detected by SNP array in some hematopoietic neoplasms are of prognostic significance. A few specific genes in the affected regions have been implicated in the pathogenesis and may be the targets for specific therapeutic agents in the future. In this review, we summarize the current findings of application of SNP arrays in a variety of hematopoietic malignancies with an emphasis on the clinically significant genetic variants.

  10. Nonmalignant T cells stimulate growth of T-cell lymphoma cells in the presence of bacterial toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woetmann, Anders; Lovato, Paola; Eriksen, Karsten W;

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial toxins including staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). Here, we investigate SE-mediated interactions between nonmalignant T cells and malignant T-cell lines established from skin and blood of CTCL patients...

  11. Predictors of long-term opioid use among chronic nonmalignant pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carrinna; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Aims: 1) To determine the distribution and determinants of opioid use among chronic nonmalignant pain(CNP) patients. 2) To identify the patient, treatment and socioeconomic characteristics as determinants for potential risk groups. We hypothesized that CNP patient who use opioids for more than 1...... year would differ in demographics and comorbidity from other patients who use opioids for less than 6 months. Methods: National registers were used to include patients beginning opioid therapy in the period 01/01/2000 to 31/12/2014(incl.). The cohort consists of adults aged 16 years or older who...... redeemed at least one prescription for an opioid product and residing in Denmark, analysing only patients who survived for at least two years. Follow-up minimum one year after the last redeemed opioid prescription or to 31/12/2015. Participants are included at first redeemed prescription for an opioid...

  12. Photodynamic therapy for malignant and non-malignant diseases: clinical investigation and application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANG Yong-gang; ZHANG Xiu-ping; LI Jian; HUANG Zheng

    2006-01-01

    @@ Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a relatively new treatment modality. Clinical PDT procedure involves the administration of a photosensitizer followed by local illumination with visible light of a specific wavelength. In the presence of molecule oxygen, the light illumination of photosensitizer can lead to a series of photochemical reactions and consequently generate a variety of cytotoxic species.The nature, location and quantity of PDT-induced cytotoxic species and the sensitivity of the target cells determine the outcome of a PDT treatment.Since the first government approval of photosensitizer Photofrin was granted, for the treatment of bladder cancer in Canada in 1993,1 the utilization of PDT in the treatment of malignant and non-malignant diseases has increased significantly due to the improvement in photosensitizers and light applicators. Several similar photosensitizers have been developed and utilization in China since the 1980s.2

  13. Prognostic factors for disability and sick leave in patients with subacute non-malignant pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Gitte H; Pilegaard, Marc S; Vaegter, Henrik B

    2016-01-01

    : Multiple site pain, high pain severity, older age, baseline disability and longer pain duration were identified as potential prognostic factors for disability across pain sites. There was limited evidence that anxiety and depression were associated with disability in patients with subacute pain, indicating......OBJECTIVE: This systematic review aims to identify generic prognostic factors for disability and sick leave in subacute pain patients. SETTING: General practice and other primary care facilities. PARTICIPANTS: Adults (>18 years) with a subacute (≤3-month) non-malignant pain condition. Eligibility...... criteria were cohort studies investigating the prediction of disability or long-term sick leave in adults with a subacute pain condition in a primary care setting. 19 studies were included, referring to a total of 6266 patients suffering from pain in the head, neck, back and shoulders. PRIMARY...

  14. Non-malignant respiratory diseases and occupational exposure to wood dust. Part II. Dry wood industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Gitte; Schaumburg, Inger; Sigsgaard, Torben; Schlunssen, Vivi

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on associations between dry wood dust exposure and non-malignant respiratory diseases. Criteria for inclusion are epidemiological studies in English language journals with an internal or external control group describing relationships between dry wood dust exposure and respiratory diseases or symptoms. Papers took into consideration smoking and when dealing with lung function age. A total of 37 papers forms the basis of this review. The results support an association between dry wood dust exposure and asthma, asthma symptoms, coughing, bronchitis, and acute and chronic impairment of lung function. In addition, an association between wood dust exposure and rhino-conjunctivitis is seen across the studies. Apart from plicatic acid in western red cedar wood, no causal agent has consistently been disclosed. Type 1 allergy is not suspected to be a major cause of wood dust induced asthma.

  15. Nonmalignant Respiratory Effects of Chronic Arsenic Exposure from Drinking Water among Never-Smokers in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Faruque; Chen, Yu; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W.; Bernard, Alfred; Dumont, Xavier; Slavkovich, Vesna; Argos, Maria; D’Armiento, Jeanine; Foronjy, Robert; Hasan, M. Rashidul; Eunus, HEM Mahbubul; Graziano, Joseph H.; Ahsan, Habibul

    2008-01-01

    Background Arsenic from drinking water has been associated with malignant and nonmalignant respiratory illnesses. The association with nonmalignant respiratory illnesses has not been well established because the assessments of respiratory symptoms may be influenced by recall bias or interviewer bias because participants had visible skin lesions. Objectives We examined the relationship of the serum level of Clara cell protein CC16—a novel biomarker for respiratory illnesses—with well As, total urinary As, and urinary As methylation indices. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in nonsmoking individuals (n = 241) selected from a large cohort with a wide range of As exposure (0.1–761 μg/L) from drinking water in Bangladesh. Total urinary As, urinary As metabolites, and serum CC16 were measured in urine and serum samples collected at baseline of the parent cohort study. Results We observed an inverse association between urinary As and serum CC16 among persons with skin lesions (β = −0.13, p = 0.01). We also observed a positive association between secondary methylation index in urinary As and CC16 levels (β = 0.12, p = 0.05) in the overall study population; the association was stronger among people without skin lesions (β = 0.18, p = 0.04), indicating that increased methylation capability may be protective against As-induced respiratory damage. In a subsample of study participants undergoing spirometric measures (n = 31), we observed inverse associations between urinary As and predictive FEV1 (forced expiratory volume measured in 1 sec) (r = −0.37; FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio and primary methylation index (r = −0.42, p = 0.01). Conclusions The findings suggest that serum CC16 may be a useful biomarker of epithelial lung damage in individuals with arsenical skin lesions. Also, we observed the deleterious respiratory effects of As exposure at concentrations lower than reported in earlier studies. PMID:18288317

  16. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nangalia, J.; Massie, C.E.; Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Loo, P. Van; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O'Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS: We performed exome sequencing

  17. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasm Having Clinical Characteristics of Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm and a Benign Histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takatomi Oku

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Context An intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm is a rare pancreatic tumor which was first described by Adsay et al. in 1996. It has been defined as a new subgroup of IPMN. Case report We report the case of a 76-year-old woman who presented with nausea. Imaging studies revealed a cystic mass in the body of the pancreas. She underwent a successful distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, and has subsequently remained well. Microscopically, the cyst was lined by columnar epithelium similar to pancreatic duct epithelium, and the nodular projection consisted of arborizing papillary structures, lined by plump cells with abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. These eosinophilic cells were immunohistochemically positively stained with anti-mitochondrial antibody. The cellular atypism was mild and the proliferating index was low, compatible with adenoma of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm. Although no ovarian type stroma was identified, in our case, no communication to main pancreatic duct (located in the pancreatic body and rapid growth by intracystic hemorrhage were clinical characteristics of a mucinous cystic neoplasm, but not IPMN. Conclusion With only 17 cases reported to date, the clinical and pathological details of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm are still unclear. We herein add one case with different characteristics from those of the past reports. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of an intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasm with the clinical characteristics of a mucinous cystic neoplasm.

  18. Left ventricular ischemia due to coronary stenosis as an unexpected treatable cause of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonderwoerd, BA; Van Gelder, IC; Crijns, HJGM

    Ischemia-Related Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation. We present a patient with exercise-induced paroxysmal atrial fibrillation who was eventually scheduled for a Cox-maze operation due to persistence of his complaints of fatigue, impaired exercise tolerance, and predominantly exercise-related irregular

  19. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in sporadic and familial forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groffen, Alexander J. A.; Klapwijk, Thom; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Groen, Justus L.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Paroxysmal dyskinesia (PxD) is a group of movement disorders characterized by recurrent episodes of involuntary movements. Familial paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is caused by PRRT2 mutations, but a distinct etiology has been suggested for sporadic PKD. Here we describe a cohort of patients

  20. Treatment of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia with intravenous injection of adenosine triphosphate.

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, D.; Ueeda, M; Abe, Y.; Tani, H; Nakatsu, T.; Yoshida, H.; Haraoka, S; Nagashima, H

    1986-01-01

    Intravenous adenosine triphosphate rapidly terminated all 11 episodes of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia in 10 patients. Eight patients reported side effects but these resolved within 20 seconds and did not require treatment. Adenosine triphosphate is a suitable agent for the rapid termination of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

  1. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is uncommon in outpatients with chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corell, Pernille; Gustafsson, Finn; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the prevalence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) in patients with heart failure (HF) due to systolic dysfunction.......The objective was to evaluate the prevalence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) in patients with heart failure (HF) due to systolic dysfunction....

  2. HEREDITARY MYOKYMIA AND PAROXYSMAL ATAXIA LINKED TO CHROMOSOME-12 IS RESPONSIVE TO ACETAZOLAMIDE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUBBERS, WJ; BRUNT, ERP; SCHEFFER, H; LITT, M; STULP, R; BROWNE, DL; VANWEERDEN, TW

    1995-01-01

    A sixth family with autosomal dominantly inherited myokymia and paroxysmal ataxia is described. The syndrome in this family is linked to the recently discovered locus for inherited myokymia and paroxysmal ataxia on the human chromosome 12p, and a missense mutation is shown in the KCNA1 gene. The att

  3. HEREDITARY MYOKYMIA AND PAROXYSMAL ATAXIA LINKED TO CHROMOSOME-12 IS RESPONSIVE TO ACETAZOLAMIDE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LUBBERS, WJ; BRUNT, ERP; SCHEFFER, H; LITT, M; STULP, R; BROWNE, DL; VANWEERDEN, TW

    1995-01-01

    A sixth family with autosomal dominantly inherited myokymia and paroxysmal ataxia is described. The syndrome in this family is linked to the recently discovered locus for inherited myokymia and paroxysmal ataxia on the human chromosome 12p, and a missense mutation is shown in the KCNA1 gene. The att

  4. EEG findings during "paroxysmal hemiplegia" in a patient with GLUT1-deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrin, S; Cantalupo, G; Opri, R; Dalla Bernardina, B; Darra, F

    2017-05-01

    A growing number of studies have disclosed the myriad of features that can suggest the diagnosis of a Glucose-transporter-1 deficiency (GLUT1D). The occurrence of paroxysmal movement disorders such as exercise-induced dystonia and non-kinesigenic dyskinesia, received considerable emphasis, while limited attention has been paid to other paroxysmal phenomena, as transitory neurological disorders. These paroxysmal events are roughly and variably described as limb weakness, hemiparesis or ataxia. Their EEG correlate has been never documented. We report the EEG pattern characterizing two acute episodes of paroxysmal paresis with confusion and aphasia, in a girl with GLUT1D. The EEG picture is characterized by a clear-cut contralateral EEG slowing, similar to what is observed in Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood and Hemiplegic Migraine attacks. In our patient the paroxysmal events were responsive to a ketogenic diet. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Paroxysmal eye-head movements in Glut1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Toni S; Pons, Roser; Engelstad, Kristin; Kane, Steven A; Goldberg, Michael E; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2017-04-25

    To describe a characteristic paroxysmal eye-head movement disorder that occurs in infants with Glut1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1 DS). We retrospectively reviewed the medical charts of 101 patients with Glut1 DS to obtain clinical data about episodic abnormal eye movements and analyzed video recordings of 18 eye movement episodes from 10 patients. A documented history of paroxysmal abnormal eye movements was found in 32/101 patients (32%), and a detailed description was available in 18 patients, presented here. Episodes started before age 6 months in 15/18 patients (83%), and preceded the onset of seizures in 10/16 patients (63%) who experienced both types of episodes. Eye movement episodes resolved, with or without treatment, by 6 years of age in 7/8 patients with documented long-term course. Episodes were brief (usually <5 minutes). Video analysis revealed that the eye movements were rapid, multidirectional, and often accompanied by a head movement in the same direction. Eye movements were separated by clear intervals of fixation, usually ranging from 200 to 800 ms. The movements were consistent with eye-head gaze saccades. These movements can be distinguished from opsoclonus by the presence of a clear intermovement fixation interval and the association of a same-direction head movement. Paroxysmal eye-head movements, for which we suggest the term aberrant gaze saccades, are an early symptom of Glut1 DS in infancy. Recognition of the episodes will facilitate prompt diagnosis of this treatable neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Chiropractic management of a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anette R; Lauridsen, Henrik H; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article describes and discusses the case of a patient with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) characterized by severe vertigo with dizziness, nausea, and nystagmus, treated without the use of spinal manipulation by a doctor of chiropractic. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 46-year......-old woman presented for care with complaints of acute vertigo and dizziness. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: The patient was examined and diagnosed with left posterior canalolithiasis by means of the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. She was treated successfully with the Epley maneuver once and subsequently discharged...

  7. Radiofrequency ablation as initial therapy in paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walfridsson, H; Walfridsson, U; Nielsen, J Cosedis

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The Medical ANtiarrhythmic Treatment or Radiofrequency Ablation in Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (MANTRA-PAF) trial assessed the long-term efficacy of an initial strategy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) vs. antiarrhythmic drug therapy (AAD) as first-line treatment for patients with PAF. I......L and symptom burden in patients with PAF. Patients randomized to RFA showed greater improvement in physical scales (SF-36) and the EQ-visual analogue scale. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: URL http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00133211....

  8. Paroxysmal Autonomic Instability with Dystonia after Pneumococcal Meningoencephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layal Safadieh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of bacterial meningitis, frequently resulting in severe neurological impairment. A seven-month-old child presenting with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis developed right basal ganglia and hypothalamic infarctions. Daily episodes of agitation, hypertension, tachycardia, diaphoresis, hyperthermia, and decerebrate posturing were observed. The diagnosis of paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia was established. The patient responded to clonidine, baclofen, and benzodiazepines. Although this entity has been reported in association with traumatic brain injury, and as a sequel to some nervous system infections, this is the first case, to our knowledge, associated with pneumococcal meningoencephalitis.

  9. Phase 4 paroxysmal AV block in a patient with scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butschek, Ross; Powell, Brian D; Littmann, Laszlo

    2013-01-01

    A 72-year-old man with limited cutaneous systemic scleroderma was hospitalized for two episodes of witnessed syncope. The baseline 12-lead electrocardiogram was normal but on telemetry there were numerous episodes of paroxysmal AV block with asystolic periods of up to 7.5 s duration. Analysis of the rhythm strips revealed phase 4 intra-His bundle block characterized by critical P-P intervals that triggered the AV block, and a narrow range of junctional escape to subsequent P wave intervals that were required to release the AV block. A dual chamber pacemaker was implanted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Use of digoxin in patients with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetnev, A S; Titov, V N; Shevchenko, N M; Gurevich, E M

    1989-04-01

    The effectiveness and electrophysiologic mechanisms of antiarrhythmic effect of digoxin were examined in 27 patients with paroxysmal atrioventricular nodal reciprocal tachycardia (PAVNRT) and supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) due to latent complementary conductive pathways, i. e. latent Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome. To assess antiarrhythmic action of digoxin, transesophageal pacing and plasma digoxin radioimmonoassays were used. Preventive antiarrhythmic efficiency of digoxin was 53% in PAVNRT patients, and 25% in SVT patients with latent WPW syndrome. Antegrade atrioventricular conduction block seems to be the mechanism of oral digoxin preventive effect. There was no relationship between antiarrhythmic efficiency of digoxin and its plasma level.

  11. DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT BENIGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO (BPPV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Prida Purnamasari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is one of the most frequent Neurotology disorders. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is a vestibular disorder in which 17% -20% of patients complained of vertigo. In the general population the prevalence of BPPV is between 11 to 64 per 100,000 (prevalence 2.4%. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo is a disturbance in the inner ear with positional vertigo symptoms that occur repeatedly with the typical nystagmus paroxysmal. The disorders can be caused either by canalithiasis or cupulolithiasis and could in theory be about three semicircular canals, although superior canal (anterior is very rare. The most common is the form of the posterior canal, followed by a lateral. The diagnosis of BPPV can be enforced based on history and physical examination, including some tests such as Dix-Hallpike test, caloric test, and Supine Roll test. The diagnosis of BPPV is also classified according to the types of channels. Management of BPPV include non-pharmacological, pharmacological and operations. Treatment is often used non-pharmacological includes several maneuvers such as Epley maneuver, Semount maneuver, Lempert maneuver, forced prolonged position and Brandt-Daroff exercises. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  12. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo in the Acute Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fife, Terry D; von Brevern, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common cause of vertigo characterized by brief episodes provoked by head movements. The first attack of BPPV usually occurs in bed or upon getting up. Because it often begins abruptly, it can be alarming and lead to emergency department evaluation. The episodes of spinning often last 10 to 20 seconds, but may occasionally last as long as 1 minute. There are several forms of BPPV. In nearly all cases, highly effective treatment can be offered to patients. This article reviews the current state of our understanding of this condition and its management.

  13. Nonlinear Analysis of Bedload Transport Rate of Paroxysm Debris Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The evolution characteristics of bedload transport feature of paroxysm debris flow have been studied by means of both theory analysis and experimental data.The analysis based on the flume experiment data of a sand pile model as well as a large amount of field data of debris flow clearly shown that the statistical distribu- tion for the main variable of the sand pile made of non-uniform sand (according the sand pile experiment,φ≥2.55) conform to the negative power law,that means the non-uniform sand syste...

  14. Pregnancy in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Singh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH during pregnancy is very rare. It can cause significant fetomaternal morbidity and mortality due to associated complement mediated hemolysis and/or thrombosis. We report a case of PNH in a pregnant lady who presented to our antenatal clinic at 10th weeks of gestation. Her pregnancy was managed with multiple blood transfusions and steroid administration. During 3rd weeks postpartum period she developed sepsis with acute renal failure and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome requiring prolonged hospitalization. She was subsequently discharged from hospital in satisfactory condition. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(1.000: 285-287

  15. Benign paroxysmal torticollis in infancy – diagnostic error possibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatanović Dragan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Benign paroxysmal torticollis (BPT is a rare paroxysmal dyskinesia characterized by attacks of head tilt alone or tilt accompanied by vomiting and ataxia, which may last hours to days. It is claimed that BPT disappears completely in childhood, but that it can evolve into other conditions, such as benign paroxysmal vertigo, cyclical vomiting syndrome, abdominal migraine, hemiplegic migraine, motion sickness and/or migraine with aura. The aim of this manuscript was to renew focus on benign paroxysmal torticollis because the disorder is almost always under-recognized by pediatric practitioners, who often order extensive and unrewarding testing and physiotherapy treatment. Methods. Twelve BPT cases observed during a 5-year period (2009–2014 at the Clinical Centre Niš, Niš, Serbia were reviewed. Data were collected on the features of torticollis, the age of onset, the duration of episodes, associated symptoms, the frequency of episodes, the persistence of symptoms over time, the age when the disorder finally disappeared, sequelae appearing after the 5th birthday, and family history of BPT, migraine or kinetosis. All the children were followed for periods ranging from 48 to 72 months. Results. The series included 6 females and 6 males. The age at onset of BPT was less than 8 months in 84% of the cases. Episodes of torticollis occurred suddenly on waking in all the cases without any trigger factors. The duration of torticollis ranged from a few hours to a few weeks. In 58% of cases, the condition persisted for more than one week. The frequency of the episodes ranged from once every 3 days to once every 25 days. The episodes were more frequent and lasted longer in the early months and tended to cease as the child became older. The age when episodes ended ranged from 11 months to 62 months. In 11 (91.66% cases, the disorder disappeared before the patient's 5th birthday. No patient had a family history of BPT. In 6 cases, family

  16. Horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in a fighter pilot

    OpenAIRE

    Su-Jiang Xie; Jiang-Chang Wang; Li Ding; Xi-Qing Sun

    2011-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common disorder of the peripheral vestibular system, characterized by intense, positional provoked vertigo. BPPV is thought to occur due to canalithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal. Recently, a new entity of BPPV, known as horizontal canal (HC)-BPPV, has been recognized. Although only 3 to 8% of BPPV is due to horizontal canal involvement, HC-BPPV is not rare. We present a case of a naval fighter pilot who had an incident of HC-...

  17. Horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in a fighter pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jiang Xie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is the most common disorder of the peripheral vestibular system, characterized by intense, positional provoked vertigo. BPPV is thought to occur due to canalithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal. Recently, a new entity of BPPV, known as horizontal canal (HC-BPPV, has been recognized. Although only 3 to 8% of BPPV is due to horizontal canal involvement, HC-BPPV is not rare. We present a case of a naval fighter pilot who had an incident of HC-BPPV on the ground. The pilot aeromedical evaluation and considerations are discussed.

  18. Horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in a fighter pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Su-Jiang; Wang, Jiang-Chang; Ding, Li; Sun, Xi-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common disorder of the peripheral vestibular system, characterized by intense, positional provoked vertigo. BPPV is thought to occur due to canalithiasis of the posterior semicircular canal. Recently, a new entity of BPPV, known as horizontal canal (HC)-BPPV, has been recognized. Although only 3 to 8% of BPPV is due to horizontal canal involvement, HC-BPPV is not rare. We present a case of a naval fighter pilot who had an incident of HC-BPPV on the ground. The pilot aeromedical evaluation and considerations are discussed.

  19. EGC diagnosis of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias in patients without preexcitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Torrecilla, Esteban; Arenal, Angel; Atienza, Felipe; Datino, Tomás; Atea, Leonardo F; Calvo, David; Pachón, Marta; Miracle, Angel; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    This review is aimed at discussing the diagnostic value of the different electrocardiographic criteria so far described in the differential diagnosis of the major forms of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias (PSVTs). The predictive value of different combinations of these independent electrocardiographic (ECG) signs in distinguishing atrioventricular reentrant tachycardias (AVRTs) through a concealed accessory pathway (AP) versus atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardias (AVNRTs) are discussed in detail. In addition, the adjunctive diagnostic value of simple, bedside clinical variables and their combinations to the ECG interpretation in differentiating both tachycardia mechanisms is also reviewed.

  20. Intrathoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Very little is known regarding the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in companion animals. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms. Most studies of thoracic neoplasia have focused on the pathology of primary and metastatic neoplasms of the lung with little attention given to diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Although the cited incidence rate for primary respiratory tract neoplasia is low, 8.5 cases per 100,000 dogs and 5.5 cases per 100,000 cats, intrathoracic masses often attract attention out of proportion to their actual importance since they are often readily visualized on routine thoracic radiographs.

  1. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for gastrointestinal neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naomi Kakushima; Mitsuhiro Fujishiro

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is an advanced technique of therapeutic endoscopy for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms. Three steps characterize it:injecting fluid into the submucosa to elevate the lesion,cutting the surrounding mucosa of the lesion, and dissecting the submucosa beneath the lesion. The ESD technique has rapidly permeated in Japan for treatment of early gastric cancer, due to its excellent results of enbloc resection compared to endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). Although there is still room for improvement to lessen its technical difficulty, ESD has recently been applied to esophageal and colorectal neoplasms.Favorable short-term results have been reported, but the application of ESD should be well considered by three aspects: (1) the possibility of nodal metastases of the lesion, (2) technical difficulty such as location, ulceration and operator's skill, and (3) organ characteristics.

  2. Primary bone neoplasms in dogs: 90 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Trost

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of necropsy and biopsy cases of 90 primary bone tumors (89 malignant and one benign in dogs received over a period of 22 years at the Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, was performed. Osteosarcoma was the most prevalent bone tumor, accounting for 86.7% of all malignant primary bone neoplasms diagnosed. Most cases occurred in dogs of large and giant breeds with ages between 6 and 10-years-old. The neoplasms involved mainly the appendicular skeleton, and were 3.5 times more prevalent in the forelimbs than in the hindlimbs. Osteoblastic osteosarcoma was the predominant histological subtype. Epidemiological and pathological findings of osteosarcomas are reported and discussed.

  3. Acquired uniparental disomy in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Score, Joannah; Cross, Nicholas C P

    2012-10-01

    The finding of somatically acquired uniparental disomy, where both copies of a chromosome pair or parts of chromosomes have originated from one parent, has led to the discovery of several novel mutated genes in myeloproliferative neoplasms and related disorders. This article examines how the development of single nucleotide polymorphism array technology has facilitated the identification of regions of acquired uniparental disomy and has led to a much greater understanding of the molecular pathology of these heterogeneous diseases.

  4. MR appearance of skeletal neoplasms following cryotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, M.L. [Dept. of Radiology SB-05, Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States); Lough, L.R. [Pitts Radiological Associates, Columbia, SC (United States); Shuman, W.P. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Lazerte, G.D. [Dept. of Pathology RC-72, Washington Univ., Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Conrad, E.U. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery RK-10, Washington Univ., Medical Center of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Cryotherapy is an increasingly popular mode of therapy adjunctive to surgical curettage in the treatment of certain skeletal neoplasms, such as giant cell tumors or chondrosarcomas. The magnetic resonance (MR) findings following cryotherapy have not been previously reported. We reviewed the MR findings in seven patients with skeletal neoplasms following curettage and cryotherapy. In six cases we found a zone of varying thickness extending beyond the surgical margins, corresponding to an area of cryoinjury to medullary bone. This zone displayed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, consistent with the presence of marrow edema. This zone of edema almost certainly reflects underlying thermal osteonecrosis. This zone may vary in size and intensity over time as the area of cryoinjury evolves or resolves. MR is currently the imaging procedure of choice for follow-up of most musculoskeletal neoplasms. Knowledge of the MR findings following cryotherapy should help prevent confusion during the interpretation of follow-up MR examinations. (orig.)

  5. [Intravenous amiodarone in the therapy of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storelli, A; Andriulo, C; Chisena, A; De Giorgi, M; De Giorgio, N A; Gallone, V; Guadalupi, M; Lupis, O; Nadovezza, S; Tarentini, A

    1985-03-01

    The Authors evaluated the effectiveness and the tolerance of intravenous Amiodarone in 50 cases of recent onset paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmias. Fifty consecutive patients, aged 17 to 84 (mean 52 years), presenting with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT, 33 cases) or atrial flutter (11 cases) or atrial fibrillation (6 cases), were given 300 mg of Amiodarone intravenously within 2 min, followed in 4 patients by 150 mg after 15 min. All patients were monitored for 1 hour; ECG and blood pressure were recorded at fixed times. Within 15 min sinus rhythm was restored in 88% of PSVT, in 27% of atrial flutter and in 17% of atrial fibrillation cases; the other cases of atrial flutter and fibrillation always showed a 48-81% reduction of the average heart rate within 15 min. We have evidenced neither significant modifications of blood pressure and ECG parameters (P-Q, QRS and Q-T duration) nor particular side effects, except for 2 cases in which brief hot flushes were reported. The Authors believe Amiodarone to be an effective and well tolerated drug for the above mentioned arrhythmias, particularly promptly acting in PSVT cases, in whom sinus rhythm was restored within 15 min in 88% and within 1 hour in 100% of the cases.

  6. Dual chamber pacemaker in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rađen Goran

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent cardiac dysrhythmia. The aim of this study was to show the role and the efficacy of a dual chamber pacemaker with the algorithm of atrial dynamic overdrive, in the suppression of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Case report. A woman with a classical bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome, and frequent attacks of atrial fibrillation, underwent the implantation of a single chamber permanent pacemaker (VVI. Pacemaker successfully treated the episodes of symptomatic bradycardia, but the patient had frequent attacks of atrial fibrillation, despite the use of different antiarrhythmic drugs, which she did not tolerate well. The decision was made to reimplant a permanent dual chamber pacemaker with the algorithm of atrial dynamic overdrive. The pacemaker was programmed to the basic rate of 75/min, while rate at rest was 55/min. In addition, sotalol was administered. After three months, the patient became asymptomatic with only 4 short − term episodes of atrial fibrillation, and a high level of atrial pacing (99%. Conclusion. In selected patients with bradycardia−tachycardia syndrome, atrial-based pacing seemed to be very effective in reducing the incidence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

  7. Understanding paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly S Meyer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH is a condition occurring in a small percentage of patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. It is characterized by a constellation of symptoms associated with excessive adrenergic output, including tachycardia, hypertension, tachypnea, and diaphoresis. Diagnosis is one of exclusion and, therefore, is often delayed. Treatment is aimed at minimizing triggers and pharmacologic management of symptoms. Methods: A literature review using medline and cinahl was conducted to identify articles related to PSH. Search terms included paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity, autonomic storming, diencephalic seizures, and sympathetic storming. Reference lists of pertinent articles were also reviewed and these additional papers were included. Results: The literature indicates that the understanding of PSH following TBI is in its infancy. The majority of information is based on small case series. The review revealed treatments that may be useful in treating PSH. Conclusions: Nurses play a critical role in the identification of at-risk patients, symptom complexes, and in the education of family. Early detection and treatment is likely to decrease overall morbidity and facilitate recovery. Further research is needed to establish screening tools and treatment algorithms for PSH.

  8. Benign paroxysmal vertigo in childhood: a migraine equivalent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira, E; Piacentino, G; Lanzi, G; Balottin, U; Fazzi, E

    1984-01-01

    The two main problems in defining and classifying the syndrome of benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV) in childhood are the vestibular function pattern and the relationship between BPV and migraine. 13 children suffering from this syndrome were submitted to complete otoneurological examination, including caloric and rotational labyrinthine stimulation with ENG recording, and to headache provocation tests with nitroglycerin, histamine and fenfluramine. Vestibular responses were normal in all except 2 cases which presented signs of central vestibular impairment at the level of the vestibulocerebellar pathways. Headache provocation tests were positive in 9 out of 10 children, and in 4 cases they induced a typical vertiginous attack instead of headache. In addition, several children had a positive family history for migraine, headache was frequently associated with the crisis and other signs of a 'periodic syndrome' (motion sickness, cyclic vomiting, abdominal pain) were present, unrelated to vertiginous attacks. During the follow-up period, some children responded positively to migraine treatment. BPV, like paroxysmal torticollis in infancy and the signs of the periodic syndrome, can be considered a migraine equivalent or a migraine precursor and could be due to the same vascular and/or biochemical mechanisms responsible for the migraine. In children, for anatomical or developmental reasons, these mechanisms could selectively affect parts of the brain stem, including the vestibular nuclei and vestibulocerebellar pathways.

  9. Breakthrough pain in opioid-treated chronic non-malignant pain patients referred to a multidisciplinary pain centre: a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højsted, J; Nielsen, P R; Eriksen, Jacob Gram;

    2006-01-01

    Breakthrough pain (BTP) has not formerly been discussed as such in chronic non-malignant pain patients referred to pain centres and clinics. The purpose of the study was to investigate the prevalence, characteristics and mechanisms of BTP in opioid-treated chronic non-malignant pain patients refe...... referred to a pain centre and to assess the short-term effects of pain treatment.......Breakthrough pain (BTP) has not formerly been discussed as such in chronic non-malignant pain patients referred to pain centres and clinics. The purpose of the study was to investigate the prevalence, characteristics and mechanisms of BTP in opioid-treated chronic non-malignant pain patients...

  10. Neuropsychological and neuroanatomical sequelae of chronic non-malignant pain and opioid analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Cady; Cianfrini, Leanne

    2013-01-01

    The pervasive disease of chronic pain is a common challenge for the clinical rehabilitation professional. Concurrent with physical and emotional symptoms, pain-related cognitive impairment has been reported. Although opioid analgesics are frequently prescribed, concern exists that opioids possess adverse cognitive effects of their own. To review the neuropsychological and neuroanatomical sequelae of chronic non-malignant pain and opioid therapy, to clarify roles and benefits of neuropsychological assessment in a chronic pain population, and to provide recommendations for clinical practice and future research. This non-systematic review sought to provide a comprehensive synthesis of relevant neurobiology, neuroimaging, neuropsychological, and rehabilitation research literatures. We included citations from seminal and current texts as well as relevant original and review articles from 1980-2012 in PubMed and PubMedCentral online research databases. To date, evidence from opioid studies suggests only mild deficits in specific cognitive domains (e.g., memory, attention/concentration) and only under specific conditions (e.g., dose escalations). Additionally, neuroimaging and neuropsychological evidence suggests that pain itself results in cognitive sequelae. Methodological improvements in future research will allow for better delineation of the contributing effects of pain and opioids, with an overall goal of improving evidence-based clinical treatment recommendations.

  11. Treosulfan-Based Conditioning and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Nonmalignant Diseases: A Prospective Multi-Center Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, Lauri M.; Nemecek, Eneida R.; Torgerson, Troy R.; Storer, Barry E.; Talano, Julie-An; Domm, Jennifer; Giller, Roger H.; Shimamura, Akiko; Delaney, Colleen; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Thakar, Monica S.; Baker, K. Scott; Rawlings, David J.; Englund, Janet A.; Flowers, Mary E. D.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Storb, Rainer; Woolfrey, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is effective in the treatment of patients with nonmalignant diseases and for many is the only known cure. Conventional myeloablative regimens have been associated with unacceptably high early transplant-related mortality (TRM) particularly in patients with co-morbid conditions. This prospective multicenter trial was designed to determine the safety and engraftment efficacy of treosulfan-based conditioning in patients with nonmalignant diseases. Thirty-one patients received HLA-matched related (n=4) or unrelated (n=27) grafts following conditioning with treosulfan (total dose: 42 g/m2), fludarabine (total dose: 150 mg/m2), ± thymoglobulin (6 mg/kg; n=22). Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis consisted of tacrolimus and methotrexate. All patients engrafted. Day-100 TRM was 0%. With a median follow-up of 2 years, the 2-year survival was 90%. Three patients died of GVHD, recurrent hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, and a surgical complication, respectively. The cumulative incidences of grades II–IV and III–IV acute GVHD at day 100 and chronic GVHD at 2 years were 62%, 10% and 21%, respectively. Patients who received thymoglobulin had a significantly lower incidence of grade III-IV acute GVHD (0% versus 33%; P = 0.005). These results indicate that the combination of treosulfan, fludarabine, and thymoglobulin is effective at establishing donor engraftment with low toxicity and improved survival in patients with nonmalignant diseases, and support the need for future disease-specific clinical trials. PMID:25196857

  12. The influence of discordance in pain assessment on the functional status of patients with chronic nonmalignant pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Mukta; Staton, Lisa J; Chen, Ian; Kurz, James; O'Rorke, Jane; Pasanen, Mark; Menon, Madhusudan; Genao, Inginia; Wood, Joann; Mechaber, Alex; Rosenberg, Eric; Faselis, Charles; Carey, Tim; Calleson, Diane; Cykert, Sam

    2006-07-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent cause of suffering and disability that seriously affects patients' quality of life and imposes a staggering socioeconomic toll on society. Little is known about the impact of patient-physician disagreement (discordance) regarding the assessment of chronic pain on patients' quality of life in primary care settings. This study evaluates the role of discordance and other potentially modifiable factors that affect the quality of life and functional status of chronic pain patients. We evaluated 436 patient-physician encounters at 12 academic medical centers in the United States. We surveyed chronic nonmalignant pain patients to understand their pain perceptions. We concurrently surveyed their physicians about their perceptions of their patient's pain in primary care settings. More than 50% of physicians disagreed with their patient's pain. Thirty-nine percent of primary care physicians underestimated their patient's pain. In the multivariate analysis, this discordance was associated with poor physical functioning and worse bodily pain (P < 0.018 and P < 0.001 respectively). Patients with chronic, nonmalignant pain have reductions in physical function and bodily pain domains of the SF-36 compared to age-matched populations. Depression and obesity represented other associations. Patients with chronic nonmalignant pain have poor physical functioning and worse bodily pain. Discordance, obesity, and depression are other modifiable factors. Prospective studies are needed to design interventions. However, a multifaceted approach appears to represent the best opportunity to reduce the pain and suffering of this challenging population.

  13. High Lysyl Oxidase (LOX) in the Non-Malignant Prostate Epithelium Predicts a Poor Outcome in Prostate Cancer Patient Managed by Watchful Waiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Maria; Hägglöf, Christina; Hammarsten, Peter; Thysell, Elin; Stattin, Pär; Egevad, Lars; Granfors, Torvald; Jernberg, Emma; Wikstrom, Pernilla; Halin Bergström, Sofia; Bergh, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) has been shown to both promote and suppress tumor progression, but its role in prostate cancer is largely unknown. LOX immunoreactivity was scored in prostate tumor epithelium, tumor stroma and in the tumor-adjacent non-malignant prostate epithelium and stroma. LOX scores in tumor and non-malignant prostate tissues were then examined for possible associations with clinical characteristics and survival in a historical cohort of men that were diagnosed with prostate cancer at transurethral resection and followed by watchful waiting. Men with a low LOX score in the non-malignant prostate epithelium had significantly longer cancer specific survival than men with a high score. Furthermore, LOX score in non-malignant prostate epithelium remained prognostic in a multivariable analysis including Gleason score. LOX score in prostate tumor epithelium positively correlated to Gleason score and metastases but was not associated with cancer survival. LOX score in tumor and non-malignant prostate stroma appeared unrelated to these tumor characteristics. In radical prostatectomy specimens, LOX immune-staining corresponded to LOX in-situ hybridization and LOX mRNA levels were found to be similar between tumor and adjacent non-malignant areas, but significantly increased in bone metastases samples. LOX levels both in tumors and in the surrounding tumor-bearing organ are apparently related to prostate cancer aggressiveness.

  14. Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbui, T.; Barosi, G.; Birgegard, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a review of critical concepts and produce recommendations on the management of Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms, including monitoring, response definition, first- and second-line therapy, and therapy for special issues. Key questions were selected according......, with the addition of cytogenetics evaluation and transfusion status. High-risk patients with PV should be managed with phlebotomy, low-dose aspirin, and cytoreduction, with either hydroxyurea or interferon at any age. High-risk patients with ET should be managed with cytoreduction, using hydroxyurea at any age...

  15. Four types of neoplasms in Asian sea bass (Lates calcarifer)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramalingam Vijayakumar; Kuzhanthaivel Raja; Vijayapoopathi Singaravel; Ayyaru Gopalakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To describe and observe four types of neoplasms on different parts (external and internal organs) of an Asian sea bass (Lates calcarifer). Methods:The sample was collected from local fish landing center (south east coast of India). Histopathology of normal and tumour tissues were analyzed. Results:A total of 83 tumour masses (neoplasm) were recorded on the fish skin, also the neoplasms were recorded in internal organs of fish such as liver, stomach and ovary. Conclusions:Aetiology of such neoplasm’s are unknown, further more researches need to confirm the causative agent for this type of neoplasm.

  16. Paroxysmal vascular events in Sturge– Weber syndrome: Role of aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Sanghvi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS is a rare, sporadically occurring neurocutaneous disorder with a frequency of approximately 1 per 50,000. The hallmark is an intracranial leptomeningeal vascular angioma in association with a port wine nevus, usually involving ophthalmic or maxillary distribution of trigeminal nerve. Other clinical findings associated with SWS are seizures, glaucoma, hemiparesis and mental retardation. The radiological hallmark is "Tram-line" or "Gyri-form" calcification. 25 to 56% of patients experience recurrent episodes of paroxysmal focal neurological deficits in form of transient hemiparesis, which may be due to vascular ischemia or postictal in origin. EEG helps to differentiate the exact etiology, as it is normal in former. Aspirin prophylaxis in those, due to ischemia decreases their recurrences and improves overall neurological prognosis. We report a 25-month-old child of SWS with recurrent episodes of transient hemiparesis and atypical midline location of facial vascular nevus.

  17. Diagnosis and management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnes, Lorne S; Agrawal, Sumit K; Atlas, Jason

    2003-09-30

    There is compelling evidence that free-floating endolymph particles in the posterior semicircular canal underlie most cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Recent pathological findings suggest that these particles are otoconia, probably displaced from the otolithic membrane in the utricle. They typically settle in the dependent posterior canal and render it sensitive to gravity. Well over 90% of patients can be successfully treated with a simple outpatient manoeuvre that moves the particles back into the utricle. We describe the various techniques for this manoeuvre, plus treatments for uncommon variants of BPPV such as that of the lateral canal. For the rare patient whose BPPV is not responsive to these manoeuvres and has severe symptoms, posterior canal occlusion surgery is a safe and highly effective procedure.

  18. Acute tubular necrosis in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eranga S Wijewickrama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is a well-recognized complication of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH. The predominant mechanism is intravascular hemolysis resulting in massive hemoglobinuria ARF. We report a case of acute tubular necrosis (ATN developed in the absence of overwhelming evidence of intravascular hemolysis in a 21-year-old man with anemia, who was eventually diagnosed to have PNH. The patient presented with rapidly deteriorating renal functions in the background of iron deficiency anemia, which was attributed to reflux esophagitis. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence of intravascular hemolysis. Renal biopsy revealed ATN with deposition of hemosiderin in the proximal tubular epithelial cells. Diagnosis of PNH was confirmed with a positive Ham′s test and flow cytometry. Our case emphasizes the need to consider ATN as a possible cause for ARF in patients suspected to have PNH even in the absence of overwhelming evidence of intravascular hemolysis.

  19. [Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia-mechanisms, diagnostic, and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Hildegard

    2014-02-01

    Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia have their origin above the His bundle. However, this definition has a historical origin and is imprecise regarding AV-reentry tachycardia using an accessory pathways since this tachycardia use the ventricule a part of the reentry-circuit. The most common supraventricular tachycardia is the atrioventricular nodal re-entry tachycardia, which is caused by a re-entrant tachycardia that involves the AV node and the atrial tissue followed by the atrioventricular re-entry tachycardia using an accessory pathway. More prevalent are sinus tachycardia, which is often physiologic and atrial fibrillation/flutter which are covered in detail by other articles within this issue of Therapeutischen Umschau. Therefore, the main topic of this review is the discussion of the mechanisms, diagnosis and treatment of AV nodal reentry tachycardia, AV reentry tachycardia using an accessory pathway and to a less extent focal atrial tachycardia.

  20. Childhood paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH), a report of 11 cases in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel-Eibrink, MM; Bredius, RGM; Winkel, MLT; Tamminga, R; de Kraker, J; Schouten-van Meeteren, AYN; Bruin, Marrie; Korthof, ET

    2005-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is characterized by intravascular haemolysis, nocturnal haemoglobinuria, thrombotic events, serious infections and bone marrow failure. This acquired disease, caused by a deficiency of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored proteins on the haematopoiet

  1. Topiramate-antagonism of L-glutamate-induced paroxysms in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffa, Robert B; Finno, Kristin E; Tallarida, Christopher S; Rawls, Scott M

    2010-12-15

    We recently reported that NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) and AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid) induce concentration-dependent paroxysms in planarians (Dugesia dorotocephala). Since the postulated mechanisms of action of the sulfamate-substituted monosaccharide antiepileptic drug topiramate include inhibition of glutamate-activated ion channels, we tested the hypothesis that topiramate would inhibit glutamate-induced paroxysms in our model. We demonstrate that: (1) L-glutamate (1-10 mM), but not D-glutamate, induced dose-related paroxysms, and that (2) topiramate dose-relatedly (0.3-3 mM) inhibited L-glutamate-induced paroxysms. These results provide further evidence of a topiramate-sensitive glutamate receptor-mediated activity in this model.

  2. EFFECT OF SPIRAPRIL ON THE LENGTH OF INTERICTAL INTERVAL IN PAROXYSMAL ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Chikhireva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate effects of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor spirapril on efficacy of preventive antiarrhythmic therapy in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF.Material and methods. 40 patients with paroxysmal AF were involved in open-label, cross-over study with periods of antiarrhythmic drug withdrawal. During 3 months all patients received by turns two types of therapy: combination of preventive antiarrhythmic therapy with spirapril 6 mg once daily - (CT group or preventive antiarrhythmic therapy only (AT group.Results. AF-free intervals to the first and the second AF paroxysms during antiarrhythmic drug withdrawal were comparable in AT and CT groups (p=0,4 and p=0,6, respectively, logrank test.Conclusion. Spirapril added to the basic preventive antiarrhythmic therapy during 3 months had no effect on the length of interictal period in paroxysmal AF.

  3. Impaired autonomic function predicts dizziness at onset of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, MP; Hassink, RJ; Tuinenburg, AE; Lefrandt, JD; de Kam, PJ; Crijns, HJGM

    2001-01-01

    Background: Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is associated with various symptoms, including dizziness, which presumably reflects hemodynamic deterioration. Given the importance of the autonomic nervous system in mitigating the hemodynamic effect of atrial fibrillation, we hypothesized that autonomic f

  4. [Rare case of a pregnancy in a woman with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horányi, Dániel; Várkonyi, Andrea; Nagy, Gyula Richárd; Bodó, Imre; Masszi, Tamás

    2016-06-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is a rare hematological disease. It is associated with increased maternal and fetal complications to such an extent that pregnancy has been considered relatively contraindicated in woman with paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria. Recently, eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody, has been shown to decrease complications during pregnancies. The highest risk is thromboembolic complication and, therefore, anticoagulant is a standard therapy during pregnancy. In the presented case, a 29-year-old woman with a 5-year history of paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria had a pregnancy. It was her first pregnancy and was complicated by a sinus thrombosis at the 11th gestational week. After the introduction of eculizumab treatment, the remaining period of pregnancy and delivery were uncomplicated. There are only a few cases in the literature about pregnancy in woman with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria who are treated with eculizumab. This monoclonal antibody seems to be safe and it likely prevents many of the complications otherwise observed.

  5. PRRT2 phenotypes and penetrance of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia and infantile convulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, Rianne; Breedveld, Guido; de Rijk-van Andel, Johanneke; Brilstra, Eva; Verbeek, Nienke; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, Corien; Boon, Maartje; Samijn, Johnny; Diderich, Karin; van de Laar, Ingrid; Oostra, Ben; Bonifati, Vincenzo; Maat-Kievit, Anneke

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe the phenotypes and penetrance of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), a movement disorder characterized by attacks of involuntary movements occurring after sudden movements, infantile convulsion and choreoathetosis (ICCA) syndrome, and benign familial infantile convulsions

  6. Predictors and prognosis of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in general practice in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallander Mari-Ann

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF is not very well documented. Clinical experience suggests that paroxysmal AF could progress to chronic AF with estimates ranging between 15 and 30% over a period of 1–3 years. We performed an epidemiologic study to elucidate the natural history of paroxysmal AF, this study estimated its incidence in a general practice setting, identified associated factors and analyzed the progression into chronic AF as well as the mortality rate. Methods Using the UK General Practice Research Database (GPRD, we identified patients aged 40–89 years with a first-recorded episode of paroxysmal AF during 1996. Risk factors were assessed using 525 incident paroxysmal AF cases confirmed by the general practitioner (GP and a random sample of controls. We follow-up paroxysmal AF patients and estimated their mortality rate and progression to chronic AF. Results The incidence of paroxysmal AF was 1.0 per 1,000 person-years. Major risk factors for paroxysmal AF were age and prior valvular heart disease, ischaemic heart disease, heart failure and hyperthyroidism. During a mean follow-up of 2.7 years, 70 of 418 paroxysmal AF patients with complete information progressed to chronic AF. Risk factors associated with progression were valvular heart disease (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.2–6.0 and moderate to high alcohol consumption (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.1–8.0. Paroxysmal AF patients did not carry an increased risk of mortality, compared to an age and sex matched sample of the general population. There was a suggestion of a small increased risk among patients progressing to chronic AF (RR 1.5, 96% CI 0.8–2.9. Conclusion Paroxysmal AF is a common arrhythmia in the general practice setting, increasing with age and commonly associated with other heart diseases. It sometimes is the initial presentation and then progress to chronic AF. A history of valvular heart disease and alcohol consumption are associated with

  7. Malignant neoplasms of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Paxton V; Davidoff, Andrew M

    2006-05-01

    Head and neck masses represent a common clinical entity in children. In general, these masses are classified as developmental, inflammatory, or neoplastic. Having a working knowledge of lesions within this region and conducting a thorough history and physical examination generally enables the clinician to facilitate an appropriate workup and establish a diagnosis. The differential diagnosis is broad, and expeditiously distinguishing benign from malignant masses is critical for instituting a timely multidisciplinary approach to the management of malignant lesions. Neoplasms of the head and neck account for approximately 5% of all childhood malignancies. A diagnosis of malignancy may represent a primary tumor or metastatic foci to cervical nodes. In this review, we discuss the general approach to evaluating suspicious masses and adenopathy in the head and neck region and summarize the most common malignant neoplasms of the head and neck with regard to their incidence, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, staging, and management. Thyroid, parathyroid, and salivary gland tumors are discussed elsewhere in this issue of Seminars in Pediatric Surgery.

  8. Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms; Neuroendokrine Neoplasien des Pankreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiderwellen, K.; Lauenstein, T.C. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Essen (Germany); Sabet, A.; Poeppel, T.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Essen (Germany); Lahner, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Endokrinologie und Stoffwechselerkrankungen, Essen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2 % of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. (orig.) [German] Neuroendokrine Neoplasien (NEN) des Pankreas stellen mit einem Anteil von 1-2 % aller pankreatischen Tumoren eine seltene Differenzialdiagnose dar. Ein Teil der Tumoren ist hormonell aktiv und faellt klinisch durch charakteristische Symptome auf, wohingegen der ueberwiegende Anteil hormonell inaktiv ist. Bildgebende Verfahren wie Sonographie, Computertomographie (CT), Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) und nicht zuletzt Positronenemissionstomographie (PET oder kombiniert als PET/CT) spielen eine zentrale Rolle fuer Erstdiagnose, Therapieplanung und -kontrolle. Die Endosonographie und die multiphasische CT stellen die Referenzmethoden zur Lokalisation des Primaertumors dar. Fuer die Differenzierung insbesondere kleiner Leberlaesionen bietet die MRT die hoechste Aussagekraft. Fuer das Ganzkoerperstaging und bestimmte Aspekte der Therapieplanung lassen sich die Somatostatinrezeptorszintigraphie und v. a. die Somatostatinrezeptor-PET/CT heranziehen. (orig.)

  9. Topical treatment options for conjunctival neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan W Kim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan W Kim, David H AbramsonOphthalmic Oncology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Topical therapies offer a nonsurgical method for treating conjunctival tumors by delivering high drug concentrations to the ocular surface. Over the past ten years, topical agents have been used by investigators to treat various premalignant and malignant lesions of the conjunctiva, such as primary acquired melanosis with atypia, conjunctival melanoma, squamous intraepithelial neoplasia and squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva, and pagetoid spread of the conjunctiva arising from sebaceous cell carcinoma. Despite the enthusiasm generated by the success of these agents, there are unanswered questions regarding the clinical efficacy of this new nonsurgical approach, and whether a single topical agent can achieve cure rates comparable with traditional therapies. Furthermore, the long-term consequences of prolonged courses of topical chemotherapeutic drugs on the ocular surface are unknown, and the ideal regimen for each of these agents is still being refined. In this review, we present specific guidelines for treating both melanocytic and squamous neoplasms of the conjunctiva, utilizing the available data in the literature as well as our own clinical experience at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.Keywords: topical therapies, conjunctival neoplasms melanosis, Mitomycin-C, 5-Fluorouracil

  10. Different glycosylation of cadherins from human bladder non-malignant and cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lityńska Anna

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to determine whether stage of invasiveness of bladder cancer cell lines contributes to alterations in glycan pattern of their cadherins. Results Human non-malignant epithelial cell of ureter HCV29, v-raf transfected HCV29 line (BC3726 and transitional cell cancers of urine bladder Hu456 and T24 were grown in cell culture. Equal amounts of protein from each cell extracts were separated by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis and were blotted on an Immobilon P membrane. Cadherins were immunodetected using anti-pan cadherin mAb and lectin blotting assays were performed, in parallel. N-oligosaccharides were analysed by specific reaction with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA, Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA, Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA, Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA, Aleuria aurantia agglutinin (AAA, Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA-L and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA. The cadherin from HCV29 cell line possessed bi- and/or 2,4-branched triantennary complex type glycans, some of which were α2,6-sialylated. The cadherin from BC3726 cell line exhibited exclusively high mannose type glycans. Cadherins from Hu456 and T24 cell lines expressed high mannose type glycans as well as β1,6-branched oligosaccharides with poly-N-acetyllactosamine structures and α2,3-linked sialic acid residues. Additionally, the presence of fucose and α2,6-sialic acid residues on the cadherin from T24 cell line was detected. Conclusions These results indicate that N-glycosylation pattern of cadherin from bladder cancer cell line undergoes modification during carcinogenesis.

  11. Analgesic use by ageing and elderly patients with chronic non-malignant pain: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mary-Claire; Cousins, Grainne; Henman, Martin C

    2017-08-01

    Background Analgesics are used in the management of chronic non-malignant pain (CNMP), a condition which is highly prevalent among older adults. CNMP may not only be physically distressing but also complicated by psychosocial and economic factors. An individual's perception and use of analgesics may be influenced by a range of factors such as perceptions of risk or benefits, ability to purchase medication or access to non-pharmacological therapies or specialist care. Objective The aim of this study was to describe the perceptions and experiences of analgesics by ageing and elderly individuals with CNMP and identify factors that influence their use. Setting Telephone interviews with 28 members of Chronic Pain Ireland aged ≥50. Method In-depth semi-structured interviews; audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analysed. Main outcome measure Experiences and perceptions of ageing and elderly individuals with CNMP taking analgesics. Results A combination of factors specific to the patient and arising from outside influences informed perceptions and experiences of analgesics. Pain severity, perceived efficacy of analgesics, occurrence of adverse-effects and concerns about addiction/dependence were identified as internal factors influencing medication use. External factors included views of family members, access to specialised care and the individual's interaction with healthcare professionals (HCPs). Conclusion Individuals with CNMP regard analgesics as an important method for managing pain and are relied upon when other interventions are difficult to access. HCPs in primary care, who are the main point of contact for patients, need to take into account the various factors that may influence analgesic use when consulting with this patient group.

  12. Paroxysmal neuralgia in pediatric population--a diagnostic dilemma for physicians and dental practioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, A; Mujoo, S; Sakarde, S B; Dubey, A K

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal neuralgia is relatively uncommon in children. Neuropathic orofacial pain is a challenge for the clinician, as no obvious dental pathology exists either clinically or radiographically. Dentist and physician should be able to recognize the characteristics of neuropathic pain so as to correctly diagnose these conditions hence avoid unnecessary dental intervention. This article reviews the conditions with paroxysmal neuralgia in children and available treatment strategies.

  13. Paroxysmal Exercise-induced Dyskinesias Caused by GLUT1 Deficiency Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongin, Marie; Mezouar, Nicolas; Dodet, Pauline; Vidailhet, Marie; Roze, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is due to de novo mutations in the SLC2A1 gene encoding the glucose transporter type 1. Phenomenology Shown Paroxysmal motor manifestations induced by exercise or fasting may be the main manifestations of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome. Educational Value Proper identification of the paroxysmal events and early diagnosis is important since the disease is potentially treatable. PMID:27351150

  14. Emergency cesarean delivery in a parturient who had an intractable paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia -A case report-

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kyoung Ok; Chang, Eun-Jung; Han, Jin; Cho, Hun

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is a common arrhythmia in the parturient and can occur with or without an underlying organic heart disease. A woman of 35 weeks' gestation, who had a paroxysmal SVT that was resistant to antiarrhythmic drugs and electric cardioversion, required emergency Cesarean delivery. The Cesarean delivery was performed under spinal anesthesia and a healthy baby was delivered uneventfully. SVT spontaneously converted to normal sinus rhythm right after deliver...

  15. [Anxiety-depressive disorders and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: the psychosomatic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marilov, V V; Artem'eva, M S; Iurovskaia, I I

    2013-01-01

    One hundred and forty-five patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation were examined to evaluate the effectiveness of the correction of physical state in the course of complex (somatotropic and psychotropic) therapy. Personality characteristics of patients with arrhythmias, the structure and severity of stress and anxiety-depressive disorders preceding the manifestation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation were studied. Patients were examined at baseline and at the 21st day of therapy using clinical and instrumental methods (Holter ECG monitoring) and psychometric scales (the Beck Depression Inventory, the Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating scale). The complex treatment of patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation with SSRI antidepressants (paroxetine, fluvoxamine, sertraline) allowed to rapidly reduce neurotic anxiety depressive disorders. There was a significant positive trend in the course and frequency of paroxysms of atrial fibrillation on 21st day of treatment. These remedies help to reduce the duration of arrhythmia's attack which has already begun facilitating its relief. After 3-5 months of such regular complex pharmacotherapy, paroxysms of atrial fibrillation were completely stopped in 10.3% of patients. The follow-up investigation 18 months later showed that patients with certain personality traits and the positive dynamics of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation under a complex (somatotropic and psychotropic) treatment can develop cardiophobia' attacks in recurrent significant stress situations. Side-effects of the drugs were not significant and did not require discontinuation of the treatment.

  16. Primary cardiac neoplasms:a clinicopathologic analysis of 81 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王继纲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the disease spectrum,clinical and pathologic features of primary cardiac neoplasms at asingle medical in stitution during a period of eight years.Methods The clinical and pathologic features of 81 cases of primary cardiac neoplasms encountered at the Affiliated

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  5. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas: a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Jafar Memon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic neoplasms are rare in children and have a different histo-logic spectrum and prognosis than those in adults. Pancreatoblastoma is the most common pancreatic neoplasm in young children. Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm occurs in adolescent girls. It is heterogeneous in internal architecture, with a mixture of solid and cystic hemorrhagic and necrotic elements. All pancreatic neoplasms in children are capable of producing metastases, usually to the liver and lymph nodes; however, on the whole, these tumors have a better clinical outcome than most pancreatic tumors in adults. We present a case of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm with a liver metastasis in a 13 year old male patient. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(7.000: 3090-3093

  6. Cholesteryl esters in human malignant neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, M R; Bottura, G; Lucchi, P; Reggiani, A; Trinchero, A; Tugnoli, V

    2003-01-01

    Cholesteryl esters (CholE) were detected in human malignant neoplasms by means of in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Spectroscopic analysis of the total lipid extracts obtained from cerebral tumors revealed appreciable amount of esterified cholesterol in high grade gliomas such as glioblastomas and anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, characterized by prominent neovascularity. The finding that no CholE were detected in the healthy brain and in low grade and benign tumors supports a possible correlation between this class of lipids and histological vascular proliferation. Compared with high grade gliomas, renal cell carcinomas show higher levels of CholE, absent in the healthy renal parenchyma and in benign oncocytomas. In nefro-carcinomas, cytoplasmic lipid inclusions and prominent vascularization contribute to the increased levels of CholE present mainly as oleate. CholE are discussed as potential biochemical markers of cancer and as a target for new therapeutic strategies.

  7. Clinical photodynamic therapy of malignant neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Skobelkin, Oleg K.; Litwin, Gregory; Astrakhankina, Tamara A.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of the results of treatment of 379 malignant neoplasms with PDT in 89 patients has been made. Photogem (hematoporphyrin derivative) and Photosense (aluminum sulfonated derivative) -- both produced in Russia -- were used as photosensitizers. An argon-pumped dye- laser called `Innova 200' (Coherent USA), a Russian dye laser with copper vapor pumping (Yakhroma 2), a gold vapor laser (630 nm and 627.8 nm, accordingly) for Photogem, and a solid aluminate ittrium laser (672 nm) for Photosense were used. Up to now we have had follow-up control of 75 patients for the period of 2 months to 2.5 years. Positive effect of PDT was seen in 90.7% (68 out of 75); including complete regression -39 (52%), partial (50 - 100%), -in 29 (38.7%).

  8. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for stomach neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mitsuhiro Fujishiro

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in techniques of therapeutic endoscopy for stomach neoplasms are rapidly achieved. One of the major topics in this field is endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). ESD is a new endoscopic technique using cutting devices to remove the tumor by thefollowing three steps: injecting fluid into the submucosa to elevate the tumor from the muscle layer, pre-cutting the surrounding mucosa of the tumor, and dissecting the connective tissue of the submucosa beneath the tumor. So the tumors are resectable in an en bloc fashion, regardless of the size, shape, coexisting ulcer,and location. Indication for ESD is strictly confined by two aspects: the possibility of nodal metastases and technical difficulty, which depends on the operators. Although long-term outcome data are still lacking, short-term outcomes of ESD are extremely favourable and laparotomy with gastrectomy is replaced with ESD in some parts of therapeutic strategy for early gastric cancer.

  9. Cytogenetically unrelated clones in hematological neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, S; Mitelman, F

    1989-01-01

    We have reviewed literature data on 6,306 cases of hematological neoplasia--acute and chronic lymphatic and myeloid leukemias (CML excepted), myelodysplastic and chronic lymphoproliferative and myeloproliferative disorders, and malignant lymphomas--with the goal of quantitatively ascertaining how often cytogenetically unrelated clones occur in these diseases. Unexpectedly wide variations were found: in ANLL, unrelated clones were present in 1.1% of the 2,506 known cases with chromosome abnormalities characterized with banding technique; in the various myelodysplastic (MDS) and chronic myeloproliferative (CMD) disorders (total number of cases 1,299) the frequency was 4.3% and in lymphatic malignancies 1.3% (total case number 2,501). In the latter group the proportions varied between 0.4% and 0.6% in ALL and malignant lymphoma (ML) to as much as 6.2% in CLD and 7.3% in CLL. Some karyotypic abnormalities were encountered more often than would be expected from their general frequency in the various diseases. This discrepancy was particularly evident in MDS and CMD, where 5q- was found in slightly less and +8 in somewhat more than half of the 56 cases. Furthermore, these two aberrations were found as the only changes in the two coexisting clones in one-fourth of the material. Although if viewed in isolation these data would undoubtedly be best explained by assuming a multicellular origin of the neoplasm, it is entirely possible that what are cytogenetically perceived as unrelated clones could be subclones with some invisible aberration in common. If so, this interpretation indicates that changes like +8 and 5q-, both of which are common rearrangements in bone marrow neoplasms, are actually secondary changes that develop during tumor progression.

  10. Incidence of colorectal neoplasms among male pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshkowitz, Menachem; Toledano, Ohad; Galazan, Lior; Hallak, Aharon; Arber, Nadir; Santo, Erwin

    2014-07-21

    To assess the prevalence of colorectal neoplasms (adenomas, advanced adenomas and colorectal cancers) among Israeli military and commercial airline pilots. Initial screening colonoscopy was performed on average-risk (no symptoms and no family history) airline pilots at the Integrated Cancer Prevention Center (ICPC) in the Tel-Aviv Medical Center. Visualized polyps were excised and sent for pathological examination. Advanced adenoma was defined as a lesion >10 mm in diameter, with high-grade dysplasia or villous histology. The results were compared with those of an age- and gender-matched random sample of healthy adults undergoing routine screening at the ICPC. There were 270 pilots (mean age 55.2 ± 7.4 years) and 1150 controls (mean age 55.7 ± 7.8 years). The prevalence of colorectal neoplasms was 15.9% among the pilots and 20.6% among the controls (P = 0.097, χ (2) test). There were significantly more hyperplastic polyps among pilots (15.5% vs 9.4%, P = 0.004) and a trend towards fewer adenomas (14.8% vs 20.3% P = 0.06). The prevalence of advanced lesions among pilots and control groups was 5.9% and 4.7%, respectively (P = 0.49), and the prevalence of cancer was 0.7% and 0.69%, respectively (P = 0.93). There tends to be a lower colorectal adenoma, advanced adenoma and cancer prevalence but a higher hyperplastic polyp prevalence among pilots than the general population.

  11. Somatic mutations of calreticulin in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klampfl, Thorsten; Gisslinger, Heinz; Harutyunyan, Ashot S; Nivarthi, Harini; Rumi, Elisa; Milosevic, Jelena D; Them, Nicole C C; Berg, Tiina; Gisslinger, Bettina; Pietra, Daniela; Chen, Doris; Vladimer, Gregory I; Bagienski, Klaudia; Milanesi, Chiara; Casetti, Ilaria Carola; Sant'Antonio, Emanuela; Ferretti, Virginia; Elena, Chiara; Schischlik, Fiorella; Cleary, Ciara; Six, Melanie; Schalling, Martin; Schönegger, Andreas; Bock, Christoph; Malcovati, Luca; Pascutto, Cristiana; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Cazzola, Mario; Kralovics, Robert

    2013-12-19

    Approximately 50 to 60% of patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis carry a mutation in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2), and an additional 5 to 10% have activating mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor gene (MPL). So far, no specific molecular marker has been identified in the remaining 30 to 45% of patients. We performed whole-exome sequencing to identify somatically acquired mutations in six patients who had primary myelofibrosis without mutations in JAK2 or MPL. Resequencing of CALR, encoding calreticulin, was then performed in cohorts of patients with myeloid neoplasms. Somatic insertions or deletions in exon 9 of CALR were detected in all patients who underwent whole-exome sequencing. Resequencing in 1107 samples from patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms showed that CALR mutations were absent in polycythemia vera. In essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, CALR mutations and JAK2 and MPL mutations were mutually exclusive. Among patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis with nonmutated JAK2 or MPL, CALR mutations were detected in 67% of those with essential thrombocythemia and 88% of those with primary myelofibrosis. A total of 36 types of insertions or deletions were identified that all cause a frameshift to the same alternative reading frame and generate a novel C-terminal peptide in the mutant calreticulin. Overexpression of the most frequent CALR deletion caused cytokine-independent growth in vitro owing to the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) by means of an unknown mechanism. Patients with mutated CALR had a lower risk of thrombosis and longer overall survival than patients with mutated JAK2. Most patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis that was not associated with a JAK2 or MPL alteration carried a somatic mutation in CALR. The clinical course in these patients was more indolent than that in patients with the JAK2 V617F

  12. A mega-ethnography of eleven qualitative evidence syntheses exploring the experience of living with chronic non-malignant pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toye, Fran; Seers, Kate; Hannink, Erin; Barker, Karen

    2017-08-01

    Each year over five million people develop chronic non-malignant pain and can experience healthcare as an adversarial struggle. The aims of this study were: (1) to bring together qualitative evidence syntheses that explore patients' experience of living with chronic non-malignant pain and develop conceptual understanding of what it is like to live with chronic non-malignant pain for improved healthcare; (2) to undertake the first mega-ethnography of qualitative evidence syntheses using the methods of meta-ethnography. We used the seven stages of meta-ethnography refined for large studies. The innovation of mega-ethnography is to use conceptual findings from qualitative evidence syntheses as primary data. We searched 7 bibliographic databases from inception until February 2016 to identify qualitative evidence syntheses that explored patients' experience of living with chronic non-malignant pain. We identified 82 potential studies from 556 titles, screened 34 full text articles and included 11 qualitative evidence syntheses synthesising a total of 187 qualitative studies reporting more than 5000 international participants living with chronic pain. We abstracted concepts into 7 conceptual categories: (1) my life is impoverished and confined; (2) struggling against my body to be me; (3) the quest for the diagnostic 'holy grail'; (4) lost personal credibility; (5) trying to keep up appearances; (6) need to be treated with dignity; and (7) deciding to end the quest for the grail is not easy. Each conceptual category was supported by at least 7 of the 11 qualitative evidence syntheses. This is the first mega-ethnography, or synthesis of qualitative evidence syntheses using the methods of meta-ethnography. Findings help us to understand that the decision to end the quest for a diagnosis can leave patients feeling vulnerable and this may contribute to the adversarial nature of the clinical encounter. This knowledge demonstrates that treating a patient with a sense that they

  13. Pharmacological consequences of long-term morphine treatment in patients with cancer and chronic non-malignant pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Gertrud; Sjøgren, Per; Hansen, Steen Honoré;

    2004-01-01

    In patients with pain of malignant origin morphine may be administered in high and often increasing doses during extended periods of time. In patients with chronic pain of non-malignant origin morphine may be an important remedy, and in these cases the goal is to keep the morphine dose stable. Th....... The pharmacokinetic as well as the pharmacodynamic consequences of long-term morphine treatment with special reference to the two most important metabolites of morphine morphine-6-glucuronide (M-6-G) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M-3-G) remain to be settled....

  14. Fluoro-edenite induces fibulin-3 overexpression in non-malignant human mesothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Salemi, Rossella; Marconi, Andrea; Loreto, Carla; Graziano, Adriana C.; Cardile, Venera; Basile, Maria S.; Candido, Saverio; Falzone, Luca; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Fenga, Concettina; Libra, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to asbestos is associated with the development of mesothelioma. In addition to asbestos, other fibers have been identified as risk factors for malignant and non-malignant diseases of the lungs. Among these, fluoro-edenite (FE) was found in patients from Biancavilla (Sicily, Italy) with pleural and lung disease, suggesting its role for tumor expansion. In this context, the identification of early biomarkers useful for the diagnosis of cancer is mandatory. Fibulin-3 represents an important marker for the diagnosis of mesothelioma. However, it remains to be determined whether it is directly associated with exposure to asbestos-like fibers. In the present study, peripheral blood levels of fibulin-3 from 40 asbestos-exposed workers were compared with those detected in 27 street cleaners from Biancavilla. Intriguingly, the results showed that fibulin-3 levels were higher in the group of street cleaners compared with those of the asbestos-exposed workers, suggesting that these workers used the personal protective equipment according to the current regulations. These data suggest that subjects exposed to FE should be monitored for the risk of mesothelioma. FE and volcanic particulates are probably contained within dust inhaled by street cleaners from Biancavilla during their work activities. Based on these criteria, in this study, such fibers were used to treat mesothelial cells (MeT5A) in order to verify whether fibulin-3 levels are affected by these treatments. The results showed that only treatment with FE was associated with fibulin-3 overexpression at both the transcript and protein levels. It was previously demonstrated that mesothelial cells exhibited low levels of p27 following treatment with FE. Notably, p27 downregulation is associated with stathmin upregulation in cancer, conferring an aggressive phenotype of tumor cells. This observation prompted us to perform a computational evaluation demonstrating the activation of stathmin in lung cancer in

  15. CHRONIC HEPATITIS OR «DISGUISE» PAROXYSMAL NOCTURAL HEMOGLOBINURIA?

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    D. A. Dolgopolova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective is description of a case of diagnostics of a paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria. Subjects and methods. The male patient of 50 years asked for medical care with complaints to emergence of yellowness a skin, urine darkening, not expressed general weakness. To the patient examination was conducted: clinical and biochemical blood tests, urine, miyelogramm, definition of an index of sphericity of erythrocytes, definition of free hemoglobin of plasma of blood, urine, gemosiderinuriya, flow citometry, immunological markers of rheumatic diseases, tool inspection, etc. Results. On the basis of complaints, a clinical picture of a disease, data of objective and tool inspections the final diagnosis is made: a paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria, a classical haemolytic form (on the International classification of diseases of the 10th revision – B 59.5. The comorbid diagnoses: anemia of heavy degree; transfusion dependence; thrombosis of a subclavial vein on the right (11.2011; cholelithiasis; chronic calculous cholecystitis in remission; chronic hepatitis of the mixed genesis (alcoholic, metabolic, moderate degree of activity. By the main diagnostic method which allowed to verify the diagnosis became flow citometry. According to an flow citometry erythrocytes I Tip (normal expression of CD59 – 87,0 %, II Type (partial deficiency of CD59 – 0,3 %, III Type (full deficiency of CD59 – 12,7 %; monocytes with deficiency of FLAER/CD14 – 93,3 %; granulocytes with deficiency of FLAER/CD24 – 97,7 %. Flow citometry was revealed by availability of APG-clone among erythrocytes, granulocytes and monocytes. Judging by the huge size of a clone (on granulocytes 97,7 %, it is possible to draw a conclusion that the patient was in the highest zone of risk of APG of crises. Conclusion. Practical interest of this supervision is caused by a rarity of this hematologic disease, the analysis of modern opportunities of diagnostics and complexity of a choice of

  16. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and telomere length predicts response to immunosuppressive therapy in pediatric aplastic anemia.

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    Narita, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Sekiya, Yuko; Okuno, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Hirotoshi; Nishio, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Nao; Wang, Xinan; Xu, Yinyan; Kawashima, Nozomu; Doisaki, Sayoko; Hama, Asahito; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kudo, Kazuko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Ito, Etsuro; Yabe, Hiromasa; Ohga, Shouichi; Ohara, Akira; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an immune-mediated disease characterized by severe defects in stem cell number resulting in hypocellular marrow and peripheral blood cytopenias. Minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria populations and a short telomere length were identified as predictive biomarkers of immunosuppressive therapy responsiveness in aplastic anemia. We enrolled 113 aplastic anemia patients (63 boys and 50 girls) in this study to evaluate their response to immunosuppressive therapy. The paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria populations and telomere length were detected by flow cytometry. Forty-seven patients (42%) carried a minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population. The median telomere length of aplastic anemia patients was -0.99 standard deviation (SD) (range -4.01-+3.01 SD). Overall, 60 patients (53%) responded to immunosuppressive therapy after six months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the absence of a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population and a shorter telomere length as independent unfavorable predictors of immunosuppressive therapy response at six months. The cohort was stratified into a group of poor prognosis (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria negative and shorter telomere length; 37 patients) and good prognosis (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria positive and/or longer telomere length; 76 patients), respectively. The response rates of the poor prognosis and good prognosis groups at six months were 19% and 70%, respectively (P<0.001). The combined absence of a minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population and a short telomere length is an efficient predictor of poor immunosuppressive therapy response, which should be considered while deciding treatment options: immunosuppressive therapy or first-line hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The trial was registered in www.umin.ac.jp with number UMIN000017972.

  17. Benzodiazepines for the relief of breathlessness in advanced malignant and non-malignant diseases in adults.

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    Simon, Steffen T; Higginson, Irene J; Booth, Sara; Harding, Richard; Weingärtner, Vera; Bausewein, Claudia

    2016-10-20

    This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 1, 2010, on 'Benzodiazepines for the relief of breathlessness in advanced malignant and non-malignant diseases in adults'. Breathlessness is one of the most common symptoms experienced in the advanced stages of malignant and non-malignant disease. Benzodiazepines are widely used for the relief of breathlessness in advanced diseases and are regularly recommended in the literature. At the time of the previously published Cochrane review, there was no evidence for a beneficial effect of benzodiazepines for the relief of breathlessness in people with advanced cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The primary objective of this review was to determine the efficacy of benzodiazepines for the relief of breathlessness in people with advanced disease. Secondary objectives were to determine the efficacy of different benzodiazepines, different doses of benzodiazepines, different routes of application, adverse effects of benzodiazepines, and the efficacy in different disease groups. This is an update of a review published in 2010. We searched 14 electronic databases up to September 2009 for the original review. We checked the reference lists of all relevant studies, key textbooks, reviews, and websites. For the update, we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE and registers of clinical trials for further ongoing or unpublished studies, up to August 2016. We contacted study investigators and experts in the field of palliative care asking for further studies, unpublished data, or study details when necessary. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) assessing the effect of benzodiazepines compared with placebo or active control in relieving breathlessness in people with advanced stages of cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic heart failure (CHF), motor neurone disease (MND), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF

  18. CT findings of intrathoricic neoplasm associated with hypertrophic osteoarthropathy

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    Hwang, Hee Sung; Choe, Kyu Ok; Chung, Jin Il; Oh, Sei Chung [College of Medicine Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy(HOA) is a clinical syndrome consisting of clubbing, periostitis and synovitis. Most frequent causes of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy are intrathoracic neoplasms, among which the bronchogenic carcinoma ranks the highest. But computed tomographic evaluation of intrathoracic neoplasm associated with HOA has been seldom reported. The purpose of this study is to evaluate CT findings of intrathoracic neoplasm associated with HOA, and to infer possible mechanism. Seven cases of intrathoracic neoplasm associated with HOA were included in our study. Diagnoses of HOA were made by Tc99m bone scintigraphy or plain radiography. The findings of chest CT scans were reviewed retrospectively, with main interests on their size, location and internal characteristics, ect. Seven cases of intrathoracic neoplasm consisted of five bronchogenic carcinomas and two thymic tumors. The size of intrathoracic tumors were relatively large ranging from 6cm to 13cm(average 8.0cm). All thoracic neoplasms showed wide pleural contact, and one of them invaded thoracic wall. The range of length of pleural contact was 5-18cm(average 9.9cm). All of seven patients had internal necrosis, and one of them showed cavitation in thoracic mass. Intrathoracic neoplasms associated with HOA had a tendency to be large, to contain internal necrosis, and to widely abut the thoracic pleura.

  19. Cognitive Findings in Benign Childhood Epilepsy with Occipital Paroxysms

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    Ebru Kolsal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the cognitive and visual perceptive functions in children with childhood epilepsy with occipital paroxysms (CEOP. Material and Method: Hospital charts of children ages 1 to 18 years who admitted to pediatric neurology out-patient clinic between 2009 and 2010 were reviewed. Twenty one children with a diagnosis of CEOP were identified. Sixteen of these children who accepted to include the study were evaluated with neuropsychological tests. Results: Two of five patients who were evaluated with Denver developmental screening test were found to have lower scores than their reference standards. Remaining 11 patients were evaluated with Wechsler Scales of Intelligence tests, 4 were mildly mental retarded and 1 had null intelligence. Eleven patients were also evaluated with Bender Gestalt Visual Motor Test and 7of them had disturbances in visual perception. Reading speed and writing norm tests were applied to 9 literate patients and 7 of them showed slower reading ability and writing ability was found worse in 6 patients. Discussion: The absence of neurological and neuropsylogical deficits has long been considered as a prerequisite for diagnosis of benign childhood partial epilepsies. However, only a few studies describing the cognitive profile of patients with CEOP have been published. The present study has demonstrated that the patients with CEOP had varying degree of cognitive dysfunction and disturbance in visual perception. In order to provide appropriate intervention, cognitive functions should be assessed in children with CEOP.

  20. Canalith Repositioning Variations for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Helen S.; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if variations in common treatments for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) affected efficacy. Study Design Prospective, pseudo-randomized study. Setting Out-patient practice in a tertiary care facility Subjects and Methods Patients (n=118) with unilateral BPPV of the posterior canal, including 13 patients with BPPV of the lateral canal were tested at a tertiary care center on one of five interventions: canalith repositioning maneuver (CRP), CRP plus home exercise, modified CRP, CRP for patients with involvement of two semicircular canals, self-CRP home exercise. Self-CRP was also compared to previously published data on efficacy of the Brandt Daroff exercise. Main outcome measures were vertigo intensity and frequency, presence/ absence of Dix-Hallpike responses, Vestibular Disorders Activities of Daily Living Scale (VADL), computerized dynamic posturography. Results Vertigo intensity and frequency and Dix-Hallpike responses decreased significantly and posturography and VADL improved significantly from pre- to post tests. No other significant changes were found. The groups did not differ significantly. Vertigo intensity and frequency were not strongly related at pre-test but were related at post-test. Length of illness and age did not influence the results. Conclusions However the head is moved, as long as it is moved rapidly enough and through the correct planes in space repositioning treatments are likely to be effective. Therefore clinicians have a range of choices in selecting the treatment best suited for each patient’s unique needs. PMID:20723779

  1. Prevalence of unrecognized benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zaag-Loonen, H J; van Leeuwen, R B; Bruintjes, Tj D; van Munster, B C

    2015-06-01

    Dizziness is a relatively common complaint which occurs more often with increasing age. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is an important cause which can easily be treated but is frequently not recognized by professionals. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of unrecognized BPPV in older patients. Patients ≥70 years of age (n = 989) indicated whether they experienced dizziness, and if so whether the symptoms were typical for BPPV. If affirmed, a diagnostic maneuver was performed. Positive patients were treated at once. All suspected patients completed quality of life questionnaires and were followed for 3 and 6 months. Positive BPPV patients were compared with negative (but suspected) patients. Almost one quarter of the patients (226 patients, 23 %) suffered from dizziness, among whom 101 were suspected of BPPV. Less than half (n = 45) underwent the diagnostic maneuver, of whom 13 (29 %) were positive for BPPV. At follow-up, one patient developed BPPV, leading to a total of 14 positive patients (overall prevalence 1.4 %). BPPV positive patients did not differ from BPPV negative patients. Among a large group of older patients, one quarter experiences dizziness, and 1.4 % has definite BPPV.

  2. Clinical evaluation of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

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    Titus S Ibekwe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a mechanical peripheral vestibular disorder which may involve any of the three semicircular canals but principally the posterior. In as much as the literature has described theories to explain the mechanism of BPPV and also contains scholarly works that elucidate BPPV; its management remains an enigma to most clinicians. To this end, this work was aimed at outlining an evidence-based best practice for most common form of BPPV. Materials and Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted between 1948 and June 2011 in PubMed, Embase, Ovid, and Cochrane database through the online Library of the University of Cape Town. Seventy-nine worthy articles that addressed the study were selected on consensus of the two authors. Conclusion: There is consensus for the use of canalith repositioning procedures as the best form of treatment for posterior canal canalolithiasis. However, successful treatment is dependent on accurate identification of the implicated canal and the form of lithiasis. Furthermore, clinicians should note that there is no place for pharmacological treatment of BPPV; unless it is to facilitate repositioning.

  3. A Geriatric Perspective on Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Kourosh; Kuchel, George A

    2016-02-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common cause of vertigo in older adults. Beyond the unpleasant sensation of vertigo, BPPV also negatively affects older adults' gait and balance and increases their risk of falling. As such it has a profound effect on function, independence, and quality of life. Otoconia are the inner ear structures that help detect horizontal and vertical movements. Aging contributes to the fragmentation of otoconia, whose displacement into the semicircular, most commonly posterior canals, can produce rotatory movement sensations with head movement. BPPV is more commonly idiopathic in older adults than in younger individuals, can present atypically, and has a more-protracted course and higher risk of recurrence. Medications such as meclizine that are commonly prescribed for BPPV can be associated with significant side effects. Dix-Hallpike and Head Roll tests can generally identify the involved canal. Symptoms resolve as otoconia fragments dissolve into the endolymph, but appropriate canalith repositioning (e.g., Epley maneuver) can expedite recovery and reduce the burden of this disorder. Observations suggesting an association between idiopathic BPPV and vitamin D deficiency and osteoporosis indicate that BPPV may share risk factors with other common geriatric conditions, which highlights the importance of moving beyond purely otological considerations and addressing the needs of older adults with vertigo through a systems-based multidisciplinary approach.

  4. Gender-based comorbidity in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

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    Oluwaseye Ayoola Ogun

    Full Text Available It has been noted that benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV may be associated with certain disorders and medical procedures. However, most studies to date were done in Europe, and epidemiological data on the United States (US population are scarce. Gender-based information is even rarer. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the relative prevalence of each type of association based solely on literature data, because different comorbidities were reported by various groups from different countries using different patient populations and possibly different inclusion/exclusion criteria. In this study, we surveyed and analyzed a large adult BPPV population (n = 1,360 surveyed, 227 completed, most of which were recurrent BPPV cases from Omaha, NE, US, and its vicinity, all diagnosed at Boys Town National Research Hospital (BTNRH over the past decade using established and consistent diagnostic criteria. In addition, we performed a retrospective analysis of patients' diagnostic records (n = 1,377, with 1,360 adults and 17 children. The following comorbidities were found to be significantly more prevalent in the BPPV population when compared to the age- and gender-matched general population: ear/hearing problems, head injury, thyroid problems, allergies, high cholesterol, headaches, and numbness/paralysis. There were gender differences in the comorbidities. In addition, familial predisposition was fairly common among the participants. Thus, the data confirm some previously reported comorbidities, identify new ones (hearing loss, thyroid problems, high cholesterol, and numbness/paralysis, and suggest possible predisposing and triggering factors and events for BPPV.

  5. Classification, diagnostic criteria and management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Takao; Takeda, Noriaki; Ikezono, Tetsuo; Shigeno, Kohichiro; Asai, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Yukio; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2017-02-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common peripheral vertigo and the posterior and/or lateral semicircular canals are usually affected. BPPV is characterized by brief attacks of rotatory vertigo associated with positional and/or positioning nystagmus, which are elicited by specific head positions or changes in head position relative to gravity. In patients with the posterior-canal-type of BPPV, torsional nystagmus is induced by the Dix-Hallpike maneuver. In patients with the lateral-canal-type of BPPV, horizontal geotropic or apogeotropic nystagmus is induced by the supine roll test. The pathophysiology of BPPV is canalolithiasis comprising free-floating otoconial debris within the endolymph of a semicircular canal, or cupulolithiasis comprising otoconial debris adherent to the cupula. The observation of positional and/or positioning nystagmus is essential for the diagnosis of BPPV. BPPV is treated with the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP). Through a series of head position changes, the CRP moves otoconial debris from the affected semicircular canal to the utricle. In this review, we provide the classification, diagnostic criteria, and examinations for the diagnosis, and specific and non-specific treatments of BPPV in accordance with the Japanese practical guidelines on BPPV published by the Japan Society for Equilibrium Research.

  6. Prolonged Paroxysmal Sympathetic Storming Associated with Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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    Yan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal sympathetic storming (PSS is a rare disorder characterized by acute onset of nonstimulated tachycardia, hypertension, tachypnea, hyperthermia, external posturing, and diaphoresis. It is most frequently associated with severe traumatic brain injuries and has been reported in intracranial tumors, hydrocephalous, severe hypoxic brain injury, and intracerebral hemorrhage. Although excessive release of catecholamine and therefore increased sympathetic activities have been reported in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH, there is no descriptive report of PSS primarily caused by spontaneous SAH up to date. Here, we report a case of prolonged PSS in a patient with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and consequent vasospasm. The sympathetic storming started shortly after patient was rewarmed from hypothermia protocol and symptoms responded to Labetalol, but intermittent recurrence did not resolve until 3 weeks later with treatment involving Midazolam, Fentanyl, Dexmedetomidine, Propofol, Bromocriptine, and minimizing frequency of neurological and vital checks. In conclusion, prolonged sympathetic storming can also be caused by spontaneous SAH. In this case, vasospasm might be a precipitating factor. Paralytics and hypothermia could mask the manifestations of PSS. The treatment of the refractory case will need both timely adjustment of medications and minimization of exogenous stressors or stimuli.

  7. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in an airline pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ahmet; Al-Deleamy, Louai S; Kendirli, Tansel M

    2007-11-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common types of peripheral vertigo, characterized by violent whirling vertigo after a positional change. Although the condition is termed "benign," the clinical presentation can be incapacitating for pilots in certain maneuvers. We present a case of an airline transport pilot with the complaint of vertigo for 5 d. The vertigo was aggravated by head movements when looking up or rolling over, lasting for a few seconds. The patient was diagnosed with BPPV, and he was treated with physical therapy with the use of Epley maneuver. The airman applied for his First-Class medical examination after the treatment was successfully completed. The aviation medical examiner (AME) issued the airman medical certificate after contacting and receiving verbal approval from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Aerospace Medical Certification Division (AMCD). While evaluating aviators who have had BPPV, AMEs should not issue medical certificates for any class until the condition is fully resolved. Although the AME Guide states that certification of pilots with other types of vertigo requires an FAA decision, once the patient is successfully treated and free of symptoms, approval for issuing the medical certificate can be obtained through contacting AMCD and by submitting all information and documentation pertaining to the diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Cerebral stroke in a teenage girl with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

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    Francesco Gervasi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH in a 14 year-old girl presenting a cerebral arterial thrombosis. The initial diagnosis was carential anemia due to menarche following identification of slight macrocytic anemia, leucopenia and mild thrombocytopenia at routine blood analysis. The child was eventually referred to a children’s hospital after the onset of progressive fatigue, anorexia and paleness. Severe anemia (hemoglobin 6 g/dL with negative Coombs test, mild leucopenia (white blood cells 4.9×109/L and thrombocytopenia (platelets 97×109/L and high values of lactate dehydrogenase (2855 U/L were identified; a packed red cells transfusion was administered. Her condition worsened and she subsequently presented complete right hemiplegia, aphasia and coma; magnetic resonance imaging revealed a massive ischemic lesion. A diagnosis of PNH was eventually made following high sensitivity flow cytometry, which identified a PNH clone (CD66b negative equal to 93.7% of granulocytes. Fast recovery from neurologic and hematological problems occurred in response to anticoagulant therapy and intravenous therapy with eculizumab. We are convinced that PNH should be included in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with cytopenia.

  9. Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania in paediatric age: report of two cases.

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    Tarantino, Samuela; Vollono, Catello; Capuano, Alessandro; Vigevano, Federico; Valeriani, Massimiliano

    2011-04-01

    Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH) is a rare primary headache syndrome, which is classified along with hemicrania continua and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT) as trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia (TACs). CPH is characterised by short-lasting (2-30 min), severe and multiple (more than 5/day) pain attacks. Headache is unilateral, and fronto-orbital-temporal pain is combined with cranial autonomic symptoms. According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition, the attacks are absolutely responsive to indomethacin. CPH has been only rarely and incompletely described in the developmental age. Here, we describe two cases concerning a 7-year-old boy and a 11-year-old boy with short-lasting, recurrent headache combined with cranial autonomic features. Pain was described as excruciating, and was non-responsive to most traditional analgesic drugs. The clinical features of our children's headache and the positive response to indomethacin led us to propose the diagnosis of CPH. Therefore, our children can be included amongst the very few cases of this trigeminal autonomic cephalgia described in the paediatric age.

  10. Levodropropizine in the management of cough associated with cancer or nonmalignant chronic disease--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildmann, Eva Katharina; Rémi, Constanze; Bausewein, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Cough associated with cancer or nonmalignant chronic disease is common and distressing. Levodropropizine, a peripherally acting drug, has been used as an alternative antitussive to opioids. The authors aimed to determine the efficacy and safety of levodropropizine in relieving cough associated with cancer or nonmalignant chronic disease. The authors searched five databases and hand searched relevant journals to identify randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials assessing the antitussive effect of levodropropizine for cough associated with cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease, or chronic heart failure. Study quality was assessed using a modified version of the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination criteria. The search yielded 58 references. Six were checked in more detail, and four studies were included. Two were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing levodropropizine against dihydrocodeine and moguisteine, and two were nonrandomized placebo-controlled studies, all with important limitations and high risk of bias. Levodropropizine was significantly more effective than placebo in reducing cough frequency and severity, and equally effective as dihydrocodeine or moguisteine. It was generally well tolerated. The authors conclude that the evidence for the antitussive efficacy of levodropropizine in these patients is scarce, and is further limited by the methodological weaknesses of the primary studies. Further well-designed research is needed to support its use.

  11. Treosulfan-based conditioning regimens for allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with non-malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatter, M A; Boztug, H; Pötschger, U; Sykora, K-W; Lankester, A; Yaniv, I; Sedlacek, P; Glogova, E; Veys, P; Gennery, A R; Peters, C

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of children with non-malignant diseases can be cured by allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Treosulfan (L-treitol-1,4-bis-methanesulfonate) is being used more frequently for conditioning, owing to its' lower toxicity profile compared with conventional myeloablative regimens. A retrospective analysis was performed of children registered in the EBMT database, who received treosulfan before HSCT between January 2005 and 2010, to identify possible dose-related toxicity and determine the incidence of engraftment, treatment-related mortality and overall survival (OS). Results from 316 transplants from 11 different countries are presented. Ninety-five (30%) were under 1 year of age at the time of transplant. OS was 83% and event-free survival was 76%; 3-year OS and event-free survival of infants below 1 year were 79% and 73%, respectively. No association was found with age at transplant, dose of treosulfan given, other agents used in combination with treosulfan, donor type, stem cell source, or second or subsequent transplant. In this report of the largest number of children to date receiving treosulfan for non-malignant diseases, treosulfan is shown to be a safe and effective agent even for those under 1 year of age at the time of transplant. Further prospective studies are needed using precisely defined protocols with pharmacokinetic monitoring and detailed chimerism analysis. In addition, long-term studies will be vital to determine long-term effects, for example, on fertility in comparison with other regimens.

  12. Chronic paroxysmal hemicrania and hemicrania continua: lack of efficacy of sumatriptan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonaci, F; Pareja, J A; Caminero, A B; Sjaastad, O

    1998-03-01

    Attacks of chronic paroxysmal hemicrania are prevented by the continuous administration of indomethacin. Sumatriptan, an agonist of 5-HT1-like receptors, has proven effective in the treatment of cluster headache attacks. There are clear clinical similarities between chronic paroxysmal hemicrania and cluster headache. A natural consequence of these considerations would be to establish whether chronic paroxysmal hemicrania also responds similarly to sumatriptan. Since hemicrania continua is another unilateral headache responsive to indomethacin, it would be meaningful to also include hemicrania continua in such a study. Sumatriptan, 6 mg subcutaneous, was tried in an open fashion in 7 patients (6 women and 1 man) with chronic paroxysmal hemicrania and 7 patients (5 women and 2 men) with hemicrania continua. In chronic paroxysmal hemicrania, the mean interval between the last three attacks prior to sumatriptan treatment (40 +/- 23 minutes) was not statistically different from the mean interval between the three attacks subsequent to sumatriptan treatment of an attack (32 +/- 20 minutes). In none of the patients did the mean duration of the "test attack" decrease as compared to the attacks antedating the test attack (25 +/- 11 minutes and 19 +/- 9 minutes, respectively) (P = 0.027, Wilcoxon). In 2 patients with chronic paroxysmal hemicrania, placebo (saline) administration did not lead to any change in the interval between attacks. There was a mild, but statistically significant reduction in visual analog scale values for headache intensity in hemicrania continua (P = 0.04, Wilcoxon). There was no clear, i.e., clinically meaningful, reduction in visual analog scale values in any particular patient with hemicrania continua. Taken together, these results seem to show that sumatriptan is of no benefit in chronic paroxysmal hemicrania, but may have a partial efficacy in hemicrania continua. However, the latter effect is clinically unimportant. This minor difference in

  13. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

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    Mozhgan Masoom

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Since utricle is the main damaged organ in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP may be an appropriate method to evaluate the utricule dysfunction and the effect of disease recurrence rate on it. This study aimed to record myogenic potential in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, ocular myogenic potential was recorded in 25 healthy subjects and 20 patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo using 500 Hz-tone bursts (95 dB nHL.Results: In the affected ear, mean amplitude was lower and mean threshold was higher than those in the unaffected ear and in the normal group (p<0.05. Mean amplitude asymmetry ratio of patients was more than the healthy subjects (p0.05. Frequencies of abnormal responses in the affected ears were higher than in unaffected ears and in the normal group (p<0.05. Furthermore, the patients with recurrent vertigo showed more abnormalities than the patients with non-recurrent (p=0.030.Conclusion: In the recurrent benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential showed more damage in the utricle, suggesting this response could be used to evaluate the patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  14. Cases requiring increased number of repositioning maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

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    Mukadder Korkmaz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is a clinical syndrome that is proposed to be caused by dislocated utricular debris into semicircular canals. Although the majority of patients are treated by one or two repositioning maneuvers, some of the patients need repeated maneuvers for relief. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to investigate the factors associated with patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who required multiple repositioning procedures for treatment. METHODS: Data were obtained from the clinical records of 153 patients diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Patients were treated by repositioning maneuvers. Demographic data and the factors including age, sex, canal type, duration of symptoms, comorbidities and number of repositioning maneuvers for relief were documented for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Age, sex, canal type and the duration of symptoms had no impact on the number of maneuvers. The most common comorbidity was spine problems. Hypertension was the only comorbidity that significantly associated with increased number of maneuvers. CONCLUSION: The presence of hypertension is a risk factor for repeated maneuvers in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo treatment. Physicians should be aware of the increased probability of repeated repositioning maneuvers in these group of patients. The role of comorbidities and vascular factors need to be further clarified in the course of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

  15. Paroxysmal events during prolonged video-video electroencephalography monitoring in refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Castro, A; Henríquez-Varela, F; Monge-Bonilla, C; Lara-Maier, S; Sittenfeld-Appel, M

    2017-03-16

    Given that epileptic seizures and non-epileptic paroxysmal events have similar clinical manifestations, using specific diagnostic methods is crucial, especially in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Prolonged video electroencephalography monitoring during epileptic seizures reveals epileptiform discharges and has become an essential procedure for epilepsy diagnosis. The main purpose of this study is to characterise paroxysmal events and compare patterns in patients with refractory epilepsy. We conducted a retrospective analysis of medical records from 91 patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy who underwent prolonged video electroencephalography monitoring during hospitalisation. During prolonged video electroencephalography monitoring, 76.9% of the patients (n=70) had paroxysmal events. The mean number of events was 3.4±2.7; the duration of these events was highly variable. Most patients (80%) experienced seizures during wakefulness. The most common events were focal seizures with altered levels of consciousness, progressive bilateral generalized seizures and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. Regarding all paroxysmal events, no differences were observed in the number or type of events by sex, in duration by sex or age at onset, or in the number of events by type of event. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures were predominantly registered during wakefulness, lasted longer, started at older ages, and were more frequent in women. Paroxysmal events recorded during prolonged video electroencephalography monitoring in patients with refractory epilepsy show similar patterns and characteristics to those reported in other latitudes. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Cortical hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current takes part in the generation of focal paroxysmal activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim; Sejnowski, Terrence; Steriade, Mircea

    2002-01-01

    During paroxysmal neocortical oscillations, sudden depolarization leading to the next cycle occurs when the majority of cortical neurons are hyperpolarized. Both the Ca2+-dependent K+ currents (IK(Ca)) and disfacilitation play critical roles in the generation of hyperpolarizing potentials. In vivo experiments and computational models are used here to investigate whether the hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing current (Ih) in cortical neurons also contributes to the generation of paroxysmal onsets. Hyperpolarizing current pulses revealed a depolarizing sag in ≈20% of cortical neurons. Intracellular recordings from glial cells indirectly indicated an increase in extracellular potassium concentration ([K+]o) during paroxysmal activities, leading to a positive shift in the reversal potential of K+-mediated currents, including Ih. In the paroxysmal neocortex, ≈20% of neurons show repolarizing potentials originating from hyperpolarizations associated with depth-electroencephalogram positive waves of spike-wave complexes. The onset of these repolarizing potentials corresponds to maximal [K+]o as estimated from dual simultaneous impalements from neurons and glial cells. Computational models showed how, after the increased [K+]o, the interplay between Ih, IK(Ca), and a persistent Na+ current, INa(P), could organize paroxysmal oscillations at a frequency of 2–3 Hz. PMID:12089324

  17. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Oneil Machado

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs of the pancreas are neoplasms that are characterized by ductal dilation, intraductal papillary growth, and thick mucus secretion. This relatively recently defined pathology is evolving in terms of its etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and treatment guidelines. A PubMed database search was performed. All the relevant abstracts in English language were reviewed and the articles in which cases of IPMN could be identified were further scrutinized. Information of IPMN was derived, and duplication of information in several articles and those with areas of persisting uncertainties were excluded. The recent consensus guidelines were examined. The reported incidence of malignancy varies from 57% to 92% in the main duct-IPMN (MD-IPMN and from 6% to 46% in the branch duct-IPMN (BD-IPMN. The features of high-risk malignant lesions that raise concern include obstructive jaundice in a patient with a cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, the findings on radiological imaging of a mass lesion of >30 mm, enhanced solid component, and the main pancreatic duct (MPD of size ≥10 mm; while duct size 5-9 mm and cyst size <3 mm are considered as "worrisome features." Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS are primary investigations in diagnosing and following up on these patients. The role of pancreatoscopy and the analysis of aspirated cystic fluid for cytology and DNA analysis is still to be established. In general, resection is recommended for most MD-IPMN, mixed variant, and symptomatic BD-IPMN. The 5-year survival of patients after surgical resection for noninvasive IPMN is reported to be at 77-100%, while for those with invasive carcinoma, it is significantly lower at 27-60%. The follow-up of these patients could vary from 6 months to 1 year and would depend on the risk stratification for invasive malignancy and the pathology of the resected specimen. The

  18. Quality of life in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and its predictors : importance of the autonomic nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, MP; Hassink, RJ; Tuinenburg, AE; van Sonderen, EFLP; Lefrandt, JD; de Kam, PJ; van Gelder, IC; Smit, AJ; Sanderman, R; Crijns, HJGM

    2001-01-01

    Aims To determine the impact of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation on quality of life and to determine the predictors of quality of life, particularly the role of symptomatology and autonomic function. Methods and Results The study group comprised 73 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (mean ag

  19. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: Part I. Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the field of medicine. In this article, the first of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to neoplasms, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Future therapies for the myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherber, Robyn; Mesa, Ruben A

    2011-03-01

    Ever since their description as "myeloproliferative syndromes" by William Dameshek in 1951, the myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) have been managed by the selective use of rather mundane, nonspecific therapies that rely on either antiplatelet effects or myelosuppression. The year 2005 ushered in a new era of drug development and discovery for the MPNs after the description of the JAK2 V617F mutation and the role this constitutively active tyrosine kinase has in MPN pathogenesis. Subsequently, multiple pharmacologic agents have begun (or are about to begin) testing for the inhibition of JAK2 in an attempt to improve the treatment of MPNs. Both primary myelofibrosis and myelofibrosis following essential thrombocythemia or polycythemia vera have been the targets of the most extensive testing of these agents to date. Responses to these oral JAK2 inhibitors have been primarily intended to reduce splenomegaly and meaningfully improve symptoms; effects on the JAK2 V617F allele burden or marrow histology are limited. Toxicities have ranged from myelosuppression to significant diarrhea. Additional agents with other mechanisms of action are also targeting JAK2, including histone deacetylase inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors. The results of preliminary trials of JAK2 inhibitors in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia have been mixed but are premature. Many questions remain as to the optimal JAK2 inhibitory strategy and the full extent of the benefit of single-agent JAK2 inhibition.

  1. Origin and Molecular Pathology of Adrenocortical Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielinska, M.; Parviainen, H.; Kiiveri, S.; Heikinheimo, M.; Wilson, D.B.

    2008-01-01

    Neoplastic adrenocortical lesions are common in humans and several species of domestic animals. Although there are unanswered questions about the origin and evolution of adrenocortical neoplasms, analysis of human tumor specimens and animal models indicates that adrenocortical tumorigenesis involves both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Chromosomal changes accumulate during tumor progression, and aberrant telomere function is one of the key mechanisms underlying chromosome instability during this process. Epigenetic changes serve to expand the size of the uncommitted adrenal progenitor population, modulate their phenotypic plasticity (i.e., responsiveness to extracellular signals), and increase the likelihood of subsequent genetic alterations. Analyses of heritable and spontaneous types of human adrenocortical tumors have documented alterations in either cell surface receptors or their downstream effectors that impact neoplastic transformation. Many of the mutations associated with benign human adrenocortical tumors result in dysregulated cyclic AMP signaling, whereas key factors/signaling pathways associated with adrenocortical carcinomas include dysregulated expression of the IGF2 gene cluster, activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. A better understanding of the factors and signaling pathways involved in adrenal tumorigenesis is necessary to develop targeted pharmacologic and genetic therapies. PMID:19261630

  2. The Hematopoietic Niche in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette H. Schmitt-Graeff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Specialized microanatomical areas of the bone marrow provide the signals that are mandatory for the maintenance and regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and progenitor cells. A complex microenvironment adjacent to the marrow vasculature (vascular niche and close to the endosteum (endosteal niche harbors multiple cell types including mesenchymal stromal cells and their derivatives such as CAR cells expressing high levels of chemokines C-X-C motif ligand 12 and early osteoblastic lineage cells, endothelial cells, and megakaryocytes. The characterization of the cellular and molecular networks operating in the HSC niche has opened new perspectives for the understanding of the bidirectional cross-talk between HSCs and stromal cell populations in normal and malignant conditions. A structural and functional remodeling of the niche may contribute to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN. Malignant HSCs may alter the function and survival of MSCs that do not belong to the neoplastic clone. For example, a regression of nestin+ MSCs by apoptosis has been attributed to neuroglial damage in MPN. Nonneoplastic MSCs in turn can promote aggressiveness and drug resistance of malignant cells. In the future, strategies to counteract the pathological interaction between the niche and neoplastic HSCs may offer additional treatment strategies for MPN patients.

  3. 'Real-world' management and outcomes of patients with paroxysmal vs. non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in Europe: the EURObservational Research Programme-Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) General Pilot Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriani, Giuseppe; Laroche, Cecile; Diemberger, Igor; Fantecchi, Elisa; Popescu, Mircea Ioachim; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo P; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has different presentations (first detected, paroxysmal, persistent, permanent), with uncertain impact on outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate clinical presentation, management, and outcome of paroxysmal and non-paroxysmal AFs within the EURObservational Research Programme-Atrial Fibrillation General Pilot Registry. Overall 2589 patients with available 1-year follow-up data were evaluated according to AF type. Patients with paroxysmal AF (26.8%) were younger, had lower prevalence of heart disease (particularly valvular), and major co-morbidities, as well as lower CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, and HAS-BLED scores. Patients with first-detected AF (29.9%) had characteristics similar to persistent AF patients (25.9%), but lower use of oral anticoagulants. Patients with permanent AF represented 17.4% of the cohort. At 1 year, the rate of stroke/transient ischaemic attack and thromboembolism was low (0.6-1.0%) and did not differ between paroxysmal and non-paroxysmal AFs. All-cause mortality was higher in non-paroxysmal vs. paroxysmal AF (log rank test, P = 0.0018). Using a multivariable Cox model, non-paroxysmal AF was not an independent predictor of death during follow-up. Independent predictors of death were age, chronic heart failure, chronic kidney disease, diabetes, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and physical activity. In this 'real-world' contemporary observational registry, patients with non-paroxysmal AF had a worse outcome, in terms of all-cause mortality, which was related to a more severe clinical profile. The risk of stroke at 1 year was relatively low, perhaps reflecting the high rates of anticoagulation use in this cohort. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasm presenting with Cushing's syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabayegit Ozlem

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Oncocytic neoplasms occur in several organs and are most commonly found in the thyroid, kidneys and salivary glands. Oncocytic neoplasms of the adrenal cortex are extremely rare and are usually non-functioning. Case presentation We report the case of an adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasm with uncertain malignant potential in a 31-year-old man with Cushing's syndrome. The patient had been operated on following diagnosis of a 7 cm adrenal mass. Following surgery, the Cushing's syndrome resolved. The patient is still alive with no metastases one year after the surgery. Conclusion Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms must be considered in the differential diagnosis of both functioning and non-functioning adrenal masses.

  5. A three-pulmonary vein isolation approach to treat paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lexin WANG; Jing ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the safety and efficacy of a 3-pulmonary vein (PV) isolation approach in treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). Methods Radiofrequency catheter ablation was used to eliminate PV potential in 11 patterns with frequent paroxysmal AF refractory to anti-arrhythmic agents. During sinus rhythm, PV potential was mapped in the left and right superior PVs and left inferior PV. The procedural success was defined as the elimination of PV potential in the 3 PVs. Restults PV potential was identified and abolished in a total of 24 PVs, mostly in the left and right superior PV. There was no pulmonary stenosis or other complications during or after the procedures. AF recurred in one patient after an average of 12 ± 3 month follow-up. Conclusions PV potemials were present mostly in the left or right superior PV. The 3-PVs isolation approach is safe and effective in preventing drug-resistant paroxysmal AF.

  6. [Formation of paroxysmal brain activity in the liquidators of the consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podsonnaya, I V; Shumacher, G I; Efremushkin, G G; Gelobetskaya, E D

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of ionizing radiation on the formation of paroxysmal brain activity (PBA) in the liquidators of the consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in view of their age on the date of exposure to radiation. EEG examinations were performed in 105 liquidators of the consequences of the nuclear disaster (LCND) and 90 people without radiation anamnesis (control group). It has been determined that the formation of paroxysmal brain activity in LCND occurs 3.5 times more frequent (pradiation. The history of the exposure to ionizing radiation is associated with the increased risk of the development of convulsive PBA as focal seizures by 5.5 times (pRadiation effect on LCND under 30 years old increases (as compared to the control group) the risk of the formation of elevated paroxysmal brain activity by 19 times (peffect of ionizing radiation on the development of PBA related to the age on the date of exposure to radiation was found.

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  19. Plurihormonal Cosecretion by a Case of Adrenocortical Oncocytic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Corrales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasms (oncocytomas are extremely rare; only approximately 159 cases have been described so far. The majority are nonfunctional and benign. We describe an unusual case of a functional oncocytoma secreting an excess of glucocorticoids (cortisol and androgens (androstenedione and DHEAS, a pattern of plurihormonal cosecretion previously not reported in men, presenting with endocrine manifestations of Cushing’s syndrome. The neoplasm was considered to be of uncertain malignant potential (borderline according to the Lin-Weiss-Bisceglia criteria.

  20. Nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms: gender differences in prevalence and malignant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondagh, Eveline J A; Masclee, Ad A M; van der Valk, Mirthe E; Winkens, Bjorn; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Soetikno, Roy M; Sanduleanu, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Colonoscopy may fail to prevent colorectal cancer, especially in the proximal colon and in women. Nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms may potentially explain some of these post-colonoscopy cancers. In the present study, we aimed to examine the prevalence and malignant potential of nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms in a large population, with special attention to gender and location. We performed a cross-sectional study of all consecutive patients undergoing elective colonoscopy at a single academic medical center. The endoscopists were familiarized on the detection and treatment of nonpolypoid lesions. Advanced histology was defined by the presence of high-grade dysplasia or early cancer. We included 2310 patients (53.9% women, mean age 58.4 years) with 2143 colorectal polyps. Prevalences of colorectal neoplasms and nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms were lower in women than in men (20.9% vs. 33.7%, p colorectal neoplasms were significantly more likely to contain advanced histology than polypoid ones (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.24-6.74, p = 0.01), while this was not the case in men (OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.40-2.06, p = 0.83). Proximal neoplasms with advanced histology were more likely to be nonpolypoid than distal ones (OR 4.68, 95% CI 1.54-14.2, p = 0.006). Nonpolypoid mechanisms may play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis, in both women and men. Although women have fewer colorectal neoplasms than men, they have nonpolypoid colorectal neoplasms, which frequently contain advanced histology.

  1. Morbidity and mortality of malignant neoplasms in Macedonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vukovikj, Viktorija; Markovski, Velo

    2015-01-01

    Introductions: Malignant neoplasms are the second cause of death among the population in Republic of Macedonia with representation of and represent 19.0% in the structure of total deaths. Objective: To analyze the morbidity and mortality of the most common malignant neoplasms in Republic of Macedonia. Material and methods: Were used a data from the Institute of Public Health of the Republic of Macedonia, National institute for statistic of Republic Macedonia. Results and discussions:...

  2. Somatosensory disinhibition in patients with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Hua; SUN Ying; CHEN Hai; WANG De-quan; LI Li-ping; DING Yan; LIU Ai-hua; LU Chang-feng; WANG Yu-ping

    2012-01-01

    Background Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) is characterized by recurrent brief episodes of chorea and dystonia induced by sudden movement.Whether the central nervous system is hyper- or hypoexcitable in PKD remains undetermined.The aim of our study was to compare the somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) recovery cycle,a marker of somatosensory system excitability,in PKD patients and controls.Methods Twenty-four PKD patients (mean age of (20.0±5.3) years; 21 males,3 females) and 18 control age-matched subjects (mean age of (22.0±5.0) years; 17 males,1 female) were studied.The stimuli were delivered to the median nerve in the affected dominant arm in patients and in the dominant arm in controls.The change in SEP amplitude was measured after paired electrical stimulation at interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 5,20,and 40 ms.The SEPs evoked by S2 (test stimulus) were calculated by subtracting the response to S1 (the conditioning stimulus) from the response to a pair of stimuli (S1 + S2),and their amplitudes were compared with those of the control response (S1) at each ISI.Analysis of variance (ANOVA) or equivalent was used for non-parametric data.Results In patients,the P27 amplitude after the single stimulus (S1) was significantly larger than that after the control stimulus.The (S2/S1)x100 ratio for P14 and N30 SEPs did not differ significantly between PKD patients and normal subjects at ISI of 5 ms but were significantly higher in patients at ISIs of 20 and 40 ms (P<0.05).Conclusions Somatosensory system disinhibition takes place in PKD.The finding of reduced suppression of different SEPs,each thought to have a different origin,suggests an abnormality of intracortical and subcortical inhibitory circuits.

  3. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after radiologic scanning: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aydin Erdinc

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is the most common type of vertigo. It is frequently seen in elderly patients, and the course of the attack may easily mimic cerebrovascular disease. A BPPV attack after a radiologic examination has not been reported previously. We report the cases of two patients who had BPPV attacks after radiologic imaging. Case presentation The first patient with headache and tremor was admitted to the radiology department for cranial computed tomography (CT imaging. During scanning, she was asked to lie in the supine position with no other head movements for approximately 10 minutes. After the cranial CT imaging, she stood up rapidly, and suddenly experienced a vertigo attack and nausea. The second patient was admitted to the radiology department for evaluation of his renal arteries. During the renal magnetic resonance angiography, he was in the supine position for 20 minutes and asked not to move. After the examination, he stood up rapidly with the help of the technician and suddenly experienced a vertigo attack with nausea and vomiting. The results of standard laboratory analyses and their neurologic examinations were within normal limits and Dix-Hallpike tests showed rotatory nystagmus in both cases. An Epley maneuver was performed to the patients. The results of a control Dix-Hallpike tests after 1 Epley maneuver were negative in both patients. Conclusion Radiologists and clinicians must keep in mind that after radiologic imaging in which the patient is still for some time in the supine position and then helped to stand up rapidly, a BPPV attack may occur.

  4. Decreased serum vitamin D in idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seong-Hae; Kim, Ji-Soo; Shin, Jong Wook; Kim, Sungbo; Lee, Hajeong; Lee, Ae Young; Kim, Jae-Moon; Jo, Hyunjin; Song, Junghan; Ghim, Yuna

    2013-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated an association of osteopenia/osteoporosis with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Since vitamin D takes part in the regulation of calcium and phosphorus found in the body and plays an important role in maintaining proper bone structure, decreased bone mineral density in patients with BPPV may be related to decreased serum vitamin D. We measured the serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 100 patients (63 women and 37 men, mean age ± SD = 61.8 ± 11.6) with idiopathic BPPV and compared the data with those of 192 controls (101 women and 91 men, mean age ± SD = 60.3 ± 11.3) who had lived in the same community without dizziness or imbalance during the preceding year. The selection of the controls and acquisition of clinical information were done using the data from the Fourth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008. The serum level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was lower in the patients with BPPV than in the controls (mean ± SD = 14.4 ± 8.4 versus 19.1 ± 6.8 ng/ml, p = 0.001). Furthermore, patients with BPPV showed a higher prevalence of decreased serum vitamin D (BPPV with the odds ratios of 3.8 (95 % confidence interval = 1.51-9.38, p = 0.004) and 23.0 (95 % confidence interval = 6.88-77.05, p BPPV and decreased serum vitamin D. Decreased serum vitamin D may be a risk factor of BPPV.

  5. Awareness of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in central Israel

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    Pollak Lea

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its frequent occurrence and effective treatment options, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV still remains under-estimated in the community. Methods We reviewed referral letters and medical records of 120 patients who were treated for BPPV at our Dizziness Clinic during the years 2006–2008 and searched for factors that possibly contribute to missing this entity. Results The referral diagnosis could be clustered into four groups: BPPV (25.6%, further unspecified vertigo (36.6%, dizziness (27.5% and other (10%. BPPV was recognized more frequently by ENT doctors than by other specialists. Patients referred with the correct diagnosis of BPPV were significantly younger and the duration of their symptoms shorter than in other referral groups. Patients in the distinct referral groups did not differ in the presence of autonomic symptoms or a history of another serious disease. A history typical of BPPV could be obtained in all but 11 patients, but position dependence was noted by the referring physician only in 55 patients, 31 of them correctly assigned as possible BPPV. Only in two patients was the Dix-Hallpike test performed. Thirty two patients were diagnosed with BPPV in the past, but this did not influence the recognition of the recurrence of this clinical entity. About 40% of patients had an audiogram and/or brainstem auditory evoked potentials. Electronystagmography was performed in 7.5% and brain imaging in 14% of patients before referral. Conclusion Our results show that BPPV is still an under-recognized entity. Education and the demand on specialists to learn how to treat BPPV, could improve the situation.

  6. Clinical analysis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in youth

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    Jin XU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical features of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV in patients of 40 years old or younger. Methods The clinical features of 40 patients (age ≤40 years with BPPV admitted from August 2009 to July 2011 were retrospectively analyzed, and compared with that of 286 middle and old-aged patients (age >40 years with BPPV admitted in the same period. Results The incidence of BPPV in young patients showed a relatively higher incidence (12.3%, with the sex ratio of male to female 1:3 and a mean age of 32.1±6.2 years. The mean latent period of vertigo attack was 1.2±1.3 seconds, and 10 patients (25% showed no obvious latent period. The median duration of vertigo was 10s. The posterior semicircular canal was involved in 27 patients (67.5%. Cupulolithiasis was found in 6 patients, and all the otolithiasis was found to involve the posterior semicircular canal. The proportion of BPPV with no obvious latency was higher in the young patients than in the middle and old-aged patients (25.0% vs 11.5%, χ2=5.554, P=0.018, but no significant difference in sex ratio, the course of disease, the ratio of involved semicircular canal, the latency and the duration of vertigo attack was found between two groups (P>0.05. Conclusions The incidence of BPPV is relatively higher in youth, more common in females, and the posterior semicircular canal is commonly involved. Compared with the middle and old-aged patients with BPPV, the proportion patients with no obvious latency of vertigo attack in young patients is higher, and the incidence of cupulolithiasis involving posterior semicircular canal is higher in the youth.

  7. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in outpatient practice: Diagnosis and treatment

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    N. V. Bestuzheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dizziness is one of the common reasons for visits to physicians of various specialties; the data of foreign investigations show that benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV is most frequently encountered.Objective: to study the causes of dizziness, to analyze the frequency of BPPV and the efficiency of its treatment in outpatient practice.Patients and methods. The investigation enrolled 80 patients, including 55 (68.7% women and 25 (31.3% men, aged 18 to 75 years (mean age 53.8±12.8 years, who complained of dizziness and sought for medical advice in the Therapeutic-and-Diagnostic Unit, A.Ya. Kozhevnikov Clinic of Nervous System Diseases, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University.Results. The most common causes of dizziness in outpatient practice were BPPV (46.2% and postural phobic vertigo (35%. The diagnosis of VPPV, if special positional testing (Dix-Hallpike and McClure-Pagnini tests was carried out, was shown to create no significant difficulties. The diagnosis was not established in the majority (97.5% of the patients; effective treatment was performed in one of the patients. Combined treatment, by performing the positional tests and using betaserc for 2 months, led to complete resolution of positional vertigo in most (97.3% patients.Discussion. The findings indicate the efficiency of examining patients with complaints of dizziness, by using the special otoneurological tests to detect BPPV. The purposeful questioning of patients with BPPV can suspect this disease in the majority of cases. Our investigation shows the high efficiency of rehabilitation maneuvers for BPPV, which agrees well with the data of other authors. Physicians’ poor awareness of BPPV among physicians and the high efficiency of its treatment in outpatient practice are noted.

  8. FOCAL GENERATION OF PAROXYSMAL FAST RUNS DURING ELECTROGRAPHIC SEIZURES

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    Boucetta, Sofiane; Chauvette, Sylvain; Bazhenov, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Purpose A cortically generated Lennox-Gastaut type seizure is associated with spike-wave/polyspike-wave discharges at 1.0–2.5 Hz and fast runs at 7–16 Hz. Here we studied the patterns of synchronization during runs of paroxysmal fast spikes. Methods Electrographic activities were recorded using multisite intracellular and field potential recordings in vivo from cats anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine. In different experiments, the recording electrodes were located either at short distances (<1 mm) or at longer distances (up to 12 mm). The main experimental findings were tested in computational models. Results In the majority of cases, the onset and the offset of fast runs occurred almost simultaneously in different recording sites. The amplitude and duration of fast runs could vary by orders of magnitude. Within the fast runs, the patterns of synchronization recorded in different electrodes were as following: (i) synchronous, in phase, (ii) synchronous, with phase shift, (iii) patchy, repeated in phase/phase shift transitions and (iv) non-synchronous, slightly different frequencies in different recording sites or absence of oscillatory activity in one of the recording sites; the synchronous patterns (in phase or with phase shifts) were most common. All these patterns could be recorded in the same pair of electrodes during different seizures and they were reproduced in a computational network model. Intrinsically-bursting (IB) neurons fired more spikes per cycle than any other neurons suggesting their leading role in the fast run generation. Conclusions Once started, the fast runs are generated locally with variable correlations between neighboring cortical foci. PMID:18616553

  9. Neuromyelitis optica: association with paroxysmal painful tonic spasms.

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    Carnero Contentti, E; Leguizamón, F; Hryb, J P; Celso, J; Pace, J L Di; Ferrari, J; Knorre, E; Perassolo, M B

    2016-10-01

    Paroxysmal painful tonic spasms (PPTS) were initially described in multiple sclerosis (MS) but they are more frequent in neuromyelitis optica (NMO). The objective is to report their presence in a series of cases of NMO and NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD), as well as to determine their frequency and clinical features. We conducted a retrospective assessment of medical histories of NMO/NMOSD patients treated in 2 hospitals in Buenos Aires (Hospital Durand and Hospital Álvarez) between 2009 and 2013. Out of 15 patients with NMOSD (7 with definite NMO and 8 with limited NMO), 4 presented PPTS (26.66%). PPTS frequency in the definite NMO group was 57.14% (4/7). Of the 9 patients with longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis (LETM), 44.44% (9/15) presented PPTS. Mean age was 35 years (range, 22-38 years) and all patients were women. Mean time between NMO diagnosis and PPTS onset was 7 months (range, 1-29 months) and mean time from last relapse of LETM was 30 days (range 23-40 days). LETM (75% cervicothoracic and 25% thoracic) was observed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in all patients. Control over spasms and pain was achieved in all patients with carbamazepine (associated with gabapentin in one case). No favourable responses to pregabalin, gabapentin, or phenytoin were reported. PPTS are frequent in NMO. Mean time of PPTS onset is approximately one month after an LETM relapse, with extensive cervicothoracic lesions appearing on the MRI scan. They show an excellent response to carbamazepine but little or no response to pregabalin and gabapentin. Prospective studies with larger numbers of patients are necessary in order to confirm these results. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. PRRT2 links infantile convulsions and paroxysmal dyskinesia with migraine.

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    Cloarec, Robin; Bruneau, Nadine; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Massacrier, Annick; Salmi, Manal; Bataillard, Marc; Boulay, Clotilde; Caraballo, Roberto; Fejerman, Natalio; Genton, Pierre; Hirsch, Edouard; Hunter, Alasdair; Lesca, Gaetan; Motte, Jacques; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanlaville, Damien; Wong, Sau-Wei; Fu, Ying-Hui; Rochette, Jacques; Ptácek, Louis J; Szepetowski, Pierre

    2012-11-20

    Whole genome sequencing and the screening of 103 families recently led us to identify PRRT2 (proline-rich-transmembrane protein) as the gene causing infantile convulsions (IC) with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) (PKD/IC syndrome, formerly ICCA). There is interfamilial and intrafamilial variability and the patients may have IC or PKD. Association of IC with hemiplegic migraine (HM) has also been reported. In order to explore the mutational and clinical spectra, we analyzed 34 additional families with either typical PKD/IC or PKD/IC with migraine. We performed Sanger sequencing of all PRRT2 coding exons and of exon-intron boundaries in the probands and in their relatives whenever appropriate. Two known and 2 novel PRRT2 mutations were detected in 18 families. The p.R217Pfs*8 recurrent mutation was found in ≈50% of typical PKD/IC, and the unreported p.R145Gfs*31 in one more typical family. PRRT2 mutations were also found in PKD/IC with migraine: p.R217Pfs*8 cosegregated with PKD associated with HM in one family, and was also detected in one IC patient having migraine with aura, in related PKD/IC familial patients having migraine without aura, and in one sporadic migraineur with abnormal MRI. Previously reported p.R240X was found in one patient with PKD with migraine without aura. The novel frameshift p.S248Afs*65 was identified in a PKD/IC family member with IC and migraine with aura. We extend the spectrum of PRRT2 mutations and phenotypes to HM and to other types of migraine in the context of PKD/IC, and emphasize the phenotypic pleiotropy seen in patients with PRRT2 mutations.

  11. CT characteristics of primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children

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    Xu Yufeng; Wang Jichen [Department of Radiology, Peking University First Hospital, No. 8, Xishike Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100034 (China); Peng Yun [Imaging Center, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China); Zeng Jinjin, E-mail: jzeng5567@yahoo.co [Imaging Center, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China)

    2010-09-15

    Primary retroperitoneal neoplasms are uncommon in children. Retroperitoneal neoplasms are either mesodermal, neurogenic, germ cell ectodermal or lymphatic in origin. In general, primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children have different spectrum and prevalence compared to those in adults. Neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, benign teratoma and lymphoma are the common retroperitoneal neoplasms. In this review, the clinical and CT futures of common retroperitoneal neoplasms in children are described. Coarse, amorphous, and mottled calcification are very common in neuroblastoma. Paraganglioma tends to show marked and early enhancement and may present with clinical symptoms associated with the excess catecholamine. Sarcomas are often very large and have heterogeneous appearance. Imaging cannot be reliably used to identify the type of retroperitoneal sarcomas due to overlapped radiographic features. In children, lipoblastoma is the most common lipomatous tumor in the retroperitoneum. The percentage of visible fat in tumor varies depending on the cellular composition of the lesion. The CT characteristics of teratoma are quite variable, which may be cystic, solid, on a combination of both. Typically teratoma appears as a large complex mass containing fluid, fat, fat-fluid level, and calcifications. Lymphoma is often homogeneous on both enhanced and unenhanced CT scans. Necrosis and calcification are rare on CT. In conclusion, making a final histological diagnosis of retroperitoneal tumor base on CT features is not often possible; however, CT can help to develop a differential diagnosis and determine the size and extent of the retroperitoneal neoplasms.

  12. Second neoplasms following megavoltage radiation in a pediatric population

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    Haselow, R.E.; Nesbit, M.; Dehner, L.P.; Khan, F.M.; McHugh, R.; Levitt, S.H.

    1978-09-01

    Previous reports of radiation-related neoplasia have relied primarily upon patients treated by orthovoltage to low doses for benign disease. This survey is believed to be the first to assess the incidence of second neoplasms following megavoltage therapy. The source was the records of all long-term pediatric survivors (88 patients) who were treated with megavoltage radiation (cobalt 60) at the University of Minnesota. There was an average follow-up period of 14 years during which 7 second neoplasms were discovered (8%). Five were not associated with prior radiation. Both radiation-related neoplasms were associated with low doses and one was without significant morbidity. Two of the seven neoplasms were malignant; one was not associated with radiation while the other was associated with prolonged chemotherapy and low dose radiation (1%). The only fatal second neoplasm was not associated with radiation but developed 5 years after prolonged chlorambucil treatment. This review reveals the tendency of childhood cancer victims to develop other neoplasms regardless of radiation. The finding of neoplasia induction only at low radiation doses supports the Gray hypothesis of decreased tumor induction at high doses through increased cell killing.

  13. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease.

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    Kari Hemminki

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis. By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation.

  14. Mucins in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic neoplasms: report of 40 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yuan; TAN Yun-shan; XU Jian-fang; QI Wei-dong; LI Xiao-ping; SU-JIE Ake-su; ZHU Xiong-zeng

    2006-01-01

    @@ Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas account for 10% to 15% of all cystic pancreatic lesions.The majority (85% to 90%) of cystic lesions of the pancreas are pseudocysts. Although cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are rare, they range from benign to malignant neoplasms. The clinical challenge is the differential diagnosis and management of the cystic neoplasms, which represent 10% to 25% of primary pancreatic neoplasms. Pancreatic neoplasms and tumour like lesions with cystic features have been recently reviewed. The incidence of pancreatic cystic neoplasms reported is variable. Because there is no large, systematic study on tne cases from China comparing the incidence and biology of cystic neoplasms of pancreas to that of Western series, we reviewed all the cases of cystic neoplasms from Zhongshan Hospital over 6 years. Most of the neoplasms in our series were classified according to the recent World Health Organization (WHO)classification.1,2

  15. Insights into horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo from a human case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Margaret; Bance, Manohar

    2013-12-01

    For horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, determination of the pathologic side is difficult and based on many physiological assumptions. This article reports findings on a patient who had one dysfunctional inner ear and who presented with horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, giving us a relatively pure model for observing nystagmus arising in a subject in whom the affected side is known a priori. It is an interesting human model corroborating theories of nystagmus generation in this pathology and also serves to validate Ewald's second law in a living human subject. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia in multiple sclerosis and corresponding magnetic resonance imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongmei; Zeng, Chun; Luo, Tianyou

    2011-02-01

    Paroxysmal dysarthria (PD) and paroxysmal dysarthria-ataxia (PDA) syndromes are uncommon symptoms of the neurological dysfunction in multiple sclerosis (MS). We describe two patients who had clinically definite MS presented with symptomatic PD and PDA syndromes, respectively, related to demyelinating lesions. In one patient, the PD symptom was the initial manifestation of an acute episode. In the other patient, the episode of dysarthria was accompanied by ataxia disorders. Both patients had midbrain lesions at or below the level of the right red nucleus on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), confirming that this area is critically involved. Both responded well to carbamazepine (CBZ).

  17. Paroxysmal Nonkinesigenic Dyskinesias Responsive to Carbamazepine in Fahr Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montilla-Uzcátegui, Verónica; Araujo-Unda, Hilarión; Daza-Restrepo, Anilú; Sáenz-Farret, Michel; Micheli, Federico

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to report the case of a patient with paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesias and Fahr syndrome who had a marked response to carbamazepine. We present the case of a 57-year-old female patient with episodes of paroxysmal choreoathetoid dyskinesias in the oromandibular region and distal region of upper and lower extremities, with fluctuating dystonic postures in the same distribution; duration was variable ranging from 30 minutes to 3 hours. Laboratory studies were consistent with primary hyperparathyroidism with bilateral brain calcifications. Treatment with low doses of carbamazepine was successful.

  18. Classification conundrums in paroxysmal dyskinesias: a new subtype or variations on classic themes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourfar, Michael H; Guerrini, Renzo; Parain, Dominique; Frucht, Steven J

    2005-08-01

    Paroxysmal movement disorders are a group of heterogeneous entities that have been categorized based on their most salient features. The four classic categories of paroxysmal dyskinesias are kinesigenic, nonkinesigenic, hypnogenic, and exercise-induced. The phenotypic variability of these disorders, coupled with new insights into their possible etiologies, has made the task of classification increasingly problematic. We describe 4 cases that do not fit easily into the current classification scheme, compare them with four others recently described in the literature, and raise the question as to whether they constitute a new subtype.

  19. Secondary malignant neoplasms in testicular cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, Stephanie A; Fung, Chunkit; Beard, Clair J

    2015-09-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer among men aged 15 to 40 years, and the incidence of testicular cancer is steadily increasing. Despite successful treatment outcomes and the rate of survival at 5 to 10 years being 95%, survivors can experience late effects of both their cancer and the treatment they received, including secondary malignant neoplasms (SMNs). We discuss the development of non-germ cell SMNs that develop after diagnosis and treatment of testicular cancer and their effect on mortality. Patients diagnosed with testicular cancer frequently choose postoperative surveillance if they are diagnosed with clinical stage I disease. These patients may experience an increased risk for developing SMNs following radiation exposure from diagnostic imaging. Similarly, radiotherapy for testicular cancer is associated with increased risks of developing both solid tumors and leukemia. Studies have reported that patients exposed to higher doses of radiation have an increased risk of developing SMNs when compared with patients who received lower doses of radiation. Patients treated with chemotherapy also experience an increased risk of developing SMNs following testicular cancer, though the risk following chemotherapy and radiation therapy combined is not well described. A large population-based study concluded that the rate ratios for both cancer-specific and all-cause mortality for SMNs among testicular cancer survivors were not significantly different from those of matched first cancers. Although it is known that patients who receive adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy or who undergo routine diagnostic or follow-up imaging for a primary testicular cancer are at an increased risk for developing SMNs, the extent of this risk is largely unknown. It is critically important that research be conducted to determine this risk and its contributing factors as accurately as possible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Struggling for a normal life: work as an individual self-care management strategy among persons living with non-malignant chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Gudrun; Anderssen, Norman

    2014-01-01

    A significant part of the population suffers from non-malignant chronic pain that is not treated by pain specialists. No successful long-term treatment exists. The patients have to deal with their condition in collaboration with health personnel establishing treatment programmes under uncertain circumstances with few guidelines. Thus, there is a strong need for knowledge on how patients with chronic non-malignant pain manage their condition. The aim of the study was to explore how patients with chronic non-malignant pain deal with their condition. Twenty patients with chronic non-malignant pain (aged 26-63 in year 2006) told in an open-ended interview situation, how they lived with and dealt with their condition. The interviews were analysed within a phenomenological meaning condensation framework. For all patients the pain was as an integrated part of their life that required huge efforts to cope with. Typically, the patients experienced loneliness, fear of stigmatization and despair because of their unpredictable condition, and they wanted to come back to a normalized daily life, first and foremost by getting back to paid work. In general, the patients developed individual strategies that were influenced by their local contexts and life situation as well as the pain itself. This may be interpreted in line with Bourdieu's notions of habitus, strategies and social capital.

  1. Cost of pain medication to treat adult patients with nonmalignant chronic pain in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasu, Rafia S; Vouthy, Kiengkham; Crowl, Ashley N; Stegeman, Anne E; Fikru, Bithia; Bawa, Walter Agbor; Knell, Maureen E

    2014-09-01

    Nonmalignant chronic pain (NMCP) is a public health concern. Among primary care appointments, 22% focus on pain management. The American Academy of Pain Medicine guidelines for NMCP recommend combination medication therapy (including analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], opioids, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants) as a key component to effective treatment for many chronic pain diagnoses. However, there has been little evidence outlining the costs of pain medications in adult patients with NMCP in the United States, an area that necessitates further consideration as the nation moves toward value-based benefit design. To estimate the cost of pain medication attributable to treating adult patients with NMCP in the United States and to analyze the trend of outpatient pain visits. This cross-sectional study used the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) data from 2000-2007. The Division of Health Care Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted the survey. The study included patients aged ≥18 years with chronic pain diagnoses (identified by the ICD-9-CM codes: primary, secondary, and tertiary). Patients prescribed at least 1 pain medication were included in the cost analysis. Pain-related prescription medications prescribed during ambulatory care visits were retrieved by using NAMCS drug codes/National Drug Code numbers. National pain prescription frequencies (weighted) were obtained from NAMCS data, using the statistical software STATA. We created pain therapy categories (drug classes) for cost analysis based on national pain guidelines. Drug classes used in this analysis were opioids/opioid-like agents, analgesics/NSAIDs, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antirheumatics/immunologics, muscle relaxants, topical products, and corticosteroids. We calculated average prices based on the 3 lowest average wholesale prices reported in the

  2. Ionizing radiation predisposes non-malignant human mammaryepithelial cells to undergo TGF beta-induced epithelial to mesenchymaltransition

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    Andarawewa, Kumari L.; Erickson, Anna C.; Chou, William S.; Costes, Sylvain; Gascard, Philippe; Mott, Joni D.; Bissell, Mina J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2007-04-06

    Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}) is a tumor suppressor during the initial stage of tumorigenesis, but it can switch to a tumor promoter during neoplastic progression. Ionizing radiation (IR), both a carcinogen and a therapeutic agent, induces TGF{beta}, activation in vivo. We now show that IR sensitizes human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Non-malignant HMEC (MCF10A, HMT3522 S1 and 184v) were irradiated with 2 Gy shortly after attachment in monolayer culture, or treated with a low concentration of TGF{beta} (0.4 ng/ml), or double-treated. All double-treated (IR+TGF{beta}) HMEC underwent a morphological shift from cuboidal to spindle-shaped. This phenotype was accompanied by decreased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin, {beta}-catenin and ZO-1, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton, and increased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, fibronectin and vimentin. Furthermore, double-treatment increased cell motility, promoted invasion and disrupted acinar morphogenesis of cells subsequently plated in Matrigel{trademark}. Neither radiation nor TGF{beta} alone elicited EMT, even though IR increased chronic TGF{beta} signaling and activity. Gene expression profiling revealed that double treated cells exhibit a specific 10-gene signature associated with Erk/MAPK signaling. We hypothesized that IR-induced MAPK activation primes non-malignant HMEC to undergo TGF{beta}-mediated EMT. Consistent with this, Erk phosphorylation were transiently induced by irradiation, persisted in irradiated cells treated with TGF{beta}, and treatment with U0126, a Mek inhibitor, blocked the EMT phenotype. Together, these data demonstrate that the interactions between radiation-induced signaling pathways elicit heritable phenotypes that could contribute to neoplastic progression.

  3. Paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation associated with subclinical hyperthyroidism, chronic renal failure and elevation of prostate-specific antigen during acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo

    2010-02-04

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism is an increasingly recognized entity that is defined as a normal serum free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine levels with a thyroid-stimulating hormone level suppressed below the normal range and usually undetectable. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is a frequent complication of acute myocardial infarction. It has been reported that subclinical hyperthyroidism is not associated with coronary heart disease or mortality from cardiovascular causes but it is sufficient to induce arrhythmias including an increase in atrial fibrillation rate. It has also been reported that increased factor X activity in patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism represents a potential hypercoagulable state. Moreover chronic renal failure presents an increased arrhythmic risk. Apparently spurious result has been reported in a work about mean serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration during acute myocardial infarction with mean serum PSA concentration significantly lower on day 2 than either day 1 or day 3 and it has been reported that these preliminary results could reflect several factors, such as antiinfarctual treatment, reduced physical activity or an acute-phase response. We present a case of paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation associated with subclinical hyperthyroidism, chronic renal failure and elevation of serum PSA concentration in a 90-year-old Italian man during acute myocardial infarction. Also this case focuses attention on the importance of a correct evaluation of subclinical hyperthyroidism and of chronic renal failure. Moreover, our report also confirms previous findings and extends the evaluation of PSA during acute myocardial infarction.

  4. Somatic CALR Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with Nonmutated JAK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Van Loo, P.; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O’Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.-Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.P.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.P.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. RESULTS Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. CONCLUSIONS Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with

  5. Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity after acquired brain injury: consensus on conceptual definition, nomenclature, and diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguley, Ian J; Perkes, Iain E; Fernandez-Ortega, Juan-Francisco; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Dolce, Giuliano; Hendricks, Henk T

    2014-09-01

    A syndrome of paroxysmal, episodic sympathetic hyperactivity after acquired brain injury has been recognized for almost 60 years. This project sought to simplify the confused nomenclature for the condition (>31 eponyms) and simplify the nine overlapping sets of diagnostic criteria. A consensus-developed questionnaire based on a systematic review of the literature was circulated to a widely representative, international expert group utilizing a Delphi approach. Diagnostic criteria were dropped if group consensus failed to agree on their relative importance, with a goal of reaching a Cronbach α of 0.8 (suitable for research purposes). The resulting criteria were combined into an assessment measure for clinical and research settings. The consensus group recommend that the term "paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity" replace previous terms to describe the "syndrome, recognised in a subgroup of survivors of severe acquired brain injury, of simultaneous, paroxysmal transient increases in sympathetic [elevated heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, temperature, sweating] and motor [posturing] activity." An 11 point probabilistic diagnostic scale was developed with reference to published criteria, yielding an acceptable Cronbach α of 0.8. These 11 items were proceduralized and combined with a symptom severity index to produce a diagnostic tool for use with adults (the paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity assessment measure [PSH-AM]). Development of a pediatric version of the scale and further research into the validity of the PSH-AM is recommended. The consensus position builds on previous literature to establish diagnostic definitions and criteria, an important move to standardize research and management of this condition.

  6. MYELODYSPLASIA FOLLOWING PAROXYSMAL-NOCTURNAL HEMOGLOBINURIA - EVIDENCE FOR THE EMERGENCE OF A SEPARATE CLONE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANKAMP, H; SMIT, JW; VANDENBERG, E; HALIE, MR; VELLENGA, E

    1994-01-01

    patient with paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) who developed a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is described. After the onset of myelodysplasia the neutrophils of the patient fully expressed GPI-linked proteins. It is concluded that the myelodysplasia does not originate from transformed PNH s

  7. Mutations in the Gene PRRT2 Cause Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia with Infantile Convulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Hsien-Yang; Huang, Yong; Bruneau, Nadine; Roll, Patrice; Roberson, Elisha D. O.; Hermann, Mark; Quinn, Emily; Maas, James; Edwards, Robert; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Baykan, Betul; Bhatia, Kailash; Bressman, Susan; Bruno, Michiko K.; Brunt, Ewout R.; Caraballo, Roberto; Echenne, Bernard; Fejerman, Natalio; Frucht, Steve; Gurnett, Christina A.; Hirsch, Edouard; Houlden, Henry; Jankovic, Joseph; Lee, Wei-Ling; Lynch, David R.; Mohammed, Shehla; Mueller, Ulrich; Nespeca, Mark P.; Renner, David; Rochette, Jacques; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Saiki, Shinji; Soong, Bing-Wen; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Tucker, Sam; Wood, Nicholas; Hanna, Michael; Bowcock, Anne M.; Szepetowski, Pierre; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptacek, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia with infantile convulsions (PKD/IC) is an episodic movement disorder with autosomal-dominant inheritance and high penetrance, but the causative genetic mutation is unknown. We have now identified four truncating mutations involving the gene PRRT2 in the vast majorit

  8. VDDR pacing after His-bundle ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buys, EM; van Hemel, NM; Jessurun, ER; Bakema, L; Kingma, JH

    1998-01-01

    His-bundle ablation followed by pacemaker implantation is today a widely accepted therapeutic choice when drug refractoriness of symptomatic AF is evident. The selection of pacing mode in patients suffering from paroxysmal AF is still controversial. Preservation of AV synchrony is an attractive opti

  9. Mutations in the Gene PRRT2 Cause Paroxysmal Kinesigenic Dyskinesia with Infantile Convulsions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Hsien-Yang; Huang, Yong; Bruneau, Nadine; Roll, Patrice; Roberson, Elisha D. O.; Hermann, Mark; Quinn, Emily; Maas, James; Edwards, Robert; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Baykan, Betul; Bhatia, Kailash; Bressman, Susan; Bruno, Michiko K.; Brunt, Ewout R.; Caraballo, Roberto; Echenne, Bernard; Fejerman, Natalio; Frucht, Steve; Gurnett, Christina A.; Hirsch, Edouard; Houlden, Henry; Jankovic, Joseph; Lee, Wei-Ling; Lynch, David R.; Mohammed, Shehla; Mueller, Ulrich; Nespeca, Mark P.; Renner, David; Rochette, Jacques; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Saiki, Shinji; Soong, Bing-Wen; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Tucker, Sam; Wood, Nicholas; Hanna, Michael; Bowcock, Anne M.; Szepetowski, Pierre; Fu, Ying-Hui; Ptacek, Louis J.

    2012-01-01

    Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia with infantile convulsions (PKD/IC) is an episodic movement disorder with autosomal-dominant inheritance and high penetrance, but the causative genetic mutation is unknown. We have now identified four truncating mutations involving the gene PRRT2 in the vast majorit

  10. Fluvastatin therapy could not decrease progression of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in non-valvular disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qiang; Zhang, Shuangyue; Zou, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Jun; Hao, Jia; Sun, Qian

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether fluvastatin therapy could decrease the probability of atrial fibrillation (AF) progression from paroxysmal AF to permanent AF and decrease the recurrence frequency of AF. Analyses were performed using two-tailed Student's t test or Mann-Whitney U tests. Categorical variables were compared with the χ2 statistics or Fisher's exact test. Patients with paroxysmal AF were randomized case-control, prospective into either the fluvastatin group (n=61) or control group (n=57). Patients were followed up for 24 months. The primary endpoint event was paroxysmal AF that progressed to permanent AF. Secondary endpoints were AF recurrence, cardiac dysfunction, stroke, or death. There were no differences in AF progression (fluvastatin group, 8.19% vs. control group, 12.51%; p>0.05) and stroke (fluvastatin group. 6.55% vs. 8.77%; p>0.05). Patients in the fluvastatin group had a lower rate of AF recurrence (fluvastatin group, 24.59% vs. control group, 49.12%; pdecrease AF progression. However, it could decrease the recurrence frequency of paroxysmal AF and cardiac dysfunction. This may occur because of depressing inflammation and improving circulating EPCs.

  11. Physical therapy rehabilitation of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Evidence based case report

    OpenAIRE

    Selvam Ramachandran; Manish Goon; Priyanka Singh

    2013-01-01

    The benign paroxysmal positional vertigo results in dizziness and imbalance leading to risk of fall thus, imposing functional limitations. The repositioning-liberatory maneuvers, habituation and balance exercises are widely used as the treatment strategies of the rehabilitation program. This case report discusses the success of such rehabilitation program on two subjects based on the updated clinical evidence.

  12. [The variety of symptoms in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo--revision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Lea

    2013-02-01

    Despite its frequent occurrence and effective treatment options, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) still remains underestimated in the community. Acquaintance of the physician with the various presentation symptoms assists in recognition of the entity. We report the complaints and subjective outcome in our cohort of BPPV patients and discuss the possible origin of the atypical, but common, symptoms.

  13. [Affective respiratory and reflex paroxysms--evaluation of anamnestic data, clinical manifestations and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lnĕnicková, D; Makovská, Z; Lnĕnicka, J

    1993-08-01

    The authors elaborated data, using the retrospective method, of a group of 146 patients with affective respiratory and reflex paroxysms. They focused attention on clinical manifestations of the disease, anamnestic data suggesting possible damage or immaturity of stem structures, the influence of heredity and the family environment. They found that in 63.7% the disease was manifested before the age of 1 year, most frequently at the age of 9-12 months. The cyanotic type of paroxysms was found in 67.5% of the patients, the pallid type in 21% and 3.5% of the patients suffered from both types of paroxysms. In 27.4% perinatal risks were recorded. The influence of a family-history was statistically significant in relation to the patient's age during the first attack: in patients with a positive family-history the mean age being by 1.8 months lower. 82.9% of the patients had a normal neurological finding, the EEG was evaluated as normal in 89.6% of 125 thus examined children. Psychological examinations made in 12 children revealed in all instances anomalies of personality with a predominance of lack of compliance and adaptability to the environment. Deterioration of the health status as a result of affective respiratory and reflex paroxysms was not recorded in any of the patients.

  14. Physical therapy rehabilitation of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Evidence based case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvam Ramachandran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The benign paroxysmal positional vertigo results in dizziness and imbalance leading to risk of fall thus, imposing functional limitations. The repositioning-liberatory maneuvers, habituation and balance exercises are widely used as the treatment strategies of the rehabilitation program. This case report discusses the success of such rehabilitation program on two subjects based on the updated clinical evidence.

  15. THE EFFECT OF CYCLOSPORINE ON HEMATOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN PATIENTS WITH PAROXYSMAL-NOCTURNAL HEMOGLOBINURIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANKAMP, H; VANIMHOFF, GW; DEWOLF, JTM; SMIT, JW; HALIE, MR; VELLENGA, E

    Four patients with paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) were treated with cyclosporine. The treatment with cyclosporine was based on the hypothesis that immune-mediated bone-marrow damage is the common pathogenetic mechanism of aplasia and PNH, with lack of GPI-linked ligands for an immune

  16. VDDR pacing after His-bundle ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buys, EM; van Hemel, NM; Jessurun, ER; Bakema, L; Kingma, JH

    1998-01-01

    His-bundle ablation followed by pacemaker implantation is today a widely accepted therapeutic choice when drug refractoriness of symptomatic AF is evident. The selection of pacing mode in patients suffering from paroxysmal AF is still controversial. Preservation of AV synchrony is an attractive

  17. Molecular biology of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Vidal Campregher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms are clonal diseases of hematopoietic stem cells characterized by myeloid hyperplasia and increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Myeloproliferative neoplasms are caused, as any other malignancy, by genetic defects that culminate in the neoplastic phenotype. In the past six years, since the identification of JAK2V617F, we have experienced a substantial increase in our knowledge about the genetic mechanisms involved in the genesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Mutations described in several genes have revealed a considerable degree of molecular homogeneity between different subtypes of myeloproliferative neoplasms. At the same time, the molecular differences between each subtype have become clearer. While mutations in several genes, such as JAK2, myeloproliferative leukemia (MPL and LNK have been validated in functional assays or animal models as causative mutations, the roles of other recurring mutations in the development of disease, such as TET2 and ASXL1 remain to be elucidated. In this review we will examine the most prevalent recurring gene mutations found in myeloproliferative neoplasms and their molecular consequences.

  18. Increased risk of lymphoid neoplasms in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Masala, Giovanna; Antonioli, Elisabetta; Chiara Susini, Maria; Guglielmelli, Paola; Pieri, Lisa; Maggi, Laura; Caini, Saverio; Palli, Domenico; Bogani, Costanza; Ponziani, Vanessa; Pancrazzi, Alessandro; Annunziato, Francesco; Bosi, Alberto

    2009-07-01

    Association of myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) with lymphoproliferative neoplasm (LPN) has been occasionally reported. The aim of this study, which included 353 patients with polycythemia vera and 467 with essential thrombocythemia, was to assess whether the risk of developing LPN is increased in MPN patients. Expected numbers of LPN incident cases were calculated based on 5-year age group, gender, and calendar time-specific cancer incidence rates in the general population of the same area. Standardized incidence ratios were computed to estimate the relative risk of developing LPN. Analyses were carried out for the whole series and then separately for essential thrombocythemia and polycythemia vera, gender, and JAK2V617F genotype. With 4,421 person-years, we found 11 patients developing LPN, including four chronic lymphocytic leukemias, five non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and two plasma cell disorders, after a median interval time of 68 months from MPN diagnosis. Cumulative risk to develop LPN at 5 and 10 years was 0.93% (95% confidence interval, 0.39-2.22) and 2.96% (95% confidence interval, 1.52-5.72), respectively. There was a 3.44-fold increased risk of LPN compared with the general population, ranging from 2.86 for plasma cell disorder to 12.42 for chronic lymphocytic leukemia; the risk was significantly increased in JAK2V617F mutated patients (5.46-fold) and in males (4.52-fold). The JAK2V617F mutation was found in lymphoid tumor cells in two of three cases evaluated, indicating that, in some patients, LPN originated in a JAK2V617F mutated common lymphoid-myeloid hematopoietic progenitor cell. We conclude that the risk of developing LPN is significantly increased in MPN patients compared with the general population.

  19. Hepatic small vessel neoplasm, a rare infiltrative vascular neoplasm of uncertain malignant potential☆,☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ryan M.; Buelow, Benjamin; Mather, Cheryl; Joseph, Nancy M.; Alves, Venancio; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Liu, Ta-Chiang; Makhlouf, Hala; Marginean, Celia; Nalbantoglu, ILKe; Sempoux, Christine; Snover, Dale C.; Thung, Swan N.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Ferrell, Linda D.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Characteristic but rare vascular neoplasms in the adult liver composed of small vessels with an infiltrative border were collected from an international group of collaborators over a 5-year period (N = 17). These tumors were termed hepatic small vessel neoplasm (HSVN), and the histologic differential diagnosis was angiosarcoma (AS). The average age of patients was 54 years (range, 24–83 years). HSVN was more common in men. The average size was 2.1 cm (range, 0.2–5.5 cm). Diagnosis was aided by immunohistochemical stains for vascular lineage (CD31, CD34, FLI-1), which were uniformly positive in HSVN. Immunohistochemical stains (p53, c-Myc, GLUT-1, and Ki-67) for possible malignant potential are suggestive of a benign/low-grade tumor. Capture-based next-generation sequencing (using an assay that targets the coding regions of more than 500 cancer genes) identified an activating hotspot GNAQ mutation in 2 of 3 (67%) tested samples, and one of these cases also had a hotspot mutation in PIK3CA. When compared with hepatic AS (n = 10) and cavernous hemangioma (n = 6), the Ki-67 proliferative index is the most helpful tool in excluding AS, which demonstrated a tumor cell proliferative index greater than 10% in all cases. Strong p53 and diffuse c-Myc staining was also significantly associated with AS but not with HSVN or cavernous hemangioma. There have been no cases with rupture/hemorrhage, disseminated intravascular coagulation, or Kasabach-Merritt syndrome. Thus far, there has been no metastasis or recurrence of HSVN, but complete resection and close clinical follow-up are recommended because the outcome remains unknown. PMID:27090685

  20. Methemoglobinemia in Young Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Aplastic Anemia Treated With Dapsone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-04

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Methemoglobinemia; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Nonmalignant Neoplasm

  1. Tissue, Blood, and Body Fluid Sample Collection From Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-20

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Nonmalignant Neoplasm

  2. DEGRO guidelines for the radiotherapy of non-malignant disorders. Part III: Hyperproliferative disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seegenschmiedt, M.H. [Center for Radiotherapy, Hamburg (Germany); Micke, Oliver [Franziskus Hospital Bielefeld, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Bielefeld (Germany); Niewald, Marcus [University of Saarland, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Muecke, Ralph [Lippe Hospital Lemgo, Department of Radiotherapy, Lemgo (Germany); Marien Hospital Herne, Ruhr University Bochum, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Herne (Germany); Eich, Hans Theodor; Kriz, Jan [University of Muenster, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Heyd, Reinhard [Municipal Hospital Aschaffenburg, Radiotherapy Practice, Aschaffenburg (Germany); Collaboration: The German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy of Benign Diseases (GCG-BD)

    2015-07-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an established and effective treatment modality in the management of a large variety of hyperproliferative disorders and benign neoplasms. Objective of this article is to summarize the updated DEGRO consensus S2e guideline recommendations. This report comprises an overview of the relevant aspects of the updated guidelines with regard to treatment decision, dose prescription, and RT technique for a selected group of disorders including Morbus Dupuytren (MD)/Morbus Ledderhose (ML), keloids, Peyronie's disease (induratio penis plastica, IPP), desmoid tumors, pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), symptomatic vertebral hemangiomas (sVH), and Gorham-Stout syndrome (GSS). On the basis of results in the literature, we attempted to classify the level of evidence (LoE) and the grade of recommendation (GR) according to the Oxford criteria. There is comprehensive evidence in the literature that RT is a reasonable and effective treatment modality for the treatment of all the above-mentioned disorders. The LoE varies from 2c to 4, and GR varies from A to C. The use of RT can be recommended for the interdisciplinary management of most of the reported disorders. It can be used in the primary treatment approach and as an effective adjunct to other treatment modalities or in some indications as a valuable alternative treatment option. We hope that the updated DEGRO S2e consensus guideline recommendations are a helpful tool for radiation oncologists in the clinical decision-making process. (orig.) [German] Die Radiotherapie (RT) ist eine etablierte und effektive Therapieoption fuer zahlreiche hyperproliferative Erkrankungen und gutartige Neubildungen. Gegenstand dieses Artikels ist die Zusammenfassung der aktualisierten DEGRO-S2e-Konsensus-Leitlinienempfehlungen.. Die Arbeit enthaelt eine Uebersicht ueber die relevanten Aspekte der aktualisierten Leitlinien bezueglich der Indikationsstellung, der Dosisverschreibung und den Bestrahlungstechniken fuer

  3. Triheptanoin dramatically reduces paroxysmal motor disorder in patients with GLUT1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochel, Fanny; Hainque, Elodie; Gras, Domitille; Adanyeguh, Isaac M; Caillet, Samantha; Héron, Bénédicte; Roubertie, Agathe; Kaphan, Elsa; Valabregue, Romain; Rinaldi, Daisy; Vuillaumier, Sandrine; Schiffmann, Raphael; Ottolenghi, Chris; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Servais, Laurent; Roze, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    On the basis of our previous work with triheptanoin, which provides key substrates to the Krebs cycle in the brain, we wished to assess its therapeutic effect in patients with glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1-DS) who objected to or did not tolerate ketogenic diets. We performed an open-label pilot study with three phases of 2 months each (baseline, treatment and withdrawal) in eight patients with GLUT1-DS (7-47 years old) with non-epileptic paroxysmal manifestations. We used a comprehensive patient diary to record motor and non-motor paroxysmal events. Functional (31)P-NMR spectroscopy was performed to quantify phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) within the occipital cortex during (activation) and after (recovery) a visual stimulus. Patients with GLUT1-DS experienced a mean of 30.8 (± 27.7) paroxysmal manifestations (52% motor events) at baseline that dropped to 2.8 (± 2.9, 76% motor events) during the treatment phase (p = 0.028). After withdrawal, paroxysmal manifestations recurred with a mean of 24.2 (± 21.9, 52% motor events; p = 0.043). Furthermore, brain energy metabolism normalised with triheptanoin, that is, increased Pi/PCr ratio during brain activation compared to the recovery phase (p = 0.021), and deteriorated when triheptanoin was withdrawn. Treatment with triheptanoin resulted in a 90% clinical improvement in non-epileptic paroxysmal manifestations and a normalised brain bioenergetics profile in patients with GLUT1-DS. NCT02014883. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and other pancreatic cystic lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic neoplasms are being increasingly recognized, even in the absence of symptoms, in large part, due to markedly improved imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance cholangio pancreatography (MRCP) and computer tomography (CT) scanning. During the past 2 decades, better imaging of these cystic lesions has resulted in definition of different types, including pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). While IPMN represent only a distinct minority of all pancreatic cancers, they appear to be a relatively frequent neoplastic form of pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Moreover, IPMN have a much better outcome and prognosis compared to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. Therefore, recognition of this entity is exceedingly important for the clinician involved in diagnosis and further evaluation of a potentially curable form of pancreatic cancer.

  5. Interdisciplinary Management of Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are increasingly recognized due to the frequent use of abdominal imaging. It is reported that up to 20% of abdominal cross-sectional scans identify incidental asymptomatic pancreatic cysts. Proper characterization of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is important not only to recognize premalignant lesions that will require surgical resection, but also to allow nonoperative management of many cystic lesions that will not require resection with its inherent morbidity. Though reliable biomarkers are lacking, a wide spectrum of diagnostic modalities are available to evaluate pancreatic cystic neoplasms, including radiologic, endoscopic, laboratory, and pathologic analysis. An interdisciplinary approach to management of these lesions which incorporates recent, specialty-specific advances in the medical literature is herein suggested.

  6. Synchronous laparoscopic resection of colorectal and renal/adrenal neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Simon S M; Lee, Janet F Y; Yiu, Raymond Y C; Li, Jimmy C M; Leung, Ka Lau

    2007-08-01

    Synchronous laparoscopic resections of coexisting abdominal diseases are shown to be feasible without additional postoperative morbidity. We report our experience with synchronous laparoscopic resection of colorectal carcinoma and renal/adrenal neoplasms with an emphasis on surgical and oncologic outcomes. Five patients diagnosed to have synchronous colorectal carcinoma and renal/adrenal neoplasms (renal cell carcinoma in 2 patients, adrenal cortical adenoma in 2 patients, and adrenal metastasis in 1 patient) underwent synchronous laparoscopic resection. The median operative time was 420 minutes and the median operative blood loss was 1000 mL. Three patients developed minor complications, including wound infection in 2 patients and retention of urine in 1 patient. There was no operative mortality. The median duration of hospital stay was 11 days. At a median follow-up of 17.6 months, no patient developed recurrence of disease. Synchronous laparoscopic resection of colorectal and renal/adrenal neoplasms is technically feasible and safe.

  7. Canine Central Nervous System Neoplasm Phenotyping Using Tissue Microarray Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzbarth, I; Heinrich, F; Herder, V; Recker, T; Wohlsein, P; Baumgärtner, W

    2017-05-01

    Tissue microarrays (TMAs) represent a useful technique for the simultaneous phenotyping of large sample numbers and are particularly suitable for histopathologic tumor research. In this study, TMAs were used to evaluate semiquantitatively the expression of multiple antigens in various canine central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms and to identify markers with potential discriminative diagnostic relevance. Ninety-seven canine CNS neoplasms, previously diagnosed on hematoxylin and eosin sections according to the World Health Organization classification, were investigated on TMAs, with each tumor consisting of 2 cylindrical samples from the center and the periphery of the neoplasm. Tumor cells were phenotyped using a panel of 28 monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, and hierarchical clustering analysis was applied to group neoplasms according to similarities in their expression profiles. Hierarchical clustering generally grouped cases with similar histologic diagnoses; however, gliomas especially exhibited a considerable heterogeneity in their positivity scores. Multiple tumor groups, such as astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, significantly differed in the proportion of positive immunoreaction for certain markers such as p75(NTR), AQP4, GFAP, and S100 protein. The study highlights AQP4 and p75(NTR) as novel markers, helping to discriminate between canine astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma. Furthermore, the results suggest that p75(NTR) and proteolipid protein may represent useful markers, whose expression inversely correlates with malignant transformation in canine astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, respectively. Tissue microarray was demonstrated to be a useful and time-saving tool for the simultaneous immunohistochemical characterization of multiple canine CNS neoplasms. The present study provides a detailed overview of the expression patterns of different types of canine CNS neoplasms.

  8. PATIENTS WITH METASTATIC GESTATIONAL TROPHOBLASTIC NEOPLASMS AND NO GYNECOLOGICAL SYMPTOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ghaemmaghami T. Ashraf Ganjoie

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Early recognition of Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasm (GTN will maximize the chances of cure with chemotherapy but some patients present with many different symptoms months or even years after the causative pregnancy making diagnosis difficult. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of GTN in any reproductive age woman with bizarre central nervous system, gastrointestinal, pulmonary symptoms or radiographic evidence of metastatic tumor of unknown primary origin. We reported five cases of metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasms with bizarre pulmonary symptoms, acute abdomen, neurologic symptoms presenting without gynecological symptoms.

  9. Disseminated encephalomyelitis-like central nervous system neoplasm in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhui; Bao, Xinhua; Fu, Na; Ye, Jintang; Li, Ting; Yuan, Yun; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Yuehua; Qin, Jiong; Wu, Xiru

    2014-08-01

    A malignant neoplasm in the central nervous system with diffuse white matter changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is rare in children. It could be misdiagnosed as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. This report presents our experience based on 4 patients (3 male, 1 female; aged 7-13 years) whose MRI showed diffuse lesions in white matter and who were initially diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. All of the patients received corticosteroid therapy. After brain biopsy, the patients were diagnosed with gliomatosis cerebri, primitive neuroectodermal tumor and central nervous system lymphoma. We also provide literature reviews and discuss the differentiation of central nervous system neoplasm from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  10. CD4~+CD56~+ hematodermic neoplasm in a child

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xia; LI Qiang; ZHOU Chen-yan

    2010-01-01

    @@ CD4~+CD56~+ hematodermic neoplasm (HN) is a rare, highly aggressive systemic neoplasm, which had been described under various names including lymphoblastic lymphoma of natural killer (NK) phenotype, blastic NK cell lymphoma (BNK), leukemic lymphoma of immature NK lineage and CD4~+CD56~+ HN. This malignancy is mainly involved in elderly people and usually a rapidly fatal disease, since consistently effective treatments have not yet been developed. It is relatively rare in children.~(1-6) Herein we report a boy with CD4~+CD56~+ HN.

  11. Unicentric Castleman’s Disease Masquerading Pancreatic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s disease is a rare nonclonal proliferative disorder of the lymph nodes with an unknown etiology. Common locations of Castleman’s disease are mediastinum, neck, axilla, and abdomen. Castleman’s disease of a peripancreatic location masquerading as pancreatic neoplasm is an even rarer entity. On search of published data, we came across about 17 cases published on peripancreatic Castleman’s disease until now. Here we are reporting a case of retropancreatic Castleman's disease masquerading as retroperitoneal neoplasm in a 46-year-old male patient.

  12. INTERFERON BETA IN TREATMENT OF DISSEMINATED SCLEROSIS IN ADOLESCENTS — INFLUENCE ON NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL STATUS AND PAROXYSMAL STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Platonova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated sclerosis is chronic progressive disease of central nervous system, which is characterized by demyelination, degeneration of nerve fibers and polymorphous clinical symptoms. According to literature data, 2–10% of patients have onset of a disease in childhood and adolescence. Frequent clinical symptoms of disseminated sclerosis, especially in adolescents, are paroxysmal states and neuropsychological disorders. Drugs containing interferon beta which are used for immunomodulating treatment, can increase the rate of paroxysmal neuropsychological disorders in patients with disseminated sclerosis. Present study with participation of 78 adolescents analyzed frequency and spectrum of neuropsychological disorders and paroxysmal states in patients 12–17 years old and relation of revealed disorders with a treatment with interferon beta.Key words: adolescents, disseminated sclerosis, interferon beta, treatment, depression, paroxysmal states, anxiety, neuropsychological testing.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(4:34-39

  13. Corrected QT dispersion as a predictor of the frequency of paroxysmal tachyarrhythmias in patients with Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eid M. Daoud

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Calculation of QTcd in patients with WPW syndrome presented with paroxysmal tachyarrhythmias is a simple noninvasive clinical test for risk stratification of those patients and hence detecting patients at higher risk for frequent and recurrent tachyarrhythmias.

  14. Failure of long-term digitalization to prevent rapid ventricular response in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galun, E; Flugelman, M Y; Glickson, M; Eliakim, M

    1991-04-01

    Digitalis is frequently prescribed to patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation to reduce the ventricular rate during subsequent paroxysms. To verify the validity of this assumption, we determined the ventricular rate during paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in 13 patients receiving long-term digoxin therapy (mean plasma digoxin level + 1.28 +/- 0.4 ng/ml) and compared it with that of a group of 14 patients who had not taken digoxin or beta-adrenergic and calcium-blocking agents before the attack. The treated and the untreated groups were similar statistically. The mean ventricular rate of the digitalized patients was 121 +/- 15 beats per minute, while that of the patients in the control group was 118 +/- 16 beats per minute. It is concluded that long-term digoxin therapy is not effective in reducing the ventricular response in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation despite adequate therapeutic levels.

  15. Effect on the disability index of adult patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo using vestibular rehabilitation and human movement

    OpenAIRE

    Chaverri Flores, Sofía; Chaverri Polini, Julián; Mora Campos, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Objective: determine the effect on the disability index of adult patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) using vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) and human movement. Subjects: six subjects with an average age of 49.5 ± 14.22 years who have been diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo by an otolaryngologist. Instruments: the Dizziness Handicap Inventory and a questionnaire to determine impact on the quality of life of patients with this pathology (Ceballos an...

  16. Horizontal canal paroxysmal positional vertigo (HCPPV) vs classical BPPV (new concepts about mechanism and domiciliary repositioning of particles)

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, P.

    2002-01-01

    Some new modificutiont of existing diagnostic and therapeutic manoeuvres (repositioning of particles) have been proposed, basing an the applications of the principles of hydrodynamics, inertial and gravitational forces in the semicircular canals. The above has been tried successfully on patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and horizontal eanal paroxysmal positional vertigo (HCPPV) which can be executed by the patients themselves at home without the kelp of a therapist.

  17. Twenty-eight day Holter monitoring is poorly tolerated and insensitive for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation detection in cryptogenic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, H T; Spence, S; Kalman, J M; Davis, S M

    2014-05-01

    This pilot study in a prospective cohort of 20 cryptogenic stroke patients showed that a significant proportion has paroxysmal atrial fibrillation undetected by 24-h Holter monitoring. However, longer monitoring with 28-day Holter was poorly tolerated and still insufficiently sensitive for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation detection. Further studies are urgently needed to elucidate the optimal timing, method and duration of cardiac rhythm monitoring following ischaemic stroke.

  18. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clone in 103 Brazilian patients: diagnosis and classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula de Azambuja

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is an acquired chronic hemolytic ane- mia, which often manifests as peripheral blood cytopenias and thrombosis. Objective: The aim of this study is to describe a Brazilian population of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria patients. Methods: One hundred and three paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria cases were retrospectively reviewed and the clinical presentation, thrombosis, survival, and clone size were assessed. Diagnosis was established by flow cytometry. Results: Fifty-two male and 51 female patients with a median age of 24.1 years (5.5-62 years were studied. Clinical symptoms included hemoglobinuria (18.4%, infection (46.6% and thrombosis (16.5%, and 80.6% had pancytopenia. Patients were classified as classic parox- ysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (10, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria with aplastic anemia (39, and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria with subclinical features and aplas- tic anemia (54. There were significant differences in terms of median age, size of clone, clinical symptoms, and peripheral blood cell counts between the three subcategories. The clone size in erythrocytes and granulocytes were respectively 0.04% (range: 0-18% and 7.3% (range: 0.3-68.7% in patients with subclinical features and aplastic anemia, 15.8% (range: 0-99.7% and 63.0% (range: 1.7-99.8% in patients with aplastic anemia alone, and 82.2% (range: 0-99.85% and 98.0% (81.3-100.0% in Classic disease. Statistical differences were identified for platelets (p-value = 0.001, lactate dehydrogenase (p-value = 0.002 and the clone size (p-value < 0.001 in patients who suffered thrombotic events compared to those who did not. Overall survival was 81.7%, with patients with subclinical features and aplastic anemia having lower overall survival (76.5%. Conclusion: This retrospective review of 103 patients over an 11-year period represents the largest collection of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria cases from a

  19. The Continuing Value of Ultrastructural Observation in Central Nervous System Neoplasms in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Rae Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS neoplasms are the second most common childhood malignancy after leukemia and the most common solid organ neoplasm in children. Diagnostic dilemmas with small specimens from CNS neoplasms are often the result of multifactorial etiologies such as frozen or fixation artifact, biopsy size, or lack of knowledge about rare or unfamiliar entities. Since the late 1950s, ultrastructural examination has been used in the diagnosis of CNS neoplasms, though it has largely been replaced by immunohistochemical and molecular cytogenetic studies. Nowadays, pathologic diagnosis of CNS neoplasms is achieved through intraoperative cytology, light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and molecular cytogenetic results. However, the utility of electron microscopy (EM in the final diagnosis of CNS neoplasms and investigation of its pathogenetic origin remains critical. Here, we reviewed the distinguishing ultrastructural features of pediatric CNS neoplasms and emphasize the continuing value of EM in the diagnosis of CNS neoplasms.

  20. Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas: A diagnostic challenge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grant F Hutchins; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are increasingly recognized due to the expanding use and improved sensitivity of cross-sectional abdominal imaging. Major advances in the last decade have led to an improved understanding of the various types of cystic lesions and their biologic behavior. Despite significant improvements in imaging technology and the advent of endoscopic-ultrasound (EUS)-guided fineneedle aspiration, the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cystic lesions remains a significant clinical challenge. The first diagnostic step is to differentiate between pancreatic pseudocyst and cystic neoplasm.If a pseudocyst has been effectively excluded, the cornerstone issue is then to determine the malignant potential of the pancreatic cystic neoplasm. In the majority of cases, the correct diagnosis and successful management is based not on a single test but on incorporating data from various sources including patient history, radiologic studies, endoscopic evaluation, and cyst fluid analysis. This review will focus on describing the various types of cystic neoplasms of the pancreas, their malignant potential, and will provide the clinician with a comprehensive diagnostic approach.

  1. Pattern of metastatic deposits of malignant neoplasms to the chest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of metastatic deposits of malignant neoplasms to the chest seen on plain ... chest x-ray (CXR) is a veritable tool in the survey of metastases to the lung. ... from breast, prostate, thyroid and cervix Rare from osteosarcoma and melanoma.

  2. Mucin profile of the pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yuan; XU Jian-fang; KUANG Tian-tao; ZHOU Yan-nan; LU Shao-hua; TAN Yun-shan

    2006-01-01

    @@ Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) of the pancreas are a distinct entity, account for 1% of pancreatic exocrine tumors. MCNs can be classified histologically as adenomas, borderline tumors, or carcinomas. Because several evidences showing that mucinous cystadenomas are poten- tially malignant and may transform into cystadeno- carcinomas, particularly if treated by drainage, these tumors should be identified accurately.1

  3. Confocal Endomicroscopy Characteristics of Different Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Amrit K; Dewitt, John M; Modi, Rohan M; Conwell, Darwin L; Krishna, Somashekar G

    2017-05-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are classified into gastric, intestinal, pancreatobiliary, and oncocytic subtypes where morphology portends disease prognosis. The study aim was to demonstrate EUS-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy imaging features of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes. Four subjects, each with a specific intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtype were enrolled. An EUS-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy miniprobe was utilized for image acquisition. The mean cyst size from the 4 subjects (2 females; mean age = 65.3±12 years) was 36.8±12 mm. All lesions demonstrated mural nodules and focal dilation of the main pancreatic duct. EUS-nCLE demonstrated characteristic finger-like papillae with inner vascular core for all subtypes. The image patterns of the papillae for the gastric, intestinal, and pancreatobiliary subtypes were similar. However, the papillae in the oncocytic subtype were thick and demonstrated a fine scale-like or honeycomb pattern with intraepithelial lumina correlating with histopathology. There was significant overlap in the needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy findings for the different intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes; however, the oncocytic subtype demonstrated distinct patterns. These findings need to be replicated in larger multicenter studies.

  4. Cutaneous epithelioid angiosarcoma: a neoplasm with potential pitfalls in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Narciss

    2009-03-01

    Angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare neoplasm. Cutaneous AS is the most common form of AS. The epithelioid variant of the disease, however, is a rare entity. This subset can histologically mimic non-vascular neoplasms and impose serious challenges in reaching the correct diagnosis. We present five patients with cutaneous epithelioid angiosarcoma (EAS); in none, the clinical diagnosis included a vascular lesion. Three patients had history of breast conservation surgery with/without radiation therapy. Other patients had no previous radiation, and there was no lymphedema in any of the cases. The histopathological examination of the biopsy specimens by hematoxylin and eosin method was not suggestive of a malignant vascular neoplasm initially and the differential diagnoses included carcinoma, malignant melanoma and atypical lymphoid infiltrate. Only after performing immunohistochemical studies that included vascular markers, a definitive diagnosis was possible. Some cases showed unusual histopathological features. Cutaneous EAS is a rare variant of cutaneous AS that can mimic a variety of more common, non-vascular neoplasms, creating a major pitfall in the diagnosis. A careful and thorough histopathological examination and a high index of suspicion, along with appropriate immunohistochemical evaluation, can help reach a correct diagnosis and provide optimal patient care.

  5. Secondary neoplasms of the larynx from a colonic adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dadkhah, Naser; Hahn, Christoffer

    2015-01-01

    Secondary neoplasms of the larynx are rare and account for 0.09-0,4% of all laryngeal tumours. Cutaneous melanomas are the preponderant primaries metastasizing to the larynx, fol-lowed by renal cell carcinomas, breast and lung carcinomas. Colonic adenocarcinoma metastases to the larynx...

  6. Age-specific incidence of all neoplasms after colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Fabio; Randimbison, Lalao; Blanc-Moya, Rafael; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    Patients diagnosed with a specific neoplasm tend to have a subsequent excess risk of the same neoplasm. The age incidence of a second neoplasm at the same site is approximately constant with age, and consequently the relative risk is greater at younger age. It is unclear whether such a line of reasoning can be extended from a specific neoplasm to the incidence of all neoplasms in subjects diagnosed with a defined neoplasm. We considered the age-specific incidence of all non-hormone-related epithelial neoplasms after a first primary colorectal cancer (n = 9542) in the Vaud Cancer Registry data set. In subjects with a previous colorectal cancer, the incidence rate of all other epithelial non-hormone-related cancers was stable around 800 per 100,000 between age 30 and 60 years, and rose only about twofold to reach 1685 at age 70 to 79 years and 1826 per 100,000 at age 80 years or older. After excluding synchronous cancers, the rise was only about 1.5-fold, that is, from about 700 to 1000. In the general population, the incidence rate of all epithelial non-hormone-related cancers was 29 per 100,000 at age 30 to 39 years, and rose 30-fold to 883 per 100,000 at age 70 to 79 years. Excluding colorectal cancers, the rise of all non-hormone-related cancers was from 360 per 100,000 at age 40 to 49 years to 940 at age 70 to 79 years after colorectal cancer, and from 90 to 636 per 100,000 in the general population (i.e., 2.6- vs. 7.1-fold). The rise of incidence with age of all epithelial non-hormone-related second cancers after colorectal cancer is much smaller than in the general population. This can possibly be related to the occurrence of a single mutational event in a population of susceptible individuals, although alternative models are plausible within the complexity of the process of carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Safety, efficacy, and response predictors of anticoagulation for the treatment of nonmalignant portal-vein thrombosis in patients with cirrhosis: a propensity score matching analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Wha Chung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsPortal-vein thrombosis (PVT develops in 10-25% of cirrhotic patients and may aggravate portal hypertension. There are few data regarding the effects of anticoagulation on nonmalignant PVT in liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the safety, efficacy, and predictors of response to anticoagulation therapy in cirrhotic patients.MethodsPatients with liver cirrhosis and nonmalignant PVT were identified by a hospital electronic medical record system (called BESTCARE. Patients with malignant PVT, Budd-Chiari syndrome, underlying primary hematologic disorders, or preexisting extrahepatic thrombosis were excluded from the analysis. Patients were divided into two groups (treatment and nontreatment, and propensity score matching analysis was performed to identify control patients. The sizes of the thrombus and spleen were evaluated using multidetector computed tomography.ResultsTwenty-eight patients were enrolled in this study between 2003 and 2014: 14 patients who received warfarin for nonmalignant PVT and 14 patients who received no anticoagulation. After 112 days of treatment, 11 patients exhibited significantly higher response rates (complete in 6 and partial in 5 compared to the control patients, with decreases in thrombus size of >30%. Compared to nonresponders, the 11 responders were older, and had a thinner spleen and fewer episodes of previous endoscopic variceal ligations, whereas pretreatment liver function and changes in prothrombin time after anticoagulation did not differ significantly between the two groups. Two patients died after warfarin therapy, but the causes of death were not related to anticoagulation.ConclusionsWarfarin can be safely administered to cirrhotic patients with nonmalignant PVT. The presence of preexisting portal hypertension is a predictor of nonresponse to anticoagulation.

  8. Utility of FDG-PETCT and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in differentiating between cerebral lymphoma and non-malignant CNS lesions in HIV-infected patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westwood, Thomas D., E-mail: tdwestwood@googlemail.com [Department of Radiology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester (United Kingdom); Hogan, Celia, E-mail: celiahogan@hotmail.com [Monsall Unit, Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, North Manchester General Hospital, Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom); Julyan, Peter J., E-mail: Peter.Julyan@christie.nhs.uk [Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester (United Kingdom); Coutts, Glyn, E-mail: Glyn.Coutts@christie.nhs.uk [Christie Medical Physics and Engineering, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bonington, Suzie, E-mail: suzi.bonington@christie.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester (United Kingdom); Carrington, Bernadette, E-mail: Bernadette.Carrington@christie.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester (United Kingdom); Taylor, Ben, E-mail: Ben.taylor@christie.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester (United Kingdom); Khoo, Saye, E-mail: S.H.Khoo@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, Royal Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Bonington, Alec, E-mail: Alec.Bonington@pat.nhs.uk [Monsall Unit, Department of Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, North Manchester General Hospital, Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Background and purpose: In HIV infected patients, MRI cannot reliably differentiate between central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma and non-malignant CNS lesions, particularly cerebral toxoplasmosis (CTOX). This study prospectively investigates the utility of FDG PET-CT and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in discriminating CNS lymphoma from non-malignant CNS lesions in HIV infected patients, and assesses the ability of FDG PET-CT to guide the use of early brain biopsy. Methods: 10 HIV patients with neurological symptoms and contrast enhancing lesions on MRI were commenced on anti-toxoplasmosis therapy before undergoing FDG PET-CT and MRS. Brain biopsies were sought in those with FDG PET-CT suggestive of CNS lymphoma, and in those with a negative FDG PET-CT scan who failed to respond to therapy. Final diagnosis was based on histology or treatment response. Results: Two patients were confirmed to have CNS lymphoma and FDG PET-CT was consistent with this diagnosis in both. Six patients had cerebral toxoplasmosis in all of whom FDG PET-CT was consistent with non-malignant disease. One patient had progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), FDG PET-CT was equivocal. One patient had a haemorrhagic brain metastasis and FDG PET-CT wrongly suggested non-malignant disease. MRS was performed successfully in eight subjects: three results were suggestive of CNS lymphoma (one true positive, two false positive), four suggested CTOX (two false negative, two true negative), one scan was equivocal. Conclusion: FDG PET-CT correctly identified all cases of CNS lymphoma and CTOX, supporting its use in this situation. MRS was unhelpful in our cohort.

  9. A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of a fiberglass manufacturing facility. II. Exposure assessment.

    OpenAIRE

    Chiazze, L.; Watkins, D. K.; Fryar, C.; Kozono, J

    1993-01-01

    A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of the Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation's Newark, Ohio plant was undertaken. The aim was to determine the extent to which exposures to substances in the Newark plant environment, to non-workplace factors, or to a combination may play a part in the risk of mortality from respiratory disease among workers in this plant. A historical environmental reconstruction of the plant was undertaken to characterise ...

  10. A systematic review into the use of superficial heat and cold applications in the management of non-malignant, non-procedural pain in older adults.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Background Hot and cold treatments are an example of simple, inexpensive techniques that can be easily utilised to manage pain. Despite recommendations for the use of hot and cold modalities in the treatment of pain there is little and conflicting empirical evidence to support this. There is a need to summarise the available literature in this area. Aim To systematically review the use of superficially administered heat and cold therapy in the management of non-malignant, non-proced...

  11. Impact of Graft-Recipient ABO Compatibility on Outcomes after Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant for Nonmalignant Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudek, Matthew R; Shanley, Ryan; Zantek, Nicole D; McKenna, David H; Smith, Angela R; Miller, Weston P

    2016-11-01

    Existing literature shows mixed conclusions regarding the impact of ABO incompatibility on outcomes after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Because the future for umbilical cord blood (UCB) expansion technologies is bright, we assessed whether this typically overlooked graft characteristic impacted various outcomes after UCB transplantation (UCBT) for nonmalignant disorders (NMDs). A prospectively maintained institutional blood and marrow transplant program database was queried for all patients undergoing first UCBT for NMDs. UCB and recipient ABO compatibility was considered as matched, major mismatched, minor mismatched, or bidirectional mismatched. The impact of ABO incompatibility was assessed on overall survival, graft failure, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), time to neutrophil and platelet recovery, day 0 to day 100 RBC transfusion burden, and donor hematopoietic chimerism. Through December 2014, 270 patients have undergone first UCBT for various NMDs. In both univariable and multivariable analyses, ABO compatibility status did not appear to impact any outcomes assessed, although a trend toward increased grades III to IV acute GVHD was seen in recipients of major mismatched units. When considering UCBT for treatment of NMDs, ABO compatibility between the donor unit and intended recipient does not appear to be an important consideration in the UCB unit choice.

  12. The effects of erythropoietin signaling on telomerase regulation in non-erythroid malignant and non-malignant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uziel, Orit, E-mail: Oritu@clalit.org.il [Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Kanfer, Gil [Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Dep. of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Beery, Einat [Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Yelin, Dana; Shepshelovich, Daniel [Medicine A, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Bakhanashvili, Mary [Unit of Infectious Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Nordenberg, Jardena [Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Dep. of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Endocrinology Laboratory, Beilinson Medical Center, Petah-Tikva (Israel); Lahav, Meir [Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Medicine A, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We assumed that some of erythropoietin adverse effects may be mediated by telomerase activity. • EPO administration increased telomerase activity, cells proliferation and migration. • The inhibition of telomerase modestly repressed the proliferative effect of erythropoietin. • Telomere shortening caused by long term inhibition of the enzyme totally abolished that effect. • This effect was mediated via the Lyn–AKT axis and not by the canonical JAK2–STAT pathway. - Abstract: Treatment with erythropoietin (EPO) in several cancers is associated with decreased survival due to cancer progression. Due to the major importance of telomerase in cancer biology we hypothesized that some of these effects may be mediated through EPO effect on telomerase. For this aim we explored the possible effects of EPO on telomerase regulation, cell migration and chemosensitivity in non-erythroid malignant and non-malignant cells. Cell proliferation, telomerase activity (TA) and cell migration increased in response to EPO. EPO had no effect on cancer cells sensitivity to cisplatinum and on the cell cycle status. The inhibition of telomerase modestly repressed the proliferative effect of EPO. Telomere shortening caused by long term inhibition of the enzyme abolished the effect of EPO, suggesting that EPO effects on cancer cells are related to telomere dynamics. TA was correlated with the levels of Epo-R. The increase in TA was mediated post-translationally through the Lyn-Src and not the canonical JAK2 pathway.

  13. Non-malignant respiratory diseases and occupational exposure to wood dust. Part I. Fresh wood and mixed wood industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Gitte; Schaumburg, Inger; Sigsgaard, Torben; Schlunssen, Vivi

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews associations in literature between exposure to wood dust from fresh wood and non-malignant respiratory diseases. Criteria for inclusion are epidemiological studies in English language journals with an internal or external control group describing relationships between wood dust exposure and respiratory diseases or symptoms. The papers took into account smoking, and when dealing with lung function took age into consideration. A total of 25 papers concerning exposure to fresh wood and mixed wood formed the basis of this review. The results support an association between fresh wood dust exposure and asthma, asthma symptoms, coughing, bronchitis, and acute and chronic impairment of lung function. In addition, an association between fresh wood dust exposure and rhino-conjunctivitis was seen across studies. Apart from plicatic acid in western red cedar wood, no causal agent was consistently disclosed. Type 1 allergy is not suspected of being a major cause of wood dust induced asthma. Concurrent exposure to microorganisms and terpenes probably add to the inherent risk of wood dust exposure in the fresh wood industry.

  14. Heat shock protein 70 and glycoprotein 96 are differentially expressed on the surface of malignant and nonmalignant breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melendez, Karla; Wallen, Erik S; Edwards, Bruce S; Mobarak, Charlotte D; Bear, David G; Moseley, Pope L

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are important for a number of different intracellular functions, are occasionally found on the surface of cells. The function of heat shock protein on the cell surface is not understood, although it has been shown to be greater in some tumor cells and some virally infected cells. Surface expression of both glycoprotein 96 (gp96) and Hsp70 occurs on tumor cells, and this expression correlates with natural killer cell killing of the cells. We examined the surface expression of gp96 and Hsp70 on human breast cell lines MCF7, MCF10A, AU565, and HS578, and in primary human mammary epithelial cells by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The nonmalignant cell lines HS578, MCF10A, and HMEC showed no surface expression of gp96, whereas malignant cell lines MCF7 and AU565 were positive for gp96 surface expression. All of the breast cell lines examined showed Hsp70 surface expression. These results also confirm previous studies, demonstrating that Hsp70 is on the plasma membrane of tumor cell lines. Given the involvement of heat shock proteins, gp96 and Hsp70, in innate and adaptive immunity, these observations may be important in the immune response to tumor cells.

  15. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria associated with venous thrombosis and papillary endothelial hyperplasia presenting as ulcerated duodenal mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunphy, C H; Sotelo-Avila, C; Luisiri, A; Chu, J Y

    1994-08-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is an acquired clonal expansion of bone marrow stem cells that are deficient in the decay-accelerating factor, which is a complement regulatory glycoprotein (CD55), as well as in the membrane inhibitor of reactive lysis (CD59) and the C8-binding protein. These proteins are deficient on the membranes of red blood cells, granulocytes, monocytes, and platelets. The disorder is associated with intermittent hemolytic anemia, hemoglobinuria, infection, a tendency toward bone marrow aplasia, and venous thromboses. The thromboses, on resolution, may give rise to endothelial proliferation that may cause ischemia and ulceration, or, alternatively, the thromboses may cause ulceration leading to a granulation tissue response with exaggerated endothelial proliferation. We report a second case of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria that presented roentgenographically as an ulcerated circumferential duodenal mass secondary to venous thrombosis accompanied by florid papillary endothelial hyperplasia. We also review the literature concerning this phenomenon.

  12. [Identification of paroxysmal, transient arrhythmias: Intermittent registration more efficient than the 24-hour Holter monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikx, Tijn; Rosenqvist, Mårten; Sandström, Herbert; Persson, Mats; Hörnsten, Rolf

    2015-01-06

    Many patients suffer from palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. These patients are often referred for Holter ECG (24 hour), although the sensitivity for detecting arrhythmias is low. A new method, short intermittent regular and symptomatic ECG registrations at home, might be a convenient and more sensitive alternative also suitable for primary health care. In this case report we present a patient who had contacted health care several times during a seven year period for paroxysmal palpitations. Routine examination with 24 hour Holter ECG and event recorder did not result in a diagnosis. Using intermittent handheld ECG registration at home, a paroxysmal supraventricular arrhythmia was diagnosed. Further investigation revealed that the patient had a concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome.

  13. [The clinical characteristics of endogenous mental diseases with paroxysm-like disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikovani, G O

    1997-01-01

    Paroxysmal-like disorders (PLD) were observed in 11 patients with manic-depressive psychosis and in 34 ones with shift-like progredient schizophrenia. 8 variations of the fits were described by the author earlier and included the states from vegetative fits to complex psychotic ones with manifestations of Kandinsky-Clérambault syndrome. Clinical pattern of endogenous psychoses was characterized by considerable presence of affective disorders (both hypomanic and depressive), moreover depressive disturbances were observed more frequently. Debut of PLD was mentioned either before depressions' or in their structure: The appearance of psychotic symptoms in structure of affective phases does not change the character of paroxysmal-like states. It was supposed that endogenous diseases with PLD are the special variant of psychoses.

  14. Labile and Paroxysmal Hypertension: Common Clinical Dilemmas in Need of Treatment Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Samuel J

    2015-11-01

    Although "labile hypertension" is regularly encountered by clinicians, there is a paucity of information available to guide therapeutic decisions. This review discusses its clinical relevance, the limitations of current knowledge, and possible directions for future research and clinical management. Results of studies that assessed measures of blood pressure variability or reactivity are reviewed. The limited information about effects of antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure variability is discussed. Two different clinical presentations are differentiated: labile hypertension and paroxysmal hypertension. Labile hypertension remains a clinical impression without defined criteria or treatment guidance. Paroxysmal hypertension, also called pseudopheochromocytoma, presents as dramatic episodes of abrupt and severe blood pressure elevation. The disorder can be disabling. Although it regularly raises suspicion of a pheochromocytoma, such a tumor is found in <2 % of patients. The cause, which involves both emotional factors and the sympathetic nervous system, and treatment approaches, are presented.

  15. Clinical Practice Guideline: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (Update).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Gubbels, Samuel P; Schwartz, Seth R; Edlow, Jonathan A; El-Kashlan, Hussam; Fife, Terry; Holmberg, Janene M; Mahoney, Kathryn; Hollingsworth, Deena B; Roberts, Richard; Seidman, Michael D; Steiner, Robert W Prasaad; Do, Betty Tsai; Voelker, Courtney C J; Waguespack, Richard W; Corrigan, Maureen D

    2017-03-01

    Objective This update of a 2008 guideline from the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation provides evidence-based recommendations to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), defined as a disorder of the inner ear characterized by repeated episodes of positional vertigo. Changes from the prior guideline include a consumer advocate added to the update group; new evidence from 2 clinical practice guidelines, 20 systematic reviews, and 27 randomized controlled trials; enhanced emphasis on patient education and shared decision making; a new algorithm to clarify action statement relationships; and new and expanded recommendations for the diagnosis and management of BPPV. Purpose The primary purposes of this guideline are to improve the quality of care and outcomes for BPPV by improving the accurate and efficient diagnosis of BPPV, reducing the inappropriate use of vestibular suppressant medications, decreasing the inappropriate use of ancillary testing such as radiographic imaging, and increasing the use of appropriate therapeutic repositioning maneuvers. The guideline is intended for all clinicians who are likely to diagnose and manage patients with BPPV, and it applies to any setting in which BPPV would be identified, monitored, or managed. The target patient for the guideline is aged ≥18 years with a suspected or potential diagnosis of BPPV. The primary outcome considered in this guideline is the resolution of the symptoms associated with BPPV. Secondary outcomes considered include an increased rate of accurate diagnoses of BPPV, a more efficient return to regular activities and work, decreased use of inappropriate medications and unnecessary diagnostic tests, reduction in recurrence of BPPV, and reduction in adverse events associated with undiagnosed or untreated BPPV. Other outcomes considered include minimizing costs in the diagnosis and treatment of BPPV, minimizing potentially unnecessary return physician visits, and maximizing

  16. Mucin-hypersecreting bile duct neoplasm characterized by clinicopathological resemblance to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN of the pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harimoto Norifumi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN of the pancreas is acceptable as a distinct disease entity, the concept of mucin-secreting biliary tumors has not been fully established. Case presentation We describe herein a case of mucin secreting biliary neoplasm. Imaging revealed a cystic lesion 2 cm in diameter at the left lateral segment of the liver. Duodenal endoscopy revealed mucin secretion through an enlarged papilla of Vater. On the cholangiogram, the cystic lesion communicated with bile duct, and large filling defects caused by mucin were observed in the dilated common bile duct. This lesion was diagnosed as a mucin-secreting bile duct tumor. Left and caudate lobectomy of the liver with extrahepatic bile duct resection and reconstruction was performed according to the possibility of the tumor's malignant behavior. Histological examination of the specimen revealed biliary cystic wall was covered by micropapillary neoplastic epithelium with mucin secretion lacking stromal invasion nor ovarian-like stroma. The patient has remained well with no evidence of recurrence for 38 months since her operation. Conclusion It is only recently that the term "intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN," which is accepted as a distinct disease entity of the pancreas, has begun to be used for mucin-secreting bile duct tumor. This case also seemed to be intraductal papillary neoplasm with prominent cystic dilatation of the bile duct.

  17. Cerebral venous thrombosis presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gentle Sunder Shrestha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is an uncommon cause of stroke. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare type of hemolytic anemia, frequently associated with thrombophilia. PNH may rarely present with CVT. Approximately, one-third of the patients with CVT develop cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we present a rare combination of CVT presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage in a patient with PNH. High index of suspicion is needed to avoid misdiagnosis. Patient was successfully managed with anticoagulation therapy.

  18. [Solcoseryl--new preparation for the pathogenetic treatment of patients with paroxysmal forms of cerebrovascular pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, A Iu; Bashkirova, L M

    2003-01-01

    The central goal of the investigation was to study Solcoseryl (SolcoSwitzerland) therapeutic efficacy for patients suffering from early or chronic cerebrovascular diseases complicated with different forms of paroxysms. 29 patients were examined. (14 of them were with vegetovascular dystonia, 7 with discirculatory encephalopathy of degree of 1 and 8 with discirculatory encephalopathy of degree of II). The authors revealed Solcoseryl to be positive in decreasing incidence and duration of vegetovascular fits, complaints, pathologic symptoms.

  19. The feasibility of a Box isolation strategy for non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in elderly patients

    OpenAIRE

    Higuchi, Satoshi; Sohara, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Yoshinori; Ihara, Minoru; Yamaguchi, Yoshio; Shoda, Morio; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa; Satake, Shutaro

    2016-01-01

    Background Catheter ablation of non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (non-PAF) is a therapeutic challenge especially in elderly patients. This study describes the feasibility of a posterior left atrium isolation as a substrate modification in addition to pulmonary vein isolation, the so-called Box isolation, for elderly patients with non-PAF. Methods Two hundred twenty-nine consecutive patients who underwent Box isolations for drug-refractory non-PAF were divided into two groups according to th...

  20. The Effect of Vestibular Rehabilitation in the Treatment of Elderly Patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    OpenAIRE

    N. Saki; Bayat, A; S. Nikakhlagh; F. Memari; G. Mirmomeni

    2011-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Vertigo in the elderly is relatively common, but only a few studies are available. Vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy is an important therapeutic option in treating patients with significant balance deficits. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on vertigo symptoms in elderly patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Materials & Methods: In a cross sectional analytic design, 46 patients older than 60 ye...

  1. Diagnosis dan Tatalaksana Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) Horizontal Berdasarkan Head Roll Test

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Edward; Yelvita Roza

    2014-01-01

    AbstrakLatar belakang: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) merupakan vertigo yang dicetuskan oleh perubahan posisi kepala atau badan terhadap gaya gravitasi. Diagnosis BPPV ditegakkan berdasarkan anamnesis dan manuver provokasi. Sering kali terjadi kesalahan dalam menegakkan diagnosis BPPV yang berakibat terhadap penatalaksanaan vertigo yang tidak adekuat. Tujuan: Untuk menjelaskan bagaimana diagnosis dan tatalaksana BPPV Kanalis Horizontal. Kasus: Seorang laki-laki berusia 56 tahun y...

  2. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo with Simultaneous Involvement of Multiple Semicircular Canals

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Dae Bo; Song, Chang Eun; Jung, Eun Jung; Ko, Kyung Min; Park, Jin Woo; Song, Mee Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) generally involves a single semicircular canal (single canal BPPV) but it has been reported that more than one semicircular canal on either the same or the opposite side can be involved in 6.8-20% of the cases (multiple canal BPPV). In this study, the clinical characteristics of multiple canal BPPV were analyzed and compared to those of single canal BPPV. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis was performed on 1054 co...

  3. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo after use of noise-canceling headphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan-Goor, Eric; Samra, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common cause of vertigo. We describe a case of a woman presenting acutely with a severe episode of disabling positional vertigo. Although she had no known etiologic risk factors, this attack followed 12 hours of continuously wearing digital noise-canceling headphones. This is the first such reported association between BPPV and the use of this gadget. We also provide a short review of BPPV and speculate on the possible pathogenic mechanisms involved.

  4. [Anterior Mediastinal Bronchogenic Cyst Associated with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia ; Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    We experienced a rare case of anterior mediastinal bronchogenic cyst. A 55-year-old female was admitted to our hospital because of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) and an abnormal shadow on the chest computed tomography. She had a 5.5 cm tumor at anterior mediastinum. The tumor was surgically removed completely by video assisted thoracoscopic surgery, and the diagnosis of bronchogenic cyst was established pathologically. After surgery, PSVT has disappeared.

  5. Ibutilide for the Cardioversion of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation during Radiofrequency Ablation of Supraventricular Tachycardias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Polymeropoulos

    2011-01-01

     min. Efficacy and total time to cardioversion did not differ between the study groups. No adverse events were observed. RFA was successfully performed in 16 patients (94% in the ibutilide arm and in all patients (100% in the DC-ECV arm, p = NS. In conclusion, ibutilide is a safe and effective alternative treatment for restoring sinus rhythm in cases of paroxysmal AF complicating SVT-RFA.

  6. Association between osteoporosis and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Shudong; Liu, Fenye; Cheng, Zhixin; Wang, Qirong

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing recent evidence has implicated osteoporosis as a risk factor for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). We conducted a systematic review to examine the association between osteoporosis and BPPV. Methods Four electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and the China Network Knowledge Infrastructure) were searched to identify all papers, published in either English or Chinese, examining the association between osteoporosis (osteopenia) and BPPV. Results S...

  7. Potassium Model for Slow (2-3 Hz) In Vivo Neocortical Paroxysmal Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenov, M.; Timofeev, I.; Steriade, M.; Sejnowski, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    In slow neocortical paroxysmal oscillations, the de- and hyperpolarizing envelopes in neocortical neurons are large compared with slow sleep oscillations. Increased local synchrony of membrane potential oscillations during seizure is reflected in larger electroencephalographic oscillations and the appearance of spike- or polyspike-wave complex recruitment at 2- to 3-Hz frequencies. The oscillatory mechanisms underlying this paroxysmal activity were investigated in computational models of cortical networks. The extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) was continuously computed based on neuronal K+ currents and K+ pumps as well as glial buffering. An increase of [K+]o triggered a transition from normal awake-like oscillations to 2- to 3-Hz seizure-like activity. In this mode, the cells fired periodic bursts and nearby neurons oscillated highly synchronously; in some cells depolarization led to spike inactivation lasting 50–100 ms. A [K+]o increase, sufficient to produce oscillations could result from excessive firing (e.g., induced by external stimulation) or inability of K+ regulatory system (e.g., when glial buffering was blocked). A combination of currents including high-threshold Ca2+, persistent Na+ and hyperpolarization-activated depolarizing (Ih) currents was sufficient to maintain 2- to 3-Hz activity. In a network model that included lateral K+ diffusion between cells, increase of [K+]o in a small region was generally sufficient to maintain paroxysmal oscillations in the whole network. Slow changes of [K+]o modulated the frequency of bursting and, in some case, led to fast oscillations in the 10- to 15-Hz frequency range, similar to the fast runs observed during seizures in vivo. These results suggest that modifications of the intrinsic currents mediated by increase of [K+]o can explain the range of neocortical paroxysmal oscillations in vivo. PMID:15056684

  8. Black, white and shades of grey: SUNCT or short-lasting chronic paroxysmal hemicrania?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, Yára Dadalti

    2006-09-01

    To report a case of unilateral headache with two possibilities of diagnosis. Case report. Patient with unilateral, intense, stabbing periocular headache with conjuntival injection and tearing. Although the duration of attacks was typical of SUNCT, there was complete remission of the pain with indomethacin, suggesting that this was a case of chronic paroxysmal hemicrania with unusually short attack duration. Therapeutic trials of indomethacin on younger patients presenting clinical diagnosis of SUNCT could be tried on a more regular basis.

  9. Paroxysmal dysarthria-ataxia in remitting-relapsing Bickerstaff's-like encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piffer, Silvio; Turri, Giulia; Acler, Michele; Richelli, Silvia; Cerini, Roberto; Fiaschi, Antonio; Monaco, Salvatore; Bonetti, Bruno

    2014-06-15

    Paroxysmal dysarthria-ataxia is a rare neurological condition due to ephaptic transmission, generally appearing in multiple sclerosis patients characterized by stereotyped attacks of slurred speech usually accompanied by ataxia, appearing many times a day. Here we describe a patient with an unusual remitting-relapsing form of Bickerstaff's-like brainstem encephalitis who manifested PDA after a relapse with the involvement of a peculiar region below the red nuclei and benefited from lamotrigine.

  10. Canal switch after canalith repositioning procedure for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Giant C; Basura, Gregory J; Wong, Hiu Tung; Heidenreich, Katherine D

    2012-09-01

    Canal switch is a complication following canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) for posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Instead of being returned to the utricle, the loose otoconia migrate into the superior or horizontal semicircular canal. Patients remain symptomatic, and treatment can be ineffective unless the switch is recognized and additional repositioning maneuvers directed toward the appropriate semicircular canal are performed. This report provides the first videographic documentation of canal switch involving conversion of unilateral posterior semicircular canal BPPV to geotropic horizontal canalithiasis.

  11. Diagnosis and Treatment of Anterior-Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzi, Ioanna; Spengos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In contrast to the posterior- and horizontal-canal variants, data on the frequency and therapeutic management of anterior-canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (AC-BPPV) are sparse. To synthesize the existing body of evidence into a systematic review regarding the incidence and treatment of AC-BPPV. Methods Systematic search of medical databases employing predefined criteria, using the term "anterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo." Results The electronic search retrieved 178 unique citations, 31 of which were considered eligible for further analysis. Analysis of the collected data revealed an estimated occurrence of AC-BPPV among benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients of 3% (range 1-17.1%). No controlled therapeutic trials could be identified, and so the analysis was focused on uncontrolled case series. Treatment was categorized into three groups: Epley maneuver, Yacovino maneuver, and specific, nonstandard maneuvers described in individual articles. All three categories demonstrated success rates of over 75%, and the overall sample-size-weighted mean was 85.6%. Conclusions The present analysis demonstrated that AC-BPPV comprises about 3% of all BPPV cases. It can be treated safely using the Epley, Yacovino, and other maneuvers with rates of symptom resolution lying in the range of that reported for the other, more frequent canal variants. Multicenter controlled trials are needed in order to develop evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of AC-BPPV. PMID:26022461

  12. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia in a patient with tuberculous meningitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramdhani Navin A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction This case report describes an extremely rare combination of paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia and tuberculous meningitis. Paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia is normally associated with severe traumatic brain injury. Case presentation A 69-year-old man of Indonesian descent was initially suspected of having a community-acquired pneumonia, which was seen on chest X-ray and computed tomography of the chest. However, a bronchoscopy showed no abnormalities. He was treated with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid in combination with ciprofloxacin. However, nine days after admission he was disorientated and complained of headache. Neurological examination revealed no further abnormalities. A lumbar puncture revealed no evidence of meningitis. He was then transferred to our hospital. At that time, initial cultures of bronchial fluid for Mycobacterium tuberculosis turned positive, as well as polymerase chain reaction for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Later, during his stay in our intensive care unit, he developed periods with hypertension, sinus tachycardia, excessive transpiration, decreased oxygen saturation with tachypnea, pink foamy sputum, and high fever. This constellation of symptoms was accompanied by dystonia in the first days. These episodes lasted approximately 30 minutes and improved after administration of morphine, benzodiazepines or clonidine. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an abnormal signal in the region of the hippocampus, thalamus and the anterior parts of the lentiform nucleus and caudate nucleus. Conclusions In patients with (tuberculous meningitis and episodes of extreme hypertension and fever, paroxysmal autonomic instability with dystonia should be considered.

  13. Paroxysmal itch caused by gain-of-function Nav1.7 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devigili, Grazia; Eleopra, Roberto; Pierro, Tiziana; Lombardi, Raffaella; Rinaldo, Sara; Lettieri, Christian; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G; Lauria, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    Itch is a common experience. It can occur in the course of systemic diseases and can be a manifestation of allergies or a consequence of diseases affecting the somatosensory pathway. We describe a kindred characterized by paroxysmal itch caused by a variant in SCN9A gene encoding for the Nav1.7 sodium channel. Patients underwent clinical and somatosensory profile assessment by quantitative sensory testing, nerve conduction study, autonomic cardiovascular reflex, and sympathetic skin response examination, skin biopsy with quantification of intraepidermal nerve fiber density, and SCN9A mutational analysis. The index patient, her mother, and a sister presented with a stereotypical clinical picture characterized by paroxysmal itch attacks involving the shoulders, upper back, and upper limbs, followed by transient burning pain, and triggered by environmental warmth, hot drinks, and spicy food. Somatosensory profile assessment demonstrated a remarkably identical pattern of increased cold and pain thresholds and paradoxical heat sensation. Autonomic tests were negative, whereas skin biopsy revealed decreased intraepidermal nerve fiber density in 2 of the 3 patients. All affected members harbored the 2215A>G I739V substitution in exon 13 of SCN9A gene. Pregabalin treatment reduced itch intensity and attack frequency in all patients. The co-segregation of the I739V variant in the affected members of the family provides evidence, for the first time, that paroxysmal itch can be related to a mutation in sodium channel gene.

  14. Hemicrania continua changed to chronic paroxysmal hemicrania after treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Kai Ivar; Bekkelund, Svein Ivar

    2011-02-01

    Remission of hemicrania continua (HC) and transformation from HC to chronic paroxysmal hemicrania (CPH) are unusual. We report a patient with left-sided HC who, after a period of remission, presented as CPH. The continuous HC headache disappeared completely after initiating treatment with cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, but reappeared on the same side after 14 months remission with paroxysmal, frequent, intense and short-lasting headache attacks accompanied by ipsilateral cranial autonomic symptoms. This happened shortly after the treatment was discontinued because of withdrawal of the COX-2 inhibitor from the market. The response to indomethacin was prompt, and the patient became completely free from her paroxysmal headache with a dose of 50 mg 2 times daily. This case questions a possible modification effect on the course of HC by use of COX-2 inhibitor, as well as further supporting that some aspects of the pathophysiology of HC may resemble those of CPH, and may argue for common biological mechanisms in HC and CPH.

  15. Natriuretic peptides for the detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with cerebral ischemia--the Find-AF study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Wachter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Diagnosis of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF can be challenging, but it is highly relevant in patients presenting with sinus rhythm and acute cerebral ischemia. We aimed to evaluate prospectively whether natriuretic peptide levels and kinetics identify patients with paroxysmal AF. METHODS: Patients with acute cerebral ischemia were included into the prospective observational Find-AF study. N-terminal pro brain-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP and N-terminal pro atrial-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proANP plasma levels were measured on admission, after 6 and 24 hours. Patients free from AF at presentation received 7 day Holter monitoring. We prospectively hypothesized that patients presenting in sinus rhythm with NT-proBNP>median were more likely to have paroxysmal AF than patients with NT-proBNPmedian (239 pg/ml, 17.9% had paroxysmal AF in contrast to 7.4% with NT-proBNP<239 pg/ml (p = 0.025. The ratio of early (0 h to late (24 h plasma levels of NT-proBNP showed no difference between both groups. For the detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, BNP, NT-proBNP and NT-proANP at admission had an area under the curve in ROC analysis of 0.747 (0.663-0.831, 0.638 (0.531-0.744 and 0.663 (0.566-0.761, respectively. In multivariate analysis, BNP was the only biomarker to be independently predictive for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. CONCLUSIONS: BNP is independently predictive of paroxysmal AF detected by prolonged ECG monitoring in patients with cerebral ischemia and may be used to effectively select patients for prolonged Holter monitoring.

  16. Factors predicting the duration of adrenal insufficiency in patients successfully treated for Cushing disease and nonmalignant primary adrenal Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prete, Alessandro; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Bottiglieri, Filomena; Rota, Carlo Antonio; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Salvatori, Roberto; Corsello, Salvatore Maria

    2017-03-01

    Successful treatment of Cushing syndrome causes transient or permanent adrenal insufficiency deriving from endogenous hypercortisolism-induced hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis suppression. We analyzed pre-treatment factors potentially affecting the duration of adrenal insufficiency. We conducted a retrospective analysis on patients successfully treated for Cushing disease (15 patients) who underwent transsphenoidal surgery, and nonmalignant primary adrenal Cushing syndrome (31 patients) who underwent unilateral adrenalectomy, divided into patients with overt primary adrenal Cushing syndrome (14 patients) and subclinical primary adrenal Cushing syndrome (17 patients). Epidemiological data, medical history, and hormonal parameters depending on the etiology of hypercortisolism were collected and compared to the duration of adrenal insufficiency. The median duration of follow-up after surgery for Cushing disease and primary adrenal Cushing syndrome was 70 and 48 months, respectively. In the Cushing disease group, the median duration of adrenal insufficiency after transsphenoidal surgery was 15 months: younger age at diagnosis and longer duration of signs and symptoms of hypercortisolism before diagnosis and surgery were associated with longer duration of adrenal insufficiency. The median duration of adrenal insufficiency was 6 months for subclinical primary adrenal Cushing syndrome and 18.5 months for overt primary adrenal Cushing syndrome. The biochemical severity of hypercortisolism, the grade of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis suppression, and treatment with ketoconazole before surgery accounted for longer duration of adrenal insufficiency. In patients with Cushing disease, younger age and delayed diagnosis and treatment predict longer need for glucocorticoid replacement therapy after successful transsphenoidal surgery. In patients with primary adrenal Cushing syndrome, the severity of hypercortisolism plays a primary role in influencing the duration of

  17. [Precursors of acute leukemia: myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreipe, H H

    2011-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) represent neoplastic proliferations of hematopoietic stem cells, which may progress to loss of differentiation and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Transitions between MDSs and MPNs as well as combinations between both disorders occur and MPNs may acquire dysplastic features combined with cytopenia. Myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms show dysplastic and myeloproliferative properties and have in common genetic aberrations at the stem cell level (TET2, ASXL 1, CBL, IDH 1, IDH 2, EZH2, p53, Runx1), which may be found in one cell or may affect different hematopoietic stem cells, expanding in parallel. Progress to AML follows a linear clonal evolution only in a subset of cases. Alternatively AML derives from secondary clones, devoid of any marker mutation or originates from a common aberrant progenitor cell which shares other but not the JAK2 ( V617F ) mutation.

  18. Central Cemento-Ossifying Fibroma: Primary Odontogenic or Osseous Neoplasm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sook-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Currently, central cemento-ossifying fibroma is classified by the World Health Organization as a primary bone-forming tumor of the jaws. However, histopathologically, it is often indistinguishable from cemento-osseous dysplasias in that it forms osteoid and cementicles (cementum droplets) in varying proportions. It is believed that pluripotent cells within the periodontal membrane can be stimulated to produce either osteoid or woven bone and cementicles when stimulated. If this is true, cemento-ossifying fibroma would be better classified as a primary odontogenic neoplasm arising from the periodontal ligament. Cemento-ossifying fibromas also do not occur in the long bones. The present report compares several entities that fall within the diagnostic realm of benign fibro-osseous lesions and reviews the evidence for reclassifying central cemento-ossifying fibroma as a primary odontogenic neoplasm. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lesions and Neoplasms of the Penis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Debra S

    2016-01-01

    In addition to practitioners who care for male patients, with the increased use of high-resolution anoscopy, practitioners who care for women are seeing more men in their practices as well. Some diseases affecting the penis can impact on their sexual partners. Many of the lesions and neoplasms of the penis occur on the vulva as well. In addition, there are common and rare lesions unique to the penis. A review of the scope of penile lesions and neoplasms that may present in a primary care setting is presented to assist in developing a differential diagnosis if such a patient is encountered, as well as for practitioners who care for their sexual partners. A familiarity will assist with recognition, as well as when consultation is needed.

  20. Primary Intracranial Myoepithelial Neoplasm: A Potential Mimic of Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Bonnie; Pytel, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Myoepithelial neoplasms were originally described in the salivary glands but their spectrum has been expanding with reports in other locations, including soft tissue. Intracranial cases are exceptionally rare outside the sellar region where they are assumed to be arising from Rathke pouch rests. Two cases of pediatric intracranial myoepithelial neoplasm in the interhemispheric fissure and the right cerebral hemisphere are reported here. Imaging studies suggest that the second case was associated with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination. Both cases showed typical variation in morphology and immunophenotype between more epithelioid and more mesenchymal features. The differential diagnosis at this particular anatomic location includes meningioma, which can show some overlap in immunophenotype since both tumors express EMA as well as GLUT1. One case was positive for EWSR1 rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization. One patient is disease free at last follow-up while the other succumbed to the disease within days illustrating the clinical spectrum of these tumors.

  1. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  2. Pancreatic endocrine neoplasms: Epidemiology and prognosis of pancreatic endocrine tumors

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic endocrine neoplasms (PETs) are uncommon tumors with an annual incidence less than 1 per 100,000 persons per year in the general population. PETs that produce hormones resulting in symptoms are designated as functional. The majority of PETs are nonfunctional. Of the functional tumors, insulinomas are the most common, followed by gastrinomas. The clinical course of patients with PETs is variable and depends on the extent of the disease and the treatment rendered. Patients with comple...

  3. SCHWANNOMA OF TONGUE, A RARE INTRAORAL NEOPLASM: CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas are truly encapsulated neoplasms of the human body and are always solitary. Only 1-2% occur intraorally with tongue being the most common site. A 20yr old male presented with a painless, slow growing swelling on the left side of the tongue for the past 1 year. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done and a benign mesenchymal lesion, possibility of Schwannoma was given. Biopsy of the tumour was performed and sent for histopathological examination which confirmed the diagnosis of Sc...

  4. Primary duodenal neoplasms: A retrospective clinico-pathological analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Amanjit; Joshi, Kusum; Vaiphei, Kim; Wig, JD

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinico-pathological spectrum of primary duodenal neoplasms. METHODS: A total of 55 primary duodenal neoplasms reported in the last 10 years after excluding ampullary and periampullary tumors were included in the study. Clinical details were noted and routine hematoxylin and eosin stained paraffin sections were studied for histological subtyping of the tumors. RESULTS: On histopathological examination primary duodenal neoplasms were categorized as: epithelial tumor in 27 cases (49.0%) including 10 cases of adenoma, 15 cases of adenocarcinoma, and 2 cases of Brunner gland adenoma; mesenchymal tumor in 9 cases (16.3%) consisting of 4 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor, 4 cases of smooth muscle tumor and I case of neurofibroma; lymphoproliferative tumor in 12 cases (21.8%), and neuroendocrine tumor in 7 cases (12.7%). CONCLUSION: Although non-ampullary/periampullary duodenal adenocarcinomas are rare, they constitute the largest group. Histopathological examination of primary duodenal tumors is important for correct histological subtyping. PMID:17373748

  5. Primary duodenal neoplasms:A retrospective clinico-pathological analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amanjit Bal; Kusum Joshi; Kim Vaiphei; JD Wig

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To analyze the clinico-pathological spectrum of primary duodenal neoplasms.METHODS:A total of 55 primary duodenal neoplasms reported in the last 10 years after excluding ampullary and periampullary tumors were included in the study.Clinical details were noted and routine hematoxylin and eosin stained paraffin sections were studied for histological subtyping of the tumors.RESULTS:On histopathological examination primary duodenal neoplasms were categorized as:epithelial tumor in 27 cases(49.0%)including 10 cases of adenoma,15 cases of adenocarcinoma,and 2 cases of Brunner gland adenoma;mesenchymal tumor in 9 cases (16.3%)consisting of 4 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor,4 cases of smooth muscle tumor and I case of neurofibroma;lymphoproliferative tumor in 12 cases (21.8%),and neuroendocrine tumor in 7 cases(12.7%).CONCLUSION:Although non-ampullary/periampullary duodenal adenocarcinomas are rare,they constitute the largest group.Histopathological examination of primary duodenal tumors is important for correct histological subtyping.

  6. THYROID NEOPLASMS AND PERITUMORAL MORPHOLOGY IN THYROIDECTOMY SPECIMENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmavathi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid neoplasms represent the most common malignancies of the endocrine system. They are known to occur in association with benign lesions of the thyroid, like multinodular goitre and Hashimoto thyroiditis. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : To study the neoplasms of thyroid and their peritumoral morphology. MATERIALS AND METHODS : All thyroidectomy specimens received in the Department of Pathology, RRMCH over a period of three years from June 2011 to May 2014 were included in the study. Thyro idectomies for non - neoplastic lesions were also extensively sampled and morphologically studied, with focus on peritumoral morphology, in neoplasms. RESULTS : Of the one hundred and fifty four thyroidectomy specimens received over three years, one hundred a nd thirteen (73.4% were non - neoplastic, and forty one were neoplastic (26.6%. Colloid goitre and lymphocytic infiltrate were the most common features in the peritumoral thyroid tissue, followed by multinodular goitre . Hashimoto thyroiditis and Hurthle cell change were noted in 11.5% of cases. Tumors were multicentric in 11.5% of cases. Malignancy was detected in eight of the fifty nine thyroidectomies performed for multinodular goitre . Of the thirty four surgeries for Hashimoto thyroiditis, four were reported as malignant on histopathology. CONCLUSION : All thyroidectomies, including those operated for benign lesions, need to be extensively sampled and morphology studied due to the possibility of occult malignancy. Larger series need to be st udied to find a causal association between the two.

  7. A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of a fiberglass manufacturing facility. II. Exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiazze, L; Watkins, D K; Fryar, C; Kozono, J

    1993-08-01

    A case-control study of malignant and non-malignant respiratory disease among employees of the Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation's Newark, Ohio plant was undertaken. The aim was to determine the extent to which exposures to substances in the Newark plant environment, to non-workplace factors, or to a combination may play a part in the risk of mortality from respiratory disease among workers in this plant. A historical environmental reconstruction of the plant was undertaken to characterise the exposure profile for workers in this plant from its beginnings in 1934 to the end of 1987. The exposure profile provided estimates of cumulative exposure to respirable fibres, fine fibres, asbestos, talc, formaldehyde, silica, and asphalt fumes. Employment histories from Owens-Corning Fiberglas provided information on employment characteristics (duration of employment, year of hire, age at first hire) and an interview survey obtained information on demographic characteristics (birthdate, race, education, marital state, parent's ethnic background, and place of birth), lifetime residence, occupational and smoking histories, hobbies, and personal and family medical history. Matched, unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) were used to assess the association between lung cancer or non-malignant respiratory disease and the cumulative exposure history, demographic characteristics, and employment variables. Only the smoking variables and employment characteristics (year of hire and age at first hire) were statistically significant for lung cancer. For non-malignant respiratory disease, only the smoking variables were statistically significant in the univariate analysis. Of the variables entered into a conditional logistic regression model for lung cancer, only smoking (smoked for six months or more v never smoked: OR = 26.17, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 3.316-206.5) and age at first hire (35 and over v less than 35: OR = 0.244, 95% CI 0.083-0.717) were statistically significant. There

  8. Paroxysmal Disorders in Neuropsychiatry: Why Episodic Disorders Must be Accounted For

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon M Neppe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Possibly the most under-diagnosed of all medical conditions are the episodic ones linked with the brain. These paroxysmal disorders are often ignored because when the patient presents to the mental health practitioner (MHP they appear well. Very often, they deny that anything is wrong, and yet their families cry out for the MHP to help them. But this is only one side. These patients may have one or more of several conditions and many are not even listed in diagnostic bibles such as DSM5. They require revised terminology, which is sometimes non-existent. They need to be diagnosed, yet the criteria to evaluate them are usually unknown. The broader impacts on spouses, partner and families must be understood and in return how much role those varying ethicospirituobiopsychofamilioethnicosociocultural considerations may play in alleviating or aggravating these conditions. Episodic phenomena are difficult to evaluate, and the need for appropriate management after the initial and continued evaluations make them a challenge. Additionally, the absence of proper diagnostic listings makes even potential insurance remuneration more difficult. The author places these conditions in a varied basket of diagnoses and syndromes, called “paroxysmal disorders”. Clearly, the organic elements must be particularly carefully treated, and the underlying psychological conditions handled potentially in a therapeutic relationship or at least with appropriate support. The author has been fortunate enough to be involved in pioneering the discipline of neuropsychiatry and behavioral neurology having established the first division of neuropsychiatry in the USA in 1986 and having led the first USA and International Delegation in Neuropsychiatry and Psychopharmacology. This has necessitated developing a string of diagnostic questionnaires and standardized follow up historical questions. These various historical measures are administered in a standard way—the Inventory of

  9. Borrelidin has limited anti-cancer effects in bcl-2 overexpressing breast cancer and leukemia cells and reveals toxicity in non-malignant breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafiuc, Diana; Weiß, Marlene; Mylonas, Ioannis; Brüning, Ansgar

    2014-10-01

    Clinically effective anti-cancer drugs have to tread a narrow line between selective cytotoxicity on tumor cells and tolerable adverse effects against healthy tissues. This causes the failure of many potential cancer drugs in advanced clinical trials, hence signifying the importance of a comprehensive initial estimate of the cytotoxicity of prospective anti-cancer drugs in preclinical studies. In this study, the cytotoxicity of borrelidin, a macrolide antibiotic with a high cytotoxic selectivity for proliferating endothelial cells and leukemia cells, was tested on malignant and non-malignant breast cells. Highly metastatic breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435) showed promising results and exhibited good sensitivity to borrelidin at low nanomolar concentrations, but borrelidin was cytotoxic to a non-malignant breast epithelial cell line (MCF10A) as well. Furthermore, although a high sensitivity of endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells; HUVEC) and individual leukemia cell lines (Jurkat and IM9) to borrelidin was confirmed in this study, another leukemia cell line (HL60) and an immortalized endothelial cell line (EA.hy926) displayed a significantly decreased sensitivity. Reduced sensitivity to borrelidin was associated with elevated bcl-2 expression in these cell lines. In conclusion, the results presented show that borrelidin displays high and selective cytotoxicity against subgroups of cancer cells and endothelial cells, but, owing to its non-specific toxicity to non-malignant cells, its clinical application might be restricted because of likely adverse effects and limited efficacy in bcl2-overexpressing cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Intact and cleaved forms of the urokinase receptor enhance discrimination of cancer from non-malignant conditions in patients presenting with symptoms related to colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, A F; Høyer-Hansen, G; Nielsen, H J;

    2009-01-01

    plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) was proposed as a marker in CRC patients. This study was undertaken to evaluate the individual molecular forms of suPAR as discriminators in a group of patients undergoing endoscopical examination following symptoms related to colorectal cancer. METHODS: In a case......-control study comprising 308 patients undergoing endoscopical examination following CRC-related symptoms, 77 CRC patients with adenocarcinoma were age and gender matched to: 77 patients with adenomas; 77 with other non-malignant findings, and 77 with no findings. The different uPAR forms were measured...

  11. Associations between demographics and health-related quality of life for chronic non-malignant pain patients treated at a multidisciplinary pain centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Plesner, Karin; Kvorning, Nina

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the associations between demographics and health-related quality of life for chronic non-malignant pain patients. DESIGN: A cohort study. SETTING: A multidisciplinary Danish pain centre. STUDY PARTICIPANTS: All patients treated at the centre between 2007 and 2013. MAIN.......7 ± 14.4 (range 18-89), and 21% were able to work full or part time. On a Numeric Rating Scale from 0 to 10, median pain-intensity was 8 (interquartile range 7-8) and pain-discomfort 8 (interquartile range 7-9) at time of referral. More than half of the patients had symptoms of anxiety and depression...

  12. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors l-deprenyl and clorgyline protect nonmalignant human cells from ionising radiation and chemotherapy toxicity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seymour, C B

    2003-11-17

    l-Deprenyl (R-(-)-deprenyl, selegiline) is an inhibitor of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) that is known to protect nerve cells from a variety of chemical and physical insults. As apoptosis is a common mechanism of radiation-induced cell death, the effect of l-deprenyl on the survival of cultured cells and tissue explants was studied following exposure to gamma radiation. The results obtained were compared with the effects of the less-selective MAO-B inhibitor pargyline and the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline. l-Deprenyl at a concentration of 10(-9) M protected the nontumorigenic cell line (HaCaT) and normal human urothelial explants from the effects of cobalt-60 gamma radiation, but did not protect tumorigenic human cell lines HaCaT-ras, HPV-transfected human keratinocytes (HPV-G cells), or PC3. Human bladder carcinoma explants were not protected. Clorgyline showed a smaller protective effect of normal cells, whereas pargyline had no effect. Radiation-induced delayed effects (genomic instability measured as delayed cell death) were prevented in normal cells by l-deprenyl but, interestingly, deprenyl appeared to increase the amount of delayed death in the tumorigenic cell lines. Studies using l-deprenyl prior to the exposure of nonmalignant cells to cisplatin showed that cell death due to this agent was also reduced. Treatment of cultures of nontumorigenic cells with l-deprenyl or clorgyline significantly increased the levels of the protein Bcl-2 following irradiation, but there was no such effect on the already-elevated levels of this protein in the tumour samples. Since the Bcl-2 has been shown to be an inhibitor of apoptosis or programmed cell death, this would imply that the protective effects of l-deprenyl and clorgyline involve activation of antiapoptotic pathways within the normal cell. This hypothesis is supported by data showing reduced levels of apoptosis in HaCAT cells and in normal bladder explant cultures following treatment with l-deprenyl.

  13. Ultrasound ablation of pulmonary veins for treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建安; 孙勇; 何红

    2003-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound ablation of pulmonary veins for treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Methods: The study population consisted of 9 patients with 5 males and 4 females enrolled consecutively who had idiopathic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation(AF). The ultrasound balloon was positioned through a special sheath to the orifice of the target vein by a transseptal procedure. The balloon was inflated with contrast-mixed saline (contrast: saline = 1:4) whose volume was decided by the diameter of the target pulmonary vein. The ablation energy was usually set up at 35 to 40 watts with temperature controlled at 60℃. The duration of each ablation was about 120 seconds which was repeated not over 10 times. Results: The average duration of the total procedure was 132±68 min for our patients. The average fluoroscopy time was 33±17 min. With a mean follow-up of 16±8 months after the procedure, AF was completely eliminated in 4 patients without antiarrhythmic drugs. The episodes of atrial fibrillation were eliminated in 2 patients with low dosage of oral amiodarone (0.1, once daily) which was ineffective before the procedure. The frequency of episodes was similar to that before the procedure in 3 patients. There were no complications such as hemopericardium, air embolism and stenosis of the pulmonary veins by angiography, related to the procedure. Conclusion: Ultrasound ablation of the pulmonary veins is a new approach to treat paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Before we determined its value, we need to do more researches with bigger sample, randomization and comparison design.

  14. Ultrasound ablation of pulmonary veins for treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建安; 孙勇; 何红

    2003-01-01

    Objective : to evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound ablation of pulmonary veins for treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Methods : The study population consisted of 9 patients with 5 males and 4 females enrolled consecutively who had idiopathic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation(AF) . The ultrasound balloon was positioned through a special sheath to the orifice of the target vein by a transseptal procedure. The balloon was inflated with contrast-mixed saline (contrast: saline = 1:4) whose volume was decided by the diameter of the target pulmonary vein. The ablation energy was usually set up at 35 to 40 watts with temperature controlled at 60℃ . The duration of each ablation was about 120 seconds which was repeated not over 10 times. Results: The average duration of the total procedure was 132± 68 min for our patients. The average fluoroscopy time was 33 ±17 min. With a mean follow-up of 16 ±8 months after the procedure, AF was completely eliminated in 4 patients without antiarrhythmic drugs. The episodes of atrial fibrillation were eliminated in 2 patients with low dosage of oral amiodarone (0.1, once daily) which was ineffective before the procedure. The frequency of episodes was similar to that before the procedure in 3 patients. There were no complications such as hemopericardium, air embolism and stenosis of the pulmonary veins by angiography, related to the procedure. Conclusion : Ultrasound ablation of the pulmonary veins is a new approach to treat paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Before we determined its value, we need to do more researches with bigger sample, randomization and comparison design.

  15. Pulmonary vein isolation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is associated with regional cardiac sympathetic denervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) is the cornerstone of the current state-of-the-art management of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, the precise mechanisms behind AF relapses post PVI are still unknown. Since the activity of the autonomous nervous system is crucial in triggering paroxysmal AF, we hypothesized that PVI is associated with changes of cardiac sympathetic activity. Methods Sixteen patients with paroxysmal AF underwent cardiac iodine-123-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (123I-mIBG) planar cardiac imaging and single-photon emission computed tomography with low-dose computed tomography (SPECT/CT) for attenuation correction before and 4 weeks after PVI. The heart-to-mediastinum ratio (H/M ratio), washout rate (WR), regional myocardial uptake, and regional washout were analyzed. Results The late H/M ratio was unchanged by PVI (pre, 2.9 ± 0.5 vs. post, 2.7 ± 0.6, p = 0.53). Four of the 16 patients (25%) displayed regional deficits before PVI. After PVI, regional deficits were present in ten patients (62.5%) with newly emerging deficits localized in the inferolateral wall. In a 6-month follow-up, four out of the ten patients (40%) with regional 123I-mIBG defects suffered from a recurrence of AF, while only one of the six patients (16.7%) without a regional 123I-mIBG defect experienced a recurrence. Conclusion A significant number of patients with paroxysmal AF show regional cardiac sympathetic innervation deficits at baseline. In addition, PVI is associated with newly emerging defects. The presence of regional sympathetic denervation after PVI may correlate with the risk of AF relapses. PMID:24360192

  16. Multiple neoplasms among cervical cancer patients in the material of the lower Silesian cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmajłowicz, Barbara; Kornafel, Jan; Błaszczyk, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    According to the definition by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), primary multiple neoplasms are two or more neoplasms of different histopathological build in one organ, or two or more tumors occurring in one patient, regardless of the time of their occurrence (synchronic - up to 6 months, metachronous - after 6 months), coming from an organ or a tissue and not being an infiltration from another neoplasm, a relapse or a metastasis. It was the aim of the study to analyze the frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasms among patients suffering from uterine cervix cancer, with a special interest in coexistent neoplasms, the time of their occurrence and total 5-year survivals. The data from the Lower Silesian Cancer Registry concerning the years 1984-2009 formed the material of the present study. 5.3% of all cervix neoplasms occurred as multiple cancers. Cervix neoplasms were 13.4% of multiple neoplasms. On average, cervical cancer occurred as a subsequent cancer in 6 patients yearly (60.7% of the occurrences of cervical cancer were in the period of 5 years following treatment for the first neoplasm). 5-year survival in patients suffering from primarily multiple cervix neoplasms constituted 57% and was convergent with the results for all patients suffering from cervical cancer. Cervical cancer as the first neoplasm occurred in 287 patients, on average in 11 patients annually. In the period of the first 5 years after the treatment of cervical cancer, there were 42.8% occurrences of other cancers. Cervical neoplasms most frequently coexisted with cancers of the breast, lung and large intestine. The frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasm among cervical cancer patients is increasing. Most frequently they coexist with other tobacco-related neoplasms, those related to HPV infections and with secondary post-radiation neoplasms. These facts should be taken into consideration during post-treatment observation and when directing diagnostic

  17. Ictal SPECT in paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia. Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Carmen García M; Intruvini; Vazquez; Beserra; Rabinowicz

    2000-04-01

    Purpose: Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD) should be included in the list of differential diagnosis in patients with refractory epilepsy. Although the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie this disorder remain controversial, it is now accepted that the basal ganglia are the anatomical substrate responsible for it.Material and methods: We report a 16-year-old mentally retarded male with PNKD admitted for video-EEG monitoring and ictal SPECT, which showed hyperperfusion on the right caudate and thalamus.Conclusion: This case supports more evidence for the involvement of the caudate nucleus and thalamus in the mechanisms responsible for the production of PNKD.

  18. Paroxysmal drastic abdominal pain with tardive cutaneous lesions presenting in Henoch-Sch(o)nlein purpura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Liang Chen; Hong Tian; Jian-Zhong Li; Jin Tao; Hua Tang; Yang Li; Bin Wu

    2012-01-01

    Henoch-Sch(o)nlein purpura (HSP) is a small-vessel vasculitis mediated by IgA-immune complex deposition.It is characterized by the clinical tetrad of non-thrombocytopenic palpable purpura,abdominal pain,arthritis and renal involvement.The diagnosis of HSP is difficult,especially when abdominal symptoms precede cutaneous lesions.We report a rare case of paroxysmal drastic abdominal pain with gastrointestinal bleeding presented in HSP.The diagnosis was verified by renal damage and the occurrence of purpura.

  19. Successful pregnancy outcome in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH following escalated eculizumab dosing to control breakthrough hemolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruby Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in women with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is associated with increased maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. There is limited published experience regarding therapy of PNH during pregnancy. We describe a case of a 30 year old female with hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome and PNH. After two years of treatment with eculizumab, she became pregnant. She developed breakthrough hemolysis at 20 weeks gestation. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated a subtherapeutic eculizumab level with absence of complement blockade. Escalation of her eculizumab dose successfully controlled hemolysis and restored therapeutic eculizumab level and activity. She delivered a healthy baby at 36 weeks.

  20. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and clinically reversible cor pulmonale in a horse with complicated recurrent airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanka, J; van den Hoven, R; Schwarz, B

    2015-01-01

    Cor pulmonale is considered an uncommon complication in horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO). This case report describes the history, clinical and further examination findings, treatment, progression and outcome of a horse diagnosed with cor pulmonale and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation of 2 days duration due to a severe exacerbation of RAO. To our best knowledge, this is the first report of RAO induced pulmonary hypertension in a horse causing atrial fibrillation. However, even severe cardiac changes due to respiratory dysfunction seem to be largely reversible in horses.

  1. Efficacy of atrial substrate modification based on dominant frequency of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    KUMAGAI, Koji; Minami, Kentaro; Kutsuzawa, Daisuke; Oshima, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Background The endpoint of ablation procedures is suggested to be non-inducibility of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). However, the prognosis of induced AF/atrial tachycardia (AT) after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) in PAF patients remains unclear. Methods A total of 122 PAF patients were divided into the following 3 groups: Group 1, 79 without AF/AT induced after PVI; Group 2, 21 with AF/AT induced or sustained after PVI, and followed by a high-dominant frequency (DF) and continuous co...

  2. Successful treatment of paroxysmal tonic spasms with topiramate in a patient with neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Shin; Nakamura, Masataka; Wate, Reika; Kaneko, Satoshi; Kusaka, Hirofumi

    2015-09-01

    A 49-year-old woman with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) developed severe quadriplegia and frequent paroxysmal tonic spasms (PTS). Carbamazepine, although initially effective against PTS, caused drug eruption and she was unable to continue. PTS re-emerged after discontinuation of carbamazepine and hindered rehabilitation. Then topiramate was started, and PTS promptly disappeared. The patient became able to resume rehabilitation and her activity of daily life improved significantly. Carbamazepine and topiramate have a common pharmacological action to block voltage-gated sodium channels. The action may have contributed to inhibition of ephaptic transmission in the demyelinating lesions by NMO and eventually improved PTS.

  3. New Treatment Strategy for Apogeotropic Horizontal Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Science.gov (United States)

    e Maia, Francisco Zuma

    2016-01-01

    The apogeotropic variant of horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV) is attributed to canalithiasis of the anterior arm or cupulolithiasis. Despite some therapeutic maneuvers, I propose a new treatment strategy for apogeotropic HC-BPPV that is designed to detach both the otoconial debris from the anterior arm of the semicircular canal and the debris that is attached to the utricular side of the cupula using inertia and gravity and based on simulations with a 3D biomechanical model. PMID:27942374

  4. Severe hydrocephalus complicated with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: one case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian Jun; Cheng, Wei Jin; Rao, Jie; Lu, Ye Fen; Qiu, Wei Wen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we reported one female patient diagnosed with severe hydrocephalus who presented with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). She presented with progressive headache and dizziness prior to hospitalization as chief complaints. She received Diagnostic Dix-Hallpike and Roll tests to make a definite diagnosis. The patient was cured after Gufoni maneuver and did not recur after 6-month follow-up. The diagnostic procedures of this female case prompted that prior to formal treatment, patients developing severe hydrocephalus complicated with BPPV should receive provocative test for positional dizziness, performed by experienced physicians from the Department of neurology and otolaryngology. PMID:26885146

  5. Application of DSA and ultrasonic blood rheography (Doppler) to benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Nobuya; Wada, Yoshiro; Suzumura, Shigeo; Matsunaga, Takashi (Nara Medical Univ., Kashihara (Japan))

    1990-03-01

    Fourteen cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) were studied with cervical circulation using DSA and Doppler. DSA study showed 7 abnormal cases out of 10 cases of BPPV. The abnormal findings included 5 cases of stenosis and 5 cases of coiling and kinking in cervical vertebral arteries. Doppler study showed that vertebral a. and also carotid a. had low volume and high laterality of cervical blood circulation in parameter of flow and velocity. These findings suggest the cervical circulation disorder was one of background factors in pathogenesis of BPPV. (author).

  6. Observation of curative effect of modified canalith reposition on 48 cases with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAN Jun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of the canalith repositioning maneuver in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. Methods The modified Epley procedure, Semont maneuver and Barbecue maneuver were applied in 48 cases of BPPV. Followed for one year, the curative effects were observed. Results After treatment in modified canalith reposition, the recovery rate was 89.58% , and effective rate was 100% . Followed for one year, the recurrence rate was 6.25% . Conclusion Modified canalith reposition for BPPV has no contraindications, and no special adverse reactions. It is simple and can fastly relieve symptoms. The cost and recurrence rate are low. It is suitable for clinical application.

  7. Post-traumatic refractory multiple canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Mehmet Akif; Derin, Serhan; Aricigil, Mitat; Eryilmaz, Mehmet Akif; Arbag, Hamdi

    2016-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most prevalent form of peripheral vertigo and is seen in a significant number of patients who present at neurology and ear, nose, and throat clinics. Various maneuvers may be used to determine the affected canal based on observation of specific nystagmus signs, and may also be used for treatment. Multiple canal pathology can make diagnosis and treatment more difficult. Presently described is case of BPPV with multiple canal pathology and traumatic etiology that was resistant to treatment. PMID:28275757

  8. New treatment strategy for apogeotropic horizontal canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Zuma e Maia

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The apogeotropic variant of horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (HC-BPPV is attributed to canalithiasis of the anterior arm or cupulolithiasis. Despite some therapeutic maneuvers, I propose a new treatment strategy for apogeotropic HCBPPV that is designed to detach both the otoconial debris from the anterior arm of the semicircular canal and the debris that is attached to the utricular side of the cupula using inertia and gravity and based on simulations with a 3D biomechanical model.

  9. [Treatment of the benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) by Epley maneuver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino Rivero, V; Pantoja Hernández, C G; González Palomino, A; Mora Santos, M E; Marcos García, M; Montero García, C; Blasco Huelva, A

    2007-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most common of the peripheral vertigo. We report the case of a 45 years old female with that pathology suspected by the symptoms which the patient related to head changes of positions and movements. Her diagnosis was confirmed by the maneuver of Dix-Hallpike, that was positive, and the treatment consisted in a maneuver of canalicular reposition according to Epley's technique. Such maneuver was successful and actually the patient is without symptoms after more than 2 years since the first episode. Finally we have performed a bibliographic review to verify the effectiveness of that treatment.

  10. Improving cytopenia with splenic artery embolization in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria on eculizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Suresh K; Hill, Anita; Hillmen, Peter; Arnold, Louise M; Brooksbank, Gemma L; Wood, Alex; Scarsbrook, Andrew; Davies, Mervyn H; Kelly, Richard J

    2013-12-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria is a rare acquired stem cell disorder characterized by intravascular hemolysis, aplasia and an increased risk of thrombosis. We describe a patient under treatment with the anti-complement antibody eculizumab who developed pancytopenia, requiring blood transfusions, due to massive splenomegaly. The patient underwent two separate splenic embolizations, which reduced the size of the spleen and improved his blood count to the point that blood transfusions were no longer necessary. Splenic embolization was chosen over splenectomy due to the potential postoperative complications of splenectomy, especially that of thrombosis.

  11. Paroxysmal atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardias: epidemiology, clinical picture, diagnostics, treatment (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozov I.A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays paroxysmal AV nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT is one of the most widespread arrhythmias. In most cases AVRNT is a recurrent process, and it worsens the life quality of such patients, reduces their workability and increases the incidence of applying for medical help. Thus AVNRT today is of special attention among investigators. The interest of clinicians to the problem of cardiac arrhythmias is associated with permanent dissatisfaction with the results of antiarrhythmic therapy and also with the rapid development of the surgical methods of treatment, i.e. the use of radio frequency catheter ablation.

  12. [Myocardial damage and paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia in a dog after Albuterol intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, J; Jenni, S; Fischer, N; Bienz, H; Glaus, T

    2012-07-01

    Intoxication with the beta2-agonist Albuterol may lead to immediate signs of beta-adrenergic stimulation like excitation, tachypnea and tachycardia. Furthermore, it typically causes severe hypokalemia, which then leads to muscle weakness and which predisposes to ventricular arrhythmias. We describe a dog where albuterol intoxication caused runs of fast paroxysmal ventricular tachycardia that persisted after normalization of the hypokalemia. Based on a markedly elevated serum troponin I level acute myocardial damage was identified as cause of the tachyarrhythmia. Repeated Troponin I measurements and Holter-ECGs were the means to document complete cure.

  13. Coincidence of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and panic disorder: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breithardt Günter

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Panic disorder (PD is characterised by sudden attacks of intense fear with somatic symptoms including palpitations and tachycardia. Reciprocally, palpitations caused by paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT are commonly associated with anxiety and may therefore be misdiagnosed as PD. As demonstrated by two case reports, PSVT and PD can occur comorbidly in a chronological sequence, with PSVT possibly precipitating and maintaining PD via interoceptive processes or, alternatively, with PD increasing the risk for PSVT by elevating stress levels. As both PSVT and PD require different treatments, potentially helpful differential clinical diagnostic criteria are proposed.

  14. Progress in the research of genetics and clinical manifestation of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Xiao-jun

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD is a disorder characterized by recurrent and brief attacks that are induced by sudden voluntary movement with highly clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Familial PKD are mostly autosomal dominant inherited and proline-rich transmembrare protein 2 (PRRT2 gene has been identified as the causative gene for PKD. So far 56 mutations have been documented and most of them are nonsense ones. No obvious genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed and the function of PRRT2 is still unclear, but the interaction between PRRT2 and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25 will shed the light on the research of PKD mechanism.

  15. [The preliminary research of progress on sudden deafness with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Yu, Youjin; Zhao, Yuanxin; Wang, Yuejian; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Qiuling

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the prognosis of sudden deafness patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). The clinical data of 24 sudden deafness patients with BPPV was analyzed. The outcome of 125 sudden deafness patients without BPPV at the same time was compared. Hearing improvement after three months treatment was 41.67% and 72.80% in sudden deafness patients with BPPV and sudden deafness patients without BPPV, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (Psudden deafness patients with BPPV is worse than that in sudden deafness patients without BPPV. BPPV may predict a poor hearing outcome in sudden deafness.

  16. National clinical guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kulagin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a rare acquired clonal blood disorder caused by somatic mutation of the phosphatidylinositolglycan complementation group A gene (PIG-A in a hematopoietic stem cell. PNH is characterized by chronic intravascular hemolysis, bone marrow failure, thrombosis, renal dysfunction and other severe clinical syndromes. These clinical guidelines include definition, classification, methods and diagnostic criteria of PNH, indications for screening, optimal treatment including targeted therapy with eculizumab, bone marrow transplantation and symptomatic therapy.

  17. Novel mutation in KCNA1 causes episodic ataxia with paroxysmal dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, Steven J; Mamsa, Hafsa; Jen, Joanna C; Baloh, Robert W; Zhou, Lan

    2008-03-01

    Episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) is an autosomal-dominant neurological disease caused by point mutations in the potassium channel-encoding gene KCNA1. It is characterized by attacks of ataxia and continuous myokymia. Respiratory muscle involvement has not been previously reported in EA1. We clinically evaluated a family with features of EA1 and paroxysmal shortness of breath. Coding and flanking intronic regions of KCNA1 were sequenced. We identified a novel 3-nucleotide deletion mutation in KCNA1 in the affected individuals. Our findings of a deletion mutation with unusual respiratory muscle involvement expand the genetic and clinical spectrum of EA1.

  18. Persistent positional nystagmus: a case of superior semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Katherine D; Kerber, Kevin A; Carender, Wendy J; Basura, Gregory J; Telian, Steven A

    2011-08-01

    Involvement of the superior semicircular canal (SSC) in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is rare. SSC BPPV is distinguished from the more common posterior semicircular canal (PSC) variant by the pattern of nystagmus triggered by the Dix-Hallpike position: down-beating torsional nystagmus in SSC BPPV versus up-beating torsional nystagmus in PSC BPPV. SSC BPPV may be readily treated at the bedside, which is a key component in excluding central causes of down-beating nystagmus. We present an unusual video case report believed to represent refractory SSC BPPV based on the pattern of nystagmus and the absence of any other central signs.

  19. Evolution of incidental branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas: A study with magnetic resonance imaging cholangiopancreatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girometti, Rossano; Pravisani, Riccardo; Intini, Sergio Giuseppe; Isola, Miriam; Cereser, Lorenzo; Risaliti, Andrea; Zuiani, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the type and timing of evolution of incidentally found branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (bd-IPMN) of the pancreas addressed to magnetic resonance imaging cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) follow-up. METHODS We retrospectively evaluated 72 patients who underwent, over the period 2006-2016, a total of 318 MRCPs (mean 4.4) to follow-up incidental, presumed bd-IPMN without signs of malignancy, found or confirmed at a baseline MRCP examination. Median follow-up time was 48.5 mo (range 13-95 mo). MRCPs were acquired on 1.5T and/or 3.0T systems using 2D and/or 3D technique. Image analysis assessed the rates of occurrence over the follow-up of the following outcomes: (1) imaging evolution, defined as any change in cysts number and/or size and/or appearance; and (2) alert findings, defined as worrisome features and/or high risk stigmata (e.g., thick septa, parietal thickening, mural nodules and involvement of the main pancreatic duct). Time to outcomes was described with the Kaplan-Meir approach. Cox regression model was used to investigate clinical or initial MRCP findings predicting cysts changes. RESULTS We found a total of 343 cysts (per-patient mean 5.1) with average size of 8.5 mm (range 5-25 mm). Imaging evolution was observed in 32/72 patients (44.4%; 95%CI: 32-9-56.6), involving 47/343 cysts (13.7%). There was a main trend towards small (IPMN appearance (P > 0.01). CONCLUSION Changes in MRCP appearance of incidental bd-IPNM were frequent over the follow-up (44.4%), with relatively rare (8.3%) occurrence of non-malignant alert findings that prompted further diagnostic steps. Changes occurred at a wide interval of time and were unpredictable, suggesting that imaging follow-up should be not discontinued, though MRCPs might be considerably delayed without a significant risk of missing malignancy. PMID:27920477

  20. Small-bowel neoplasms in patients undergoing video capsule endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondonotti, E; Pennazio, M; Toth, E

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIM: Small-bowel tumors account for 1% - 3% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Recent studies with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) suggest that the frequency of these tumors may be substantially higher than previously reported. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency...... findings. 55 patients underwent VCE as the third procedure after negative bidirectional endoscopy. The lesions were single in 89.5% of cases, and multiple in 10.5%. Retention of the capsule occurred in 9.8% of patients with small-bowel tumors. After VCE, 54/124 patients underwent 57 other examinations...

  1. [Celiac disease as a risk factor for digestive neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurano, A; Cirillo, L C; Noviello, A; Fabbrocini, P; Valente, T

    1987-03-01

    Coeliac disease is a primary malabsorption syndrome, whose gastrointestinal symptomatology regresses following a gluten-free diet. Several authors report an increased incidence of intestinal lymphoma in patients with longstanding coeliac disease; on the other hand the association of this malabsorption syndrome with malignant tumors of the esophagus, stomach or large bowel is not very common. The authors describe three cases of coeliac disease complicated after 5, 12 and 18 years by neoplasms of the esophagus, stomach and small bowel. It is stressed that in this disease patients must be monitored with periodic radiologic examinations, in the hope of detecting any malignancy at an early and perhaps treatable stage.

  2. Serum hyaluronic acid in patients with disseminated neoplasm.

    OpenAIRE

    Manley, G.; Warren, C

    1987-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid concentrations were measured by a laser nephelometric assay in serum samples from 50 patients with advanced disseminated neoplasm and 50 healthy controls matched for age and sex. The identity of hyaluronic acid was confirmed by a combination of electrophoretic and enzymatic techniques. The mean serum hyaluronic acid concentration for the control group was 1.09 mg/l, with a range of 0-4 mg/l. The mean concentration for patients with neoplastic disease was 10.38 mg/l, with a ran...

  3. Cellular schwannoma: a benign neoplasm sometimes overdiagnosed as sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberghini, M. [Dept. of Surgical Pathology, Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy); Anatomia Patologica, Istituto Rizzoli, Bologna (Italy); Zanella, L.; Bacchini, P.; Bertoni, F. [Dept. of Surgical Pathology, Rizzoli Institute, Bologna (Italy)

    2001-06-01

    A case of cellular schwannoma originating in the left lumbar paraspinal region is described. The diagnosis was originally made on needle biopsy material. The histological examination is usually not sufficient to correctly diagnose this benign neoplasm. Bone erosion, neurological symptoms, caused by compression of the spinal roots, together with hypercellularity, pleomorphism and an occasional increase in mitotic activity, may lead to an erroneous diagnosis of malignancy. Immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural analysis are helpful in confirming the diagnosis. The recognition of this entity avoids unnecessary overtreatment of these patients. (orig.)

  4. Histologic and Immunohistochemical classification of 41 bovine adrenal gland neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Anette Blak; Leifsson, Páll S.; Jensen, Henrik Elvang;

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of the adrenal glands are among the most frequent tumors in cattle; however, few studies have been conducted to describe their characteristics. The aim of this study was to classify 41 bovine adrenal neoplasms from 40 animals based on macroscopic and histologic examination, including....... An immunohistochemistry panel consisting of antibodies against melan A, synaptophysin, and CNPase was considered most useful to classify bovine adrenal tumors. However, the distinction between benign and malignant adrenocortical tumors was based on histologic features as in human medicine....

  5. [Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas, IPMN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirén, Jukka

    2013-01-01

    With the development and increasing use of imaging techniques, intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is being detected with increasing frequency. Two forms of the disease are distinguished, the rare main duct form and the common accessory pancreatic duct form. The former often progresses to malignancy, the latter only seldom. The mixed form of IPMN exhibits features of both forms. In main duct IPMN, mucin production obstructs the pancreatic duct causing its dilatation and often symptoms typical of chronic pancreatitis. Main duct IPMN is always an indication for surgery, whereas monitoring is often sufficient for side duct IPMN.

  6. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980...... and 2007. RESULTS: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 186), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 69), and nonmeningioma brain tumor (n = 116) were the most common types of SMNs and had the poorest outcome (5-year survival rate, 18.1% ± 2.9%, 31.1% ± 6.2%, and 18.3% ± 3.8%, respectively). Five-year survival...

  7. Distinct molecular features of different macroscopic subtypes of colorectal neoplasms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Konda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal adenoma develops into cancer with the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic changes. We studied the underlying molecular and clinicopathological features to better understand the heterogeneity of colorectal neoplasms (CRNs. METHODS: We evaluated both genetic (mutations of KRAS, BRAF, TP53, and PIK3CA, and microsatellite instability [MSI] and epigenetic (methylation status of nine genes or sequences, including the CpG island methylator phenotype [CIMP] markers alterations in 158 CRNs including 56 polypoid neoplasms (PNs, 25 granular type laterally spreading tumors (LST-Gs, 48 non-granular type LSTs (LST-NGs, 19 depressed neoplasms (DNs and 10 small flat-elevated neoplasms (S-FNs on the basis of macroscopic appearance. RESULTS: S-FNs showed few molecular changes except SFRP1 methylation. Significant differences in the frequency of KRAS mutations were observed among subtypes (68% for LST-Gs, 36% for PNs, 16% for DNs and 6% for LST-NGs (P<0.001. By contrast, the frequency of TP53 mutation was higher in DNs than PNs or LST-Gs (32% vs. 5% or 0%, respectively (P<0.007. We also observed significant differences in the frequency of CIMP between LST-Gs and LST-NGs or PNs (32% vs. 6% or 5%, respectively (P<0.005. Moreover, the methylation level of LINE-1 was significantly lower in DNs or LST-Gs than in PNs (58.3% or 60.5% vs. 63.2%, P<0.05. PIK3CA mutations were detected only in LSTs. Finally, multivariate analyses showed that macroscopic morphologies were significantly associated with an increased risk of molecular changes (PN or LST-G for KRAS mutation, odds ratio [OR] 9.11; LST-NG or DN for TP53 mutation, OR 5.30; LST-G for PIK3CA mutation, OR 26.53; LST-G or DN for LINE-1 hypomethylation, OR 3.41. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that CRNs could be classified into five macroscopic subtypes according to clinicopathological and molecular differences, suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of colorectal

  8. Unusual Presentation of Hypothyroidism in a Pregnant Woman, Mimicking Gestational Trophoblastic Neoplasm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Karisani, Narmin; Mazloomi, Maryam; Rahimi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    .... We report a woman who experienced an incomplete abortion and undiagnosed hypothyroidism who was referred to the oncologist with the suspicion of metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasm (GTN...

  9. Mammaglobin-A immunohistochemistry in primary central nervous system neoplasms and intracranial metastatic breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Patrick J; Perrin, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Metastases represent the most common type of intracranial neoplasm. In women, 30% of such tumors derive from breast carcinoma. In neurosurgical cases with ambiguous cellular morphology and/or limited biopsy material, immunohistochemistry (IHC) is often performed to distinguish metastases from primary central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms. IHC for mammaglobin-A (MGA), a protein expressed in a majority of breast carcinomas, is commonly applied in this setting, but its utility for distinguishing primary CNS neoplasms from metastatic breast carcinoma is unknown; the reactivity of MGA in primary and metastatic CNS neoplasms has never been described. Here, we describe the frequency and patterns of IHC reactivity for MGA in metastatic and primary CNS neoplasms from patients with well-documented histories of breast carcinoma. Following a published protocol previously applied to non-CNS neoplasms, MGA staining of moderate to strong intensity within 5% or more of a neoplasm was considered positive. On the basis of these criteria, 3 of 12 (25.0%) glioblastomas, 1 of 10 (10.0%) meningiomas, and 47 of 95 (49.5%) metastases were positive. Importantly, the cytoarchitectural staining characteristics among all 4 MGA-positive primary CNS neoplasms (cytoplasmic and nuclear) differed from those of the metastases (cytoplasmic and membranous). These findings suggest that MGA IHC staining intensity and distribution can distinguish metastases from primary CNS neoplasms (P=0.0086) in women with a history of breast carcinoma but also indicate that cytologic staining patterns must be interpreted for more accurate tumor classification.

  10. Current perspectives on pancreatic serous cystic neoplasms: Diagnosis, management and beyond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Peng Zhang; Zhong-Xun Yu; Yu-Pei Zhao; Meng-Hua Dai

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cystic neoplasms have been increasingly recognized recently. Comprising about 16% of all resected pancreatic cystic neoplasms, serous cystic neoplasms are uncommon benign lesions that are usually asymptomatic and found incidentally. Despite overall low risk of malignancy, these pancreatic cysts still generate anxiety, leading to intensive medical investigations with considerable financial cost to health care systems. This review discusses the general background of serous cystic neoplasms, including epidemiology and clinical characteristics, and provides an updated overview of diagnostic approaches based on clinical features, relevant imaging studies and new findings that are being discovered pertaining to diagnostic evaluation. We also concisely discuss and propose management strategies for better quality of life.

  11. Diagnosis dan Tatalaksana Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV Horizontal Berdasarkan Head Roll Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Edward

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV merupakan vertigo yang dicetuskan oleh perubahan posisi kepala atau badan terhadap gaya gravitasi. Diagnosis BPPV ditegakkan berdasarkan anamnesis dan manuver provokasi. Sering kali terjadi kesalahan dalam menegakkan diagnosis BPPV yang berakibat terhadap penatalaksanaan vertigo yang tidak adekuat. Tujuan: Untuk menjelaskan bagaimana diagnosis dan tatalaksana BPPV Kanalis Horizontal. Kasus: Seorang laki-laki berusia 56 tahun yang didiagnosis sebagai BPPV Kanalis Horizontal kiri tipe kanalolithiasis apogeotropik. Penatalaksanaan: Dilakukan barbeque maneuver terapi reposisi kanalith. Kesimpulan: Penatalaksanaan BPPV adalah berdasarkan lokasi kanal yang terlibat dengan terapi reposisi kanalith.Kata kunci: BPPV, kanalis horizontal, kanalolithiasis apogeotropik.AbstractBackground: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV is vertigo that provoked by a position change of the head or body to the gravitation. The diagnosis of BPPV can be established by anamnesis and provocation maneuver. However, because BPPV frequently is misdiagnosed, it will implicate to an adequate therapeutic. Purposes: Explaining how to diagnose and manage a Horizontal Canal BPPV. Case : a man, 56 ages which diagnosed as a Left Horizontal Canal BPPV apogeotropic canalolithiasis type. Management: A barbeque maneuver was performed as canalith reposition treatment. Conclution: The management of BPPV is based on the involved canal with canalith repositioning treatment.Keywords: BPPV, horizontal canal, apogeotropic canalolithiasis.

  12. DRUG THERAPY OF PAROXYSMAL ATRIAL FIBRILLATION IN THE ELDERLY OVER 75 YEARS OLD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness and safety of various agents on paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in the elderly over 75 years old.Methods Totally 264 in-patients (75-91 years old, 185 males and 79 females) with atrial fibrillation history of less than 7 days were enrolled in this study. A total of 611 atrial fibrillation episodes were recorded, but 130 episodes (22. 3% ) of atrial fibrillation were auto-converted to sinus rhythm. The rest 481 episodes of atrial fibrillation were divided into six groups based on the drug used. Results The cardioversion ratio of atrial fibrillation were 9. 5%, 46.9%, 71.7%, 55.9%, 32.7%, and73.6%in control, cedilanid, amiodarone, propafenone, verapamil, and quinidine groups, respectively. Ventricular rate control were 5.4%, 83.6%, 84. 9%, 77.9%, 78.8%, and 11.3% in those groups, respectively. The total effective rates of amiodarone and cedilanid groups were the highest. When the ventricular rate was controlled to below 90 bpm, the patients would almost complain of no discomfort. No severe side-effect was observed in each group. Conclusion Amiodarone and cedilanid may be the proper drugs for the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in the elderly. The above antiarrhythmics in each therapeutic group were relatively safe and effective.

  13. Late onset of atypical paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia with remote history of Graves′ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qayyum Rana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD is a rare hyperkinetic movement disorder and falls under the category of paroxysmal movement disorders. In this condition, episodes are spontaneous, involuntary, and involve dystonic posturing with choreic and ballistic movements. Attacks last for minutes to hours and rarely occur more than once per day. Attacks are not typically triggered by sudden movement, but may be brought on by alcohol, caffeine, stress, fatigue, or chocolate. We report a patient with multiple atypical features of PNKD. She had a 7-year history of this condition with onset at the age of 59, and a remote history of Graves′ disease requiring total thyroidectomy. The frequency of attacks in our case ranged from five to six times a day to a minimum of twice per week, and the duration of episode was short, lasting not more than 2 min. Typically, PNKDs occur at a much younger age and have longer attack durations with low frequency. Administering clonazepam worked to reduce her symptoms, although majority of previous research suggests that pharmacological interventions have poor outcomes.

  14. Late onset of atypical paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia with remote history of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Abdul Qayyum; Nadeem, Ambreen; Yousuf, Muhammad Saad; Kachhvi, Zakerabibi M

    2013-10-01

    Paroxysmal non-kinesigenic dyskinesia (PNKD) is a rare hyperkinetic movement disorder and falls under the category of paroxysmal movement disorders. In this condition, episodes are spontaneous, involuntary, and involve dystonic posturing with choreic and ballistic movements. Attacks last for minutes to hours and rarely occur more than once per day. Attacks are not typically triggered by sudden movement, but may be brought on by alcohol, caffeine, stress, fatigue, or chocolate. We report a patient with multiple atypical features of PNKD. She had a 7-year history of this condition with onset at the age of 59, and a remote history of Graves' disease requiring total thyroidectomy. The frequency of attacks in our case ranged from five to six times a day to a minimum of twice per week, and the duration of episode was short, lasting not more than 2 min. Typically, PNKDs occur at a much younger age and have longer attack durations with low frequency. Administering clonazepam worked to reduce her symptoms, although majority of previous research suggests that pharmacological interventions have poor outcomes.

  15. The canalith repositioning procedure for the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehling, D A; Bowen, J M; Mohr, D N; Brey, R H; Beatty, C W; Wollan, P C; Silverstein, M D

    2000-07-01

    To compare the canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) with a sham maneuver for the treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. We recruited 50 patients with a history of positional vertigo and unilateral positional nystagmus on physical examination (Dix-Hallpike maneuver). Patients were randomized to either the CRP (n = 24) or a sham maneuver (n = 26). Measured outcomes included resolution of vertigo and positional nystagmus at follow-up examination. The mean duration of follow-up was 10 days for both groups. Resolution of symptoms was reported by 12 (50%) of the 24 patients in the CRP group and by 5 (19%) of the 26 patients in the sham group (P = .02). The results of the Dix-Hallpike maneuver were negative for positional nystagmus in 16 (67%) of 24 patients in the CRP group and in 10 (38%) of 26 patients in the sham group (P = .046). The CRP is effective treatment of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and this procedure can be performed by general internists on outpatients with this disorder.

  16. Posterior Semicircular Canal Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo Presenting with Torsional Downbeating Nystagmus: An Apogeotropic Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Vannucchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to verify the hypothesis that free-floating particles could sometimes localize into the distal portion of the non ampullary arm of the posterior semicircular canal (PSC so that assuming the Dix-Hallpike’s positions, the clot could move towards the ampulla eliciting a inhibitory torsional-down beating paroxysmal positional nystagmus (PPNy, instead of typical excitatory torsional-up beating PPNy. Among 45 patients with vestibular signs suggesting anterior semicircular canal paroxysmal positional vertigo (PPV, collected from February 2003 to August 2006, we detected a group of 6 subjects whose clinical findings showed a singular behaviour during follow-up. At the first check-up, all patients were submitted to different types of physical manoeuvres for ASC canalolithiasis. Patients were controlled during the same session and after one week. When we found that nystagmus was qualitatively changed we adopted the appropriate physical therapies for that sign. At a next check-up, after having performed some physical therapies, all patients had a typical PSC PPNy of the opposite side, with respect to that of the ASC initially diagnosed. Basing on these observations we conclude that PSC PPV, similarly to lateral semicircular canal PPV, could manifests in a apogeotropic variant.

  17. Recessive spinocerebellar ataxia with paroxysmal cough attacks: a report of five cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Pérez, Luis; González-Piña, Rigoberto; Rodríguez-Labrada, Roberto; Aguilera-Rodríguez, Raul; Galicia-Polo, Lourdes; Vázquez-Mojena, Yaimeé; Cortés-Rubio, Ana M; Trujillo-Bracamontes, Marla R; Cerecedo-Zapata, Cesar M; Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Magaña, Jonathan J

    2014-04-01

    Hereditary ataxias are a heterogeneous group of neurological diseases characterized by progressive cerebellar syndrome and numerous other features, which result in great diversity of ataxia subtypes. Despite the characterization of a number of both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive ataxias, it is thought that a large group of these conditions remains to be identified. In this study, we report the characterization of five patients (three Mexicans and two Italians) who exhibit a peculiar form of recessive ataxia associated with coughing. The main clinical and neurophysiological features of these patients include cerebellar ataxia, paroxysmal cough, restless legs syndrome (RLS), choreic movements, atrophy of distal muscles, and oculomotor disorders. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed cerebellar atrophy, while video polysomnography (VPSG) studies showed a severe pattern of breathing-related sleep disorder, including sleep apnea, snoring, and significant oxygen saturation in the absence of risk factors. All patients share clinical features in the peripheral nervous system, including reduction of amplitude and prolonged latency of sensory potentials in median and sural nerves. Altogether, clinical criteria as well as molecular genetic testing that was negative for different autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive ataxias suggest the presence of a new form of recessive ataxia. This ataxia, in which cerebellar signs are preceded by paroxysmal cough, affects not only the cerebellum and its fiber connections, but also the sensory peripheral nervous system and extracerebellar central pathways.

  18. Effect of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster on pain intensity and paroxysms in classical trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburin, Stefano; Schweiger, Vittorio; Magrinelli, Francesca; Brugnoli, Maria Paola; Zanette, Giampietro; Polati, Enrico

    2014-11-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a neuropathic pain condition affecting one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. It is characterized by unilateral, sudden, shock-like, and brief painful attacks, which follow the distribution of trigeminal nerve branches, and with no other accompanying sensorimotor or autonomic signs and symptoms. Current guidelines stipulate which therapies represent first-, second-, and third-line treatments for TN, but there is a consistent mismatch between the therapeutic guidelines and the patient's preferences and expectations. We report on 2 patients with classical TN in whom conventional drugs for TN were not tolerated. In these patients, treatment with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster (LMP) resulted in reduction of pain intensity and the number of pain paroxysms. LMP is known to block the sodium channels on peripheral nerves and may cause a selective and partial block of Aδ and C fibers. According to the TN ignition hypothesis, blockage of peripheral afferents by LMP may reduce pain paroxysms. The effect of LMP may outlast the pharmacokinetics of the drug by reducing pain amplification mechanisms in the central nervous system. LMP has limited or no systemic side effects. LMP may be an effective and well-tolerated treatment option for TN in those patients who do not tolerate or who refuse other therapies. Future randomized controlled studies should better address this issue. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias: paroxysmal hemicrania, SUNCT/SUNA, and hemicrania continua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goadsby, Peter J; Cittadini, Elisabetta; Cohen, Anna S

    2010-04-01

    The trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headache disorders that include cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing/cranial autonomic features (SUNCT/SUNA). Hemicrania continua (HC) is often included with this group, although the second edition of The International Classification of Headache Disorders did not link the entities. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias are generally characterized by relatively short-lasting attacks of severe pain and lateralized associated features including the pain, cranial autonomic symptoms, and where present, migrainous symptoms, such as photophobia. Paroxysmal hemicrania has intermediate duration and intermediate attack frequency. Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing has the shortest attack duration and the highest attack frequency. Hemicrania continua has a continuous pain with exacerbations that can include cranial autonomic symptoms as part of the phenotype. The syndromes share much in their pathophysiology and investigation paths; however, their treatment is distinct, so that the accurate differentiation is important for optimal management.

  20. Emerging tumor entities and variants of CNS neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenacchi, Giovanna; Giangaspero, Felice

    2004-03-01

    Since the appearance in 2000 of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification for central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms, numerous descriptions of new entities or variants have appeared in the literature. In the group of neuronal and mixed glioneuronal neoplasms are lesions with distinctive morphological features that are still not included in a precise classification, including extraventricular neurocytoma, papillary glioneuronal tumor, rosette-forming glioneuronal of the fourth ventricle, glioneuronal with neuropil-like rosette, and DNT-like tumor of the septum pellucidum. The glioneuronal tumor with neuropil-like rosette and oligodendroglioma with neurocytic differentiation represent morphological variants of genetically proven diffuse gliomas. The lipoastrocytoma and the pilomixoid astrocytoma enlarge the group of astrocytic lesions. Rare, low-grade gliomas of the spinal cord with extensive leptomeningeal dissemination associated with unusual neuroimaging are described. The chordoid glioma of the third ventricle and the papillary tumor of the pineal region seem to be correlated by a common histogenesis from the specialized ependyma of the subcommissural organ. An embryonal tumor with neuropil and true rosettes combining features of neuroblastoma and ependymoblastoma is discussed. These new, recently described lesions indicate that the complex morphologic spectrum of CNS tumors is far from being completely delineated.