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Sample records for noninvasive transcranial therapy

  1. A 1372-element Large Scale Hemispherical Ultrasound Phased Array Transducer for Noninvasive Transcranial Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-01-01

    Noninvasive transcranial therapy using high intensity focused ultrasound transducers has attracted high interest as a promising new modality for the treatments of brain related diseases. We describe the development of a 1372 element large scale hemispherical ultrasound phased array transducer operating at a resonant frequency of 306 kHz. The hemispherical array has a diameter of 31 cm and a 15.5 cm radius of curvature. It is constructed with piezoelectric (PZT-4) tube elements of a 10 mm in diameter, 6 mm in length and 1.4 mm wall thickness. Each element is quasi-air backed by attaching a cork-rubber membrane on the back of the element. The acoustic efficiency of the element is determined to be approximately 50%. The large number of the elements delivers high power ultrasound and offers better beam steering and focusing capability. Comparisons of sound pressure-squared field measurements with theoretical calculations in water show that the array provides good beam steering and tight focusing capability over an efficient volume of approximately 100x100x80 mm 3 with nominal focal spot size of approximately 2.3 mm in diameter at -6 dB. We also present its beam steering and focusing capability through an ex vivo human skull by measuring pressure-squared amplitude after phase corrections. These measurements show the same efficient volume range and focal spot sizes at -6 dB as the ones in water without the skull present. These results indicate that the array is sufficient for use in noninvasive transcranial ultrasound therapy.

  2. Noninvasive Transcranial Brain Stimulation and Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, Allyson C.; Ramkumar, Mukund; Nguyen, Tam; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2009-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are two noninvasive brain stimulation techniques that can modulate activity in specific regions of the cortex. At this point, their use in brain stimulation is primarily investigational; however, there is clear evidence that these tools can reduce pain and modify neurophysiologic correlates of the pain experience. TMS has also been used to predict response to surgically implanted stimulation for the tre...

  3. Non-invasive transcranial ultrasound therapy based on a 3D CT scan: protocol validation and in vitro results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet, F; Pernot, M; Aubry, J-F; Montaldo, G; Tanter, M; Fink, M; Marsac, L

    2009-01-01

    A non-invasive protocol for transcranial brain tissue ablation with ultrasound is studied and validated in vitro. The skull induces strong aberrations both in phase and in amplitude, resulting in a severe degradation of the beam shape. Adaptive corrections of the distortions induced by the skull bone are performed using a previous 3D computational tomography scan acquisition (CT) of the skull bone structure. These CT scan data are used as entry parameters in a FDTD (finite differences time domain) simulation of the full wave propagation equation. A numerical computation is used to deduce the impulse response relating the targeted location and the ultrasound therapeutic array, thus providing a virtual time-reversal mirror. This impulse response is then time-reversed and transmitted experimentally by a therapeutic array positioned exactly in the same referential frame as the one used during CT scan acquisitions. In vitro experiments are conducted on monkey and human skull specimens using an array of 300 transmit elements working at a central frequency of 1 MHz. These experiments show a precise refocusing of the ultrasonic beam at the targeted location with a positioning error lower than 0.7 mm. The complete validation of this transcranial adaptive focusing procedure paves the way to in vivo animal and human transcranial HIFU investigations.

  4. Non-invasive transcranial ultrasound therapy based on a 3D CT scan: protocol validation and in vitro results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquet, F; Pernot, M; Aubry, J-F; Montaldo, G; Tanter, M; Fink, M [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, ESPCI, Universite Paris VII, UMR CNRS 7587, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France); Marsac, L [Supersonic Imagine, Les Jardins de la Duranne, 510 rue Rene Descartes, 13857 Aix-en-Provence (France)], E-mail: fabrice.marquet@espci.org

    2009-05-07

    A non-invasive protocol for transcranial brain tissue ablation with ultrasound is studied and validated in vitro. The skull induces strong aberrations both in phase and in amplitude, resulting in a severe degradation of the beam shape. Adaptive corrections of the distortions induced by the skull bone are performed using a previous 3D computational tomography scan acquisition (CT) of the skull bone structure. These CT scan data are used as entry parameters in a FDTD (finite differences time domain) simulation of the full wave propagation equation. A numerical computation is used to deduce the impulse response relating the targeted location and the ultrasound therapeutic array, thus providing a virtual time-reversal mirror. This impulse response is then time-reversed and transmitted experimentally by a therapeutic array positioned exactly in the same referential frame as the one used during CT scan acquisitions. In vitro experiments are conducted on monkey and human skull specimens using an array of 300 transmit elements working at a central frequency of 1 MHz. These experiments show a precise refocusing of the ultrasonic beam at the targeted location with a positioning error lower than 0.7 mm. The complete validation of this transcranial adaptive focusing procedure paves the way to in vivo animal and human transcranial HIFU investigations.

  5. Noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Allyson C; Ramkumar, Mukund; Nguyen, Tam; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2009-02-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are two noninvasive brain stimulation techniques that can modulate activity in specific regions of the cortex. At this point, their use in brain stimulation is primarily investigational; however, there is clear evidence that these tools can reduce pain and modify neurophysiologic correlates of the pain experience. TMS has also been used to predict response to surgically implanted stimulation for the treatment of chronic pain. Furthermore, TMS and tDCS can be applied with other techniques, such as event-related potentials and pharmacologic manipulation, to illuminate the underlying physiologic mechanisms of normal and pathological pain. This review presents a description and overview of the uses of two major brain stimulation techniques and a listing of useful references for further study.

  6. Noninvasive brain stimulation with transcranial magnetic or direct current stimulation (TMS/tDCS)-From insights into human memory to therapy of its dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparing, Roland; Mottaghy, Felix M

    2008-04-01

    Noninvasive stimulation of the brain by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has driven important discoveries in the field of human memory functions. Stand-alone or in combination with other brain mapping techniques noninvasive brain stimulation can assess issues such as location and timing of brain activity, connectivity and plasticity of neural circuits and functional relevance of a circumscribed brain area to a given cognitive task. In this emerging field, major advances in technology have been made in a relatively short period. New stimulation protocols and, especially, the progress in the application of tDCS have made it possible to obtain longer and much clearer inhibitory or facilitatory effects even after the stimulation has ceased. In this introductory review, we outline the basic principles, discuss technical limitations and describe how noninvasive brain stimulation can be used to study human memory functions in vivo. Though improvement of cognitive functions through noninvasive brain stimulation is promising, it still remains an exciting challenge to extend the use of TMS and tDCS from research tools in neuroscience to the treatment of neurological and psychiatric patients.

  7. Modulating the brain at work using noninvasive transcranial stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, R Andy; Bridges, Nathaniel; Walters, Craig M; Nelson, Jeremy

    2012-01-02

    This paper proposes a shift in the way researchers currently view and use transcranial brain stimulation technologies. From a neuroscience perspective, the standard application of both transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been mainly to explore the function of various brain regions. These tools allow for noninvasive and painless modulation of cortical tissue. In the course of studying the function of an area, many studies often report enhanced performance of a task during or following the stimulation. However, little follow-up research is typically done to further explore these effects. Approaching this growing pool of cognitive neuroscience literature with a neuroergonomics mindset (i.e., studying the brain at work), the possibilities of using these stimulation techniques for more than simply investigating the function of cortical areas become evident. In this paper, we discuss how cognitive neuroscience brain stimulation studies may complement neuroergonomics research on human performance optimization. And, through this discussion, we hope to shift the mindset of viewing transcranial stimulation techniques as solely investigatory basic science tools or possible clinical therapeutic devices to viewing transcranial stimulation techniques as interventional tools to be incorporated in applied science research and systems for the augmentation and enhancement of human operator performance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Combining non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation with neuroimaging and electrophysiology: Current approaches and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Til Ole; Karabanov, Anke; Hartwigsen, Gesa

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial current stimulation (TCS) are important tools in human systems and cognitive neuroscience because they are able to reveal the relevance of certain brain structures...... are technically demanding. We argue that the benefit from this combination is twofold. Firstly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can inform subsequent NTBS, providing the required information to optimize where, when, and how to stimulate the brain. Information can be achieved both before and during the NTBS...... experiment, requiring consecutive and concurrent applications, respectively. Secondly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can provide the readout for neural changes induced by NTBS. Again, using either concurrent or consecutive applications, both "online" NTBS effects immediately following the stimulation...

  9. Noninvasive transcranial stimulation of rat abducens nerve by focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungmin; Taghados, Seyed Javid; Fischer, Krisztina; Maeng, Lee-So; Park, Shinsuk; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2012-09-01

    Nonpharmacologic and nonsurgical transcranial modulation of the nerve function may provide new opportunities in evaluation and treatment of cranial nerve diseases. This study investigates the possibility of using low-intensity transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) to selectively stimulate the rat abducens nerve located above the base of the skull. FUS (frequencies of 350 kHz and 650 kHz) operating in a pulsed mode was applied to the abducens nerve of Sprague-Dawley rats under stereotactic guidance. The abductive eyeball movement ipsilateral to the side of sonication was observed at 350 kHz, using the 0.36-msec tone burst duration (TBD), 1.5-kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and the overall sonication duration of 200 msec. Histologic and behavioral monitoring showed no signs of disruption in the blood brain barrier (BBB), as well as no damage to the nerves and adjacent brain tissue resulting from the sonication. As a novel functional neuro-modulatory modality, the pulsed application of FUS has potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: A potential therapy for cognitive disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhaud, C; Sherrard, R M; Belmin, J

    2017-03-01

    Considering the limited effectiveness of drugs treatments in cognitive disorders, the emergence of noninvasive techniques to modify brain function is very interesting. Among these techniques, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can modulate cortical excitability and have potential therapeutic effects on cognition and behaviour. These effects are due to physiological modifications in the stimulated cortical tissue and their associated circuits, which depend on the parameters of stimulation. The objective of this article is to specify current knowledge and efficacy of rTMS in cognitive disorders. Previous studies found very encouraging results with significant improvement of higher brain functions. Nevertheless, these few studies have limits: a few patients were enrolled, the lack of control of the mechanisms of action by brain imaging, insufficiently formalized technique and variability of cognitive tests. It is therefore necessary to perform more studies, which identify statistical significant improvement and to specify underlying mechanisms of action and the parameters of use of the rTMS to offer rTMS as a routine therapy for cognitive dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The potential of transcranial photobiomodulation therapy for treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Farzad; Rasta, Seyed Hossein

    2017-05-24

    Major depressive disorder is a common debilitating mood disorder that affects quality of life. Prefrontal cortex abnormalities, an imbalance in neurotransmitters, neuroinflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction are the major factors in the etiology of major depressive disorder. Despite the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder, 30%-40% of patients do not respond to antidepressants. Given this, exploring the alternative therapies for treatment or prevention of major depressive disorder has aroused interest among scientists. Transcranial photobiomodulation therapy is the use of low-power lasers and light-emitting diodes in the far-red to near-infrared optical region for stimulation of neuronal activities. This non-invasive modality improves the metabolic capacity of neurons due to more oxygen consumption and ATP production. Beneficial effects of transcranial photobiomodulation therapy in the wide range of neurological and psychological disorders have been already shown. In this review, we focus on some issue relating to the application of photobiomodulation therapy for major depressive disorder. There is some evidence that transcranial photobiomodulation therapy using near-infrared light on 10-Hz pulsed mode appears to be a hopeful technique for treatment of major depressive disorder. However, further studies are necessary to find the safety of this method and to determine its effective treatment protocol.

  12. Noninvasive transcranial focal stimulation via tripolar concentric ring electrodes lessens behavioral seizure activity of recurrent pentylenetetrazole administrations in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Liu, Xiang; Besio, Walter G

    2013-05-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 1% of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We have been developing a noninvasive transcranial focal electrical stimulation with our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes as an alternative/complementary therapy for seizure control. In this study we demonstrate the effect of focal stimulation on behavioral seizure activity induced by two successive pentylenetetrazole administrations in rats. Seizure onset latency, time of the first behavioral change, duration of seizure, and maximal seizure severity score were studied and compared for focal stimulation treated (n = 9) and control groups (n = 10). First, we demonstrate that no significant difference was found in behavioral activity for focal stimulation treated and control groups after the first pentylenetetrazole administration. Next, comparing first and second pentylenetetrazole administrations, we demonstrate there was a significant change in behavioral activity (time of the first behavioral change) in both groups that was not related to focal stimulation. Finally, we demonstrate focal stimulation provoking a significant change in seizure onset latency, duration of seizure, and maximal seizure severity score. We believe that these results, combined with our previous reports, suggest that transcranial focal stimulation may have an anticonvulsant effect.

  13. Combining non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation with neuroimaging and electrophysiology: Current approaches and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Til Ole; Karabanov, Anke; Hartwigsen, Gesa; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-10-15

    Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial current stimulation (TCS) are important tools in human systems and cognitive neuroscience because they are able to reveal the relevance of certain brain structures or neuronal activity patterns for a given brain function. It is nowadays feasible to combine NTBS, either consecutively or concurrently, with a variety of neuroimaging and electrophysiological techniques. Here we discuss what kind of information can be gained from combined approaches, which often are technically demanding. We argue that the benefit from this combination is twofold. Firstly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can inform subsequent NTBS, providing the required information to optimize where, when, and how to stimulate the brain. Information can be achieved both before and during the NTBS experiment, requiring consecutive and concurrent applications, respectively. Secondly, neuroimaging and electrophysiology can provide the readout for neural changes induced by NTBS. Again, using either concurrent or consecutive applications, both "online" NTBS effects immediately following the stimulation and "offline" NTBS effects outlasting plasticity-inducing NTBS protocols can be assessed. Finally, both strategies can be combined to close the loop between measuring and modulating brain activity by means of closed-loop brain state-dependent NTBS. In this paper, we will provide a conceptual framework, emphasizing principal strategies and highlighting promising future directions to exploit the benefits of combining NTBS with neuroimaging or electrophysiology. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A new brain stimulation method: Noninvasive transcranial magneto–acoustical stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Yi; Chen Yu-Dong; Li Xiao-Li

    2016-01-01

    We investigate transcranial magneto–acoustical stimulation (TMAS) for noninvasive brain neuromodulation in vivo. TMAS as a novel technique uses an ultrasound wave to induce an electric current in the brain tissue in the static magnetic field. It has the advantage of high spatial resolution and penetration depth. The mechanism of TMAS onto a neuron is analyzed by combining the TMAS principle and Hodgkin–Huxley neuron model. The anesthetized rats are stimulated by TMAS, resulting in the local field potentials which are recorded and analyzed. The simulation results show that TMAS can induce neuronal action potential. The experimental results indicate that TMAS can not only increase the amplitude of local field potentials but also enhance the effect of focused ultrasound stimulation on the neuromodulation. In summary, TMAS can accomplish brain neuromodulation, suggesting a potentially powerful noninvasive stimulation method to interfere with brain rhythms for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. (paper)

  15. [Optimization of enuresis therapy in children using transcranial magnetotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otpushchennikova, T V; Kazanskaia, I V; Volkov, S V; Raĭgorodskaia, Iu M

    2010-01-01

    A total of 58 children (age from 6 to 14 years) suffering from nocturnal enuresis (NE) were divided into two groups. The study group received basic therapy (driptan dose was reduced to 2.5 mg twice a day) in combination with transcranial bitemporal magnetotherapy (TcMT). The control group received placebo TcMT and basic therapy. It is shown that addition of TcMT to reduced basic therapy lowered the score of imperative voiding symptoms 1.3-fold, number of enuresis patients 1.7-fold, volume of the bladder 6.8 months after the treatment 1.9-fold, corrected vegetative status and activity of the subcortical nervous center in 24% children according to cardiointervalography versus the controls. Thus, TcMT improves clinical effect in NE patients in 2-fold reduction of pharmacological burden.

  16. Using non-invasive transcranial stimulation to improve motor and cognitive function in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwill, Alicia M; Lum, Jarrad A G; Hendy, Ashlee M; Muthalib, Makii; Johnson, Liam; Albein-Urios, Natalia; Teo, Wei-Peng

    2017-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor and cognitive abilities. There is no cure for PD, therefore identifying safe therapies to alleviate symptoms remains a priority. This meta-analysis quantified the effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) to improve motor and cognitive dysfunction in PD. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Google Scholar, Scopus, Library of Congress and Cochrane library were searched. 24 rTMS and 9 TES studies (n = 33) with a sham control group were included for analyses. The Physiotherapy Evidence Database and Cochrane Risk of Bias showed high quality (7.5/10) and low bias with included studies respectively. Our results showed an overall positive effect in favour of rTMS (SMD = 0.394, CI [0.106-0.683], p = 0.007) and TES (SMD = 0.611, CI [0.188-1.035], p = 0.005) compared with sham stimulation on motor function, with no significant differences detected between rTMS and TES (Q [1] = 0.69, p = 0.406). Neither rTMS nor TES improved cognition. No effects for stimulation parameters on motor or cognitive function were observed. To enhance the clinical utility of non-invasive brain stimulation (NBS), individual prescription of stimulation parameters based upon symptomology and resting excitability state should be a priority of future research.

  17. [Effectiveness of transcranial magnetic therapy in the complex treatment of alcohol abstinent syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staroverov, A T; Zhukov, O B; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M

    2008-01-01

    Fifty-four abstinent alcohol-dependent patients have been studied. Twenty-nine patients (a main group) received, along with basic therapy, a physiotherapeutic treatment (transcranial dynamic magnetic therapy) and 25 patients (a control group) received only basic therapy. The comparison of the efficacy of treatment in patients of the main and control groups revealed the benefits of transcranial dynamic magnetic therapy in CNS function, performance on memory and attention tests, state of autonomic nervous system and psychoemotional state of patients (the reduction of anxiety and depression).

  18. Synergistic effect of combined transcranial direct current stimulation/constraint-induced movement therapy in children and young adults with hemiparesis: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillick, Bernadette; Menk, Jeremiah; Mueller, Bryon; Meekins, Gregg; Krach, Linda E; Feyma, Timothy; Rudser, Kyle

    2015-11-12

    Perinatal stroke occurs in more than 1 in 2,500 live births and resultant congenital hemiparesis necessitates investigation into interventions which may improve long-term function and decreased burden of care beyond current therapies ( http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/cp/data.html ). Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) is recognized as an effective hemiparesis rehabilitation intervention. Transcranial direct current stimulation as an adjunct treatment to CIMT may potentiate neuroplastic responses and improve motor function. The methodology of a clinical trial in children designed as a placebo-controlled, serial -session, non-invasive brain stimulation trial incorporating CIMT is described here. The primary hypotheses are 1) that no serious adverse events will occur in children receiving non-invasive brain stimulation and 2) that children in the stimulation intervention group will show significant improvements in hand motor function compared to children in the placebo stimulation control group. A randomized, controlled, double-blinded clinical trial. Twenty children and/or young adults (ages 8-21) with congenital hemiparesis, will be enrolled. The intervention group will receive ten 2-hour sessions of transcranial direct current stimulation combined with constraint-induced movement therapy and the control group will receive sham stimulation with CIMT. The primary outcome measure is safety assessment of transcranial direct current stimulation by physician evaluation, vital sign monitoring and symptom reports. Additionally, hand function will be evaluated using the Assisting Hand Assessment, grip strength and assessment of goals using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Neuroimaging will confirm diagnoses, corticospinal tract integrity and cortical activation. Motor cortical excitability will also be examined using transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques. Combining non-invasive brain stimulation and CIMT interventions has the potential to improve motor

  19. The Role of Noninvasive Techniques in Stroke Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Maxwell Bernad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS have provided insight into understanding how neural connections are altered in consequence to cerebrovascular injury. The first part of this review will briefly survey some of the methodological issues and limitations related to noninvasive poststroke motor recovery studies. The second section will investigate some of the different neural mechanisms that underlie neurorehabilitation in stroke patients. The third part will explore our current understanding of motor memory processing, describe the neural structures that subserve motor memory consolidation, and discuss the current literature related to memory reconsolidation in healthy adults. Lastly, this paper will suggest the potential therapeutic applications of integrating noninvasive tools with memory consolidation and reconsolidation theories to enhance motor recovery. The overall objective of this work is to demonstrate how noninvasive technologies have been utilized in the multidisciplinary field of clinical behavioral neuroscience and to highlight their potential to be employed as clinical tools to promote individualized motor recovery in stroke patients.

  20. Ex vivo optimisation of a heterogeneous speed of sound model of the human skull for non-invasive transcranial focused ultrasound at 1 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, L; Chauvet, D; La Greca, R; Boch, A-L; Chaumoitre, K; Tanter, M; Aubry, J-F

    2017-09-01

    Transcranial brain therapy has recently emerged as a non-invasive strategy for the treatment of various neurological diseases, such as essential tremor or neurogenic pain. However, treatments require millimetre-scale accuracy. The use of high frequencies (typically ≥1 MHz) decreases the ultrasonic wavelength to the millimetre scale, thereby increasing the clinical accuracy and lowering the probability of cavitation, which improves the safety of the technique compared with the use of low-frequency devices that operate at 220 kHz. Nevertheless, the skull produces greater distortions of high-frequency waves relative to low-frequency waves. High-frequency waves require high-performance adaptive focusing techniques, based on modelling the wave propagation through the skull. This study sought to optimise the acoustical modelling of the skull based on computed tomography (CT) for a 1 MHz clinical brain therapy system. The best model tested in this article corresponded to a maximum speed of sound of 4000 m.s -1 in the skull bone, and it restored 86% of the optimal pressure amplitude on average in a collection of six human skulls. Compared with uncorrected focusing, the optimised non-invasive correction led to an average increase of 99% in the maximum pressure amplitude around the target and an average decrease of 48% in the distance between the peak pressure and the selected target. The attenuation through the skulls was also assessed within the bandwidth of the transducers, and it was found to vary in the range of 10 ± 3 dB at 800 kHz and 16 ± 3 dB at 1.3 MHz.

  1. Toward a noninvasive automatic seizure control system in rats with transcranial focal stimulations via tripolar concentric ring electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Liu, Xiang; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mucio-Ramirez, Samuel; Liu, Yuhong; Sun, Yan L; Kay, Steven M; Besio, Walter G

    2012-07-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately 1% of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We are developing a noninvasive, or minimally invasive, transcranial focal electrical stimulation system through our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes to control seizures. In this study, we demonstrate feasibility of an automatic seizure control system in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures through single and multiple stimulations. These stimulations are automatically triggered by a real-time electrographic seizure activity detector based on a disjunctive combination of detections from a cumulative sum algorithm and a generalized likelihood ratio test. An average seizure onset detection accuracy of 76.14% was obtained for the test set (n = 13). Detection of electrographic seizure activity was accomplished in advance of the early behavioral seizure activity in 76.92% of the cases. Automatically triggered stimulation significantly (p = 0.001) reduced the electrographic seizure activity power in the once stimulated group compared to controls in 70% of the cases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first closed-loop automatic seizure control system based on noninvasive electrical brain stimulation using tripolar concentric ring electrode electrographic seizure activity as feedback.

  2. Non-invasive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS of the Motor Cortex for Neuropathic Pain—At the Tipping Point?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roi Treister

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The term “neuropathic pain” (NP refers to chronic pain caused by illnesses or injuries that damage peripheral or central pain-sensing neural pathways to cause them to fire inappropriately and signal pain without cause. Neuropathic pain is common, complicating diabetes, shingles, HIV, and cancer. Medications are often ineffective or cause various adverse effects, so better approaches are needed. Half a century ago, electrical stimulation of specific brain regions (neuromodulation was demonstrated to relieve refractory NP without distant effects, but the need for surgical electrode implantation limited use of deep brain stimulation. Next, electrodes applied to the dura outside the brain’s surface to stimulate the motor cortex were shown to relieve NP less invasively. Now, electromagnetic induction permits cortical neurons to be stimulated entirely non-invasively using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS. Repeated sessions of many TMS pulses (rTMS can trigger neuronal plasticity to produce long-lasting therapeutic benefit. Repeated TMS already has US and European regulatory approval for treating refractory depression, and multiple small studies report efficacy for neuropathic pain. Recent improvements include “frameless stereotactic” neuronavigation systems, in which patients’ head MRIs allow TMS to be applied to precise underlying cortical targets, minimizing variability between sessions and patients, which may enhance efficacy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation appears poised for the larger trials necessary for regulatory approval of a NP indication. Since few clinicians are familiar with TMS, we review its theoretical basis and historical development, summarize the neuropathic pain trial results, and identify issues to resolve before large-scale clinical trials.

  3. Postgraduate education in noninvasive laser therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navratil, Leos; Kymplova, Jaroslava; Navratilova, Blanka

    2002-10-01

    Non-invasive lasertherapy became today an appreciated treatment method. To avoid its degradation, it is necessary that every physician, who indicates it, would pass out the basic course in these problems. So the error danger by its application would be reduced. As we have verified, in every country the education process is different; we don't consider this fact as right. In the Czech Republic the Radiobiologic Society of Czech Medical Society J. E. Purkynje in co-operation with the Institute of Further Physician's Education, having wide experiences in postgraduate education, organizes already five years such courses. The basic course has 20 lessons, in which the graduates are acquainted with physical base of laser, hygienic rulings for working with laser and biologic changes induced by low level laser in the tissue in vivo. A considerable attention is dedicated to clinical practice and practical education on clinical departments in the fields of dermatology, physiotherapy, stomatology and gynaecology. This course is completed with a lecture of the recent marketing in health service. Participants document their knowledge's in the closing test. Every physician can perfect his knowledge's in a continuation course. Our experiences proved that the education in phototherapy in Czech Republic is on high level in comparison with number of other countries.

  4. Combined noninvasive language mapping by navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional MRI and its comparison with direct cortical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ille, Sebastian; Sollmann, Nico; Hauck, Theresa; Maurer, Stefanie; Tanigawa, Noriko; Obermueller, Thomas; Negwer, Chiara; Droese, Doris; Zimmer, Claus; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2015-07-01

    Repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is now increasingly used for preoperative language mapping in patients with lesions in language-related areas of the brain. Yet its correlation with intraoperative direct cortical stimulation (DCS) has to be improved. To increase rTMS's specificity and positive predictive value, the authors aim to provide thresholds for rTMS's positive language areas. Moreover, they propose a protocol for combining rTMS with functional MRI (fMRI) to combine the strength of both methods. The authors performed multimodal language mapping in 35 patients with left-sided perisylvian lesions by using rTMS, fMRI, and DCS. The rTMS mappings were conducted with a picture-to-trigger interval (PTI, time between stimulus presentation and stimulation onset) of either 0 or 300 msec. The error rates (ERs; that is, the number of errors per number of stimulations) were calculated for each region of the cortical parcellation system (CPS). Subsequently, the rTMS mappings were analyzed through different error rate thresholds (ERT; that is, the ER at which a CPS region was defined as language positive in terms of rTMS), and the 2-out-of-3 rule (a stimulation site was defined as language positive in terms of rTMS if at least 2 out of 3 stimulations caused an error). As a second step, the authors combined the results of fMRI and rTMS in a predefined protocol of combined noninvasive mapping. To validate this noninvasive protocol, they correlated its results to DCS during awake surgery. The analysis by different rTMS ERTs obtained the highest correlation regarding sensitivity and a low rate of false positives for the ERTs of 15%, 20%, 25%, and the 2-out-of-3 rule. However, when comparing the combined fMRI and rTMS results with DCS, the authors observed an overall specificity of 83%, a positive predictive value of 51%, a sensitivity of 98%, and a negative predictive value of 95%. In comparison with fMRI, rTMS is a more sensitive but less specific

  5. Non-invasive mapping of calculation function by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Stefanie; Tanigawa, Noriko; Sollmann, Nico; Hauck, Theresa; Ille, Sebastian; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-11-01

    Concerning calculation function, studies have already reported on localizing computational function in patients and volunteers by functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation. However, the development of accurate repetitive navigated TMS (rTMS) with a considerably higher spatial resolution opens a new field in cognitive neuroscience. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the feasibility of rTMS for locating cortical calculation function in healthy volunteers, and to establish this technique for future scientific applications as well as preoperative mapping in brain tumor patients. Twenty healthy subjects underwent rTMS calculation mapping using 5 Hz/10 pulses. Fifty-two previously determined cortical spots of the whole hemispheres were stimulated on both sides. The subjects were instructed to perform the calculation task composed of 80 simple arithmetic operations while rTMS pulses were applied. The highest error rate (80 %) for all errors of all subjects was observed in the right ventral precentral gyrus. Concerning division task, a 45 % error rate was achieved in the left middle frontal gyrus. The subtraction task showed its highest error rate (40 %) in the right angular gyrus (anG). In the addition task a 35 % error rate was observed in the left anterior superior temporal gyrus. Lastly, the multiplication task induced a maximum error rate of 30 % in the left anG. rTMS seems feasible as a way to locate cortical calculation function. Besides language function, the cortical localizations are well in accordance with the current literature for other modalities or lesion studies.

  6. Non-invasive mapping of bilateral motor speech areas using navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könönen, Mervi; Tamsi, Niko; Säisänen, Laura; Kemppainen, Samuli; Määttä, Sara; Julkunen, Petro; Jutila, Leena; Äikiä, Marja; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Niskanen, Eini; Vanninen, Ritva; Karjalainen, Pasi; Mervaala, Esa

    2015-06-15

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is a modern precise method to activate and study cortical functions noninvasively. We hypothesized that a combination of nTMS and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) could clarify the localization of functional areas involved with motor control and production of speech. Navigated repetitive TMS (rTMS) with short bursts was used to map speech areas on both hemispheres by inducing speech disruption during number recitation tasks in healthy volunteers. Two experienced video reviewers, blinded to the stimulated area, graded each trial offline according to possible speech disruption. The locations of speech disrupting nTMS trials were overlaid with fMRI activations of word generation task. Speech disruptions were produced on both hemispheres by nTMS, though there were more disruptive stimulation sites on the left hemisphere. Grade of the disruptions varied from subjective sensation to mild objectively recognizable disruption up to total speech arrest. The distribution of locations in which speech disruptions could be elicited varied among individuals. On the left hemisphere the locations of disturbing rTMS bursts with reviewers' verification followed the areas of fMRI activation. Similar pattern was not observed on the right hemisphere. The reviewer-verified speech disruptions induced by nTMS provided clinically relevant information, and fMRI might explain further the function of the cortical area. nTMS and fMRI complement each other, and their combination should be advocated when assessing individual localization of speech network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Posterior Cerebral Artery and its Main Cortical Branches Identified with Noninvasive Transcranial Color-Coded Duplex Sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, P E; Schreiber, S J; Pade, O; Doepp, F; Valdueza, J

    2015-11-01

    To differentiate PCA segments and cortical branches by means of transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (TCCD) and to measure flow parameters at rest and during visual stimulation. 60 healthy subjects with a good acoustic temporal bone window were examined. The main stem of the PCA (P1, P2 and P3) and 4 main cortical branches - the anterior temporal artery (ATA), the occipital temporal artery (OTA), the parietooccipital artery (POA) and the calcarine artery (CA) - were assessed using an axial transtemporal approach. Systolic and diastolic blood flow velocities (BFVs) were recorded at rest and during visual stimulation. Identification of the P1 segment of the PCA was successful in 97.5% (117/120) of cases. The P2 and P3 segments were visualized in all cases. The 4 main cortical branches could be identified to varying degrees: ATA in 88%, OTA in 96%, POA in 69% and CA in 62%. There was an evoked flow response in the P2 main stem and in all cortical branches. The most pronounced increase in diastolic/systolic BFV after visual stimulation test was seen in the CA (42%/35%), followed by P2 (30%/24%), the POA (27%/27%), the OTA (16%/13%) and the ATA (9%/8%). Insonation through the temporal bone window with TCCD confidently allows the assessment of the P1 to P3 segments of the PCA as well as the 2 proximal branches, the ATA and the OTA. An ultrasound-based classification of PCA anatomy and its cortical branches may be used as a noninvasive method for the evaluation of posterior circulation pathology.

  8. [Possibilities of transcranial magnetic therapy and color and rhythm therapy in rehabilitation of ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholomov, I I; Cherevashchenko, L A; Suprunov, O V; Raĭgorondskiĭ, Iu M

    2009-01-01

    One hundred and sixteen post-stroke patients were studied in the early rehabilitation period. All patients were divided into 4 groups: 3 main and 1 control groups. Three main groups (87 patients) received transcranial magnetic therapy (TMT) and/or color and rhythm therapy (CRT) along with traditional treatment and the control group (29 patients) received only basic therapy. TMT was conducted using bitemporal technique, running regime with modulation frequency 1-10 Hz. In CRT, the alternating stimulation of the right and left eye with green and/or blue color with a period of 2-4 s and duration of luminescence 1s was applied. Each of 3 main groups received 2 treatment sessions with an interval of 1,5 month (1st - TMT, 2nd - CRT, 3rd - TMT + CRT). After the treatment, the marked positive changes were seen in all main groups, in particular in group 3. The improvement of neurologic symptoms on the B. Lindmark scale was higher by 9,5% in group 3 compared to the control one, on the Barthel index - by 8,8%, on MMSE and A. Luria and Schulte test - by 5,4 and 14,3%, respectively. Rheographic and encephalographic study revealed the significant improvement of hemodynamics and alpha-rhythm differentiation, decrease of patients with dysrhythmia by 14,6% in group 3 as compared to the control group. The best results were seen in the combination of TMT and CRT, TMT exerted a higher effect on the hemodynamics and CRT - on the psychoemotional state. Both therapies were well tolerated and had no side-effects.

  9. Non-invasive anesthesia for children undergoing proton radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owusu-Agyemang, Pascal; Grosshans, David; Arunkumar, Radha; Rebello, Elizabeth; Popovich, Shannon; Zavala, Acsa; Williams, Cynthia; Ruiz, Javier; Hernandez, Mike; Mahajan, Anita; Porche, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proton therapy is a newer modality of radiotherapy during which anesthesiologists face specific challenges related to the setup and duration of treatment sessions. Purpose: Describe our anesthesia practice for children treated in a standalone proton therapy center, and report on complications encountered during anesthesia. Materials and methods: A retrospective review of anesthetic records for patients ⩽18 years of age treated with proton therapy at our institution between January 2006 and April 2013 was performed. Results: A total of 9328 anesthetics were administered to 340 children with a median age of 3.6 years (range, 0.4–14.2). The median daily anesthesia time was 47 min (range, 15–79). The average time between start of anesthesia to the start of radiotherapy was 7.2 min (range, 1–83 min). All patients received Total Intravenous Anesthesia (TIVA) with spontaneous ventilation, with 96.7% receiving supplemental oxygen by non-invasive methods. None required daily endotracheal intubation. Two episodes of bradycardia, and one episode each of; seizure, laryngospasm and bronchospasm were identified for a cumulative incidence of 0.05%. Conclusions: In this large series of children undergoing proton therapy at a freestanding center, TIVA without daily endotracheal intubation provided a safe, efficient, and less invasive option of anesthetic care

  10. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Mark

    2000-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is rapidly developing as a powerful, non-invasive tool for studying the human brain. A pulsed magnetic field creates current flow in the brain and can temporarily excite or inhibit specific areas. TMS of motor cortex can produce a muscle twitch or block movement; TMS of occipital cortex can produce visual phosphenes or scotomas. TMS can also alter the functioning of the brain beyond the time of stimulation, offering potential for therapy.

  11. Sensorimotor plasticity after music-supported therapy in chronic stroke patients revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julià L Amengual

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several recently developed therapies targeting motor disabilities in stroke sufferers have shown to be more effective than standard neurorehabilitation approaches. In this context, several basic studies demonstrated that music training produces rapid neuroplastic changes in motor-related brain areas. Music-supported therapy has been recently developed as a new motor rehabilitation intervention. METHODS AND RESULTS: In order to explore the plasticity effects of music-supported therapy, this therapeutic intervention was applied to twenty chronic stroke patients. Before and after the music-supported therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied for the assessment of excitability changes in the motor cortex and a 3D movement analyzer was used for the assessment of motor performance parameters such as velocity, acceleration and smoothness in a set of diadochokinetic movement tasks. Our results suggest that the music-supported therapy produces changes in cortical plasticity leading the improvement of the subjects' motor performance. CONCLUSION: Our findings represent the first evidence of the neurophysiological changes induced by this therapy in chronic stroke patients, and their link with the amelioration of motor performance. Further studies are needed to confirm our observations.

  12. Sensorimotor plasticity after music-supported therapy in chronic stroke patients revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amengual, Julià L; Rojo, Nuria; Veciana de Las Heras, Misericordia; Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Schneider, Sabine; Vaquero, Lucía; Juncadella, Montserrat; Montero, Jordi; Mohammadi, Bahram; Rubio, Francisco; Rueda, Nohora; Duarte, Esther; Grau, Carles; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münte, Thomas F; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Several recently developed therapies targeting motor disabilities in stroke sufferers have shown to be more effective than standard neurorehabilitation approaches. In this context, several basic studies demonstrated that music training produces rapid neuroplastic changes in motor-related brain areas. Music-supported therapy has been recently developed as a new motor rehabilitation intervention. In order to explore the plasticity effects of music-supported therapy, this therapeutic intervention was applied to twenty chronic stroke patients. Before and after the music-supported therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied for the assessment of excitability changes in the motor cortex and a 3D movement analyzer was used for the assessment of motor performance parameters such as velocity, acceleration and smoothness in a set of diadochokinetic movement tasks. Our results suggest that the music-supported therapy produces changes in cortical plasticity leading the improvement of the subjects' motor performance. Our findings represent the first evidence of the neurophysiological changes induced by this therapy in chronic stroke patients, and their link with the amelioration of motor performance. Further studies are needed to confirm our observations.

  13. Sensorimotor Plasticity after Music-Supported Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients Revealed by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amengual, Julià L.; Rojo, Nuria; Veciana de las Heras, Misericordia; Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Schneider, Sabine; Vaquero, Lucía; Juncadella, Montserrat; Montero, Jordi; Mohammadi, Bahram; Rubio, Francisco; Rueda, Nohora; Duarte, Esther; Grau, Carles; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münte, Thomas F.; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Background Several recently developed therapies targeting motor disabilities in stroke sufferers have shown to be more effective than standard neurorehabilitation approaches. In this context, several basic studies demonstrated that music training produces rapid neuroplastic changes in motor-related brain areas. Music-supported therapy has been recently developed as a new motor rehabilitation intervention. Methods and Results In order to explore the plasticity effects of music-supported therapy, this therapeutic intervention was applied to twenty chronic stroke patients. Before and after the music-supported therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied for the assessment of excitability changes in the motor cortex and a 3D movement analyzer was used for the assessment of motor performance parameters such as velocity, acceleration and smoothness in a set of diadochokinetic movement tasks. Our results suggest that the music-supported therapy produces changes in cortical plasticity leading the improvement of the subjects' motor performance. Conclusion Our findings represent the first evidence of the neurophysiological changes induced by this therapy in chronic stroke patients, and their link with the amelioration of motor performance. Further studies are needed to confirm our observations. PMID:23613966

  14. Outcomes in spasticity after repetitive transcranial magnetic and transcranial direct current stimulations

    OpenAIRE

    Gunduz, Aysegul; Kumru, Hatice; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulations mainly consist of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation exhibits satisfactory outcomes in improving multiple sclerosis, stroke, spinal cord injury and cerebral palsy-induced spasticity. By contrast, transcranial direct current stimulation has only been studied in post-stroke spasticity. To better validate the efficacy of non-invasive brain stimulations in improving ...

  15. Mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease is improved by transcranial direct current stimulation combined with physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenti, Rosa; Brambilla, Michela; Benussi, Alberto; Rosini, Sandra; Cobelli, Chiara; Ferrari, Clarissa; Petesi, Michela; Orizio, Italo; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara; Cotelli, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by both motor and cognitive deficits. In PD, physical exercise has been found to improve physical functioning. Recent studies demonstrated that repeated sessions of transcranial direct current stimulation led to an increased performance in cognitive and motor tasks in patients with PD. The present study investigated the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation applied over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and combined with physical therapy in PD patients. A total of 20 patients with PD were assigned to 1 of 2 study groups: group 1, anodal transcranial direct current stimulation plus physical therapy (n = 10) or group 2, placebo transcranial direct current stimulation plus physical therapy (n = 10). The 2 weeks of treatment consisted of daily direct current stimulation application for 25 minutes during physical therapy. Long-term effects of treatment were evaluated on clinical, neuropsychological, and motor task performance at 3-month follow-up. An improvement in motor abilities and a reduction of depressive symptoms were observed in both groups after the end of treatment and at 3-month follow-up. The Parkinson's Disease Cognitive Rating Scale and verbal fluency test performances increased only in the anodal direct current stimulation group with a stable effect at follow-up. The application of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation may be a relevant tool to improve cognitive abilities in PD and might be a novel therapeutic strategy for PD patients with mild cognitive impairment. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. [Transcranial magnetic therapy in the treatment of psychoautonomous disturbances in children with diabetes mellitus type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filina, N Iu; Bolotova, N V; Manukian, V Iu; Nikolaeva, N V; Kompaniets, O V

    2009-01-01

    Results of a clinical-physiological study of 80 children with diabetes mellitus type 1 with psychoautonomous disturbances are presented. Forty patients of the main group received transcranial magnetic therapy (TcMT), 40 patients of the control group had placebo sessions of TcMT with magnetic power supply switched off. TcMT was applied using bitemporal method, running regime with modulation frequency 1-10 Hz. Patients received 10 sessions. Positive changes were found in the main group compared to the controls. In the main group, TcMT sessions allowed to normalize the autonomous status in 75% of children and to improve psychoemotional state in 55%. The correction of psychoemotional status of children changed their behavior towards diabetes, improved control and compensation of the disease.

  17. A multi-frequency sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lulu; O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Jones, Ryan M; An, Ran; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-12-21

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) phased arrays show promise for non-invasive brain therapy. However, the majority of them are limited to a single transmit/receive frequency and therefore lack the versatility to expose and monitor the treatment volume. Multi-frequency arrays could offer variable transmit focal sizes under a fixed aperture, and detect different spectral content on receive for imaging purposes. Here, a three-frequency (306, 612, and 1224 kHz) sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array (31.8 cm aperture; 128 transducer modules) was constructed and evaluated for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping. The array is able to perform effective electronic beam steering over a volume spanning (-40, 40) and (-30, 50) mm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. The focal size at the geometric center is approximately 0.9 (2.1) mm, 1.7 (3.9) mm, and 3.1 (6.5) mm in lateral (axial) pressure full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 1224, 612, and 306 kHz, respectively. The array was also found capable of dual-frequency excitation and simultaneous multi-foci sonication, which enables the future exploration of more complex exposure strategies. Passive acoustic mapping of dilute microbubble clouds demonstrated that the point spread function of the receive array has a lateral (axial) intensity FWHM between 0.8-3.5 mm (1.7-11.7 mm) over a volume spanning (-25, 25) mm in both the lateral and axial directions, depending on the transmit/receive frequency combination and the imaging location. The device enabled both half and second harmonic imaging through the intact skull, which may be useful for improving the contrast-to-tissue ratio or imaging resolution, respectively. Preliminary in vivo experiments demonstrated the system's ability to induce blood-brain barrier opening and simultaneously spatially map microbubble cavitation activity in a rat model. This work presents a tool to investigate optimal strategies for non

  18. [The peculiarities of the application of transcranial magnetic therapy and electrical stimulation for the treatment of the patients presenting with various types of stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, E A

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the results of the authors' research, including analysis of the clinical and instrumental data concerning 203 patients with, stroke are presented. It is shown that the clinical effectiveness of the transcranial methods incorporated in the combined rehabilitation programs depends on the type of stroke and localization of the lesions. Specifically, the patients presenting with ischemic stroke of hemispheric localization experienced a neurophysiologically confirmed significant clinical improvement that became apparent after the consistent application of transcranial magnetic therapy and micropolarization. In the patients with ischemic stroke of stem localization, the positive influence on psychomotor recovery was achieved with the application of transcranial magnetic therapy, but transcranial micropolarization did not have an appreciable effect on the recovery of such patients. The patients presenting with hemorrhagic stroke did not experience any significant improvement of psychomotor parameters from transcranial magnetic therapy and transcranial micropolarization. The likely mechanism underlying the recovery of psychomotor processes under effect of transcranial magnetic therapy in the patients with ischemic stroke is the normalization of the frequency of interaction between brain structures. In addition, in the patients with ischemic stroke of hemispheric localization and in the patients with hemorrhagic stroke electrical myostimulation has a marked impact on the psychomotor recovery only in case of functional treatment. In the patients suffering from ischemic stroke of stem localization non-functional electromyostimulation significantly improves motor functions and cognitive motor control.

  19. Modulation of Brain Activity with Noninvasive Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): Clinical Applications and Safety Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haichao; Qiao, Lei; Fan, Dongqiong; Zhang, Shuyue; Turel, Ofir; Li, Yonghui; Li, Jun; Xue, Gui; Chen, Antao; He, Qinghua

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a widely-used tool to induce neuroplasticity and modulate cortical function by applying weak direct current over the scalp. In this review, we first introduce the underlying mechanism of action, the brief history from discovery to clinical scientific research, electrode positioning and montages, and parameter setup of tDCS. Then, we review tDCS application in clinical samples including people with drug addiction, major depression disorder, Alzheimer's disease, as well as in children. This review covers the typical characteristics and the underlying neural mechanisms of tDCS treatment in such studies. This is followed by a discussion of safety, especially when the current intensity is increased or the stimulation duration is prolonged. Given such concerns, we provide detailed suggestions regarding safety procedures for tDCS operation. Lastly, future research directions are discussed. They include foci on the development of multi-tech combination with tDCS such as with TMS and fMRI; long-term behavioral and morphological changes; possible applications in other research domains, and more animal research to deepen the understanding of the biological and physiological mechanisms of tDCS stimulation. PMID:28539894

  20. [Transcranial magnetic therapy in the complex treatment of affective disorders in patients with alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staroverov, A T; Vil'ianov, V B; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Rogozina, M A

    2008-01-01

    A main group--32 patients receiving transcranial magnetic therapy (TMT) in addition to the basic treatment (nootrops, hepatoprotectors, vitamins/minerals etc)--was compared to a control group (30 patients) receiving placebo instead of TMT. All patients, aged from 35 to 64 years, had the second stage of alcoholism with illness duration from 4 to 12 years and were in the postabstinent state at the moment of treatment. The TMT course included 10 daily sessions with a 10-20 min exposure. A somatic, neurological and instrumental study, including cardiointervalography, electroencephalography, assessment of autonomic system state and psychometric scales for depression and anxiety, was conducted before, during and after the therapy. The improvement of health, mood and sleep, increase of tolerability to physical loading and reduction of alcohol craving were observed after TMT in 75% of patients in the main group and in 30% in the control one. The improvement of patient's state was correlated with the data of the paraclinical study (electrophysiological parameters of the autonomic nervous system and psychometric scales scores).

  1. Noninvasive Stimulation of the Human Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Rothwell, John; Capogna, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation methods, such as transcranial electric stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation are widely used tools for both basic research and clinical applications. However, the cortical circuits underlying their effects are poorly defined. Here we review the current...

  2. Transcranial magnetic stimulation primes the effects of exercise therapy in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Francesco; Ljoka, Concetta; Magni, Elisabetta; Codecà, Claudia; Kusayanagi, Hajime; Monteleone, Fabrizia; Sancesario, Andrea; Bernardi, Giorgio; Koch, Giacomo; Foti, Calogero; Centonze, Diego

    2011-07-01

    Exercise therapy (ET) can be beneficial in disabled multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Intermittent transcranial magnetic theta burst stimulation (iTBS) induces long-term excitability changes of the cerebral cortex and may ameliorate spasticity in MS. We investigated whether the combination of iTBS and a program of ET can improve motor disability in MS patients. In a double-blind, sham-controlled trial, 30 participants were randomized to three different interventions: iTBS plus ET, sham stimulation plus ET, and iTBS alone. Before and after 2 weeks of treatment, measures of spasticity through the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and the 88 items Multiple Sclerosis Spasticity Score questionnaire (MSSS-88), fatigue through the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), daily living activities (ADL) through the Barthel index and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) through the 54 items Multiple Sclerosis Quality of life inventory (MSQoL-54) were collected. iTBS plus ET reduced MAS, MSSS-88, FSS scores, while in the Barthel index and MSQoL-54, physical composite scores were increased. iTBS alone caused a reduction of the MAS score, while none of the measured scales showed significant changes after sham iTBS plus ET. iTBS associated with ET is a promising tool for motor rehabilitation of MS patients.

  3. Application and outcomes of therapy combining transcranial direct current stimulation and virtual reality: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massetti, Thais; Crocetta, Tânia Brusque; Silva, Talita Dias da; Trevizan, Isabela Lopes; Arab, Claudia; Caromano, Fátima Aparecida; Monteiro, Carlos Bandeira de Mello

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the methods and major outcomes of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) combined with virtual reality (VR) therapy in randomized controlled trials. A systematic review was performed following PRISMA guidelines using PubMed, PubMed Central, Web of Science and CAPES periodic databases, with no time restriction. The studies were screened for the following inclusion criteria: human subjects, combination of VR and tDCS methods, and randomized controlled study design. All potentially relevant articles were independently reviewed by two researchers, who reached a consensus on which articles met the inclusion criteria. The PEDro scale was used to evaluate the studies. Eleven studies were included, all of which utilized a variety of tDCS and VR application methods. The main outcomes were found to be beneficial in intervention groups of different populations, including improvements in body sway, gait, stroke recovery, pain management and vegetative reactions. The use of tDCS combined with VR showed positive results in both healthy and impaired patients. Future studies with larger sample sizes and homogeneous participants are required to confirm the benefits of tDCS and VR. Implications for Rehabilitation tDCS with VR intervention can be an alternative to traditional rehabilitation programs. tDCS with VR is a promising type of intervention with a variety of positive effects. Application of tDCS with VR is appropriated to both healthy and impaired patients. There is no consensus of tDCS with VR application.

  4. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Therapy in Parkinson Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle Shukla, Aparna; Shuster, Jonathan J; Chung, Jae Woo; Vaillancourt, David E; Patten, Carolynn; Ostrem, Jill; Okun, Michael S

    2016-04-01

    Several studies have reported repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) therapy as an effective treatment for the control of motor symptoms in Parkinson disease. The objective of the study is to quantify the overall efficacy of this treatment. Systematic review and meta-analysis. We reviewed the literature on clinical rTMS trials in Parkinson disease since the technique was introduced in 1980. We used the following databases: MEDLINE, Web of Science, Cochrane, and CINAHL. Patients with Parkinson disease who were participating in prospective clinical trials that included an active arm and a control arm and change in motor scores on Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale as the primary outcome. We pooled data from 21 studies that met these criteria. We then analyzed separately the effects of low- and high-frequency rTMS on clinical motor improvements. The overall pooled mean difference between treatment and control groups in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor score was significant (4.0 points, 95% confidence interval, 1.5, 6.7; P = .005). rTMS therapy was effective when low-frequency stimulation (≤ 1 Hz) was used with a pooled mean difference of 3.3 points (95% confidence interval 1.6, 5.0; P = .005). There was a trend for significance when high-frequency stimulation (≥ 5 Hz) studies were evaluated with a pooled mean difference of 3.9 points (95% confidence interval, -0.7, 8.5; P = .08). rTMS therapy demonstrated benefits at short-term follow-up (immediately after a treatment protocol) with a pooled mean difference of 3.4 points (95% confidence interval, 0.3, 6.6; P = .03) as well as at long-term follow-up (average follow-up 6 weeks) with mean difference of 4.1 points (95% confidence interval, -0.15, 8.4; P = .05). There were insufficient data to statistically analyze the effects of rTMS when we specifically examined bradykinesia, gait, and levodopa-induced dyskinesia using quantitative methods. rTMS therapy in patients with Parkinson

  5. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation and motor cortex stimulation in neuropathic pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylius, V; Ayache, S S; Teepker, M; Kappus, C; Kolodziej, M; Rosenow, F; Nimsky, C; Oertel, W H; Lefaucheur, J P

    2012-12-01

    Non-invasive and invasive cortical stimulation allows the modulation of therapy-refractory neuropathic pain. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the contralateral motor cortex yields therapeutic effects at short-term and predicts the benefits of epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS). The present article summarizes the findings on application, mechanisms and therapeutic effects of cortical stimulation in neuropathic pain.

  6. Inhibitory non-invasive brain stimulation to homologous language regions as an adjunct to speech and language therapy in post-stroke aphasia: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begonya eOtal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic communication impairment is common after stroke, and conventional speech and language therapy (SLT strategies have limited effectiveness in post-stroke aphasia. Neurorehabilitation with non-invasive brain stimulation techniques (NIBS ‒ particularly repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS ‒ may enhance the effects of SLT in selected patients. Applying inhibitory NIBS to specific homologous language regions may induce neural reorganization and reduce interhemispheric competition. This mini review highlights randomized controlled trials (RCTs and randomized cross-over trials using low-frequency rTMS or cathodal tDCS over the non-lesioned non-language dominant hemisphere and performs an exploratory meta-analysis of those trials considered combinable. Using a random-effects model, a meta-analysis of nine eligible trials involving 215 participants showed a significant mean effect size of 0.51 (95% CI = 0.24 to 0.79 for the main outcome accuracy of naming in language assessment. No heterogeneity was observed (I2 = 0%. More multicenter RCTs with larger populations and homogenous intervention protocols are required to confirm these and the longer-term effects.

  7. Transcranial low-level laser therapy improves brain mitochondrial function and cognitive impairment in D-galactose-induced aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Farzad; Ahmadian, Nahid; Rasta, Seyed Hossein; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Karimi, Pouran; Sadigh-Eteghad, Saeed

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondrial function plays a key role in the aging-related cognitive impairment, and photoneuromodulation of mitochondria by transcranial low-level laser therapy (LLLT) may contribute to its improvement. This study focused on the transcranial LLLT effects on the D-galactose (DG)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and cognitive impairment in mice. For this purpose, red and near-infrared (NIR) laser wavelengths (660 and 810 nm) at 2 different fluencies (4 and 8 J/cm 2 ) at 10-Hz pulsed wave mode were administrated transcranially 3 d/wk in DG-received (500 mg/kg/subcutaneous) mice model of aging for 6 weeks. Spatial and episodic-like memories were assessed by the Barnes maze and What-Where-Which (WWWhich) tasks. Brain tissues were analyzed for mitochondrial function including active mitochondria, adenosine triphosphate, and reactive oxygen species levels, as well as membrane potential and cytochrome c oxidase activity. Apoptosis-related biomarkers, namely, Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3 were evaluated by Western blotting method. Laser treatments at wavelengths of 660 and 810 nm at 8 J/cm 2 attenuated DG-impaired spatial and episodic-like memories. Also, results showed an obvious improvement in the mitochondrial function aspects and modulatory effects on apoptotic markers in aged mice. However, same wavelengths at the fluency of 4 J/cm 2 had poor effect on the behavioral and molecular indexes in aging model. This data indicates that transcranial LLLT at both of red and NIR wavelengths at the fluency of 8 J/cm 2 has a potential to ameliorate aging-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, and cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Combined transcranial direct current stimulation and home-based occupational therapy for upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jesper; Figlewski, Krystian; Andersen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the combined effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and home-based occupational therapy on activities of daily living (ADL) and grip strength, in patients with upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). METHODS: A double......-blind randomized controlled trial with one-week follow-up. Patients received five consecutive days of occupational therapy at home, combined with either anodal (n = 8) or sham (n = 7) tDCS. The primary outcome was ADL performance, which was assessed with the Jebsen-Taylor test (JTT). RESULTS: Both groups improved...... with the sham group, from baseline to post-assessment (p = 0.158). CONCLUSIONS: Five consecutive days of tDCS combined with occupational therapy provided greater improvements in grip strength compared with occupational therapy alone. tDCS is a promising add-on intervention regarding training of upper limb motor...

  9. Transcranial magnetic therapy is an effective strategy for remediating neuroendocrine pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina V. Bolotova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of reactivation and remediation of impaired functions of the brain and of the inner organs regulatory systems are crucial to medical science. The study presents the technique of transcranial magnetic therapy (TMT with extremely low frequency alternating magnetic field employed for balanced activation of central nervous system function. This study was aimed to assess the effectiveness of TMT in diseases caused by hypothalamic–pituitary dysfunction. Material and Methods ― 90 children aged 10-16 years with different diseases but with similar pathogenic patterns were enrolled in the study. Group 1 included 30 adolescent girls with menstrual irregularities. Group 2 included 30 children with nocturnal enuresis. Group 3 included 30 teenage boys with constitutional delay of growth and puberty. Medical histories were studied, clinical and laboratory evaluation was carried out. TMT stimulation was performed using the device “AMO-ATOS” (TRIMA LLC, Saratov, Russia. Results ― Children in all the groups had high incidence of antenatal and perinatal pathologies recorded in their medical histories. Analysis of electroencephalograms (EEG showed the prevalence of disorganized and flat EEG patterns – 70% in all the children. Sympathicotonia being the symptom of autonomic nervous system dysfunction, prevailed in 60-80% of the children. The children in the three groups had hormonal imbalance. The treatment with TMT resulted in considerable improvement in hormonal balance and laboratory findings. Conclusion ― ТМТ stimulation is effective in remediation of impaired functions of the brain and treatment of the diseases caused by hypothalamic–pituitary dysfunction.

  10. The potential of transcranial magnetotherapy in color and rhythm therapy in the rehabilitation of ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholomov, I I; Cherevashchenko, L A; Suprunov, O V; Raigorodskii, Yu M

    2010-10-01

    A total of 116 patients with ischemic stroke were studied during the early recovery period. The patients were divided into four groups - three experimental groups and one control group. Of these, 87 patients in the first three groups received transcranial magneto- and/or color and rhythm therapy (TcMT, CRT) along with traditional treatment, while the 29 patients of the control group received basal treatment only. TcMT was performed using a bitemporal method, with a running field regime with a modulation frequency of 1-10 Hz. CRT consisted of an alternating scheme of stimulation of the left and right eyes with green and/or blue light with a period of 2-4 sec and an on time of 1 sec. Each of the three experimental groups (group 1 received TcMT, group 2 received CRT, and group 3 received TcMT + CRT) received two courses of treatment separated by 1.5 months. After treatment, all experimental groups, particularly group 3, showed more marked improvements than the control group. Regression of neurological symptomatology on the Lindmark scale in group 3 was 9.5% greater than that in controls; improvements in impairments to activity and self-care ability on the Barthel scale were greater by 8.8%; memory and intellectual changes were also seen on the MMSE and the Luriya and Schulte tests. Rheography and electroencephalography demonstrated significant improvements in hemodynamics and alpha-rhythm differentiation and a 14.6% reduction in the proportion of patients with dysrhythmia in group 3 compared with the control group. The best result on all measures were obtained in patients given the combination of TcMT and CRT; TcMT had the greater influence on hemodynamics, while CRT had the greater effect on psychoemotional status. Both treatments were well tolerated and produced no side effects.

  11. New insights into amblyopia: binocular therapy and noninvasive brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Robert F; Thompson, Benjamin

    2013-02-01

    The current approach to the treatment of amblyopia is problematic for a number of reasons. First, it promotes recovery of monocular vision but because it is not designed to promote binocularity, its binocular outcomes often are disappointing. Second, compliance is poor and variable. Third, the effectiveness of the treatment is thought to decrease with increasing age. We discuss 2 new approaches aimed at recovering visual function in adults with amblyopia. The first is a binocular approach to amblyopia treatment that is showing promise in initial clinical studies. The second is still in development and involves the use of well-established noninvasive brain stimulation techniques to temporarily alter the balance of excitation and inhibition in the visual cortex. Copyright © 2013 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transcranial LED therapy for cognitive dysfunction in chronic, mild traumatic brain injury: two case reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Saltmarche, Anita; Krengel, Maxine H.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Knight, Jeffrey A.

    2010-02-01

    Two chronic, traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases are presented, where cognitive function improved following treatment with transcranial light emitting diodes (LEDs). At age 59, P1 had closed-head injury from a motor vehicle accident (MVA) without loss of consciousness and normal MRI, but unable to return to work as development specialist in internet marketing, due to cognitive dysfunction. At 7 years post-MVA, she began transcranial LED treatments with cluster heads (2.1" diameter with 61 diodes each - 9x633nm, 52x870nm; 12-15mW per diode; total power, 500mW; 22.2 mW/cm2) on bilateral frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital and midline sagittal areas (13.3 J/cm2 at scalp, estimated 0.4 J/cm2 to brain cortex per area). Prior to transcranial LED, focused time on computer was 20 minutes. After 2 months of weekly, transcranial LED treatments, increased to 3 hours on computer. Performs nightly home treatments (now, 5 years, age 72); if stops treating >2 weeks, regresses. P2 (age 52F) had history of closed-head injuries related to sports/military training and recent fall. MRI shows fronto-parietal cortical atrophy. Pre-LED, was not able to work for 6 months and scored below average on attention, memory and executive function. Performed nightly transcranial LED treatments at home (9 months) with similar LED device, on frontal and parietal areas. After 4 months of LED treatments, returned to work as executive consultant, international technology consulting firm. Neuropsychological testing (post- 9 months of transcranial LED) showed significant improvement in memory and executive functioning (range, +1 to +2 SD improvement). Case 2 reported reduction in PTSD symptoms.

  13. Non-invasive imaging for studying anti-angiogenic therapy effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehling, J.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Kiessling, F.

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging plays an emerging role in preclinical and clinical cancer research and has high potential to improve clinical translation of new drugs. This article summarises and discusses tools and methods to image tumour angiogenesis and monitor anti-angiogenic therapy effects. In this

  14. Noninvasive Ventilatory Correction as an Adjunct to an Experimental Systemic Reperfusion Therapy in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Barlinn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a common condition in patients with acute ischemic stroke and associated with early clinical deterioration and poor functional outcome. However, noninvasive ventilatory correction is hardly considered as a complementary treatment option during the treatment phase of acute ischemic stroke. Summary of Case. A 55-year-old woman with an acute middle cerebral artery (MCA occlusion received intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (tPA and enrolled into a thrombolytic research study. During tPA infusion, she became drowsy, developed apnea episodes, desaturated and neurologically deteriorated without recanalization, re-occlusion or intracerebral hemorrhage. Urgent noninvasive ventilatory correction with biphasic positive airway pressure (BiPAP reversed neurological fluctuation. Her MCA completely recanalized 24 hours later. Conclusions. Noninvasive ventilatory correction should be considered more aggressively as a complementary treatment option in selected acute stroke patients. Early initiation of BiPAP can stabilize cerebral hemodynamics and may unmask the true potential of other therapies.

  15. Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Intensive Occupational Therapy for Poststroke Patients with Upper Limb Hemiparesis: Preliminary Study of a 15-Day Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kazushige; Momosaki, Ryo; Yokoi, Aki; Fukuda, Akiko; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Ito, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Ayumi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the safety and feasibility of a 15-day protocol of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with intensive occupational therapy (OT) on motor function and spasticity in hemiparetic upper limbs in poststroke patients. Fifteen poststroke patients (age at study entry 55 [plus…

  16. Effects of the addition of transcranial direct current stimulation to virtual reality therapy after stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, R T; Laurentino, G E C; Souza, R J P; Fonseca, J B; Silva Filho, E M; Dias, S N; Teixeira-Salmela, L F; Monte-Silva, K K

    2014-01-01

    Upper limb (UL) impairment is the most common disabling deficit following a stroke. Previous studies have suggested that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) enhances the effect of conventional therapies. This pilot double-blind randomized control trial aimed to determine whether or not tDCS, combined with Wii virtual reality therapy (VRT), would be superior to Wii therapy alone in improving upper limb function and quality of life in chronic stroke individuals. Twenty participants were randomly assigned either to an experimental group that received VRT and tDCS, or a control group that received VRT and sham tDCS. The therapy was delivered over 15 sessions with 13 minutes of active or sham anodal tDCS, and one hour of virtual reality therapy. The outcomes included were determined using the Fugl-Meyer scale, the Wolf motor function test, the modified Ashworth scale (MAS), grip strength, and the stroke specific quality of life scale (SSQOL). Minimal clinically important differences (MCID) were observed when assessing outcome data. Both groups demonstrated gains in all evaluated areas, except for the SSQOL-UL domain. Differences between groups were only observed in wrist spasticity levels in the experimental group, where more than 50% of the participants achieved the MCID. These findings support that tDCS, combined with VRT therapy, should be investigated and clarified further.

  17. 3D-printed adaptive acoustic lens as a disruptive technology for transcranial ultrasound therapy using single-element transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimbourg, Guillaume; Houdouin, Alexandre; Deffieux, Thomas; Tanter, Mickael; Aubry, Jean-François

    2018-01-01

    The development of multi-element arrays for better control of the shape of ultrasonic beams has opened the way for focusing through highly aberrating media, such as the human skull. As a result, the use of brain therapy with transcranial-focused ultrasound has rapidly grown. Although effective, such technology is expensive. We propose a disruptive, low-cost approach that consists of focusing a 1 MHz ultrasound beam through a human skull with a single-element transducer coupled with a tailored silicone acoustic lens cast in a 3D-printed mold and designed using computed tomography-based numerical acoustic simulation. We demonstrate on N  =  3 human skulls that adding lens-based aberration correction to a single-element transducer increases the deposited energy on the target 10 fold.

  18. Immunoadjuvant Therapy and Noninvasive Ventilation for Acute Respiratory Failure in Lung Tuberculosis: A Case Study

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    René Agustín Flores-Franco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory failure caused by pulmonary tuberculosis is a rare event but with a high mortality even while receiving mechanical ventilatory support. We report the case of a young man with severe pulmonary tuberculosis refractory to conventional therapy who successfully overcame the critical period of his condition using noninvasive ventilation and immunoadjuvant therapy that included three doses of etanercept 25 mg subcutaneously. We conclude that the use of etanercept along with antituberculosis treatment appears to be safe and effective in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis presenting with acute respiratory failure.

  19. Non-invasive brain stimulation and computational models in post-stroke aphasic patients: single session of transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Devido dos Santos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Patients undergoing the same neuromodulation protocol may present different responses. Computational models may help in understanding such differences. The aims of this study were, firstly, to compare the performance of aphasic patients in naming tasks before and after one session of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and sham, and analyze the results between these neuromodulation techniques; and secondly, through computational model on the cortex and surrounding tissues, to assess current flow distribution and responses among patients who received tDCS and presented different levels of results from naming tasks. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective, descriptive, qualitative and quantitative, double blind, randomized and placebo-controlled study conducted at Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo. METHODS: Patients with aphasia received one session of tDCS, TMS or sham stimulation. The time taken to name pictures and the response time were evaluated before and after neuromodulation. Selected patients from the first intervention underwent a computational model stimulation procedure that simulated tDCS. RESULTS: The results did not indicate any statistically significant differences from before to after the stimulation.The computational models showed different current flow distributions. CONCLUSIONS: The present study did not show any statistically significant difference between tDCS, TMS and sham stimulation regarding naming tasks. The patients’responses to the computational model showed different patterns of current distribution.

  20. Non-invasive brain stimulation enhances the effects of Melodic Intonation Therapy

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    Bradley W. Vines

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Research has suggested that a fronto-temporal network in the right hemisphere may be responsible for mediating Melodic Intonation Therapy’s positive effects on speech recovery. We investigated the potential for a non-invasive brain stimulation technique, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, to augment the benefits of MIT in patients with non-fluent aphasia by modulating neural activity in the brain during treatment with MIT. The polarity of the current applied to the scalp determines the effects of tDCS on the underlying tissue: anodal tDCS increases excitability, whereas cathodal tDCS decreases excitability. We applied anodal tDCS to the posterior inferior frontal gyrus (IFG of the right hemisphere, an area that has been shown to both contribute to singing through the mapping of sounds to ariculatory actions and serve as a key region in the process of recovery from aphasia, particularly in patients with large left hemispheric lesions. The stimulation was applied while patients were treated with MIT by a trained therapist. Six patients with moderate to severe non-fluent aphasia underwent three consecutive days of anodal-tDCS+MIT, and an equivalent series of sham-tDCS+MIT. The two treatment series were separated by one week, and the order in which the treatments were administered was randomized. Compared to the effects of sham-tDCS+MIT, anodal-tDCS+MIT led to significant improvements in fluency of speech. These results support the hypothesis that, as the brain seeks to reorganize and compensate for damage to left-hemisphere language centers, combining anodal-tDCS with MIT may further recovery from post-stroke aphasia by enhancing activity in a right-hemisphere sensorimotor network for articulation.

  1. Improving executive function using transcranial infrared laser stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Nathaniel J; Maddox, W Todd; Gonzalez-Lima, Francisco

    2017-03-01

    Transcranial infrared laser stimulation is a new non-invasive form of low-level light therapy that may have a wide range of neuropsychological applications. It entails using low-power and high-energy-density infrared light from lasers to increase metabolic energy. Preclinical work showed that this intervention can increase cortical metabolic energy, thereby improving frontal cortex-based memory function in rats. Barrett and Gonzalez-Lima (2013, Neuroscience, 230, 13) discovered that transcranial laser stimulation can enhance sustained attention and short-term memory in humans. We extend this line of work to executive function. Specifically, we ask whether transcranial laser stimulation enhances performance in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task that is considered the gold standard of executive function and is compromised in normal ageing and a number of neuropsychological disorders. We used a laser of a specific wavelength (1,064 nm) that photostimulates cytochrome oxidase - the enzyme catalysing oxygen consumption for metabolic energy production. Increased cytochrome oxidase activity is considered the primary mechanism of action of this intervention. Participants who received laser treatment made fewer errors and showed improved set-shifting ability relative to placebo controls. These results suggest that transcranial laser stimulation improves executive function and may have exciting potential for treating or preventing deficits resulting from neuropsychological disorders or normal ageing. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  2. Noninvasive Brain Stimulation in Pediatric ADHD: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Belen; Boes, Aaron D.; Laganiere, Simon; Rotenberg, Alexander; Jeurissen, Danique; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent neurodevelopmental disorders in the pediatric population. The clinical management of ADHD is currently limited by a lack of reliable diagnostic biomarkers and inadequate therapy for a minority of patients that do not respond to standard pharmacotherapy. There is optimism that noninvasive brain stimulation may help to address these limitations. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are two methods of noninvasive brain stimulation that modulate cortical excitability and brain network activity. TMS can be used diagnostically to probe cortical neurophysiology, while daily use of repetitive TMS or tDCS can induce long-lasting and potentially therapeutic changes in targeted networks. In this review we highlight research showing the potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications of TMS and tDCS in pediatric ADHD. We also discuss the safety and ethics of using these tools in the pediatric population. PMID:26661481

  3. Non-invasive therapy for the prevention of moist desquamation following β-radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, L.; Wilcock, S.; Rezvani, M.; Hsia, C.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: In an environment of potential nuclear mishap, effective therapies are lacking for radiation-induced skin burns. In this report we describe an effective, non-invasive therapy for post acute radiation exposure based on skin compression. A pig skin model of β-radiation-induced moist desquamation (MD) was employed in this study. Exposure to 30 Gy was used to induce skin lesions involving >80% MD in prescribed test sites on flank skin of female Large White pigs (n 18 per flank). The animals' left flank was placed under pressure from the weight of the pig's own body for 3 hours, immediately following radiation exposure. The right flank served as control, and was not subject to compression following irradiation. Percentage differences in MD were measured between sites on both flanks based on the the area of the test site containing 50% MD (severe) as determined by clinical assessment using blinded observers. The incidence of MD was significantly higher on the uncompressed right flank as compared to the compressed left flank (p < 0.005). A 61% and 45% reduction of MD was observed in both total and severe MD, respectively, during the 8-week study period. Radiation-induced MD was significantly reduced by immediate, mild skin compression (approx. 1.5 psi) for 3 hours immediately following exposure. This observation suggests that skin lesion development from radiation-induced oxidative damage cascades may be modulated non-invasively. Understanding the mechanism(s) at work and developing devices based on this non-invasive therapeutic principle may provide a novel treatment for consequent skin injury in radiation oncology, cosmetic and therapeutic UV, laser, glycolic and derm abrasion procedures

  4. Non-invasive stem cell therapy in a rat model for retinal degeneration and vascular pathology.

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    Shaomei Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is characterized by progressive night blindness, visual field loss, altered vascular permeability and loss of central vision. Currently there is no effective treatment available except gene replacement therapy has shown promise in a few patients with specific gene defects. There is an urgent need to develop therapies that offer generic neuro-and vascular-protective effects with non-invasive intervention. Here we explored the potential of systemic administration of pluripotent bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to rescue vision and associated vascular pathology in the Royal College Surgeons (RCS rat, a well-established animal model for RP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Animals received syngeneic MSCs (1x10(6 cells by tail vein at an age before major photoreceptor loss. PRINCIPAL RESULTS: both rod and cone photoreceptors were preserved (5-6 cells thick at the time when control animal has a single layer of photoreceptors remained; Visual function was significantly preserved compared with controls as determined by visual acuity and luminance threshold recording from the superior colliculus; The number of pathological vascular complexes (abnormal vessels associated with migrating pigment epithelium cells and area of vascular leakage that would ordinarily develop were dramatically reduced; Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated there was upregulation of growth factors and immunohistochemistry revealed that there was an increase in neurotrophic factors within eyes of animals that received MSCs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results underscore the potential application of MSCs in treating retinal degeneration. The advantages of this non-invasive cell-based therapy are: cells are easily isolated and can be expanded in large quantity for autologous graft; hypoimmunogenic nature as allogeneic donors; less controversial in nature than other stem cells; can be readministered with minor discomfort

  5. Synergistic effects of Combined Therapy: nonfocused ultrasound plus Aussie current for noninvasive body contouring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Vivianne Carvalho; Crivelaro, Cinthia Nicoletti; Ferla, Luciane Zacchi; Pelozo, Gisele Marques; Azevedo, Juliana; Liebano, Richard Eloin; Nogueira, Caroline; Guidi, Renata Michelini; Grecco, Clóvis; Sant'Ana, Estela

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays, there are several noninvasive technologies being used for improving of body contouring. The objectives of this pilot study were to verify the effectiveness of the Heccus ® device, emphasizing the synergism between nonfocused ultrasound plus Aussie current in the improvement of body contour, and to determine if the association of this therapy with whole-body vibration exercises can have additional positive effects in the results of the treatments. Twenty healthy women aged 20-40 years participated in the study. Ten patients received Combined Therapy treatment (G1) and the other 10 participants received Combined Therapy with additional vibratory platform treatment (G2). Anthropometric and standardized photography analysis, ultrasonography, cutometry and self-adminestered questionnaires of tolerance and satisfaction levels with the treatment were used. Compared with baseline values, reduction of fat thickness was observed by ultrasonography in the posterior thigh area in the G1 group ( P <0.05) and in the buttocks ( P <0.05) and the posterior thigh areas ( P <0.05) in the G2. All the treated areas in both groups showed reduction in cellulite degree in the buttocks, G1 ( P <0.05) and G2 ( P <0.05), and in posterior thigh areas, G1 ( P <0.05) and G2 ( P <0.05). Optimal improvement of skin firmness (G1, P <0.0001; G2, P =0.0034) in the treated areas was observed in both groups. We conclude that the synergistic effects of the Combined Therapy (nonfocused ultrasound plus Aussie current) might be a good option with noninvasive body contouring treatment for improving the aspect of the cellulite, skin firmness and localized fat. If used in association with the whole-body vibratory platform, the results can be better, especially in the treatment of localized fat. Further studies with larger sample size should be performed to confirm these results.

  6. Noninvasive treatment of deep venous thrombosis using pulsed ultrasound cavitation therapy (histotripsy) in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Adam D; Owens, Gabe; Gurm, Hitinder S; Ives, Kimberly; Myers, Daniel D; Xu, Zhen

    2011-03-01

    This study evaluated histotripsy as a noninvasive, image-guided method of thrombolysis in a porcine model of deep vein thrombosis. Histotripsy therapy uses short, high-intensity, focused ultrasound pulses to cause mechanical breakdown of targeted soft tissue by acoustic cavitation, which is guided by real-time ultrasound imaging. This is an in vivo feasibility study of histotripsy thrombolysis. Acute thrombi were formed in the femoral vein of juvenile pigs weighing 30-40 kg by balloon occlusion with two catheters and thrombin infusion. A 10-cm-diameter 1-MHz focused transducer was used for therapy. An 8-MHz ultrasound imager was used to align the clot with the therapy focus. Therapy consisted of five cycle pulses delivered at a rate of 1 kHz and peak negative pressure between 14 and 19 MPa. The focus was scanned along the long axis of the vessel to treat the entire visible clot during ultrasound exposure. The targeted region identified by a hyperechoic cavitation bubble cloud was visualized via ultrasound during treatment. Thrombus breakdown was apparent as a decrease in echogenicity within the vessel in 10 of 12 cases and in 7 cases improved flow through the vein as measured by color Doppler. Vessel histology found denudation of vascular endothelium and small pockets of hemorrhage in the vessel adventitia and underlying muscle and fatty tissue, but perforation of the vessel wall was never observed. The results indicate histotripsy has potential for development as a noninvasive treatment for deep vein thrombosis. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcranial low-level laser therapy increases memory, learning, neuroprogenitor cells, BDNF and synaptogenesis in mice with traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weijun; Huang, Liyi; Vatansever, Fatma; Agrawal, Tanupriya; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2015-03-01

    Increasing concern is evident over the epidemic of traumatic brain injury in both civilian and military medicine, and the lack of approved treatments. Transcranial low level laser therapy tLLLT) is a new approach in which near infrared laser is delivered to the head, penetrates the scalp and skull to reach the brain. We asked whether tLLLT at 810-nm could improve memory and learning in mice with controlled cortical impact traumatic brain injury. We investigated the mechanism of action by immunofluorescence studies in sections from brains of mice sacrificed at different times. Mice with TBI treated with 1 or 3 daily laser applications performed better on Morris Water Maze test at 28 days. Laser treated mice had increased BrdU incorporation into NeuN positive cells in the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone indicating formation of neuroprogenitor cells at 7 days and less at 28 days. Markers of neuron migration (DCX and Tuj1) were also increased, as was the neurotrophin, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) at 7 days. Markers of synaptogenesis (formation of new connections between existing neurons) were increased in the perilesional cortex at 28 days. tLLLT is proposed to be able to induce the brain to repair itself after injury. However its ability to induce neurogenesis and synaptogenesis suggests that tLLLT may have much wider applications to neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders.

  8. Experimental therapy of epilepsy with transcranial magnetic stimulation: lack of additional benefit with prolonged treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brasil-Neto Joaquim P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of three months of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS treatment in intractable epilepsy. METHODS: Five patients (four males, one female; ages 6 to 50 years, were enrolled in the study; their epilepsy could not be controlled by medical treatment and surgery was not indicated. rTMS was performed twice a week for three months; patients kept records of seizure frequency for an equal period of time before, during, and after rTMS sessions. rTMS was delivered to the vertex with a round coil, at an intensity 5 % below motor threshold. During rTMS sessions, 100 stimuli (five series of 20 stimuli, with one-minute intervals between series were delivered at a frequency of 0.3 Hz. RESULTS: Mean daily number of seizures (MDNS decreased in three patients and increased in two during rTMS- one of these was treated for only one month; the best result was achieved in a patient with focal cortical dysplasia (reduction of 43.09 % in MDNS. In the whole patient group, there was a significant (p<0.01 decrease in MDNS of 22.8 %. CONCLUSION: Although prolonged rTMS treatment is safe and moderately decreases MDNS in a group of patients with intractable epilepsy, individual patient responses were mostly subtle and clinical relevance of this method is probably low. Our data suggest, however, that patients with focal cortical lesions may indeed benefit from this novel treatment. Further studies should concentrate on that patient subgroup.

  9. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M

    2016-09-07

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy.

  10. A randomized controlled comparison of electroconvulsive therapy and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in severe and resistant nonpsychotic major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunhaus, Leon; Schreiber, Shaul; Dolberg, Ornah T; Polak, Dana; Dannon, Pinhas N

    2003-02-15

    Studies published over the past few years suggest that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may have significant antidepressant actions. In a previous report, we compared electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and repetitive TMS (rTMS) and found ECT to be superior for psychotic major depression (MD); however, ECT and rTMS had similar results in nonpsychotic MD. We now report on a controlled randomized comparison of ECT and rTMS in patients with nonpsychotic MD. Forty patients with nonpsychotic MD referred for ECT were included. Electroconvulsive therapy was performed according to established protocols. Repetitive TMS was performed over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex at 90% motor threshold. Patients were treated with 20 sessions (five times per week for 4 weeks) of 10-Hz treatments (1200 pulses per treatment-day) at 90% motor threshold. Response to treatment was defined as a decrease of at least 50% in the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) score, with a final HRSD equal or less than 10 points and a final Global Assessment of Function Scale rating of 60 or more points. The overall response rate was 58% (23 out of 40 patients responded to treatment). In the ECT group, 12 responded and eight did not; in the rTMS group, 11 responded and nine did not (chi2 =.10, ns). Thus, patients responded as well to either ECT or rTMS. This study adds to the growing literature supporting an antidepressant effect for rTMS. This study is particularly relevant because it suggests that rTMS and ECT reach similar results in nonpsychotic major depressive disorder.

  11. Sensorimotor Plasticity after Music-Supported Therapy in Chronic Stroke Patients Revealed by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Amengual, J. L.; Rojo, N.; Veciana De Las Heras, Misericordia; Marco-Pallarés, J.; Grau-Sánchez, J.; Schneider, S.; Vaquero, L.; Juncadella Puig, Montserrat; Montero Homs, Jordi; Mohammadi, B.; Rubio, F.; Rueda, N.; Duarte, E.; Grau Fonollosa, Carles; Altenmuller, E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several recently developed therapies targeting motor disabilities in stroke sufferers have shown to be more effective than standard neurorehabilitation approaches. In this context, several basic studies demonstrated that music training produces rapid neuroplastic changes in motor-related brain areas. Music-supported therapy has been recently developed as a new motor rehabilitation intervention. METHODS AND RESULTS: In order to explore the plasticity effects of music-supported ther...

  12. Clinical Applications of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Pediatric Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Shalini; Papanicolaou, Andrew C; McGregor, Amy; Boop, Frederick A; Wheless, James W

    2015-08-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation is now an accepted technique that is used as a diagnostic aid and in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders in adults, and is being increasingly used in children. In this review, we will discuss the basic principles and safety of one noninvasive brain stimulation method, transcranial magnetic stimulation. Improvements in the spatial accuracy of transcranial magnetic stimulation are described in the context of image-guided transcranial magnetic stimulation. The article describes and provides examples of the current clinical applications of transcranial magnetic stimulation in children as an aid in the diagnosis and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and discusses future potential applications. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a noninvasive tool that is safe for use in children and adolescents for functional mapping and treatment, and for many children it aids in the preoperative evaluation and the risk-benefit decision making. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Synergistic effects of Combined Therapy: nonfocused ultrasound plus Aussie current for noninvasive body contouring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Vivianne Carvalho; Crivelaro, Cinthia Nicoletti; Ferla, Luciane Zacchi; Pelozo, Gisele Marques; Azevedo, Juliana; Liebano, Richard Eloin; Nogueira, Caroline; Guidi, Renata Michelini; Grecco, Clóvis; Sant’Ana, Estela

    2018-01-01

    Background and objectives Nowadays, there are several noninvasive technologies being used for improving of body contouring. The objectives of this pilot study were to verify the effectiveness of the Heccus® device, emphasizing the synergism between nonfocused ultrasound plus Aussie current in the improvement of body contour, and to determine if the association of this therapy with whole-body vibration exercises can have additional positive effects in the results of the treatments. Subjects and methods Twenty healthy women aged 20–40 years participated in the study. Ten patients received Combined Therapy treatment (G1) and the other 10 participants received Combined Therapy with additional vibratory platform treatment (G2). Anthropometric and standardized photography analysis, ultrasonography, cutometry and self-adminestered questionnaires of tolerance and satisfaction levels with the treatment were used. Results Compared with baseline values, reduction of fat thickness was observed by ultrasonography in the posterior thigh area in the G1 group (Pcellulite degree in the buttocks, G1 (Ptreatment for improving the aspect of the cellulite, skin firmness and localized fat. If used in association with the whole-body vibratory platform, the results can be better, especially in the treatment of localized fat. Further studies with larger sample size should be performed to confirm these results. PMID:29731654

  14. Transcranial direct-current stimulation as treatment in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwind, Markus; Seeck, Margitta

    2016-12-01

    Neuromodulation (NM) is a complementary therapy for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Vagal nerve stimulation and deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamus are established techniques and have shown their efficacy in lowering seizure frequency, but they are invasive and rarely render patients seizure-free. Non-invasive NM techniques are therefore increasingly investigated in a clinical context. Areas covered: Current knowledge about transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) and other non-invasive NM in patients with epilepsy, based on the available animal and clinical studies from PubMed search. Expert commentary: tDCS modulates neuronal membrane potentials, and consequently alters cortical excitability. Cathodal stimulation leads to cortical inhibition, which is of particular importance in epilepsy treatment. The antiepileptic efficacy is promising but still lacks systematic studies. The beneficial effect, seen in ~20%, outlasts the duration of stimulation, indicating neuronal plasticity and is therefore of great interest to obtain long-term effects.

  15. Reduced neuronal activity in language-related regions after transcranial magnetic stimulation therapy for auditory verbal hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Jochen; Homan, Philipp; Jann, Kay; Federspiel, Andrea; Flury, Richard; Hauf, Martinus; Strik, Werner; Dierks, Thomas; Hubl, Daniela

    2013-03-15

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a novel therapeutic approach, used in patients with pharmacoresistant auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH). To investigate the neurobiological effects of TMS on AVH, we measured cerebral blood flow with pseudo-continuous magnetic resonance-arterial spin labeling 20 ± 6 hours before and after TMS treatment. Thirty patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were investigated. Fifteen patients received a 10-day TMS treatment to the left temporoparietal cortex, and 15 received the standard treatment. The stimulation location was chosen according to an individually determined language region determined by a functional magnetic resonance imaging language paradigm, which identified the sensorimotor language area, area Spt (sylvian parietotemporal), as the target region. TMS-treated patients showed positive clinical effects, which were indicated by a reduction in AVH scores (p ≤ .001). Cerebral blood flow was significantly decreased in the primary auditory cortex (p ≤ .001), left Broca's area (p ≤ .001), and cingulate gyrus (p ≤ .001). In control subjects, neither positive clinical effects nor cerebral blood flow decreases were detected. The decrease in cerebral blood flow in the primary auditory cortex correlated with the decrease in AVH scores (p ≤ .001). TMS reverses hyperactivity of language regions involved in the emergence of AVH. Area Spt acts as a gateway to the hallucination-generating cerebral network. Successful therapy corresponded to decreased cerebral blood flow in the primary auditory cortex, supporting its crucial role in triggering AVH and contributing to the physical quality of the false perceptions. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The impact of large structural brain changes in chronic stroke patients on the electric field caused by transcranial brain stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minjoli, Sena; Saturnino, Guilherme B.; Blicher, Jakob Udby

    2017-01-01

    . Realistic head models containing large cortical and subcortical stroke lesions in the right parietal cortex were created using MR images of two patients. For TMS, the electric field of a double coil was simulated using the finite-element method. Systematic variations of the coil position relative...... to the lesion were tested. For TDCS, the finite-element method was used to simulate a standard approach with two electrode pads, and the position of one electrode was systematically varied. For both TMS and TDCS, the lesion caused electric field " hot spots" in the cortex. However, these maxima were......Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) are two types of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (TBS). They are useful tools for stroke research and may be potential adjunct therapies for functional recovery. However, stroke often causes large...

  17. The impact of large structural brain changes in chronic stroke patients on the electric field caused by transcranial brain stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minjoli, Sena; Saturnino, Guilherme B.; Blicher, Jakob Udby

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) are two types of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (TBS). They are useful tools for stroke research and may be potential adjunct therapies for functional recovery. However, stroke often causes large...... cerebral lesions, which are commonly accompanied by a secondary enlargement of the ventricles and atrophy. These structural alterations substantially change the conductivity distribution inside the head, which may have potentially important consequences for both brain stimulation methods. We therefore....... Realistic head models containing large cortical and subcortical stroke lesions in the right parietal cortex were created using MR images of two patients. For TMS, the electric field of a double coil was simulated using the finite-element method. Systematic variations of the coil position relative...

  18. Non-invasive pre-clinical MR imaging of prostate tumor hypoxia for radiation therapy prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek White

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the usefulness of Oxygen-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (OE-MRI changes in signal intensity related to oxygen challenge for predicting tumor response to radiation therapy.Methods: Dynamic MR signal changes were acquired using Varian 4.7T small animal MR scanner prior to image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT of small (n = 6 and large subcutaneous (n = 5 prostate tumors in adult male rats. An interleaved blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD and tissue-oxygen level dependent (TOLD data acquisition or (IBT was performed using a baseline of medical air as positive control and using medical oxygen as a breathing challenge. BOLD used a 2-D multi-slice spoiled gradient-echo with multi-echo sequence. TOLD used a 2-D multi-slice spoiled gradient-echo sequence. Voxel changes in signal intensity were determined by a correlation coefficient mapping technique. Irradiation technique planned consisted of 1F × 15 Gy AP/PA or 2F × 7.5 Gy AP/PA to the gross tumor volume (GTV. Tumor growth measurements were recorded over time to assess the response to IGRT.Results: BOLD and TOLD signals variously illustrated positive or negative impulse responses in the tumor ROI due to inhaling medical oxygen. Correlation coefficient mapping demonstrated heterogeneity in tumors after inhaling medical oxygen. BOLD and TOLD signals exhibited increased changes in signal intensities after the first fraction of dose. Multi-fractionation had minimum effect until the second fraction of dose was applied. Tumor growth delays were observed when inhaling medical oxygen during IGRT.Conclusion: OE-MRI is a non-invasive imaging modality that can provide insight to the oxygen status of tumors. Observed increase percent changes in BOLD and TOLD signal intensities after the first fraction of dose suggest tumors experienced reoxygenation. OE-MRI could be used for predicting tumor response to IGRT when using medical oxygen for increasing GTV radiosensitivity, suggesting

  19. Transcranial cavitation-mediated ultrasound therapy at sub-MHz frequency via temporal interference modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Sutton, Jonathan T.; Power, Chanikarn; Zhang, Yongzhi; Miller, Eric L.; McDannold, Nathan J.

    2017-10-01

    Sub-megahertz transmission is not usually adopted in pre-clinical small animal experiments for focused ultrasound (FUS) brain therapy due to the large focal size. However, low frequency FUS is vital for preclinical evaluations due to the frequency-dependence of cavitation behavior. To maximize clinical relevance, a dual-aperture FUS system was designed for low-frequency (274.3 kHz) cavitation-mediated FUS therapy. Combining two spherically curved transducers provides significantly improved focusing in the axial direction while yielding an interference pattern with strong side lobes, leading to inhomogeneously distributed cavitation activities. By operating the two transducers at slightly offset frequencies to modulate this interference pattern over the period of sonication, the acoustic energy was redistributed and resulted in a spatially homogenous treatment profile. Simulation and pressure field measurements in water were performed to assess the beam profiles. In addition, the system performance was demonstrated in vivo in rats via drug delivery through microbubble-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption. This design resulted in a homogenous treatment profile that was fully contained within the rat brain at a clinically relevant acoustic frequency.

  20. Effect of Parkinson's Disease in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, Farheen; Magsood, Hamzah; Lee, Erik; El-Gendy, Ahmed; Jiles, David; Hadimani, Ravi

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation is a non-invasive clinical therapy used to treat depression and migraine, and shows further promise as treatment for Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurological disorders. However, it is yet unclear as to how anatomical differences may affect stimulation from this treatment. We use finite element analysis to model and analyze the results of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in various head models. A number of heterogeneous head models have been developed using MRI data of real patients, including healthy individuals as well as patients of Parkinson's disease. Simulations of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation performed on 22 anatomically different models highlight the differences in induced stimulation. A standard Figure of 8 coil is used with frequency 2.5 kHz, placed 5 mm above the head. We compare cortical stimulation, volume of brain tissue stimulated, specificity, and maximum E-field induced in the brain for models ranging from ages 20 to 60. Results show that stimulation varies drastically between patients of the same age and health status depending upon brain-scalp distance, which is not necessarily a linear progression with age.

  1. High power phased array prototype for clinical high intensity focused ultrasound : applications to transcostal and transcranial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernot, M; Aubry, J -F; Tanter, M; Marquet, F; Montaldo, G; Boch, A -L; Kujas, M; Seilhean, D; Fink, M

    2007-01-01

    Bursts of focused ultrasound energy three orders of magnitude more intense than diagnostic ultrasound became during the last decade a noninvasive option for treating cancer from breast to prostate or uterine fibroid. However, many challenges remain to be addressed. First, the corrections of distortions induced on the ultrasonic therapy beam during its propagation through defocusing obstacles like skull bone or ribs remain today a technological performance that still need to be validated clinically. Secondly, the problem of motion artifacts particularly important for the treatment of abdominal parts becomes today an important research topic. Finally, the problem of the treatment monitoring is a wide subject of interest in the growing HIFU community. For all these issues, the potential of new ultrasonic therapy devices able to work both in Transmit and Receive modes will be emphasized. A review of the work under achievement at L.O.A. using this new generation of HIFU prototypes on the monitoring, motion correction and aberrations corrections will be presented.

  2. Adaptive Focusing For Ultrasonic Transcranial Brain Therapy: First In Vivo Investigation On 22 Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernot, Mathieu; Aubry, Jean-François; Tanter, Mickael; Boch, Anne Laure; Kujas, Michelle; Fink, Mathias

    2005-03-01

    A high power prototype dedicated to trans-skull therapy has been tested in vivo on 22 sheep. The array is made of 300 high power transducers working at 1MHz central frequency and is able to achieve 400 bars at focus in water during five seconds with a 50% percent duty cycle. In the first series of experiments, 10 sheep were treated and sacrificed immediately after treatment. A complete craniotomy was performed on half of the treated animal models in order to get a reference model. On the other half, minimally invasive surgery has been performed: a hydrophone was inserted at a given target location inside the brain through a craniotomy of a few mm2. A time reversal experiment was then conducted through the skull bone with the therapeutic array to treat the targeted point. Thanks to the high power technology of the prototype, trans-skull adaptive treatment could be achieved. In a second series of experiments, 12 animals were divided into three groups and sacrificed respectively one, two or three weeks after treatment. Finally, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and histological examination were performed to confirm tissue damage.

  3. Augmentation of spelling therapy with transcranial direct current stimulation in primary progressive aphasia: Preliminary results and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapkini, Kyrana; Frangakis, Constantine; Gomez, Yessenia; Davis, Cameron; Hillis, Argye E

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily affects language functions and often begins in the fifth or sixth decade of life. The devastating effects on work and family life call for the investigation of treatment alternatives. In this article, we present new data indicating that neuromodulatory treatment, using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) combined with a spelling intervention, shows some promise for maintaining or even improving language, at least temporarily, in PPA. The main aim of the present article is to determine whether tDCS plus spelling intervention is more effective than spelling intervention alone in treating written language in PPA. We also asked whether the effects of tDCS are sustained longer than the effects of spelling intervention alone. We present data from six PPA participants who underwent anodal tDCS or sham plus spelling intervention in a within-subject crossover design. Each stimulation condition lasted 3 weeks or a total of 15 sessions with a 2-month interval in between. Participants were evaluated on treatment tasks as well as on other language and cognitive tasks at 2-week and 2-month follow-up intervals after each stimulation condition. All participants showed improvement in spelling (with sham or tDCS). There was no difference in the treated items between the two conditions. There was, however, consistent and significant improvement for untrained items only in the tDCS plus spelling intervention condition. Furthermore, the improvement lasted longer in the tDCS plus spelling intervention condition compared to sham plus spelling intervention condition. Neuromodulation with tDCS offers promise as a means of augmenting language therapy to improve written language function at least temporarily in PPA. The consistent finding of generalisation of treatment benefits to untreated items and the superior sustainability of treatment effects with tDCS justifies further investigations. However

  4. Synergistic effects of Combined Therapy: nonfocused ultrasound plus Aussie current for noninvasive body contouring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canela VC

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Vivianne Carvalho Canela,1 Cinthia Nicoletti Crivelaro,1 Luciane Zacchi Ferla,1 Gisele Marques Pelozo,1 Juliana Azevedo,2 Richard Eloin Liebano,3 Caroline Nogueira,4,5 Renata Michelini Guidi,4,5 Clóvis Grecco,4 Estela Sant’Ana4 1Ibramed Center for Education and Advanced Training (CEFAI, Amparo, SP, Brazil; 2CDE Medical Imaging Department, Brazilian College of Radiology (CBR, Amparo, SP, Brazil; 3Department of Physiotherapy, Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar, São Carlos, SP, Brazil; 4Research, Development and Innovation Department, Ibramed Research Group (IRG, IBRAMED, Amparo, SP, Brazil; 5Biomedical Engineering Department, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Campinas (UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil Background and objectives: Nowadays, there are several noninvasive technologies being used for improving of body contouring. The objectives of this pilot study were to verify the effectiveness of the Heccus® device, emphasizing the synergism between nonfocused ultrasound plus Aussie current in the improvement of body contour, and to determine if the association of this therapy with whole-body vibration exercises can have additional positive effects in the results of the treatments.Subjects and methods: Twenty healthy women aged 20–40 years participated in the study. Ten patients received Combined Therapy treatment (G1 and the other 10 participants received Combined Therapy with additional vibratory platform treatment (G2. Anthropometric and standardized photography analysis, ultrasonography, cutometry and self-adminestered questionnaires of tolerance and satisfaction levels with the treatment were used.Results: Compared with baseline values, reduction of fat thickness was observed by ultrasonography in the posterior thigh area in the G1 group (P<0.05 and in the buttocks (P<0.05 and the posterior thigh areas (P<0.05 in the G2. All the treated areas in both groups showed reduction in cellulite degree in the

  5. Combined Dextroamphetamine and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Poststroke Aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Zafer; Dehgan, Michelle Weber; Shadravan, Shaparak; Yozbatiran, Nuray; Maher, Lynn M; Francisco, Gerard E

    2017-10-01

    There is a growing need for various effective adjunctive treatment options for speech recovery after stroke. A pharmacological agent combined with noninvasive brain stimulation has not been previously reported for poststroke aphasia recovery. In this "proof of concept" study, we aimed to test the safety of a combined intervention consisting of dextroamphetamine, transcranial direct current stimulation, and speech and language therapy in subjects with nonfluent aphasia. Ten subjects with chronic nonfluent aphasia underwent two experiments where they received dextroamphetamine or placebo along with transcranial direct current stimulation and speech and language therapy on two separate days. The Western Aphasia Battery-Revised was used to monitor changes in speech performance. No serious adverse events were observed. There was no significant increase in blood pressure with amphetamine or deterioration in speech and language performance. Western Aphasia Battery-Revised aphasia quotient and language quotient showed a statistically significant increase in the active experiment. Comparison of proportional changes of aphasia quotient and language quotient in active experiment with those in placebo experiment showed significant difference. We showed that the triple combination therapy is safe and implementable and seems to induce positive changes in speech and language performance in the patients with chronic nonfluent aphasia due to stroke.

  6. Combined transcranial direct current stimulation and home-based occupational therapy for upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Jesper; Figlewski, Krystian; Andersen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the combined effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and home-based occupational therapy on activities of daily living (ADL) and grip strength, in patients with upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). A double-blind randomized controlled trial with one-week follow-up. Patients received five consecutive days of occupational therapy at home, combined with either anodal (n = 8) or sham (n = 7) tDCS. The primary outcome was ADL performance, which was assessed with the Jebsen-Taylor test (JTT). Both groups improved JTT over time (p occupational therapy provided greater improvements in grip strength compared with occupational therapy alone. tDCS is a promising add-on intervention regarding training of upper limb motor impairment. It is well tolerated by patients and can easily be applied for home-based training. Larger studies with long-term follow-up are needed to further explore possible effects of tDCS in patients with ICH. Five consecutive days of tDCS combined with occupational therapy provided greater improvements in grip strength compared with occupational therapy alone. tDCS is well tolerated by patients and can easily be applied for home-based rehabilitation.

  7. Computational analysis of transcranial magnetic stimulation in the presence of deep brain stimulation probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, F.; Holloway, K.; El-Gendy, A. A.; Hadimani, R. L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation is an emerging non-invasive treatment for depression, Parkinson's disease, and a variety of other neurological disorders. Many Parkinson's patients receive the treatment known as Deep Brain Stimulation, but often require additional therapy for speech and swallowing impairment. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation has been explored as a possible treatment by stimulating the mouth motor area of the brain. We have calculated induced electric field, magnetic field, and temperature distributions in the brain using finite element analysis and anatomically realistic heterogeneous head models fitted with Deep Brain Stimulation leads. A Figure of 8 coil, current of 5000 A, and frequency of 2.5 kHz are used as simulation parameters. Results suggest that Deep Brain Stimulation leads cause surrounding tissues to experience slightly increased E-field (Δ Emax =30 V/m), but not exceeding the nominal values induced in brain tissue by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation without leads (215 V/m). The maximum temperature in the brain tissues surrounding leads did not change significantly from the normal human body temperature of 37 °C. Therefore, we ascertain that Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the mouth motor area may stimulate brain tissue surrounding Deep Brain Stimulation leads, but will not cause tissue damage.

  8. Investigative and therapeutic uses of Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Rashid

    2016-09-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder that affects children and young adults. It results in significant impairment of their educational, social and occupational functioning and is associated economic societal burden. Whilst there are effective medications (such as methylphenidate) as well as some psychobehavioural therapies that can help with management of symptoms of ADHD, the former can have significant cardiac side effects, which limit their use. For number of patients these treatment options lack efficacy or are not acceptable. There is need to improve our understanding of neurobiology of ADHD as well as explore other treatment options. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are safe and non-invasive investigative and therapeutic tools respectively. In this short paper, I will explore the potential role of TMS and rTMS in further improving our understanding of the neurobiology of ADHD as well as possible treatment option.

  9. The efficacy of transcranial magnetic stimulation on migraine: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Lihuan; Zhang, Xiaoni; Li, Xiangpen; Rong, Xiaoming; Peng, Ying

    2017-08-22

    As a non-invasive therapy, whether transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is effective on migraine. This article was aimed to assess the efficacy of TMS on migraine based on randomized controlled trails (RCTs). We searched PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library electronic databases for published studies which compared TMS group with sham group, conducted a meta-analysis of all RCTs. Five studies, consisting of 313 migraine patients, were identified. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation is effective for the acute treatment of migraine with aura after the first attack (p = 0.02). And, the efficacy of TMS on chronic migraine was not significant (OR 2.93; 95% CI 0.71-12.15; p = 0.14). TMS is effective for migraine based on the studies included in the article.

  10. Multimodal quantitation of the effects of endovascular therapy for vasospasm on cerebral blood flow, transcranial doppler ultrasonographic velocities, and cerebral artery diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskouian, Rod J; Martin, Neil A; Lee, Jae Hong; Glenn, Thomas C; Guthrie, Donald; Gonzalez, Nestor R; Afari, Arash; Viñuela, Fernando

    2002-07-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the effects of endovascular therapy on vasospastic cerebral vessels. We reviewed the medical records for 387 patients with ruptured intracranial aneurysms who were treated at a single institution (University of California, Los Angeles) between May 1, 1993, and March 31, 2001. Patients who developed cerebral vasospasm and underwent cerebral arteriographic, transcranial Doppler ultrasonographic, and cerebral blood flow (CBF) studies before and after endovascular therapy for cerebral arterial spasm (vasospasm) were included in this study. Forty-five patients fulfilled the aforementioned criteria and were treated with either papaverine infusion, papaverine infusion with angioplasty, or angioplasty alone. After balloon angioplasty (12 patients), CBF increased from 27.8 +/- 2.8 ml/100 g/min to 28.4 +/- 3.0 ml/100 g/min (P = 0.87); the middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity was 1 57.6 +/- 9.4 cm/s and decreased to 76.3 +/- 9.3 cm/s (P < 0.05), with a mean increase in cerebral artery diameters of 24.4%. Papaverine infusion (20 patients) transiently increased the CBF from 27.5 +/- 2.1 ml/100 g/min to 38.7 +/- 2.8 ml/100 g/min (P < 0.05) and decreased the middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity from 109.9 +/- 9.1 cm/s to 82.8 +/- 8.6 cm/s (P < 0.05). There was a mean increase in vessel diameters of 30.1% after papaverine infusion. Combined treatment (13 patients) significantly increased the CBF from 33.3 +/- 3.2 ml/100 g/min to 41.7 +/- 2.8 ml/100 g/min (P< 0.05) and decreased the transcranial Doppler velocities from 148.9 +/- 12.7 cm/s to 111.4 +/- 10.6 cm/s (P < 0.05), with a mean increase in vessel diameters of 42.2%. Balloon angioplasty increased proximal vessel diameters, whereas papaverine treatment effectively dilated distal cerebral vessels. In our small series, we observed no correlation between early clinical improvement or clinical outcomes and any of our quantitative or physiological data (CBF, transcranial Doppler

  11. Noninvasive nodal restaging in clinically node positive breast cancer patients after neoadjuvant systemic therapy: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schipper, R.J.; Moossdorff, M.; Beets-Tan, R.G.H.; Smidt, M.L.; Lobbes, M.B.I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To provide a systematic review of studies comparing the diagnostic performance of noninvasive techniques and axillary lymph node dissection in the identification of initially node positive patients with pathological complete response of axillary lymph nodes to neoadjuvant systemic therapy. Methods: PubMed and Embase databases were searched until May 21st, 2014. First, duplicate studies were eliminated. Next, study abstracts were read by two readers to assess eligibility. Studies were selected based on predefined inclusion criteria. Of these, data extraction was performed by two readers independently. Results: Of the 987 abstracts that were considered for inclusion, four were eligible for final analysis, which included a total of 572 patients. The diagnostic performance of clinical examination, axillary ultrasound, breast MRI, whole body 18 F-FDG PET-CT, and a prediction model to identify patients with pathological complete response were investigated. Studies were often limited by small sample size. Furthermore, systemic therapy regimens and definitions of clinical and pathological complete response were variable, refraining further pooling of data. The reported positive predictive value of different techniques to identify patients with axillary pathological complete response after neoadjuvant systemic therapy varied between 40% and 100%. Conclusion: At present, there is no accurate noninvasive restaging technique able to identify patients with complete axillary response after neoadjuvant systemic therapy

  12. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is as effective as electroconvulsive therapy in the treatment of nondelusional major depressive disorder: an open study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunhaus, L; Dannon, P N; Schreiber, S; Dolberg, O H; Amiaz, R; Ziv, R; Lefkifker, E

    2000-02-15

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a new method for the stimulation of the central nervous system, is being proposed as a potential new treatment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). We tested the hypothesis that rTMS would be as effective as electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients with MDD. Forty patients with MDD referred for ECT were randomly assigned to either ECT or rTMS. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation was performed at 90% power of the motor threshold. The stimulation frequency was 10 Hz for either 2 sec (first eight patients) or 6 sec (final 12 patients) for 20 trains. Patients were treated for up to 20 treatment days. Electroconvulsive therapy was performed according to standard protocols. Overall patients responded best to ECT (chi(2) = 3.8, p <.05). Patients with MDD and psychosis responded significantly better to ECT (chi(2) = 9.2, p <. 01), whereas MDD patients without psychosis responded similarly to both treatments (chi(2) = 0.0, ns). The analysis of variance with repeated measures of clinical variables for the whole sample revealed significant treatment effects for both groups; however, interaction between group and treatment was seen only for the Global Assessment of Function and the Sleep assessment. When the psychosis-nonpsychosis grouping was considered, patients with psychosis responded dramatically better to ECT in all assessments, whereas those without psychosis responded similarly to both treatments. Overall ECT was a more potent treatment for patients with MDD, this being particularly evident in patients with MDD and psychosis; however, in patients with MDD without psychosis the effects of rTMS were similar to those of ECT. The results we report are encouraging and support an important role for rTMS in the treatment of severe MDD; however, additional blinded studies are needed to precisely define this role.

  13. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over Premotor Cortex Improves Motor Function in Severe Stroke: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen M. Andrade

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We compared the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation at different cortical sites (premotor and motor primary cortex combined with constraint-induced movement therapy for treatment of stroke patients. Design. Sixty patients were randomly distributed into 3 groups: Group A, anodal stimulation on premotor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group B, anodal stimulation on primary motor cortex and constraint-induced movement therapy; Group C, sham stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy. Evaluations involved analysis of functional independence, motor recovery, spasticity, gross motor function, and muscle strength. Results. A significant improvement in primary outcome (functional independence after treatment in the premotor group followed by primary motor group and sham group was observed. The same pattern of improvement was highlighted among all secondary outcome measures regarding the superior performance of the premotor group over primary motor and sham groups. Conclusions. Premotor cortex can contribute to motor function in patients with severe functional disabilities in early stages of stroke. This study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (NCT 02628561.

  14. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Juan, Daniel; Morales-Quezada, León; Orozco Garduño, Adolfo Josué; Alonso-Vanegas, Mario; González-Aragón, Maricarmen Fernández; Espinoza López, Dulce Anabel; Vázquez Gregorio, Rafael; Anschel, David J; Fregni, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an emerging non-invasive neuromodulation therapy in epilepsy with conflicting results in terms of efficacy and safety. Review the literature about the efficacy and safety of tDCS in epilepsy in humans and animals. We searched studies in PubMed, MedLine, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar (January 1969 to October 2013) using the keywords 'transcranial direct current stimulation' or 'tDCS' or 'brain polarization' or 'galvanic stimulation' and 'epilepsy' in animals and humans. Original articles that reported tDCS safety and efficacy in epileptic animals or humans were included. Four review authors independently selected the studies, extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the studies using the recommendations of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, PRISMA guidelines and Jadad Scale. A meta-analysis was not possible due to methodological, clinical and statistical heterogeneity of included studies. We analyzed 9 articles with different methodologies (3 animals/6 humans) with a total of 174 stimulated individuals; 109 animals and 65 humans. In vivo and in vitro animal studies showed that direct current stimulation can successfully induce suppression of epileptiform activity without neurological injury and 4/6 (67%) clinical studies showed an effective decrease in epileptic seizures and 5/6 (83%) reduction of inter-ictal epileptiform activity. All patients tolerated tDCS well. tDCS trials have demonstrated preliminary safety and efficacy in animals and patients with epilepsy. Further larger studies are needed to define the best stimulation protocols and long-term follow-up. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Add-on Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Subacute Aphasia Therapy: Enhanced Improvement of Functional Communication and Basic Linguistic Skills. A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi-Fessen, Ilona; Hartmann, Alexander; Huber, Walter; Fimm, Bruno; Rommel, Thomas; Thiel, Alexander; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    To determine to what extent repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with speech and language therapy improves functional communication and basic linguistic skills of individuals with subacute aphasia. Randomized, blinded, and sham-controlled study. Neurologic rehabilitation hospital. Participants (N=30) with subacute aphasia after stroke. During a 2-week treatment period, half of the participants received 10 sessions of 20-minute inhibitory 1-Hz rTMS over the right inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 45), and the other half received sham stimulation. Directly thereafter, all the participants underwent 45 minutes of speech and language therapy. Aachen Aphasia Test, Amsterdam-Nijmegen Everyday Language Test (ANELT), a naming screening, and subscales of the FIM, all assessed the day before and the day after treatment period. The participants who received real rTMS significantly improved with respect to all 10 measures of basic linguistic skills and functional communication, whereas sham-treated participants significantly improved in only 6 of 10 measures (paired t tests, Pcommunication (ANELT) (repeated-measures analysis of variance, P≤.05). For the first time, this study has demonstrated that basic linguistic skills as well as functional communication are bolstered by combining rTMS and behavioral language therapy in patients with subacute aphasia. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and cerebral angiography - alternative or complementary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockenheimer, S.; Lorey, N.

    1985-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is a noninvasive method of recording the flow velocity of larger intracranial vessels. The impact on diagnosis of cerebravascular occlusive disease is not yet evaluated. We present 15 patients, age range 39-73 years, who suffered from completed stroke. The findings of transcranial Doppler ultrasound and of cerebral angiography are presented. The value of both methods in treatment strategy is discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation of the Right Wernicke's Area Improves Comprehension in Subacute Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Dae Sang; Kim, Dae-Yul; Chun, Min Ho; Jung, Seung Eun; Park, Sung Jong

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the appearance of right-sided language-related brain activity in right-handed patients after a stroke. Non-invasive brain stimulation such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have been shown to modulate excitability in the brain. Moreover, rTMS and…

  18. Non-invasive treatment efficacy evaluation for high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy using magnetically induced magnetoacoustic measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Gepu; Wang, Jiawei; Ma, Qingyu; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2018-04-01

    Although the application of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been demonstrated to be a non-invasive treatment technology for tumor therapy, the real-time temperature monitoring is still a key issue in the practical application. Based on the temperature-impedance relation, a fixed-point magnetically induced magnetoacoustic measurement technology of treatment efficacy evaluation for tissue thermocoagulation during HIFU therapy is developed with a sensitive indicator of critical temperature monitoring in this study. With the acoustic excitation of a focused transducer in the magnetoacoustic tomography with the magnetic induction system, the distributions of acoustic pressure, temperature, electrical conductivity, and acoustic source strength in the focal region are simulated, and the treatment time dependences of the peak amplitude and the corresponding amplitude derivative under various acoustic powers are also achieved. It is proved that the strength peak of acoustic sources is generated by tissue thermocoagulation with a sharp conductivity variation. The peak amplitude of the transducer collected magnetoacoustic signal increases accordingly along with the increase in the treatment time under a fixed acoustic power. When the temperature in the range with the radial and axial widths of about ±0.46 mm and ±2.2 mm reaches 69 °C, an obvious peak of the amplitude derivative can be achieved and used as a sensitive indicator of the critical status of treatment efficacy. The favorable results prove the feasibility of real-time non-invasive temperature monitoring and treatment efficacy evaluation for HIFU ablation using the magnetically induced magnetoacoustic measurement, and might provide a new strategy for accurate dose control during HIFU therapy.

  19. Robotically Assisted Sonic Therapy as a Noninvasive Nonthermal Ablation Modality: Proof of Concept in a Porcine Liver Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolock, Amanda R; Cristescu, Mircea M; Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Green, Chelsey; Cannata, Jonathan; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J; Lee, Fred T

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To determine the feasibility of creating a clinically relevant hepatic ablation (ie, an ablation zone capable of treating a 2-cm liver tumor) by using robotically assisted sonic therapy (RAST), a noninvasive and nonthermal focused ultrasound therapy based on histotripsy. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional animal use and care committee. Ten female pigs were treated with RAST in a single session with a prescribed 3-cm spherical treatment region and immediately underwent abdominal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Three pigs (acute group) were sacrificed immediately following MR imaging. Seven pigs (chronic group) were survived for approximately 4 weeks and were reimaged with MR imaging immediately before sacrifice. Animals underwent necropsy and harvesting of the liver for histologic evaluation of the ablation zone. RAST ablations were performed with a 700-kHz therapy transducer. Student t tests were performed to compare prescribed versus achieved ablation diameter, difference of sphericity from 1, and change in ablation zone volume from acute to chronic imaging. Results Ablation zones had a sphericity index of 0.99 ± 0.01 (standard deviation) (P < .001 vs sphericity index of 1). Anteroposterior and transverse dimensions were not significantly different from prescribed (3.4 ± 0.7; P = .08 and 3.2 ± 0.8; P = .29, respectively). The craniocaudal dimension was significantly larger than prescribed (3.8 ± 1.1; P = .04), likely because of respiratory motion. The central ablation zone demonstrated complete cell destruction and a zone of partial necrosis. A fibrous capsule surrounded the ablation zone by 4 weeks. On 4-week follow-up images, ablation zone volumes decreased by 64% (P < .001). Conclusion RAST is capable of producing clinically relevant ablation zones in a noninvasive manner in a porcine model. © RSNA, 2018.

  20. Effect of electroconvulsive therapy in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation non-responder MDD patients: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannon, P N; Grunhaus, L

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the effectiveness of ECT in-patients who had failed to respond to a course of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment. Seventeen patients with severe MDD who had not responded to a course of rTMS were switched to receive ECT treatments. All the patients were assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, the Global Assessment Functioning Scale, the Global Depression Scale, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Response to the treatment was defined as a 50% decrease in HDRS final score and a final GAS higher than 60. Seven out of 17 patients responded to ECT. Three out of 5 non-psychotics and 4 out of 12 psychotic patients responded. ECT seems to be an effective treatment for 40% of patients who failed to respond to rTMS treatment. Whether this is a result of reduced responsiveness to ECT in rTMS-resistant patients or a consequence of small sample size requires further study.

  1. Electroconvulsive therapy in the treatment of neuropsychiatric conditions and transcranial magnetic stimulation as a pathophysiological probe in neuropsychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, W M; Greenberg, B D

    2000-01-01

    It is a challenging task to review transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies in neuropsychiatric disorders alongside assessments of longstanding clinical applications of ECT as an empirical treatment. The task is challenging because TMS was developed as a probe of neural mechanisms, whereas, in marked contrast, ECT has been a clinical technique from its inception. Since the onset of modern psychopharmacology, the understanding of the potential applications of ECT to neuropsychiatric disorders is generally restricted to case reports of patients with intractable disease that have had at least a partial response to ECT. Studies of the possible efficacy of TMS in neuropsychiatric conditions have a significant advantage over ECT as the treatments are associated with less morbidity. The only serious known complication in TMS is a risk of seizures that may increase in patients with neuropsychiatric conditions such as course brain disease. Only cortical structures are themselves accessible to TMS using current technology. Present TMS techniques, however, seem capable of affecting activity in deeper brain structures that are functionally linked to cortical brain regions. TMS permits novel explorations of relationships between regional brain activity and symptoms of a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, as well as in research relating activity in functionally related brain regions to modulation of cognition and affective states in healthy individuals. This is particularly true at present because TMS and powerful neuroimaging and neuropsychological tools are all making rapid advances simultaneously.

  2. Noninvasive referencing of intraocular tumors for external beam radiation therapy using optical coherence tomography: A proof of concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rüegsegger, Michael B.; Steiner, Patrick; Kowal, Jens H.; Geiser, Dominik; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy is currently considered the most common treatment modality for intraocular tumors. Localization of the tumor and efficient compensation of tumor misalignment with respect to the radiation beam are crucial. According to the state of the art procedure, localization of the target volume is indirectly performed by the invasive surgical implantation of radiopaque clips or is limited to positioning the head using stereoscopic radiographies. This work represents a proof-of-concept for direct and noninvasive tumor referencing based on anterior eye topography acquired using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods: A prototype of a head-mounted device has been developed for automatic monitoring of tumor position and orientation in the isocentric reference frame for LINAC based treatment of intraocular tumors. Noninvasive tumor referencing is performed with six degrees of freedom based on anterior eye topography acquired using OCT and registration of a statistical eye model. The proposed prototype was tested based on enucleated pig eyes and registration accuracy was measured by comparison of the resulting transformation with tilt and torsion angles manually induced using a custom-made test bench. Results: Validation based on 12 enucleated pig eyes revealed an overall average registration error of 0.26 ± 0.08° in 87 ± 0.7 ms for tilting and 0.52 ± 0.03° in 94 ± 1.4 ms for torsion. Furthermore, dependency of sampling density on mean registration error was quantitatively assessed. Conclusions: The tumor referencing method presented in combination with the statistical eye model introduced in the past has the potential to enable noninvasive treatment and may improve quality, efficacy, and flexibility of external beam radiotherapy of intraocular tumors

  3. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswa Ranjan Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a non-invasive and relatively painless tool that has been used to study various cognitive functions as well as to understand the brain-behavior relationship in normal individuals as well as in those with various neuropsychiatric disorders. It has also been used as a therapeutic tool in various neuropsychiatric disorders because of its ability to specifically modulate distinct brain areas. Studies have shown that repeated stimulation at low frequency produces long-lasting inhibition, which is called as long-term depression, whereas repeated high-frequency stimulation can produce excitation through long-term potentiation. This paper reviews the current status of rTMS as an investigative and therapeutic modality in various neuropsychiatric disorders. It has been used to study the cortical and subcortical functions, neural plasticity and brain mapping in normal individuals and in various neuropsychiatric disorders. rTMS has been most promising in the treatment of depression, with an overall milder adverse effect profile compared with electroconvulsive therapy. In other neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, mania, epilepsy and substance abuse, it has been found to be useful, although further studies are required to establish therapeutic efficacy. It appears to be ineffective in the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder. There is a paucity of studies of efficacy and safety of rTMS in pediatric and geriatric population. Although it appears safe, further research is required to optimize its efficacy and reduce the side-effects. Magnetic seizure therapy, which involves producing seizures akin to electroconvulsive therapy, appears to be of comparable efficacy in the treatment of depression with less cognitive adverse effects.

  4. Evaluation of non-invasive multispectral imaging as a tool for measuring the effect of systemic therapy in Kaposi sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana M Kainerstorfer

    Full Text Available Diffuse multi-spectral imaging has been evaluated as a potential non-invasive marker of tumor response. Multi-spectral images of Kaposi sarcoma skin lesions were taken over the course of treatment, and blood volume and oxygenation concentration maps were obtained through principal component analysis (PCA of the data. These images were compared with clinical and pathological responses determined by conventional means. We demonstrate that cutaneous lesions have increased blood volume concentration and that changes in this parameter are a reliable indicator of treatment efficacy, differentiating responders and non-responders. Blood volume decreased by at least 20% in all lesions that responded by clinical criteria and increased in the two lesions that did not respond clinically. Responses as assessed by multi-spectral imaging also generally correlated with overall patient clinical response assessment, were often detectable earlier in the course of therapy, and are less subject to observer variability than conventional clinical assessment. Tissue oxygenation was more variable, with lesions often showing decreased oxygenation in the center surrounded by a zone of increased oxygenation. This technique could potentially be a clinically useful supplement to existing response assessment in KS, providing an early, quantitative, and non-invasive marker of treatment effect.

  5. PsychotherapyPlus: augmentation of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with prefrontal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in major depressive disorder-study design and methodology of a multicenter double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajbouj, Malek; Aust, Sabine; Spies, Jan; Herrera-Melendez, Ana-Lucia; Mayer, Sarah V; Peters, Maike; Plewnia, Christian; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Frase, Lukas; Normann, Claus; Behler, Nora; Wulf, Linda; Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Padberg, Frank

    2017-12-06

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders worldwide. About 20-30% of patients do not respond to the standard psychopharmacological and/or psychotherapeutic interventions. Mounting evidence from neuroimaging studies in MDD patients reveal altered activation patterns in lateral prefrontal brain areas. Successful cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is associated with a recovery of these neural alterations. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is capable of influencing prefrontal cortex activity and cognitive functions such as working memory and emotion regulation. Thus, a clinical trial investigating the effects of an antidepressant intervention combining CBT with tDCS seems promising. The present study investigates the antidepressant efficacy of a combined CBT-tDCS intervention as compared to CBT with sham-tDCS or CBT alone. A total of 192 patients (age range 20-65 years) with MDD (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale Score ≥ 15, 21-item version) will be recruited at four study sites across Germany (Berlin, Munich, Tuebingen, and Freiburg) and randomly assigned to one of the following three treatment arms: (1) CBT + active tDCS; (2) CBT + sham-tDCS; and (3) CBT alone. All participants will attend a 6-week psychotherapeutic intervention comprising 12 sessions of CBT each lasting 100 min in a closed group setting. tDCS will be applied simultaneously with CBT. Active tDCS includes stimulation with an intensity of 2 mA for 30 min with the anode placed over F3 and the cathode over F4 according to the EEG 10-20 system, if assigned. The primary outcome measure is the change in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale scores from baseline to 6, 18, and 30 weeks after the first session. Participants also undergo pre- and post-treatment neuropsychological testing and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess changes in prefrontal functioning and connectivity

  6. Safety of primed repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and modified constraint-induced movement therapy in a randomized controlled trial in pediatric hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillick, Bernadette T; Krach, Linda E; Feyma, Tim; Rich, Tonya L; Moberg, Kelli; Menk, Jeremiah; Cassidy, Jessica; Kimberley, Teresa; Carey, James R

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the safety of combining a 6-Hz primed low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) intervention in the contralesional hemisphere with a modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT) program in children with congenital hemiparesis. Phase 1 randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled pretest/posttest trial. University academic facility and pediatric specialty hospital. Subjects (N = 19; age range, 8-17 y) with congenital hemiparesis caused by ischemic stroke or periventricular leukomalacia. No subject withdrew because of adverse events. All subjects included completed the study. Subjects were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: either real rTMS plus mCIMT (n = 10) or sham rTMS plus mCIMT (n = 9). Adverse events, physician assessment, ipsilateral hand function, stereognosis, cognitive function, subject report of symptoms assessment, and subject questionnaire. No major adverse events occurred. Minor adverse events were found in both groups. The most common events were headaches (real: 50%, sham: 89%; P = .14) and cast irritation (real: 30%, sham: 44%; P = .65). No differences between groups in secondary cognitive and unaffected hand motor measures were found. Primed rTMS can be used safely with mCIMT in congenital hemiparesis. We provide new information on the use of rTMS in combination with mCIMT in children. These findings could be useful in research and future clinical applications in advancing function in congenital hemiparesis. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison between neurostimulation techniques repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation vs electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of resistant depression: patient preference and cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnezi, Racheli; Aminov, Emanuel; Shmuel, Dikla; Dreifuss, Merav; Dannon, Pinhas

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common disorder, widely distributed in the population, and is often associated with severe symptoms and functional impairment. It has been estimated that 30% of MDD patients do not benefit adequately from therapeutic interventions, including pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is generally defined as a failure to achieve remission, despite therapeutic interventions. The most effective treatment alternatives for TRD are hospitalization, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here we compared the clinical effectiveness of ECT and TMS, including success rates, patient responses, side-effect profiles, and financial worthiness. We found that ECT (P<0.0001) was more effective than TMS (P<0.012) (not statistically significant in group effect) in TRD patients. However, ECT patients reported a higher percentage of side effects (P<0.01) and the TMS treatment scored better in terms of patient preference. The cost benefit of ECT was higher than that of TMS (US$2075 vs US$814). Patient's preferences for treatment could be more intense in the TMS, if the TMS is included in the Health Maintenance Organization's service list. We propose that both of these treatment options should be available in psychiatric wards, thus expanding the therapeutic toolkit for TRD.

  8. Comparing the Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Electroconvulsive Therapy in the Treatment of Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beppe Micallef-Trigona

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is the longest standing psychiatric treatment available and has unequivocal benefit in severe depression. However this treatment comes with a number of side effects such as memory impairment. On the other hand, Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS is a relatively new form of treatment which has been shown to be efficacious in patients suffering from a number of psychopathologies, including severe depression, with few reported side effects. Due to its potential therapeutic efficacy and lack of side effects, rTMS has gained traction in the treatment of depression, with a number of authors keen to see it take over from ECT. However, it is not clear whether rTMS represents a therapeutic alternative to ECT. This meta-analysis will therefore compare the “gold standard” treatment for severe depression, with the relatively new but promising rTMS. A literature search will be performed with the intention to include all randomised clinical trials. The null hypothesis is that there is no difference in the antidepressant efficacy between the two types of treatment modalities. Statistical analysis of Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS scores will be performed.

  9. Effect of anatomical variability in brain on transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syeda, F.; Magsood, H.; Lee, E. G.; El-Gendy, A. A.; Jiles, D. C.; Hadimani, R. L.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation is a non-invasive clinical therapy used to treat depression and migraine, and shows further promise as treatment for Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurological disorders. However, it is yet unclear as to how anatomical differences may affect stimulation from this treatment. We use finite element analysis to model and analyze the results of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in various head models. A number of heterogeneous head models have been developed using MRI data of real patients, including healthy individuals as well as patients of Parkinson's disease. Simulations of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation performed on 22 anatomically different models highlight the differences in induced stimulation. A standard Figure of 8 coil is used with frequency 2.5 kHz, placed 5 mm above the head. We compare cortical stimulation, volume of brain tissue stimulated, specificity, and maximum E-field induced in the brain for models ranging from ages 20 to 60. Results show that stimulation varies drastically between patients of the same age and health status depending upon brain-scalp distance, which is not necessarily a linear progression with age.

  10. Breast Cancer Gene Therapy: Development of Novel Non-Invasive Magnetic Resonance Assay to Optimize Efficacy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mason, Ralph P

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treatment of breast cancer. In particular clinical trials are underway to apply therapeutic genes related to pro-drug activation or to modulate the activity of oncogenes by blocking promoter sites...

  11. Primed low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy in pediatric hemiparesis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillick, Bernadette T; Krach, Linda E; Feyma, Tim; Rich, Tonya L; Moberg, Kelli; Thomas, William; Cassidy, Jessica M; Menk, Jeremiah; Carey, James R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of five treatments of 6 Hz primed, low-frequency, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) to promote recovery of the paretic hand in children with congenital hemiparesis. Nineteen children with congenital hemiparesis aged between 8 and 17 years (10 males, nine females; mean age 10 years 10 months, SD 2 years 10 months; Manual Ability Classification Scale levels I-III) underwent five sessions of either real rTMS (n=10) or sham rTMS (n=9) alternated daily with CIMT. CIMT consisted of 13 days of continuous long-arm casting with five skin-check sessions. Each child received a total of 10 hours of one-to-one therapy. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) and the secondary outcome variables were the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and stereognosis. A Wilcoxon signed-rank sum test was used to analyze differences between pre- and post-test scores within the groups. Analysis of covariance was used to compute mean differences between groups adjusting for baseline. Fisher's exact test was used to compare individual change in AHA raw scores with the smallest detectable difference (SDD) of 4 points. All participants receiving treatment finished the study. Improvement in AHA differed significantly between groups (p=0.007). No significant differences in the secondary outcome measures were found. Eight out of 10 participants in the rTMS/CIMT group showed improvement greater than the SDD, but only two out of nine in the sham rTMS/CIMT group showed such improvement (p=0.023). No serious adverse events occurred. Primed, low-frequency rTMS combined with CIMT appears to be safe, feasible, and efficacious in pediatric hemiparesis. Larger clinical trials are now indicated. © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  12. Using non-invasive brain stimulation to augment motor training-induced plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascual-Leone Alvaro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Therapies for motor recovery after stroke or traumatic brain injury are still not satisfactory. To date the best approach seems to be the intensive physical therapy. However the results are limited and functional gains are often minimal. The goal of motor training is to minimize functional disability and optimize functional motor recovery. This is thought to be achieved by modulation of plastic changes in the brain. Therefore, adjunct interventions that can augment the response of the motor system to the behavioural training might be useful to enhance the therapy-induced recovery in neurological populations. In this context, noninvasive brain stimulation appears to be an interesting option as an add-on intervention to standard physical therapies. Two non-invasive methods of inducing electrical currents into the brain have proved to be promising for inducing long-lasting plastic changes in motor systems: transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. These techniques represent powerful methods for priming cortical excitability for a subsequent motor task, demand, or stimulation. Thus, their mutual use can optimize the plastic changes induced by motor practice, leading to more remarkable and outlasting clinical gains in rehabilitation. In this review we discuss how these techniques can enhance the effects of a behavioural intervention and the clinical evidence to date.

  13. Noninvasive delivery systems for peptides and proteins in osteoporosis therapy: a retroperspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Herbert; Perera, Glen; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide the reader general and inspiring prospects in various attempts to make noninvasive delivery systems of calcitonin and teriparatide feasible and as convenient as possible. Calcitonin and teriparatide play an important role in both calcium homeostasis and bone remodelling. Currently calcitonin is available as a subcutaneous injection and as a nasal spray whereas teriparatide is administered subcutaneously. In the past few years, an increasing number of articles about drug delivery systems for calcitonin and teriparatide have been published. These delivery systems have been developed to overcome the inherent barriers for the uptake across the diverse membranes on the various routes for protein and peptide delivery. Co-administration of permeation enhancers, mucoadhesive agents, viscosity modifying agents, multifunctional polymers, protease inhibitors as well as encapsulation and chemical modification are utilized in order to improve calcitonin and teriparatide absorption after oral, nasal, pulmonal, or buccal administration. The majority of research groups have been working on the development of formulations based on the encapsulation of molecules in biodegradable and biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles. However these observations are based on data obtained under different experimental conditions. Hence, it is difficult to compare the obtained results in order to draw general conclusions about the most promising characteristics required for oral and nasal formulations for these peptides.

  14. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF NON-INVASIVE BRAIN STIMULATION THERAPIES AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE TREATMENT OF MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Augusto Negreiros Parente Capela Sampaio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD and cardiovascular diseases are intimately associated. Depression is an independent risk factor for mortality in cardiovascular samples. Neuroendocrine dysfunctions in MDD are related to an overactive hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and increased sympathetic activity. Novel intervention strategies for MDD include the non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS techniques such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. In fact, although these techniques have being increasingly used as a treatment for MDD, their cardiovascular effects were not sufficiently investigated, which would be important considering the dyad MDD/cardiovascular disorders. We investigated this issue through a systematic review for published articles from the first date available to May 2012 in MEDLINE and other databases, looking for main risk factors and surrogate markers for cardiovascular disease such as: cortisol, heart rate variability, alcohol, smoking, obesity, hypertension, glucose. We identified 37 articles (981 subjects according to our eligibility criteria. Our main findings were that NIBS techniques might be effective strategies for down-regulating HPA activity and regulating food, alcohol and cigarette consumption. NIBS’s effects on HRV and blood pressure presented mixed findings, with studies suggesting that HRV values can decrease or remain unchanged after NIBS, while one study found that rTMS increased blood pressure levels. Also, a single study showed that glucose levels decrease after tDCS. However, most studies tested the acute effects after one single session of rTMS/tDCS; therefore further studies are necessary to investigate whether NIBS modifies cardiovascular risk factors in the long-term. In fact, considering the burden of cardiac disease, further trials in cardiovascular, depressed and nondepressed samples using NIBS should be performed.

  15. Transcranial brain stimulation: closing the loop between brain and stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabanov, Anke; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2016-01-01

    -related and state-related variability. Fluctuations in brain-states can be traced online with functional brain imaging and inform the timing or other settings of transcranial brain stimulation. State-informed open-loop stimulation is aligned to the expression of a predefined brain state, according to prespecified......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss recent strategies for boosting the efficacy of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation to improve human brain function. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent research exposed substantial intra- and inter-individual variability in response to plasticity-inducing transcranial brain...... stimulation. Trait-related and state-related determinants contribute to this variability, challenging the standard approach to apply stimulation in a rigid, one-size-fits-all fashion. Several strategies have been identified to reduce variability and maximize the plasticity-inducing effects of noninvasive...

  16. Noninvasive MR-Guided HIFU Therapy of TSC-Associated Renal Angiomyolipomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    sufficient for this application because coil array configuration is limited by small mouse anatomy. In our third year’s effort, the research plan was...therapy and a new Ingenia 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner from Philips HealthCare. Using the new instrumentation, we established a large animal MR-guided HIFU...anatomy limitation in mice MRI coil development, mouse cancer model was not used eventually. In the third year, we developed a large animal MR

  17. Use of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment in Psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleman, Andre

    The potential of noninvasive neurostimulation by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for improving psychiatric disorders has been studied increasingly over the past two decades. This is especially the case for major depression and for auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia.

  18. Comparison between neurostimulation techniques rapid transcranial magnetic stimulation vs electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of resistant depression: patient preference and cost-effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnezi R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Racheli Magnezi,1 Emanuel Aminov,1 Dikla Shmuel,2 Merav Dreifuss,1 Pinhas Dannon1,2 1Public Health and Health Systems Management Program, Department of Management, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, 2Beer Yaakov Mental Health Center affiliated to Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Objectives: Major depressive disorder (MDD is a common disorder, widely distributed in the population, and is often associated with severe symptoms and functional impairment. It has been estimated that 30% of MDD patients do not benefit adequately from therapeutic interventions, including pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. Treatment-resistant depression (TRD is generally defined as a failure to achieve remission, despite therapeutic interventions. Aim: The most effective treatment alternatives for TRD are hospitalization, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS. Here we compared the clinical effectiveness of ECT and TMS, including success rates, patient responses, side-effect profiles, and financial worthiness. Results: We found that ECT (P<0.0001 was more effective than TMS (P<0.012 (not statistically significant in group effect in TRD patients. However, ECT patients reported a higher percentage of side effects (P<0.01 and the TMS treatment scored better in terms of patient preference. The cost benefit of ECT was higher than that of TMS (US$2075 vs US$814. Patient’s preferences for treatment could be more intense in the TMS, if the TMS is included in the Health Maintenance Organization’s service list. Conclusion: We propose that both of these treatment options should be available in psychiatric wards, thus expanding the therapeutic toolkit for TRD. Keywords: ECT, TMS, treatment-resistant depression, cost benefit, patient preference

  19. Comparative efficacy and acceptability of electroconvulsive therapy versus repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for major depression: A systematic review and multiple-treatments meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Li-Bo; Liu, Yi-Yun; Fan, Song-Hua; Xie, Peng

    2017-03-01

    The effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and bilateral, left prefrontal, and right prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on major depressive disorder (MDD) have not been adequately addressed by previous studies. Here, a multiple-treatments meta-analysis, which incorporates evidence from direct and indirect comparisons from a network of trials, was performed to assess the efficacy and acceptability of these four treatment modalities on MDD. The literature was searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on ECT, bilateral rTMS, and unilateral rTMS for treating MDD up to May 2016. The main outcome measures were response and drop-out rates. Data were obtained from 25 studies consisting of 1288 individuals with MDD. ECT was non-significantly more efficacious than B-rTMS, R-rTMS, and L-rTMS. Left prefrontal rTMS was non -significantly less efficacious than all other treatment modalities. In terms of acceptability, R-rTMS was non-significantly better tolerated than ECT, B-rTMS, and L-rTMS. ECT was the most efficacious treatment with the cumulative probabilities of being the most efficacious treatment being: ECT (65%), B-rTMS (25%), R-rTMS (8%), and L-rTMS (2%). R-rTMS was the best-tolerated treatment with the cumulative probabilities of being the best-tolerated treatment being: R-rTMS (52%), B-rTMS (17%), L-rTMS (16%), and ECT (14%). Coherence analysis detected no statistically significant incoherence in any comparisons of direct with indirect evidence for the response rate and drop-out rate. ECT was the most efficacious, but least tolerated, treatment, while R-rTMS was the best tolerated treatment for MDD. B-rTMS appears to have the most favorable balance between efficacy and acceptability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Low intensity transcranial electric stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antal, Andrea; Alekseichuk, I; Bikson, M

    2017-01-01

    Low intensity transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) in humans, encompassing transcranial direct current (tDCS), transcutaneous spinal Direct Current Stimulation (tsDCS), transcranial alternating current (tACS), and transcranial random noise (tRNS) stimulation or their combinations, appears...

  1. Distinct Neural-Functional Effects of Treatments With Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Electroconvulsive Therapy, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Their Relations to Regional Brain Function in Major Depression: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, David T; Fogelman, Phoebe; Nordanskog, Pia; Drevets, Wayne C; Hamilton, J Paul

    2017-05-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have examined the neural substrates of treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Low sample size and methodological heterogeneity, however, undermine the generalizability of findings from individual studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to identify reliable neural changes resulting from different modes of treatment for MDD and compared them with each other and with reliable neural functional abnormalities observed in depressed versus control samples. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies reporting changes in brain activity (e.g., as indexed by positron emission tomography) following treatments with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), or transcranial magnetic stimulation. Additionally, we examined the statistical reliability of overlap among thresholded meta-analytic SSRI, ECT, and transcranial magnetic stimulation maps as well as a map of abnormal neural function in MDD. Our meta-analysis revealed that 1) SSRIs decrease activity in the anterior insula, 2) ECT decreases activity in central nodes of the default mode network, 3) transcranial magnetic stimulation does not result in reliable neural changes, and 4) regional effects of these modes of treatment do not significantly overlap with each other or with regions showing reliable functional abnormality in MDD. SSRIs and ECT produce neurally distinct effects relative to each other and to the functional abnormalities implicated in depression. These treatments therefore may exert antidepressant effects by diminishing neural functions not implicated in depression but that nonetheless impact mood. We discuss how the distinct neural changes resulting from SSRIs and ECT can account for both treatment effects and side effects from these therapies as well as how to individualize these treatments. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of electroconvulsive therapy and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eGedge

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels are decreased in individuals with depression and increase following antidepressant treatment. The objective of this study is to compare pre- and post-treatment serum BDNF levels in patients with drug-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD who received either electroconvulsive therapy (ECT or repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS. It is hypothesized that non-pharmacological treatments also increase serum BDNF levels.Methods: This was a prospective, single-blind study comparing pre- and post-treatment serum BDNF levels of twenty-nine patients with drug-resistant MDD who received ECT or rTMS treatment. Serum BDNF levels were measured one week prior to and one week after treatment using the sandwich ELISA technique. Depression severity was measured one week before and one week after treatment using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Two-sided normal distribution paired t-test analysis was used to compare pre- and post-treatment BDNF concentration and illness severity. Bivariate correlations using Pearson's coefficient assessed the relationship between post-treatment BDNF levels and post-treatment depression severity.Results: There was no significant difference in serum BDNF levels before and after ECT, although concentrations tended to increase from a baseline mean of 9.95 ng/ml to 12.29 ng/ml after treatment (p= 0.137. Treatment with rTMS did not significantly alter BDNF concentrations (p= 0.282. Depression severity significantly decreased following both ECT (p= 0.003 and rTMS (p< 0.001. Post-treatment BDNF concentration was not significantly correlated with post-treatment depression severity in patients who received either ECT (r= -0.133, p= 0.697 or rTMS (r= 0.374, p= 0.126.Conclusion: This study suggests that ECT and rTMS may not exert their clinical effects by altering serum BDNF levels. Serum BDNF concentration may not be a biomarker of ECT or rTMS treatment response.

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation--may be useful as a preoperative screen of motor tract function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Gloria M; Dias, Brennan R; Brown, Judy L; Henry, Christina M; Brooks, David A; Buggie, Ed W

    2013-08-01

    Transcranial motor stimulation with noninvasive cortical surface stimulation, using a high-intensity magnetic field referred to as transcranial magnetic stimulation generally, is considered a nonpainful technique. In contrast, transcranial electric stimulation of the motor tracts typically cannot be done in unanesthesized patients. Intraoperative monitoring of motor tract function with transcranial electric stimulation is considered a standard practice in many institutions for patients during surgical procedures in which there is potential risk of motor tract impairment so that the risk of paraplegia or paraparesis can be reduced. Because transcranial electric stimulation cannot be typically done in the outpatient setting, transcranial magnetic stimulation may be able to provide a well-tolerated method for evaluation of the corticospinal motor tracts before surgery. One hundred fifty-five patients aged 5 to 20 years were evaluated preoperatively with single-stimulation nonrepetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for preoperative assessment. The presence of responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation reliably predicted the presence of responses to transcranial electric stimulation intraoperatively. No complications occurred during the testing, and findings were correlated to the clinical history and used in the setup of the surgical monitoring.

  4. Noninvasive neuromodulation in migraine and cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Amaal

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the currently available noninvasive neuromodulation devices for the treatment of migraine and cluster headache. Over the last decade, several noninvasive devices have undergone development and clinical trials to evaluate efficacy and safety. Based on this body of work, single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcutaneous supraorbital neurostimulation, and noninvasive vagal nerve stimulation devices have been cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration and are available for clinical use for the treatment of primary headache disorders. Overall, these novel noninvasive devices appear to be safe, well tolerated, and have demonstrated promising results in clinical trials in both migraine and cluster headache. This narrative review will provide a summary and update of the proposed mechanisms of action, evidence, safety, and future directions of various currently available modalities of noninvasive neuromodulation for the treatment of migraine and cluster headache.

  5. Interest of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex in the management of refractory cancer pain in palliative care: Two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizard, Julien; Levesque, Amélie; Denis, Nathalie; de Chauvigny, Edwige; Lepeintre, Aurélie; Raoul, Sylvie; Labat, Jean-Jacques; Bulteau, Samuel; Maillard, Benoît; Buffenoir, Kevin; Potel, Gilles; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Nguyen, Jean Paul

    2015-06-01

    Non-drug treatments should be systematically associated to the medical analgesic treatment during the terminal phase of cancer. Patient 1, a 23-year-old woman, presented an adenocarcinoma of the rectum, with liver and lung metastases. Pain was initially treated by oral morphine and a combination of pregabalin and amitriptyline. Ketamine and intrathecal administration of morphine were both ineffective. Patient 2, a 69-year-old woman, presented a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. She was admitted to the palliative care unit with mixed pain related to cutaneous lymphomatous infiltration. World Health Organization (WHO) step 3 analgesics had not been tolerated. Both patients received five consecutive 20-min sessions of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to the right motor cortex. Patient 1 experienced a marked improvement of her pain over the days following the first repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation session. Medical treatment was able to be rapidly decreased by about 50%, which restored an almost normal level of consciousness and lucidity. Patient 2's pain was also markedly decreased over the days following these five consecutive sessions, and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation also appeared to have had a beneficial effect on the patient's anxiety and mood. In the context of palliative care of cancer patients experiencing refractory pain that is difficult to control by the usual treatments, motor cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, due to its noninvasive nature, can be used as an adjuvant therapy to improve various components of pain, including the emotional components. By reducing the doses of analgesics, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation decreases the severity of their adverse effects and improves the patient's quality of life. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Is there potential for repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) as a treatment of OCD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Rashid; Robbins, Trevor W

    2017-09-01

    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a common and highly debilitating psychiatric disorder. Amongst OCD sufferers are a significant number (40-60%) of so-called non-responders who do not fully respond to commonly available treatments, which include medications (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors-SSRIs) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT). Modern 'neuromodulatory' techniques such as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) potentially offer alternative forms of treatment for OCD patients who either do not respond to, or are unable or unwilling to take SSRIs and undergo CBT. Although shown to be effective in treatment resistant OCD, DBS requires invasive neurosurgical procedures with associated risks. On the other hand, rTMS and tDCS are non-invasive forms of treatment, which are largely risk free, but the evidence of their efficacy so far is somewhat limited, with only small number of published studies. In this brief survey we will address the potential of rTMS as a therapeutic tool for OCD and review the published literature on the cortical targets for rTMS used so far. We will also discuss some of the newer variants of rTMS techniques only a few of which have been employed so far, and speculate whether there might be a place for rTMS as a standard treatment in OCD, along side CBT, SSRIs and DBS.

  7. Non-invasive brain stimulation: an interventional tool for enhancing behavioral training after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Jonas Wessel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of disability among adults. Motor deficit is the most common impairment after stroke. Especially, deficits in fine motor skills impair numerous activities of daily life. Re-acquisition of motor skills resulting in improved or more accurate motor performance is paramount to regain function, and is the basis of behavioral motor therapy after stroke. Within the past years, there has been a rapid technological and methodological development in neuroimaging leading to a significant progress in the understanding of the neural substrates that underlie motor skill acquisition and functional recovery in stroke patients. Based on this and the development of novel non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, new adjuvant interventional approaches that augment the response to behavioral training have been proposed. Transcranial direct current (tDCS, transcranial magnetic (TMS and paired associative (PAS stimulation are noninvasive brain stimulation techniques that can modulate cortical excitability, neuronal plasticity and interact with learning and memory in both healthy individuals and stroke patients. These techniques can enhance the effect of practice and facilitate the retention of tasks that mimic daily life activities. The purpose of the present review is to provide a comprehensive overview of neuroplastic phenomena in the motor system during learning of a motor skill, recovery after brain injury, and of interventional strategies to enhance the beneficial effects of customarily used neurorehabilitation after stroke.

  8. Non-invasive brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease: Current concepts and outlook 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, David H; Hallett, Mark

    2015-01-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), the emergence of symptoms refractory to conventional therapy poses a therapeutic challenge. The success of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of PD have raised interest in non-invasive brain stimulation as an alternative therapeutic tool. The rationale for its use draws from the concept that reversing abnormalities in brain activity and physiology thought to cause the clinical deficits may restore normal functioning. Currently the best evidence in support of this concept comes from DBS, which improves motor deficits, and modulates brain activity and motor cortex physiology, though whether a causal interaction exists remains largely undetermined. Most trials of non-invasive brain stimulation in PD have applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) targeting the primary motor cortex and cortical areas of the motor circuit. Published studies suggest a possible therapeutic potential of rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), but clinical effects so far have been small and negligible regarding functional independence and quality of life. Approaches to potentiate the efficacy of rTMS, including increasing stimulation intensity and novel stimulation parameters, derive their rationale from studies of brain physiology. These novel parameters simulate normal firing patterns or act on the hypothesized role of oscillatory activity in the motor cortex and basal ganglia in motor control. There may also be diagnostic potential of TMS in characterizing individual traits for personalized medicine.

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Ari A; Dannon, Pinhas N; Grunhaus, Leon

    2003-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive and easily tolerated method of altering cortical physiology. The authors evaluate evidence from the last decade supporting a possible role for TMS in the treatment of depression and explore clinical and technical considerations that might bear on treatment success. The authors review English-language controlled studies of nonconvulsive TMS therapy for depression that appeared in the MEDLINE database through early 2002, as well as one study that was in press in 2002 and was published in 2003. In addition, the authors discuss studies that have examined technical, methodological, and clinical treatment parameters of TMS. Most data support an antidepressant effect of high-frequency repetitive TMS administered to the left prefrontal cortex. The absence of psychosis, younger age, and certain brain physiologic markers might predict treatment success. Technical parameters possibly affecting treatment success include intensity and duration of treatment, but these suggestions require systematic testing. TMS shows promise as a novel antidepressant treatment. Systematic and large-scale studies are needed to identify patient populations most likely to benefit and treatment parameters most likely to produce success. In addition to its potential clinical role, TMS promises to provide insights into the pathophysiology of depression through research designs in which the ability of TMS to alter brain activity is coupled with functional neuroimaging.

  10. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation-coil design with improved focality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, P.; Lee, E. G.; Hadimani, R. L.; Jiles, D. C.

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a technique for neuromodulation that can be used as a non-invasive therapy for various neurological disorders. In TMS, a time varying magnetic field generated from an electromagnetic coil placed on the scalp is used to induce an electric field inside the brain. TMS coil geometry plays an important role in determining the focality and depth of penetration of the induced electric field responsible for stimulation. Clinicians and basic scientists are interested in stimulating a localized area of the brain, while minimizing the stimulation of surrounding neural networks. In this paper, a novel coil has been proposed, namely Quadruple Butterfly Coil (QBC) with an improved focality over the commercial Figure-8 coil. Finite element simulations were conducted with both the QBC and the conventional Figure-8 coil. The two coil's stimulation profiles were assessed with 50 anatomically realistic MRI derived head models. The coils were positioned on the vertex and the scalp over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to stimulate the brain. Computer modeling of the coils has been done to determine the parameters of interest-volume of stimulation, maximum electric field, location of maximum electric field and area of stimulation across all 50 head models for both coils.

  11. Improved transcranial magnetic stimulation coil design with realistic head modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    We are investigating Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a noninvasive technique based on electromagnetic induction which causes stimulation of the neurons in the brain. TMS can be used as a pain-free alternative to conventional electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) which is still widely implemented for treatment of major depression. Development of improved TMS coils capable of stimulating subcortical regions could also allow TMS to replace invasive deep brain stimulation (DBS) which requires surgical implantation of electrodes in the brain. Our new designs allow new applications of the technique to be established for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic applications of psychiatric disorders and neurological diseases. Calculation of the fields generated inside the head is vital for the use of this method for treatment. In prior work we have implemented a realistic head model, incorporating inhomogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, allowing the site of neuronal activation to be accurately calculated. We will show how we utilize this model in the development of novel TMS coil designs to improve the depth of penetration and localization of stimulation produced by stimulator coils.

  12. A dual function fusion protein of Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and firefly luciferase for noninvasive in vivo imaging of gene therapy in malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söling, Ariane; Theiss, Christian; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Rainov, Nikolai G

    2004-08-04

    BACKGROUND: Suicide gene therapy employing the prodrug activating system Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-TK)/ ganciclovir (GCV) has proven to be effective in killing experimental brain tumors. In contrast, glioma patients treated with HSV-TK/ GCV did not show significant treatment benefit, most likely due to insufficient transgene delivery to tumor cells. Therefore, this study aimed at developing a strategy for real-time noninvasive in vivo monitoring of the activity of a therapeutic gene in brain tumor cells. METHODS: The HSV-TK gene was fused to the firefly luciferase (Luc) gene and the fusion construct HSV-TK-Luc was expressed in U87MG human malignant glioma cells. Nude mice with subcutaneous gliomas stably expressing HSV-TK-Luc were subjected to GCV treatment and tumor response to therapy was monitored in vivo by serial bioluminescence imaging. Bioluminescent signals over time were compared with tumor volumes determined by caliper. RESULTS: Transient and stable expression of the HSV-TK-Luc fusion protein in U87MG glioma cells demonstrated close correlation of both enzyme activities. Serial optical imaging of tumor bearing mice detected in all cases GCV induced death of tumor cells expressing the fusion protein and proved that bioluminescence can be reliably used for repetitive and noninvasive quantification of HSV-TK/ GCV mediated cell kill in vivo. CONCLUSION: This approach may represent a valuable tool for the in vivo evaluation of gene therapy strategies for treatment of malignant disease.

  13. Magnetic fields in noninvasive brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Dourado, Marcos; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Scaff, Milberto; Guilhoto, Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    The idea that magnetic fields could be used therapeutically arose 2000 years ago. These therapeutic possibilities were expanded after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry. In 1896, Arsène d'Arsonval reported his experience with noninvasive brain magnetic stimulation to the scientific French community. In the second half of the 20th century, changing magnetic fields emerged as a noninvasive tool to study the nervous system and to modulate neural function. In 1985, Barker, Jalinous, and Freeston presented transcranial magnetic stimulation, a relatively focal and painless technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been proposed as a clinical neurophysiology tool and as a potential adjuvant treatment for psychiatric and neurologic conditions. This article aims to contextualize the progress of use of magnetic fields in the history of neuroscience and medical sciences, until 1985.

  14. Challenges in comparing the acute cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) vs. electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depression: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzior, Karina Karolina; Schuchinsky, Maria; Gerkensmeier, Imke; Loo, Colleen

    2017-08-01

    The present study aimed to systematically compare the cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in head-to-head studies with major depression (MDD) patients. A systematic literature search identified six studies with 219 MDD patients that were too heterogeneous to reliably detect meaningful differences in acute cognitive outcomes after ECT vs. HF-rTMS. Cognitive effects of brain stimulation vary depending on the timeframe and methods of assessment, stimulation parameters, and maintenance treatment. Thus, acute and longer-term differences in cognitive outcomes both need to be investigated at precisely defined timeframes and with similar instruments assessing comparable functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation assisted by neuronavigation of magnetic resonance images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viesca, N. Angeline; Alcauter, S. Sarael; Barrios, A. Fernando; González, O. Jorge J.; Márquez, F. Jorge A.

    2012-10-01

    Technological advance has improved the way scientists and doctors can learn about the brain and treat different disorders. A non-invasive method used for this is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) based on neuron excitation by electromagnetic induction. Combining this method with functional Magnetic Resonance Images (fMRI), it is intended to improve the localization technique of cortical brain structures by designing an extracranial localization system, based on Alcauter et al. work.

  16. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Rashid; Thind, Dilraj; Kocmur, Marga

    2008-11-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive and painless way of stimulating the neural tissue (cerebral cortex, spinal roots, and cranial and peripheral nerves). The first attempts at stimulating the neural tissue date back to 1896 by d'Arsonval; however, it was successfully carried out by Barker and colleagues in Sheffield, UK, in 1985. It soon became a useful tool in neuroscience for neurophysiologists and neurologists and psychiatrists. The original single-pulse TMS, largely used as an investigative tool, was further refined and developed in the early 1990s into what is known as repetitive TMS (rTMS), having a frequency range of 1-60 Hz. The stimulation by both TMS and rTMS of various cortical regions displayed alteration of movement, mood, and behavior, leading researchers to investigate a number of psychiatric and neuropsychiatric disorders, as well as to explore its therapeutic potential. There is now a large amount of literature on the use of TMS/rTMS in depression; however, its use in schizophrenia, both as an investigative and certainly as a therapeutic tool is relatively recent with a limited but increasing number of publications. In this article, we will outline the principles of TMS/rTMS and critically review their use in schizophrenia both as investigative and potential therapeutic tools.

  17. COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS OF A PROGRESSIVE MOBILIZATION AND MOZART MUSIC THERAPY ON NON-INVASIVE HEMODYNAMIC STATUS CHANGES IN PATIENTS WITH HEAD INJURY IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novi Indriani

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The instability of hemodynamic status in patients with head injury with decreased consciousness has an effect on the increase of intracranial pressure. The recovery of hemodynamic status can be done through nursing intervention either by providing a sensory stimulus (music therapy or motor stimulus (progressive mobilization. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of progressive mobilization of level I with Mozart's music therapy on non-invasive hemodynamic status changes in patients with head injury with decreased awareness. Methods: This was a quasy-experimental study with pretest-posttest design. There were 34 samples selected using consecutive sampling, which 17 samples assigned in a group of progressive mobilization and group of music therapy. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon test were used for paired group, and Independent t-test and Mann-Whitney test for unpaired group. Results: Progressive mobilization of level I had significant effect on changes in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.0001, diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.002 and MAP (p = 0.019, and no significant effect on heart rate (p = 0.155, respiration (p = 0.895 and oxygen saturation (p = 0.248. Mozart's music therapy had a significant effect on changes in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.0001, diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.0001, respiration (p= 0.032 and oxygen saturation (p = 0.008, but no effect on MAP (p = 0.561. There was a significant difference between the two interventions in the systolic blood pressure and heart rate variables (p 0.05. Conclusion: The Mozart's music therapy is more effective on non-invasive hemodynamic status changes in patients with head injury with decreased consciousness compared with progressive mobilization of level I.

  18. Computational electromagnetic methods for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Luis J.

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive technique used both as a research tool for cognitive neuroscience and as a FDA approved treatment for depression. During TMS, coils positioned near the scalp generate electric fields and activate targeted brain regions. In this thesis, several computational electromagnetics methods that improve the analysis, design, and uncertainty quantification of TMS systems were developed. Analysis: A new fast direct technique for solving the large and sparse linear system of equations (LSEs) arising from the finite difference (FD) discretization of Maxwell's quasi-static equations was developed. Following a factorization step, the solver permits computation of TMS fields inside realistic brain models in seconds, allowing for patient-specific real-time usage during TMS. The solver is an alternative to iterative methods for solving FD LSEs, often requiring run-times of minutes. A new integral equation (IE) method for analyzing TMS fields was developed. The human head is highly-heterogeneous and characterized by high-relative permittivities (107). IE techniques for analyzing electromagnetic interactions with such media suffer from high-contrast and low-frequency breakdowns. The novel high-permittivity and low-frequency stable internally combined volume-surface IE method developed. The method not only applies to the analysis of high-permittivity objects, but it is also the first IE tool that is stable when analyzing highly-inhomogeneous negative permittivity plasmas. Design: TMS applications call for electric fields to be sharply focused on regions that lie deep inside the brain. Unfortunately, fields generated by present-day Figure-8 coils stimulate relatively large regions near the brain surface. An optimization method for designing single feed TMS coil-arrays capable of producing more localized and deeper stimulation was developed. Results show that the coil-arrays stimulate 2.4 cm into the head while stimulating 3

  19. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood–brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for ...

  20. Metabolomics of Therapy Response in Preclinical Glioblastoma: A Multi-Slice MRSI-Based Volumetric Analysis for Noninvasive Assessment of Temozolomide Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Ramos, Nuria; Ferrer-Font, Laura; Lope-Piedrafita, Silvia; Mocioiu, Victor; Julià-Sapé, Margarida; Pumarola, Martí; Arús, Carles; Candiota, Ana Paula

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common aggressive primary brain tumor in adults, with a short survival time even after aggressive therapy. Non-invasive surrogate biomarkers of therapy response may be relevant for improving patient survival. Previous work produced such biomarkers in preclinical GBM using semi-supervised source extraction and single-slice Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI). Nevertheless, GBMs are heterogeneous and single-slice studies could prevent obtaining relevant information. The purpose of this work was to evaluate whether a multi-slice MRSI approach, acquiring consecutive grids across the tumor, is feasible for preclinical models and may produce additional insight into therapy response. Nosological images were analyzed pixel-by-pixel and a relative responding volume, the Tumor Responding Index (TRI), was defined to quantify response. Heterogeneous response levels were observed and treated animals were ascribed to three arbitrary predefined groups: high response (HR, n = 2), TRI = 68.2 ± 2.8%, intermediate response (IR, n = 6), TRI = 41.1 ± 4.2% and low response (LR, n = 2), TRI = 13.4 ± 14.3%, producing therapy response categorization which had not been fully registered in single-slice studies. Results agreed with the multi-slice approach being feasible and producing an inverse correlation between TRI and Ki67 immunostaining. Additionally, ca. 7-day oscillations of TRI were observed, suggesting that host immune system activation in response to treatment could contribute to the responding patterns detected. PMID:28524099

  1. Metabolomics of Therapy Response in Preclinical Glioblastoma: A Multi-Slice MRSI-Based Volumetric Analysis for Noninvasive Assessment of Temozolomide Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Arias-Ramos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common aggressive primary brain tumor in adults, with a short survival time even after aggressive therapy. Non-invasive surrogate biomarkers of therapy response may be relevant for improving patient survival. Previous work produced such biomarkers in preclinical GBM using semi-supervised source extraction and single-slice Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI. Nevertheless, GBMs are heterogeneous and single-slice studies could prevent obtaining relevant information. The purpose of this work was to evaluate whether a multi-slice MRSI approach, acquiring consecutive grids across the tumor, is feasible for preclinical models and may produce additional insight into therapy response. Nosological images were analyzed pixel-by-pixel and a relative responding volume, the Tumor Responding Index (TRI, was defined to quantify response. Heterogeneous response levels were observed and treated animals were ascribed to three arbitrary predefined groups: high response (HR, n = 2, TRI = 68.2 ± 2.8%, intermediate response (IR, n = 6, TRI = 41.1 ± 4.2% and low response (LR, n = 2, TRI = 13.4 ± 14.3%, producing therapy response categorization which had not been fully registered in single-slice studies. Results agreed with the multi-slice approach being feasible and producing an inverse correlation between TRI and Ki67 immunostaining. Additionally, ca. 7-day oscillations of TRI were observed, suggesting that host immune system activation in response to treatment could contribute to the responding patterns detected.

  2. Noninvasive ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabatin, J T; Gay, P C

    1999-08-01

    Noninvasive ventilation refers to the delivery of assisted ventilatory support without the use of an endotracheal tube. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) can be delivered by using a volume-controlled ventilator, a pressure-controlled ventilator, a bilevel positive airway pressure ventilator, or a continuous positive airway pressure device. During the past decade, there has been a resurgence in the use of noninvasive ventilation, fueled by advances in technology and clinical trials evaluating its use. Several manufacturers produce portable devices that are simple to operate. This review describes the equipment, techniques, and complications associated with NPPV and also the indications for both short-term and long-term applications. NPPV clearly represents an important addition to the techniques available to manage patients with respiratory failure. Future clinical trials evaluating its many clinical applications will help to define populations of patients most apt to benefit from this type of treatment.

  3. Successful Treatment of a Drug-Resistant Epilepsy by Long-term Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Juan, Daniel; Sarmiento, Carlos Ignacio; González, Katia Márquez; Orenday Barraza, José Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a reemerged noninvasive cerebral therapy used to treat patients with epilepsy, including focal cortical dysplasia, with controversial results. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with left frontal cortical dysplasia refractory to antiepileptic drugs, characterized by 10-15 daily right tonic hemi-body seizures. The patient received a total of seven sessions of cathodal tDCS (2 mA, 30 min). The first three sessions were applied over three consecutive days, and the remaining four sessions of tDCS were given each at 2-week intervals. At the 1-year follow-up, the patient reported to have a single seizure per month and only mild adverse events.

  4. Impact of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on neuronal functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, S. (Suman); P.J. Holland (Peter); M.A. Frens (Maarten); O. Donchin (Opher)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTranscranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a non-invasive brain stimulation technique, modulates neuronal excitability by the application of a small electrical current. The low cost and ease of the technique has driven interest in potential clinical applications. However, outcomes

  5. Subcortical structures in humans can be facilitated by transcranial direct current stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonnekes, Johan Hendrik; Arrogi, Anass; Munneke, Moniek; van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; Oude Nijhuis, Lars; Geurts, Alexander; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that alters cortical excitability via application of a weak direct current. Interestingly, it was demonstrated in cats that tDCS can facilitate subcortical structures as well (Bolzonii et al., J

  6. Subcortical structures in humans can be facilitated by transcranial direct current stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonnekes, J.H.; Arrogi, A.; Munneke, M.A.M.; Asseldonk, E.H. van; Nijhuis, L.B.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Weerdesteyn, V.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that alters cortical excitability. Interestingly, in recent animal studies facilitatory effects of tDCS have also been observed on subcortical structures. Here, we sought to provide evidence for the potential

  7. Subcortical Structures in Humans Can Be Facilitated by Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nonnekes, Johan Hendrik; Arrogi, A.; Munneke, M.A.M.; van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; Oude Nijhuis, L.B.; Geurts, A.C.; Weerdesteyn, V.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that alters cortical excitability. Interestingly, in recent animal studies facilitatory effects of tDCS have also been observed on subcortical structures. Here, we sought to provide evidence for the potential

  8. Simulating Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation With a Detailed Anisotropic Human Head Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rampersad, S.; Janssen, A.J.E.M.; Lucka, F.; Aydin, U.; Lanfer, B.; Lew, S.; Wolters, C.H.; Stegeman, D.F.; Oostendorp, T.F.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique able to induce long-lasting changes in cortical excitability that can benefit cognitive functioning and clinical treatment. In order to both better understand the mechanisms behind tDCS and possibly improve

  9. Simulating transcranial direct current stimulation with a detailed anisotropic human head model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rampersad, S.M.; Janssen, A.M.; Lucka, F.; Aydin, U.; Lanfer, B.; Lew, S.; Wolters, C.H.; Stegeman, D.F.; Oostendorp, T.F.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique able to induce long-lasting changes in cortical excitability that can benefit cognitive functioning and clinical treatment. In order to both better understand the mechanisms behind tDCS and possibly improve

  10. Improving Naming Abilities among Healthy Young-Old Adults Using Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifshitz-Ben-Basat, Adi; Mashal, Nira

    2018-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive tool to facilitate brain plasticity and enhance language abilities. Our study aims to search for a potential beneficial influence of tDCS on a cognitive linguistic task of naming which found to decline during aging. A group of fifteen healthy old adults (M = 64.93 ± 5.09 years) were…

  11. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to improve mood and motor function in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Siebner, H.R.; Bakker, M.; Munchau, A.; Bloem, B.R.

    2006-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that can produce lasting changes in excitability and activity in cortical regions underneath the stimulation coil (local effect), but also within functionally connected cortical or subcortical regions

  12. Spatiotemporal structure of intracranial electric fields induced by transcranial electric stimulation in humans and nonhuman primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opitz, Alexander; Falchier, Arnaud; Yan, Chao-Gan

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial electric stimulation (TES) is an emerging technique, developed to non-invasively modulate brain function. However, the spatiotemporal distribution of the intracranial electric fields induced by TES remains poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how much current actually reac...

  13. Enhancement of multitasking performance and neural oscillations by transcranial alternating current stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsu, W.Y.; Zanto, T.P.; van Schouwenburg, M.R.; Gazzaley, A.

    2017-01-01

    Multitasking is associated with the generation of stimulus-locked theta (4–7 Hz) oscillations arising from prefrontal cortex (PFC). Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that influences endogenous brain oscillations. Here, we investigate

  14. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eAntal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS seems likely to open a new era of the field of noninvasive electrical stimulation of the human brain by directly interfering with cortical rhythms. It is expected to synchronize (by one single resonance frequency or desynchronize (e.g. by the application of several frequencies cortical oscillations. If applied long enough it may cause neuroplastic effects. In the theta range it may improve cognition when applied in phase. Alpha rhythms could improve motor performance, whereas beta intrusion may deteriorate them. TACS with both alpha and beta frequencies has a high likelihood to induce retinal phosphenes. Gamma intrusion can possibly interfere with attention. Stimulation in the ripple range induces intensity dependent inhibition or excitation in the motor cortex most likely by entrainment of neuronal networks, whereas stimulation in the low kHz range induces excitation by neuronal membrane interference. TACS in the 200 kHz range may have a potential in oncology.

  15. Integrated Technologies Like Noninvasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS for Stroke Rehabilitation; New Hopes for Patients, Neuroscientists, and Clinicians in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid Bashir

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A B S T R A C TThe applications of neurophysiological therapy techniques range far and few in the realm of modern day medicine. However, the concept of electromagnetic stimulation, the basis for many noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS techniques today, has been of interest to the scientific community since the late nineteenth century. Recently, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, two noninvasive neurostimulation techniques, have begun to gain popularity and acceptance in the clinical neurophysiology, neurorehabilitaion, neurology, neuroscience, and psychiatry has spread widely, mostly in research applications, but increasingly with clinical aims in mind. These two neurophysiological techniques have proven to be valuable assets in not only the diagnosis, but also the treatment of many neurological disorders (post-stroke motor deficits, tinnitus, fibromyalgia, depression, epilepsy, autism, ageing and parkinson’s disease. Its effects can be modulated by combination with pharmacological treatment that has undergone resurgence in recent years. In this review we discuss how these integrated technology like NIBS for evaluation in the clinical evidence to date and what mechanism it work for stroke rehabilitation particularly. Then, we will review the current situation of stroke rehabilitation in Iran and new hopes that NIBS could bring for clinicians and patients in this nationally prioritized field.

  16. Noninvasive brain stimulation to suppress craving in substance use disorders: Review of human evidence and methodological considerations for future work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hone-Blanchet, Antoine; Ciraulo, Domenic A; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Fecteau, Shirley

    2015-12-01

    Substance use disorders (SUDs) can be viewed as a pathology of neuroadaptation. The pharmacological overstimulation of neural mechanisms of reward, motivated learning and memory leads to drug-seeking behavior. A critical characteristic of SUDs is the appearance of craving, the motivated desire and urge to use, which is a main focus of current pharmacological and behavioral therapies. Recent proof-of-concept studies have tested the effects of noninvasive brain stimulation on craving. Although its mechanisms of action are not fully understood, this approach shows interesting potential in tuning down craving and possibly consumption of diverse substances. This article reviews available results on the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) in SUDs, specifically tobacco, alcohol and psychostimulant use disorders. We discuss several important factors that need to be addressed in future works to improve clinical assessment and effects of noninvasive brain stimulation in SUDs. Factors discussed include brain stimulation devices and parameters, study designs, brain states and subjects' characteristics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation for treatment of neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Leis, Stefan; Höller, Peter; Thon, Natasha; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2014-01-01

    Past evidence has shown that invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation may be effective for relieving central pain. To perform a topical review of the literature on brain neurostimulation techniques in patients with chronic neuropathic pain due to traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) and to assess the current evidence for their therapeutic efficacy. A MEDLINE search was performed using following terms: "Spinal cord injury", "Neuropathic pain", "Brain stimulation", "Deep brain stimulation" (DBS), "Motor cortex stimulation" (MCS), "Transcranial magnetic stimulation" (TMS), "Transcranial direct current stimulation" (tDCS), "Cranial electrotherapy stimulation" (CES). Invasive neurostimulation therapies, in particular DBS and epidural MCS, have shown promise as treatments for neuropathic and phantom limb pain. However, the long-term efficacy of DBS is low, while MCS has a relatively higher potential with lesser complications that DBS. Among the non-invasive techniques, there is accumulating evidence that repetitive TMS can produce analgesic effects in healthy subjects undergoing laboratory-induced pain and in chronic pain conditions of various etiologies, at least partially and transiently. Another very safe technique of non-invasive brain stimulation - tDCS - applied over the sensory-motor cortex has been reported to decrease pain sensation and increase pain threshold in healthy subjects. CES has also proved to be effective in managing some types of pain, including neuropathic pain in subjects with SCI. A number of studies have begun to use non-invasive neuromodulatory techniques therapeutically to relieve neuropathic pain and phantom phenomena in patients with SCI. However, further studies are warranted to corroborate the early findings and confirm different targets and stimulation paradigms. The utility of these protocols in combination with pharmacological approaches should also be explored.

  18. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Rashid

    2015-09-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder, which affects children as well as adults and leads to significant impairment in educational, social and occupational functioning and has associated personal and societal costs. Whilst there are effective medications (mostly stimulants) as well as some psychobehavioural treatments that help alleviate symptoms of ADHD, there is still need to improve our understanding of its neurobiology as well as explore other treatment options. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are safe and non-invasive investigative and therapeutic tools respectively. In this short article, I will explore their potential for improving our understanding of the neurobiology of ADHD as well consider its as a possible treatment option.

  19. Cerebrovascular reactivity in migraineurs as measured by transcranial Doppler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, T.D.; Harpold, G.J. (Alabama Univ., Birmingham, AL (USA). School of Medicine); Troost, B.T. (Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is a relatively new diagnostic modality which allows the non-invasive assessment of intracranial circulation. A total of 10 migraine patients were studied and compared to healthy controls without headaches. Migraineurs during the headache-free interval demonstrated excessive cerebrovascular reactivity to CO{sub 2}, evidenced by an increase in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity of 47% {plus minus} 15% compared to 28% {plus minus} 14% in controls. Differences between the two study groups revealed no significant decrease in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity with hypocapnia. However, the differences between middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity during hyperventilation and CO{sub 2} inhalation were significantly different comparing migraineurs and controls. Instability of the baseline blood flow velocities was also noted in migraineurs during the interictal period. Characteristics which may allow differentiation of migraineurs from other headache populations could possibly be obtained from transcranial Doppler ultrasound flow studies. 24 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Cerebrovascular reactivity in migraineurs as measured by transcranial Doppler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, T.D.; Harpold, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is a relatively new diagnostic modality which allows the non-invasive assessment of intracranial circulation. A total of 10 migraine patients were studied and compared to healthy controls without headaches. Migraineurs during the headache-free interval demonstrated excessive cerebrovascular reactivity to CO 2 , evidenced by an increase in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity of 47% ± 15% compared to 28% ± 14% in controls. Differences between the two study groups revealed no significant decrease in middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity with hypocapnia. However, the differences between middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity during hyperventilation and CO 2 inhalation were significantly different comparing migraineurs and controls. Instability of the baseline blood flow velocities was also noted in migraineurs during the interictal period. Characteristics which may allow differentiation of migraineurs from other headache populations could possibly be obtained from transcranial Doppler ultrasound flow studies. 24 refs., 2 tabs

  1. Noninvasive monitoring of cancer therapy induced activated T cells using [18F]FB-IL-2 PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartimath, S V; Draghiciu, O; van de Wall, S; Manuelli, V; Dierckx, R A J O; Nijman, H W; Daemen, T; de Vries, E F J

    2017-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy urgently calls for methods to monitor immune responses at the site of the cancer. Since activated T lymphocytes may serve as a hallmark for anticancer responses, we targeted these cells using the radiotracer N-(4-[ 18 F]fluorobenzoyl)-interleukin-2 ([ 18 F]FB-IL-2) for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Thus, we noninvasively monitored the effects of local tumor irradiation and/or immunization on tumor-infiltrating and systemic activated lymphocytes in tumor-bearing mice. A 10- and 27-fold higher [ 18 F]FB-IL-2 uptake was observed in tumors of mice receiving tumor irradiation alone or in combination with immunization, respectively. This increased uptake was extended to several non-target tissues. Administration of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 reduced tracer uptake by 2.8-fold, indicating a CXCR4-dependent infiltration of activated T lymphocytes upon cancer treatment. In conclusion, [ 18 F]FB-IL-2 PET can serve as a clinical biomarker to monitor treatment-induced infiltration of activated T lymphocytes and, on that basis, may guide cancer immunotherapies.

  2. Non-invasive therapy of wrinkles and lax skin using a novel multisource phase-controlled radio frequency system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elman, Monica; Vider, Itzhak; Harth, Yoram; Gottfried, Varda; Shemer, Avner

    2010-04-01

    Abstract The last few years have shown an increased demand for non-invasive skin tightening to improve body contour. Since light (lasers or intense pulsed light sources) has a limited ability to penetrate deep into the tissue, radio frequency (RF) modalities were introduced for the reduction of lax skin to achieve skin tightening and body circumference reduction. This study presents the use of the novel 3DEEP technology for body contouring. 3DEEP is a next generation RF technology that provides targeted heating to deeper skin layers without pain or other local or systemic side effects associated with the use of the earlier generation RF systems available today. The study included 30 treatment areas on 23 healthy volunteers at two sites. The treatment protocol included four weekly and two bi-weekly (n= 6) treatments on different body areas. Results were evaluated by standardized photography and by circumference measurements at the treatment area, and were compared to changes in body weight. Significant improvement could be observed in wrinkles and skin laxity, and in the appearance of stretch marks and cellulite. Some changes appeared as early as after a single treatment. Circumference changes of up to 4.3 cm were measured.

  3. Eletroconvulsoterapia e estimulação magnética transcraniana: semelhanças e diferenças Electroconvulsive therapy and transcranial magnetic stimulation: similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacyr Alexandro Rosa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, é feita uma revisão detalhada das semelhanças e diferenças entre os dois principais tratamentos biológicos não-medicamentosos existentes na atualidade para o tratamento da depressão, a eletroconvulsoterapia e a estimulação magnética transcraniana de repetição. São comparados detalhadamente os efeitos fisiológicos, os aspectos clínicos, a técnica e os mecanismos de ação. Por fim, é feita uma revisão da eficácia comparativa entre os dois tratamentos para a depressão.This article is a detailed review of similarities and differences between the two main non pharmacological biological treatments currently used for depression, electroconvulsive therapy and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Comparison is made on physiological effects, clinical aspects, technique and mechanisms of action. A review of the clinical efficacy is shown in the end of the article.

  4. A Review of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Use in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Durmaz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique first introduced by Barker et al. in 1985. The principle of rTMS is based on a cortical neuronal transmembrane potential stimulated by a pulsative magnetic field. This magnetic field is induced by a direct electrical current sent through a circular coil. rTMS is an effective and widely used therapeutic stimulation method for psychiatric disorders, primarily for unipolar depression. Cost-effectiveness, minor side effects and well-tolerated profile of rTMS with no need to hospitalization for administation are the prominent features of this method. Beside the information for depression, rTMS has been reported to have some remarkable impacts in alleviating symptoms of anxiety disorders. Although data regarding efficacy of rTMS in anxiety disorders is conflicting, there are positive outcomes about generalized anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder and panic disorder whereas results of rTMS treatment in obsessive-compulsive disorder are generally not favorable. Since low frequency stimulation techniques have been found to be effective in treatment of auditory hallucinations, methodological similarity in concerned studies could be accepted as a supportive aspect of efficacy. Additionally, high frequency stimulation techniques applied to prefrontal area have a potential to impact negative symptoms of schizophrenia. With improving novel techniques of this stimulation method, rTMS is being used increasingly in psychiatric disorders. However, some issues concerning rTMS treatment such as maintenance or prophilactic therapy procedures, duration of effect are remain unclear. Hence, we conclude that multicenter sham controlled studies including similar designs, sociodemographic and clinical variables, methodological protocols with larger sample sizes and studies guieded by imaging methods are warranted to determinate efficacy and side effects of rTMS use

  5. Noninvasive brain stimulation of the parietal lobe for improving neurologic, neuropsychologic, and neuropsychiatric deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolognini, Nadia; Miniussi, Carlo

    2018-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial electric stimulation (tES) are noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) tools that are now widely used in neuroscientific research in humans. The fact that both TMS and tES are able to modulate brain plasticity and, in turn, affect behavior is opening up new horizons in the treatment of brain circuit and plasticity disorders. In the present chapter, we will first provide the reader with a brief background on the basic principles of NIBS, describing the electromagnetic and physical foundations of TMS and tES, as well as the current knowledge of the neurophysiologic basis of their effects on brain activity and plasticity. In the main part, we will outline studies aimed at improving persistent symptoms and deficits in patients suffering from neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders featured by dysfunction of the parietal lobe. The emerging view is that NIBS of parietal areas holds the promise to overcome various sensory, motor, and cognitive disorders that are often refractory to standard medical or behavioral therapies. The chapter closes with an outlook on further developments in this realm, discussing novel therapeutic approaches that could lead to more effective rehabilitation procedures, better suited for the specific parietal lobe dysfunction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Non-invasive brain stimulation: an interventional tool for enhancing behavioral training after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Maximilian J; Zimerman, Máximo; Hummel, Friedhelm C

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability among adults. Motor deficit is the most common impairment after stroke. Especially, deficits in fine motor skills impair numerous activities of daily life. Re-acquisition of motor skills resulting in improved or more accurate motor performance is paramount to regain function, and is the basis of behavioral motor therapy after stroke. Within the past years, there has been a rapid technological and methodological development in neuroimaging leading to a significant progress in the understanding of the neural substrates that underlie motor skill acquisition and functional recovery in stroke patients. Based on this and the development of novel non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques, new adjuvant interventional approaches that augment the response to behavioral training have been proposed. Transcranial direct current, transcranial magnetic, and paired associative (PAS) stimulation are NIBS techniques that can modulate cortical excitability, neuronal plasticity and interact with learning and memory in both healthy individuals and stroke patients. These techniques can enhance the effect of practice and facilitate the retention of tasks that mimic daily life activities. The purpose of the present review is to provide a comprehensive overview of neuroplastic phenomena in the motor system during learning of a motor skill, recovery after brain injury, and of interventional strategies to enhance the beneficial effects of customarily used neurorehabilitation after stroke.

  7. Transcranial focal electrical stimulation via tripolar concentric ring electrodes does not modify the short- and long-term memory formation in rats evaluated in the novel object recognition test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogel-Salazar, G; Luna-Munguía, H; Stevens, K E; Besio, W G

    2013-04-01

    Noninvasive transcranial focal electrical stimulation (TFS) via tripolar concentric ring electrodes (TCREs) has been under development as an alternative/complementary therapy for seizure control. Transcranial focal electrical stimulation has shown efficacy in attenuating penicillin-, pilocarpine-, and pentylenetetrazole-induced acute seizures in rat models. This study evaluated the effects of TFS via TCREs on the memory formation of healthy rats as a safety test of TFS. Short- and long-term memory formation was tested after the application of TFS using the novel object recognition (NOR) test. The following independent groups were used: naïve, control (without TFS), and TFS (treated). The naïve, control, and stimulated groups spent more time investigating the new object than the familiar one during the test phase. Transcranial focal electrical stimulation via TCREs given once does not modify the short- and long-term memory formation in rats in the NOR test. Results provide an important step towards a better understanding for the safe usage of TFS via TCREs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Address Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumond Marra, Hellen Livia; Myczkowski, Martin Luiz; Maia Memória, Cláudia; Arnaut, Débora; Leite Ribeiro, Philip; Sardinha Mansur, Carlos Gustavo; Lancelote Alberto, Rodrigo; Boura Bellini, Bianca; Alves Fernandes da Silva, Adriano; Ciampi de Andrade, Daniel; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Forlenza, Orestes Vicente; Marcolin, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique with potential to improve memory. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), which still lacks a specific therapy, is a clinical syndrome associated with increased risk of dementia. This study aims to assess the effects of high-frequency repetitive TMS (HF rTMS) on everyday memory of the elderly with MCI. We conducted a double-blinded randomized sham-controlled trial using rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Thirty-four elderly outpatients meeting Petersen's MCI criteria were randomly assigned to receive 10 sessions of either active TMS or sham, 10 Hz rTMS at 110% of motor threshold, 2,000 pulses per session. Neuropsychological assessment at baseline, after the last session (10th) and at one-month follow-up, was applied. ANOVA on the primary efficacy measure, the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test, revealed a significant group-by-time interaction (p = 0.05), favoring the active group. The improvement was kept after one month. Other neuropsychological tests were heterogeneous. rTMS at 10 Hz enhanced everyday memory in elderly with MCI after 10 sessions. These findings suggest that rTMS might be effective as a therapy for MCI and probably a tool to delay deterioration. PMID:26160997

  9. Quadruple Cone Coil with improved focality than Figure-8 coil in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Priyam; Lee, Erik G.; Hadimani, Ravi L.; Jiles, David C.

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive therapy which uses a time varying magnetic field to induce an electric field in the brain and to cause neuron depolarization. Magnetic coils play an important role in the TMS therapy since their coil geometry determines the focality and penetration's depth of the induced electric field in the brain. Quadruple Cone Coil (QCC) is a novel coil with an improved focality when compared to commercial Figure-8 coil. The results of this newly designed QCC coil are compared with the Figure-8 coil at two different positions of the head - vertex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, over the 50 anatomically realistic MRI derived head models. Parameters such as volume of stimulation, maximum electric, area of stimulation and location of maximum electric field are determined with the help of computer modelling of both coils. There is a decrease in volume of brain stimulated by 11.6 % and a modest improvement of 8 % in the location of maximum electric field due to QCC in comparison to the Figure-8 coil. The Carver Charitable Trust and The Galloway Foundation.

  10. Treating Clinical Depression with Repetitive Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Using the Brainsway H1-coil

    OpenAIRE

    Feifel, David; Pappas, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an emerging non-pharmacological approach to treating many brain-based disorders. rTMS uses electromagnetic coils to stimulate areas of the brain non-invasively. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) with the Brainsway H1-coil system specifically is a type of rTMS indicated for treating patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who are resistant to medication. The unique H1-coil design of this device is able to stimulate neuron...

  11. [Transcranial magnetic stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormos, J M; Catalá, M D; Pascual-Leone, A

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) permits stimulation of the cerebral cortex in humans without requiring open access to the brain and is one of the newest tools available in neuroscience. There are two main types of application: single-pulse TMS and repetitive TMS. The magnetic stimulator is composed of a series of capacitors that store the voltage necessary to generate a stimulus of the sufficient intensity of generate an electric field in the stimulation coil. The safety of TMS is supported by the considerable experience derived from studies involving electrical stimulation of the cortex in animals and humans, and also specific studies on the safety of TMS in humans. In this article we review historical and technical aspects of TMS, describe its adverse effects and how to avoid them, summarize the applications of TMS in the investigation of different cerebral functions, and discuss the possibility of using TMS for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  12. A clinical repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation service in Australia: 6 years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletly, Cherrie A; Clarke, Patrick; Carnell, Benjamin L; Gill, Shane

    2015-11-01

    There is considerable research evidence for the effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of depression. However, there is little information about its acceptability and outcomes in clinical settings. This naturalistic study reports on a clinical repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation service that has been running in Adelaide, South Australia (SA), for 6 years. During this time, 214 complete acute courses were provided to patients with treatment-resistant Major Depressive Disorder. Patients received either sequential bilateral or right unilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment involving either 18 or 20 sessions given over 6 or 4 weeks respectively. Data included patient demographic details, duration of depression, and medication at the beginning of their repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation course. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was used to assess response to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Of those undergoing a first-time acute treatment course of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (N = 167), 28% achieved remission, while a further 12% met the criteria for a response to treatment. Most patients (N = 123, 77%) had previously been treated with five or more antidepressant medications, and 77 (47%) had previously received electroconvulsive therapy. Referral rates remained high over the 6 years, indicating acceptance of the treatment by referring psychiatrists. There were no significant adverse events, and the treatment was generally well tolerated. In all, 41 patients (25%) had a second course of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and 6 (4%) patients had a third course; 21 patients subsequently received maintenance repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. This naturalistic study showed that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation was well accepted by both psychiatrists and patients, and has good efficacy and safety. Furthermore

  13. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis progression in hepatitis C patients retreated for 96 weeks with antiviral therapy: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarski, Jean-Pierre; Sturm, Nathalie; Desmorat, Hervé; Melin, Pascal; Raabe, Jean-Jacques; Bonny, Corinne; Sogni, Philippe; Pinta, Alexandrina; Rouanet, Stéphanie; Babany, Gérard; Cheveau, Alice; Chevallier, Michèle

    2010-08-01

    The efficacy of a maintenance therapy in non-responder patients with chronic hepatitis C has been essentially evaluated by histological semiquantitative scores. The aim was to evaluate the efficiency of 2 years of treatment with peginterferon alpha-2a vs alpha-tocopherol in these patients by histology, morphometry and blood markers of fibrosis. Hundred and five HCV patients with a Metavir fibrosis score > or = 2 were randomized to receive peginterferon alpha-2a 180 microg/week (PEG) (n=55) or alpha-tocopherol (TOCO) 1000 mg/day (n=50) for 96 weeks. The primary endpoint was improvement or stabilization of the Metavir fibrosis score by biopsy performed at week 96. Secondary endpoints included a quantitative assessment of fibrosis by morphometry and changes in blood markers of fibrosis. There was no difference at baseline between PEG and TOCO according to the metavir (83.3 vs 86.8%, P=0.751) stage. The median fibrosis rate, measured with morphometry was 2.72 and 2.86% at day 0, and 3.66 and 2.82% at week 96, in the PEG and TOCO groups (P=0.90) respectively. However, the percentage of patients with metavir activity grade improvement was significantly higher in the PEG group vs the TOCO group (52.8 vs 23.7%, P=0.016). Non-invasive markers analysis did not show any significant change in both groups. Long-term therapy with peginterferon alpha-2a did not reduce liver fibrosis degree assessed by morphometry and blood tests as compared with alpha-tocopherol. Blood tests could be useful to assess liver fibrosis changes in clinical trials.

  14. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Aphasia Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Martin, Paula I; Ho, Michael; Treglia, Ethan; Kaplan, Elina; Bhashir, Shahid; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been reported to improve naming in chronic stroke patients with nonfluent aphasia since 2005. In Part 1, we review the rationale for applying slow, 1 Hz, rTMS to the undamaged right hemisphere in chronic nonfluent aphasia patients following a left hemisphere stroke; and present a TMS protocol used with these patients that is associated with long-term, improved naming post- TMS. In Part, 2 we present results from a case study with chronic nonfluent aphasia where TMS treatments were followed immediately by speech therapy (constraint-induced language therapy). In Part 3, some possible mechanisms associated with improvement following a series of TMS treatments in stroke patients with aphasia are discussed. PMID:22202188

  15. Multidetector row computed tomography noninvasively assesses coronary reperfusion after thrombolytic therapy in patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Dong-Il; Won, Yoo-Dong; Chang, Kiyuk

    2006-01-01

    The study objective was to assess the efficacy of 16-slice multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) in estimating residual stenosis and successful reperfusion after thrombolysis in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). A total of 31 patients with STEMI underwent MDCT scanning within 6 h (mean 4.6±1.1) after thrombolysis and the results for detection of significant residual stenosis and distal flow of the infarct-related artery were compared with those from conventional coronary angiography (CCAG) performed within 24 h (mean 12.1±5.6) after the MDCT scan. Successful reperfusion was defined as Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction flow 2 or 3 on CCAG and full contrast enhancement of the distal artery landmarks on MDCT. A final analysis was performed using 24 patients (312 segments). MDCT had a positive predictive value of 73.3% and a negative predictive value of 95.1% for detecting significant residual stenosis. It accurately estimated 17 of 18 patients (94.4%) with successful reperfusion and 5 of 6 (83.3%) with failed reperfusion on the basis of comparison with CCAG. MDCT demonstrated high accuracy not only for the detecting residual stenosis, but also for assessing successful reperfusion after thrombolytic therapy in patients with STEMI. (author)

  16. Design and validation of an MR-conditional robot for transcranial focused ultrasound surgery in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Karl D., E-mail: karl.price@sickkids.ca [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8 (Canada); The Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Sin, Vivian W. [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8 (Canada); Mougenot, Charles [Philips Healthcare Canada, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada); Pichardo, Samuel [Electrical Engineering, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 (Canada); Looi, Thomas [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8 (Canada); The Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, The University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 3G9 (Canada); Waspe, Adam C. [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5T 1W7 (Canada); Drake, James M. [Centre for Image Guided Innovation and Therapeutic Intervention, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8 (Canada); Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 (Canada); The Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, The University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 3G9 (Canada)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: Current treatment of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) involves cerebral shunt placement or an invasive brain surgery. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) applied to the brains of pediatric patients presents an opportunity to treat IVH in a noninvasive manner, termed “incision-less surgery.” Current clinical and research focused ultrasound systems lack the capability to perform neonatal transcranial surgeries due to either range of motion or dexterity requirements. A novel robotic system is proposed to position a focused ultrasound transducer accurately above the head of a neonatal patient inside an MRI machine to deliver the therapy. Methods: A clinical Philips Sonalleve MRgFUS system was expanded to perform transcranial treatment. A five degree-of-freedom MR-conditional robot was designed and manufactured using MR compatible materials. The robot electronics and control were integrated into existing Philips electronics and software interfaces. The user commands the position of the robot with a graphical user interface, and is presented with real-time MR imaging of the patient throughout the surgery. The robot is validated through a series of experiments that characterize accuracy, signal-to-noise ratio degeneration of an MR image as a result of the robot, MR imaging artifacts generated by the robot, and the robot’s ability to operate in a representative surgical environment inside an MR machine. Results: Experimental results show the robot responds reliably within an MR environment, has achieved 0.59 ± 0.25 mm accuracy, does not produce severe MR-imaging artifacts, has a workspace providing sufficient coverage of a neonatal brain, and can manipulate a 5 kg payload. A full system demonstration shows these characteristics apply in an application environment. Conclusions: This paper presents a comprehensive look at the process of designing and validating a new robot from concept to implementation for use in an MR environment. An MR

  17. Design and validation of an MR-conditional robot for transcranial focused ultrasound surgery in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Karl D.; Sin, Vivian W.; Mougenot, Charles; Pichardo, Samuel; Looi, Thomas; Waspe, Adam C.; Drake, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Current treatment of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) involves cerebral shunt placement or an invasive brain surgery. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) applied to the brains of pediatric patients presents an opportunity to treat IVH in a noninvasive manner, termed “incision-less surgery.” Current clinical and research focused ultrasound systems lack the capability to perform neonatal transcranial surgeries due to either range of motion or dexterity requirements. A novel robotic system is proposed to position a focused ultrasound transducer accurately above the head of a neonatal patient inside an MRI machine to deliver the therapy. Methods: A clinical Philips Sonalleve MRgFUS system was expanded to perform transcranial treatment. A five degree-of-freedom MR-conditional robot was designed and manufactured using MR compatible materials. The robot electronics and control were integrated into existing Philips electronics and software interfaces. The user commands the position of the robot with a graphical user interface, and is presented with real-time MR imaging of the patient throughout the surgery. The robot is validated through a series of experiments that characterize accuracy, signal-to-noise ratio degeneration of an MR image as a result of the robot, MR imaging artifacts generated by the robot, and the robot’s ability to operate in a representative surgical environment inside an MR machine. Results: Experimental results show the robot responds reliably within an MR environment, has achieved 0.59 ± 0.25 mm accuracy, does not produce severe MR-imaging artifacts, has a workspace providing sufficient coverage of a neonatal brain, and can manipulate a 5 kg payload. A full system demonstration shows these characteristics apply in an application environment. Conclusions: This paper presents a comprehensive look at the process of designing and validating a new robot from concept to implementation for use in an MR environment. An MR

  18. Considering the influence of stimulation parameters on the effect of conventional and high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Wing Ting; Hart, John; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Recently, techniques to non-invasively modulate specific brain areas gained popularity in the form of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation. These non-invasive techniques have already shown promising outcomes in various studies with healthy subjects as well as patient populations. Despite widespread dissemination of tDCS, there remain significant unknowns about the influence of a diverse number of tDCS parameters (e.g. polarity, size, position of electrodes & duration of stimulation) in inducing neurophysiological and behavioral effects. This article explores both techniques starting with the history of tDCS, to the differences between conventional tDCS and high-definition transcranial direct current stimulation, the underlying physiological mechanism, the (in)direct effects, the applications of tDCS with varying parameters, the efficacy, the safety issues and the opportunities for future research.

  19. Acute changes in motor cortical excitability during slow oscillatory and constant anodal transcranial direct current stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Til Ole; Groppa, Sergiu; Seeger, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Transcranial oscillatory current stimulation has recently emerged as a noninvasive technique that can interact with ongoing endogenous rhythms of the human brain. Yet, there is still little knowledge on how time-varied exogenous currents acutely modulate cortical excitability. In ten healthy...... individuals we used on-line single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to search for systematic shifts in corticospinal excitability during anodal sleeplike 0.8-Hz slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (so-tDCS). In separate sessions, we repeatedly applied 30-s trials (two blocks...... at 20 min) of either anodal so-tDCS or constant tDCS (c-tDCS) to the primary motor hand area during quiet wakefulness. Simultaneously and time-locked to different phase angles of the slow oscillation, motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) as an index of corticospinal excitability were obtained...

  20. Transcranial surgery for craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirane, Reizo; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2007-01-01

    The current treatment of craniopharyngiomas is evolving into a multimodal approach in which the aim is disease control and improved preservation of quality of life (QOL). In this the paper, the transcranial removal of craniopharyngiomas is discussed. Fifty-two patients who were surgically treated for craniopharyngiomas extending outside the sellar-suprasellar region were evaluated. All the patients were operated on mainly by the fronto-basal interhemispheric approach. Multiple surgeries were performed in 15 cases. A total of 10 patients were treated with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) after surgical removal. In the immediate postoperative period, major complications, including impairment of the perforating arteries were observed in three cases. They exhibited hyperphagia and obesity due to infarction of the hypothalamic nuclei. In our experience, the cost of aggressive resection is hypothalamic dysfunction and a poor QOL. A good QOL may be achieved by careful total or near total resection followed by reoperation or GKS. The fronto-basal interhemispheric approach is a valid choice for the removal of craniopharyngiomas extending outside the sellar-suprasellar region. Using this approach, tumors can be removed without significant sequelae related to surgical technique due to easy preservation of the pituitary stalk, hypothalamic structures, and perforators. This approach offers a safe and minimally invasive means of treating craniopharyngiomas. (author)

  1. Transcranial light-emitting diode therapy for neuropsychological improvement after traumatic brain injury: a new perspective for diffuse axonal lesion management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos JG

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available João Gustavo Rocha Peixoto dos Santos, Wellingson Silva Paiva, Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira Department of Neurological Surgery, University of São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: The cost of traumatic brain injury (TBI for public health policies is undeniable today. Even patients who suffer from mild TBI may persist with cognitive symptoms weeks after the accident. Most of them show no lesion in computed tomography or conventional magnetic resonance imaging, but microstructural white matter abnormalities (diffuse axonal lesion can be found in diffusion tensor imaging. Different brain networks work together to form an important part of the cognition process, and they can be affected by TBI. The default mode network (DMN plays an important central role in normal brain activities, presenting greater relative deactivation during more cognitively demanding tasks. After deactivation, it allows a distinct network to activate. This network (the central executive network acts mainly during tasks involving executive functions. The salience network is another network necessary for normal executive function, and its activation leads to deactivation of the DMN. The use of red or near-infrared (NIR light to stimulate or regenerate tissue is known as photobiomodulation. It was discovered that NIR (wavelength 800–900 nm and red (wavelength 600 nm light-emitting diodes (LEDs are able to penetrate through scalp and skull and have the potential to improve the subnormal, cellular activity of compromised brain tissue. Based on this, different experimental and clinical studies were done to test LED therapy for TBI, and promising results were found. It leads us to consider developing different approaches to maximize the positive effects of this therapy and improve the quality of life of TBI patients. Keywords: traumatic brain injuries, diffuse axonal injury, low-level light therapy, neurologic manifestations, post-concussion syndrome, quality

  2. Clinical utility of carotid and transcranial ultrasound in cerebrovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueiredo L

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lívia Figueiredo, Viviane F Zétola, Marcos C Lange Neurology Division, Hospital de Clínicas, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil Abstract: Carotid and transcranial (CTU ultrasound is a useful tool in a number of clinical settings, particularly in cerebrovascular diseases. CTU is the only method that provides real-time determination of velocity and the spectral waveform of blood flow in the extracranial and basal intracranial arteries, and is effective in the detection of stenosis and occlusion. When transcranial ultrasound is considered, CTU is the only method that allows visualization of microembolic signals in the intracranial arteries. CTU makes a rapid differential diagnosis possible, improving therapeutic decision-making in acute stroke and determining the risk of recurrence and prognosis based on its findings. It is also the standard of care in children with sickle cell disease, when selecting patients for chronic blood transfusion, and for reducing the risk of ischemic stroke in these patients. CTU has some advantages, ie, relative simplicity in terms of interpretation and performance, and affordability, noninvasiveness, and portability. The main concern with ultrasound is that it is an operator-dependent tool and requires a high level of expertise and knowledge of three-dimensional cerebrovascular anatomy for correct interpretation of sonograms. The most significant limitation of intracranial evaluation by transcranial ultrasound is the absence of a suitable bone window in approximately 10% of patients. This paper gives an overview of the current utility and importance of CTU in the prevention and evaluation of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Keywords: transcranial Doppler ultrasonography, Doppler ultrasonography duplex, cerebrovascular disorders, stroke

  3. Transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of the human motor cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, Antonio; Mordillo-Mateos, Laura; Arias, Pablo; Panyavin, Ivan; Foffani, Guglielmo; Aguilar, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate in healthy humans the possibility of a non-invasive modulation of motor cortex excitability by the application of static magnetic fields through the scalp. Static magnetic fields were obtained by using cylindrical NdFeB magnets. We performed four sets of experiments. In Experiment 1, we recorded motor potentials evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex before and after 10 min of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) in conscious subjects. We observed an average reduction of motor cortex excitability of up to 25%, as revealed by TMS, which lasted for several minutes after the end of tSMS, and was dose dependent (intensity of the magnetic field) but not polarity dependent. In Experiment 2, we confirmed the reduction of motor cortex excitability induced by tSMS using a double-blind sham-controlled design. In Experiment 3, we investigated the duration of tSMS that was necessary to modulate motor cortex excitability. We found that 10 min of tSMS (compared to 1 min and 5 min) were necessary to induce significant effects. In Experiment 4, we used transcranial electric stimulation (TES) to establish that the tSMS-induced reduction of motor cortex excitability was not due to corticospinal axon and/or spinal excitability, but specifically involved intracortical networks. These results suggest that tSMS using small static magnets may be a promising tool to modulate cerebral excitability in a non-invasive, painless, and reversible way. PMID:21807616

  4. WE-D-210-04: Radiation-Induced Polymerization of Ultrasound Contrast Agents in View of Non-Invasive Dosimetry in External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callens, M; Verboven, E; Van Den Abeele, K [Department of Physics, Wave Propagation and Signal Processing, KU Leuven KULAK, Kortrijk (Belgium); D’Agostino, E [DoseVue NV, Hasselt (Belgium); Pfeiffer, H [Department of Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); D’hooge, J [Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, Bio-Medical Science Group, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    polymerizable under influence of ionizing radiation and are a promising design concept within the development of a novel non-invasive in-vivo radiation dosimeter for external beam radiation therapy. This work was funded by the Research Foundation - Flanders (FWO)

  5. Feasibility of transcranial direct current stimulation use in children aged 5 to 12 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Agnes Carvalho; Magnavita, Guilherme Moreira; Allegro, Juleilda Valéria Brasil Nunes; Neto, Carlos Eduardo Borges Passos; Lucena, Rita de Cássia Saldanha; Fregni, Felipe

    2014-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique that has been studied for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders in adults, with minimal side effects. The objective of this study is to report the feasibility, tolerability, and the short-term adverse effects of transcranial direct current stimulation in children from 5 to 12 years of age. It is a naturalistic study of 14 children who underwent 10 sessions of transcranial direct current stimulation as an alternative, off-label, and open-label treatment for various languages disorders. Frequency, intensity, adverse effects, and perception of improvement reported by parents were collected. The main side effects detected were tingling (28.6%) and itching (28.6%), acute mood changes (42.9%), and irritability (35.7%). Transcranial direct current stimulation is a feasible and tolerable technique in children, although studies regarding plastic and cognitive changes in children are needed to confirm its safety. In conclusion, this is a naturalistic report in which we considered transcranial direct current stimulation as feasible in children. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. A Noninvasive Imaging Approach to Understanding Speech Changes following Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Shalini; Jacks, Adam; Robin, Donald A.; Poizner, Howard; Zhang, Wei; Franklin, Crystal; Liotti, Mario; Vogel, Deanie; Fox, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the use of noninvasive functional imaging and "virtual" lesion techniques to study the neural mechanisms underlying motor speech disorders in Parkinson's disease. Here, we report the use of positron emission tomography (PET) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to explain exacerbated speech impairment following…

  7. Transcranial electrostimulation in patients with alcoholic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barylnik Yu.B.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The method of transcranial electrostimulation (TES was used for treating patients with alcoholic encephalopathy against the background of the basic treatment, which includes nootropics, normotimics, soporifics, over-all strengthening therapy and other devices. The course of treatment consisted of 10 daily procedures lasting for 30 minutes. The TES influence was evaluated according to the clinical state, the neurologic status, including EEG (electroencephalogram, the psychometric scales were also used for evaluating the manifestation of depression, anxiety and working memory in comparison with appropriate indices in the control group of patients, who were being treated by the traditional method. TES led to normalization of health state, neurologic status and vegetative innervation, the reduction in pathologic inclination, which corresponded to general improvement of the state of patients, EEG indices and psychometric scales

  8. Simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and single neuron recording in alert non-human primates

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Jerel K.; Grigsby, Erinn M.; Prevosto, Vincent; Petraglia, Frank W.; Rao, Hrishikesh; Deng, Zhi-De; Peterchev, Angel V.; Sommer, Marc A.; Egner, Tobias; Platt, Michael L.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used, noninvasive method for stimulating nervous tissue, yet its mechanisms of effect are poorly understood. Here we report novel methods for studying the influence of TMS on single neurons in the brain of alert non-human primates. We designed a TMS coil that focuses its effect near the tip of a recording electrode and recording electronics that enable direct acquisition of neuronal signals at the site of peak stimulus strength minimally per...

  9. Transcranial direct current stimulation may modulate extinction memory in posttraumatic stress disorder

    OpenAIRE

    van?t Wout, Mascha; Longo, Sharon M.; Reddy, Madhavi K.; Philip, Noah S.; Bowker, Marguerite T.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Abnormalities in fear extinction and recall are core components of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Data from animal and human studies point to a role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in extinction learning and subsequent retention of extinction memories. Given the increasing interest in developing noninvasive brain stimulation protocols for psychopathology treatment, we piloted whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) during extinction lear...

  10. Transcranial direct current stimulation in psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella, Gabriel; Casati, Roberta; Aparicio, Luana V M; Mantovani, Antonio; Senço, Natasha; D’Urso, Giordano; Brunelin, Jerome; Guarienti, Fabiana; Selingardi, Priscila Mara Lorencini; Muszkat, Débora; Junior, Bernardo de Sampaio Pereira; Valiengo, Leandro; Moffa, Adriano H; Simis, Marcel; Borrione, Lucas; Brunoni, André R

    2015-01-01

    The interest in non-invasive brain stimulation techniques is increasing in recent years. Among these techniques, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been the subject of great interest among researchers because of its easiness to use, low cost, benign profile of side effects and encouraging results of research in the field. This interest has generated several studies and randomized clinical trials, particularly in psychiatry. In this review, we provide a summary of the development of the technique and its mechanism of action as well as a review of the methodological aspects of randomized clinical trials in psychiatry, including studies in affective disorders, schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder, child psychiatry and substance use disorder. Finally, we provide an overview of tDCS use in cognitive enhancement as well as a discussion regarding its clinical use and regulatory and ethical issues. Although many promising results regarding tDCS efficacy were described, the total number of studies is still low, highlighting the need of further studies aiming to replicate these findings in larger samples as to provide a definite picture regarding tDCS efficacy in psychiatry. PMID:25815258

  11. Novel transcranial magnetic stimulation coil for mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Stephen; Stark, Spencer; Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) shows potential for non-invasive treatment of various neurological disorders. Significant work has been performed on the design of coils used for TMS on human subjects but few reports have been made on the design of coils for use on the brains of animals such as mice. This work is needed as TMS studies utilizing mice can allow rapid preclinical development of TMS for human disorders but the coil designs developed for use on humans are inadequate for optimal stimulation of the much smaller mouse brain. A novel TMS coil has been developed with the goal of inducing strong and focused electric fields for the stimulation of small animals such as mice. Calculations of induced electric fields were performed utilizing an MRI derived inhomogeneous model of an adult male mouse. Mechanical and thermal analysis of this new TMS helmet-coil design have also been performed at anticipated TMS operating conditions to ensure mechanical stability of the new coil and establish expected linear attraction and rotational force values. Calculated temperature increases for typical stimulation periods indicate the helmet-coil system is capable of operating within established medical standards. A prototype of the coil has been fabricated and characterization results are presented.

  12. Numerical dosimetry of transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique capable of stimulating neurons by means of electromagnetic induction. TMS can be used to map brain function and shows promise for the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Calculation of fields induced in the brain are necessary to accurately identify stimulated neural tissue during TMS. This allows the development of novel TMS coil designs capable of stimulating deeper brain regions and increasing the localization of stimulation that can be achieved. We have performed numerical calculations of magnetic and electric field with high-resolution anatomically realistic human head models to find these stimulated brain regions for a variety of proposed TMS coil designs. The realistic head models contain heterogeneous tissue structures and electrical conductivities, yielding superior results to those obtained from the simplified homogeneous head models that are commonly employed. The attenuation of electric field as a function of depth in the brain and the localization of stimulating field have been methodically investigated. In addition to providing a quantitative comparison of different TMS coil designs the variation of induced field between subjects has been investigated. We also show the differences in induced fields between adult, adolescent and child head models to preemptively identify potential safety issues in the application of pediatric TMS.

  13. Improvement of Upper Extremity Deficit after Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Combined with and without Preconditioning Stimulation Using Dual-hemisphere Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Peripheral Neuromuscular Stimulation in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Takebayashi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of dual-hemisphere transcranial direct current stimulation (dual-tDCS of both the affected (anodal tDCS and non-affected (cathodal tDCS primary motor cortex, combined with peripheral neuromuscular electrical stimulation (PNMES, on the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT as a neurorehabilitation intervention in chronic stroke. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of feasibility, with a single blind assessor, with patients recruited from three outpatient clinics. Twenty chronic stroke patients were randomly allocated to the control group, receiving conventional CIMT, or the intervention group receiving dual-tDCS combined with PNMES before CIMT. Patients in the treatment group first underwent a 20-min period of dual-tDCS, followed immediately by PNMES, and subsequent CIMT for 2 h. Patients in the control group only received CIMT (with no pretreatment stimulation. All patients underwent two CIMT sessions, one in the morning and one in the afternoon, each lasting 2 h, for a total of 4 h of CIMT per day. Upper extremity function was assessed using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (primary outcome, as well as the amount of use (AOU and quality of movement (QOM scores, obtained via the Motor Activity Log (secondary outcome. Nineteen patients completed the study, with one patient withdrawing after allocation. Compared to the control group, the treatment improvement in upper extremity function and AOU was significantly greater in the treatment than control group (change in upper extremity score, 9.20 ± 4.64 versus 4.56 ± 2.60, respectively, P < 0.01, η2 = 0.43; change in AOU score, 1.10 ± 0.65 versus 0.62 ± 0.85, respectively, P = 0.02, η2 = 0.52. There was no significant effect of the intervention on the QOM between the intervention and control groups (change in QOM score, 1.00 ± 0.62 versus 0.71 ± 0.72, respectively, P = 0.07, η2

  14. Non-invasive in vivo imaging with radiolabelled FIAU for monitoring cancer gene therapy using herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and ganciclovir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Win-Ping; Lai, Wen-Fu [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Materials, Taipei Medical University, Taipei (Taiwan); Yang, Wen K.; Yang, Den-Mei [Institute of Biological Science, Academic Sinica, Taipei (Taiwan); Liu, Ren-Shyan [Department of Nuclear Medicine and National PET Cyclotron Center, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Wang, Hsin-Ell [Institute of Radiological Science, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Lih-Nong Street, 112, Pei-tou, Taipei (Taiwan); Fu, Ying-Kai [Institute of Nuclear Energy, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan (Taiwan)

    2004-01-01

    An experimental cancer gene therapy model was employed to develop a non-invasive imaging procedure using radiolabelled 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-5-iodo-1-{beta}-d-arabinofuranosyluracil (FIAU) as an enzyme substrate for monitoring retroviral vector-mediated herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene (HSV1-tk) transgene expression. Iodine-131 labelled FIAU was prepared by a no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) synthesis process and lyophilised to give ''hot kits''. The labelling yield was over 95%, with a radiochemical purity of more than 98%. The stability of [{sup 131}I]FIAU in the form of lyophilised powder (the hot kit) was much better than that in the normal saline solution. The shelf life of the final [{sup 131}I]FIAU hot kit product is as long as 4 weeks. Cellular uptake of [{sup 131}I]FIAU after different periods of storage was investigated in vitro with HSV1-tk-retroviral vector transduced NG4TL4-STK and parental non-transduced NG4TL4 murine sarcoma cell lines over an 8-h incubation period. The NG4TL4-STK cells accumulated more radioactivity than NG4TL4 cells in all conditions, and accumulation increased with time up to 8 h. The kinetic profile of the cellular uptake of n.c.a. [{sup 131}I]FIAU formulated from the lyophilised hot kit or from the stock solution was qualitatively similar. For animal model cancer gene therapy studies, FVB/N mice were inoculated subcutaneously with the HSV1-tk(+) and tk(-) sarcoma cells into the flank to produce tumours. Biodistribution studies showed that tumour/blood ratios were 2, 3.5, 8.2 and 386.8 at 1, 4, 8 and 24 h post injection, respectively, for the HSV1-tk(+) tumours, and 0.5, 0.5, 0.7 and 5.4, respectively, for the HSV1-tk(-) tumours. Radiotracer clearance from blood was completed in 24 h and was bi-exponential. A significant difference in radioactivity accumulation was revealed among the HSV1-tk(+) tumours, the tk(-) tumours and other tissues. At 24 h p.i., higher activity retention was observed

  15. A non-invasive immobilization system and related quality assurance for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy of intracranial and head and neck disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai Jensan; Engler, Mark J.; Ling, Marilyn N.; Wu, Julian K.; Kramer, Bradley; Dipetrillo, Thomas; Wazer, David E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement a non-invasive immobilization system guided by a dedicated quality assurance (QA) program for dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of intracranial and head and neck disease, with IMRT delivered using the NOMOS Corporation's Peacock System and MIMiC collimator. Methods and Materials: Thermoplastic face masks are combined with cradle-shaped polyurethane foaming agents and a dedicated quality assurance program to create a customized headholder system (CHS). Plastic shrinkage was studied to understand its effect on immobilization. Fiducial points for computerized tomography (CT) are obtained by placing multiple dabs of barium paste on mask surfaces at intersections of laser projections used for patient positioning. Fiducial lines are drawn on the cradle along laser projections aligned with nasal surfaces. Lateral CT topograms are annotated with a crosshair indicating the origin of the treatment planning and delivery coordinate system, and with lines delineating the projections of superior-inferior field borders of the linear accelerator's secondary collimators, or with those of the fully open MIMiC. Port films exposed with and without the MIMiC are compared to annotated topograms to measure positional variance (PV) in superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior posterior (AP) directions. MIMiC vane patterns superposed on port films are applied to verify planned patterns. A 12-patient study of PV was performed by analyzing positions of 10 anatomic points on repeat CT topograms, plotting histograms of PV, and determining average PV. Results and Discussion: A 1.5 ± 0.3 mm SD shrinkage per 70 cm of thermoplastic was observed over 24 h. Average PV of 1.0 ± 0.8, 1.2 ± 1.1, and 1.3 ± 0.8 mm were measured in SI, AP, and RL directions, respectively. Lateral port films exposed with and without the MIMiC showed PV of 0.2 ± 1.3 and 0.8 ± 2.2 mm in AP and SI directions. Vane patterns superimposed on port films

  16. Noninvasive monitoring of early antiangiogenic therapy response in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenograft model using MRI with RGD-conjugated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Y

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Yanfen Cui,1,* Caiyuan Zhang,1,* Ran Luo,1 Huanhuan Liu,1 Zhongyang Zhang,1 Tianyong Xu,2 Yong Zhang,2 Dengbin Wang11Department of Radiology, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 2MR Advanced Application and Research Center, GE Healthcare China, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD-based nanoprobes allow specific imaging of integrin αvβ3, a protein overexpressed during angiogenesis. Therefore, this study applied a novel RGD-coupled, polyacrylic acid (PAA-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO (referred to as RGD-PAA-USPIO in order to detect tumor angiogenesis and assess the early response to antiangiogenic treatment in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC xenograft model by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.Materials and methods: The binding specificity of RGD-PAA-USPIO with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs was confirmed by Prussian blue staining and transmission electron microscopy in vitro. The tumor targeting of RGD-PAA-USPIO was evaluated in the NPC xenograft model. Later, mice bearing NPC underwent MRI at baseline and after 4 and 14 days of consecutive treatment with Endostar or phosphate-buffered saline (n=10 per group.Results: The specific uptake of the RGD-PAA-USPIO nanoparticles was mainly dependent on the interaction between RGD and integrin αvβ3 of HUVECs. The tumor targeting of RGD-PAA-USPIO was observed in the NPC xenograft model. Moreover, the T2 relaxation time of mice in the Endostar-treated group decreased significantly compared with those in the control group both on days 4 and 14, consistent with the immunofluorescence results of CD31 and CD61 (P<0.05.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the magnetic resonance molecular nanoprobes, RGD-PAA-USPIOs, allow noninvasive in vivo imaging of tumor angiogenesis and assessment of the early response to antiangiogenic treatment in

  17. Long term clinical and neurophysiological effects of cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with neurodegenerative ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benussi, Alberto; Dell'Era, Valentina; Cotelli, Maria Sofia; Turla, Marinella; Casali, Carlo; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    Neurodegenerative cerebellar ataxias represent a group of disabling disorders for which we currently lack effective therapies. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive technique, which has been demonstrated to modulate cerebellar excitability and improve symptoms in patients with cerebellar ataxias. The present study investigated whether a two-weeks' treatment with cerebellar anodal tDCS could improve symptoms in patients with neurodegenerative cerebellar ataxia and could modulate cerebello-motor connectivity, at short and long term. We performed a double-blind, randomized, sham controlled trial with cerebellar tDCS (5 days/week for 2 weeks) in twenty patients with ataxia. Each patient underwent a clinical evaluation pre- and post-anodal tDCS or sham stimulation. A follow-up evaluation was performed at one and three months. Cerebello-motor connectivity was evaluated using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) at baseline and at follow-up. Patients who underwent anodal tDCS showed a significant improvement in all performance scores (scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia, international cooperative ataxia rating scale, 9-hole peg test, 8-m walking time) and in cerebellar brain inhibition compared to patients who underwent sham stimulation. A two-weeks' treatment with anodal cerebellar tDCS improves symptoms in patients with ataxia and restores physiological cerebellar brain inhibition pathways. Cerebellar tDCS might represent a promising future therapeutic and rehabilitative approach in patients with neurodegenerative ataxia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Brazilian Guidelines for transcranial doppler in children and adolescents with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarisse Lopes de Castro Lobo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sickle cell disease is the most common monogenic hereditary disease in Brazil. Although strokes are one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in these patients, the use of transcranial Doppler to identify children at risk is not universally used. OBJECTIVE: To develop Brazilian guidelines for the use of transcranial Doppler in sickle cell disease children and adolescents, so that related health policies can be expanded, and thus contribute to reduce morbidity and mortality. METHODS: The guidelines were formulated in a consensus meeting of experts in transcranial Doppler and sickle cell disease. The issues discussed were previously formulated and scientific articles in databases (MEDLINE, SciELO and Cochrane were carefully analyzed. The consensus for each question was obtained by a vote of experts on the specific theme. RESULTS: Recommendations were made, including indications for the use of transcranial Doppler according to the sickle cell disease genotype and patients age; the necessary conditions to perform the exam and its periodicity depending on exam results; the criteria for the indication of blood transfusions and iron chelation therapy; the indication of hydroxyurea; and the therapeutic approach in cases of conditional transcranial Doppler. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian guidelines on the use of transcranial doppler in sickle cell disease patients may reduce the risk of strokes, and thus reduce the morbidity and mortality and improve the quality of life of sickle cell disease patients.

  19. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Garvey, Marjorie A.; Mall, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Developmental disabilities (e.g. attention deficit disorder; cerebral palsy) are frequently associated with deviations of the typical pattern of motor skill maturation. Neurophysiologic tools, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which probe motor cortex function, can potentially provide insights into both typical neuromotor maturation and the mechanisms underlying the motor skill deficits in children with developmental disabilities. These insights may set the stage for finding ef...

  20. The impact of large structural brain changes in chronic stroke patients on the electric field caused by transcranial brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Minjoli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS are two types of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (TBS. They are useful tools for stroke research and may be potential adjunct therapies for functional recovery. However, stroke often causes large cerebral lesions, which are commonly accompanied by a secondary enlargement of the ventricles and atrophy. These structural alterations substantially change the conductivity distribution inside the head, which may have potentially important consequences for both brain stimulation methods. We therefore aimed to characterize the impact of these changes on the spatial distribution of the electric field generated by both TBS methods. In addition to confirming the safety of TBS in the presence of large stroke-related structural changes, our aim was to clarify whether targeted stimulation is still possible. Realistic head models containing large cortical and subcortical stroke lesions in the right parietal cortex were created using MR images of two patients. For TMS, the electric field of a double coil was simulated using the finite-element method. Systematic variations of the coil position relative to the lesion were tested. For TDCS, the finite-element method was used to simulate a standard approach with two electrode pads, and the position of one electrode was systematically varied. For both TMS and TDCS, the lesion caused electric field “hot spots” in the cortex. However, these maxima were not substantially stronger than those seen in a healthy control. The electric field pattern induced by TMS was not substantially changed by the lesions. However, the average field strength generated by TDCS was substantially decreased. This effect occurred for both head models and even when both electrodes were distant to the lesion, caused by increased current shunting through the lesion and enlarged ventricles. Judging from the similar peak field strengths compared

  1. The impact of large structural brain changes in chronic stroke patients on the electric field caused by transcranial brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minjoli, Sena; Saturnino, Guilherme B; Blicher, Jakob Udby; Stagg, Charlotte J; Siebner, Hartwig R; Antunes, André; Thielscher, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) are two types of non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (TBS). They are useful tools for stroke research and may be potential adjunct therapies for functional recovery. However, stroke often causes large cerebral lesions, which are commonly accompanied by a secondary enlargement of the ventricles and atrophy. These structural alterations substantially change the conductivity distribution inside the head, which may have potentially important consequences for both brain stimulation methods. We therefore aimed to characterize the impact of these changes on the spatial distribution of the electric field generated by both TBS methods. In addition to confirming the safety of TBS in the presence of large stroke-related structural changes, our aim was to clarify whether targeted stimulation is still possible. Realistic head models containing large cortical and subcortical stroke lesions in the right parietal cortex were created using MR images of two patients. For TMS, the electric field of a double coil was simulated using the finite-element method. Systematic variations of the coil position relative to the lesion were tested. For TDCS, the finite-element method was used to simulate a standard approach with two electrode pads, and the position of one electrode was systematically varied. For both TMS and TDCS, the lesion caused electric field "hot spots" in the cortex. However, these maxima were not substantially stronger than those seen in a healthy control. The electric field pattern induced by TMS was not substantially changed by the lesions. However, the average field strength generated by TDCS was substantially decreased. This effect occurred for both head models and even when both electrodes were distant to the lesion, caused by increased current shunting through the lesion and enlarged ventricles. Judging from the similar peak field strengths compared to the healthy

  2. Non-invasive brain stimulation to promote motor and functional recovery following spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysegul Gunduz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a systematic review of studies using non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS: repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS as a research and clinical tool aimed at improving motor and functional recovery or spasticity in patients following spinal cord injury (SCI under the assumption that if the residual corticospinal circuits could be stimulated appropriately, the changes might be accompanied by functional recovery or an improvement in spasticity. This review summarizes the literature on the changes induced by NIBS in the motor and functional recovery and spasticity control of the upper and lower extremities following SCI.

  3. Low level light therapy on stroke with a portable and illumination-parameter adjustable LED helmet: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengbo; Sun, Jiajing; Li, Zebin; Li, Ting

    2018-02-01

    Stroke is an obstinate and dreaded disease, which present characteristics of high incidence rates, high relapse rates, high mortality rates and high disability rates. Recent World Health Organization data suggest that a stroke victim is identified every 6 seconds around the world. There are not effective therapies for stroke except surgery that caused stroke victims enormous physical and psychological trauma. Transcranial low-level light/laser therapy (LLLT) of neurological diseases and brain trauma has gained momentum due to the character of high-efficiency, safe and non-invasive in the past decade. In this study, we found three conclusions through previous studies. 1). In simulation, 810nm light/laser makes the maximum light penetration (>5cm), which allow light to cross through gray matter into white matter. Gaussian beam with the same size of lesion area achieves better therapeutic. What's more, multi-light/laser- source has potential effect on stroke treatment. 2). In animal tests, LLLT has a positive therapeutic effect and PW mode LLLT has a better effect than XW mode LLLT on stroke treatment. 3). In clinical, large scale human experiment results are not so ideal due to the lower energy density of LLLT. In summary, it is no deny that those research results highlighted the great potential of transcranial LLLT as a novel, effective, and non-invasive therapy for stroke treatment.

  4. [Effects of combined action of radon baths and transcranial magnetotherapy on cerebral circulation in patients in an intermediate period of a mild craniocerebral trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliavchikova, O V; Cherevashchenko, L A; Grinzaĭd, Iu M; Aĭvazov, V N; Zhuravlev, M E

    2007-01-01

    The authors propose combined therapy improving cerebral circulation in patients in an intermediate period of a mild craniocerebral trauma. The combination consists of radon baths and transcranial magnetotherapy which raise blood volume filling, relieve vascular resistance, improve venous outflow.

  5. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and behavioral models of smoking addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige eFraser

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available While few studies have applied transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS to smoking addiction, existing work suggests that the intervention holds promise for altering the complex system by which environmental cues interact with cravings to drive behavior. Imaging and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS studies suggest that increased dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC activation and integrity may be associated with increased resistance to smoking cues. Anodal tDCS of the DLPFC, believed to boost activation, reduces cravings in response to these cues. The finding that noninvasive stimulation modifies cue induced cravings has profound implications for understanding the processes underlying addiction and relapse. TDCS can also be applied to probe mechanisms underlying and supporting nicotine addiction, as was done in a pharmacologic study that applied nicotine, tDCS, and TMS paired associative stimulation to find that stopping nicotine after chronic use induces a reduction in plasticity, causing difficulty in breaking free from association between cues and cravings. This mini-review will place studies that apply tDCS to smokers in the context of research involving the neural substrates of nicotine addiction.

  6. Ultrasound measurement of transcranial distance during head-down tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torikoshi, S.; Wilson, M. H.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Murthy, G.; Yost, W. T.; Cantrell, J. H.; Chang, D. S.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity elevates blood pressure and flow in the head, which may increase intracranial volume (ICV) and intracranial pressure (ICP). Rhesus monkeys exposed to simulated microgravity in the form of 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) experience elevated ICP. With humans, twenty-four hours of 6 degree HDT bed rest increases cerebral blood flow velocity relative to pre-HDT upright posture. Humans exposed to acute 6 degree HDT experiments increased ICP, measured with the tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) technique. Other studies suggest that increased ICP in humans and cats causes measurable cranial bone movement across the sagittal suture. Due to the slightly compliant nature of the cranium, elevation of the ICP will increase ICV and transcranial distance. Currently, several non-invasive approaches to monitor ICP are being investigated. Such techniques include TMD and modal analysis of the skull. TMD may not be reliable over a large range of ICP and neither method is capable of measuring the small changes in pressure. Ultrasound, however, may reliably measure small distance changes that accompany ICP fluctuations. The purpose of our study was to develop and evaluate an ultrasound technique to measure transcranial distance changes during HDT.

  7. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janicak PG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Philip G Janicak, Mehmet E DokucuDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Major depression is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Even when the diagnosis is properly made, standard treatment approaches (eg, psychotherapy, medications, or their combination are often inadequate to control acute symptoms or maintain initial benefit. Additional obstacles involve safety and tolerability problems, which frequently preclude an adequate course of treatment. This leaves an important gap in our ability to properly manage major depression in a substantial proportion of patients, leaving them vulnerable to ensuing complications (eg, employment-related disability, increased risk of suicide, comorbid medical disorders, and substance abuse. Thus, there is a need for more effective and better tolerated approaches. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a neuromodulation technique increasingly used to partly fill this therapeutic void. In the context of treating depression, we critically review the development of transcranial magnetic stimulation, focusing on the results of controlled and pragmatic trials for depression, which consider its efficacy, safety, and tolerability.Keywords: electroconvulsive therapy, treatment-resistant depression, major depression, transcranial magnetic stimulation

  8. Precise positional measurement system in transcranial magnetic stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tomonori; Mishima, Yukuo; Hiwaki, Osamu

    2006-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a method for noninvasive stimulation of cerebral cortex, and it has contributed to clinical and basic researches of brain function. In order to estimate the accurate stimulating points of the cortex in TMS, precise measurement of the subject's head and the stimulating coil is necessary. In this study, we have developed the positioning TMS system with a three-dimensional (3-D) digitizer and a multi-articular system. We proposed a method for the accurate measurement of a subject's head and cortex, in which the location data of the subject's face surface captured by a 3-D digitizer were superimposed on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of the subject's face surface. Using this system, the precise estimation of the stimulated sites of the cortex in TMS was achieved. The validity of the system was verified by the experiment on the TMS of the motor cortex. (author)

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation: applications in basic neuroscience and neuropsychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisanby, Sarah H.; Luber, Bruce; Perera, Tarique; Sackeim, Harold A.

    2000-09-01

    Introduced 15 years ago, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive means of stimulating the cortex that has proved to be a unique tool for probing brain-behaviour relationships. While a therapeutic role for TMS in neuropsychiatry is uncertain, the utility of TMS in studying brain function has been demonstrated in diverse neuroscience applications. We review studies in animals on the mechanisms of action of TMS, and present a summary of the applications of TMS in basic neuroscience. TMS is still a relatively young technique, and unanswered questions remain regarding its acute and chronic impact on neural excitability and various aspects of brain function. Nonetheless, recent work with TMS has demonstrated its unique role in complementing other tools for studying brain function. As a brain intervention tool, TMS holds the promise of moving beyond correlative studies to help define the functional role of cortical regions in selected cognitive and affective processes.

  10. Noninvasive Personalization of Lung Cancer Therapy Using a New, Clinical-Grade Assay for Plasma-Based Measurement and Monitoring of Tumor Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    funding to launch our plasma assay as a clinical test at Brigham and Women’s Hospital . With this assay, I have launched an investigator-sponsored trial...Manager [Recently Completed] Phi Beta Psi Charity Trust (Oxnard) 08/15/14 – 08/14/16 *0.00 CM Non-invasive genotyping realized at last...Harvard University, MA BA 06/1999 Chemistry University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine, IL MD 06/2005 Medicine Massachusetts General Hospital

  11. Pressure pain thresholds increase after preconditioning 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Tonya M; Witney, Alice G

    2014-01-01

    The primary motor cortex (M1) is an effective target of non-invasive cortical stimulation (NICS) for pain threshold modulation. It has been suggested that the initial level of cortical excitability of M1 plays a key role in the plastic effects of NICS. Here we investigate whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) primed 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds and if this is related to observed alterations in cortical excitability. 15 healthy, male participants received 10 min 1 mA anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS to the left M1 before 15 min 1 Hz rTMS in separate sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Motor cortical excitability was recorded at baseline, post-tDCS priming and post-rTMS through recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from right FDI muscle. Pressure pain thresholds were determined by quantitative sensory testing (QST) through a computerized algometer, on the palmar thenar of the right hand pre- and post-stimulation. Cathodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS was found to reverse the expected suppressive effect of 1 Hz rTMS on cortical excitability; leading to an overall increase in activity (ppain thresholds (ppain. This study demonstrates that priming the M1 before stimulation of 1 Hz-rTMS modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds in a safe and controlled manner, producing a form of analgesia.

  12. Combining physical training with transcranial direct current stimulation to improve gait in Parkinson's disease: a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaski, D; Dominguez, R O; Allum, J H; Islam, A F; Bronstein, A M

    2014-11-01

    To improve gait and balance in patients with Parkinson's disease by combining anodal transcranial direct current stimulation with physical training. In a double-blind design, one group (physical training; n = 8) underwent gait and balance training during transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS; real/sham). Real stimulation consisted of 15 minutes of 2 mA transcranial direct current stimulation over primary motor and premotor cortex. For sham, the current was switched off after 30 seconds. Patients received the opposite stimulation (sham/real) with physical training one week later; the second group (No physical training; n = 8) received stimulation (real/sham) but no training, and also repeated a sequential transcranial direct current stimulation session one week later (sham/real). Hospital Srio Libanes, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Sixteen community-dwelling patients with Parkinson's disease. Transcranial direct current stimulation with and without concomitant physical training. Gait velocity (primary gait outcome), stride length, timed 6-minute walk test, Timed Up and Go Test (secondary outcomes), and performance on the pull test (primary balance outcome). Transcranial direct current stimulation with physical training increased gait velocity (mean = 29.5%, SD = 13; p transcranial direct current stimulation alone. There was no isolated benefit of transcranial direct current stimulation alone. Although physical training improved gait velocity (mean = 15.5%, SD = 12.3; p = 0.03), these effects were comparatively less than with combined tDCS + physical therapy (p stimulation-related improvements were seen in patients with more advanced disease. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation during physical training improves gait and balance in patients with Parkinson's disease. Power calculations revealed that 14 patients per treatment arm (α = 0.05; power = 0.8) are required for a definitive trial. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Noninvasive neuromodulation in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Láinez, Miguel J A; Jensen, Rigmor

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Neuromodulation is an alternative in the management of medically intractable cluster headache patients. Most of the techniques are invasive, but in the last 2 years, some studies using a noninvasive device have been presented. The objective of this article is to review the data...... using this approach. RECENT FINDINGS: Techniques as occipital nerve stimulation or sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation are recommended as first-line therapy in refractory cluster patients, but they are invasive and maybe associated with complications. Noninvasive vagal nerve stimulation with an external...... device has been tried in cluster patients. Results from clinical practice and a single randomized clinical trial have been presented showing a reduction of the number of cluster attacks/week in the patients treated with the device. The rate of adverse events was low and most of them were mild. SUMMARY...

  14. A random phased-array for MR-guided transcranial ultrasound neuromodulation in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Vandiver; Phipps, Marshal A; Caskey, Charles F

    2018-04-18

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is a non-invasive technique for therapy and study of brain neural activation. Here we report on the design and characterization of a new MR-guided FUS transducer for neuromodulation in non-human primates at 650 kHz. The array is randomized with 128 elements 6.6 mm in diameter, radius of curvature 7.2 cm, opening diameter 10.3 cm (focal ratio 0.7), and 46% coverage. Simulations were used to optimize transducer geometry with respect to focus size, grating lobes, and directivity. Focus size and grating lobes during electronic steering were quantified using hydrophone measurements in water and a three-axis stage. A novel combination of optical tracking and acoustic mapping enabled measurement of the 3D pressure distribution in the cortical region of an ex vivo skull to within ~3.5 mm of the surface, and allowed accurate modelling of the experiment via non-homogeneous 3D acoustic simulations. The data demonstrates acoustic focusing beyond the skull bone, with the focus slightly broadened and shifted proximal to the skull. The fabricated design is capable of targeting regions within the S1 sensorimotor cortex of macaques. © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  15. A random phased-array for MR-guided transcranial ultrasound neuromodulation in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Vandiver; Phipps, Marshal A.; Caskey, Charles F.

    2018-05-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is a non-invasive technique for therapy and study of brain neural activation. Here we report on the design and characterization of a new MR-guided FUS transducer for neuromodulation in non-human primates at 650 kHz. The array is randomized with 128 elements 6.6 mm in diameter, radius of curvature 7.2 cm, opening diameter 10.3 cm (focal ratio 0.7), and 46% coverage. Simulations were used to optimize transducer geometry with respect to focus size, grating lobes, and directivity. Focus size and grating lobes during electronic steering were quantified using hydrophone measurements in water and a three-axis stage. A novel combination of optical tracking and acoustic mapping enabled measurement of the 3D pressure distribution in the cortical region of an ex vivo skull to within ~3.5 mm of the surface, and allowed accurate modelling of the experiment via non-homogeneous 3D acoustic simulations. The data demonstrates acoustic focusing beyond the skull bone, with the focus slightly broadened and shifted proximal to the skull. The fabricated design is capable of targeting regions within the S1 sensorimotor cortex of macaques.

  16. Transcranial and spinal cord magnetic stimulation in treatment of spasticity: a literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzhova, Julia; Sinitsyn, Dmitry; Chervyakov, Alexander; Poydasheva, Alexandra; Zakharova, Maria; Suponeva, Natalia; Chernikova, Lyudmila; Piradov, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Spasticity is associated with various diseases of the nervous system. Current treatments such as drug therapy, botulinum toxin injections, kinesitherapy, and physiotherapy are not sufficiently effective in a large number of patients. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be considered as an alternative method of treatment. The purpose of this article was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of all available publications assessing the efficacy of repetitive TMS in treatment of spasticity. Search for articles was conducted in databases PubMed, Willey, and Google. Keywords included "TMS", "spasticity", "TMS and spasticity", "non-invasive brain stimulation", and "non-invasive spinal cord stimulation". The difference in scores according to the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) for one joint before and after treatment was taken as the effect size. We found 26 articles that examined the TMS efficacy in treatment of spasticity. Meta-analysis included 6 trials comprising 149 patients who underwent real stimulation or simulation. No statistically significant difference in the effect of real and simulated stimulation was found in stroke patients. In patients with spinal cord injury and spasticity, the mean effect size value and the 95% confidence interval were -0.80 and (-1.12, -0.49), respectively, in a group of real stimulation; in the case of simulated stimulation, these parameters were 0.15 and (-0.30, -0.00), respectively. Statistically significant differences between groups of real stimulation and simulation were demonstrated for using high-frequency repetitive TMS or iTBS mode for the M1 area of the spastic leg (P=0.0002). According to the meta-analysis, the statistically significant effect of TMS in the form of reduced spasticity was demonstrated only for the developed due to lesions at the brain stem and spinal cord level. To clarify the amount of the antispasmodic effect of repetitive TMS at other lesion levels, in particular in patients with

  17. Transcranial direct current stimulation for depression in Alzheimer's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Zui; Yokoi, Yuma

    2017-06-19

    Patients with Alzheimer's disease frequently elicit neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as cognitive deficits. Above all, depression is one of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer's disease but antidepressant drugs have not shown significant beneficial effects on it. Moreover, electroconvulsive therapy has not ensured its safety for potential severe adverse events although it does show beneficial clinical effect. Transcranial direct current stimulation can be the safe alternative of neuromodulation, which applies weak direct electrical current to the brain. Although transcranial direct current stimulation has plausible evidence for its effect on depression in young adult patients, no study has explored it in older subjects with depression in Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we present a study protocol designed to evaluate the safety and clinical effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on depression in Alzheimer's disease in subjects aged over 65 years. This is a two-arm, parallel-design, randomized controlled trial, in which patients and assessors will be blinded. Subjects will be randomized to either an active or a sham transcranial direct current stimulation group. Participants in both groups will be evaluated at baseline, immediately, and 2 weeks after the intervention. This study investigates the safety and effect of transcranial direct current stimulation that may bring a significant impact on both depression and cognition in patients with Alzheimer's disease, and may be useful to enhance their quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02351388 . Registered on 27 January 2015. Last updated on 30 May 2016.

  18. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation of the undamaged brain to identify lesion sites that predict language outcome after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorca-Puls, Diego L; Gajardo-Vidal, Andrea; Seghier, Mohamed L; Leff, Alexander P; Sethi, Varun; Prejawa, Susan; Hope, Thomas M H; Devlin, Joseph T; Price, Cathy J

    2017-06-01

    unguided lesion overlap map; and (iii) a region identified from voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. Finally, consistent with prior findings from functional imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy participants, we show how damage to our transcranial magnetic stimulation-guided regions affected performance on phonologically more than semantically demanding tasks. The observation that phonological processing abilities were impaired years after the stroke, suggests that other brain regions were not able to fully compensate for the contribution that the transcranial magnetic stimulation-guided regions make to language tasks. More generally, our novel transcranial magnetic stimulation-guided lesion-deficit mapping approach shows how non-invasive stimulation of the healthy brain can be used to guide the identification of regions where brain damage is likely to cause persistent behavioural effects. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  19. Using imaging to target the prefrontal cortex for transcranial magnetic stimulation studies in treatment-resistant depression

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Kevin A.; Ramsey, Dave; Kozel, Frank A.; Bohning, Daryl E.; Anderson, Berry; Nahas, Ziad; Sacke?m, Harold A.; George, Mark S.

    2006-01-01

    Structural imaging studies of the brains of patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) have found several abnormalities, including smaller hippocampus, orbitofrontal cortex, or pre?frontal cortex. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive means of modulating brain activity, and has shown antidepressant treatment efficacy. 1 The initial methods used for targeting the prefrontal cortex are most likely insufficient. Herwig et al found that a common rule-based approach (the...

  20. Effects of acetazolamide on the micro- and macro-vascular cerebral hemodynamics: A diffuse optical and transcranial doppler ultrasound study

    OpenAIRE

    Zirak P.; Delgado-Mederos R.; Marti-Fabregas J.; Durduran T.

    2010-01-01

    Acetazolamide (ACZ) was used to stimulate the cerebral vasculature on ten healthy volunteers to assess the cerebral vasomotor reactivity (CVR). We have combined near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and transcranial Doppler (TCD) technologies to non-invasively assess CVR in real-time by measuring oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations, using NIRS, local cerebral blood flow (CBF), using DCS, and blood flow velocity (CBFV) in the middle cerebral artery, usi...

  1. Noninvasive imaging of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medarova, Z.

    2009-01-01

    With the development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies, it is highly advantageous to be able to determine their efficacy, to improve overall patient survival. Non-invasive imaging techniques are currently available for visualizing different pathological conditions of the human body, but their use for cancer monitoring is limited due to the lack of tumor-specific imaging probes. This review will attempt to summarize the current clinical diagnostic approaches for breast cancer detection, staging, and therapy assessment. In addition, I will present some novel concepts from the field of molecular imaging that form the basis of some of our research. We believe that this general imaging strategy has the potential of significantly advancing our ability to diagnose breast cancer at the earliest stages of the pathology, before any overt clinical symptoms have developed, as well as to better direct the development of molecularly-targeted individualized therapy protocols.

  2. Transcranial laser stimulation as neuroenhancement for attention bias modification in adults with elevated depression symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disner, Seth G.; Beevers, Christopher G.; Gonzalez-Lima, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-level light therapy (LLLT) with transcranial laser is a non-invasive form of neuroenhancement shown to regulate neuronal metabolism and cognition. Attention bias modification (ABM) is a cognitive intervention designed to improve depression by decreasing negative attentional bias, but to date its efficacy has been inconclusive. Adjunctive neuroenhancement to augment clinical effectiveness has shown promise, particularly for individuals who respond positively to the primary intervention. Objective/Hypothesis This randomized, sham-controlled proof-of-principle study is the first to test the hypothesis that augmentative LLLT will improve the effects of ABM among adults with elevated symptoms of depression. Methods Fifty-one adult participants with elevated symptoms of depression received ABM before and after laser stimulation and were randomized to one of three conditions: right forehead, left forehead, or sham. Participants repeated LLLT two days later and were assessed for depression symptoms one and two weeks later. Results A significant three-way interaction between LLLT condition, ABM response, and time indicated that right LLLT led to greater symptom improvement among participants whose attention was responsive to ABM (i.e., attention was directed away from negative stimuli). Minimal change in depression was observed in the left and sham LLLT. Conclusions The beneficial effects of ABM on depression symptoms may be enhanced when paired with adjunctive interventions such as right prefrontal LLLT; however, cognitive response to ABM likely moderates the impact of neuroenhancement. The results suggest that larger clinical trials examining the efficacy of using photoneuromodulation to augment cognitive training are warranted. PMID:27267860

  3. Electromagnetic Field Modeling of Transcranial Electric and Magnetic Stimulation: Targeting, Individualization, and Safety of Convulsive and Subconvulsive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-De

    The proliferation of noninvasive transcranial electric and magnetic brain stimulation techniques and applications in recent years has led to important insights into brain function and pathophysiology of brain-based disorders. Transcranial electric and magnetic stimulation encompasses a wide spectrum of methods that have developed into therapeutic interventions for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Although these methods are at different stages of development, the physical principle underlying these techniques is the similar. Namely, an electromagnetic field is induced in the brain either via current injection through scalp electrodes or via electromagnetic induction. The induced electric field modulates the neuronal transmembrane potentials and, thereby, neuronal excitability or activity. Therefore, knowledge of the induced electric field distribution is key in the design and interpretation of basic research and clinical studies. This work aims to delineate the fundamental physical limitations, tradeoffs, and technological feasibility constraints associated with transcranial electric and magnetic stimulation, in order to inform the development of technologies that deliver safer, and more spatially, temporally, and patient specific stimulation. Part I of this dissertation expounds on the issue of spatial targeting of the electric field. Contrasting electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) configurations that differ markedly in efficacy, side effects, and seizure induction efficiency could advance our understanding of the principles linking treatment parameters and therapeutic outcome and could provide a means of testing hypotheses of the mechanisms of therapeutic action. Using the finite element method, we systematically compare the electric field characteristics of existing forms of ECT and MST. We introduce a method of incorporating a modality-specific neural activation threshold in the electric field models that can

  4. Time reversal for ultrasonic transcranial surgery and echographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanter, Mickael; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Vignon, Francois; Fink, Mathias

    2005-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is able to induce non-invasively controlled and selective destruction of tissues by focusing ultrasonic beams within organs, analogous to a magnifying glass that concentrates enough sunlight to burn a hole in paper. The brain is an attractive organ in which to perform ultrasonic tissue ablation, but such an application has been hampered by the strong defocusing effect of the skull bone. Our group has been involved in this topic for several years, providing proofs of concept and proposing technological solutions to this problem. Thanks to a high-power time-reversal mirror, presented here are in vivo thermal lesions induced through the skull of 12 sheep. Thermal lesions were confirmed by T2-weighted magnetic resonance post-treatment images and histological examination. These results provide striking evidence that noninvasive ultrasound brain surgery is feasible. A recent approach for high-resolution brain ultrasonic imaging will also be discussed with a skull aberration correction technique based on twin arrays technology. The correction of transcranial ultrasonic images is implemented on a new generation of time-reversal mirrors relying on a fully programmable transmit and receive beamformer.

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and sleep disorders: pathophysiologic insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2013-11-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying the development of the most common intrinsic sleep disorders are not completely known. Therefore, there is a great need for noninvasive tools which can be used to better understand the pathophysiology of these diseases. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers a method to noninvasively investigate the functional integrity of the motor cortex and its corticospinal projections in neurologic and psychiatric diseases. To date, TMS studies have revealed cortical and corticospinal dysfunction in several sleep disorders, with cortical hyperexcitability being a characteristic feature in some disorders (i.e., the restless legs syndrome) and cortical hypoexcitability being a well-established finding in others (i.e., obstructive sleep apnea syndrome narcolepsy). Several research groups also have applied TMS to evaluate the effects of pharmacologic agents, such as dopaminergic agent or wake-promoting substances. Our review will focus on the mechanisms underlying the generation of abnormal TMS measures in the different types of sleep disorders, the contribution of TMS in enhancing the understanding of their pathophysiology, and the potential diagnostic utility of TMS techniques. We also briefly discussed the possible future implications for improving therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcranial focused ultrasound stimulation of human primary visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Jung, Yujin; Chung, Yong An; Song, In-Uk; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is making progress as a new non-invasive mode of regional brain stimulation. Current evidence of FUS-mediated neurostimulation for humans has been limited to the observation of subjective sensory manifestations and electrophysiological responses, thus warranting the identification of stimulated brain regions. Here, we report FUS sonication of the primary visual cortex (V1) in humans, resulting in elicited activation not only from the sonicated brain area, but also from the network of regions involved in visual and higher-order cognitive processes (as revealed by simultaneous acquisition of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging). Accompanying phosphene perception was also reported. The electroencephalo graphic (EEG) responses showed distinct peaks associated with the stimulation. None of the participants showed any adverse effects from the sonication based on neuroimaging and neurological examinations. Retrospective numerical simulation of the acoustic profile showed the presence of individual variability in terms of the location and intensity of the acoustic focus. With exquisite spatial selectivity and capability for depth penetration, FUS may confer a unique utility in providing non-invasive stimulation of region-specific brain circuits for neuroscientific and therapeutic applications.

  7. Noninvasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation: Local and distant effects for motor recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Lei eLiew

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS may enhance motor recovery after neurological injury through the causal induction of plasticity processes. Neurological injury, such as stroke, often results in serious long-term physical disabilities, and despite intensive therapy, a large majority of brain injury survivors fail to regain full motor function. Emerging research suggests that NIBS techniques, such as transcranial magnetic (TMS and direct current (tDCS stimulation, in association with customarily used neurorehabilitative treatments, may enhance motor recovery. This paper provides a general review on TMS and tDCS paradigms, the mechanisms by which they operate and the stimulation techniques used in neurorehabilitation, specifically stroke. TMS and tDCS influence regional neural activity underlying the stimulation location and also distant interconnected network activity throughout the brain. We discuss recent studies that document NIBS effects on global brain activity measured with various neuroimaging techniques, which help to characterize better strategies for more accurate NIBS stimulation. These rapidly growing areas of inquiry may hold potential for improving the effectiveness of NIBS-based interventions for clinical rehabilitation.

  8. The effect of entrainment site and inspiratory pressure on the delivery of oxygen therapy during non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV in acute COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep Kaul

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Supplemental O2 is frequently added to bi-level non-invasive ventilation circuits to maintain Sa,O2 >90%. Oxygen can be added at several points & in the presence of different inspiratory pressures. The effect of varying entrainment sites and inspiratory pressures (IPAP on PO2, PCO2, Fio2, inspiratory triggering and expiratory triggering in COPD patients is unknown. 18 patients with stable COPD (mean FEV1 47% participated in the study. Oxygen was added at 4 sites in the ventilatory circuit (site 1: between mask and exhalation port; site 2: just distal to exhalation port; site 3: at ventilator outlet; site 4: directly into the mask via an inlet. The effect of varying entrainment sites and inspiratory pressures on arterial PO2, PCO2, FIO2, was recorded at 3 mins. The same full face mask (Respironics, Image 3 & ventilator (Respironics, BIPAP ST 30 was used.

  9. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively decoupled by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area had a clear vascular pattern and spread wider than the somatosensory region. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism. PMID:22940116

  10. Noninvasive optical inhibition with a red-shifted microbial rhodopsin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuong, Amy S; Miri, Mitra L; Busskamp, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic inhibition of the electrical activity of neurons enables the causal assessment of their contributions to brain functions. Red light penetrates deeper into tissue than other visible wavelengths. We present a red-shifted cruxhalorhodopsin, Jaws, derived from Haloarcula (Halobacterium......) salinarum (strain Shark) and engineered to result in red light-induced photocurrents three times those of earlier silencers. Jaws exhibits robust inhibition of sensory-evoked neural activity in the cortex and results in strong light responses when used in retinas of retinitis pigmentosa model mice. We also...... demonstrate that Jaws can noninvasively mediate transcranial optical inhibition of neurons deep in the brains of awake mice. The noninvasive optogenetic inhibition opened up by Jaws enables a variety of important neuroscience experiments and offers a powerful general-use chloride pump for basic and applied...

  11. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor cortical excitability and sensory nerve conduction velocity in subacute-stage incomplete spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun Gyu; Ji, Sang-Goo; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted on 20 subjects with diagnosed paraplegia due to spinal cord injury. These 20 subjects were allocated to an experimental group of 10 subjects that underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or to a control group of 10 subjects that underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy, whereas the spinal cord injury patients in the control group underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for six-weeks. Latency, amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed before and after the six week therapy period. [Results] A significant intergroup difference was observed for posttreatment velocity gains, but no significant intergroup difference was observed for amplitude or latency. [Conclusion] repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients.

  12. Non-invasive assessment of changes in corticomotoneuronal transmission in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taube, Wolfgang; Leukel, Christian; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2017-01-01

    The corticospinal pathway is the major pathway connecting the brain with the muscles and is therefore highly relevant for movement control and motor learning. There exists a number of noninvasive electrophysiological methods investigating the excitability and plasticity of this pathway. However...... cortical and spinal effects but also assessment of transmission at the corticomotoneural synapse. In this manuscript, we describe how this method can be used to assess corticomotoneural transmission after low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, a method that was previously shown...

  13. 3D realistic head model simulation based on transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Xu, Guizhi; Wang, Lei; Chen, Yong; Wu, Huanli; Li, Ying; Yang, Qingxin

    2006-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a powerful non-invasive tool for investigating functions in the brain. The target inside the head is stimulated with eddy currents induced in the tissue by the time-varying magnetic field. Precise spatial localization of stimulation sites is the key of efficient functional magnetic stimulations. Many researchers devote to magnetic field analysis in empty free space. In this paper, a realistic head model used in Finite Element Method has been developed. The magnetic field inducted in the head bt TMS has been analysed. This three-dimensional simulation is useful for spatial localization of stimulation.

  14. Augmentation of Fear Extinction by Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Dittert

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Although posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; DSM-V 309.82 and anxiety disorders (DSM-V 300.xx are widely spread mental disorders, the effectiveness of their therapy is still unsatisfying. Non-invasive brain-stimulation techniques like transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS might be an option to improve extinction learning, which is a main functional factor of exposure-based therapy for anxiety disorders. To examine this hypothesis, we used a fear conditioning paradigm with female faces as conditioned stimuli (CS and a 95-dB female scream as unconditioned stimulus (UCS. We aimed to perform a tDCS of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC, which is mainly involved in the control of extinction-processes. Therefore, we applied two 4 × 4 cm electrodes approximately at the EEG-positions F7 and F8 and used a direct current of 1.5 mA. The 20-min stimulation was started during a 10-min break between acquisition and extinction and went on overall extinction-trials. The healthy participants were randomly assigned in two double-blinded process into two sham stimulation and two verum stimulation groups with opposite current flow directions. To measure the fear reactions, we used skin conductance responses (SCR and subjective ratings. We performed a generalized estimating equations model for the SCR to assess the impact of tDCS and current flow direction on extinction processes for all subjects that showed a successful conditioning (N = 84. The results indicate that tDCS accelerates early extinction processes with a significantly faster loss of CS+/CS– discrimination. The discrimination loss was driven by a significant decrease in reaction toward the CS+ as well as an increase in reaction toward the CS– in the tDCS verum groups, whereas the sham groups showed no significant reaction changes during this period. Therefore, we assume that tDCS of the vmPFC can be used to enhance early extinction processes successfully. But before it should be

  15. Transcranial infrared laser stimulation improves rule-based, but not information-integration, category learning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Nathaniel J; Saucedo, Celeste L; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2017-03-01

    This is the first randomized, controlled study comparing the cognitive effects of transcranial laser stimulation on category learning tasks. Transcranial infrared laser stimulation is a new non-invasive form of brain stimulation that shows promise for wide-ranging experimental and neuropsychological applications. It involves using infrared laser to enhance cerebral oxygenation and energy metabolism through upregulation of the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase, the primary infrared photon acceptor in cells. Previous research found that transcranial infrared laser stimulation aimed at the prefrontal cortex can improve sustained attention, short-term memory, and executive function. In this study, we directly investigated the influence of transcranial infrared laser stimulation on two neurobiologically dissociable systems of category learning: a prefrontal cortex mediated reflective system that learns categories using explicit rules, and a striatally mediated reflexive learning system that forms gradual stimulus-response associations. Participants (n=118) received either active infrared laser to the lateral prefrontal cortex or sham (placebo) stimulation, and then learned one of two category structures-a rule-based structure optimally learned by the reflective system, or an information-integration structure optimally learned by the reflexive system. We found that prefrontal rule-based learning was substantially improved following transcranial infrared laser stimulation as compared to placebo (treatment X block interaction: F(1, 298)=5.117, p=0.024), while information-integration learning did not show significant group differences (treatment X block interaction: F(1, 288)=1.633, p=0.202). These results highlight the exciting potential of transcranial infrared laser stimulation for cognitive enhancement and provide insight into the neurobiological underpinnings of category learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Transcranial Electric Stimulation for Precision Medicine: A Spatiomechanistic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, Fatemeh; Nitsche, Michael A.; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    During recent years, non-invasive brain stimulation, including transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) in general, and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in particular, have created new hopes for treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Despite promising primary results in some brain disorders, a more widespread application of tES is hindered by the unsolved question of determining optimum stimulation protocols to receive meaningful therapeutic effects. tES has a large parameter space including various montages and stimulation parameters. Moreover, inter- and intra-individual differences in responding to stimulation protocols have to be taken into account. These factors contribute to the complexity of selecting potentially effective protocols for each disorder, different clusters of each disorder, and even each single patient. Expanding knowledge in different dimensions of basic and clinical neuroscience could help researchers and clinicians to select potentially effective protocols based on tES modulatory mechanisms for future clinical studies. In this article, we propose a heuristic spatiomechanistic framework which contains nine levels to address tES effects on brain functions. Three levels refer to the spatial resolution (local, small-scale networks and large-scale networks) and three levels of tES modulatory effects based on its mechanisms of action (neurochemical, neuroelectrical and oscillatory modulations). At the group level, this framework could be helpful to enable an informed and systematic exploration of various possible protocols for targeting a brain disorder or its neuroscience-based clusters. Considering recent advances in exploration of neurodiversity at the individual level with different brain mapping technologies, the proposed framework might also be used in combination with personal data to design individualized protocols for tES in the context of precision medicine in the future. PMID:28450832

  17. Noninvasive theranostic imaging of HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy in liver cancer by folate-targeted quantum dot-based liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shao, D.; Li, J.; Pan, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, X.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, H.; Chen, L.

    2015-01-01

    Theranostics is emerging as a popular strategy for cancer therapy; thanks to the development of nano-technology. In this work, we have combined an HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene system and near-infrared quantum dots, as the former is quite effective in liver cancer treatment and the latter facilitates

  18. Action-blindsight in healthy subjects after transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Kristiansen, Lasse; Rowe, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical cases of blindsight have shown that visually guided movements can be accomplished without conscious visual perception. Here, we show that blindsight can be induced in healthy subjects by using transcranial magnetic stimulation over the visual cortex. Transcranial magnetic stimulation...

  19. MRI tracing non-invasive TiO2-based nanoparticles activated by ultrasound for multi-mechanism therapy of prostatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Pu; Song, Dongkui

    2018-03-01

    To reduce the side effects of chemotherapy and achieve effective and safe therapy for prostate cancer, herein a simple but multi-functional TiO2:Gd@DOX/FA system activated by ultrasound was developed for the MRI-guided multi-mechanism therapy of prostate cancer. TiO2 nanoparticles served as a sonosensitizer as well as a nanocarrier with the pH-responsive release of DOX. The doping of Gd was not only able to endow the TiO2 with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ability, but also further improve the sonodynamic ability of the TiO2. The characterization of the as-prepared TiO2:Gd@DOX/FA showed sensitive pH-responsive drug release, high reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, T 1-MRI contrast performance and excellent biocompatibility. The cytotoxicity assay in vitro showed cell death up to 91.68% after 48 h incubation induced by the TiO2:Gd@DOX + ultrasound group. Meanwhile, in the in vivo synergistic therapy studies, the tumor sizes of all the nanomedicine groups were smaller than for the free DOX (V:V 0 = 4.2). More importantly, the body showed nearly no weight loss. This safety was also confirmed by the H&E staining, biodistribution experiment and serum biochemistry results. Altogether, TiO2:Gd@DOX/FA significantly reduced the side effects of DOX, augmented the levels of ROS and achieved effective and safe therapy, indicating its potential for the multi-mechanism therapy of prostate cancer. There is no conflict of interest in this study and no funding has been received for it. We received the approval of the Research Ethics Committee before conducting this study.

  20. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to improve naming ability in post-stroke aphasia: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALHarbi, Mohammed F; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Kim, Esther S

    2017-08-14

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation tool that can be used to influence cortical brain activity to induce measurable behavioral changes. Although there is growing evidence that tDCS combined with behavioural language therapy could boost language recovery in patients with post-stroke aphasia, there is great variability in patient characteristics, treatment protocols, and outcome measures in these studies that poses challenges for analyzing the evidence. The purpose of this study is to critically analyze the methodological rigor of the evidence regarding the use of tDCS for post-stroke anomia. This critical review was conducted by searching four databases (MEDLINE, EMBase, PsycINFO, and CINAHL). Nineteen studies fully met the inclusion criteria. Three critical appraisal tools and Robey and Schultz's (1998) five- phase model for conducting clinical outcome research were adopted to evaluate and analyze the current level of evidence. Methodological issues of the studies were also identified. The current level of evidence for using tDCS for anomia is at the pre-efficacy level with emerging evidence at the efficacy level. Lack of proper evaluation of carry-over effects in cross-over studies, lack of or unclear randomization, allocation concealment, and incomplete data handling were the main methodological issues that could threaten the validity of the tDCS for anomia studies. Several methodological issues have been identified in pre-efficacy studies that pose challenges in determining whether tDCS is a beneficial adjunct to behavioral aphasia therapy. Future studies need to improve the quality of the methods used to investigate the effect of tDCS for anomia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation: treatments for cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms in the neurodegenerative dementias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Two methods of non-invasive brain stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), have demonstrable positive effects on cognition and can ameliorate neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression. Less is known about the efficacy of these approaches in common neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we evaluate the effects of TMS and tDCS upon cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms in the major dementias, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), Parkinson’s disease with dementia (PDD), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), as well as the potential pre-dementia states of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Methods PubMed (until 7 February 2014) and PsycINFO (from 1967 to January Week 3 2014) databases were searched in a semi-systematic manner in order to identify relevant treatment studies. A total of 762 studies were identified and 32 studies (18 in the dementias and 14 in PD populations) were included. Results No studies were identified in patients with PDD, FTD or VaD. Of the dementias, 13 studies were conducted in patients with AD, one in DLB, and four in MCI. A total of 16 of the 18 studies showed improvements in at least one cognitive or neuropsychiatric outcome measure. Cognitive or neuropsychiatric improvements were observed in 12 of the 14 studies conducted in patients with PD. Conclusions Both TMS and tDCS may have potential as interventions for the treatment of symptoms associated with dementia and PD. These results are promising; however, available data were limited, particularly within VaD, PDD and FTD, and major challenges exist in order to maximise the efficacy and clinical utility of both techniques. In particular, stimulation parameters vary considerably between studies and are likely to subsequently impact upon treatment efficacy. PMID:25478032

  2. Pressure pain thresholds increase after preconditioning 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonya M Moloney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The primary motor cortex (M1 is an effective target of non-invasive cortical stimulation (NICS for pain threshold modulation. It has been suggested that the initial level of cortical excitability of M1 plays a key role in the plastic effects of NICS. OBJECTIVE: Here we investigate whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS primed 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds and if this is related to observed alterations in cortical excitability. METHOD: 15 healthy, male participants received 10 min 1 mA anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS to the left M1 before 15 min 1 Hz rTMS in separate sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Motor cortical excitability was recorded at baseline, post-tDCS priming and post-rTMS through recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs from right FDI muscle. Pressure pain thresholds were determined by quantitative sensory testing (QST through a computerized algometer, on the palmar thenar of the right hand pre- and post-stimulation. RESULTS: Cathodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS was found to reverse the expected suppressive effect of 1 Hz rTMS on cortical excitability; leading to an overall increase in activity (p<0.001 with a parallel increase in pressure pain thresholds (p<0.01. In contrast, anodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS resulted in a corresponding decrease in cortical excitability (p<0.05, with no significant effect on pressure pain. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that priming the M1 before stimulation of 1 Hz-rTMS modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds in a safe and controlled manner, producing a form of analgesia.

  3. Predicting the behavioural impact of transcranial direct current stimulation: issues and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archy Otto De Berker

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The transcranial application of weak currents to the human brain has enjoyed a decade of success, providing a simple and powerful tool for non-invasively altering human brain function. However, our understanding of current delivery and its impact upon neural circuitry leaves much to be desired. We argue that the credibility of conclusions drawn with tDCS is contingent upon realistic explanations of how tDCS works, and that our present understanding of tDCS limits the technique’s use to localize function in the human brain. We outline two central issues where progress is required: the localization of currents, and predicting their functional consequence. We encourage experimenters to eschew simplistic explanations of mechanisms of transcranial current stimulation. We suggest the use of individualized current modelling, together with computational neurostimulation to inform mechanistic frameworks in which to interpret the physiological impact of tDCS. We hope that through mechanistically richer descriptions of current flow and action, insight into the biological processes by which transcranial currents influence behaviour can be gained, leading to more effective stimulation protocols and empowering conclusions drawn with tDCS.

  4. Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation Attenuates Neuronal Adaptation.

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    Kar, Kohitij; Duijnhouwer, Jacob; Krekelberg, Bart

    2017-03-01

    We previously showed that brief application of 2 mA (peak-to-peak) transcranial currents alternating at 10 Hz significantly reduces motion adaptation in humans. This is but one of many behavioral studies showing that weak currents applied to the scalp modulate neural processing. Transcranial stimulation has been shown to improve perception, learning, and a range of clinical symptoms. Few studies, however, have measured the neural consequences of transcranial current stimulation. We capitalized on the strong link between motion perception and neural activity in the middle temporal (MT) area of the macaque monkey to study the neural mechanisms that underlie the behavioral consequences of transcranial alternating current stimulation. First, we observed that 2 mA currents generated substantial intracranial fields, which were much stronger in the stimulated hemisphere (0.12 V/m) than on the opposite side of the brain (0.03 V/m). Second, we found that brief application of transcranial alternating current stimulation at 10 Hz reduced spike-frequency adaptation of MT neurons and led to a broadband increase in the power spectrum of local field potentials. Together, these findings provide a direct demonstration that weak electric fields applied to the scalp significantly affect neural processing in the primate brain and that this includes a hitherto unknown mechanism that attenuates sensory adaptation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Transcranial stimulation has been claimed to improve perception, learning, and a range of clinical symptoms. Little is known, however, how transcranial current stimulation generates such effects, and the search for better stimulation protocols proceeds largely by trial and error. We investigated, for the first time, the neural consequences of stimulation in the monkey brain. We found that even brief application of alternating current stimulation reduced the effects of adaptation on single-neuron firing rates and local field potentials; this mechanistic

  5. Treatment of Neck Pain: Noninvasive Interventions

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    Carragee, Eugene J.; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Carroll, Linda J.; Nordin, Margareta; Guzman, Jaime; Peloso, Paul M.; Holm, Lena W.; Côté, Pierre; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Cassidy, J. David; Haldeman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Study Design. Best evidence synthesis. Objective. To identify, critically appraise, and synthesize literature from 1980 through 2006 on noninvasive interventions for neck pain and its associated disorders. Summary of Background Data. No comprehensive systematic literature reviews have been published on interventions for neck pain and its associated disorders in the past decade. Methods. We systematically searched Medline and screened for relevance literature published from 1980 through 2006 on the use, effectiveness, and safety of noninvasive interventions for neck pain and associated disorders. Consensus decisions were made about the scientific merit of each article; those judged to have adequate internal validity were included in our best evidence synthesis. Results. Of the 359 invasive and noninvasive intervention articles deemed relevant, 170 (47%) were accepted as scientifically admissible, and 139 of these related to noninvasive interventions (including health care utilization, costs, and safety). For whiplash-associated disorders, there is evidence that educational videos, mobilization, and exercises appear more beneficial than usual care or physical modalities. For other neck pain, the evidence suggests that manual and supervised exercise interventions, low-level laser therapy, and perhaps acupuncture are more effective than no treatment, sham, or alternative interventions; however, none of the active treatments was clearly superior to any other in either the short-or long-term. For both whiplash-associated disorders and other neck pain without radicular symptoms, interventions that focused on regaining function as soon as possible are relatively more effective than interventions that do not have such a focus. Conclusion. Our best evidence synthesis suggests that therapies involving manual therapy and exercise are more effective than alternative strategies for patients with neck pain; this was also true of therapies which include educational interventions

  6. Risk of seizures in transcranial magnetic stimulation: a clinical review to inform consent process focused on bupropion

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    Dobek CE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Christine E Dobek,1 Daniel M Blumberger,2 Jonathan Downar,3 Zafiris J Daskalakis,2 Fidel Vila-Rodriguez11Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Non-Invasive Neurostimulation Therapies (NINET Laboratory, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, 2Department of Psychiatry, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 3Department of Psychiatry, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaObjective: When considering repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS for major depressive disorder, clinicians often face a lack of detailed information on potential interactions between rTMS and pharmacotherapy. This is particularly relevant to patients receiving bupropion, a commonly prescribed antidepressant with lower risk of sexual side effects or weight increase, which has been associated with increased risk of seizure in particular populations. Our aim was to systematically review the information on seizures occurred with rTMS to identify the potential risk factors with attention to concurrent medications, particularly bupropion.Data sources: We conducted a systematic review through the databases PubMed, PsycINFO, and EMBASE between 1980 and June 2015. Additional articles were found using reference lists of relevant articles. Reporting of data follows Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement.Study selection: Two reviewers independently screened articles reporting the occurrence of seizures during rTMS. Articles reporting seizures in epilepsy during rTMS were excluded. A total of 25 rTMS-induced seizures were included in the final review.Data extraction: Data were systematically extracted, and the authors of the applicable studies were contacted when appropriate to provide more detail about the seizure incidents.Results: Twenty-five seizures were identified. Potential risk factors emerged such as sleep deprivation, polypharmacy, and neurological insult. High-frequency-rTMS was

  7. Mechanisms and Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

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    Giordano, James; Bikson, Marom; Kappenman, Emily S.; Clark, Vincent P.; Coslett, H. Branch; Hamblin, Michael R.; Hamilton, Roy; Jankord, Ryan; Kozumbo, Walter J.; McKinley, R. Andrew; Nitsche, Michael A.; Reilly, J. Patrick; Richardson, Jessica; Wurzman, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The US Air Force Office of Scientific Research convened a meeting of researchers in the fields of neuroscience, psychology, engineering, and medicine to discuss most pressing issues facing ongoing research in the field of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and related techniques. In this study, we present opinions prepared by participants of the meeting, focusing on the most promising areas of research, immediate and future goals for the field, and the potential for hormesis theory to inform tDCS research. Scientific, medical, and ethical considerations support the ongoing testing of tDCS in healthy and clinical populations, provided best protocols are used to maximize safety. Notwithstanding the need for ongoing research, promising applications include enhancing vigilance/attention in healthy volunteers, which can accelerate training and support learning. Commonly, tDCS is used as an adjunct to training/rehabilitation tasks with the goal of leftward shift in the learning/treatment effect curves. Although trials are encouraging, elucidating the basic mechanisms of tDCS will accelerate validation and adoption. To this end, biomarkers (eg, clinical neuroimaging and findings from animal models) can support hypotheses linking neurobiological mechanisms and behavioral effects. Dosage can be optimized using computational models of current flow and understanding dose–response. Both biomarkers and dosimetry should guide individualized interventions with the goal of reducing variability. Insights from other applied energy domains, including ionizing radiation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and low-level laser (light) therapy, can be prudently leveraged. PMID:28210202

  8. Transcranial magnetic stimulation: language function.

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    Epstein, C M

    1998-07-01

    Studies of language using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have focused both on identification of language areas and on elucidation of function. TMS may result in either inhibition or facilitation of language processes and may operate directly at a presumptive site of language cortex or indirectly through intracortical networks. TMS has been used to create reversible "temporary lesions," similar to those produced by Wada tests and direct cortical electrical stimulation, in cerebral cortical areas subserving language function. Rapid-rate TMS over the left inferior frontal region blocks speech output in most subjects. However, the results are not those predicted from classic models of language organization. Speech arrest is obtained most easily over facial motor cortex, and true aphasia is rare, whereas right hemisphere or bilateral lateralization is unexpectedly prominent. A clinical role for these techniques is not yet fully established. Interfering with language comprehension and verbal memory is currently more difficult than blocking speech output, but numerous TMS studies have demonstrated facilitation of language-related tasks, including oral word association, story recall, digit span, and picture naming. Conversely, speech output also facilitates motor responses to TMS in the dominant hemisphere. Such new and often-unexpected findings may provide important insights into the organization of language.

  9. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in children.

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    Garvey, Marjorie A; Mall, Volker

    2008-05-01

    Developmental disabilities (e.g. attention deficit disorder; cerebral palsy) are frequently associated with deviations of the typical pattern of motor skill maturation. Neurophysiologic tools, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which probe motor cortex function, can potentially provide insights into both typical neuromotor maturation and the mechanisms underlying the motor skill deficits in children with developmental disabilities. These insights may set the stage for finding effective interventions for these disorders. We review the literature pertaining to the use of TMS in pediatrics. Most TMS-evoked parameters show age-related changes in typically developing children and some of these are abnormal in a number of childhood-onset neurological disorders. Although no TMS-evoked parameters are diagnostic for any disorder, changes in certain parameters appear to reflect disease burden or may provide a measure of treatment-related improvement. Furthermore, TMS may be especially useful when combined with other neurophysiologic modalities (e.g. fMRI). However, much work remains to be done to determine if TMS-evoked parameters can be used as valid and reliable biomarkers for disease burden, the natural history of neurological injury and repair, and the efficacy of pharmacological and rehabilitation interventions.

  10. Targeted, noninvasive blockade of cortical neuronal activity

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    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a novel method to noninvasively modulate targeted brain areas through the temporary disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) via focused ultrasound, enabling focal delivery of a neuroactive substance. Ultrasound was used to locally disrupt the BBB in rat somatosensory cortex, and intravenous administration of GABA then produced a dose-dependent suppression of somatosensory-evoked potentials in response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve. No suppression was observed 1-5 days afterwards or in control animals where the BBB was not disrupted. This method has several advantages over existing techniques: it is noninvasive; it is repeatable via additional GABA injections; multiple brain regions can be affected simultaneously; suppression magnitude can be titrated by GABA dose; and the method can be used with freely behaving subjects. We anticipate that the application of neuroactive substances in this way will be a useful tool for noninvasively mapping brain function, and potentially for surgical planning or novel therapies.

  11. Non-invasive imaging provides spatiotemporal information on disease progression and response to therapy in a murine model of multiple myeloma.

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    Simone S Riedel

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a B-cell malignancy, where malignant plasma cells clonally expand in the bone marrow of older people, causing significant morbidity and mortality. Typical clinical symptoms include increased serum calcium levels, renal insufficiency, anemia, and bone lesions. With standard therapies, MM remains incurable; therefore, the development of new drugs or immune cell-based therapies is desirable. To advance the goal of finding a more effective treatment for MM, we aimed to develop a reliable preclinical MM mouse model applying sensitive and reproducible methods for monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis in response to therapy.A mouse model was created by intravenously injecting bone marrow-homing mouse myeloma cells (MOPC-315.BM that expressed luciferase into BALB/c wild type mice. The luciferase in the myeloma cells allowed in vivo tracking before and after melphalan treatment with bioluminescence imaging (BLI. Homing of MOPC-315.BM luciferase+ myeloma cells to specific tissues was examined by flow cytometry. Idiotype-specific myeloma protein serum levels were measured by ELISA. In vivo measurements were validated with histopathology.Strong bone marrow tropism and subsequent dissemination of MOPC-315.BM luciferase(+ cells in vivo closely mimicked the human disease. In vivo BLI and later histopathological analysis revealed that 12 days of melphalan treatment slowed tumor progression and reduced MM dissemination compared to untreated controls. MOPC-315.BM luciferase(+ cells expressed CXCR4 and high levels of CD44 and α4β1 in vitro which could explain the strong bone marrow tropism. The results showed that MOPC-315.BM cells dynamically regulated homing receptor expression and depended on interactions with surrounding cells.This study described a novel MM mouse model that facilitated convenient, reliable, and sensitive tracking of myeloma cells with whole body BLI in living animals. This model is highly suitable for monitoring

  12. Increased growth factors play a role in wound healing promoted by noninvasive oxygen-ozone therapy in diabetic patients with foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Guan, Meiping; Xie, Cuihua; Luo, Xiangrong; Zhang, Qian; Xue, Yaoming

    2014-01-01

    Management of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) is a great challenge for clinicians. Although the oxygen-ozone treatment improves the diabetic outcome, there are few clinical trials to verify the efficacy and illuminate the underlying mechanisms of oxygen-ozone treatment on DFUs. In the present study, a total of 50 type 2 diabetic patients complicated with DFUs, Wagner stage 2~4, were randomized into control group treated by standard therapy only and ozone group treated by standard therapy plus oxygen-ozone treatment. The therapeutic effects were graded into 4 levels from grade 0 (no change) to grade 3 (wound healing). The wound sizes were measured at baseline and day 20, respectively. Tissue biopsies were performed at baseline and day 11. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) proteins in the pathologic specimens were determined by immunohistochemical examinations. The effective rate of ozone group was significantly higher than that of control group (92% versus 64%, P healing of DFUs via potential induction of VEGF, TGF-β, and PDGF at early stage of the treatment. (Clinical trial registry number is ChiCTR-TRC-14004415).

  13. Cerebral Hemodynamics in the Elderly: A Transcranial Doppler Study in the Einstein Aging Study Cohort.

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    Yang, Dixon; Cabral, Digna; Gaspard, Emmanuel N; Lipton, Richard B; Rundek, Tatjana; Derby, Carol A

    2016-09-01

    We sought to describe the relationship between age, sex, and race/ethnicity with transcranial Doppler hemodynamic characteristics from major intracerebral arterial segments in a large elderly population with varying demographics. We analyzed 369 stroke-free participants aged 70 years and older from the Einstein Aging Study. Single-gate, nonimaging transcranial Doppler sonography, a noninvasive sonographic technique that assesses real-time cerebrovascular hemodynamics, was used to interrogate 9 cerebral arterial segments. Individual Doppler spectra and cerebral blood flow velocities were acquired, and the pulsatility index and resistive index were calculated by the device's automated waveform-tracking function. Multiple linear regression models were used to examine the independent associations of age, sex, and race/ethnicity with transcranial Doppler measures, adjusting for hypertension, history of myocardial infarction or revascularization, and history of diabetes. Among enrolled participants, 303 individuals had at least 1 vessel insonated (mean age [SD], 80 [6] years; 63% women; 58% white; and 32% black). With age, transcranial Doppler measures of mean blood flow velocity were significantly decreased in the basilar artery (P = .001) and posterior cerebral artery (right, P = .003; left, P = .02). Pulsatility indices increased in the left middle cerebral artery (P = .01) and left anterior cerebral artery (P = .03), and the resistive index was increased in the left middle cerebral artery (P = .007) with age. Women had higher pulsatility and resistive indices compared to men in several vessels. We report a decreased mean blood flow velocity and weakly increased arterial pulsatility and resistance with aging in a large elderly stroke-free population. These referential trends in cerebrovascular hemodynamics may carry important implications in vascular diseases associated with advanced age, increased risk of cerebrovascular disease, cognitive decline, and dementia.

  14. Computational exploration of wave propagation and heating from transcranial focused ultrasound for neuromodulation

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    Mueller, Jerel K.; Ai, Leo; Bansal, Priya; Legon, Wynn

    2016-10-01

    Objective. While ultrasound is largely established for use in diagnostic imaging, its application for neuromodulation is relatively new and crudely understood. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of tissue properties and geometry on the wave propagation and heating in the context of transcranial neuromodulation. Approach. A computational model of transcranial-focused ultrasound was constructed and validated against empirical data. The models were then incrementally extended to investigate a number of issues related to the use of ultrasound for neuromodulation, including the effect on wave propagation of variations in geometry of skull and gyral anatomy as well as the effect of multiple tissue and media layers, including scalp, skull, CSF, and gray/white matter. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was run to characterize the influence of acoustic properties of intracranial tissues. Finally, the heating associated with ultrasonic stimulation waveforms designed for neuromodulation was modeled. Main results. The wave propagation of a transcranially focused ultrasound beam is significantly influenced by the cranial domain. The half maximum acoustic beam intensity profiles are insensitive overall to small changes in material properties, though the inclusion of sulci in models results in greater peak intensity values compared to a model without sulci (1%-30% greater). Finally, heating using currently employed stimulation parameters in humans is highest in bone (0.16 °C) and is negligible in brain (4.27 × 10-3 °C) for a 0.5 s exposure. Significance. Ultrasound for noninvasive neuromodulation holds great promise and appeal for its non-invasiveness, high spatial resolution and deep focal lengths. Here we show gross brain anatomy and biological material properties to have limited effect on ultrasound wave propagation and to result in safe heating levels in the skull and brain.

  15. Numerical evaluation of the skull for human neuromodulation with transcranial focused ultrasound

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    Mueller, Jerel K.; Ai, Leo; Bansal, Priya; Legon, Wynn

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Transcranial focused ultrasound is an emerging field for human non-invasive neuromodulation, but its dosing in humans is difficult to know due to the skull. The objective of the present study was to establish modeling methods based on medical images to assess skull differences between individuals on the wave propagation of ultrasound. Approach. Computational models of transcranial focused ultrasound were constructed using CT and MR scans to solve for intracranial pressure. We explored the effect of including the skull base in models, different transducer placements on the head, and differences between 250 kHz or 500 kHz acoustic frequency for both female and male models. We further tested these features using linear, nonlinear, and elastic simulations. To better understand inter-subject skull thickness and composition effects we evaluated the intracranial pressure maps between twelve individuals at two different skull sites. Main results. Nonlinear acoustic simulations resulted in virtually identical intracranial pressure maps with linear acoustic simulations. Elastic simulations showed a difference in max pressures and full width half maximum volumes of 15% at most. Ultrasound at an acoustic frequency of 250 kHz resulted in the creation of more prominent intracranial standing waves compared to 500 kHz. Finally, across twelve model human skulls, a significant linear relationship to characterize intracranial pressure maps was not found. Significance. Despite its appeal, an inherent problem with the use of a noninvasive transcranial ultrasound method is the difficulty of knowing intracranial effects because of the skull. Here we develop detailed computational models derived from medical images of individuals to simulate the propagation of neuromodulatory ultrasound across the skull and solve for intracranial pressure maps. These methods allow for a much better understanding of the intracranial effects of ultrasound for an individual in order to

  16. ASSESSMENT OF THE RESPONSE OF PATIENTS WITH CROHN'S DISEASE TO BIOLOGICAL THERAPY USING NEW NON-INVASIVE MARKERS: lactoferrin and calprotectin

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    Islaine Martins NOGUEIRA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Context The use of fecal markers to monitor Crohn's disease is crucial for assessing the response to treatment. Objective To assess the inflammatory activity of Crohn's disease by comparing fecal markers (calprotectin and lactoferrin, colonoscopy combined with biopsy, and the Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI, as well as serum markers, before treatment with infliximab, after the end of induction, and after the end of maintenance. Methods Seventeen patients were included who had been previously diagnosed with Crohn's disease and were using conventional treatment but required the introduction of biological therapy with infliximab. Each patient underwent a colonoscopy with biopsy, serum, and fecal (calprotectin and lactoferrin tests to assess inflammatory activity, and CDAI assessments before treatment with infliximab, after induction (week 8, and after maintenance (week 32. Results The calprotectin levels exhibited significant reductions (P = 0.04 between the assessment before treatment with infliximab and the end of induction, which did not occur after the end of the maintenance phase. Lactoferrin remained positive throughout the three phases of the study. Regarding the histological assessment, a significant difference was found only between the assessment before treatment and after the end of maintenance (P = 0.036, and 60% of the patients exhibited histological improvements after the completion of the follow-up period. The CDAI exhibited a significant difference between the assessment before treatment with infliximab and after induction, as well as before treatment and after maintenance (P<0.01. Conclusion Calprotectin and lactoferrin are not useful for monitoring inflammatory activity in Crohn's disease patients who are subjected to biological therapy.

  17. Imaging transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the prefrontal cortex-correlation or causality in stimulation-mediated effects?

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    Wörsching, Jana; Padberg, Frank; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Kumpf, Ulrike; Kirsch, Beatrice; Keeser, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    Transcranial current stimulation approaches include neurophysiologically distinct non-invasive brain stimulation techniques widely applied in basic, translational and clinical research: transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), oscillating transcranial direct current stimulation (otDCS), transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS). Prefrontal tDCS seems to be an especially promising tool for clinical practice. In order to effectively modulate relevant neural circuits, systematic research on prefrontal tDCS is needed that uses neuroimaging and neurophysiology measures to specifically target and adjust this method to physiological requirements. This review therefore analyses the various neuroimaging methods used in combination with prefrontal tDCS in healthy and psychiatric populations. First, we provide a systematic overview on applications, computational models and studies combining neuroimaging or neurophysiological measures with tDCS. Second, we categorise these studies in terms of their experimental designs and show that many studies do not vary the experimental conditions to the extent required to demonstrate specific relations between tDCS and its behavioural or neurophysiological effects. Finally, to support best-practice tDCS research we provide a methodological framework for orientation among experimental designs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring and manipulating brain connectivity with resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Michael D.; Halko, Mark A.; Eldaief, Mark C.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Both resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly popular techniques that can be used to non-invasively measure brain connectivity in human subjects. TMS shows additional promise as a method to manipulate brain connectivity. In this review we discuss how these two complimentary tools can be combined to optimally study brain connectivity and manipulate distributed brain networks. Important clinical applications include...

  19. An ethical discussion of the use of transcranial direct current stimulation for cognitive enhancement in healthy individuals: a fictional case study

    OpenAIRE

    Lapenta, Olivia M.; Valasek, Claudia A.; Brunoni, André R.; Boggio, Paulo S.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique. Because of its low cost, ease of use, safety, and portability, tDCS has been increasingly investigated for therapeutic purposes in neuropsychiatric disorders and in experimental neuropsychological studies with healthy volunteers. These experiments on healthy cognition have shown significant effects on working memory, decision-making, and language. Such promising results have fomented reflections on st...

  20. Transcranial direct current stimulation over left inferior frontal cortex improves speech fluency in adults who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesters, Jennifer; Möttönen, Riikka; Watkins, Kate E

    2018-04-01

    See Crinion (doi:10.1093/brain/awy075) for a scientific commentary on this article.Stuttering is a neurodevelopmental condition affecting 5% of children, and persisting in 1% of adults. Promoting lasting fluency improvement in adults who stutter is a particular challenge. Novel interventions to improve outcomes are of value, therefore. Previous work in patients with acquired motor and language disorders reported enhanced benefits of behavioural therapies when paired with transcranial direct current stimulation. Here, we report the results of the first trial investigating whether transcranial direct current stimulation can improve speech fluency in adults who stutter. We predicted that applying anodal stimulation to the left inferior frontal cortex during speech production with temporary fluency inducers would result in longer-lasting fluency improvements. Thirty male adults who stutter completed a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over left inferior frontal cortex. Fifteen participants received 20 min of 1-mA stimulation on five consecutive days while speech fluency was temporarily induced using choral and metronome-timed speech. The other 15 participants received the same speech fluency intervention with sham stimulation. Speech fluency during reading and conversation was assessed at baseline, before and after the stimulation on each day of the 5-day intervention, and at 1 and 6 weeks after the end of the intervention. Anodal stimulation combined with speech fluency training significantly reduced the percentage of disfluent speech measured 1 week after the intervention compared with fluency intervention alone. At 6 weeks after the intervention, this improvement was maintained during reading but not during conversation. Outcome scores at both post-intervention time points on a clinical assessment tool (the Stuttering Severity Instrument, version 4) also showed significant improvement in the group receiving

  1. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Considerations for Research in Adolescent Depression

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    Jonathan C. Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adolescent depression is a prevalent disorder with substantial morbidity and mortality. Current treatment interventions do not target relevant pathophysiology and are frequently ineffective, thereby leading to a substantial burden for individuals, families, and society. During adolescence, the prefrontal cortex undergoes extensive structural and functional changes. Recent work suggests that frontolimbic development in depressed adolescents is delayed or aberrant. The judicious application of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques to the prefrontal cortex may present a promising opportunity for durable interventions in adolescent depression. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS applies a low-intensity, continuous current that alters cortical excitability. While this modality does not elicit action potentials, it is thought to manipulate neuronal activity and neuroplasticity. Specifically, tDCS may modulate N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and effect changes through long-term potentiation or long-term depression-like mechanisms. This mini-review considers the neurobiological rationale for developing tDCS protocols in adolescent depression, reviews existing work in adult mood disorders, surveys the existing tDCS literature in adolescent populations, reviews safety studies, and discusses distinct ethical considerations in work with adolescents.

  2. Sex and Electrode Configuration in Transcranial Electrical Stimulation

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    Michael J. Russell

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES can be an effective non-invasive neuromodulation procedure. Unfortunately, the considerable variation in reported treatment outcomes, both within and between studies, has made the procedure unreliable for many applications. To determine if individual differences in cranium morphology and tissue conductivity can account for some of this variation, the electrical density at two cortical locations (temporal and frontal directly under scalp electrodes was modeled using a validated MRI modeling procedure in 23 subjects (12 males and 11 females. Three different electrode configurations (non-cephalic, bi-cranial, and ring commonly used in tES were modeled at three current intensities (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mA. The aims were to assess the effects of configuration and current intensity on relative current received at a cortical brain target directly under the stimulating electrode and to characterize individual variation. The different electrode configurations resulted in up to a ninefold difference in mean current densities delivered to the brains. The ring configuration delivered the least current and the non-cephalic the most. Female subjects showed much less current to the brain than male subjects. Individual differences in the current received and differences in electrode configurations may account for significant variability in current delivered and, thus, potentially a significant portion of reported variation in clinical outcomes at two commonly targeted regions of the brain.

  3. Use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment in psychiatry.

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    Aleman, André

    2013-08-01

    The potential of noninvasive neurostimulation by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for improving psychiatric disorders has been studied increasingly over the past two decades. This is especially the case for major depression and for auditory-verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia. The present review briefly describes the background of this novel treatment modality and summarizes evidence from clinical trials into the efficacy of rTMS for depression and hallucinations. Evidence for efficacy in depression is stronger than for hallucinations, although a number of studies have reported clinically relevant improvements for hallucinations too. Different stimulation parameters (frequency, duration, location of stimulation) are discussed. There is a paucity of research into other psychiatric disorders, but initial evidence suggests that rTMS may also hold promise for the treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. It can be concluded that rTMS induces alterations in neural networks relevant for psychiatric disorders and that more research is needed to elucidate efficacy and underlying mechanisms of action.

  4. Modeling the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation on cortical circuits.

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    Esser, Steve K; Hill, Sean L; Tononi, Giulio

    2005-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is commonly used to activate or inactivate specific cortical areas in a noninvasive manner. Because of technical constraints, the precise effects of TMS on cortical circuits are difficult to assess experimentally. Here, this issue is investigated by constructing a detailed model of a portion of the thalamocortical system and examining the effects of the simulated delivery of a TMS pulse. The model, which incorporates a large number of physiological and anatomical constraints, includes 33,000 spiking neurons arranged in a 3-layered motor cortex and over 5 million intra- and interlayer synaptic connections. The model was validated by reproducing several results from the experimental literature. These include the frequency, timing, dose response, and pharmacological modulation of epidurally recorded responses to TMS (the so-called I-waves), as well as paired-pulse response curves consistent with data from several experimental studies. The modeled responses to simulated TMS pulses in different experimental paradigms provide a detailed, self-consistent account of the neural and synaptic activities evoked by TMS within prototypical cortical circuits.

  5. Effect of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Neuronal Networks

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    Unsal, Ahmet; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    The human brain contains around 100 billion nerve cells controlling our day to day activities. Consequently, brain disorders often result in impairments such as paralysis, loss of coordination and seizure. It has been said that 1 in 5 Americans suffer some diagnosable mental disorder. There is an urgent need to understand the disorders, prevent them and if possible, develop permanent cure for them. As a result, a significant amount of research activities is being directed towards brain research. Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a promising tool for diagnosing and treating brain disorders. It is a non-invasive treatment method that produces a current flow in the brain which excites the neurons. Even though TMS has been verified to have advantageous effects on various brain related disorders, there have not been enough studies on the impact of TMS on cells. In this study, we are investigating the electrophysiological effects of TMS on one dimensional neuronal culture grown in a circular pathway. Electrical currents are produced on the neuronal networks depending on the directionality of the applied field. This aids in understanding how neuronal networks react under TMS treatment.

  6. Comparison of Coil Designs for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Mice

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    Rastogi, Priyam; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive treatment for neurological disorders using time varying magnetic field. The electric field generated by the time varying magnetic field is used to depolarize the brain neurons which can lead to measurable effects. TMS provides a surgical free method for the treatment of neurological brain disorders like depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury and Parkinson's disease. Before using TMS on human subjects, it is appropriate that its effects are verified on animals such as mice. The magnetic field intensity and stimulated region of the brain can be controlled by the shape, position and current in the coils. There are few reports on the designs of the coils for mice. In this paper, different types of coils are developed and compared using an anatomically realistic mouse model derived from MRI images. Parameters such as focality, depth of the stimulation, electric field strength on the scalp and in the deep brain regions, are taken into account. These parameters will help researchers to determine the most suitable coil design according to their need. This should result in improvements in treatment of specific disorders. Carver Charitable Trust.

  7. Transcranial direct current stimulation as a treatment for auditory hallucinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne eKoops

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Auditory hallucinations (AH are a symptom of several psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. In a significant minority of patients, AH are resistant to antipsychotic medication. Alternative treatment options for this medication-resistant group are scarce and most of them focus on coping with the hallucinations. Finding an alternative treatment that can diminish AH is of great importance.Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a safe and non-invasive technique that is able to directly influence cortical excitability through the application of very low electric currents. A 1-2 mA direct current is applied between two surface electrodes, one serving as the anode and the other as the cathode. Cortical excitability is increased in the vicinity of the anode and reduced near the cathode. The technique, which has only a few transient side effects and is cheap and portable, is increasingly explored as a treatment for neurological and psychiatric symptoms. It has shown efficacy on symptoms of depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy and stroke. However, the application of tDCS as a treatment for AH is relatively new. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge in this field and provides guidelines for future research.

  8. Transcranial doppler: Technique and common findings (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokesh Bathala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial Doppler (TCD can be aptly called as the doctor′s stethoscope of the brain. Since its introduction in 1982, by Rune Aaslid, TCD has evolved as a diagnostic, monitoring, and therapeutic tool. During evaluation of patients with acute ischemic stroke, TCD combined with cervical duplex ultrasonography provides physiological information on the cerebral hemodynamics, which is often complementary to structural imaging. Currently, TCD is the only diagnostic tool that can provide real time information about cerebral hemodynamics and can detect embolization to the cerebral vessels. TCD is a noninvasive, cost-effective, and bedside tool for obtaining information regarding the collateral flow across various branches of the circle of Willis in patients with cerebrovascular disorders. Advanced applications of TCD help in the detection of right-to-left shunts, vasomotor reactivity, diagnosis, and monitoring of vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage and as a supplementary test for confirmation of brain death. This article describes the basic ultrasound physics pertaining to TCD insonation methods, for detecting the flow in intracranial vessels in addition to the normal and abnormal spectral flow patterns.

  9. A Wearable Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound Phased Array System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrangelo, Sabino J; Lee, Hae-Seung; Sodini, Charles G

    2018-01-01

     Practical deficiencies related to conventional transcranial Doppler (TCD) sonography have restricted its use and applicability. This work seeks to mitigate several such constraints through the development of a wearable, electronically steered TCD velocimetry system, which enables noninvasive measurement of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) for monitoring applications with limited operator interaction. A highly-compact, discrete prototype system was designed and experimentally validated through flow phantom and preliminary human subject testing. The prototype system incorporates a custom two-dimensional transducer array and multi-channel transceiver electronics, thereby facilitating acoustic beamformation via phased array operation. Electronic steering of acoustic energy enables algorithmic system controls to map Doppler power throughout the tissue volume of interest and localize regions of maximal flow. Multi-focal reception permits dynamic vessel position tracking and simultaneous flow velocimetry over the time-course of monitoring. Experimental flow phantom testing yielded high correlation with concurrent flowmeter recordings across the expected range of physiological flow velocities. Doppler power mapping has been validated in both flow phantom and preliminary human subject testing, resulting in average vessel location mapping times testing. A wearable prototype CBFV measurement system capable of autonomous vessel search and tracking has been presented. Although flow phantom and preliminary human validation show promise, further human subject testing is necessary to compare velocimetry data against existing commercial TCD systems. Additional human subject testing must also verify acceptable vessel search and tracking performance under a variety of subject populations and motion dynamics-such as head movement and ambulation.

  10. Deep brain transcranial magnetic stimulation using variable "Halo coil" system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Y.; Hadimani, R. L.; Crowther, L. J.; Xu, Z.; Qu, J.; Jiles, D. C.

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation has the potential to treat various neurological disorders non-invasively and safely. The "Halo coil" configuration can stimulate deeper regions of the brain with lower surface to deep-brain field ratio compared to other coil configurations. The existing "Halo coil" configuration is fixed and is limited in varying the site of stimulation in the brain. We have developed a new system based on the current "Halo coil" design along with a graphical user interface system that enables the larger coil to rotate along the transverse plane. The new system can also enable vertical movement of larger coil. Thus, this adjustable "Halo coil" configuration can stimulate different regions of the brain by adjusting the position and orientation of the larger coil on the head. We have calculated magnetic and electric fields inside a MRI-derived heterogeneous head model for various positions and orientations of the coil. We have also investigated the mechanical and thermal stability of the adjustable "Halo coil" configuration for various positions and orientations of the coil to ensure safe operation of the system.

  11. Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation to Enhance Post-Stroke Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Brain plasticity after stroke remains poorly understood. Patients may improve spontaneously within the first 3 months and then more slowly in the coming year. The first day, decreased edema and reperfusion of the ischemic penumbra may possibly account for these phenomena, but the improvement during the next weeks suggests plasticity phenomena and cortical reorganization of the brain ischemic areas and of more remote areas. Indeed, the injured ischemic motor cortex has a reduced cortical excitability at the acute phase and a suspension of the topographic representation of affected muscles, whereas the contralateral motor cortex has an increased excitability and an enlarged somatomotor representation; furthermore, contralateral cortex exerts a transcallosal interhemispheric inhibition on the ischemic cortex. This results from the imbalance of the physiological reciprocal interhemispheric inhibition of each hemisphere on the other, contributing to worsening of neurological deficit. Cortical excitability is measurable through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and prognosis has been established according to the presence of motor evoked potentials (MEP) at the acute phase of stroke, which is predictive of better recovery. Conversely, the lack of response to early stimulation is associated with a poor functional outcome. Non-invasive stimulation techniques such as repetitive TMS (rTMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have the potential to modulate brain cortical excitability with long lasting effects. In the setting of cerebrovascular disease, around 1000 stroke subjects have been included in placebo-controlled trials so far, most often with an objective of promoting motor recovery of the upper limb. High frequency repetitive stimulation (>3 Hz) rTMS, aiming to increase excitability of the ischemic cortex, or low frequency repetitive stimulation (≤1 Hz), aiming to reduce excitability of the contralateral homonymous cortex, or combined therapies

  12. Noninvasive Urodynamic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arturo Levi D'Ancona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The longevity of the world's population is increasing, and among male patients, complaints of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS are growing. Testing to diagnose LUTS and to differentiate between the various causes should be quick, easy, cheap, specific, not too bothersome for the patient, and noninvasive or minimally so. Urodynamic evaluation is the gold standard for diagnosing bladder outlet obstruction (BOO but presents some inconveniences such as embarrassment, pain, and dysuria; furthermore, 19% of cases experience urinary retention, macroscopic hematuria, or urinary tract infection. A greater number of resources in the diagnostic armamentarium could increase the opportunity for selecting less invasive tests. A number of groups have risen to this challenge and have formulated and developed ideas and technologies to improve noninvasive methods to diagnosis BOO. These techniques start with flowmetry, an increase in the interest of ultrasound, and finally the performance of urodynamic evaluation without a urethral catheter. Flowmetry is not sufficient for confirming a diagnosis of BOO. Ultrasound of the prostate and the bladder can help to assess BOO noninvasively in all men and can be useful for evaluating the value of BOO at assessment and during treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia patients in the future. The great advantages of noninvasive urodynamics are as follows: minimal discomfort, minimal risk of urinary tract infection, and low cost. This method can be repeated many times, permitting the evaluation of obstruction during clinical treatment. A urethral connector should be used to diagnose BOO, in evaluation for surgery, and in screening for treatment. In the future, noninvasive urodynamics can be used to identify patients with BOO to initiate early medical treatment and evaluate the results. This approach permits the possibility of performing surgery before detrusor damage occurs.

  13. A systematic review of the clinical efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekic, Maria; Boysen, Elena; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-03-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique, which can be used to selectively disrupt patterns of neural activity that are associated with symptoms of mental illness. tDCS has been implemented in numerous therapeutic trials across a range of patient populations, with a rapidly increasing number of studies being published each year. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the efficacy of tDCS in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Four electronic databases were searched from inception until December 2015 by two independent reviewers, and 66 eligible studies were identified. Depression was the most extensively researched condition, followed by schizophrenia and substance use disorders. Data on obsessive compulsive disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, and anorexia nervosa were also obtained. The quality of included studies was appraised using a standardised assessment framework, which yielded a median score corresponding to "weak" on the three-point scale. This improved to "moderate" when case reports/series were excluded from the analysis. Overall, data suggested that tDCS interventions comprising multiple sessions can ameliorate symptoms of several major psychiatric disorders, both acutely and in the long-term. Nevertheless, the tDCS field is still in its infancy, and several methodological and ethical issues must be addressed before clinical efficacy can truly be determined. Studies probing the mechanisms of action of tDCS and those facilitating the definition of optimised stimulation protocols are warranted. Furthermore, evidence from large-scale, multi-centre randomised controlled trials is required if the transition of this therapy from the laboratory to the clinic is to be considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transcranial Doppler velocimetry in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsø, J M; Edsen, T; Romner, B

    2013-01-01

    -coded transcranial Doppler (TCCD), with the secondary aim of describing prediction of angiographic vasospasm and mortality. METHODS: /st>Sixty patients and 70 healthy controls were each examined in duplicate by alternating operators. A total of 939 measurements divided on 201 examination sets were conducted by four...

  15. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Neurodegenerative Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argye E. Hillis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We review rationale, challenges, study designs, reported results, and future directions in the use of transcranial direct cranial stimulation (tDCS in neurodegenerative disease, focusing on treatment of spelling in primary progressive aphasia (PPA. Rationale Evidence from both animal studies and human studies indicates that anodal and cathodal tDCS over the brain result in a temporary change in membrane potentials, reducing the threshold for long-term potentiation of neurons in the affected area. This may allow unaffected brain regions to assume functions of diseased regions. Challenges Special challenges in treating individuals with progressive conditions include altered goals of treatment and the possibility that participants may accumulate new deficits over the course of the treatment program that interfere with their ability to understand, retain, or cooperate with aspects of the program. The most serious challenge – particularly for single case designs - is that there may be no stable baseline against which to measure change with treatment. Thus, it is essential to demonstrate that treatment results in a statistically significant change in the slope of decline or improvement. Therefore, demonstration of a significant difference between tDCS and control (sham requires either a large number of participants or a large effect size. Designs The choice of a treatment design reflects these limitations. Group studies with a randomized, double-blind, sham control trial design (without cross-over provide the greatest power to detect a difference between intervention and control conditions, with the fewest participants. A cross-over design, in which all participants (from 1 to many receive both active and sham conditions, in randomized order, requires a larger effect size for the active condition relative to the control condition (or little to no maintenance of treatment gains or carry-over effect to show significant differences between treatment

  16. Safety and feasibility of transcranial direct current stimulation in pediatric hemiparesis: randomized controlled preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillick, Bernadette T; Feyma, Tim; Menk, Jeremiah; Usset, Michelle; Vaith, Amy; Wood, Teddi Jean; Worthington, Rebecca; Krach, Linda E

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a form of noninvasive brain stimulation that has shown improved adult stroke outcomes. Applying tDCS in children with congenital hemiparesis has not yet been explored. The primary objective of this study was to explore the safety and feasibility of single-session tDCS through an adverse events profile and symptom assessment within a double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled preliminary study in children with congenital hemiparesis. A secondary objective was to assess the stability of hand and cognitive function. A double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled pretest/posttest/follow-up study was conducted. The study was conducted in a university pediatric research laboratory. Thirteen children, ages 7 to 18 years, with congenital hemiparesis participated. Adverse events/safety assessment and hand function were measured. Participants were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a control group, with safety and functional assessments at pretest, at posttest on the same day, and at a 1-week follow-up session. An intervention of 10 minutes of 0.7 mA tDCS was applied to bilateral primary motor cortices. The tDCS intervention was considered safe if there was no individual decline of 25% or group decline of 2 standard deviations for motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and behavioral data and no report of adverse events. No major adverse events were found, including no seizures. Two participants did not complete the study due to lack of MEP and discomfort. For the 11 participants who completed the study, group differences in MEPs and behavioral data did not exceed 2 standard deviations in those who received the tDCS (n=5) and those in the control group (n=6). The study was completed without the need for stopping per medical monitor and biostatisticial analysis. A limitation of the study was the small sample size, with data available for 11 participants. Based on the results of this study, tDCS appears to be safe

  17. Notes on Human Trials of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation between 1960 and 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilpour, Zeinab; Schestatsky, Pedro; Bikson, Marom; Brunoni, André R.; Pellegrinelli, Ada; Piovesan, Fernanda X.; Santos, Mariana M. S. A.; Menezes, Renata B.; Fregni, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is investigated to modulate neuronal function including cognitive neuroscience and neuropsychiatric therapies. While cases of human stimulation with rudimentary batteries date back more than 200 years, clinical trials with current controlled stimulation were published intermittently since the 1960s. The modern era of tDCS only started after 1998. Objectives: To review methods and outcomes of tDCS studies from old literature (between 1960 and 1998) with intention of providing new insight for ongoing tDCS trials and development of tDCS protocols especially for the purpose of treatment. Methods: Articles were identified through a search in PubMed and through the reference list from its selected articles. We included only non-invasive human studies that provided controlled direct current and were written in English, French, Spanish or Portuguese before the year of 1998, the date in which modern stimulation paradigms were implemented. Results: Fifteen articles met our criteria. The majority were small-randomized controlled clinical trials that enrolled a mean of approximately 26 subjects (Phase II studies). Most of the studies (around 83%) assessed the role of tDCS in the treatment of psychiatric conditions, in which the main outcomes were measured by means of behavioral scales and clinical observation, but the diagnostic precision and the quality of outcome monitoring, including adverse events, were deficient by modern standards. Compared to modern tDCS dose, the stimulation intensities used (0.1–1 mA) were lower, however as the electrodes were typically smaller (e.g., 1.26 cm2), the average electrode current density (0.2 mA/cm2) was approximately 4× higher. The number of sessions ranged from one to 120 (median 14). Notably, the stimulation session durations of several minutes to 11 h (median 4.5 h) could markedly exceed modern tDCS protocols. Twelve studies out of 15 showed positive results. Only mild side

  18. : ventilators for noninvasive ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Fauroux , Brigitte; Leroux , Karl; Desmarais , Gilbert; Isabey , Daniel; Clément , Annick; Lofaso , Frédéric; Louis , Bruno

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance characteristics of all the ventilators proposed for home noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in children in France. The ventilators (one volume-targeted, 12 pressure-targeted and four dual) were evaluated on a bench which simulated six different paediatric ventilatory patterns. For each ventilator, the quality of the inspiratory and expiratory trigger and the ability to reach and maintain the preset pre...

  19. Combined Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Virtual Reality-Based Paradigm for Upper Limb Rehabilitation in Individuals with Restricted Movements. A Feasibility Study with a Chronic Stroke Survivor with Severe Hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María Antonia; Borrego, Adrián; Latorre, Jorge; Colomer, Carolina; Alcañiz, Mariano; Sánchez-Ledesma, María José; Noé, Enrique; Llorens, Roberto

    2018-04-02

    Impairments of the upper limb function are a major cause of disability and rehabilitation. Most of the available therapeutic options are based on active exercises and on motor and attentional inclusion of the affected arm in task oriented movements. However, active movements may not be possible after severe impairment of the upper limbs. Different techniques, such as mirror therapy, motor imagery, and non-invasive brain stimulation have been shown to elicit cortical activity in absence of movements, which could be used to preserve the available neural circuits and promote motor learning. We present a virtual reality-based paradigm for upper limb rehabilitation that allows for interaction of individuals with restricted movements from active responses triggered when they attempt to perform a movement. The experimental system also provides multisensory stimulation in the visual, auditory, and tactile channels, and transcranial direct current stimulation coherent to the observed movements. A feasibility study with a chronic stroke survivor with severe hemiparesis who seemed to reach a rehabilitation plateau after two years of its inclusion in a physical therapy program showed clinically meaningful improvement of the upper limb function after the experimental intervention and maintenance of gains in both the body function and activity. The experimental intervention also was reported to be usable and motivating. Although very preliminary, these results could highlight the potential of this intervention to promote functional recovery in severe impairments of the upper limb.

  20. Recent Advances in Non-invasive Brain Stimulation for Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shui Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive brain stimulation (NBS is a promising treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD, which is an affective processing disorder involving abnormal emotional processing. Many studies have shown that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS over the prefrontal cortex can play a regulatory role in affective processing. Although the clinical efficacy of NBS in MDD has been demonstrated clinically, the precise mechanism of action remains unclear. Therefore, this review article summarizes the current status of NBS methods, including rTMS and tDCS, in the treatment of MDD. The article explores possible correlations between depressive symptoms and affective processing, highlighting the relevant affective processing mechanisms. Our review provides a reference for the safety and efficacy of NBS methods in the clinical treatment of MDD.

  1. A technical guide to tDCS, and related non-invasive brain stimulation tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, AJ; Antal, A; Bikson, M; Boggio, PS; Brunoni, AR; Celnik, P; Cohen, LG; Fregni, F; Herrmann, CS; Kappenman, ES; Knotkova, H; Liebetanz, D; Miniussi, C; Miranda, PC; Paulus, W; Priori, A; Reato, D; Stagg, C; Wenderoth, N; Nitsche, MA

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES), including transcranial direct and alternating current stimulation (tDCS, tACS) are non-invasive brain stimulation techniques increasingly used for modulation of central nervous system excitability in humans. Here we address methodological issues required for tES application. This review covers technical aspects of tES, as well as applications like exploration of brain physiology, modelling approaches, tES in cognitive neurosciences, and interventional approaches. It aims to help the reader to appropriately design and conduct studies involving these brain stimulation techniques, understand limitations and avoid shortcomings, which might hamper the scientific rigor and potential applications in the clinical domain. PMID:26652115

  2. Efficacy of transcranial magnetotherapy in the complex treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staroverov, A T; Zhukov, O B; Raigorodskii, Yu M

    2009-11-01

    A total of 54 patients with alcoholism were studied during abstinence. Of these, 29 patients in the experimental group received basal therapy supplemented with physical treatment consisting of transcranial dynamic magnetotherapy (TcDMT), while the control group of 25 patients received only basal therapy. Comparison of the status of patients in the experimental and control groups during treatment demonstrated advantages of TcDMT in relation to improving the functional state of the CNS, memory, and attention, the autonomic nervous system, and the psychoemotional status of the patients (with decreases in the severity of anxiety and depression).

  3. Targeting the Cerebellum by Noninvasive Neurostimulation: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dun, Kim; Bodranghien, Florian; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic and electric stimulation of the brain are novel and highly promising techniques currently employed in both research and clinical practice. Improving or rehabilitating brain functions by modulating excitability with these noninvasive tools is an exciting new area in neuroscience. Since the cerebellum is closely connected with the cerebral regions subserving motor, associative, and affective functions, the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways are an interesting target for these new techniques. Targeting the cerebellum represents a novel way to modulate the excitability of remote cortical regions and their functions. This review brings together the studies that have applied cerebellar stimulation, magnetic and electric, and presents an overview of the current knowledge and unsolved issues. Some recommendations for future research are implemented as well.

  4. Influence of Distance and Illumination on Detection of Marks in Augmented Reality applied to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Soeiro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out while developing an Augmented Reality mobile application that represents 3D virtual models of the brain of a patient over the real image of the patient’s head. The main purpose of the application is to guide doctors during a non-invasive medical procedure called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation that uses electromagnetic stimulation to treat neurological problems. The tracking of these markers have proven to be one of the more challenging components of such an application and we observe that lighting conditions and distance to the markers are two of the main factors that can influence their accurate recognition

  5. Transcranial Doppler sonography in familial hemiplegic migraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierelli, F.; Pauri, F.; Cupini, L.M.; Fiermonte, G.; Rizzo, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    A patient affected by familial hemiplegic migraine underwent transcranial Doppler sonography twice: the first during a spontaneous attack with right hemiparesis and aphasia, the second during a headachefree period. During the attack the following haemodynamic changes were seen: (a) bilateral increase in the middle cerebral artery and anterior cerebral artery blood flow velocities (this increase was more pronounced on the left side), (b) decreased systo-diastolic ratio and pulsatility index on the right side, (c) increased systo-diastolic ratio and pulsatility index on the left side. The results indicate that during the attack in this familial hemiplegic migraine patient, a diffuse vasoconstriction of the basal cerebral arteries developed. Moreover, transcranial Doppler sonography data suggest that a prolonged vasoconstriction of the peripheral arterioles could play a role in determining the neurological symptoms in this syndrome. 13 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab

  6. Transcranial Doppler sonography in familial hemiplegic migraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierelli, F.; Pauri, F.; Cupini, L.M.; Fiermonte, G.; Rizzo, P.A. (Universita la Sapienza, Roma (Italy))

    1991-02-01

    A patient affected by familial hemiplegic migraine underwent transcranial Doppler sonography twice: the first during a spontaneous attack with right hemiparesis and aphasia, the second during a headachefree period. During the attack the following haemodynamic changes were seen: (a) bilateral increase in the middle cerebral artery and anterior cerebral artery blood flow velocities (this increase was more pronounced on the left side), (b) decreased systo-diastolic ratio and pulsatility index on the right side, (c) increased systo-diastolic ratio and pulsatility index on the left side. The results indicate that during the attack in this familial hemiplegic migraine patient, a diffuse vasoconstriction of the basal cerebral arteries developed. Moreover, transcranial Doppler sonography data suggest that a prolonged vasoconstriction of the peripheral arterioles could play a role in determining the neurological symptoms in this syndrome. 13 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Transcranial electrical stimulation accelerates human sleep homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Reato

    Full Text Available The sleeping brain exhibits characteristic slow-wave activity which decays over the course of the night. This decay is thought to result from homeostatic synaptic downscaling. Transcranial electrical stimulation can entrain slow-wave oscillations (SWO in the human electro-encephalogram (EEG. A computational model of the underlying mechanism predicts that firing rates are predominantly increased during stimulation. Assuming that synaptic homeostasis is driven by average firing rates, we expected an acceleration of synaptic downscaling during stimulation, which is compensated by a reduced drive after stimulation. We show that 25 minutes of transcranial electrical stimulation, as predicted, reduced the decay of SWO in the remainder of the night. Anatomically accurate simulations of the field intensities on human cortex precisely matched the effect size in different EEG electrodes. Together these results suggest a mechanistic link between electrical stimulation and accelerated synaptic homeostasis in human sleep.

  8. Non-invasive brain stimulation in the detection of deception: scientific challenges and ethical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luber, Bruce; Fisher, Carl; Appelbaum, Paul S; Ploesser, Marcus; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2009-01-01

    Tools for noninvasive stimulation of the brain, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), have provided new insights in the study of brain-behavior relationships due to their ability to directly alter cortical activity. In particular, TMS and tDCS have proven to be useful tools for establishing causal relationships between behavioral and brain imaging measures. As such, there has been interest in whether these tools may represent novel technologies for deception detection by altering a person's ability to engage brain networks involved in conscious deceit. Investigation of deceptive behavior using noninvasive brain stimulation is at an early stage. Here we review the existing literature on the application of noninvasive brain stimulation in the study of deception. Whether such approaches could be usefully applied to the detection of deception by altering a person's ability to engage brain networks involved in conscious deceit remains to be validated. Ethical and legal consequences of the development of such a technology are discussed. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Efficacy of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) in women with provoked vestibulodynia: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Annie; Léonard, Guillaume; Gougeon, Véronique; Waddell, Guy; Bureau, Yves-André; Girard, Isabelle; Morin, Mélanie

    2016-05-14

    Provoked vestibulodynia is the most common form of vulvodynia. Despite its high prevalence and deleterious sexual, conjugal, and psychological repercussions, effective evidence-based interventions for provoked vestibulodynia remain limited. For a high proportion of women, significant pain persists despite the currently available treatments. Growing evidence suggests that the central nervous system (CNS) could play a key role in provoked vestibulodynia; thus, treatment targeting the CNS, rather than localized dysfunctions, may be beneficial for women suffering from provoked vestibulodynia. In this study, we aim to build on the promising results of a previous case report and evaluate whether transcranial direct-current stimulation, a non-invasive brain stimulation technique targeting the CNS, could be an effective treatment option for women with provoked vestibulodynia. This single-center, triple-blind, parallel group, randomized, controlled trial aims to compare the efficacy of transcranial direct-current stimulation with sham transcranial direct-current stimulation in women with provoked vestibulodynia. Forty women diagnosed with provoked vestibulodynia by a gynecologist, following a standardized treatment protocol, are randomized to either active transcranial direct-current stimulation treatment for ten sessions of 20 minutes at an intensity of 2 mA or sham transcranial direct-current stimulation over a 2-week period. Outcome measures are collected at baseline, 2 weeks after treatment and at 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome is pain during intercourse, assessed with a numerical rating scale. Secondary measurements focus on the sexual function, vestibular pain sensitivity, psychological distress, treatment satisfaction, and the patient's global impression of change. To our knowledge, this study is the first randomized controlled trial to examine the efficacy of transcranial direct-current stimulation in women with provoked vestibulodynia. Findings from this

  10. ANODAL TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT CURRENT STIMULATION (TDCS) INCREASES ISOMETRIC STRENGTH OF SHOULDER ROTATORS MUSCLES IN HANDBALL PLAYERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazime, Fuad Ahmad; da Cunha, Ronaldo Alves; Soliaman, Renato Rozenblit; Romancini, Ana Clara Bezerra; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ejnisman, Benno; Baptista, Abrahão Fontes

    2017-06-01

    Weakness of the rotator cuff muscles can lead to imbalances in the strength of shoulder external and internal rotators, change the biomechanics of the glenohumeral joint and predispose an athlete to injury. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that has demonstrated promising results in a variety of health conditions. However few studies addressed its potential approach in the realm of athletics. The purpose of this study was to investigate if transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) technique increases the isometric muscle strength of shoulder external and internal rotators in handball athletes. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Eight female handball players aged between 17 and 21 years (Mean=19.65; SD=2.55) with 7.1 ± 4.8 years of experience in training, participating in regional and national competitions were recruited. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of shoulder external and internal rotator muscles was evaluated during and after 30 and 60 minutes post one session of anodal and sham current (2mA; 0.057mA/cm 2 ) with a one-week interval between stimulations. Compared to baseline, MVIC of shoulder external and internal rotators significantly increased after real but not sham tDCS. Between-group differences were observed for external and internal rotator muscles. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction of external rotation increased significantly during tDCS, and 30 and 60 minutes post-tDCS for real tDCS compared to that for sham tDCS. For internal rotation MVIC increased significantly during and 60 minutes post-tDCS. The results indicate that transcranial direct current stimulation temporarily increases maximal isometric contractions of the internal and external rotators of the shoulder in handball players. 2.

  11. Online effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on prefrontal metabolites in gambling disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickler, Maya; Lenglos, Christophe; Renauld, Emmanuelle; Ferland, Francine; Edden, Richard A; Leblond, Jean; Fecteau, Shirley

    2018-03-15

    Gambling disorder is characterized by persistent maladaptive gambling behaviors and is now considered among substance-related and addictive disorders. There is still unmet therapeutic need for these clinical populations, however recent advances indicate that interventions targeting the Glutamatergic/GABAergic system hold promise in reducing symptoms in substance-related and addictive disorders, including gambling disorder. There is some data indicating that transcranial direct current stimulation may hold clinical benefits in substance use disorders and modulate levels of brain metabolites including glutamate and GABA. The goal of the present work was to test whether this non-invasive neurostimulation method modulates key metabolites in gambling disorder. We conducted a sham-controlled, crossover, randomized study, blinded at two levels in order to characterize the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex on neural metabolites levels in sixteen patients with gambling disorder. Metabolite levels were measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy from the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the right striatum during active and sham stimulation. Active as compared to sham stimulation elevated prefrontal GABA levels. There were no significant changes between stimulation conditions in prefrontal glutamate + glutamine and N-acetyl Aspartate, or in striatal metabolite levels. Results also indicated positive correlations between metabolite levels during active, but not sham, stimulation and levels of risk taking, impulsivity and craving. Our findings suggest that transcranial direct current stimulation can modulate GABA levels in patients with gambling disorder which may represent an interesting future therapeutic avenue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain: guidelines for pain treatment research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Max M.; Treister, Roi; Raij, Tommi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Park, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Turo; Lenz, Fred; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Lang, Magdalena; Hallett, Mark; Fox, Michael; Cudkowicz, Merit; Costello, Ann; Carr, Daniel B.; Ayache, Samar S.; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Recognizing that electrically stimulating the motor cortex could relieve chronic pain sparked development of noninvasive technologies. In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromagnetic coils held against the scalp influence underlying cortical firing. Multiday repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce long-lasting, potentially therapeutic brain plasticity. Nearby ferromagnetic or electronic implants are contraindications. Adverse effects are minimal, primarily headaches. Single provoked seizures are very rare. Transcranial magnetic stimulation devices are marketed for depression and migraine in the United States and for various indications elsewhere. Although multiple studies report that high-frequency rTMS of the motor cortex reduces neuropathic pain, their quality has been insufficient to support Food and Drug Administration application. Harvard's Radcliffe Institute therefore sponsored a workshop to solicit advice from experts in TMS, pain research, and clinical trials. They recommended that researchers standardize and document all TMS parameters and improve strategies for sham and double blinding. Subjects should have common well-characterized pain conditions amenable to motor cortex rTMS and studies should be adequately powered. They recommended standardized assessment tools (eg, NIH's PROMIS) plus validated condition-specific instruments and consensus-recommended metrics (eg, IMMPACT). Outcomes should include pain intensity and qualities, patient and clinician impression of change, and proportions achieving 30% and 50% pain relief. Secondary outcomes could include function, mood, sleep, and/or quality of life. Minimum required elements include sample sources, sizes, and demographics, recruitment methods, inclusion and exclusion criteria, baseline and posttreatment means and SD, adverse effects, safety concerns, discontinuations, and medication-usage records. Outcomes should be monitored for at least 3 months after

  13. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain: guidelines for pain treatment research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Max M; Treister, Roi; Raij, Tommi; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Park, Lawrence; Nurmikko, Turo; Lenz, Fred; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Lang, Magdalena; Hallett, Mark; Fox, Michael; Cudkowicz, Merit; Costello, Ann; Carr, Daniel B; Ayache, Samar S; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2015-09-01

    Recognizing that electrically stimulating the motor cortex could relieve chronic pain sparked development of noninvasive technologies. In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromagnetic coils held against the scalp influence underlying cortical firing. Multiday repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce long-lasting, potentially therapeutic brain plasticity. Nearby ferromagnetic or electronic implants are contraindications. Adverse effects are minimal, primarily headaches. Single provoked seizures are very rare. Transcranial magnetic stimulation devices are marketed for depression and migraine in the United States and for various indications elsewhere. Although multiple studies report that high-frequency rTMS of the motor cortex reduces neuropathic pain, their quality has been insufficient to support Food and Drug Administration application. Harvard's Radcliffe Institute therefore sponsored a workshop to solicit advice from experts in TMS, pain research, and clinical trials. They recommended that researchers standardize and document all TMS parameters and improve strategies for sham and double blinding. Subjects should have common well-characterized pain conditions amenable to motor cortex rTMS and studies should be adequately powered. They recommended standardized assessment tools (eg, NIH's PROMIS) plus validated condition-specific instruments and consensus-recommended metrics (eg, IMMPACT). Outcomes should include pain intensity and qualities, patient and clinician impression of change, and proportions achieving 30% and 50% pain relief. Secondary outcomes could include function, mood, sleep, and/or quality of life. Minimum required elements include sample sources, sizes, and demographics, recruitment methods, inclusion and exclusion criteria, baseline and posttreatment means and SD, adverse effects, safety concerns, discontinuations, and medication-usage records. Outcomes should be monitored for at least 3 months after initiation

  14. Simultaneous acoustic stimulation of human primary and secondary somatosensory cortices using transcranial focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonhye; Chung, Yong An; Jung, Yujin; Song, In-Uk; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2016-10-26

    Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) is gaining momentum as a novel non-invasive brain stimulation method, with promising potential for superior spatial resolution and depth penetration compared to transcranial magnetic stimulation or transcranial direct current stimulation. We examined the presence of tactile sensations elicited by FUS stimulation of two separate brain regions in humans-the primary (SI) and secondary (SII) somatosensory areas of the hand, as guided by individual-specific functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Under image-guidance, acoustic stimulations were delivered to the SI and SII areas either separately or simultaneously. The SII areas were divided into sub-regions that are activated by four types of external tactile sensations to the palmar side of the right hand-vibrotactile, pressure, warmth, and coolness. Across the stimulation conditions (SI only, SII only, SI and SII simultaneously), participants reported various types of tactile sensations that arose from the hand contralateral to the stimulation, such as the palm/back of the hand or as single/neighboring fingers. The type of tactile sensations did not match the sensations that are associated with specific sub-regions in the SII. The neuro-stimulatory effects of FUS were transient and reversible, and the procedure did not cause any adverse changes or discomforts in the subject's mental/physical status. The use of multiple FUS transducers allowed for simultaneous stimulation of the SI/SII in the same hemisphere and elicited various tactile sensations in the absence of any external sensory stimuli. Stimulation of the SII area alone could also induce perception of tactile sensations. The ability to stimulate multiple brain areas in a spatially restricted fashion can be used to study causal relationships between regional brain activities and their cognitive/behavioral outcomes.

  15. 3-dimensional modeling of transcranial magnetic stimulation: Design and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Felipe Santiago

    Over the past three decades, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has emerged as an effective tool for many research, diagnostic and therapeutic applications in humans. TMS delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this dissertation, we present a thorough examination of the total electric field induced by TMS in air and a realistic head model with clinically relevant coil poses. In the first chapter, a detailed account of TMS coil wiring geometry was shown to provide significant improvements in the accuracy of primary E-field calculations. Three-dimensional models which accounted for the TMS coil's wire width, height, shape and number of turns clearly improved the fit of calculated-to-measured E-fields near the coil body. Detailed primary E-field models were accurate up to the surface of the coil body (within 0.5% of measured values) whereas simple models were often inadequate (up to 32% different from measured). In the second chapter, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3-D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistic head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. We found that secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes were predominantly between 25% and 45% of the primary E-fields magnitude. The direction of the secondary E

  16. Transcranial alternating current stimulation: A review of the underlying mechanisms and modulation of cognitive processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph S Herrmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain oscillations of different frequencies have been associated with a variety of cognitive functions. Convincing evidence supporting those associations has been provided by studies using intracranial stimulation, pharmacological interventions and lesion studies. The emergence of novel non-invasive brain stimulation techniques like repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS now allows to modulate brain oscillations directly. Particularly, tACS offers the unique opportunity to causally link brain oscillations of a specific frequency range to cognitive processes, because it uses sinusoidal currents that are bound to one frequency only. Using tACS allows to modulate brain oscillations and in turn to influence cognitive processes, thereby demonstrating the causal link between the two. Here, we review findings about the physiological mechanism of tACS and studies that have used tACS to modulate basic motor and sensory processes as well as higher cognitive processes like memory, ambiguous perception, and decision making.

  17. Treating Clinical Depression with Repetitive Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Using the Brainsway H1-coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feifel, David; Pappas, Katherine

    2016-10-04

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an emerging non-pharmacological approach to treating many brain-based disorders. rTMS uses electromagnetic coils to stimulate areas of the brain non-invasively. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) with the Brainsway H1-coil system specifically is a type of rTMS indicated for treating patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who are resistant to medication. The unique H1-coil design of this device is able to stimulate neuronal pathways that lie deeper in the targeted brain areas than those reached by conventional rTMS coils. dTMS is considered to be low-risk and well tolerated, making it a viable treatment option for people who have not responded to medication or psychotherapy trials for their depression. Randomized, sham-control studies have demonstrated that dTMS produces significantly greater improvement in depressive symptoms than sham dTMS treatment in patients with major depression that has not responded to antidepressant medication. In this paper, we will review the methodology for treating major depression with dTMS using an H1-coil.

  18. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS): A Promising Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennabi, Djamila; Haffen, Emmanuel

    2018-01-01

    Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) opens new perspectives in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD), because of its ability to modulate cortical excitability and induce long-lasting effects. The aim of this review is to summarize the current status of knowledge regarding tDCS application in MDD. Methods: In this review, we searched for articles published in PubMed/MEDLINE from the earliest available date to February 2018 that explored clinical and cognitive effects of tDCS in MDD. Results: Despite differences in design and stimulation parameters, the examined studies indicated beneficial effects of tDCS for MDD. These preliminary results, the non-invasiveness of tDCS, and its good tolerability support the need for further research on this technique. Conclusions: tDCS constitutes a promising therapeutic alternative for patients with MDD, but its place in the therapeutic armamentarium remains to be determined. PMID:29734768

  19. Chronic transcranial focal stimulation from tripolar concentric ring electrodes does not disrupt memory formation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luby, Matthew D; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Besio, Walter G

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive electrical brain stimulation has shown potential utility as a treatment for seizures in epilepsy patients. Transcranial focal stimulation (TFS) via tripolar concentric ring electrodes (TCREs) has been effective in reducing seizure severity in acute rodent models, but it has yet to be determined whether or not it will serve as a viable long-term treatment strategy. Prior experiments indicate that a single dose of TFS via TCRE does not impact short- or long-term memory formation. The present study investigated if five daily doses of TFS via a TCRE on the scalp affected the memory. The spontaneous object recognition (SOR) test was used to evaluate the memory. Sham and TFS-treated groups were evaluated and both showed comparable levels of preference for novel objects, indicating successful memory formation. More work on repeated dosage strategies is important for establishing the safety and efficacy of TFS as a putative treatment.

  20. Factors influencing the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Ye; Tao Feng

    2016-01-01

    Barker first used transcranial magnetic stimulation in 1985 in human brain function research. Since then, it has gradually been developed into a secure and non-invasive treatment method for neurological diseases. In 1994, Pascual Leone first used it for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) and observed an improvement in the motor symptoms of most of the patients. Recent studies have confirmed that both motor and non-motor symptoms of patients with PD could be improved through biochemical, electrophysiological, and functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis. Different therapeutic applications can be achieved by adjusting the stimulation parameters. Physical factors affecting the therapeutic effect include the shape and size of the coil, array orientation, materials and intensity, frequency of stimulus, etc.; the biological factors include stimulating targets, baseline, circadian rhythms, cerebral cortex thickness, and so on. This paper will review these factors and provide a reference for future research.

  1. Factors influencing the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in Parkinson’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Ye; Tao Feng

    2016-01-01

    Barker first used transcranial magnetic stimulation in 1985 in human brain function research. Since then, it has gradually been developed into a secure and non-invasive treatment method for neurological diseases. In 1994, Pascual Leone first used it for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease(PD) and observed an improvement in the motor symptoms of most of the patients. Recent studies have confirmed that both motor and non-motor symptoms of patients with PD could be improved through biochemical, electrophysiological, and functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis. Different therapeutic applications can be achieved by adjusting the stimulation parameters.Physical factors affecting the therapeutic effect include the shape and size of the coil, array orientation, materials and intensity, frequency of stimulus, etc.; the biological factors include stimulating targets, baseline, circadian rhythms, cerebral cortex thickness, and so on. This paper will review these factors and provide a reference for future research.

  2. Simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and single-neuron recording in alert non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jerel K; Grigsby, Erinn M; Prevosto, Vincent; Petraglia, Frank W; Rao, Hrishikesh; Deng, Zhi-De; Peterchev, Angel V; Sommer, Marc A; Egner, Tobias; Platt, Michael L; Grill, Warren M

    2014-08-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used, noninvasive method for stimulating nervous tissue, yet its mechanisms of effect are poorly understood. Here we report new methods for studying the influence of TMS on single neurons in the brain of alert non-human primates. We designed a TMS coil that focuses its effect near the tip of a recording electrode and recording electronics that enable direct acquisition of neuronal signals at the site of peak stimulus strength minimally perturbed by stimulation artifact in awake monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We recorded action potentials within ∼1 ms after 0.4-ms TMS pulses and observed changes in activity that differed significantly for active stimulation as compared with sham stimulation. This methodology is compatible with standard equipment in primate laboratories, allowing easy implementation. Application of these tools will facilitate the refinement of next generation TMS devices, experiments and treatment protocols.

  3. Simultaneous transcranial magnetic stimulation and single neuron recording in alert non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jerel K.; Grigsby, Erinn M.; Prevosto, Vincent; Petraglia, Frank W.; Rao, Hrishikesh; Deng, Zhi-De; Peterchev, Angel V.; Sommer, Marc A.; Egner, Tobias; Platt, Michael L.; Grill, Warren M.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used, noninvasive method for stimulating nervous tissue, yet its mechanisms of effect are poorly understood. Here we report novel methods for studying the influence of TMS on single neurons in the brain of alert non-human primates. We designed a TMS coil that focuses its effect near the tip of a recording electrode and recording electronics that enable direct acquisition of neuronal signals at the site of peak stimulus strength minimally perturbed by stimulation artifact in intact, awake monkeys (Macaca mulatta). We recorded action potentials within ~1 ms after 0.4 ms TMS pulses and observed changes in activity that differed significantly for active stimulation as compared to sham stimulation. The methodology is compatible with standard equipment in primate laboratories, allowing for easy implementation. Application of these new tools will facilitate the refinement of next generation TMS devices, experiments, and treatment protocols. PMID:24974797

  4. Transcranial direct current stimulation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease: Challenges and responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS as a noninvasive therapeutic approach for Alzheimer’s disease (AD has gained increasing attention. Research regarding the utility of tDCS in AD is inconsistent. In this study, we reviewed the importance of individual diversity among AD patients, starting from the uninformative mean results. We also demonstrated variation among AD patients. Highly educated patients seem to benefit more; education also seems to modulate baseline measurements and the results. Individual cortical morphology also affects the current distribution, which influences the effectiveness of stimulation. We suggest the use of structural MRI to distinguish inter-individual variability; high-resolution modeling can also be used to predict current distributions and should be combined with cognitive training (CT along with tDCS.

  5. Network-targeted cerebellar transcranial magnetic stimulation improves attentional control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterman, Michael; Thai, Michelle; Okabe, Hidefusa; DeGutis, Joseph; Saad, Elyana; Laganiere, Simon E.; Halko, Mark A.

    2018-01-01

    Developing non-invasive brain stimulation interventions to improve attentional control is extremely relevant to a variety of neurologic and psychiatric populations, yet few studies have identified reliable biomarkers that can be readily modified to improve attentional control. One potential biomarker of attention is functional connectivity in the core cortical network supporting attention - the dorsal attention network (DAN). We used a network-targeted cerebellar transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) procedure, intended to enhance cortical functional connectivity in the DAN. Specifically, in healthy young adults we administered intermittent theta burst TMS (iTBS) to the midline cerebellar node of the DAN and, as a control, the right cerebellar node of the default mode network (DMN). These cerebellar targets were localized using individual resting-state fMRI scans. Participants completed assessments of both sustained (gradual onset continuous performance task, gradCPT) and transient attentional control (attentional blink) immediately before and after stimulation, in two sessions (cerebellar DAN and DMN). Following cerebellar DAN stimulation, participants had significantly fewer attentional lapses (lower commission error rates) on the gradCPT. In contrast, stimulation to the cerebellar DMN did not affect gradCPT performance. Further, in the DAN condition, individuals with worse baseline gradCPT performance showed the greatest enhancement in gradCPT performance. These results suggest that temporarily increasing functional connectivity in the DAN via network-targeted cerebellar stimulation can enhance sustained attention, particularly in those with poor baseline performance. With regard to transient attention, TMS stimulation improved attentional blink performance across both stimulation sites, suggesting increasing functional connectivity in both networks can enhance this aspect of attention. These findings have important implications for intervention applications

  6. Coil optimisation for transcranial magnetic stimulation in realistic head geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, Lari M; Nieminen, Jaakko O; Mutanen, Tuomas P; Stenroos, Matti; Ilmoniemi, Risto J

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows focal, non-invasive stimulation of the cortex. A TMS pulse is inherently weakly coupled to the cortex; thus, magnetic stimulation requires both high current and high voltage to reach sufficient intensity. These requirements limit, for example, the maximum repetition rate and the maximum number of consecutive pulses with the same coil due to the rise of its temperature. To develop methods to optimise, design, and manufacture energy-efficient TMS coils in realistic head geometry with an arbitrary overall coil shape. We derive a semi-analytical integration scheme for computing the magnetic field energy of an arbitrary surface current distribution, compute the electric field induced by this distribution with a boundary element method, and optimise a TMS coil for focal stimulation. Additionally, we introduce a method for manufacturing such a coil by using Litz wire and a coil former machined from polyvinyl chloride. We designed, manufactured, and validated an optimised TMS coil and applied it to brain stimulation. Our simulations indicate that this coil requires less than half the power of a commercial figure-of-eight coil, with a 41% reduction due to the optimised winding geometry and a partial contribution due to our thinner coil former and reduced conductor height. With the optimised coil, the resting motor threshold of abductor pollicis brevis was reached with the capacitor voltage below 600 V and peak current below 3000 A. The described method allows designing practical TMS coils that have considerably higher efficiency than conventional figure-of-eight coils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcranial magnetic stimulation distinguishes Alzheimer disease from frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benussi, Alberto; Di Lorenzo, Francesco; Dell'Era, Valentina; Cosseddu, Maura; Alberici, Antonella; Caratozzolo, Salvatore; Cotelli, Maria Sofia; Micheli, Anna; Rozzini, Luca; Depari, Alessandro; Flammini, Alessandra; Ponzo, Viviana; Martorana, Alessandro; Caltagirone, Carlo; Padovani, Alessandro; Koch, Giacomo; Borroni, Barbara

    2017-08-15

    To determine whether a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) multiparadigm approach can be used to distinguish Alzheimer disease (AD) from frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Paired-pulse TMS was used to investigate short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and facilitation (ICF), long-interval intracortical inhibition, and short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) to measure the activity of different intracortical circuits in patients with AD, patients with FTD, and healthy controls (HC). The primary outcome measures were sensitivity and specificity of TMS measures, derived from receiver operating curve analysis. A total of 175 participants met the inclusion criteria. We diagnosed 79 patients with AD, 64 patients with FTD, and 32 HC. We found that while patients with AD are characterized by a specific impairment of SAI, FTD shows a remarkable dysfunction of SICI-ICF intracortical circuits. With the use of the best indexes, TMS differentiated FTD from AD with a sensitivity of 91.8% and specificity of 88.6%, AD from HC with a sensitivity of 84.8% and specificity of 90.6%, and FTD from HC with a sensitivity of 90.2% and specificity of 78.1%. These results were confirmed in patients with mild disease. TMS is a noninvasive procedure that reliably distinguishes AD from FTD and HC and, if these findings are replicated in larger studies, could represent a useful additional diagnostic tool for clinical practice. This study provides Class III evidence that TMS measures can distinguish patients with AD from those with FTD. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. The Presto 1000: A novel automated transcranial Doppler ultrasound system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunggu J; Rutledge, William Caleb; Englot, Dario J; Winkler, Ethan A; Browne, Janet L; Pflugrath, Lauren; Cronsier, David; Abla, Adib A; Kliot, Michel; Lawton, Michael T

    2015-11-01

    We examined the reliability and ease of use of a novel automated transcranial Doppler (TCD) system in comparison to a conventional TCD system. TCD ultrasound allows non-invasive monitoring of cerebral blood flow, and can predict arterial vasospasm after a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The Presto 1000 TCD system (PhysioSonics, Bellevue, WA, USA) is designed for monitoring flow through the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) via temporal windows. The Presto 1000 system was tested across multiple preclinical and clinical settings in parallel with a control predicate TCD system. In a phantom flow generating device, both the Presto 1000 and Spencer system (Spencer Technologies, Redmond, WA, USA) were able to detect velocities with high accuracy. In nine volunteer patients, the Presto system was able to locate the MCA in 14 out of 18 temporal windows, in an average of 12.5s. In the SAH cohort of five patients with a total of 25 paired measurements, the mean absolute difference in flow velocities of the M1 segment, as measured by the two systems, was 17.5 cm/s. These data suggest that the Presto system offers an automated TCD that can reliably localize and detect flow of the MCA, with relative ease of use. The system carries the additional benefit of requiring minimal training for the operator, and can be used by many providers across multiple bedside settings. The mean velocities that were generated warrant further validation across an extended group of patients, and the predictive value for vasospasm should be checked against the current standard of angiography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for the treatment of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricova, Jitka; Englerova, Katerina; Rokyta, Richard

    2016-10-01

    tDCS is a promising method for the treatment of chronic pain. Electrode placement locations must be chosen in accordance with the density and the time course of the current in order to prevent pathological changes in the underlying tissue. In order to reduce current spatial variability, more electrodes of the same polarity are placed in a circle around the second electrode of the opposite polarity. The applied current produced the greatest changes directly beneath the electrodes: the cathode reduces the excitability of cortical neurons, while the anode has the opposite effect. Based on inclusion criteria, 10 patients with chronic orofacial pain, secondary trigeminal neuralgia after oral surgery, were enrolled and underwent both anode and cathode stimulation. Before the first session we measured pain intensity on a numeric pain rating scale and tactile and thermal stimulation were used to assess somatosensory status. tDCS was applied for five consecutive days. At the end of tDCS application, somatosensory status was assessed again. From our results we can conclude that the application of tDCS improves the perception of some types of pain. When we increase our sample size, we would expect confirmation not only on our positive results, but also some additional findings for explaining the pathophysiology of orofacial pain. These pathophysiological findings and explanations are very important for the application of tDCS in the treatment of orofacial pain and also for other types of neuropathic pain.

  10. Modeling the effects of noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation at the biophysical, network, and cognitive Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, Gesa; Bergmann, Til Ole; Herz, Damian Marc

    2015-01-01

    these approaches advance the scientific potential of NTBS as an interventional tool in cognitive neuroscience. (i) Leveraging the anatomical information provided by structural imaging, the electric field distribution in the brain can be modeled and simulated. Biophysical modeling approaches generate testable...... predictions regarding the impact of interindividual variations in cortical anatomy on the injected electric fields or the influence of the orientation of current flow on the physiological stimulation effects. (ii) Functional brain mapping of the spatiotemporal neural dynamics during cognitive tasks can...

  11. The impact of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) combined with modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT) on upper limb function in chronic stroke: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Sérgio; Silva, Evelyn; Foerster, Águida; Wiesiolek, Carine; Chagas, Anna Paula; Machado, Giselle; Baltar, Adriana; Monte-Silva, Katia

    2016-01-01

    This pilot double-blind sham-controlled randomized trial aimed to determine if the addition of anodal tDCS on the affected hemisphere or cathodal tDCS on unaffected hemisphere to modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT) would be superior to constraints therapy alone in improving upper limb function in chronic stroke patients. Twenty-one patients with chronic stroke were randomly assigned to receive 12 sessions of either (i) anodal, (ii) cathodal or (iii) sham tDCS combined with mCIMT. Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA), motor activity log scale (MAL), and handgrip strength were analyzed before, immediately, and 1 month (follow-up) after the treatment. Minimal clinically important difference (mCID) was defined as an increase of ≥5.25 in the upper limb FMA. An increase in the FMA scores between the baseline and post-intervention and follow-up for active tDCS group was observed, whereas no difference was observed in the sham group. At post-intervention and follow-up, when compared with the sham group, only the anodal tDCS group achieved an improvement in the FMA scores. ANOVA showed that all groups demonstrated similar improvement over time for MAL and handgrip strength. In the active tDCS groups, 7/7 (anodal tDCS) 5/7 (cathodal tDCS) of patients experienced mCID against 3/7 in the sham group. The results support the merit of association of mCIMT with brain stimulation to augment clinical gains in rehabilitation after stroke. However, the anodal tDCS seems to have greater impact than the cathodal tDCS in increasing the mCIMT effects on motor function of chronic stroke patients. The association of mCIMT with brain stimulation improves clinical gains in rehabilitation after stroke. The improvement in motor recovery (assessed by Fugl-Meyer scale) was only observed after anodal tDCS. The modulation of damaged hemisphere demonstrated greater improvements than the modulation of unaffected hemispheres.

  12. Protective effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in a rat model of transient cerebral ischaemia: a microPET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Feng; Wang, Shuang; Guo, Yi; Lou, Min; Wu, Jimin; Ding, Meiping; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2010-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive method to excite neurons in the brain. However, the underlying mechanism of its therapeutic effects in stroke remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of high-frequency rTMS in a rat model of transient cerebral ischaemia using positron emission tomography (PET). Sprague-Dawley rats (n=30) were anaesthetized with chloral hydrate and subjected to 90 min of intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with subsequent reperfusion in three groups: control (n=10), rTMS (n=10), or sham-rTMS groups (n=10). In the rTMS group, rTMS was given 1 h after ischaemia and every 24 h for 7 days after MCAO. In all three groups, small-animal PET (microPET) imaging with 18 F-FDG was used to evaluate brain glucose metabolism. Apoptotic molecules were measured in the infarct margin using immunohistochemical staining. The neurological scores of the rats in the rTMS group were higher than in those of the control group over the whole 7-day observation period. The total, cortical and striatal infarct volumes were significantly less in the rTMS group than in the control group, as measured by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. 18 F-FDG microPET images showed significantly higher standardized uptake values in the cortex and striatum in the rTMS group than in the control group in the affected hemisphere. The number of cells positive for caspase-3 was significantly lower in the rTMS group than in the control group, while the Bcl-2/Bax ratio was significantly higher in the rTMS group than in the control group. rTMS therapy increased glucose metabolism and inhibited apoptosis in the ischaemic hemisphere. 18 F-FDG PET could be used to monitor rTMS therapy in transient cerebral ischaemia in animal studies and in future clinical trials. (orig.)

  13. Protective effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in a rat model of transient cerebral ischaemia: a microPET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Shuang; Guo, Yi; Lou, Min; Wu, Jimin; Ding, Meiping [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Tian, Mei [The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive method to excite neurons in the brain. However, the underlying mechanism of its therapeutic effects in stroke remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of high-frequency rTMS in a rat model of transient cerebral ischaemia using positron emission tomography (PET). Sprague-Dawley rats (n=30) were anaesthetized with chloral hydrate and subjected to 90 min of intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with subsequent reperfusion in three groups: control (n=10), rTMS (n=10), or sham-rTMS groups (n=10). In the rTMS group, rTMS was given 1 h after ischaemia and every 24 h for 7 days after MCAO. In all three groups, small-animal PET (microPET) imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG was used to evaluate brain glucose metabolism. Apoptotic molecules were measured in the infarct margin using immunohistochemical staining. The neurological scores of the rats in the rTMS group were higher than in those of the control group over the whole 7-day observation period. The total, cortical and striatal infarct volumes were significantly less in the rTMS group than in the control group, as measured by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. {sup 18}F-FDG microPET images showed significantly higher standardized uptake values in the cortex and striatum in the rTMS group than in the control group in the affected hemisphere. The number of cells positive for caspase-3 was significantly lower in the rTMS group than in the control group, while the Bcl-2/Bax ratio was significantly higher in the rTMS group than in the control group. rTMS therapy increased glucose metabolism and inhibited apoptosis in the ischaemic hemisphere. {sup 18}F-FDG PET could be used to monitor rTMS therapy in transient cerebral ischaemia in animal studies and in future clinical trials. (orig.)

  14. Modulation of untruthful responses with noninvasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley eFecteau

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Deceptive abilities have long been studied in relation to personality traits. More recently, studies explored the neural substrates associated with deceptive skills suggesting a critical role of the prefrontal cortex. Here we investigated whether noninvasive brain stimulation over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC could modulate generation of untruthful responses about subject’s personal life across contexts (i.e., deceiving on guilt-free questions on daily activities; generating previously memorized lies about past experience; and producing spontaneous lies about past experience, as well as across modality responses (verbal and motor responses. Results reveal that real, but not sham, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS over the DLPFC can reduce response latency for untruthful over truthful answers across contexts and modality responses. Also, contexts of lies seem to incur a different hemispheric laterality. These findings add up to previous studies demonstrating that it is possible to modulate some processes involved in generation of untruthful answers by applying noninvasive brain stimulation over the DLPFC and extend these findings by showing a differential hemispheric contribution of DLPFCs according to contexts.

  15. Noninvasive Ventilation in Premature Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Keri Ann

    2016-04-01

    The use of noninvasive ventilation is a constantly evolving treatment option for respiratory disease in the premature infant. The goals of these noninvasive ventilation techniques are to improve gas exchange in the premature infant's lungs and to minimize the need for intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation. The goals of this article are to consider various uses of nasal interfaces, discuss skin care and developmental positioning concerns faced by the bedside nurse, and discuss the medical management aimed to reduce morbidity and mortality. This article explores the nursing role, the advances in medical strategies for noninvasive ventilation, and the team approach to noninvasive ventilation use in this population. Search strategy included a literature review on medical databases, such as EBSCOhost, CINAHL, PubMed, and NeoReviews. Innovative products, nursing research on developmental positioning and skin care, and advanced medical management have led to better and safer outcomes for premature infants requiring noninvasive ventilation. The medical focus of avoiding long-term mechanical ventilation would not be possible without the technology to provide noninvasive ventilation to these premature infants and the watchful eye of the nurse in terms of careful positioning, preventing skin breakdown and facial scarring, and a proper seal to maximize ventilation accuracy. This article encourages nursing-based research to quantify some of the knowledge about skin care and positioning as well as research into most appropriate uses for noninvasive ventilation devices.

  16. Study design for the fostering eating after stroke with transcranial direct current stimulation trial: a randomized controlled intervention for improving Dysphagia after acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchina, Sarah; Schlaug, Gottfried; Kumar, Sandeep

    2015-03-01

    Dysphagia is a major stroke complication but lacks effective therapy that can promote recovery. Noninvasive brain stimulation with and without peripheral sensorimotor activities may be an attractive treatment option for swallowing recovery but has not been systematically investigated in the stroke population. This article describes the study design of the first prospective, single-center, double-blinded trial of anodal versus sham transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) used in combination with swallowing exercises in patients with dysphagia from an acute ischemic stroke. The aim of this study is to gather safety data on cumulative sessions of tDCS in acute-subacute phases of stroke, obtain information about effects of this intervention on important physiologic and clinically relevant swallowing parameters, and examine possible dose effects. Ninety-nine consecutive patients with dysphagia from an acute unilateral hemispheric infarction with a Penetration and Aspiration Scale (PAS) score of 4 or more and without other confounding reasons for dysphagia will be enrolled at a single tertiary care center. Subjects will be randomized to either a high or low dose tDCS or a sham group and will undergo 10 sessions over 5 consecutive days concomitantly with effortful swallowing maneuvers. The main efficacy measures are a change in the PAS score before and after treatment; the main safety measures are mortality, seizures, neurologic, motor, and swallowing deterioration. The knowledge gained from this study will help plan a larger confirmatory trial for treating stroke-related dysphagia and advance our understanding of important covariates influencing swallowing recovery and response to the proposed intervention. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced Motor Skill Acquisition in the Non-dominant Upper Extremity using Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation and Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray eButts

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Individuals suffering from motor impairments often require physical therapy (PT to help improve their level of function. Previous investigations suggest that both intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS and bihemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation may increase the speed and extent of motor learning/relearning and that this increase may be related to brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. The purpose of the current study was to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of a novel, non-invasive brain stimulation approach that combined an iTBS primer, and bihemispheric stimulation coupled with motor training. We hypothesized that individuals exposed to this novel treatment would make greater functional improvements than individuals undergoing sham stimulation when tested immediately following, 24-hours, and 7-days post-training. A total of 26 right-handed, healthy young adults were randomly assigned to either a treatment (n = 15 or control group (n = 12. iTBS (20 trains of 10 pulse triplets each delivered at 80% AMT / 50Hz over 191.84 seconds and bihemispheric tDCS (1.0 ma for 20 minutes were used as a primer to, and in conjunction with, 20 minutes of motor training, respectively. Our primary outcome measure was performance on the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function Test. Participants tolerated the combined iTBS/bihemispheric stimulation treatment without complaint. While performance gains in the sham and stimulation group were not significant immediately after training, they were nearly significant 24-hours post training (p = 0.055, and were significant at 7-days post training (p < 0.05. These results suggest that the combined iTBS/bihemispheric stimulation protocol is both feasible and effective. Future research should examine the mechanistic explanation of this approach as well as the potential of using this approach in clinical populations.

  18. Enhanced motor skill acquisition in the non-dominant upper extremity using intermittent theta burst stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Raymond J; Kolar, Melissa B; Newman-Norlund, Roger D

    2014-01-01

    Individuals suffering from motor impairments often require physical therapy (PT) to help improve their level of function. Previous investigations suggest that both intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) and bihemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may increase the speed and extent of motor learning/relearning. The purpose of the current study was to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of a novel, non-invasive brain stimulation approach that combined an iTBS primer, and bihemispheric stimulation coupled with motor training. We hypothesized that individuals exposed to this novel treatment would make greater functional improvements than individuals undergoing sham stimulation when tested immediately following, 24-h, and 7-days post-training. A total of 26 right-handed, healthy young adults were randomly assigned to either a treatment (n = 15) or control group (n = 12). iTBS (20 trains of 10 pulse triplets each delivered at 80% active motor threshold (AMT) / 50 Hz over 191.84 s) and bihemispheric tDCS (1.0 ma for 20 min) were used as a primer to, and in conjunction with, 20 min of motor training, respectively. Our primary outcome measure was performance on the Jebsen-Taylor Hand Function (JTHF) test. Participants tolerated the combined iTBS/bihemispheric stimulation treatment without complaint. While performance gains in the sham and stimulation group were not significant immediately after training, they were nearly significant 24-h post training (p = 0.055), and were significant at 7-days post training (p iTBS/bihemispheric stimulation protocol is both feasible and effective. Future research should examine the mechanistic explanation of this approach as well as the potential of using this approach in clinical populations.

  19. Research with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the Treatment of Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paula I; Naeser, Margaret A.; Ho, Michael; Treglia, Ethan; Kaplan, Elina; Baker, Errol H.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been used to improve language behavior, including naming, in stroke patients with chronic, nonfluent aphasia. Part 1 of this paper reviews functional imaging studies related to language recovery in aphasia. Part 2 reviews the rationale for using rTMS to treat nonfluent aphasia (based on functional imaging); and presents our current rTMS protocol. We present language results from our rTMS studies, and imaging results from overt naming fMRI scans obtained pre- and post- a series of rTMS treatments. Part 3 presents results from a pilot study where rTMS treatments were followed immediately by constraint-induced language therapy. Part 4 reviews our diffusion tensor imaging study that examined possible connectivity of arcuate fasciculus to different parts of Broca’s area (pars triangularis, PTr; pars opercularis, POp); and to ventral premotor cortex (vPMC). The potential role of mirror neurons in R POp and vPMC in aphasia recovery is discussed. PMID:19818232

  20. Characteristics of bowl-shaped coils for transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Keita; Suyama, Momoko; Takiyama, Yoshihiro; Kim, Dongmin; Saitoh, Youichi; Sekino, Masaki

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has recently been used as a method for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases. Daily TMS sessions can provide continuous therapeutic effectiveness, and the installation of TMS systems at patients' homes has been proposed. A figure-eight coil, which is normally used for TMS therapy, induces a highly localized electric field; however, it is challenging to achieve accurate coil positioning above the targeted brain area using this coil. In this paper, a bowl-shaped coil for stimulating a localized but wider area of the brain is proposed. The coil's electromagnetic characteristics were analyzed using finite element methods, and the analysis showed that the bowl-shaped coil induced electric fields in a wider area of the brain model than a figure-eight coil. The expanded distribution of the electric field led to greater robustness of the coil to the coil-positioning error. To improve the efficiency of the coil, the relationship between individual coil design parameters and the resulting coil characteristics was numerically analyzed. It was concluded that lengthening the outer spherical radius and narrowing the width of the coil were effective methods for obtaining a more effective and more uniform distribution of the electric field.

  1. Noninvasive medical management of fungus ball uropathy in a premature infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkalay, A L; Srugo, I; Blifeld, C; Komaiko, M S; Pomerance, J J

    1991-09-01

    Unilateral renal obstruction secondary to fungus balls is described in a premature infant. Noninvasive medical management, which included amphotericin B and 5-flucytosine therapy and forced diuresis, resulted in disappearance of fungus balls and resolution of the obstruction.

  2. Rapid Biolayer Interferometry Measurements of Urinary CXCL9 to Detect Cellular Infiltrates Noninvasively After Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Gandolfini

    2017-11-01

    Discussion: Together, our proof-of-principle results demonstrate that BLI-based urinary CXCL9 detection has potential as a point-of-care noninvasive biomarker to diagnose and guide therapy for ACR in kidney transplantation recipients.

  3. Modulation of Total Sleep Time by Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frase, Lukas; Piosczyk, Hannah; Zittel, Sulamith; Jahn, Friederike; Selhausen, Peter; Krone, Lukas; Feige, Bernd; Mainberger, Florian; Maier, Jonathan G; Kuhn, Marion; Klöppel, Stefan; Normann, Claus; Sterr, Annette; Spiegelhalder, Kai; Riemann, Dieter; Nitsche, Michael A; Nissen, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Arousal and sleep are fundamental physiological processes, and their modulation is of high clinical significance. This study tested the hypothesis that total sleep time (TST) in humans can be modulated by the non-invasive brain stimulation technique transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting a 'top-down' cortico-thalamic pathway of sleep-wake regulation. Nineteen healthy participants underwent a within-subject, repeated-measures protocol across five nights in the sleep laboratory with polysomnographic monitoring (adaptation, baseline, three experimental nights). tDCS was delivered via bi-frontal target electrodes and bi-parietal return electrodes before sleep (anodal 'activation', cathodal 'deactivation', and sham stimulation). Bi-frontal anodal stimulation significantly decreased TST, compared with cathodal and sham stimulation. This effect was location specific. Bi-frontal cathodal stimulation did not significantly increase TST, potentially due to ceiling effects in good sleepers. Exploratory resting-state EEG analyses before and after the tDCS protocols were consistent with the notion of increased cortical arousal after anodal stimulation and decreased cortical arousal after cathodal stimulation. The study provides proof-of-concept that TST can be decreased by non-invasive bi-frontal anodal tDCS in healthy humans. Further elucidating the 'top-down' pathway of sleep-wake regulation is expected to increase knowledge on the fundamentals of sleep-wake regulation and to contribute to the development of novel treatments for clinical conditions of disturbed arousal and sleep.

  4. Visualizing Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) in vivo using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jog, Mayank Anant

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a low-cost, non-invasive neuromodulation technique that has been shown to treat clinical symptoms as well as improve cognition. However, no techniques exist at the time of research to visualize tDCS currents in vivo. This dissertation presents the theoretical framework and experimental implementations of a novel MRI technique that enables non-invasive visualization of the tDCS electric current using magnetic field mapping. The first chapter establishes the feasibility of measuring magnetic fields induced by tDCS currents. The following chapter discusses the state of the art implementation that can measure magnetic field changes in individual subjects undergoing concurrent tDCS/MRI. The final chapter discusses how the developed technique was integrated with BOLD fMRI-an established MRI technique for measuring brain function. By enabling a concurrent measurement of the tDCS current induced magnetic field as well as the brain's hemodynamic response to tDCS, our technique opens a new avenue to investigate tDCS mechanisms and improve targeting.

  5. Quantifying uncertainty in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation - A high resolution simulation study in ICBM space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toschi, Nicola; Keck, Martin E; Welt, Tobias; Guerrisi, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation offers enormous potential for noninvasive brain stimulation. While it is known that brain tissue significantly "reshapes" induced field and charge distributions, most modeling investigations to-date have focused on single-subject data with limited generality. Further, the effects of the significant uncertainties which exist in the simulation (i.e. brain conductivity distributions) and stimulation (e.g. coil positioning and orientations) setup have not been quantified. In this study, we construct a high-resolution anisotropic head model in standard ICBM space, which can be used as a population-representative standard for bioelectromagnetic simulations. Further, we employ Monte-Carlo simulations in order to quantify how uncertainties in conductivity values propagate all the way to induced field and currents, demonstrating significant, regionally dependent dispersions in values which are commonly assumed "ground truth". This framework can be leveraged in order to quantify the effect of any type of uncertainty in noninvasive brain stimulation and bears relevance in all applications of TMS, both investigative and therapeutic.

  6. Lifting the veil on the dynamics of neuronal activities evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingshuo; Virtanen, Juha P; Oeltermann, Axel; Schwarz, Cornelius; Giese, Martin A; Ziemann, Ulf

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used non-invasive tool to study and modulate human brain functions. However, TMS-evoked activity of individual neurons has remained largely inaccessible due to the large TMS-induced electromagnetic fields. Here, we present a general method providing direct in vivo electrophysiological access to TMS-evoked neuronal activity 0.8–1 ms after TMS onset. We translated human single-pulse TMS to rodents and unveiled time-grained evoked activities of motor cortex layer V neurons that show high-frequency spiking within the first 6 ms depending on TMS-induced current orientation and a multiphasic spike-rhythm alternating between excitation and inhibition in the 6–300 ms epoch, all of which can be linked to various human TMS responses recorded at the level of spinal cord and muscles. The advance here facilitates a new level of insight into the TMS-brain interaction that is vital for developing this non-invasive tool to purposefully explore and effectively treat the human brain. PMID:29165241

  7. Lifting the veil on the dynamics of neuronal activities evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bingshuo; Virtanen, Juha P; Oeltermann, Axel; Schwarz, Cornelius; Giese, Martin A; Ziemann, Ulf; Benali, Alia

    2017-11-22

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used non-invasive tool to study and modulate human brain functions. However, TMS-evoked activity of individual neurons has remained largely inaccessible due to the large TMS-induced electromagnetic fields. Here, we present a general method providing direct in vivo electrophysiological access to TMS-evoked neuronal activity 0.8-1 ms after TMS onset. We translated human single-pulse TMS to rodents and unveiled time-grained evoked activities of motor cortex layer V neurons that show high-frequency spiking within the first 6 ms depending on TMS-induced current orientation and a multiphasic spike-rhythm alternating between excitation and inhibition in the 6-300 ms epoch, all of which can be linked to various human TMS responses recorded at the level of spinal cord and muscles. The advance here facilitates a new level of insight into the TMS-brain interaction that is vital for developing this non-invasive tool to purposefully explore and effectively treat the human brain.

  8. Actual review of diagnostics and endovascular therapy of intracranial arterial stenoses; Diagnostik und endovaskulaere Therapie intrakranieller arterieller Stenosen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizewski, E.R. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Weber, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Neurologie; Forsting, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Giessen und Marburg, Giessen (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2011-02-15

    Approximately 6 - 50 % of all ischemic strokes are caused by intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS). Despite medical prevention, patients with symptomatic IAS have a high annual risk for recurrent ischemic stroke of about 12 %, and up to 19 % in the case of high-grade IAS ({>=} 70 %). Digital subtraction angiography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis and grading of IAS. However, noninvasive imaging techniques including CT angiography, MR angiography, or transcranial Doppler and duplex ultrasound examinations are used in the clinical routine to provide additional information about the brain structure and hemodynamic. However, for technical reasons, the grading of stenoses is sometimes difficult and inaccurate. To date, aspirin is recommended as the treatment of choice in the prevention of recurrent ischemic stroke in patients with IAS. IAS patients who suffer a recurrent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack while taking aspirin can be treated with endovascular stenting or angioplasty in specialized centers. The periprocedural complication rate of these endovascular techniques is about 2 - 7 % at experienced neuro-interventional centers. The rate of re-stenosis is reported between 10 and 40 % depending on patient age and stenosis location. Further randomized studies comparing medical secondary prevention and endovascular therapy are currently being performed. With regard to the improvement of endovascular methods and lower complication rates, the indication for endovascular therapy in IAS could be broadened especially for stenosis in the posterior circulation. (orig.)

  9. Trials of Transcranial Stimulation for the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hallett, Mark; Lomarev, Mikhail P; Richardson, Sarah P; Wassermann, Eric; Bara, William; Lopez, Grisel

    2007-01-01

    During the first year of the study, we have been mainly working on the protocol "Transcranial Electrical Polarization for the Treatment of Bradykinesia and Rigidity in Patients with Parkinson's Disease...

  10. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Improves Audioverbal Memory in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuta, Toshinari; Takeda, Kotaro; Osu, Rieko; Tanaka, Satoshi; Oishi, Ayako; Kondo, Kunitsugu; Liu, Meigen

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the left temporoparietal area improved audioverbal memory performance in stroke patients. Twelve stroke patients with audioverbal memory impairment participated in a single-masked, crossover, and sham-controlled experiment. The anodal or sham transcranial direct current stimulation was applied during the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, which evaluates the ability to recall a list of 15 heard words over five trials. The number of correctly recalled words was compared between the anodal and sham conditions and the influence of transcranial direct current stimulation on serial position effect of the 15 words was also examined. The increase in the number of correctly recalled words from the first to the fifth trial was significantly greater in the anodal condition than in the sham condition (P transcranial direct current stimulation over the left temporoparietal area improved audioverbal memory performance and induced the primacy effect in stroke patients.

  11. Development of magnetic resonance technology for noninvasive boron quantification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, K.M.

    1990-11-01

    Boron magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) were developed in support of the noninvasive boron quantification task of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) program. The hardware and software described in this report are modifications specific to a GE Signa trademark MRI system, release 3.X and are necessary for boron magnetic resonance operation. The technology developed in this task has been applied to obtaining animal pharmacokinetic data of boron compounds (drug time response) and the in-vivo localization of boron in animal tissue noninvasively. 9 refs., 21 figs

  12. Consensus paper: combining transcranial stimulation with neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebner, Hartwig R; Bergmann, Til O; Bestmann, Sven

    2009-01-01

    neuroimaging (online approach), TMS can be used to test how focal cortex stimulation acutely modifies the activity and connectivity in the stimulated neuronal circuits. TMS and neuroimaging can also be separated in time (offline approach). A conditioning session of repetitive TMS (rTMS) may be used to induce...... information obtained by neuroimaging can be used to define the optimal site and time point of stimulation in a subsequent experiment in which TMS is used to probe the functional contribution of the stimulated area to a specific task. In this review, we first address some general methodologic issues that need......In the last decade, combined transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)-neuroimaging studies have greatly stimulated research in the field of TMS and neuroimaging. Here, we review how TMS can be combined with various neuroimaging techniques to investigate human brain function. When applied during...

  13. Dosimetry of typical transcranial magnetic stimulation devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2010-05-01

    The therapeutic staff using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) devices could be exposed to magnetic pulses. In this paper, dependence of induced currents in real human man model on different coil shapes, distance between the coil and man model as well as the rotation of the coil in space have been investigated by employing impedance method. It was found that the figure-of-eight coil has less leakage magnetic field and low current density induced in the body compared with the round coil. The TMS power supply cables play an important role in the induced current density in human body. The induced current density in TMS operator decreased as the coil rotates from parallel position to perpendicular position. Our present study shows that TMS operator should stand at least 110 cm apart from the coil.

  14. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm, Martin C., Jr.; Austen, William G., Jr.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-05-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases.

  15. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm Jr., Martin C.; Austen Jr., William G.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases. PMID:25965851

  16. Effects of High-Definition Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Applied Simultaneously to Both Primary Motor Cortices on Bimanual Sensorimotor Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Nils H. Pixa; Fabian Steinberg; Michael Doppelmayr; Michael Doppelmayr

    2017-01-01

    Many daily activities, such as tying one’s shoe laces, opening a jar of jam or performing a free throw in basketball, require the skillful coordinated use of both hands. Even though the non-invasive method of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been repeatedly shown to improve unimanual motor performance, little is known about its effects on bimanual motor performance. More knowledge about how tDCS may improve bimanual behavior would be relevant to motor recovery, e.g., in pers...

  17. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Michael

    2009-12-01

    The cause of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS), a chronic motor and vocal tic disorder of childhood onset, remains unknown. Abnormalities in basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuits presumably play an important role in the pathophysiology underlying the involuntary tics. The use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a noninvasive and painless tool to examine the excitability of several different circuits in the human motor cortex has advanced our understanding of the pathophysiology. Motor thresholds are similar in GTS and healthy subjects; in the resting state, recruitment of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) above threshold is more gradual in patients than controls. In contrast, recruitment of MEPs during preactivation is similar in both groups, as is the duration of the cortical silent period. This suggests that the distribution of excitability in the corticospinal system in patients at rest is different to that in healthy individuals. Importantly, correlation analysis showed that reduced levels of excitability at rest relate, in pure GTS patients, to video ratings of complex tics, and hand and finger tics, with less excitability predicting fewer tics. The correlations disappear for measures made during voluntary activation. This suggests that this is an adaptive response to abnormal basal ganglia-motor cortex inputs in an effort to reduce unwanted movements, a notion supported by electroencephalography-coherence studies that show increased cortico-cortical coupling. Compared to the healthy control group, short intracortical inhibition (SICI) thresholds are similar. However, above-threshold SICI recruitment and sensory afferent inhibition (SAI), a paradigm to examine sensory motor integration, are reduced in patients. This is consistent with the suggestion that reduced excitability of cortical inhibition is one factor that contributes to the difficulty that patients have in suppressing involuntary tics. In addition the reduced SAI indicates that impaired

  18. Adaptive threshold hunting for the effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on primary motor cortex inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Ronan A; Cirillo, John; Byblow, Winston D

    2018-06-01

    Primary motor cortex excitability can be modulated by anodal and cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). These neuromodulatory effects may, in part, be dependent on modulation within gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory networks. GABAergic function can be quantified non-invasively using adaptive threshold hunting paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The previous studies have used TMS with posterior-anterior (PA) induced current to assess tDCS effects on inhibition. However, TMS with anterior-posterior (AP) induced current in the brain provides a more robust measure of GABA-mediated inhibition. The aim of the present study was to assess the modulation of corticomotor excitability and inhibition after anodal and cathodal tDCS using TMS with PA- and AP-induced current. In 16 young adults (26 ± 1 years), we investigated the response to anodal, cathodal, and sham tDCS in a repeated-measures double-blinded crossover design. Adaptive threshold hunting paired-pulse TMS with PA- and AP-induced current was used to examine separate interneuronal populations within M1 and their influence on corticomotor excitability and short- and long-interval inhibition (SICI and LICI) for up to 60 min after tDCS. Unexpectedly, cathodal tDCS increased corticomotor excitability assessed with AP (P = 0.047) but not PA stimulation (P = 0.74). SICI AP was reduced after anodal tDCS compared with sham (P = 0.040). Pearson's correlations indicated that SICI AP and LICI AP modulation was associated with corticomotor excitability after anodal (P = 0.027) and cathodal tDCS (P = 0.042). The after-effects of tDCS on corticomotor excitability may depend on the direction of the TMS-induced current used to make assessments, and on modulation within GABA-mediated inhibitory circuits.

  19. Transcranial direct current stimulation over the right DLPFC selectively modulates subprocesses in working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarui Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Working memory, as a complex system, consists of two independent components: manipulation and maintenance process, which are defined as executive control and storage process. Previous studies mainly focused on the overall effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS on working memory. However, little has been known about the segregative effects of tDCS on the sub-processes within working memory. Method Transcranial direct current stimulation, as one of the non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, is being widely used to modulate the cortical activation of local brain areas. This study modified a spatial n-back experiment with anodal and cathodal tDCS exertion on the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, aiming to investigate the effects of tDCS on the two sub-processes of working memory: manipulation (updating and maintenance. Meanwhile, considering the separability of tDCS effects, we further reconfirmed the causal relationship between the right DLPFC and the sub-processes of working memory with different tDCS conditions. Results The present study showed that cathodal tDCS on the right DLPFC selectively improved the performance of the modified 2-back task in the difficult condition, whereas anodal tDCS significantly reduced the performance of subjects and showed an speeding-up tendency of response time. More precisely, the results of discriminability index and criterion showed that only cathodal tDCS enhanced the performance of maintenance in the difficult condition. Neither of the two tDCS conditions affected the performance of manipulation (updating. Conclusion These findings provide evidence that cathodal tDCS of the right DLPFC selectively affects maintenance capacity. Besides, cathodal tDCS also serves as an interference suppressor to reduce the irrelevant interference, thereby indirectly improving the working memory capacity. Moreover, the right DLPFC is not the unique brain regions for working memory

  20. The Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS on Multitasking Throughput Capacity

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    Justin Nelson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multitasking has become an integral attribute associated with military operations within the past several decades. As the amount of information that needs to be processed during these high level multitasking environments exceeds the human operators’ capabilities, the information throughput capacity reaches an asymptotic limit. At this point, the human operator can no longer effectively process and respond to the incoming information resulting in a plateau or decline in performance. The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a non-invasive brain stimulation technique known as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS applied to a scalp location over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (lDLPFC to improve information processing capabilities during a multitasking environment. Methods: The study consisted of 20 participants from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (16 male and 4 female with an average age of 31.1 (SD = 4.5. Participants were randomly assigned into two groups, each consisting of eight males and two females. Group one received 2mA of anodal tDCS and group two received sham tDCS over the lDLPFC on their testing day. Results: The findings indicate that anodal tDCS significantly improves the participants’ information processing capability resulting in improved performance compared to sham tDCS. For example, the multitasking throughput capacity for the sham tDCS group plateaued near 1.0 bits/s at the higher baud input (2.0 bits/s whereas the anodal tDCS group plateaued near 1.3 bits/s. Conclusion: The findings provided new evidence that tDCS has the ability to augment and enhance multitasking capability in a human operator. Future research should be conducted to determine the longevity of the enhancement of transcranial direct current stimulation on multitasking performance, which has yet to be accomplished.

  1. The Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Multitasking Throughput Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Justin; McKinley, Richard A; Phillips, Chandler; McIntire, Lindsey; Goodyear, Chuck; Kreiner, Aerial; Monforton, Lanie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multitasking has become an integral attribute associated with military operations within the past several decades. As the amount of information that needs to be processed during these high level multitasking environments exceeds the human operators' capabilities, the information throughput capacity reaches an asymptotic limit. At this point, the human operator can no longer effectively process and respond to the incoming information resulting in a plateau or decline in performance. The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a non-invasive brain stimulation technique known as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) applied to a scalp location over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (lDLPFC) to improve information processing capabilities during a multitasking environment. Methods: The study consisted of 20 participants from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (16 male and 4 female) with an average age of 31.1 (SD = 4.5). Participants were randomly assigned into two groups, each consisting of eight males and two females. Group one received 2 mA of anodal tDCS and group two received sham tDCS over the lDLPFC on their testing day. Results: The findings indicate that anodal tDCS significantly improves the participants' information processing capability resulting in improved performance compared to sham tDCS. For example, the multitasking throughput capacity for the sham tDCS group plateaued near 1.0 bits/s at the higher baud input (2.0 bits/s) whereas the anodal tDCS group plateaued near 1.3 bits/s. Conclusion: The findings provided new evidence that tDCS has the ability to augment and enhance multitasking capability in a human operator. Future research should be conducted to determine the longevity of the enhancement of transcranial direct current stimulation on multitasking performance, which has yet to be accomplished.

  2. Non-invasive diagnosis in cerebral ischemia by means of magnetic resonance imaging and near-infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepgras, A.; Gueckel, F.; Laemmler, B.; Weigel, R.; Schmiedek, P.

    1994-01-01

    We describe the non-invasive assessment of cerebrovascular reserve capacity by means of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and magnetic resonance imaging. Both methods are compared with transcranial Doppler sonography. There is a good correlation of the three methods in the changes in cerebral oxygen saturation and in blood velocity following acetazolamide stimulation of cerebral blood flow, except found in one patient with unilateral carotid artery occlusion. In this patient we found a decreased cerebrovascular reserve capacity, revealed by a magnetic resonance technique designed to quantify CBV and CBF. We postulate a raised oxygen extraction as raised oxygen extraction as the cause of his changes in oxygen saturation. (orig.) [de

  3. Non-invasive brain-to-brain interface (BBI: establishing functional links between two brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Schik Yoo

    Full Text Available Transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS is capable of modulating the neural activity of specific brain regions, with a potential role as a non-invasive computer-to-brain interface (CBI. In conjunction with the use of brain-to-computer interface (BCI techniques that translate brain function to generate computer commands, we investigated the feasibility of using the FUS-based CBI to non-invasively establish a functional link between the brains of different species (i.e. human and Sprague-Dawley rat, thus creating a brain-to-brain interface (BBI. The implementation was aimed to non-invasively translate the human volunteer's intention to stimulate a rat's brain motor area that is responsible for the tail movement. The volunteer initiated the intention by looking at a strobe light flicker on a computer display, and the degree of synchronization in the electroencephalographic steady-state-visual-evoked-potentials (SSVEP with respect to the strobe frequency was analyzed using a computer. Increased signal amplitude in the SSVEP, indicating the volunteer's intention, triggered the delivery of a burst-mode FUS (350 kHz ultrasound frequency, tone burst duration of 0.5 ms, pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz, given for 300 msec duration to excite the motor area of an anesthetized rat transcranially. The successful excitation subsequently elicited the tail movement, which was detected by a motion sensor. The interface was achieved at 94.0±3.0% accuracy, with a time delay of 1.59±1.07 sec from the thought-initiation to the creation of the tail movement. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of a computer-mediated BBI that links central neural functions between two biological entities, which may confer unexplored opportunities in the study of neuroscience with potential implications for therapeutic applications.

  4. Onsite-effects of dual-hemisphere versus conventional single-hemisphere transcranial direct current stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Jang, Sung Ho

    2012-01-01

    We performed functional MRI examinations in six right-handed healthy subjects. During functional MRI scanning, transcranial direct current stimulation was delivered with the anode over the right primary sensorimotor cortex and the cathode over the left primary sensorimotor cortex using dual-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation. This was compared to a cathode over the left supraorbital area using conventional single-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation. Voxel counts and blood oxygenation level-dependent signal intensities in the right primary sensorimotor cortex regions were estimated and compared between the two transcranial direct current stimulation conditions. Our results showed that dual-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation induced greater cortical activities than single-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation. These findings suggest that dual-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation may provide more effective cortical stimulation than single-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation. PMID:25624815

  5. A study protocol for a single-blind, randomized controlled trial of adjunctive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for chronic pain among patients receiving specialized, inpatient multimodal pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janice Jimenez-Torres, G; Weinstein, Benjamin L; Walker, Cory R; Christopher Fowler, J; Ashford, Philippa; Borckardt, Jeffrey J; Madan, Alok

    2017-03-01

    Available treatments for chronic pain (CP) are modestly effective or associated with iatrogenic harm. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that may be an effective, adjunctive treatment to non-opioid therapies. In this randomized control trial (RCT), we compare adjunctive active versus sham tDCS among patients in a multimodal inpatient pain management program. The primary objectives of the RCT are to improve pain tolerance and subjective pain experience. Patients admitted to the Pain Management Program at The Menninger Clinic in Houston, Texas are eligible for this trial. Eighty-four participants will be randomized (1:1) into a single-blind, 2×12 (group×time) controlled trial. A battery-powered direct and constant current stimulator (Soterix Medical Inc. 2014) delivers anodal stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and cathodal stimulation over the right DLPFC. Active tDCS is applied by supplying a 2mA current for 20min/session over 10 sessions. Participants complete self-report and performance-based assessments on a weekly basis just prior to brain stimulation. Self-report assessments are collected via Chronic Pain Tracker version 3.6, an iPad interfaced application. The performance-based pain tolerance task is completed through the cold presser task. Interventions with cross-symptomatic therapeutic potential are absolutely essential in the context of CP, in which psychiatric comorbidity is the norm. Modalities that can be used in tandem with evidence-based, non-opioid therapies have the potential to have a synergistic effect, resulting in increased effectiveness of what have been modestly effective treatments to date. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transcranial Duplex Sonography Predicts Outcome following an Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps-Renom, P; Méndez, J; Granell, E; Casoni, F; Prats-Sánchez, L; Martínez-Domeño, A; Guisado-Alonso, D; Martí-Fàbregas, J; Delgado-Mederos, R

    2017-08-01

    Several radiologic features such as hematoma volume are related to poor outcome following an intracerebral hemorrhage and can be measured with transcranial duplex sonography. We sought to determine the prognostic value of transcranial duplex sonography in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. We conducted a prospective study of patients diagnosed with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Transcranial duplex sonography examinations were performed within 2 hours of baseline CT, and we recorded the following variables: hematoma volume, midline shift, third ventricle and lateral ventricle diameters, and the pulsatility index in both MCAs. We correlated these data with the CT scans and assessed the prognostic value of the transcranial duplex sonography measurements. We assessed early neurologic deterioration during hospitalization and mortality at 1-month follow-up. We included 35 patients with a mean age of 72.2 ± 12.8 years. Median baseline hematoma volume was 9.85 mL (interquartile range, 2.74-68.29 mL). We found good agreement and excellent correlation between transcranial duplex sonography and CT when measuring hematoma volume ( r = 0.791; P duplex sonography measurements showed that hematoma volume was an independent predictor of early neurologic deterioration (OR, 1.078; 95% CI, 1.023-1.135) and mortality (OR, 1.089; 95% CI, 1.020-1.160). A second regression analysis with CT variables also demonstrated that hematoma volume was associated with early neurologic deterioration and mortality. When we compared the rating operation curves of both models, their predictive power was similar. Transcranial duplex sonography showed an excellent correlation with CT in assessing hematoma volume and midline shift in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Hematoma volume measured with transcranial duplex sonography was an independent predictor of poor outcome. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  7. Non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Haider, Ansab; Rhee, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Technology has transformed the practice of medicine and surgery in particular over the last several decades. This change in practice has allowed diagnostic and therapeutic tests to be performed less invasively. Hemoglobin monitoring remains one of the most commonly performed diagnostic tests in the United States. Recently, non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring technology has gained popularity. The aim of this article is to review the principles of how this technology works, pros and cons, and the implications of non-invasive hemoglobin technology particularly in trauma surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Noninvasive brain stimulation for treatment of right- and left-handed poststroke aphasics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Hartmann, Alexander; Rubi-Fessen, Ilona; Anglade, Carole; Kracht, Lutz; Kessler, Josef; Weiduschat, Nora; Rommel, Thomas; Thiel, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from single case studies, small case series and randomized controlled trials seems to suggest that inhibitory noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) over the contralesional inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) of right-handers in conjunction with speech and language therapy (SLT) improves recovery from poststroke aphasia. Application of inhibitory NIBS to improve recovery in left-handed patients has not yet been reported. A total of 29 right-handed subacute poststroke aphasics were randomized to receive either 10 sessions of SLT following 20 min of inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the contralesional IFG or 10 sessions of SLT following sham stimulation; 2 left-handers were treated according to the same protocol with real rTMS. Language activation patterns were assessed with positron emission tomography prior to and after the treatment; 95% confidence intervals for changes in language performance scores and the activated brain volumes in both hemispheres were derived from TMS- and sham-treated right-handed patients and compared to the same parameters in left-handers. Right-handed patients treated with rTMS showed better recovery of language function in global aphasia test scores (t test, p right-handers. In treated right-handers, a shift of activation to the ipsilesional hemisphere was observed, while sham-treated patients consolidated network activity in the contralesional hemisphere (repeated-measures ANOVA, p = 0.009). Both left-handed patients also improved, with 1 patient within the confidence limits of TMS-treated right-handers (23 points, 15.9-28.9) and the other patient within the limits of sham-treated subjects (8 points, 2.8-14.5). Both patients exhibited only a very small interhemispheric shift, much less than expected in TMS-treated right-handers, and more or less consolidated initially active networks in both hemispheres. Inhibitory rTMS over the nondominant IFG appears to be a safe and effective treatment

  9. Efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in reducing consumption in patients with alcohol use disorders: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojak, Benoit; Soudry-Faure, Agnès; Abello, Nicolas; Carpentier, Maud; Jonval, Lysiane; Allard, Coralie; Sabsevari, Foroogh; Blaise, Emilie; Ponavoy, Eddy; Bonin, Bernard; Meille, Vincent; Chauvet-Gelinier, Jean-Christophe

    2016-05-17

    Approximately 15 million persons in the European Union and 10 million persons in the USA are alcohol-dependent. The global burden of disease and injury attributable to alcohol is considerable: worldwide, approximately one in 25 deaths in 2004 was caused by alcohol. At the same time, alcohol use disorders remain seriously undertreated. In this context, alternative or adjunctive therapies such as brain stimulation may play a prominent role. The early results of studies using transcranial direct current stimulation found that stimulations delivered to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex result in a significant reduction of craving and an improvement of the decision-making processes in various additive disorders. We, therefore, hypothesize that transcranial direct current stimulation can lead to a decrease in alcohol consumption in patients suffering from alcohol use disorders. We report the protocol of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial, to evaluate the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation on alcohol reduction in patients with an alcohol use disorder. The study will be conducted in 14 centers in France and Monaco. Altogether, 340 subjects over 18 years of age and diagnosed with an alcohol use disorder will be randomized to receive five consecutive twice-daily sessions of either active or placebo transcranial direct current stimulation. One session consists in delivering a current flow continuously (anode F4; cathode F3) twice for 13 minutes, with treatments separated by a rest interval of 20 min. Efficacy will be evaluated using the change from baseline (alcohol consumption during the 4 weeks before randomization) to 24 weeks in the total alcohol consumption and number of heavy drinking days. Secondary outcome measures will include alcohol craving, clinical and biological improvements, and the effects on mood and quality of life, as well as cognitive and safety assessments, and, for smokers, an assessment of the

  10. Noninvasive photoacoustic computed tomography of mouse brain metabolism in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Junjie; Xia, Jun; Maslov, Konstantin; Avanaki, Mohammadreza R. N.; Tsytsarev, Vassiliy; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    To control the overall action of the body, brain consumes a large amount of energy in proportion to its volume. In humans and many other species, the brain gets most of its energy from oxygen-dependent metabolism of glucose. An abnormal metabolic rate of glucose and/or oxygen usually reflects a diseased status of brain, such as cancer or Alzheimer's disease. We have demonstrated the feasibility of imaging mouse brain metabolism using photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT), a fast, noninvasive and functional imaging modality with optical contrast and acoustic resolution. Brain responses to forepaw stimulations were imaged transdermally and transcranially. 2-NBDG, which diffuses well across the blood-brain-barrier, provided exogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of glucose response. Concurrently, hemoglobin provided endogenous contrast for photoacoustic imaging of hemodynamic response. Glucose and hemodynamic responses were quantitatively unmixed by using two-wavelength measurements. We found that glucose uptake and blood perfusion around the somatosensory region of the contralateral hemisphere were both increased by stimulations, indicating elevated neuron activity. The glucose response amplitude was about half that of the hemodynamic response. While the glucose response area was more homogenous and confined within the somatosensory region, the hemodynamic response area showed a clear vascular pattern and spread about twice as wide as that of the glucose response. The PACT of mouse brain metabolism was validated by high-resolution open-scalp OR-PAM and fluorescence imaging. Our results demonstrate that 2-NBDG-enhanced PACT is a promising tool for noninvasive studies of brain metabolism.

  11. POSSIBLE MECHANISMS UNDERLYING THE THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChervyakov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is an effective method used to diagnose and treat many neurological disorders. Although repetitive TMS (rTMS has been used to treat a variety of serious pathological conditions including stroke, depression, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, pain, and migraines, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term TMS remain unclear. In the present review, the effects of rTMS on neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity are described, including the classic interpretations of TMS effects on synaptic plasticity via long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD. We also discuss the effects of rTMS on the genetic apparatus of neurons, glial cells and the prevention of neuronal death. The neurotrophic effects of rTMS on dendritic growth and sprouting and neurotrophic factors are described, including change in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF concentration under the influence of rTMS. Also, non-classical effects of TMS related to biophysical effects of magnetic fields are described, including the quantum effects, the magnetic spin effects, genetic magnetoreception, the macromolecular effects of TMS, and the electromagnetic theory of consciousness. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of TMS effects according to dynamical systems theory. Evidence suggests that a rTMS-induced magnetic field should be considered a separate physical factor that can be impactful at the subatomic level and that rTMS is capable of significantly altering the reactivity of molecules (radicals. It is thought that these factors underlie the therapeutic benefits of therapy with TMS. Future research on these mechanisms will be instrumental to the development of more powerful and reliable TMS treatment protocols.

  12. Possible Mechanisms Underlying the Therapeutic Effects of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervyakov, Alexander V.; Chernyavsky, Andrey Yu.; Sinitsyn, Dmitry O.; Piradov, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an effective method used to diagnose and treat many neurological disorders. Although repetitive TMS (rTMS) has been used to treat a variety of serious pathological conditions including stroke, depression, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, pain, and migraines, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term TMS remain unclear. In the present review, the effects of rTMS on neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity are described, including the classic interpretations of TMS effects on synaptic plasticity via long-term potentiation and long-term depression. We also discuss the effects of rTMS on the genetic apparatus of neurons, glial cells, and the prevention of neuronal death. The neurotrophic effects of rTMS on dendritic growth and sprouting and neurotrophic factors are described, including change in brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration under the influence of rTMS. Also, non-classical effects of TMS related to biophysical effects of magnetic fields are described, including the quantum effects, the magnetic spin effects, genetic magnetoreception, the macromolecular effects of TMS, and the electromagnetic theory of consciousness. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of TMS effects according to dynamical systems theory. Evidence suggests that a rTMS-induced magnetic field should be considered a separate physical factor that can be impactful at the subatomic level and that rTMS is capable of significantly altering the reactivity of molecules (radicals). It is thought that these factors underlie the therapeutic benefits of therapy with TMS. Future research on these mechanisms will be instrumental to the development of more powerful and reliable TMS treatment protocols. PMID:26136672

  13. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Expression of Immediate Early Genes (IEG’s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    TRANSCRANIAL DIRECT CURRENT STIMULATION OF EXPRESSION OF IMMEDIATE EARLY GENES (IEG’S) Jessica...AND SUBTITLE Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Expression of Immediate Early Genes (IEG’s) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b...community in better understanding what is occurring biologically during tDCS. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Transcranial direct current stimulation

  14. Noninvasive vaccination against infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhichao; Diaz-Arévalo, Diana; Guan, Hongbing; Zeng, Mingtao

    2018-04-06

    The development of a successful vaccine, which should elicit a combination of humoral and cellular responses to control or prevent infections, is the first step in protecting against infectious diseases. A vaccine may protect against bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral infections in animal models, but to be effective in humans there are some issues that should be considered, such as the adjuvant, the route of vaccination, and the antigen-carrier system. While almost all licensed vaccines are injected such that inoculation is by far the most commonly used method, injection has several potential disadvantages, including pain, cross contamination, needlestick injury, under- or overdosing, and increased cost. It is also problematic for patients from rural areas of developing countries, who must travel to a hospital for vaccine administration. Noninvasive immunizations, including oral, intranasal, and transcutaneous administration of vaccines, can reduce or eliminate pain, reduce the cost of vaccinations, and increase their safety. Several preclinical and clinical studies as well as experience with licensed vaccines have demonstrated that noninvasive vaccine immunization activates cellular and humoral immunity, which protect against pathogen infections. Here we review the development of noninvasive immunization with vaccines based on live attenuated virus, recombinant adenovirus, inactivated virus, viral subunits, virus-like particles, DNA, RNA, and antigen expression in rice in preclinical and clinical studies. We predict that noninvasive vaccine administration will be more widely applied in the clinic in the near future.

  15. Reducing proactive aggression through non-invasive brain stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhmann, Teresa; Lobbestael, Jill; Arntz, Arnoud; Brugman, Suzanne; Sack, Alexander T.

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive behavior poses a threat to human collaboration and social safety. It is of utmost importance to identify the functional mechanisms underlying aggression and to develop potential interventions capable of reducing dysfunctional aggressive behavior already at a brain level. We here experimentally shifted fronto-cortical asymmetry to manipulate the underlying motivational emotional states in both male and female participants while assessing the behavioral effects on proactive and reactive aggression. Thirty-two healthy volunteers received either anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to increase neural activity within right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, or sham stimulation. Aggressive behavior was measured with the Taylor Aggression Paradigm. We revealed a general gender effect, showing that men displayed more behavioral aggression than women. After the induction of right fronto-hemispheric dominance, proactive aggression was reduced in men. This study demonstrates that non-invasive brain stimulation can reduce aggression in men. This is a relevant and promising step to better understand how cortical brain states connect to impulsive actions and to examine the causal role of the prefrontal cortex in aggression. Ultimately, such findings could help to examine whether the brain can be a direct target for potential supportive interventions in clinical settings dealing with overly aggressive patients and/or violent offenders. PMID:25680991

  16. Facilitate insight by non-invasive brain stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Chi

    Full Text Available Our experiences can blind us. Once we have learned to solve problems by one method, we often have difficulties in generating solutions involving a different kind of insight. Yet there is evidence that people with brain lesions are sometimes more resistant to this so-called mental set effect. This inspired us to investigate whether the mental set effect can be reduced by non-invasive brain stimulation. 60 healthy right-handed participants were asked to take an insight problem solving task while receiving transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS to the anterior temporal lobes (ATL. Only 20% of participants solved an insight problem with sham stimulation (control, whereas 3 times as many participants did so (p = 0.011 with cathodal stimulation (decreased excitability of the left ATL together with anodal stimulation (increased excitability of the right ATL. We found hemispheric differences in that a stimulation montage involving the opposite polarities did not facilitate performance. Our findings are consistent with the theory that inhibition to the left ATL can lead to a cognitive style that is less influenced by mental templates and that the right ATL may be associated with insight or novel meaning. Further studies including neurophysiological imaging are needed to elucidate the specific mechanisms leading to the enhancement.

  17. A wearable neuro-feedback system with EEG-based mental status monitoring and transcranial electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Taehwan; Song, Kiseok; Cho, Hyunwoo; Shin, Dongjoo; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2014-12-01

    A wearable neuro-feedback system is proposed with a low-power neuro-feedback SoC (NFS), which supports mental status monitoring with encephalography (EEG) and transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) for neuro-modulation. Self-configured independent component analysis (ICA) is implemented to accelerate source separation at low power. Moreover, an embedded support vector machine (SVM) enables online source classification, configuring the ICA accelerator adaptively depending on the types of the decomposed components. Owing to the hardwired accelerating functions, the NFS dissipates only 4.45 mW to yield 16 independent components. For non-invasive neuro-modulation, tES stimulation up to 2 mA is implemented on the SoC. The NFS is fabricated in 130-nm CMOS technology.

  18. TU-G-210-03: Acoustic Simulations in Transcranial MRgFUS: Treatment Prediction and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, U. [Stanford University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Modeling can play a vital role in predicting, optimizing and analyzing the results of therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Simulating the propagating acoustic beam in various targeted regions of the body allows for the prediction of the resulting power deposition and temperature profiles. In this session we will apply various modeling approaches to breast, abdominal organ and brain treatments. Of particular interest is the effectiveness of procedures for correcting for phase aberrations caused by intervening irregular tissues, such as the skull in transcranial applications or inhomogeneous breast tissues. Also described are methods to compensate for motion in targeted abdominal organs such as the liver or kidney. Douglas Christensen – Modeling for Breast and Brain HIFU Treatment Planning Tobias Preusser – TRANS-FUSIMO - An Integrative Approach to Model-Based Treatment Planning of Liver FUS Urvi Vyas – Acoustic Simulations in Transcranial MRgFUS: Treatment Prediction and Analysis Learning Objectives: Understand the role of acoustic beam modeling for predicting the effectiveness of therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Apply acoustic modeling to specific breast, liver, kidney and transcranial anatomies. Determine how to obtain appropriate acoustic modeling parameters from clinical images. Understand the separate role of absorption and scattering in energy delivery to tissues. See how organ motion can be compensated for in ultrasound therapies. Compare simulated data with clinical temperature measurements in transcranial applications. Supported by NIH R01 HL172787 and R01 EB013433 (DC); EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under 270186 (FUSIMO) and 611889 (TRANS-FUSIMO)(TP); and P01 CA159992, GE, FUSF and InSightec (UV)

  19. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on reducing spasticity in patients suffering from HTLV-1-associated myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Mostafa; Nafissi, Shahriar; Jamal-Omidi, Shirin; Amiri, Motahareh; Fatehi, Farzad

    2014-12-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 has been implicated in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Regarding its endemicity in Iran and the role of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in reducing spasticity, we decided to evaluate the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in reducing spasticity (as primary outcome) and pain, muscle power, and quality of life (as secondary outcomes) in patients suffering from HAM/TSP. In this pretest-posttest study, nine definite patients with HAM/TSP (according to WHO guidelines) were recruited. All patients underwent five consecutive daily sessions of active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (each session consisting of 20 trains of 10 pulses at 5 Hz and an intensity of 90% of resting motor threshold for the biceps brachii muscle). Main outcome measures including spasticity (by modified Ashworth scale), pain (by visual analog scale), muscle power, and quality of life (by SF 36) were measured before the study and days 5, 7, 30 after the termination of the sessions. Seven (77.8%) females and 2 (22.2%) males were recruited with the mean age of 52 ± 12.67 years, and the mean duration of the disease was 5 ± 3.94. Comparison of the repeated measures showed a statistically significant decrease in pain and spasticity in lower limbs. The decrement in spasticity was persistent even 30 days after the intervention; however, the pain reduction was seen only 5 days after the procedure. No change in quality of life, and muscle power was detected. It seems that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation could decrease spasticity and pain in patients with HAM/TSP, and this effect could persistently continue by 1 month, but it did not influence patients' muscle power and quality of life, and it could be used as an adjuvant therapy in patients suffering from human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-associated HAM/TSP.

  20. Transcranial magnetic stimulation techniques in clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currà, A; Modugno, N; Inghilleri, M; Manfredi, M; Hallett, M; Berardelli, A

    2002-12-24

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a technique that can activate cortical motor areas and the corticospinal tract without causing the subject discomfort. Since TMS was introduced, numerous applications of the technique have been developed for the evaluation of neurologic diseases. Standard TMS applications (central motor conduction time, threshold and amplitude of motor evoked potentials) allow the evaluation of motor conduction in the CNS. Conduction studies provide specific information in neurologic conditions characterized by clinical and subclinical upper motor neuron involvement. In addition, they have proved useful in monitoring motor abnormalities and the recovery of motor function. TMS also gives information on the pathophysiology of the processes underlying the various clinical conditions. More complex TMS applications (paired-pulse stimulation, silent period, ipsilateral silent period, input-output curve, and evaluation of central fatigue) allow investigation into the mechanisms of diseases causing changes in the excitability of cortical motor areas. These techniques are also useful in monitoring the effects of neurotrophic drugs on cortical activity. TMS applications have an important place among the investigative tools to study patients with motor disorders.

  1. Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Grey, Michael James

    2010-01-01

    Human movement sense relies on both somatosensory feedback and on knowledge of the motor commands used to produce the movement. We have induced a movement illusion using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex in the absence of limb movement...... and its associated somatosensory feedback. Afferent and efferent neural signalling was abolished in the arm with ischemic nerve block, and in the leg with spinal nerve block. Movement sensation was assessed following trains of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied over...... premotor cortex stimulation was less affected by sensory and motor deprivation than was primary motor cortex stimulation. We propose that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsal premotor cortex produces a corollary discharge that is perceived as movement....

  2. Transcranial stimulability of phosphenes by long lightning electromagnetic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peer, J.; Kendl, A.

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic pulses of rare long (order of seconds) repetitive lightning discharges near strike point (order of 100 m) are analyzed and compared to magnetic fields applied in standard clinical transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) practice. It is shown that the time-varying lightning magnetic fields and locally induced electric fields are in the same order of magnitude and frequency as those established in TMS experiments to study stimulated perception phenomena, like magnetophosphenes. Lightning electromagnetic pulse induced transcranial magnetic stimulation of phosphenes in the visual cortex is concluded to be a plausible interpretation of a large class of reports on luminous perceptions during thunderstorms.

  3. Transcranial stimulability of phosphenes by long lightning electromagnetic pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peer, J. [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Kendl, A., E-mail: alexander.kendl@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Ionenphysik und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-06-28

    The electromagnetic pulses of rare long (order of seconds) repetitive lightning discharges near strike point (order of 100 m) are analyzed and compared to magnetic fields applied in standard clinical transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) practice. It is shown that the time-varying lightning magnetic fields and locally induced electric fields are in the same order of magnitude and frequency as those established in TMS experiments to study stimulated perception phenomena, like magnetophosphenes. Lightning electromagnetic pulse induced transcranial magnetic stimulation of phosphenes in the visual cortex is concluded to be a plausible interpretation of a large class of reports on luminous perceptions during thunderstorms.

  4. Transcranial route of brain targeted delivery of methadone in oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathirana, W; Abhayawardhana, P; Kariyawasam, H; Ratnasooriya, W D

    2009-05-01

    The unique anatomical arrangement of blood vessels and sinuses in the human skull and the brain, the prevalence of a high density of skin appendages in the scalp, extracranial vessels of the scalp communicating with the brain via emissary veins and most importantly, the way that the scalp is used in Ayurvedic medical system in treating diseases associated with the brain show that a drug could be transcranially delivered and targeted to the brain through the scalp. The present study was to investigate by measuring the antinociceptive effect on rats whether the opioid analgesic methadone could be delivered and targeted to the brain by transcranial delivery route. A non aqueous solution of methadone base in sesame oil was used for the application on the scalp. Animal studies were carried out using six groups of male rats consisting of group 1, the oral control treated with distilled water 1 ml; group 2, the oral positive control treated with methadone hydrochloride solution 316.5 mug/ml; group 3, the negative control treated transcranially with the blank sesame oil 0.2 ml and three test groups 4, 5 and 6 treated with three different dose levels of the transcranial oil formulation of methadone base, 41.6 mug/0.2 ml, 104 mug/0.2 ml and 208 mug/0.2 ml, respectively. The antinociceptive effects were examined by subjecting the rats to the hot plate and tail flick tests. The two higher concentrations of the three transcranial methadone formulations yielded response vs time curves showing nearly equal maximum antinociceptive effects similar to that of the oral positive control. Maximum analgesic effect after transcranial administration was observed between 1st and 2nd h and declined up to 6th hour. The results indicate that the transcranial brain targeted delivery of methadone base in the form of an oil based non aqueous solution results in statistically significant antinociceptive effects under experimental conditions. Therefore, it is possible to deliver central nervous

  5. Diagnostic Use of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Bolu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Motor evoked potentials from peripheral nerves, spinal cord or muscle can be recorded by stimulation of the motor cortex and motor pathways in the central nervous system with transcranial magnetic stimulation which is a neurophysiological analysis method. This method allows investigation the mechanism of diseases which cause changes in the excitability of cortical motor areas. Similarly, it was used in determining the effects of psychotropic drugs on cortical activity and electrophysiological measurement of aggressive behavior Transcranial magnetic stimulation studies in the field of psychiatry are focused on etiopathogenesis of pathologies such as schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and substance abuse.

  6. Longitudinal Changes in Depressive Circuitry in Response to Neuromodulation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagna Pathak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Major Depressive Disorder (MDD is a public health problem worldwide. There is increasing interest in using non-invasive therapies such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to treat MDD. However, the changes induced by rTMS on neural circuits remain poorly characterized. The present study aims to test whether the brain regions previously targeted by deep brain stimulation (DBS in the treatment of MDD respond to rTMS, and whether functional connectivity measures can predict clinical response.Methods: rTMS (20 sessions was administered to five MDD patients at the left-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L-DLPFC over 4 weeks. Magnetoencephalography (MEG recordings and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS assessments were acquired before, during and after treatment. Our primary measures, obtained with MEG source imaging, were changes in power spectral density (PSD and changes in functional connectivity as measured using coherence.Results: Of the five patients, four met the clinical response criterion (40% or greater decrease in MADRS after four weeks of treatment. An increase in gamma power at the L-DLPFC was correlated with improvement in symptoms. We also found that increases in delta band connectivity between L-DLPFC/amygdala and L-DLPFC/pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC, and decreases in gamma band connectivity between L-DLPFC/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC, were correlated with improvements in depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Our results suggest that non-invasive intervention techniques, such as rTMS, modulate the ongoing activity of depressive circuits targeted for DBS, and that MEG can capture these changes. Gamma oscillations may originate from GABA-mediated inhibition, which increases synchronization of large neuronal populations, possibly leading to increased long-range functional connectivity. We postulate that responses to rTMS could provide valuable insights into early evaluation

  7. Effects of slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with corticobasal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civardi, Carlo; Pisano, Fabrizio; Delconte, Carmen; Collini, Alessandra; Monaco, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Corticobasal syndrome is characterized by asymmetric cortical sensorimotor dysfunction and parkinsonism; an altered cortical excitability has been reported. We explored with transcranial magnetic stimulation the motor cortical excitability in corticobasal syndrome, and the effects of slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. With transcranial magnetic stimulation, we studied two corticobasal syndrome patients. We determined bilaterally from the first dorsal interosseous muscle: relaxed threshold, and contralateral and ipsilateral silent period. We also evaluated the contralateral silent period after active/sham slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the most affected side. At T0 the silent period was bilaterally short. On the most affected side, active slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induced a short lasting prolongation of the contralateral silent period. In corticobasal syndrome, transcranial magnetic stimulation showed a reduction cortical inhibitory phenomenon potentially reversed transiently by slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

  8. Non-invasive brain stimulation for fine motor improvement after stroke: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, A T; Bertolucci, F; Torrealba-Acosta, G; Huerta, R; Fregni, F; Thibaut, A

    2018-05-09

    The aim of this study was to determine whether non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques improve fine motor performance in stroke. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, SciELO and OpenGrey for randomized clinical trials on NIBS for fine motor performance in stroke patients and healthy participants. We computed Hedges' g for active and sham groups, pooled data as random-effects models and performed sensitivity analysis on chronicity, montage, frequency of stimulation and risk of bias. Twenty-nine studies (351 patients and 152 healthy subjects) were reviewed. Effect sizes in stroke populations for transcranial direct current stimulation and repeated transcranial magnetic stimulation were 0.31 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.08-0.55; P = 0.010; Tau 2 , 0.09; I 2 , 34%; Q, 18.23; P = 0.110] and 0.46 (95% CI, 0.00-0.92; P = 0.05; Tau 2 , 0.38; I 2 , 67%; Q, 30.45; P = 0.007). The effect size of non-dominant healthy hemisphere transcranial direct current stimulation on non-dominant hand function was 1.25 (95% CI, 0.09-2.41; P = 0.04; Tau 2 , 1.26; I 2 , 93%; Q, 40.27; P < 0.001). Our results show that NIBS is associated with gains in fine motor performance in chronic stroke patients and healthy subjects. This supports the effects of NIBS on motor learning and encourages investigation to optimize their effects in clinical and research settings. © 2018 EAN.

  9. Transcranial Doppler sonography as diagnostic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasminka Đelilović-Vranić

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Having in mind the fact that cerebrovascular disease (CVB takes today in medicine, in spite of diagnostic and therapeutic modernisation, the third place of mortality causes in the world (behind cordial and malignant diseases, but in front of depressions, and the second place of invalidity cause (right after trauma as well as the second place of dementia cause (after Alzheimer disease, it urges primary prophylaxis. Developing countries, but before all countries of East and Middle Europe, where is our country, are highly risked areas where CV disease has trend of incidence and total frequency increase. In the neighbouring Croatia today CV disease is at the first place of mortality causes. In the world today 5 million people annually suffer CV disease, in Europe about 700.000, but frequency of suffering on Balkan is about 5 prom. Age of CV disease effecting unfortunately moved towards young age, and today 49% of effected by CV disease are of 46 to 59 years of age. Early detection and treatment of risk factors (before hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidaemia, stress and physical non-activities are the first aspect of CV disease prophylaxis. Together with this aspect of primary prophylaxis is early detection of complications of mentioned risk factors on the walls of blood vessels, before all changing in sense of arteriosclerosis, with consequence of disorder of cerebral haemodynamics. With that objective - verification of circulator and total haemodynamic disorders, there is obvious disclose of non-invasive diagnostic methods, and one of them is Transcranial Doppler Sonography(TCD. TCD is method comfortable for patient, reliable and rather precise, dynamic, and can be repeated several times, without side effects and in comparison with others rather cheap.

  10. Transcranial sonography for diagnosis of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaser Peter

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD transcranial sonography (TCS represents an alternative diagnostic method to verify clinical diagnosis. Although the phenomenon of an increased echogenicity of the Substantia nigra (SN is well known this method is still not widly used in the diagnostic workup. Until now reliability of this method is still a matter of debate, partly because data only existed from a few laboratories using the same ultrasound machine. Therefore our study was conducted to test the reliability of this method by using a different ultrasound device and examining a large population of control and IPD subjects by two examiners to calculate interobserver reliability. Method In this study echogenicity of SN was examined in 199 IPD patients and 201 control subjects. All individuals underwent a neurological assessment including Perdue pegboard test and Webster gait test. Using a Sonos 5500 ultrasound device area of SN was measured, echogenicity of raphe, red nuclei, thalamus, caudate and lenticular nuclei, width of third and lateral ventricle were documented. Results We found a highly characteristic enlargement of the SN echogenic signal in IPD. The cut-off value for the SN area was established using a ROC curve with a sensitivity of 95% corresponding to an area of SN of 0.2 cm2 and was found to be equivalent to the cut-off values of other studies using different ultrasound devices. Conclusions Our study shows that TCS is a reliable and highly sensitive tool for differentiation of IPD patients from individuals without CNS disorders.

  11. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Clinical Applications in Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Paes, Flávia; Vieira, Renata Teles; Caixeta, Leonardo; Novaes, Felipe; Marinho, Tamires; Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2013-01-01

    Neurological and psychiatric disorders are characterized by several disabling symptoms for which effective, mechanism-based treatments remain elusive. Consequently, more advanced non-invasive therapeutic methods are required. A method that may modulate brain activity and be viable for use in clinical practice is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). It is a non-invasive procedure whereby a pulsed magnetic field stimulates electrical activity in the brain. Here, we focus on the basic foundation of rTMS, the main stimulation parametters, the factors that influence individual responses to rTMS and the experimental advances of rTMS that may become a viable clinical application to treat neurological and psychiatric disorders. The findings showed that rTMS can improve some symptoms associated with these conditions and might be useful for promoting cortical plasticity in patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, these changes are transient and it is premature to propose these applications as realistic therapeutic options, even though the rTMS technique has been evidenced as a potential modulator of sensorimotor integration and neuroplasticity. Functional imaging of the region of interest could highlight the capacity of rTMS to bring about plastic changes of the cortical circuitry and hint at future novel clinical interventions. Thus, we recommend that further studies clearly determine the role of rTMS in the treatment of these conditions. Finally, we must remember that however exciting the neurobiological mechanisms might be, the clinical usefulness of rTMS will be determined by its ability to provide patients with neurological and psychiatric disorders with safe, long-lasting and substantial improvements in quality of life. PMID:25610279

  12. Noninvasive brain stimulation can induce paradoxical facilitation . Are these neuroenhancements transferable and meaningful to security services?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean eLevasseur-Moreau

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available For ages, we have been looking for ways to enhance our physical and cognitive capacities in order to augment our security. One potential way to achieve this goal may be to externally stimulate the brain. Methods of noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial electrical stimulation, have been recently developed to modulate brain activity. Both techniques are relatively safe and can transiently modify motor and cognitive functions outlasting the stimulation period. The purpose of this paper is to review data suggesting that NIBS can enhance motor and cognitive performance in healthy volunteers. We frame these findings in the context of whether they may serve security purposes. Specifically, we review studies reporting that NIBS induces paradoxical facilitation in motor (precision, speed, strength, acceleration endurance, and execution of daily motor task and cognitive functions (attention, impulsive behaviour, risk-taking, working memory, planning, and deceptive capacities. Although transferability and meaningfulness of these NIBS-induced paradoxical facilitations into real life situations are not clear yet, NIBS may contribute at improving training of motor and cognitive functions relevant for military, civil and forensic security services. This is an enthusiastic perspective that also calls for fair and open debates on the ethics of using NIBS in healthy individuals to enhance normal functions.

  13. Induction of neuroplasticity and recovery in post-stroke aphasia by non-invasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka eShah

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Stroke victims tend to prioritize speaking, writing and walking as the three most important rehabilitation goals. Of note is that two of these goals involve communication. This underscores the significance of developing successful approaches to aphasia treatment for the several hundred thousand new aphasia patients each year and over 1 million stroke survivors with chronic aphasia in the U.S. alone. After several years of growth as a research tool, noninvasive brain stimulation (NBS is gradually entering the arena of clinical aphasiology. In this review, we first examine the current state of knowledge of post-stroke language recovery including the contributions from the dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Next, we briefly discuss the methods and the physiologic basis of the use of inhibitory and excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS as research tools in patients who experience post-stroke aphasia. Finally, we provide a critical review of the most influential evidence behind the potential use of these two brain stimulation methods as clinical rehabilitative tools.

  14. Application of noninvasive brain stimulation for post-stroke dysphagia rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Song, Wei-Qun; Wang, Liang

    2017-02-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS), commonly consisting of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS), as well as paired associative stimulation (PAS), has attracted increased interest and been applied experimentally in the treatment of post-stroke dysphagia (PSD). This review presented a synopsis of the current research for the application of NIBS on PSD. The intention here was to understand the current research progress and limitations in this field and to stimulate potential research questions not yet investigated for the application of NIBS on patients with PSD. Here we successively reviewed advances of repetitive TMS (rTMS), tDCS, and PAS techniques on both healthy participants and PSD patients in three aspects, including scientific researches about dysphagia mechanism, applied studies about stimulation parameters, and clinical trials about their therapeutic effects. The techniques of NIBS, especially rTMS, have been used by the researchers to explore the different mechanisms between swallowing recovery and extremity rehabilitation. The key findings included the important role of intact hemisphere reorganization for PSD recovery, and the use of NIBS on the contra-lesional side as a therapeutic potential for dysphagia rehabilitation. Though significant results were achieved in most studies by using NIBS on swallowing rehabilitation, it is still difficult to draw conclusions for the efficacy of these neurostimulation techniques, considering the great disparities between studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  15. Targeting neural endophenotypes of eating disorders with non-invasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine A Dunlop

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The term eating disorders (ED encompasses a wide variety of disordered eating and compensatory behaviors, and so the term is associated with considerable clinical and phenotypic heterogeneity. This heterogeneity makes optimizing treatment techniques difficult. One class of treatments is non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS. NIBS, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS are accessible forms of neuromodulation that alter the cortical excitability of a target brain region. It is crucial for NIBS to be successful that the target is well selected for the patient population in question. Targets may best be selected by stepping back from conventional DSM-5 diagnostic criteria to identify neural substrates of more basic phenotypes, including behavior related rewards and punishment cognitive control, and social processes. These phenotypic dimensions have been recently laid out by the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC initiative. Consequently, this review is intended to identify potential dimensions as outlined by the RDoC and their underlying behavioral and neurobiological targets associated with ED as potential candidates for NIBS and review the available literature on rTMS and tDCS in ED. This review systematically reviews abnormal neural circuitry in ED within the RDoC framework, and also systematically reviews the available literature investigating NIBS as a treatment for ED.

  16. Induction of neuroplasticity and recovery in post-stroke aphasia by non-invasive brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Priyanka P; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Allendorfer, Jane; Hamilton, Roy H

    2013-12-24

    Stroke victims tend to prioritize speaking, writing, and walking as the three most important rehabilitation goals. Of note is that two of these goals involve communication. This underscores the significance of developing successful approaches to aphasia treatment for the several hundred thousand new aphasia patients each year and over 1 million stroke survivors with chronic aphasia in the U.S. alone. After several years of growth as a research tool, non-invasive brain stimulation (NBS) is gradually entering the arena of clinical aphasiology. In this review, we first examine the current state of knowledge of post-stroke language recovery including the contributions from the dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Next, we briefly discuss the methods and the physiologic basis of the use of inhibitory and excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) as research tools in patients who experience post-stroke aphasia. Finally, we provide a critical review of the most influential evidence behind the potential use of these two brain stimulation methods as clinical rehabilitative tools.

  17. Non-invasive brain stimulation to assess and modulate neuroplasticity in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio, Paulo Sérgio; Valasek, Claudia Aparecida; Campanhã, Camila; Giglio, Ana Carolina Alem; Baptista, Nathalia Ishikawa; Lapenta, Olivia Morgan; Fregni, Felipe

    2011-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative and progressive disease related to a gradual decline in cognitive functions such as memory, attention, perceptual-spatial abilities, language, and executive functions. Recent evidence has suggested that interventions promoting neural plasticity can induce significant cognitive gains especially in subjects at risk of or with mild AD. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are non-invasive techniques that can induce significant and long-lasting changes in focal and non-focal neuroplasticity. In this review, we present initial preliminary evidence that TMS and tDCS can enhance performance in cognitive functions typically impaired in AD. Also, we reviewed the initial six studies on AD that presented early findings showing cognitive gains such as in recognition memory and language associated with TMS and tDCS treatment. In addition, we showed that TMS has also been used to assess neuroplasticity changes in AD supporting the notion that cortical excitability is changed in AD due to the neurodegenerative process. Due to the safe profile, cost of these tools, and initial clinical trials results, further studies are warranted in order to replicate and extend the initial findings of rTMS and tDCS as cognitive enhancers in AD. Further trials should explore different targets of stimulation along with different paradigms of stimulation including combination with behavioural interventions.

  18. Red/near-infrared light-emitting diode therapy for traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeser, Margaret A.; Martin, Paula I.; Ho, Michael D.; Krengel, Maxine H.; Bogdanova, Yelena; Knight, Jeffrey A.; Yee, Megan K.; Zafonte, Ross; Frazier, Judith; Hamblin, Michael R.; Koo, Bang-Bon

    2015-05-01

    This invited paper reviews our research with scalp application of red/near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting diodes (LED) to improve cognition in chronic, traumatic brain injury 1. Application of red/NIR light improves mitochondrial function (especially hypoxic/compromised cells) promoting increased ATP, important for cellular metabolism. Nitric oxide is released locally, increasing regional cerebral blood flow. Eleven chronic, mTBI participants with closed-head injury and cognitive dysfunction received 18 outpatient treatments (MWF, 6 Wks) starting at 10 Mo. to 8 Yr. post-mTBI (MVA, sports-related, IED blast injury). LED therapy is non-invasive, painless, non-thermal (FDA-cleared, non-significant risk device). Each LED cluster head (2.1" diameter, 500mW, 22.2mW/cm2) was applied 10 min (13J/cm2) to 11 scalp placements: midline, from front-to-back hairline; and bilaterally on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, temporal, and parietal areas. Testing performed pre- and post-LED (+1 Wk, 1 and 2 Mo post- 18th treatment) showed significant linear trend for LED effect over time, on improved executive function and verbal memory. Fewer PTSD symptoms were reported. New studies at VA Boston include TBI patients treated with transcranial LED (26J/cm2); or treated with only intranasal red, 633nm and NIR, 810nm diodes placed into the nostrils (25 min, 6.5mW, 11.4J/cm2). Intranasal LEDs are hypothesized to deliver photons to hippocampus. Results are similar to Naeser et al. (2014). Actigraphy sleep data show increased sleep time (average, +1 Hr/night) post-18th transcranial or intranasal LED treatment. LED treatments may be self-administered at home (Naeser et al., 2011). A shamcontrolled study with Gulf War Illness Veterans is underway.

  19. Actual review of diagnostics and endovascular therapy of intracranial arterial stenoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gizewski, E.R.; Weber, R.; Forsting, M.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 6 - 50 % of all ischemic strokes are caused by intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS). Despite medical prevention, patients with symptomatic IAS have a high annual risk for recurrent ischemic stroke of about 12 %, and up to 19 % in the case of high-grade IAS (≥ 70 %). Digital subtraction angiography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis and grading of IAS. However, noninvasive imaging techniques including CT angiography, MR angiography, or transcranial Doppler and duplex ultrasound examinations are used in the clinical routine to provide additional information about the brain structure and hemodynamic. However, for technical reasons, the grading of stenoses is sometimes difficult and inaccurate. To date, aspirin is recommended as the treatment of choice in the prevention of recurrent ischemic stroke in patients with IAS. IAS patients who suffer a recurrent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack while taking aspirin can be treated with endovascular stenting or angioplasty in specialized centers. The periprocedural complication rate of these endovascular techniques is about 2 - 7 % at experienced neuro-interventional centers. The rate of re-stenosis is reported between 10 and 40 % depending on patient age and stenosis location. Further randomized studies comparing medical secondary prevention and endovascular therapy are currently being performed. With regard to the improvement of endovascular methods and lower complication rates, the indication for endovascular therapy in IAS could be broadened especially for stenosis in the posterior circulation. (orig.)

  20. [Actual review of diagnostics and endovascular therapy of intracranial arterial stenoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizewski, E R; Weber, R; Forsting, M

    2011-02-01

    Approximately 6 - 50% of all ischemic strokes are caused by intracranial arterial stenosis (IAS). Despite medical prevention, patients with symptomatic IAS have a high annual risk for recurrent ischemic stroke of about 12%, and up to 19% in the case of high-grade IAS (≥ 70%). Digital subtraction angiography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis and grading of IAS. However, noninvasive imaging techniques including CT angiography, MR angiography, or transcranial Doppler and duplex ultrasound examinations are used in the clinical routine to provide additional information about the brain structure and hemodynamic. However, for technical reasons, the grading of stenoses is sometimes difficult and inaccurate. To date, aspirin is recommended as the treatment of choice in the prevention of recurrent ischemic stroke in patients with IAS. IAS patients who suffer a recurrent ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack while taking aspirin can be treated with endovascular stenting or angioplasty in specialized centers. The periprocedural complication rate of these endovascular techniques is about 2 - 7% at experienced neuro-interventional centers. The rate of re-stenosis is reported between 10 and 40% depending on patient age and stenosis location. Further randomized studies comparing medical secondary prevention and endovascular therapy are currently being performed. With regard to the improvement of endovascular methods and lower complication rates, the indication for endovascular therapy in IAS could be broadened especially for stenosis in the posterior circulation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. A case of cerebral reversible vasoconstriction syndrome triggered by repetition transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mamiko; Yamate, Koji; Hayashi, Hiromi; Miura, Toyoaki; Kobayashi, Yasutaka

    2017-08-31

    A 75-year-old man was admitted for combined low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and intensive occupational therapy. Five days after the initiation of rTMS, he developed hypotension and temporary exacerbation of the right hemiplegia with thunderclap headache. MRA showed segmental stenosis of the left middle cerebral artery, which findings were improved at 9 days after the onset of the headache. He was diagnosed as having the reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS). The rTMS was recognized as safe rehabilitation treatment. However, it is necessary to recognize that RCVS can become one of the precipitants. This is the first report of RCVS triggered by rTMS.

  2. Current status and future of non-invasive studies of human brain functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Currently available non-invasive studies are divided into two groups: electrophysiological studies and functional neuroimaging based on the hemodynamic principle. The former includes electroencephalography (EEG), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation, and the latter includes functional MRI, positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and near-infrared spectroscopy. The hemodynamic response has been shown to be correlated with neuronal electrical activity, especially with synaptic activity rather than spiking activity, within a certain range. Since each technique has advantage and disadvantage, it is important to apply the most appropriate technique to solve each specific question. The combined use of more than one techniques of different principles, if possible, provides data of higher spatial and temporal resolution. Functional connectivity among different brain areas can be studied by using some of these techniques either alone or in combination. (author)

  3. Transcranial magnetic stimulation promotes the proliferation of dopaminergic neuronal cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaojing; Luo, Jie; Rastogi, Priyam; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Jiles, David C.; Fellow, IEEE

    2018-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a safe and non-invasive treatment for neurological disorders. TMS has been approved as a treatment for major depressive disorders by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2008. Due to the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction, a time-varying magnetic field induces an electric field in the conductive tissues in the brain, TMS has the ability to activate neurons in vivo. However, the effects of the magnetic fields on neurons in cell culture have not been investigated adequately. The magnetic fields affect the neurons when the potential across the neuronal membrane exceeds the threshold which in turn causes an action potential. Based on these theories, we investigated the effects of the magnetic fields generated by a monophasic stimulator with a 70 mm double coil on rat dopaminergic neuronal cell lines (N27). The directions of the magnetic fields in each coil of the double coil oppose each other. The effects of changing the direction of the magnetic field on N27 neurons was also investigated. The results of the experiments showed that both of the fields perpendicular to the coil surface promoted the proliferation of N27 dopaminergic neurons. In order to investigate the gene expression and protein expression affected by TMS, quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) was used. Here we report changes in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in dopaminergic neuronal cells (N27) after TMS treatment.

  4. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) on Pain Distress Tolerance: A Preliminary Study.

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    Mariano, Timothy Y; van't Wout, Mascha; Jacobson, Benjamin L; Garnaat, Sarah L; Kirschner, Jason L; Rasmussen, Steven A; Greenberg, Benjamin D

    2015-08-01

    Pain remains a critical medical challenge. Current treatments target nociception without addressing affective symptoms. Medically intractable pain is sometimes treated with cingulotomy or deep brain stimulation to increase tolerance of pain-related distress. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may noninvasively modulate cortical areas related to sensation and pain representations. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that cathodal ("inhibitory") stimulation targeting left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) would increase tolerance to distress from acute painful stimuli vs anodal stimulation. Forty healthy volunteers received both anodal and cathodal stimulation. During stimulation, we measured pain distress tolerance with three tasks: pressure algometer, cold pressor, and breath holding. We measured pain intensity with a visual-analog scale before and after each task. Mixed ANOVA revealed that mean cold pressor tolerance tended to be higher with cathodal vs anodal stimulation (P = 0.055) for participants self-completing the task. Pressure algometer (P = 0.81) and breath holding tolerance (P = 0.19) did not significantly differ. The pressure algometer exhibited a statistically significant order effect irrespective of stimulation polarity (all P tDCS (P = 0.072). Although our primary results were nonsignificant, there is a preliminary suggestion that cathodal tDCS targeting left dACC may increase pain distress tolerance to cold pressor. Pressure algometer results are consistent with task-related sensitization. Future studies are needed to refine this novel approach for pain neuromodulation. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Using transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) to understand cognitive processing.

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    Reinhart, Robert M G; Cosman, Josh D; Fukuda, Keisuke; Woodman, Geoffrey F

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation methods are becoming increasingly common tools in the kit of the cognitive scientist. In particular, transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) is showing great promise as a tool to causally manipulate the brain and understand how information is processed. The popularity of this method of brain stimulation is based on the fact that it is safe, inexpensive, its effects are long lasting, and you can increase the likelihood that neurons will fire near one electrode and decrease the likelihood that neurons will fire near another. However, this method of manipulating the brain to draw causal inferences is not without complication. Because tDCS methods continue to be refined and are not yet standardized, there are reports in the literature that show some striking inconsistencies. Primary among the complications of the technique is that the tDCS method uses two or more electrodes to pass current and all of these electrodes will have effects on the tissue underneath them. In this tutorial, we will share what we have learned about using tDCS to manipulate how the brain perceives, attends, remembers, and responds to information from our environment. Our goal is to provide a starting point for new users of tDCS and spur discussion of the standardization of methods to enhance replicability.

  6. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on binge eating disorder.

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    Burgess, Emilee E; Sylvester, Maria D; Morse, Kathryn E; Amthor, Frank R; Mrug, Sylvie; Lokken, Kristine L; Osborn, Mary K; Soleymani, Taraneh; Boggiano, Mary M

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on food craving, intake, binge eating desire, and binge eating frequency in individuals with binge eating disorder (BED). N = 30 adults with BED or subthreshold BED received a 20-min 2 milliampere (mA) session of tDCS targeting the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC; anode right/cathode left) and a sham session. Food image ratings assessed food craving, a laboratory eating test assessed food intake, and an electronic diary recorded binge variables. tDCS versus sham decreased craving for sweets, savory proteins, and an all-foods category, with strongest reductions in men (p tDCS also decreased total and preferred food intake by 11 and 17.5%, regardless of sex (p tDCS administration (p tDCS in BED. Stimulation of the right DLPFC suggests that enhanced cognitive control and/or decreased need for reward may be possible functional mechanisms. The results support investigation of repeated tDCS as a safe and noninvasive treatment adjunct for BED. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:930-936). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Methodological Dimensions of Transcranial Brain Stimulation with the Electrical Current in Human

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    Maryam Rostami

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial current stimulation (TCS is a neuromodulation method in which the patient is exposed to a mild electric current (direct or alternating at 1-2 mA, resulting in an increase or a decrease in the brain excitability. This modi.cation in neural activities can be used as a method for functional human brain mapping with causal inferences. This method might also facilitate the treatments of many neuropsychiatric disorders based on its inexpensive, simple, safe, noninvasive, painless, semi-focal excitatory and inhibitory effects. Given this, a comparison amongst different brain stimulation modalities has been made to determine the potential advantages of the TCS method. In addition, considerable methodological details on using TCS in basic and clinical neuroscience studies in human subjects have been introduced. Technical characteristics of TCS devices and their related accessories with regard to safety concerns have also been well articulated. Finally, some TCS application opportunities have been emphasized, including its potential use in the near future

  8. Transcranial magnetic stimulation research on reading and dyslexia: a new clinical intervention technique for treating dyslexia?

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    Maurits van den Noort

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, several noninvasive neuroimaging techniques, including transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, exist. The working mechanism behind TMS is a rapidly changing magnetic field that generates an electric current via electromagnetic induction. When the coil is placed on the scalp, the magnetic field generates a physiological reaction in the underlying neural tissue. The TMS-induced change in the participant′s behavior is used by researchers to investigate the causal relations between specific brain areas and cognitive functions such as language. A variant of TMS has been developed, which is called rapid-rate TMS (rTMS. In this review, three databases (Medline, Educational Resources Information Center, and Scopus were searched for rTMS studies on normal reading and dyslexia with a cut-off date of October 31, 2014. rTMS was found to be a valuable tool for investigating questions related to reading research, both on the word and the sentence level. Moreover, it can be successfully used in research on dyslexia. Recently, (high-frequency rTMS has been used as a "clinical" intervention technique for treating dyslexia and for improving reading performance by exciting underactive reading pathways in the brain. Finally, we end the paper with a discussion of future directions in the field of rTMS research and dyslexia, for instance, the promising prospect of combining TMS with simultaneous electroencephalographic imaging.

  9. Correlation Networks for Identifying Changes in Brain Connectivity during Epileptiform Discharges and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

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    Elsa Siggiridou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of epileptiform discharges (ED in electroencephalographic (EEG recordings of patients with epilepsy signifies a change in brain dynamics and particularly brain connectivity. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS has been recently acknowledged as a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that can be used in focal epilepsy for therapeutic purposes. In this case study, it is investigated whether simple time-domain connectivity measures, namely cross-correlation and partial cross-correlation, can detect alterations in the connectivity structure estimated from selected EEG channels before and during ED, as well as how this changes with the application of TMS. The correlation for each channel pair is computed on non-overlapping windows of 1 s duration forming weighted networks. Further, binary networks are derived by thresholding or statistical significance tests (parametric and randomization tests. The information for the binary networks is summarized by statistical network measures, such as the average degree and the average path length. Alterations of brain connectivity before, during and after ED with or without TMS are identified by statistical analysis of the network measures at each state.

  10. Patient- and Technician-Oriented Attitudes Toward Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Devices.

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    Lonergan, Brady; Nguyen, Eliza; Lembo, Cara; Hinchman, Carrie; Morales, Oscar G; Press, Daniel Z; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Stern, Adam P

    2018-01-25

    Four transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) devices are currently approved for use in treatment-resistant depression. The authors present the first data-driven study examining the patient- and technician-experience using three of these distinct devices. A retrospective survey design with both patient and technician arms was utilized. The study population included patients who received TMS for treatment-resistant depression at the Berenson Allen Center for Noninvasive Brain Stimulation for the first time between 2013 and 2016 and technicians who worked in the program from 2009 to 2017. Statistical analysis included t tests and analyses of variance to assess differences between and across the multiple groups, respectively. Patients treated with the NeuroStar device reported greater confidence that the treatment was being performed correctly compared with those treated with the Magstim device. Conversely, with regard to tolerability, patients treated with the Magstim device reported less pain in the last week and less pain on average compared with those treated with the NeuroStar device. On average, technicians reported feeling that both the Magstim and NeuroStar devices were significantly easier to use than the Brainsway Deep TMS H-Coil device. Additionally, they found the former two devices to be more reliable and better tolerated. Furthermore, the technicians reported greater confidence in the Magstim and NeuroStar devices compared with the Brainsway Deep TMS H-Coil device and indicated that they would be more likely to recommend the two former devices to other treatment centers.

  11. The application of low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in rehabilitation of Parkinson's disease patients

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    WU Zhuo-hua

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the application value of low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS in Parkinson's disease (PD patients and electrophysiological research. Methods Fifty-six PD patients treated in the Department of Neurology of our hospital from September 2010 to September 2012 were randomly divided into 2 groups, group A (N = 28 and group B (N = 28. Patients in group A were given conventional drug treatment and rehabilitation training, while patients in group B were given low frequency rTMS on the basis of conventional drug treatment and rehabilitation training. After 3 weeks, the scores of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS, resting threshold (RT, cortical latent period, nerve root latent period, central motor conduction time (CMCT and the incidence of adverse reactions were compared between 2 groups. Results After intervention, the emotion, ability of daily living and motor function of patients in group B was obviously improved, and the scores of UPDRS in group B were significantly lower than that in group A (P 0.05. Conclusion The effect of low frequency rTMS in the treatment for PD is evident, safe and reliable, and with less adverse reaction. It can be used as a noninvasive physical treatment measure for PD.

  12. Assessing the Effect of Early Visual Cortex Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Working Memory Consolidation.

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    van Lamsweerde, Amanda E; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2017-07-01

    Maintaining visual working memory (VWM) representations recruits a network of brain regions, including the frontal, posterior parietal, and occipital cortices; however, it is unclear to what extent the occipital cortex is engaged in VWM after sensory encoding is completed. Noninvasive brain stimulation data show that stimulation of this region can affect working memory (WM) during the early consolidation time period, but it remains unclear whether it does so by influencing the number of items that are stored or their precision. In this study, we investigated whether single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (spTMS) to the occipital cortex during VWM consolidation affects the quantity or quality of VWM representations. In three experiments, we disrupted VWM consolidation with either a visual mask or spTMS to retinotopic early visual cortex. We found robust masking effects on the quantity of VWM representations up to 200 msec poststimulus offset and smaller, more variable effects on WM quality. Similarly, spTMS decreased the quantity of VWM representations, but only when it was applied immediately following stimulus offset. Like visual masks, spTMS also produced small and variable effects on WM precision. The disruptive effects of both masks and TMS were greatly reduced or entirely absent within 200 msec of stimulus offset. However, there was a reduction in swap rate across all time intervals, which may indicate a sustained role of the early visual cortex in maintaining spatial information.

  13. Task-specific effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on motor learning

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    Cinthia Maria Saucedo Marquez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a relatively new non-invasive brain stimulation technique that modulates neural processes. When applied to the human primary motor cortex (M1, tDCS has beneficial effects on motor skill learning and consolidation in healthy controls and in patients. However, it remains unclear whether tDCS improves motor learning in a general manner or whether these effects depend on which motor task is acquired. Here we compare whether the effect of tDCS differs when the same individual acquires (1 a Sequential Finger Tapping Task (SEQTAP and (2 a Visual Isometric Pinch Force Task (FORCE. Both tasks have been shown to be sensitive to tDCS applied over M1, however, the underlying processes mediating learning and memory formation might benefit differently from anodal-tDCS. Thirty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to an anodal-tDCS group or sham-group. Using a double-blind, sham-controlled cross-over design, tDCS was applied over M1 while subjects acquired each of the motor tasks over 3 consecutive days, with the order being randomized across subjects. We found that anodal-tDCS affected each task differently: The SEQTAP task benefited from anodal-tDCS during learning, whereas the FORCE task showed improvements only at retention. These findings suggest that anodal tDCS applied over M1 appears to have a task-dependent effect on learning and memory formation.

  14. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation reduces psychophysically measured surround suppression in the human visual cortex.

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    Daniel P Spiegel

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a safe, non-invasive technique for transiently modulating the balance of excitation and inhibition within the human brain. It has been reported that anodal tDCS can reduce both GABA mediated inhibition and GABA concentration within the human motor cortex. As GABA mediated inhibition is thought to be a key modulator of plasticity within the adult brain, these findings have broad implications for the future use of tDCS. It is important, therefore, to establish whether tDCS can exert similar effects within non-motor brain areas. The aim of this study was to assess whether anodal tDCS could reduce inhibitory interactions within the human visual cortex. Psychophysical measures of surround suppression were used as an index of inhibition within V1. Overlay suppression, which is thought to originate within the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN, was also measured as a control. Anodal stimulation of the occipital poles significantly reduced psychophysical surround suppression, but had no effect on overlay suppression. This effect was specific to anodal stimulation as cathodal stimulation had no effect on either measure. These psychophysical results provide the first evidence for tDCS-induced reductions of intracortical inhibition within the human visual cortex.

  15. No Effect of Cathodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Fear Memory in Healthy Human Subjects

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    Aditya Mungee

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have demonstrated that fear memories can be modified using non-invasive methods. Recently, we demonstrated that anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is capable of enhancing fear memories. Here, we examined the effects of cathodal tDCS of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during fear reconsolidation in humans. Methods: Seventeen young, healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups, which underwent fear conditioning with mild electric stimuli paired with a visual stimulus. Twenty-four hours later, both groups were shown a reminder of the conditioned fearful stimulus. Shortly thereafter, they received either tDCS (right prefrontal—cathodal, left supraorbital—anodal for 20 min at 1 mA, or sham stimulation. A day later, fear responses of both groups were compared. Results: On Day 3, during fear response assessment, there were no significant differences between the tDCS and sham group (p > 0.05. Conclusion: We conclude that cathodal tDCS of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (right prefrontal—cathodal, left supraorbital—anodal did not influence fear memories.

  16. Treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice Using Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Preliminary Study

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    Carr, Alexandria; Zenitsky, Gary; Crowther, Lawrence; Hadimani, Ravi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Jiles, David

    2014-03-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive surgery-free tool used to stimulate the brain by time-varying magnetic fields. TMS is currently being investigated as a treatment for neurological disorders such as depression, Parkinson's disease and TBI. Before moving to human TMS/TBI trials, animal testing should be pursued to determine suitability and adverse effects. As an initial study, four healthy mice were treated with TMS at different power levels to determine short-term behavioral effects and set a control group baseline. The mouse's behavior was studied using the Rotorod test, which measures the animal's latency to fall off a rotating rod, and the Versamax test, which measures horizontal and vertical movement, and total distance traveled. The Rotorod test has shown for TMS power levels >=90% the mice begin to fall directly post-treatment. Similarly, the Versamax test has shown for power levels >=80% the mice are less mobile directly post-treatment. Versamax mobility was found to return to normal the day following treatment. These mice were housed in the facility for 4 months and the behavioral tests were repeated. Versamax results showed there was no significant variation in mobility indicating there are no long-term side effects of TMS treatment on the mice. This work was supported by the Barbara and James Palmer Endowment and the Carver Charitable Trust at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University.

  17. Daily left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for medication-resistant burning mouth syndrome.

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    Umezaki, Y; Badran, B W; Gonzales, T S; George, M S

    2015-08-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a persistent and chronic burning sensation in the mouth in the absence of any abnormal organic findings. The pathophysiology of BMS is unclear and its treatment is not fully established. Although antidepressant medication is commonly used for treatment, there are some medication-resistant patients, and a new treatment for medication-resistant BMS is needed. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technology approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of depression. Recent studies have found beneficial effects of TMS for the treatment of pain. A case of BMS treated successfully with daily left prefrontal rTMS over a 2-week period is reported here. Based on this patient's clinical course and a recent pain study, the mechanism by which TMS may act to decrease the burning pain is discussed. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transcranial magnetic stimulation of mouse brain using high-resolution anatomical models

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    Crowther, L. J.; Hadimani, R. L.; Kanthasamy, A. G.; Jiles, D. C.

    2014-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers the possibility of non-invasive treatment of brain disorders in humans. Studies on animals can allow rapid progress of the research including exploring a variety of different treatment conditions. Numerical calculations using animal models are needed to help design suitable TMS coils for use in animal experiments, in particular, to estimate the electric field induced in animal brains. In this paper, we have implemented a high-resolution anatomical MRI-derived mouse model consisting of 50 tissue types to accurately calculate induced electric field in the mouse brain. Magnetic field measurements have been performed on the surface of the coil and compared with the calculations in order to validate the calculated magnetic and induced electric fields in the brain. Results show how the induced electric field is distributed in a mouse brain and allow investigation of how this could be improved for TMS studies using mice. The findings have important implications in further preclinical development of TMS for treatment of human diseases.

  19. FDTD-based Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation model applied to specific neurodegenerative disorders.

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    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; Salas-García, Irene; Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive treatment of neurodegenerative diseases is particularly challenging in Western countries, where the population age is increasing. In this work, magnetic propagation in human head is modelled by Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method, taking into account specific characteristics of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in neurodegenerative diseases. It uses a realistic high-resolution three-dimensional human head mesh. The numerical method is applied to the analysis of magnetic radiation distribution in the brain using two realistic magnetic source models: a circular coil and a figure-8 coil commonly employed in TMS. The complete model was applied to the study of magnetic stimulation in Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases (AD, PD). The results show the electrical field distribution when magnetic stimulation is supplied to those brain areas of specific interest for each particular disease. Thereby the current approach entails a high potential for the establishment of the current underdeveloped TMS dosimetry in its emerging application to AD and PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An investigation into the induced electric fields from transcranial magnetic stimulation

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    Hadimani, Ravi; Lee, Erik; Duffy, Walter; Waris, Mohammed; Siddiqui, Waquar; Islam, Faisal; Rajamani, Mahesh; Nathan, Ryan; Jiles, David; David C Jiles Team; Walter Duffy Collaboration

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a promising tool for noninvasive brain stimulation that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of major depressive disorder. To stimulate the brain, TMS uses large, transient pulses of magnetic field to induce an electric field in the head. This transient magnetic field is large enough to cause the depolarization of cortical neurons and initiate a synaptic signal transmission. For this study, 50 unique head models were created from MRI images. Previous simulation studies have primarily used a single head model, and thus give a limited image of the induced electric field from TMS. This study uses finite element analysis simulations on 50 unique, heterogeneous head models to better investigate the relationship between TMS and the electric field induced in brain tissues. Results showed a significant variation in the strength of the induced electric field in the brain, which can be reasonably predicted by the distance from the TMS coil to the stimulated brain. Further, it was seen that some models had high electric field intensities in over five times as much brain volume as other models.

  1. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Substance Use Disorders: A Systematic Review of Scientific Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Matteo; Martinotti, Giovanni; Santacroce, Rita; Cinosi, Eduardo; Carlucci, Maria; Marini, Stefano; Acciavatti, Tiziano; di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2017-09-01

    New treatment options such as noninvasive brain stimulation have been recently explored in the field of substance use disorders (SUDs), including transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). In light of this, we have performed a review of the scientific literature to assess efficacy and technical and methodological issues resulting from applying tDCS to the field of SUDs. Our analysis highlighted the following selection criteria: clinical studies on tDCS and SUDs (alcohol, caffeine, cannabis, cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, and nicotine). Study selection, data analysis, and reporting were conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Exclusion criteria were as follows: clinical studies about tDCS among behavioral addiction; review and didactic articles; physiopathological studies; and case reports. Eighteen scientific papers were selected out of 48 articles. Among these, 16 studied the efficacy of tDCS applied to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and 8 suggested the efficacy of tDCS in reducing substance craving. In light of these data, it is premature to conclude that tDCS over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is a very efficient technique in reducing craving. Small sample size, different stimulation protocols, and study duration were the main limitations. However, the efficacy of tDCS in treating SUDs requires further investigation.

  2. Cognitive Impairment After Sleep Deprivation Rescued by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Application in Octodon degus.

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    Estrada, C; López, D; Conesa, A; Fernández-Gómez, F J; Gonzalez-Cuello, A; Toledo, F; Tunez, I; Blin, O; Bordet, R; Richardson, J C; Fernandez-Villalba, E; Herrero, M T

    2015-11-01

    Sleep is indispensable for maintaining regular daily life activities and is of fundamental physiological importance for cognitive performance. Sleep deprivation (SD) may affect learning capacity and the ability to form new memories, particularly with regard to hippocampus-dependent tasks. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive procedure of electromagnetic induction that generates electric currents, activating nearby nerve cells in the stimulated cortical area. Several studies have looked into the potential therapeutic use of TMS. The present study was designed to evaluate how TMS could improve learning and memory functions following SD in Octodon degus. Thirty juvenile (18 months old) females were divided into three groups (control, acute, and chronic TMS treatment-with and without SD). TMS-treated groups were placed in plastic cylindrical cages designed to keep them immobile, while receiving head magnetic stimulation. SD was achieved by gently handling the animals to keep them awake during the night. Behavioral tests included radial arm maze (RAM), Barnes maze (BM), and novel object recognition. When TMS treatment was applied over several days, there was significant improvement of cognitive performance after SD, with no side effects. A single TMS session reduced the number of errors for the RAM test and improved latency and reduced errors for the BM test, which both evaluate spatial memory. Moreover, chronic TMS treatment brings about a significant improvement in both spatial and working memories.

  3. Combining transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional imaging in cognitive brain research: possibilities and limitations.

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    Sack, Alexander T; Linden, David E J

    2003-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used tool for the non-invasive study of basic neurophysiological processes and the relationship between brain and behavior. We review the physical and physiological background of TMS and discuss the large body of perceptual and cognitive studies, mainly in the visual domain, that have been performed with TMS in the past 15 years. We compare TMS with other neurophysiological and neuropsychological research tools and propose that TMS, compared with the classical neuropsychological lesion studies, can make its own unique contribution. As the main focus of this review, we describe the different approaches of combining TMS with functional neuroimaging techniques. We also discuss important shortcomings of TMS, especially the limited knowledge concerning its physiological effects, which often make the interpretation of TMS results ambiguous. We conclude with a critical analysis of the resulting conceptual and methodological limitations that the investigation of functional brain-behavior relationships still has to face. We argue that while some of the methodological limitations of TMS applied alone can be overcome by combination with functional neuroimaging, others will persist until its physical and physiological effects can be controlled.

  4. Contribution of transcranial magnetic stimulation to the understanding of cortical mechanisms involved in motor control.

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    Reis, Janine; Swayne, Orlando B; Vandermeeren, Yves; Camus, Mickael; Dimyan, Michael A; Harris-Love, Michelle; Perez, Monica A; Ragert, Patrick; Rothwell, John C; Cohen, Leonardo G

    2008-01-15

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was initially used to evaluate the integrity of the corticospinal tract in humans non-invasively. Since these early studies, the development of paired-pulse and repetitive TMS protocols allowed investigators to explore inhibitory and excitatory interactions of various motor and non-motor cortical regions within and across cerebral hemispheres. These applications have provided insight into the intracortical physiological processes underlying the functional role of different brain regions in various cognitive processes, motor control in health and disease and neuroplastic changes during recovery of function after brain lesions. Used in combination with neuroimaging tools, TMS provides valuable information on functional connectivity between different brain regions, and on the relationship between physiological processes and the anatomical configuration of specific brain areas and connected pathways. More recently, there has been increasing interest in the extent to which these physiological processes are modulated depending on the behavioural setting. The purpose of this paper is (a) to present an up-to-date review of the available electrophysiological data and the impact on our understanding of human motor behaviour and (b) to discuss some of the gaps in our present knowledge as well as future directions of research in a format accessible to new students and/or investigators. Finally, areas of uncertainty and limitations in the interpretation of TMS studies are discussed in some detail.

  5. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Improves Handwriting in Parkinson’s Disease

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    Bubblepreet K. Randhawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parkinson disease (PD is characterized by hypometric movements resulting from loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. PD leads to decreased activation of the supplementary motor area (SMA; the net result of these changes is a poverty of movement. The present study determined the impact of 5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the SMA on a fine motor movement, handwriting (writing cursive “l”s, and on cortical excitability, in individuals with PD. Methods. In a cross-over design, ten individuals with PD were randomized to receive either 5 Hz or control stimulation over the SMA. Immediately following brain stimulation right handed writing was assessed. Results. 5 Hz stimulation increased vertical size of handwriting and diminished axial pressure. In addition, 5 Hz rTMS significantly decreased the threshold for excitability in the primary motor cortex. Conclusions. These data suggest that in the short term 5 Hz rTMS benefits functional fine motor task performance, perhaps by altering cortical excitability across a network of brain regions. Further, these data may provide the foundation for a larger investigation of the effects of noninvasive brain stimulation over the SMA in individuals with PD.

  6. Action mechanisms of transcranial direct current stimulation in Alzheimer´s disease and memory loss

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    Niels eHansen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer´s disease (AD is often limited and accompanied by drug side effects. Thus alternative therapeutic strategies such as non-invasive brain stimulation are needed. Few studies have demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, a method of neuromodulation with consecutive robust excitability changes within the stimulated cortex area, is beneficial in AD. There is also evidence that tDCS enhances memory function in cognitive rehabilitation in depressive patients, Parkinson´s disease and stroke. TDCS improves working and visual recognition memory in humans and object-recognition learning in the elderly. Neurobiological mechanisms of AD comprise changes in neuronal activity and the cerebral blood flow caused by altered microvasculature, synaptic dysregulation from ß-amyloid peptide accumulation, altered neuromodulation by degeneration of modulatory amine transmitter systems, altered brain oscillations, and changes in network connectivity. tDCS alters (i neuronal activity and (ii human cerebral blood flow, (iii has synaptic and non-synaptic after-effects (iv, can modify neurotransmitters polarity-dependently, (v and alter oscillatory brain activity and (vi functional connectivity patterns in the brain. It thus is reasonable to use tDCS as a therapeutic instrument in AD as it improves cognitive function in manner based on a disease mechanism. Moreover, it might prove valuable in other types of dementia. Future large-scale clinical and mechanism-oriented studies may enable to identify its therapeutic validity in other types of demential disorders.

  7. Action mechanisms of transcranial direct current stimulation in Alzheimer's disease and memory loss.

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    Hansen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is often limited and accompanied by drug side effects. Thus alternative therapeutic strategies such as non-invasive brain stimulation are needed. Few studies have demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a method of neuromodulation with consecutive robust excitability changes within the stimulated cortex area, is beneficial in AD. There is also evidence that tDCS enhances memory function in cognitive rehabilitation in depressive patients, Parkinson's disease, and stroke. tDCS improves working and visual recognition memory in humans and object-recognition learning in the elderly. AD's neurobiological mechanisms comprise changes in neuronal activity and the cerebral blood flow (CBF) caused by altered microvasculature, synaptic dysregulation from ß-amyloid peptide accumulation, altered neuromodulation via degenerated modulatory amine transmitter systems, altered brain oscillations, and changes in network connectivity. tDCS alters (i) neuronal activity and (ii) human CBF, (iii) has synaptic and non-synaptic after-effects (iv), can modify neurotransmitters polarity-dependently, (v) and alter oscillatory brain activity and (vi) functional connectivity patterns in the brain. It thus is reasonable to use tDCS as a therapeutic instrument in AD as it improves cognitive function in manner based on a disease mechanism. Moreover, it could prove valuable in other types of dementia. Future large-scale clinical and mechanism-oriented studies may enable us to identify its therapeutic validity in other types of demential disorders.

  8. Enhancement of multitasking performance and neural oscillations by transcranial alternating current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wan-Yu; Zanto, Theodore P; van Schouwenburg, Martine R; Gazzaley, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Multitasking is associated with the generation of stimulus-locked theta (4-7 Hz) oscillations arising from prefrontal cortex (PFC). Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that influences endogenous brain oscillations. Here, we investigate whether applying alternating current stimulation within the theta frequency band would affect multitasking performance, and explore tACS effects on neurophysiological measures. Brief runs of bilateral PFC theta-tACS were applied while participants were engaged in a multitasking paradigm accompanied by electroencephalography (EEG) data collection. Unlike an active control group, a tACS stimulation group showed enhancement of multitasking performance after a 90-minute session (F1,35 = 6.63, p = 0.01, ηp2 = 0.16; effect size = 0.96), coupled with significant modulation of posterior beta (13-30 Hz) activities (F1,32 = 7.66, p = 0.009, ηp2 = 0.19; effect size = 0.96). Across participant regression analyses indicated that those participants with greater increases in frontal theta, alpha and beta oscillations exhibited greater multitasking performance improvements. These results indicate frontal theta-tACS generates benefits on multitasking performance accompanied by widespread neuronal oscillatory changes, and suggests that future tACS studies with extended treatments are worth exploring as promising tools for cognitive enhancement.

  9. Enhancement of multitasking performance and neural oscillations by transcranial alternating current stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Yu Hsu

    Full Text Available Multitasking is associated with the generation of stimulus-locked theta (4-7 Hz oscillations arising from prefrontal cortex (PFC. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that influences endogenous brain oscillations. Here, we investigate whether applying alternating current stimulation within the theta frequency band would affect multitasking performance, and explore tACS effects on neurophysiological measures. Brief runs of bilateral PFC theta-tACS were applied while participants were engaged in a multitasking paradigm accompanied by electroencephalography (EEG data collection. Unlike an active control group, a tACS stimulation group showed enhancement of multitasking performance after a 90-minute session (F1,35 = 6.63, p = 0.01, ηp2 = 0.16; effect size = 0.96, coupled with significant modulation of posterior beta (13-30 Hz activities (F1,32 = 7.66, p = 0.009, ηp2 = 0.19; effect size = 0.96. Across participant regression analyses indicated that those participants with greater increases in frontal theta, alpha and beta oscillations exhibited greater multitasking performance improvements. These results indicate frontal theta-tACS generates benefits on multitasking performance accompanied by widespread neuronal oscillatory changes, and suggests that future tACS studies with extended treatments are worth exploring as promising tools for cognitive enhancement.

  10. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation, Symptomatology, and Cognition in Psychosis: A Qualitative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Gupta

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a chronic, debilitating condition that affects approximately 1% of the population. Individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia typically exhibit positive (e.g., hallucinations and negative symptoms (e.g., anhedonia and impairments in cognitive function. Given the limitations of antipsychotic medication and psychotherapy in fully treating psychosis symptomatology, there has been increasing interest in other interventions such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. tDCS is a non-invasive neuromodulation technique, that is safe, cost-effective, and widely accessible. Here, we discuss treatment studies that seek to improve symptoms and cognitive performance in schizophrenia using tDCS. Currently within the literature, there is support for reductions in positive symptoms such as hallucinations after receiving tDCS. Further, studies indicate that tDCS can improve cognitive functioning, which is an area of investigation that is sorely needed, as it is unclear which types of interventions may be useful in ameliorating cognitive deficits among this group. Taken together, the evidence suggests that tDCS holds promise in improving symptoms and cognition. To that end, tDCS has critical clinical implications for this population.

  11. Transcranial magnetic stimulation promotes the proliferation of dopaminergic neuronal cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Zhong

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a safe and non-invasive treatment for neurological disorders. TMS has been approved as a treatment for major depressive disorders by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in 2008. Due to the phenomenon of electromagnetic induction, a time-varying magnetic field induces an electric field in the conductive tissues in the brain, TMS has the ability to activate neurons in vivo. However, the effects of the magnetic fields on neurons in cell culture have not been investigated adequately. The magnetic fields affect the neurons when the potential across the neuronal membrane exceeds the threshold which in turn causes an action potential. Based on these theories, we investigated the effects of the magnetic fields generated by a monophasic stimulator with a 70 mm double coil on rat dopaminergic neuronal cell lines (N27. The directions of the magnetic fields in each coil of the double coil oppose each other. The effects of changing the direction of the magnetic field on N27 neurons was also investigated. The results of the experiments showed that both of the fields perpendicular to the coil surface promoted the proliferation of N27 dopaminergic neurons. In order to investigate the gene expression and protein expression affected by TMS, quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR was used. Here we report changes in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF in dopaminergic neuronal cells (N27 after TMS treatment.

  12. Is effect of transcranial direct current stimulation on visuomotor coordination dependent on task difficulty?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Hyun Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, an emerging technique for non-invasive brain stimulation, is increasingly used to induce changes in cortical excitability and modulate motor behavior, especially for upper limbs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of tDCS of the primary motor cortex on visuomotor coordination based on three levels of task difficulty in healthy subjects. Thirty-eight healthy participants underwent real tDCS or sham tDCS. Using a single-blind, sham-controlled crossover design, tDCS was applied to the primary motor cortex. For real tDCS conditions, tDCS intensity was 1 mA while stimulation was applied for 15 minutes. For the sham tDCS, electrodes were placed in the same position, but the stimulator was turned off after 5 seconds. Visuomotor tracking task, consisting of three levels (levels 1, 2, 3 of difficulty with higher level indicating greater difficulty, was performed before and after tDCS application. At level 2, real tDCS of the primary motor cortex improved the accurate index compared to the sham tDCS. However, at levels 1 and 3, the accurate index was not significantly increased after real tDCS compared to the sham tDCS. These findings suggest that tasks of moderate difficulty may improve visuomotor coordination in healthy subjects when tDCS is applied compared with easier or more difficult tasks.

  13. Transcranial Doppler velocities in a large, healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegeler, Charles H; Crutchfield, Kevin; Katsnelson, Michael; Kim, Jongyeol; Tang, Rong; Passmore Griffin, Leah; Rundek, Tanja; Evans, Greg

    2013-07-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography has been extensively used in the evaluation and management of patients with cerebrovascular disease since the clinical application was first described in 1982 by Aaslid and colleagues TCD is a painless, safe, and noninvasive diagnostic technique that measures blood flow velocity in various cerebral arteries. Numerous commercially available TCD devices are currently approved for use worldwide, and TCD is recognized to have an established clinical value for a variety of clinical indications and settings. Although many studies have reported normal values, there have been few recently, and none to include a large cohort of healthy subjects across age, race, and gender. As more objective, automated processes are being developed to assist with the performance and interpretation of TCD studies, and with the potential to easily compare results against a reference population, it is important to define stable normal values and variances across age, race, and gender, with clear understanding of variability of the measurements, as well as the yield from various anatomic segments. To define normal TCD values in a healthy population, we enrolled 364 healthy subjects, ages 18-80 years, to have a complete, nonimaging TCD examination. Subjects with known or suspected cerebrovascular disorders, systemic disorders with cerebrovascular effects, as well as those with known hypertension, diabetes, stroke, coronary artery disease, or myocardial infarction, were excluded. Self-reported ethnicity, handedness, BP, and BMI were recorded. A complete TCD examination was performed by a single experienced sonographer, using a single gate nonimaging TCD device, and a standardized protocol to interrogate up to 23 arterial segments. Individual Doppler spectra were saved for each segment, with velocity and pulsatility index (PI) values calculated using the instrument's automated waveform tracking function. Descriptive analysis was done to determine the mean

  14. Transcranial Doppler for detection of cerebral ischaemia during carotid endarterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L G; Schroeder, T V

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) for the detection of cerebral ischaemia during carotid endarterectomy in 30 male and 14 female patients with ipsilateral focal cerebro-vascular symptoms. Surgery was performed during halothane-nitrous oxide anaesthesia with moderate hypocapnia...

  15. Transcranial direct current stimulation enhances propulsion during walking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asseldonk, Edwin H.F.; Jensen, W.; Andersen, O.K.; Akay, M

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been shown to improve force generation and control in single leg joints in healthy subjects and stroke survivors. However, it is unknown whether these effects also result in improved force production and coordination during walking. Here we

  16. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of pathological gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Oded; Klein, Limor Dinur; Dannon, Pinhas N

    2013-03-30

    Five pathological gamblers received deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (DTMS). Evaluations included rating scales and collateral anamnesis. Despite initial improvement in ratings, collateral anamnesis demonstrated failure to respond. DTMS to the pre-frontal cortex using an H1 coil was an ineffective treatment. Our study is preliminary, and additional studies are required. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Language Lateralization in Children Using Functional Transcranial Doppler Sonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Anja; Moeller, Nicola; Knake, Susanne; Hermsen, Anke; Oertel, Wolfgang H.; Rosenow, Felix; Hamer, Hajo M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Language lateralization with functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) and lexical word generation has been shown to have high concordance with the Wada test and functional magnetic resonance imaging in adults. We evaluated a nonlexical paradigm to determine language dominance in children. Method: In 23 right-handed children (12…

  18. Use of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberman, Lindsay M.; Rotenberg, Alexander; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The clinical, social and financial burden of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is staggering. We urgently need valid and reliable biomarkers for diagnosis and effective treatments targeting the often debilitating symptoms. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is beginning to be used by a number of centers worldwide and may represent a novel…

  19. Transcranial magnetic stimulation potentiates glutamatergic neurotransmission in depressed adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croarkin, Paul E; Nakonezny, Paul A; Wall, Christopher A; Murphy, Lauren L; Sampson, Shirlene M; Frye, Mark A; Port, John D

    2016-01-30

    Abnormalities in glutamate neurotransmission may have a role in the pathophysiology of adolescent depression. The present pilot study examined changes in cortical glutamine/glutamate ratios in depressed adolescents receiving high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Ten adolescents with treatment-refractory major depressive disorder received up to 30 sessions of 10-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation at 120% motor threshold with 3000 pulses per session applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Baseline, posttreatment, and 6-month follow-up proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy scans of the anterior cingulate cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex were collected at 3T with 8-cm(3) voxels. Glutamate metabolites were quantified with 2 distinct proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy sequences in each brain region. After repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and at 6 months of follow-up, glutamine/glutamate ratios increased in the anterior cingulate cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex with both measurements. The increase in the glutamine/glutamate ratio reached statistical significance with the TE-optimized PRESS sequence in the anterior cingulate cortex. Glutamine/glutamate ratios increased in conjunction with depressive symptom improvement. This reached statistical significance with the TE-optimized PRESS sequence in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex may modulate glutamate neurochemistry in depressed adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of combined treatment with transcranial direct current stimulation on cerebral blood flow in patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Yatsenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a close link between the activity of the brain and cerebral blood supply. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS modulates the activity of the cerebral cortex and thus affects the cerebral blood flow. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of combined treatment with tDCS on cerebral blood flow in patients with cerebral palsy (CP. Materials and Methods. 60 patients with various forms of cerebral palsy were examined and received the course of treatment. The comparison group was formed from 30 children who received the course of basic medical and rehabilitation procedures. The main group included 30 children who, in addition to the same therapy, received a course of tDCS. A transcranial Doppler ultrasound examination of head blood vessels was used for the study of cerebral hemodynamics in children with cerebral palsy before and after combined treatment with tDCS. Results. tDCS reduced asymmetry coefficient of blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries (MCA by 12.3 %, whereas in the comparison group only by 2.5 %; in the anterior cerebral artery (ACA – 9.5 %, while in the comparison group – 0.8 %. tDCS significantly reduced the high mean blood flow velocity per cycle (MFV in the basilar artery (BA, MCA and ACA (21.7 %, 18.3 % and 7.8 %, respectively; in the comparison group no statistically significant positive dynamics was observed. tDCS significantly increased the low MVF in the BA, MCA and ACA (29.7 %, 21.2 % and 9.7 % respectively; a statistically significant increase of MVF by 9.9 % was only in the CMA in the comparison group of patients. Conclusions. Our data indicate that the use of tDCS in the combined treatment of CP patients improves cerebral hemodynamics in 87 % of patients, in contrast to 52 % in the comparison group. The addition of transcranial direct current stimulation method to the complex treatment of patients with cerebral palsy improves the effectiveness of treatment and may also

  1. Is transcranial direct current stimulation a potential method for improving response inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Kwon, Jung Won

    2013-04-15

    Inhibitory control of movement in motor learning requires the ability to suppress an inappropriate action, a skill needed to stop a planned or ongoing motor response in response to changes in a variety of environments. This study used a stop-signal task to determine whether transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area alters the reaction time in motor inhibition. Forty healthy subjects were recruited for this study and were randomly assigned to either the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition or a sham-transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. All subjects consecutively performed the stop-signal task before, during, and after the delivery of anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation over the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, transcranial direct-current stimulation phase, and post-transcranial direct-current stimulation phase). Compared to the sham condition, there were significant reductions in the stop-signal processing times during and after transcranial direct-current stimulation, and change times were significantly greater in the transcranial direct-current stimulation condition. There was no significant change in go processing-times during or after transcranial direct-current stimulation in either condition. Anodal transcranial direct-current stimulation was feasibly coupled to an interactive improvement in inhibitory control. This coupling led to a decrease in the stop-signal process time required for the appropriate responses between motor execution and inhibition. However, there was no transcranial direct-current stimulation effect on the no-signal reaction time during the stop-signal task. Transcranial direct-current stimulation can adjust certain behaviors, and it could be a useful clinical intervention for patients who have difficulties with response inhibition.

  2. Non-invasive neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, William J.; Sanguinetti, Joseph L.; Fini, Maria; Hool, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Neurotechnologies for non-invasively interfacing with neural circuits have been evolving from those capable of sensing neural activity to those capable of restoring and enhancing human brain function. Generally referred to as non-invasive neural stimulation (NINS) methods, these neuromodulation approaches rely on electrical, magnetic, photonic, and acoustic or ultrasonic energy to influence nervous system activity, brain function, and behavior. Evidence that has been surmounting for decades shows that advanced neural engineering of NINS technologies will indeed transform the way humans treat diseases, interact with information, communicate, and learn. The physics underlying the ability of various NINS methods to modulate nervous system activity can be quite different from one another depending on the energy modality used as we briefly discuss. For members of commercial and defense industry sectors that have not traditionally engaged in neuroscience research and development, the science, engineering and technology required to advance NINS methods beyond the state-of-the-art presents tremendous opportunities. Within the past few years alone there have been large increases in global investments made by federal agencies, foundations, private investors and multinational corporations to develop advanced applications of NINS technologies. Driven by these efforts NINS methods and devices have recently been introduced to mass markets via the consumer electronics industry. Further, NINS continues to be explored in a growing number of defense applications focused on enhancing human dimensions. The present paper provides a brief introduction to the field of non-invasive neural stimulation by highlighting some of the more common methods in use or under current development today.

  3. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T [Research Imaging Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2009-06-21

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  4. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T

    2009-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and aging: Effects on spatial learning and memory after sleep deprivation in Octodon degus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, C; Fernández-Gómez, F J; López, D; Gonzalez-Cuello, A; Tunez, I; Toledo, F; Blin, O; Bordet, R; Richardson, J C; Fernandez-Villalba, E; Herrero, M T

    2015-11-01

    The benefits of neuromodulatory procedures as a possible therapeutic application for cognitive rehabilitation have increased with the progress made in non-invasive modes of brain stimulation in aged-related disorders. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive method used to examine multiple facets of the human brain and to ameliorate the impairment in cognition caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was designed to evaluate how a chronic TMS treatment could improve learning and memory functions after sleep deprivation (SD) in old Octodon degus. SD was executed by gently handling to keep the animals awake throughout the night. Thirty young and twenty-four old O. degus females were divided in six groups (control, acute and chronic TMS treatment). Behavioral tests included; Radial Arm Maze (RAM), Barnes Maze (BM) and Novel Object Recognition (NOR). Although learning and memory functions improved in young animals with only one session of TMS treatment, a significant improvement in cognitive performance was seen in old animals after 4 and 7days of TMS, depending on the task that was performed. No side effects were observed following, which showed therapeutic potential for improving age-related cognitive performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, F. S.; Lancaster, J. L.; Fox, P. T.

    2009-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  7. Noninvasive Test Detects Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA-developed Video Imaging Communication and Retrieval (VICAR) software laid the groundwork for analyzing images of all kinds. A project seeking to use imaging technology for health care diagnosis began when the imaging team considered using the VICAR software to analyze X-ray images of soft tissue. With marginal success using X-rays, the team applied the same methodology to ultrasound imagery, which was already digitally formatted. The new approach proved successful for assessing amounts of plaque build-up and arterial wall thickness, direct predictors of heart disease, and the result was a noninvasive diagnostic system with the ability to accurately predict heart health. Medical Technologies International Inc. (MTI) further developed and then submitted the technology to a vigorous review process at the FDA, which cleared the software for public use. The software, patented under the name Prowin, is being used in MTI's patented ArterioVision, a carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) test that uses ultrasound image-capturing and analysis software to noninvasively identify the risk for the major cause of heart attack and strokes: atherosclerosis. ArterioVision provides a direct measurement of atherosclerosis by safely and painlessly measuring the thickness of the first two layers of the carotid artery wall using an ultrasound procedure and advanced image-analysis software. The technology is now in use in all 50 states and in many countries throughout the world.

  8. Middle cerebral artery vasospasm: transcranial color-coded duplex sonography versus conventional nonimaging transcranial Doppler sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiat, Maciej; Weigele, John; Hurst, Robert W; Kasner, Scott E; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Arkuszewski, Michal; Al-Okaili, Riyadh N; Swiercz, Miroslaw; Ustymowicz, Andrzej; Opala, Grzegorz; Melhem, Elias R; Krejza, Jaroslaw

    2009-03-01

    To prospectively compare accuracies of transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (TCCS) and transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) in the diagnosis of middle cerebral artery (MCA) vasospasm. Prospective blinded head-to-head comparison TCD and TCCS methods using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference standard. Department of Radiology in a tertiary university health center in a metropolitan area. Eighty-one consecutive patients (mean age, 53.9 +/- 13.9 years; 48 women). The indication for DSA was subarachnoid hemorrhage in 71 patients (87.6%), stroke or transient ischemic attack in five patients (6.2%), and other reasons in five patients (6.2%). The MCA was graded as normal, narrowed 50% using DSA. The accuracy of ultrasound methods was estimated by total area (Az) under receiver operator characteristic curve. To compare sensitivities of ultrasound methods, McNemar's test was used with mean velocity thresholds of 120 cm/sec for the detection of less advanced, and 200 cm/sec for the more advanced MCA narrowing. Angiographic MCA narrowing 50% in 10 of 135 arteries. Accuracy of TCCS was insignificantly higher than that of TCD in the detection of 50% narrowing, total Az for mean velocity being 0.83 +/- 0.05, 0.77 +/- 0.05, and 0.95 +/- 0.02, 0.86 +/- 0.08, respectively. Sensitivity of TCCS at commonly used threshold of 120 cm/sec for less advanced MCA spasm was significantly better than that of TCD at similar specificity, 55% vs. 39%, p = 0.038, whereas at a threshold of 200 cm/sec used for more advanced spasm, sensitivities and specificities of both methods were not different. The accuracy of TCCS and TCD is similar, but TCCS is more sensitive than TCD in the detection of MCA spasm. Sensitivity of both techniques in the detection of mild and more advanced spasm using 120 cm/sec and 200 cm/sec thresholds, respectively, is poor; however, a larger sample is required to increase precision of our sensitivity estimates.

  9. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) for idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Bernhard; Kugler, Joachim; Pohl, Marcus; Mehrholz, Jan

    2016-07-18

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, with the severity of the disability usually increasing with disease duration. IPD affects patients' health-related quality of life, disability, and impairment. Current rehabilitation approaches have limited effectiveness in improving outcomes in patients with IPD, but a possible adjunct to rehabilitation might be non-invasive brain stimulation by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to modulate cortical excitability, and hence to improve these outcomes in IPD. To assess the effectiveness of tDCS in improving motor and non-motor symptoms in people with IPD. We searched the following databases (until February 2016): the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; the Cochrane Library ; 2016 , Issue 2), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, Science Citation Index, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), Rehabdata, and Inspec. In an effort to identify further published, unpublished, and ongoing trials, we searched trial registers and reference lists, handsearched conference proceedings, and contacted authors and equipment manufacturers. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and randomised controlled cross-over trials that compared tDCS versus control in patients with IPD for improving health-related quality of life , disability, and impairment. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality (JM and MP) and extracted data (BE and JM). If necessary, we contacted study authors to ask for additional information. We collected information on dropouts and adverse events from the trial reports. We included six trials with a total of 137 participants. We found two studies with 45 participants examining the effects of tDCS compared to control (sham tDCS) on our primary outcome measure, impairment, as measured by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). There was very low quality evidence for no effect of tDCS on change in global UPDRS score ( mean

  10. Stroke rehabilitation using noninvasive cortical stimulation: aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylius, Veit; Zouari, Hela G; Ayache, Samar S; Farhat, Wassim H; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2012-08-01

    Poststroke aphasia results from the lesion of cortical areas involved in the motor production of speech (Broca's aphasia) or in the semantic aspects of language comprehension (Wernicke's aphasia). Such lesions produce an important reorganization of speech/language-specific brain networks due to an imbalance between cortical facilitation and inhibition. In fact, functional recovery is associated with changes in the excitability of the damaged neural structures and their connections. Two main mechanisms are involved in poststroke aphasia recovery: the recruitment of perilesional regions of the left hemisphere in case of small lesion and the acquisition of language processing ability in homotopic areas of the nondominant right hemisphere when left hemispheric language abilities are permanently lost. There is some evidence that noninvasive cortical stimulation, especially when combined with language therapy or other therapeutic approaches, can promote aphasia recovery. Cortical stimulation was mainly used to either increase perilesional excitability or reduce contralesional activity based on the concept of reciprocal inhibition and maladaptive plasticity. However, recent studies also showed some positive effects of the reinforcement of neural activities in the contralateral right hemisphere, based on the potential compensatory role of the nondominant hemisphere in stroke recovery.

  11. Onsite-effects of dual-hemisphere versus conventional single-hemisphere transcranial direct current stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Jang, Sung Ho

    2012-01-01

    We performed functional MRI examinations in six right-handed healthy subjects. During functional MRI scanning, transcranial direct current stimulation was delivered with the anode over the right primary sensorimotor cortex and the cathode over the left primary sensorimotor cortex using dual-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation. This was compared to a cathode over the left supraorbital area using conventional single-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation. Voxel coun...

  12. Priming With 1-Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over Contralesional Leg Motor Cortex Does Not Increase the Rate of Regaining Ambulation Within 3 Months of Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Zu; Lin, Li-Fong; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lin, Yen-Nung

    2018-05-01

    The potential benefits of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), applied either alone or as a combination treatment, on recovery of lower limbs after stroke have been insufficiently studied. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of priming with 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over contralesional leg motor area with a double-cone coil before physical therapy on regaining ambulation. Thirty-eight subacute stroke patients with significant leg disabilities were randomly assigned into the experimental group or control group to receive a 15-min real or sham 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, respectively, over the contralesional motor cortex representing the quadriceps muscle followed by 45-min physical therapy for 15 sessions for 3 wks. Functional measures, motor evoked potentials, and quality of life were assessed. There was no significant difference between experimental group and control group regarding the recovery in ambulation, balance, motor functions, and activity of daily living. No significant difference was found in other functional measures and the quality of life. Only the control group displayed significantly increased cortical excitability of the contralesional hemisphere after the intervention. The present study found that insufficient evidence that contralesional priming with 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation improves ambulatory and other motor functions among patients with a severe leg dysfunction in subacute stroke.

  13. Determination of stimulation focality in heterogeneous head models during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erik; Hadimani, Ravi; Jiles, David

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is an increasingly popular tool used by both the scientific and medical community to understand and treat the brain. TMS has the potential to help people with a wide range of diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and PTSD, while currently being used to treat people with chronic, drug-resistant depression. Through computer simulations, we are able to see the electric field that TMS induces in anatomical human models, but there is no measure to quantify this electric field in a way that relates to a specific patient undergoing TMS therapy. We propose a way to quantify the focality of the induced electric field in a heterogeneous head model during TMS by relating the surface area of the brain being stimulated to the total volume of the brain being stimulated. This figure would be obtained by conducting finite element analysis (FEA) simulations of TMS therapy on a patient specific head model. Using this figure to assist in TMS therapy will allow clinicians and researchers to more accurately stimulate the desired region of a patient's brain and be more equipped to do comparative studies on the effects of TMS across different patients. This work was funded by the Carver Charitable Trust.

  14. Transcranial diffuse optical monitoring of microvascular cerebral hemodynamics after thrombolysis in ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, Peyman; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Dinia, Lavinia; Carrera, David; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Durduran, Turgut

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate goal of therapeutic strategies for ischemic stroke is to reestablish the blood flow to the ischemic region of the brain. However, currently, the local cerebral hemodynamics (microvascular) is almost entirely inaccessible for stroke clinicians at the patient bed-side, and the recanalization of the major cerebral arteries (macrovascular) is the only available measure to evaluate the therapy, which does not always reflect the local conditions. Here we report the case of an ischemic stroke patient whose microvascular cerebral blood flow and oxygenation were monitored by a compact hybrid diffuse optical monitor during thrombolytic therapy. This monitor combined diffuse correlation spectroscopy and near-infrared spectroscopy. The reperfusion assessed by hybrid diffuse optics temporally correlated with the recanalization of the middle cerebral artery (assessed by transcranial-Doppler) and was in agreement with the patient outcome. This study suggests that upon further investigation, diffuse optics might have a potential for bed-side acute stroke monitoring and therapy guidance by providing hemodynamics information at the microvascular level.

  15. Transcranial Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniley Martínez González

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and, since it is associated with aging, the probability of developing this disease increases with age. The diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease is based on clinical criteria; however, its differentiation from other forms of Parkinsonism can be difficult, especially in early stages of the disease. Transcranial ultrasound has become a tool for the diagnosis of this disorder, being very useful for its early diagnosis. Ultrasonographic findings characteristic of this disease include increased echogenicity of the substantia nigra in the midbrain measured through the temporal bone window. This paper discusses the usefulness of transcranial ultrasound for early diagnosis of patients with Parkinson's disease.

  16. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicak, Philip G; Dokucu, Mehmet E

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Even when the diagnosis is properly made, standard treatment approaches (eg, psychotherapy, medications, or their combination) are often inadequate to control acute symptoms or maintain initial benefit. Additional obstacles involve safety and tolerability problems, which frequently preclude an adequate course of treatment. This leaves an important gap in our ability to properly manage major depression in a substantial proportion of patients, leaving them vulnerable to ensuing complications (eg, employment-related disability, increased risk of suicide, comorbid medical disorders, and substance abuse). Thus, there is a need for more effective and better tolerated approaches. Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a neuromodulation technique increasingly used to partly fill this therapeutic void. In the context of treating depression, we critically review the development of transcranial magnetic stimulation, focusing on the results of controlled and pragmatic trials for depression, which consider its efficacy, safety, and tolerability. PMID:26170668

  17. Effects of Navigated Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervyakov, Alexander V; Poydasheva, Alexandra G; Lyukmanov, Roman H; Suponeva, Natalia A; Chernikova, Ludmila A; Piradov, Michael A; Ustinova, Ksenia I

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the effects of navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, delivered in different modes, on motor impairments and functional limitations after stroke. The study sample included 42 patients (58.5 ± 10.7 years; 26 males) who experienced a single unilateral stroke (1-12 months previously) in the area of the middle cerebral artery. Patients completed a course of conventional rehabilitation, together with 10 sessions of navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or sham stimulation. Stimulation was scheduled five times a week over two consecutive weeks in an inpatient clinical setting. Patients were randomly assigned to one of four groups and received sham stimulation (n = 10), low-frequency (1-Hz) stimulation of the nonaffected hemisphere (n = 11), high-frequency (10-Hz) stimulation of the affected hemisphere (n = 13), or sequential combination of low- and high-frequency stimulations (n = 8). Participants were evaluated before and after stimulation with clinical tests, including the arm and hand section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale, modified Ashworth Scale of Muscle Spasticity, and Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living. Participants in the three groups receiving navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation showed improvements in arm and hand functions on the Fugl-Meyer Stroke Assessment Scale. Ashworth Scale of Muscle Spasticity and Barthel Index scores were significantly reduced in groups receiving low- or high-frequency stimulation alone. Including navigated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in a conventional rehabilitation program positively influenced motor and functional recovery in study participants, demonstrating the clinical potential of the method. The results of this study will be used for designing a large-scale clinical trial.

  18. Transcranial Route of Brain Targeted Delivery of Methadone in Oil

    OpenAIRE

    Pathirana, W.; Abhayawardhana, P.; Kariyawasam, H.; Ratnasooriya, W. D.

    2009-01-01

    The unique anatomical arrangement of blood vessels and sinuses in the human skull and the brain, the prevalence of a high density of skin appendages in the scalp, extracranial vessels of the scalp communicating with the brain via emissary veins and most importantly, the way that the scalp is used in Ayurvedic medical system in treating diseases associated with the brain show that a drug could be transcranially delivered and targeted to the brain through the scalp. The present study was to inv...

  19. Transcranial extracellular impedance control (tEIC modulates behavioral performances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumu Matani

    Full Text Available Electric brain stimulations such as transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS, and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS electrophysiologically modulate brain activity and as a result sometimes modulate behavioral performances. These stimulations can be viewed from an engineering standpoint as involving an artificial electric source (DC, noise, or AC attached to an impedance branch of a distributed parameter circuit. The distributed parameter circuit is an approximation of the brain and includes electric sources (neurons and impedances (volume conductors. Such a brain model is linear, as is often the case with the electroencephalogram (EEG forward model. Thus, the above-mentioned current stimulations change the current distribution in the brain depending on the locations of the electric sources in the brain. Now, if the attached artificial electric source were to be replaced with a resistor, or even a negative resistor, the resistor would also change the current distribution in the brain. In light of the superposition theorem, which holds for any linear electric circuit, attaching an electric source is different from attaching a resistor; the resistor affects each active electric source in the brain so as to increase (or decrease in some cases of a negative resistor the current flowing out from each source. From an electrophysiological standpoint, the attached resistor can only control the extracellular impedance and never causes forced stimulation; we call this technique transcranial extracellular impedance control (tEIC. We conducted a behavioral experiment to evaluate tEIC and found evidence that it had real-time enhancement and depression effects on EEGs and a real-time facilitation effect on reaction times. Thus, tEIC could be another technique to modulate behavioral performance.

  20. Promoting Sleep Oscillations and Their Functional Coupling by Transcranial Stimulation Enhances Memory Consolidation in Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladenbauer, Julia; Ladenbauer, Josef; Külzow, Nadine; de Boor, Rebecca; Avramova, Elena; Grittner, Ulrike; Flöel, Agnes

    2017-07-26

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) not only involves loss of memory functions, but also prominent deterioration of sleep physiology, which is already evident at the stage of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Cortical slow oscillations (SO; 0.5-1 Hz) and thalamocortical spindle activity (12-15 Hz) during sleep, and their temporal coordination, are considered critical for memory formation. We investigated the potential of slow oscillatory transcranial direct current stimulation (so-tDCS), applied during a daytime nap in a sleep-state-dependent manner, to modulate these activity patterns and sleep-related memory consolidation in nine male and seven female human patients with MCI. Stimulation significantly increased overall SO and spindle power, amplified spindle power during SO up-phases, and led to stronger synchronization between SO and spindle power fluctuations in EEG recordings. Moreover, visual declarative memory was improved by so-tDCS compared with sham stimulation and was associated with stronger synchronization. These findings indicate a well-tolerated therapeutic approach for disordered sleep physiology and memory deficits in MCI patients and advance our understanding of offline memory consolidation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the light of increasing evidence that sleep disruption is crucially involved in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD), sleep appears as a promising treatment target in this pathology, particularly to counteract memory decline. This study demonstrates the potential of a noninvasive brain stimulation method during sleep in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a precursor of AD, and advances our understanding of its mechanism. We provide first time evidence that slow oscillatory transcranial stimulation amplifies the functional cross-frequency coupling between memory-relevant brain oscillations and improves visual memory consolidation in patients with MCI. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/377111-14$15.00/0.

  1. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation to the cerebellum improves handwriting and cyclic drawing kinematics in focal hand dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradnam, Lynley V; Graetz, Lynton J; McDonnell, Michelle N; Ridding, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the cerebellum has a role in the pathophysiology of primary focal hand dystonia and might provide an intervention target for non-invasive brain stimulation to improve function of the affected hand. The primary objective of this study was to determine if cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) improves handwriting and cyclic drawing kinematics in people with hand dystonia, by reducing cerebellar-brain inhibition (CBI) evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Eight people with dystonia (5 writer's dystonia, 3 musician's dystonia) and eight age-matched controls completed the study and underwent cerebellar anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS in separate sessions. Dystonia severity was assessed using the Writer's Cramp Rating Scale (WRCS) and the Arm Dystonia Disability Scale (ADDS). The kinematic measures that differentiated the groups were; mean stroke frequency during handwriting and fast cyclic drawing and average pen pressure during light cyclic drawing. TMS measures of cortical excitability were no different between people with FHD and controls. There was a moderate, negative relationship between TMS-evoked CBI at baseline and the WRCS in dystonia. Anodal cerebellar tDCS reduced handwriting mean stroke frequency and average pen pressure, and increased speed and reduced pen pressure during fast cyclic drawing. Kinematic measures were not associated with a decrease in CBI within an individual. In conclusion, cerebellar anodal tDCS appeared to improve kinematics of handwriting and circle drawing tasks; but the underlying neurophysiological mechanism remains uncertain. A study in a larger homogeneous population is needed to further investigate the possible therapeutic benefit of cerebellar tDCS in dystonia.

  2. Modulating phonemic fluency performance in healthy subjects with transcranial magnetic stimulation over the left or right lateral frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirni, Daniela; Turriziani, Patrizia; Mangano, Giuseppa Renata; Bracco, Martina; Oliveri, Massimiliano; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2017-07-28

    A growing body of evidence have suggested that non-invasive brain stimulation techniques, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), can improve the performance of aphasic patients in language tasks. For example, application of inhibitory rTMS or tDCs over the right frontal lobe of dysphasic patients resulted in improved naming abilities. Several studies have also reported that in healthy controls (HC) tDCS application over the left prefrontal cortex (PFC) improve performance in naming and semantic fluency tasks. The aim of this study was to investigate in HC, for the first time, the effects of inhibitory repetitive TMS (rTMS) over left and right lateral frontal cortex (BA 47) on two phonemic fluency tasks (FAS or FPL). 44 right-handed HCs were administered rTMS or sham over the left or right lateral frontal cortex in two separate testing sessions, with a 24h interval, followed by the two phonemic fluency tasks. To account for possible practice effects, an additional 22 HCs were tested on only the phonemic fluency task across two sessions with no stimulation. We found that rTMS-inhibition over the left lateral frontal cortex significantly worsened phonemic fluency performance when compared to sham. In contrast, rTMS-inhibition over the right lateral frontal cortex significantly improved phonemic fluency performance when compared to sham. These results were not accounted for practice effects. We speculated that rTMS over the right lateral frontal cortex may induce plastic neural changes to the left lateral frontal cortex by suppressing interhemispheric inhibitory interactions. This resulted in an increased excitability (disinhibition) of the contralateral unstimulated left lateral frontal cortex, consequently enhancing phonemic fluency performance. Conversely, application of rTMS over the left lateral frontal cortex may induce a temporary, virtual lesion, with effects similar to those reported in left frontal

  3. Modelling noninvasively measured cerebral signals during a hypoxemia challenge: steps towards individualised modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth Jelfs

    Full Text Available Noninvasive approaches to measuring cerebral circulation and metabolism are crucial to furthering our understanding of brain function. These approaches also have considerable potential for clinical use "at the bedside". However, a highly nontrivial task and precondition if such methods are to be used routinely is the robust physiological interpretation of the data. In this paper, we explore the ability of a previously developed model of brain circulation and metabolism to explain and predict quantitatively the responses of physiological signals. The five signals all noninvasively-measured during hypoxemia in healthy volunteers include four signals measured using near-infrared spectroscopy along with middle cerebral artery blood flow measured using transcranial Doppler flowmetry. We show that optimising the model using partial data from an individual can increase its predictive power thus aiding the interpretation of NIRS signals in individuals. At the same time such optimisation can also help refine model parametrisation and provide confidence intervals on model parameters. Discrepancies between model and data which persist despite model optimisation are used to flag up important questions concerning the underlying physiology, and the reliability and physiological meaning of the signals.

  4. A noninvasive estimation of cerebral perfusion pressure using critical closing pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsos, Georgios V; Kolias, Angelos G; Smielewski, Peter; Brady, Ken M; Varsos, Vassilis G; Hutchinson, Peter J; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral blood flow is associated with cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which is clinically monitored through arterial blood pressure (ABP) and invasive measurements of intracranial pressure (ICP). Based on critical closing pressure (CrCP), the authors introduce a novel method for a noninvasive estimator of CPP (eCPP). Data from 280 head-injured patients with ABP, ICP, and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography measurements were retrospectively examined. CrCP was calculated with a noninvasive version of the cerebrovascular impedance method. The eCPP was refined with a predictive regression model of CrCP-based estimation of ICP from known ICP using data from 232 patients, and validated with data from the remaining 48 patients. Cohort analysis showed eCPP to be correlated with measured CPP (R = 0.851, p area under the curve of 0.913 (95% CI 0.883-0.944). When each recording session of a patient was assessed individually, eCPP could predict CPP with a 95% CI of the SD for estimating CPP between multiple recording sessions of 1.89-5.01 mm Hg. Overall, CrCP-based eCPP was strongly correlated with invasive CPP, with sensitivity and specificity for detection of low CPP that show promise for clinical use.

  5. Non-invasive techniques for determining musculoskeleton body composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation analysis, combined with gamma spectrometry, has ushered in a new era of clinical diagnosis and evaluation of therapies, as well as investigation into and modelling of body composition in both normal individuals and patients suffering from various diseases and dysfunctions. Body composition studies have provided baseline data on such vital constituents as nitrogen, potassium and calcium. The non-invasive measurement techniques are particularly suitable for study of the musculo-skeletal changes in body composition. Of particular relevance here is the measurement of calcium loss in astronauts during prolonged space flights

  6. Onsite-effects of dual-hemisphere versus conventional single-hemisphere transcranial direct current stimulation: A functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Jang, Sung Ho

    2012-08-25

    We performed functional MRI examinations in six right-handed healthy subjects. During functional MRI scanning, transcranial direct current stimulation was delivered with the anode over the right primary sensorimotor cortex and the cathode over the left primary sensorimotor cortex using dual-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation. This was compared to a cathode over the left supraorbital area using conventional single-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation. Voxel counts and blood oxygenation level-dependent signal intensities in the right primary sensorimotor cortex regions were estimated and compared between the two transcranial direct current stimulation conditions. Our results showed that dual-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation induced greater cortical activities than single-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation. These findings suggest that dual-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation may provide more effective cortical stimulation than single-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation.

  7. Non-Invasive Transcranial Doppler Sonogram Device for Detection of Embolic Air in Cerebral Arteries, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Technology is needed to provide real-time assessment and evaluation of hematological parameters during prolong space flights and planetary missions. A key...

  8. Probing phase- and frequency-dependent characteristics of cortical interneurons using combined transcranial alternating current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Sara J; Thirugnanasambandam, Nivethida

    2017-06-01

    Paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and peripheral stimulation combined with TMS can be used to study cortical interneuronal circuitry. By combining these procedures with concurrent transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), Guerra and colleagues recently showed that different cortical interneuronal populations are differentially modulated by the phase and frequency of tACS-imposed oscillations (Guerra A, Pogosyan A, Nowak M, Tan H, Ferreri F, Di Lazzaro V, Brown P. Cerebral Cortex 26: 3977-2990, 2016). This work suggests that different cortical interneuronal populations can be characterized by their phase and frequency dependency. Here we discuss how combining TMS and tACS can reveal the frequency at which cortical interneuronal populations oscillate, the neuronal origins of behaviorally relevant cortical oscillations, and how entraining cortical oscillations could potentially treat brain disorders. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Non-Invasive Radiofrequency-Induced Targeted Hyperthermia for the Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Raoof

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted biological therapies for hepatocellular cancer have shown minimal improvements in median survival. Multiple pathways to oncogenesis leading to rapid development of resistance to such therapies is a concern. Non-invasive radiofrequency field-induced targeted hyperthermia using nanoparticles is a radical departure from conventional modalities. In this paper we underscore the need for innovative strategies for the treatment of hepatocellular cancer, describe the central paradigm of targeted hyperthermia using non-invasive electromagnetic energy, review the process of characterization and modification of nanoparticles for the task, and summarize data from cell-based and animal-based models of hepatocellular cancer treated with non-invasive RF energy. Finally, future strategies and challenges in bringing this modality from bench to clinic are discussed.

  10. Enhancement of Cortical Excitability and Lower Limb Motor Function in Patients With Stroke by Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Min Cheol; Kim, Dae Yul; Park, Dae Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Motor dysfunction in the lower limbs is a common sequela in stroke patients. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to determine if applying transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to the primary motor cortex helps enhance cortical excitability. Furthermore, we evaluate if combination anodal tDCS and conventional physical therapy improves motor function in the lower limbs. Twenty-four patients with early-stage stroke were randomly assigned to 2 groups: 1) the tDCS group, in which patients received 10 sessions of anodal tDCS and conventional physical therapy; and 2) the sham group, in which patients received 10 sessions of sham stimulation and conventional physical therapy. One day before and after intervention, the motor-evoked potential (MEP) of the affected tibialis anterior muscle was evaluated and motor function was assessed using the lower limb subscale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA-LE), lower limb Motricity Index (MI-LE), Functional Ambulatory Category (FAC), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and gait analysis. The MEPs in the tDCS group became shorter in latency and higher in amplitude after intervention in comparison with the sham group. Improvements in FMA-LE and MI-LE were greater in the tDCS group, but no significant differences in FAC or BBS scores were found. Also, the changes observed on the gait analyses did not significantly differ between the tDCS and sham groups. Combination anodal tDCS and conservative physical therapy appears to be a beneficial therapeutic modality for improving motor function in the lower limbs in patients with subacute stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for hallucination in schizophrenia spectrum disorders: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingli; Liang, Wei; Yang, Shichang; Dai, Ping; Shen, Lijuan; Wang, Changhong

    2013-10-05

    This study assessed the efficacy and tolerability of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of auditory hallucination of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Online literature retrieval was conducted using PubMed, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, Medline and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases from January 1985 to May 2012. Key words were "transcranial magnetic stimulation", "TMS", "repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation", and "hallucination". Selected studies were randomized controlled trials assessing therapeutic efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for hallucination in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Experimental intervention was low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in left temporoparietal cortex for treatment of auditory hallucination in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Control groups received sham stimulation. The primary outcome was total scores of Auditory Hallucinations Rating Scale, Auditory Hallucination Subscale of Psychotic Symptom Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Symptom Scale-Auditory Hallucination item, and Hallucination Change Scale. Secondary outcomes included response rate, global mental state, adverse effects and cognitive function. Seventeen studies addressing repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of schizophrenia spectrum disorders were screened, with controls receiving sham stimulation. All data were completely effective, involving 398 patients. Overall mean weighted effect size for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation versus sham stimulation was statistically significant (MD = -0.42, 95%CI: -0.64 to -0.20, P = 0.000 2). Patients receiving repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation responded more frequently than sham stimulation (OR = 2.94, 95%CI: 1.39 to 6.24, P = 0.005). No significant differences were found between active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and sham stimulation for

  12. On the relative merits of invasive and non-invasive pre-surgical brain mapping: New tools in ablative epilepsy surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, Andrew C; Rezaie, Roozbeh; Narayana, Shalini; Choudhri, Asim F; Abbas-Babajani-Feremi; Boop, Frederick A; Wheless, James W

    2018-05-01

    Cortical Stimulation Mapping (CSM) and the Wada procedure have long been considered the gold standard for localizing motor and language-related cortical areas and for determining the language and memory-dominant hemisphere, respectively. In recent years, however, non-invasive methods such as magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have emerged as promising alternatives to the aforementioned procedures, particularly in cases where the invasive localization of eloquent cortex has proven to be challenging. To illustrate this point, we will first introduce the evidence of the compatibility of invasive and non-invasive methods and subsequently outline the rationale and the conditions where the latter methods are applicable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Low-level light therapy of the eye and brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas JC

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Julio C Rojas1,2, F Gonzalez-Lima1 1Departments of Psychology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX; 2Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Abstract: Low-level light therapy (LLLT using red to near-infrared light energy has gained attention in recent years as a new scientific approach with therapeutic applications in ophthalmology, neurology, and psychiatry. The ongoing therapeutic revolution spearheaded by LLLT is largely propelled by progress in the basic science fields of photobiology and bioenergetics. This paper describes the mechanisms of action of LLLT at the molecular, cellular, and nervous tissue levels. Photoneuromodulation of cytochrome oxidase activity is the most important primary mechanism of action of LLLT. Cytochrome oxidase is the primary photoacceptor of light in the red to near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. It is also a key mitochondrial enzyme for cellular bioenergetics, especially for nerve cells in the retina and the brain. Evidence shows that LLLT can secondarily enhance neural metabolism by regulating mitochondrial function, intraneuronal signaling systems, and redox states. Current knowledge about LLLT dosimetry relevant for its hormetic effects on nervous tissue, including noninvasive in vivo retinal and transcranial effects, is also presented. Recent research is reviewed that supports LLLT potential benefits in retinal disease, stroke, neurotrauma, neurodegeneration, and memory and mood disorders. Since mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in neurodegeneration, LLLT has potential significant applications against retinal and brain damage by counteracting the consequences of mitochondrial failure. Upon transcranial delivery in vivo, LLLT induces brain metabolic and antioxidant beneficial effects, as measured by increases in cytochrome oxidase and superoxide dismutase activities. Increases

  14. Prefrontal transcranial direct current stimulation alters activation and connectivity in cortical and subcortical reward systems: a tDCS-fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Matthew J; Messing, Samuel B; Rao, Hengyi; Detre, John A; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L

    2014-08-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique used both experimentally and therapeutically to modulate regional brain function. However, few studies have directly measured the aftereffects of tDCS on brain activity or examined changes in task-related brain activity consequent to prefrontal tDCS. To investigate the neural effects of tDCS, we collected fMRI data from 22 human subjects, both at rest and while performing the Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART), before and after true or sham transcranial direct current stimulation. TDCS decreased resting blood perfusion in orbitofrontal cortex and the right caudate and increased task-related activity in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in response to losses but not wins or increasing risk. Network analysis showed that whole-brain connectivity of the right ACC correlated positively with the number of pumps subjects were willing to make on the BART, and that tDCS reduced connectivity between the right ACC and the rest of the brain. Whole-brain connectivity of the right DLPFC also correlated negatively with pumps on the BART, as prior literature would suggest. Our results suggest that tDCS can alter activation and connectivity in regions distal to the electrodes. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Home noninvasive ventilatory support for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : patient selection and perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storre, Jan Hendrik; Callegari, Jens; Magnet, Friederike Sophie; Schwarz, Sarah Bettina; Duiverman, Marieke Leontine; Wijkstra, Peter Jan; Windisch, Wolfram

    2018-01-01

    Long-term or home mechanical noninvasive ventilation (Home-NIV) has become a well-established form of therapy over the last few decades for chronic hypercapnic COPD patients in European countries. However, meta-analyses and clinical guidelines do not recommend Home-NIV for COPD patients on a routine

  16. Validity of bioluminescence measurements for noninvasive in vivo imaging of tumor load in small animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, Clara P. W.; Overmeer, Renée M.; Niers, Tatjana M. H.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Richel, Dick J.; Buckle, Tessa; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; van Tellingen, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    A relatively new strategy to longitudinally monitor tumor load in intact animals and the effects of therapy is noninvasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI). The validity of BLI for quantitative assessment of tumor load in small animals is critically evaluated in the present review. Cancer cells are

  17. Semantic Feature Training in Combination with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS for Progressive Anomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyi Hung

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effectiveness of a 2-week regimen of a semantic feature training in combination with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS for progressive naming impairment associated with primary progressive aphasia (N = 4 or early onset Alzheimer’s Disease (N = 1. Patients received a 2-week regimen (10 sessions of anodal tDCS delivered over the left temporoparietal cortex while completing a language therapy that consisted of repeated naming and semantic feature generation. Therapy targets consisted of familiar people, household items, clothes, foods, places, hygiene implements, and activities. Untrained items from each semantic category provided item level controls. We analyzed naming accuracies at multiple timepoints (i.e., pre-, post-, 6-month follow-up via a mixed effects logistic regression and individual differences in treatment responsiveness using a series of non-parametric McNemar tests. Patients showed advantages for naming trained over untrained items. These gains were evident immediately post tDCS. Trained items also showed a shallower rate of decline over 6-months relative to untrained items that showed continued progressive decline. Patients tolerated stimulation well, and sustained improvements in naming accuracy suggest that the current intervention approach is viable. Future implementation of a sham control condition will be crucial toward ascertaining whether neurostimulation and behavioral treatment act synergistically or alternatively whether treatment gains are exclusively attributable to either tDCS or the behavioral intervention.

  18. Measuring and manipulating brain connectivity with resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Michael D; Halko, Mark A; Eldaief, Mark C; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2012-10-01

    Both resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly popular techniques that can be used to non-invasively measure brain connectivity in human subjects. TMS shows additional promise as a method to manipulate brain connectivity. In this review we discuss how these two complimentary tools can be combined to optimally study brain connectivity and manipulate distributed brain networks. Important clinical applications include using resting state fcMRI to guide target selection for TMS and using TMS to modulate pathological network interactions identified with resting state fcMRI. The combination of TMS and resting state fcMRI has the potential to accelerate the translation of both techniques into the clinical realm and promises a new approach to the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases that demonstrate network pathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiday Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Causes Clinically Insignificant Changes in Childhood Dystonia: A Pilot Study.

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    Bhanpuri, Nasir H; Bertucco, Matteo; Young, Scott J; Lee, Annie A; Sanger, Terence D

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal motor cortex activity is common in dystonia. Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation may alter cortical activity by decreasing excitability while anodal stimulation may increase motor learning. Previous results showed that a single session of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation can improve symptoms in childhood dystonia. Here we performed a 5-day, sham-controlled, double-blind, crossover study, where we measured tracking and muscle overflow in a myocontrol-based task. We applied cathodal and anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (2 mA, 9 minutes per day). For cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (7 participants), 3 subjects showed improvements whereas 2 showed worsening in overflow or tracking error. The effect size was small (about 1% of maximum voluntary contraction) and not clinically meaningful. For anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (6 participants), none showed improvement, whereas 5 showed worsening. Thus, multiday cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation reduced symptoms in some children but not to a clinically meaningful extent, whereas anodal transcranial direct current stimulation worsened symptoms. Our results do not support transcranial direct current stimulation as clinically viable for treating childhood dystonia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Transcranial direct current stimulation of the posterior parietal cortex modulates arithmetic learning.

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    Grabner, Roland H; Rütsche, Bruno; Ruff, Christian C; Hauser, Tobias U

    2015-07-01

    The successful acquisition of arithmetic skills is an essential step in the development of mathematical competencies and has been associated with neural activity in the left posterior parietal cortex (PPC). It is unclear, however, whether this brain region plays a causal role in arithmetic skill acquisition and whether arithmetic learning can be modulated by means of non-invasive brain stimulation of this key region. In the present study we addressed these questions by applying transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the left PPC during a short-term training that simulates the typical path of arithmetic skill acquisition (specifically the transition from effortful procedural to memory-based problem-solving strategies). Sixty participants received either anodal, cathodal or sham tDCS while practising complex multiplication and subtraction problems. The stability of the stimulation-induced learning effects was assessed in a follow-up test 24 h after the training. Learning progress was modulated by tDCS. Cathodal tDCS (compared with sham) decreased learning rates during training and resulted in poorer performance which lasted over 24 h after stimulation. Anodal tDCS showed an operation-specific improvement for subtraction learning. Our findings extend previous studies by demonstrating that the left PPC is causally involved in arithmetic learning (and not only in arithmetic performance) and that even a short-term tDCS application can modulate the success of arithmetic knowledge acquisition. Moreover, our finding of operation-specific anodal stimulation effects suggests that the enhancing effects of tDCS on learning can selectively affect just one of several cognitive processes mediated by the stimulated area. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Transcranial direct current stimulation transiently increases the blood-brain barrier solute permeability in vivo

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    Shin, Da Wi; Khadka, Niranjan; Fan, Jie; Bikson, Marom; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2016-03-01

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive electrical stimulation technique investigated for a broad range of medical and performance indications. Whereas prior studies have focused exclusively on direct neuron polarization, our hypothesis is that tDCS directly modulates endothelial cells leading to transient changes in blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability (P) that are highly meaningful for neuronal activity. For this, we developed state-of-the-art imaging and animal models to quantify P to various sized solutes after tDCS treatment. tDCS was administered using a constant current stimulator to deliver a 1mA current to the right frontal cortex of rat (approximately 2 mm posterior to bregma and 2 mm right to sagittal suture) to obtain similar physiological outcome as that in the human tDCS application studies. Sodium fluorescein (MW=376), or FITC-dextrans (20K and 70K), in 1% BSA mammalian Ringer was injected into the rat (SD, 250-300g) cerebral circulation via the ipsilateral carotid artery by a syringe pump at a constant rate of ~3 ml/min. To determine P, multiphoton microscopy with 800-850 nm wavelength laser was applied to take the images from the region of interest (ROI) with proper microvessels, which are 100-200 micron below the pia mater. It shows that the relative increase in P is about 8-fold for small solute, sodium fluorescein, ~35-fold for both intermediate sized (Dex-20k) and large (Dex-70k) solutes, 10 min after 20 min tDCS pretreatment. All of the increased permeability returns to the control after 20 min post treatment. The results confirmed our hypothesis.

  2. Effects of Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Visually Guided Learning of Grip Force Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamas Minarik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Anodal transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS has been shown to be an effective non-invasive brain stimulation method for improving cognitive and motor functioning in patients with neurological deficits. tDCS over motor cortex (M1, for instance, facilitates motor learning in stroke patients. However, the literature on anodal tDCS effects on motor learning in healthy participants is inconclusive, and the effects of tDCS on visuo-motor integration are not well understood. In the present study we examined whether tDCS over the contralateral motor cortex enhances learning of grip-force output in a visually guided feedback task in young and neurologically healthy volunteers. Twenty minutes of 1 mA anodal tDCS were applied over the primary motor cortex (M1 contralateral to the dominant (right hand, during the first half of a 40 min power-grip task. This task required the control of a visual signal by modulating the strength of the power-grip for six seconds per trial. Each participant completed a two-session sham-controlled crossover protocol. The stimulation conditions were counterbalanced across participants and the sessions were one week apart. Performance measures comprised time-on-target and target-deviation, and were calculated for the periods of stimulation (or sham and during the afterphase respectively. Statistical analyses revealed significant performance improvements over the stimulation and the afterphase, but this learning effect was not modulated by tDCS condition. This suggests that the form of visuomotor learning taking place in the present task was not sensitive to neurostimulation. These null effects, together with similar reports for other types of motor tasks, lead to the proposition that tDCS facilitation of motor learning might be restricted to cases or situations where the motor system is challenged, such as motor deficits, advanced age, or very high task demand.

  3. A Fast EEG Forecasting Algorithm for Phase-Locked Transcranial Electrical Stimulation of the Human Brain

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    Farrokh Mansouri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of research suggests that non-invasive electrical brain stimulation can more effectively modulate neural activity when phase-locked to the underlying brain rhythms. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS can potentially stimulate the brain in-phase to its natural oscillations as recorded by electroencephalography (EEG, but matching these oscillations is a challenging problem due to the complex and time-varying nature of the EEG signals. Here we address this challenge by developing and testing a novel approach intended to deliver tACS phase-locked to the activity of the underlying brain region in real-time. This novel approach extracts phase and frequency from a segment of EEG, then forecasts the signal to control the stimulation. A careful tuning of the EEG segment length and prediction horizon is required and has been investigated here for different EEG frequency bands. The algorithm was tested on EEG data from 5 healthy volunteers. Algorithm performance was quantified in terms of phase-locking values across a variety of EEG frequency bands. Phase-locking performance was found to be consistent across individuals and recording locations. With current parameters, the algorithm performs best when tracking oscillations in the alpha band (8–13 Hz, with a phase-locking value of 0.77 ± 0.08. Performance was maximized when the frequency band of interest had a dominant frequency that was stable over time. The algorithm performs faster, and provides better phase-locked stimulation, compared to other recently published algorithms devised for this purpose. The algorithm is suitable for use in future studies of phase-locked tACS in preclinical and clinical applications.

  4. Effects of an NMDA antagonist on the auditory mismatch negativity response to transcranial direct current stimulation.

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    Impey, Danielle; de la Salle, Sara; Baddeley, Ashley; Knott, Verner

    2017-05-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive form of brain stimulation which uses a weak constant current to alter cortical excitability and activity temporarily. tDCS-induced increases in neuronal excitability and performance improvements have been observed following anodal stimulation of brain regions associated with visual and motor functions, but relatively little research has been conducted with respect to auditory processing. Recently, pilot study results indicate that anodal tDCS can increase auditory deviance detection, whereas cathodal tDCS decreases auditory processing, as measured by a brain-based event-related potential (ERP), mismatch negativity (MMN). As evidence has shown that tDCS lasting effects may be dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity, the current study investigated the use of dextromethorphan (DMO), an NMDA antagonist, to assess possible modulation of tDCS's effects on both MMN and working memory performance. The study, conducted in 12 healthy volunteers, involved four laboratory test sessions within a randomised, placebo and sham-controlled crossover design that compared pre- and post-anodal tDCS over the auditory cortex (2 mA for 20 minutes to excite cortical activity temporarily and locally) and sham stimulation (i.e. device is turned off) during both DMO (50 mL) and placebo administration. Anodal tDCS increased MMN amplitudes with placebo administration. Significant increases were not seen with sham stimulation or with anodal stimulation during DMO administration. With sham stimulation (i.e. no stimulation), DMO decreased MMN amplitudes. Findings from this study contribute to the understanding of underlying neurobiological mechanisms mediating tDCS sensory and memory improvements.

  5. Sensor probes and phantoms for advanced transcranial magnetic stimulation system developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinglei; Patel, Prashil; Trivedi, Sudhir; Du, Xiaoming; Hong, Elliot; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has become one of the most widely used noninvasive method for brain tissue stimulation and has been used as a treatment tool for various neurological and psychiatric disorders including migraine, stroke, Parkinson's disease, dystonia, tinnitus and depression. In the process of developing advanced TMS deep brain stimulation tools, we need first to develop field measurement devices like sensory probes and brain phantoms, which can be used to calibrate the TMS systems. Currently there are commercially available DC magnetic or electric filed measurement sensors, but there is no instrument to measure transient fields. In our study, we used a commercial figure-8 shaped TMS coil to generate transient magnetic field and followed induced field and current. The coil was driven by power amplified signal from a pulse generator with tunable pulse rate, amplitude, and duration. In order to obtain a 3D plot of induced vector electric field, many types of probes were designed to detect single component of electric-field vectors along x, y and z axis in the space around TMS coil. We found that resistor probes has an optimized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) near 3k ohm but it signal output is too weak compared with other techniques. We also found that inductor probes can have very high output for Curl E measurement, but it is not the E-field distribution we are interested in. Probes with electrical wire wrapped around iron coil can directly measure induced E-field with high sensitivity, which matched computer simulation results.

  6. A review of transcranial magnetic stimulation and multimodal neuroimaging to characterize post-stroke neuroplasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Michelle Auriat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Following stroke, the brain undergoes various stages of recovery where the central nervous system can reorganize neural circuitry (neuroplasticity both spontaneously and with the aid of behavioural rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation. Multiple neuroimaging techniques can characterize common structural and functional stroke-related deficits, and importantly, help predict recovery of function. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI typically reveals increased overall diffusivity throughout the brain following stroke, and is capable of indexing the extent of white matter damage. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS provides an index of metabolic changes in surviving neural tissue after stroke, serving as a marker of brain function. The neural correlates of altered brain activity after stroke have been demonstrated by abnormal activation of sensorimotor cortices during task performance, and at rest, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Electroencephalography (EEG has been used to characterize motor dysfunction in terms of increased cortical amplitude in the sensorimotor regions when performing upper-limb movement, indicating abnormally increased cognitive effort and planning in individuals with stroke. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS work reveals changes in ipsilesional and contralesional cortical excitability in the sensorimotor cortices. The severity of motor deficits indexed using TMS has been linked to the magnitude of activity imbalance between the sensorimotor cortices. In this paper we will provide a narrative review of data from studies utilizing DTI, MRS, fMRI, EEG and brain stimulation techniques focusing on TMS and its combination with uni and multi-modal neuroimaging methods to assess recovery after stroke. Approaches that delineate the best measures with which to predict or positively alter outcomes will be highlighted.

  7. A Review of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Multimodal Neuroimaging to Characterize Post-Stroke Neuroplasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriat, Angela M.; Neva, Jason L.; Peters, Sue; Ferris, Jennifer K.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2015-01-01

    Following stroke, the brain undergoes various stages of recovery where the central nervous system can reorganize neural circuitry (neuroplasticity) both spontaneously and with the aid of behavioral rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation. Multiple neuroimaging techniques can characterize common structural and functional stroke-related deficits, and importantly, help predict recovery of function. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) typically reveals increased overall diffusivity throughout the brain following stroke, and is capable of indexing the extent of white matter damage. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides an index of metabolic changes in surviving neural tissue after stroke, serving as a marker of brain function. The neural correlates of altered brain activity after stroke have been demonstrated by abnormal activation of sensorimotor cortices during task performance, and at rest, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Electroencephalography (EEG) has been used to characterize motor dysfunction in terms of increased cortical amplitude in the sensorimotor regions when performing upper limb movement, indicating abnormally increased cognitive effort and planning in individuals with stroke. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) work reveals changes in ipsilesional and contralesional cortical excitability in the sensorimotor cortices. The severity of motor deficits indexed using TMS has been linked to the magnitude of activity imbalance between the sensorimotor cortices. In this paper, we will provide a narrative review of data from studies utilizing DTI, MRS, fMRI, EEG, and brain stimulation techniques focusing on TMS and its combination with uni- and multimodal neuroimaging methods to assess recovery after stroke. Approaches that delineate the best measures with which to predict or positively alter outcomes will be highlighted. PMID:26579069

  8. Influence of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation to the Cerebellum on Standing Posture Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuto Inukai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Damage to the vestibular cerebellum results in dysfunctional standing posture control. Patients with cerebellum dysfunction have a larger sway in the center of gravity while standing compared with healthy subjects. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is a noninvasive technique for selectively exciting or inhibiting specific neural structures with potential applications in functional assessment and treatment of neural disorders. However, the specific stimulation parameters for influencing postural control have not been assessed. In this study, we investigated the influence of tDCS when applied over the cerebellum on standing posture control. Sixteen healthy subjects received tDCS (20 min, 2 mA over the scalp 2 cm below the inion. In experiment 1, all 16 subjects received tDCS under three stimulus conditions, Sham, Cathodal, and Anodal, in a random order with the second electrode placed on the forehead. In experiment 2, five subjects received cathodal stimulation only with the second electrode placed over the right buccinator muscle. Center of gravity sway was measured twice for 60 s before and after tDCS in a standing posture with eyes open and legs closed, and average total locus length, locus length per second, rectangular area, and enveloped area were calculated. In experiment 1, total locus length and locus length per second decreased significantly after cathodal stimulation but not after anodal or sham stimulation, while no tDCS condition influenced rectangular or enveloped areas. In experiment 2, cathodal tDCS again significantly reduced total locus length and locus length per second but not rectangular and enveloped areas. The effects of tDCS on postural control are polarity-dependent, likely reflecting the selective excitation or inhibition of cerebellar Purkinje cells. Cathodal tDCS to the cerebellum of healthy subjects can alter body sway (velocity.

  9. Modulation of Perception or Emotion? A Scoping Review of Tinnitus Neuromodulation Using Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Giriraj Singh; Stinear, Cathy M; Searchfield, Grant D

    2015-10-01

    Tinnitus is the phantom perception of sound and can have negative effect on the quality of life. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a noninvasive neuromodulation technique, which can increase or decrease the cortical excitability in the brain region to which it is applied. tDCS has been used for tinnitus research since 2006. To investigate whether tDCS affects tinnitus perception, related emotion, or both, and the potential implications for tinnitus management. A scoping review was undertaken using the methods proposed by Arksey and O'Malley. After initial consideration of title relevance and reading abstracts, 15 studies were included in this review. The data from these studies were charted to investigate the impact of tDCS on tinnitus perception and emotions. tDCS results in transient suppression of tinnitus loudness and annoyance; however, it does not lead to long-term impact on tinnitus related emotion. Local stimulation of different sites of stimulation (left temporoparietal area, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and auditory cortex) might modulate tinnitus perception (loudness) and emotions differently; however, further research is needed to explore this hypothesis. This review has identified aspects of methodologies that require attention in upcoming tinnitus and tDCS trials to offer better insights. tDCS is an effective research tool for transient tinnitus neuromodulation. However, efforts should be invested in designing clinical trials using local and multiple sites of stimulation, optimized parameters, and objective outcome measures before it can be translated in to a clinical tool for tinnitus management. © The Author(s) 2015.