WorldWideScience

Sample records for noninvasive multimodal technique

  1. Multimodality Noninvasive Imaging in the Monitoring of Pediatric Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindel, Steven J; Hsu, Hao H; Hussain, Tarique; Johnson, Jonathan N; McMahon, Colin J; Kutty, Shelby

    2017-09-01

    Orthotopic heart transplantation is a well-established and effective therapeutic option for children with end-stage heart failure. Multiple modalities, including noninvasive cardiac imaging, cardiac catheterization, angiography, and endomyocardial biopsy, are helpful to monitor these patients for graft dysfunction, rejection, and vasculopathy. Because of morbidities associated with invasive monitoring, noninvasive imaging plays a key role in the surveillance and evaluation of symptoms in pediatric transplant recipients. Echocardiography with or without stress augmentation may provide serial data on systolic and diastolic function, ventricular deformation, and tissue characteristics in children after transplantation. Although not perfectly sensitive or specific, advanced two- and three-dimensional echocardiographic detection of functional changes in cardiac grafts may allow early recognition of allograft rejection. Magnetic resonance imaging has shown promise for characterization of edema and scar and myocardial perfusion reserve, as well as potential application for the detection of microvasculopathic changes in the transplanted heart. Cardiac computed tomography is particularly well suited for the demonstration of coronary artery dimensions and anatomic residual lesions. In combination, these noninvasive imaging techniques help the transplantation cardiologist screen for graft dysfunction, detect critical graft events, and identify situations that require invasive testing of the transplanted heart. Advanced multimodality imaging techniques are likely to increasingly shape the monitoring practices for children following heart transplantation. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A holistic multimodal approach to the non-invasive analysis of watercolour paintings

    CERN Document Server

    Kogou, Sotiria; Bellesia, Sonia; Burgio, Lucia; Bailey, Kate; Brooks, Charlotte; Liang, Haida

    2015-01-01

    A holistic approach using non-invasive multimodal imaging and spectroscopic techniques to study the materials (pigments, drawing materials and paper) and painting techniques of watercolour paintings is presented. The non-invasive imaging and spectroscopic techniques include VIS-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and multispectral imaging, micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The three spectroscopic techniques complement each other in pigment identification. Multispectral imaging (near infrared bands), OCT and micro-Raman complement each other in the visualisation and identification of the drawing material. OCT probes the microstructure and light scattering properties of the substrate while XRF detects the elemental composition that indicates the sizing methods and the filler content. The multiple techniques were applied in a study of forty six 19th century Chinese export watercolours from the Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) and the Royal Hort...

  3. Mediating multimodal environmental knowledge across animation techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Carmen Daniela

    2011-01-01

    in the technology- mediated discourse of short animation films. This is done by employing the model of multimodal discourse analysis proposed by Van Leeuwen (2008) and Machin and Van Leeuwen (2007) to the analysis of a series of animation films focused on environmental problems. These films are united under......://www.sustainlane.com/. The multimodal discourse analysis is meant to reveal how selection and representation of environmental knowledge about social actors, social actions, resources, time and space are influenced by animation techniques. Furthermore, in the context of this multimodal discourse analysis, their influence upon...

  4. Mediating multimodal environmental knowledge across animation techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Carmen Daniela

    2011-01-01

    The growing awareness of and concern about present environmental problems generate a proliferation of new forms of environmental discourses that are mediated in various ways. This chapter explores issues related to the ways in which environmental knowledge is multimodally communicated...... in the technology- mediated discourse of short animation films. This is done by employing the model of multimodal discourse analysis proposed by Van Leeuwen (2008) and Machin and Van Leeuwen (2007) to the analysis of a series of animation films focused on environmental problems. These films are united under......://www.sustainlane.com/. The multimodal discourse analysis is meant to reveal how selection and representation of environmental knowledge about social actors, social actions, resources, time and space are influenced by animation techniques. Furthermore, in the context of this multimodal discourse analysis, their influence upon...

  5. Gold-Speckled Multimodal Nanoparticles for Noninvasive Bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In this report the synthesis, characterization, and functional evaluation of a multimodal nanoparticulate contrast agent for noninvasive imaging through both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is presented. The nanoparticles described herein enable high resolution and highly sensitive three-dimensional diagnostic imaging through the synergistic coupling of MRI and PAT capabilities. Gadolinium (Gd)-doped gold-speckled silica (GSS) nanoparticles, ranging from 50 to 200 nm, have been prepared in a simple one-pot synthesis using nonionic microemulsions. The photoacoustic signal is generated from a nonuniform, discontinuous gold nanodomains speckled across the silica surface, whereas the MR contrast is provided through Gd incorporated in the silica matrix. The presence of a discontinuous speckled surface, as opposed to a continuous gold shell, allows sufficient bulk water exchange with the Gd ions to generate a strong MR contrast. The dual imaging capabilities of the particles have been demonstrated through in silicio and in vitro methods. The described particles also have the capacity for therapeutic applications including the thermal ablation of tumors through the absorption of irradiated light. PMID:19466201

  6. Novel noninvasive techniques in management of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadaf Sameer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery, insulin remains as effective means of curing the diabetes. During the last decades, diabetes has become a life-threatening disease, because of this people initially goes for insulin injections but the inconvenience leads to the development of noninvasive techniques, which has recently replaced the insulin injection. These techniques overcome the barrier for the insulin treatment and ultimately control the glucose level of patient effectively than invasive technique. In these review, an attempt has been made to cover overall techniques available for diabetes treatment noninvasively. In an attempt of this, data has been collected, which includes insulin delivery via oral, nasal, pulmonary, rectal, buccal and ocular route. Along with these devices available in the market and under trials for diabetes treatment has also been covered. As this disease requires continuous treatment, it is advisable to go with noninvasive means of insulin delivery.

  7. A holistic multimodal approach to the non-invasive analysis of watercolour paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogou, Sotiria; Lucian, Andrei; Bellesia, Sonia; Burgio, Lucia; Bailey, Kate; Brooks, Charlotte; Liang, Haida

    2015-11-01

    A holistic approach using non-invasive multimodal imaging and spectroscopic techniques to study the materials (pigments, drawing materials and paper) and painting techniques of watercolour paintings is presented. The non-invasive imaging and spectroscopic techniques include VIS-NIR reflectance spectroscopy and multispectral imaging, micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The three spectroscopic techniques complement each other in pigment identification. Multispectral imaging (near-infrared bands), OCT and micro-Raman complement each other in the visualisation and identification of the drawing material. OCT probes the micro-structure and light scattering properties of the substrate, while XRF detects the elemental composition that indicates the sizing methods and the filler content. The multiple techniques were applied in a study of forty-six nineteenth-century Chinese export watercolours from the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) and the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) to examine to what extent the non-invasive analysis techniques employed complement each other and how much useful information about the paintings can be extracted to address art conservation and history questions. A micro-destructive technique of micro-fade spectrometry was used to assess the vulnerability of the paintings to light exposure. Most of the paint and paper substrates were found to be more stable than ISO Blue Wool 3. The palette was found to be composed of mostly traditional Chinese pigments. While the synthetic pigment, Prussian blue, made in Europe, was found on some of the paintings, none was found on the RHS paintings accurately recorded as being between 1817 and 1831 even though it is known that Prussian blue was imported to China during this period. The scale insect dyes, lac and cochineal, were detected on nearly every painting including those that fall within the identified date range. Cochineal is known to have

  8. Silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods as multimodal contrast agents for a non-invasive visualization of the gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaopeng; Shi, Junxin; Bu, Yang; Tian, Gan; Zhang, Xiao; Yin, Wenyan; Gao, Bifen; Yang, Zhiyong; Hu, Zhongbo; Liu, Xiangfeng; Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-07-01

    Non-invasive and real-time imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is particularly desirable for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we designed and fabricated silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods (Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs) for a non-invasive spatial-temporally imaging of the GI tract. The Bi2S3 NRs were synthesized by a facile solvothermal method and then coated with a SiO2 layer to improve their biocompatibility and stability in the harsh environments of the GI tract, such as the stomach and the small intestine. Due to their strong X-ray- and near infrared-absorption abilities, we demonstrate that, following oral administration in mice, the Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs can be used as a dual-modal contrast agent for the real-time and non-invasive visualization of NRs distribution and the GI tract via both X-ray computed tomography (CT) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) techniques. Importantly, integration of PAT with CT provides complementary information on anatomical details with high spatial resolution. In addition, we use Caenorhabditis Elegans (C. Elegans) as a simple model organism to investigate the biological response of Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs by oral administration. The results indicate that these NRs can pass through the GI tract of C. Elegans without inducing notable toxicological effects. The above results suggest that Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs pave an alternative way for the fabrication of multi-modal contrast agents which integrate CT and PAT modalities for a direct and non-invasive visualization of the GI tract with low toxicity.Non-invasive and real-time imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is particularly desirable for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we designed and fabricated silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods (Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs) for a non-invasive spatial-temporally imaging of the GI tract. The Bi2S3 NRs were synthesized by a facile

  9. Selective therapeutic hypothermia: A review of invasive and noninvasive techniques

    OpenAIRE

    David Straus; Vinay Prasad; Lorenzo Munoz

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Therapeutic hypothermia is a promising treatment to prevent secondary neurologic injury. Clinical utility is limited by systemic complications of global hypothermia. Selective brain cooling remains a largely uninvestigated application. We review techniques of inducing selective brain cooling. METHOD: Literature review. RESULTS: Strategies of inducing selective brain cooling were divided between non-invasive and invasive techniques. Non-invasive techniques were surface cooling and c...

  10. Novel technique for mode selection in a multimode fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J M O; Chan, J S P; Kim, J W; Sahu, J K; Ibsen, M; Clarkson, W A

    2011-06-20

    A simple technique for transverse mode selection in a large-mode-area (multimode) fiber laser is described. The technique exploits the different spectral responses of feedback elements based on a fiber Bragg grating and a volume Bragg grating to achieve wavelength-dependent mode filtering. This approach has been applied to a cladding-pumped thulium-doped fiber laser with a multimode core to achieve a single-spatial-mode output beam with a beam propagation factor (M2) of 1.05 at 1923 nm. Without mode selection the free-running fiber laser has a multimode output beam with an M2 parameter of 3.3. Selective excitation of higher order modes is also possible via the technique and preliminary results for laser oscillation on the LP11 mode are also discussed along with the prospects for scaling to higher power levels.

  11. Muscle perfusion and metabolic heterogeneity: insights from noninvasive imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Kjaer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments in noninvasive imaging techniques have enabled the study of local changes in perfusion and metabolism in skeletal muscle as well as patterns of heterogeneity in these variables in humans. In this review, the principles of these techniques along with some recent findings on fun...

  12. Selective therapeutic hypothermia: A review of invasive and noninvasive techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Straus

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Therapeutic hypothermia is a promising treatment to prevent secondary neurologic injury. Clinical utility is limited by systemic complications of global hypothermia. Selective brain cooling remains a largely uninvestigated application. We review techniques of inducing selective brain cooling. METHOD: Literature review. RESULTS: Strategies of inducing selective brain cooling were divided between non-invasive and invasive techniques. Non-invasive techniques were surface cooling and cooling via the upper airway. Invasive cooling methods include transvascular and compartmental (epidural, subdural, subarachnoid and intraventricular cooling methods to remove heat from the brain. CONCLUSION: Selective brain cooling may offer the best strategy for achieving hypothermic neuroprotection. Non-invasive strategies have proven disappointing in human trials. There is a paucity of human experiments using invasive methods of selective brain cooling. Further application of invasive cooling strategies is needed.

  13. The Role of Noninvasive Techniques in Stroke Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Maxwell Bernad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS have provided insight into understanding how neural connections are altered in consequence to cerebrovascular injury. The first part of this review will briefly survey some of the methodological issues and limitations related to noninvasive poststroke motor recovery studies. The second section will investigate some of the different neural mechanisms that underlie neurorehabilitation in stroke patients. The third part will explore our current understanding of motor memory processing, describe the neural structures that subserve motor memory consolidation, and discuss the current literature related to memory reconsolidation in healthy adults. Lastly, this paper will suggest the potential therapeutic applications of integrating noninvasive tools with memory consolidation and reconsolidation theories to enhance motor recovery. The overall objective of this work is to demonstrate how noninvasive technologies have been utilized in the multidisciplinary field of clinical behavioral neuroscience and to highlight their potential to be employed as clinical tools to promote individualized motor recovery in stroke patients.

  14. Non-invasive multimodal functional imaging of the intestine with frozen micellar naphthalocyanines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yumiao; Jeon, Mansik; Rich, Laurie J.; Hong, Hao; Geng, Jumin; Zhang, Yin; Shi, Sixiang; Barnhart, Todd E.; Alexandridis, Paschalis; Huizinga, Jan D.; Seshadri, Mukund; Cai, Weibo; Kim, Chulhong; Lovell, Jonathan F.

    2014-08-01

    There is a need for safer and improved methods for non-invasive imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. Modalities based on X-ray radiation, magnetic resonance and ultrasound suffer from limitations with respect to safety, accessibility or lack of adequate contrast. Functional intestinal imaging of dynamic gut processes has not been practical using existing approaches. Here, we report the development of a family of nanoparticles that can withstand the harsh conditions of the stomach and intestine, avoid systemic absorption, and provide good optical contrast for photoacoustic imaging. The hydrophobicity of naphthalocyanine dyes was exploited to generate purified ∼20 nm frozen micelles, which we call nanonaps, with tunable and large near-infrared absorption values (>1,000). Unlike conventional chromophores, nanonaps exhibit non-shifting spectra at ultrahigh optical densities and, following oral administration in mice, passed safely through the gastrointestinal tract. Non-invasive, non-ionizing photoacoustic techniques were used to visualize nanonap intestinal distribution with low background and remarkable resolution, and enabled real-time intestinal functional imaging with ultrasound co-registration. Positron emission tomography following seamless nanonap radiolabelling allowed complementary whole-body imaging.

  15. Tricuspid regurgitation: noninvasive techniques for determining causes and severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePace, N L; Ross, J; Iskandrian, A S; Nestico, P F; Kotler, M N; Mintz, G S; Segal, B L; Hakki, A H; Morganroth, J

    1984-06-01

    Tricuspid regurgitation is often not apparent on physical examination and several methods are now available to aid in this difficult assessment. Cardiac catheterization using right ventriculography, previously considered the diagnostic standard, has several limitations. Currently available noninvasive tools such as M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography (with or without contrast), Doppler techniques and even radionuclide cardiologic imaging have added significantly to the precise assessment of the presence and severity of tricuspid regurgitation. This review examines the comparative use and limitations of these various techniques.

  16. Multimodality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, I address an ongoing discussion in Danish E-learning research about how to take advantage of the fact that digital media facilitate other communication forms than text, so-called ‘multimodal' communication, which should not be confused with the term ‘multimedia'. While multimedia...... on their teaching and learning situations. The choices they make involve e-learning resources like videos, social platforms and mobile devices, not just as digital artefacts we interact with, but the entire practice of using digital media. In a life-long learning perspective, multimodality is potentially very...... represent the use of various media for communication, multimodality refers to the different symbol systems we employ in communication practices. As new educational practices emerge from the application of ICT, multimodality becomes a matter for all teachers when they plan, practice and reflect...

  17. Multimodality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2010-01-01

    on their teaching and learning situations. The choices they make involve e-learning resources like videos, social platforms and mobile devices, not just as digital artefacts we interact with, but the entire practice of using digital media. In a life-long learning perspective, multimodality is potentially very...... represent the use of various media for communication, multimodality refers to the different symbol systems we employ in communication practices. As new educational practices emerge from the application of ICT, multimodality becomes a matter for all teachers when they plan, practice and reflect......In this paper, I address an ongoing discussion in Danish E-learning research about how to take advantage of the fact that digital media facilitate other communication forms than text, so-called ‘multimodal' communication, which should not be confused with the term ‘multimedia'. While multimedia...

  18. A Novel Technique for Prealignment in Multimodality Medical Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Image pair is often aligned initially based on a rigid or affine transformation before a deformable registration method is applied in medical image registration. Inappropriate initial registration may compromise the registration speed or impede the convergence of the optimization algorithm. In this work, a novel technique was proposed for prealignment in both monomodality and multimodality image registration based on statistical correlation of gradient information. A simple and robust algorithm was proposed to determine the rotational differences between two images based on orientation histogram matching accumulated from local orientation of each pixel without any feature extraction. Experimental results showed that it was effective to acquire the orientation angle between two unregistered images with advantages over the existed method based on edge-map in multimodalities. Applying the orientation detection into the registration of CT/MR, T1/T2 MRI, and monomadality images with respect to rigid and nonrigid deformation improved the chances of finding the global optimization of the registration and reduced the search space of optimization.

  19. Multimodality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    In this paper, I address an ongoing discussion in Danish E-learning research about how to take advantage of the fact that digital media facilitate other communication forms than text, so-called ‘multimodal’ communication, which should not be confused with the term ‘multimedia’. While multimedia...... and learning situations. The choices they make involve E-learning resources like videos, social platforms and mobile devices, not just as digital artefacts we interact with, but the entire practice of using digital media. In a life-long learning perspective, multimodality is potentially very useful...... represent the use of various media for communication, multimodality refers to the different symbol systems we employ in communication practices. As new educational practices emerge from the application of ICT, all teachers address multimodality when they plan, practice and reflect on their teaching...

  20. Multimodality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    and learning situations. The choices they make involve E-learning resources like videos, social platforms and mobile devices, not just as digital artefacts we interact with, but the entire practice of using digital media. In a life-long learning perspective, multimodality is potentially very useful...... represent the use of various media for communication, multimodality refers to the different symbol systems we employ in communication practices. As new educational practices emerge from the application of ICT, all teachers address multimodality when they plan, practice and reflect on their teaching......In this paper, I address an ongoing discussion in Danish E-learning research about how to take advantage of the fact that digital media facilitate other communication forms than text, so-called ‘multimodal’ communication, which should not be confused with the term ‘multimedia’. While multimedia...

  1. Neurophotonics: non-invasive optical techniques for monitoring brain functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Contini, Davide; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Pifferi, Antonio; Re, Rebecca; Zucchelli, Lucia; Caffini, Matteo; Farina, Andrea; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Summary The aim of this review is to present the state of the art of neurophotonics, a recently founded discipline lying at the interface between optics and neuroscience. While neurophotonics also includes invasive techniques for animal studies, in this review we focus only on the non-invasive methods that use near infrared light to probe functional activity in the brain, namely the fast optical signal, diffuse correlation spectroscopy, and functional near infrared spectroscopy methods. We also present an overview of the physical principles of light propagation in biological tissues, and of the main physiological sources of signal. Finally, we discuss the open issues in models, instrumentation, data analysis and clinical approaches. PMID:25764252

  2. Noninvasive in vivo glucose sensing using an iris based technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Anthony J.; Cameron, Brent D.

    2011-03-01

    Physiological glucose monitoring is important aspect in the treatment of individuals afflicted with diabetes mellitus. Although invasive techniques for glucose monitoring are widely available, it would be very beneficial to make such measurements in a noninvasive manner. In this study, a New Zealand White (NZW) rabbit animal model was utilized to evaluate a developed iris-based imaging technique for the in vivo measurement of physiological glucose concentration. The animals were anesthetized with isoflurane and an insulin/dextrose protocol was used to control blood glucose concentration. To further help restrict eye movement, a developed ocular fixation device was used. During the experimental time frame, near infrared illuminated iris images were acquired along with corresponding discrete blood glucose measurements taken with a handheld glucometer. Calibration was performed using an image based Partial Least Squares (PLS) technique. Independent validation was also performed to assess model performance along with Clarke Error Grid Analysis (CEGA). Initial validation results were promising and show that a high percentage of the predicted glucose concentrations are within 20% of the reference values.

  3. Multimodality Image Fusion-Guided Procedures: Technique, Accuracy, and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine, E-mail: naj@mail.nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Radiology and Imaging Sciences (United States); Kruecker, Jochen, E-mail: jochen.kruecker@philips.com [Philips Research North America (United States); Kadoury, Samuel, E-mail: samuel.kadoury@polymtl.ca [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Department of Computer and Software Engineering, Institute of Biomedical Engineering (Canada); Kobeiter, Hicham, E-mail: hicham.kobeiter@gmail.com [CHU Henri Mondor, UPEC, Departments of Radiology and d' imagrie medicale (France); Venkatesan, Aradhana M., E-mail: VenkatesanA@cc.nih.gov; Levy, Elliot, E-mail: levyeb@cc.nih.gov; Wood, Bradford J., E-mail: bwood@cc.nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Radiology and Imaging Sciences (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Personalized therapies play an increasingly critical role in cancer care: Image guidance with multimodality image fusion facilitates the targeting of specific tissue for tissue characterization and plays a role in drug discovery and optimization of tailored therapies. Positron-emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) may offer additional information not otherwise available to the operator during minimally invasive image-guided procedures, such as biopsy and ablation. With use of multimodality image fusion for image-guided interventions, navigation with advanced modalities does not require the physical presence of the PET, MRI, or CT imaging system. Several commercially available methods of image-fusion and device navigation are reviewed along with an explanation of common tracking hardware and software. An overview of current clinical applications for multimodality navigation is provided.

  4. Noninvasive Multimodal Imaging to Predict Recovery of Locomotion after Extended Limb Ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Radowsky

    Full Text Available Acute limb ischemia is a common cause of morbidity and mortality following trauma both in civilian centers and in combat related injuries. Rapid determination of tissue viability and surgical restoration of blood flow are desirable, but not always possible. We sought to characterize the response to increasing periods of hind limb ischemia in a porcine model such that we could define a period of critical ischemia (the point after which irreversible neuromuscular injury occurs, evaluate non-invasive methods for characterizing that ischemia, and establish a model by which we could predict whether or not the animal's locomotion would return to baselines levels post-operatively. Ischemia was induced by either application of a pneumatic tourniquet or vessel occlusion (performed by clamping the proximal iliac artery and vein at the level of the inguinal ligament. The limb was monitored for the duration of the procedure with both 3-charge coupled device (3CCD and infrared (IR imaging for tissue oxygenation and perfusion, respectively. The experimental arms of this model are effective at inducing histologically evident muscle injury with some evidence of expected secondary organ damage, particularly in animals with longer ischemia times. Noninvasive imaging data shows excellent correlation with post-operative functional outcomes, validating its use as a non-invasive means of viability assessment, and directly monitors post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. A classification model, based on partial-least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA of imaging variables only, successfully classified animals as "returned to normal locomotion" or "did not return to normal locomotion" with 87.5% sensitivity and 66.7% specificity after cross-validation. PLSDA models generated from non-imaging data were not as accurate (AUC of 0.53 compared the PLSDA model generated from only imaging data (AUC of 0.76. With some modification, this limb ischemia model could also serve as a

  5. Noninvasive skin tightening: focus on new ultrasound techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabi SG

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Guillen Fabi Goldman, Butterwick, Fitzpatrick, Groff and Fabi, Cosmetic Laser Dermatology, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: Microfocused ultrasound (MFU has been recently developed to meet the ever-growing public demand for achieving significant, noninvasive skin lifting and tightening. MFU can be focused on subcutaneous tissue where the temperature briefly reaches greater than 60°C, producing small (<1 mm3 thermal coagulation points to a depth of up to 5 mm within the mid-to-deep reticular layer of the dermis and subdermis. The intervening papillary dermal and epidermal layers of skin remain unaffected. The application of heat at these discrete thermal coagulation points causes collagen fibers in the facial planes such as the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and platysma, as well as the deep reticular dermis, to become denatured, contracting and stimulating de novo collagen. A commercially available device combines MFU with high-resolution ultrasound imaging (MFU-V, which enables visualization of tissue planes to a depth of 8 mm and allows the user to see where the MFU energy will be applied (Ultherapy®; Ulthera Inc., Mesa, AZ, USA. Using different transducers, MFU-V treatment can be customized to meet the unique physical characteristics of each patient by adjusting energy and focal depth of the emitted ultrasound. By targeting the facial superficial musculoaponeurotic system, noninvasive tightening and lifting of sagging facial and neck skin and improvements in the appearance of wrinkles can be achieved. MFU-V can also improve lines and wrinkles of the décolleté. Treatment protocols for the use of MFU-V continue to be refined, and its use in combination with other rejuvenation techniques has been demonstrated. Brief discomfort that often occurs during treatment can be minimized with oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Other treatment-related adverse events include transient erythema, edema, and occasional bruising. MFU-V is

  6. Dye-enhanced multimodal confocal microscopy for noninvasive detection of skin cancers in mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jesung; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2010-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer. Its early diagnosis and timely treatment is of paramount importance for dermatology and surgical oncology. In this study, we evaluate the use of reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for detecting skin cancers in an in-vivo trial with B16F10 melanoma and SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma in mice. For the experiments, the mice are anesthetized, then the tumors are infiltrated with aqueous solution of methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance images are acquired at 658 nm. Fluorescence is excited at 658 nm and registered in the range between 690 and 710 nm. After imaging, the mice are sacrificed. The tumors are excised and processed for hematoxylin and eosin histopathology, which is compared to the optical images. The results of the study indicate that in-vivo reflectance images provide valuable information on vascularization of the tumor, whereas the fluorescence images mimic the structural features seen in histopathology. Simultaneous dye-enhanced reflectance and fluorescence confocal microscopy shows promise for the detection, demarcation, and noninvasive monitoring of skin cancer development.

  7. Towards a Noninvasive Intracranial Tumor Irradiation Using 3D Optical Imaging and Multimodal Data Registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada, R.; Daul, Ch.; Wolf, D.; Aletti, P.

    2007-01-01

    Conformal radiotherapy (CRT) results in high-precision tumor volume irradiation. In fractioned radiotherapy (FRT), lesions are irradiated in several sessions so that healthy neighbouring tissues are better preserved than when treatment is carried out in one fraction. In the case of intracranial tumors, classical methods of patient positioning in the irradiation machine coordinate system are invasive and only allow for CRT in one irradiation session. This contribution presents a noninvasive positioning method representing a first step towards the combination of CRT and FRT. The 3D data used for the positioning is point clouds spread over the patient's head (CT-data usually acquired during treatment) and points distributed over the patient's face which are acquired with a structured light sensor fixed in the therapy room. The geometrical transformation linking the coordinate systems of the diagnosis device (CT-modality) and the 3D sensor of the therapy room (visible light modality) is obtained by registering the surfaces represented by the two 3D point sets. The geometrical relationship between the coordinate systems of the 3D sensor and the irradiation machine is given by a calibration of the sensor position in the therapy room. The global transformation, computed with the two previous transformations, is sufficient to predict the tumor position in the irradiation machine coordinate system with only the corresponding position in the CT-coordinate system. Results obtained for a phantom show that the mean positioning error of tumors on the treatment machine isocentre is 0.4 mm. Tests performed with human data proved that the registration algorithm is accurate (0.1 mm mean distance between homologous points) and robust even for facial expression changes. PMID:18364992

  8. Spatially-Structured Sharing Technique for Multimodal Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grant Dick; Peter Whigham

    2008-01-01

    Spatially-structured populations are one approach to increasing genetic diversity in an evolutionary algorithm (EA). However, they are suscptible to convergence to a single peak in a multimodal fitness landscape. Niching methods, such as fitness sharing, allow an EA to maintain multiple solutions in a single population, however they have rarely been used in conjunction with spatially-structured populations. This paper introduces local sharing, a method that applies sharing to the overlapping demes of a spatially-structured population. The combination of these two methods succeeds in maintaining multiple solutions in problems that have previously proved difficult for sharing alone (and vice-versa).

  9. Multimodal Imaging and Spectroscopy Fiber-bundle Microendoscopy Platform for Non-invasive, In Vivo Tissue Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, Gage J; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Muldoon, Timothy J

    2016-10-17

    Recent fiber-bundle microendoscopy techniques enable non-invasive analysis of in vivo tissue using either imaging techniques or a combination of spectroscopy techniques. Combining imaging and spectroscopy techniques into a single optical probe may provide a more complete analysis of tissue health. In this article, two dissimilar modalities are combined, high-resolution fluorescence microendoscopy imaging and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, into a single optical probe. High-resolution fluorescence microendoscopy imaging is a technique used to visualize apical tissue micro-architecture and, although mostly a qualitative technique, has demonstrated effective real-time differentiation between neoplastic and non-neoplastic tissue. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is a technique which can extract tissue physiological parameters including local hemoglobin concentration, melanin concentration, and oxygen saturation. This article describes the specifications required to construct the fiber-optic probe, how to build the instrumentation, and then demonstrates the technique on in vivo human skin. This work revealed that tissue micro-architecture, specifically apical skin keratinocytes, can be co-registered with its associated physiological parameters. The instrumentation and fiber-bundle probe presented here can be optimized as either a handheld or endoscopically-compatible device for use in a variety of organ systems. Additional clinical research is needed to test the viability of this technique for different epithelial disease states.

  10. Non-invasive image-guided laser microsurgery by a dual-wavelength fiber laser and an integrated fiber-optic multi-modal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Li, Dean-Ru; Chan, Ming-Che

    2016-10-15

    A new approach to non-invasive image-guided laser micro-treatment is demonstrated by a dual-wavelength fiber laser source and an integrated fiber-based multi-modal system. The fiber-based source, operated in 1.55 and 1.2 μm simultaneously, was directly connected to an integrated fiber-based multi-modal system for imaging and laser micro-treatment at the same time. The 1.2 μm radiations, within the 1.2-1.35 μm bio-penetration window of skin, were utilized for spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging. The 1.55 μm radiations, highly absorptive to waters, were utilized for laser microsurgery. The new approach, which is simple in configuration and accurately controls the positions and exposure time of the laser microsurgery, shows great promises for future clinical applications.

  11. Multimodal CT techniques for cerebrovascular and hemodynamic evaluation of ischemic stroke: occlusion, collaterals, and perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Baixue; Scalzo, Fabien; Agbayani, Elijah; Woolf, Graham W; Liu, Liping; Miao, Zhongrong; Liebeskind, David S

    2016-05-01

    Neuroimaging of cerebrovascular status and hemodynamics has vastly improved our understanding of stroke mechanisms and provided information for therapeutic decision-making. CT techniques are the most commonly used techniques due to wide availability, rapid acquisition and acceptable tolerance. Numerous multimodal CT techniques have been developed in the last few years. We summarize and explain the various multimodal CT acquisition techniques within three categories based on the scanning mode, namely static mode (single-phase CTA), multiple static mode (multi-phase CTA) and continuous mode (CT perfusion and dynamic CTA). Post-processing methods based on different acquisition modes are also introduced in an easy manner by focusing on the information extracted and products generated. We also describe the applications for these techniques along with their advantages and disadvantages.

  12. Multi-modality analysis of glucose aqueous solution using photoacoustic and dielectric spectroscopy for non-invasive glucose monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Takuro; Tanaka, Yujiro; Nakamura, Masahito; Seyama, Michiko

    2017-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of glucose using conventional optical spectroscopy suffers from a lack of repeatability due to high optical scattering in skin tissue. Here we present a multi-modality analysis of glucose aqueous solution using photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS). These techniques involve the direct detection of the acoustic and electromagnetic waves propagating through or reflecting from tissue without their being scattered. They therefore have potential for better tolerance to the variation of scattering. For PAS, to differentiate signals induced by water absorption, we select another laser wavelength (1.38 μm) that exhibits the same absorbance for water at 1.61 μm. Furthermore, one of the two photoacoustic signals is used to normalize the variations of acoustic properties in differential signal. Measured results for glucose solutions (0-2 g/dL) showed that the differential signal has a sensitivity of 1.61%/g·dL-1 and a detection limit of 120 mg/dL. We also tested glucose detection with BDS (500 MHz to 50 GHz) by detecting glucose hydration bonding at around 10-20 GHz. Using a partial least square analysis and first derivation on broadband spectra, we obtained an RMS error 19 mg/dL and a detection limit of 59 mg/dL. Using both the low-scattering ultrasonic and microwave detection techniques, we successfully captured the glucose footprint in the physiological range.

  13. Neonatal noninvasive ventilation techniques: do we really need to intubate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBlasi, Robert M

    2011-09-01

    The current trend for supporting neonates with respiratory distress syndrome is nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Nearly half of all neonates who are supported with CPAP will still develop respiratory failure that requires potentially injurious endotracheal intubation and invasive ventilation. Thus, the role of any neonatal clinician is to minimize invasive ventilation whenever possible, to avoid the multitude of complications that can arise when using this form of therapy. Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is a form of respiratory assistance that provides greater respiratory support than does CPAP and may prevent intubation in a larger fraction of neonates who would otherwise fail CPAP. With the inception of nasal airway interfaces, clinicians have ushered in many different forms of NIV in neonates, often with very little experimental data to guide management. This review will explore in detail all of the different forms of neonatal NIV that are currently focused within an area of intense clinical investigation.

  14. Evaluating noninvasive genetic sampling techniques to estimate large carnivore abundance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Matthew A; Zieminski, Chris; Fuller, Todd K; Mahoney, Shane P; Waits, Lisette P

    2015-09-01

    Monitoring large carnivores is difficult because of intrinsically low densities and can be dangerous if physical capture is required. Noninvasive genetic sampling (NGS) is a safe and cost-effective alternative to physical capture. We evaluated the utility of two NGS methods (scat detection dogs and hair sampling) to obtain genetic samples for abundance estimation of coyotes, black bears and Canada lynx in three areas of Newfoundland, Canada. We calculated abundance estimates using program capwire, compared sampling costs, and the cost/sample for each method relative to species and study site, and performed simulations to determine the sampling intensity necessary to achieve abundance estimates with coefficients of variation (CV) of sampling was effective for both coyotes and bears and hair snags effectively sampled bears in two of three study sites. Rub pads were ineffective in sampling coyotes and lynx. The precision of abundance estimates was dependent upon the number of captures/individual. Our simulations suggested that ~3.4 captures/individual will result in a sampling was more cost-effective for sampling multiple species, but suggest that hair sampling may be less expensive at study sites with limited road access for bears. Given the dependence of sampling scheme on species and study site, the optimal sampling scheme is likely to be study-specific warranting pilot studies in most circumstances. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Generalized high-spectral-resolution lidar technique with a multimode laser for aerosol remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhongtao; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yupeng; Liu, Chong; Bai, Jian; Wang, Dan; Wang, Nanchao; Zhou, Yudi; Luo, Jing; Yang, Yongying; Shen, Yibing; Su, Lin; Yang, Liming

    2017-01-23

    High-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL) is a powerful tool for atmospheric aerosol remote sensing. The current HSRL technique often requires a single longitudinal mode laser as the transmitter to accomplish the spectral discrimination of the aerosol and molecular scattering conveniently. However, single-mode laser is cumbersome and has very strict requirements for ambient stability, making the HSRL instrument not so robust in many cases. In this paper, a new HSRL concept, called generalized HSRL technique with a multimode laser (MML-gHSRL), is proposed, which can work using a multimode laser. The MML-gHSRL takes advantage of the period characteristic of the spectral function of the interferometric spectral discrimination filter (ISDF) thoroughly. By matching the free spectral range of the ISDF with the mode interval of the multimode laser, fine spectral discrimination for the lidar return from each longitudinal mode can be realized. Two common ISDFs, i.e., the Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) and field-widened Michelson interferometer (FWMI), are introduced to develop the MML-gHSRL, and their performance is quantitatively analyzed and compared. The MML-gHSRL is a natural but significant generalization for the current HSRL technique based on the IDSF. It is potential that this technique would be a good entrance to future HSRL developments, especially in airborne and satellite-borne aerosol remote sensing applications.

  16. Physical And Medical Attributes Of Six Contemporary Noninvasive Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    1981-11-01

    Digital subtraction angiography(DSA)is compared to five other noninvasive imaging methods with respect to physical attributes and medical applications. 1) Digital subtraction angiography measures flow channel (vessel) anatomy and vascular leaks in regions where signals from under and overlying vascular pools do not conflict in strength with the vessel or tissue of interest. 2) X-ray computed tomography, in principle, can separate the under and overlying signals, yet presently it is limited in speed, axial coverage, and computational burden for tasks DSA can efficiently perform. Possible exceptions are the dynamic spatial reconstructor (DSR) of Mayo Clinic and the system under construction at the University of California, San Francisco. 3) Heavy ion imaging measures electron density and is less sensitive to injected contrast than x-ray imaging which has the advantage of the photoelectric effect. A unique attribute of heavy ion imaging is its potential for treatment planning and the fact that beam hardening is not a physical problem. 4) Ultrasound detects surfaces, bulk tissue characteristics, and blood velocity. Doppler ultrasound competes with DSA in some regions of the body and generally involves less equipment and patient procedures. Ultrasound vessel imaging and range-gated Doppler have limitations due to sound absorption by atheromatous tissue and available imaging windows. 5) Emission tomography measures receptor site distribution, metabolism, permeability, and tissue perfusion. Resolution is limited to 7mm full width half maximum (FWHM) in the near future, and extraction of metabolic and perfusion information usually requires kinetic analyses with statistically poor data. The ability of positron tomography to measure metabolism (sugar, fatty acid, and oxygen utilization) and the ability to measure tissue perfusion with single photon tomography (17 mm FWHM) or PET (7 mm FWHM) using non-cyclotron produced radionuclides are the major unique features of emission

  17. Cardiac abnormalities assessed by non-invasive techniques in patients with newly diagnosed idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Simonsen, Jane Angel; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2015-01-01

    inflammatory myopathies (IIM) by means of non-invasive techniques. METHODS: Fourteen patients with IIM (8 polymyositis, 4 dermatomyositis, 2 cancer-associated dermatomyositis) and 14 gender- and age- matched healthy control subjects were investigated. Participant assessments included a cardiac questionnaire...

  18. Microgradients in bacterial colonies : use of fluorescence ratio imaging : a non-invasive technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malakar, P.K.; Brocklehurst, T.F.; Mackie, A.R.; Wilson, P.D.G.; Zwietering, M.H.; Riet, K. van 't

    2000-01-01

    Fluorescence ratio imaging is a non-invasive technique for studying the formation of microgradients in immobilised bacterial colonies. These gradients can be quantified easily when combined with the gel cassette system designed at the Institute of Food Research, Norwich, UK. Colonies of

  19. Optimal design of 850 nm 2×2 multimode interference polymer waveguide coupler by imprint technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yuchen; Han, Xiuyou; Han, Xiaonan; Lu, Zhili; Wu, Zhenlin; Teng, Jie; Wang, Jinyan; Morthier, Geert; Zhao, Mingshan

    2016-09-01

    A 2×2 optical waveguide coupler at 850 nm based on the multimode interference (MMI) structure with the polysilsesquioxanes liquid series (PSQ-Ls) polymer material and the imprint technique is presented. The influence of the structural parameters, such as the single mode condition, the waveguide spacing of input/output ports, and the width and length of the multimode waveguide, on the optical splitting performance including the excess loss and the uniformity is simulated by the beam propagation method. By inserting a taper section of isosceles trapezoid between the single mode and multimode waveguides, the optimized structural parameters for low excess loss and high uniformity are obtained with the excess loss of‒0.040 dB and the uniformity of‒0.007 dB. The effect of the structure deviations induced during the imprint process on the optical splitting performance at different residual layer thicknesses is also investigated. The analysis results provide useful instructions for the waveguide device fabrication.

  20. Intercomparison of techniques for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of methods are presently available for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass of both normal individuals and patients with metabolic disorders. Chief among these methods are radiographic techniques such as radiogrammetry, photon absorptiometry, computer tomography, Compton scattering and neutron activation analysis. In this review, the salient features of the bone measurement techniques are discussed along with their accuracy and precision. The advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques for measuring bone mass are summarized. Where possible, intercomparisons are made of the various techniques.

  1. Image evaluation of HIV encephalopathy: a multimodal approach using quantitative MR techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Paulo T.C.; Escorsi-Rosset, Sara [University of Sao Paulo, Radiology Section, Internal Medicine Department, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cervi, Maria C. [University of Sao Paulo, Department of Pediatrics, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Santos, Antonio Carlos [University of Sao Paulo, Radiology Section, Internal Medicine Department, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hospital das Clinicas da FMRP-USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    A multimodal approach of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy using quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) techniques can demonstrate brain changes not detectable only with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to compare conventional MRI and MR quantitative techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and relaxometry and to determine whether quantitative techniques are more sensitive than conventional imaging for brain changes caused by HIV infection. We studied prospectively nine HIV positive children (mean age 6 years, from 5 to 8 years old) and nine controls (mean age 7.3 years; from 3 to 10 years), using MRS and relaxometry. Examinations were carried on 1.5-T equipment. HIV-positive patients presented with only minor findings and all control patients had normal conventional MR findings. MRS findings showed an increase in choline to creatine (CHO/CRE) ratios bilaterally in both frontal gray and white matter, in the left parietal white matter, and in total CHO/CRE ratio. In contrast, N-acetylaspartate to creatine (NAA/CRE) ratios did not present with any significant difference between both groups. Relaxometry showed significant bilateral abnormalities, with lengthening of the relaxation time in HIV positive in many regions. Conventional MRI is not sensitive for early brain changes caused by HIV infection. Quantitative techniques such as MRS and relaxometry appear as valuable tools in the diagnosis of these early changes. Therefore, a multimodal quantitative study can be useful in demonstrating and understanding the physiopathology of the disease. (orig.)

  2. A noninvasive hair sampling technique to obtain high quality DNA from elusive small mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Philippe; Henry, Alison; Russello, Michael A

    2011-03-13

    Noninvasive genetic sampling approaches are becoming increasingly important to study wildlife populations. A number of studies have reported using noninvasive sampling techniques to investigate population genetics and demography of wild populations. This approach has proven to be especially useful when dealing with rare or elusive species. While a number of these methods have been developed to sample hair, feces and other biological material from carnivores and medium-sized mammals, they have largely remained untested in elusive small mammals. In this video, we present a novel, inexpensive and noninvasive hair snare targeted at an elusive small mammal, the American pika (Ochotona princeps). We describe the general set-up of the hair snare, which consists of strips of packing tape arranged in a web-like fashion and placed along travelling routes in the pikas' habitat. We illustrate the efficiency of the snare at collecting a large quantity of hair that can then be collected and brought back to the lab. We then demonstrate the use of the DNA IQ system (Promega) to isolate DNA and showcase the utility of this method to amplify commonly used molecular markers including nuclear microsatellites, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), mitochondrial sequences (800bp) as well as a molecular sexing marker. Overall, we demonstrate the utility of this novel noninvasive hair snare as a sampling technique for wildlife population biologists. We anticipate that this approach will be applicable to a variety of small mammals, opening up areas of investigation within natural populations, while minimizing impact to study organisms.

  3. Estimation of coronary wave intensity analysis using noninvasive techniques and its application to exercise physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broyd, Christopher J; Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Sen, Sayan; Petraco, Ricardo; Jones, Siana; Al-Lamee, Rasha; Foin, Nicolas; Al-Bustami, Mahmud; Sethi, Amarjit; Kaprielian, Raffi; Ramrakha, Punit; Khan, Masood; Malik, Iqbal S; Francis, Darrel P; Parker, Kim; Hughes, Alun D; Mikhail, Ghada W; Mayet, Jamil; Davies, Justin E

    2016-03-01

    Wave intensity analysis (WIA) has found particular applicability in the coronary circulation where it can quantify traveling waves that accelerate and decelerate blood flow. The most important wave for the regulation of flow is the backward-traveling decompression wave (BDW). Coronary WIA has hitherto always been calculated from invasive measures of pressure and flow. However, recently it has become feasible to obtain estimates of these waveforms noninvasively. In this study we set out to assess the agreement between invasive and noninvasive coronary WIA at rest and measure the effect of exercise. Twenty-two patients (mean age 60) with unobstructed coronaries underwent invasive WIA in the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Immediately afterwards, noninvasive LAD flow and pressure were recorded and WIA calculated from pulsed-wave Doppler coronary flow velocity and central blood pressure waveforms measured using a cuff-based technique. Nine of these patients underwent noninvasive coronary WIA assessment during exercise. A pattern of six waves were observed in both modalities. The BDW was similar between invasive and noninvasive measures [peak: 14.9 ± 7.8 vs. -13.8 ± 7.1 × 10(4) W·m(-2)·s(-2), concordance correlation coefficient (CCC): 0.73, P Exercise increased the BDW: at maximum exercise peak BDW was -47.0 ± 29.5 × 10(4) W·m(-2)·s(-2) (P < 0.01 vs. rest) and cumulative BDW -19.2 ± 12.6 × 10(3) W·m(-2)·s(-1) (P < 0.01 vs. rest). The BDW can be measured noninvasively with acceptable reliably potentially simplifying assessments and increasing the applicability of coronary WIA.

  4. Using multimodal imaging techniques to monitor limb ischemia: a rapid noninvasive method for assessing extremity wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Rajiv; Caruso, Joseph D.; Radowsky, Jason S.; Rodriguez, Maricela; Forsberg, Jonathan; Elster, Eric A.; Crane, Nicole J.

    2013-03-01

    Over 70% of military casualties resulting from the current conflicts sustain major extremity injuries. Of these the majority are caused by blasts from improvised explosive devices. The resulting injuries include traumatic amputations, open fractures, crush injuries, and acute vascular disruption. Critical tissue ischemia—the point at which ischemic tissues lose the capacity to recover—is therefore a major concern, as lack of blood flow to tissues rapidly leads to tissue deoxygenation and necrosis. If left undetected or unaddressed, a potentially salvageable limb may require more extensive debridement or, more commonly, amputation. Predicting wound outcome during the initial management of blast wounds remains a significant challenge, as wounds continue to "evolve" during the debridement process and our ability to assess wound viability remains subjectively based. Better means of identifying critical ischemia are needed. We developed a swine limb ischemia model in which two imaging modalities were combined to produce an objective and quantitative assessment of wound perfusion and tissue viability. By using 3 Charge-Coupled Device (3CCD) and Infrared (IR) cameras, both surface tissue oxygenation as well as overall limb perfusion could be depicted. We observed a change in mean 3CCD and IR values at peak ischemia and during reperfusion correlate well with clinically observed indicators for limb function and vitality. After correcting for baseline mean R-B values, the 3CCD values correlate with surface tissue oxygenation and the IR values with changes in perfusion. This study aims to not only increase fundamental understanding of the processes involved with limb ischemia and reperfusion, but also to develop tools to monitor overall limb perfusion and tissue oxygenation in a clinical setting. A rapid and objective diagnostic for extent of ischemic damage and overall limb viability could provide surgeons with a more accurate indication of tissue viability. This may help reducing the number of surgical interventions required, by aiding surgeons in identifying and demarcating areas of critical tissue ischemia, so that a more adequate debridement may be performed. This would have obvious benefits of reducing patient distress and decreasing both the overall recovery time and cost of rehabilitation.

  5. A Multimodal Technique for an Embedded Fingerprint Recognizer in Mobile Payment Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Conti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and the diffusion of distributed systems, directly connected to recent communication technologies, move people towards the era of mobile and ubiquitous systems. Distributed systems make merchant-customer relationships closer and more flexible, using reliable e-commerce technologies. These systems and environments need many distributed access points, for the creation and management of secure identities and for the secure recognition of users. Traditionally, these access points can be made possible by a software system with a main central server. This work proposes the study and implementation of a multimodal technique, based on biometric information, for identity management and personal ubiquitous authentication. The multimodal technique uses both fingerprint micro features (minutiae and fingerprint macro features (singularity points for robust user authentication. To strengthen the security level of electronic payment systems, an embedded hardware prototype has been also created: acting as self-contained sensors, it performs the entire authentication process on the same device, so that all critical information (e.g. biometric data, account transactions and cryptographic keys, are managed and stored inside the sensor, without any data transmission. The sensor has been prototyped using the Celoxica RC203E board, achieving fast execution time, low working frequency, and good recognition performance.

  6. ANALYSIS OF MULTIMODAL FUSION TECHNIQUES FOR AUDIO-VISUAL SPEECH RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Ivanko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with analytical review, covering the latest achievements in the field of audio-visual (AV fusion (integration of multimodal information. We discuss the main challenges and report on approaches to address them. One of the most important tasks of the AV integration is to understand how the modalities interact and influence each other. The paper addresses this problem in the context of AV speech processing and speech recognition. In the first part of the review we set out the basic principles of AV speech recognition and give the classification of audio and visual features of speech. Special attention is paid to the systematization of the existing techniques and the AV data fusion methods. In the second part we provide a consolidated list of tasks and applications that use the AV fusion based on carried out analysis of research area. We also indicate used methods, techniques, audio and video features. We propose classification of the AV integration, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches. We draw conclusions and offer our assessment of the future in the field of AV fusion. In the further research we plan to implement a system of audio-visual Russian continuous speech recognition using advanced methods of multimodal fusion.

  7. Assessment of lung function using a non-invasive oscillating gas-forcing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Lei; Clifton, David A; Hahn, Clive E W; Farmery, Andrew D

    2013-10-01

    Conventional methods for monitoring lung function can require complex, or special, gas analysers, and may therefore not be practical in clinical areas such as the intensive care unit (ICU) or operating theatre. The system proposed in this article is a compact and non-invasive system for the measurement and monitoring of lung variables, such as alveolar volume, airway dead space, and pulmonary blood flow. In contrast with conventional methods, the compact apparatus and non-invasive nature of the proposed method could eventually allow it to be used in the ICU, as well as in general clinical settings. We also propose a novel tidal ventilation model using a non-invasive oscillating gas-forcing technique, where both nitrous oxide and oxygen are used as indicator gases. Experimental results are obtained from healthy volunteers, and are compared with those obtained using a conventional continuous ventilation model. Our findings show that the proposed technique can be used to assess lung function, and has several advantages over conventional methods such as compact and portable apparatus, easy usage, and quick estimation of cardiopulmonary variables.

  8. An optical authentication system based on encryption technique and multimodal biometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheng; Zhang, Tong; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xuemei; Liu, Mingtang

    2013-12-01

    A major concern nowadays for a biometric credential management system is its potential vulnerability to protect its information sources. To prevent a genuine user's templates from both internal and external threats, a novel and simple method combined optical encryption with multimodal biometric authentication technique is proposed. In this method, the standard biometric templates are generated real-timely by the verification keys owned by legal user so that they are unnecessary to be stored in a database. Compared with the traditional recognition algorithms, storage space and matching time are greatly saved. In addition, the verification keys are difficult to be forged due to the utilization of optical encryption technique. Although the verification keys are lost or stolen, they are useless for others in absence of the legal owner's biometric. A series of numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of this method.

  9. Cerebral blood flow and autoregulation: current measurement techniques and prospects for noninvasive optical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Sergio; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tgavalekos, Kristen T; Kornbluth, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral autoregulation (CA) are critically important to maintain proper brain perfusion and supply the brain with the necessary oxygen and energy substrates. Adequate brain perfusion is required to support normal brain function, to achieve successful aging, and to navigate acute and chronic medical conditions. We review the general principles of CBF measurements and the current techniques to measure CBF based on direct intravascular measurements, nuclear medicine, X-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound techniques, thermal diffusion, and optical methods. We also review techniques for arterial blood pressure measurements as well as theoretical and experimental methods for the assessment of CA, including recent approaches based on optical techniques. The assessment of cerebral perfusion in the clinical practice is also presented. The comprehensive description of principles, methods, and clinical requirements of CBF and CA measurements highlights the potentially important role that noninvasive optical methods can play in the assessment of neurovascular health. In fact, optical techniques have the ability to provide a noninvasive, quantitative, and continuous monitor of CBF and autoregulation.

  10. Non-invasive treatment in pain therapy with the iontophoretic technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Desio

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available From January 2001 to December 2003, 52 patients, 31 females and 21 males, aged between 19 and 78 years, underwent iontophoresis; they all had acute lumbar ischialgia or hiparthrosis; each cycle consisted of 4 consecutive applications in successive days. The 88% of patients (n = 46 had a positive outcome; in 12% (n = 6, pain with characteristics similar to that before treatment arouse again. No patient showed a worsening or side effects on long term. The validity and the advantages of the technique indicate that the iontophoresis is a useful non-invasive and non-traumatic therapeutic presidium, which allows direct drug use in painful area.

  11. Non-invasive studies of multiphase flow in process equipment. Positron emission particle tracking technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakin, B. V.; Adamsen, T. C. H.; Chang, Y.-F.; Kosinski, P.; Hoffmann, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) is a novel experimental technique for non-invasive inspection of industrial fluid/particle flows. The method is based on the dynamic positioning of a positron-emitting, flowing object (particle) performed through the sensing of annihilation events and subsequent numerical treatment to determine the particle position. The present paper shows an integrated overview of PEPT studies which were carried out using a new PET scanner in the Bergen University Hospital to study multiphase flows in different geometric configurations.

  12. Optical coherence tomography: a non-invasive technique applied to conservation of paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Haida; Gomez Cid, Marta; Cucu, Radu; Dobre, George; Kudimov, Boris; Pedro, Justin; Saunders, David; Cupitt, John; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2005-06-01

    It is current practice to take tiny samples from a painting to mount and examine in cross-section under a microscope. However, since conservation practice and ethics limit sampling to a minimum and to areas along cracks and edges of paintings, which are often unrepresentative of the whole painting, results from such analyses cannot be taken as representative of a painting as a whole. Recently in a preliminary study, we have demonstrated that near-infrared Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can be used directly on paintings to examine the cross-section of paint and varnish layers without contact and the need to take samples. OCT is an optical interferometric technique developed for in vivo imaging of the eye and biological tissues; it is essentially a scanning Michelson's interferometer with a "broad-band" source that has the spatial coherence of a laser. The low temporal coherence and high spatial concentration of the source are the keys to high depth resolution and high sensitivity 3D imaging. The technique is non-invasive and non-contact with a typical working distance of 2 cm. This non-invasive technique enables cross-sections to be examined anywhere on a painting. In this paper, we will report new results on applying near-infrared en-face OCT to paintings conservation and extend the application to the examination of underdrawings, drying processes, and quantitative measurements of optical properties of paint and varnish layers.

  13. Noninvasive Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Spoilage Attributes of Chilled Pork Using Hyperspectral Scattering Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leilei; Peng, Yankun

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a rapid noninvasive method for quantitative and qualitative determination of chilled pork spoilage. Microbiological, physicochemical, and organoleptic characteristics such as the total viable count (TVC), Pseudomonas spp., total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N), pH value, and color parameter L* were determined to appraise pork quality. The hyperspectral scattering characteristics from 54 meat samples were fitted by four-parameter modified Gompertz function accurately. Support vector machines (SVM) was applied to establish quantitative prediction model between scattering fitting parameters and reference values. In addition, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and Bayesian analysis were utilized as supervised and unsupervised techniques for the qualitative identification of meat spoilage. All stored chilled meat samples were classified into three grades: "fresh," "semi-fresh," and "spoiled." Bayesian classification model was superior to PLS-DA with overall classification accuracy of 92.86%. The results demonstrated that hyperspectral scattering technique combined with SVM and Bayesian possessed a powerful capability for meat spoilage assessment rapidly and noninvasively. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Specificity of noninvasive blood glucose sensing using optical coherence tomography technique: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larin, Kirill V; Motamedi, Massoud; Ashitkov, Taras V; Esenaliev, Rinat O

    2003-05-21

    Noninvasive monitoring of blood glucose concentration in diabetic patients would significantly reduce complications and mortality associated with this disease. In this paper, we experimentally and theoretically studied specificity of noninvasive blood glucose monitoring with the optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique. OCT images and signals were obtained from skin of Yucatan micropigs and New Zealand rabbits. Obtained results demonstrate that: (1) several body osmolytes may change the refractive index mismatch between the interstitial fluid (ISF) and scattering centres in tissue, however the effect of the glucose is approximately one to two orders of magnitude higher; (2) an increase of the ISF glucose concentration in the physiological range (3-30 mM) may decrease the scattering coefficient by 0.22% mM(-1) due to cell volume change; (3) stability of the OCT signal slope is dependent on tissue heterogeneity and motion artefacts; and (4) moderate skin temperature fluctuations (+/- 1 degree C) do not decrease accuracy and specificity of the OCT-based glucose sensor, however substantial skin heating or cooling (several degrees C) significantly change the OCT signal slope. These results suggest that the OCT technique may provide blood glucose concentration monitoring with sufficient specificity under normal physiological conditions.

  15. Semantic Entity-Component State Management Techniques to Enhance Software Quality for Multimodal VR-Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Martin; Wiebusch, Dennis; Latoschik, Marc Erich

    2017-04-01

    Modularity, modifiability, reusability, and API usability are important software qualities that determine the maintainability of software architectures. Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Reality (VR, AR, MR) systems, modern computer games, as well as interactive human-robot systems often include various dedicated input-, output-, and processing subsystems. These subsystems collectively maintain a real-time simulation of a coherent application state. The resulting interdependencies between individual state representations, mutual state access, overall synchronization, and flow of control implies a conceptual close coupling whereas software quality asks for a decoupling to develop maintainable solutions. This article presents five semantics-based software techniques that address this contradiction: Semantic grounding, code from semantics, grounded actions, semantic queries, and decoupling by semantics. These techniques are applied to extend the well-established entity-component-system (ECS) pattern to overcome some of this pattern's deficits with respect to the implied state access. A walk-through of central implementation aspects of a multimodal (speech and gesture) VR-interface is used to highlight the techniques' benefits. This use-case is chosen as a prototypical example of complex architectures with multiple interacting subsystems found in many VR, AR and MR architectures. Finally, implementation hints are given, lessons learned regarding maintainability pointed-out, and performance implications discussed.

  16. A novel noninvasive all optical technique to monitor physiology of an exercising muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Vishal; Marcu, Laura; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2008-11-01

    An all optical technique based on near-infrared spectroscopy and mid-infrared imaging (MIRI) is applied as a noninvasive, in vivo tool to monitor the vascular status of skeletal muscle and the physiological changes that occur during exercise. A near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique, namely, steady state diffuse optical spectroscopy (SSDOS) along with MIRI is applied for monitoring the changes in the values of tissue oxygenation and thermometry of an exercising muscle. The NIRS measurements are performed at five discrete wavelengths in a spectral window of 650-850 nm and MIRI is performed in a spectral window of 8-12 µm. The understanding of tissue oxygenation status and the behavior of the physiological parameters derived from thermometry may provide a useful insight into muscle physiology, therapeutic response and treatment.

  17. Noninvasive Techniques for Intracranial Pressure Assessment: A Review from Aerospace Medicine Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas R.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Fogarty, Jennifer; Ebert, Douglas J. W.; Polk, J. D.

    2010-01-01

    Microgravity-induced changes in fluid distribution and other physiological factors due to space flight have been implicated as the cause of increased intracranial pressure (ICP) in a number of space crewmembers. The modest levels of ICP elevation and absence of severe symptoms in this group do not warrant invasive diagnostic interventions. However, the long-term trends and residual or consequential changes secondary to the observed ICP elevation in this group are not yet known. Therefore, close attention is needed to evaluate the potential techniques of noninvasively assessing ICP, including those feasible for in-flight use. Of particular interest is continuity between ground and in-flight testing, whereby data from the same or different techniques allow reasonably dependable estimation of ICP trends and responses. Methods: A thorough review of current literature, analysis of NASA data, and interviews with subject matter experts were conducted to construct a presentation that reflects the state of the art for noninvasive ICP measurement and monitoring. Results: Multiple imaging and non-imaging modalities are available to assess ICP in terrestrial clinical and experimental environments. Imaging alternatives include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and high-resolution sonography. Non-imaging techniques include transcranial Doppler, certain audiological methods, and venous ophthalmodynamometry, among others. Special functional techniques have been proposed recently that allow the use of advanced MRI methods to calculate ICP in addition to the acquisition of high-resolution images. Our data include many of these applications, with several cases of correlation with lumbar puncture, the invasive "gold standard" measurement of ICP.

  18. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles function as a long-term, multi-modal imaging label for non-invasive tracking of implanted progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A Pacak

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles to function as a long-term tracking label for multi-modal imaging of implanted engineered tissues containing muscle-derived progenitor cells using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT. SPIO-labeled primary myoblasts were embedded in fibrin sealant and imaged to obtain intensity data by MRI or radio-opacity information by μCT. Each imaging modality displayed a detection gradient that matched increasing SPIO concentrations. Labeled cells were then incorporated in fibrin sealant, injected into the atrioventricular groove of rat hearts, and imaged in vivo and ex vivo for up to 1 year. Transplanted cells were identified in intact animals and isolated hearts using both imaging modalities. MRI was better able to detect minuscule amounts of SPIO nanoparticles, while μCT more precisely identified the location of heavily-labeled cells. Histological analyses confirmed that iron oxide particles were confined to viable, skeletal muscle-derived cells in the implant at the expected location based on MRI and μCT. These analyses showed no evidence of phagocytosis of labeled cells by macrophages or release of nanoparticles from transplanted cells. In conclusion, we established that SPIO nanoparticles function as a sensitive and specific long-term label for MRI and μCT, respectively. Our findings will enable investigators interested in regenerative therapies to non-invasively and serially acquire complementary, high-resolution images of transplanted cells for one year using a single label.

  19. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles function as a long-term, multi-modal imaging label for non-invasive tracking of implanted progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacak, Christina A; Hammer, Peter E; MacKay, Allison A; Dowd, Rory P; Wang, Kai-Roy; Masuzawa, Akihiro; Sill, Bjoern; McCully, James D; Cowan, Douglas B

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles to function as a long-term tracking label for multi-modal imaging of implanted engineered tissues containing muscle-derived progenitor cells using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT). SPIO-labeled primary myoblasts were embedded in fibrin sealant and imaged to obtain intensity data by MRI or radio-opacity information by μCT. Each imaging modality displayed a detection gradient that matched increasing SPIO concentrations. Labeled cells were then incorporated in fibrin sealant, injected into the atrioventricular groove of rat hearts, and imaged in vivo and ex vivo for up to 1 year. Transplanted cells were identified in intact animals and isolated hearts using both imaging modalities. MRI was better able to detect minuscule amounts of SPIO nanoparticles, while μCT more precisely identified the location of heavily-labeled cells. Histological analyses confirmed that iron oxide particles were confined to viable, skeletal muscle-derived cells in the implant at the expected location based on MRI and μCT. These analyses showed no evidence of phagocytosis of labeled cells by macrophages or release of nanoparticles from transplanted cells. In conclusion, we established that SPIO nanoparticles function as a sensitive and specific long-term label for MRI and μCT, respectively. Our findings will enable investigators interested in regenerative therapies to non-invasively and serially acquire complementary, high-resolution images of transplanted cells for one year using a single label.

  20. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungJoon Cho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995. Magn Reson Med 33, 506– 514 derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  1. Non-invasive scanning ion-selective electrode technique and its applications to the research of higher plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Tong; Xu Yue; Li Peng; Yu Shangguan; Yin Liping

    2007-01-01

    The process of various ions and molecules getting into and out of cells is critical for plant survival. The non-invasive scanning ion-selective electrode technique (SIET) is a non-invasive method to obtain the information of ions/molecules across membranes in plant. This technique can measure the absolute concentration of ions and molecules, and also their fluxes and directions of movement.The samples to be analyzed can be a single cell, a piece of tissue, a whole organ and even an intact seedling. This article reviews the recent progress made in plant physiology by using this technique and discusses its potentials in future studies on plant physiology.

  2. Cardiovascular dysfunction in obesity and new diagnostic imaging techniques: the role of noninvasive image methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa JA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available José Augusto A Barbosa¹, Alexandre B Rodrigues¹, Cleonice Carvalho C Mota¹, Márcia M Barbosa², Ana C Simões e Silva¹¹Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil; ²Ecocenter, Socor Hospital, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, BrazilAbstract: Obesity is a major public health problem affecting adults and children in both developed and developing countries. This condition often leads to metabolic syndrome, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. A large number of studies have been carried out to understand the pathogenesis of cardiovascular dysfunction in obese patients. Endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the progression of atherosclerosis and the development of coronary artery disease, hypertension and congestive heart failure. Noninvasive methods in the field of cardiovascular imaging, such as measuring intima-media thickness, flow-mediated dilatation, tissue Doppler, and strain, and strain rate, constitute new tools for the early detection of cardiac and vascular dysfunction. These techniques will certainly enable a better evaluation of initial cardiovascular injury and allow the correct, timely management of obese patients. The present review summarizes the main aspects of cardiovascular dysfunction in obesity and discusses the application of recent noninvasive imaging methods for the early detection of cardiovascular alterations.Keywords: cardiovascular risk, endothelium dysfunction, obesity, strain and strain rate, tissue Doppler

  3. The Book of Kells: A non-invasive MOLAB investigation by complementary spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, B.; Daveri, A.; Clementi, C.; Romani, A.; Bioletti, S.; Brunetti, B.; Sgamellotti, A.; Miliani, C.

    2013-11-01

    This paper highlights the efficacy of non-invasive portable spectroscopy for assessing the execution technique and constituent materials in one of the most important medieval manuscripts, the Book of Kells. An aimed campaign of in situ measurements by the MObile LABoratory (MOLAB) has analyzed its elemental composition and vibrational and electronic molecular properties. The ample analytical toolbox has afforded complementary diagnostic information of the pigment palette permitting the characterization of both inorganic and organic materials as pigments and dyes in the white, purple, blue, red, orange, green and black areas. In particular, the novel widespread use of calcinated gypsum (anhydrite) as both a white pigment and in correlation to the organic dyes in this manuscript has been noted. The non-invasive identification of the organic dye orchil is significant considering its rare non invasive detection in medieval manuscripts. Finally the occurrence of particular alterations of the organic black areas giving rise to calcium carboxylate and calcium oxalate has been specifically highlighted. Importantly, this work elaborates complex aspects of the employed painting materials which have given rise to numerous significant points of interest for a more elaborate understanding of this Irish treasure.

  4. A novel non-invasive diagnostic sampling technique for cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taslimi, Yasaman; Sadeghipour, Pardis; Habibzadeh, Sima; Mashayekhi, Vahid; Mortazavi, Hossien; Müller, Ingrid; Lane, Majella E; Kropf, Pascale; Rafati, Sima

    2017-07-01

    Accurate diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is important for chemotherapy and epidemiological studies. Common approaches for Leishmania detection involve the invasive collection of specimens for direct identification of amastigotes by microscopy and the culturing of promastigotes from infected tissues. Although these techniques are highly specific, they require highly skilled health workers and have the inherent risks of all invasive procedures, such as pain and risk of bacterial and fungal super-infection. Therefore, it is essential to reduce discomfort, potential infection and scarring caused by invasive diagnostic approaches especially for children. In this report, we present a novel non-invasive method, that is painless, rapid and user-friendly, using sequential tape strips for sampling and isolation of DNA from the surface of active and healed skin lesions of CL patients. A total of 119 patients suspected of suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis with different clinical manifestations were recruited and samples were collected both from their lesions and from uninfected areas. In addition, 15 fungal-infected lesions and 54 areas of healthy skin were examined. The duration of sampling is short (less than one minute) and species identification by PCR is highly specific and sensitive. The sequential tape stripping sampling method is a sensitive, non-invasive and cost-effective alternative to traditional diagnostic assays and it is suitable for field studies as well as for use in health care centers.

  5. ESR technique for noninvasive way to quantify cyclodextrins effect on cell membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grammenos, A., E-mail: A.Grammenos@ulg.ac.be [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, B5, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman (Belgium); Mouithys-Mickalad, A. [Center of Oxygen, Research and Development (CORD), Department of Chemistry, B6a, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman (Belgium); Guelluy, P.H.; Lismont, M. [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, B5, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman (Belgium); Piel, G. [Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Pharmacy, CHU, B36, University of Liege, 1 Av. de l' Hopital (Belgium); Hoebeke, M. [Laboratory of Biomedical Spectroscopy, Department of Physics, B5, University of Liege, Sart-Tilman (Belgium)

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} ESR: a new tool for cyclodextrins study on living cells. {yields} Cholesterol and phospholipid extraction by Rameb in a dose- and time-dependent way. {yields} Extracted phospholipids and cholesterol form stable aggregates. {yields} ESR spectra show that lipid rafts are damaged by Rameb. {yields} Quantification of the cholesterol extraction on cell membranes in a noninvasive way. -- Abstract: A new way to study the action of cyclodextrin was developed to quantify the damage caused on cell membrane and lipid bilayer. The Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to study the action of Randomly methylated-beta-cyclodextrin (Rameb) on living cells (HCT-116). The relative anisotropy observed in ESR spectrum of nitroxide spin probe (5-DSA and cholestane) is directly related to the rotational mobility of the probe, which can be further correlated with the microviscosity. The use of ESR probes clearly shows a close correlation between cholesterol contained in cells and cellular membrane microviscosity. This study also demonstrates the Rameb ability to extract cholesterol and phospholipids in time- and dose-dependent ways. In addition, ESR spectra enabled to establish that cholesterol is extracted from lipid rafts to form stable aggregates. The present work supports that ESR is an easy, reproducible and noninvasive technique to study the effect of cyclodextrins on cell membranes.

  6. Non-invasive diagnostic techniques in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warszawik-Hendzel, Olga; Olszewska, Małgorzata; Maj, Małgorzata; Rakowska, Adriana; Czuwara, Joanna; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2015-12-31

    Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common cutaneous malignancy after basal cell carcinoma. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for squamous cell carcinoma is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Dermoscopy has become one of the basic diagnostic methods in clinical practice. The most common dermoscopic features of squamous cell carcinoma include clustered vascular pattern, glomerular vessels and hyperkeratosis. Under reflectance confocal microscopy, squamous cell carcinoma shows an atypical honeycomb or disarranged pattern of the spinous-granular layer of the epidermis, round nucleated bright cells in the epidermis and round vessels in the dermis. High frequency ultrasound and optical coherence tomography may be helpful in predominantly in pre-surgical evaluation of tumor size. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, lip, oral mucosa, vulva or other tissues include high-definition optical coherence tomography, in vivo multiphoton tomography, direct oral microscopy, electrical impedance spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, elastic scattering spectroscopy, differential path-length spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and angle-resolved low coherence interferometry.

  7. Continuous Non-Invasive Arterial Pressure Technique Improves Patient Monitoring during Interventional Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Siebig, Felix Rockmann, Karl Sabel, Ina Zuber-Jerger, Christine Dierkes, Tanja Brünnler, Christian E. Wrede

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Close monitoring of arterial blood pressure (BP is a central part of cardiovascular surveillance of patients at risk for hypotension. Therefore, patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with the use of sedating agents are monitored by discontinuous non-invasive BP measurement (NIBP. Continuous non-invasive BP monitoring based on vascular unloading technique (CNAP®, CN Systems, Graz may improve patient safety in those settings. We investigated if this new technique improved monitoring of patients undergoing interventional endoscopy. Methods: 40 patients undergoing interventional endoscopy between April and December 2007 were prospectively studied with CNAP® in addition to standard monitoring (NIBP, ECG and oxygen saturation. All monitoring values were extracted from the surveillance network at one-second intervals, and clinical parameters were documented. The variance of CNAP® values were calculated for every interval between two NIBP measurements. Results: 2660 minutes of monitoring were recorded (mean 60.1±34.4 min/patient. All patients were analgosedated with midazolam and pethidine, and 24/40 had propofol infusion (mean 90.9±70.3 mg. The mean arterial pressure for CNAP® was 102.4±21.2 mmHg and 106.8±24.8 mmHg for NIBP. Based on the first NIBP value in an interval between two NIBP measurements, BP values determined by CNAP® showed a maximum increase of 30.8±21.7% and a maximum decrease of 22.4±28.3% (mean of all intervals. Discussion: Conventional intermittent blood pressure monitoring of patients receiving sedating agents failed to detect fast changes in BP. The new technique CNAP® improved the detection of rapid BP changes, and may contribute to a better patient safety for those undergoing interventional procedures.

  8. Cartilage repair surgery: outcome evaluation by using noninvasive cartilage biomarkers based on quantitative MRI techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Pia M; Baum, Thomas; Bauer, Jan S; Karampinos, Dimitrios C; Erdle, Benjamin; Link, Thomas M; Li, Xiaojuan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Rummeny, Ernst J; Woertler, Klaus; Welsch, Goetz H

    2014-01-01

    New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair.

  9. Cartilage Repair Surgery: Outcome Evaluation by Using Noninvasive Cartilage Biomarkers Based on Quantitative MRI Techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia M. Jungmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. Objective. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Methods. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Results. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. Conclusions. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair.

  10. Non-Invasive Glucose Monitoring Techniques: A review and current trends

    CERN Document Server

    Poddar, Raju; Shukla, Pratyoosh; Sen, Pratima

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex group of syndromes that have in common a disturbance in the body's use of glucose, resulting in an elevated blood sugar. Once detected, sugar diabetes can be controlled by an appropriate regimen that should include diet therapy, a weight reduction program for those persons who are overweight, a program of exercise and insulin injections or oral drugs to lower blood glucose. Blood glucose monitoring by the patient and the physician is an important aspect in the control of the devastating complications (heart disease, blindness, kidney failure or amputations) due to the disease. Intensive therapy and frequent glucose testing has numerous benefits. With ever improving advances in diagnostic technology, the race for the next generation of bloodless, painless, accurate glucose instruments has begun. In this paper, we reviewed various methods, techniques and approaches successfully demonstrated for measuring or monitoring blood glucose. Invasive, minimally invasive and noninvasive tec...

  11. High-Level Modeling of Multimodal Interaction Techniques Using NiMMiT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Raymaekers

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The past few years, multimodal interaction has been gaining importance in virtual environments. Although multimodality renders interacting with an environment more natural and intuitive, the development cycle of such an application is often long and expensive. In our overall field of research, we investigate how model-based design can facilitate the development process by designing environments through the use of high-level diagrams. In this scope, we present ‘NiMMiT′, a graphical notation for expressing and evaluating multimodal user interaction; we elaborate on the NiMMiT primitives and demonstrate its use by means of a comprehensive example.

  12. Combining non-invasive techniques for delimitation and monitoring of chlorinated solvents in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrenbom, Charlotte; Åkesson, Sofia; Hagerberg, David; Dahlin, Torleif; Holmstrand, Henry; Johansson, Sara

    2016-04-01

    Large numbers of polluted areas cause leakage of hazardous pollutants into our groundwater. Remediated actions are needed in a vast number of areas to prevent degradation of the quality of our water resources. As excavation of polluted masses is problematic as it often moves the pollutants from one site to another (in best case off site treatment is carried out), in-situ remediation and monitoring thereof needs further development. In general, we need to further develop and improve how we retrieve information on the status of the underground system. This is needed to avoid costly and hazardous shipments associated with excavations and to avoid unnecessary exposure when handling polluted masses. Easier, cheaper, more comprehensive and nondestructive monitoring techniques are needed for evaluation of remediation degree, degradation status of the contaminants and the remaining groundwater contaminant plume. We investigate the possibility to combine two investigation techniques, which are invasive to a very low degree and can give a very good visualization and evaluation of pollutant status underground and changes therein in time. The two methods we have combined are Direct Current resistivity and time-domain Induced Polarization tomography (DCIP) and Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) and their use within the context of DNAPL contaminated sites. DCIP is a non-invasive and non-destructive geoelectrical measurement method with emerging new techniques for 4D mapping for promising visualization of underground hydrogeochemical structures and spatial distribution of contaminants. The strength of CSIA is that inherent degradation-relatable isotopic information of contaminant molecules remains unaffected as opposed to the commonly used concentration-based studies. Our aim is to evaluate the possibilities of gas sampling on the ground surface for this technique to become non-invasive and usable without interfering ground conditions.Drillings together with soil and

  13. Noninvasive saliva collection techniques for free-ranging mountain gorillas and captive eastern gorillas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley, Tierra; Spelman, Lucy; Lukasik-Braum, Magdalena; Mukherjee, Jean; Kaufman, Gretchen; Akiyoshi, Donna E; Cranfield, Michael

    2010-06-01

    This study was designed to develop a simple, noninvasive method for saliva collection: a first step toward developing new diagnostic tests to survey gorillas for infectious diseases. The subjects included free-ranging mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) in the Parc National des Volcans, Rwanda, and a group of orphan mountain and Grauer's gorillas (Gorilla heringei graueri) housed nearby in a temporary holding facility. Three collection methods were used to recover saliva from discarded forest food: swabbing, soaking, and washing. Saliva was also collected from orphan gorillas maintained in a captive setting by using dental ropes inside mesh bags. The presence of gorilla saliva in each sample was confirmed by using a salivary s-amylase assay and forensic press test paper. The recovery of gorilla DNA was verified by polymerase chain reaction by using primers specific to mountain and Grauer's gorillas. Of the three collection techniques used to recover saliva from forest food, directly swabbing plant bite marks was the most effective. Wild celery (Peucedanum linderi) provided for the most consistent saliva recovery and is eaten year round by mountain gorillas in Rwanda. This study shows that gorilla saliva can be recovered easily and noninvasively from known individual free-ranging gorillas by collecting pieces of wild celery discarded as the gorillas forage and from captive gorillas by offering them juice-soaked dental ropes inside mesh bags. Both methods can be used to recover gorilla DNA for genetic studies. Saliva collected from free-ranging and captive gorillas may prove to be a useful biologic sample for the development of new diagnostic tests and hormonal analysis.

  14. Towards non-invasive diagnostic techniques for early detection of acute renal transplant rejection: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Hollis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The kidney is a very important complicated filtering organ of the body. When the kidney reaches stage 5 chronic kidney disease, end stage renal failure, the preeminent therapy is renal transplantation. Although it is the best form of treatment, lack of kidney donors is still challenging. Therefore, all efforts should be employed to prolong the survival rate of the transplanted kidney. However, graft dysfunction (e.g., acute rejection is one of the serious barriers to long term kidney transplant survival. Currently, graft dysfunction’s gold standard of diagnosis is renal biopsy. Although renal biopsy is helpful, it is not preferred due to its invasive nature, high morbidity rates, and expensiveness. Therefore, noninvasive imaging techniques have become the subject of extensive research and interest, giving a strong promise to replace, or at least to decrease, biopsy usage in diagnosing graft dysfunction. This survey will discuss not only the current diagnosis and treatment of graft dysfunction but also the state-of-the-art imaging techniques in detecting acute renal transplant rejection.

  15. A New Feature Extraction Technique for Person Identification Using Multimodal Biometrics

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    C. Malathy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Unimodal biometric systems when compared with multimodal systems can be easily spoofed and may get affected by noisy data. Due to the limitations faced by unimodal systems, the need for multimodal biometric systems has rapidly increased. Multimodal systems are more reliable as it uses more than one independent biometric trait to recognize a person. These systems are more secured and have less enrollment problems compared to unimodal systems. A new Enhanced Local Line Binary Pattern (ELLBP method is devised to extract features from ear and fingerprint so as to improve recognition rate and to provide a more reliable and secured multimodal system. The features extracted are stored in the database and compared with the test features for matching. Hamming distance is used as the metric for identification. Experiments were conducted with publicly available databases and were observed that this enhanced method provides excellent results compared to earlier methods. The method was analyzed for performance with Local Binary Pattern (LBP, Local Line Binary Pattern (LLBP and Local Ternary Pattern (LTP. The results of our multimodal system were compared with individual biometric traits and also with ear and fingerprint fused together using enhanced LLPD and other earlier methods. It is observed that our method outperforms earlier methods.

  16. A novel technique to incorporate structural prior information into multi-modal tomographic reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Ourselin, Sébastien; Hutton, Brian F.; Dobson, Katherine J.; Kaestner, Anders P.; Lionheart, William R. B.; Withers, Philip J.; Lee, Peter D.; Arridge, Simon R.

    2014-06-01

    There has been a rapid expansion of multi-modal imaging techniques in tomography. In biomedical imaging, patients are now regularly imaged using both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and x-ray computed tomography (CT), or using both positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In non-destructive testing of materials both neutron CT (NCT) and x-ray CT are widely applied to investigate the inner structure of material or track the dynamics of physical processes. The potential benefits from combining modalities has led to increased interest in iterative reconstruction algorithms that can utilize the data from more than one imaging mode simultaneously. We present a new regularization term in iterative reconstruction that enables information from one imaging modality to be used as a structural prior to improve resolution of the second modality. The regularization term is based on a modified anisotropic tensor diffusion filter, that has shape-adapted smoothing properties. By considering the underlying orientations of normal and tangential vector fields for two co-registered images, the diffusion flux is rotated and scaled adaptively to image features. The images can have different greyscale values and different spatial resolutions. The proposed approach is particularly good at isolating oriented features in images which are important for medical and materials science applications. By enhancing the edges it enables both easy identification and volume fraction measurements aiding segmentation algorithms used for quantification. The approach is tested on a standard denoising and deblurring image recovery problem, and then applied to 2D and 3D reconstruction problems; thereby highlighting the capabilities of the algorithm. Using synthetic data from SPECT co-registered with MRI, and real NCT data co-registered with x-ray CT, we show how the method can be used across a range of imaging modalities.

  17. State-of-the-Art Sensor Technology in Spain: Invasive and Non-Invasive Techniques for Monitoring Respiratory Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Domingo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The interest in measuring physiological parameters (especially arterial blood gases has grown progressively in parallel to the development of new technologies. Physiological parameters were first measured invasively and at discrete time points; however, it was clearly desirable to measure them continuously and non-invasively. The development of intensive care units promoted the use of ventilators via oral intubation ventilators via oral intubation and mechanical respiratory variables were progressively studied. Later, the knowledge gained in the hospital was applied to out-of-hospital management. In the present paper we review the invasive and non-invasive techniques for monitoring respiratory variables.

  18. Non-invasive techniques for revealing the palette of the Romantic painter Francesco Hayez

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampazzi, Laura; Brunello, Valentina; Corti, Cristina; Lissoni, Elena

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the first systematic analysis of the palette of Francesco Hayez, one of the most outstanding artists of European Romanticism, whose painting technique has never been extensively investigated despite the plethora of artistic studies. He lived in a particular moment in the history of painting, as in the first half of the 19th century many synthetic pigments were available, also in tin tubes, but traditional materials were still used. Sixteen paintings on canvas and on panels, created between 1823 and 1868, were analyzed in situ through non-invasive techniques (infrared reflectography and infrared reflection spectroscopy). Imaging investigation provided clues on painting technique, revealing some cases of pentimenti and underdrawings. A preliminary survey was carried out on a hundred pure pigments used up to the 19th century and on new synthetic colours, in order to attain reference spectra for the interpretation of painting spectra. The portable infrared instrument provided insight into Hayez's painting materials, identifying barite, ivory black, lead-tin yellow, Naples yellow, ochres, Prussian blue, and white lead. The pigments were often blended, to obtain a unique fabric appearance or to attain cold shades. The results pointed to a siccative oil as a binder, mixed with white lead so that it could act as a catalyzer in polymerization reactions, and in some cases with a proteinaceous binder and resins. The preparation was made with gypsum and white lead mixed with a siccative oil. The results showed that the artist used a typical traditional palette, throughout his career, in order to lead to brilliant colours and with long-term stability. Anyway, the possible presence of cobalt blue in a few paintings suggests that Hayez had probably started testing the new colours, since the second decade of 19th century.

  19. Non-invasive techniques for revealing the palette of the Romantic painter Francesco Hayez.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampazzi, Laura; Brunello, Valentina; Corti, Cristina; Lissoni, Elena

    2017-04-05

    This paper describes the first systematic analysis of the palette of Francesco Hayez, one of the most outstanding artists of European Romanticism, whose painting technique has never been extensively investigated despite the plethora of artistic studies. He lived in a particular moment in the history of painting, as in the first half of the 19th century many synthetic pigments were available, also in tin tubes, but traditional materials were still used. Sixteen paintings on canvas and on panels, created between 1823 and 1868, were analyzed in situ through non-invasive techniques (infrared reflectography and infrared reflection spectroscopy). Imaging investigation provided clues on painting technique, revealing some cases of pentimenti and underdrawings. A preliminary survey was carried out on a hundred pure pigments used up to the 19th century and on new synthetic colours, in order to attain reference spectra for the interpretation of painting spectra. The portable infrared instrument provided insight into Hayez's painting materials, identifying barite, ivory black, lead-tin yellow, Naples yellow, ochres, Prussian blue, and white lead. The pigments were often blended, to obtain a unique fabric appearance or to attain cold shades. The results pointed to a siccative oil as a binder, mixed with white lead so that it could act as a catalyzer in polymerization reactions, and in some cases with a proteinaceous binder and resins. The preparation was made with gypsum and white lead mixed with a siccative oil. The results showed that the artist used a typical traditional palette, throughout his career, in order to lead to brilliant colours and with long-term stability. Anyway, the possible presence of cobalt blue in a few paintings suggests that Hayez had probably started testing the new colours, since the second decade of 19th century. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of Image Fusion Techniques for fingerprint Palmprint Multimodal Biometric System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Anu H Naira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The multimodal Biometric System using multiple sources of information has been widely recognized. However computational models for multimodal biometrics recognition have only recently received attention. In this paper the fingerprint and palmprint images are chosen and fused together using image fusion methods. The biometric features are subjected to modality extraction. Different fusion methods like average fusion, minimum fusion, maximum fusion, discrete wavelet transform fusion and stationary wavelet transformfusion are implemented for the fusion of extracting modalities. The best fused template is analyzed by applying various fusion metrics. Here the DWT fused image provided better results.

  1. The temporomandibular joint in video motion--noninvasive image techniques to present the functional anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordass, B

    1999-01-01

    The presentation of the functional anatomy of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is involved with difficulties if dynamic aspects are to be of prime interest, and it should be demonstrated with the highest resolution. Usually noninvasive techniques like MRI and sonography are available for presenting functionality of the temporomandibular joint in video motion. Such images reflect the functional anatomy much better than single pictures of figures could do. In combination with computer aided records of the condyle movements the video motion of MR and sonographical images represent tools for better understanding the relationships between functional or dysfunctional patterns and the morphological or dysmorphological shape and structure of the temporomandibular joint. The possibilities of such tools will be explained and discussed in detail relating, in addition, to loading effects caused by transmitted occlusal pressure onto the joint compartments. If pressure occurs the condyle slides mainly more or less retrocranially whereas the articular disc takes up a more displaced position and a deformed shape. In a few extreme cases the disc prolapses out of the joint space. These video pictures offer new aspects for the diagnosis of the disc-condyle stability and can also be used for explicit educational programs on the complex dysfunction-dysmorphology-relationship of temporomandibular diseases.

  2. Noninvasive technique for monitoring drug transport through the murine cochlea using micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghpanahi, Masoumeh; Gladstone, Miriam B; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D; Borkholder, David A

    2013-10-01

    Local delivery of drugs to the inner ear has the potential to treat inner ear disorders including permanent hearing loss or deafness. Current mathematical models describing the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery to the inner ear have been based on large rodent studies with invasive measurements of concentration at few locations within the cochlea. Hence, estimates of clearance and diffusion parameters are based on fitting measured data with limited spatial resolution to a model. To overcome these limitations, we developed a noninvasive imaging technique to monitor and characterize drug delivery inside the mouse cochlea using micro-computed tomography (μCT). To increase the measurement accuracy, we performed a subject-atlas image registration to exploit the information readily available in the atlas image of the mouse cochlea and pass segmentation or labeling information from the atlas to our μCT scans. The approach presented here has the potential to quantify concentrations at any point along fluid-filled scalae of the inner ear. This may permit determination of spatially dependent diffusion and clearance parameters for enhanced models.

  3. Non-invasive quantification of endogenous root auxin transport using an integrated flux microsensor technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLamore, Eric S; Diggs, Alfred; Calvo Marzal, Percy; Shi, Jin; Blakeslee, Joshua J; Peer, Wendy A; Murphy, Angus S; Porterfield, D Marshall

    2010-09-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is a primary phytohormone that regulates multiple aspects of plant development. Because polar transport of IAA is an essential determinant of organogenesis and dynamic tropic growth, methods to monitor IAA movement in vivo are in demand. A self-referencing electrochemical microsensor was optimized to non-invasively measure endogenous IAA flux near the surface of Zea mays roots without the addition of exogenous IAA. Enhanced sensor surface modification, decoupling of acquired signals, and integrated flux analyses were combined to provide direct, real time quantification of endogenous IAA movement in B73 maize inbred and brachytic2 (br2) auxin transport mutant roots. BR2 is localized in epidermal and hypodermal tissues at the root apex. br2 roots exhibit reduced shootward IAA transport at the root apex in radiotracer experiments and reduced gravitropic growth. IAA flux data indicates that maximal transport occurs in the distal elongation zone of maize roots, and net transport in/out of br2 roots was decreased compared to B73. Integration of short term real time flux data in this zone revealed oscillatory patterns, with B73 exhibiting shorter oscillatory periods and greater amplitude than br2. IAA efflux and influx were inhibited using 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), and 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (NOA), respectively. A simple harmonic oscillation model of these data produced a correlation between modeled and measured values of 0.70 for B73 and 0.69 for br2. These results indicate that this technique is useful for real-time IAA transport monitoring in surface tissues and that this approach can be performed simultaneously with current live imaging techniques.

  4. Evaluation of biolistic gene transfer methods in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniell Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy continues to hold great potential for treating many different types of disease and dysfunction. Safe and efficient techniques for gene transfer and expression in vivo are needed to enable gene therapeutic strategies to be effective in patients. Currently, the most commonly used methods employ replication-defective viral vectors for gene transfer, while physical gene transfer methods such as biolistic-mediated ("gene-gun" delivery to target tissues have not been as extensively explored. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of biolistic gene transfer techniques in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging (BLI methods. Results Plasmid DNA carrying the firefly luciferase (LUC reporter gene under the control of the human Cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter/enhancer was transfected into mouse skin and liver using biolistic methods. The plasmids were coupled to gold microspheres (1 μm diameter using different DNA Loading Ratios (DLRs, and "shot" into target tissues using a helium-driven gene gun. The optimal DLR was found to be in the range of 4-10. Bioluminescence was measured using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS-50 at various time-points following transfer. Biolistic gene transfer to mouse skin produced peak reporter gene expression one day after transfer. Expression remained detectable through four days, but declined to undetectable levels by six days following gene transfer. Maximum depth of tissue penetration following biolistic transfer to abdominal skin was 200-300 μm. Similarly, biolistic gene transfer to mouse liver in vivo also produced peak early expression followed by a decline over time. In contrast to skin, however, liver expression of the reporter gene was relatively stable 4-8 days post-biolistic gene transfer, and remained detectable for nearly two weeks. Conclusions The use of bioluminescence imaging techniques enabled efficient evaluation of reporter gene expression in vivo. Our results

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopy: a powerful technique for the noninvasive characterization of artwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Aldo; Clementi, Catia; Miliani, Costanza; Favaro, Gianna

    2010-06-15

    After electronic excitation by ultraviolet or visible radiation, atoms and molecules can undergo thermal or radiative deactivation processes before relaxing to the ground state. They can emit photons with longer wavelengths than the incoming exciting radiation, that is, they can fluoresce in the UV-vis-near-infrared (NIR) range. The study of fluorescence relaxation processes is one of the experimental bases on which modern theories of atomic and molecular structure are founded. Over the past few decades, technological improvements in both optics and electronics have greatly expanded fluorimetric applications, particularly in analytical fields, because of the high sensitivity and specificity afforded by the methods. Using fluorimetry in the study and conservation of cultural heritage is a recent innovation. In this Account, we briefly summarize the use of fluorescence-based techniques in examining the constituent materials of a work of art in a noninvasive manner. Many chemical components in artwork, especially those of an organic nature, are fluorescent materials, which can be reliably used for both diagnostic and conservative purposes. We begin by examining fluorimetry in the laboratory setting, considering the organic dyes and inorganic pigments that are commonly studied. For a number of reasons, works of art often cannot be moved into laboratories, so we continue with a discussion of portable instruments and a variety of successful "field applications" of fluorimetry to works of cultural heritage. These examples include studies of mural paintings, canvas paintings, tapestries, and parchments. We conclude by examining recent advances in treating the data that are generated in fluorescence studies. These new perspectives are focused on the spectral shape and lifetime of the emitted radiation. Recent developments have provided the opportunity to use various spectroscopic techniques on an increasing number of objects, as well as the ability to fully characterize

  6. Recommendations for multimodal noninvasive and invasive screening for detection of extracranial venous abnormalities indicative of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency: a position statement of the International Society for Neurovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivadinov, Robert; Bastianello, Stefano; Dake, Michael D; Ferral, Hector; Haacke, E Mark; Haskal, Ziv J; Hubbard, David; Liasis, Nikolaos; Mandato, Kenneth; Sclafani, Salvatore; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Simka, Marian; Zamboni, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Under the auspices of the International Society for Neurovascular Disease (ISNVD), four expert panel committees were created from the ISNVD membership between 2011 and 2012 to determine and standardize noninvasive and invasive imaging protocols for detection of extracranial venous abnormalities indicative of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI). The committees created working groups on color Doppler ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, catheter venography (CV), and intravascular US. Each group organized a workshop focused on its assigned imaging modality. Non-ISNVD members from other societies were invited to contribute to the various workshops. More than 60 neurology, radiology, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology experts participated in these workshops and contributed to the development of standardized noninvasive and invasive imaging protocols for the detection of extracranial venous abnormalities indicative of CCSVI. This ISNVD position statement presents the MR imaging and intravascular US protocols for the first time and describes refined color Doppler US and CV protocols. It also emphasizes the need for the use of for noninvasive and invasive multimodal imaging to diagnose adequately and monitor extracranial venous abnormalities indicative of CCSVI for open-label or double-blinded, randomized, controlled studies.

  7. Influence of multimode universal adhesives and zirconia primer application techniques on zirconia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Bruno; Arantes-Oliveira, Sofia; Portugal, Jaime

    2014-08-01

    More information is needed on the efficacy of the new universal adhesives and on the best 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate- (MDP)-containing primer protocol to promote adhesion to zirconia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 new multimode MDP-containing adhesives and several application protocols of a zirconia primer on the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite resin to zirconia. Sixty zirconia (3Y-TZP) blocks were abraded (50 μm Al2O3) and divided into 6 experimental groups (n=10): one Z-Prime Plus coat without light polymerization; one Z-Prime Plus light-polymerized coat; two Z-Prime Plus coats without light polymerization; two Z-Prime Plus light-polymerized coats; All-Bond Universal; and ScotchBond Universal Adhesive. Multimode adhesives were applied according to the manufacturers' recommendations. After composite resin (Filtek Z250) light polymerization, the specimens were stored in distilled water (37°C/48 hours) and tested in shear (1 mm/min). Failure mode was classified as adhesive or mixed. Statistical analysis of the SBS data was performed with 1-way ANOVA followed by the Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc tests. Nonparametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis) were used to analyze the failure mode data (α=.05). The ScotchBond Universal Adhesive, All-Bond Universal, and two Z-Prime Plus light-polymerized coats groups showed a higher mean SBS than the other experimental groups (Padhesive failures. The new multimode adhesives tested were effective in promoting adhesion between composite resin and zirconia. Z-Prime Plus should be applied in 2 light-polymerized coats to promote SBS values similar to those of the new multimode adhesives. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Multimodality imaging for resuscitated sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingming Amy; Deva, Djeven; Kirpalani, Anish; Prabhudesai, Vikram; Marcuzzi, Danny W; Graham, John J; Verma, Subodh; Jimenez-Juan, Laura; Yan, Andrew T

    2015-01-01

    We present a case that elegantly illustrates the utility of two novel noninvasive imaging techniques, computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography and cardiac MRI, in the diagnosis and management of a 27-year-old man with exertion-induced cardiac arrest caused by an anomalous right coronary artery. CT coronary angiography with 3D reformatting delineated the interarterial course of an anomalous right coronary artery compressed between the aorta and pulmonary artery, whereas cardiac MRI showed a small myocardial infarction in the right coronary artery territory not detected on echocardiography. This case highlights the value of novel multimodality imaging techniques in the risk stratification and management of patients with resuscitated cardiac arrest.

  9. Multimodal nanoparticulate bioimaging contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Parvesh; Singh, Amit; Brown, Scott C; Bengtsson, Niclas; Walter, Glenn A; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Iwakuma, Nobutaka; Santra, Swadeshmukul; Scott, Edward W; Moudgil, Brij M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of bioimaging techniques (e.g., ultrasound, computed X-ray tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography) are commonly employed for clinical diagnostics and scientific research. While all of these methods use a characteristic "energy-matter" interaction to provide specific details about biological processes, each modality differs from another in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, anatomical and molecular details, imaging depth, as well as the desirable material properties of contrast agents needed for augmented imaging. On many occasions, it is advantageous to apply multiple complimentary imaging modalities for faster and more accurate prognosis. Since most imaging modalities employ exogenous contrast agents to improve the signal-to-noise ratio, the development and use of multimodal contrast agents is considered to be highly advantageous for obtaining improved imagery from sought-after imaging modalities. Multimodal contrast agents offer improvements in patient care, and at the same time can reduce costs and enhance safety by limiting the number of contrast agent administrations required for imaging purposes. Herein, we describe the synthesis and characterization of nanoparticulate-based multimodal contrast agent for noninvasive bioimaging using MRI, optical, and photoacoustic tomography (PAT)-imaging modalities. The synthesis of these agents is described using microemulsions, which enable facile integration of the desired diversity of contrast agents and material components into a single entity.

  10. Respiratory muscle activity measured with a noninvasive EMG technique : technical aspects and reproducibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, EJW; Van Eykern, LA; Sprikkelman, AB; Hoekstra, MO; Van Aalderen, WMC

    A new method is being developed to investigate airway obstruction in young children by means of noninvasive electromyography (EMG) of diaphragmatic and intercostal muscles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of the EMG measurements. Eleven adults, 39 school children (20

  11. Respiratory muscle activity measured with a noninvasive EMG technique : technical aspects and reproducibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maarsingh, EJW; Van Eykern, LA; Sprikkelman, AB; Hoekstra, MO; Van Aalderen, WMC

    2000-01-01

    A new method is being developed to investigate airway obstruction in young children by means of noninvasive electromyography (EMG) of diaphragmatic and intercostal muscles. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of the EMG measurements. Eleven adults, 39 school children (20 he

  12. Noninvasive assessment of cutaneous alterations in mice exposed to whole body gamma irradiation using optical imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Sahu, K; Kushwaha, P K; Kumar, S; Swami, M K; Kumawat, J; Patel, H S; Kher, S; Sahani, P K; Haridas, G; Gupta, P K

    2017-07-11

    We report the results of a study carried out to investigate the potential of optical techniques such as optical coherence tomography, Mueller matrix spectroscopy, and cross-polarization imaging for noninvasive monitoring of the ionizing radiation exposure-induced alterations in cutaneous tissue of mice. Radiation dose-dependent changes were observed in tissue microvasculature and tissue optical parameters like retardance and depolarization as early as 1 h post radiation exposure. Results suggest that these optical techniques may allow early detection of radiation dose-dependent alterations which could help in screening of population exposed to radiation.

  13. Enhancing motor performance improvement by personalizing non-invasive cortical stimulation with concurrent functional near-infrared spectroscopy and multi-modal motor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Bilal; Hodics, Timea; Hervey, Nathan; Kondraske, George; Stowe, Ann; Alexandrakis, George

    2015-03-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive cortical stimulation technique that can facilitate task specific plasticity that can improve motor performance. Current tDCS interventions uniformly apply a chosen electrode montage to a subject population without personalizing electrode placement for optimal motor gains. We propose a novel perturbation tDCS (ptDCS) paradigm for determining a personalized electrode montage in which tDCS intervention yields maximal motor performance improvements during stimulation. PtDCS was applied to ten healthy adults and five stroke patients with upper hemiparesis as they performed an isometric wrist flexion task with their non-dominant arm. Simultaneous recordings of torque applied to a stationary handle, muscle activity by electromyography (EMG), and cortical activity by functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during ptDCS helped interpret how cortical activity perturbations by any given electrode montage related to changes in muscle activity and task performance quantified by a Reaction Time (RT) X Error product. PtDCS enabled quantifying the effect on task performance of 20 different electrode pair montages placed over the sensorimotor cortex. Interestingly, the electrode montage maximizing performance in all healthy adults did not match any of the ones being explored in current literature as a means of improving the motor performance of stroke patients. Furthermore, the optimal montage was found to be different in each stroke patient and the resulting motor gains were very significant during stimulation. This study supports the notion that task-specific ptDCS optimization can lend itself to personalizing the rehabilitation of patients with brain injury.

  14. A Non-Invasive Ultrasonic Urinary Bladder Internal Pressure Monitoring Technique: Its Theoretical Foundation and Feasibility Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Min Joo; Kang, Gwan Suk [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Il [Department of Physics, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    A new approach was proposed in this article, named, a non-invasive ultrasonic method to monitor the urinary bladder internal pressure which can resolve the shortcomings of the existing methods. The proposed method makes use of acoustic cavitation. It is based on a physical phenomenon that an extracorporeal high intensity focused ultrasonic pulse generates bubbles inside the urinary bladder and the dynamic properties of the bubbles are related to the urinary bladder internal pressure. The article presents the theoretical foundation for the proposed technique and verifies its feasibility with preliminary experimental data. The suggested ultrasonic urinary bladder internal pressure monitoring method is non-invasive and can be used any time regardless of sex and age.

  15. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor of 0–0.36 psi by Multimode Interference Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Mejia-Aranda

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, development and tests made to a fiber optic pressure sensor using the multimodal interference methodology (MMI thus, we propose an alternative sensor to the ones available which are limited by high robust environments where the use of them is a potential hazard (explosive gases, corrosion and even electromagnetic fields. The range of work for this sensor is 0 to 0.36 psi, the arrangement used is formed by a laser diode, a sensing element, an electronic amplifying circuit, a data acquisition board and a computer. The sensing element used is a SMS fiber optic structure (singlemode–multimode–singlemode, where a multimode fiber is embedded between two singlemode fibers placed within the contact surface (diaphragm made of a polymeric material; the body of the sensor was made of nylamid. The bending produced in the diaphragm by the pressure inside the body of the sensor generates changes in the transmitted power response carried inside the fiber.

  16. Circulating nucleic acids in plasma and serum: applications in diagnostic techniques for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gahan PB

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Peter B Gahan Anatomy and Human Sciences Department, King's College London, London Bridge, London, UK Abstract: The analysis of fetal nucleic acids in maternal blood 13 years ago has led to the initiation of noninvasive methods for the early determination of fetal gender, rhesus D status, and a number of aneuploid disorders and hemoglobinopathies. Subsequently, a comparatively large quantity of fetal DNA and RNA has been demonstrated in amniotic fluid as well as small amounts in premature infant saliva. The DNA and RNA in amniotic fluid has permitted an analysis of core transcriptomes, whilst the DNA and RNA in saliva allows the early detection and treatment monitoring of fetal developmental problems. These aspects are discussed together with the methodology and limits of analysis for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis in predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine. Keywords: fetal circulating DNA/RNA, amniotic fluid, saliva, aneuploidy, thalassemias

  17. The Accuracy of Noninvasive Imaging Techniques in Diagnosis of Carotid Plaque Morphology

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    Detelina Valchkova Lukanova

    2015-03-01

    CONCLUSION: The ultrasound has high accuracy for diagnostics of carotid plaque morphology, magnetic resonance imaging has high potential for tissue differentiation and multidetector computed tomography determines precisely degree of stenosis and presence of ulceration and calcifications. The three noninvasive imaging modalities are complementary for optimal evaluation of the morphology of carotid plaque. This will help to determine the risk of stroke and to decide on the best treatment – carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting.

  18. Non-invasive cardiac imaging techniques and vascular tools for the assessment of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaberi, R; Beishuizen, E D; Pereira, A M; Rabelink, T J; Smit, J W; Tamsma, J T; Huisman, M V; Jukema, J W

    2008-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus. The criteria for the selection of those asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes who should undergo cardiac screening and the therapeutic consequences of screening remain controversial. Non-invasive techniques as markers of atherosclerosis and myocardial ischaemia may aid risk stratification and the implementation of tailored therapy for the patient with type 2 diabetes. In the present article we review the literature on the implementation of non-invasive vascular tools and cardiac imaging techniques in this patient group. The value of these techniques as endpoints in clinical trials and as risk estimators in asymptomatic diabetic patients is discussed. Carotid intima-media thickness, arterial stiffness and flow-mediated dilation are abnormal long before the onset of type 2 diabetes. These vascular tools are therefore most likely to be useful for the identification of 'at risk' patients during the early stages of atherosclerotic disease. The additional value of these tools in risk stratification and tailored therapy in type 2 diabetes remains to be proven. Cardiac imaging techniques are more justified in individuals with a strong clinical suspicion of advanced coronary heart disease (CHD). Asymptomatic myocardial ischaemia can be detected by stress echocardiography and myocardial perfusion imaging. The more recently developed non-invasive multi-slice computed tomography angiography is recommended for exclusion of CHD, and can therefore be used to screen asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes, but has the associated disadvantages of high radiation exposure and costs. Therefore, we propose an algorithm for the screening of asymptomatic diabetic patients, the first step of which consists of coronary artery calcium score assessment and exercise ECG.

  19. Terracotta polychrome sculptures examined before and after their conservation work: contributions from non-invasive in situ analytical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, C; Bevilacqua, F; Brambilla, L; Conti, C; Realini, M; Striova, J; Zerbi, G

    2011-08-01

    The potential of non-invasive in situ analytical techniques such as portable Raman, portable X-ray fluorescence, portable optical microscope and fibre optics reflectance spectroscopy has been shown studying painted layers of Renaissance terracotta polychrome sculptures belonging to the statuary of Santo Sepolcro Church in Milan. The results obtained allowed pointing out the contribution of these techniques to the compositional diagnostic, providing complete information, in some cases, better than micro-destructive techniques, on the kind of pigments used on the external painted layers. Moreover, a comparison with the results obtained before the last conservation work (2009) with micro-destructive techniques allowed ascertaining the removal of the external painted layers during the conservation operations.

  20. Multimodality Inferring of Human Cognitive States Based on Integration of Neuro-Fuzzy Network and Information Fusion Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bhattacharya

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available To achieve an effective and safe operation on the machine system where the human interacts with the machine mutually, there is a need for the machine to understand the human state, especially cognitive state, when the human's operation task demands an intensive cognitive activity. Due to a well-known fact with the human being, a highly uncertain cognitive state and behavior as well as expressions or cues, the recent trend to infer the human state is to consider multimodality features of the human operator. In this paper, we present a method for multimodality inferring of human cognitive states by integrating neuro-fuzzy network and information fusion techniques. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, we take the driver fatigue detection as an example. The proposed method has, in particular, the following new features. First, human expressions are classified into four categories: (i casual or contextual feature, (ii contact feature, (iii contactless feature, and (iv performance feature. Second, the fuzzy neural network technique, in particular Takagi-Sugeno-Kang (TSK model, is employed to cope with uncertain behaviors. Third, the sensor fusion technique, in particular ordered weighted aggregation (OWA, is integrated with the TSK model in such a way that cues are taken as inputs to the TSK model, and then the outputs of the TSK are fused by the OWA which gives outputs corresponding to particular cognitive states under interest (e.g., fatigue. We call this method TSK-OWA. Validation of the TSK-OWA, performed in the Northeastern University vehicle drive simulator, has shown that the proposed method is promising to be a general tool for human cognitive state inferring and a special tool for the driver fatigue detection.

  1. Optimization of a Novel Non-invasive Oral Sampling Technique for Zoonotic Pathogen Surveillance in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiley Evans, Tierra; Barry, Peter A; Gilardi, Kirsten V; Goldstein, Tracey; Deere, Jesse D; Fike, Joseph; Yee, JoAnn; Ssebide, Benard J; Karmacharya, Dibesh; Cranfield, Michael R; Wolking, David; Smith, Brett; Mazet, Jonna A K; Johnson, Christine K

    2015-01-01

    Free-ranging nonhuman primates are frequent sources of zoonotic pathogens due to their physiologic similarity and in many tropical regions, close contact with humans. Many high-risk disease transmission interfaces have not been monitored for zoonotic pathogens due to difficulties inherent to invasive sampling of free-ranging wildlife. Non-invasive surveillance of nonhuman primates for pathogens with high potential for spillover into humans is therefore critical for understanding disease ecology of existing zoonotic pathogen burdens and identifying communities where zoonotic diseases are likely to emerge in the future. We developed a non-invasive oral sampling technique using ropes distributed to nonhuman primates to target viruses shed in the oral cavity, which through bite wounds and discarded food, could be transmitted to people. Optimization was performed by testing paired rope and oral swabs from laboratory colony rhesus macaques for rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) and simian foamy virus (SFV) and implementing the technique with free-ranging terrestrial and arboreal nonhuman primate species in Uganda and Nepal. Both ubiquitous DNA and RNA viruses, RhCMV and SFV, were detected in oral samples collected from ropes distributed to laboratory colony macaques and SFV was detected in free-ranging macaques and olive baboons. Our study describes a technique that can be used for disease surveillance in free-ranging nonhuman primates and, potentially, other wildlife species when invasive sampling techniques may not be feasible.

  2. Non-invasive dendrochronology of late-medieval objects in Oslo: refinement of a technique and discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Aoife; Streeton, Noëlle L. W.

    2017-06-01

    A technique for non-invasive dendrochronological analysis of oak was developed for archaeological material, using an industrial CT scanner. Since 2013, this experience has been extended within the scope of the research project `After the Black Death: Painting and Polychrome Sculpture in Norway'. The source material for the project is a collection of late-medieval winged altarpieces, shrines, polychrome sculpture, and fragments from Norwegian churches, which are owned by the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo. The majority cannot be sampled, and many are too large to fit into the CT scanner. For these reasons, a combined approach was adopted, utilizing CT scanning where possible, but preceded by an `exposed-wood' imaging technique. Both non-invasive techniques have yielded reliable results, and CT scanning has confirmed the reliability of the imaging technique alone. This paper presents the analytical methods, along with results from two of the 13 objects under investigation. Results for reliable dates and provenances provide new foundations for historical interpretations.

  3. Non-invasive assessment of static scatterer concentration in phantom body fluids using laser speckle contrast analysis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthy, A. K.; Sujatha, N.; Ramasubba Reddy, M.

    2011-04-01

    An adequate amount of supply of blood to the body organs is essential for the optimum survival and function of the cells. The Red Blood Cells (RBC) which are the most abundant cells of the blood transports hemoglobin which in turn carries oxygen from the lungs to the tissues. And hence its concentration in blood is an important factor. In this paper, we are presenting LAser Speckle Contrast Analysis (LASCA) as a tool for analyzing RBC concentration. Preliminary results obtained using body fluid such as blood mimicking phantoms are presented here. The technique described provides a non-contact, non-scanning and whole field method for assessing RBC concentration non-invasively.

  4. Benthic O-2 uptake of two cold-water coral communities estimated with the non-invasive eddy correlation technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovelli, Lorenzo; Attard, Karl M.; Bryant, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    The community respiration of 2 tidally dominated cold-water coral (CWC) sites was estimated using the non-invasive eddy correlation (EC) technique. The first site, Mingulay Reef Complex, was a rock ridge located in the Sea of Hebrides off Scotland at a depth of 128 m and the second site, Stjernsund......, was a channel-like sound in Northern Norway at a depth of 220 m. Both sites were characterized by the presence of live mounds of the reef framework-forming scleractinian Lophelia pertusa and reef-associated fauna such as sponges, crustaceans and other corals. The measured O-2 uptake at the 2 sites varied...

  5. Signal processing technique for non-invasive real-time estimation of cardiac output by inductance cardiography (thoracocardiography).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucklar, G B; Kaplan, V; Bloch, K E

    2003-05-01

    Inductance cardiography (thoracocardiography) non-invasively monitors changes in stroke volume by recording ventricular volume curves with an inductive plethysmographic transducer encircling the chest at the level of the heart. Clinical application of this method has been hampered, as data analysis has not been feasible in real time. Therefore a novel, real-time signal processing technique for inductance cardiography has been developed. Its essential concept consists in performance of multiple tasks by several, logically linked signal processing modules that have access to common databases. Based on these principles, a software application was designed that performs acquisition, display, filtering and ECG-triggered ensemble averaging of inductance signals and separates cardiogenic waveforms from noise related to respiration and other sources. The resulting ventricular volume curves are automatically analysed. Performance of the technique for monitoring cardiac output in real time was compared with thermodilution in four patients in an intensive care unit. The bias (mean difference) among 76 paired thoracocardiographic and thermodilution derived changes in cardiac output was 0%; limits of agreement (+/- 2 SD of the bias) were +/- 25%. It is concluded that the proposed signal processing technique for inductance cardiography holds promise for non-invasive, real-time estimation of changes in cardiac output.

  6. Thirty-two-channel coil 3T magnetic resonance-guided biopsies of prostate tumor suspicious regions identified on multimodality 3T magnetic resonance imaging: technique and feasibility.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hambrock, T.; Futterer, J.J.; Huisman, H.J.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.; Basten, JP van; Oort, I van; Witjes, J.A.; Barentsz, J.O.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the technique and feasibility of translating tumor suspicious region maps in the prostate, obtained by multimodality, anatomic, and functional 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data to 32-channel coil, T2-weighted (T2-w), 3T MR images, for directing MR-guided biopsies. Furtherm

  7. Application of magnetic resonance elastography as a non-invasive technique for diagnosis of liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Minglei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, liver biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis and grading of liver fibrosis, but its limitations have been widely acknowledged. The non-invasive detection methods are needed in clinical practice, and at present, magnetic resonance elastography (MRE is a hot research topic. This article reviews the advances in the clinical application of MRE in related fields, and studies have shown that MRE has a high diagnostic value due to its high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis and grading of liver fibrosis and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve as high as 0.95. Compared with serological and other imaging diagnostic methods, MRE can determine fibrosis stage more accurately and has good reproducibility and objectivity. MRE can be widely applied in all patients except those with hemochromatosis, with special advantages in the diagnosis for patients with obesity and ascites, and can make up for the disadvantages of other methods. This article points out that MRE may become the best non-invasive method for the assessment of liver fibrosis, especially advanced fibrosis.

  8. High-field (11.75T) multimodal MR imaging of exercising hindlimb mouse muscles using a non-invasive combined stimulation and force measurement device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondin, Julien; Vilmen, Christophe; Cozzone, Patrick J; Bendahan, David; Duhamel, Guillaume

    2014-08-01

    We have designed and constructed an experimental set-up allowing electrical stimulation of hindlimb mouse muscles and the corresponding force measurements at high-field (11.75T). We performed high-resolution multimodal MRI (including T2 -weighted imaging, angiography and diffusion) and analysed the corresponding MRI changes in response to a stimulation protocol. Mice were tested twice over a 1-week period to investigate the reliability of mechanical measurements and T2 changes associated with the stimulation protocol. Additionally, angiographic images were obtained before and immediately after the stimulation protocol. Finally, multislice diffusion imaging was performed before, during and immediately after the stimulation session. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were calculated on the basis of diffusion weighted images (DWI). Both force production and T2 values were highly reproducible as illustrated by the low coefficient of variation (muscle contractions, motion artifacts were minimal for DWI recorded under exercising conditions, thereby underlining the robustness of the measurements. Mean ADC values increased under exercising conditions and were higher during the recovery period as compared with the corresponding control values. The proposed experimental approach demonstrates accurate high-field multimodal MRI muscle investigations at a preclinical level which is of interest for monitoring the severity and/or the progression of neuromuscular diseases but also for assessing the efficacy of potential therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. On the advance of non-invasive techniques implementation for monitoring moisture distribution in cultural heritage: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inmaculada Martínez Garrido, María; Gómez Heras, Miguel; Fort González, Rafael; Valles Iriso, Javier; José Varas Muriel, María

    2015-04-01

    This work presents a case study developed in San Juan Bautista church in Talamanca de Jarama (12th -16th Century), which have been selected as an example of a historical church with a complex construction with subsequent combination of architectural styles and building techniques and materials. These materials have a differential behavior under the influence of external climatic conditions and constructive facts. Many decay processes related to humidity are affecting the building's walls and also have influence in the environmental dynamics inside the building. A methodology for monitoring moisture distribution on stone and masonry walls and floors was performed with different non-invasive techniques as thermal imaging, wireless sensor networks (WSN), portable moisture meter, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR), in order to the evaluate the effectiveness of these techniques for the knowledge of moisture distribution inside the walls and the humidity origin. North and south oriented sections, both on walls and floors, were evaluated and also a general inspection in the church was carried out with different non-invasive techniques. This methodology implies different monitoring stages for a complete knowledge of the implication of outdoors and indoors conditions on the moisture distribution. Each technique is evaluated according to its effectiveness in the detection of decay processes and maintenance costs. Research funded by Geomateriales (S2013/MIT-2914) and Deterioration of stone materials in the interior of historic buildings as a result induced variation of its microclimate (CGL2011-27902) projects. The cooperation received from the Complutense University of Madrid's Research Group Alteración y Conservación de los Materiales Pétreos del Patrimonio (ref. 921349), the Laboratory Network in Science and Technology for Heritage Conservation (RedLabPat, CEI Moncloa) and the Diocese of Alcalá is gratefully acknowledged. MI Mart

  10. Multimodal imaging of the human temporal bone: A comparison of CT and optical scanning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voie, Arne H.; Whiting, Bruce; Skinner, Margaret; Neely, J. Gail; Lee, Kenneth; Holden, Tim; Brunsden, Barry

    2003-10-01

    A collaborative effort between Washington University in St. Louis and Spencer Technologies in Seattle, WA has been undertaken to create a multimodal 3D reconstruction of the human cochlea and vestibular system. The goal of this project is to improve the accuracy of in vivo CT reconstructions of implanted cochleae, and to expand the knowledge of high-resolution anatomical detail provided by orthogonal-plane optical sectioning (OPFOS). At WUSL, computed tomography (CT) images of the cochlea are used to determine the position of cochlear implant electrodes relative to target auditory neurons. The cochlear implant position is determined using pre- and post-operative CT scans. The CT volumes are cross-registered to align the semicircular canals and internal auditory canal, which have a unique configuration in 3-D space. The head of a human body donor was scanned with a clinical CT device, after which the temporal bones were removed, fixed in formalin and trimmed prior to scanning with a laboratory Micro CT scanner. Following CT, the temporal bones were sent to the OPFOS Imaging Lab at Spencer Technologies for a further analysis. 3-D reconstructions of CT and OPFOS imaging modalities were compared, and results are presented. [Work supported by NIDCD Grants R44-03623-5 and R01-00581-13.

  11. Objective Assessment of Sunburn and Minimal Erythema Doses: Comparison of Noninvasive In Vivo Measuring Techniques after UVB Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Pei-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Military personnel movement is exposed to solar radiation and sunburn is a major problem which can cause lost workdays and lead to disciplinary action. This study was designed to identify correlation parameters in evaluating in vivo doses and epidermis changes following sunburn inflammation. Several noninvasive bioengineering techniques have made objective evaluations possible. The volar forearms of healthy volunteers ( , 2 areas, 20 mm in diameter, were irradiated with UVB 100 mj/ and 200 mj/ , respectively. The skin changes were recorded by several monitored techniques before and 24 hours after UV exposures. Our results showed that chromameter value provides more reliable information and can be adopted with mathematical model in predicting the minimal erythema dose (MED which showed lower than visual assessment by 10 mj/ (Pearson correlation coefficient . A more objective measure for evaluation of MED was established for photosensitive subjects' prediction and sunburn risks prevention.

  12. Noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique (MIFE) for the study of the regulation of root membrane transport by cyclic nucleotides

    KAUST Repository

    Ordoñez, Natalia Maria

    2013-09-03

    Changes in ion permeability and subsequently intracellular ion concentrations play a crucial role in intracellular and intercellular communication and, as such, confer a broad array of developmental and adaptive responses in plants. These changes are mediated by the activity of plasma-membrane based transport proteins many of which are controlled by cyclic nucleotides and/or other signaling molecules. The MIFE technique for noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring allows concurrent quantification of net fluxes of several ions with high spatial (μm range) and temporal (ca. 5 s) resolution, making it a powerful tool to study various aspects of downstream signaling events in plant cells. This chapter details basic protocols enabling the application of the MIFE technique to study regulation of root membrane transport in general and cyclic nucleotide mediated transport in particular. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  13. Multimodal CT in stroke imaging: new concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, Carlos J; Wintermark, Max

    2009-01-01

    A multimodal CT protocol provides a comprehensive noninvasive survey of acute stroke patients with accurate demonstration of the site of arterial occlusion and its hemodynamic tissue status. It combines widespread availability with the ability to provide functional characterization of cerebral ischemia, and could potentially allow more accurate selection of candidates for acute stroke reperfusion therapy. This article discusses the individual components of multimodal CT and addresses the potential role of a combined multimodal CT stroke protocol in acute stroke therapy.

  14. [Semiotics of lesions of the cerebral venous collectors on application of noninvasive techniques of x-ray diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, S; Abalmasov, V

    2001-01-01

    The study included application of a complex of the noninvasive diagnostic techniques such as MR tomography, MR venography, duplex scanning of the internal jugular veins, and transcranial Doppler sonography. The authors provide a detailed description of the semiotics of the MR signs of cerebral venous collector lesion in patients with thrombosis, extravasal compression, aneurysms, and developmental anomalies. Present the quantitative ultrasound parameters of hemodynamics in the efferent vessels of the brain accessible to inspections describe the effect of spontaneous echo-opacification in the internal jugular veins, which is assumed to be a predictor of thrombosis. Intravenous injection of magnevist resulted in an appreciable refinement of visualization of small dural sinuses at MR venography thereby allowing for the diagnosis of their thrombosis. It is suggested that the use of the entire complex of the x-ray modalities under consideration may lead to a more complete and noninvasive evaluation of the nature of cerebral venous insufficiency and of the degree of hemodynamic significance. Moreover, this will make it possible to outline approaches to therapeutic or surgical correction of the disease.

  15. Noninvasive continuous versus intermittent arterial pressure monitoring: evaluation of the vascular unloading technique (CNAP device) in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julia Y; Prantner, Julia S; Meidert, Agnes S; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Schmid, Roland M; Saugel, Bernd

    2014-01-29

    Monitoring cardiovascular function in acutely ill patients in the emergency department (ED) is of paramount importance. Arterial pressure (AP) is usually monitored using intermittent oscillometric measurements with an upper arm cuff. The vascular unloading technique (VUT) allows continuous noninvasive AP monitoring. In this study, we compare continuous AP measurements obtained by VUT with intermittent oscillometric AP measurements in ED patients. In addition, we aimed to investigate whether continuous noninvasive AP monitoring allows detection of relevant hypotensive episodes that might be missed with intermittent AP monitoring. In a German university hospital, 130 ED patients who required AP monitoring were analyzed in this prospective method comparison study. Continuous AP monitoring was performed using VUT (CNAP technology; CNSystems Medizintechnik AG, Graz, Austria) over a 2-hour period. The oscillometric AP values were recorded simultaneously every 15 minutes for the comparison of both methods. For statistical evaluation, Bland-Altman plots accounting for repeated AP measurements per individual were used. The mean difference (±standard deviation) between AP measurements obtained by VUT and oscillometric AP measurements was -5 mmHg (±22 mmHg) for systolic AP (SAP), -2 mmHg (±15 mmHg) for diastolic AP (DAP), and -6 mmHg (±16 mmHg) for mean AP (MAP), respectively. In the interval between two oscillometric measurements, the VUT device detected hypotensive episodes (≥4 minutes) defined as either SAP monitoring allows immediate recognition of clinically relevant hypotensive episodes, which are missed or only belatedly recognized with intermittent AP measurement.

  16. Recent trends in non-invasive in situ techniques to monitor bacterial colonies in solid (model food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eMartinez Lobete

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Planktonic cells typically found in liquid systems, are routinely used for building predictive models or assessing the efficacy of food preserving technologies. However, freely suspended cells often show different susceptibility to environmental hurdles than colony cells in solid matrices. Limited oxygen, water and nutrient availability, metabolite accumulation and physical constraints due to cell immobilization in the matrix, are main factors affecting cell growth. Moreover, intra- and inter-colony interactions, as a consequence of the initial microbial load in solid systems, may affect microbial physiology. Predictive food microbiology approaches are moving towards a more realistic resemblance to food products, performing studies in structured solid systems instead of liquids. Since structured systems promote microbial cells to become immobilized and grow as colonies, it is essential to study the colony behaviour, not only for food safety assurance systems, but also for understanding cell physiology and optimizing food production processes in solid matrices. Traditionally, microbial dynamics in solid systems have been assessed with a macroscopic approach by applying invasive analytical techniques; for instance, viable plate counting, which yield information about overall population. In the last years, this approach is being substituted by more mechanistically-inspired ones at mesoscopic (colony and microscopic (cell levels. Therefore, non-invasive and in-situ monitoring is mandatory for a deeper insight into bacterial colony dynamics. Several methodologies that enable high-throughput data collection have been developed, such as microscopy-based techniques coupled with image analysis and OD–based measurements in microplate readers. This research paper provides an overview of non-invasive in-situ techniques to monitor bacterial colonies in solid (model food and emphasizes their advantages and inconveniences in terms of accuracy, performance

  17. The Effect of Multimodal Remedial Techniques on the Spelling Ability of Learning Disabled Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Susheela; Gupta, Raj K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effectiveness of three remedial techniques to improve the spelling ability of students with learning disability. The three techniques, namely, TAK/v, visual orthographic method and listen, speak, read and write (LSRW) method were administered to three experimental groups, each having 13 students with…

  18. Development of a non-invasive polysomnography technique for dogs (Canis familiaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Anna; Szakadát, Sára; Kovács, Enikő; Gácsi, Márta; Simor, Péter; Gombos, Ferenc; Topál, József; Miklósi, Adám; Bódizs, Róbert

    2014-05-10

    Recently dogs (Canis familiaris) have been demonstrated to be a promising model species for studying human behavior as they have adapted to the human niche and developed human-like socio-cognitive skills. Research on dog behavior, however, has so far almost exclusively focused on awake functioning. Here we present a self-developed non-invasive canine polysomnography method that can easily be applied to naive pet dogs. N=22 adult pet dogs (with their owners present) and N=12 adult humans participated in Study I. From these subjects, N=7 dogs returned on two more occasions for Study II. In Study I, we give a descriptive analysis of the sleep electroencephalogram of the dog and compare it to human data. In order to validate our canine polysomnography method in Study II, we compare the sleep macrostructure and the EEG spectrum of dogs after a behaviorally active day without sleep versus passive day with sleep. In Study I, we found that dogs' sleep EEG resembled that of human subjects and was generally in accordance with previous literature using invasive technology. In Study II, we show that similarly to previous results on humans daytime load of novel experiences and sleep deprivation affects the macrostructural and spectral aspects of subsequent sleep. Our results validate the family dog as a model species for studying the effects of pre-sleep activities on the EEG pattern under natural conditions and, thus, broaden the perspectives of the rapidly growing fields of canine cognition and sleep research.

  19. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy: A Potential Technique for Noninvasive Detection of Spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilany, Kambiz; Pouracil, Roudabeh Sadat Moazeni; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background The seminal plasma is an excellent source for noninvasive detection of spermatogenesis. The seminal plasma of normospermic and azoospermic men has been analyzed for detection of spermatogenesis. Methods Optical spectroscopy (Attenuated Total Reflectance-Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) has been used to analyze the seminal plasma and the metabolome of seminal plasma for detection of spermatogenesis. Results The seminal plasma of normospermic and azoospermic men has been analyzed by ATR-IR. The results show that there is a pattern variation in the azoospermic men compared to normospermic men. However, the seminal plasma is too complex to show significant pattern variation. Therefore, the metabolome which is a subcomponent of the seminal plasma was analyzed. The seminal plasma metabolome of normospermic and azoospermic men has been analyzed by FT-IR. A significant pattern change was observed. The data combined with chemometrics analysis showed that significant changes are observed at metabolome level. Conclusion We suggest that FT-IR has the potential as a diagnostic tool instead of testicular biopsy. PMID:24523955

  20. Novel MRI Technique Enables Non-Invasive Measurement of Atrial Wall Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Marta; Morgan, Ross; Theron, Adeline; Dillon-Murphy, Desmond; Chubb, Henry; Whitaker, John; Henningsson, Markus; Aljabar, Paul; Schaeffter, Tobias; Kolbitsch, Christoph; Aslanidi, Oleg V

    2017-08-01

    Knowledge of atrial wall thickness (AWT) has the potential to provide important information for patient stratification and the planning of interventions in atrial arrhythmias. To date, information about AWT has only been acquired in post-mortem or poor-contrast computed tomography (CT) studies, providing limited coverage and highly variable estimates of AWT. We present a novel contrast agent-free MRI sequence for imaging AWT and use it to create personalized AWT maps and a biatrial atlas. A novel black-blood phase-sensitive inversion recovery protocol was used to image ten volunteers and, as proof of concept, two atrial fibrillation patients. Both atria were manually segmented to create subject-specific AWT maps using an average of nearest neighbors approach. These were then registered non-linearly to generate an AWT atlas. AWT was 2.4 ± 0.7 and 2.7 ± 0.7 mm in the left and right atria, respectively, in good agreement with post-mortem and CT data, where available. AWT was 2.6 ± 0.7 mm in the left atrium of a patient without structural heart disease, similar to that of volunteers. In a patient with structural heart disease, the AWT was increased to 3.1 ± 1.3 mm. We successfully designed an MRI protocol to non-invasively measure AWT and create the first whole-atria AWT atlas. The atlas can be used as a reference to study alterations in thickness caused by atrial pathology. The protocol can be used to acquire personalized AWT maps in a clinical setting and assist in the treatment of atrial arrhythmias.

  1. Restoring cognitive functions using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques in patients with cerebellar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Pope

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have highlighted the possibility of modulating the excitability of cerebro-cerebellar circuits bi-directionally using transcranial electrical brain stimulation, in a manner akin to that observed using magnetic stimulation protocols. It has been proposed that cerebellar stimulation activates Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, leading to inhibition of the dentate nucleus, which exerts a tonic facilitatory drive onto motor and cognitive regions of cortex through a synaptic relay in the ventral-lateral thalamus. Some cerebellar deficits present with cognitive impairments if damage to non-motor regions of the cerebellum disrupts the coupling with cerebral cortical areas for thinking and reasoning. Indeed, white matter changes in the dentato-rubral tract correlate with cognitive assessments in patients with Friedreich ataxia, suggesting that this pathway is one component of the anatomical substrate supporting a cerebellar contribution to cognition. An understanding of the physiology of the cerebro-cerebellar pathway previously helped us to constrain our interpretation of results from two recent studies in which we showed cognitive enhancements in healthy participants during tests of arithmetic after electrical stimulation of the cerebellum, but only when task demands were high. Others studies have also shown how excitation of the prefrontal cortex can enhance performance in a variety of working memory tasks. Thus, future efforts might be guided towards neuro-enhancement in certain patient populations, using what is commonly termed 'non-invasive brain stimulation' as a cognitive rehabilitation tool to modulate cerebro-cerebellar circuits, or for stimulation over the cerebral cortex to compensate for decreased cerebellar drive to this region. This article will address these possibilities with a review of the relevant literature covering ataxias and cerebellar cognitive affective disorders, which are characterized by thalamo

  2. Restoring cognitive functions using non-invasive brain stimulation techniques in patients with cerebellar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Paul A; Miall, R Chris

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the possibility of modulating the excitability of cerebro-cerebellar circuits bi-directionally using transcranial electrical brain stimulation, in a manner akin to that observed using magnetic stimulation protocols. It has been proposed that cerebellar stimulation activates Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, leading to inhibition of the dentate nucleus, which exerts a tonic facilitatory drive onto motor and cognitive regions of cortex through a synaptic relay in the ventral-lateral thalamus. Some cerebellar deficits present with cognitive impairments if damage to non-motor regions of the cerebellum disrupts the coupling with cerebral cortical areas for thinking and reasoning. Indeed, white matter changes in the dentato-rubral tract correlate with cognitive assessments in patients with Friedreich ataxia, suggesting that this pathway is one component of the anatomical substrate supporting a cerebellar contribution to cognition. An understanding of the physiology of the cerebro-cerebellar pathway previously helped us to constrain our interpretation of results from two recent studies in which we showed cognitive enhancements in healthy participants during tests of arithmetic after electrical stimulation of the cerebellum, but only when task demands were high. Others studies have also shown how excitation of the prefrontal cortex can enhance performance in a variety of working memory tasks. Thus, future efforts might be guided toward neuro-enhancement in certain patient populations, using what is commonly termed "non-invasive brain stimulation" as a cognitive rehabilitation tool to modulate cerebro-cerebellar circuits, or for stimulation over the cerebral cortex to compensate for decreased cerebellar drive to this region. This article will address these possibilities with a review of the relevant literature covering ataxias and cerebellar cognitive affective disorders, which are characterized by thalamo-cortical disturbances.

  3. Cerebral Angiography for Multimodal Surgical Planning in Epilepsy Surgery: Description of a New Three-Dimensional Technique and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Francesco; Pero, Guglielmo; Quilici, Luca; Piano, Mariangela; Colombo, Paola; Moscato, Alessio; Castana, Laura; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Fuschillo, Dalila; Gennari, Luciana; Cenzato, Marco; Lo Russo, Giorgio; Cossu, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    Cerebrovascular imaging is critical for safe and accurate planning of Stereo-ElectroEncephaloGraphy (SEEG) electrode trajectory. We developed a new technique for Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Three-Dimensional Digital Subtraction Angiography (3D DSA). The workflow core is the acquisition of computed tomography datasets without (bone mask) and with selective injection of contrast medium in the main brain-feeding arteries, followed by dataset registration and subtraction. The images were acquired with the O-armTM 1000 System (Medtronic). Images were postprocessed with FSL software package. We retrospectively analyzed 191 3D DSA procedures and qualitatively analyzed the quality of each 3D DSA dataset. The quality of 3D DSA was good in 150 procedures, sufficient in 37, and poor in 4. 3D rendering of the vascular tree was helpful for both SEEG implantation and resective surgery planning. Angiography complications occurred in only one procedure that was aborted due to a major allergic reaction to contrast medium. No other complications directly related to 3D DSA occurred. Minor intracerebral hemorrhage occurred in 2/191 patients after SEEG implantation, with no permanent sequelae. CBCT 3D DSA is a safe diagnostic procedure for SEEG electrode trajectory planning and for 3D reconstructions of the vascular tree in multimodal scenes for resections. The high fidelity and geometric accuracy contribute to the safety of electrode implantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Advances in longitudinal studies of amnestic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease based on multi-modal MRI techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongjie; Wu, Liyong; Jia, Jianping; Han, Ying

    2014-04-01

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) is a prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 75%-80% of aMCI patients finally develop AD. So, early identification of patients with aMCI or AD is of great significance for prevention and intervention. According to cross-sectional studies, it is known that the hippocampus, posterior cingulate cortex, and corpus callosum are key areas in studies based on structural MRI (sMRI), functional MRI (fMRI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) respectively. Recently, longitudinal studies using each MRI modality have demonstrated that the neuroimaging abnormalities generally involve the posterior brain regions at the very beginning and then gradually affect the anterior areas during the progression of aMCI to AD. However, it is not known whether follow-up studies based on multi-modal neuroimaging techniques (e.g., sMRI, fMRI, and DTI) can help build effective MRI models that can be directly applied to the screening and diagnosis of aMCI and AD. Thus, in the future, large-scale multi-center follow-up studies are urgently needed, not only to build an MRI diagnostic model that can be used on a single person, but also to evaluate the variability and stability of the model in the general population. In this review, we present longitudinal studies using each MRI modality separately, and then discuss the future directions in this field.

  5. A general technique for interstudy registration of multifunction and multimodality images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, K.P.; Huang, S.C.; Bacter, L.R.; Phelps, M.E. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). School of Medicine)

    1994-12-01

    A technique that can register anatomic/structural brain images (e.g., MRI) with various functional images (e.g., PET-FDG and PET-FDOPA) of the same subject has been developed. The procedure of this technique includes the following steps: (1) segmentation of MRI brain images into gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and, muscle (MS) components, (2) assignment of appropriate radio-tracer concentrations to various components depending on the kind of functional image that is being registered, (3) generation of simulated functional images to have a spatial resolution that is comparable to that of the measured ones, (4) alignment of the measured functional images to the simulated ones that are based on MRI images. A self-organization clustering method is used to segment the MRI images. The image alignment is based on the criterion of least squares of the pixel-by-pixel differences between the two sets of images that are being matched and on the Powell's algorithm for minimization. The technique was applied successfully for registering the MRI, PET-FDG, and PET-FDOPA images. This technique offers a general solution to the registration of structural images to functional images and to the registration of different functional images of markedly different distributions.

  6. Specification Techniques for Multi-Modal Dialogues in the U-Wish Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, A.; Dijk, van E.M.A.G.; Donk, O.; Sanchez, B.; Nada, N.; Rashid, A.; Arndt, T.; Sanchez, M.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development of a specification technique for specifying interactive web-based services. We wanted to design a language that can be a means of communication between designers and developers of interactive services, that makes it easier to develop web-based services fitte

  7. Specification Techniques for Multi-Modal Dialogues in the U-Wish Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Donk, O.A.; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Donk, O.; Sanchez, B.; Nada, N.; Rashid, A.; Arndt, T.; Sanchez, M.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we describe the development of a specification technique for specifying interactive web-based services. We wanted to design a language that can be a means of communication between designers and developers of interactive services, that makes it easier to develop web-based services

  8. Clinical application of a molecular assay for the detection of dermatophytosis and a novel non-invasive sampling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizny Gordon, Alice; McIver, Christopher; Kim, Minhee; Murrell, Dedee F; Taylor, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The dermatophytoses are the most common superficial fungal infections worldwide. Clinical diagnosis is not reliable as there are many differentials, and laboratory diagnosis is required to gain access to treatment in more severe disease. Traditional diagnostic methods are limited by suboptimal sensitivity, specificity and prolonged turnaround times. Molecular methods are being used increasingly in the diagnostic algorithm in the clinical microbiology laboratory. The aim of this study was to evaluate a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeting the chitin synthase 1 gene (CHS1) of dermatophytes for analytical specificity, and to assess its clinical application by comparing it to the current methods of microscopy and culture. We also assessed a novel non-invasive sample collection technique involving adhesive tape impressions of suspected lesions. The PCR was highly specific, being able to discern between cultures of dermatophytes and other microorganisms. It also proved to be more sensitive than traditional methods at detecting dermatophytes in clinical samples. Similar sensitivities were seen on the samples assessed by the adhesive tape technique. An internal control system allowed for the detection of inhibition in certain culture and clinical specimens. This rapid and cost-effective technique could be incorporated into the initial diagnostic algorithm for dermatophytosis in Australian laboratories. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-invasive techniques for measuring body composition: state of the art and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 20 years, in vivo analysis of body elements by neutron activation has become an important tool in medical research. In particular, it provides a much needed means to make quantitative assessments of body composition of human beings in vivo. The data are useful both for basic physiological understanding and for diagnosis and management of a variety of diseases and disorders. This paper traces the development of the in vivo neutron activation technique from basic systems to the present state of the art facilities. A scan of some of the numerous clinical applications that have been made with this technique, reveals the broad potentialities of in vivo neutron activation. The paper also considers alternative routes of future development and raises some of the questions now faced in making the techniques more widely available to both medical practitioners and medical investigators. In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into the modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Objective Assessment of Sunburn and Minimal Erythema Doses: Comparison of Noninvasive In Vivo Measuring Techniques after UVB Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Sheng Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Military personnel movement is exposed to solar radiation and sunburn is a major problem which can cause lost workdays and lead to disciplinary action. This study was designed to identify correlation parameters in evaluating in vivo doses and epidermis changes following sunburn inflammation. Several noninvasive bioengineering techniques have made objective evaluations possible. The volar forearms of healthy volunteers (n=20, 2 areas, 20 mm in diameter, were irradiated with UVB 100 mj/cm2 and 200 mj/cm2, respectively. The skin changes were recorded by several monitored techniques before and 24 hours after UV exposures. Our results showed that chromameter a∗ value provides more reliable information and can be adopted with mathematical model in predicting the minimal erythema dose (MED which showed lower than visual assessment by 10 mj/cm2 (Pearson correlation coefficient ℑ=0.758. A more objective measure for evaluation of MED was established for photosensitive subjects' prediction and sunburn risks prevention.

  11. Non-invasive imaging techniques in assessing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a current status of available methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lăpădat, A M; Jianu, I R; Ungureanu, B S; Florescu, L M; Gheonea, D I; Sovaila, S; Gheonea, I A

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an ailment affecting and increasing a number of people worldwide diagnosed via non-invasive imaging techniques, at a time when a minimum harm caused by medical procedures is rightfully emphasized, more sought after, than ever before. Liver steatosis should not be taken lightly even if its evolution is largely benign as it has the potential to develop into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) or even more concerning, hepatic cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Traditionally, liver biopsy has been the standard for diagnosing this particular liver disease, but nowadays, a consistent number of imagistic methods are available for diagnosing hepatosteatosis and choosing the one appropriate to the clinical context is the key. Although different in sensitivity and specificity when it comes to determining the hepatic fat fraction (FF), these imaging techniques possessing a diverse availability, operating difficulty, cost, and reproducibility are invaluable to any modern physician. Ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), elastography, and spectroscopy will be discussed in order to lay out the advantages and disadvantages of their diagnostic potential and application. Although imagistics has given physicians a valuable insight into the means of managing NAFLD, the current methods are far from perfect, but given the time, they will surely be improved and the use of liver biopsy will be completely removed.

  12. A Non-invasive Technique for Configuring Low Level RF Feedback Loops in PEP-II

    CERN Document Server

    Teytelman, Dmitry

    2005-01-01

    The RF system of the PEP-II collider uses two fast feedback loops around each klystron and set of cavities. These loops reduce the impedance of the fundamental mode of the accelerating cavities seen by the beam, and are necessary to reduce the growth rates of longitudinal modes within the RF system bandwidth. Operation of the accelerator at high beam currents is very sensitive to the configuration of the low-level RF feedback loops. There are 7 loop control parameters that strongly influence the stability of the feedback loops and the achieved level of longitudinal impedance reduction. Diagnostic techniques for the analysis of the RF feedback via closed-loop system transfer function measurements will be presented. The model is fit to the measured closed-loop transfer function data and the extracted parameters are then used to calculate optimal tuning and corrections to the loop control elements in the physical channel. These techniques allow fine-tuning of RF feedback with stored beam as well as diagnosis of ...

  13. The use of a multimodal image, the apple technique, to facilitate clinical hypnosis: a brief communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, B S

    1991-01-01

    A 1- to 3-minute exercise involving imagination (of an apple) and ideomotor ideation (hand levitation) is a simple, benign technique that is useful for illustrating to patients the nature of imagery and hypnosis. It avoids power struggles and allows a reasonable approximation of the patient's capacity for imagery and hypnotic responsiveness, without emphasizing the use of a hypnotic procedure. When administered to 35 college students, the hand levitation component of this exercise correlated with the Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (Weitzenhoffer & E. R. Hilgard, 1963) (r = .66, p less than .001) and with the Stanford Hypnotic Clinical Scale: Adult (Morgan & J. R. Hilgard, 1975, 1978/79) (r = .60, p less than .001).

  14. Comparison of noninvasive blood pressure measurement techniques via the coccygeal artery in anesthetized cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Ryan A; Hall, Natalie H; Kass, Philip H; Citino, Scott B

    2013-12-01

    Two indirect blood pressure measurement techniques, Doppler (DOP) sphygmomanometry and oscillometry, applied at the ventral coccygeal artery were compared with simultaneous direct blood pressure measurements at the dorsal pedal artery in 10 anesthetized, captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). The DOP method was moderately accurate, with relatively little bias (mean difference 3.8 mmHg) and 88.6% of the DOP systolic arterial pressure measurements being within 10 mmHg of the direct systolic arterial measurement. With the oscillometric (OM) method, 89.2% of the mean arterial pressure measurements were within 10 mmHg of the direct measurement and had the least bias (mean difference 2.3 mmHg), 80.7% of the systolic measurements were within 10 mmHg of the direct measurement and had the second least bias (mean difference 2.3 mmHg), and 59% of the diastolic measurements were within 10 mmHg of the direct measurement and had significant bias (mean difference 7.3 mmHg). However, DOP showed relatively poor precision (SD 11.2 mmHg) compared with OM systolic (SD 8.0 mmHg), diastolic (SD 8.6 mmHg), and mean (SD 5.7 mmHg). Both techniques showed a linear relationship with the direct technique measurements over a wide range of blood pressures. The DOP method tended to underestimate systolic measurements below 160 mmHg and overestimate systolic measurements above 160 mmHg. The OM method tended to underestimate mean pressures below 160 mm Hg, overestimate mean pressures above 160 mmHg, underestimate systolic pressures below 170 mmHg, overestimate systolic pressures above 170 mmHg, and underestimate diastolic pressures throughout the measured blood pressure range. Indirect blood pressure measurement using the ventral coccygeal artery, particularly when using an OM device for mean and systolic arterial pressure, may be useful in the clinical assessment of cheetahs when monitoring trends over time, but caution should be taken when interpreting individual values.

  15. Non-invasive Florentine Renaissance Panel Painting Replica Structures Investigation by Using Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Picollo, Marcello; Cucci, Costanza

    2016-01-01

    The potentials of the Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) technique for a non-invasive inspection of panel paintings have been considered in detail. The THz-TD data acquired on a replica of a panel painting made in imitation of Italian Renaissance panel paintings were processed in order to pr...

  16. Robust biological parametric mapping: an improved technique for multimodal brain image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Beason-Held, Lori; Resnick, Susan M.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2011-03-01

    Mapping the quantitative relationship between structure and function in the human brain is an important and challenging problem. Numerous volumetric, surface, region of interest and voxelwise image processing techniques have been developed to statistically assess potential correlations between imaging and non-imaging metrics. Recently, biological parametric mapping has extended the widely popular statistical parametric approach to enable application of the general linear model to multiple image modalities (both for regressors and regressands) along with scalar valued observations. This approach offers great promise for direct, voxelwise assessment of structural and functional relationships with multiple imaging modalities. However, as presented, the biological parametric mapping approach is not robust to outliers and may lead to invalid inferences (e.g., artifactual low p-values) due to slight mis-registration or variation in anatomy between subjects. To enable widespread application of this approach, we introduce robust regression and robust inference in the neuroimaging context of application of the general linear model. Through simulation and empirical studies, we demonstrate that our robust approach reduces sensitivity to outliers without substantial degradation in power. The robust approach and associated software package provides a reliable way to quantitatively assess voxelwise correlations between structural and functional neuroimaging modalities.

  17. Are novel non-invasive imaging techniques needed in patients with suspected prosthetic heart valve endocarditis? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habets, Jesse; Mali, Willem P.T.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Tanis, Wilco [Haga Teaching Hospital, Department of Cardiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Reitsma, Johannes B. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brink, Renee B.A. van den [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Chamuleau, Steven A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Multimodal non-invasive imaging plays a key role in establishing a diagnosis of PHV endocarditis. The objective of this study was to provide a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of TTE, TEE, and MDCT in patients with (suspected) PHV endocarditis. Studies published between 1985 and 2013 were identified via search and cross-reference of PubMed/Embase databases. Studies were included if (1) they reported on the non-invasive index tests TTE, TEE, or MDCT; (2) data was provided on PHV endocarditis as the condition of interest; and (3) imaging results were verified against either surgical inspection/autopsy or clinical follow-up reference standards, thereby enabling the extraction of 2-by-2 tables. Twenty articles (including 496 patients) met the inclusion criteria for PHV endocarditis. TTE, TEE, and MDCT + TEE had a pooled sensitivity/specificity for vegetations of 29/100 %; 82/95 %, and 88/94 %, respectively. The pooled sensitivity/specificity of TTE, TEE, and MDCT + TEE for periannular complications was 36/93 %, 86/98 %, and 100/94 %, respectively. TEE showed good sensitivity and specificity for establishing a diagnosis of PHV endocarditis. Although MDCT data are limited, this review showed that MDCT in addition to TEE may improve sensitivity in detecting life-threatening periannular complications. (orig.)

  18. Early use of noninvasive techniques for clearing respiratory secretions during noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinrong; Cui, Zhaobo; Liu, Shuhong; Gao, Xiuling; Gao, Pan; Shi, Yi; Guo, Shufen; Li, Peipei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation (NPPV) might be superior to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in patients with acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPDs). Inefficient clearance of respiratory secretions provokes NPPV failure in patients with hypercapnic encephalopathy (HE). This study compared CMV and NPPV combined with a noninvasive strategy for clearing secretions in HE and AECOPD patients. The present study is a prospective cohort study of AECOPD and HE patients enrolled between October 2013 and August 2015 in a critical care unit of a major university teaching hospital in China. A total of 74 patients received NPPV and 90 patients received CMV. Inclusion criteria included the following: physician-diagnosed AECOPD, spontaneous airway clearance of excessive secretions, arterial blood gas analysis requiring intensive care, moderate-to-severe dyspnea, and a Kelly–Matthay scale score of 3 to 5. Exclusion criteria included the following: preexisting psychiatric/neurological disorders unrelated to HE, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, upper airway obstruction, acute coronary syndromes, preadmission tracheostomy or endotracheal intubation, and urgent endotracheal intubation for cardiovascular, psychomotor agitation, or severe hemodynamic conditions. Intensive care unit participants were managed by NPPV. Participants received standard treatment consisting of controlled oxygen therapy during NPPV-free periods; antibiotics, intravenous doxofylline, corticosteroids (e.g., salbutamol and ambroxol), and subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin; and therapy for comorbidities if necessary. Nasogastric tubes were inserted only in participants who developed gastric distension. No pharmacological sedation was administered. The primary and secondary outcome measures included comparative complication rates, durations of ventilation and hospitalization, number of invasive devices/patient, and in-hospital and 1-year mortality

  19. Clinical applications of non-invasive imaging techniques in suspected coronary artery disease and in acute myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nucifora, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive cardiac imaging modalities play a crucial role in the diagnostic process and clinical management of patients without known coronary artery disease and patients with acute myocardial infarction. The first part of the thesis discusses the use of non-invasive imaging modalities (including

  20. Noninvasive brain stimulation and auditory verbal hallucinations: new techniques and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eMoseley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs are the experience of hearing a voice in the absence of any speaker. Results from recent attempts to treat AVHs with neurostimulation (rTMS or tDCS to the left temporoparietal junction have not been conclusive, but suggest that it may be a promising treatment option for some individuals. Some evidence suggests that the therapeutic effect of neurostimulation on AVHs may result from modulation of cortical areas involved in the ability to monitor the source of self-generated information. Here, we provide a brief overview of cognitive models and neurostimulation paradigms associated with treatment of AVHs, and discuss techniques that could be explored in the future to improve the efficacy of treatment, including alternating current and random noise stimulation. Technical issues surrounding the use of neurostimulation as a treatment option are discussed (including methods to localise the targeted cortical area, and the state-dependent effects of brain stimulation, as are issues surrounding the acceptability of neurostimulation for adolescent populations and individuals who experience qualitatively different types of AVH.

  1. Non-invasive imaging of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hao; Yang, Yunan; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-09-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold tremendous therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases. Over the last decade, non-invasive imaging techniques have proven to be of great value in tracking transplanted hESCs. This review article will briefly summarize the various techniques used for non-invasive imaging of hESCs, which include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), fluorescence, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), and multimodality approaches. Although the focus of this review article is primarily on hESCs, the labeling/tracking strategies described here can be readily applied to other (stem) cell types as well. Non-invasive imaging can provide convenient means to monitor hESC survival, proliferation, function, as well as overgrowth (such as teratoma formation), which could not be readily investigated previously. The requirement for hESC tracking techniques depends on the clinical scenario and each imaging technique will have its own niche in preclinical/clinical research. Continued evolvement of non-invasive imaging techniques will undoubtedly contribute to significant advances in understanding stem cell biology and mechanisms of action.

  2. Non-invasive technique to measure biogeochemical parameters (pH and O2) in a microenvironment: Design and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Biting; Seliman, Ayman; Pales, Ashley; Liang, Weizhen; Sams, Allison; Darnault, Christophe; Devol, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    The primary objectives of this research are to do the pH and O2 sensor foils calibration and then to test them in applications. Potentially, this project can be utilized to monitor the fate and transport of radionuclides in porous media. The information for physical and chemical parameters (e.g. pH and O2) is crucial to know when determining contaminants' behavior and transport in the environment. As a non-invasive method, optical imaging technique using a DSLR camera could capture data on the foil when it fluoresces, and gives a high temporal and spatial resolution during the experimental period. The calibration procedures were done in cuvettes in a row. The preliminary experiments could measure pH value in the range from 4.5 to 7.5, and O2 concentration from 0 mg/L to 20.74 mg/L. Applications of sensor foils have involved nano zero valent and acid rain experiments in order to obtain a gradient of parameter changes.

  3. Clinical value of diascopy and other non-invasive techniques on differential diagnosis algorithms of oral pigmentations: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena-Cristóbal, Maite; Otero-Rey, Eva-María; Tomás, Inmaculada; Blanco-Carrión, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the diagnostic value of diascopy and other non-invasive clinical aids on recent differential diagnosis algorithms of oral mucosal pigmentations affecting subjects of any age. Material and Methods Data Sources: this systematic review was conducted by searching PubMed, Scopus, Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source and the Cochrane Library (2000-2015); Study Selection: two reviewers independently selected all types of English articles describing differential diagnosis algorithms of oral pigmentations and checked the references of finally included papers; Data Extraction: one reviewer performed the data extraction and quality assessment based on previously defined fields while the other reviewer checked their validity. Results Data Synthesis: eight narrative reviews and one single case report met the inclusion criteria. Diascopy was used on six algorithms (66.67%) and X-ray was included once (11.11%; 44.44% with text mentions); these were considered helpful tools in the diagnosis of intravascular and exogenous pigmentations, respectively. Surface rubbing was described once in the text (11.11%). Conclusions Diascopy was the most applied method followed by X-ray and surface rubbing. The limited scope of these procedures only makes them useful when a positive result is obtained, turning biopsy into the most recommended technique when diagnosis cannot be established on clinical grounds alone. Key words:Algorithm, differential diagnosis, flow chart, oral mucosa, oral pigmentation, systematic review. PMID:27703615

  4. Multimodal Afslapning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Palmer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Artiklen beskriver Multimodal Relaxation Method (MRM, fremover Multimodal Afslapningsmetode, somkan anvendes i livs-, ledelses-, virksomheds-, sports- eller sundhedscoaching til at forbedre ydeevnen hos denenkelte og reducere eller håndtere stress. Inden for sports- og sundhedscoaching kan metoden anvendes til atreducere fysiske spændinger og styrke fysiologisk kontrol, fx lavere hjertefrekvens og nedsætte blodtrykket.

  5. PET/CT colonography: a novel non-invasive technique for assessment of extent and activity of ulcerative colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Chandan J.; Sharma, Raju [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India); Makharia, Govind K.; Tiwari, Rajeew P. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, New Delhi (India); Kumar, Rakesh; Kumar, Rajender; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India)

    2010-04-15

    Extent of involvement and activity of ulcerative colitis (UC) is best evaluated by colonoscopy. Colonoscopy however carries risk during acute exacerbation. We investigated the utility of PET/CT colonography for assessment of extent and activity of UC. Within a 1-week window, 15 patients with mild to moderately active UC underwent colonoscopy and PET/CT colonography 60 min after injection of 10 mCi of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). PET activity score based on the amount of FDG uptake and endoscopic mucosal activity in seven colonic segments of each patient was recorded. The mean maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of seven segments was compared with activity in liver. A PET activity grade of 0, 1, 2 or 3 was assigned to each region depending upon their SUV{sub max} ratio (colon segment to liver). The extent of disease was left-sided colitis in five and pancolitis in ten. The mean Ulcerative Colitis Disease Activity Index (UCDAI) was 7.6. The number of segments involved as per colonoscopic evaluation and PET/CT colonography was 67 and 66, respectively. There was a good correlation for extent evaluation between the two modalities (kappa 55.3%, p = 0.02). One patient had grade 0 PET activity, nine had grade 2 and five had grade 3 PET activity. In six patients, there was one to one correlation between PET activity grades with that of endoscopic grade. One patient showed activity in the sacroiliac joint suggesting active sacroiliitis. PET/CT colonography is a novel non-invasive technique for the assessment of extent and activity of the disease in patients with UC. (orig.)

  6. Non-invasive Florentine Renaissance Panel Painting Replica Structures Investigation by Using Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch Dandolo, Corinna L.; Picollo, Marcello; Cucci, Costanza; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-11-01

    The potentials of the Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) technique for a non-invasive inspection of panel paintings have been considered in detail. The THz-TD data acquired on a replica of a panel painting made in imitation of Italian Renaissance panel paintings were processed in order to provide insights as to the limits and potentials of the technique in detecting different kinds of underdrawings and paint layers. Constituent layers, construction techniques, and anomalies were identified and localized by interpreting the extracted THz dielectric stratigraphy.

  7. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-05

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm(-1) and 1545 cm(-1), respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  8. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm- 1 and 1545 cm- 1, respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties.

  9. Multimode geodesic branching components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, D.; Voges, E.

    1983-01-01

    Geodesic branching components are investigated for multimode guided wave optics. Geodesic structures with particular properties, e.g. focussing star couplers, are derived by a synthesis technique based on a theorem of Toraldo di Francia. Experimentally, the geodesic surfaces are printed on acrylic glass and are spin-coated with organic film waveguides.

  10. Cardiac output measurement by bioimpedance and noninvasive pulse contour analysis compared with the continuous pulmonary artery thermodilution technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, Saskia W. M. C.; Roekaerts, Paul M. H. J.; Lance, Marcus D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare 2 noninvasive cardiac output measurement methods with the continuous cardiac output thermodilution (CCO-TD) method. Design: A single-center prospective design. Setting: A university hospital. Participants: Fifty-three consecutive patients schedu

  11. A reliable genetic technique for sex determination of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) from non-invasively collected hair samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durnin, Matthew E.; Palsboll, Per J.; Ryder, Oliver A.; McCullough, Dale R.

    2007-01-01

    Extractions from non-invasive hair samples usually yield low amounts of highly degraded DNA. Previously developed mammal molecular sexing methods were not designed with such sub-optimal conditions in mind. We developed a simple and reliable PCR-based sexing method aimed at degraded, low yield DNA ex

  12. State-of-the-Art Methods for Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Analysis in Athletes—The Need for Novel Non-Invasive Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Greene

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Muscle glycogen levels have a profound impact on an athlete’s sporting performance, thus measurement is vital. Carbohydrate manipulation is a fundamental component in an athlete’s lifestyle and is a critical part of elite performance, since it can provide necessary training adaptations. This paper provides a critical review of the current invasive and non-invasive methods for measuring skeletal muscle glycogen levels. These include the gold standard muscle biopsy, histochemical analysis, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and musculoskeletal high frequency ultrasound, as well as pursuing future application of electromagnetic sensors in the pursuit of portable non-invasive quantification of muscle glycogen. This paper will be of interest to researchers who wish to understand the current and most appropriate techniques in measuring skeletal muscle glycogen. This will have applications both in the lab and in the field by improving the accuracy of research protocols and following the physiological adaptations to exercise.

  13. State-of-the-Art Methods for Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Analysis in Athletes-The Need for Novel Non-Invasive Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jacob; Louis, Julien; Korostynska, Olga; Mason, Alex

    2017-02-23

    Muscle glycogen levels have a profound impact on an athlete's sporting performance, thus measurement is vital. Carbohydrate manipulation is a fundamental component in an athlete's lifestyle and is a critical part of elite performance, since it can provide necessary training adaptations. This paper provides a critical review of the current invasive and non-invasive methods for measuring skeletal muscle glycogen levels. These include the gold standard muscle biopsy, histochemical analysis, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and musculoskeletal high frequency ultrasound, as well as pursuing future application of electromagnetic sensors in the pursuit of portable non-invasive quantification of muscle glycogen. This paper will be of interest to researchers who wish to understand the current and most appropriate techniques in measuring skeletal muscle glycogen. This will have applications both in the lab and in the field by improving the accuracy of research protocols and following the physiological adaptations to exercise.

  14. Non-Invasive, Non-Contact Heart Monitoring of Hemodialysis Patients with a Micropower Impulse Radar Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J; Levin, N; Poland, D; Welsh, P; Paulsen, C; Trebes, J; Rosenbury, R; Killip, T

    2002-02-01

    This report summarizes the LLNL LDRD funded portion of a collaborative project to demonstrate and clinically evaluate the micropower impulse radar technology as a means to non-invasively monitor the heart of chronic care patients undergoing hemodialysis. The development is based upon technologies and expertise unique to LLNL. The LLNL LDRD funded portion of this project was used to assist in the definition, design, construction, and evaluation of the prototype.

  15. A pilot study using laser-based technique for non-invasive diagnostics of hypertensive conditions in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, Karina S.; Ahmad, Shakil; Wang, Keqing; Rafailov, Ilya E.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Zhang, Lin; Rafailov, Edik U.; Ahmed, Asif

    2016-02-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is directly linked to preeclampsia, a maternal hypertensive condition that is life threating for both the mother and the baby. Epidemiological studies show that women with a history of pre-eclampsia have an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease. Here we report a new non-invasive diagnostic test for preeclampsia in mice that allows us to non-invasively assess the condition of the animals during the experiment and treatment in established models of preeclampsia. A laser-based multifunctional diagnostics system (LAKK-M) was chosen to carry out non-invasive analysis of multiple parameters. The device was used to simultaneously record the microcirculatory blood flow and oxygen saturation, as well as fluorescence levels of endogenous fluorophores. Preliminary experiments were conducted on adenoviral (Ad-)- mediated overexpression of sFlt-1 (Ad-sFlt-1) to mimic preeclampsialike symptoms in mice. The recorded data displayed the ability of the LAKK-M diagnostics device to detect significant differences in perfusion measurements between the control and Ad-sFlt-1 treatment. Preliminary results provide a potential avenue to employ these diagnostics technology to monitor and aid in maintaining control of live animal conditions throughout the experiment and treatment.

  16. Techniques for efficient, real-time, 3D visualization of multi-modality cardiac data using consumer graphics hardware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, David; Aladl, Usaf; Germano, Guido; Slomka, Piotr

    2005-09-01

    We exploit consumer graphics hardware to perform real-time processing and visualization of high-resolution, 4D cardiac data. We have implemented real-time, realistic volume rendering, interactive 4D motion segmentation of cardiac data, visualization of multi-modality cardiac data and 3D display of multiple series cardiac MRI. We show that an ATI Radeon 9700 Pro can render a 512x512x128 cardiac Computed Tomography (CT) study at 0.9 to 60 frames per second (fps) depending on rendering parameters and that 4D motion based segmentation can be performed in real-time. We conclude that real-time rendering and processing of cardiac data can be implemented on consumer graphics cards.

  17. Multimodal Imaging Techniques for the Extraction of Detailed Geometrical and Physiological Information for Use in Multi-Scale Models of Colorectal Cancer and Treatment of Individual Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Pitt-Francis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A vast array of mathematical models have been proposed for all stages of cancer formation across a wide range of spatio–temporal scales. Attention is now turning to coupling these models across scales and building models of “virtual tumours” for use in in silico testing of novel drugs and treatment regimes. This leads naturally to the requirement for detailed knowledge of the underlying geometry and physiological properties of individual tumours for use in: (i multi-scale mathematical models of in vivo tumour growth and development; (ii fusion of multi-scale, multimodal medical imaging techniques to improve the diagnosis and treatment of individual patients; and (iii training of cancer specialists and surgeons.

  18. Laser light scattering technique for non-invasive in situ simultaneous measurements on elastic constants and viscosity coefficients of nematic liquid crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU; Mei; HUANG; Yaoxiong

    2004-01-01

    The laser light scattering technique for non-invasive in situ simultaneous measurements on elastic constants and viscosity coefficients of nematic liquid crystals is introduced. By measuring the autocorrelation function of the scattered light from nematic liquid crystals at different scattering angles, the splay and twist elastic constants K11 and K22 are obtained from the amplitudes of the autocorrelation function, and the viscosity coefficients of (Splay and (Twist are determined using the viscoelastic ratios K11/( Splay and K22/(Twist from the relaxation parameters of the two modes.

  19. Non-invasive measurement of cardiac output in heart failure patients using a new foreign gas rebreathing technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, Anders; Videbaek, Regitze; Schou, Morten

    2002-01-01

    Values of effective pulmonary blood flow (Q(EP)) and cardiac output, determined by a non-invasive foreign gas rebreathing method (CO(RB)) using a new infrared photoacoustic gas analysing system, were compared with measurements of cardiac output obtained by the direct Fick (CO(FICK)) and thermodil......Values of effective pulmonary blood flow (Q(EP)) and cardiac output, determined by a non-invasive foreign gas rebreathing method (CO(RB)) using a new infrared photoacoustic gas analysing system, were compared with measurements of cardiac output obtained by the direct Fick (CO...... with significant shunt flow. In the eight patients without significant shunt flow, the agreement between Q(EP) and CO(FICK) was 0.3 +/- 0.9 litre x min(-1). In conclusion, a foreign gas rebreathing method with a new infrared photoacoustic gas analyser provided at least as reliable a measure of cardiac output...... as did thermodilution. In the absence of significant shunt flow, measurement of Q(EP) itself provides a reliable estimate of cardiac output in heart failure patients. The infrared photoacoustic gas analyser markedly facilitates clinical use of the rebreathing method in general, which makes the method...

  20. Multimodal stilistik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Nina

    2012-01-01

    socialsemiotiske multimodalitetsteori. Formålet med en sådan multimodal stilistik er således at udvikle et konsistent systematisk analyseapparat, der kan fange og beskrive den multimodale semiosis, der realiseres i romanen såvel som i andre typer tekst. Med nedslag i et udvalg af skandinaviske og oversatte...

  1. The use of non-invasive field techniques in the study of small topographically closed lakes: two case studies in Sicily (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Madonia

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Small endhoreic (topografically closed lakes represent a little percentage of continental waters but, in arid or sub-arid regions, they develop special ecosystems potentially prone to ecological involution due to climatic changes. The mandatory use of light, non-invasive field techniques is often required, especially in protected areas. In the present work the use of non-invasive techniques like GPS−based bathymetric and photographic surveys have been applied to the study of two lakes, Specchio di Venere and Sfondato (Sicily, southern Italy, both natural reserves. The comparison between historical surveys and modern GPS−based bathymetries highlighted the difficulty of using the former for the reconstruction of climatic-induced variations due to the low number of measurements (spatial aliasing. In particular, at the intracaldera Lake Specchio di Venere, a high resolution survey gave new insights into a peculiar geo-ecosystem whose evolution is driven by both volcanic phenomena and biomineralization processes. On the contrary, the morphology of Lake Sfondato floor is much more simple and driven only by the superimposition of a detrital sedimentation on the initial collapse that generated the lake. The comparison betweem direct measurements and estimated changes of lake level, carried out between February 2008 and October 2009 variations, allowed us to test different hypotheses of hydrological balances, leading to opposite conclusions with respect to previous studies and remarking the fundamental importance of direct measurements in the validation of theoretical hydrological models.

  2. A non-invasive technique for estimating carpal tunnel pressure by measuring shear wave speed in tendon: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuexiang; Qiang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaoming; Greenleaf, James F; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2012-11-15

    Although a close relationship between carpal tunnel pressure and median nerve dysfunction has been found, the current methods for pressure measurements are invasive, using a catheter in the carpal canal to monitor the pressure. A noninvasive method for quantifying carpal tunnel pressure would be useful as an alternative to the catheter method. In this study, a simplified experimental model was developed to measure the shear wave speed in a canine Achilles tendon under different tunnel pressures. The results showed that the speed of waves through the inside-tunnel tendon had a linear relationship with the pressure in the tunnel (first measurement: r=0.966, Ppropagation speed. However, further validations in human cadavers and clinical subjects are necessary. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in twin pregnancies with treatment of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) in a single center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, YueQiu; Gao, Ya; Lin, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study is to report the performance of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in twin pregnancies after the treatment of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Method: In two years period, 565 pregnant women with ART twin pregnancies were prospectively tested by NIPT......-test counseling. Results: In total of 565 cases, NIPT had a failure rate of 0.9% (5/565). Four cases of T21 were identified by NIPT and confirmed by karyotyping, resulting in 100% (95%CI 39.8%-100%) positive predictive value. Among 556 cases with NIPT negative results, 506 cases (91.0%) were confirmed by follow......-up of postnatal phenotypes, while 33 cases (5.9%) had adverse pregnant outcomes with unconfirmed reasons because of the lack of cytogenetic samples. The remaining 17 cases (3.1%) refused follow-up. No false negative result was reported. Conclusion: With apparently high positive predictive value and low false...

  4. Non-destructive and non-invasive analyses shed light on the realization technique of ancient polychrome prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striová, Jana; Coccolini, Gabriele; Micheli, Sara; Lofrumento, Cristiana; Galeotti, Monica; Cagnini, Andrea; Castellucci, Emilio Mario

    2009-08-01

    Five polychrome prints representing famous painters, such as Albrecht Dürer, were analyzed using a non-destructive and non-invasive methodology as required by the artwork typology. The diagnostic strategy includes X-ray fluorescence (XRF), reflectance micro-infrared (μFTIR) and micro-Raman (μRaman) spectroscopy. These prints were realized with a la poupée method that involves application of the polychrome inks on a single copper plate, before the printing process. A broad range of compounds (i.e., cinnabar, red lead, white lead, umber earth, hydrated calcium sulfate, calcium carbonate, amorphous carbon, and Prussian blue) was employed as chalcographic inks, using linseed oil as a binding medium. Gamboge was identified in the delicate finishing brush touches realized in watercolor.

  5. Improvement and development of non-invasive blood pressure measurement techniques%无创血压测量技术的改进与进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑理华; 窦建洪; 何兴华; 屠伟峰; 马铭俊; 吴昊

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the improvement and development of some general non-invasive blood pressure measurement(NBPM)techniques, e.g. korotkoff sound method, oscillometric method and double cuff method. The new practical techniques and methods at home and abroad and perspective of non-invasive continuous blood pressure measurement(NCBPM)have also been presented systematically in this article, such as arterial tonometry method, arterial volumn clamp method, pulse-wave velocity method, ultrasonic method and the application of wavelet analysis and fuzzy recognition. Finally, it's pointed out that NBPM, especially NCBPM, has a huge market demand. Pulse-wave velocity method can achieve real non-invasive continuous blood pressure measurement and thus has abroad application. Research progress of methods and theories of continuous non-invasive measurement of blood pressure will be a desired direction.%介绍数种常规的无创血压测量方法-柯氏音法、示波法和双袖带法及其改进.重点对国际上连续无创血压测量的新型实用技术、方法及前景进行较为详细的介绍,如动脉张力测量法、动脉容积钳制法、脉搏波速度测量法、超声测压法以及小波分析和模糊识别技术在血压信号处理中的应用等.指出无创血压测量技术,尤其是无创连续血压测量方法有着巨大的市场需求;脉搏波速度测量法能实现真正意义上的连续无创血压测量,因此具有广泛的应用前景,而采用新理论进行连续的无创血压测量将是该领域的目标和发展方向.

  6. Simplified Multimodal Biometric Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Shete

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Multibiometric systems are expected to be more reliable than unimodal biometric systems for personal identification due to the presence of multiple, fairly independent pieces of evidence e.g. Unique Identification Project "Aadhaar" of Government of India. In this paper, we present a novel wavelet based technique to perform fusion at the feature level and score level by considering two biometric modalities, face and fingerprint. The results indicate that the proposed technique can lead to substantial improvement in multimodal matching performance. The proposed technique is simple because of no preprocessing of raw biometric traits as well as no feature and score normalization.

  7. Does a Multimodal No-Compression Suture Technique of the Intercostal Space Reduce Chronic Postthoracotomy Pain? A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohsen; Menna, Cecilia; Andreetti, Claudio; Puyo, Carlos; Maurizi, Giulio; D'Andrilli, Antonio; Ciccone, Anna Maria; Massullo, Domenico; Vanni, Camilla; Berardi, Giammauro; Baldini, Rossella; Rendina, Erino Angelo

    2016-09-01

    Chronic postthoracotomy pain is a significant adverse outcome of thoracic surgery. We evaluated with a prospective randomized trial the effect of a multimodal no-compression suture technique of the intercostal space on postoperative pain occurrence in patients undergoing minithoracotomy. Patients undergoing a muscle-sparing lateral minithoracotomy for different thoracic diseases were randomly divided into two groups: 146 patients received intercostal muscle flap harvesting and pericostal no-compression "edge" suture (the IMF group), and 151 patients received a standard suture technique associated with an intrapleural intercostal nerve block (the IINB group). Pain scores and interference of pain with daily activities were assessed by using the Italian version of the Brief Pain Inventory on day 1, and at 1 to 6 months postoperatively. The results of pulmonary function tests (spirometry and the 6-minute walking test ) were evaluated preoperatively and at 1 and 6 months postoperatively. Postthoracotomy pain scores throughout the first postoperative day were significantly lower in the IMF group. After 1 and 6 months, patients in the IMF group had a significantly lower average pain score (p = 0.001). There were no significant differences in pain interference scores at each evaluation time point in either group. However, differences were shown in lung function test results at 1 and 6 months postoperatively (the forced expiratory volume in 1 second in the IINB group averaged 68.8 ± 17.4% of predicted value and 72.8 ± 10.5%, respectively, and in the IMF group it averaged 83.1 ± 7.4% and 86.4 ± 12.8%, respectively [p = 0.023 and 0.013, respectively]; the 6-minute walking test results in the IINB group averaged 311.1 ± 51.0 and 329.9 ± 54.8 m, respectively, and those in the IMF group averaged 371.2 ± 54.8 and 395.7 ± 56.4 m, respectively [p = 0.0001]). The multimodal no-compression suture technique is a rapid and feasible procedure that reduces the intensity of

  8. Multimodal imaging of ischemic wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Huang, Jiwei; Liu, Peng; Gordillo, Gayle; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald

    2012-12-01

    The wound healing process involves the reparative phases of inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Interrupting any of these phases may result in chronically unhealed wounds, amputation, or even patient death. Quantitative assessment of wound tissue ischemia, perfusion, and inflammation provides critical information for appropriate detection, staging, and treatment of chronic wounds. However, no method is available for noninvasive, simultaneous, and quantitative imaging of these tissue parameters. We integrated hyperspectral, laser speckle, and thermographic imaging modalities into a single setup for multimodal assessment of tissue oxygenation, perfusion, and inflammation characteristics. Advanced algorithms were developed for accurate reconstruction of wound oxygenation and appropriate co-registration between different imaging modalities. The multimodal wound imaging system was validated by an ongoing clinical trials approved by OSU IRB. In the clinical trial, a wound of 3mm in diameter was introduced on a healthy subject's lower extremity and the healing process was serially monitored by the multimodal imaging setup. Our experiments demonstrated the clinical usability of multimodal wound imaging.

  9. Measuring Ca2+ influxes of TRPC1-dependent Ca2+ channels in HL-7702 cells with Non-invasive Micro-test Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Ya Zhang; Wen-Jun Wang; Li-Jie Pan; Yue Xu; Zong-Ming Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To explore the possibility of using the Noninvasive Micro-test Technique (NMT) to investigate the role of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 1 (TRPC1) in regulating Ca2+ influxes in HL-7702 cells, a normal human liver cell line.METHODS: Net Ca2+ fluxes were measured with NMT,a technology that can obtain dynamic information of specific/selective ionic/molecular activities on material surfaces, non-invasively. The expression levels of TRPC1 were increased by liposomal transfection, whose effectiveness was evaluated by Western-blotting and single cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.RESULTS: Ca2+ influxes could be elicited by adding 1 mmol/L CaCl2 to the test solution of HL-7702 cells. They were enhanced by addition of 20 μmol/L noradrenalin and inhibited by 100 μmol/L LaCl3 (a non-selective Ca2+ channel blocker);5 μmol/L nifedipine did not induce any change. Overexpression of TRPC1 caused increased Ca2+ influx. Five micromoles per liter nifedipine did not inhibit this elevation, whereas 100 μmol/L LaCl3 did.CONCLUSION: In HL-7702 cells, there is a type of TRPC1-dependent Ca2+ channel, which could be detected via NMT and inhibited by La3+.

  10. Research Techniques Made Simple: Noninvasive Imaging Technologies for the Delineation of Basal Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Syril Keena T

    2016-04-01

    In this article we discuss the development of noninvasive imaging modalities to help delineate tumor margins of basal cell carcinomas in the setting of Mohs micrographic surgery. A review of the available literature reveals that dermoscopy can help delineate basal cell carcinomas before surgical removal but that it has no benefit over clinical inspection in reducing the number of Mohs stages. In contrast, fluorescence confocal microscopy has a sensitivity of 88-96% and specificity of 89-99% for the detection of basal cell carcinomas and can potentially serve as a rapid means for tumor evaluation on ex vivo specimens. Optical coherence tomography has shown some success in the presurgical evaluation of tumor margins in vivo, before surgical excision. With ongoing developments in device portability, speed of image retrieval, and image resolution, these technologies are likely to gain traction in cutaneous oncology research and practice. It is therefore important for dermatology clinicians and researchers to understand the mechanisms, principal uses, advantages, and limitations of each device.

  11. Chronic ankle pain and fibrosis successfully treated with a new noninvasive augmented soft tissue mobilization technique (ASTM): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melham, T J; Sevier, T L; Malnofski, M J; Wilson, J K; Helfst, R H

    1998-06-01

    This clinical case report demonstrates the clinical effectiveness of a new form of soft tissue mobilization in the treatment of excessive connective tissue fibrosis (scar tissue) around an athlete's injured ankle. The scar tissue was causing the athlete to have pain with activity, pain on palpation of the ankle, decreased range of motion, and loss of function. Surgery and several months of conventional physical therapy failed to alleviate the athlete's symptoms. As a final resort, augmented soft tissue mobilization (ASTM) was administered. ASTM is an alternative nonsurgical treatment modality that is being researched at Performance Dynamics (Muncip, IN). ASTM is a process that uses ergonomically designed instruments that assist therapists in the rapid localization and effective treatment of areas exhibiting excessive soft tissue fibrosis. This is followed by a stretching and strengthening program. Upon the completion of 6 wk of ASTM therapy, the athlete had no pain and had regained full range of motion and function. This case report is an example of how a noninvasive augmented form of soft tissue mobilization (ASTM) demonstrated impressive clinical results in treating a condition caused by connective tissue fibrosis.

  12. Characterizing the behavior and reproductive biology of zoo-housed Sichuan takin (Budorcas taxicolor tibetana) using non-invasive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkin, A; Bernier, D; Santymire, R M

    2012-08-01

    The Sichuan takin (takin; Budorcas taxicolor tibetana) is distributed in the Gansu and Sichuan providences of southern China and along eastern Tibet. Because of their ecology, few data on takin reproductive biology exist, with the exception of its mating season in the Sichuan province, which occurs from July through August. Therefore, the objectives were to: 1) characterize reproductive hormones in zoo-housed male and female takin, including pregnancy in the female, using non-invasive fecal steroid hormonal monitoring; 2) characterize behaviors of zoo-housed takin, emphasizing reproductive behaviors and activity budget; and 3) assess the influence of season on births in North America and reproductive hormonal and behavioral activity. Fecal samples were collected 3 to 5 times per week from two adult males and three adult females. Extracted hormones were analyzed using an enzyme immunoassay for progestagen and androgen concentrations. Behavioral observations were collected for 2 yrs using an ethogram. In this study, season affected reproduction, specifically birth occurrences, reproductive cyclicity in females and androgen production in males. The duration of the estrous cycle was approximately 35 d and cycles occurred June through December. Androgen concentrations peaked in May through August. Season did not influence behavior; however, age and sex may affect some behaviors, including activity level, foraging and drinking, social affiliative behavior, and visibility from the visitor's viewpoint. In conclusion, fecal hormonal and behavioral analyses can provide information for management and conservation of this herd species.

  13. Bioluminescence : the potential of a non-invasive bio-optical imaging technique and improvement of animal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, J. W.; van Dam, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Bioluminescence is an optical imaging technique that exploits the emission of photons at specific wavelengths based on energy-dependent reactions catalysed by luciferases. The technique makes it possible to monitor measure, and track biological processes in living animals. A short review is

  14. Bioluminescence : the potential of a non-invasive bio-optical imaging technique and improvement of animal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, J. W.; van Dam, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Bioluminescence is an optical imaging technique that exploits the emission of photons at specific wavelengths based on energy-dependent reactions catalysed by luciferases. The technique makes it possible to monitor measure, and track biological processes in living animals. A short review is presente

  15. Multimode optical fibers: steady state mode exciter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M; Sugimura, A; Ikegami, T

    1976-09-01

    The steady state mode power distribution of the multimode graded index fiber was measured. A simple and effective steady state mode exciter was fabricated by an etching technique. Its insertion loss was 0.5 dB for an injection laser. Deviation in transmission characteristics of multimode graded index fibers can be avoided by using the steady state mode exciter.

  16. Multimodal Literacies in the Secondary English Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, William C.; Denton, Shawn

    2011-01-01

    To provide insight into the issue of multimodal literacy instruction, the authors explore presentation techniques and instructional activities employed in their secondary language arts classes. They collaborate on assignments that focus students on "anchored media instruction" and engage them in producing multimodal, technology-infused projects,…

  17. Non-invasive measurement of cardiac output in heart failure patients using a new foreign gas rebreathing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Anders; Videbaek, Regitze; Schou, Morten; Damgaard, Morten; Kastrup, Jens; Norsk, Peter

    2002-02-01

    Values of effective pulmonary blood flow (Q(EP)) and cardiac output, determined by a non-invasive foreign gas rebreathing method (CO(RB)) using a new infrared photoacoustic gas analysing system, were compared with measurements of cardiac output obtained by the direct Fick (CO(FICK)) and thermodilution (CO(TD)) methods in patients with heart failure or pulmonary hypertension. In 11 patients, of which three had shunt flow through areas without significant gas exchange, the mean difference (bias) and limits of agreement (+/- 2 S.D.) were 0.6 +/- 1.2 litre x min(-1) when comparing CO(FICK) and Q(EP), and -0.8 +/- 1.3 litre x min(-1) when comparing CO(FICK) and CO(TD). When correction for intrapulmonary shunt flow was applied (i.e. calculation of CO(RB)) in all 11 patients, the bias between CO(FICK) and CO(RB) was 0.1 +/- 0.9 litre x min(-1), primarily because agreement improved in the three patients with significant shunt flow. In the eight patients without significant shunt flow, the agreement between Q(EP) and CO(FICK) was 0.3 +/- 0.9 litre x min(-1). In conclusion, a foreign gas rebreathing method with a new infrared photoacoustic gas analyser provided at least as reliable a measure of cardiac output as did thermodilution. In the absence of significant shunt flow, measurement of Q(EP) itself provides a reliable estimate of cardiac output in heart failure patients. The infrared photoacoustic gas analyser markedly facilitates clinical use of the rebreathing method in general, which makes the method available to a larger group of clinicians working with patients with cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Assessment of disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis using optical spectral transmission measurements, a non-invasive imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Onna, M; Ten Cate, D F; Tsoi, K L; Meier, A J L; Jacobs, J W G; Westgeest, A A A; Meijer, P B L; van Beek, M C; Rensen, W H J; Bijlsma, J W J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), treat-to-target strategies require instruments for valid detection of joint inflammation. Therefore, imaging modalities are increasingly used in clinical practice. Optical spectral transmission (OST) measurements are non-invasive and fast and may therefore have benefits over existing imaging modalities. We tested whether OST could measure disease activity validly in patients with RA. Methods In 59 patients with RA and 10 patients with arthralgia, OST, joint counts, Disease Activity Score (DAS) 28 and ultrasonography (US) were performed. Additionally, MRI was performed in patients with DAS28<2.6. We developed and validated within the same cohort an algorithm for detection of joint inflammation by OST with US as reference. Results At the joint level, OST and US performed similarly inproximal interphalangeal-joints (area under the receiver-operating curve (AUC) of 0.79, p<0.0001) andmetacarpophalangeal joints (AUC 0.78, p<0.0001). Performance was less similar in wrists (AUC 0.62, p=0.006). On the patient level, OST correlated moderately with clinical examination (DAS28 r=0.42, p=0.001), and US scores (r=0.64, p<0.0001). Furthermore, in patients with subclinical and low disease activity, there was a correlation between OST and MRI synovitis score (RAMRIS (Rheumatoid Arthritis MRI Scoring) synovitis), r=0.52, p=0.005. Conclusions In this pilot study, OST performed moderately in the detection of joint inflammation in patients with RA. Further studies are needed to determine the diagnostic performance in a new cohort of patients with RA. PMID:26452538

  19. Visceral anatomy of ocean sunfish (Mola mola (L., 1758), Molidae, Tetraodontiformes) and angler (Lophius piscatorius (L., 1758), Lophiidae, Lophiiformes) investigated by non-invasive imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanet, Bruno; Guintard, Claude; Boisgard, Thierry; Fusellier, Marion; Tavernier, Cédric; Betti, Eric; Madec, Stéphane; Richaudeau, Yvan; Raphaël, Christian; Dettaï, Agnès; Lecointre, Guillaume

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to examine the gross visceral anatomy of ocean sunfish and angler using non-invasive imaging techniques: computed tomography imaging (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Similarities and differences in the internal organisation of these two species are verified. Both species lack a swimbladder and present a significant asymmetry in the hepatic lobes, an elongated bile duct terminating close to the stomach, a compact thyroid embedded in a blood lacuna, and very reduced brain and spinal cord. These observations are important in regard to the close relationships between Tetraodontiformes and Lophiiformes, established by several molecular works, but not yet confirmed by morpho-anatomical data. However the occurrence of these features has to be examined in other taxa before phylogenetic hypotheses are proposed. Copyright © 2012 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Thallium myocardial perfusion scans for the assessment of right ventricular hypertrophy in patients with cystic fibrosis. A comparison with other noninvasive techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newth, C.J.; Corey, M.L.; Fowler, R.S.; Gilday, D.L.; Gross, D.; Mitchell, I.

    1981-01-01

    The incidence of right ventricular hypertrophy in 32 patients with cystic fibrosis was studied using thallium 201 (TI-201) myocardial perfusion scans, and compared with other noninvasive techniques including electrocardiography, vectorcardiography, and M-mode echocardiography. The patients (mean age, 17.3 yr; range, 7 to 33) had a wide range of clinical and pulmonary abnormalities (mean Shwachman-Kulczycki score, 66.6). In the total study group, TI-201 scans, like the vectorcardiograms and the M-mode echocardiograms, gave a surprisingly high proportion of positive predictions for right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) (44%). The correlations with all other noninvasive methods were uniformly poor, so caution must be exercised in using this technique to predict early RVH in order to follow the natural history of cor pulmonale in cystic fibrosis. At the time of the study, 6 patients had clinical evidence of right ventricular failure, and in this disease setting must have had RVH. In 3 patients, RVH was confirmed at autopsy, and it was successfully predicted by TI-201 scans in 5 of the 6 patients. The false negative scan may have been due to regional myocardial ischemia secondary to severe right ventricular failure. In contrast, the vectorcardiogram, using Fowler's new criteria, made a successful prediction of RVH in all 6 patients, and the electro cardiogram in only 3. Although the M-mode echocardiogram was abnormal in all patients, it would have predicted RVH (with increased right ventricular anterior wall thickness) in only 1 patient. We concluded that TI-201 myocardial perfusion cans are good at confirming RVH in cases with established right ventricular failure, but have no advantage over vectorcardiographic assessments, which are logistically easier to perform and carry no radiation risks.

  1. Note: A non-invasive electronic measurement technique to measure the embedded four resistive elements in a Wheatstone bridge sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravelo Arias, S. I.; Ramírez Muñoz, D. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, Avda. de la Universitat, s/n, 46100-Burjassot (Spain); Cardoso, S. [INESC Microsystems and Nanotechnologies (INESC-MN) and Institute for Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies, R. Alves Redol 9, Lisbon 1000-029 (Portugal); Ferreira, R. [INL-International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Av. Mestre José Veiga, Braga 4715-31 (Portugal); Freitas, P. [INESC Microsystems and Nanotechnologies (INESC-MN) and Institute for Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies, R. Alves Redol 9, Lisbon 1000-029 (Portugal); INL-International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Av. Mestre José Veiga, Braga 4715-31 (Portugal)

    2015-06-15

    The work shows a measurement technique to obtain the correct value of the four elements in a resistive Wheatstone bridge without the need to separate the physical connections existing between them. Two electronic solutions are presented, based on a source-and-measure unit and using discrete electronic components. The proposed technique brings the possibility to know the mismatching or the tolerance between the bridge resistive elements and then to pass or reject it in terms of its related common-mode rejection. Experimental results were taken in various Wheatstone resistive bridges (discrete and magnetoresistive integrated bridges) validating the proposed measurement technique specially when the bridge is micro-fabricated and there is no physical way to separate one resistive element from the others.

  2. Multimodality molecular imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Fangfang; Shen, Yehua; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating stroke. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. Molecular imaging provides the possibility of the visual representation of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand the stem cells therapeutic mechanisms, we need to further develop means of monitoring these cells noninvasively, longitudinally and repeatedly. Because of tissue depth and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in vivo imaging of stem cells therapy for stroke has unique challenges. In this review, we describe existing methods of tracking transplanted stem cells in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nuclear medicine imaging, and optical imaging (OI). Each of the imaging techniques has advantages and drawbacks. Finally, we describe multimodality imaging strategies as a more comprehensive and potential method to monitor transplanted stem cells for stroke.

  3. The rotational memory effect of a multimode fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Amitonova, L V; Pinkse, P W H

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the rotational memory effect in a multimode fiber. Rotating the incident wavefront around the fiber core axis leads to a rotation of the resulting pattern of the fiber output without significant changes in the resulting speckle pattern. The rotational memory effect can be exploited for non-invasive imaging or ultrafast high-resolution scanning through a multimode fiber. Our experiments demonstrate this effect over a full range of angles in two experimental configurations.

  4. Use of noninvasive geophysical techniques for the In Situ Vitrification Program. Volume 1, Literature review: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josten, N.E.; Marts, S.T.; Carpenter, G.S.

    1991-11-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a waste pit remediation technology that can potentially eliminate the need for pit excavation. The ISV program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) funded this study to evaluate geophysical techniques that might be useful for performing detailed screening of the materials, soil conditions, and local geology of waste pits targeted for remediation. The evaluation focuses on a specific set of characterization objectives developed by ISV engineers. The objectives are based on their assessment of safety, environmental, and cost efficiency issues associated with the ISV process. A literature review of geophysical case histories was conducted and a geophysical survey was performed at the INEL simulated waste pit so that the evaluation could be based on demonstrable results.

  5. Tracking the eye non-invasively: Simultaneous comparison of the scleral search coil and optical tracking techniques in themacaque monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Kimmel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available From human perception to primate neurophysiology, monitoring eye position is critical to the study of vision, attention, oculomotor control, and behavior. Two principal techniques for the precise measurement of eye position—the long-standing sclera-embedded search coil and more recent optical tracking techniques—are in use in various laboratories, but no published study compares the performance of the two methods simultaneously in the same primates. Here we compare two popular systems—a sclera-embedded search coil from C-N-C Engineering and the EyeLink 1000 optical system from SR Research—by recording simultaneously from the same eye in the macaque monkey while the animal performed a simple oculomotor task. We found broad agreement between the two systems, particularly in positional accuracy during fixation, measurement of saccade amplitude, detection of fixational saccades, and sensitivity to subtle changes in eye position from trial to trial. Nonetheless, certain discrepancies persist, particularly elevated saccade peak velocities, post-saccadic ringing, influence of luminance change on reported position, and greater sample-to-sample variation in the optical system. Our study shows that optical performance now rivals that of the search coil, rendering optical systems appropriate for many if not most applications. This finding is consequential, especially for animal subjects, because the optical systems do not require invasive surgery for implantation and repair of search coils around the eye. Our data also allow laboratories using the optical system in human subjects to assess the strengths and limitations of the technique for their own applications.

  6. Noninvasive imaging of oral premalignancy and malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Krasieva, T.; Jung, W.; You, J. S.; Chen, Z.; Osann, K.; Tromberg, B.

    2005-04-01

    Objectives: Early detection of cancer and its curable precursors remains the best way to ensure patient survival and quality of life. Despite significant advances in treatment, oral cancer still results in 10,000 U.S. deaths annually, mainly due to the late detection of most oral lesions. Specific aim was to use a combination of non-invasive optical in vivo technologies to test a multi-modality approach to non-invasive diagnostics of oral premalignancy and malignancy. Methods: In the hamster cheek pouch model (120 hamsters), in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) mapped epithelial, subepithelial and vascular change throughout carcinogenesis in specific, marked sites. In vivo multi-wavelength multi-photon (MPM) and second harmonic generated (SHG) fluorescence techniques provided parallel data on surface and subsurface tissue structure, specifically collagen presence and structure, cellular presence, and vasculature. Images were diagnosed by 2 blinded, pre-standardized investigators using a standardized scale from 0-6 for all modalities. After sacrifice, histopathological sections were prepared and pathology evaluated on a scale of 0-6. ANOVA techniques compared imaging diagnostics with histopathology. 95% confidence limits of the sensitivity and specificity were established for the diagnostic capability of OCT/ODT+ MPM/SHG using ROC curves and kappa statistics. Results: Imaging data were reproducibly obtained with good accuracy. Carcinogenesis-related structural and vascular changes were clearly visible to tissue depths of 2mm. Sensitivity (OCT/ODT alone: 71-88%; OCT+MPM/SHG: 79-91%) and specificity (OCT alone: 62-83%;OCT+MPM/SHG: 67-90%) compared well with conventional techniques. Conclusions: OCT/ODT and MPM/SHG are promising non-invasive in vivo diagnostic modalities for oral dysplasia and malignancy. Supported by CRFA 30003, CCRP 00-01391V-20235, NIH (LAMMP) RR01192, DOE DE903-91ER 61227, NIH EB-00293 CA91717, NSF BES

  7. Non-invasive investigative techniques for the diachronic study of territorial compartments: a case study for the documentation and analysis of architectural complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lieto, Marco; Marchetta, Isabella; Ciriello, Rosanna; De Martino, Gregory; Della Mora, Dario

    2014-05-01

    The trend in the study of areas of land in their integrity and as dynamic, anthropic units in diachronic history has initiated long survey campaigns over several decades that have covered large areas mapping the evidence and attempting a reconstruction of the evolution of ancient settlements. The need for further study to disentangle the knots of modes and types of settlement boosted further investigations of targeted excavations, based on the quality and density of the findings from the field. Currently archaeological research can rely on non-invasive integrated methods to better define the areas to be investigated systematically obtaining new typologies of information and better management of time and research costs. In this paper we present a specific case study in which a variety of integrated survey methods have contributed to the documentation and analysis of monumental complexes linked to specific local contexts. The area under investigation lies in Italy, in the province of Potenza and, specifically in the town of Forenza. The survey activities, involving the entire municipality, have been running on and off for about 2 years and have already resulted in the collection of a lot of interesting data that will be useful to essential fieldwork. In particular, we carried out different types of investigation in three different sample sites: 1. monumental complex of Santa Maria de 'Armenis: to complement previous excavations which involved only a portion of the estimated area of interest, we carried out magnetometric and geo-electrical surveys aimed at a more precise definition of the true extent and interpretation of the monument in antiquity; 2. site of Monte Caruso: we carried out remote sensing using a remote-controlled UAV hexakopter drone with stereoscopic photogrammetric survey techniques aimed at the detailed documentation of the monumental evidence of a structure visible in elevation but in a context difficult to approach with traditional surveying

  8. New imaging technique using degree of polarization for the study of polarimetric properties for non-invasive biomedical diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Isabella C.; Guyot, Steve; Lemoine, Jacques

    2012-06-01

    This research proposes a new imaging technique for near real time multispectral acquisition using CCD RGB cameras of the so called "Degree Of Polarization" (DOP) in polarimetry for future clinical investigation. The aim of exploiting the DOP as the contrast element is to demonstrate that the elliptical DOP provides more information characterizing complex medium than the more traditional linear and circular ones. The system considers an incoherent input white light beam and opportunely calibrated nematic crystals (LCVR), so no mechanical tools are necessary. The particular features of the system indicate it to be the perfect candidate for a new imaging system considering in-vivo (as well as ex-vivo) non invasive superficial diagnostic for medical application as dermatologic diagnostics, since no type of sample preparation is necessary, i.e. tissue biopsy, radiation or contrast agent injection. Thus the biomedical application of this method suggests a simple, direct, fast and also easily exploitable future employment, as a desirable mean for clinical investigation but also for digital recognition in biometrics. Further new elements to improve the model of light scattering and matter-light interaction will be acquired, in particular considering a very complete characterization of the system response using latex microspheres suspension to simulate turbid media with different concentration.

  9. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: diagnostic accuracy of a non-invasive screening technique for early detection of malignant changes in the oral cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, J L; Nisha, G U; Manju, S; Philip, E K; Jeemon, P; Baiju, K V; Beena, V T

    2011-01-01

    Background Strong proof-of-principle for utilisation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, a non-invasive tool for early detection of malignant changes, has emerged recently. The potential of this technique in distinguishing normal tissue from hyperplastic and dysplastic tissues was explored. Methods Diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra in the 400–700 nm region were obtained from the buccal mucosa of 96 patients and 34 healthy volunteers. The DR spectral data were compared against the gold standard biopsy and histopathology results. A principal-component analysis was performed for dimensional reduction in the normalised spectral data with linear discriminant analysis as the classifying technique. The receiver operator characteristic curve technique was employed for evaluating the performance of the diagnostic test. Results DR spectral features for different lesions, such as normal/healthy, hyperplastic, dysplastic and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), varied significantly according to the intensity of oxygenated haemoglobin absorption. While the classification based on discriminant scores provided an overall sensitivity of 98.5% and specificity of 96.0% for distinguishing SCC from dysplasia, they were 100.0% and 95.0%, respectively, for distinguishing dysplasia from hyperplasia. Similarly, the analysis yielded a sensitivity of 95.0% and specificity of 100.0% for distinguishing hyperplasia from healthy tissue. The areas under the receiver operator characteristic curves were 0.98 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.00) and 0.95 (95% CI 0.90 to 1.00) for distinguishing dysplasia from SCC and hyperplasia from dysplasia, respectively. Conclusion DR spectral data efficiently discriminate healthy tissue from oral malignant lesions. Diagnostic accuracies obtained in this study highlight the potential use of this method for routine clinical practice. PMID:22021749

  10. Reproducibility of a non-invasive ultrasonic technique of tendon force measurement, determined in vitro in equine superficial digital flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevier-Denoix, Nathalie; Ravary-Plumioën, Bérangère; Evrard, Delphine; Pourcelot, Philippe

    2009-09-18

    A non-invasive ultrasonic (US) technique of tendon force measurement has been recently developed. It is based on the relationship demonstrated between the speed of sound (SOS) in a tendon and the traction force applied to it. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the variability of this non-linear relationship among 7 equine superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendons, and the reproducibility of SOS measurements in these tendons over successive loading cycles and tests. Seven SDF tendons were equipped with an US probe (1MHz), secured in contact with the skin overlying the tendon metacarpal part. The tendons were submitted to a traction test consisting in 5 cycles of loading/unloading between 50 and 4050N. Four tendons out of the 7 were submitted to 5 additional cycles up to 5550N. The SOS-tendon force relationships appeared similar in shape, although large differences in SOS levels were observed among the tendons. Reproducibility between cycles was evaluated from the root mean square of the standard deviations (RMS-SD) of SOS values observed every 100N, and of force values every 2m/s. Reproducibility of SOS measurements revealed high between successive cycles: above 500N the RMS-SD was less than 2% of the corresponding traction force. Reproducibility between tests was lower, partly due to the experimental set-up; above 500N the difference between the two tests stayed nevertheless below 15% of the corresponding mean traction force. The reproducibility of the US technique here demonstrated in vitro has now to be confirmed in vivo.

  11. Multimodal perception and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkhoven, P.J.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses mechanisms of multimodal perception in the context of multimodal simulators and virtual worlds. We review some notable findings from psychophysical experiments with a focus on what we call touch-inclusive multimodal perception—that is, the sensory integration of the tactile sy

  12. Multimodal Biometrics using Feature Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Krishneswari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Biometrics is a unique, measurable physiological or behavioural characteristic of a person and finds extensive applications in authentication and authorization. Fingerprint, palm print, iris, voice, are some of the most widely used biometrics for personal identification. To reduce the error rates and enhance the usability of biometric system, multimodal biometric systems are used where more than one biometric characteristics are used. Approach: In this study it is proposed to investigate the performance of multimodal biometrics using palm print and fingerprint. Features are extracted using Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT and attributes selected using Information Gain (IG. Results and Conclusion: The proposed technique shows an average improvement of 8.52% compared to using palmprint technique alone. The processing time does not increase for verification compared to palm print techniques.

  13. Validation of 2 noninvasive, markerless reconstruction techniques in biplane high-speed fluoroscopy for 3-dimensional research of bovine distal limb kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, M; Reich, E; Grund, S; Mülling, C K W; Geiger, S M

    2017-10-01

    Lameness severely impairs cattle's locomotion, and it is among the most important threats to animal welfare, performance, and productivity in the modern dairy industry. However, insight into the pathological alterations of claw biomechanics leading to lameness and an understanding of the biomechanics behind development of claw lesions causing lameness are limited. Biplane high-speed fluoroscopic kinematography is a new approach for the analysis of skeletal motion. Biplane high-speed videos in combination with bone scans can be used for 3-dimensional (3D) animations of bones moving in 3D space. The gold standard, marker-based animation, requires implantation of radio-opaque markers into bones, which impairs the practicability for lameness research in live animals. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the comparative accuracy of 2 noninvasive, markerless animation techniques (semi-automatic and manual) in 3D animation of the bovine distal limb. Tantalum markers were implanted into each of the distal, middle, and proximal phalanges of 5 isolated bovine distal forelimbs, and biplane high-speed x-ray videos of each limb were recorded to capture the simulation of one step. The limbs were scanned by computed tomography to create bone models of the 6 digital bones, and 3D animation of the bones' movements were subsequently reconstructed using the marker-based, the semi-automatic, and the manual animation techniques. Manual animation translational bias and precision varied from 0.63 ± 0.26 mm to 0.80 ± 0.49 mm, and rotational bias and precision ranged from 2.41 ± 1.43° to 6.75 ± 4.67°. Semi-automatic translational values for bias and precision ranged from 1.26 ± 1.28 mm to 2.75 ± 2.17 mm, and rotational values varied from 3.81 ± 2.78° to 11.7 ± 8.11°. In our study, we demonstrated the successful application of biplane high-speed fluoroscopic kinematography to gait analysis of bovine distal limb. Using the manual animation technique, kinematics

  14. Learning multimodal latent attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanwei; Hospedales, Timothy M; Xiang, Tao; Gong, Shaogang

    2014-02-01

    The rapid development of social media sharing has created a huge demand for automatic media classification and annotation techniques. Attribute learning has emerged as a promising paradigm for bridging the semantic gap and addressing data sparsity via transferring attribute knowledge in object recognition and relatively simple action classification. In this paper, we address the task of attribute learning for understanding multimedia data with sparse and incomplete labels. In particular, we focus on videos of social group activities, which are particularly challenging and topical examples of this task because of their multimodal content and complex and unstructured nature relative to the density of annotations. To solve this problem, we 1) introduce a concept of semilatent attribute space, expressing user-defined and latent attributes in a unified framework, and 2) propose a novel scalable probabilistic topic model for learning multimodal semilatent attributes, which dramatically reduces requirements for an exhaustive accurate attribute ontology and expensive annotation effort. We show that our framework is able to exploit latent attributes to outperform contemporary approaches for addressing a variety of realistic multimedia sparse data learning tasks including: multitask learning, learning with label noise, N-shot transfer learning, and importantly zero-shot learning.

  15. Assessment of slow-breathing relaxation technique in acute stressful tasks using a multipurpose non-invasive beat-by-beat cardiovascular monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Masamichi; Yamakoshi, Takehiro; Ikarashi, Akira; Tanaka, Shinobu; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2007-01-01

    Recently, several studies revealed that daily slow-breathing exercise lowered blood pressure and increased baroreflex sensitivity. With this interesting finding, we have been contemplating to design a compact breath-controllable device for relaxation to stress reaction during daily living for home as well as ambulatory use, as a final goal, towards reduction of cognitive hemodynamic disorders, hypertension, and acute stress-induced hemodynamic disorders. The present study thereby describes, as a first step, to design a prototype system combining a compact multipurpose non-invasive beat-by-beat cardiovascular monitor developed previously with a wrist-type vibrator to make a respiration rhythm, and to assess an effect of slow-breathing relaxation on the cardiovascular hemodynamics in response to acute stressful conditions. The cardiovascular hemodynamic monitor can measure beat-by-beat systolic (SBP), mean (MBP) and diastolic (DBP) pressure in a finger based on the volume-compensation method, cardiac output (CO) by the electrical admittance method and the other hemodynamic-related parameters (e.g., total peripheral resistance (TPR=MBP/CO), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate, pulse wave velocity, etc.). The wrist-type vibrator can give various breathing rhythms quietly to a subject using a small vibration motor. The stressful tasks loaded to healthy volunteers (3 males, 23-34 yrs.) in the experiments were cold pressor and arithmetic ones as a representative of daily passive and active coping tasks, respectively, under conditions with (respiratory rate of 6 1/min) and without breath control.. The results showed that the slow-breathing technique could have a significant effect on improvement of the hemodynamic changes following the acute stressful tasks, especially in the passive coping task.

  16. Multimodal neuroimaging in presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial EEG (icEEG monitoring is critical in epilepsy surgical planning, but it has limitations. The advances of neuroimaging have made it possible to reveal epileptic abnormalities that could not be identified previously and improve the localization of the seizure focus and the vital cortex. A frequently asked question in the field is whether non-invasive neuroimaging could replace invasive icEEG or reduce the need for icEEG in presurgical evaluation. This review considers promising neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy presurgical assessment in order to address this question. In addition, due to large variations in the accuracies of neuroimaging across epilepsy centers, multicenter neuroimaging studies are reviewed, and there is much need for randomized controlled trials (RCTs to better reveal the utility of presurgical neuroimaging. The results of multiple studies indicate that non-invasive neuroimaging could not replace invasive icEEG in surgical planning especially in non-lesional or extratemporal lobe epilepsies, but it could reduce the need for icEEG in certain cases. With technical advances, multimodal neuroimaging may play a greater role in presurgical evaluation to reduce the costs and risks of epilepsy surgery, and provide surgical options for more patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

  17. Multimodal neuroimaging in presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Weifang; Chen, Hui; Xia, Hong; Zhou, Zhen; Mei, Shanshan; Liu, Qingzhu; Li, Yunlin

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial EEG (icEEG) monitoring is critical in epilepsy surgical planning, but it has limitations. The advances of neuroimaging have made it possible to reveal epileptic abnormalities that could not be identified previously and improve the localization of the seizure focus and the vital cortex. A frequently asked question in the field is whether non-invasive neuroimaging could replace invasive icEEG or reduce the need for icEEG in presurgical evaluation. This review considers promising neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy presurgical assessment in order to address this question. In addition, due to large variations in the accuracies of neuroimaging across epilepsy centers, multicenter neuroimaging studies are reviewed, and there is much need for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to better reveal the utility of presurgical neuroimaging. The results of multiple studies indicate that non-invasive neuroimaging could not replace invasive icEEG in surgical planning especially in non-lesional or extratemporal lobe epilepsies, but it could reduce the need for icEEG in certain cases. With technical advances, multimodal neuroimaging may play a greater role in presurgical evaluation to reduce the costs and risks of epilepsy surgery, and provide surgical options for more patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

  18. Multi-modal CT in Stroke Imaging: New Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, Carlos J.; Wintermark, Max

    2009-01-01

    A multimodal CT protocol provides a comprehensive non-invasive survey of acute stroke patients with accurate demonstration of the site of arterial occlusion and its hemodynamic tissue status. It combines widespread availability with the ability to provide functional characterization of cerebral ischemia, and could potentially allow more accurate selection of candidates for acute stroke reperfusion therapy. PMID:19195537

  19. Theoretical and simulation analysis of a novel multiple-input multiple-output scheme over multimode fiber links with dual restricted launch techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanquan; Chi, Nan; Li, Rongling; Fang, Wuliang; Zhang, Junwen; Tao, Li; Shao, Yufeng

    2012-06-01

    Different launching methods over multimode fiber (MMF) are reviewed and compared under various aspects such as coupling coefficient, mode power distribution, and bit error rate performance. Among these, center launch and ring launch are elaborated and chosen as the inputs of multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) scheme for center launch exciting limited lower-order modes while ring launch exciting limited higher ones. Furthermore, we discuss the theoretical background and give a new wide-band MMF MIMO mathematical model. This paper also proposes a novel MMF MIMO system combining the dual restricted launches together with multi-segments receiving. The simulated results indicate that an aggregate data rate of 20 Gb/s over 800-m graded index-multimode fiber can be achieved by using this newly established MIMO scheme.

  20. The Intersection of Multimodality and Critical Perspective: Multimodality as Subversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shin-ying

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the relevance of multimodality to critical media literacy. It is based on the understanding that communication is intrinsically multimodal and multimodal communication is inherently social and ideological. By analysing two English-language learners' multimodal ensembles, the study reports on how multimodality contributes to a…

  1. Using a non-invasive technique in nutrition: synchrotron radiation infrared microspectroscopy spectroscopic characterization of oil seeds treated with different processing conditions on molecular spectral factors influencing nutrient delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-07-02

    Non-invasive techniques are a key to study nutrition and structure interaction. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy coupled with a synchrotron radiation source (SR-IMS) is a rapid, non-invasive, and non-destructive bioanalytical technique. To understand internal structure changes in relation to nutrient availability in oil seed processing is vital to find optimal processing conditions. The objective of this study was to use a synchrotron-based bioanalytical technique SR-IMS as a non-invasive and non-destructive tool to study the effects of heat-processing methods and oil seed canola type on modeled protein structure based on spectral data within intact tissue that were randomly selected and quantify the relationship between the modeled protein structure and protein nutrient supply to ruminants. The results showed that the moisture heat-related processing significantly changed (p0.05) in the protein spectral profile between the raw and dry-heated canola tissue and between yellow- and brown-type canola tissue. The results indicated that different heat processing methods have different impacts on the protein inherent structure. The protein intrinsic structure in canola seed tissue was more sensitive and more response to the moisture heating in comparison to the dry heating. These changes are expected to be related to the nutritive value. However, the current study is based on limited samples, and more large-scale studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  2. A non-invasive technique for measuring the electroencephalogram of broiler chickens in a fast way: the 'chicken EEG clamp' (CHEC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, A.M.L.; Prinz, S.; Oijen, G.B.M. van; Bessei, W.

    2007-01-01

    A device was developed to measure in a fast way the electroencephalogram (EEG) of broiler chickens in a non-invasive way. The 'chicken EEG clamp' (CHEC) consists of a framework with two pointed electrodes, fitting as a clamp around the chicken's head. The EEG is recorded by the two active electrodes

  3. EDITORIAL: Integrated non-invasive sensing techniques and geophysical methods for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage Integrated non-invasive sensing techniques and geophysical methods for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, N.; Soldovieri, F.

    2011-09-01

    In the last two decades, the use of non-invasive methods for the study and conservation of cultural heritage, from artefacts and historical sites to recent architectural structures, has gained increasing interest. This is due to several reasons: (i) the improvement of performance and information resolution of sensors and devices; (ii) the increasing availability of user-friendly data/image analysis, and processing software and routines; (iii) the ever greater awareness of archaeologists and conservators of the benefits of these technologies, in terms of reduction of costs, time and the risk associated with direct and destructive investigations of archaeological sites (excavation) and monuments (i.e. masonry coring). The choice of diagnostic strategy depends on the spatial and physical characteristics of the cultural objects or sites, the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment, etc). This makes the set up and validation of ad hoc procedures based on data processing and post-processing methods necessary, generally developed to address issues in other fields of application. This methodological perspective based on an integrated and multi-scale approach characterizes the papers of this special issue, which is focused on integrated non-invasive sensing techniques and geophysical methods for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage. In particular, attention is given to the advanced application of the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) from the satellite-based platform for deformation monitoring thanks to the innovative differential SAR interferometry (DInSAR) technique; Zeni et al show the significant possibilities of the proposed methodology in achieving a global vision not only of cultural heritage but also of the embedding territory. This collection also deals with the application of non-invasive diagnostics to archaeological prospecting, and

  4. Towards Multimodal Content Representation

    CERN Document Server

    Bunt, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Multimodal interfaces, combining the use of speech, graphics, gestures, and facial expressions in input and output, promise to provide new possibilities to deal with information in more effective and efficient ways, supporting for instance: - the understanding of possibly imprecise, partial or ambiguous multimodal input; - the generation of coordinated, cohesive, and coherent multimodal presentations; - the management of multimodal interaction (e.g., task completion, adapting the interface, error prevention) by representing and exploiting models of the user, the domain, the task, the interactive context, and the media (e.g. text, audio, video). The present document is intended to support the discussion on multimodal content representation, its possible objectives and basic constraints, and how the definition of a generic representation framework for multimodal content representation may be approached. It takes into account the results of the Dagstuhl workshop, in particular those of the informal working group...

  5. The ANIMAGE project: a multimodal imaging platform for small animal research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappey-Marinier, D.; Beuf, O.; Billotey, C.; Chereul, E.; Dupuy, J.; Jeandey, M.; Grenier, D.; Hasserodt, J.; Langlois, J. B.; Lartizien, C.; Mai, W.; Odet, C.; Samarut, J.; Vray, D.; Zimmer, L.; Janier, M.

    2004-07-01

    The advent of the molecular era has just generated a revolution in the development of new in vivo imaging techniques to examine the integrative functions of molecules, cells, organ systems and whole organisms. Molecular imaging constitutes a new tool allowing the biologist to characterize, repeatedly and non-invasively, a large number of experimental models developed in rodents. In order to monitor biological processes such as gene expression, normal development, metabolic alterations or medical treatment effects, several methodological and technological challenges have to be raised up. Developments are needed in chemistry to create new radiotracers or contrast agents, and in physic, to adapt the medical imaging techniques to the constraints of small animal investigations. ANIMAGE is a multimodal imaging platform to image the structure and function of systems using and developing different technologies such as autoradiography, ultrasounds, positron emission tomography (PET), X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI/MRS). The first biological applications and results are presented.

  6. Neural Network Classifier for Automatic Detection of Invasive Versus Noninvasive Airway Management Technique Based on Respiratory Monitoring Parameters in a Pediatric Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Jorge A; Jalali, Ali; Ahumada, Luis; Simpao, Allan F; Rehman, Mohamed A

    2017-08-23

    Children undergoing general anesthesia require airway monitoring by an anesthesia provider. The airway may be supported with noninvasive devices such as face mask or invasive devices such as a laryngeal mask airway or an endotracheal tube. The physiologic data stored provides an opportunity to apply machine learning algorithms distinguish between these modes based on pattern recognition. We retrieved three data sets from patients receiving general anesthesia in 2015 with either mask, laryngeal mask airway or endotracheal tube. Patients underwent myringotomy, tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy or inguinal hernia repair procedures. We retrieved measurements for end-tidal carbon dioxide, tidal volume, and peak inspiratory pressure and calculated statistical features for each data element per patient. We applied machine learning algorithms (decision tree, support vector machine, and neural network) to classify patients into noninvasive or invasive airway device support. We identified 300 patients per group (mask, laryngeal mask airway, and endotracheal tube) for a total of 900 patients. The neural network classifier performed better than the boosted trees and support vector machine classifiers based on the test data sets. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for neural network classification are 97.5%, 96.3%, and 95.8%. In contrast, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of support vector machine are 89.1%, 92.3%, and 88.3% and with the boosted tree classifier they are 93.8%, 92.1%, and 91.4%. We describe a method to automatically distinguish between noninvasive and invasive airway device support in a pediatric surgical setting based on respiratory monitoring parameters. The results show that the neural network classifier algorithm can accurately classify noninvasive and invasive airway device support.

  7. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Jerome Eyer

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface DNAPL carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, DOE Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high-resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are noninvasive means of site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This final report covers the results of Tasks 1, 2, and 3. Task (1) contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task (2) is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task (3) is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. During the commission of these tasks four seismic reflection profiles were collected. Subsurface velocity information was obtained by vertical seismic profile surveys in three wells. The interpretation of these data is in two parts. Part one is the construction and interpretation of structural contour maps of the contact between the Hanford Fine unit and the underlying Plio/Pleistocene unit and of the contact between the Plio/Pleistocene unit and the underlying caliche layer. These two contacts were determined to be the most likely surfaces to contain the highest concentration CCl{sub 4}. Part two of the interpretation uses the results of the AVO modeling to locate any seismic amplitude anomalies that might be

  8. Factors affecting the sensitivity and detection limits of MRI, CT, and SPECT for multimodal diagnostic and therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seevinck, Peter R; Seppenwoolde, Jan-Henry; de Wit, Tim C; Nijsen, Johannes F W; Beekman, Freek J; van Het Schip, Alfred D; Bakker, Chris J G

    2007-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) play an increasingly important role in the diagnostic workup and treatment of cancerous disease. In this context, a distinct trend can be observed towards the development of contrast agents and radiopharmaceuticals that open up perspectives on a multimodality imaging approach, involving all three aforementioned techniques. To promote insight into the potentialities of such an approach, we prepared an overview of the strengths and limitations of the various imaging techniques, in particular with regard to their capability to quantify the spatial distribution of a multimodal diagnostic agent. To accomplish this task, we used a two-step approach. In the first step, we examined the situation for a particular therapeutic anti-cancer agent with multimodal imaging opportunities, viz. holmium-loaded microspheres (HoMS). Physical phantom experiments were performed to enable a comparative evaluation of the three modalities assuming the use of standard equipment, standard clinical scan protocols, and signal-known-exactly conditions. These phantom data were then analyzed so as to obtain first order estimates of the sensitivity and detection limits of MRI, CT and SPECT for HoMS. In the second step, the results for HoMS were taken as a starting point for a discussion of the factors affecting the sensitivity and detection limits of MRI, CT and SPECT for multimodal agents in general. In this, emphasis was put on the factors that must be taken into account when extrapolating the findings for HoMS to other diagnostic tasks, other contrast agents, other experimental conditions, and other scan protocols.

  9. Critical Analysis of Multimodal Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo

    2013-01-01

    This is an encyclopaedia article which defines the fields of critical discourse analysis and multimodality studies, argues that within critical discourse analysis more attention should be paid to multimodality, and within multimodality to critical analysis, and ends reviewing a few examples...... of recent work in the critical analysis of multimodal discourse....

  10. Multimodal full-field optical coherence tomography on biological tissue: toward all optical digital pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, F.; Dalimier, E.; Vermeulen, P.; Fragola, A.; Boccara, A. C.

    2012-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is an efficient technique for in-depth optical biopsy of biological tissues, relying on interferometric selection of ballistic photons. Full-Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) is an alternative approach to Fourier-domain OCT (spectral or swept-source), allowing parallel acquisition of en-face optical sections. Using medium numerical aperture objective, it is possible to reach an isotropic resolution of about 1x1x1 ìm. After stitching a grid of acquired images, FF-OCT gives access to the architecture of the tissue, for both macroscopic and microscopic structures, in a non-invasive process, which makes the technique particularly suitable for applications in pathology. Here we report a multimodal approach to FF-OCT, combining two Full-Field techniques for collecting a backscattered endogeneous OCT image and a fluorescence exogeneous image in parallel. Considering pathological diagnosis of cancer, visualization of cell nuclei is of paramount importance. OCT images, even for the highest resolution, usually fail to identify individual nuclei due to the nature of the optical contrast used. We have built a multimodal optical microscope based on the combination of FF-OCT and Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM). We used x30 immersion objectives, with a numerical aperture of 1.05, allowing for sub-micron transverse resolution. Fluorescent staining of nuclei was obtained using specific fluorescent dyes such as acridine orange. We present multimodal images of healthy and pathological skin tissue at various scales. This instrumental development paves the way for improvements of standard pathology procedures, as a faster, non sacrificial, operator independent digital optical method compared to frozen sections.

  11. Noninvasive monitoring of PaCO2 during one-lung ventilation and minimal access surgery in adults: End-tidal versus transcutaneous techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, Paul; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have suggested that end-tidal CO2 (ET-CO2) may be inaccurate during one-lung ventilation (OLV). This study was performed to compare the accuracy of the noninvasive monitoring of PCO2 using transcutaneous CO2 (TC-CO2) with ET-CO2 in patients undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) during OLV. Materials and Methods: In adult patients undergoing thoracoscopic surgical procedures, PCO2 was simultaneously measured with TC-CO2 and ET-CO2 devices and compa...

  12. Applications of external cavity diode laser-based technique to noninvasive clinical diagnosis using expired breath ammonia analysis: chronic kidney disease, epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayrakli, Ismail; Turkmen, Aysenur; Akman, Hatice; Sezer, M. Tugrul; Kutluhan, Suleyman

    2016-08-01

    An external cavity laser (ECL)-based off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy was applied to noninvasive clinical diagnosis using expired breath ammonia analysis: (1) the correlation between breath ammonia levels and blood parameters related to chronic kidney disease (CKD) was investigated and (2) the relationship between breath ammonia levels and blood concentrations of valproic acid (VAP) was studied. The concentrations of breath ammonia in 15 healthy volunteers, 10 epilepsy patients (before and after taking VAP), and 27 patients with different stages of CKD were examined. The range of breath ammonia levels was 120 to 530 ppb for healthy subjects and 710 to 10,400 ppb for patients with CKD. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between breath ammonia concentrations and urea, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, or estimated glomerular filtration rate in 27 patients. It was demonstrated that taking VAP gave rise to increasing breath ammonia levels. A statistically significant difference was found between the levels of exhaled ammonia (NH3) in healthy subjects and in patients with epilepsy before and after taking VAP. The results suggest that our breath ammonia measurement system has great potential as an easy, noninvasive, real-time, and continuous monitor of the clinical parameters related to epilepsy and CKD.

  13. In vivo imaging of nanoparticle delivery and tumor microvasculature with multimodal optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Schwartz, Jason M.; Beavers, Kelsey R.; Sit, Wesley W.; Shah, Amy T.; Duvall, Craig L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Current imaging techniques capable of tracking nanoparticles in vivo supply either a large field of view or cellular resolution, but not both. Here, we demonstrate a multimodality imaging platform of optical coherence tomography (OCT) techniques for high resolution, wide field of view in vivo imaging of nanoparticles. This platform includes the first in vivo images of nanoparticle pharmacokinetics acquired with photothermal OCT (PTOCT), along with overlaying images of microvascular and tissue morphology. Gold nanorods (51.8 ± 8.1 nm by 15.2 ± 3.3 nm) were intravenously injected into mice, and their accumulation into mammary tumors was non-invasively imaged in vivo in three dimensions over 24 hours using PTOCT. Spatial frequency analysis of PTOCT images indicated that gold nanorods reached peak distribution throughout the tumors by 16 hours, and remained well-dispersed up to 24 hours post-injection. In contrast, the overall accumulation of gold nanorods within the tumors peaked around 16 hours post-injection. The accumulation of gold nanorods within the tumors was validated post-mortem with multiphoton microscopy. This shows the utility of PTOCT as part of a powerful multimodality imaging platform for the development of nanomedicines and drug delivery technologies. PMID:24940536

  14. Proof of principle: non-invasive sampling for early detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus infection in wild boar using a rope-in-a-bait sampling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchantat, Susan; Haas, Bernd; Böhle, Wolfgang; Globig, Anja; Lange, Elke; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Depner, Klaus

    2014-08-06

    In this study we describe the use of a rope-in-a-bait sampling method ("pSWAB": pathogen sampling wild animals with baits) for non-invasive saliva sampling aimed at the detection of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) viral genome in wild boar. The pSWABs are produced in the form of a standardized product by embedding a 10 cm long cotton rope in a cereal-based bait matrix. To assess the general suitability of this novel sampling technique an animal experiment was conducted to detect FMD viral genome in saliva of infected wild boar. Two juvenile animals were inoculated in the bulb of the heel with a recent wild boar FMD virus isolate and kept together with three noninoculated wild boar of the same age. Over a period of 29 days, the animals were sampled by using five pSWABs per day in addition to the collection of blood and conventional saliva swabs taken every three to four days. Viral RNA in pSWABs was identified already 24 h after infection during the incubation period and until 23 dpi. Comparison of the results of pSWAB sampling with those of conventional saliva swabs or serum samples showed satisfactory sensitivity. These experimental data demonstrate the suitability of non-invasive sampling of wild boar by using pSWABs as a sensitive, cheap and feasible sample collection technique independent of hunting activities. In addition, the use of non-invasive sampling in an appropriate surveillance strategy is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-invasive MRI Assessments of Tissue Microstructures and Macromolecules in the Eye upon Biomechanical or Biochemical Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Leon C; Sigal, Ian A; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Yang, Xiaoling; van der Merwe, Yolandi; Yu, Yu; Chau, Ying; Leung, Christopher K; Conner, Ian P; Jin, Tao; Wu, Ed X; Kim, Seong-Gi; Wollstein, Gadi; Schuman, Joel S; Chan, Kevin C

    2016-08-26

    The microstructural organization and composition of the corneoscleral shell (CSS) determine the biomechanical behavior of the eye, and are important in diseases such as glaucoma and myopia. However, limited techniques can assess these properties globally, non-invasively and quantitatively. In this study, we hypothesized that multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reveal the effects of biomechanical or biochemical modulation on CSS. Upon intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation, CSS appeared hyperintense in both freshly prepared ovine eyes and living rat eyes using T2-weighted MRI. Quantitatively, transverse relaxation time (T2) of CSS increased non-linearly with IOP at 0-40 mmHg and remained longer than unloaded tissues after being unpressurized. IOP loading also increased fractional anisotropy of CSS in diffusion tensor MRI without apparent change in magnetization transfer MRI, suggestive of straightening of microstructural fibers without modification of macromolecular contents. Lastly, treatments with increasing glyceraldehyde (mimicking crosslinking conditions) and chondroitinase-ABC concentrations (mimicking glycosaminoglycan depletion) decreased diffusivities and increased magnetization transfer in cornea, whereas glyceraldehyde also increased magnetization transfer in sclera. In summary, we demonstrated the changing profiles of MRI contrast mechanisms resulting from biomechanical or biochemical modulation of the eye non-invasively. Multi-modal MRI may help evaluate the pathophysiological mechanisms in CSS and the efficacy of corneoscleral treatments.

  16. Log-Gabor Energy Based Multimodal Medical Image Fusion in NSCT Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Yang; Song Tong; Shuying Huang; Pan Lin

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal medical image fusion is a powerful tool in clinical applications such as noninvasive diagnosis, image-guided radiotherapy, and treatment planning. In this paper, a novel nonsubsampled Contourlet transform (NSCT) based method for multimodal medical image fusion is presented, which is approximately shift invariant and can effectively suppress the pseudo-Gibbs phenomena. The source medical images are initially transformed by NSCT followed by fusing low- and high-frequency components. ...

  17. Effect of Injector Geometry on Atomization of a Liquid-Liquid Double Swirl Coaxial Injector Using Non-invasive Laser, Optical and X-ray Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, C. R.; Meyer, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    The spray characteristics of a liquid-liquid double swirl coaxial injector were studied using non-invasive optical, laser, and X-ray diagnostics. A parametric study of injector exit geometry demonstrated that spray breakup time, breakup type and sheet stability could be controlled with exit geometry. Phase Doppler interferometry was used to characterize droplet statistics and non-dimensional droplet parameters over a range of inlet conditions and for various fluids allowing for a study on the role of specific fluid properties in atomization. Further, X-ray radiography allowed for investigation of sheet thickness and breakup length to be quantified for different recess exit diameters and inlet pressures. Finally, computed tomography scans revealed that the spray cone was distinctively non-uniform and comprised of several pockets of increased mass flux.

  18. Multi-modality molecular imaging for gastric cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jimin; Chen, Xueli; Liu, Junting; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Wang, Fu; Nie, Yongzhan

    2011-12-01

    Because of the ability of integrating the strengths of different modalities and providing fully integrated information, multi-modality molecular imaging techniques provide an excellent solution to detecting and diagnosing earlier cancer, which remains difficult to achieve by using the existing techniques. In this paper, we present an overview of our research efforts on the development of the optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform, including the development of the imaging system, reconstruction algorithms and preclinical biomedical applications. Primary biomedical results show that the developed optical imaging-centric multi-modality molecular imaging platform may provide great potential in the preclinical biomedical applications and future clinical translation.

  19. Noninvasive neuromodulation in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Láinez, Miguel J A; Jensen, Rigmor

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Neuromodulation is an alternative in the management of medically intractable cluster headache patients. Most of the techniques are invasive, but in the last 2 years, some studies using a noninvasive device have been presented. The objective of this article is to review the data...... need to replicate these results with further controlled studies and conduct basic research in order to clarify the mechanism of action....

  20. Partial order approach to compute shortest paths in multimodal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ensor, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Many networked systems involve multiple modes of transport. Such systems are called multimodal, and examples include logistic networks, biomedical phenomena, manufacturing process and telecommunication networks. Existing techniques for determining optimal paths in multimodal networks have either required heuristics or else application-specific constraints to obtain tractable problems, removing the multimodal traits of the network during analysis. In this paper weighted coloured--edge graphs are introduced to model multimodal networks, where colours represent the modes of transportation. Optimal paths are selected using a partial order that compares the weights in each colour, resulting in a Pareto optimal set of shortest paths. This approach is shown to be tractable through experimental analyses for random and real multimodal networks without the need to apply heuristics or constraints.

  1. Relativistic Quantum Noninvasive Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bednorz, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Quantum weak, noninvasive measurements are defined in the framework of relativity. Invariance with respect to reference frame transformations of the results in different models is discussed. Surprisingly, the bare results of noninvasive measurements are invariant for certain class of models, but not the detection error. Consequently, any stationary quantum realism based on noninvasive measurements will break, at least spontaneously, relativistic invariance and correspondence principle at zero temperature.

  2. Multimodality approach to optical early detection and mapping of oral neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yeh-Chan; Chung, Jungrae; Wilder-Smith, Petra; Chen, Zhongping

    2011-07-01

    Early detection of cancer remains the best way to ensure patient survival and quality of life. Squamous cell carcinoma is usually preceded by dysplasia presenting as white, red, or mixed red and white epithelial lesions on the oral mucosa (leukoplakia, erythroplakia). Dysplastic lesions in the form of erythroplakia can carry a risk for malignant conversion of 90%. A noninvasive diagnostic modality would enable monitoring of these lesions at regular intervals and detection of treatment needs at a very early, relatively harmless stage. The specific aim of this work was to test a multimodality approach [three-dimensional optical coherence tomography (OCT) and polarimetry] to noninvasive diagnosis of oral premalignancy and malignancy using the hamster cheek pouch model (nine hamsters). The results were compared to tissue histopathology. During carcinogenesis, epithelial down grow, eventual loss of basement membrane integrity, and subepithelial invasion were clearly visible with OCT. Polarimetry techniques identified a four to five times increased retardance in sites with squamous cell carcinoma, and two to three times greater retardance in dysplastic sites than in normal tissues. These techniques were particularly useful for mapping areas of field cancerization with multiple lesions, as well as lesion margins.

  3. Biodistribution of arctigenin-loaded nanoparticles designed for multimodal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qingxin; Hou, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yanan; Li, Xu; Liu, Yang; Ma, Xiaoyao; Wang, Zengyong; Wang, Weiya; Tao, Jin; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Min; Chen, Dongyan; Feng, Xizeng; Bai, Gang

    2017-04-07

    Tracking targets of natural products is one of the most challenging issues in fields ranging from pharmacognosy to biomedicine. It is widely recognized that the biocompatible nanoparticle (NP) could function as a "key" that opens the target "lock". We report a functionalized poly-lysine NP technique that can monitor the target protein of arctigenin (ATG) in vivo non-invasively. The NPs were synthesized, and their morphologies and surface chemical properties were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), laser particle size analysis and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In addition, we studied the localization of ATG at the level of the cell and the whole animal (zebrafish and mice). We demonstrated that fluorescent NPs could be ideal carriers in the development of a feasible method for target identification. The distributions of the target proteins were found to be consistent with the pharmacological action of ATG at the cellular and whole-organism levels. The results indicated that functionalized poly-lysine NPs could be valuable in the multimodal imaging of arctigenin.

  4. Multi-modality evaluation of the abnormalities of the aortic arches in children: techniques and imaging spectrum with emphasis on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oddone, Mauro; Granata, Claudio; Toma, Paolo [Giannina Gaslini Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Vercellino, Nadia; Bava, Erica [Giannina Gaslini Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Genoa (Italy)

    2005-10-01

    The failure of embryonic vascular arches to fuse and regress in the usual manner during the formation of the aortic arch, pulmonary arteries and ductus arteriosus can cause a wide spectrum of vascular congenital abnormalities of the aortic arch and its branches. These abnormal vascular structures may cause variable compression of the trachea and/or oesophagus with symptoms ranging from none to severe stridor, dyspnoea, dysphagia and cyanosis. Diagnosis and possible treatment of affected patients require multiple imaging modalities. In the majority of cases, the underlying malformation can be detected by chest radiography and barium oesophagography, visualizing the location of the aortic arch and the presence of anomalous compressions of the trachea and/or oesophagus. However, in most cases the exact configuration of the vascular abnormality cannot be fully defined with conventional radiology alone. MRI is fundamental for evaluation of the thoracic vessels. Not only is it non-invasive, but it can also provide large-field-of-view images in any number of planes with three-dimensional reconstruction, adding valuable information about exact vascular configuration, tracheobronchial compression and brachiocephalic vessel branching. The aim of this review is to describe the imaging findings in children affected with special emphasis on MRI. (orig.)

  5. Knowing what the brain is seeing in three dimensions: A novel, noninvasive, sensitive, accurate, and low-noise technique for measuring ocular torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Millan, Jorge; Roberts, Dale C; Lasker, Adrian; Zee, David S; Kheradmand, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Torsional eye movements are rotations of the eye around the line of sight. Measuring torsion is essential to understanding how the brain controls eye position and how it creates a veridical perception of object orientation in three dimensions. Torsion is also important for diagnosis of many vestibular, neurological, and ophthalmological disorders. Currently, there are multiple devices and methods that produce reliable measurements of horizontal and vertical eye movements. Measuring torsion, however, noninvasively and reliably has been a longstanding challenge, with previous methods lacking real-time capabilities or suffering from intrusive artifacts. We propose a novel method for measuring eye movements in three dimensions using modern computer vision software (OpenCV) and concepts of iris recognition. To measure torsion, we use template matching of the entire iris and automatically account for occlusion of the iris and pupil by the eyelids. The current setup operates binocularly at 100 Hz with noise <0.1° and is accurate within 20° of gaze to the left, to the right, and up and 10° of gaze down. This new method can be widely applicable and fill a gap in many scientific and clinical disciplines.

  6. Improved heuristics for early melanoma detection using multimode hyperspectral dermoscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasefi, Fartash; MacKinnon, Nicholas B.; Booth, Nicholas; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the performance of a multimode dermoscopy system (SkinSpect) designed to quantify and 3-D map in vivo melanin and hemoglobin concentrations in skin and its melanoma scoring system, and compare the results accuracy with SIAscopy, and histopathology. Methods: A multimode imaging dermoscope is presented that combines polarization, fluorescence and hyperspectral imaging to accurately map the distribution of skin melanin, collagen and hemoglobin in pigmented lesions. We combine two depth-sensitive techniques: polarization, and hyperspectral imaging, to determine the spatial distribution of melanin and hemoglobin oxygenation in a skin lesion. By quantifying melanin absorption in pigmented areas, we can also more accurately estimate fluorescence emission distribution mainly from skin collagen. Results and discussion: We compared in vivo features of melanocytic lesions (N = 10) extracted by non-invasive SkinSpect and SIMSYS-MoleMate SIAscope, and correlate them to pathology report. Melanin distribution at different depths as well as hemodynamics including abnormal vascularity we detected will be discussed. We will adapt SkinSpect scoring with ABCDE (asymmetry , border, color, diameter, evolution) and seven point dermatologic checklist including: (1) atypical pigment network, (2) blue-whitish veil, (3) atypical vascular pattern, (4) irregular streaks, (5) irregular pigmentation, (6) irregular dots and globules, (7) regression structures estimated by dermatologist. Conclusion: Distinctive, diagnostic features seen by SkinSpect in melanoma vs. normal pigmented lesions will be compared by SIAscopy and results from histopathology.

  7. Performance Enhancement Of Multimodal Biometrics Using Cryptosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muskaan,

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal biometrics means the unification of two or more uni modal biometrics so as to make the system more reliable and secure. Such systems promise better security. This study is a blend of iris and fingerprint recognition technique and their fusion at feature level. Our work comprises of two main sections: feature extraction of both modalities and fusing them before matching and finally application of an encryption technique to enhance the security of the fused template.

  8. Multimodal Resources in Transnational Adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    The paper discusses an empirical analysis which highlights the multimodal nature of identity construction. A documentary on transnational adoption provides real life incidents as research material. The incidents involve (or from them emerge) various kinds of multimodal resources and participants...

  9. Multimodal Resources in Transnational Adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    The paper discusses an empirical analysis which highlights the multimodal nature of identity construction. A documentary on transnational adoption provides real life incidents as research material. The incidents involve (or from them emerge) various kinds of multimodal resources and participants...

  10. IN VIVO EVALUATION OF SKIN IRRITATION POTENTIAL, MELASMA AND SEBUM CONTENT FOLLOWING LONG TERM APPLICATION OF SKIN CARE CREAM IN HEALTHY ADULTS, USING NON-INVASIVE BIOMETROLOGICAL TECHNIQUES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Atif I; Khan, Shoaib H M; Akhtar, Naveed; Mahmood, Asif; Sarfraz, Rai Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to evaluate non-invasively, various functional skin parameters i.e., irritation potential, melasma and sebum contents following long term application of topical cream (w/o) loaded with 2% methanolic extract of Ananas comosus L. versus placebo control (base) in healthy adults. Healthy human volunteers (n = 11, aged 20-30 years) were recruited for investigation and written informed consent was taken from each volunteer. In this single blinded study every volunteer applied formulation on one side of face and placebo on the other side of face twice daily for a period of 12 weeks (three months). Different skin parameters i.e., skin irritancy, melasma, and sebum contents were measured on both sides of face at baseline and after two weeks interval, using photometric device Mexameter and Sebumeter in a draught free room with modulated conditions of temperature (22-25°C) and humidity (55-60%). It was evident from the results that no primary skin irritancy was observed with patch test. Besides, statistical interpretation indicates that treatment with formulation is superior to placebo because it significantly (p ≤ 0.05) reduced the skin irritancy, melasma and sebum secretions throughout the study and reaching maximum -20.76 ± 0.89, -54.2 ± 0.37 and -40.71 ± 0.75%, respectively, at the end of study period. Antioxidant activity of extract was 92% compared to standard antioxidant. Conclusively, active cream loaded with fruit extract was well tolerated by all the volunteers and suitable to treat contact dermatitis, greasy skin, acne and seborrheic dermatitis and augmenting beauty and attraction by depigmentation of human skin. So, in the future, there is need to clinically evaluate these formulations in patients with compromised skin functions i.e., contact dermatitis, melasma, and acne vulgaris in order to explore the actual potential of this fruit.

  11. Noninvasive Measurement of Carbon Dioxide during One-Lung Ventilation with Low Tidal Volume for Two Hours: End-Tidal versus Transcutaneous Techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    Full Text Available There may be significant difference between measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide partial pressure (PetCO2 and arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2 during one-lung ventilation with low tidal volume for thoracic surgeries. Transcutaneous carbon dioxide partial pressure (PtcCO2 monitoring can be used continuously to evaluate PaCO2 in a noninvasive fashion. In this study, we compared the accuracy between PetCO2 and PtcCO2 in predicting PaCO2 during prolonged one-lung ventilation with low tidal volume for thoracic surgeries.Eighteen adult patients who underwent thoracic surgeries with one-lung ventilation longer than two hours were included in this study. Their PetCO2, PtcCO2, and PaCO2 values were collected at five time points before and during one-lung ventilation. Agreement among measures was evaluated by Bland-Altman analysis.Ninety sample sets were obtained. The bias and precision when PtcCO2 and PaCO2 were compared were 4.1 ± 6.5 mmHg during two-lung ventilation and 2.9 ± 6.1 mmHg during one-lung ventilation. Those when PetCO2 and PaCO2 were compared were -11.8 ± 6.4 mmHg during two-lung ventilation and -11.8 ± 4.9 mmHg during one-lung ventilation. The differences between PtcCO2 and PaCO2 were significantly lower than those between PetCO2 and PaCO2 at all five time-points (p < 0.05.PtcCO2 monitoring was more accurate for predicting PaCO2 levels during prolonged one-lung ventilation with low tidal volume for patients undergoing thoracic surgeries.

  12. Hyperspectral remote sensing techniques applied to the noninvasive investigation of mural paintings: a feasibility study carried out on a wall painting by Beato Angelico in Florence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucci, Costanza; Picollo, Marcello; Chiarantini, Leandro; Sereni, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays hyperspectral imaging is a well-established methodology for the non-invasive diagnostics of polychrome surfaces, and is increasingly utilized in museums and conservation laboratories for documentation purposes and in support of restoration procedures. However, so far the applications of hyperspectral imaging have been mainly limited to easel paintings or paper-based artifacts. Indeed, specifically designed hyperspectral imagers, are usually used for applications in museum context. These devices work at short-distances from the targets and cover limited size surfaces. Instead, almost still unexplored remain the applications of hyperspectral imaging to the investigations of frescoes and large size mural paintings. For this type of artworks a remote sensing approach, based on sensors capable of acquiring hyperspectral data from distances of the order of tens of meters, is needed. This paper illustrates an application of hyperspectral remote sensing to an important wall-painting by Beato Angelico, located in the San Marco Museum in Florence. Measurements were carried out using a re-adapted version of the Galileo Avionica Multisensor Hyperspectral System (SIM-GA), an avionic hyperspectral imager originally designed for applications from mobile platforms. This system operates in the 400-2500 nm range with over 700 channels, thus guaranteeing acquisition of high resolution hyperspectral data exploitable for materials identification and mapping. In the present application, the SIM-GA device was mounted on a static scanning platform for ground-based applications. The preliminary results obtained on the Angelico's wall-painting are discussed, with highlights on the main technical issues addressed to optimize the SIM-GA system for new applications on cultural assets.

  13. 无创助产技术降低会阴侧切率的效果分析%Analysis of the Effects of Noninvasive Midwifery Technique on Reducing Episiotomy Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钮淑梅

    2015-01-01

    目的:通过与传统会阴保护接生法比较,探讨无创助产技术对会阴侧切率的影响。方法将2014年1~10月本院开展实施无创助产技术的1000名产妇设为观察组,回顾性分析选取2013年1~11月采用传统保护会阴法的1000名产妇为对照组。比较两组产妇会阴侧切率、会阴裂伤情况。结果观察组会阴侧切226例,侧切率为22.6%,对照组会阴侧切734例,侧切率为73.4%,具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论无创助产技术有利于控制和降低会阴侧切率,保护会阴完整。%Objective To investigate the effect of noninvasive midwifery technique on episiotomy rate through comparison with traditional perineum protecting midwifery.MethodsA total of 1 000 puerperae received noninvasive midwifery in our hospital from 2014 Jan to Oct. 2014 were selected as the subjects of the observation group,and another 1 000 puerperae received traditional perineum protecting midwifery from 2013 Jan to Nov. 2013 were selected as the subjects of the control group in a retrospective analysis. The episiotomy rate and perineal laceration in puerperae of these two groups were compared. Results There were 226 cases of episiotomy in the observation group and the episiotomy rate was 22.6%,the case number of episiotomy in the control group was 734 and the episiotomy rate was 73.4%(P< 0.05).Conclusion Noninvasive midwifery technique is beneficial to controling and reducing the episiotomy rate and protecting perinaeum integrity,and thereby is worthy of clinical promotion and application.

  14. Multimodal sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemény, Ferenc; Meier, Beat

    2016-02-01

    While sequence learning research models complex phenomena, previous studies have mostly focused on unimodal sequences. The goal of the current experiment is to put implicit sequence learning into a multimodal context: to test whether it can operate across different modalities. We used the Task Sequence Learning paradigm to test whether sequence learning varies across modalities, and whether participants are able to learn multimodal sequences. Our results show that implicit sequence learning is very similar regardless of the source modality. However, the presence of correlated task and response sequences was required for learning to take place. The experiment provides new evidence for implicit sequence learning of abstract conceptual representations. In general, the results suggest that correlated sequences are necessary for implicit sequence learning to occur. Moreover, they show that elements from different modalities can be automatically integrated into one unitary multimodal sequence.

  15. Non-invasive sensing for food reassurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaobo, Zou; Xiaowei, Huang; Povey, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    Consumers and governments are increasingly interested in the safety, authenticity and quality of food commodities. This has driven attention towards non-invasive sensing techniques used for rapid analyzing these commodities. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art in, and available alternatives for, food assurance based on non-invasive sensing techniques. The main food quality traits of interest using non-invasive sensing techniques are sensory characteristics, chemical composition, physicochemical properties, health-protecting properties, nutritional characteristics and safety. A wide range of non-invasive sensing techniques, from optical, acoustical, electrical, to nuclear magnetic, X-ray, biosensor, microwave and terahertz, are organized according to physical principle. Some of these techniques are now in a period of transition between experimental and applied utilization and several sensors and instruments are reviewed. With continued innovation and attention to key challenges, such non-invasive sensors and biosensors are expected to open up new exciting avenues in the field of portable and wearable wireless sensing devices and connecting with mobile networks, thus finding considerable use in a wide range of food assurance applications. The need for an appropriate regulatory framework is emphasized which acts to exclude unwanted components in foods and includes needed components, with sensors as part of a reassurance framework supporting regulation and food chain management. The integration of these sensor modalities into a single technological and commercial platform offers an opportunity for a paradigm shift in food reassurance.

  16. Multimodal Processes Rescheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocewicz, Grzegorz; Banaszak, Zbigniew A.; Nielsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic scheduling problems concerning multimodal processes are usually observed in FMSs producing multi-type parts where the Automated Guided Vehicles System (AGVS) plays a role of a material handling system. Schedulability analysis of concurrently flowing cyclic processes (SCCP) exe-cuted in the......Cyclic scheduling problems concerning multimodal processes are usually observed in FMSs producing multi-type parts where the Automated Guided Vehicles System (AGVS) plays a role of a material handling system. Schedulability analysis of concurrently flowing cyclic processes (SCCP) exe...

  17. Cardiac imaging. A multimodality approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, Manfred [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany); Erbel, Raimund [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany). Clinic and Polyclinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Barkhausen, Joerg (eds.) [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    An excellent atlas on modern diagnostic imaging of the heart Written by an interdisciplinary team of experts, Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach features an in-depth introduction to all current imaging modalities for the diagnostic assessment of the heart as well as a clinical overview of cardiac diseases and main indications for cardiac imaging. With a particular emphasis on CT and MRI, the first part of the atlas also covers conventional radiography, echocardiography, angiography and nuclear medicine imaging. Leading specialists demonstrate the latest advances in the field, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The book's second part features clinical chapters on heart defects, endocarditis, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, cardiac tumors, pericardial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, and diseases of the thoracic aorta. The authors address anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical features, and evaluate the various diagnostic options. Key features: - Highly regarded experts in cardiology and radiology off er image-based teaching of the latest techniques - Readers learn how to decide which modality to use for which indication - Visually highlighted tables and essential points allow for easy navigation through the text - More than 600 outstanding images show up-to-date technology and current imaging protocols Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach is a must-have desk reference for cardiologists and radiologists in practice, as well as a study guide for residents in both fields. It will also appeal to cardiac surgeons, general practitioners, and medical physicists with a special interest in imaging of the heart. (orig.)

  18. Rapid MRI using a modified Dixon technique: a non-invasive and effective method for detection and monitoring of fatty metamorphosis of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbein, M.H. [Pediatric Gastroenterology, Dept. of Pediatrics, Springfield, IL (United States); Stevens, W.R. [St. John' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Springfield, IL (United States)

    2001-11-01

    Fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are frequently associated with obesity. Weight loss is the mainstay of therapy for these conditions. In this case report, we used a modification of the Dixon method to demonstrate normalization of hepatic fat content in an obese individual with fatty liver following weight reduction. This technique involves fast gradient echo instead of spin echo, which has been utilized previously, as the former provides an accurate and more rapid means of assessing hepatic fat content. This technique is recommended for the assessment of hepatic steatosis in at-risk subjects. (orig.)

  19. Use of multidimensional, multimodal imaging and PACS to support neurological diagnoses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, S.T.C.; Knowlton, R.; Hoo, K.S.; Huang, H.K. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Technological advances in brain imaging have revolutionized diagnosis in neurology and neurological surgery. Major imaging techniques include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize structural anatomy, positron emission tomography (PET) to image metabolic function and cerebral blood flow, magnetoencephalography (MEG) to visualize the location of physiologic current sources, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure specific biochemicals. Each of these techniques studies different biomedical aspects of the grain, but there lacks an effective means to quantify and correlate the disparate imaging datasets in order to improve clinical decision making processes. This paper describes several techniques developed in a UNIX-based neurodiagnostic workstation to aid the non-invasive presurgical evaluation of epilepsy patients. These techniques include on-line access to the picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) multimedia archive, coregistration of multimodality image datasets, and correlation and quantitative of structural and functional information contained in the registered images. For illustration, the authors describe the use of these techniques in a patient case of non-lesional neocortical epilepsy. They also present the future work based on preliminary studies.

  20. Use of multidimensional, multimodal imaging and PACS to support neurological diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stephen T. C.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Hoo, Kent S.; Huang, H. K.

    1995-05-01

    Technological advances in brain imaging have revolutionized diagnosis in neurology and neurological surgery. Major imaging techniques include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to visualize structural anatomy, positron emission tomography (PET) to image metabolic function and cerebral blood flow, magnetoencephalography (MEG) to visualize the location of physiologic current sources, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure specific biochemicals. Each of these techniques studies different biomedical aspects of the brain, but there lacks an effective means to quantify and correlate the disparate imaging datasets in order to improve clinical decision making processes. This paper describes several techniques developed in a UNIX-based neurodiagnostic workstation to aid the noninvasive presurgical evaluation of epilepsy patients. These techniques include online access to the picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) multimedia archive, coregistration of multimodality image datasets, and correlation and quantitation of structural and functional information contained in the registered images. For illustration, we describe the use of these techniques in a patient case of nonlesional neocortical epilepsy. We also present out future work based on preliminary studies.

  1. Multimodal emergens via musik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Anders

    2010-01-01

    I denne artikel præsenteres og argumenteres for en værkanalytisk indfaldsvinkel i forhold til det at undersøge multimodal betydningsdannelse i audiovisuelle medieprodukter såsom reklamefilm og dokumentarfilm, hvor flere forskellige modaliteter eller semiotiske ressourcer samvirker. Som teoretisk...

  2. Multimodal Strategies of Theorization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartel, Melodie; Colombero, Sylvain; Boxenbaum, Eva

    This paper examines the role of multimodal strategies in processes of theorization. Empirically, we investigate the theorization process of a highly disruptive innovation in the history of architecture: reinforced concrete. Relying on archival data from a dominant French architectural journal fro...

  3. Multimodal Strategies of Theorization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartel, Melodie; Colombero, Sylvain; Boxenbaum, Eva

    This paper examines the role of multimodal strategies in processes of theorization. Empirically, we investigate the theorization process of a highly disruptive innovation in the history of architecture: reinforced concrete. Relying on archival data from a dominant French architectural journal from...... with well-known rhetorical strategies and develop a process model of theorization....

  4. Modeling Multimodal Stratification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses one of the core axioms of social semiotic theory, namely stratification, in the light of developments in multimodality in recent years. The discussion takes a point of departure in the approaches to stratification taken by Hjelmslev, Halliday, and Kress and van Leeuwen...

  5. Performance evaluation of similarity measures for dense multimodal stereovision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Mustafa; Kalkan, Sinan

    2016-05-01

    Multimodal imaging systems have recently been drawing attention in fields such as medical imaging, remote sensing, and video surveillance systems. In such systems, estimating depth has become possible due to the promising progress of multimodal matching techniques. We perform a systematic performance evaluation of similarity measures frequently used in the literature for dense multimodal stereovision. The evaluated measures include mutual information (MI), sum of squared distances, normalized cross-correlation, census transform, local self-similarity (LSS) as well as descriptors adopted to multimodal settings, like scale invariant feature transform (SIFT), speeded-up robust features (SURF), histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), binary robust independent elementary features, and fast retina keypoint (FREAK). We evaluate the measures over datasets we generated, compiled, and provided as a benchmark and compare the performances using the Winner Takes All method. The datasets are (1) synthetically modified four popular pairs from the Middlebury Stereo Dataset (namely, Tsukuba, Venus, Cones, and Teddy) and (2) our own multimodal image pairs acquired using the infrared and the electro-optical cameras of a Kinect device. The results show that MI and HOG provide promising results for multimodal imagery, and FREAK, SURF, SIFT, and LSS can be considered as alternatives depending on the multimodality level and the computational complexity requirements of the intended application.

  6. Walking the Filament of Feasibility: Global Optimization of Highly-Constrained, Multi-Modal Interplanetary Trajectories Using a Novel Stochastic Search Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander, Arnold C.; Englander, Jacob A.

    2017-01-01

    Interplanetary trajectory optimization problems are highly complex and are characterized by a large number of decision variables and equality and inequality constraints as well as many locally optimal solutions. Stochastic global search techniques, coupled with a large-scale NLP solver, have been shown to solve such problems but are inadequately robust when the problem constraints become very complex. In this work, we present a novel search algorithm that takes advantage of the fact that equality constraints effectively collapse the solution space to lower dimensionality. This new approach walks the filament'' of feasibility to efficiently find the global optimal solution.

  7. Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder includes radiography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography, computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, and ultrasound. Target-oriented evaluation of the postoperative shoulder necessitates familiarity with surgical techniques, their typical complications and sources of failure, knowledge of normal and abnormal postoperative findings, awareness of the advantages and weaknesses with the different radiologic techniques, and clinical information on current symptoms and function. This article reviews the most commonly used surgical procedures for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability, lesions of the labral-bicipital complex, subacromial impingement, and rotator cuff lesions and highlights the significance of imaging findings with a view to detection of recurrent lesions and postoperative complications in a multimodality approach. (orig.)

  8. In-situ fluorimetry: a powerful non-invasive diagnostic technique for natural dyes used in artefacts. Part II. Identification of orcein and indigo in Renaissance tapestries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, C; Miliani, C; Romani, A; Santamaria, U; Morresi, F; Mlynarska, K; Favaro, G

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, three Renaissance tapestries depicting scenes painted by Raffaello Sanzio, conserved at the Vatican Museum, were investigated using in-situ UV-Visible fluorimetric measurements. The results show that this technique is suitable for the detection of natural organic colorants used for dyeing the threads woven in these tapestries. The emission signals detected on red-purple colours were assigned to the colorant orcein and those on different nuances of blue and green colours to indigo by comparison with data from reference laboratory samples. The assignments were supported by chromatographic experiments carried out on threads taken from the back side of the tapestry in the same points analysed by spectrofluorimentry.

  9. Applying Time-sharing technique in a multimodal compact low-power CMOS neurochip for simultaneous neurochemical and action potential recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poustinchi, Mohammad; Stacey, R Greg; Musallam, Sam

    2014-01-01

    Brain is an electrochemical system and recent studies suggest simultaneous measurement of interrelated brain's electrical and neurochemical activity may lead to better understanding of brain function in addition to developing optimal neural prosthetics. By exploiting opamp Time-sharing technique to minimized power dissipation and silicon area, we have fabricated a power efficient implantable CMOS microsystem for simultaneous measurement of Action Potential (AP) and neurotransmitter concentration. Both AP-recording and neurotransmitter sensing subsystems share a single 653 nW amplifier which senses picoscale to microscale current that corresponds to micromolar neurotransmitter concentration and microscale AP voltage. This microsystem is fabricated in CMOS 0.18 μm technology and tested using recorded signals from dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) area of a macaque monkey in our lab.

  10. Comparison of a compatible and an incompatible pepper-tobamovirus interaction by biochemical and non-invasive techniques: chlorophyll a fluorescence, isothermal calorimetry and FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, Magdalena; Juhász, Csilla; Surówka, Ewa; Janeczko, Anna; Saja, Diana; Tóbiás, István; Skoczowski, Andrzej; Barna, Balázs; Gullner, Gábor

    2014-10-01

    Leaves of a pepper cultivar harboring the L(3) resistance gene were inoculated with Obuda pepper virus (ObPV), which led to the appearance of hypersensitive necrotic lesions approx. 72 h post-inoculation (hpi) (incompatible interaction), or with Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) that caused no visible symptoms on the inoculated leaves (compatible interaction). ObPV inoculation of leaves resulted in ion leakage already 18 hpi, up-regulation of a pepper carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) gene from 24 hpi, heat emission and declining chlorophyll a content from 48 hpi, and partial desiccation from 72 hpi. After the appearance of necrotic lesions a strong inhibition of photochemical energy conversion was observed, which led to photochemically inactive leaf areas 96 hpi. However, leaf tissues adjacent to these inactive areas showed elevated ΦPSII and Fv/Fm values proving the advantage of chlorophyll a imaging technique. PMMoV inoculation also led to a significant rise of ion leakage and heat emission, to the up-regulation of the pepper CCD gene as well as to decreased PSII efficiency, but these responses were much weaker than in the case of ObPV inoculation. Chlorophyll b and total carotenoid contents as measured by spectrophotometric methods were not significantly influenced by any virus inoculations when these pigment contents were calculated on leaf surface basis. On the other hand, near-infrared FT-Raman spectroscopy showed an increase of carotenoid content in ObPV-inoculated leaves suggesting that the two techniques detect different sets of compounds.

  11. Multimodal analgesia and regional anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero Tornero, C; Fernández Rodríguez, L E; Orduña Valls, J

    Multimodal analgesia provides quality analgesia, with fewer side effects due to the use of combined analgesics or analgesic techniques. Regional anaesthesia plays a fundamental role in achieving this goal. The different techniques of regional anaesthesia that include both peripheral and central blocks in either a single dose or in continuous infusion help to modulate the nociceptive stimuli that access the central level. The emergence of the ultrasound as an effective system to perform regional anaesthesia techniques has allowed the development of new regional anaesthesia techniques that formerly could not be carried out since only neurostimulation or skin references were used. It is essential to take into account that even with effective blocking it is advisable to associate other drugs by other routes, in this way we will be able to reduce the required doses individually and attempt to achieve a synergistic, not purely additive, effect. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. A non-invasive technique for standing surgical repair of urinary bladder rupture in a post-partum mare: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen JO

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 11-year-old mare presented 36 hours after foaling with a ruptured bladder. Uroperitoneum was diagnosed on ultrasound and from the creatinine concentration of the peritoneal fluid. Bladder endoscopy demonstrated tissue necrosis and a rent in the dorsocranial aspect of the bladder. Following stabilisation, including abdominal drainage and lavage, the mare was taken to standing surgery. Under continuous sedation and epidural anaesthesia, and after surgical preparation, a Balfour retractor was placed in the vagina. Using sterile lubricant and moderate force, it was possible to insert a hand into the bladder. The tear was easily palpable on the dorsal portion of the bladder. Two fingers were inserted through the tear and used to provide traction to evert the bladder completely into the vagina where it could grasped with the surgeons other hand to prevent further trauma. A second surgeon could then visualise the entire tear and repaired this using a single layer of size zero PDS suture in a single continuous pattern. As soon as the bladder was repaired, it was replaced via the urethra. The mare did well after surgery and was discharged after 48 hours, apparently normal. This report is the first describing repair of the bladder without an abdominal incision or incision into the urethral sphincter. This greatly reduces the chance of possible complications such as urine pooling after surgery with the previously described standing technique or bladder trauma due to traction with abdominal surgery.

  13. Multimodal eye recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Du, Yingzi; Thomas, N. L.; Delp, Edward J., III

    2010-04-01

    Multimodal biometrics use more than one means of biometric identification to achieve higher recognition accuracy, since sometimes a unimodal biometric is not good enough used to do identification and classification. In this paper, we proposed a multimodal eye recognition system, which can obtain both iris and sclera patterns from one color eye image. Gabor filter and 1-D Log-Gabor filter algorithms have been applied as the iris recognition algorithms. In sclera recognition, we introduced automatic sclera segmentation, sclera pattern enhancement, sclera pattern template generation, and sclera pattern matching. We applied kernelbased matching score fusion to improve the performance of the eye recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed eye recognition method can achieve better performance compared to unimodal biometric identification, and the accuracy of our proposed kernel-based matching score fusion method is higher than two classic linear matching score fusion methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA).

  14. Programmable Multimode Quantum Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Armstrong, Seiji; Janousek, Jiri; Hage, Boris; Treps, Nicolas; Lam, Ping Koy; Bachor, Hans-A

    2012-01-01

    Entanglement between large numbers of quantum modes is the quintessential resource for quantum information processing and future applications such as the quantum internet. Conventionally the generation of multimode entanglement in optics requires complex layouts of beam-splitters and phase shifters in order to transform the input modes in to entangled modes. These networks need substantial modification for every new set of entangled modes to be generated. Further, the complexity grows rapidly with the number of entangled modes as the number of detectors, phase locks and optical components needs to be increased. Here we report on the highly efficient and versatile generation of various multimode entangled states within one optical beam. By defining our modes to be combinations of different spatial regions of the beam, we may use just one pair of multi-pixel detectors and one local oscillator to measure an orthogonal set of modes. The transformation of this set into a desired set of entangled modes is calculate...

  15. Validation of automatic target volume definition as demonstrated for 11C-choline PET/CT of human prostate cancer using multi-modality fusion techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyunjin; Meyer, Charles R; Wood, David; Khan, Asra; Shah, Rajal; Hussain, Hero; Siddiqui, Javed; Seo, Jongbum; Chenevert, Thomas; Piert, Morand

    2010-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is actively investigated to aid in target volume definition for radiation therapy. The objectives of this study were to apply an automatic computer algorithm to compute target volumes and to validate the algorithm using histologic data from real human prostate cancer. Various modalities for prostate imaging were performed. In vivo imaging included T2 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and (11)C-choline PET. Ex vivo imaging included 3-T magnetic resonance imaging, histology, and block face photos of the prostate specimen. A novel registration method based on mutual information and thin-plate splines was applied to all modalities. Once PET is registered with histology, a voxel-by-voxel comparison between PET and histology is possible. A thresholding technique based on various fractions of the maximum standardized uptake value in the tumor was applied, and the respective computed threshold volume on PET was compared with histologic truth. Sixteen patients whose primary tumor volumes ranged from 1.2 to 12.6 cm(3) were tested. PET has low spatial resolution, so only tumors > 4 cm(3) were considered. Four cases met this criterion. A threshold value of 60% of the (11)C-choline maximum standardized uptake value resulted in the highest volume overlap between threshold volume on PET and histology. Medial axis distances between threshold volume on PET and histology showed a mean error of 7.7 +/- 5.2 mm. This is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating for the first time that histology-guided thresholding on PET can delineate tumor volumes in real human prostate cancer. Copyright 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. General anaesthesia with multimodal principles versus intrathecal analgesia with conventional principles in total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harsten, Andreas; Hjartarson, Hjortur; Werner, Mads Utke;

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative outcomes following major surgery are influenced by surgical and anaesthesiological factors. While techniques of minimal invasive surgery have been associated with improved outcome, the techniques of minimal invasive, multimodal anaesthesia have not been adequately investigated. The ...

  17. Coronaries disease: the nuclear cardiology face to the new non-invasive techniques of imaging; Maladie coronaire: la cardiologie nucleaire face aux nouvelles techniques d'imagerie non invasive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanzetto, G.; Fagret, D.; Thony, F.; Ferretti, G.; Saunier, C.; Machecourt, J. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2005-11-15

    Different techniques of imaging in nuclear cardiology are available today: SPECT, NMR, tomodensitometry, scintigraphy, echography. This article sums up the situation on the actual performances of each technique and considers what could be their respective place in the future strategies to take in charge the coronary disease. (N.C.)

  18. Clinical application of noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Chuanlong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic fibrosis is the common outcome of chronic liver diseases of various causes. At present, liver biopsy is the “gold standard” for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis, but it has limitations and is invasive, which leads to the development of noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis. The article mainly introduces the technology and application of noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis from the aspects of clinical manifestation, serology, and radiology. It has pointed out the clinical value of these noninvasive diagnosis techniques, and it discusses the progress in clinical research and its limitations for noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis.

  19. Multimodality imaging of coronary artery bypass grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, Liesbeth Pauline

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes multiple imaging modalities to examine coronary artery bypass grafts, and the research which was performed to further develop noninvasive imaging techniques to detect stenoses in native coronary arteries and bypass grafts in patients who experienced recurrent chest pain after

  20. Multimodality imaging of coronary artery bypass grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salm, Liesbeth Pauline

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes multiple imaging modalities to examine coronary artery bypass grafts, and the research which was performed to further develop noninvasive imaging techniques to detect stenoses in native coronary arteries and bypass grafts in patients who experienced recurrent chest pain after c

  1. Non-invasive ventilation for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Fidelma; Bradley, Judy M; Piper, Amanda J

    2017-02-20

    other domains. One single intervention trial had a low risk of bias for the randomisation procedure with the remaining trials judged to have an unclear risk of bias. Most trials had a low risk of bias with regard to incomplete outcome data and selective reporting.Six trials (151 participants) evaluated non-invasive ventilation for airway clearance compared with an alternative chest physiotherapy method such as the active cycle of breathing techniques or positive expiratory pressure. Three trials used nasal masks, one used a nasal mask or mouthpiece and one trial used a face mask and in one trial it is unclear. Three of the trials reported on one of the review's primary outcome measures (quality of life). Results for the reviews secondary outcomes showed that airway clearance may be easier with non-invasive ventilation and people with cystic fibrosis may prefer it. We were unable to find any evidence that non-invasive ventilation increases sputum expectoration, but it did improve some lung function parameters.Three trials (27 participants) evaluated non-invasive ventilation for overnight ventilatory support compared to oxygen or room air using nasal masks (two trials) and nasal masks or full face masks (one trial). Trials reported on two of the review's primary outcomes (quality of life and symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing). Results for the reviews secondary outcome measures showed that they measured lung function, gas exchange, adherence to treatment and preference, and nocturnal transcutaneous carbon dioxide. Due to the small numbers of participants and statistical issues, there were discrepancies in the results between the RevMan and the original trial analyses. No clear differences were found between non-invasive ventilation compared with oxygen or room air except for exercise performance, which significantly improved with non-invasive ventilation compared to room air over six weeks.One trial (13 participants) evaluated non-invasive ventilation on exercise

  2. [Multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ltaief, Z; Ben-Hamouda, N; Suys, T; Daniel, R T; Rossetti, A O; Oddo, M

    2014-12-10

    Management of neurocritical care patients is focused on the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury, i.e. the number of pathophysiological intracerebral (edema, ischemia, energy dysfunction, seizures) and systemic (hyperthermia, disorders of glucose homeostasis) events that occur following the initial insult (stroke, hemorrhage, head trauma, brain anoxia) that may aggravate patient outcome. The current therapeutic paradigm is based on multimodal neuromonitoring, including invasive (intracranial pressure, brain oxygen, cerebral microdialysis) and non-invasive (transcranial doppler, near-infrared spectroscopy, EEG) tools that allows targeted individualized management of acute coma in the early phase. The aim of this review is to describe the utility of multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma.

  3. Multimodality imaging for patient evaluation and guidance of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation - current status and future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagirath, P; van der Graaf, A W M; Karim, R; van Driel, V J H M; Ramanna, H; Rhode, K S; de Groot, N M S; Götte, M J W

    2014-08-20

    Left atrial catheter ablation is an established non-pharmacological therapy for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. The importance of a noninvasive multimodality imaging approach is emphasized by the current guidelines for the various phases of the ablation work-up e.g. patient identification, therapy guidance and procedural evaluation. Advances in the capabilities of imaging modalities and the increasing cost of healthcare warrant a review of the multimodality approach. This review discusses the application of cardiac imaging for pulmonary vein and left atrial ablation divided into stages: pre-procedural stage (assessment of left atrial dimensions, left atrial appendage thrombus and pulmonary vein anatomy), peri-procedural stage (integration of anatomical and electrical information) and post-procedural stage (evaluation of efficacy by assessment of tissue properties). Each section is dedicated to one of the subtopics of a stage, allowing a thorough comparison to be made between the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging modalities and the identification of one that exhibits the potential for a single technique approach.

  4. Differences in Multi-Modal Ultrasound Imaging between Triple Negative and Non-Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziyao; Tian, Jiawei; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Ying; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Lei; Jing, Hui; Wu, Tong

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify multi-modal ultrasound imaging parameters that could potentially help to differentiate between triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) and non-TNBC. Conventional ultrasonography, ultrasound strain elastography and 3-D ultrasound (3-D-US) findings from 50 TNBC and 179 non-TNBC patients were retrospectively reviewed. Immunohistochemical examination was used as the reference gold standard for cancer subtyping. Different ultrasound modalities were initially analyzed to define TNBC-related features. Subsequently, logistic regression analysis was applied to TNBC-related features to establish models for predicting TNBC. TNBCs often presented as micro-lobulated, markedly hypo-echoic masses with an abrupt interface (p = 0.015, 0.0015 and 0.004, compared with non-TNBCs, respectively) on conventional ultrasound, and showed a diminished retraction pattern phenomenon in the coronal plane (p = 0.035) on 3-D-US. Our findings suggest that B-mode ultrasound and 3-D-US in multi-modality ultrasonography could be a useful non-invasive technique for differentiating TNBCs from non-TNBCs.

  5. A Multimodal Nanocomposite for Biomedical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Aiguo; Paunesku, Tatjana; Zhang, Zhuoli; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Maser, Jörg; Yaghmai, Vahid; Li, Debiao; Omary, Reed A.; Woloschak, Gayle E.

    2013-01-01

    A multimodal nanocomposite was designed, synthesized with super-paramagnetic core (CoFe2O4), noble metal corona (Au), and semiconductor shell (TiO2). The sizes of core, core-corona, and core-corona-shell particles were determined by TEM. This multimodal nanocrystal showed promise as a contrast agent for two of the most widely used biomedical imaging techniques: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray computed tomography (CT). Finally, these nanocomposites were coated with a peptide SN-50. This led to their ready uptake by the cultured cells and targeted the nanocomposites to the pores of nuclear membrane. Inside cells, this nanocomposite retained its integrity as shown by X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM). Inside cells imaged by XFM we found the complex elemental signature of nanoconjugates (Ti-Co-Fe-Au) always co-registered in the 2D elemental map of the cell. PMID:24817775

  6. Multimodality imaging in nanomedicine and nanotheranostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Li; Xue-Ning Zhang; Xiao-Dong Li; Jin Chang

    2016-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of tumors needs much detailed information. However, available single imaging modality cannot provide complete or comprehensive data. Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to medicine, and multimodality imaging based on nanoparticles has been receiving extensive attention. This new hybrid imaging technology could provide complementary information from different imaging modalities using only a single injection of contrast agent. In this review, we introduce recent developments in multifunctional nanoparticles and their biomedical applications to multimodal imaging and theragnosis as nanomedicine. Most of the reviewed studies are based on the intrinsic properties of nanoparticles and their application in clinical imaging technology. The imaging techniques include positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, optical imaging, and ultrasound imaging.

  7. Digital confocal microscopy through a multimode fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Loterie, Damien; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Goy, Alexandre; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Acquiring high-contrast optical images deep inside biological tissues is still a challenging issue. Confocal microscopy is an important tool for biomedical imaging since it improves image quality by rejecting background signals. On the other hand, it suffers from low sensitivities in deep tissues due to light scattering. Recently, multimode fibers have provided a new paradigm for minimally invasive endoscopic imaging by controlling light propagation through them. Here we introduce a combined imaging technique where confocal images of a human epithelial cell are acquired through a multimode fiber. We achieve this by digitally engineering the excitation wavefront and then applying a virtual digital pinhole on the collected signal. In this way, we are able to acquire images through the fiber with significantly increased contrast.

  8. Applied of Vivo Non-invasive Muscle Image Measurement Techniques in Sports Teaching and Scientific Research%肌肉非侵入性影像测量技术在体育科研教学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙明运; 孙泊

    2015-01-01

    Comparing for non-invasive quantification methods in vivo muscle by using the method of literature review , com-parative analysis and so on, it shows that CT has the body exposed to particle radiation risks; ultrasonic instrument is cheap and with good results for muscle dynamic image, but has poor accuracy and time consuming;the accuracy of bioelectrical impedance is to be improved.Although the high cost and time-consuming of MRI technology, but it is still considered to be a “gold standard”. With the development, ultrasound has a wider application and appeared close to MRI.New technologies applications of three-di-mensional ultrasound, panoramic ultrasound, real-time ultrasound are still evolving.Yet CT can be viewed as a compromise be-tween these ultrasound ( echocardiography) and MRI.The authors would like to emphasize that Non-invasive Measurement Tech-niques can complement each other.%对活体肌肉非侵入性量化方法比较研究表明:CT有使人体暴露在粒子辐射下的风险;超声波仪便宜,对于肌肉动态影像具有较好的效果,但精度较差,且耗时较长;生物电阻抗仪精度有待提高;MRI技术虽费用高、耗时长,但仍被认为是目前肌肉影像学中一个“金标准”。随着技术的发展,三维超声、全景超声、实时超声等新技术在近几年出现,其图像清晰度接近MRI,应用更广,而CT技术亦被认为是超声和MRI的中和。非侵入性肌肉测量方法是相互补充的。

  9. Develop and Evaluate the Effects of Multimodal Presentation System on Elementary ESL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Fang-O; Yu, Pao-Ta; Hsiao, Wei-Hung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate the effects of multimodal presentation system (MPS), a multimodal presentation software integrated with interactive whiteboard (IWB), on student learning in the elementary English as second language (ESL) course. It focuses primarily on techniques and tools to enhance the students' ESL learning…

  10. A Single-Photon Subtractor for Multimode Quantum States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Young-Sik; Jacquard, Clément; Averchenko, Valentin; Roslund, Jonathan; Cai, Yin; Dufour, Adrien; Fabre, Claude; Treps, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    In the last decade, single-photon subtraction has proved to be key operations in optical quantum information processing and quantum state engineering. Implementation of the photon subtraction has been based on linear optics and single-photon detection on single-mode resources. This technique, however, becomes unsuitable with multimode resources such as spectrally multimode squeezed states or continuous variables cluster states. We implement a single-photon subtractor for such multimode resources based on sum-frequency generation and single-photon detection. An input multimode quantum state interacts with a bright control beam whose spectrum has been engineered through ultrafast pulse-shaping. The multimode quantum state resulting from the single-photon subtractor is analyzed with multimode homodyne detection whose local oscillator spectrum is independently engineered. We characterize the single-photon subtractor via coherent-state quantum process tomography, which provides its mode-selectivity and subtraction modes. The ability to simultaneously control the state engineering and its detection ensures both flexibility and scalability in the production of highly entangled non-Gaussian quantum states.

  11. Multimodal fusion of polynomial classifiers for automatic person recgonition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broun, Charles C.; Zhang, Xiaozheng

    2001-03-01

    With the prevalence of the information age, privacy and personalization are forefront in today's society. As such, biometrics are viewed as essential components of current evolving technological systems. Consumers demand unobtrusive and non-invasive approaches. In our previous work, we have demonstrated a speaker verification system that meets these criteria. However, there are additional constraints for fielded systems. The required recognition transactions are often performed in adverse environments and across diverse populations, necessitating robust solutions. There are two significant problem areas in current generation speaker verification systems. The first is the difficulty in acquiring clean audio signals in all environments without encumbering the user with a head- mounted close-talking microphone. Second, unimodal biometric systems do not work with a significant percentage of the population. To combat these issues, multimodal techniques are being investigated to improve system robustness to environmental conditions, as well as improve overall accuracy across the population. We propose a multi modal approach that builds on our current state-of-the-art speaker verification technology. In order to maintain the transparent nature of the speech interface, we focus on optical sensing technology to provide the additional modality-giving us an audio-visual person recognition system. For the audio domain, we use our existing speaker verification system. For the visual domain, we focus on lip motion. This is chosen, rather than static face or iris recognition, because it provides dynamic information about the individual. In addition, the lip dynamics can aid speech recognition to provide liveness testing. The visual processing method makes use of both color and edge information, combined within Markov random field MRF framework, to localize the lips. Geometric features are extracted and input to a polynomial classifier for the person recognition process. A late

  12. Multimodal Authentication Techniques For Staff Identification And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2014-12-01

    Dec 1, 2014 ... nt. Feasibilit y Study. Feasibility. Study. Report. Feasibility Study. System. Analysis and ... Write the Staff. Check Staff .... writing process which aids maintenance of the program .... business, engineering, science and computing.

  13. Non-Invasive Optical Blood Glucose Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha C.Pande

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The method for noninvasively blood glucose monitoring system is discussed in this paper. Lot of research work has been done in developing the device which is completely noninvasive to avoid the pros & cons because of frequent pricking. In this paper we are trying to analyze the noninvasive blood glucose measurement study in the near infrared region which is the most suitable region for blood glucose measurement. For this purpose we use a technique which is similar to pulseoximetry based on near infrared spectrometry .An infrared light of particular wavelength is passed through fingertip containing an arterial pulse component are derived,thus minimizing influences of basal components such as resting blood volume,skin, muscle and bone.

  14. Medical Image Retrieval: A Multimodal Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Steffey, Shawn; He, Jianbiao; Xiao, Degui; Tao, Cui; Chen, Ping; Müller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging is becoming a vital component of war on cancer. Tremendous amounts of medical image data are captured and recorded in a digital format during cancer care and cancer research. Facing such an unprecedented volume of image data with heterogeneous image modalities, it is necessary to develop effective and efficient content-based medical image retrieval systems for cancer clinical practice and research. While substantial progress has been made in different areas of content-based image retrieval (CBIR) research, direct applications of existing CBIR techniques to the medical images produced unsatisfactory results, because of the unique characteristics of medical images. In this paper, we develop a new multimodal medical image retrieval approach based on the recent advances in the statistical graphic model and deep learning. Specifically, we first investigate a new extended probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis model to integrate the visual and textual information from medical images to bridge the semantic gap. We then develop a new deep Boltzmann machine-based multimodal learning model to learn the joint density model from multimodal information in order to derive the missing modality. Experimental results with large volume of real-world medical images have shown that our new approach is a promising solution for the next-generation medical imaging indexing and retrieval system.

  15. Multimodality of Learning Through Anchored Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Mary Susan

    2004-01-01

    Multimodality of learning results from the intertextual relationship between multimodal design and other meaning-making modes. Meaning making is becoming more multimodal because language is continually reshaped by new forms of communication media. This article examines anchored instruction from a multimodal perspective. The first section includes…

  16. Non-invasive Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Hao; Yang, Yunan; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold tremendous therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases. Over the last decade, non-invasive imaging techniques have proven to be of great value in tracking transplanted hESCs. This review article will briefly summarize the various techniques used for non-invasive imaging of hESCs, which include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), fluorescence, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography...

  17. Multimodal responsive action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae

    While a first pair part projects a limited set of second pair parts to be provided next, responders select different types and formats for second pair parts to assemble activities (Schegloff 2007). Accordingly, various ways of shaping responses have been extensively studied (e.g. Pomerantz 1984......; Raymond 2003; Schegloff and Lerner 2009), including those with multimodal actions (e.g. Olsher 2004; Fasulo & Monzoni 2009). Some responsive actions can also be completed with bodily behavior alone, such as: when an agreement display is achieved by using only nonvocal actions (Jarmon 1996), when...... both verbal and body-behavioral elements. This paper explores one such situation in professional-client interaction, during the event of evaluating a service outcome in a haircutting session. In general, a haircutting session is brought to its closure through the service-assessment sequence, in which...

  18. Multimodality image registration and fusion using neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa G Mostafa; Aly A Farag; Edward Essock

    2003-01-01

    Multimodality image registration and fusion are essential steps in building 3-D models from remotesensing data. We present in this paper a neural network technique for the registration and fusion of multimodali-ty remote sensing data for the reconstruction of 3-D models of terrain regions. A FeedForward neural network isused to fuse the intensity data sets with the spatial data set after learning its geometry. Results on real data arepresented. Human performance evaluation is assessed on several perceptual tests in order to evaluate the fusionresults.

  19. Multimodal Biometric Systems - Study to Improve Accuracy and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Sasidhar, K; Ramakrishna, Kolikipogu; KailasaRao, K

    2010-01-01

    Biometrics is the science and technology of measuring and analyzing biological data of human body, extracting a feature set from the acquired data, and comparing this set against to the template set in the database. Experimental studies show that Unimodal biometric systems had many disadvantages regarding performance and accuracy. Multimodal biometric systems perform better than unimodal biometric systems and are popular even more complex also. We examine the accuracy and performance of multimodal biometric authentication systems using state of the art Commercial Off- The-Shelf (COTS) products. Here we discuss fingerprint and face biometric systems, decision and fusion techniques used in these systems. We also discuss their advantage over unimodal biometric systems.

  20. Robustness of multimodal processes itineraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocewicz, G.; Banaszak, Z.; Nielsen, Izabela Ewa

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns multimodal transport systems (MTS) represented by a supernetworks in which several unimodal networks are connected by transfer links and focuses on the scheduling problems encountered in these systems. Assuming unimodal networks are modeled as cyclic lines, i.e. the routes det...... of multimodal processes driven itinerary planning problem is our main contribution. Illustrative examples providing alternative itineraries in some cases of MTS malfunction are presented....

  1. A double-blind comparison of two creams containing urea as the active ingredient. Assessment of efficacy and side-effects by non-invasive techniques and a clinical scoring scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serup, J

    1992-01-01

    From a group of 72 healthy individuals, 47 with evidence of dry skin according to measurements by non-invasive techniques were enrolled for a 3-week study with double-blind and randomized treatment of one forearm, using either 3% urea cream (HTH lotion 'light') or 10% urea cream (HTH lotion 'Original'). The contralateral forearm served as an untreated control. Two volunteers had to be excluded because measurements of skin surface lipids gave evidence of vehicle components on the skin surface at the time of final evaluations. Evaluations took place not less than 12 h after the last application. According to questionnaire replies, the two creams were equally effective. This was confirmed by "blind" evaluation of the skin hydration state by a dermatologist, measurements of electrical capacitance and conductance indicating epidermal and skin surface hydration, and by D-Squame tape assessments including optical transmission of tapes with stratum corneum and scales from adhering skin, as well as visual scoring of the tapes. The methods showed a high degree of correlation, i.a. a definite relation between increase in electrical hydration parameters, reduced scaling according to the D-Squame tape evaluations, and clinical improvement of dryness. In skin treated with 10% urea cream the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) decreased, indicating an improved water barrier function. Skin colour measurement according to the CIE colour system showed that skin treated with the 3% urea cream turned in the direction of yellow, and there was generally a tendency for the brightness to decrease. Thus, the 3% urea cream gave the skin a more golden colour. There was no change in redness with any of the creams. Neither data from the questionnaire, the clinical examination, nor results of TEWL and colour measurements indicated any local irritant effect of urea causing water barrier damage or inflammation. In conclusion, the 3% and 10% urea creams were both found efficient, resulting in

  2. Coronary plaque morphology on multi-modality imagining and periprocedural myocardial infarction after percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Sato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI may be complicated by periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI as manifested by elevated cardiac biomarkers such as creatine kinase (CK-MB or troponin T. The occurrence of PMI has been shown to be associated with worse short- and long-term clinical outcome. However, recent studies suggest that PMI defined by biomarker levels alone is a marker of atherosclerosis burden and procedural complexity but in most cases does not have independent prognostic significance. Diagnostic multi-modality imaging such as intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, coronary angioscopy, near-infrared spectroscopy, multidetector computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can be used to closely investigate the atherosclerotic lesion in order to detect morphological markers of unstable and vulnerable plaques in the patients undergoing PCI. With the improvement of technical aspects of multimodality coronary imaging, clinical practice and research are increasingly shifting toward defining the clinical implication of plaque morphology and patients outcomes. There were numerous published data regarding the relationship between pre-PCI lesion subsets on multi-modality imaging and post-PCI biomarker levels. In this review, we discuss the relationship between coronary plaque morphology estimated by invasive or noninvasive coronary imaging and the occurrence of PMI. Furthermore, this review underlies that the value of the multimodality coronary imaging approach will become the gold standard for invasive or noninvasive prediction of PMI in clinical practice.

  3. Investigation of protein selectivity in multimodal chromatography using in silico designed Fab fragment variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkov, Hanne Sophie; Krogh, Berit Olsen; Woo, James; Parimal, Siddharth; Ahmadian, Haleh; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a unique set of antibody Fab fragments was designed in silico and produced to examine the relationship between protein surface properties and selectivity in multimodal chromatographic systems. We hypothesized that multimodal ligands containing both hydrophobic and charged moieties would interact strongly with protein surface regions where charged groups and hydrophobic patches were in close spatial proximity. Protein surface property characterization tools were employed to identify the potential multimodal ligand binding regions on the Fab fragment of a humanized antibody and to evaluate the impact of mutations on surface charge and hydrophobicity. Twenty Fab variants were generated by site-directed mutagenesis, recombinant expression, and affinity purification. Column gradient experiments were carried out with the Fab variants in multimodal, cation-exchange, and hydrophobic interaction chromatographic systems. The results clearly indicated that selectivity in the multimodal system was different from the other chromatographic modes examined. Column retention data for the reduced charge Fab variants identified a binding site comprising light chain CDR1 as the main electrostatic interaction site for the multimodal and cation-exchange ligands. Furthermore, the multimodal ligand binding was enhanced by additional hydrophobic contributions as evident from the results obtained with hydrophobic Fab variants. The use of in silico protein surface property analyses combined with molecular biology techniques, protein expression, and chromatographic evaluations represents a previously undescribed and powerful approach for investigating multimodal selectivity with complex biomolecules.

  4. Multimodal nonlinear optical microscopy improves the accuracy of early diagnosis of squamous intraepithelial neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Seng Khoon; Zheng, Wei; Li, Shuxia; Li, Dong; Zeng, Yan; Yang, Yanqi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2013-03-01

    We explore diagnostic utility of a multicolor excitation multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy for noninvasive detection of squamous epithelial precancer in vivo. The 7,12-dimenthylbenz(a)anthracene treated hamster cheek pouch was used as an animal model of carcinogenesis. The NLO microscope system employed was equipped with the ability to collect multiple tissue endogenous NLO signals such as two-photon excited fluorescence of keratin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, collagen, and tryptophan, and second harmonic generation of collagen in spectral and time domains simultaneously. A total of 34 (11 controlled and 23 treated) Golden Syrian hamsters with 62 in vivo spatially distinct measurement sites were assessed in this study. High-resolution label-free NLO images were acquired from stratum corneum, stratum granulosum-stratum basale, and stroma for all tissue measurement sites. A total of nine and eight features from 745 and 600 nm excitation wavelengths, respectively, involving tissue structural and intrinsic biochemical properties were found to contain significant diagnostic information for precancers detection (p<0.05). Particularly, 600 nm excited tryptophan fluorescence signals emanating from stratum corneum was revealed to provide remarkable diagnostic utility. Multivariate statistical techniques confirmed the integration of diagnostically significant features from multicolor excitation wavelengths yielded improved diagnostic accuracy as compared to using the individual wavelength alone.

  5. Effects of Restricted Launch Conditions for the Enhancement of Bandwidth-Distance Product of Multimode Fiber Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrawis, Alfred S.

    2000-01-01

    Several techniques had been proposed to enhance multimode fiber bandwidth-distance product. Single mode-to-multimode offset launch condition technique had been experimented with at Kennedy Space Center. Significant enhancement in multimode fiber link bandwidth is achieved using this technique. It is found that close to three-fold bandwidth enhancement can be achieved compared to standard zero offset launch technique. Moreover, significant reduction in modal noise has been observed as a function of offset launch displacement. However, significant reduction in the overall signal-to-noise ratio is also observed due to signal attenuation due to mode radiation from fiber core to its cladding.

  6. Multimodal brain monitoring in fulminant hepatic failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fernando; Mendes; Paschoal; Jr; Ricardo; Carvalho; Nogueira; Karla; De; Almeida; Lins; Ronconi; Marcelo; de; Lima; Oliveira; Manoel; Jacobsen; Teixeira; Edson; Bor-Seng-Shu

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure, also known as fulminant hepatic failure(FHF), embraces a spectrum of clinical entities characterized by acute liver injury, severe hepatocellular dysfunction, and hepatic encephalopathy. Cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension are common causes of mortality in patients with FHF. The management of patients who present acute liver failure starts with determining the cause and an initial evaluation of prognosis. Regardless of whether or not patients are listed for liver transplantation, they should still be monitored for recovery, death, or transplantation. In the past, neuromonitoring was restricted to serial clinical neurologic examination and, in some cases, intracranial pressure monitoring. Over the years, this monitoring has proven insufficient, as brain abnormalities were detected at late and irreversible stages. The need for real-time monitoring of brain functions to favor prompt treatment and avert irreversible brain injuries led to the concepts of multimodal monitoring and neurophysiological decision support. New monitoring techniques, such as brain tissue oxygen tension, continuous electroencephalogram, transcranial Doppler, and cerebral microdialysis, have been developed. These techniques enable early diagnosis of brain hemodynamic, electrical, and biochemical changes, allow brain anatomical and physiological monitoring-guided therapy, and have improved patient survival rates. The purpose of this review is to discuss the multimodality methods available for monitoring patients with FHF in the neurocritical care setting.

  7. Multimodal brain monitoring in fulminant hepatic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal, Fernando Mendes; Nogueira, Ricardo Carvalho; Ronconi, Karla De Almeida Lins; de Lima Oliveira, Marcelo; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2016-08-01

    Acute liver failure, also known as fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), embraces a spectrum of clinical entities characterized by acute liver injury, severe hepatocellular dysfunction, and hepatic encephalopathy. Cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension are common causes of mortality in patients with FHF. The management of patients who present acute liver failure starts with determining the cause and an initial evaluation of prognosis. Regardless of whether or not patients are listed for liver transplantation, they should still be monitored for recovery, death, or transplantation. In the past, neuromonitoring was restricted to serial clinical neurologic examination and, in some cases, intracranial pressure monitoring. Over the years, this monitoring has proven insufficient, as brain abnormalities were detected at late and irreversible stages. The need for real-time monitoring of brain functions to favor prompt treatment and avert irreversible brain injuries led to the concepts of multimodal monitoring and neurophysiological decision support. New monitoring techniques, such as brain tissue oxygen tension, continuous electroencephalogram, transcranial Doppler, and cerebral microdialysis, have been developed. These techniques enable early diagnosis of brain hemodynamic, electrical, and biochemical changes, allow brain anatomical and physiological monitoring-guided therapy, and have improved patient survival rates. The purpose of this review is to discuss the multimodality methods available for monitoring patients with FHF in the neurocritical care setting.

  8. Multimodal imaging of bone metastases: From preclinical to clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Ellmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the skeletal system are commonly observed in cancer patients, highly affecting the patients' quality of life. Imaging plays a major role in detection, follow-up, and molecular characterisation of metastatic disease. Thus, imaging techniques have been optimised and combined in a multimodal and multiparametric manner for assessment of complementary aspects in osseous metastases. This review summarises both application of the most relevant imaging techniques for bone metastasis in preclinical models and the clinical setting.

  9. Vector-Resonance-Multimode Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyev, S. V.; Kbashi, H.; Tarasov, N.; Loiko, Yu.; Kolpakov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The modulation and multimode instabilities are the main mechanisms which drive spontaneous spatial and temporal pattern formation in a vast number of nonlinear systems ranging from biology to laser physics. Using an Er-doped fiber laser as a test bed, here for the first time we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically a new type of a low-threshold vector-resonance-multimode instability which inherits features of multimode and modulation instabilities. The same as for the multimode instability, a large number of longitudinal modes can be excited without mode synchronization. To enable modulation instability, we modulate the state of polarization of the lasing signal with the period of the beat length by an adjustment of the in-cavity birefringence and the state of polarization of the pump wave. As a result, we show the regime's tunability from complex oscillatory to periodic with longitudinal mode synchronization in the case of resonance matching between the beat and cavity lengths. Apart from the interest in laser physics for unlocking the tunability and stability of dynamic regimes, the proposed mechanism of the vector-resonance-multimode instability can be of fundamental interest for the nonlinear dynamics of various distributed systems.

  10. Multimodality Data Integration in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Muzik

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An important goal of software development in the medical field is the design of methods which are able to integrate information obtained from various imaging and nonimaging modalities into a cohesive framework in order to understand the results of qualitatively different measurements in a larger context. Moreover, it is essential to assess the various features of the data quantitatively so that relationships in anatomical and functional domains between complementing modalities can be expressed mathematically. This paper presents a clinically feasible software environment for the quantitative assessment of the relationship among biochemical functions as assessed by PET imaging and electrophysiological parameters derived from intracranial EEG. Based on the developed software tools, quantitative results obtained from individual modalities can be merged into a data structure allowing a consistent framework for advanced data mining techniques and 3D visualization. Moreover, an effort was made to derive quantitative variables (such as the spatial proximity index, SPI characterizing the relationship between complementing modalities on a more generic level as a prerequisite for efficient data mining strategies. We describe the implementation of this software environment in twelve children (mean age 5.2±4.3 years with medically intractable partial epilepsy who underwent both high-resolution structural MR and functional PET imaging. Our experiments demonstrate that our approach will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of epileptogenesis and might ultimately have an impact on treatment. Moreover, our software environment holds promise to be useful in many other neurological disorders, where integration of multimodality data is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms.

  11. The Multimodal Possibilities of Online Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2006-01-01

    The WWW simplifies the process of delivering online instructions through multimodal channels because of the ease of use for voice, video, pictures, and text modes of communication built into it.  Given that instructions are being produced in multimodal format for the WWW, how do multi-modal analy...

  12. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  13. Multimodal Indexing of Multilingual News Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranmay Ghosh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems associated with automatic analysis of news telecasts are more severe in a country like India, where there are many national and regional language channels, besides English. In this paper, we present a framework for multimodal analysis of multilingual news telecasts, which can be augmented with tools and techniques for specific news analytics tasks. Further, we focus on a set of techniques for automatic indexing of the news stories based on keywords spotted in speech as well as on the visuals of contemporary and domain interest. English keywords are derived from RSS feed and converted to Indian language equivalents for detection in speech and on ticker texts. Restricting the keyword list to a manageable number results in drastic improvement in indexing performance. We present illustrative examples and detailed experimental results to substantiate our claim.

  14. [Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Ezra, Oranit; Ben-Ari, Ziv

    2015-03-01

    Chronic liver diseases represent a major public health problem, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prognosis and management of chronic liver diseases depend on the amount of liver fibrosis. Liver biopsy has long remained the gold standard for assessment of liver fibrosis. Liver biopsy is an invasive procedure with associated morbidity, it is rarely the cause for mortality, and has a few limitations. During the past two decades, in an attempt to overcome the limitations of liver biopsy, non-invasive methods for the evaluation of liver fibrosis have been developed, mainly in the field of viral hepatitis. This review will focus on different methods available for non-invasive evaluation of liver fibrosis including a biological approach which quantifies serum levels of biomarkers of fibrosis and physical techniques which measure liver stiffness by transient elastography, ultrasound or magnetic resonance based elastography, their accuracy, advantages and disadvantages.

  15. Non-invasive Mapping of Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashok; Hocini, Meleze; Haissaguerre, Michel; Jaïs, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Since more than 100 years, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) is the standard-of-care tool, which involves measuring electrical potentials from limited sites on the body surface to diagnose cardiac disorder, its possible mechanism, and the likely site of origin. Several decades of research has led to the development of a 252-lead ECG and computed tomography (CT) scan-based three-dimensional electro-imaging modality to non-invasively map abnormal cardiac rhythms including fibrillation. These maps provide guidance towards ablative therapy and thereby help advance the management of complex heart rhythm disorders. Here, we describe the clinical experience obtained using non-invasive technique in mapping the electrical disorder and guide the catheter ablation of atrial arrhythmias (premature atrial beat, atrial tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), ventricular arrhythmias (premature ventricular beats), and ventricular pre-excitation (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome).

  16. Multimodal pain management and arthrofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavernia, Carlos; Cardona, Diego; Rossi, Mark D; Lee, David

    2008-09-01

    Pain control after arthroplasty has been a key concern for orthopedic surgeons. After total knee arthroplasty (TKA), a small group of patients developed a painful joint with suboptimal range of motion. Manipulation under anesthesia increases flexion and extension while decreasing pain in most cases. The objective of the present investigation is to asses the effect of a multimodal pain management protocol on arthrofibrosis in primary TKAs. A cohort of 1136 patients who underwent primary TKA was selected. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group A had 778 procedures performed using a traditional approach to pain control; group B included 358 procedures that received multimodal pain management. Group A had an incidence of manipulation of 4.75% (37/778). Of 357 patients, 8 required manipulation in group B, which is an incidence of 2.24%. We recommend that orthopedic surgeons consider using a multimodal pain management protocol for TKA.

  17. Control of two-photon quantum walk in a complex multimode system by wavefront shaping

    CERN Document Server

    Defienne, Hugo; Walmsley, Ian A; Smith, Brian J; Gigan, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Multi-photon interferences in complex multimode structures - quantum walks - are of both funda- mental and technological interest. They rely on the ability to design the complex network where the walk occurs. Here, we demonstrate the control of quantum walks of two indistinguishable photons in a complex linear system - a highly multimode fiber - by means of wavefront shaping techniques. Using the measured transmission matrix of the fiber, we demonstrate the ability to address arbitrary output modes of the two-photon speckle pattern, and simultaneous control of the quantum inter- ferences. This work provides a reconfigurable platform for multi-photon, multimode interference experiments and a route to high-dimensional quantum systems.

  18. Neural Network-Based Multimode Fiber-Optic Information Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusarz, Ronald K.; Sayeh, Mohammad R.

    2001-01-01

    A new technique for transmitting information through multimode fiber-optic cables is presented. This technique sends parallel channels through the fiber-optic cable, thereby greatly improving the data transmission rate compared with that of the current technology, which uses serial data transmission through single-mode fiber. An artificial neural network is employed to decipher the transmitted information from the received speckle pattern. Several different preprocessing algorithms are developed, tested, and evaluated. These algorithms employ average region intensity, distributed individual pixel intensity, and maximum mean-square-difference optimal group selection methods. The effect of modal dispersion on the data rate is analyzed. An increased data transmission rate by a factor of 37 over that of single-mode fibers is realized. When implementing our technique, we can increase the channel capacity of a typical multimode fiber by a factor of 6.

  19. Switchable lasing in multimode microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei V.; Chigrin, Dmitry N.; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    We propose the new concept of a switchable multimode microlaser. As a generic, realistic model of a multimode microresonator a system of two coupled defects in a two-dimensional photonic crystal is considered. We demonstrate theoretically that lasing of the cavity into one selected resonator mode...... can be caused by injecting an appropriate optical pulse at the onset of laser action (injection seeding). Temporal mode-to-mode switching by reseeding the cavity after a short cooldown period is demonstrated by direct numerical solution. A qualitative analytical explanation of the mode switching...

  20. Evaluation of noninvasive cardiac output methods during exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alan D.; Barrows, Linda H.; Rashid, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    Noninvasive techniques to estimate cardiac output (Qc) will be used during future space flight. This retrospective literature survey compared the Qc techniques of carbon dioxide rebreathing (CO2-R), CO2 single breath (CO2-S), Doppler (DOP), impedance (IM), and inert gas (IG: acetylene or nitrous oxide) to direct (DIR) assessments measured at rest and during exercise.

  1. Multimodal Network Equilibrium with Stochastic Travel Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The private car, unlike public traffic modes (e.g., subway, trolley running along dedicated track-ways, is invariably subject to various uncertainties resulting in travel time variation. A multimodal network equilibrium model is formulated that explicitly considers stochastic link capacity variability in the road network. The travel time of combined-mode trips is accumulated based on the concept of the mean excess travel time (METT which is a summation of estimated buffer time and tardy time. The problem is characterized by an equivalent VI (variational inequality formulation where the mode choice is expressed in a hierarchical logit structure. Specifically, the supernetwork theory and expansion technique are used herein to represent the multimodal transportation network, which completely represents the combined-mode trips as constituting multiple modes within a trip. The method of successive weighted average is adopted for problem solutions. The model and solution method are further applied to study the trip distribution and METT variations caused by the different levels of the road conditions. Results of numerical examples show that travelers prefer to choose the combined travel mode as road capacity decreases. Travelers with different attitudes towards risk are shown to exhibit significant differences when making travel choice decisions.

  2. Dual Channel Pulse Coupled Neural Network Algorithm for Fusion of Multimodality Brain Images with Quality Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha SRINIVASAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the review of medical imaging techniques, an important fact that emerged is that radiologists and physicians still are in a need of high-resolution medical images with complementary information from different modalities to ensure efficient analysis. This requirement should have been sorted out using fusion techniques with the fused image being used in image-guided surgery, image-guided radiotherapy and non-invasive diagnosis. Aim: This paper focuses on Dual Channel Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN Algorithm for fusion of multimodality brain images and the fused image is further analyzed using subjective (human perception and objective (statistical measures for the quality analysis. Material and Methods: The modalities used in fusion are CT, MRI with subtypes T1/T2/PD/GAD, PET and SPECT, since the information from each modality is complementary to one another. The objective measures selected for evaluation of fused image were: Information Entropy (IE - image quality, Mutual Information (MI – deviation in fused to the source images and Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR – noise level, for analysis. Eight sets of brain images with different modalities (T2 with T1, T2 with CT, PD with T2, PD with GAD, T2 with GAD, T2 with SPECT-Tc, T2 with SPECT-Ti, T2 with PET are chosen for experimental purpose and the proposed technique is compared with existing fusion methods such as the Average method, the Contrast pyramid, the Shift Invariant Discrete Wavelet Transform (SIDWT with Harr and the Morphological pyramid, using the selected measures to ascertain relative performance. Results: The IE value and SNR value of the fused image derived from dual channel PCNN is higher than other fusion methods, shows that the quality is better with less noise. Conclusion: The fused image resulting from the proposed method retains the contrast, shape and texture as in source images without false information or information loss.

  3. Multimodal Aspects of Corporate Social Responsibility Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Daniela Maier

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses how the multimodal persuasive strategies of corporate social responsibility communication can highlight a company’s commitment to gender empowerment and environmental protection while advertising simultaneously its products. Drawing on an interdisciplinary methodological framework related to CSR communication, multimodal discourse analysis and gender theory, the article proposes a multimodal analysis model through which it is possible to map and explain the multimodal persuasive strategies employed by Coca-Cola company in their community-related films. By examining the semiotic modes’ interconnectivity and functional differentiation, this analytical endeavour expands the existing research work as the usual textual focus is extended to a multimodal one.

  4. Dynamic Response of Tapered Optical Multimode Fiber Coated with Carbon Nanotubes for Ethanol Sensing Application

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a highly combustible chemical universally designed for biomedical applications. In this paper, optical sensing performance of tapered multimode fiber tip coated with carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film towards aqueous ethanol with different concentrations is investigated. The tapered optical multimode fiber tip is coated with CNT using drop-casting technique and is annealed at 70 °C to enhance the binding of the nanomaterial to the silica fiber tip. The optical fiber tip and the CNT se...

  5. Fiber-bundle microendoscopy with sub-diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and intensity mapping for multimodal optical biopsy of stratified epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, Gage J; James, Haley M; Powless, Amy J; Hutcheson, Joshua A; Dierks, Mary K; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Muldoon, Timothy J

    2015-12-01

    Early detection of structural or functional changes in dysplastic epithelia may be crucial for improving long-term patient care. Recent work has explored myriad non-invasive or minimally invasive "optical biopsy" techniques for diagnosing early dysplasia, such as high-resolution microendoscopy, a method to resolve sub-cellular features of apical epithelia, as well as broadband sub-diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, a method that evaluates bulk health of a small volume of tissue. We present a multimodal fiber-based microendoscopy technique that combines high-resolution microendoscopy, broadband (450-750 nm) sub-diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (sDRS) at two discrete source-detector separations (374 and 730 μm), and sub-diffuse reflectance intensity mapping (sDRIM) using a 635 nm laser. Spatial resolution, magnification, field-of-view, and sampling frequency were determined. Additionally, the ability of the sDRS modality to extract optical properties over a range of depths is reported. Following this, proof-of-concept experiments were performed on tissue-simulating phantoms made with poly(dimethysiloxane) as a substrate material with cultured MDA-MB-468 cells. Then, all modalities were demonstrated on a human melanocytic nevus from a healthy volunteer and on resected colonic tissue from a murine model. Qualitative in vivo image data is correlated with reduced scattering and absorption coefficients.

  6. A Learning Algorithm for Multimodal Grammar Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ulizia, A; Ferri, F; Grifoni, P

    2011-12-01

    The high costs of development and maintenance of multimodal grammars in integrating and understanding input in multimodal interfaces lead to the investigation of novel algorithmic solutions in automating grammar generation and in updating processes. Many algorithms for context-free grammar inference have been developed in the natural language processing literature. An extension of these algorithms toward the inference of multimodal grammars is necessary for multimodal input processing. In this paper, we propose a novel grammar inference mechanism that allows us to learn a multimodal grammar from its positive samples of multimodal sentences. The algorithm first generates the multimodal grammar that is able to parse the positive samples of sentences and, afterward, makes use of two learning operators and the minimum description length metrics in improving the grammar description and in avoiding the over-generalization problem. The experimental results highlight the acceptable performances of the algorithm proposed in this paper since it has a very high probability of parsing valid sentences.

  7. On Using Genetic Algorithms for Multimodal Relevance Optimization in Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughanem, M.; Christment, C.; Tamine, L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a genetic relevance optimization process performed in an information retrieval system that uses genetic techniques for solving multimodal problems (niching) and query reformulation techniques. Explains that the niching technique allows the process to reach different relevance regions of the document space, and that query reformulations…

  8. On Using Genetic Algorithms for Multimodal Relevance Optimization in Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughanem, M.; Christment, C.; Tamine, L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a genetic relevance optimization process performed in an information retrieval system that uses genetic techniques for solving multimodal problems (niching) and query reformulation techniques. Explains that the niching technique allows the process to reach different relevance regions of the document space, and that query reformulations…

  9. Integrated processing in multimodal argumentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoven, P.J. van den; Jiang, W.

    2011-01-01

    The question addressed in this paper is simple. If the argumentative function of a multimodal narrative text requires the integration of the information from different modes, among which verbal ones, what model for the order of processing and the integration of information do we need to adopt? Using

  10. Multimodal approach to postoperative recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To provide updated information on recent developments within individual components of multimodal interventions to improve postoperative outcome (fast-track methodology). RECENT FINDINGS: The value of the fast-track methodology to improve recovery and decrease hospital stay...

  11. Multimodality as a Sociolinguistic Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collister, Lauren Brittany

    2013-01-01

    This work explores the use of multimodal communication in a community of expert "World of Warcraft"® players and its impact on politeness, identity, and relationships. Players in the community regularly communicated using three linguistic modes quasi-simultaneously: text chat, voice chat, and face-to-face interaction. Using the…

  12. Multi-Modality Phantom Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu; Moses, William W.

    2009-03-20

    Multi-modality imaging has an increasing role in the diagnosis and treatment of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and anatomical information are acquired and accurately co-registered. Hence, there is a resulting need for multi modality phantoms in order to validate image co-registration and calibrate the imaging systems. We present our PET-ultrasound phantom development, including PET and ultrasound images of a simple prostate phantom. We use agar and gelatin mixed with a radioactive solution. We also present our development of custom multi-modality phantoms that are compatible with PET, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS), MRI and CT imaging. We describe both our selection of tissue mimicking materials and phantom construction procedures. These custom PET-TRUS-CT-MRI prostate phantoms use agargelatin radioactive mixtures with additional contrast agents and preservatives. We show multi-modality images of these custom prostate phantoms, as well as discuss phantom construction alternatives. Although we are currently focused on prostate imaging, this phantom development is applicable to many multi-modality imaging applications.

  13. Recent advances in noninvasive glucose monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So CF

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chi-Fuk So,1 Kup-Sze Choi,1 Thomas KS Wong,2 Joanne WY Chung2,31Centre for Integrative Digital Health, School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, 2Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, Tung Wah College, Hong Kong, 3Department of Health and Physical Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong KongAbstract: The race for the next generation of painless and reliable glucose monitoring for diabetes mellitus is on. As technology advances, both diagnostic techniques and equipment improve. This review describes the main technologies currently being explored for noninvasive glucose monitoring. The principle of each technology is mentioned; its advantages and limitations are then discussed. The general description and the corresponding results for each device are illustrated, as well as the current status of the device and the manufacturer; internet references for the devices are listed where appropriate. Ten technologies and eleven potential devices are included in this review. Near infrared spectroscopy has become a promising technology, among others, for blood glucose monitoring. Although some reviews have been published already, the rapid development of technologies and information makes constant updating mandatory. While advances have been made, the reliability and the calibration of noninvasive instruments could still be improved, and more studies carried out under different physiological conditions of metabolism, bodily fluid circulation, and blood components are needed.Keywords: noninvasive, glucose monitoring, diabetes mellitus, blood glucose measurement

  14. Discrimination of skin diseases using the multimodal imaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, N.; Heuke, S.; Akimov, D.; Latka, I.; Kluschke, F.; Röwert-Huber, H.-J.; Lademann, J.; Dietzek, B.; Popp, J.

    2012-06-01

    Optical microspectroscopic tools reveal great potential for dermatologic diagnostics in the clinical day-to-day routine. To enhance the diagnostic value of individual nonlinear optical imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG) or two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), the approach of multimodal imaging has recently been developed. Here, we present an application of nonlinear optical multimodal imaging with Raman-scattering microscopy to study sizable human-tissue cross-sections. The samples investigated contain both healthy tissue and various skin tumors. This contribution details the rich information content, which can be obtained from the multimodal approach: While CARS microscopy, which - in contrast to spontaneous Raman-scattering microscopy - is not hampered by single-photon excited fluorescence, is used to monitor the lipid and protein distribution in the samples, SHG imaging selectively highlights the distribution of collagen structures within the tissue. This is due to the fact, that SHG is only generated in structures which lack inversion geometry. Finally, TPF reveals the distribution of autofluorophores in tissue. The combination of these techniques, i.e. multimodal imaging, allows for recording chemical images of large area samples and is - as this contribution will highlight - of high clinically diagnostic value.

  15. Discovering Knowledge from Multi-modal Lecture Recordings

    CERN Document Server

    Kannan, Rajkumar

    2010-01-01

    Educational media mining is the process of converting raw media data from educational systems to useful information that can be used to design learning systems, answer research questions and allow personalized learning experiences. Knowledge discovery encompasses a wide range of techniques ranging from database queries to more recent developments in machine learning and language technology. Educational media mining techniques are now being used in IT Services research worldwide. Multi-modal Lecture Recordings is one of the important types of educational media and this paper explores the research challenges for mining lecture recordings for the efficient personalized learning experiences. Keywords: Educational Media Mining; Lecture Recordings, Multimodal Information System, Personalized Learning; Online Course Ware; Skills and Competences;

  16. Multimodality imaging of structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, D W [Departments of Medicine and Radiology, University of Tennessee Medical Center, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37920 (United States)], E-mail: dtownsend@mc.utmck.edu

    2008-02-21

    Historically, medical devices to image either anatomical structure or functional processes have developed along somewhat independent paths. The recognition that combining images from different modalities can nevertheless offer significant diagnostic advantages gave rise to sophisticated software techniques to coregister structure and function. Recently, alternatives to retrospective software-based fusion have become available through instrumentation that combines two imaging modalities within a single device, an approach that has since been termed hardware fusion. As a result, following their recent introduction into the clinic, combined PET/CT and SPECT/CT devices are now playing an increasingly important role in the diagnosis and staging of human disease. Recently, although limited to the brain, the first clinical MR scanner with a PET insert, a technically-challenging design, has been undergoing evaluation. This review will follow the development of multimodality instrumentation for clinical use from conception to present-day technology and assess the status and future potential for such devices. (topical review)

  17. Non-Invasive in vivo Imaging in Small Animal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Koo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real time in vivo molecular imaging in small animal models has become the essential bridge between in vitro data and their translation into clinical applications. The tremendous development and technological progress, such as tumour modelling, monitoring of tumour growth and detection of metastasis, has facilitated translational drug development. This has added to our knowledge on carcinogenesis. The modalities that are commonly used include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Computed Tomography (CT, Positron Emission Tomography (PET, bioluminescence imaging, fluorescence imaging and multi-modality imaging systems. The ability to obtain multiple images longitudinally provides reliable information whilst reducing animal numbers. As yet there is no one modality that is ideal for all experimental studies. This review outlines the instrumentation available together with corresponding applications reported in the literature with particular emphasis on cancer research. Advantages and limitations to current imaging technology are discussed and the issues concerning small animal care during imaging are highlighted.

  18. Multimode-singlemode-multimode fiber sensor for alcohol sensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofi'ah, Iftihatur; Hatta, A. M.; Sekartedjo, Sekartedjo

    2016-11-01

    Alcohol is volatile and flammable liquid which is soluble substances both on polar and non polar substances that has been used in some industrial sectors. Alcohol detection method now widely used one of them is the optical fiber sensor. In this paper used fiber optic sensor based on Multimode-Single-mode-Multimode (MSM) to detect alcohol solution at a concentration range of 0-3%. The working principle of sensor utilizes the modal interference between the core modes and the cladding modes, thus make the sensor sensitive to environmental changes. The result showed that characteristic of the sensor not affect the length of the single-mode fiber (SMF). We obtain that the sensor with a length of 5 mm of single-mode can sensing the alcohol with a sensitivity of 0.107 dB/v%.

  19. A Review of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Multimodal Neuroimaging to Characterize Post-Stroke Neuroplasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriat, Angela M.; Neva, Jason L.; Peters, Sue; Ferris, Jennifer K.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2015-01-01

    Following stroke, the brain undergoes various stages of recovery where the central nervous system can reorganize neural circuitry (neuroplasticity) both spontaneously and with the aid of behavioral rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation. Multiple neuroimaging techniques can characterize common structural and functional stroke-related deficits, and importantly, help predict recovery of function. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) typically reveals increased overall diffusivity throughout the brain following stroke, and is capable of indexing the extent of white matter damage. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides an index of metabolic changes in surviving neural tissue after stroke, serving as a marker of brain function. The neural correlates of altered brain activity after stroke have been demonstrated by abnormal activation of sensorimotor cortices during task performance, and at rest, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Electroencephalography (EEG) has been used to characterize motor dysfunction in terms of increased cortical amplitude in the sensorimotor regions when performing upper limb movement, indicating abnormally increased cognitive effort and planning in individuals with stroke. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) work reveals changes in ipsilesional and contralesional cortical excitability in the sensorimotor cortices. The severity of motor deficits indexed using TMS has been linked to the magnitude of activity imbalance between the sensorimotor cortices. In this paper, we will provide a narrative review of data from studies utilizing DTI, MRS, fMRI, EEG, and brain stimulation techniques focusing on TMS and its combination with uni- and multimodal neuroimaging methods to assess recovery after stroke. Approaches that delineate the best measures with which to predict or positively alter outcomes will be highlighted. PMID:26579069

  20. A review of transcranial magnetic stimulation and multimodal neuroimaging to characterize post-stroke neuroplasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Michelle Auriat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Following stroke, the brain undergoes various stages of recovery where the central nervous system can reorganize neural circuitry (neuroplasticity both spontaneously and with the aid of behavioural rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation. Multiple neuroimaging techniques can characterize common structural and functional stroke-related deficits, and importantly, help predict recovery of function. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI typically reveals increased overall diffusivity throughout the brain following stroke, and is capable of indexing the extent of white matter damage. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS provides an index of metabolic changes in surviving neural tissue after stroke, serving as a marker of brain function. The neural correlates of altered brain activity after stroke have been demonstrated by abnormal activation of sensorimotor cortices during task performance, and at rest, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Electroencephalography (EEG has been used to characterize motor dysfunction in terms of increased cortical amplitude in the sensorimotor regions when performing upper-limb movement, indicating abnormally increased cognitive effort and planning in individuals with stroke. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS work reveals changes in ipsilesional and contralesional cortical excitability in the sensorimotor cortices. The severity of motor deficits indexed using TMS has been linked to the magnitude of activity imbalance between the sensorimotor cortices. In this paper we will provide a narrative review of data from studies utilizing DTI, MRS, fMRI, EEG and brain stimulation techniques focusing on TMS and its combination with uni and multi-modal neuroimaging methods to assess recovery after stroke. Approaches that delineate the best measures with which to predict or positively alter outcomes will be highlighted.

  1. Noninvasive evaluation of peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, R W

    1978-08-01

    Doppler ultrasound is the most simple, inexpensive, accurate and versatile of the available noninvasive screening techniques to assess peripheral vascular diseases. The four fundamental components of peripheral arterial evaluation with this technique are assessment of blood velocity signal, measurement of resting ankle pressure, determination of segmental leg blood pressures, and measurement of ankle pressure response to exercise or reactive hyperemia. Plethysmography permits graphic recording of pulse-wave morphology, determination of digit blood pressure, and pulsatile responses to compression maneuvers. These techniques are useful in objectively quantifying peripheral arterial occlusive disease, predicting the results of operative therapy, monitoring the success of arterial reconstruction during surgery, and following the physiologic status of the patient after surgery.

  2. Using 2-D arrays for sensing multimodal Lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engholm, Marcus; Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2010-04-01

    Monitoring structural integrity of large planar structures requires normally a relatively dense network of uniformly distributed ultrasonic sensors. A 2-D ultrasonic phased array with all azimuth angle coverage would be extremely useful for the structural health monitoring (SHM) of such structures. Known techniques for estimating direction of arriving (DOA) waves cannot efficiently cope with dispersive and multimodal Lamb waves (LWs). In the paper we propose an adaptive spectral estimation technique capable of handling broadband LWs sensed by 2-D arrays, the modified Capon method. Performance of the technique is evaluated using simulated multiple-mode LWs, and verified using experimental data.

  3. Multimodal recognition of emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datcu, D.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis proposes algorithms and techniques to be used for automatic recognition of six prototypic emotion categories by computer programs, based on the recognition of facial expressions and emotion patterns in voice. Considering the applicability in real-life conditions, the research is carried

  4. Transverse-mode controlling of a large-mode-area multimode fiber laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Libo Li; Qihong Lou; Jun Zhou; Jingxing Dong; Yunrong Wei; Bing He; Jinyan Li

    2007-01-01

    @@ Coiling technique is used to control the transverse mode of a large-mode-area (LMA) multimode fiber laser. By winding the fiber to a coil with different radius, high-order modes of a multimode fiber laser are suppressed one by one and finally 15.4-W single-transverse-mode output is achieved when the coil radius is 20 mm. It is found that as the coil radius decreases, the beam quality of a multimode fiber laser gets better but the slope efficiency drops for higher-order modes are discriminated. During the experiment, as the coil radius of multimode fiber changes, output characteristic of the laser has been measured. Meanwhile,the mode loss of different modes is calculated theoretically. It is proved that the experimental measured results fit well with the theoretically calculated results.

  5. Noninvasive screening tools for Down syndrome: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Meagan Smith, Jeannie Visootsak Emory University, Department of Human Genetics, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Down syndrome is the leading cause of prenatal chromosome abnormalities, accounting for 53% of all reported chromosome conditions. Testing strategies, guidelines, and screening options have expanded from their conception in the 1970s, and now include such options as anatomical ultrasound, maternal serum screening, and noninvasive prenatal testing. This review summarizes all currently available noninvasive diagnostic techniques for the detection of Down syndrome. By understanding fully each technology and the possible alternatives, the physician will be able to provide their patients with all the information necessary to make an informed decision regarding their medical management. Keywords: Down syndrome, noninvasive screening, diagnostic techniques

  6. Noninvasive Physiologic Assessment of Coronary Stenoses Using Cardiac CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary CT angiography (CCTA has become an important noninvasive imaging modality in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD. CCTA enables accurate evaluation of coronary artery stenosis. However, CCTA provides limited information on the physiological significance of stenotic lesions. A noninvasive “one-stop-shop” diagnostic test that can provide both anatomical significance and functional significance of stenotic lesions would be beneficial in the diagnosis and management of CAD. Recently, with the introduction of novel techniques, such as myocardial CT perfusion, CT-derived fractional flow reserve (FFRCT, and transluminal attenuation gradient (TAG, CCTA has emerged as a noninvasive method for the assessment of both anatomy of coronary lesions and its physiological consequences during a single study. This review provides an overview of the current status of new CT techniques for the physiologic assessments of CAD.

  7. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Swierczewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal molecular imaging can offer a synergistic improvement of diagnostic ability over a single imaging modality. Recent development of hybrid imaging systems has profoundly impacted the pool of available multimodal imaging probes. In particular, much interest has been focused on biocompatible, inorganic nanoparticle-based multimodal probes. Inorganic nanoparticles offer exceptional advantages to the field of multimodal imaging owing to their unique characteristics, such as nanometer dimensions, tunable imaging properties, and multifunctionality. Nanoparticles mainly based on iron oxide, quantum dots, gold, and silica have been applied to various imaging modalities to characterize and image specific biologic processes on a molecular level. A combination of nanoparticles and other materials such as biomolecules, polymers, and radiometals continue to increase functionality for in vivo multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents. In this review, we discuss the unique concepts, characteristics, and applications of the various multimodal imaging probes based on inorganic nanoparticles.

  8. Cognitive Principles in Robust Multimodal Interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Chai, J Y; Qu, S; 10.1613/jair.1936

    2011-01-01

    Multimodal conversational interfaces provide a natural means for users to communicate with computer systems through multiple modalities such as speech and gesture. To build effective multimodal interfaces, automated interpretation of user multimodal inputs is important. Inspired by the previous investigation on cognitive status in multimodal human machine interaction, we have developed a greedy algorithm for interpreting user referring expressions (i.e., multimodal reference resolution). This algorithm incorporates the cognitive principles of Conversational Implicature and Givenness Hierarchy and applies constraints from various sources (e.g., temporal, semantic, and contextual) to resolve references. Our empirical results have shown the advantage of this algorithm in efficiently resolving a variety of user references. Because of its simplicity and generality, this approach has the potential to improve the robustness of multimodal input interpretation.

  9. Continuous verification using multimodal biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Terence; Zhang, Sheng; Janakiraman, Rajkumar; Kumar, Sandeep

    2007-04-01

    Conventional verification systems, such as those controlling access to a secure room, do not usually require the user to reauthenticate himself for continued access to the protected resource. This may not be sufficient for high-security environments in which the protected resource needs to be continuously monitored for unauthorized use. In such cases, continuous verification is needed. In this paper, we present the theory, architecture, implementation, and performance of a multimodal biometrics verification system that continuously verifies the presence of a logged-in user. Two modalities are currently used--face and fingerprint--but our theory can be readily extended to include more modalities. We show that continuous verification imposes additional requirements on multimodal fusion when compared to conventional verification systems. We also argue that the usual performance metrics of false accept and false reject rates are insufficient yardsticks for continuous verification and propose new metrics against which we benchmark our system.

  10. The bicriterion multimodal assignment problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Roed; Nielsen, Lars Relund; Andersen, Kim Allan

    2008-01-01

    We consider the bicriterion multimodal assignment problem, which is a new generalization of the classical linear assignment problem. A two-phase solution method using an effective ranking scheme is presented. The algorithm is valid for generating all nondominated criterion points...... or an approximation. Extensive computational results are conducted on a large library of test instances to test the performance of the algorithm and to identify hard test instances. Also, test results of the algorithm applied to the bicriterion assignment problem are provided....

  11. Evaluation of multimodal ground cues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf; Lecuyer, Anatole; Serafin, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents an array of results on the perception of ground surfaces via multiple sensory modalities,with special attention to non visual perceptual cues, notably those arising from audition and haptics, as well as interactions between them. It also reviews approaches to combining synth...... synthetic multimodal cues, from vision, haptics, and audition, in order to realize virtual experiences of walking on simulated ground surfaces or other features....

  12. The Theme in the Multimodality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu; Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    <正>1.Systemic Functional Linguistic(SFL)and Multimodality The theoretical foundation for this analysis is mainly extrapolated from the approach of language as a social semiotic process(Halliday 1978,2004).SFL deals with the way texts are articulated to be appropriate for particular situations of use.Halliday develops a Systemic Functional approach in relation to verbal language and offers a set of grammatical systems which realize the three metafunctions of language.In them,the clause

  13. Multi-Mode Broadband Patch Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A multi-mode broad band patch antenna is provided that allows for the same aperture to be used at independent frequencies such as reception at 19 GHz and transmission at 29 GHz. Furthermore, the multi-mode broadband patch antenna provides a ferroelectric film that allows for tuning capability of the multi-mode broadband patch antenna over a relatively large tuning range. The alternative use of a semiconductor substrate permits reduced control voltages since the semiconductor functions as a counter electrode.

  14. Multimodal Diversity of Postmodernist Fiction Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. I. Tykha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of structural and functional manifestations of multimodal diversity in postmodernist fiction texts. Multimodality is defined as the coexistence of more than one semiotic mode within a certain context. Multimodal texts feature a diversity of semiotic modes in the communication and development of their narrative. Such experimental texts subvert conventional patterns by introducing various semiotic resources – verbal or non-verbal.

  15. Advances in multimodality molecular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidi Habib

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality molecular imaging using high resolution positron emission tomography (PET combined with other modalities is now playing a pivotal role in basic and clinical research. The introduction of combined PET/CT systems in clinical setting has revolutionized the practice of diagnostic imaging. The complementarity between the intrinsically aligned anatomic (CT and functional or metabolic (PET information provided in a "one-stop shop" and the possibility to use CT images for attenuation correction of the PET data has been the driving force behind the success of this technology. On the other hand, combining PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI in a single gantry is technically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of few preclinical PET systems and one human prototype dedicated for simultaneous PET/MR brain imaging. This paper discusses recent advances in PET instrumentation and the advantages and challenges of multimodality imaging systems. Future opportunities and the challenges facing the adoption of multimodality imaging instrumentation will also be addressed.

  16. Diffusion Maps for Multimodal Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Piella

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal image registration is a difficult task, due to the significant intensity variations between the images. A common approach is to use sophisticated similarity measures, such as mutual information, that are robust to those intensity variations. However, these similarity measures are computationally expensive and, moreover, often fail to capture the geometry and the associated dynamics linked with the images. Another approach is the transformation of the images into a common space where modalities can be directly compared. Within this approach, we propose to register multimodal images by using diffusion maps to describe the geometric and spectral properties of the data. Through diffusion maps, the multimodal data is transformed into a new set of canonical coordinates that reflect its geometry uniformly across modalities, so that meaningful correspondences can be established between them. Images in this new representation can then be registered using a simple Euclidean distance as a similarity measure. Registration accuracy was evaluated on both real and simulated brain images with known ground-truth for both rigid and non-rigid registration. Results showed that the proposed approach achieved higher accuracy than the conventional approach using mutual information.

  17. Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, T.J.P., E-mail: timothyjpbray@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); Mortensen, K.H., E-mail: mortensen@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); University Department of Radiology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Hills Road, Box 318, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Gopalan, D., E-mail: deepa.gopalan@btopenworld.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A plethora of pulmonary and systemic disorders, often associated with grave outcomes, may cause pulmonary infarction. • A stereotypical infarct is a peripheral wedge shaped pleurally based opacity but imaging findings can be highly variable. • Multimodality imaging is key to diagnosing the presence, aetiology and complications of pulmonary infarction. • Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction together with any ancillary features often guide to early targeted treatment. • CT remains the principal imaging modality with MRI increasingly used alongside nuclear medicine studies and ultrasound. - Abstract: The impact of absent pulmonary arterial and venous flow on the pulmonary parenchyma depends on a host of factors. These include location of the occlusive insult, the speed at which the occlusion develops and the ability of the normal dual arterial supply to compensate through increased bronchial arterial flow. Pulmonary infarction occurs when oxygenation is cut off secondary to sudden occlusion with lack of recruitment of the dual supply arterial system. Thromboembolic disease is the commonest cause of such an insult but a whole range of disease processes intrinsic and extrinsic to the pulmonary arterial and venous lumen may also result in infarcts. Recognition of the presence of infarction can be challenging as imaging manifestations often differ from the classically described wedge shaped defect and a number of weighty causes need consideration. This review highlights aetiologies and imaging appearances of pulmonary infarction, utilising cases to illustrate the essential role of a multimodality imaging approach in order to arrive at the appropriate diagnosis.

  18. Noninvasive Hemodynamic Measurements During Neurosurgical Procedures in Sitting Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Patrick; Tzanova, Irene; Gööck, Tilman; Hagen, Frank; Schmidtmann, Irene; Engelhard, Kristin; Pestel, Gunther

    2017-07-01

    Neurosurgical procedures in sitting position need advanced cardiovascular monitoring. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) to measure cardiac output (CO)/cardiac index (CI) and stroke volume (SV), and invasive arterial blood pressure measurements for systolic (ABPsys), diastolic (ABPdiast) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) are established monitoring technologies for these kind of procedures. A noninvasive device for continuous monitoring of blood pressure and CO based on a modified Penaz technique (volume-clamp method) was introduced recently. In the present study the noninvasive blood pressure measurements were compared with invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring, and the noninvasive CO monitoring to TEE measurements. Measurements of blood pressure and CO were performed in 35 patients before/after giving a fluid bolus and a change from supine to sitting position, start of surgery, and repositioning from sitting to supine at the end of surgery. Data pairs from the noninvasive device (Nexfin HD) versus arterial line measurements (ABPsys, ABPdiast, MAP) and versus TEE (CO, CI, SV) were compared using Bland-Altman analysis and percentage error. All parameters compared (CO, CI, SV, ABPsys, ABPdiast, MAP) showed a large bias and wide limits of agreement. Percentage error was above 30% for all parameters except ABPsys. The noninvasive device based on a modified Penaz technique cannot replace arterial blood pressure monitoring or TEE in anesthetized patients undergoing neurosurgery in sitting position.

  19. NON-INVASIVE PRENATAL DIAGNOSIS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Dey, Sumita Agarwal and Sumedha Sharma

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Aneuploidies are one of the important causes of perinatal morbidity and mortality. Initially screening for aneuploidies started with maternal age risk estimation. Later on, serum testing for biochemical markers and ultrasound markers were added. Women detected to be at high risk for aneuploidies were offered invasive testing. Recently, various methods including non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT by analysis of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA in maternal blood has shown promise for highly accurate detection of common fetal autosomal trisomies. Incorporating these new non-invasive technologies into clinical practice will impact the current prenatal screening paradigm for fetal aneuploidy, in which genetic counselling plays an integral role. The advantage of the technique being elimination of risks such as miscarriage associated with invasive diagnostic procedures. But then this new technique has its own set of technical limitations and ethical issues at present and further research is required before implementation. Data was obtained through a literature search via Pubmed and Google as well as detailed search of our library database.

  20. Look at your process non-invasively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyes, W. (TN Technologies, Inc., Round Rock, TX (United States)); Jean, R. (Epsilon Industrial, Inc. Austin, TX (United States))

    1994-06-01

    Gaining access to hazardous areas in process plants is a constant problem for instrument engineers. The area may contain hazardous chemicals, or may have dangerously high temperatures or pressures. An additional problem is the desire to avoid ports or other openings into process vessels, to improve safety and to minimize fugitive emissions. The answer of these types of problems is a sensor that is noninvasive or noncontacting in nature. A noncontacting sensor is one that might be mounted in a process vessel or through a port, but does not directly contact the process material. Among the range of noninvasive sensing techniques are those using microwave energy: microwave radar for level and guided microwave spectrometry (GMS) for composition. First introduced in the early 1980s for shipboard level measurement, the use of radar level has expanded to onshore tank farms, and then to process vessels. GMS, a relatively new application of microwave energy, is beginning to make inroads in a variety of online techniques for composition, water content and other process variables. The paper describes the technology and its applications.

  1. Imaging the pancreas: from ex vivo to non-invasive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, D; Ahlgren, U

    2008-01-01

    While many recently published reviews have covered non-invasive nuclear imaging techniques, the aim of this review is to focus on current developments in optical imaging technologies for investigating the pancreas. Several of these modalities are being developed into non-invasive, real...

  2. INFORMATION SUPPORT TRANSPORTATION PROCESS MULTIMODAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Filippova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: is to improve information support for the organization and functioning of multimodal systems delive-ry modes of transport in the northern regions of the Russian Federation on the basis of the development of theoretical and methodological and practical provisions, criteria, methods and mathematical models.Method or methodology of the work: a methodology placement vehicle logistics center (TLC in the Nordic region, providing links all transport modes involved in the delivery of energy, developed a model to optimize the parameters of the transport network, used for traffic, the most effective schemes of delivery of goods in multimodal report, taking into account the specifics of the Nordic region, and funding.Results: Studies have applied and may be used by the fe-deral and regional authorities and management in the deve-lopment of integrated programs for energy-Northern regions. Proposed in the theoretical research and methodological approaches are one way to increase the efficiency of the delivery of goods in the event of a little predictable situations on the route, TLC and transhipment points. The developed techniques are used and can be used to improve the northern region of the process control of cargo delivery.Conclusion: Therefore, based on the analysis of the status of the issue, it is quite obvious that the very topical area of optimization of the transport needs of the region to ensure the development and implementation of methods to improve the efficiency and quality of freight traffic by improving organizational structures and technology traffic control all transport space in the region.

  3. New developments in non-invasive coronary imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Riksta

    2008-01-01

    Coronary artery disease, and especially ischemic heart disease, is a major concern in Western society. To reduce mortality and morbidity early detection and treatment is important. Ideally, early detection should be non-invasive, fast and cheap. Coronary angiography (CAG) is a reliable technique to

  4. New developments in non-invasive coronary imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Riksta

    2008-01-01

    Coronary artery disease, and especially ischemic heart disease, is a major concern in Western society. To reduce mortality and morbidity early detection and treatment is important. Ideally, early detection should be non-invasive, fast and cheap. Coronary angiography (CAG) is a reliable technique to

  5. Acoustic emission monitoring using a multimode optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Steve; Papy, Jean-Michel; Wevers, Martine; Van Huffel, Sabine

    2004-07-01

    Permanent damage in various materials and constructions often causes high-energy high-frequency acoustic waves. To detect those so called `acoustic emission (AE) events', in most cases ultrasonic transducers are embedded in the structure or attached to its surface. However, for many applications where event localization is less important, an embedded low-cost multimode optical fiber sensor configured for event counting may be a better alternative due to its corrosion resistance, immunity to electromagnetic interference and light-weight. The sensing part of this intensity-modulated sensor consists of a multimode optical fiber. The sensing principle now relies on refractive index variations, microbending and mode-mode interferences by the action of the acoustic pressure wave. A photodiode is used to monitor the intensity of the optical signal and transient signal detection techniques (filtering, frame-to-frame analysis, recursive noise estimation, power detector estimator) on the photodiode output are applied to detect the events. In this work, the acoustic emission monitoring capabilities of the multimode optical fiber sensor are demonstrated with the fiber sensor embedded in the liner of a Power Data Transmission (PDT) coil to detect damage (delamination, matrix cracking and fiber breaking) while bending the coil. With the Hankel Total Least Square (HTLS) technique, it is shown that both the acoustic emission signal and optical signal can be modeled with a sum of exponentially damped complex sinusoids with common poles.

  6. Focusing and imaging with increased numerical apertures through multimode fibers with micro-fabricated optics

    KAUST Repository

    Bianchi, Silvio

    2013-01-01

    The use of individual multimode optical fibers in endoscopy applications has the potential to provide highly miniaturized and noninvasive probes for microscopy and optical micromanipulation. A few different strategies have been proposed recently, but they all suffer from intrinsically low resolution related to the low numerical aperture of multimode fibers. Here, we show that two-photon polymerization allows for direct fabrication of micro-optics components on the fiber end, resulting in an increase of the numerical aperture to a value that is close to 1. Coupling light into the fiber through a spatial light modulator, we were able to optically scan a submicrometer spot (300 nm FWHM) over an extended region, facing the opposite fiber end. Fluorescence imaging with improved resolution is also demonstrated. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  7. Non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Haider, Ansab; Rhee, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Technology has transformed the practice of medicine and surgery in particular over the last several decades. This change in practice has allowed diagnostic and therapeutic tests to be performed less invasively. Hemoglobin monitoring remains one of the most commonly performed diagnostic tests in the United States. Recently, non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring technology has gained popularity. The aim of this article is to review the principles of how this technology works, pros and cons, and the implications of non-invasive hemoglobin technology particularly in trauma surgery.

  8. Practical applications of multimodal NDT data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankle, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    Today's powerful computer workstations enable multimodal nondestructive testing (NDT) to be used for such practical applications as detecting and evaluating defects in structures. Radiography (x ray) and ultrasonics (UT) are examples of two different nondestructive tests, or modalities, which measure characteristics of materials and structures without affecting them. Traditionally, NDT produced an analog result, such as an image on x-ray film, which was difficult to review, interpret, and store. New and more powerful digital NDT techniques, such as industrial x-ray computed tomography (CT), produce digital output that is readily amenable to computerized analysis and storage. Computers are now available with sufficient memory and performance to support interactive processing of digital NDT data sets, which can easily exceed 100 megabytes. Numerous data sets can be stored on small, inexpensive tape cassettes. Failure Analysis Associates, Inc. (FaAA) has developed software-based techniques for using NDT to identify defects in structures. These techniques are also used to visualize the NDT data and to analyze the structural integrity of parts containing NDT-detected defects. FaAA's approach employs state-of-the-art scientific visualization and computer workstation technology. For some types of materials, such as advanced composites, data from different NDT modalities are needed to locate different types of defects. Applications of this technology include assessment of impact damage in composite aerospace structures, investigation of failed assemblies, and evaluation of metallic casting defects.

  9. Particle Filtering for Large Dimensional State Spaces with Multimodal Observation Likelihoods

    CERN Document Server

    Vaswani, Namrata

    2008-01-01

    We study efficient importance sampling techniques for particle filtering (PF) when either (a) the observation likelihood (OL) is frequently multimodal or heavy-tailed, or (b) the state space dimension is large or both. When the OL is multimodal, but the state transition pdf (STP) is narrow enough, the optimal importance density is usually unimodal. Under this assumption, many techniques have been proposed. But when the STP is broad, this assumption does not hold. We study how existing techniques can be generalized to situations where the optimal importance density is multimodal, but is unimodal conditioned on a part of the state vector. Sufficient conditions to test for the unimodality of this conditional posterior are derived. The number of particles, N, to accurately track using a PF increases with state space dimension, thus making any regular PF impractical for large dimensional tracking problems. We propose a solution that partially addresses this problem. An important class of large dimensional problems...

  10. Three-dimensional microfabrication through a multimode optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Morales-Delgado, Edgar E; Conkey, Donald B; Stasio, Nicolino; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, is an advanced manufacturing technique that allows the fabrication of arbitrary macroscopic and microscopic objects. All 3D printing systems require large optical elements or nozzles in proximity to the built structure. This prevents their use in applications in which there is no direct access to the area where the objects have to be printed. Here, we demonstrate three-dimensional microfabrication based on two-photon polymerization (TPP) with sub diffraction-limited resolution through an ultra-thin, 50 mm long printing nozzle of 560 micrometers in diameter. Using wavefront shaping, femtosecond infrared pulses are focused and scanned through a multimode optical fiber (MMF) inside a photoresist that polymerizes via two-photon absorption. We show the construction of arbitrary 3D structures of 500 nm resolution on the other side of the fiber. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of microfabrication through a multimode optical fiber. Our work represen...

  11. Multidimensional and Multimodal Separations by HPTLC in Phytochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesla, Lukasz; Waksmundzka-Hajnos, Monika

    HPTLC is one of the most widely applied methods in phytochemical analysis. It is due to its numerous advantages, e.g., it is the only chromatographic method offering the option of presenting the results as an image. Other advantages include simplicity, low costs, parallel analysis of samples, high sample capacity, rapidly obtained results, and possibility of multiple detection. HPTLC provides identification as well as quantitative results. It also enables the identification of adulterants. In case of complex samples, the resolving power of traditional one-dimensional chromatography is usually inadequate, hence special modes of development are required. Multidimensional and multimodal HPTLC techniques include those realized in one direction (UMD, IMD, GMD, BMD, AMD) as well as typical two-dimensional methods realized on mono- or bi-layers. In this manuscript, an overview on variable multidimensional and multimodal methods, applied in the analysis of phytochemical samples, is presented.

  12. Noninvasive fluid property measurements using acoustic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbush, Michael; Chow, Humphrey; Chiao, James; Rose, Andrew

    2007-03-01

    The properties of a fluid are normally determined using invasive methods. These methods may lead to possibly contaminating or consuming the sample. When only very small amounts of a valuable sample exist, noninvasive measurement methods are preferred. The properties of fluids can then be used to deduce additional properties based on known relationships. In one case, the surface tension of a fluid may be used to determine the concentration of a fluid. The authors describe a measurement technique involving excitation of the surface of the fluid and the measurement of its response. An acoustic wave is used to both excite and monitor the surface of the liquid. This technique is used to determine the concentration of DMSO and water in solution, and the result determines the amount of fluid needed to deliver an accurate amount of solute in solution.

  13. Noninvasive ventilation in acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mas A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Arantxa Mas, Josep MasipCritical Care Department, Consorci Sanitari Integral (CSI, Hospital Sant Joan Despí Moisès Broggi and Hospital General de l’Hospitalet, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: After the institution of positive-pressure ventilation, the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV through an interface substantially increased. The first technique was continuous positive airway pressure; but, after the introduction of pressure support ventilation at the end of the 20th century, this became the main modality. Both techniques, and some others that have been recently introduced and which integrate some technological innovations, have extensively demonstrated a faster improvement of acute respiratory failure in different patient populations, avoiding endotracheal intubation and facilitating the release of conventional invasive mechanical ventilation. In acute settings, NIV is currently the first-line treatment for moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation as well as for acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and should be considered in immunocompromised patients with acute respiratory insufficiency, in difficult weaning, and in the prevention of postextubation failure. Alternatively, it can also be used in the postoperative period and in cases of pneumonia and asthma or as a palliative treatment. NIV is currently used in a wide range of acute settings, such as critical care and emergency departments, hospital wards, palliative or pediatric units, and in pre-hospital care. It is also used as a home care therapy in patients with chronic pulmonary or sleep disorders. The appropriate selection of patients and the adaptation to the technique are the keys to success. This review essentially analyzes the evidence of benefits of NIV in different populations with acute respiratory failure and describes the main modalities, new devices, and some practical aspects of the use of this technique. Keywords

  14. 一步浸渍合成具有多重孔隙的铸型炭体%Synthesis of carbon monoliths with a multi-modal pore system bya one step impregnation technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆安慧; Jan-Henrik Sm(a)tt; Mika Lindén; Ferdi Schüth

    2003-01-01

    以多孔块状硅体为模板,通过一步浸渍、炭化、酸处理工艺,制备出结构可控、孔隙联通且具有多重孔隙的铸型炭体.分别采用氮吸附技术、高分辨透射电镜和扫描电镜对模板硅、硅碳复合物及相应炭体进行了结构表征.从微米尺度分析,该炭体是由高度联接的枝状结构单元为骨架构筑而成.与模板硅相比较,此炭体是硅体的正复本.从纳米尺度分析,这种炭体枝状骨架是由分布均匀且相互连接的中孔构成,此中孔及其孔壁对应于模板硅的孔壁及中孔,是多孔硅的负复本.此外构成中孔的炭骨架本体又含有大量炭化过程产生的微孔.因此该法合成的铸型炭具有孔隙高度发达和结构层层嵌套的特点.%Carbon monoliths with a multi-modal hierarchical porosity have been prepared by a nanocasting method with silica monoliths as the scaffold, in which volume and surface templating has been successfully combined in a one-step impregnation approach, and the smaller pores in the silica template are impregnated in a straightforward way. The monoliths obtained at different stages of the process were characterized by N2-adsorption, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that the carbon monoliths represent a positive replica of the starting silica monoliths on the micrometer scale. The surface templated mesopores can be regarded as a positive replica, while the volume templated mesopores are a negative replica of the silica scaffold.

  15. Adhesion of multimode adhesives to enamel and dentin after one year of water storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Paulo Moreira; Reis, André Figueiredo; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ultramorphological characteristics of tooth-resin interfaces and the bond strength (BS) of multimode adhesive systems to enamel and dentin. Multimode adhesives (Scotchbond Universal (SBU) and All-Bond Universal) were tested in both self-etch and etch-and-rinse modes and compared to control groups (Optibond FL and Clearfil SE Bond (CSB)). Adhesives were applied to human molars and composite blocks were incrementally built up. Teeth were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile BS and TEM analysis. Specimens were tested after storage for either 24 h or 1 year. SEM analyses were performed to classify the failure pattern of beam specimens after BS testing. Etching increased the enamel BS of multimode adhesives; however, BS decreased after storage for 1 year. No significant differences in dentin BS were noted between multimode and control in either evaluation period. Storage for 1 year only reduced the dentin BS for SBU in self-etch mode. TEM analysis identified hybridization and interaction zones in dentin and enamel for all adhesives. Silver impregnation was detected on dentin-resin interfaces after storage of specimens for 1 year only with the SBU and CSB. Storage for 1 year reduced enamel BS when adhesives are applied on etched surface; however, BS of multimode adhesives did not differ from those of the control group. In dentin, no significant difference was noted between the multimode and control group adhesives, regardless of etching mode. In general, multimode adhesives showed similar behavior when compared to traditional adhesive techniques. Multimode adhesives are one-step self-etching adhesives that can also be used after enamel/dentin phosphoric acid etching, but each product may work better in specific conditions.

  16. Multimodal, high-dimensional, model-based, Bayesian inverse problems with applications in biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, I. M.; Koutsourelakis, P. S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the numerical solution of model-based, Bayesian inverse problems. We are particularly interested in cases where the cost of each likelihood evaluation (forward-model call) is expensive and the number of unknown (latent) variables is high. This is the setting in many problems in computational physics where forward models with nonlinear PDEs are used and the parameters to be calibrated involve spatio-temporarily varying coefficients, which upon discretization give rise to a high-dimensional vector of unknowns. One of the consequences of the well-documented ill-posedness of inverse problems is the possibility of multiple solutions. While such information is contained in the posterior density in Bayesian formulations, the discovery of a single mode, let alone multiple, poses a formidable computational task. The goal of the present paper is two-fold. On one hand, we propose approximate, adaptive inference strategies using mixture densities to capture multi-modal posteriors. On the other, we extend our work in [1] with regard to effective dimensionality reduction techniques that reveal low-dimensional subspaces where the posterior variance is mostly concentrated. We validate the proposed model by employing Importance Sampling which confirms that the bias introduced is small and can be efficiently corrected if the analyst wishes to do so. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed strategy in nonlinear elastography where the identification of the mechanical properties of biological materials can inform non-invasive, medical diagnosis. The discovery of multiple modes (solutions) in such problems is critical in achieving the diagnostic objectives.

  17. Multimodal Interactions with Agents in Virtual Worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, A.; Hulstijn, J.; Kasabov, N.

    2000-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss our research on multimodal interaction in a virtual environment. The environment we have developed can be considered as a ‘laboratory’ for research on multimodal interactions and multimedia presentation, where we have multiple users and various agents that help the users t

  18. Multimodal Narrative Inquiry: Six Teacher Candidates Respond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawski, Cynthia M.; Rottmann, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present findings of a study on the implementation of a multimodal teacher narrative inquiry component, theoretically grounded by Rosenblatt's theory of transaction analysis, methodologically supported by action research and practically enacted by narrative inquiry and multimodal learning. In particular, the component offered…

  19. Multimodal Pedagogies for Teacher Education in TESOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Youngjoo; Angay-Crowder, Tuba

    2016-01-01

    As a growing number of English language learners (ELLs) engage in digital and multimodal literacy practices in their daily lives, teachers are starting to incorporate multimodal approaches into their instruction. However, anecdotal and empirical evidence shows that teachers often feel unprepared for integrating such practices into their curricula…

  20. (Re-)Examination of Multimodal Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosa, N.E.; Werkhoven, P.J.; Hürst, W.O.

    The majority of augmented reality (AR) research has been concerned with visual perception, however the move towards multimodality is imminent. At the same time, there is no clear vision of what multimodal AR is. The purpose of this position paper is to consider possible ways of examining AR other

  1. Evaluating Multimodal Literacies in Student Blogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, Barbara; Murrell, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    This research presents ways in which high school students used the multimodal and interactive affordances of blogs to create, organize, communicate and participate on an educational blog. Their actions demonstrated how plural modes of literacy are infiltrating digital environments and reshaping literacy and learning. Multimodal blogging practices…

  2. A cuckoo search algorithm for multimodal optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Erik; Reyna-Orta, Adolfo

    2014-01-01

    Interest in multimodal optimization is expanding rapidly, since many practical engineering problems demand the localization of multiple optima within a search space. On the other hand, the cuckoo search (CS) algorithm is a simple and effective global optimization algorithm which can not be directly applied to solve multimodal optimization problems. This paper proposes a new multimodal optimization algorithm called the multimodal cuckoo search (MCS). Under MCS, the original CS is enhanced with multimodal capacities by means of (1) the incorporation of a memory mechanism to efficiently register potential local optima according to their fitness value and the distance to other potential solutions, (2) the modification of the original CS individual selection strategy to accelerate the detection process of new local minima, and (3) the inclusion of a depuration procedure to cyclically eliminate duplicated memory elements. The performance of the proposed approach is compared to several state-of-the-art multimodal optimization algorithms considering a benchmark suite of fourteen multimodal problems. Experimental results indicate that the proposed strategy is capable of providing better and even a more consistent performance over existing well-known multimodal algorithms for the majority of test problems yet avoiding any serious computational deterioration.

  3. Addressing multimodality in overt aggression detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lefter, I.; Rothkrantz, L.J.M.; Burghouts, G.; Yang, Z.; Wiggers, P.

    2011-01-01

    Automatic detection of aggressive situations has a high societal and scientific relevance. It has been argued that using data from multimodal sensors as for example video and sound as opposed to unimodal is bound to increase the accuracy of detections. We approach the problem of multimodal aggressio

  4. Multipartite State Representations in Multi-mode Fock Space and Their Squeezing Transformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Hong-Chun; LI Heng-Mei; QI Kai-Guo

    2007-01-01

    We present the continuous state vector of the total coordinate of multi-particle and the state vector of their total momentum, respectively, which possess completeness relation in multi-mode Fock space by virtue of the integration within an order product (IWOP) technique. We also calculate the transition from classical transformation of variables in the states to quantum unitary operator, deduce a new multi-mode squeezing operator, and discuss its squeezing effect. In progress, it indicates that the IWOP technique provides a convenient way to construct new representation in quantum mechanics.

  5. Towards multimodal detection of melanoma thickness based on optical coherence tomography and optoacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahlves, M.; Varkentin, A.; Stritzel, J.; Blumenröther, E.; Mazurenka, M.; Wollweber, M.; Roth, B.

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma skin cancer has one of the highest mortality rates of all types of cancer if not detected at an early stage. The survival rate is highly dependent on its penetration depth, which is commonly determined by histopathology. In this work, we aim at combining optical coherence tomography and optoacoustic as a non-invasive all-optical method to measure the penetration depth of melanoma. We present our recent achievements to setup a handheld multimodal device and also results from first in vivo measurements on healthy and cancerous skin tissue, which are compared to measurements obtained by ultrasound and histopathology.

  6. The Multimodal Possibilities of Online Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2006-01-01

    The WWW simplifies the process of delivering online instructions through multimodal channels because of the ease of use for voice, video, pictures, and text modes of communication built into it.  Given that instructions are being produced in multimodal format for the WWW, how do multi......-modal analysis tools help us understand the impact of multimodal channels used in instructions?  This paper looks at Kress and VanLeewan's questions of "how narrative is shaped in a specific mode and how it is reshaped when it appears in different modes?" (2001:128)  In addition, the intersection of linguistics...... and rhetoric is explored as a means of understanding the multimodal possibilities for technical communication genres such as instructions....

  7. Multifuel multimodal network design; Projeto de redes multicombustiveis multimodal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, Carolina; Dias, Gustavo; Bahiense, Laura; Ferreira Filho, Virgilio J.M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia de Producao

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the Multi commodity Multimodal Network Project is the development of modeling tools and methodologies for the optimal sizing of production networks and multimodal distribution of multiple fuel and its incomes, considering investments and transportation costs. Given the inherently non-linear combinatory nature of the problem, the resolution of real instances by the complete model, in an exact way, becomes computationally intractable. Thus, the strategy for resolution should contain a combination of exacts and heuristics methods, that must be applied to subdivisions of the original problem. This paper deals with one of these subdivisions, tackling the problem of modeling a network of pipelines in order to drain the production of ethanol away from the producing plants. The objective consists in defining the best network topology, minimizing investment and operational costs, and attending the total demand. In order to do that, the network was considered a tree, where the nodes are the center of producing regions and the edges are the pipelines, trough where the ethanol produced by plants must be drained away. The main objective also includes the decision over the optimal diameter of each pipeline and the optimal size of the bombs, in order to minimize the pumping costs. (author)

  8. Metawidgets in the multimodal interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattner, M.M. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States) Anderson (M.D.) Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)); Glinert, E.P.; Jorge, J.A.; Ormsby, G.R. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    We analyze two intertwined and fundamental issues concerning computer-to-human communication in the multimodal interfaces: the interplay between sound and graphics, and the role of object persistence. Our observations lead us to introduce metawidgets as abstract entities capable of manifesting themselves to users as image, as sound, or as various combinations and/or sequences of the two media. We show examples of metawidgets in action, and discuss mechanisms for choosing among alternative media for metawidget instantiation. Finally, we describe a couple of experimental microworlds we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Multimodal Treatment of Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Rebecca; Stacey, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with chronic pain receive multimodal treatment. There is scant literature to guide us, but when approaching combination pharmacotherapy, the practitioner and patient must weigh the benefits with the side effects; many medications have modest effect yet carry significant side effects that can be additive. Chronic pain often leads to depression, anxiety, and deconditioning, which are targets for treatment. Structured interdisciplinary programs are beneficial but costly. Interventions have their place in the treatment of chronic pain and should be a part of a multidisciplinary treatment plan. Further research is needed to validate many common combination treatments.

  10. Modal dynamics in multimode fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Moti; Nixon, Micha; Friesem, Asher A; Davidson, Nir

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of modes and their states of polarizations in multimode fibers as a function of time, space, and wavelength are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The results reveal that the states of polarizations are displaced in Poincare sphere representation when varying the angular orientations of the polarization at the incident light. Such displacements, which complicates the interpretation of the results, are overcome by resorting to modified Poincare spheres representation. With such modification it should be possible to predict the output modes and their state of polarization when the input mode and state of polarization are known.

  11. Multimodal therapy in perioperative analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsenko, Karina; Khelemsky, Yury; Kaye, Alan David; Vadivelu, Nalini; Urman, Richard D

    2014-03-01

    This article reviews the current evidence for multimodal analgesic options for common surgical procedures. As perioperative physicians, we have come a long way from using only opioids for postoperative pain to combinations of acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), selective Cyclo-oxygenase (COX-2) inhibitors, local anesthetics, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, and regional anesthetics. As discussed in this article, many of these agents have decreased narcotic requirements, improved patient satisfaction, and decreased postanesthesia care unit (PACU) times, as well as morbidity in the perioperative period.

  12. Insular Epilepsy: Semiology and Noninvasive Investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Sami; Zerouali, Younes; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2017-07-01

    In this review, authors discuss the semiology and noninvasive investigations of insular epilepsy, an underrecognized type of epilepsy, which may mimic other focal epilepsies. In line with the various functions of the insula and its widespread network of connections, insular epilepsy may feature a variety of early ictal manifestations from somatosensory, visceral, olfactory, gustatory, or vestibular manifestations. Depending on propagation pathways, insular seizures may also include altered consciousness, dystonic posturing, complex motor behaviors, and even autonomic features. Considering the variability in seizure semiology, recognition of insular epilepsy may be challenging and confirmation by noninvasive tests is warranted although few studies have assessed their value. Detection of an insular lesion on MRI greatly facilitates the diagnosis. Scalp EEG findings in frontocentral and/or temporal derivations will generally allow lateralization of the seizure focus. Ictal single-photon computed tomography has moderate sensitivity, whereas positron emission tomography has lower sensitivity. Among newer techniques, magnetoencephalography is highly beneficial, whereas proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy currently has limited value.

  13. A Multimodal Search Engine for Medical Imaging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Eduardo; Godinho, Tiago; Valente, Frederico; Costa, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    The use of digital medical imaging systems in healthcare institutions has increased significantly, and the large amounts of data in these systems have led to the conception of powerful support tools: recent studies on content-based image retrieval (CBIR) and multimodal information retrieval in the field hold great potential in decision support, as well as for addressing multiple challenges in healthcare systems, such as computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). However, the subject is still under heavy research, and very few solutions have become part of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) in hospitals and clinics. This paper proposes an extensible platform for multimodal medical image retrieval, integrated in an open-source PACS software with profile-based CBIR capabilities. In this article, we detail a technical approach to the problem by describing its main architecture and each sub-component, as well as the available web interfaces and the multimodal query techniques applied. Finally, we assess our implementation of the engine with computational performance benchmarks.

  14. Deep Dynamic Neural Networks for Multimodal Gesture Segmentation and Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Pigou, Lionel; Kindermans, Pieter-Jan; Le, Nam Do-Hoang; Shao, Ling; Dambre, Joni; Odobez, Jean-Marc

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a novel method called Deep Dynamic Neural Networks (DDNN) for multimodal gesture recognition. A semi-supervised hierarchical dynamic framework based on a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is proposed for simultaneous gesture segmentation and recognition where skeleton joint information, depth and RGB images, are the multimodal input observations. Unlike most traditional approaches that rely on the construction of complex handcrafted features, our approach learns high-level spatio-temporal representations using deep neural networks suited to the input modality: a Gaussian-Bernouilli Deep Belief Network (DBN) to handle skeletal dynamics, and a 3D Convolutional Neural Network (3DCNN) to manage and fuse batches of depth and RGB images. This is achieved through the modeling and learning of the emission probabilities of the HMM required to infer the gesture sequence. This purely data driven approach achieves a Jaccard index score of 0.81 in the ChaLearn LAP gesture spotting challenge. The performance is on par with a variety of state-of-the-art hand-tuned feature-based approaches and other learning-based methods, therefore opening the door to the use of deep learning techniques in order to further explore multimodal time series data.

  15. Untangled modes in multimode waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plöschner, Martin; Tyc, TomáÅ.¡; Čižmár, TomáÅ.¡

    2016-03-01

    Small, fibre-based endoscopes have already improved our ability to image deep within the human body. A novel approach introduced recently utilised disordered light within a standard multimode optical fibre for lensless imaging. Importantly, this approach brought very significant reduction of the instruments footprint to dimensions below 100 μm. The most important limitations of this exciting technology is the lack of bending flexibility - imaging is only possible as long as the fibre remains stationary. The only route to allow flexibility of such endoscopes is in trading-in all the knowledge about the optical system we have, particularly the cylindrical symmetry of refractive index distribution. In perfect straight step-index cylindrical waveguides we can find optical modes that do not change their spatial distribution as they propagate through. In this paper we present a theoretical background that provides description of such modes in more realistic model of real-life step-index multimode fibre taking into account common deviations in distribution of the refractive index from its ideal step-index profile. Separately, we discuss how to include the influence of fibre bending.

  16. Non-invasive acoustic-based monitoring of uranium in solution and H/D ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beedle, Christopher Craig [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lakis, Rollin Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The primary objective of this project is to adapt existing non-invasive acoustic techniques (Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry and Gaussian-pulse acoustic technique) for the purpose of demonstrating the ability to quantify U or H/D ratios in solution. Furthermore, a successful demonstration will provide an easily implemented, low cost, and non-invasive method for remote and unattended uranium mass measurements for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  17. Non-invasive, Focused Ultrasound-Facilitated Gene Delivery for Optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shutao; Kugelman, Tara; Buch, Amanda; Herman, Mathieu; Han, Yang; Karakatsani, Maria Eleni; Hussaini, S. Abid; Duff, Karen; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2017-01-01

    Optogenetics, a widely used technique in neuroscience research, is often limited by its invasive nature of application. Here, we present a noninvasive, ultrasound-based technique to introduce optogenetic channels into the brain by temporarily opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We demonstrate the efficiency of the method developed and evaluate the bioactivity of the non-invasively introduced channelrhodopsin channels by performing stimulation in freely behaving mice.

  18. Noninvasive diagnosis of vulnerable coronary plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Eduardo; Agudo-Quilez, Pilar; Rojas-González, Antonio; Alvarado, Teresa; Olivera, María José; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis Jesús; Alfonso, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death are frequently the first manifestation of coronary artery disease. For this reason, screening of asymptomatic coronary atherosclerosis has become an attractive field of research in cardiovascular medicine. Necropsy studies have described histopathological changes associated with the development of acute coronary events. In this regard, thin-cap fibroatheroma has been identified as the main vulnerable coronary plaque feature. Hence, many imaging techniques, such as coronary computed tomography, cardiac magnetic resonance or positron emission tomography, have tried to detect noninvasively these histomorphological characteristics with different approaches. In this article, we review the role of these diagnostic tools in the detection of vulnerable coronary plaque with particular interest in their advantages and limitations as well as the clinical implications of the derived findings. PMID:27721935

  19. Versatile quantitative phase imaging system applied to high-speed, low noise and multimodal imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Antoine; Aknoun, Sherazade; Savatier, Julien; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2017-02-01

    Quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry (QWLSI) is a well-established quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique based on the analysis of interference patterns of four diffraction orders by an optical grating set in front of an array detector [1]. As a QPI modality, this is a non-invasive imaging technique which allow to measure the optical path difference (OPD) of semi-transparent samples. We present a system enabling QWLSI with high-performance sCMOS cameras [2] and apply it to perform high-speed imaging, low noise as well as multimodal imaging. This modified QWLSI system contains a versatile optomechanical device which images the optical grating near the detector plane. Such a device is coupled with any kind of camera by varying its magnification. In this paper, we study the use of a sCMOS Zyla5.5 camera from Andor along with our modified QWLSI system. We will present high-speed live cell imaging, up to 200Hz frame rate, in order to follow intracellular fast motions while measuring the quantitative phase information. The structural and density information extracted from the OPD signal is complementary to the specific and localized fluorescence signal [2]. In addition, QPI detects cells even when the fluorophore is not expressed. This is very useful to follow a protein expression with time. The 10 µm spatial pixel resolution of our modified QWLSI associated to the high sensitivity of the Zyla5.5 enabling to perform high quality fluorescence imaging, we have carried out multimodal imaging revealing fine structures cells, like actin filaments, merged with the morphological information of the phase. References [1]. P. Bon, G. Maucort, B. Wattellier, and S. Monneret, "Quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry for quantitative phase microscopy of living cells," Opt. Express, vol. 17, pp. 13080-13094, 2009. [2] P. Bon, S. Lécart, E. Fort and S. Lévêque-Fort, "Fast label-free cytoskeletal network imaging in living mammalian cells," Biophysical journal, 106

  20. The Clinical Application of Noninvasive Repair Technique for the Treatment of Dental Caries of Deciduous Teeth%无创伤性修复技术治疗儿童乳牙龋齿临床研究应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘红娟

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical effect of noninvasive repair technology for treatment of dental caries of deciduous teeth in children. Methods 110 cases of primary molars with caries were chosen during the May 2013 to 2014 July in our hospital, according to principle of random distribution, the 110 cases of primary molars with caries were randomly divided into observation group and control group, 55 patients in each group. Patients in the observation group adopted non traumatic repair surgery treatment, against a control group of stannous fluoride treatment, after the end of treatment the curative effect in the two groups of children with were compared. Results The observation group were treated with atraumatic restorative treatment, 55 cases in 45 cases were successfully treated, efficiency has reached 96.4%, and control group treated with stannous fluoride treatment of, only 32 cases were successfully cured, efficiency was 74.5%, compared to the efficacy of the two groups after treatment in children with, the differences of statistical significance (P Conclusion Traumatic repair in the treatment of caries in children has more significant effect, effectively promote the children's health, improve the quality of life of children.%目的:对无创伤性修复技术治疗儿童乳牙龋齿的临床效果进行分析。方法选取2013年5月~2014年7月本院接受治疗的110例乳牙龋齿患儿,按照随机分配的原则,将这110例乳牙龋齿患儿随机分成观察组和对照组,每组55例患儿,对观察组患儿采取无创伤性修复术治疗,对对照组采取氟化亚锡治疗,治疗结束后对两组患儿的治疗疗效进行比较。结果对观察组患儿采用无创伤性修复术治疗后,55例患儿中45例患儿成功治愈,有效率达为96.4%,而对对照组患儿采用氟化亚锡治疗后,仅32例患儿成功治愈,有效率为74.5%,两组患儿治疗后的疗效相比,差异有统计学意义(P <0.05

  1. Tibial cortical lesions: A multimodality pictorial review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, P.A., E-mail: philippa.tyler@rnoh.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Brockley Hill, Stanmore HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Mohaghegh, P., E-mail: pegah1000@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Brockley Hill, Stanmore HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Foley, J., E-mail: jfoley1@nhs.net [Department of Radiology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, 16 Alexandra Parade, Glasgow G31 2ES (United Kingdom); Isaac, A., E-mail: amandaisaac@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, King' s College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Zavareh, A., E-mail: ali.zavareh@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, North Bristol NHS Trust, Frenchay, Bristol BS16 1LE (United Kingdom); Thorning, C., E-mail: cthorning@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, East Surrey Hospital, Canada Avenue, Redhill, Surrey RH1 5RH (United Kingdom); Kirwadi, A., E-mail: anandkirwadi@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9WL (United Kingdom); Pressney, I., E-mail: ipressney@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Brockley Hill, Stanmore HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Amary, F., E-mail: fernanda.amary@rnoh.nhs.uk [Department of Histopathology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Brockley Hill, Stanmore HA7 4LP (United Kingdom); Rajeswaran, G., E-mail: grajeswaran@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, 369 Fulham Road, London SW10 9NH (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Multimodality imaging plays an important role in the investigation and diagnosis of shin pain. • We review the multimodality imaging findings of common cortically based tibial lesions. • We also describe the rarer pathologies of tibial cortical lesions. - Abstract: Shin pain is a common complaint, particularly in young and active patients, with a wide range of potential diagnoses and resulting implications. We review the natural history and multimodality imaging findings of the more common causes of cortically-based tibial lesions, as well as the rarer pathologies less frequently encountered in a general radiology department.

  2. The multimodal argumentation of persuasive counter discourses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Carmen Daniela

    are given prominence in the argumentation by examining their complex interplay and functional differentiation. The ways in which speech, writing and images articulate the counter discourse occupy a central position in the analysis. A special focus is put on the multimodal configuration of specific...... and new multimodal ways of discussing them. References Kress, G. 2010. Multimodality. A Social Semiotic Approach to Contemporary Communication. London: Routledge. Van Leeuwen, Theo. 2008. Discourse and Practice. New Tools for Critical Discourse Analysis. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chouliaraki, L...

  3. Wearable Brain Imaging with Multi-Modal Physiological Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangman, Gary E; Ivkovic, Vladimir; Zhang, Quan

    2017-07-13

    The brain is a central component of cognitive and physical human performance. Measures including functional brain activation, cerebral perfusion, cerebral oxygenation, evoked electrical responses, and resting hemodynamic and electrical activity are all related to, or can predict health status or performance decrements. However, measuring brain physiology typically requires large, stationary machines that are not suitable for mobile or self-monitoring. Moreover, when individuals are ambulatory, systemic physiological fluctuations-e.g., in heart rate, blood pressure, skin perfusion and more-can interfere with non-invasive brain measurements. In efforts to address the physiological monitoring and performance assessment needs for astronauts during spaceflight, we have developed easy-to-use, wearable prototypes- NINscan, for near-infrared scanning-that can collect synchronized multi-modal physiology data, including hemodynamic deep-tissue imaging (including brain and muscles), electroencephalography, electrocardiography, electromyography, electrooculography, accelerometry, gyroscopy, pressure, respiration and temperature measurements. Given their self-contained and portable nature, these devices can be deployed in a much broader range of settings-including austere environments-thereby enabling a wider range of novel medical and research physiology applications. We review these, including high-altitude assessments, self-deployable multi-modal e.g., (polysomnographic) recordings in remote or low-resource environments, fluid shifts in variable-gravity or spaceflight analog environments, intra-cranial brain motion during high-impact sports, and long-duration monitoring for clinical symptom-capture in various clinical conditions. In addition to further enhancing sensitivity and miniaturization, advanced computational algorithms could help support real-time feedback and alerts regarding performance and health. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Applied Physiology.

  4. Photon correlations in multimode waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poem, Eilon; Silberberg, Yaron [Department of Physics of Complex Systems, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2011-10-15

    We consider the propagation of classical and nonclassical light in multimode optical waveguides. We focus on the evolution of the few-photon correlation functions, which, much as the light-intensity distribution in such systems, evolve in a periodic manner, culminating in the ''revival'' of the initial correlation pattern at the end of each period. It is found that when the input state possesses nontrivial symmetries, the correlation revival period can be longer than that of the intensity, and thus the same intensity pattern can display different correlation patterns. We experimentally demonstrate this effect for classical, pseudothermal light, and compare the results with the predictions for nonclassical, quantum light.

  5. Multimode waveguide based directional coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rajib; Rifat, Ahmmed A.; Sabouri, Aydin; Al-Qattan, Bader; Essa, Khamis; Butt, Haider

    2016-07-01

    The Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) based platform overcomes limitations of the previous copper and fiber based technologies. Due to its high index difference, SOI waveguide (WG) and directional couplers (DC) are widely used for high speed optical networks and hybrid Electro-Optical inter-connections; TE00-TE01, TE00-TE00 and TM00-TM00 SOI direction couplers are designed with symmetrical and asymmetrical configurations to couple with TE00, TE01 and TM00 in a multi-mode semi-triangular ring-resonator configuration which will be applicable for multi-analyte sensing. Couplers are designed with effective index method and their structural parameters are optimized with consideration to coupler length, wavelength and polarization dependence. Lastly, performance of the couplers are analyzed in terms of cross-talk, mode overlap factor, coupling length and coupling efficiency.

  6. Multimodal integration in statistical learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Aaron; Christiansen, Morten Hyllekvist; Weiss, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of statistical learning have established that learners are able to track regularities of multimodal stimuli, yet it is unknown whether the statistical computations are performed on integrated representations or on separate, unimodal representations. In the present study......, we investigated the ability of adults to integrate audio and visual input during statistical learning. We presented learners with a speech stream synchronized with a video of a speaker’s face. In the critical condition, the visual (e.g., /gi/) and auditory (e.g., /mi/) signals were occasionally...... incongruent, which we predicted would produce the McGurk illusion, resulting in the perception of an audiovisual syllable (e.g., /ni/). In this way, we used the McGurk illusion to manipulate the underlying statistical structure of the speech streams, such that perception of these illusory syllables...

  7. Multimodal signalling in estrildid finches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, A. C. R.; Funghi, C.; Soma, M.

    2017-01-01

    radiations, and one that includes many model species for research in sexual selection and communication. We found little evidence for either joint evolution or trade-offs between song and colour ornamentation. Some negative correlations between dance repertoire and song traits may suggest a functional...... compromise, but generally courtship dance also evolved independently from other signals. Instead of correlated evolution, we found that song, dance and colour are each related to different socio-ecological traits. Song complexity evolved together with ecological generalism, song performance with investment...... in reproduction, dance with commonness and habitat type, whereas colour ornamentation was shown previously to correlate mostly with gregariousness. We conclude that multimodal signals evolve in response to various socio-ecological traits, suggesting the accumulation of distinct signalling functions....

  8. Palmprint and Face Multi-Modal Biometric Recognition Based on SDA-GSVD and Its Kernelization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yu Yang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available When extracting discriminative features from multimodal data, current methods rarely concern themselves with the data distribution. In this paper, we present an assumption that is consistent with the viewpoint of discrimination, that is, a person’s overall biometric data should be regarded as one class in the input space, and his different biometric data can form different Gaussians distributions, i.e., different subclasses. Hence, we propose a novel multimodal feature extraction and recognition approach based on subclass discriminant analysis (SDA. Specifically, one person’s different bio-data are treated as different subclasses of one class, and a transformed space is calculated, where the difference among subclasses belonging to different persons is maximized, and the difference within each subclass is minimized. Then, the obtained multimodal features are used for classification. Two solutions are presented to overcome the singularity problem encountered in calculation, which are using PCA preprocessing, and employing the generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD technique, respectively. Further, we provide nonlinear extensions of SDA based multimodal feature extraction, that is, the feature fusion based on KPCA-SDA and KSDA-GSVD. In KPCA-SDA, we first apply Kernel PCA on each single modal before performing SDA. While in KSDA-GSVD, we directly perform Kernel SDA to fuse multimodal data by applying GSVD to avoid the singular problem. For simplicity two typical types of biometric data are considered in this paper, i.e., palmprint data and face data. Compared with several representative multimodal biometrics recognition methods, experimental results show that our approaches outperform related multimodal recognition methods and KSDA-GSVD achieves the best recognition performance.

  9. Rapid multi-modality preregistration based on SIFT descriptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Tian, Jie

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) method for rapid preregistration of medical image. This technique originates from Lowe's method wherein preregistration is achieved by matching the corresponding keypoints between two images. The computational complexity has been reduced when we applied SIFT preregistration method before refined registration due to its O(n) exponential calculations. The features of SIFT are highly distinctive and invariant to image scaling and rotation, and partially invariant to change in illumination and contrast, it is robust and repeatable for cursorily matching two images. We also altered the descriptor so our method can deal with multimodality preregistration.

  10. Confocal microscopy through a multimode fiber using optical correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Loterie, Damien; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We report on a method to obtain confocal imaging through multimode fibers using optical correlation. First, we measure the fiber's transmission matrix in a calibration step. This allows us to create focused spots at one end of the fiber by shaping the wavefront sent into it from the opposite end. These spots are scanned over a sample, and the light coming back from the sample via the fiber is optically correlated with the input pattern. We show that this achieves spatial selectivity in the detection. The technique is demonstrated on microbeads, a dried epithelial cell, and a cover glass.

  11. Confocal microscopy through a multimode fiber using optical correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loterie, Damien; Goorden, Sebastianus A.; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    We report on a method to obtain confocal imaging through multimode fibers using optical correlation. First, we measure the fiber's transmission matrix in a calibration step. This allows us to create focused spots at one end of the fiber by shaping the wavefront sent into it from the opposite end. These spots are scanned over a sample, and the light coming back from the sample via the fiber is optically correlated with the input pattern. We show that this achieves spatial selectivity in the detection. The technique is demonstrated on microbeads, a dried epithelial cell, and a cover glass.

  12. Noninvasive assessment of cytokines in occupational respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar-Elci, Muge; Yucesoy, Berran; Elci, Omur Cinar; Weissman, David N

    2007-06-01

    A major goal in studying occupational respiratory diseases is to show relationships between occupational exposures and health outcomes. Due to the nature of these diseases, accurate, practical, and objective measurement techniques are needed in field investigations. Pulmonary function tests, such as spirometry, are important objective health outcome measures. However, they reflect the functional changes of the lung, often in relatively late stages, which may be irreversible. Direct monitoring of airways inflammations, in response to occupational exposures, are receiving an increasing attention since they may pick up inflammatory changes before the injury becomes irreversible. Invasive approaches such as bronchoalveolar lavage and bronchial biopsies have been used to assess airways inflammation: but these methods are not practical for use in occupational field investigations. Thus, much work has focused on the development of noninvasive methods for monitoring inflammation in occupational respiratory diseases. The three recent most commonly used noninvasive techniques in occupational respiratory diseases investigations are induced sputum, exhaled breath condensate, and nasal lavage. In this review, we discuss the practical application of these techniques, patents and cytokines measured with them. Since variation of cytokine genes contribute to the inflammatory processes, we briefly discuss the genetic polymorphisms on the expression of occupational respiratory diseases. Details of genetic polymorphism were beyond the focus of this review. Our primary focus was cytokines measured with these three noninvasive techniques in occupational respiratory investigations.

  13. 应用品管圈实施无创接生技术降低会阴切开率%Applications QCC implementation of noninvasive delivery techniques to reduce episiotomy rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李桂平; 王坤昌; 周秀荣; 周萍萍

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨应用品管圈实施无创接生技术对会阴切开率的影响。方法:成立品管圈小组,活动开展前对影响会阴切开的要因进行分析,确定通过实施无创接生技术,降低会阴切开率为活动主题,制定并落实改进措施。结果:应用品管圈活动,实施无创接生,会阴切开率由活动前的62.71%降低到活动后的30.24%,差异有统计学意义(P <0.05)。结论:应用品管圈活动,实施无创接生技术,可有效降低产妇会阴切开率,提升助产服务质量,促进自然分娩。%Objective:To evaluate the impact of the implementation of quality control circle for non -invasive delivery techniques episiotomy rate.Methods:Founded QCC group activities before affecting episiotomy should cause analysis to determine through the implementation of non -invasive delivery tech-niques to reduce episiotomy rate theme,develop and implement improvement measures.Results:QCC activities,the implementation of non -invasive deliver-y,episiotomy rate of 62.71% before the event was reduced to 30.24% after the event,the difference was statistically significant(P <0.05).Conclusion:QCC activities,the implementation of non -invasive delivery techniques, can effectively reduce maternal episiotomy rate,improve midwifery service quality, and promote natural childbirth.

  14. Validation of non-invasive haemodynamic methods in patients with liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brittain, Jane M; Busk, Troels M; Møller, Søren

    2017-01-01

    , SBP, DBP and HR were measured non-invasively and by femoral artery catheterization. CO was measured non-invasively and by indicator dilution technique. The non-invasive pressure monitoring was considered acceptable with a bias (accuracy) and a SD (precision) not exceeding 5 and 8 mmHg, respectively......Patients with advanced cirrhosis often present a hyperdynamic circulation characterized by a decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), and an increase in heart rate (HR) and cardiac output (CO). Accurate assessment of the altered circulation can be performed invasively......; however, due to the disadvantages of this approach, non-invasive methods are warranted. The purpose of this study was to compare continuous non-invasive measurements of haemodynamic variables by the Finometer and the Task Force Monitor with simultaneous invasive measurements. In 25 patients with cirrhosis...

  15. In situ fluorimetry: a powerful non-invasive diagnostic technique for natural dyes used in artefacts Part I. Spectral characterization of orcein in solution, on silk and wool laboratory-standards and a fragment of Renaissance tapestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, C; Miliani, C; Romani, A; Favaro, G

    2006-07-01

    In this paper the potentialities of spectrophotometric and fluorimetric techniques for identifying the materials used in artistic textiles are investigated. A portable non-destructive instrument suitable to record fluorescence spectra on surfaces was set up and successfully experienced. A naturally occurring dye, orcein, which was widely used in antiquity for textile dyeing, has been spectrally characterized in both solution and powder. Laboratory samples of wool and silk orcein-dyed threads were analysed before and after ageing. An original fragment of Renaissance tapestry was also analysed. The textile (wool) and the colourant (orcein) were recognised by comparison with the data from the laboratory samples.

  16. Unraveling Students' Interaction around a Tangible Interface Using Multimodal Learning Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bertrand; Blikstein, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe multimodal learning analytics (MMLA) techniques to analyze data collected around an interactive learning environment. In a previous study (Schneider & Blikstein, submitted), we designed and evaluated a Tangible User Interface (TUI) where dyads of students were asked to learn about the human hearing system by…

  17. An Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search Algorithm for the Multi-mode RCPSP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Laurent Flindt

    We present an Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search algorithm for the Multi-mode Resource-Constrained Project Scheduling Problem (MRCPSP). We incorporate techniques for deriving additional precedence relations and propose a new method, so-called mode-diminution, for removing modes during execution...

  18. Multimodal Learning Analytics and Education Data Mining: Using Computational Technologies to Measure Complex Learning Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikstein, Paulo; Worsley, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    New high-frequency multimodal data collection technologies and machine learning analysis techniques could offer new insights into learning, especially when students have the opportunity to generate unique, personalized artifacts, such as computer programs, robots, and solutions engineering challenges. To date most of the work on learning analytics…

  19. Tools for Multimode Quantum Information: Modulation, Detection, and Spatial Quantum Correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Delaubert, Vincent; Janousek, Jirí

    2007-01-01

    We present here all the tools required for continuous variable parallel quantum information protocols based on spatial multi-mode quantum correlations and entanglement. We describe techniques for encoding and detecting this quantum information with high efficiency in the individual modes. We use ...

  20. Histology image search using multimodal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Juan C; Vanegas, Jorge A; Páez, Fabian; González, Fabio A

    2014-10-01

    This work proposes a histology image indexing strategy based on multimodal representations obtained from the combination of visual features and associated semantic annotations. Both data modalities are complementary information sources for an image retrieval system, since visual features lack explicit semantic information and semantic terms do not usually describe the visual appearance of images. The paper proposes a novel strategy to build a fused image representation using matrix factorization algorithms and data reconstruction principles to generate a set of multimodal features. The methodology can seamlessly recover the multimodal representation of images without semantic annotations, allowing us to index new images using visual features only, and also accepting single example images as queries. Experimental evaluations on three different histology image data sets show that our strategy is a simple, yet effective approach to building multimodal representations for histology image search, and outperforms the response of the popular late fusion approach to combine information.

  1. Intelligent Multimodal Signal Adaptation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Micro Analysis and Design (MA&D) is pleased to submit this proposal to design an Intelligent Multimodal Signal Adaptation System. This system will dynamically...

  2. Multimode siloxane polymer components for optical interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamiedakis, Nikolaos; Beals, Joseph, IV; Penty, Richard V.; White, Ian H.; DeGroot, Jon v., Jr.; Clapp, Terry V.; De Shazer, David

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of multimode waveguides and waveguide components formed from siloxane polymer materials which are suitable for use in optical interconnection applications. The components can be cost-effectively integrated onto conventional PCBs and offer increased functionality in optical transmission. The multimode waveguides exhibit low loss (0.04 dB/cm at 850 nm) and low crosstalk (benefit from the multimode nature of the waveguides allowing low loss combining (4 dB for an 8×1 device). A large range of power splitting ratios between 30% and 75% is achieved with multimode coupler devices. Examples of system applications benefiting from the use of these components are briefly presented including a terabit capacity optical backplane, a radio-over-fibre multicasting system and a SCM passive optical network.

  3. Multi-Modal Treatment of Nocturnal Enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Caroline; Sharpley, Christopher F.

    1988-01-01

    The article reports a multimodal treatment of nocturnal enuresis and anxious behavior in a mildly mentally retarded woman. Behavioral treatment and removal of caffeine from the subject's diet eliminated both nocturnal enuresis and anxious behavior. (Author/DB)

  4. Accuracy of continuous noninvasive arterial pressure monitoring in living-liver donors during transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araz, Coskun; Zeyneloglu, Pinar; Pirat, Arash; Veziroglu, Nukhet; Camkiran Firat, Aynur; Arslan, Gulnaz

    2015-04-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is vital during liver transplant surgeries because distinct hemodynamic changes are expected. The continuous noninvasive arterial pressure (CNAP) monitor is a noninvasive device for continuous arterial pressure measurement by a tonometric method. This study compared continuous noninvasive arterial pressure monitoring with invasive direct arterial pressure monitoring in living-liver donors during transplant. There were 40 patients analyzed while undergoing hepatic lobectomy for liver transplant. Invasive pressure monitoring was established at the radial artery and continuous noninvasive arterial pressure monitoring using a finger sensor was recorded simultaneously from the contralateral arm. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures from the 2 methods were compared. Correlation between the 2 methods was calculated. A total of 5433 simultaneous measurements were obtained. For systolic arterial blood pressure, 55% continuous noninvasive arterial pressure measurements were within 10% direct arterial measurement; the correlation was 0.479, continuous noninvasive arterial pressure bias was -0.3 mm Hg, and limits of agreement were 32.0 mm Hg. For diastolic arterial blood pressure, 50% continuous noninvasive arterial pressure measurements were within 10% direct arterial measurement; the correlation was 0.630, continuous noninvasive arterial pressure bias was -0.4 mm Hg, and limits of agreement were 21.1 mm Hg. For mean arterial blood pressure, 60% continuous noninvasive arterial pressure measurements were within 10% direct arterial measurement; the correlation was 0.692, continuous noninvasive arterial pressure bias was +0.4 mm Hg, and limits of agreement were 20.8 mm Hg. The 2 monitoring techniques did not show acceptable agreement. Our results suggest that continuous noninvasive arterial pressure monitoring is not equivalent to invasive arterial pressure monitoring in donors during living-donor liver transplant.

  5. In-Building Wireless Distribution in legacy Multimode Fiber with an improved RoMMF system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visani, Davide; Petersen, Martin Nordal; Sorci, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    A radio over multimode fiber (RoMMF) system for in-building wireless distribution employing a directly modulated Fabry-Perot (FP) transmitter and the central launch technique is presented. The worst-case spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) exceeds 105 dB×Hz2/3 up to 525 m of OM2 multimode fiber (MMF......). Experimental and theoretical results are reported showing that this scheme outperforms a RoMMF system employing a distributed feed-back (DFB) laser diode (LD) and/or a mode scrambler to achieve overfilled launch (OFL). Long Term Evolution (LTE) signal transmission is achieved with high quality in terms...

  6. Linking variability in brain chemistry and circuit function through multimodal human neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Patrick M; Hariri, A R

    2012-01-01

    to assay in vivo regional brain chemistry and function, respectively. Typically, these neuroimaging modalities are implemented independently despite the capacity for integrated data sets to offer unique insight into molecular mechanisms associated with brain function. Through examples from the serotonin...... and dopamine system and its effects on threat- and reward-related brain function, we review evidence for how such a multimodal neuroimaging strategy can be successfully implemented. Furthermore, we discuss how multimodal PET-fMRI can be integrated with techniques such as imaging genetics, pharmacological...

  7. Engineering gestures for multimodal user interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Echtler, Florian; Kammer, Dietrich; Vanacken, Davy; Hoste, Lode; Signer, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Despite increased presence of gestural and multimodal user interfaces in research as well as daily life, development of such systems still mostly relies on programming concepts which have emerged from classic WIMP user interfaces. This workshop proposes to explore the gap between attempts to formalize and structure development for multimodal interfaces in the research community on the one hand and the lack of adoption of these formal languages and frameworks by practitioners and other researc...

  8. Esthesioneuroblastoma: Multimodal management and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ritesh

    2015-01-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma (ENB) is a rare malignant neoplasm arising from the olfactory neuroepithelium. ENB constitutes only 3% of all malignant intranasal neoplasm. Because of the rarity, the number of patients of ENB treated in individual departments is small. Most of these patients presents in locally advanced stages and require multimodality treatment in form of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Multimodality approach with a risk-adapted strategy is required to achieve good control rates while minimizing treatment related toxicity. PMID:26380824

  9. Quantifying Quality Aspects of Multimodal Interactive Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kühnel, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This book systematically addresses the quantification of quality aspects of multimodal interactive systems. The conceptual structure is based on a schematic view on human-computer interaction where the user interacts with the system and perceives it via input and output interfaces. Thus, aspects of multimodal interaction are analyzed first, followed by a discussion of the evaluation of output and input and concluding with a view on the evaluation of a complete system.

  10. Log-Gabor energy based multimodal medical image fusion in NSCT domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Tong, Song; Huang, Shuying; Lin, Pan

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal medical image fusion is a powerful tool in clinical applications such as noninvasive diagnosis, image-guided radiotherapy, and treatment planning. In this paper, a novel nonsubsampled Contourlet transform (NSCT) based method for multimodal medical image fusion is presented, which is approximately shift invariant and can effectively suppress the pseudo-Gibbs phenomena. The source medical images are initially transformed by NSCT followed by fusing low- and high-frequency components. The phase congruency that can provide a contrast and brightness-invariant representation is applied to fuse low-frequency coefficients, whereas the Log-Gabor energy that can efficiently determine the frequency coefficients from the clear and detail parts is employed to fuse the high-frequency coefficients. The proposed fusion method has been compared with the discrete wavelet transform (DWT), the fast discrete curvelet transform (FDCT), and the dual tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT) based image fusion methods and other NSCT-based methods. Visually and quantitatively experimental results indicate that the proposed fusion method can obtain more effective and accurate fusion results of multimodal medical images than other algorithms. Further, the applicability of the proposed method has been testified by carrying out a clinical example on a woman affected with recurrent tumor images.

  11. Log-Gabor Energy Based Multimodal Medical Image Fusion in NSCT Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal medical image fusion is a powerful tool in clinical applications such as noninvasive diagnosis, image-guided radiotherapy, and treatment planning. In this paper, a novel nonsubsampled Contourlet transform (NSCT based method for multimodal medical image fusion is presented, which is approximately shift invariant and can effectively suppress the pseudo-Gibbs phenomena. The source medical images are initially transformed by NSCT followed by fusing low- and high-frequency components. The phase congruency that can provide a contrast and brightness-invariant representation is applied to fuse low-frequency coefficients, whereas the Log-Gabor energy that can efficiently determine the frequency coefficients from the clear and detail parts is employed to fuse the high-frequency coefficients. The proposed fusion method has been compared with the discrete wavelet transform (DWT, the fast discrete curvelet transform (FDCT, and the dual tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT based image fusion methods and other NSCT-based methods. Visually and quantitatively experimental results indicate that the proposed fusion method can obtain more effective and accurate fusion results of multimodal medical images than other algorithms. Further, the applicability of the proposed method has been testified by carrying out a clinical example on a woman affected with recurrent tumor images.

  12. Non-invasive neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, William J.; Sanguinetti, Joseph L.; Fini, Maria; Hool, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Neurotechnologies for non-invasively interfacing with neural circuits have been evolving from those capable of sensing neural activity to those capable of restoring and enhancing human brain function. Generally referred to as non-invasive neural stimulation (NINS) methods, these neuromodulation approaches rely on electrical, magnetic, photonic, and acoustic or ultrasonic energy to influence nervous system activity, brain function, and behavior. Evidence that has been surmounting for decades shows that advanced neural engineering of NINS technologies will indeed transform the way humans treat diseases, interact with information, communicate, and learn. The physics underlying the ability of various NINS methods to modulate nervous system activity can be quite different from one another depending on the energy modality used as we briefly discuss. For members of commercial and defense industry sectors that have not traditionally engaged in neuroscience research and development, the science, engineering and technology required to advance NINS methods beyond the state-of-the-art presents tremendous opportunities. Within the past few years alone there have been large increases in global investments made by federal agencies, foundations, private investors and multinational corporations to develop advanced applications of NINS technologies. Driven by these efforts NINS methods and devices have recently been introduced to mass markets via the consumer electronics industry. Further, NINS continues to be explored in a growing number of defense applications focused on enhancing human dimensions. The present paper provides a brief introduction to the field of non-invasive neural stimulation by highlighting some of the more common methods in use or under current development today.

  13. Noninvasive particle sizing using camera-based diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Falster, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    , but their low spatial resolution limits their validity ranges for the coefficients. To cover a wider range of coefficients, we use camera-based spectroscopic oblique incidence reflectometry. We develop a noninvasive technique for acquisition of apparent particle size distributions based on this approach. Our......Diffuse reflectance measurements are useful for noninvasive inspection of optical properties such as reduced scattering and absorption coefficients. Spectroscopic analysis of these optical properties can be used for particle sizing. Systems based on optical fiber probes are commonly employed...... technique is validated using stable oil-in-water emulsions with a wide range of known particle size distributions. We also measure the apparent particle size distributions of complex dairy products. These results show that our tool, in contrast to those based on fiber probes, can deal with a range...

  14. Multimodal pain stimulation of the gastrointestinal tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes; Hans Gregersen

    2006-01-01

    Understanding and characterization of pain and other sensory symptoms are among the most important issues in the diagnosis and assessment of patient with gastrointestinal disorders. Methods to evoke and assess experimental pain have recently developed into a new area with the possibility for multimodal stimulation (e.g.,electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical stimulation)of different nerves and pain pathways in the human gut. Such methods mimic to a high degree the pain experienced in the clinic. Multimodal pain methods have increased our basic understanding of different peripheral receptors in the gut in health and disease. Together with advanced muscle analysis, the methods have increased our understanding of receptors sensitive to mechanical,chemical and temperature stimuli in diseases, such as systemic sclerosis and diabetes. The methods can also be used to unravel central pain mechanisms, such as those involved in allodynia, hyperalgesia and referred pain. Abnormalities in central pain mechanisms are often seen in patients with chronic gut pain and hence methods relying on multimodal pain stimulation may help to understand the symptoms in these patients.Sex differences have been observed in several diseases of the gut, and differences in central pain processing between males and females have been hypothesized using multimodal pain stimulations. Finally, multimodal methods have recently been used to gain more insight into the effect of drugs against pain in the GI tract.Hence, the multimodal methods undoubtedly represents a major step forward in the future characterization and treatment of patients with various diseases of the gut.

  15. Biometric Person Identification System: A Multimodal Approach Employing Spectral Graph Characteristics of Hand Geometry and Palmprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmukhappa A. Angadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biometric authentication systems operating in real world environments using a single modality are found to be insecure and unreliable due to numerous limitations. Multimodal biometric systems have better accuracy and reliability due to the use of multiple biometric traits to authenticate a claimed identity or perform identification. In this paper a novel method for person identification using multimodal biometrics with hand geometry and palmprint biometric traits is proposed. The geometrical information embedded in the user hand and palmprint images are brought out through the graph representations. The topological characterization of the image moments, represented as the virtual nodes of the palmprint image graph is a novel feature of this work. The user hand and palmprint images are represented as weighted undirected graphs and spectral characteristics of the graphs are extracted as features vectors. The feature vectors of the hand geometry and palmprint are fused at feature level to obtain a graph spectral feature vector to represent the person. User identification is performed by using a multiclass support vector machine (SVM classifier. The experimental results demonstrate, an appreciable performance giving identification rate of 99.19% for multimodal biometric after feature level fusion of hand geometry and palmprint modalities. The performance is investigated by conducting the experiments separately for handgeometry, palmprint and fused feature vectors for person identification. Experimental results show that the proposed multimodal system achieves better performance than the unimodal cues, and can be used in high security applications. Further comparison show that it is better than similar other multimodal techniques.

  16. Improved multimodal biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment diagnosis: data from ADNI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Torteya, Antonio; Treviño-Alvarado, Víctor; Tamez-Peña, José

    2013-02-01

    The accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) confers many clinical research and patient care benefits. Studies have shown that multimodal biomarkers provide better diagnosis accuracy of AD and MCI than unimodal biomarkers, but their construction has been based on traditional statistical approaches. The objective of this work was the creation of accurate AD and MCI diagnostic multimodal biomarkers using advanced bioinformatics tools. The biomarkers were created by exploring multimodal combinations of features using machine learning techniques. Data was obtained from the ADNI database. The baseline information (e.g. MRI analyses, PET analyses and laboratory essays) from AD, MCI and healthy control (HC) subjects with available diagnosis up to June 2012 was mined for case/controls candidates. The data mining yielded 47 HC, 83 MCI and 43 AD subjects for biomarker creation. Each subject was characterized by at least 980 ADNI features. A genetic algorithm feature selection strategy was used to obtain compact and accurate cross-validated nearest centroid biomarkers. The biomarkers achieved training classification accuracies of 0.983, 0.871 and 0.917 for HC vs. AD, HC vs. MCI and MCI vs. AD respectively. The constructed biomarkers were relatively compact: from 5 to 11 features. Those multimodal biomarkers included several widely accepted univariate biomarkers and novel image and biochemical features. Multimodal biomarkers constructed from previously and non-previously AD associated features showed improved diagnostic performance when compared to those based solely on previously AD associated features.

  17. Optimization of Connector Position Offset for Bandwidth Enhancement of a Multimode Optical Fiber Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, Banmali

    2000-01-01

    The multimode fiber bandwidth enhancement techniques to meet the Gigabit Ethernet standards for local area networks (LAN) of the Kennedy Space Center and other NASA centers have been discussed. Connector with lateral offset coupling between single mode launch fiber cable and the multimode fiber cable has been thoroughly investigated. An optimization of connector position offset for 8 km long optical fiber link at 1300 nm with 9 micrometer diameter single mode fiber (SMF) and 50 micrometer diameter multimode fiber (MMF) coupling has been obtained. The optimization is done in terms of bandwidth, eye-pattern, and bit pattern measurements. It is simpler, is a highly practical approach and is cheaper as no additional cost to manufacture the offset type of connectors is involved.

  18. Highly Flexible Multimode Digital Signal Processing Systems Using Adaptable Components and Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinu Vijay; Lach, John

    2006-12-01

    Multimode systems have emerged as an area- and power-efficient platform for implementing multiple timewise mutually exclusive digital signal processing (DSP) applications in a single hardware space. This paper presents a design methodology for integrating flexible components and controllers into primarily fixed logic multimode DSP systems, thereby increasing their overall efficiency and implementation capabilities. The components are built using a technique called small-scale reconfigurability (SSR) that provides the necessary flexibility for both intermode and intramode reconfigurabilities, without the penalties associated with general-purpose reconfigurable logic. Using this methodology, area and power consumption are reduced beyond what is provided by current multimode systems, without sacrificing performance. The results show an average of 7% reduction in datapath component area, 26% reduction in register area, 36% reduction in interconnect MUX cost, and 68% reduction in the number of controller signals, with an average 38% increase in component utilization for a set of benchmark 32-bit DSP applications.

  19. Highly Flexible Multimode Digital Signal Processing Systems Using Adaptable Components and Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Vinu Vijay

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimode systems have emerged as an area- and power-efficient platform for implementing multiple timewise mutually exclusive digital signal processing (DSP applications in a single hardware space. This paper presents a design methodology for integrating flexible components and controllers into primarily fixed logic multimode DSP systems, thereby increasing their overall efficiency and implementation capabilities. The components are built using a technique called small-scale reconfigurability (SSR that provides the necessary flexibility for both intermode and intramode reconfigurabilities, without the penalties associated with general-purpose reconfigurable logic. Using this methodology, area and power consumption are reduced beyond what is provided by current multimode systems, without sacrificing performance. The results show an average of 7% reduction in datapath component area, 26% reduction in register area, 36% reduction in interconnect MUX cost, and 68% reduction in the number of controller signals, with an average 38% increase in component utilization for a set of benchmark 32-bit DSP applications.

  20. Analysis and synthesis of multi-qubit, multi-mode quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solgun, Firat

    2015-03-27

    In this thesis we propose new methods in multi-qubit multi-mode circuit quantum electrodynamics (circuit-QED) architectures. First we describe a direct parity measurement method for three qubits, which can be realized in 2D circuit-QED with a possible extension to four qubits in a 3D circuit-QED setup for the implementation of the surface code. In Chapter 3 we show how to derive Hamiltonians and compute relaxation rates of the multi-mode superconducting microwave circuits consisting of single Josephson junctions using an exact impedance synthesis technique (the Brune synthesis) and applying previous formalisms for lumped element circuit quantization. In the rest of the thesis we extend our method to multi-junction (multi-qubit) multi-mode circuits through the use of state-space descriptions which allows us to quantize any multiport microwave superconducting circuit with a reciprocal lossy impedance response.

  1. Multimodal nonlinear microscopy of biopsy specimen: towards intraoperative diagnostics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael; Heuke, Sandro; Meyer, Tobias; Chernavskaia, Olga; Bocklitz, Thomas W.; Popp, Juergen

    2016-03-01

    The realization of label-free molecule specific imaging of morphology and chemical composition of tissue at subcellular spatial resolution in real time is crucial for many envisioned applications in medicine, e.g., precise surgical guidance and non-invasive histopathologic examination of tissue. Thus, new approaches for a fast and reliable in vivo and near in vivo (ex corpore in vivo) tissue characterization to supplement routine pathological diagnostics is needed. Spectroscopic imaging approaches are particularly important since they have the potential to provide a pathologist with adequate support in the form of clinically-relevant information under both ex vivo and in vivo conditions. In this contribution it is demonstrated, that multimodal nonlinear microscopy combining coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) enables the detection of characteristic structures and the accompanying molecular changes of widespread diseases, particularly of cancer and atherosclerosis. The detailed images enable an objective evaluation of the tissue samples for an early diagnosis of the disease status. Increasing the spectral resolution and analyzing CARS images at multiple Raman resonances improves the chemical specificity. To facilitate handling and interpretation of the image data characteristic properties can be automatically extracted by advanced image processing algorithms, e.g., for tissue classification. Overall, the presented examples show the great potential of multimodal imaging to augment standard intraoperative clinical assessment with functional multimodal CARS/SHG/TPEF images to highlight functional activity and tumor boundaries. It ensures fast, label-free and non-invasive intraoperative tissue classification paving the way towards in vivo optical pathology.

  2. Subharmonic microbubble emissions for noninvasively tracking right ventricular pressures

    OpenAIRE

    Dave, Jaydev K.; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R.; Raichlen, Joel S; Liu, Ji-Bin; McDonald, Maureen E.; Dickie, Kris; Wang, Shumin; Leung, Corina; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Right heart catheterization is often required to monitor intra-cardiac pressures in a number of disease states. Ultrasound contrast agents can produce pressure modulated subharmonic emissions that may be used to estimate right ventricular (RV) pressures. A technique based on subharmonic acoustic emissions from ultrasound contrast agents to track RV pressures noninvasively has been developed and its clinical potential evaluated. The subharmonic signals were obtained from the aorta, RV, and rig...

  3. Non-invasive matrices in human biomonitoring: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Marta; Castaño, Argelia

    2009-02-01

    Humans and other living organisms are exposed to a variety of chemical pollutants that are released into the environment as a consequence of anthropogenic activities. Environmental pollutants are incorporated into the organism by different routes and can then be stored and distributed in different tissues, which leads to an internal concentration that can induce different alterations, adverse effects and/or diseases. Control measures should be taken to avoid these effects and human biomonitoring is a very useful tool that can contribute to this aim. Human biomonitoring uses different matrices to measure the target chemicals depending on the chemical, the amount of matrix necessary for the analysis and the detection limit (LOD) of the analytical technique. Blood is the ideal matrix for most chemicals due to its contact with the whole organism and its equilibrium with organs and tissues where chemicals are stored. However, it has an important disadvantage of being an invasive matrix. The development of new methodology and modern analytical techniques has allowed the use of other matrices that are less or non-invasive, such as saliva, urine, meconium, nails, hair, and semen or breast milk. The presence of a chemical in these matrices reflects an exposure, but correlations between levels in non-invasive matrices and blood must be established to ensure that these levels are related to the total body burden. The development of new biomarkers that are measurable in these matrices will improve non-invasive biomonitoring. This paper reviews studies that measure Cd, Pb, Hg, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), organochlorine pesticides and phthalates in non-invasive matrices, the most used techniques for measurements and what alternative techniques are available.

  4. Noninvasive Inguinal Approach for Cryptorchidectomy in Thirty-eight Stallions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arighi, Mimi; Horney, J. Donald; Bosu, William T. K.

    1988-01-01

    We describe the results of the noninvasive inguinal approach in 38 cases of cryptorchidism. Whether the retained testis was intra-abdominal or in the inguinal canal, this technique was found to be an easy, reliable method of locating abdominal and inguinal testes through a normal body opening. No postoperative complications were recorded in this series of cases and the postoperative rest period was minimal. PMID:17423023

  5. Generalized modulational instability in multimode fibers: wideband multimode parametric amplification

    CERN Document Server

    Guasoni, M

    2015-01-01

    In this paper intermodal modulational instability (IM-MI) is analyzed in a multimode fiber where several spatial and polarization modes propagate. The coupled nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equations describing the modal evolution in the fiber are linearized and reduced to an eigenvalue problem. As a result, the amplification of each mode can be described by means of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a matrix that stores the information about the dispersion properties of the modes and the modal power distribution of the pump. Some useful analytical formulas are also provided that estimate the modal amplification as function of the system parameters. Finally, the impact of third-order dispersion and of absorbtion losses is evaluated, which reveals some surprising phenomena into the IM-MI dynamics. These outcomes generalize previous studies on bimodal-MI, related to the interaction between 2 spatial or polarization modes, to the most general case of $N>2$ interacting modes. Moreover, they pave the way towards the ...

  6. Non-invasive light observer

    CERN Document Server

    Morichetti, Francesco; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Sampietro, Marco; Strain, Michael; Sorel, Marc; Melloni, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Photonic technologies lack non-invasive monitoring tools to inspect the light inside optical waveguides. This is one of the main barriers to large scale of integration, even though photonic platforms are potentially ready to host several thousands of elements on a single chip. Here, we demonstrate non-invasive light observation in silicon photonics devices by exploiting photon interaction with intra-gap energy states localized at the waveguide surface. Light intensity is measured through a ContactLess Integrated Photonic Probe (CLIPP) that introduces no measurable extra-photon absorption and a phase perturbation as low as 0.2 mrad, comparable to thermal fluctuations of less than 3 mK. Multipoint light monitoring is demonstrated with a sensitivity of -30 dBm and a dynamic range of 40 dB. CLIPP technology is simple, inherently CMOS compatible, and scalable to hundreds of probing points per chip. This concept provides a viable way to real-time conditioning and feedback control of densely-integrated photonic syst...

  7. Exploring Opioid-Sparing Multimodal Analgesia Options in Trauma: A Nursing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Mary; Montgomery, Robert; Quinlan-Colwell, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Challenges with opioids (e.g., adverse events, misuse and abuse with long-term administration) have led to a renewed emphasis on opioid-sparing multimodal management of trauma pain. To assess the extent to which currently available evidence supports the efficacy and safety of various nonopioid analgesics and techniques to manage trauma pain, a literature search of recently published references was performed. Additional citations were included on the basis of authors' knowledge of the literature. Effective options for opioid-sparing analgesics include oral and intravenous (IV) acetaminophen; nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs available via multiple routes; and anticonvulsants, which are especially effective for neuropathic pain associated with trauma. Intravenous routes (e.g., IV acetaminophen, IV ketorolac) may be associated with a faster onset of action than oral routes. Additional adjuvants for the treatment of trauma pain are muscle relaxants and alpha-2 adrenergic agonists. Ketamine and regional techniques play an important role in multimodal therapy but require medical and nursing support. Nonpharmacologic treatments (e.g., cryotherapy, distraction techniques, breathing and relaxation, acupuncture) supplement pharmacologic analgesics and can be safe and easy to implement. In conclusion, opioid-sparing multimodal analgesia addresses concerns associated with high doses of opioids, and many pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options are available to implement this strategy. Nurses play key roles in comprehensive patient assessment; administration of patient-focused, opioid-sparing, multimodal analgesia in trauma; and monitoring for safety concerns. PMID:27828892

  8. Measuring elevated intracranial pressure through noninvasive methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Helena; Nissborg, Emelie; Bartek, Jiri;

    2013-01-01

    . This article is a review of the current literature on noninvasive methods for measuring and evaluating elevated ICP. The main focus is on studies that compare noninvasively measured ICP with invasively measured ICP. The aim is to provide an overview of the current state of the most common noninvasive...... is associated with certain risks. Intraparenchymal ICP monitoring methods are considered to be a safer alternative but can, in certain conditions, be imprecise due to zero drift and still require an invasive procedure. An accurate noninvasive method to measure elevated ICP would therefore be desirable...

  9. Non-invasive assessment of in-vitro embryo quality to improve transfer success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbøge, Tina Rødgaard; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Callesen, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    embryos before the transfer to a recipient still remains challenging. Presently, the predominant non-invasive technique for selecting viable embryos is based on morphology, where parameters such as rates of cleavage and blastocyst formation as well as developmental kinetics are evaluated mostly...... subjectively. The simple morphological approach is, however, inadequate for the prediction of embryo quality, and several studies have focused on developing new non-invasive methods using molecular approaches based particularly on proteomics, metabolomics and most recently small non-coding RNA, including micro......RNA. This review outlines the potential of several non-invasive in-vitro methods based on analysis of spent embryo culture medium....

  10. Human Behavior Analysis by Means of Multimodal Context Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banos, Oresti; Villalonga, Claudia; Bang, Jaehun; Hur, Taeho; Kang, Donguk; Park, Sangbeom; Huynh-The, Thien; Le-Ba, Vui; Amin, Muhammad Bilal; Razzaq, Muhammad Asif; Khan, Wahajat Ali; Hong, Choong Seon; Lee, Sungyoung

    2016-01-01

    There is sufficient evidence proving the impact that negative lifestyle choices have on people's health and wellness. Changing unhealthy behaviours requires raising people's self-awareness and also providing healthcare experts with a thorough and continuous description of the user's conduct. Several monitoring techniques have been proposed in the past to track users' behaviour; however, these approaches are either subjective and prone to misreporting, such as questionnaires, or only focus on a specific component of context, such as activity counters. This work presents an innovative multimodal context mining framework to inspect and infer human behaviour in a more holistic fashion. The proposed approach extends beyond the state-of-the-art, since it not only explores a sole type of context, but also combines diverse levels of context in an integral manner. Namely, low-level contexts, including activities, emotions and locations, are identified from heterogeneous sensory data through machine learning techniques. Low-level contexts are combined using ontological mechanisms to derive a more abstract representation of the user's context, here referred to as high-level context. An initial implementation of the proposed framework supporting real-time context identification is also presented. The developed system is evaluated for various realistic scenarios making use of a novel multimodal context open dataset and data on-the-go, demonstrating prominent context-aware capabilities at both low and high levels.

  11. Multimodal biometric approach for cancelable face template generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Padma Polash; Gavrilova, Marina

    2012-06-01

    Due to the rapid growth of biometric technology, template protection becomes crucial to secure integrity of the biometric security system and prevent unauthorized access. Cancelable biometrics is emerging as one of the best solutions to secure the biometric identification and verification system. We present a novel technique for robust cancelable template generation algorithm that takes advantage of the multimodal biometric using feature level fusion. Feature level fusion of different facial features is applied to generate the cancelable template. A proposed algorithm based on the multi-fold random projection and fuzzy communication scheme is used for this purpose. In cancelable template generation, one of the main difficulties is keeping interclass variance of the feature. We have found that interclass variations of the features that are lost during multi fold random projection can be recovered using fusion of different feature subsets and projecting in a new feature domain. Applying the multimodal technique in feature level, we enhance the interclass variability hence improving the performance of the system. We have tested the system for classifier fusion for different feature subset and different cancelable template fusion. Experiments have shown that cancelable template improves the performance of the biometric system compared with the original template.

  12. Multimodal functional neuroimaging: integrating functional MRI and EEG/MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Liu, Zhongming

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive functional neuroimaging, as an important tool for basic neuroscience research and clinical diagnosis, continues to face the need of improving the spatial and temporal resolution. While existing neuroimaging modalities might approach their limits in imaging capability mostly due to fundamental as well as technical reasons, it becomes increasingly attractive to integrate multiple complementary modalities in an attempt to significantly enhance the spatiotemporal resolution that cannot be achieved by any modality individually. Electrophysiological and hemodynamic/metabolic signals reflect distinct but closely coupled aspects of the underlying neural activity. Combining fMRI and EEG/MEG data allows us to study brain function from different perspectives. In this review, we start with an overview of the physiological origins of EEG/MEG and fMRI, as well as their fundamental biophysics and imaging principles, we proceed with a review of the major advances in the understanding and modeling of neurovascular coupling and in the methodologies for the fMRI-EEG/MEG simultaneous recording. Finally, we summarize important remaining issues and perspectives concerning multimodal functional neuroimaging, including brain connectivity imaging.

  13. Multimodality Management of Trigeminal Schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, Ajay; Barnett, Samuel; Anand, Vijay; Agazzi, Siviero

    2016-08-01

    Patients presenting with trigeminal schwannomas require multimodality management by a skull base surgical team that can offer expertise in both transcranial and transnasal approaches as well as radiosurgical and microsurgical strategies. Improvement in neurologic symptoms, preservation of cranial nerve function, and control of mass effect are the primary goals of management for trigeminal schwannomas. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice but may not be possible in all cases. Radiosurgery is an option as primary management for small- to moderate-sized tumors and can be used for postoperative residuals or recurrences. Planned surgical resection followed by SRS for residual tumor is an effective option for larger trigeminal schwannomas. The endoscopic resection is an excellent approach for patients with an extradural tumor or tumors isolated to the Meckel cave. A detailed analysis of a tumor and its surroundings based on high-quality imaging can help better estimate the expected outcome from each treatment. An expert skull base team should be able to provide precise counseling for each patient's situation for selecting the best option.

  14. Miniature multimode monolithic flextensional transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladky-Hennion, Anne-Christine; Uzgur, A Erman; Markley, Douglas C; Safari, Ahmad; Cochran, Joe K; Newnham, Robert E

    2007-10-01

    Traditional flextensional transducers classified in seven groups based on their designs have been used extensively in 1-100 kHz range for mine hunting, fish finding, oil explorations, and biomedical applications. In this study, a new family of small, low cost underwater, and biomedical transducers has been developed. After the fabrication of transducers, finite-elements analysis (FEA) was used extensively in order to optimize these miniature versions of high-power, low-frequency flextensional transducer designs to achieve broad bandwidth for both transmitting and receiving, engineered vibration modes, and optimized acoustic directivity patterns. Transducer topologies with various shapes, cross sections, and symmetries can be fabricated through high-volume, low-cost ceramic and metal extrusion processes. Miniaturized transducers posses resonance frequencies in the range of above 1 MHz to below 10 kHz. Symmetry and design of the transducer, polling patterns, driving and receiving electrode geometries, and driving conditions have a strong effect on the vibration modes, resonance frequencies, and radiation patterns. This paper is devoted to small, multimode flextensional transducers with active shells, which combine the advantages of small size and low-cost manufacturing with control of the shape of the acoustic radiation/receive pattern. The performance of the transducers is emphasized.

  15. NONINVASIVE MEASUREMENT OF LOCAL THERMAL DIFFUSIVITY USING BACKSCATTERED ULTRASOUND AND FOCUSED ULTRASOUND HEATING

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Previously, noninvasive methods of estimating local tissue thermal and acoustic properties using backscattered ultrasound have been proposed in the literature. In this article, a noninvasive method of estimating local thermal diffusivity in situ during focused ultrasound heating using beamformed acoustic backscatter data and applying novel signal processing techniques is developed. A high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer operating at subablative intensities is employed to create...

  16. Application value of multi-mode ultrasound imaging technique of observing conus medullaris in diagnosis of fetal spina bifida occulta%多模式超声成像技术观察脊髓圆锥在胎儿隐性脊柱裂诊断的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘桃; 李金英; 王抒雁

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze two-dimensional ultrasonography and three-dimensional ultrasound with skeletal pattern and VCI pattern in the observation of position of conus medullaris as well as diagnostic value of their shapes on fetal spina bifida occulta.Methods 51 896 gravidas who underwent prenatal screening during January,2013 to December,2015 were selected,and multi-mode ultrasound imaging technique was used to analyze changes of the position and morphology of conus medullaris in 6 cases of fetal spina bifida occulta which showed by prenatal ultrasound,and they were confirmed by high fre-quency ultrasonography or MRI after delivery.Results Prenatal ultrasound showed that position of conus medullaris of the 6 cases of fetal spina bifida occulta were all significantly lower than pelvis level,losing the normal form of“rat tail”,and one cases was complicated with soft palate cleft(missed prenatal diagnosis).The position and morphology of the conus medullaris could be showed by prenatal ultrasound in 100%.Conclusion Prenatal multi-mode ultrasound imaging is the first choice for the observation of the position and the shape of the conus medullaris,it can provide valuable information.%目的:探讨运用超声检查的二维模式结合三维成像的骨骼模式、VCI 模式观察胎儿脊髓圆锥的位置及其形态对胎儿隐性脊柱裂的诊断价值。方法选取2013年1月至2015年12月行产前系统筛查孕妇51896例,运用多模式超声成像技术分析产前超声提示隐性脊柱裂胎儿6例的脊髓圆锥位置及其形态的变化声像图,且经产后高频超声检查或出生后 MRI 证实。结果6例隐性脊柱裂胎儿中产前超声均发现其脊髓圆锥位置明显低于肾盂水平,失去正常的“鼠尾状”形态,其中1例合并软腭裂(产前漏诊)。产前超声胎儿脊髓圆锥位置及其形态100%可以显示。结论产前多模式超声成像技术是观察胎儿脊髓圆锥位置及其形态的首选

  17. Squeezing Properties of the Generalized Multimode Squeezed States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGTong-Qiang

    2001-01-01

    By means of the invariance of Weyl ordering under similar transformations we derive the explicit form of the generalized multimode squeezed states.Moreover,the completeness relation and the squeezing properties of the generalized multimode squeezed states are discussed.

  18. Squeezing Properties of the Generalized Multimode Squeezed States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Tong-Qiang

    2001-01-01

    By means of the invariance of Weyl ordering under similar transformations we derive the explicit form of the generalized multimode squeezed states. Moreover, the completeness relation and the squeezing properties of the generalized multimode squeezed states are discussed.

  19. Neuroplasticity in post-stroke gait recovery and noninvasive brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gait disorders drastically affect the quality of life of stroke survivors, making post-stroke rehabilitation an important research focus. Noninvasive brain stimulation has potential in facilitating neuroplasticity and improving post-stroke gait impairment. However, a large inter-individual variability in the response to noninvasive brain stimulation interventions has been increasingly recognized. We first review the neurophysiology of human gait and post-stroke neuroplasticity for gait recovery, and then discuss how noninvasive brain stimulation techniques could be utilized to enhance gait recovery. While post-stroke neuroplasticity for gait recovery is characterized by use-dependent plasticity, it evolves over time, is idiosyncratic, and may develop maladaptive elements. Furthermore, noninvasive brain stimulation has limited reach capability and is facilitative-only in nature. Therefore, we recommend that noninvasive brain stimulation be used adjunctively with rehabilitation training and other concurrent neuroplasticity facilitation techniques. Additionally, when noninvasive brain stimulation is applied for the rehabilitation of gait impairment in stroke survivors, stimulation montages should be customized according to the specific types of neuroplasticity found in each individual. This could be done using multiple mapping techniques.

  20. Noninvasive spatial metrology of single-atom devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiyaddin, Fahd A; Rahman, Rajib; Kalra, Rachpon; Klimeck, Gerhard; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L; Pla, Jarryd J; Dzurak, Andrew S; Morello, Andrea

    2013-05-01

    The exact location of a single dopant atom in a nanostructure can influence or fully determine the functionality of highly scaled transistors or spin-based devices. We demonstrate here a noninvasive spatial metrology technique, based on the microscopic modeling of three electrical measurements on a single-atom (phosphorus in silicon) spin qubit device: hyperfine coupling, ground state energy, and capacitive coupling to nearby gates. This technique allows us to locate the qubit atom with a precision of ±2.5 nm in two directions and ±15 nm in the third direction, which represents a 1500-fold improvement with respect to the prefabrication statistics obtainable from the ion implantation parameters.

  1. Single LP(0,n) mode excitation in multimode fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Nitin; Rustagi, Kailash C; John, Joseph

    2014-07-14

    We analyze the transmission of a Single mode - Multimode -Multimode (SMm) fiber structure with the aim of exciting a single radial mode in the second multimode fiber. We show that by appropriate choice of the length of the central multimode fiber one can obtain > 90% of the total core power in a chosen mode. We also discuss methods of removing undesirable cladding and radiation modes and estimate tolerances for practical applications.

  2. Multimodale trafiknet i GIS (Multimodal Traffic Network in GIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronbak, Jacob; Brems, Camilla Riff

    1996-01-01

    The report introduces the use of multi-modal traffic networks within a geographical Information System (GIS). The necessary theory of modelling multi-modal traffic network is reviewed and applied to the ARC/INFO GIS by an explorative example.......The report introduces the use of multi-modal traffic networks within a geographical Information System (GIS). The necessary theory of modelling multi-modal traffic network is reviewed and applied to the ARC/INFO GIS by an explorative example....

  3. Bioelectrical Impedance Methods for Noninvasive Health Monitoring: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Kanti Bera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the alternating electrical excitation, biological tissues produce a complex electrical impedance which depends on tissue composition, structures, health status, and applied signal frequency, and hence the bioelectrical impedance methods can be utilized for noninvasive tissue characterization. As the impedance responses of these tissue parameters vary with frequencies of the applied signal, the impedance analysis conducted over a wide frequency band provides more information about the tissue interiors which help us to better understand the biological tissues anatomy, physiology, and pathology. Over past few decades, a number of impedance based noninvasive tissue characterization techniques such as bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA, electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, electrical impedance plethysmography (IPG, impedance cardiography (ICG, and electrical impedance tomography (EIT have been proposed and a lot of research works have been conducted on these methods for noninvasive tissue characterization and disease diagnosis. In this paper BIA, EIS, IPG, ICG, and EIT techniques and their applications in different fields have been reviewed and technical perspective of these impedance methods has been presented. The working principles, applications, merits, and demerits of these methods has been discussed in detail along with their other technical issues followed by present status and future trends.

  4. Un cráneo del norte de Patagonia con modificaciones postmórtem: Aproximación mediante técnicas no invasivas A skull from northern Patagonia with postmortem modifications: an approach using non-invasive techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Del Papa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available En el contexto de la puesta en valor de las colecciones de restos óseos humanos del Museo de La Plata se halló un cráneo con evidencias de un complejo tratamiento post mórtem desconocido hasta el momento. Con el fin de obtener información acerca de la procedencia exacta y el contexto de inhumación del hallazgo, se implementaron una serie de técnicas y metodologías de análisis (revisión bibliográfica, análisis tafonómico y análisis de las huellas corte, que promueven al mismo tiempo la conservación del registro bioarqueológico (aplicación de técnicas de imágenes de carácter no invasivo. Como resultado, se presenta una práctica mortuoria particular y sin antecedentes en la bibliografía para la región norpatagónica. Asimismo, se revaloriza el tratamiento, preservación y estudio de colecciones bioarqueológicas.A skull with evidence of a form of mortuary disposal unknown in the study area was found in a human osteological collection from the Museo de La Plata. In order to get information about the exact provenance and context of discovery of the burial a number of techniques and methodologies of analysis were implemented (literature review, analysis of taphonomic and cut mark traces while promoting the conservation of the bioarchaeological record (by means of the application of non-invasive imaging techniques. As a result, a novel mortuary practice without precedents in the bibliography of north Patagonia is presented. Furthermore, the crucial importance of the treatment, preservation and study of bioarchaeological collections is emphasized.

  5. Manifold-based feature point matching for multi-modal image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liang; Wang, Manning; Song, Zhijian

    2013-03-01

    Images captured using different modalities usually have significant variations in their intensities, which makes it difficult to reveal their internal structural similarities and achieve accurate registration. Most conventional feature-based image registration techniques are fast and efficient, but they cannot be used directly for the registration of multi-modal images because of these intensity variations. This paper introduces the theory of manifold learning to transform the original images into mono-modal modalities, which is a feature-based method that is applicable to multi-modal image registration. Subsequently, scale-invariant feature transform is used to detect highly distinctive local descriptors and matches between corresponding images, and a point-based registration is executed. The algorithm was tested with T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained from BrainWeb. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the method were performed and the results compared with those produced previously. The experiments showed that feature point matching after manifold learning achieved more accurate results than did the similarity measure for multi-modal image registration. This study provides a new manifold-based feature point matching method for multi-modal medical image registration, especially for MR images. The proposed method performs better than do conventional intensity-based techniques in terms of its registration accuracy and is suitable for clinical procedures. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging increases the overall diagnostic accuracy in brain tumours: Correlation with histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasim Abul-Kasim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the contribution of multimodal MRI techniques, specifically perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI, and/or MR spectroscopy (MRS, in increasing the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in brain tumours.Methods: Forty-four patients with suspected brain tumours (27 (61% patients male, mean age 58±17 (mean±SD years were included in this retrospective analysis. Patients were examined with conventional MR sequences, DWI, and with PWI and/or MRS. The concordance between the diagnoses obtained with multimodal MRI and with the conventional MR sequences, and the final diagnosis obtained by biopsy, was estimated. Fisher’s exact test and/or chi-square test was performed to estimate the added utility of multimodal MRI. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05.Results: With multimodal MRI, the diagnosis in 41 (93% patients was the same as that obtained by biopsy, compared with 39% (17/44 patients when the readers were allowed to give one diagnostic possibility during the evaluation of the conventional MR sequences alone (p<0.001. The concordance between the diagnoses provided by evaluating the multimodal MRIs and the final diagnoses was almost perfect (κ value 0.92, 95% CI 0.82 - 1. PWI primarily helped to differentiate lymphomas from other solid tumours, whereas MRS helped to differentiate malignant glioma from metastasis. Both PWI and MRS helped in grading astrocytomas.Conclusion: Multimodal MRI increases diagnostic accuracy and should, wherever available, be performed in the work-up of brain tumours, although this entails increased examination cost and time.

  7. Reference Resolution in Multi-modal Interaction: Position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernando, T.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2002-01-01

    In this position paper we present our research on multimodal interaction in and with virtual environments. The aim of this presentation is to emphasize the necessity to spend more research on reference resolution in multimodal contexts. In multi-modal interaction the human conversational partner can

  8. Reference resolution in multi-modal interaction: Preliminary observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González González, G.R.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present our research on multimodal interaction in and with virtual environments. The aim of this presentation is to emphasize the necessity to spend more research on reference resolution in multimodal contexts. In multi-modal interaction the human conversational partner can apply

  9. Reference resolution in multi-modal interaction: Preliminary observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, A.; González González, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present our research on multimodal interaction in and with virtual environments. The aim of this presentation is to emphasize the necessity to spend more research on reference resolution in multimodal contexts. In multi-modal interaction the human conversational partner can apply mo

  10. Invasive and noninvasive methods for studying pulmonary function in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braun Armin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The widespread use of genetically altered mouse models of experimental asthma has stimulated the development of lung function techniques in vivo to characterize the functional results of genetic manipulations. Here, we describe various classical and recent methods of measuring airway responsiveness in vivo including both invasive methodologies in anesthetized, intubated mice (repetitive/non-repetitive assessment of pulmonary resistance (RL and dynamic compliance (Cdyn; measurement of low-frequency forced oscillations (LFOT and noninvasive technologies in conscious animals (head-out body plethysmography; barometric whole-body plethysmography. Outlined are the technical principles, validation and applications as well as the strengths and weaknesses of each methodology. Reviewed is the current set of invasive and noninvasive methods of measuring murine pulmonary function, with particular emphasis on practical considerations that should be considered when applying them for phenotyping in the laboratory mouse.

  11. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm, Martin C., Jr.; Austen, William G., Jr.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-05-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases.

  12. Noninvasive Intracranial Volume and Pressure Measurements Using Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Prevention of secondary brain injuries following head can be accomplished most easily when intracranial pressure (ICP) is monitored. However, current measurement techniques are invasive and thus not practical in the combat environment. The Pulsed Phase Lock Loop (PPLL) devise, which was developed and patented, uses a unique, noninvasive ultrasonic phase comparison method to measure slight changes in cranial volume which occur with changes in ICP. Year one studies involved instrument improvements and measurement of altered intracranial distance with altered ICP in fresh cadavera. Our software was improved to facilitate future studies of normal subjects and trauma patients. Our bench studies proved that PPLL output correlated highly with changes in path length across a model cranium. Cadaveric studies demonstrated excellent compact, noninvasive devise for monitoring changes in intracranial distance may aid in the early detection of elevated ICP, decreasing risk of secondary brain injury and infection, and returning head-injured patients to duty.

  13. [Multimodal pain therapy: principles and indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, B; Brinkschmidt, T; Casser, H-R; Gralow, I; Irnich, D; Klimczyk, K; Müller, G; Nagel, B; Pfingsten, M; Schiltenwolf, M; Sittl, R; Söllner, W

    2009-04-01

    Multimodal pain therapy describes an integrated multidisciplinary treatment in small groups with a closely coordinated therapeutical approach. Somatic and psychotherapeutic procedures cooperate with physical and psychological training programs. For chronic pain syndromes with complex somatic, psychological and social consequences, a therapeutic intensity of at least 100 hours is recommended. Under these conditions multimodal pain therapy has proven to be more effective than other kinds of treatment. If monodisciplinary and/or outpatient therapies fail, health insurance holders have a legitimate claim to this form of therapy.Medical indications are given for patients with chronic pain syndromes, but also if there is an elevated risk of chronic pain in the early stadium of the disease and aiming at delaying the process of chronification. Relative contraindications are a lack of motivation for behavioural change, severe mental disorders or psychopathologies and addiction problems. The availability of multimodal pain treatment centers in Germany is currently insufficient.

  14. Instrumentation challenges in multi-modality imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasse, D., E-mail: david.brasse@iphc.cnrs.fr [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess 67037 Strasbourg (France); CNRS, UMR7178, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Boisson, F. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess 67037 Strasbourg (France); CNRS, UMR7178, 67037 Strasbourg (France)

    2016-02-11

    Based on different physical principles, imaging procedures currently used in both clinical and preclinical applications present different performance that allow researchers to achieve a large number of studies. However, the relevance of obtaining a maximum of information relating to the same subject is undeniable. The last two decades have thus seen the advent of a full-fledged research axis, the multimodal in vivo imaging. Whether from an instrumentation point of view, for medical research or the development of new probes, all these research works illustrate the growing interest of the scientific community for multimodal imaging, which can be approached with different backgrounds and perspectives from engineers to end-users point of views. In the present review, we discuss the multimodal imaging concept, which focuses not only on PET/CT and PET/MRI instrumentation but also on recent investigations of what could become a possible future in the field.

  15. Multimodal surveillance sensors, algorithms, and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhigang

    2007-01-01

    From front-end sensors to systems and environmental issues, this practical resource guides you through the many facets of multimodal surveillance. The book examines thermal, vibration, video, and audio sensors in a broad context of civilian and military applications. This cutting-edge volume provides an in-depth treatment of data fusion algorithms that takes you to the core of multimodal surveillance, biometrics, and sentient computing. The book discusses such people and activity topics as tracking people and vehicles and identifying individuals by their speech.Systems designers benefit from d

  16. Detecting multimode entanglement by symplectic uncertainty relations

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, A

    2005-01-01

    Quantities invariant under symplectic (i.e. linear and canonical) transformations are constructed as functions of the second moments of N pairs of bosonic field operators. A general multimode uncertainty relation is derived as a necessary constraint on such symplectic invariants. In turn, necessary conditions for the separability of multimode continuous variable states under (MxN)-mode bipartitions are derived from the uncertainty relation. These conditions are proven to be necessary and sufficient for (1+N)-mode Gaussian states and for (M+N)-mode bisymmetric Gaussian states.

  17. Strategy development management of Multimodal Transport Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesterova Natalia S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a brief overview of works on the development of transport infrastructure for multimodal transportation and integration of Russian transport system into the international transport corridors. The technology for control of the strategy, that changes shape and capacity of Multi-modal Transport Network (MTN, is considered as part of the methodology for designing and development of MTN. This technology allows to carry out strategic and operational management of the strategy implementation based on the use of the balanced scorecard.

  18. Translating board games: multimodality and play

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the translation of modern board games as multimodal texts. It argues that games are produced in the interaction between players, pieces and rules, making them a participatory form of text. The article analyses the elements of the rules and in-game text in order to show how the multimodal elements of the text are essential to the experience of the game and how they affect the translation process. Many games are designed to be translated for many markets and avoid unnecess...

  19. Non-Invasive Screening Techniques for Drugs of Abuse,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    documentation. The system is capable of identifying all common drugs of abuse except cannabinoids, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), and psilocybin ...combined with LSD, diphenhydramine (Benadryl), mari- huana or other drugs. Methods of detection: TLC, GLC, EMIT, RIA. Psilocybin (’magic mushrooms...but highly toxic in combination with alcohol or other depressants . Oxazepam (Serax) is a metabolic product of most benzodia- zepines. Flurazepam

  20. Electrogastrography: A Noninvasive Technique to Evaluate Gastric Electrical Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia P. Sanmiguel; Mintchev, Martin P.; Bowes, Kenneth L.

    1998-01-01

    Electrogastrography (EGG) is the recording of gastric electrical activity (GEA) from the body surface. The cutaneous signal is low in amplitude and consequently must be amplified considerably. The resultant signal is heavily contaminated with noise, and visual analysis alone of an EGG signal is inadequate. Consequently, EGG recordings require special methodology for acquisition, processing and analysis. Essential components of this methodology involve an adequate system of digital filtering, ...

  1. Electrogastrography: A Noninvasive Technique to Evaluate Gastric Electrical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia P Sanmiguel

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrogastrography (EGG is the recording of gastric electrical activity (GEA from the body surface. The cutaneous signal is low in amplitude and consequently must be amplified considerably. The resultant signal is heavily contaminated with noise, and visual analysis alone of an EGG signal is inadequate. Consequently, EGG recordings require special methodology for acquisition, processing and analysis. Essential components of this methodology involve an adequate system of digital filtering, amplification and analysis, along with minimization of the sources of external noise (random motions of the patient, electrode-skin interface impedance, electrode bending, obesity, etc and a quantitative interpretation of the recordings. There is a close relationship between GEA and gastric motility. Although it has been demonstrated that EGG satisfactorily reflects internal GEA frequency, there is not acceptable correlation with gastric contractions or gastric emptying. Many attempts have been made to relate EGG 'abnormalities' with clinical syndromes and diseases; however, the diagnostic and clinical value of EGG is still very much in question.

  2. Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure Monitoring Using Advanced Machine Learning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    the intermittent nature of IVC ICP measurement, as well as our requirement for continuously measured ICP, we removed IVC ICP segments by reviewing all...Res 2010; 164(2):286-93. 5. Goodman MD, Makley AT, Huber NL, et al. Hypobaric hypoxia exacerbates the neuroinflammatory response to traumatic brain

  3. Solar Retinopathy: A Multimodal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Bruè

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Solar retinopathy is a rare clinical disturbance, for which spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings are not always consistent. We report on two cases of solar retinopathy and discuss its differential diagnosis. Methods. This is an observational case study. Results. A 12-year-old female was referred to ophthalmology for bilateral scotoma. Visual acuity was 20/50 in both eyes. Fundus examination was unremarkable, except for slight yellowish material in the central macula, bilaterally. SD-OCT revealed juxtafoveal microcystic cavities in the outer retina, interruption of the external limiting membrane and the inner and outer segment junctions, with disorganized material in the vitelliform space. Fundus autofluorescence showed hypoautofluorescence surrounded by a relatively hyperautofluorescent ring, bilaterally. Similar clinical and morphological findings were detected in a 27-year-old male. Conclusions. Solar retinopathy has a subtle presentation and patients often deny sun-gazing. SD-OCT and fundus autofluorescence are noninvasive and useful tools for its diagnosis.

  4. Multimodal biometrics system based on face profile and ear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Iman S.; Abaza, Ayman A.; Rasmy, Mohamed E.; Badawi, Ahmed M.

    2014-05-01

    Face recognition from a side profile view, has recently received significant attention in the literature. Even though current face recognition systems have reached a certain level of maturity at angles up to 30 degrees, their success is still limited with side profile angles. This paper presents an efficient technique for the fusion of face profile and ear biometrics. We propose to use a Block-based Local Binary Pattern (LBP) to generate the features for recognition from face profile images and ear images. These feature distributions are then fused at the score level using simple mean rule. Experimental results show that the proposed multimodal system can achieve 97:98% recognition performance, compared to unimodal biometrics of face profile 96.76%, and unimodal biometrics of ear 96.95%, details in the Experimental Results Section. Comparisons with other multimodal systems used in the literature, like Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Full-space Linear Discriminant Analysis (FSLDA) and Kernel Fisher discriminant analysis (KFDA), are presented in the Experimental Results Section.

  5. Glycosylated Conductive Polymer: A Multimodal Biointerface for Studying Carbohydrate-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Qu, Ke; Rehman, Abdul

    2016-09-20

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions occur through glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides displayed on the cell surface with lectins. However, studying these interactions is challenging because of the complexity and heterogeneity of the cell surface, the inherent structural complexity of carbohydrates, and the typically weak affinities of the binding reactions between the lectins and monovalent carbohydrates. The lack of chromophores and fluorophores in carbohydrate structures often drives such investigations toward fluorescence labeling techniques, which usually require tedious and complex synthetic work to conjugate fluorescent tags with additional risk of altering the reaction dynamics. Probing these interactions directly on the cell surface is even more difficult since cells could be too fragile for labeling or labile dynamics could be affected by the labeled molecules that may interfere with the cellular activities, resulting in unwanted cell responses. In contrast, label-free biosensors allow real-time monitoring of carbohydrate-protein interactions in their natural states. A prerequisite, though, for this strategy to work is to mimic the coding information on potential interactions of cell surfaces onto different biosensing platforms, while the complementary binding process can be transduced into a useful signal noninvasively. Through carbohydrate self-assembled monolayers and glycopolymer scaffolds, the multivalency of the naturally existing simple and complex carbohydrates can be mimicked and exploited with label-free readouts (e.g., optical, acoustic, mechanical, electrochemical, and electrical sensors), yet such inquiries reflect only limited aspects of complicated biointeraction processes due to the unimodal transduction. In this Account, we illustrate that functionalized glycosylated conductive polymer scaffolds are the ideal multimodal biointerfaces that not only simplify the immobilization process for surface fabrication via electrochemical

  6. BIODEGRADATION AND DENTIN BONDING EFFECTIVENESS OF ONE "UNIVERSAL" SELF-ETCH ADHESIVE USED IN MULTI-MODE MANNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gateva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A new type of one-step self-etch adhesives classified as "Universal" or "multi-mode" adhesives appeared in recent years. The idea is that these adhesives can be applied simultaneously with both techniques - etch and rinse and with self-etching technique, without compromising the bonding effectiveness. The aim of this study is to evaluate the micro-tensile adhesive bond strength to dentin of permanent teeth achieved after application of Single Bond Universal (3M ESPE adhesive system used in multi-mode manner. The results of our study show that the use of this universal adhesive system in multi-mode manner will not lead to the same results regarding the achieved bond strength with dentin. The additional etching with 37% phosphoric acid as well as the application of the adhesive in several layers deteriorates the bond strength right after application and after six months storage in artificial saliva medium (SAGF.

  7. A review on the non-invasive evaluation of skeletal muscle oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, A. A. A.; Laili, M. H.; Aziz, N. A.; Laili, A. R.; Salikin, M. S.; Rusop, M.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to conduct a feasibility study of non-invasive evaluation in skeletal muscle oxygenation. This non-invasive evaluation could extract many information using a safe non-invasive method regarding to the oxygenation and microcirculation status in human blood muscle. This brief review highlights the progress of the application of NIRS to evaluate skeletal muscle oxygenation in various activity of human nature from the historical point of view to the present advancement. Since the discovery of non-invasive optical method during 1992, there are many non-invasive techniques uses optical properties on human subject such as near infrared spectroscopy NIRS, optical topography, functional near infrared spectroscopy fNIRS and imaging fNIRI. Furthermore, in this paper we discuss the light absorption potential (LAP) towards chromophores content inside human muscle. Modified beer lambert law was studied in order to build a better understanding toward LAP between chromophores under tissue multilayers in human muscle. This paper will describe the NIRS principle and the basis for its proposed used in skeletal muscle oxygenation. This will cover the advantages and limitation of such application. Thus, these non-invasive techniques could open other possibilities to study muscle performance diagnosis.

  8. Noninvasive genomic detection of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsman, W; Morhenn, V; Palmer, T; Walls, L; Hata, T; Zalla, J; Scheinberg, R; Sofen, H; Mraz, S; Gross, K; Rabinovitz, H; Polsky, D; Chang, S

    2011-04-01

    Early detection and treatment of melanoma is important for optimal clinical outcome, leading to biopsy of pigmented lesions deemed suspicious for the disease. The vast majority of such lesions are benign. Thus, a more objective and accurate means for detection of melanoma is needed to identify lesions for excision. To provide proof-of-principle that epidermal genetic information retrieval (EGIR™; DermTech International, La Jolla, CA, U.S.A.), a method that noninvasively samples cells from stratum corneum by means of adhesive tape stripping, can be used to discern melanomas from naevi. Skin overlying pigmented lesions clinically suspicious for melanoma was harvested using EGIR. RNA isolated from the tapes was amplified and gene expression profiled. All lesions were removed for histopathological evaluation. Supervised analysis of the microarray data identified 312 genes differentially expressed between melanomas, naevi and normal skin specimens (Pclassifier that discriminates these skin lesions. Upon testing with an independent dataset, this classifier discerned in situ and invasive melanomas from naevi with 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity, with an area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic of 0·955. These results demonstrate that EGIR-harvested specimens can be used to detect melanoma accurately by means of a 17-gene genomic biomarker. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists 2011.

  9. Connecting multimodality in human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenbogen, Christina; Habel, Ute; Kellermann, Thilo

    2013-01-01

    DCM analysis instead showed a pronounced top-down control. Remarkably, all connections from the dmPFC to the three other regions were modulated by the experimental conditions. This observation is in line with the presumed role of the dmPFC in the allocation of attention. In contrary, all incoming connections to the AG were modulated, indicating its key role in integrating multimodal information and supporting comprehension. Notably, the input from the FFG to the AG was enhanced when facial expressions conveyed emotional information. These findings serve as preliminary results in understanding network dynamics in human emotional communication and empathy.

  10. Preliminary clinical investigations of a new noninvasive venous pulse oximeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Daniel; Smith, Peter R.; Caine, Michael P.; Spyt, Tomasz; Boehm, Maria; Machin, David

    2003-10-01

    For decades, the monitoring of mixed venous oxygen saturation, SvO2 has been performed invasively using fibre-optic catheters. This procedure is not without risk as complications may arise from catheterisation. The group has devised a new non-invasive venous oximetry method which involves inducing regular modulations of the venous blood volume and associated measurement of those modulations using optical means. A clinical investigation was conducted in Glenfield Hospital, UK to evaluate the sensitivity of the new technique to haemodynamic changes such as Cardiac Output (CO) in intraoperative and postoperative cardiac patients. Preliminary trials on patients recovering from cardiac surgery yielded an average correlation of r = 0.72 between CO at different Intra Aortic Balloon Pump (IABP) augmentation levels and SvO2 measured by the new venous oximeter. In intraoperative patients undergoing off-pump cardiac surgery, SvO2 recorded by the new technique responded to unplanned events such as a cardiac arrest. CONCLUSION: The new venous oximetry technique is a promising technique which responds to haemodynamic changes such as CO and with further development might offer an alternative means of monitoring SvO2 non-invasively.

  11. Non-invasive means of measuring hepatic fat content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanjeev R Mehta; E Louise Thomas; Jimmy D Bell; Desmond G Johnston; Simon D Taylor-Robinson

    2008-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis affects 20% to 30% of the general adult population in the western world. Currently, the technique of choice for determining hepatic fat deposition and the stage of fibrosis is liver biopsy. However, it is an invasive procedure and its use is limited, particularly in children. It may also be subject to sampling error. Non-invasive techniques such as ultrasound, computerised tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) can detect hepatic steatosis, but currently cannot distinguish between simple steatosis and steatohepatitis, or stage the degree of fibrosis accurately. Ultrasound is widely used to detect hepatic steatosis, but its sensitivity is reduced in the morbidly obese and also in those with small amounts of fatty infiltration. It has been used to grade hepatic fat content, but this is subjective. CT can detect hepatic steatosis, but exposes subjects to ionising radiation, thus limiting its use in longitudinal studies and in children. Recently, magnetic resonance (MR) techniques using chemical shift imaging have provided a quantitative assessment of the degree of hepatic fatty infiltration, which correlates well with liver biopsy results in the same patients. Similarly, in vivo 1H MRS is a fast, safe, non-invasive method for the quantification of intrahepatocellular lipid (IHCL) levels. Both techniques will be useful tools in future longitudinal clinical studies, either in examining the natural history of conditions causing hepatic steatosis(e.g. non-alcoholic fatty liver disease), or in testing new treatments for these conditions.

  12. Love that Book: Multimodal Response to Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Bridget; Grisham, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Composing with different modes--image, sound, video and the written word--to respond to and analyze literary and informational text helps students develop as readers and digital communicators. This article showcases five multimodal strategies for engaging children in rich literature-based learning using digital tools and Internet resources.

  13. Design Options for Multimodal Web Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciulescu, Adrian; Vanderdonckt, Jean

    The capabilities of multimodal applications running on the web are well de-lineated since they are mainly constrained by what their underlying standard mark up language offers, as opposed to hand-made multimodal applications. As the experience in developing such multimodal web applications is growing, the need arises to identify and define major design options of such application to pave the way to a structured development life cycle. This paper provides a design space of independent design options for multimodal web applications based on three types of modalities: graphical, vocal, tactile, and combined. On the one hand, these design options may provide designers with some explicit guidance on what to decide or not for their future user interface, while exploring various design alternatives. On the other hand, these design options have been implemented as graph transformations per-formed on a user interface model represented as a graph. Thanks to a transformation engine, it allows designers to play with the different values of each design option, to preview the results of the transformation, and to obtain the corresponding code on-demand

  14. Love that Book: Multimodal Response to Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Bridget; Grisham, Dana L.

    2013-01-01

    Composing with different modes--image, sound, video and the written word--to respond to and analyze literary and informational text helps students develop as readers and digital communicators. This article showcases five multimodal strategies for engaging children in rich literature-based learning using digital tools and Internet resources.

  15. Multimodal representations in collaborative history learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prangsma, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the question: How does making and connecting different types of multimodal representations affect the collaborative learning process and the acquisition of a chronological frame of reference in 12 to 14-year olds in pre vocational education? A chronological frame of refe

  16. A Multimodal Interaction Framework for Blended Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidakis, Nikolaos; Kalafatis, Konstantinos; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Humans interact with each other by utilizing the five basic senses as input modalities, whereas sounds, gestures, facial expressions etc. are utilized as output modalities. Multimodal interaction is also used between humans and their surrounding environment, although enhanced with further senses ...... framework enabling deployment of a vast variety of modalities, tailored appropriately for use in blended learning environment....

  17. Controllable spatiotemporal nonlinear effects in multimode fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Logan G.; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Wise, Frank W.

    2015-05-01

    Multimode fibres are of interest for next-generation telecommunications systems and the construction of high-energy fibre lasers. However, relatively little work has explored nonlinear pulse propagation in multimode fibres. Here, we consider highly nonlinear ultrashort pulse propagation in the anomalous-dispersion regime of a graded-index multimode fibre. Low modal dispersion and strong nonlinear coupling between the fibre's many spatial modes result in interesting behaviour. We observe spatiotemporal effects reminiscent of nonlinear optics in bulk media—self-focusing and multiple filamentation—at a fraction of the usual power. By adjusting the spatial initial conditions, we generate on-demand, megawatt, ultrashort pulses tunable between 1,550 and 2,200 nm dispersive waves over one octave; intense combs of visible light; and a multi-octave-spanning supercontinuum. Our results indicate that multimode fibres present unique opportunities for observing new spatiotemporal dynamics and phenomena. They also enable the realization of a new type of tunable, broadband fibre source that could be useful for many applications.

  18. Multimode waveguide speckle patterns for compressive sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, George C; Sefler, George A; Justin Shaw, T

    2016-06-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) of sparse gigahertz-band RF signals using microwave photonics may achieve better performances with smaller size, weight, and power than electronic CS or conventional Nyquist rate sampling. The critical element in a CS system is the device that produces the CS measurement matrix (MM). We show that passive speckle patterns in multimode waveguides potentially provide excellent MMs for CS. We measure and calculate the MM for a multimode fiber and perform simulations using this MM in a CS system. We show that the speckle MM exhibits the sharp phase transition and coherence properties needed for CS and that these properties are similar to those of a sub-Gaussian MM with the same mean and standard deviation. We calculate the MM for a multimode planar waveguide and find dimensions of the planar guide that give a speckle MM with a performance similar to that of the multimode fiber. The CS simulations show that all measured and calculated speckle MMs exhibit a robust performance with equal amplitude signals that are sparse in time, in frequency, and in wavelets (Haar wavelet transform). The planar waveguide results indicate a path to a microwave photonic integrated circuit for measuring sparse gigahertz-band RF signals using CS.

  19. The Arts, New Literacies, and Multimodality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Peggy; Harste, Jerome C.

    2007-01-01

    The arts, multimodality, and new literacies studies, each with its own distinct principles, together can redefine literacy and what constitutes being literate. To recognize the roles that each of these fields plays in literacy necessitates a cultural shift in reading, interpreting, creating, and responding to a range of multimedia messages. The…

  20. Multimode interferometer for guided matter waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Erika; Calarco, Tommaso; Folman, Ron; Andersson, Mauritz; Hessmo, Björn; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2002-03-11

    Atoms can be trapped and guided with electromagnetic fields, using nanofabricated structures. We describe the fundamental features of an interferometer for guided matter waves, built of two combined Y-shaped beam splitters. We find that such a device is expected to exhibit high contrast fringes even in a multimode regime, analogous to a white light interferometer.

  1. Brain-Computer Interaction: Can Multimodality Help?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Allison, Brendan Z.; Jacobs, Robert J.K.; Vidal, E.; Gatica-Perez, D.; Morency, L.P.; Sebe, N.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a short introduction to a special ICMI session on brain-computer interaction. During this paper, we first discuss problems, solutions, and a five-year view for brain-computer interaction. We then talk further about unique issues with multimodal and hybrid brain-computer interfaces,

  2. Single versus multimodality training basic laparoscopic skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.M.; Havermans, S.Y.; Buzink, S.N.; Botden, S.M.B.I.; Jakimowicz, J.J.; Schoot, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction - Even though literature provides compelling evidence of the value of simulators for training of basic laparoscopic skills, the best way to incorporate them into a surgical curriculum is unclear. This study compares the training outcome of single modality training with multimodality tra

  3. Academic Knowledge Construction and Multimodal Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Douglas J., Ed.; Griffith, Bryant, Ed.; Bérci, Margaret E., Ed.; Ortlieb, Evan, Ed.; Sullivan, Pamela, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    While incorporating digital technologies into the classroom has offered new ways of teaching and learning into educational processes, it is essential to take a look at how the digital shift impacts teachers, school administration, and curriculum development. "Academic Knowledge Construction and Multimodal Curriculum Development" presents…

  4. Multimodal Dialogue Management - State of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui Huu Trung, B.H.T.

    This report is about the state of the art in dialogue management. We first introduce an overview of a multimodal dialogue system and its components. Second, four main approaches to dialogue management are described (finite-state and frame-based, information-state based and probabilistic, plan-based,

  5. Reconceptualising Poetry as a Multimodal Genre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newfield, Denise; D'abdon, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    This conceptual article theorises the role of poetry in English classrooms from a multimodal perspective. It discusses the gap between the practices of poetry inside and outside South African schools, particularly where English is taught as an additional language (EAL). The former is shown to be monomodal and prescriptive, while the latter is…

  6. Multimodal Interaction with a Virtual Guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofs, D.H.W.; Theune, Mariet; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the Virtual Guide, an embodied conversational agent that gives directions in a 3D environment. We briefly describe multimodal dialogue management, language and gesture generation, and a special feature of the Virtual Guide: the ability to align her linguistic style to the user’s level

  7. Visible Quotation : The multimodal expression of viewpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stec, Kashmiri Kristina Mukti

    2016-01-01

    The central theme of this dissertation is multimodal viewpoint – that is, the way that bodily actions work together with spoken language to express the perspective of characters within a narrative. Drawing on research in cognitive linguistics, conversation analysis, gesture studies, and signed langu

  8. Multimodal representations in collaborative history learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prangsma, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the question: How does making and connecting different types of multimodal representations affect the collaborative learning process and the acquisition of a chronological frame of reference in 12 to 14-year olds in pre vocational education? A chronological frame of refe

  9. Single versus multimodality training basic laparoscopic skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.M.; Havermans, S.Y.; Buzink, S.N.; Botden, S.M.B.I.; Jakimowicz, J.J.; Schoot, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction - Even though literature provides compelling evidence of the value of simulators for training of basic laparoscopic skills, the best way to incorporate them into a surgical curriculum is unclear. This study compares the training outcome of single modality training with multimodality

  10. Academic Knowledge Construction and Multimodal Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Douglas J., Ed.; Griffith, Bryant, Ed.; Bérci, Margaret E., Ed.; Ortlieb, Evan, Ed.; Sullivan, Pamela, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    While incorporating digital technologies into the classroom has offered new ways of teaching and learning into educational processes, it is essential to take a look at how the digital shift impacts teachers, school administration, and curriculum development. "Academic Knowledge Construction and Multimodal Curriculum Development" presents…

  11. Equilibrium models in multimodal container transport systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corman, F.; Viti, F.; Negenborn, R.R.

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing the performance of multimodal freight transport networks involves adequately balancing the interplay between costs, volumes, times of departure and arrival, and times of travel. In order to study this interplay, we propose an assignment model that is able to efficiently determine flows an

  12. Multimodal representations in collaborative history learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prangsma, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the question: How does making and connecting different types of multimodal representations affect the collaborative learning process and the acquisition of a chronological frame of reference in 12 to 14-year olds in pre vocational education? A chronological frame of

  13. Interactive Multimodal Learning for Venue Recommendation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zahálka, J.; Rudinac, S.; Worring, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose City Melange, an interactive and multimodal content-based venue explorer. Our framework matches the interacting user to the users of social media platforms exhibiting similar taste. The data collection integrates location-based social networks such as Foursquare with genera

  14. Affective multimodal mirror: sensing and eliciting laughter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melder, W.A.; Truong, K.P.; Uyl, M. den; Leeuwen, D.A. van; Neerincx, M.A.; Loos, L.R.; Stock Plum, B.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a multimodal affective mirror that senses and elicits laughter. Currently, the mirror contains a vocal and a facial affect-sensing module, a component that fuses the output of these two modules to achieve a user-state assessment, a user state transition model, and a compone

  15. Noninvasive tissue temperature estimation using nonlinear ultrasound harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraghechi, Borna; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2017-03-01

    Non-invasive tissue temperature estimation is important in thermal therapies for having an efficient treatment. A noninvasive ultrasonic technique for monitoring tissue temperature changes is proposed based on the changes in the harmonics of ultrasound backscatter as a function of temperature. The backscattered pressure amplitudes of the fundamental frequency (p1), the second (p2) and the third (p3) harmonics generated by nonlinear ultrasound propagation and the ratios of the second and the third harmonics over the fundamental frequency (p2/p1 and p3/p1) were investigated as a function of temperature. The acoustic harmonics were generated and detected with a commercial high frequency ultrasound imaging system in pulse-echo mode. The experiments were performed on tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and ex vivo bovine muscle tissues. The temperature was increased from 26°C to 46°C in increments of 2°C. The average values of p1, p2, p3, p2/p1, p3/p1 increased by 14%, 50%, 117%, 37% and 92% for the gel phantoms, and for the tissue samples increased by 29%, 50%, 170%, 10% and 109%, respectively. The results indicate that the harmonic amplitudes and their ratios are highly sensitive to propagation medium's temperature and could potentially be used for noninvasive ultrasound thermometry.

  16. Biocompatible Optically Transparent MEMS for Micromechanical Stimulation and Multimodal Imaging of Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fior, Raffaella; Kwok, Jeanie; Malfatti, Francesca; Sbaizero, Orfeo; Lal, Ratnesh

    2015-08-01

    Cells and tissues in our body are continuously subjected to mechanical stress. Mechanical stimuli, such as tensile and contractile forces, and shear stress, elicit cellular responses, including gene and protein alterations that determine key behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, migration, and adhesion. Several tools and techniques have been developed to study these mechanobiological phenomena, including micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). MEMS provide a platform for nano-to-microscale mechanical stimulation of biological samples and quantitative analysis of their biomechanical responses. However, current devices are limited in their capability to perform single cell micromechanical stimulations as well as correlating their structural phenotype by imaging techniques simultaneously. In this study, a biocompatible and optically transparent MEMS for single cell mechanobiological studies is reported. A silicon nitride microfabricated device is designed to perform uniaxial tensile deformation of single cells and tissue. Optical transparency and open architecture of the device allows coupling of the MEMS to structural and biophysical assays, including optical microscopy techniques and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate the design, fabrication, testing, biocompatibility and multimodal imaging with optical and AFM techniques, providing a proof-of-concept for a multimodal MEMS. The integrated multimodal system would allow simultaneous controlled mechanical stimulation of single cells and correlate cellular response.

  17. Information content and analysis methods for multi-modal high-throughput biomedical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Bisakha; Henaff, Mikael; Ma, Sisi; Efstathiadis, Efstratios; Peskin, Eric R; Picone, Marco; Poli, Tito; Aliferis, Constantin F; Statnikov, Alexander

    2014-03-21

    The spectrum of modern molecular high-throughput assaying includes diverse technologies such as microarray gene expression, miRNA expression, proteomics, DNA methylation, among many others. Now that these technologies have matured and become increasingly accessible, the next frontier is to collect "multi-modal" data for the same set of subjects and conduct integrative, multi-level analyses. While multi-modal data does contain distinct biological information that can be useful for answering complex biology questions, its value for predicting clinical phenotypes and contributions of each type of input remain unknown. We obtained 47 datasets/predictive tasks that in total span over 9 data modalities and executed analytic experiments for predicting various clinical phenotypes and outcomes. First, we analyzed each modality separately using uni-modal approaches based on several state-of-the-art supervised classification and feature selection methods. Then, we applied integrative multi-modal classification techniques. We have found that gene expression is the most predictively informative modality. Other modalities such as protein expression, miRNA expression, and DNA methylation also provide highly predictive results, which are often statistically comparable but not superior to gene expression data. Integrative multi-modal analyses generally do not increase predictive signal compared to gene expression data.

  18. Eigenanatomy: sparse dimensionality reduction for multi-modal medical image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Benjamin M; Wang, Danny J J; Gee, James C; Avants, Brian B

    2015-02-01

    Rigorous statistical analysis of multimodal imaging datasets is challenging. Mass-univariate methods for extracting correlations between image voxels and outcome measurements are not ideal for multimodal datasets, as they do not account for interactions between the different modalities. The extremely high dimensionality of medical images necessitates dimensionality reduction, such as principal component analysis (PCA) or independent component analysis (ICA). These dimensionality reduction techniques, however, consist of contributions from every region in the brain and are therefore difficult to interpret. Recent advances in sparse dimensionality reduction have enabled construction of a set of image regions that explain the variance of the images while still maintaining anatomical interpretability. The projections of the original data on the sparse eigenvectors, however, are highly collinear and therefore difficult to incorporate into multi-modal image analysis pipelines. We propose here a method for clustering sparse eigenvectors and selecting a subset of the eigenvectors to make interpretable predictions from a multi-modal dataset. Evaluation on a publicly available dataset shows that the proposed method outperforms PCA and ICA-based regressions while still maintaining anatomical meaning. To facilitate reproducibility, the complete dataset used and all source code is publicly available. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimation of LiBr-H2O Using Multimode Interference (MMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.E. Antúnez-Cerón

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We use multimode interference (MMI as an alternative optical technique to estimate lithium bromide (LiBr concentration, of the work pair LiBr-H2O, in absorption heat pumps (AHP. The sensing element is a singlemode-multimode-singlemode (SMS fiber optic structure. This is fabricated by splicing a precisely dimensioned multimode fiber (MMF section between two singlemode fibers (SMFs. The operation principle is based on the multimode interference (MMI effect occurring in the MMF section. For that purpose, different concentrations of the mixture were prepared (from 44.30% to 60.69% to study their optical response. The input field profile entering the sensing element, which is the naked (no cladding MMF section of the SMS fiber structure, produced different transmitted intensity responses for each of these concentrations. Thus the optical characterization of the mixture was used to establish a mathematical relation to estimate the LiBr concentration. A linear fit for solutions with concentrations ranging from 43.30% to 50.87% and refractive indices between 1.421 and 1.439 is demonstrated.

  20. Noninvasive ventilation in hypoxemic respiratory failure

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    Raja Dhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive ventilation (NIV refers to positive pressure ventilation delivered through a noninvasive interface (nasal mask, facemask, or nasal plugs etc. Over the past decade its use has become more common as its benefits are increasingly recognized. This review will focus on the evidence supporting the use of NIV in various conditions resulting in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF, that is, non-hypercapnic patients having acute respiratory failure in the absence of a cardiac origin or underlying chronic pulmonary disease. Outcomes depend on the patient's diagnosis and clinical characteristics. Patients should be monitored closely for signs of noninvasive ventilation failure and promptly intubated before a crisis develops. The application of noninvasive ventilation by a trained and experienced team, with careful patient selection, should optimize patient outcomes.