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Sample records for noninvasive multimodal technique

  1. A noninvasive multimodal technique to monitor brain tumor vascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Vishal; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Laug, Walter E.

    2007-09-01

    Determination of tumor oxygenation at the microvascular level will provide important insight into tumor growth, angiogenesis, necrosis and therapeutic response and will facilitate to develop protocols for studying tumor behavior. The non-ionizing near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique has the potential to differentiate lesion and hemoglobin dynamics; however, it has a limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has achieved high spatial resolution with excellent tissue discrimination but is more susceptible to limited ability to monitor the hemoglobin dynamics. In the present work, the vascular status and the pathophysiological changes that occur during tumor vascularization are studied in an orthotopic brain tumor model. A noninvasive multimodal approach based on the NIRS technique, namely steady state diffuse optical spectroscopy (SSDOS) along with MRI, is applied for monitoring the concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor region. The concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor vasculature are extracted at 15 discrete wavelengths in a spectral window of 675-780 nm. We found a direct correlation between tumor size, intratumoral microvessel density and tumor oxygenation. The relative decrease in tumor oxygenation with growth indicates that though blood vessels infiltrate and proliferate the tumor region, a hypoxic trend is clearly present.

  2. A noninvasive multimodal technique to monitor brain tumor vascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Vishal; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Laug, Walter E

    2007-01-01

    Determination of tumor oxygenation at the microvascular level will provide important insight into tumor growth, angiogenesis, necrosis and therapeutic response and will facilitate to develop protocols for studying tumor behavior. The non-ionizing near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique has the potential to differentiate lesion and hemoglobin dynamics; however, it has a limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has achieved high spatial resolution with excellent tissue discrimination but is more susceptible to limited ability to monitor the hemoglobin dynamics. In the present work, the vascular status and the pathophysiological changes that occur during tumor vascularization are studied in an orthotopic brain tumor model. A noninvasive multimodal approach based on the NIRS technique, namely steady state diffuse optical spectroscopy (SSDOS) along with MRI, is applied for monitoring the concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor region. The concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor vasculature are extracted at 15 discrete wavelengths in a spectral window of 675-780 nm. We found a direct correlation between tumor size, intratumoral microvessel density and tumor oxygenation. The relative decrease in tumor oxygenation with growth indicates that though blood vessels infiltrate and proliferate the tumor region, a hypoxic trend is clearly present

  3. Multimodality imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Sopena, Ramón; Bartumeus, Paula; Sopena, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    In multimodality imaging, the need to combine morphofunctional information can be approached by either acquiring images at different times (asynchronous), and fused them through digital image manipulation techniques or simultaneously acquiring images (synchronous) and merging them automatically. The asynchronous post-processing solution presents various constraints, mainly conditioned by the different positioning of the patient in the two scans acquired at different times in separated machines. The best solution to achieve consistency in time and space is obtained by the synchronous image acquisition. There are many multimodal technologies in molecular imaging. In this review we will focus on those multimodality image techniques more commonly used in the field of diagnostic imaging (SPECT-CT, PET-CT) and new developments (as PET-MR). The technological innovations and development of new tracers and smart probes are the main key points that will condition multimodality image and diagnostic imaging professionals' future. Although SPECT-CT and PET-CT are standard in most clinical scenarios, MR imaging has some advantages, providing excellent soft-tissue contrast and multidimensional functional, structural and morphological information. The next frontier is to develop efficient detectors and electronics systems capable of detecting two modality signals at the same time. Not only PET-MR but also MR-US or optic-PET will be introduced in clinical scenarios. Even more, MR diffusion-weighted, pharmacokinetic imaging, spectroscopy or functional BOLD imaging will merge with PET tracers to further increase molecular imaging as a relevant medical discipline. Multimodality imaging techniques will play a leading role in relevant clinical applications. The development of new diagnostic imaging research areas, mainly in the field of oncology, cardiology and neuropsychiatry, will impact the way medicine is performed today. Both clinical and experimental multimodality studies, in

  4. Mediating multimodal environmental knowledge across animation techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Carmen Daniela

    2011-01-01

    ://www.sustainlane.com/. The multimodal discourse analysis is meant to reveal how selection and representation of environmental knowledge about social actors, social actions, resources, time and space are influenced by animation techniques. Furthermore, in the context of this multimodal discourse analysis, their influence upon......The growing awareness of and concern about present environmental problems generate a proliferation of new forms of environmental discourses that are mediated in various ways. This chapter explores issues related to the ways in which environmental knowledge is multimodally communicated...

  5. Noninvasive Remote Sensing Techniques for Infrastructures Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Palombo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at analyzing the potentialities of noninvasive remote sensing techniques used for detecting the conservation status of infrastructures. The applied remote sensing techniques are ground-based microwave radar interferometer and InfraRed Thermography (IRT to study a particular structure planned and made in the framework of the ISTIMES project (funded by the European Commission in the frame of a joint Call “ICT and Security” of the Seventh Framework Programme. To exploit the effectiveness of the high-resolution remote sensing techniques applied we will use the high-frequency thermal camera to measure the structures oscillations by high-frequency analysis and ground-based microwave radar interferometer to measure the dynamic displacement of several points belonging to a large structure. The paper describes the preliminary research results and discusses on the future applicability and techniques developments for integrating high-frequency time series data of the thermal imagery and ground-based microwave radar interferometer data.

  6. An embedded system for image segmentation and multimodal registration in noninvasive skin cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Silvana; Soto, Javier E; Inostroza, Fabian; Godoy, Sebastian E; Figueroa, Miguel

    2017-07-01

    We present a heterogeneous architecture for image registration and multimodal segmentation on an embedded system for noninvasive skin cancer screening. The architecture combines Otsu thresholding and the random walker algorithm to perform image segmentation, and features a hardware implementation of the Harris corner detection algorithm to perform region-of-interest detection and image registration. Running on a Xilinx XC7Z020 reconfigurable system-on-a-chip, our prototype computes the initial segmentation of a 400×400-pixel region of interest in the visible spectrum in 12.1 seconds, and registers infrared images against this region at 540 frames per second, while consuming 1.9W.

  7. 2017 multimodality appropriate use criteria for noninvasive cardiac imaging: Export consensus of the Asian society of cardiovascular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Kyong Min Sarah [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong A [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Yeon Hyeon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-11-15

    In 2010, the Asian Society of Cardiovascular Imaging (ASCI) provided recommendations for cardiac CT and MRI, and this document reflects an update of the 2010 ASCI appropriate use criteria (AUC). In 2016, the ASCI formed a new working group for revision of AUC for noninvasive cardiac imaging. A major change that we made in this document is the rating of various noninvasive tests (exercise electrocardiogram, echocardiography, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, radionuclide imaging, cardiac magnetic resonance, and cardiac computed tomography/angiography), compared side by side for their applications in various clinical scenarios. Ninety-five clinical scenarios were developed from eight selected pre-existing guidelines and classified into four sections as follows: 1) detection of coronary artery disease, symptomatic or asymptomatic; 2) cardiac evaluation in various clinical scenarios; 3) use of imaging modality according to prior testing; and 4) evaluation of cardiac structure and function. The clinical scenarios were scored by a separate rating committee on a scale of 1–9 to designate appropriate use, uncertain use, or inappropriate use according to a modified Delphi method. Overall, the AUC ratings for CT were higher than those of previous guidelines. These new AUC provide guidance for clinicians choosing among available testing modalities for various cardiac diseases and are also unique, given that most previous AUC for noninvasive imaging include only one imaging technique. As cardiac imaging is multimodal in nature, we believe that these AUC will be more useful for clinical decision making.

  8. Noninvasive Diagnostic Technique in Stenotic Coronary Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Vasilyev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the sensitivity and specificity of combined stress echocardiography (EchoCG using dipyri-damole and dobutamine in diagnosing and defining the extent of stenotic coronary lesions in coronary heart disease (CHD in a group of critically ill patients who are unable to perform a physical exercise.Materials and methods: the study included 57 male patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome who underwent stress EchoCG using dipyridamole in high doses in combination with dobutamine, as well as coronary angiography.Results: stress EchoCG could bring up to the diagnostic criteria in all the patients, of whom 9 patients were found at coronary angiography to have no coronary lesion, 34 and 14 patients had one- and many-vessel lesions, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of combined stress EchoCG were significantly higher than those of EchoCG used in the diagnosis of CHD.Conclusion: stress EchoCG using dipyridamole in combination with dobutamine is a highly informative safe noninvasive technique for diagnosing CHD, its helps to identify patients with atypical acute coronary syndrome and to form a group of patients to be subject to urgent coronarography and angiosurgical intervention. The pattern of segmental contractile disorders at the height of exercise during combined stress Echo-CG makes it possible to define the site of stenotic coronary atherosclerosis with 97.3% sensitivity and to diagnose many-vessel lesion with 100% sensitivity and 100%specificity.

  9. Multimodal imaging of vascular network and blood microcirculation by optical diagnostic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Yu L; Kalchenko, V V; Meglinski, I V

    2011-01-01

    We present a multimodal optical diagnostic approach for simultaneous non-invasive in vivo imaging of blood and lymphatic microvessels, utilising a combined use of fluorescence intravital microscopy and a method of dynamic light scattering. This approach makes it possible to renounce the use of fluorescent markers for visualisation of blood vessels and, therefore, significantly (tenfold) reduce the toxicity of the technique and minimise side effects caused by the use of contrast fluorescent markers. We demonstrate that along with the ability to obtain images of lymph and blood microvessels with a high spatial resolution, current multimodal approach allows one to observe in real time permeability of blood vessels. This technique appears to be promising in physiology studies of blood vessels, and especially in the study of peripheral cardiovascular system in vivo. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  10. Techniques for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Arterial Blood Pressure

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    Agnes S. Meidert

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since both, hypotension and hypertension, can potentially impair the function of vital organs such as heart, brain, or kidneys, monitoring of arterial blood pressure (BP is a mainstay of hemodynamic monitoring in acutely or critically ill patients. Arterial BP can either be obtained invasively via an arterial catheter or non-invasively. Non-invasive BP measurement provides either intermittent or continuous readings. Most commonly, an occluding upper arm cuff is used for intermittent non-invasive monitoring. BP values are then obtained either manually (by auscultation of Korotkoff sounds or palpation or automatically (e.g., by oscillometry. For continuous non-invasive BP monitoring, the volume clamp method or arterial applanation tonometry can be used. Both techniques enable the arterial waveform and BP values to be obtained continuously. This article describes the different techniques for non-invasive BP measurement, their advantages and limitations, and their clinical applicability.

  11. Noninvasive studies of human visual cortex using neuromagnetic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aine, C.J.; George, J.S.; Supek, S.; Maclin, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    The major goals of noninvasive studies of the human visual cortex are: to increase knowledge of the functional organization of cortical visual pathways; and to develop noninvasive clinical tests for the assessment of cortical function. Noninvasive techniques suitable for studies of the structure and function of human visual cortex include magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), scalp recorded event-related potentials (ERPs), and event-related magnetic fields (ERFs). The primary challenge faced by noninvasive functional measures is to optimize the spatial and temporal resolution of the measurement and analytic techniques in order to effectively characterize the spatial and temporal variations in patterns of neuronal activity. In this paper we review the use of neuromagnetic techniques for this purpose. 8 refs., 3 figs

  12. Invasive and noninvasive dental analgesia techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estafan, D J

    1998-01-01

    Although needle-administered local anesthesia has been an essential tool of modern dentistry, it has also been responsible for many patients' fears of dental visits. Several new techniques have recently evolved that may offer viable alternatives. Two of these operate via electronic mechanisms that interfere with pain signals, two others involve transmucosal modes of administration, and a fifth technique involves an intraosseous pathway for anesthesia administration. Each of these techniques has different indications for dental procedures, but none is intended to replace needle administration in dentistry. This overview highlights the salient features of these alternative dental anesthesia techniques.

  13. Muscle perfusion and metabolic heterogeneity: insights from noninvasive imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Kjaer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments in noninvasive imaging techniques have enabled the study of local changes in perfusion and metabolism in skeletal muscle as well as patterns of heterogeneity in these variables in humans. In this review, the principles of these techniques along with some recent findings...... on functional heterogeneity in human skeletal muscle will be presented....

  14. Multimodal Authentication Techniques For Staff Identification And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Username, Password, Remember me, or Register ... It helps to overcome limitations of single biometric solutions to reduce the ability for the ... It is best, most efficient, effective and most reliable when Biometric Technique and Magnetic Coded ...

  15. An Image Registration Based Technique for Noninvasive Vascular Elastography

    OpenAIRE

    Valizadeh, Sina; Makkiabadi, Bahador; Mirbagheri, Alireza; Soozande, Mehdi; Manwar, Rayyan; Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-01-01

    Non-invasive vascular elastography is an emerging technique in vascular tissue imaging. During the past decades, several techniques have been suggested to estimate the tissue elasticity by measuring the displacement of the Carotid vessel wall. Cross correlation-based methods are the most prevalent approaches to measure the strain exerted in the wall vessel by the blood pressure. In the case of a low pressure, the displacement is too small to be apparent in ultrasound imaging, especially in th...

  16. Comparison of non-invasive tear film stability measurement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Michael Tm; Murphy, Paul J; Blades, Kenneth J; Craig, Jennifer P

    2018-01-01

    Measurement of tear film stability is commonly used to give an indication of tear film quality but a number of non-invasive techniques exists within the clinical setting. This study sought to compare three non-invasive tear film stability measurement techniques: instrument-mounted wide-field white light clinical interferometry, instrument-mounted keratoscopy and hand-held keratoscopy. Twenty-two subjects were recruited in a prospective, randomised, masked, cross-over study. Tear film break-up or thinning time was measured non-invasively by independent experienced examiners, with each of the three devices, in a randomised order, within an hour. Significant correlation was observed between instrument-mounted interferometric and keratoscopic measurements (p 0.05). Tear film stability values obtained from the hand-held device were significantly shorter and demonstrated narrower spread than the other two instruments (all p 0.05). Good clinical agreement exists between the instrument-mounted interferometric and keratoscopic measurements but not between the hand-held device and either of the instrument-mounted techniques. The results highlight the importance of specifying the instrument employed to record non-invasive tear film stability. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  17. The Role of Noninvasive Techniques in Stroke Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Maxwell Bernad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS have provided insight into understanding how neural connections are altered in consequence to cerebrovascular injury. The first part of this review will briefly survey some of the methodological issues and limitations related to noninvasive poststroke motor recovery studies. The second section will investigate some of the different neural mechanisms that underlie neurorehabilitation in stroke patients. The third part will explore our current understanding of motor memory processing, describe the neural structures that subserve motor memory consolidation, and discuss the current literature related to memory reconsolidation in healthy adults. Lastly, this paper will suggest the potential therapeutic applications of integrating noninvasive tools with memory consolidation and reconsolidation theories to enhance motor recovery. The overall objective of this work is to demonstrate how noninvasive technologies have been utilized in the multidisciplinary field of clinical behavioral neuroscience and to highlight their potential to be employed as clinical tools to promote individualized motor recovery in stroke patients.

  18. A Novel Technique for Prealignment in Multimodality Medical Image Registration

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    Wu Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Image pair is often aligned initially based on a rigid or affine transformation before a deformable registration method is applied in medical image registration. Inappropriate initial registration may compromise the registration speed or impede the convergence of the optimization algorithm. In this work, a novel technique was proposed for prealignment in both monomodality and multimodality image registration based on statistical correlation of gradient information. A simple and robust algorithm was proposed to determine the rotational differences between two images based on orientation histogram matching accumulated from local orientation of each pixel without any feature extraction. Experimental results showed that it was effective to acquire the orientation angle between two unregistered images with advantages over the existed method based on edge-map in multimodalities. Applying the orientation detection into the registration of CT/MR, T1/T2 MRI, and monomadality images with respect to rigid and nonrigid deformation improved the chances of finding the global optimization of the registration and reduced the search space of optimization.

  19. Non-invasive techniques for determining musculoskeleton body composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation analysis, combined with gamma spectrometry, has ushered in a new era of clinical diagnosis and evaluation of therapies, as well as investigation into and modelling of body composition in both normal individuals and patients suffering from various diseases and dysfunctions. Body composition studies have provided baseline data on such vital constituents as nitrogen, potassium and calcium. The non-invasive measurement techniques are particularly suitable for study of the musculo-skeletal changes in body composition. Of particular relevance here is the measurement of calcium loss in astronauts during prolonged space flights

  20. Multimodality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, I address an ongoing discussion in Danish E-learning research about how to take advantage of the fact that digital media facilitate other communication forms than text, so-called ‘multimodal' communication, which should not be confused with the term ‘multimedia'. While multimedia...... on their teaching and learning situations. The choices they make involve e-learning resources like videos, social platforms and mobile devices, not just as digital artefacts we interact with, but the entire practice of using digital media. In a life-long learning perspective, multimodality is potentially very...

  1. Innovative instrumentation for VVERs based in non-invasive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanneau, H.; Favennec, J.M.; Tournu, E.; Germain, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power plants such as VVERs can greatly benefit from innovative instrumentation to improve plant safety and efficiency. In recent years innovative instrumentation has been developed for PWRs with the aim of providing additional measurements of physical parameters on the primary and secondary circuits: the addition of new instrumentation is made possible by using non-invasive techniques such as ultrasonics and radiation detection. These innovations can be adapted for upgrading VVERs presently in operation and also in future VVERs. The following innovative instrumentation for the control, monitoring or testing at VVERs is described: 1. instrumentation for more accurate primary side direct measurements (for a better monitoring of the primary circuit); 2. instrumentation to monitor radioactivity leaks (for a safer plant); 3. instrumentation-related systems to improve the plant efficiency (for a cheaper kWh)

  2. Characterizing the inflammatory tissue response to acute myocardial infarction by clinical multimodality noninvasive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenweber, Tim; Roentgen, Philipp; Schäfer, Andreas; Schatka, Imke; Zwadlo, Caroline; Brunkhorst, Thomas; Berding, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann; Bengel, Frank M

    2014-09-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) triggers a systemic inflammatory response which determines subsequent healing. Experimentally, cardiac positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have been used successfully to obtain mechanistic insights. We explored the translational potential in patients early after MI. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance were performed in 15 patients sources of inflammatory cells. Positron emission tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance multimodality characterization of the acutely infarcted, inflamed myocardium may provide multiparametric end points for clinical studies aiming at support of infarct healing. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Multimodality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    In this paper, I address an ongoing discussion in Danish E-learning research about how to take advantage of the fact that digital media facilitate other communication forms than text, so-called ‘multimodal’ communication, which should not be confused with the term ‘multimedia’. While multimedia...... and learning situations. The choices they make involve E-learning resources like videos, social platforms and mobile devices, not just as digital artefacts we interact with, but the entire practice of using digital media. In a life-long learning perspective, multimodality is potentially very useful...

  4. Criteria to evaluate bone mineralization in cattle. II. Noninvasive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S.N.; McDowell, L.R.; Lawrence, L.A.; Wilkinson, N.S.; Ferguson, P.W.; Warnick, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the capabilities of dual photon absorptiometry (PA), radiographic photometry (RP), and ultrasound (U) to estimate bone mineral content (BMC) and bone strength of a group of bovine third metacarpals (McIII). Metacarpals were chosen for evaluating BMC and bone strength because of their accessibility and susceptibility to biomechanical stress. The right and left McIII of 14 Angus heifers (24 to 32 mo of age) were collected at slaughter and all soft tissues (including periosteum) were removed. The BMC was estimated at both the midpoint and 3 cm proximal to the midpoint on the McIII diaphysis. Metacarpals then were tested by three-point bending to determine breaking load (BL) and breaking strength (BS). Bones were reassembled and two 2-cm sections were removed, one at the midpoint and one 1 cm proximal to the midpoint section. Sections then were ashed and ash content was expressed as grams per 2-cm slice and defined as BMC. Correlation coefficients (r) between BMC vs PA, RP, and U were .908 (P < .0001), .967 (P < .0001), and .565 (P < .0001), respectively; r values between BS vs PA, RP, and U were .406 (P < 05), .429 (P < .05), and .499 (P < .01), respectively, and r values between BL vs PA, RP, and U were .870 (P < .0001), .865 (P < .0001), and .588 (P < .001), respectively. These data indicate that noninvasive techniques are useful in predicting BMC and BL in the bovine

  5. Noninvasive Multimodal Imaging to Predict Recovery of Locomotion after Extended Limb Ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Radowsky

    Full Text Available Acute limb ischemia is a common cause of morbidity and mortality following trauma both in civilian centers and in combat related injuries. Rapid determination of tissue viability and surgical restoration of blood flow are desirable, but not always possible. We sought to characterize the response to increasing periods of hind limb ischemia in a porcine model such that we could define a period of critical ischemia (the point after which irreversible neuromuscular injury occurs, evaluate non-invasive methods for characterizing that ischemia, and establish a model by which we could predict whether or not the animal's locomotion would return to baselines levels post-operatively. Ischemia was induced by either application of a pneumatic tourniquet or vessel occlusion (performed by clamping the proximal iliac artery and vein at the level of the inguinal ligament. The limb was monitored for the duration of the procedure with both 3-charge coupled device (3CCD and infrared (IR imaging for tissue oxygenation and perfusion, respectively. The experimental arms of this model are effective at inducing histologically evident muscle injury with some evidence of expected secondary organ damage, particularly in animals with longer ischemia times. Noninvasive imaging data shows excellent correlation with post-operative functional outcomes, validating its use as a non-invasive means of viability assessment, and directly monitors post-occlusive reactive hyperemia. A classification model, based on partial-least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA of imaging variables only, successfully classified animals as "returned to normal locomotion" or "did not return to normal locomotion" with 87.5% sensitivity and 66.7% specificity after cross-validation. PLSDA models generated from non-imaging data were not as accurate (AUC of 0.53 compared the PLSDA model generated from only imaging data (AUC of 0.76. With some modification, this limb ischemia model could also serve as a

  6. Non-invasive spectroscopic techniques in the diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakaki, E.; Sianoudis, IA; Zois, EN; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, AA; Dessinioti, C.; Stefanaki, E.; Stratigos, AJ; Antoniou, C.; Katsambas, A.; Christofidou, E.

    2017-11-01

    The number of non-melanoma skin cancers is increasing worldwide and has become an important health and economic issue. Early detection and treatment of skin cancer can significantly improve patient outcome. Therefore there is an increase in the demand for proper management and effective non-invasive diagnostic modalities in order to avoid relapses or unnecessary treatments. Although the gold standard of diagnosis for non-melanoma skin cancers is biopsy followed by histopathology evaluation, optical non-invasive diagnostic tools have obtained increased attention. Emerging non-invasive or minimal invasive techniques with possible application in the diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancers include high-definition optical coherence tomography, fluorescence spectroscopy, oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectrometry among others spectroscopic techniques. Our findings establish how those spectrometric techniques can be used to more rapidly and easily diagnose skin cancer in an accurate and automated manner in the clinic.

  7. Optoacoustic technique for noninvasive monitoring of blood oxygenation: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esenaliev, Rinat O.; Larina, Irina V.; Larin, Kirill V.; Deyo, Donald J.; Motamedi, Massoud; Prough, Donald S.

    2002-08-01

    Replacement of invasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation with noninvasive techniques offers great promise in the management of life-threatening neurologic illnesses including traumatic brain injury. We developed and built an optoacoustic system to noninvasively monitor cerebral venous oxygenation; the system includes a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser and a specially designed optoacoustic probe. We tested the system in vitro in sheep blood with experimentally varied oxygenation. Our results demonstrated that (1) the amplitude and temporal profile of the optoacoustic waves increase with blood oxygenation in the range from 24% to 92%, (2) optoacoustic signals can be detected despite optical and acoustic attenuation by thick bone, and (3) the system is capable of real-time and continuous measurements. These results suggest that the optoacoustic technique is technically feasible for continuous, noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous oxygenation.

  8. Enhanced EDX images by fusion of multimodal SEM images using pansharpening techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, G; Angulo, J; Moreaud, M; Sorbier, L

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the potential interest of image fusion in the context of multimodal scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. In particular, we aim at merging the backscattered electron images that usually have a high spatial resolution but do not provide enough discriminative information to physically classify the nature of the sample, with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) images that have discriminative information but a lower spatial resolution. The produced images are named enhanced EDX. To achieve this goal, we have compared the results obtained with classical pansharpening techniques for image fusion with an original approach tailored for multimodal SEM fusion of information. Quantitative assessment is obtained by means of two SEM images and a simulated dataset produced by a software based on PENELOPE. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. Estimation of coronary wave intensity analysis using noninvasive techniques and its application to exercise physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broyd, Christopher J; Nijjer, Sukhjinder; Sen, Sayan; Petraco, Ricardo; Jones, Siana; Al-Lamee, Rasha; Foin, Nicolas; Al-Bustami, Mahmud; Sethi, Amarjit; Kaprielian, Raffi; Ramrakha, Punit; Khan, Masood; Malik, Iqbal S; Francis, Darrel P; Parker, Kim; Hughes, Alun D; Mikhail, Ghada W; Mayet, Jamil; Davies, Justin E

    2016-03-01

    Wave intensity analysis (WIA) has found particular applicability in the coronary circulation where it can quantify traveling waves that accelerate and decelerate blood flow. The most important wave for the regulation of flow is the backward-traveling decompression wave (BDW). Coronary WIA has hitherto always been calculated from invasive measures of pressure and flow. However, recently it has become feasible to obtain estimates of these waveforms noninvasively. In this study we set out to assess the agreement between invasive and noninvasive coronary WIA at rest and measure the effect of exercise. Twenty-two patients (mean age 60) with unobstructed coronaries underwent invasive WIA in the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Immediately afterwards, noninvasive LAD flow and pressure were recorded and WIA calculated from pulsed-wave Doppler coronary flow velocity and central blood pressure waveforms measured using a cuff-based technique. Nine of these patients underwent noninvasive coronary WIA assessment during exercise. A pattern of six waves were observed in both modalities. The BDW was similar between invasive and noninvasive measures [peak: 14.9 ± 7.8 vs. -13.8 ± 7.1 × 10(4) W·m(-2)·s(-2), concordance correlation coefficient (CCC): 0.73, P Exercise increased the BDW: at maximum exercise peak BDW was -47.0 ± 29.5 × 10(4) W·m(-2)·s(-2) (P Physiological Society.

  10. Intercomparison of techniques for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of methods are presently available for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass of both normal individuals and patients with metabolic disorders. Chief among these methods are radiographic techniques such as radiogrammetry, photon absorptiometry, computer tomography, Compton scattering and neutron activation analysis. In this review, the salient features of the bone measurement techniques are discussed along with their accuracy and precision. The advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques for measuring bone mass are summarized. Where possible, intercomparisons are made of the various techniques

  11. An integrated spectroscopic approach for the non-invasive study of modern art materials and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosi, F.; Miliani, C.; Clementi, C.; Kahrim, K.; Presciutti, F.; Vagnini, M.; Manuali, V.; Daveri, A.; Cartechini, L.; Brunetti, B. G.; Sgamellotti, A.

    2010-09-01

    A non-invasive study has been carried out on 18 paintings by Alberto Burri (1915-1995), one of Italy’s most important contemporary painters. The study aims to demonstrate the appropriate and suitable use of portable non-invasive instrumentation for the characterization of materials and techniques found in works dating from 1948 to 1975 belonging to the Albizzini Collection. Sampling of any kind has been forbidden, in order to maintain the integrity of the paintings. Furthermore, the material heterogeneity of each single artwork could potentially result in a poorly representative sampling campaign. Therefore, a non-invasive and in situ analytical approach has been deemed mandatory, notwithstanding the complexity of modern materials and challenging data interpretation. It is the non-invasive nature of the study that has allowed for the acquisition of vast spectral data (a total of about 650 spectra including XRF, mid and near FTIR, micro-Raman and UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopies). In order to better handle and to extrapolate the most meaningful information from these data, a statistical multivariate analysis, namely principal component analysis (PCA), has been applied to the spectral results. In particular, the possibility of combining elemental and molecular information has been explored by uniting XRF and infrared spectra in one PCA dataset. The combination of complementary spectroscopic techniques has allowed for the characterization of both inorganic and organic pigments, extenders, fillers, and binders employed by Alberto Burri.

  12. Image evaluation of HIV encephalopathy: a multimodal approach using quantitative MR techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Paulo T.C.; Escorsi-Rosset, Sara [University of Sao Paulo, Radiology Section, Internal Medicine Department, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cervi, Maria C. [University of Sao Paulo, Department of Pediatrics, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Santos, Antonio Carlos [University of Sao Paulo, Radiology Section, Internal Medicine Department, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hospital das Clinicas da FMRP-USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    A multimodal approach of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) encephalopathy using quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) techniques can demonstrate brain changes not detectable only with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to compare conventional MRI and MR quantitative techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and relaxometry and to determine whether quantitative techniques are more sensitive than conventional imaging for brain changes caused by HIV infection. We studied prospectively nine HIV positive children (mean age 6 years, from 5 to 8 years old) and nine controls (mean age 7.3 years; from 3 to 10 years), using MRS and relaxometry. Examinations were carried on 1.5-T equipment. HIV-positive patients presented with only minor findings and all control patients had normal conventional MR findings. MRS findings showed an increase in choline to creatine (CHO/CRE) ratios bilaterally in both frontal gray and white matter, in the left parietal white matter, and in total CHO/CRE ratio. In contrast, N-acetylaspartate to creatine (NAA/CRE) ratios did not present with any significant difference between both groups. Relaxometry showed significant bilateral abnormalities, with lengthening of the relaxation time in HIV positive in many regions. Conventional MRI is not sensitive for early brain changes caused by HIV infection. Quantitative techniques such as MRS and relaxometry appear as valuable tools in the diagnosis of these early changes. Therefore, a multimodal quantitative study can be useful in demonstrating and understanding the physiopathology of the disease. (orig.)

  13. Using multimodal imaging techniques to monitor limb ischemia: a rapid noninvasive method for assessing extremity wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Rajiv; Caruso, Joseph D.; Radowsky, Jason S.; Rodriguez, Maricela; Forsberg, Jonathan; Elster, Eric A.; Crane, Nicole J.

    2013-03-01

    Over 70% of military casualties resulting from the current conflicts sustain major extremity injuries. Of these the majority are caused by blasts from improvised explosive devices. The resulting injuries include traumatic amputations, open fractures, crush injuries, and acute vascular disruption. Critical tissue ischemia—the point at which ischemic tissues lose the capacity to recover—is therefore a major concern, as lack of blood flow to tissues rapidly leads to tissue deoxygenation and necrosis. If left undetected or unaddressed, a potentially salvageable limb may require more extensive debridement or, more commonly, amputation. Predicting wound outcome during the initial management of blast wounds remains a significant challenge, as wounds continue to "evolve" during the debridement process and our ability to assess wound viability remains subjectively based. Better means of identifying critical ischemia are needed. We developed a swine limb ischemia model in which two imaging modalities were combined to produce an objective and quantitative assessment of wound perfusion and tissue viability. By using 3 Charge-Coupled Device (3CCD) and Infrared (IR) cameras, both surface tissue oxygenation as well as overall limb perfusion could be depicted. We observed a change in mean 3CCD and IR values at peak ischemia and during reperfusion correlate well with clinically observed indicators for limb function and vitality. After correcting for baseline mean R-B values, the 3CCD values correlate with surface tissue oxygenation and the IR values with changes in perfusion. This study aims to not only increase fundamental understanding of the processes involved with limb ischemia and reperfusion, but also to develop tools to monitor overall limb perfusion and tissue oxygenation in a clinical setting. A rapid and objective diagnostic for extent of ischemic damage and overall limb viability could provide surgeons with a more accurate indication of tissue viability. This may help reducing the number of surgical interventions required, by aiding surgeons in identifying and demarcating areas of critical tissue ischemia, so that a more adequate debridement may be performed. This would have obvious benefits of reducing patient distress and decreasing both the overall recovery time and cost of rehabilitation.

  14. Cardiac abnormalities assessed by non-invasive techniques in patients with newly diagnosed idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Simonsen, Jane Angel; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2015-01-01

    inflammatory myopathies (IIM) by means of non-invasive techniques. METHODS: Fourteen patients with IIM (8 polymyositis, 4 dermatomyositis, 2 cancer-associated dermatomyositis) and 14 gender- and age- matched healthy control subjects were investigated. Participant assessments included a cardiac questionnaire...... in 8 (57%) of the patients compared to none of the controls (pgroup (p=0.01). Two patients had systolic dysfunction, and one diastolic dysfunction...

  15. Multimodal technique to eliminate humidity interference for specific detection of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Ahmed Hasnain; Umasankar, Yogeswaran; Gonzalez, Pablo J; Alfonso, Alejandro; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2017-01-15

    Multimodal electrochemical technique incorporating both open circuit potential (OCP) and amperometric techniques have been conceptualized and implemented to improve the detection of specific analyte in systems where more than one analyte is present. This approach has been demonstrated through the detection of ethanol while eliminating the contribution of water in a micro fuel cell sensor system. The sensor was interfaced with LMP91000 potentiostat, controlled through MSP430F5529LP microcontroller to implement an auto-calibration algorithm tailored to improve the detection of alcohol. The sensor was designed and fabricated as a three electrode system with Nafion as a proton exchange membrane (PEM). The electrochemical signal of the interfering phase (water) was eliminated by implementing the multimodal electrochemical detection technique. The results were validated by comparing sensor and potentiostat performances with a commercial sensor and potentiostat respectively. The results suggest that such a sensing system can detect ethanol at concentrations as low as 5ppm. The structure and properties such as low detection limit, selectivity and miniaturized size enables potential application of this device in wearable transdermal alcohol measurements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A Multimodal Technique for an Embedded Fingerprint Recognizer in Mobile Payment Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Conti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development and the diffusion of distributed systems, directly connected to recent communication technologies, move people towards the era of mobile and ubiquitous systems. Distributed systems make merchant-customer relationships closer and more flexible, using reliable e-commerce technologies. These systems and environments need many distributed access points, for the creation and management of secure identities and for the secure recognition of users. Traditionally, these access points can be made possible by a software system with a main central server. This work proposes the study and implementation of a multimodal technique, based on biometric information, for identity management and personal ubiquitous authentication. The multimodal technique uses both fingerprint micro features (minutiae and fingerprint macro features (singularity points for robust user authentication. To strengthen the security level of electronic payment systems, an embedded hardware prototype has been also created: acting as self-contained sensors, it performs the entire authentication process on the same device, so that all critical information (e.g. biometric data, account transactions and cryptographic keys, are managed and stored inside the sensor, without any data transmission. The sensor has been prototyped using the Celoxica RC203E board, achieving fast execution time, low working frequency, and good recognition performance.

  17. ANALYSIS OF MULTIMODAL FUSION TECHNIQUES FOR AUDIO-VISUAL SPEECH RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Ivanko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with analytical review, covering the latest achievements in the field of audio-visual (AV fusion (integration of multimodal information. We discuss the main challenges and report on approaches to address them. One of the most important tasks of the AV integration is to understand how the modalities interact and influence each other. The paper addresses this problem in the context of AV speech processing and speech recognition. In the first part of the review we set out the basic principles of AV speech recognition and give the classification of audio and visual features of speech. Special attention is paid to the systematization of the existing techniques and the AV data fusion methods. In the second part we provide a consolidated list of tasks and applications that use the AV fusion based on carried out analysis of research area. We also indicate used methods, techniques, audio and video features. We propose classification of the AV integration, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches. We draw conclusions and offer our assessment of the future in the field of AV fusion. In the further research we plan to implement a system of audio-visual Russian continuous speech recognition using advanced methods of multimodal fusion.

  18. Cardiovascular dysfunction in obesity and new diagnostic imaging techniques: the role of noninvasive image methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, José Augusto A; Rodrigues, Alexandre B; Mota, Cleonice Carvalho C; Barbosa, Márcia M; Simões e Silva, Ana C

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem affecting adults and children in both developed and developing countries. This condition often leads to metabolic syndrome, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. A large number of studies have been carried out to understand the pathogenesis of cardiovascular dysfunction in obese patients. Endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the progression of atherosclerosis and the development of coronary artery disease, hypertension and congestive heart failure. Noninvasive methods in the field of cardiovascular imaging, such as measuring intima-media thickness, flow-mediated dilatation, tissue Doppler, and strain, and strain rate, constitute new tools for the early detection of cardiac and vascular dysfunction. These techniques will certainly enable a better evaluation of initial cardiovascular injury and allow the correct, timely management of obese patients. The present review summarizes the main aspects of cardiovascular dysfunction in obesity and discusses the application of recent noninvasive imaging methods for the early detection of cardiovascular alterations.

  19. Muscle tissue saturation in humans studied with two non-invasive optical techniques: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaharin, Alfi; Krite Svanberg, Emilie; Ellerström, Ida; Subash, Arman Ahamed; Khoptyar, Dmitry; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Åkeson, Jonas

    2013-11-01

    Muscle tissue saturation (StO2) has been measured with two non-invasive optical techniques and the results were compared. One of the techniques is widely used in the hospitals - the CW-NIRS technique. The other is the photon timeof- flight spectrometer (pTOFS) developed in the Group of Biophotonics, Lund University, Sweden. The wavelengths used in both the techniques are 730 nm and 810 nm. A campaign was arranged to perform measurements on 21 (17 were taken for comparison) healthy adult volunteers (8 women and 13 men). Oxygen saturations were measured at the right lower arm of each volunteer. To observe the effects of different provocations on the oxygen saturation a blood pressure cuff was attached in the upper right arm. For CW-NIRS, the tissue saturation values were in the range from 70-90%, while for pTOFS the values were in the range from 55-60%.

  20. Differential Mueller matrix polarimetry technique for non-invasive measurement of glucose concentration on human fingertip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Quoc-Hung; Lo, Yu-Lung

    2017-06-26

    A differential Mueller matrix polarimetry technique is proposed for obtaining non-invasive (NI) measurements of the glucose concentration on the human fingertip. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by detecting the optical rotation angle and depolarization index of tissue phantom samples containing de-ionized water (DI), glucose solutions with concentrations ranging from 0~500 mg/dL and 2% lipofundin. The results show that the extracted optical rotation angle increases linearly with an increasing glucose concentration, while the depolarization index decreases. The practical applicability of the proposed method is demonstrated by measuring the optical rotation angle and depolarization index properties of the human fingertips of healthy volunteers.

  1. An alternative noninvasive technique for the treatment of iatrogenic femoral pseudoaneurysms: stethoscope-guided compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Ahmet; Duyuler, Serkan; Kalayci, Süleyman; Türker, Pinar; Sahan, Ekrem; Maden, Orhan; Selçuk, Mehmet Timur

    2013-06-01

    latrogenic femoral pseudoaneurysm is a well-known vascular access site complication. Many invasive and noninvasive techniques have been proposed for the management of this relatively common complication. In this study, we aimed to evaluate efficiency and safety of stethoscope-guided compression as a novel noninvasive technique in the femoral pseudoaneurysm treatment. We prospectively included 29 consecutive patients with the diagnosis of femoral pseudoaneurysm who underwent coronary angiography. Patients with a clinical suspicion of femoral pseudoaneurysm were referred to colour Doppler ultrasound evaluation. The adult (large) side of the stethoscope was used to determine the location where the bruit was best heard. Then compression with the paediatric (small) side of the stethoscope was applied until the bruit could no longer be heard and compression was maintained for at least two sessions. Once the bruit disappeared, a 12-hour bed rest with external elastic compression was advised to the patients, in order to prevent disintegration of newly formed thrombosis. Mean pseudoaneurysm size was 1.7 +/- 0.4 cmx 3.0 +/- 0.9 cm and the mean duration of compression was 36.2 +/- 8.5 minutes.Twenty-six (89.6%) of these 29 patients were successfully treated with stethoscope-guided compression. In 18 patients (62%), the pseuodoaneurysms were successfully closed after 2 sessions of 15-minute compression. No severe complication was observed. Stethoscope-guided compression of femoral pseudoaneurysms is a safe and effective novel technique which requires less equipment and expertise than other contemporary methods.

  2. Peering beneath the surface: novel imaging techniques to noninvasively select gametes and embryos for ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasensky, Joshua; Swain, Jason E

    2013-10-01

    Embryo imaging has long been a critical tool for in vitro fertilization laboratories, aiding in morphological assessment of embryos, which remains the primary tool for embryo selection. With the recent emergence of clinically applicable real-time imaging systems to assess embryo morphokinetics, a renewed interest has emerged regarding noninvasive methods to assess gamete and embryo development as a means of inferring quality. Several studies exist that utilize novel imaging techniques to visualize or quantify intracellular components of gametes and embryos with the intent of correlating localization of organelles or molecular constitution with quality or outcome. However, the safety of these approaches varies due to the potential detrimental impact of light exposure or other variables. Along with complexity of equipment and cost, these drawbacks currently limit clinical application of these novel microscopes and imaging techniques. However, as evidenced by clinical incorporation of some real-time imaging devices as well as use of polarized microscopy, some of these imaging approaches may prove to be useful. This review summarizes the existing literature on novel imaging approaches utilized to examine gametes and embryos. Refinement of some of these imaging systems may permit clinical application and serve as a means to offer new, noninvasive selection tools to improve outcomes for various assisted reproductive technology procedures.

  3. Non-invasive label-free investigation and typing of head and neck cancers by multimodal nonlinear microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Tobias; Vogler, Nadine; Dietzek, Benjamin; Akimov, Denis; Inhestern, Johanna; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Popp, Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    Early detection and typing of tumors is pressing matter in clinical research with important impacts for prognosis and successful treatment. Currently, staining is the golden standard in histopathology but requires surgical removal of tissue. In order to avoid resection of non-diseased tissue a non-invasive real-time imaging method is required which can be applied ideally intrasurgically. In this proceeding a combination of second harmonic generation (SHG), two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman (CARS) imaging has been employed to investigate tissue sections of head and neck carcinomas focussing on laryngeal carcinoma. Primary laryngeal and other head and neck carcinomas consist to 99% of squamous cell carcinoma. By fusing the various imaging methods it is possible to measure the thickness of the epithelial cell layer as a marker for dysplastic or cancerous tissue degradation and to differentiate keratinizing and nonkeratininzing squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). As nonkeratinizing SCCs of the oropharynx correlate with a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as a subentity of head and neck cancer, and HPV related tumors are associated with a better clinical prognosis, the differentiation between keratinizing and non-keratinizing forms of SCCs is of high diagnostic value. TPEF is capable of displaying cell nuclei, therefore, morphologic information as cell density, cell to cytoplasm ratio, size and shape of cell nuclei can be obtained. SHG - on the other hand - selectively reveals the collagen matrix of the connective tissue, which is useful for determination of tumor-islets boundaries within epithelial tissue - a prerequisite for precise resection. Finally CARS in the CH-stretching region visualizes the lipid content of the tissue, which can be correlated with the dysplastic grade of the tissue.

  4. A novel noninvasive all optical technique to monitor physiology of an exercising muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Vishal [Department of Radiology, University of Southern California, 4650 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90027 (United States); Marcu, Laura [Department of Bioengineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Karunasiri, Gamani [Department of Physics, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California 93943 (United States)], E-mail: Vsaxena@usc.edu

    2008-11-07

    An all optical technique based on near-infrared spectroscopy and mid-infrared imaging (MIRI) is applied as a noninvasive, in vivo tool to monitor the vascular status of skeletal muscle and the physiological changes that occur during exercise. A near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique, namely, steady state diffuse optical spectroscopy (SSDOS) along with MIRI is applied for monitoring the changes in the values of tissue oxygenation and thermometry of an exercising muscle. The NIRS measurements are performed at five discrete wavelengths in a spectral window of 650-850 nm and MIRI is performed in a spectral window of 8-12 {mu}m. The understanding of tissue oxygenation status and the behavior of the physiological parameters derived from thermometry may provide a useful insight into muscle physiology, therapeutic response and treatment.

  5. A novel noninvasive all optical technique to monitor physiology of an exercising muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Vishal; Marcu, Laura; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2008-01-01

    An all optical technique based on near-infrared spectroscopy and mid-infrared imaging (MIRI) is applied as a noninvasive, in vivo tool to monitor the vascular status of skeletal muscle and the physiological changes that occur during exercise. A near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique, namely, steady state diffuse optical spectroscopy (SSDOS) along with MIRI is applied for monitoring the changes in the values of tissue oxygenation and thermometry of an exercising muscle. The NIRS measurements are performed at five discrete wavelengths in a spectral window of 650-850 nm and MIRI is performed in a spectral window of 8-12 μm. The understanding of tissue oxygenation status and the behavior of the physiological parameters derived from thermometry may provide a useful insight into muscle physiology, therapeutic response and treatment.

  6. Post flooding damage assessment of earth dams and historical reservoirs using non-invasive geophysical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentenac, Philippe; Benes, Vojtech; Budinsky, Vladimir; Keenan, Helen; Baron, Ron

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes the use of four geophysical techniques to map the structural integrity of historical earth reservoir embankments which are susceptible to natural decay with time. The four techniques that were used to assess the post flood damage were 1. A fast scanning technique using a dipole electromagnetic profile apparatus (GEM2), 2. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) in order to obtain a high resolution image of the shape of the damaged/seepage zone, 3. Self-Potential surveys were carried out to relate the detected seepage evolution and change of the water displacement inside the embankment, 4. The washed zone in the areas with piping was characterised with microgravimetry. The four geophysical techniques used were evaluated against the case studies of two reservoirs in South Bohemia, Czech Republic. A risk approach based on the Geophysical results was undertaken for the reservoir embankments. The four techniques together enabled a comprehensive non-invasive assessment whereby remedial action could be recommended where required. Conclusions were also drawn on the efficiency of the techniques to be applied for embankments with wood structures.

  7. Noninvasive Multimodality Imaging of the Tumor Microenvironment: Registered Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Positron Emission Tomography Studies of a Preclinical Tumor Model of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungJoon Cho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In vivo knowledge of the spatial distribution of viable, necrotic, and hypoxic areas can provide prognostic information about the risk of developing metastases and regional radiation sensitivity and may be used potentially for localized dose escalation in radiation treatment. In this study, multimodality in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and positron emission tomography (PET imaging using stereotactic fiduciary markers in the Dunning R3327AT prostate tumor were performed, focusing on the relationship between dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI using Magnevist (Gd-DTPA and dynamic 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-Fmiso PET. The noninvasive measurements were verified using tumor tissue sections stained for hematoxylin/eosin and pimonidazole. To further validate the relationship between 18F-Fmiso and pimonidazole uptake, 18F digital autoradiography was performed on a selected tumor and compared with the corresponding pimonidazole-stained slices. The comparison of Akep values (kep = rate constant of movement of Gd-DTPA between the interstitial space and plasma and A = amplitude in the two-compartment model (Hoffmann U, Brix G, Knopp MV, Hess T and Lorenz WJ (1995. Magn Reson Med 33, 506– 514 derived from DCE-MRI studies and from early 18F-Fmiso uptake PET studies showed that tumor vasculature is a major determinant of early 18F-Fmiso uptake. A negative correlation between the spatial map of Akep and the slope map of late (last 1 hour of the dynamic PET scan 18F-Fmiso uptake was observed. The relationships between DCE-MRI and hematoxylin/eosin slices and between 18F-Fmiso PET and pimonidazole slices confirm the validity of MRI/PET measurements to image the tumor microenvironment and to identify regions of tumor necrosis, hypoxia, and well-perfused tissue.

  8. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles function as a long-term, multi-modal imaging label for non-invasive tracking of implanted progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A Pacak

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles to function as a long-term tracking label for multi-modal imaging of implanted engineered tissues containing muscle-derived progenitor cells using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT. SPIO-labeled primary myoblasts were embedded in fibrin sealant and imaged to obtain intensity data by MRI or radio-opacity information by μCT. Each imaging modality displayed a detection gradient that matched increasing SPIO concentrations. Labeled cells were then incorporated in fibrin sealant, injected into the atrioventricular groove of rat hearts, and imaged in vivo and ex vivo for up to 1 year. Transplanted cells were identified in intact animals and isolated hearts using both imaging modalities. MRI was better able to detect minuscule amounts of SPIO nanoparticles, while μCT more precisely identified the location of heavily-labeled cells. Histological analyses confirmed that iron oxide particles were confined to viable, skeletal muscle-derived cells in the implant at the expected location based on MRI and μCT. These analyses showed no evidence of phagocytosis of labeled cells by macrophages or release of nanoparticles from transplanted cells. In conclusion, we established that SPIO nanoparticles function as a sensitive and specific long-term label for MRI and μCT, respectively. Our findings will enable investigators interested in regenerative therapies to non-invasively and serially acquire complementary, high-resolution images of transplanted cells for one year using a single label.

  9. A novel non-invasive diagnostic sampling technique for cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Taslimi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL is important for chemotherapy and epidemiological studies. Common approaches for Leishmania detection involve the invasive collection of specimens for direct identification of amastigotes by microscopy and the culturing of promastigotes from infected tissues. Although these techniques are highly specific, they require highly skilled health workers and have the inherent risks of all invasive procedures, such as pain and risk of bacterial and fungal super-infection. Therefore, it is essential to reduce discomfort, potential infection and scarring caused by invasive diagnostic approaches especially for children. In this report, we present a novel non-invasive method, that is painless, rapid and user-friendly, using sequential tape strips for sampling and isolation of DNA from the surface of active and healed skin lesions of CL patients. A total of 119 patients suspected of suffering from cutaneous leishmaniasis with different clinical manifestations were recruited and samples were collected both from their lesions and from uninfected areas. In addition, 15 fungal-infected lesions and 54 areas of healthy skin were examined. The duration of sampling is short (less than one minute and species identification by PCR is highly specific and sensitive. The sequential tape stripping sampling method is a sensitive, non-invasive and cost-effective alternative to traditional diagnostic assays and it is suitable for field studies as well as for use in health care centers.

  10. Cardiovascular dysfunction in obesity and new diagnostic imaging techniques: the role of noninvasive image methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbosa JA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available José Augusto A Barbosa¹, Alexandre B Rodrigues¹, Cleonice Carvalho C Mota¹, Márcia M Barbosa², Ana C Simões e Silva¹¹Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil; ²Ecocenter, Socor Hospital, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, BrazilAbstract: Obesity is a major public health problem affecting adults and children in both developed and developing countries. This condition often leads to metabolic syndrome, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. A large number of studies have been carried out to understand the pathogenesis of cardiovascular dysfunction in obese patients. Endothelial dysfunction plays a key role in the progression of atherosclerosis and the development of coronary artery disease, hypertension and congestive heart failure. Noninvasive methods in the field of cardiovascular imaging, such as measuring intima-media thickness, flow-mediated dilatation, tissue Doppler, and strain, and strain rate, constitute new tools for the early detection of cardiac and vascular dysfunction. These techniques will certainly enable a better evaluation of initial cardiovascular injury and allow the correct, timely management of obese patients. The present review summarizes the main aspects of cardiovascular dysfunction in obesity and discusses the application of recent noninvasive imaging methods for the early detection of cardiovascular alterations.Keywords: cardiovascular risk, endothelium dysfunction, obesity, strain and strain rate, tissue Doppler

  11. ESR technique for noninvasive way to quantify cyclodextrins effect on cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grammenos, A.; Mouithys-Mickalad, A.; Guelluy, P.H.; Lismont, M.; Piel, G.; Hoebeke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → ESR: a new tool for cyclodextrins study on living cells. → Cholesterol and phospholipid extraction by Rameb in a dose- and time-dependent way. → Extracted phospholipids and cholesterol form stable aggregates. → ESR spectra show that lipid rafts are damaged by Rameb. → Quantification of the cholesterol extraction on cell membranes in a noninvasive way. -- Abstract: A new way to study the action of cyclodextrin was developed to quantify the damage caused on cell membrane and lipid bilayer. The Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy was used to study the action of Randomly methylated-beta-cyclodextrin (Rameb) on living cells (HCT-116). The relative anisotropy observed in ESR spectrum of nitroxide spin probe (5-DSA and cholestane) is directly related to the rotational mobility of the probe, which can be further correlated with the microviscosity. The use of ESR probes clearly shows a close correlation between cholesterol contained in cells and cellular membrane microviscosity. This study also demonstrates the Rameb ability to extract cholesterol and phospholipids in time- and dose-dependent ways. In addition, ESR spectra enabled to establish that cholesterol is extracted from lipid rafts to form stable aggregates. The present work supports that ESR is an easy, reproducible and noninvasive technique to study the effect of cyclodextrins on cell membranes.

  12. Cartilage Repair Surgery: Outcome Evaluation by Using Noninvasive Cartilage Biomarkers Based on Quantitative MRI Techniques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungmann, Pia M.; Baum, Thomas; Bauer, Jan S.; Karampinos, Dimitrios C.; Link, Thomas M.; Li, Xiaojuan; Trattnig, Siegfried; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus; Welsch, Goetz H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. Objective. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Methods. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Results. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC), and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. Conclusions. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair. PMID:24877139

  13. Cartilage Repair Surgery: Outcome Evaluation by Using Noninvasive Cartilage Biomarkers Based on Quantitative MRI Techniques?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia M. Jungmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. New quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques are increasingly applied as outcome measures after cartilage repair. Objective. To review the current literature on the use of quantitative MRI biomarkers for evaluation of cartilage repair at the knee and ankle. Methods. Using PubMed literature research, studies on biochemical, quantitative MR imaging of cartilage repair were identified and reviewed. Results. Quantitative MR biomarkers detect early degeneration of articular cartilage, mainly represented by an increasing water content, collagen disruption, and proteoglycan loss. Recently, feasibility of biochemical MR imaging of cartilage repair tissue and surrounding cartilage was demonstrated. Ultrastructural properties of the tissue after different repair procedures resulted in differences in imaging characteristics. T2 mapping, T1rho mapping, delayed gadolinium-enhanced MRI of cartilage (dGEMRIC, and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI are applicable on most clinical 1.5 T and 3 T MR scanners. Currently, a standard of reference is difficult to define and knowledge is limited concerning correlation of clinical and MR findings. The lack of histological correlations complicates the identification of the exact tissue composition. Conclusions. A multimodal approach combining several quantitative MRI techniques in addition to morphological and clinical evaluation might be promising. Further investigations are required to demonstrate the potential for outcome evaluation after cartilage repair.

  14. An omnipotent Li-ion battery charger with multimode control and polarity reversible techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiann-Jong; Ku, Yi-Tsen; Yang, Hong-Yi; Hwang, Yuh-Shyan; Yu, Cheng-Chieh

    2016-07-01

    The omnipotent Li-ion battery charger with multimode control and polarity reversible techniques is presented in this article. The proposed chip is fabricated with TSMC 0.35μm 2P4M complementary metal-oxide- semiconductor processes, and the chip area including pads is 1.5 × 1.5 mm2. The structure of the omnipotent charger combines three charging modes and polarity reversible techniques, which adapt to any Li-ion batteries. The three reversible Li-ion battery charging modes, including trickle-current charging, large-current charging and constant-voltage charging, can charge in matching polarities or opposite polarities. The proposed circuit has a maximum charging current of 300 mA and the input voltage of the proposed circuit is set to 4.5 V. The maximum efficiency of the proposed charger is about 91% and its average efficiency is 74.8%. The omnipotent charger can precisely provide the charging current to the battery.

  15. Improving Perioperative Outcomes Through Minimally Invasive and Non-invasive Hemodynamic Monitoring Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashige Yamada

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of patients require precise intraoperative hemodynamic monitoring due to aging and comorbidities. To prevent undesirable outcomes from intraoperative hypotension or hypoperfusion, appropriate threshold settings are required. These setting can vary widely from patient to patient. Goal-directed therapy techniques allow for flow monitoring as the standard for perioperative fluid management. Based on the concept of personalized medicine, individual assessment and treatment are more advantageous than conventional or uniform interventions. The recent development of minimally and noninvasive monitoring devices make it possible to apply detailed control, tracking, and observation of broad patient populations, all while reducing adverse complications. In this manuscript, we review the monitoring features of each device, together with possible advantages and disadvantages of their use in optimizing patient hemodynamic management.

  16. Comparison between invasive and noninvasive techniques of evaluation of microvascular structural alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciuceis, Carolina; Agabiti Rosei, Claudia; Caletti, Stefano; Trapletti, Valentina; Coschignano, Maria A; Tiberio, Guido A M; Duse, Sarah; Docchio, Franco; Pasinetti, Simone; Zambonardi, Federica; Semeraro, Francesco; Porteri, Enzo; Solaini, Leonardo; Sansoni, Giovanna; Pileri, Paola; Rossini, Claudia; Mittempergher, Francesco; Portolani, Nazario; Ministrini, Silvia; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2018-05-01

    The evaluation of the morphological characteristics of small resistance arteries in humans is challenging. The gold standard method is generally considered to be the measurement by wire or pressure micromyography of the media-to-lumen ratio of subcutaneous small vessels obtained by local biopsies. However, noninvasive techniques for the evaluation of retinal arterioles were recently proposed; in particular, two approaches, scanning laser Doppler flowmetry (SLDF) and adaptive optics, seem to provide useful information; both of them provide an estimation of the wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) of retinal arterioles. Moreover, a noninvasive measurement of basal and total capillary density may be obtained by videomicroscopy/capillaroscopy. No direct comparison of these three noninvasive techniques in the same population was previously performed; in particular, adaptive optics was never validated against micromyography. In the current study, we enrolled 41 controls and patients: 12 normotensive lean controls, 12 essential hypertensive lean patients, nine normotensive obese patients and eight hypertensive obese patients undergoing elective surgery. All patients underwent a biopsy of subcutaneous fat during surgery. Subcutaneous small resistance artery structure was assessed by wire micromyography and the media-to-lumen ratio was calculated. WLR of retinal arterioles was obtained by SLDF and adaptive optics. Functional (basal) and structural (total) microvascular density was evaluated by capillaroscopy before and after venous congestion. Our data suggest that adaptive optics has a substantial advantage over SLDF in terms of evaluation of microvascular morphology, as WLR measured with adaptive optics is more closely correlated with the M/L of subcutaneous small arteries (r = 0.84, P < 0.001 vs. r = 0.52, P < 0.05, slopes of the relations: P < 0.01 adaptive optics vs. SLDF). In addition, the reproducibility of the evaluation of the WLR with adaptive optics is

  17. Combining non-invasive techniques for delimitation and monitoring of chlorinated solvents in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrenbom, Charlotte; Åkesson, Sofia; Hagerberg, David; Dahlin, Torleif; Holmstrand, Henry; Johansson, Sara

    2016-04-01

    Large numbers of polluted areas cause leakage of hazardous pollutants into our groundwater. Remediated actions are needed in a vast number of areas to prevent degradation of the quality of our water resources. As excavation of polluted masses is problematic as it often moves the pollutants from one site to another (in best case off site treatment is carried out), in-situ remediation and monitoring thereof needs further development. In general, we need to further develop and improve how we retrieve information on the status of the underground system. This is needed to avoid costly and hazardous shipments associated with excavations and to avoid unnecessary exposure when handling polluted masses. Easier, cheaper, more comprehensive and nondestructive monitoring techniques are needed for evaluation of remediation degree, degradation status of the contaminants and the remaining groundwater contaminant plume. We investigate the possibility to combine two investigation techniques, which are invasive to a very low degree and can give a very good visualization and evaluation of pollutant status underground and changes therein in time. The two methods we have combined are Direct Current resistivity and time-domain Induced Polarization tomography (DCIP) and Compound Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA) and their use within the context of DNAPL contaminated sites. DCIP is a non-invasive and non-destructive geoelectrical measurement method with emerging new techniques for 4D mapping for promising visualization of underground hydrogeochemical structures and spatial distribution of contaminants. The strength of CSIA is that inherent degradation-relatable isotopic information of contaminant molecules remains unaffected as opposed to the commonly used concentration-based studies. Our aim is to evaluate the possibilities of gas sampling on the ground surface for this technique to become non-invasive and usable without interfering ground conditions.Drillings together with soil and

  18. Noninvasive glucose sensing in scattering media using OCT, PAS, and TOF techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarousu, Erkki; Hast, Jukka T.; Kinnunen, Matti T.; Kirillin, Mikhail Y.; Myllyla, Risto A.; Plucinski, Jerzy; Popov, Alexey P.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Prykari, Tuukka; Saarela, Juha; Zhao, Zuomin

    2004-08-01

    In this paper, optical measurement techniques, which enable non-invasive measurement, are superimposed to glucose sensing in scattering media. Used measurement techniques are Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and laser pulse Time-of-Flight (TOF) measurement using a streak camera. In parallel with measurements, a Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation models have been developed. Experimental in vitro measurements were performed using Intralipid fat emulsion as a tissue simulating phantom for OCT and TOF measurements. In PAS measurements, a pork meat was used as a subject but also preliminary in vivo measurements were done. OCT measurement results show that the slope of the OCT signal's envelope changes as a function of glucose content in the scattering media. TOF measurements show that the laser pulse full width of half maximum (FWHM) changes a little as function of glucose content. An agreement with MC-simulations and measurements with Intralipid was also found. Measurement results of PAS technique show that changes in glucose content in the pork meat tissue can be measured. In vivo measurements with a human volunteer show that other factors such as physiological change, blood circulation and body temperature drift may interfere the PA response of glucose.

  19. Applied potential tomography. A new noninvasive technique for measuring gastric emptying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avill, R.; Mangnall, Y.F.; Bird, N.C.; Brown, B.H.; Barber, D.C.; Seagar, A.D.; Johnson, A.G.; Read, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    Applied potential tomography is a new, noninvasive technique that yields sequential images of the resistivity of gastric contents after subjects have ingested a liquid or semisolid meal. This study validates the technique as a means of measuring gastric emptying. Experiments in vitro showed an excellent correlation between measurements of resistivity and either the square of the radius of a glass rod or the volume of water in a spherical balloon when both were placed in an oval tank containing saline. Altering the lateral position of the rod in the tank did not alter the values obtained. Images of abdominal resistivity were also directly correlated with the volume of air in a gastric balloon. Profiles of gastric emptying of liquid meals obtained using applied potential tomography were very similar to those obtained using scintigraphy or dye dilution techniques, provided that acid secretion was inhibited by cimetidine. Profiles of emptying of a mashed potato meal using applied potential tomography were also very similar to those obtained by scintigraphy. Measurements of the emptying of a liquid meal from the stomach were reproducible if acid secretion was inhibited by cimetidine. Thus, applied potential tomography is an accurate and reproducible method of measuring gastric emptying of liquids and particulate food. It is inexpensive, well tolerated, easy to use, and ideally suited for multiple studies in patients, even those who are pregnant

  20. Applied potential tomography. A new noninvasive technique for measuring gastric emptying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avill, R.; Mangnall, Y.F.; Bird, N.C.; Brown, B.H.; Barber, D.C.; Seagar, A.D.; Johnson, A.G.; Read, N.W.

    1987-04-01

    Applied potential tomography is a new, noninvasive technique that yields sequential images of the resistivity of gastric contents after subjects have ingested a liquid or semisolid meal. This study validates the technique as a means of measuring gastric emptying. Experiments in vitro showed an excellent correlation between measurements of resistivity and either the square of the radius of a glass rod or the volume of water in a spherical balloon when both were placed in an oval tank containing saline. Altering the lateral position of the rod in the tank did not alter the values obtained. Images of abdominal resistivity were also directly correlated with the volume of air in a gastric balloon. Profiles of gastric emptying of liquid meals obtained using applied potential tomography were very similar to those obtained using scintigraphy or dye dilution techniques, provided that acid secretion was inhibited by cimetidine. Profiles of emptying of a mashed potato meal using applied potential tomography were also very similar to those obtained by scintigraphy. Measurements of the emptying of a liquid meal from the stomach were reproducible if acid secretion was inhibited by cimetidine. Thus, applied potential tomography is an accurate and reproducible method of measuring gastric emptying of liquids and particulate food. It is inexpensive, well tolerated, easy to use, and ideally suited for multiple studies in patients, even those who are pregnant.

  1. EXPLICITATION AND ADDITION TECHNIQUES IN AUDIOVISUAL TRANSLATION: A MULTIMODAL APPROACH OF ENGLISHINDONESIAN SUBTITLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichwan Suyudi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In audiovisual translation, the multimodality of the audiovisual text is both a challenge and a resource for subtitlers. This paper illustrates how multi-modes provide information that helps subtitlers to gain a better understanding of meaning-making practices that will influence them to make a decision-making in translating a certain verbal text. Subtitlers may explicit, add, and condense the texts based on the multi-modes as seen on the visual frames. Subtitlers have to consider the distribution and integration of the meanings of multi-modes in order to create comprehensive equivalence between the source and target texts. Excerpts of visual frames in this paper are taken from English films Forrest Gump (drama, 1996, and James Bond (thriller, 2010.

  2. Simple and non-invasive techniques to evaluate the function of CircuLite Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohite, Prashant N; Bowles, Christopher T; Sabashnikov, Anton; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Patil, Nikhil P; Sáez, Diana García; Banner, Nicholas R; Simon, André R

    2014-11-01

    The Synergy CircuLite micropump is a novel partial-support miniature left ventricular assist device that propels 2-3 l/min blood from the left atrium into the right subclavian artery. The ability of currently available investigative modalities to confirm Synergy pump malfunction is limited. The Synergy speed fluctuates periodically (at 10-s intervals) from the baseline to a transient decrease followed by a transient increase (alternating speed algorithm, ASA) with the purpose of changing the blood flow behaviour, thereby reducing thrombogenicity. The aim of this study was to develop a simple non-invasive monitoring technique to assess pump function based on the detection of the ASA in the peripheral microcirculation. Between February 2012 and July 2013, 10 patients with advanced chronic heart failure underwent Synergy implantation at our institution. The pump function was assessed by echocardiography and invasive monitoring according to standard protocols; additionally, the pump speed and power consumption were monitored. During the pump function assessment, the pulse oximeter waveform was recorded from the index fingers of the left and right hand with simultaneous pump auscultation using a stethoscope positioned on the pump (right infra-clavicular pocket). The pulse oximeter waveform was readily detectable from the right and left hand of all study patients. If the Synergy function was normal, there was a significant difference in the morphology of the pulse oximeter waveform from each hand: the ASA algorithm produced a more pronounced variation (giant wave) in the trace from the right hand than from the left. The giant waves invariably coincided with the sound variation associated with the ASA algorithms, which were detected regularly at 10-s intervals. We describe a simple, readily applicable, inexpensive, non-invasive technique that allows evaluation of Synergy pump function and may have diagnostic utility under conditions of suspected pump thrombus

  3. Quantitative evaluation of myocardial perfusion and heart function using a non-invasive double isotope technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, W H; Doll, J; Georgi, P [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Tillmanns, H [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Innere Medizin 3

    1976-11-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive double nuclide technique for the simultaneous measurement of minimal cardiac transit times (MTT) and regional 'myocardial appearance times' (MAT) using gamma camera and computer. MAT is defined as the time lag between the appearance of an indicator with myocardial affinity in the aortic root and its extraction in the myocardial cells. The extraction can be identified as an increase of the ratio between the count rates of the two nuclides e.g. /sup 201/Tl-chloride and sup(113m)In DTPA. The clinical evaluation of this method allows the following conclusions: 1) MAT, determined over several circumscript myocardial regions permits the qualitative diagnosis of a coronary artery disease with high confidence. 2) Indices of nutritive myocardial blood flow (INF), derived by MAT using several representative areas of myocardium, show a definite correlation to the degree of coronary artery disease. In addition to the localization of infarction and the determination of infarct size, the technique described promises a quantitative evaluation of the regional myocardial perfusion. Simultaneously measured MTT help to assess segmental cardiac performance.

  4. A non-invasive acoustic and vibration analysis technique for evaluation of hip joint conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Diana; Komistek, Richard D; Cates, Harold E; Mahfouz, Mohamed R

    2010-02-10

    The performance evaluation of THA outcome is difficult and surgeons often use invasive methods to investigate effectiveness. A non-invasive acoustic and vibration analysis technique has recently been developed for more-in-depth evaluation of in vivo hip conditions. Gait kinematics, corresponding vibration and sound measurement of five THA subjects were analyzed post-operatively using video-fluoroscopy, sound and accelerometer measurements while walking on a treadmill. The sound sensor and a pair of tri-axial accelerometers, externally attached to the pelvic and femoral bone prominences, detected frequencies that are propagated through the femoral head and acetabular cup interactions. A data acquisition system was used to amplify the signal and filter out noise generated by undesired frequencies. In vivo kinematics and femoral head sliding quantified using video fluoroscopy were correlated to the sound and acceleration measurements. Distinct variations between the different subjects were identified. A correlation of sound and acceleration impulses with separation has been achieved. Although, in vivo sounds are quite variable in nature and all correlated well with the visual images. This is the first study to document and correlate visual and audible effects of THA under in-vivo conditions. This study has shown that the development of the acoustic and vibration technique provides a practical method and generates new possibilities for a better understanding of THA performance. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Verification of intravenous catheter placement by auscultation--a simple, noninvasive technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehavi, Amit; Rudich, Utay; Schechtman, Moshe; Katz, Yeshayahu Shai

    2014-01-01

    Verification of proper placement of an intravenous catheter may not always be simple. We evaluated the auscultation technique for this purpose. Twenty healthy volunteers were randomized for 18G catheter inserted intravenously either in the right (12) or left arm (8), and subcutaneously in the opposite arm. A standard stethoscope was placed over an area approximately 3 cm proximal to the tip of the catheter in the presumed direction of the vein to grade on a 0-6 scale the murmur heard by rapidly injecting 2 mL of NaCl 0.9% solution. The auscultation was evaluated by a blinded staff anesthesiologist. All 20 intravenous injection were evaluated as flow murmurs, and were graded an average 5.65 (±0.98), whereas all 20 subcutaneous injections were evaluated as either crackles or no sound, and were graded an average 2.00 (±1.38), without negative results. Sensitivity was calculated as 95%. Specificity and Kappa could not be calculated due to an empty false-positive group. Being simple, handy and noninvasive, we recommend to use the auscultation technique for verification of the proper placement of an intravenous catheter when uncertain of its position. Data obtained in our limited sample of healthy subjects need to be confirmed in the clinical setting.

  6. Primary flow and temperature measurements in PWRS using non-invasive techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favennec, J.M.; Jossinet, G.; Thomas, P.

    1995-08-01

    PWR primary flow and temperature measurements are classically done with either indirect or invasive techniques. EDF has developed and installed non-invasive innovative techniques on an industrial nuclear power plant (Chooz N1 type PWR). Primary flow-rate is determined by measurement of velocity of primary water in the hot leg: the time fluctuation of γ-ray activity from Nitrogen-16 (produced by neutron activation of 016) is measured outside of the pipe by two specially-designed detectors. The signals from both detectors are then cross-correlated to determine the transit time of primary water between the two detectors; primary flow-rate is then deduced Primary temperature is determined by measurement of sound velocity in hot and cold leg: two pairs of ultrasonic transducers, installed on pipe outer wall, emit pulses periodically, for which the time of flight along the two pipes diameters are determined. The sound velocity thus computed (diameter over time of flight) is then converted into temperature, by use of a calibration formula relating sound velocity to temperature and pressure. This paper addresses metrological and technical aspects of the methods. Experience feedback on industrial PWRs is also presented. (author). 4 refs., 13 figs

  7. Towards non-invasive diagnostic techniques for early detection of acute renal transplant rejection: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Hollis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The kidney is a very important complicated filtering organ of the body. When the kidney reaches stage 5 chronic kidney disease, end stage renal failure, the preeminent therapy is renal transplantation. Although it is the best form of treatment, lack of kidney donors is still challenging. Therefore, all efforts should be employed to prolong the survival rate of the transplanted kidney. However, graft dysfunction (e.g., acute rejection is one of the serious barriers to long term kidney transplant survival. Currently, graft dysfunction’s gold standard of diagnosis is renal biopsy. Although renal biopsy is helpful, it is not preferred due to its invasive nature, high morbidity rates, and expensiveness. Therefore, noninvasive imaging techniques have become the subject of extensive research and interest, giving a strong promise to replace, or at least to decrease, biopsy usage in diagnosing graft dysfunction. This survey will discuss not only the current diagnosis and treatment of graft dysfunction but also the state-of-the-art imaging techniques in detecting acute renal transplant rejection.

  8. Comparison of non-invasive electrohysterographic recording techniques for monitoring uterine dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberola-Rubio, J; Prats-Boluda, G; Ye-Lin, Y; Valero, J; Perales, A; Garcia-Casado, J

    2013-12-01

    Non-invasive recording of uterine myoelectric activity (electrohysterogram, EHG) could provide an alternative to monitoring uterine dynamics by systems based on tocodynamometers (TOCO). Laplacian recording of bioelectric signals has been shown to give better spatial resolution and less interference than mono- and bipolar surface recordings. The aim of this work was to study the signal quality obtained from monopolar, bipolar and Laplacian techniques in EHG recordings, as well as to assess their ability to detect uterine contractions. Twenty-two recording sessions were carried out on singleton pregnant women during the active phase of labour. In each session the following simultaneous recordings were obtained: internal uterine pressure (IUP), external tension of abdominal wall (TOCO) and EHG signals (5 monopolar and 4 bipolar recordings, 1 discrete approximation to the Laplacian of the potential and 2 estimates of the Laplacian from two active annular electrodes). The results obtained show that EHG is able to detect a higher number of uterine contractions than TOCO. Laplacian recordings give improved signal quality over monopolar and bipolar techniques, reduce maternal cardiac interference and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The optimal position for recording EHG was found to be the uterine median axis and the lower centre-right umbilical zone. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Why use Finapres or Portapres rather than intra-arterial or intermittent non-invasive techniques of blood pressure measurement?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langewouters, G. J.; Settels, J. J.; Roelandt, R.; Wesseling, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    In the clinic, blood pressure is measured almost exclusively using non-invasive intermittent techniques, of which the auscultatory (Riva-Rocci/Korotkoff, RRK) and the computerized oscillometric method are most often used. However, both methods only provide a momentary value. In addition, the

  10. Non-invasive techniques for revealing the palette of the Romantic painter Francesco Hayez

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampazzi, Laura; Brunello, Valentina; Corti, Cristina; Lissoni, Elena

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the first systematic analysis of the palette of Francesco Hayez, one of the most outstanding artists of European Romanticism, whose painting technique has never been extensively investigated despite the plethora of artistic studies. He lived in a particular moment in the history of painting, as in the first half of the 19th century many synthetic pigments were available, also in tin tubes, but traditional materials were still used. Sixteen paintings on canvas and on panels, created between 1823 and 1868, were analyzed in situ through non-invasive techniques (infrared reflectography and infrared reflection spectroscopy). Imaging investigation provided clues on painting technique, revealing some cases of pentimenti and underdrawings. A preliminary survey was carried out on a hundred pure pigments used up to the 19th century and on new synthetic colours, in order to attain reference spectra for the interpretation of painting spectra. The portable infrared instrument provided insight into Hayez's painting materials, identifying barite, ivory black, lead-tin yellow, Naples yellow, ochres, Prussian blue, and white lead. The pigments were often blended, to obtain a unique fabric appearance or to attain cold shades. The results pointed to a siccative oil as a binder, mixed with white lead so that it could act as a catalyzer in polymerization reactions, and in some cases with a proteinaceous binder and resins. The preparation was made with gypsum and white lead mixed with a siccative oil. The results showed that the artist used a typical traditional palette, throughout his career, in order to lead to brilliant colours and with long-term stability. Anyway, the possible presence of cobalt blue in a few paintings suggests that Hayez had probably started testing the new colours, since the second decade of 19th century.

  11. State-of-the-art sensor technology in Spain: invasive and non-invasive techniques for monitoring respiratory variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Christian; Blanch, Lluis; Murias, Gaston; Luján, Manel

    2010-01-01

    The interest in measuring physiological parameters (especially arterial blood gases) has grown progressively in parallel to the development of new technologies. Physiological parameters were first measured invasively and at discrete time points; however, it was clearly desirable to measure them continuously and non-invasively. The development of intensive care units promoted the use of ventilators via oral intubation ventilators via oral intubation and mechanical respiratory variables were progressively studied. Later, the knowledge gained in the hospital was applied to out-of-hospital management. In the present paper we review the invasive and non-invasive techniques for monitoring respiratory variables.

  12. Joint application of non-invasive techniques to characterize the dynamic behaviuor of engineering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallipoli, M. R.; Perrone, A.; Stabile, T. A.; Ponzo, F. C.; Ditommaso, R.

    2012-04-01

    The systematic monitoring of strategic civil infrastructures such as bridges, large dams or high-rise buildings in order to ensure their structural stability is a strategic issue particularly in earthquake-prone regions. Nevertheless, in areas less exposed to seismic hazard, the monitoring is also an important tool for civil engineers, for instance if they have to deal with structures exposed to heavy operational demands for extended periods of time and whose structural integrity might be in question or at risk. A continuous monitoring of such structures allows the identification of their fundamental response characteristics and the changes of these over time, the latter representing indicators for potential structural degradation. The aim of this paper is the estimation of fundamental dynamic parameters of some civil infrastructures by the joint application of fast executable, non-invasive techniques such as the Ambient Noise Standard Spectral Ratio, and Ground-Based microwave Radar Interferometer techniques. The joint approach combine conventional, non-conventional and innovative techniques in order to set up a non destructive evaluation procedure allowing for a multi-sensing monitoring at a multi-scale and multi-depth levels (i.e. with different degrees of spatial resolution and different subsurface depths). In particular, techniques based on ambient vibration recordings have become a popular tool for characterizing the seismic response and state-of-health of strategic civil infrastructure. The primary advantage of these approaches lies in the fact that no transient earthquake signals or even active excitation of the structure under investigation are required. The microwave interferometry radar technology, it has proven to be a powerful remote sensing tool for vibration measurement of structures, such as bridge, heritage architectural structures, vibrating stay cables, and engineering structures. The main advantage of this radar technique is the possibility to

  13. A novel technique to incorporate structural prior information into multi-modal tomographic reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazantsev, Daniil; Dobson, Katherine J; Withers, Philip J; Lee, Peter D; Ourselin, Sébastien; Arridge, Simon R; Hutton, Brian F; Kaestner, Anders P; Lionheart, William R B

    2014-01-01

    There has been a rapid expansion of multi-modal imaging techniques in tomography. In biomedical imaging, patients are now regularly imaged using both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and x-ray computed tomography (CT), or using both positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In non-destructive testing of materials both neutron CT (NCT) and x-ray CT are widely applied to investigate the inner structure of material or track the dynamics of physical processes. The potential benefits from combining modalities has led to increased interest in iterative reconstruction algorithms that can utilize the data from more than one imaging mode simultaneously. We present a new regularization term in iterative reconstruction that enables information from one imaging modality to be used as a structural prior to improve resolution of the second modality. The regularization term is based on a modified anisotropic tensor diffusion filter, that has shape-adapted smoothing properties. By considering the underlying orientations of normal and tangential vector fields for two co-registered images, the diffusion flux is rotated and scaled adaptively to image features. The images can have different greyscale values and different spatial resolutions. The proposed approach is particularly good at isolating oriented features in images which are important for medical and materials science applications. By enhancing the edges it enables both easy identification and volume fraction measurements aiding segmentation algorithms used for quantification. The approach is tested on a standard denoising and deblurring image recovery problem, and then applied to 2D and 3D reconstruction problems; thereby highlighting the capabilities of the algorithm. Using synthetic data from SPECT co-registered with MRI, and real NCT data co-registered with x-ray CT, we show how the method can be used across a range of imaging modalities. (paper)

  14. Noninvasive embryo assessment technique based on buoyancy and its association with embryo survival after cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessels, Cara; Penrose, Lindsay; Ahmad, Khaliq; Prien, Samuel

    2017-11-01

    Embryo cryopreservation offers many benefits by allowing genetic preservation, genetic screening, cost reduction, global embryo transport and single embryo transfer. However, freezing of embryos decreases embryo viability, as intracellular ice crystal formation often damages embryos. Success rates of frozen embryo transfer are expected to be 15-20% less than fresh embryo transfer. We have developed a noninvasive embryo assessment technique (NEAT) which enables us to predict embryo viability based on buoyancy. The purpose of this research was twofold. First was to determine if a NEAT, through a specific gravity device can detect embryo survival of cryopreservation. Second, it was to relate embryo buoyancy to embryo viability for establishing pregnancies in sheep. Blastocysts descent times were measured on one-hundred sixty-nine mice blastocysts before cryopreservation, according to standard protocol and post-thawing blastocysts descent times were measured again. There was a significant difference in blastocyst post-thaw descent times with NEAT in those blastocysts which demonstrated viability from those that did not (P embryos. Further studies on a larger scale commercial setting will evaluate the efficacy of NEAT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A Review of Non-Invasive Techniques to Detect and Predict Localised Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed R. Al-Mulla

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle fatigue is an established area of research and various types of muscle fatigue have been investigated in order to fully understand the condition. This paper gives an overview of the various non-invasive techniques available for use in automated fatigue detection, such as mechanomyography, electromyography, near-infrared spectroscopy and ultrasound for both isometric and non-isometric contractions. Various signal analysis methods are compared by illustrating their applicability in real-time settings. This paper will be of interest to researchers who wish to select the most appropriate methodology for research on muscle fatigue detection or prediction, or for the development of devices that can be used in, e.g., sports scenarios to improve performance or prevent injury. To date, research on localised muscle fatigue focuses mainly on the clinical side. There is very little research carried out on the implementation of detecting/predicting fatigue using an autonomous system, although recent research on automating the process of localised muscle fatigue detection/prediction shows promising results.

  16. A Review of Non-Invasive Techniques to Detect and Predict Localised Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mulla, Mohamed R.; Sepulveda, Francisco; Colley, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is an established area of research and various types of muscle fatigue have been investigated in order to fully understand the condition. This paper gives an overview of the various non-invasive techniques available for use in automated fatigue detection, such as mechanomyography, electromyography, near-infrared spectroscopy and ultrasound for both isometric and non-isometric contractions. Various signal analysis methods are compared by illustrating their applicability in real-time settings. This paper will be of interest to researchers who wish to select the most appropriate methodology for research on muscle fatigue detection or prediction, or for the development of devices that can be used in, e.g., sports scenarios to improve performance or prevent injury. To date, research on localised muscle fatigue focuses mainly on the clinical side. There is very little research carried out on the implementation of detecting/predicting fatigue using an autonomous system, although recent research on automating the process of localised muscle fatigue detection/prediction shows promising results. PMID:22163810

  17. DWI-MRI: Single, Informative, and Noninvasive Technique for Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhousseiny I. Ibrahiem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate diffusion weighted image-MRI (DWI as a single diagnostic noninvasive MRI technique for prostate cancer (PCa diagnosis. Material and Methods. A prospective study was conducted between July 2008 and July 2009. Candidates patients were equal or more than 40 years old, with suspicious digital rectal examination (more than clinical T2 or PSA >4 ng/mL. Informed consent was signed. DWI-MRI was performed at 1.5 T with a body coil combined with a spine coil in consecutive 100 cases. The histopathology of biopsies has been used as reference standard. Two examiners were evaluating MRI and TRUS, both of them were blinded regarding pathological findings. Accuracy, specificity, and sensitivity were statistically analyzed. Results. Based on pathological diagnosis: group A (cancerous; 75 cases and group B (non-cancerous; 25 cases. Mean age was 65.3 and 62.8 years in groups A and B, respectively. Mean PSA was 30.7 and 9.2 ng/mL in groups A and B, respectively. Sensitivity of DWI was 58.3% while specificity was 83.8%. Accuracy of lesion detection was 52.4–77.8% (<0.05. Moreover, DWI at ADC value 1.2×10−3 mL/sec could determine 82.4% of true positive cases (<0.05. ADC values were lower with Gleason score ≥7 (<0.05. Conclusion. DWI could represent a non invasive single diagnostic tool not only in detection and localization but also in prediction of Gleason score whenever DWI is used prior to invasive TRUS biopsy. Furthermore, targeted single biopsy could be planned after DWI to minimize patient morbidity by invasive techniques.

  18. A simple and noninvasive technique using Bohlers stirrup facilitating management of posterior soft tissue injuries of heel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikil Jayasheelan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many techniques have been devised to solve the problems associated with posterior soft tissue injuries. A noninvasive technique with plaster of Paris cast mold has been described by Ravishankar. Plaster casting techniques have been associated with problems such as tight cast and cast damage. Invasive techniques using external fixators as described by Berkowitz and Kim using tubular fixators like "kick back stand" and by Kamath using ring Illizarov fixators. The external fixators have their own problems like maintaining them for weeks and pin tract infection. Materials and Methods: We have tried to achieve as noninvasive technique using a Bohler stirrup incorporated with slab for patients with only soft tissue in injury and in a fixator for patients with skeletal injury already on tubular fixators. Results: In all the 12 cases where this method was used, the authors achieved the purpose of protecting the split skin graft in four cases and flap in eight cases. We did not encounter any problems related to this method such as skin maceration, sores including loosening of the frame. Conclusion: It is a simple and noninvasive method, which can be easily and reliably performed to maintain adequate limb elevation and soft tissue protection, which can be done is any hospital setup.

  19. Evaluation of biolistic gene transfer methods in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniell Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy continues to hold great potential for treating many different types of disease and dysfunction. Safe and efficient techniques for gene transfer and expression in vivo are needed to enable gene therapeutic strategies to be effective in patients. Currently, the most commonly used methods employ replication-defective viral vectors for gene transfer, while physical gene transfer methods such as biolistic-mediated ("gene-gun" delivery to target tissues have not been as extensively explored. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of biolistic gene transfer techniques in vivo using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging (BLI methods. Results Plasmid DNA carrying the firefly luciferase (LUC reporter gene under the control of the human Cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter/enhancer was transfected into mouse skin and liver using biolistic methods. The plasmids were coupled to gold microspheres (1 μm diameter using different DNA Loading Ratios (DLRs, and "shot" into target tissues using a helium-driven gene gun. The optimal DLR was found to be in the range of 4-10. Bioluminescence was measured using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS-50 at various time-points following transfer. Biolistic gene transfer to mouse skin produced peak reporter gene expression one day after transfer. Expression remained detectable through four days, but declined to undetectable levels by six days following gene transfer. Maximum depth of tissue penetration following biolistic transfer to abdominal skin was 200-300 μm. Similarly, biolistic gene transfer to mouse liver in vivo also produced peak early expression followed by a decline over time. In contrast to skin, however, liver expression of the reporter gene was relatively stable 4-8 days post-biolistic gene transfer, and remained detectable for nearly two weeks. Conclusions The use of bioluminescence imaging techniques enabled efficient evaluation of reporter gene expression in vivo. Our results

  20. Noninvasive ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabatin, J T; Gay, P C

    1999-08-01

    Noninvasive ventilation refers to the delivery of assisted ventilatory support without the use of an endotracheal tube. Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) can be delivered by using a volume-controlled ventilator, a pressure-controlled ventilator, a bilevel positive airway pressure ventilator, or a continuous positive airway pressure device. During the past decade, there has been a resurgence in the use of noninvasive ventilation, fueled by advances in technology and clinical trials evaluating its use. Several manufacturers produce portable devices that are simple to operate. This review describes the equipment, techniques, and complications associated with NPPV and also the indications for both short-term and long-term applications. NPPV clearly represents an important addition to the techniques available to manage patients with respiratory failure. Future clinical trials evaluating its many clinical applications will help to define populations of patients most apt to benefit from this type of treatment.

  1. Non-invasive dendrochronology of late-medieval objects in Oslo: refinement of a technique and discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Aoife; Streeton, Noëlle L. W.

    2017-06-01

    A technique for non-invasive dendrochronological analysis of oak was developed for archaeological material, using an industrial CT scanner. Since 2013, this experience has been extended within the scope of the research project `After the Black Death: Painting and Polychrome Sculpture in Norway'. The source material for the project is a collection of late-medieval winged altarpieces, shrines, polychrome sculpture, and fragments from Norwegian churches, which are owned by the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo. The majority cannot be sampled, and many are too large to fit into the CT scanner. For these reasons, a combined approach was adopted, utilizing CT scanning where possible, but preceded by an `exposed-wood' imaging technique. Both non-invasive techniques have yielded reliable results, and CT scanning has confirmed the reliability of the imaging technique alone. This paper presents the analytical methods, along with results from two of the 13 objects under investigation. Results for reliable dates and provenances provide new foundations for historical interpretations.

  2. Noninvasive visualization of in vivo release and intratumoral distribution of surrogate MR contrast agent using the dual MR contrast technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuki, Yoshinori; Jacobs, Igor; Artemov, Dmitri; Kato, Yoshinori

    2010-09-01

    A direct evaluation of the in vivo release profile of drugs from carriers is a clinical demand in drug delivery systems, because drug release characterized in vitro correlates poorly with in vivo release. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the in vivo applicability of the dual MR contrast technique as a useful tool for noninvasive monitoring of the stability and the release profile of drug carriers, by visualizing in vivo release of the encapsulated surrogate MR contrast agent from carriers and its subsequent intratumoral distribution profile. The important aspect of this technique is that it incorporates both positive and negative contrast agents within a single carrier. GdDTPA, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, and 5-fluorouracil were encapsulated in nano- and microspheres composed of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide), which was used as a model carrier. In vivo studies were performed with orthotopic xenograft of human breast cancer. The MR-based technique demonstrated here has enabled visualization of the delivery of carriers, and release and intratumoral distribution of the encapsulated positive contrast agent. This study demonstrated proof-of-principle results for the noninvasive monitoring of in vivo release and distribution profiles of MR contrast agents, and thus, this technique will make a great contribution to the field. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Multimodality Inferring of Human Cognitive States Based on Integration of Neuro-Fuzzy Network and Information Fusion Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bhattacharya

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available To achieve an effective and safe operation on the machine system where the human interacts with the machine mutually, there is a need for the machine to understand the human state, especially cognitive state, when the human's operation task demands an intensive cognitive activity. Due to a well-known fact with the human being, a highly uncertain cognitive state and behavior as well as expressions or cues, the recent trend to infer the human state is to consider multimodality features of the human operator. In this paper, we present a method for multimodality inferring of human cognitive states by integrating neuro-fuzzy network and information fusion techniques. To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, we take the driver fatigue detection as an example. The proposed method has, in particular, the following new features. First, human expressions are classified into four categories: (i casual or contextual feature, (ii contact feature, (iii contactless feature, and (iv performance feature. Second, the fuzzy neural network technique, in particular Takagi-Sugeno-Kang (TSK model, is employed to cope with uncertain behaviors. Third, the sensor fusion technique, in particular ordered weighted aggregation (OWA, is integrated with the TSK model in such a way that cues are taken as inputs to the TSK model, and then the outputs of the TSK are fused by the OWA which gives outputs corresponding to particular cognitive states under interest (e.g., fatigue. We call this method TSK-OWA. Validation of the TSK-OWA, performed in the Northeastern University vehicle drive simulator, has shown that the proposed method is promising to be a general tool for human cognitive state inferring and a special tool for the driver fatigue detection.

  4. Laser induced fluorescence thermometry (LIF-T) as a non-invasive temperature measurement technique for thermal hydraulic experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strack, J.; Leung, K.; Walker, A., E-mail: strackj@mcmaster.ca [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is an experimental technique whereby a scalar field in a fluid system is measured optically from the fluorescence intensity of a tracer dye following excitation by laser light. For laser induced fluorescence thermometry (LIF-T), a temperature sensitive dye is used. Through the use of a temperature sensitive tracer dye, sheet laser optics, optical filters, and photography, a 2D temperature field can be measured non-invasively. An experiment to test the viability of using LIF-T for macroscopic thermal hydraulic experiments was developed and tested. A reference calibration curve to relate fluorescence measurements to temperature is presented. (author)

  5. Noninvasive technique for measurement of heartbeat regularity in zebrafish (Danio rerio embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Shuk

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zebrafish (Danio rerio, due to its optical accessibility and similarity to human, has emerged as model organism for cardiac research. Although various methods have been developed to assess cardiac functions in zebrafish embryos, there lacks a method to assess heartbeat regularity in blood vessels. Heartbeat regularity is an important parameter for cardiac function and is associated with cardiotoxicity in human being. Using stereomicroscope and digital video camera, we have developed a simple, noninvasive method to measure the heart rate and heartbeat regularity in peripheral blood vessels. Anesthetized embryos were mounted laterally in agarose on a slide and the caudal blood circulation of zebrafish embryo was video-recorded under stereomicroscope and the data was analyzed by custom-made software. The heart rate was determined by digital motion analysis and power spectral analysis through extraction of frequency characteristics of the cardiac rhythm. The heartbeat regularity, defined as the rhythmicity index, was determined by short-time Fourier Transform analysis. Results The heart rate measured by this noninvasive method in zebrafish embryos at 52 hour post-fertilization was similar to that determined by direct visual counting of ventricle beating (p > 0.05. In addition, the method was validated by a known cardiotoxic drug, terfenadine, which affects heartbeat regularity in humans and induces bradycardia and atrioventricular blockage in zebrafish. A significant decrease in heart rate was found by our method in treated embryos (p p Conclusion The data support and validate this rapid, simple, noninvasive method, which includes video image analysis and frequency analysis. This method is capable of measuring the heart rate and heartbeat regularity simultaneously via the analysis of caudal blood flow in zebrafish embryos. With the advantages of rapid sample preparation procedures, automatic image analysis and data analysis, this

  6. Burn-injured tissue detection for debridement surgery through the combination of non-invasive optical imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Juesas, Juan; Thatcher, Jeffrey E; Lu, Yang; Squiers, John J; King, Darlene; Fan, Wensheng; DiMaio, J Michael; Martinez-Lorenzo, Jose A

    2018-04-01

    The process of burn debridement is a challenging technique requiring significant skills to identify the regions that need excision and their appropriate excision depths. In order to assist surgeons, a machine learning tool is being developed to provide a quantitative assessment of burn-injured tissue. This paper presents three non-invasive optical imaging techniques capable of distinguishing four kinds of tissue-healthy skin, viable wound bed, shallow burn, and deep burn-during serial burn debridement in a porcine model. All combinations of these three techniques have been studied through a k-fold cross-validation method. In terms of global performance, the combination of all three techniques significantly improves the classification accuracy with respect to just one technique, from 0.42 up to more than 0.76. Furthermore, a non-linear spatial filtering based on the mode of a small neighborhood has been applied as a post-processing technique, in order to improve the performance of the classification. Using this technique, the global accuracy reaches a value close to 0.78 and, for some particular tissues and combination of techniques, the accuracy improves by 13%.

  7. Application of magnetic resonance elastography as a non-invasive technique for diagnosis of liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Minglei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, liver biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis and grading of liver fibrosis, but its limitations have been widely acknowledged. The non-invasive detection methods are needed in clinical practice, and at present, magnetic resonance elastography (MRE is a hot research topic. This article reviews the advances in the clinical application of MRE in related fields, and studies have shown that MRE has a high diagnostic value due to its high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis and grading of liver fibrosis and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve as high as 0.95. Compared with serological and other imaging diagnostic methods, MRE can determine fibrosis stage more accurately and has good reproducibility and objectivity. MRE can be widely applied in all patients except those with hemochromatosis, with special advantages in the diagnosis for patients with obesity and ascites, and can make up for the disadvantages of other methods. This article points out that MRE may become the best non-invasive method for the assessment of liver fibrosis, especially advanced fibrosis.

  8. On the advance of non-invasive techniques implementation for monitoring moisture distribution in cultural heritage: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inmaculada Martínez Garrido, María; Gómez Heras, Miguel; Fort González, Rafael; Valles Iriso, Javier; José Varas Muriel, María

    2015-04-01

    This work presents a case study developed in San Juan Bautista church in Talamanca de Jarama (12th -16th Century), which have been selected as an example of a historical church with a complex construction with subsequent combination of architectural styles and building techniques and materials. These materials have a differential behavior under the influence of external climatic conditions and constructive facts. Many decay processes related to humidity are affecting the building's walls and also have influence in the environmental dynamics inside the building. A methodology for monitoring moisture distribution on stone and masonry walls and floors was performed with different non-invasive techniques as thermal imaging, wireless sensor networks (WSN), portable moisture meter, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR), in order to the evaluate the effectiveness of these techniques for the knowledge of moisture distribution inside the walls and the humidity origin. North and south oriented sections, both on walls and floors, were evaluated and also a general inspection in the church was carried out with different non-invasive techniques. This methodology implies different monitoring stages for a complete knowledge of the implication of outdoors and indoors conditions on the moisture distribution. Each technique is evaluated according to its effectiveness in the detection of decay processes and maintenance costs. Research funded by Geomateriales (S2013/MIT-2914) and Deterioration of stone materials in the interior of historic buildings as a result induced variation of its microclimate (CGL2011-27902) projects. The cooperation received from the Complutense University of Madrid's Research Group Alteración y Conservación de los Materiales Pétreos del Patrimonio (ref. 921349), the Laboratory Network in Science and Technology for Heritage Conservation (RedLabPat, CEI Moncloa) and the Diocese of Alcalá is gratefully acknowledged. MI Mart

  9. Noninvasive experimental determination of the individual kidney filtration fraction by means of a dual-tracer technique. [/sup 131/I and /sup 99m/Tc tracer techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assailly, J.; Pavel, D.G.; Bader, C.; Chanard, J.; Ryerson, T.W.; Cotard, J.P.; Funck-Brentano, J.L.

    1977-07-01

    A noninvasive method for measurement of the individual kidney filtration fraction (FF) is presented, based on an analysis of the early rise of the kidneys' time-activity curves obtained after simultaneous injection of tubular (/sup 131/I) ortho-iodohippurate and glomerular (Tc-99m DTPA) tracers. The analysis is based on the assumption that an insignificant amount of tracer leaves the kidney during the first few moments following injection. Therefore the kidney activity during this period is directly proportional to the integral of the blood (heart) activity. The dual-tracer technique allows the direct calculation of the ratio of glomerular to tubular clearances, i.e., the FF. In vivo studies were performed on 12 dogs, including normals as well as others with acute ureteral ligation or Benemid-induced tubular blockade. The calculated FF correlated well with the FF obtained from single-shot clearances performed simultaneously. We conclude that the FF can be calculated directly for each kidney, noninvasively, from the early part of the tubular and glomerular time-activity curves by noninvasive external detection.

  10. Transversus abdominis plane block: A multimodal analgesia technique – Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Dwivedi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: A retrospective observational study conducted to assess transversus abdominis plane (TAP block as a tool for providing multimodal analgesia postoperatively for abdominal surgeries. Aims: The aim is to compare the visual analog scale (VAS of pain and the requirement of rescue analgesia postoperatively in patients undergoing various abdominal surgeries (open and laparoscopic where TAP block was given for postoperative analgesia and was compared with patients who received pain relief according to the institutional protocol. Settings and Design: Retrospective observational study conducted in a tertiary care hospital. Subjects and Methods: Retrospective data from anesthesia records of patients, who underwent abdominal surgeries from January 2016 to December 2016, were analyzed and were divided into two groups. Group A (n = 250 consisted of patients who received the conventional standard postoperative analgesia protocol of the department of anesthesia. Group B (n = 136 consisted of patients who were administered TAP block postsurgery for the postoperative analgesia by the trained anesthesiologist. Primary outcome considered was (i average VAS at 02, 06, 12, and 24 h and (ii average opioid/nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug consumption at 24 h postoperatively. Secondary outcome considered was time to first rescue analgesia. Statistical Analysis: All parametric data were analyzed using unpaired t-test. Data are expressed as the mean ± standard deviation. A SPSS version 17 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA was used for statistical analysis. Results: Average pain scores (VAS were lower in Group B as compared to Group A in all subcategories of surgery postoperatively. Patients given TAP block (Group B required less rescue analgesia in the postoperative period with time to first rescue analgesia being prolonged. Conclusions: On the basis of our retrospective study, we suggest that TAP block can be utilized as a part of multimodal analgesia regimen for

  11. A multi-modality concept for radiotherapy planning with imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultze, J.

    1993-01-01

    The reported multi-modality concept of radiotherapy planning in the LAN can be realised in any hospital with standard equipment, although in some cases by way of auxiliary configurations. A software is currently developed as a tool for reducing the entire planning work. The heart of any radiotherapy planning is the therapy simulator, which has to be abreast with the requirements of modern radiotherapy. Integration of tomograpy, digitalisation, and electronic data processing has added important modalities to therapy planning which allow more precise target volume definition, and better biophysical planning. This is what is needed in order to achieve well differentiated radiotherapy for treatment of the manifold tumors, and the quality standards expected by the supervisory quality assurance regime and the population. At present, the CT data still are transferred indirect, on storage media, to the EDP processing system of the radiotherapy planning system. Based on the tomographic slices given by the imaging data, the contours and technical problem solutions are derived automatically, either for multi-field radiotherapy or moving field irradiation, depending on the anatomy or the targets to be protected from ionizing radiation. (orig./VHE) [de

  12. Noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique (MIFE) for the study of the regulation of root membrane transport by cyclic nucleotides

    KAUST Repository

    Ordoñ ez, Natalia Maria; Shabala, Lana; Gehring, Christoph A; Shabala, Sergey Nikolayevich

    2013-01-01

    Changes in ion permeability and subsequently intracellular ion concentrations play a crucial role in intracellular and intercellular communication and, as such, confer a broad array of developmental and adaptive responses in plants. These changes are mediated by the activity of plasma-membrane based transport proteins many of which are controlled by cyclic nucleotides and/or other signaling molecules. The MIFE technique for noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring allows concurrent quantification of net fluxes of several ions with high spatial (μm range) and temporal (ca. 5 s) resolution, making it a powerful tool to study various aspects of downstream signaling events in plant cells. This chapter details basic protocols enabling the application of the MIFE technique to study regulation of root membrane transport in general and cyclic nucleotide mediated transport in particular. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  13. Objective Assessment of Sunburn and Minimal Erythema Doses: Comparison of Noninvasive In Vivo Measuring Techniques after UVB Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Pei-Yu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Military personnel movement is exposed to solar radiation and sunburn is a major problem which can cause lost workdays and lead to disciplinary action. This study was designed to identify correlation parameters in evaluating in vivo doses and epidermis changes following sunburn inflammation. Several noninvasive bioengineering techniques have made objective evaluations possible. The volar forearms of healthy volunteers ( , 2 areas, 20 mm in diameter, were irradiated with UVB 100 mj/ and 200 mj/ , respectively. The skin changes were recorded by several monitored techniques before and 24 hours after UV exposures. Our results showed that chromameter value provides more reliable information and can be adopted with mathematical model in predicting the minimal erythema dose (MED which showed lower than visual assessment by 10 mj/ (Pearson correlation coefficient . A more objective measure for evaluation of MED was established for photosensitive subjects' prediction and sunburn risks prevention.

  14. Noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique (MIFE) for the study of the regulation of root membrane transport by cyclic nucleotides

    KAUST Repository

    Ordoñez, Natalia Maria

    2013-09-03

    Changes in ion permeability and subsequently intracellular ion concentrations play a crucial role in intracellular and intercellular communication and, as such, confer a broad array of developmental and adaptive responses in plants. These changes are mediated by the activity of plasma-membrane based transport proteins many of which are controlled by cyclic nucleotides and/or other signaling molecules. The MIFE technique for noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring allows concurrent quantification of net fluxes of several ions with high spatial (μm range) and temporal (ca. 5 s) resolution, making it a powerful tool to study various aspects of downstream signaling events in plant cells. This chapter details basic protocols enabling the application of the MIFE technique to study regulation of root membrane transport in general and cyclic nucleotide mediated transport in particular. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  15. Semiotics of lesions of the cerebral venous collectors on application of noninvasive techniques of x-ray diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, S.E.; Abalmasov, V.G.

    2001-01-01

    The study included application of a complex of the noninvasive diagnostic techniques such as MR tomography, MR venography, duplex scanning of the internal jugular veins, and transcranial Doppler sonography. The authors provide a detailed description of the semiotics of the MR signs of cerebral venous collector lesion in patients with thrombosis, extravasal compression, aneurysms, and development anomalies. Present the quantitative ultrasound parameters of hemodynamics in the efferent vessels of the brain accessible to inspections describe the effect of spontaneous echo-opacification in the internal jugular veins, which is assumed to be a predictor of thrombosis. Intravenous injection of magnevist resulted in an appreciable refinement of visualization of small dural sinuses at MR venography thereby allowing for the diagnosis of their thrombosis. It is suggested that the use of the entire complex of the X-ray modalities under consideration may lead to a more complete and noninvasive evaluation of the nature of cerebral venous insufficiency and of the degree of hemodynamic significance. Moreover, this will make it possible to outline approaches to therapeutic or surgical correction of the disease [ru

  16. [Semiotics of lesions of the cerebral venous collectors on application of noninvasive techniques of x-ray diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, S; Abalmasov, V

    2001-01-01

    The study included application of a complex of the noninvasive diagnostic techniques such as MR tomography, MR venography, duplex scanning of the internal jugular veins, and transcranial Doppler sonography. The authors provide a detailed description of the semiotics of the MR signs of cerebral venous collector lesion in patients with thrombosis, extravasal compression, aneurysms, and developmental anomalies. Present the quantitative ultrasound parameters of hemodynamics in the efferent vessels of the brain accessible to inspections describe the effect of spontaneous echo-opacification in the internal jugular veins, which is assumed to be a predictor of thrombosis. Intravenous injection of magnevist resulted in an appreciable refinement of visualization of small dural sinuses at MR venography thereby allowing for the diagnosis of their thrombosis. It is suggested that the use of the entire complex of the x-ray modalities under consideration may lead to a more complete and noninvasive evaluation of the nature of cerebral venous insufficiency and of the degree of hemodynamic significance. Moreover, this will make it possible to outline approaches to therapeutic or surgical correction of the disease.

  17. Multimodal freight investment criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Literature was reviewed on multi-modal investment criteria for freight projects, examining measures and techniques for quantifying project benefits and costs, as well as ways to describe the economic importance of freight transportation. : A limited ...

  18. Non-invasive measurement of calcium and phosphorus in human body by NAA technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haiying; Luo Xianqing; Huang Hanqiao

    1995-01-01

    A system of measuring calcium and phosphorus in human legs has been developed by the use of partial-body neutron activation analysis and partial-body counting technique. The results are compared for the normals and osteoporotic patients

  19. Noninvasive radioisotopic technique for detection of platelet deposition in mitral valve prostheses and quantitation of visceral microembolism in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Fuster, V.; Rao, S.A.; Forshaw, P.L.; Kaye, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    A noninvasive technique has been developed in the dog model for imaging, with a gamma camera, the platelet deposition on Bjoerk-Shiley mitral valve prostheses early postoperatively. At 25 hours after implantation of the prosthesis and 24 hours after intravenous administration of 400 to 500 microCi of platelets labeled with indium-111, the platelet deposition in the sewing ring and perivalvular cardiac tissue can be clearly delineated in a scintiphotograph. An in vitro technique was also developed for quantitation of visceral microemboli in brain, lungs, kidneys, and other tissues. Biodistribution of the labeled platelets was quantitated, and the tissue/blood radioactivity ratio was determined in 22 dogs in four groups: unoperated normal dogs, sham-operated dogs, prosthesis-implanted dogs, and prosthesis-implanted dogs treated with dipyridamole before and aspirin and dipyridamole immediately after operation. Fifteen to 20% of total platelets were consumed as a consequence of the surgical procedure. On quantitation, we found that platelet deposition on the components of the prostheses was significantly reduced in prosthesis-implanted animals treated with dipyridamole and aspirin when compared with prosthesis-implanted, untreated dogs. All prosthesis-implanted animals considered together had a twofold to fourfold increase in tissue/blood radioactivity ratio in comparison with unoperated and sham-operated animals, an indication that the viscera work as filters and trap platelet microemboli that are presumably produced in the region of the mitral valve prostheses. In the dog model, indium-111-labeled platelets thus provide a sensitive marker for noninvasive imaging of platelet deposition on mechanical mitral valve prostheses, in vitro evaluation of platelet microembolism in viscera, in vitro quantitation of surgical consumption of platelets, and evaluation of platelet-inhibitor drugs

  20. Assessing for Cardiotoxicity from Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants with Advanced Multimodality Imaging Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berber, Reshid; Abdel-Gadir, Amna; Rosmini, Stefania; Captur, Gabriella; Nordin, Sabrina; Culotta, Veronica; Palla, Luigi; Kellman, Peter; Lloyd, Guy W; Skinner, John A; Moon, James C; Manisty, Charlotte; Hart, Alister J

    2017-11-01

    High failure rates of metal-on-metal (MoM) hip implants prompted regulatory authorities to issue worldwide safety alerts. Circulating cobalt from these implants causes rare but fatal autopsy-diagnosed cardiotoxicity. There is concern that milder cardiotoxicity may be common and underrecognized. Although blood metal ion levels are easily measured and can be used to track local toxicity, there are no noninvasive tests for organ deposition. We sought to detect correlation between blood metal ions and a comprehensive panel of established markers of early cardiotoxicity. Ninety patients were recruited into this prospective single-center blinded study. Patients were divided into 3 age and sex-matched groups according to implant type and whole-blood metal ion levels. Group-A patients had a ceramic-on-ceramic [CoC] bearing; Group B, an MoM bearing and low blood metal ion levels; and Group C, an MoM bearing and high blood metal-ion levels. All patients underwent detailed cardiovascular phenotyping using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) with T2*, T1, and extracellular volume mapping; echocardiography; and cardiac blood biomarker sampling. T2* is a novel CMR biomarker of tissue metal loading. Blood cobalt levels differed significantly among groups A, B, and C (mean and standard deviation [SD], 0.17 ± 0.08, 2.47 ± 1.81, and 30.0 ± 29.1 ppb, respectively) and between group A and groups B and C combined. No significant between-group differences were found in the left atrial or ventricle size, ejection fraction (on CMR or echocardiography), T1 or T2* values, extracellular volume, B-type natriuretic peptide level, or troponin level, and all values were within normal ranges. There was no relationship between cobalt levels and ejection fraction (R = 0.022, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.185 to 0.229) or T2* values (R = 0.108, 95% CI = -0.105 to 0.312). Using the best available technologies, we did not find that high (but not extreme) blood cobalt and chromium levels

  1. Non-invasive techniques for measuring body composition: state of the art and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 20 years, in vivo analysis of body elements by neutron activation has become an important tool in medical research. In particular, it provides a much needed means to make quantitative assessments of body composition of human beings in vivo. The data are useful both for basic physiological understanding and for diagnosis and management of a variety of diseases and disorders. This paper traces the development of the in vivo neutron activation technique from basic systems to the present state of the art facilities. A scan of some of the numerous clinical applications that have been made with this technique, reveals the broad potentialities of in vivo neutron activation. The paper also considers alternative routes of future development and raises some of the questions now faced in making the techniques more widely available to both medical practitioners and medical investigators. In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into the modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Non-invasive techniques for measuring body composition: state of the art and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    In the past 20 years, in vivo analysis of body elements by neutron activation has become an important tool in medical research. In particular, it provides a much needed means to make quantitative assessments of body composition of human beings in vivo. The data are useful both for basic physiological understanding and for diagnosis and management of a variety of diseases and disorders. This paper traces the development of the in vivo neutron activation technique from basic systems to the present state of the art facilities. A scan of some of the numerous clinical applications that have been made with this technique, reveals the broad potentialities of in vivo neutron activation. The paper also considers alternative routes of future development and raises some of the questions now faced in making the techniques more widely available to both medical practitioners and medical investigators. In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into the modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. 18 refs., 7 figs

  3. INVASIVE AND NON-INVASIVE TECHNIQUES FOR DETECTING PORTAL HYPERTENSION AND PREDICTING VARICEAL BLEEDING IN CIRRHOSIS: A REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zardi, Enrico Maria; Di Matteo, Francesco Maria; Pacella, Claudio Maurizio; Sanyal, Arun J

    2016-01-01

    Portal hypertension is a severe syndrome that may derive from pre-sinusoidal, sinusoidal and post-sinusoidal causes. As a consequence, several complications (i.e., ascites, oesophageal varices) may develop. In sinusoidal portal hypertension, hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) is a reliable method for defining the grade of portal pressure, establishing the effectiveness of the treatment and predicting the occurrence of complications; however, some questions exist regarding its ability to discriminate bleeding from nonbleeding varices in cirrhotic patients. Other imaging techniques (transient elastography, endoscopy, endosonography and duplex Doppler sonography) for assessing causes and complications of portal hypertensive syndrome are available and may be valuable for the management of these patients. In this review, we evaluate invasive and non-invasive techniques currently employed to obtain a clinical prediction of deadly complications, such as variceal bleeding in patients affected by sinusoidal portal hypertension, in order to create a diagnostic algorithm to manage them. Again, HVPG appears to be the reference standard to evaluate portal hypertension and monitor the response to treatment, but its ability to predict several complications and support management decisions might be further improved through the diagnostic combination with other imaging techniques. PMID:24328372

  4. A general technique for interstudy registration of multifunction and multimodality images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, K.P.; Huang, S.C.; Bacter, L.R.; Phelps, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    A technique that can register anatomic/structural brain images (e.g., MRI) with various functional images (e.g., PET-FDG and PET-FDOPA) of the same subject has been developed. The procedure of this technique includes the following steps: (1) segmentation of MRI brain images into gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and, muscle (MS) components, (2) assignment of appropriate radio-tracer concentrations to various components depending on the kind of functional image that is being registered, (3) generation of simulated functional images to have a spatial resolution that is comparable to that of the measured ones, (4) alignment of the measured functional images to the simulated ones that are based on MRI images. A self-organization clustering method is used to segment the MRI images. The image alignment is based on the criterion of least squares of the pixel-by-pixel differences between the two sets of images that are being matched and on the Powell's algorithm for minimization. The technique was applied successfully for registering the MRI, PET-FDG, and PET-FDOPA images. This technique offers a general solution to the registration of structural images to functional images and to the registration of different functional images of markedly different distributions

  5. Noninvasive imaging of experimental lung fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Chen, Huaping; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Liu, Gang; Antony, Veena B; Ding, Qiang; Nath, Hrudaya; Eary, Janet F; Thannickal, Victor J

    2015-07-01

    Small animal models of lung fibrosis are essential for unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying human fibrotic lung diseases; additionally, they are useful for preclinical testing of candidate antifibrotic agents. The current end-point measures of experimental lung fibrosis involve labor-intensive histological and biochemical analyses. These measures fail to account for dynamic changes in the disease process in individual animals and are limited by the need for large numbers of animals for longitudinal studies. The emergence of noninvasive imaging technologies provides exciting opportunities to image lung fibrosis in live animals as often as needed and to longitudinally track the efficacy of novel antifibrotic compounds. Data obtained by noninvasive imaging provide complementary information to histological and biochemical measurements. In addition, the use of noninvasive imaging in animal studies reduces animal usage, thus satisfying animal welfare concerns. In this article, we review these new imaging modalities with the potential for evaluation of lung fibrosis in small animal models. Such techniques include micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and multimodal imaging systems including PET/CT and SPECT/CT. It is anticipated that noninvasive imaging will be increasingly used in animal models of fibrosis to gain insights into disease pathogenesis and as preclinical tools to assess drug efficacy.

  6. Multimodality characterization of nuclear waste drums using emerging techniques for nondestructive examination and assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, R.T.

    1993-01-01

    We are developing an x-ray imaging system that incorporates several inspection technologies for complete, nondestructive evaluation of containers of nuclear waste. In Phase I and Phase II SBIR programs for the DOE, we proved the feasibility of using x-ray computed tomography (CT) and digital radiography (DR)-imaging techniques using x-rays transmitted through the object-for container inspection. Now, with further funding from DOE and working with scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Lab., we are designing a mobile inspection system that will use CT and DR as well as two x-ray emission imaging techniques-single photon emission computed tomography and nondestructive assay. This system will provide much more information about the contents of containers than currently used inspection methods, and will provide archiving of digital data. In this paper, we describe inspection system and present recent results from the CT and DR evaluations

  7. Objective Assessment of Sunburn and Minimal Erythema Doses: Comparison of Noninvasive In Vivo Measuring Techniques after UVB Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min-Wei; Lo, Pei-Yu; Cheng, Kuo-Sheng

    2010-12-01

    Military personnel movement is exposed to solar radiation and sunburn is a major problem which can cause lost workdays and lead to disciplinary action. This study was designed to identify correlation parameters in evaluating in vivo doses and epidermis changes following sunburn inflammation. Several noninvasive bioengineering techniques have made objective evaluations possible. The volar forearms of healthy volunteers ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]), 2 areas, 20 mm in diameter, were irradiated with UVB 100 mj/[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] and 200 mj/[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.], respectively. The skin changes were recorded by several monitored techniques before and 24 hours after UV exposures. Our results showed that chromameter [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] value provides more reliable information and can be adopted with mathematical model in predicting the minimal erythema dose (MED) which showed lower than visual assessment by 10 mj/[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] (Pearson correlation coefficient [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]). A more objective measure for evaluation of MED was established for photosensitive subjects' prediction and sunburn risks prevention.

  8. Objective Assessment of Sunburn and Minimal Erythema Doses: Comparison of Noninvasive In Vivo Measuring Techniques after UVB Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Sheng Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Military personnel movement is exposed to solar radiation and sunburn is a major problem which can cause lost workdays and lead to disciplinary action. This study was designed to identify correlation parameters in evaluating in vivo doses and epidermis changes following sunburn inflammation. Several noninvasive bioengineering techniques have made objective evaluations possible. The volar forearms of healthy volunteers (n=20, 2 areas, 20 mm in diameter, were irradiated with UVB 100 mj/cm2 and 200 mj/cm2, respectively. The skin changes were recorded by several monitored techniques before and 24 hours after UV exposures. Our results showed that chromameter a∗ value provides more reliable information and can be adopted with mathematical model in predicting the minimal erythema dose (MED which showed lower than visual assessment by 10 mj/cm2 (Pearson correlation coefficient ℑ=0.758. A more objective measure for evaluation of MED was established for photosensitive subjects' prediction and sunburn risks prevention.

  9. Non-invasive Florentine Renaissance Panel Painting Replica Structures Investigation by Using Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandolo, Corinna Ludovica Koch; Picollo, Marcello; Cucci, Costanza

    2016-01-01

    The potentials of the Terahertz Time-Domain Imaging (THz-TDI) technique for a non-invasive inspection of panel paintings have been considered in detail. The THz-TD data acquired on a replica of a panel painting made in imitation of Italian Renaissance panel paintings were processed in order to pr...

  10. A new noninvasive controlled intra-articular ankle distraction technique on a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ahmet T; Ozcanli, Haluk; Soyuncu, Yetkin; Dabak, Tayyar K

    2006-08-01

    Effective joint distraction is crucial in arthroscopic ankle surgery. We describe an effective and controlled intra-articular ankle distraction technique that we have studied by means of a fresh-frozen cadaver model. Using a kyphoplasty balloon, which is currently used in spine surgery, we tried to achieve a controlled distraction. After the fixation of the cadaver model, standard anteromedial and anterolateral portals were used for ankle arthroscopy. From the same portals, the kyphoplasty balloon was inserted and placed in an appropriate position intra-articularly. The necessary amount of distraction was achieved by inflating the kyphoplasty balloon with a pressure regulation pump. All anatomic sites of the ankle joint were easily visualized with the arthroscope during surgery by changing the pressure and the intra-articular position of the kyphoplasty balloon. Ankle distraction was clearly seen on the arthroscopic and image intensifier view. The kyphoplasty balloon is simple to place through the standard portals and the advantage is that it allows easy manipulation of the arthroscopic instruments from the same portal.

  11. Signal averaging technique for noninvasive recording of late potentials in patients with coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, S.; Blatt, C. M.; Lown, B.; Graboys, T. B.; Sadeh, D.; Cohen, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced non invasive signal averaging technique was used to detect late potentials in two groups of patients: Group A (24 patients) with coronary artery disease (CAD) and without sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) and Group B (8 patients) with CAD and sustained VT. Recorded analog data were digitized and aligned using a cross correlation function with fast Fourier transform schema, averaged and band pass filtered between 60 and 200 Hz with a non-recursive digital filter. Averaged filtered waveforms were analyzed by computer program for 3 parameters: (1) filtered QRS (fQRS) duration (2) interval between the peak of the R wave peak and the end of fQRS (R-LP) (3) RMS value of last 40 msec of fQRS (RMS). Significant change was found between Groups A and B in fQRS (101 -/+ 13 msec vs 123 -/+ 15 msec; p < .0005) and in R-LP vs 52 -/+ 11 msec vs 71-/+18 msec, p <.002). We conclude that (1) the use of a cross correlation triggering method and non-recursive digital filter enables a reliable recording of late potentials from the body surface; (2) fQRS and R-LP durations are sensitive indicators of CAD patients susceptible to VT.

  12. Are novel non-invasive imaging techniques needed in patients with suspected prosthetic heart valve endocarditis? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habets, Jesse; Mali, Willem P.T.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Tanis, Wilco [Haga Teaching Hospital, Department of Cardiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Reitsma, Johannes B. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Brink, Renee B.A. van den [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Chamuleau, Steven A.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Multimodal non-invasive imaging plays a key role in establishing a diagnosis of PHV endocarditis. The objective of this study was to provide a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of TTE, TEE, and MDCT in patients with (suspected) PHV endocarditis. Studies published between 1985 and 2013 were identified via search and cross-reference of PubMed/Embase databases. Studies were included if (1) they reported on the non-invasive index tests TTE, TEE, or MDCT; (2) data was provided on PHV endocarditis as the condition of interest; and (3) imaging results were verified against either surgical inspection/autopsy or clinical follow-up reference standards, thereby enabling the extraction of 2-by-2 tables. Twenty articles (including 496 patients) met the inclusion criteria for PHV endocarditis. TTE, TEE, and MDCT + TEE had a pooled sensitivity/specificity for vegetations of 29/100 %; 82/95 %, and 88/94 %, respectively. The pooled sensitivity/specificity of TTE, TEE, and MDCT + TEE for periannular complications was 36/93 %, 86/98 %, and 100/94 %, respectively. TEE showed good sensitivity and specificity for establishing a diagnosis of PHV endocarditis. Although MDCT data are limited, this review showed that MDCT in addition to TEE may improve sensitivity in detecting life-threatening periannular complications. (orig.)

  13. Are novel non-invasive imaging techniques needed in patients with suspected prosthetic heart valve endocarditis? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habets, Jesse; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Tanis, Wilco; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Brink, Renee B.A. van den; Chamuleau, Steven A.J.; Budde, Ricardo P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Multimodal non-invasive imaging plays a key role in establishing a diagnosis of PHV endocarditis. The objective of this study was to provide a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of TTE, TEE, and MDCT in patients with (suspected) PHV endocarditis. Studies published between 1985 and 2013 were identified via search and cross-reference of PubMed/Embase databases. Studies were included if (1) they reported on the non-invasive index tests TTE, TEE, or MDCT; (2) data was provided on PHV endocarditis as the condition of interest; and (3) imaging results were verified against either surgical inspection/autopsy or clinical follow-up reference standards, thereby enabling the extraction of 2-by-2 tables. Twenty articles (including 496 patients) met the inclusion criteria for PHV endocarditis. TTE, TEE, and MDCT + TEE had a pooled sensitivity/specificity for vegetations of 29/100 %; 82/95 %, and 88/94 %, respectively. The pooled sensitivity/specificity of TTE, TEE, and MDCT + TEE for periannular complications was 36/93 %, 86/98 %, and 100/94 %, respectively. TEE showed good sensitivity and specificity for establishing a diagnosis of PHV endocarditis. Although MDCT data are limited, this review showed that MDCT in addition to TEE may improve sensitivity in detecting life-threatening periannular complications. (orig.)

  14. Non-invasive technique to measure biogeochemical parameters (pH and O2) in a microenvironment: Design and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Biting; Seliman, Ayman; Pales, Ashley; Liang, Weizhen; Sams, Allison; Darnault, Christophe; Devol, Timothy

    2017-04-01

    The primary objectives of this research are to do the pH and O2 sensor foils calibration and then to test them in applications. Potentially, this project can be utilized to monitor the fate and transport of radionuclides in porous media. The information for physical and chemical parameters (e.g. pH and O2) is crucial to know when determining contaminants' behavior and transport in the environment. As a non-invasive method, optical imaging technique using a DSLR camera could capture data on the foil when it fluoresces, and gives a high temporal and spatial resolution during the experimental period. The calibration procedures were done in cuvettes in a row. The preliminary experiments could measure pH value in the range from 4.5 to 7.5, and O2 concentration from 0 mg/L to 20.74 mg/L. Applications of sensor foils have involved nano zero valent and acid rain experiments in order to obtain a gradient of parameter changes.

  15. Comparison of two non-invasive methods of microbial analysis in surgery practice: incision swabbing and the indirect imprint technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovanec, Zdenek; Veverkova, Lenka; Votava, Miroslav; Svoboda, Jiri; Jedlicka, Vaclav; Capov, Ivan

    2014-12-01

    A variety of methods exist to take samples from surgical site infections for cultivation; however, an unambiguous and suitable method has not yet been defined. The aim of our retrospective non-randomized study was to compare two non-invasive techniques of sampling material for microbiologic analysis in surgical practice. We compared bacteria cultured from samples obtained with the use of the swab technique, defined in our study as the gold standard, with the indirect imprint technique. A cotton-tipped swab (Copan, Brescia, Italy) was used; the imprints were taken using Whatman no. 4 filter paper (Macherey-Nagal, Duren, Germany) cut into 5×5 cm pieces placed on blood agar in a Petri dish. To culture the microorganisms in the microbiology laboratory, we used blood agar, UriSelect 4 medium (Bio-Rad, Marnes-la-Coquette, France), and a medium with sodium chloride (blood agar with salt). After careful debridement, a sample was taken from the incision surface by swab and subsequently the same area of the surface was imprinted onto filter paper. The samples were analyzed in the microbiology laboratory under standard safety precautions. The cultivation results of the two techniques were processed statistically using contingency tables and the McNemar test. Those samples that were simultaneously cultivation-positive by imprint and -negative by swabbing were processed in greater detail. Over the period between October 2008 and March 2013, 177 samples from 70 patients were analyzed. Sampling was carried out from 42 males and 28 females. One hundred forty-six samples were from incisions after operations (21 samples from six patients after operation on the thoracic cavity, 73 samples from 35 patients after operation on the abdominal cavity combined with the gastrointestinal tract, 52 samples from 19 patients with other surgical site infections not included above) and 31 samples from 11 patients with no post-operative infection. One patient had a sample taken both from a post

  16. PET/CT colonography: a novel non-invasive technique for assessment of extent and activity of ulcerative colitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Chandan J.; Sharma, Raju [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiodiagnosis, New Delhi (India); Makharia, Govind K.; Tiwari, Rajeew P. [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, New Delhi (India); Kumar, Rakesh; Kumar, Rajender; Malhotra, Arun [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, New Delhi (India)

    2010-04-15

    Extent of involvement and activity of ulcerative colitis (UC) is best evaluated by colonoscopy. Colonoscopy however carries risk during acute exacerbation. We investigated the utility of PET/CT colonography for assessment of extent and activity of UC. Within a 1-week window, 15 patients with mild to moderately active UC underwent colonoscopy and PET/CT colonography 60 min after injection of 10 mCi of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). PET activity score based on the amount of FDG uptake and endoscopic mucosal activity in seven colonic segments of each patient was recorded. The mean maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of seven segments was compared with activity in liver. A PET activity grade of 0, 1, 2 or 3 was assigned to each region depending upon their SUV{sub max} ratio (colon segment to liver). The extent of disease was left-sided colitis in five and pancolitis in ten. The mean Ulcerative Colitis Disease Activity Index (UCDAI) was 7.6. The number of segments involved as per colonoscopic evaluation and PET/CT colonography was 67 and 66, respectively. There was a good correlation for extent evaluation between the two modalities (kappa 55.3%, p = 0.02). One patient had grade 0 PET activity, nine had grade 2 and five had grade 3 PET activity. In six patients, there was one to one correlation between PET activity grades with that of endoscopic grade. One patient showed activity in the sacroiliac joint suggesting active sacroiliitis. PET/CT colonography is a novel non-invasive technique for the assessment of extent and activity of the disease in patients with UC. (orig.)

  17. Noninvasive Diagnosis of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Quantification of Liver Fat Using a New Quantitative Ultrasound Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven C; Heba, Elhamy; Wolfson, Tanya; Ang, Brandon; Gamst, Anthony; Han, Aiguo; Erdman, John W; O'Brien, William D; Andre, Michael P; Sirlin, Claude B; Loomba, Rohit

    2015-07-01

    Liver biopsy analysis is the standard method used to diagnose nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Advanced magnetic resonance imaging is a noninvasive procedure that can accurately diagnose and quantify steatosis, but is expensive. Conventional ultrasound is more accessible but identifies steatosis with low levels of sensitivity, specificity, and quantitative accuracy, and results vary among technicians. A new quantitative ultrasound (QUS) technique can identify steatosis in animal models. We assessed the accuracy of QUS in the diagnosis and quantification of hepatic steatosis, comparing findings with those from magnetic resonance imaging proton density fat fraction (MRI-PDFF) analysis as a reference. We performed a prospective, cross-sectional analysis of a cohort of adults (N = 204) with NAFLD (MRI-PDFF, ≥5%) and without NAFLD (controls). Subjects underwent MRI-PDFF and QUS analyses of the liver on the same day at the University of California, San Diego, from February 2012 through March 2014. QUS parameters and backscatter coefficient (BSC) values were calculated. Patients were assigned randomly to training (n = 102; mean age, 51 ± 17 y; mean body mass index, 31 ± 7 kg/m(2)) and validation (n = 102; mean age, 49 ± 17 y; body mass index, 30 ± 6 kg/m(2)) groups; 69% of patients in each group had NAFLD. BSC (range, 0.00005-0.25 1/cm-sr) correlated with MRI-PDFF (Spearman ρ = 0.80; P hepatic steatosis, based on a cross-sectional analysis that used MRI-PDFF as the reference. With further validation, QUS could be an inexpensive, widely available method to screen the general or at-risk population for NAFLD. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Using non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to detect unique aspects of protein Amide functional groups and chemical properties of modeled forage from different sourced-origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-05

    The non-invasive molecular spectroscopic technique-FT/IR is capable to detect the molecular structure spectral features that are associated with biological, nutritional and biodegradation functions. However, to date, few researches have been conducted to use these non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques to study forage internal protein structures associated with biodegradation and biological functions. The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of protein Amide functional groups in terms of protein Amide I and II spectral profiles and chemical properties in the alfalfa forage (Medicago sativa L.) from different sourced-origins. In this study, alfalfa hay with two different origins was used as modeled forage for molecular structure and chemical property study. In each forage origin, five to seven sources were analyzed. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using FT/IR non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters of protein spectral profiles included functional groups of Amide I, Amide II and Amide I to II ratio. The results show that the modeled forage Amide I and Amide II were centered at 1653 cm(-1) and 1545 cm(-1), respectively. The Amide I spectral height and area intensities were from 0.02 to 0.03 and 2.67 to 3.36 AI, respectively. The Amide II spectral height and area intensities were from 0.01 to 0.02 and 0.71 to 0.93 AI, respectively. The Amide I to II spectral peak height and area ratios were from 1.86 to 1.88 and 3.68 to 3.79, respectively. Our results show that the non-invasive molecular spectroscopic techniques are capable to detect forage internal protein structure features which are associated with forage chemical properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Integration of non-invasive biometrics with sensory analysis techniques to assess acceptability of beer by consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Viejo, Claudia; Fuentes, Sigfredo; Howell, Kate; Torrico, Damir D; Dunshea, Frank R

    2018-03-05

    Traditional sensory tests rely on conscious and self-reported responses from participants. The integration of non-invasive biometric techniques, such as heart rate, body temperature, brainwaves and facial expressions can gather more information from consumers while tasting a product. The main objectives of this study were i) to assess significant differences between beers for all conscious and unconscious responses, ii) to find significant correlations among the different variables from the conscious and unconscious responses and iii) to develop a model to classify beers according to liking using only the unconscious responses. For this study, an integrated camera system with video and infrared thermal imagery (IRTI), coupled with a novel computer application was used. Videos and IRTI were automatically obtained while tasting nine beers to extract biometrics (heart rate, temperature and facial expressions) using computer vision analysis. Additionally, an EEG mobile headset was used to obtain brainwave signals during beer consumption. Consumers assessed foam, color, aroma, mouthfeel, taste, flavor and overall acceptability of beers using a 9-point hedonic scale with results showing a higher acceptability for beers with higher foamability and lower bitterness. i) There were non-significant differences among beers for the emotional and physiological responses, however, significant differences were found for the cognitive and self-reported responses. ii) Results from principal component analysis explained 65% of total data variability and, along with the covariance matrix (p sensory responses of participants and the biometric data obtained. There was a negative correlation between body temperature and liking of foam height and stability, and a positive correlation between theta signals and bitterness. iii) Artificial neural networks were used to develop three models with high accuracy to classify beers according to level of liking (low and high) of three sensory

  20. Value of five noninvasive diagnostic techniques and their combinations in diagnosis of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Xu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the correlation of aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI, FIB-4, Forns index, S index, and FibroScan with the degree of liver fibrosis, the diagnostic value of these techniques used alone or in combination, and the clinical value of these noninvasive techniques in the assessment of the degree of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 91 patients with pathologically confirmed CHB who visited General Hospital of Ningxia Medical University and underwent liver biopsy from January 2009 to April 2015. According to the Scheuer pathological stage and liver fibrosis stage (S, the patients were divided into non-liver fibrosis group (a liver fibrosis stage of S0, 32 patients, mild liver fibrosis group (a liver fibrosis stage of <S2, 30 patients, and marked liver fibrosis group (a liver fibrosis stage of ≥S2, 29 patients. The APRI, FIB-4, Forns index, and S index were calculated, and liver stiffness was measured by FibroScan. An analysis of variance was used for the comparison of normally distributed continuous data between three groups, and the Dunnett t-test was used for further comparison between any two groups. The Spearman correlation analysis was also performed. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC were used to evaluate the value of these noninvasive techniques in the diagnosis of liver fibrosis. Results There were significant differences in age, albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and platelet count between the three groups (F=3.552, 4.035, 4.374, and 5.992, all P<0.05, and there were significant differences in these parameters between the non-liver fibrosis group and the mild and marked liver fibrosis groups (P<0.05. There were significant differences in APRI, FIB-4, Forns index, S index, and FibroScan between the three groups (F

  1. Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in twin pregnancies with treatment of assisted reproductive techniques (ART) in a single center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, YueQiu; Gao, Ya; Lin, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study is to report the performance of noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in twin pregnancies after the treatment of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Method: In two years period, 565 pregnant women with ART twin pregnancies were prospectively tested by NIPT...

  2. A reliable genetic technique for sex determination of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) from non-invasively collected hair samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durnin, Matthew E.; Palsboll, Per J.; Ryder, Oliver A.; McCullough, Dale R.

    Extractions from non-invasive hair samples usually yield low amounts of highly degraded DNA. Previously developed mammal molecular sexing methods were not designed with such sub-optimal conditions in mind. We developed a simple and reliable PCR-based sexing method aimed at degraded, low yield DNA

  3. Multi-modal approach using Raman spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography for the discrimination of colonic adenocarcinoma from normal colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashok, Praveen C.; Praveen, Bavishna B.; Bellini, Nicola; Riches, Andrew; Dholakia, Kishan; Herrington, C. Simon

    2013-01-01

    We report a multimodal optical approach using both Raman spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) in tandem to discriminate between colonic adenocarcinoma and normal colon. Although both of these non-invasive techniques are capable of discriminating between normal and tumour tissues, they are unable individually to provide both the high specificity and high sensitivity required for disease diagnosis. We combine the chemical information derived from Raman spectroscopy with the texture parameters extracted from OCT images. The sensitivity obtained using Raman spectroscopy and OCT individually was 89% and 78% respectively and the specificity was 77% and 74% respectively. Combining the information derived using the two techniques increased both sensitivity and specificity to 94% demonstrating that combining complementary optical information enhances diagnostic accuracy. These data demonstrate that multimodal optical analysis has the potential to achieve accurate non-invasive cancer diagnosis. PMID:24156073

  4. A pilot study using laser-based technique for non-invasive diagnostics of hypertensive conditions in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, Karina S.; Ahmad, Shakil; Wang, Keqing; Rafailov, Ilya E.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Zhang, Lin; Rafailov, Edik U.; Ahmed, Asif

    2016-02-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is directly linked to preeclampsia, a maternal hypertensive condition that is life threating for both the mother and the baby. Epidemiological studies show that women with a history of pre-eclampsia have an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease. Here we report a new non-invasive diagnostic test for preeclampsia in mice that allows us to non-invasively assess the condition of the animals during the experiment and treatment in established models of preeclampsia. A laser-based multifunctional diagnostics system (LAKK-M) was chosen to carry out non-invasive analysis of multiple parameters. The device was used to simultaneously record the microcirculatory blood flow and oxygen saturation, as well as fluorescence levels of endogenous fluorophores. Preliminary experiments were conducted on adenoviral (Ad-)- mediated overexpression of sFlt-1 (Ad-sFlt-1) to mimic preeclampsialike symptoms in mice. The recorded data displayed the ability of the LAKK-M diagnostics device to detect significant differences in perfusion measurements between the control and Ad-sFlt-1 treatment. Preliminary results provide a potential avenue to employ these diagnostics technology to monitor and aid in maintaining control of live animal conditions throughout the experiment and treatment.

  5. Exclusion and diagnosis of pulmonary embolism by a rapid ELISA D-dimer test and noninvasive imaging techniques within the context of a clinical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michiels, J J; Pattynama, P M

    2000-01-01

    A negative rapid ELISA D-dimer test alone in out-patients with a low to moderate clinical probability (CP) on pulmonary embolism (PE) is predicted to safely exclude pulmonary embolism. The combination of a negative rapid ELISA D-dimer test and a low to moderate CP on PE followed by compression ultrasonography (CUS) for the detection of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is safe and cost-effective as it reduces the need for noninvasive imaging techniques to about 50% to 60% of outpatients with suspected PE. A high probability ventilation-perfusion (VP) scan or a positive spiral CT consistent with PE and the detection of DVT by CUS are currently considered to be clear indications for anticoagulant treatment. Subsequent pulmonary angiography (PA) is the gold standard diagnostic strategy to exclude or diagnose PE in suspected outpatients with a negative CUS, a positive rapid ELISA D-dimer test, and a nondiagnostic VP scan or negative spiral CT to prevent overtreatment with anticoagulants. However, the willingness of clinicians and the availability of resources to perform PA is restricted, a fact that has provided an impetus for clinical investigators to search for alternative noninvasive strategies to exclude or detect venous thromboembolism (VTE). Serial CUS testing for the detection of DVT in patients with a low to moderate CP on PE and a nondiagnostic VP scan or negative spiral CT is predicted to be safe and will reduce the need for PA to less than 10% or even less than 5%. This noninvasive serial CUS strategy restricts the need for invasive PA to a minor group of patients (spiral CT and a high CP on PE. Prospective evaluations are warranted to implement and to validate the advantages and the disadvantages of the various combinations of noninvasive strategies and to compare serial CUS testing versus PA in randomized clinical management studies of outpatients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

  6. Gastrointestinal passage of [125I]Na and blood clearance of 125I-labelled bacteria recorded with a simple non-invasive technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundqvist, T.; Skogh, T.

    1982-01-01

    To measure blood concentrations of radiolabelled particles or substances, blood sampling is generally required. The kinetics of radioactivity variations in the blood can be studied by blood sampling from each individual or experimental animal. Alternatively blood samples can be taken from different individuals at different time points. With either of these methods it is difficult to predict the optimal time points for blood sampling, and important information can easily be missed, especially in rapid processes. In this study a simple non-invasive technique for continuous recording of blood radioactivity concentrations in mice is presented. (Auth.)

  7. Non-destructive and non-invasive analyses shed light on the realization technique of ancient polychrome prints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striová, Jana; Coccolini, Gabriele; Micheli, Sara; Lofrumento, Cristiana; Galeotti, Monica; Cagnini, Andrea; Castellucci, Emilio Mario

    2009-08-01

    Five polychrome prints representing famous painters, such as Albrecht Dürer, were analyzed using a non-destructive and non-invasive methodology as required by the artwork typology. The diagnostic strategy includes X-ray fluorescence (XRF), reflectance micro-infrared (μFTIR) and micro-Raman (μRaman) spectroscopy. These prints were realized with a la poupée method that involves application of the polychrome inks on a single copper plate, before the printing process. A broad range of compounds (i.e., cinnabar, red lead, white lead, umber earth, hydrated calcium sulfate, calcium carbonate, amorphous carbon, and Prussian blue) was employed as chalcographic inks, using linseed oil as a binding medium. Gamboge was identified in the delicate finishing brush touches realized in watercolor.

  8. Non-invasive method to detect the changes of glucose concentration in whole blood using photometric technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Shiny Amala Priya; Towe, Bruce C

    2014-01-01

    A non-invasive method is developed to monitor rapid changes in blood glucose levels in diabetic patients. The system depends on an optical cell built with a LED that emits light of wavelength 535nm, which is a peak absorbance of hemoglobin. As the glucose concentration in blood decreases, its osmolarity also decreases and the Red Blood Cells (RBCs) swell and decrease the path length absorption coefficient. Decreasing absorption coefficient increases the transmission of light through the whole blood. The system was tested with a constructed optical cell that held whole blood in a capillary tube. As expected the light transmitted to the photodiode increases with decreasing glucose concentration. The average response time of the system was between 30-40 seconds.

  9. Non-invasive techniques for the measurement of extraction fraction and permeability surface area product of 99Tcm DTPA in the human forearm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, S.D.; Peters, A.M.; Myers, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Only a very limited number of clinical studies have been reported on the measurement of endothelial permeability to hydrophilic solutes (molecular weight 99 Tc m DTPA, are perfusion-dependent as well as diffusion-dependent. The authors describe non-invasive techniques for measurement of clearance and extraction fraction of 99 Tc m DTPA into the extravascular space of the resting forearm using a scintillation probe, from which we then calculated permeability surface area (PS) product. Their values for extraction fraction of about 0.5 and for PS product of about 3 ml per minute per 100 ml tissue are comparable to values reported in the literature for resting skeletal muscle using more invasive techniques. (author)

  10. Development of comprehensive image processing technique for differential diagnosis of liver disease by using multi-modality images. Pixel-based cross-correlation method using a profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Akira; Okura, Yasuhiko; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Ishida, Takayuki; Kawashita, Ikuo; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Sanada, Taizo

    2009-01-01

    Imaging techniques such as high magnetic field imaging and multidetector-row CT have been markedly improved recently. The final image-reading systems easily produce more than a thousand diagnostic images per patient. Therefore, we developed a comprehensive cross-correlation processing technique using multi-modality images, in order to decrease the considerable time and effort involved in the interpretation of a radiogram (multi-formatted display and/or stack display method, etc). In this scheme, the criteria of an attending radiologist for the differential diagnosis of liver cyst, hemangioma of liver, hepatocellular carcinoma, and metastatic liver cancer on magnetic resonance images with various sequences and CT images with and without contrast enhancement employ a cross-correlation coefficient. Using a one-dimensional cross-correlation method, comprehensive image processing could be also adapted for various artifacts (some depending on modality imaging, and some on patients), which may be encountered at the clinical scene. This comprehensive image-processing technique could assist radiologists in the differential diagnosis of liver diseases. (author)

  11. Investigating the neuroanatomical substrate of pathological laughing and crying in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with multimodal neuroimaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christidi, Foteini; Karavasilis, Efstratios; Ferentinos, Panagiotis; Xirou, Sophia; Velonakis, Georgios; Rentzos, Michalis; Zouvelou, Vasiliki; Zalonis, Ioannis; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Evdokimidis, Ioannis

    2018-02-01

    Pathological laughing and crying (PLC) is common in several neurological and psychiatric diseases and is associated with a distributed network involving the frontal cortex, the brainstem and cortico-pontine-cerebellar circuits. By applying multimodal neuroimaging approach, we examined the neuroanatomical substrate of PLC in a sample of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We studied 56 non-demented ALS patients and 25 healthy controls (HC). PLC was measured in ALS using the Center of Neurologic Study Lability Scale (CNS-LS; cutoff score: 13). All participants underwent 3D-T1-weighted and 30-directional diffusion-weighted imaging at 3T. Voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial-statistics analysis was used to examine gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) differences between ALS patients with and without PLC (ALS-PLC and ALS-nonPLC, respectively). Comparisons were restricted to regions with detected differences between ALS and HC, controlling for age, gender, total intracranial volume and depressive symptoms. In regions with significant differences between ALS and HC, ALS-PLC patients showed decreased GM volume in left orbitofrontal cortex, frontal operculum, and putamen and bilateral frontal poles, compared to ALS-nonPLC. They also had decreased fractional anisotropy in left cingulum bundle and posterior corona radiata. WM abnormalities were additionally detected in WM associative and ponto-cerebellar tracts (using a more liberal threshold). PLC in ALS is driven by both GM and WM abnormalities which highlight the role of circuits rather than isolated centers in the emergence of this condition. ALS is suggested as a useful natural experimental model to study PLC.

  12. Simplified Multimodal Biometric Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Shete

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Multibiometric systems are expected to be more reliable than unimodal biometric systems for personal identification due to the presence of multiple, fairly independent pieces of evidence e.g. Unique Identification Project "Aadhaar" of Government of India. In this paper, we present a novel wavelet based technique to perform fusion at the feature level and score level by considering two biometric modalities, face and fingerprint. The results indicate that the proposed technique can lead to substantial improvement in multimodal matching performance. The proposed technique is simple because of no preprocessing of raw biometric traits as well as no feature and score normalization.

  13. Chronic ankle pain and fibrosis successfully treated with a new noninvasive augmented soft tissue mobilization technique (ASTM): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melham, T J; Sevier, T L; Malnofski, M J; Wilson, J K; Helfst, R H

    1998-06-01

    This clinical case report demonstrates the clinical effectiveness of a new form of soft tissue mobilization in the treatment of excessive connective tissue fibrosis (scar tissue) around an athlete's injured ankle. The scar tissue was causing the athlete to have pain with activity, pain on palpation of the ankle, decreased range of motion, and loss of function. Surgery and several months of conventional physical therapy failed to alleviate the athlete's symptoms. As a final resort, augmented soft tissue mobilization (ASTM) was administered. ASTM is an alternative nonsurgical treatment modality that is being researched at Performance Dynamics (Muncip, IN). ASTM is a process that uses ergonomically designed instruments that assist therapists in the rapid localization and effective treatment of areas exhibiting excessive soft tissue fibrosis. This is followed by a stretching and strengthening program. Upon the completion of 6 wk of ASTM therapy, the athlete had no pain and had regained full range of motion and function. This case report is an example of how a noninvasive augmented form of soft tissue mobilization (ASTM) demonstrated impressive clinical results in treating a condition caused by connective tissue fibrosis.

  14. Bioluminescence : the potential of a non-invasive bio-optical imaging technique and improvement of animal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, J. W.; van Dam, G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Bioluminescence is an optical imaging technique that exploits the emission of photons at specific wavelengths based on energy-dependent reactions catalysed by luciferases. The technique makes it possible to monitor measure, and track biological processes in living animals. A short review is

  15. Multimodality and Ambient Intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Verhaegh, W.; Aarts, E.; Korst, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss multimodal interface technology. We present eexamples of multimodal interfaces and show problems and opportunities. Fusion of modalities is discussed and some roadmap discussions on research in multimodality are summarized. This chapter also discusses future developments

  16. Practical utility of on-line clearance and blood temperature monitors as noninvasive techniques to measure hemodialysis blood access flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontseré, Néstor; Blasco, Miquel; Maduell, Francisco; Vera, Manel; Arias-Guillen, Marta; Herranz, Sandra; Blanco, Teresa; Barrufet, Marta; Burrel, Marta; Montaña, Javier; Real, Maria Isabel; Mestres, Gaspar; Riambau, Vicenç; Campistol, Josep M

    2011-01-01

    Access blood flow (Qa) measurements are recommended by the current guidelines as one of the most important components in vascular access maintenance programs. This study evaluates the efficiency of Qa measurement with on-line conductivity (OLC-Qa) and blood temperature monitoring (BTM-Qa) in comparison with the gold standard saline dilution method (SDM-Qa). 50 long-term hemodialysis patients (42 arteriovenous fistulas/8 arteriovenous grafts) were studied. Bland-Altman and Lin's coefficient (ρ(c)) were used to study accuracy and precision. Mean values were 1,021.7 ± 502.4 ml/min SDM-Qa, 832.8 ± 574.3 ml/min OLC-Qa (p = 0.007) and 1,094.9 ± 491.9 ml/min with BTM-Qa (p = NS). Biases and ρ(c) obtained were -188.8 ml/min (ρ(c) 0.58) OLC-Qa and 73.2 ml/min (ρ(c) 0.89) BTM-Qa. The limits of agreement (bias ± 1.96 SD) obtained were from -1,119 to 741.3 ml/min (OLC-Qa) and -350.6 to 497.2 ml/min (BTM-Qa). BTM-Qa and OLC-Qa are valid noninvasive and practical methods to estimate Qa, although BTM-Qa was more accurate and had better concordance than OLC-Qa compared with SDM-Qa. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Noninvasive radioisotopic technique for detection of platelet deposition in mitral valve prosthesis and renal microembolism in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewanjee, M.K.; Kaye, M.P.; Fuster, V.; Rao, S.A.

    1980-01-01

    At 24 hrs after implantation of Bjoerk-Shiley mitral prosthesis in 5 dogs, in vivo images were obtained with a gamma camera after intravenous administration (0.5-0.6 mCi) one hour postoperatively of autologous Indium-111-labeled platelets. The site of platelet deposition in the teflon ring and perivascular damaged cardiac tissue is clearly delineated in the scintiphoto. In vitro biodistribution (mean % +/- SD of injected dose) at 24 hrs after injection of the 5 implanted and 7 normal dogs performed with a gamma counter demonstrated that (45.1 +/- 10.6)% and (0.7 +/- 0.4)% were in blood and kidneys in normal dogs and (28.5 +/- 6.8)%, (1.6 +/- 0.6)%, (0.3 +/- 0.1)%, and (0.2 +/- 0.1)% were in blood, kidneys, teflon rings, and perivascular damaged cardiac tissue, respectively. The strut and pyrolytic carbon-coated disc retained only (0.0033 +/- 0.0004)% and (0.0031 +/- 0.0003)%, respectively. There was a 2.3-fold increase of labeled platelets in kidneys of implanted dogs due to renal trapping of microembolism. Also, three- to fivefold increase in ratios of lung, brain, cardiac, and skeletal muscle to blood indicates that internal organs and whole body work as filter for microembolism generated by cardiovascular surgery and mitral prosthesis. Twenty percent of the administered platelets are consumed in surgical repair of damaged tissue. Indium-111-labeled platelets thus provide a sensitive marker for noninvasive imaging of Bjoerk-Shiley mitral prosthesis, thromboembolism after implantation of prosthetic device, and in vitro quantitation of surgical consumption

  18. Single-pulse CARS based multimodal nonlinear optical microscope for bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Kamali, Tschackad; Levitte, Jonathan M; Katz, Ori; Hermann, Boris; Werkmeister, Rene; Považay, Boris; Drexler, Wolfgang; Unterhuber, Angelika; Silberberg, Yaron

    2015-05-18

    Noninvasive label-free imaging of biological systems raises demand not only for high-speed three-dimensional prescreening of morphology over a wide-field of view but also it seeks to extract the microscopic functional and molecular details within. Capitalizing on the unique advantages brought out by different nonlinear optical effects, a multimodal nonlinear optical microscope can be a powerful tool for bioimaging. Bringing together the intensity-dependent contrast mechanisms via second harmonic generation, third harmonic generation and four-wave mixing for structural-sensitive imaging, and single-beam/single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering technique for chemical sensitive imaging in the finger-print region, we have developed a simple and nearly alignment-free multimodal nonlinear optical microscope that is based on a single wide-band Ti:Sapphire femtosecond pulse laser source. Successful imaging tests have been realized on two exemplary biological samples, a canine femur bone and collagen fibrils harvested from a rat tail. Since the ultra-broad band-width femtosecond laser is a suitable source for performing high-resolution optical coherence tomography, a wide-field optical coherence tomography arm can be easily incorporated into the presented multimodal microscope making it a versatile optical imaging tool for noninvasive label-free bioimaging.

  19. Note: A non-invasive electronic measurement technique to measure the embedded four resistive elements in a Wheatstone bridge sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravelo Arias, S. I.; Ramírez Muñoz, D. [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, Avda. de la Universitat, s/n, 46100-Burjassot (Spain); Cardoso, S. [INESC Microsystems and Nanotechnologies (INESC-MN) and Institute for Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies, R. Alves Redol 9, Lisbon 1000-029 (Portugal); Ferreira, R. [INL-International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Av. Mestre José Veiga, Braga 4715-31 (Portugal); Freitas, P. [INESC Microsystems and Nanotechnologies (INESC-MN) and Institute for Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies, R. Alves Redol 9, Lisbon 1000-029 (Portugal); INL-International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Av. Mestre José Veiga, Braga 4715-31 (Portugal)

    2015-06-15

    The work shows a measurement technique to obtain the correct value of the four elements in a resistive Wheatstone bridge without the need to separate the physical connections existing between them. Two electronic solutions are presented, based on a source-and-measure unit and using discrete electronic components. The proposed technique brings the possibility to know the mismatching or the tolerance between the bridge resistive elements and then to pass or reject it in terms of its related common-mode rejection. Experimental results were taken in various Wheatstone resistive bridges (discrete and magnetoresistive integrated bridges) validating the proposed measurement technique specially when the bridge is micro-fabricated and there is no physical way to separate one resistive element from the others.

  20. Note: A non-invasive electronic measurement technique to measure the embedded four resistive elements in a Wheatstone bridge sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravelo Arias, S. I.; Ramírez Muñoz, D.; Cardoso, S.; Ferreira, R.; Freitas, P.

    2015-01-01

    The work shows a measurement technique to obtain the correct value of the four elements in a resistive Wheatstone bridge without the need to separate the physical connections existing between them. Two electronic solutions are presented, based on a source-and-measure unit and using discrete electronic components. The proposed technique brings the possibility to know the mismatching or the tolerance between the bridge resistive elements and then to pass or reject it in terms of its related common-mode rejection. Experimental results were taken in various Wheatstone resistive bridges (discrete and magnetoresistive integrated bridges) validating the proposed measurement technique specially when the bridge is micro-fabricated and there is no physical way to separate one resistive element from the others

  1. Multimodal label-free microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pavillon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the different multimodal applications based on a large extent of label-free imaging modalities, ranging from linear to nonlinear optics, while also including spectroscopic measurements. We put specific emphasis on multimodal measurements going across the usual boundaries between imaging modalities, whereas most multimodal platforms combine techniques based on similar light interactions or similar hardware implementations. In this review, we limit the scope to focus on applications for biology such as live cells or tissues, since by their nature of being alive or fragile, we are often not free to take liberties with the image acquisition times and are forced to gather the maximum amount of information possible at one time. For such samples, imaging by a given label-free method usually presents a challenge in obtaining sufficient optical signal or is limited in terms of the types of observable targets. Multimodal imaging is then particularly attractive for these samples in order to maximize the amount of measured information. While multimodal imaging is always useful in the sense of acquiring additional information from additional modes, at times it is possible to attain information that could not be discovered using any single mode alone, which is the essence of the progress that is possible using a multimodal approach.

  2. Multimode optical fibers: steady state mode exciter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M; Sugimura, A; Ikegami, T

    1976-09-01

    The steady state mode power distribution of the multimode graded index fiber was measured. A simple and effective steady state mode exciter was fabricated by an etching technique. Its insertion loss was 0.5 dB for an injection laser. Deviation in transmission characteristics of multimode graded index fibers can be avoided by using the steady state mode exciter.

  3. Training of Perceptual Motor Skills in Multimodal Virtual Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopher Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal, immersive, virtual reality (VR techniques open new perspectives for perceptualmotor skill trainers. They also introduce new risks and dangers. This paper describes the benefits and pitfalls of multimodal training and the cognitive building blocks of a multimodal, VR training simulators.

  4. Multi-mode technique for the determination of the biaxial Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} permittivity tensor from 300 to 6 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, N. C., E-mail: natalia.docarmocarvalho@research.uwa.edu.au; Le Floch, J-M.; Tobar, M. E. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems (EQuS), 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley 6009 (Australia); Krupka, J. [Instytut Mikroelektroniki i Optoelektroniki PW, Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-05-11

    The Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} (YSO) crystal is a dielectric material with biaxial anisotropy with known values of refractive index at optical frequencies. It is a well-known rare-earth (RE) host material for optical research and more recently has shown promising performance for quantum-engineered devices. In this paper, we report the first microwave characterization of the real permittivity tensor of a bulk YSO sample, as well as an investigation of the temperature dependence of the tensor components from 296 K down to 6 K. Estimated uncertainties were below 0.26%, limited by the precision of machining the cylindrical dielectric. Also, the electrical Q-factors of a few electromagnetic modes were recorded as a way to provide some information about the crystal losses over the temperature range. To solve the tensor components necessary for a biaxial crystal, we developed the multi-mode technique, which uses simultaneous measurement of low order whispering gallery modes. Knowledge of the permittivity tensor offers important data, essential for the design of technologies involving YSO, such as microwave coupling to electron and hyperfine transitions in RE doped samples at low temperatures.

  5. Benthic O-2 uptake of two cold-water coral communities estimated with the non-invasive eddy correlation technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovelli, Lorenzo; Attard, Karl M.; Bryant, Lee D.

    2015-01-01

    , was a channel-like sound in Northern Norway at a depth of 220 m. Both sites were characterized by the presence of live mounds of the reef framework-forming scleractinian Lophelia pertusa and reef-associated fauna such as sponges, crustaceans and other corals. The measured O-2 uptake at the 2 sites varied...... times higher than the global mean for soft sediment communities at comparable depths. The measurements document the importance of CWC communities for local and regional carbon cycling and demonstrate that the EC technique is a valuable tool for assessing rates of benthic O2 uptake in such complex...

  6. Open heart operations without transfusion using a multimodality blood conservation strategy in 50 Jehovah's Witness patients: implications for a "bloodless" surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengart, T K; Helm, R E; DeBois, W J; Garcia, N; Krieger, K H; Isom, O W

    1997-06-01

    Blood transfusion persists as an important risk of open heart operations despite the recent introduction of a variety of new pharmacologic agents and blood conservation techniques as independent therapies. A comprehensive multimodality blood conservation program was developed to minimize this risk. To provide a strategy for operating without transfusion, this program was prospectively applied to 50 adult patients who are Jehovah's Witnesses and have undergone open heart operation at our institution since 1992. The blood conservation program used for these patients included the use of high-dose erythropoietin (800 U/kg load, 500 U/kg every other day), aprotinin (6 million U total dose full Hammersmith regimen), "maximal" volume intraoperative autologous blood donation, intraoperative cell salvage, continuous shed blood reinfusion, and drawing as few blood specimens as possible. Procedures performed included first-time coronary bypass operations (n = 30) and more complex operations, including reoperations, valve replacements, and multiple valve replacements with or without coronary bypass (n = 20). Despite the absence of transfusion, the mean discharge hematocrit in these patients was greater than 30 percent, and there was no anemia-related mortality rate in this group. The overall in-hospital mortality for the group was 4 percent. A subset analysis was performed between the 30 first-time coronary bypass patients (group 1) and a control group of 30 consecutive patients who were not Jehovah's Witnesses but had undergone first-time coronary bypass during the same period (group 2). The blood conservation program described in the previous paragraph was not used in group 2 patients and specific transfusion criteria were prospectively applied. The chest tube output in group 1 patients was less than 40 percent of that for group 2 patients at all points measured after operation (p blood products. These results suggest that even complex open heart operations can be performed

  7. Radioactive implant induced x-ray emission technique for noninvasive determination of iodine content in thyroid: experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, R; Ando, A; Hiraki, T [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Allied Medical Professions; Tonami, N; Hisada, K [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1984-02-01

    A new technique, radioactive implant x-ray emission spectrometry to determine the in vivo iodine content of the human thyroid is proposed. The variations of counting rate and effective excitation efficiencies of I Ksub(..cap alpha..) (28.6 keV) with iodine content, thyroid volume and skin-thyroid distance were studied for the /sup 201/Tl source to examine the properties of excitation and photon attenuation. As a result, the gland depth and volume could be estimated from the peak ratios of 30.7 keV/167.6 keV and 28.6 keV/167.6 keV. Using a 1 MBq /sup 201/Tl implant source, the detectable minimum iodine concentration found was approximately 70 ..mu..g/g for 2000 s measuring time in the phantom experiment. The effectiveness of the RIXE technique is discussed. It was concluded that the /sup 201/Tl RIXE spectrometry might serve to determine the in vivo iodine content of the human thyroid.

  8. Radioactive implant induced x-ray emission technique for noninvasive determination of iodine content in thyroid: experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, R; Tonami, N; Ando, A; Hiraki, T; Hisada, K

    1984-02-01

    A new technique, radioactive implant x-ray emission spectrometry to determine the in vivo iodine content of the human thyroid is proposed. The variations of counting rate and effective excitation efficiencies of I K alpha (28.6 keV) with iodine content, thyroid volume and skin-thyroid distance were studied for the /sup 201/Tl source to examine the properties of excitation and photon attenuation. As a result, the gland depth and volume could be estimated from the peak ratios of 30.7 keV/167.6 keV and 28.6 keV/167.6 keV. Using a 1 MBq /sup 201/Tl implant source, the detectable minimum iodine concentration found was approximately 70 micrograms/g for 2000 s measuring time in the phantom experiment. The effectiveness of the RIXE technique is discussed. It was concluded that the /sup 201/Tl RIXE spectrometry might serve to determine the in vivo iodine content of the human thyroid.

  9. MO-DE-202-04: Multimodality Image-Guided Surgery and Intervention: For the Rest of Us

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekhar, R. [Children’s National Health System (United States)

    2016-06-15

    At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: Keyvan Farahani, “Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy” Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, “Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guided neurosurgery” Tina Kapur, “Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite” Raj Shekhar, “Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us” Learning Objectives: Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. Learn about recent advances in 3D–2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such as neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and R41CA192504

  10. MO-DE-202-04: Multimodality Image-Guided Surgery and Intervention: For the Rest of Us

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shekhar, R.

    2016-01-01

    At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: Keyvan Farahani, “Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy” Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, “Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guided neurosurgery” Tina Kapur, “Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite” Raj Shekhar, “Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us” Learning Objectives: Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. Learn about recent advances in 3D–2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such as neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and R41CA192504

  11. A multimodal MRI dataset of professional chess players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaiming; Jiang, Jing; Qiu, Lihua; Yang, Xun; Huang, Xiaoqi; Lui, Su; Gong, Qiyong

    2015-01-01

    Chess is a good model to study high-level human brain functions such as spatial cognition, memory, planning, learning and problem solving. Recent studies have demonstrated that non-invasive MRI techniques are valuable for researchers to investigate the underlying neural mechanism of playing chess. For professional chess players (e.g., chess grand masters and masters or GM/Ms), what are the structural and functional alterations due to long-term professional practice, and how these alterations relate to behavior, are largely veiled. Here, we report a multimodal MRI dataset from 29 professional Chinese chess players (most of whom are GM/Ms), and 29 age matched novices. We hope that this dataset will provide researchers with new materials to further explore high-level human brain functions.

  12. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples; Jerome Eyer

    2001-01-01

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a 14 month proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are a noninvasive means towards site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This report covers the results of Task 3 and change of scope of Tasks 4-6. Task 1 contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task 2 is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data designed to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task 3 is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. Task 4, 5, and 6 were designing, acquiring, processing, and interpretation of a three dimensional seismic survey (3D) at the Z-9 crib area at 200 west area, Hanford

  13. The ventricular function after operative correction of chronic mitral insufficiency. Non-invasive study with technetium-99m pertechnetate. First passage technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougioukas, G.

    1982-01-01

    14 patients (age 49.6 ± 13.3 years) with pure mitral insufficiency of the second to fourth degree underwent an operative intervention on the mitral valve, whereby in 12 cases the valve was replaced and two times the insufficiency could be cleared up with a plastic reconstruction. On the average of 21.6 ± 11 months after the operation a non-invasive study was done with the help of heart scintigraphy 'first passage technique' with Tc 99m pertechnetate at rest and at maximum ergometeric stress. With this method pre- and postoperative end-diastolic volumes (227/ 114 ml), end-systolic volumes (69/ 46 ml), heart minute volumes (4.5/ 5.7 l/min), total output fraction of the left ventricle (61/ 69%), diastolic filling speed and emptying speed of the ventricle were determined as well as the measuring of the lung flow time. The speed of the rapid filling phase gave no indication of a hindrance as a result of an implanted valve or a plastic reconstruction. The changes under stress indicate a normal reaction of the ventricle. This ability to react corresponds clinically to the improvement of the patients on the average of 1.1 degrees according to the NYHA classification. (orig./TRV) [de

  14. Noninvasive Urodynamic Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arturo Levi D'Ancona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The longevity of the world's population is increasing, and among male patients, complaints of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS are growing. Testing to diagnose LUTS and to differentiate between the various causes should be quick, easy, cheap, specific, not too bothersome for the patient, and noninvasive or minimally so. Urodynamic evaluation is the gold standard for diagnosing bladder outlet obstruction (BOO but presents some inconveniences such as embarrassment, pain, and dysuria; furthermore, 19% of cases experience urinary retention, macroscopic hematuria, or urinary tract infection. A greater number of resources in the diagnostic armamentarium could increase the opportunity for selecting less invasive tests. A number of groups have risen to this challenge and have formulated and developed ideas and technologies to improve noninvasive methods to diagnosis BOO. These techniques start with flowmetry, an increase in the interest of ultrasound, and finally the performance of urodynamic evaluation without a urethral catheter. Flowmetry is not sufficient for confirming a diagnosis of BOO. Ultrasound of the prostate and the bladder can help to assess BOO noninvasively in all men and can be useful for evaluating the value of BOO at assessment and during treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia patients in the future. The great advantages of noninvasive urodynamics are as follows: minimal discomfort, minimal risk of urinary tract infection, and low cost. This method can be repeated many times, permitting the evaluation of obstruction during clinical treatment. A urethral connector should be used to diagnose BOO, in evaluation for surgery, and in screening for treatment. In the future, noninvasive urodynamics can be used to identify patients with BOO to initiate early medical treatment and evaluate the results. This approach permits the possibility of performing surgery before detrusor damage occurs.

  15. Noninvasive Ventilation in Premature Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Keri Ann

    2016-04-01

    The use of noninvasive ventilation is a constantly evolving treatment option for respiratory disease in the premature infant. The goals of these noninvasive ventilation techniques are to improve gas exchange in the premature infant's lungs and to minimize the need for intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation. The goals of this article are to consider various uses of nasal interfaces, discuss skin care and developmental positioning concerns faced by the bedside nurse, and discuss the medical management aimed to reduce morbidity and mortality. This article explores the nursing role, the advances in medical strategies for noninvasive ventilation, and the team approach to noninvasive ventilation use in this population. Search strategy included a literature review on medical databases, such as EBSCOhost, CINAHL, PubMed, and NeoReviews. Innovative products, nursing research on developmental positioning and skin care, and advanced medical management have led to better and safer outcomes for premature infants requiring noninvasive ventilation. The medical focus of avoiding long-term mechanical ventilation would not be possible without the technology to provide noninvasive ventilation to these premature infants and the watchful eye of the nurse in terms of careful positioning, preventing skin breakdown and facial scarring, and a proper seal to maximize ventilation accuracy. This article encourages nursing-based research to quantify some of the knowledge about skin care and positioning as well as research into most appropriate uses for noninvasive ventilation devices.

  16. Validation of 2 noninvasive, markerless reconstruction techniques in biplane high-speed fluoroscopy for 3-dimensional research of bovine distal limb kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, M; Reich, E; Grund, S; Mülling, C K W; Geiger, S M

    2017-10-01

    Lameness severely impairs cattle's locomotion, and it is among the most important threats to animal welfare, performance, and productivity in the modern dairy industry. However, insight into the pathological alterations of claw biomechanics leading to lameness and an understanding of the biomechanics behind development of claw lesions causing lameness are limited. Biplane high-speed fluoroscopic kinematography is a new approach for the analysis of skeletal motion. Biplane high-speed videos in combination with bone scans can be used for 3-dimensional (3D) animations of bones moving in 3D space. The gold standard, marker-based animation, requires implantation of radio-opaque markers into bones, which impairs the practicability for lameness research in live animals. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the comparative accuracy of 2 noninvasive, markerless animation techniques (semi-automatic and manual) in 3D animation of the bovine distal limb. Tantalum markers were implanted into each of the distal, middle, and proximal phalanges of 5 isolated bovine distal forelimbs, and biplane high-speed x-ray videos of each limb were recorded to capture the simulation of one step. The limbs were scanned by computed tomography to create bone models of the 6 digital bones, and 3D animation of the bones' movements were subsequently reconstructed using the marker-based, the semi-automatic, and the manual animation techniques. Manual animation translational bias and precision varied from 0.63 ± 0.26 mm to 0.80 ± 0.49 mm, and rotational bias and precision ranged from 2.41 ± 1.43° to 6.75 ± 4.67°. Semi-automatic translational values for bias and precision ranged from 1.26 ± 1.28 mm to 2.75 ± 2.17 mm, and rotational values varied from 3.81 ± 2.78° to 11.7 ± 8.11°. In our study, we demonstrated the successful application of biplane high-speed fluoroscopic kinematography to gait analysis of bovine distal limb. Using the manual animation technique, kinematics

  17. Estimation of net ecosystem metabolism of seagrass meadows in the coastal waters of the East Sea and Black Sea using the noninvasive eddy covariance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Seong; Kang, Dong-Jin; Hineva, Elitsa; Slabakova, Violeta; Todorova, Valentina; Park, Jiyoung; Cho, Jin-Hyung

    2017-06-01

    We measured the community-scale metabolism of seagrass meadows in Bulgaria (Byala [BY]) and Korea (Hoopo Bay [HP]) to understand their ecosystem function in coastal waters. A noninvasive in situ eddy covariance technique was applied to estimate net O2 flux in the seagrass meadows. From the high-quality and high-resolution time series O2 data acquired over > 24 h, the O2 flux driven by turbulence was extracted at 15-min intervals. The spectrum analysis of vertical flow velocity and O2 concentration clearly showed well-developed turbulence characteristics in the inertial subrange region. The hourly averaged net O2 fluxes per day ranged from -474 to 326 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 (-19 ± 41 mmol O2 m-2 d-1) at BY and from -74 to 482 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 (31 ± 17 mmol O2 m-2 d-1) at HP. The net O2 production rapidly responded to photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) and showed a good relationship between production and irradiance (P-I curve). The hysteresis pattern of P-I relationships during daytime also suggested increasing heterotrophic respiration in the afternoon. With the flow velocity between 3.30 and 6.70 cm s-1, the community metabolism during daytime and nighttime was significantly increased by 20 times and 5 times, respectively. The local hydrodynamic characteristics may be vital to determining the efficiency of community photosynthesis. The net ecosystem metabolism at BY was estimated to be -17 mmol O2 m-2 d-1, which was assessed as heterotrophy. However, that at HP was 36 mmol O2 m-2 d-1, which suggested an autotrophic state.

  18. Using a non-invasive technique in nutrition: synchrotron radiation infrared microspectroscopy spectroscopic characterization of oil seeds treated with different processing conditions on molecular spectral factors influencing nutrient delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-07-02

    Non-invasive techniques are a key to study nutrition and structure interaction. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy coupled with a synchrotron radiation source (SR-IMS) is a rapid, non-invasive, and non-destructive bioanalytical technique. To understand internal structure changes in relation to nutrient availability in oil seed processing is vital to find optimal processing conditions. The objective of this study was to use a synchrotron-based bioanalytical technique SR-IMS as a non-invasive and non-destructive tool to study the effects of heat-processing methods and oil seed canola type on modeled protein structure based on spectral data within intact tissue that were randomly selected and quantify the relationship between the modeled protein structure and protein nutrient supply to ruminants. The results showed that the moisture heat-related processing significantly changed (pprocessing by dry heating. The moisture heating increased (p0.05) in the protein spectral profile between the raw and dry-heated canola tissue and between yellow- and brown-type canola tissue. The results indicated that different heat processing methods have different impacts on the protein inherent structure. The protein intrinsic structure in canola seed tissue was more sensitive and more response to the moisture heating in comparison to the dry heating. These changes are expected to be related to the nutritive value. However, the current study is based on limited samples, and more large-scale studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  19. Superparamagnetic nanoparticles for enhanced magnetic resonance and multimodal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikma, Elise Ann Schultz

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool for noninvasive tomographic imaging of biological systems with high spatial and temporal resolution. Superparamagnetic (SPM) nanoparticles have emerged as highly effective MR contrast agents due to their biocompatibility, ease of surface modification and magnetic properties. Conventional nanoparticle contrast agents suffer from difficult synthetic reproducibility, polydisperse sizes and weak magnetism. Numerous synthetic techniques and nanoparticle formulations have been developed to overcome these barriers. However, there are still major limitations in the development of new nanoparticle-based probes for MR and multimodal imaging including low signal amplification and absence of biochemical reporters. To address these issues, a set of multimodal (T2/optical) and dual contrast (T1/T2) nanoparticle probes has been developed. Their unique magnetic properties and imaging capabilities were thoroughly explored. An enzyme-activatable contrast agent is currently being developed as an innovative means for early in vivo detection of cancer at the cellular level. Multimodal probes function by combining the strengths of multiple imaging techniques into a single agent. Co-registration of data obtained by multiple imaging modalities validates the data, enhancing its quality and reliability. A series of T2/optical probes were successfully synthesized by attachment of a fluorescent dye to the surface of different types of nanoparticles. The multimodal nanoparticles generated sufficient MR and fluorescence signal to image transplanted islets in vivo. Dual contrast T1/T2 imaging probes were designed to overcome disadvantages inherent in the individual T1 and T2 components. A class of T1/T2 agents was developed consisting of a gadolinium (III) complex (DTPA chelate or DO3A macrocycle) conjugated to a biocompatible silica-coated metal oxide nanoparticle through a disulfide linker. The disulfide linker has the ability to be reduced

  20. MO-DE-202-03: Image-Guided Surgery and Interventions in the Advanced Multimodality Image-Guided Operating (AMIGO) Suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapur, T. [Brigham & Women’s Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: Keyvan Farahani, “Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy” Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, “Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guided neurosurgery” Tina Kapur, “Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite” Raj Shekhar, “Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us” Learning Objectives: Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. Learn about recent advances in 3D–2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such as neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and R41CA192504

  1. MO-DE-202-03: Image-Guided Surgery and Interventions in the Advanced Multimodality Image-Guided Operating (AMIGO) Suite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapur, T.

    2016-01-01

    At least three major trends in surgical intervention have emerged over the last decade: a move toward more minimally invasive (or non-invasive) approach to the surgical target; the development of high-precision treatment delivery techniques; and the increasing role of multi-modality intraoperative imaging in support of such procedures. This symposium includes invited presentations on recent advances in each of these areas and the emerging role for medical physics research in the development and translation of high-precision interventional techniques. The four speakers are: Keyvan Farahani, “Image-guided focused ultrasound surgery and therapy” Jeffrey H. Siewerdsen, “Advances in image registration and reconstruction for image-guided neurosurgery” Tina Kapur, “Image-guided surgery and interventions in the advanced multimodality image-guided operating (AMIGO) suite” Raj Shekhar, “Multimodality image-guided interventions: Multimodality for the rest of us” Learning Objectives: Understand the principles and applications of HIFU in surgical ablation. Learn about recent advances in 3D–2D and 3D deformable image registration in support of surgical safety and precision. Learn about recent advances in model-based 3D image reconstruction in application to intraoperative 3D imaging. Understand the multi-modality imaging technologies and clinical applications investigated in the AMIGO suite. Understand the emerging need and techniques to implement multi-modality image guidance in surgical applications such as neurosurgery, orthopaedic surgery, vascular surgery, and interventional radiology. Research supported by the NIH and Siemens Healthcare.; J. Siewerdsen; Grant Support - National Institutes of Health; Grant Support - Siemens Healthcare; Grant Support - Carestream Health; Advisory Board - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Carestream Health; Licensing Agreement - Elekta Oncology.; T. Kapur, P41EB015898; R. Shekhar, Funding: R42CA137886 and R41CA192504

  2. EDITORIAL: Integrated non-invasive sensing techniques and geophysical methods for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage Integrated non-invasive sensing techniques and geophysical methods for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, N.; Soldovieri, F.

    2011-09-01

    In the last two decades, the use of non-invasive methods for the study and conservation of cultural heritage, from artefacts and historical sites to recent architectural structures, has gained increasing interest. This is due to several reasons: (i) the improvement of performance and information resolution of sensors and devices; (ii) the increasing availability of user-friendly data/image analysis, and processing software and routines; (iii) the ever greater awareness of archaeologists and conservators of the benefits of these technologies, in terms of reduction of costs, time and the risk associated with direct and destructive investigations of archaeological sites (excavation) and monuments (i.e. masonry coring). The choice of diagnostic strategy depends on the spatial and physical characteristics of the cultural objects or sites, the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment, etc). This makes the set up and validation of ad hoc procedures based on data processing and post-processing methods necessary, generally developed to address issues in other fields of application. This methodological perspective based on an integrated and multi-scale approach characterizes the papers of this special issue, which is focused on integrated non-invasive sensing techniques and geophysical methods for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage. In particular, attention is given to the advanced application of the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) from the satellite-based platform for deformation monitoring thanks to the innovative differential SAR interferometry (DInSAR) technique; Zeni et al show the significant possibilities of the proposed methodology in achieving a global vision not only of cultural heritage but also of the embedding territory. This collection also deals with the application of non-invasive diagnostics to archaeological prospecting, and

  3. Coherent multimoded dielectric wakefield accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, J.

    1998-01-01

    There has recently been a study of the potential uses of multimode dielectric structures for wakefield acceleration [1]. This technique is based on adjusting the wakefield modes of the structure to constructively interfere at certain delays with respect to the drive bunch, thus providing an accelerating gradient enhancement over single mode devices. In this report we examine and attempt to clarify the issues raised by this work in the light of the present state of the art in wakefield acceleration

  4. New tools for non-invasive exploration of collagen network in cartilaginous tissue-engineered substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrionnet, Christel; Dumas, Dominique; Hupont, Sébastien; Stoltz, Jean François; Mainard, Didier; Gillet, Pierre; Pinzano, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    In tissue engineering approaches, the quality of substitutes is a key element to determine its ability to treat cartilage defects. However, in clinical practice, the evaluation of tissue-engineered cartilage substitute quality is not possible due to the invasiveness of the standard procedure, which is to date histology. The aim of this work was to validate a new innovative system performed from two-photon excitation laser adapted to an optical macroscope to evaluate at macroscopic scale the collagen network in cartilage tissue-engineered substitutes in confrontation with gold standard histologic techniques or immunohistochemistry to visualize type II collagen. This system permitted to differentiate the quality of collagen network between ITS and TGF-β1 treatments. Multiscale large field imaging combined to multimodality approaches (SHG-TCSPC) at macroscopical scale represent an innovative and non-invasive technique to monitor the quality of collagen network in cartilage tissue-engineered substitutes before in vivo implantation.

  5. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-12-01

    This annual technical progress report is for part of Task 4 (site evaluation), Task 5 (2D seismic design, acquisition, and processing), and Task 6 (2D seismic reflection, interpretation, and AVO analysis) on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford Site. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM, it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as a monitoring tool to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. The second deployment is to the Department of Defense (DOD) Charleston Naval Weapons Station Solid Waste Management Unit 12 (SWMU-12), Charleston, SC to further test the technique to detect high concentrations of DNAPL. The Charleston Naval Weapons Station SWMU-12 site was selected in consultation with National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and DOD Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southern Division (NAVFAC) personnel. Based upon the review of existing data and due to the shallow target depth, the project team collected three Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) and an experimental P-wave seismic reflection line. After preliminary data analysis of the VSP data and the experimental reflection line data, it was decided to proceed with Task 5 and Task 6. Three high resolution P-wave reflection profiles were collected with two objectives; (1) design the reflection survey to image a target depth of 20 feet below land surface to assist in determining the geologic controls on the DNAPL plume geometry, and (2) apply AVO analysis to the seismic data to locate the zone of high concentration of DNAPL. Based upon the results of the data processing and interpretation of the seismic data, the project team was able to map the channel that is controlling the DNAPL plume

  6. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Jerome Eyer

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface DNAPL carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, DOE Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high-resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are noninvasive means of site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This final report covers the results of Tasks 1, 2, and 3. Task (1) contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task (2) is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task (3) is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. During the commission of these tasks four seismic reflection profiles were collected. Subsurface velocity information was obtained by vertical seismic profile surveys in three wells. The interpretation of these data is in two parts. Part one is the construction and interpretation of structural contour maps of the contact between the Hanford Fine unit and the underlying Plio/Pleistocene unit and of the contact between the Plio/Pleistocene unit and the underlying caliche layer. These two contacts were determined to be the most likely surfaces to contain the highest concentration CCl{sub 4}. Part two of the interpretation uses the results of the AVO modeling to locate any seismic amplitude anomalies that might be

  7. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waddell, Michael G.; Domoracki, William J.; Eyer, Jerome

    2003-01-01

    The Earth Sciences and Resources Institute, University of South Carolina is conducting a proof of concept study to determine the location and distribution of subsurface DNAPL carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) contamination at the 216-Z-9 crib, 200 West area, DOE Hanford Site, Washington by use of two-dimensional high-resolution seismic reflection surveys and borehole geophysical data. The study makes use of recent advances in seismic reflection amplitude versus offset (AVO) technology to directly detect the presence of subsurface DNAPL. The techniques proposed are noninvasive means of site characterization and direct free-phase DNAPL detection. This final report covers the results of Tasks 1, 2, and 3. Task (1) contains site evaluation and seismic modeling studies. The site evaluation consists of identifying and collecting preexisting geological and geophysical information regarding subsurface structure and the presence and quantity of DNAPL. The seismic modeling studies were undertaken to determine the likelihood that an AVO response exists and its probable manifestation. Task (2) is the design and acquisition of 2-D seismic reflection data to image areas of probable high concentration of DNAPL. Task (3) is the processing and interpretation of the 2-D data. During the commission of these tasks four seismic reflection profiles were collected. Subsurface velocity information was obtained by vertical seismic profile surveys in three wells. The interpretation of these data is in two parts. Part one is the construction and interpretation of structural contour maps of the contact between the Hanford Fine unit and the underlying Plio/Pleistocene unit and of the contact between the Plio/Pleistocene unit and the underlying caliche layer. These two contacts were determined to be the most likely surfaces to contain the highest concentration CCl 4 . Part two of the interpretation uses the results of the AVO modeling to locate any seismic amplitude anomalies that might be

  8. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  9. Multimodality in organization studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Leeuwen, Theo

    2017-01-01

    This afterword reviews the chapters in this volume and reflects on the synergies between organization and management studies and multimodality studies that emerge from the volume. These include the combination of strong sociological theorizing and detailed multimodal analysis, a focus on material...

  10. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Bonding Agent on the Tensile Bond Strength of Two Pit and Fissure Sealants Using Invasive and Non-invasive Techniques: An in-vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shamsher; Adlakha, Vivek; Babaji, Prashant; Chandna, Preetika; Thomas, Abi M; Chopra, Saroj

    2013-10-01

    Newer technologies and the development of pit and fissure sealants have shifted the treatment philosophy from 'drill and fill' to that of 'seal and heal'. The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the effects of bonding agents on the tensile bond strengths of two pit and fissure sealants by using invasive and non-invasive techniques. One hundred and twenty bicuspids were collected and teeth were divided into two groups: Group-I (Clinpro) and Group-II (Conseal f) with 60 teeth in each group. For evaluating tensile bond strengths, occlusal surfaces of all the teeth were flattened by reducing buccal and lingual cusps without disturbing fissures. Standardised polyvinyl tube was bonded to occlusal surfaces with respective materials. Sealants were applied, with or without bonding agents, in increments and they were light cured. Tensile bond strengths were determined by using Universal Testing Machine. Data were then statistically analysed by using Student t-test for comparison. A statistically significant difference was found in tensile bond strength in invasive with bonding agent group than in non-invasive with bonding agent group. This study revealed that invasive techniques increase the tensile bond strengths of sealants as compared to non- invasive techniques and that the use of a bonding agent as an intermediate layer between the tooth and fissure sealant is beneficial for increasing the bond strength.

  11. Multimodal Estimation of Distribution Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Chen, Wei-Neng; Li, Yun; Chen, C L Philip; Xu, Xiang-Min; Zhang, Jun

    2016-02-15

    Taking the advantage of estimation of distribution algorithms (EDAs) in preserving high diversity, this paper proposes a multimodal EDA. Integrated with clustering strategies for crowding and speciation, two versions of this algorithm are developed, which operate at the niche level. Then these two algorithms are equipped with three distinctive techniques: 1) a dynamic cluster sizing strategy; 2) an alternative utilization of Gaussian and Cauchy distributions to generate offspring; and 3) an adaptive local search. The dynamic cluster sizing affords a potential balance between exploration and exploitation and reduces the sensitivity to the cluster size in the niching methods. Taking advantages of Gaussian and Cauchy distributions, we generate the offspring at the niche level through alternatively using these two distributions. Such utilization can also potentially offer a balance between exploration and exploitation. Further, solution accuracy is enhanced through a new local search scheme probabilistically conducted around seeds of niches with probabilities determined self-adaptively according to fitness values of these seeds. Extensive experiments conducted on 20 benchmark multimodal problems confirm that both algorithms can achieve competitive performance compared with several state-of-the-art multimodal algorithms, which is supported by nonparametric tests. Especially, the proposed algorithms are very promising for complex problems with many local optima.

  12. Recent developments in multimodality fluorescence imaging probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Zhao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality optical imaging probes have emerged as powerful tools that improve detection sensitivity and accuracy, important in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we focus on recent developments of optical fluorescence imaging (OFI probe integration with other imaging modalities such as X-ray computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, positron emission tomography (PET, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, and photoacoustic imaging (PAI. The imaging technologies are briefly described in order to introduce the strengths and limitations of each techniques and the need for further multimodality optical imaging probe development. The emphasis of this account is placed on how design strategies are currently implemented to afford physicochemically and biologically compatible multimodality optical fluorescence imaging probes. We also present studies that overcame intrinsic disadvantages of each imaging technique by multimodality approach with improved detection sensitivity and accuracy. KEY WORDS: Optical imaging, Fluorescence, Multimodality, Near-infrared fluorescence, Nanoprobe, Computed tomography, Magnetic resonance imaging, Positron emission tomography, Single-photon emission computed tomography, Photoacoustic imaging

  13. Effect of Injector Geometry on Atomization of a Liquid-Liquid Double Swirl Coaxial Injector Using Non-invasive Laser, Optical and X-ray Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, C. R.; Meyer, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    The spray characteristics of a liquid-liquid double swirl coaxial injector were studied using non-invasive optical, laser, and X-ray diagnostics. A parametric study of injector exit geometry demonstrated that spray breakup time, breakup type and sheet stability could be controlled with exit geometry. Phase Doppler interferometry was used to characterize droplet statistics and non-dimensional droplet parameters over a range of inlet conditions and for various fluids allowing for a study on the role of specific fluid properties in atomization. Further, X-ray radiography allowed for investigation of sheet thickness and breakup length to be quantified for different recess exit diameters and inlet pressures. Finally, computed tomography scans revealed that the spray cone was distinctively non-uniform and comprised of several pockets of increased mass flux.

  14. Noninvasive neuromodulation in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Láinez, Miguel J A; Jensen, Rigmor

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Neuromodulation is an alternative in the management of medically intractable cluster headache patients. Most of the techniques are invasive, but in the last 2 years, some studies using a noninvasive device have been presented. The objective of this article is to review the data...... using this approach. RECENT FINDINGS: Techniques as occipital nerve stimulation or sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation are recommended as first-line therapy in refractory cluster patients, but they are invasive and maybe associated with complications. Noninvasive vagal nerve stimulation with an external...... device has been tried in cluster patients. Results from clinical practice and a single randomized clinical trial have been presented showing a reduction of the number of cluster attacks/week in the patients treated with the device. The rate of adverse events was low and most of them were mild. SUMMARY...

  15. Learning multimodal dictionaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaci, Gianluca; Jost, Philippe; Vandergheynst, Pierre; Mailhé, Boris; Lesage, Sylvain; Gribonval, Rémi

    2007-09-01

    Real-world phenomena involve complex interactions between multiple signal modalities. As a consequence, humans are used to integrate at each instant perceptions from all their senses in order to enrich their understanding of the surrounding world. This paradigm can be also extremely useful in many signal processing and computer vision problems involving mutually related signals. The simultaneous processing of multimodal data can, in fact, reveal information that is otherwise hidden when considering the signals independently. However, in natural multimodal signals, the statistical dependencies between modalities are in general not obvious. Learning fundamental multimodal patterns could offer deep insight into the structure of such signals. In this paper, we present a novel model of multimodal signals based on their sparse decomposition over a dictionary of multimodal structures. An algorithm for iteratively learning multimodal generating functions that can be shifted at all positions in the signal is proposed, as well. The learning is defined in such a way that it can be accomplished by iteratively solving a generalized eigenvector problem, which makes the algorithm fast, flexible, and free of user-defined parameters. The proposed algorithm is applied to audiovisual sequences and it is able to discover underlying structures in the data. The detection of such audio-video patterns in audiovisual clips allows to effectively localize the sound source on the video in presence of substantial acoustic and visual distractors, outperforming state-of-the-art audiovisual localization algorithms.

  16. Multimodality Registration without a Dedicated Multimodality Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Beattie

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality scanners that allow the acquisition of both functional and structural image sets on a single system have recently become available for animal research use. Although the resultant registered functional/structural image sets can greatly enhance the interpretability of the functional data, the cost of multimodality systems can be prohibitive, and they are often limited to two modalities, which generally do not include magnetic resonance imaging. Using a thin plastic wrap to immobilize and fix a mouse or other small animal atop a removable bed, we are able to calculate registrations between all combinations of four different small animal imaging scanners (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and computed tomography [CT] at our disposal, effectively equivalent to a quadruple-modality scanner. A comparison of serially acquired CT images, with intervening acquisitions on other scanners, demonstrates the ability of the proposed procedures to maintain the rigidity of an anesthetized mouse during transport between scanners. Movement of the bony structures of the mouse was estimated to be 0.62 mm. Soft tissue movement was predominantly the result of the filling (or emptying of the urinary bladder and thus largely constrained to this region. Phantom studies estimate the registration errors for all registration types to be less than 0.5 mm. Functional images using tracers targeted to known structures verify the accuracy of the functional to structural registrations. The procedures are easy to perform and produce robust and accurate results that rival those of dedicated multimodality scanners, but with more flexible registration combinations and while avoiding the expense and redundancy of multimodality systems.

  17. Knowing what the brain is seeing in three dimensions: A novel, noninvasive, sensitive, accurate, and low-noise technique for measuring ocular torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-Millan, Jorge; Roberts, Dale C; Lasker, Adrian; Zee, David S; Kheradmand, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Torsional eye movements are rotations of the eye around the line of sight. Measuring torsion is essential to understanding how the brain controls eye position and how it creates a veridical perception of object orientation in three dimensions. Torsion is also important for diagnosis of many vestibular, neurological, and ophthalmological disorders. Currently, there are multiple devices and methods that produce reliable measurements of horizontal and vertical eye movements. Measuring torsion, however, noninvasively and reliably has been a longstanding challenge, with previous methods lacking real-time capabilities or suffering from intrusive artifacts. We propose a novel method for measuring eye movements in three dimensions using modern computer vision software (OpenCV) and concepts of iris recognition. To measure torsion, we use template matching of the entire iris and automatically account for occlusion of the iris and pupil by the eyelids. The current setup operates binocularly at 100 Hz with noise <0.1° and is accurate within 20° of gaze to the left, to the right, and up and 10° of gaze down. This new method can be widely applicable and fill a gap in many scientific and clinical disciplines.

  18. Biodistribution of arctigenin-loaded nanoparticles designed for multimodal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Qingxin; Hou, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yanan; Li, Xu; Liu, Yang; Ma, Xiaoyao; Wang, Zengyong; Wang, Weiya; Tao, Jin; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Min; Chen, Dongyan; Feng, Xizeng; Bai, Gang

    2017-04-07

    Tracking targets of natural products is one of the most challenging issues in fields ranging from pharmacognosy to biomedicine. It is widely recognized that the biocompatible nanoparticle (NP) could function as a "key" that opens the target "lock". We report a functionalized poly-lysine NP technique that can monitor the target protein of arctigenin (ATG) in vivo non-invasively. The NPs were synthesized, and their morphologies and surface chemical properties were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), laser particle size analysis and atomic force microscopy (AFM). In addition, we studied the localization of ATG at the level of the cell and the whole animal (zebrafish and mice). We demonstrated that fluorescent NPs could be ideal carriers in the development of a feasible method for target identification. The distributions of the target proteins were found to be consistent with the pharmacological action of ATG at the cellular and whole-organism levels. The results indicated that functionalized poly-lysine NPs could be valuable in the multimodal imaging of arctigenin.

  19. Noncontact Sleep Study by Multi-Modal Sensor Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ku-young Chung

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Polysomnography (PSG is considered as the gold standard for determining sleep stages, but due to the obtrusiveness of its sensor attachments, sleep stage classification algorithms using noninvasive sensors have been developed throughout the years. However, the previous studies have not yet been proven reliable. In addition, most of the products are designed for healthy customers rather than for patients with sleep disorder. We present a novel approach to classify sleep stages via low cost and noncontact multi-modal sensor fusion, which extracts sleep-related vital signals from radar signals and a sound-based context-awareness technique. This work is uniquely designed based on the PSG data of sleep disorder patients, which were received and certified by professionals at Hanyang University Hospital. The proposed algorithm further incorporates medical/statistical knowledge to determine personal-adjusted thresholds and devise post-processing. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is highlighted by contrasting sleep stage classification performance between single sensor and sensor-fusion algorithms. To validate the possibility of commercializing this work, the classification results of this algorithm were compared with the commercialized sleep monitoring device, ResMed S+. The proposed algorithm was investigated with random patients following PSG examination, and results show a promising novel approach for determining sleep stages in a low cost and unobtrusive manner.

  20. Hyperspectral remote sensing techniques applied to the noninvasive investigation of mural paintings: a feasibility study carried out on a wall painting by Beato Angelico in Florence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucci, Costanza; Picollo, Marcello; Chiarantini, Leandro; Sereni, Barbara

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays hyperspectral imaging is a well-established methodology for the non-invasive diagnostics of polychrome surfaces, and is increasingly utilized in museums and conservation laboratories for documentation purposes and in support of restoration procedures. However, so far the applications of hyperspectral imaging have been mainly limited to easel paintings or paper-based artifacts. Indeed, specifically designed hyperspectral imagers, are usually used for applications in museum context. These devices work at short-distances from the targets and cover limited size surfaces. Instead, almost still unexplored remain the applications of hyperspectral imaging to the investigations of frescoes and large size mural paintings. For this type of artworks a remote sensing approach, based on sensors capable of acquiring hyperspectral data from distances of the order of tens of meters, is needed. This paper illustrates an application of hyperspectral remote sensing to an important wall-painting by Beato Angelico, located in the San Marco Museum in Florence. Measurements were carried out using a re-adapted version of the Galileo Avionica Multisensor Hyperspectral System (SIM-GA), an avionic hyperspectral imager originally designed for applications from mobile platforms. This system operates in the 400-2500 nm range with over 700 channels, thus guaranteeing acquisition of high resolution hyperspectral data exploitable for materials identification and mapping. In the present application, the SIM-GA device was mounted on a static scanning platform for ground-based applications. The preliminary results obtained on the Angelico's wall-painting are discussed, with highlights on the main technical issues addressed to optimize the SIM-GA system for new applications on cultural assets.

  1. Improved heuristics for early melanoma detection using multimode hyperspectral dermoscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasefi, Fartash; MacKinnon, Nicholas B.; Booth, Nicholas; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the performance of a multimode dermoscopy system (SkinSpect) designed to quantify and 3-D map in vivo melanin and hemoglobin concentrations in skin and its melanoma scoring system, and compare the results accuracy with SIAscopy, and histopathology. Methods: A multimode imaging dermoscope is presented that combines polarization, fluorescence and hyperspectral imaging to accurately map the distribution of skin melanin, collagen and hemoglobin in pigmented lesions. We combine two depth-sensitive techniques: polarization, and hyperspectral imaging, to determine the spatial distribution of melanin and hemoglobin oxygenation in a skin lesion. By quantifying melanin absorption in pigmented areas, we can also more accurately estimate fluorescence emission distribution mainly from skin collagen. Results and discussion: We compared in vivo features of melanocytic lesions (N = 10) extracted by non-invasive SkinSpect and SIMSYS-MoleMate SIAscope, and correlate them to pathology report. Melanin distribution at different depths as well as hemodynamics including abnormal vascularity we detected will be discussed. We will adapt SkinSpect scoring with ABCDE (asymmetry , border, color, diameter, evolution) and seven point dermatologic checklist including: (1) atypical pigment network, (2) blue-whitish veil, (3) atypical vascular pattern, (4) irregular streaks, (5) irregular pigmentation, (6) irregular dots and globules, (7) regression structures estimated by dermatologist. Conclusion: Distinctive, diagnostic features seen by SkinSpect in melanoma vs. normal pigmented lesions will be compared by SIAscopy and results from histopathology.

  2. Multimodal Resources in Transnational Adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    The paper discusses an empirical analysis which highlights the multimodal nature of identity construction. A documentary on transnational adoption provides real life incidents as research material. The incidents involve (or from them emerge) various kinds of multimodal resources and participants...

  3. NON-INVASIVE DETERMINATION OF THE LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF FREE-PHASE DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS (DNAPL) BY SEISMIC REFLECTION TECHNIQUES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael G. Waddell; William J. Domoracki; Tom J. Temples

    2001-05-01

    This semi-annual technical progress report is for Task 4 site evaluation, Task 5 seismic reflection design and acquisition, and Task 6 seismic reflection processing and interpretation on DOE contact number DE-AR26-98FT40369. The project had planned one additional deployment to another site other than Savannah River Site (SRS) or DOE Hanford. During this reporting period the project had an ASME peer review. The findings and recommendation of the review panel, as well at the project team response to comments, are in Appendix A. After the SUBCON midyear review in Albuquerque, NM and the peer review it was decided that two additional deployments would be performed. The first deployment is to test the feasibility of using non-invasive seismic reflection and AVO analysis as monitoring to assist in determining the effectiveness of Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) in removal of DNAPL. Under the rescope of the project, Task 4 would be performed at the Charleston Navy Weapons Station, Charleston, SC and not at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) project at SRS. The project team had already completed Task 4 at the M-area seepage basin, only a few hundred yards away from the DUS site. Because the geology is the same, Task 4 was not necessary. However, a Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) was conducted in one well to calibrate the geology to the seismic data. The first deployment to the DUS Site (Tasks 5 and 6) has been completed. Once the steam has been turned off these tasks will be performed again to compare the results to the pre-steam data. The results from the first deployment to the DUS site indicated a seismic amplitude anomaly at the location and depths of the known high concentrations of DNAPL. The deployment to another site with different geologic conditions was supposed to occur during this reporting period. The first site selected was DOE Paducah, Kentucky. After almost eight months of negotiation, site access was denied requiring the selection of another site

  4. Multimodal sequence learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemény, Ferenc; Meier, Beat

    2016-02-01

    While sequence learning research models complex phenomena, previous studies have mostly focused on unimodal sequences. The goal of the current experiment is to put implicit sequence learning into a multimodal context: to test whether it can operate across different modalities. We used the Task Sequence Learning paradigm to test whether sequence learning varies across modalities, and whether participants are able to learn multimodal sequences. Our results show that implicit sequence learning is very similar regardless of the source modality. However, the presence of correlated task and response sequences was required for learning to take place. The experiment provides new evidence for implicit sequence learning of abstract conceptual representations. In general, the results suggest that correlated sequences are necessary for implicit sequence learning to occur. Moreover, they show that elements from different modalities can be automatically integrated into one unitary multimodal sequence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Robust Multimodal Dictionary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Tian; Jojic, Vladimir; Modla, Shannon; Powell, Debbie; Czymmek, Kirk; Niethammer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We propose a robust multimodal dictionary learning method for multimodal images. Joint dictionary learning for both modalities may be impaired by lack of correspondence between image modalities in training data, for example due to areas of low quality in one of the modalities. Dictionaries learned with such non-corresponding data will induce uncertainty about image representation. In this paper, we propose a probabilistic model that accounts for image areas that are poorly corresponding between the image modalities. We cast the problem of learning a dictionary in presence of problematic image patches as a likelihood maximization problem and solve it with a variant of the EM algorithm. Our algorithm iterates identification of poorly corresponding patches and re-finements of the dictionary. We tested our method on synthetic and real data. We show improvements in image prediction quality and alignment accuracy when using the method for multimodal image registration. PMID:24505674

  6. Critical Analysis of Multimodal Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, Theo

    2013-01-01

    This is an encyclopaedia article which defines the fields of critical discourse analysis and multimodality studies, argues that within critical discourse analysis more attention should be paid to multimodality, and within multimodality to critical analysis, and ends reviewing a few examples of re...

  7. Rapid MRI using a modified Dixon technique: a non-invasive and effective method for detection and monitoring of fatty metamorphosis of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbein, M.H.; Stevens, W.R.

    2001-01-01

    Fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are frequently associated with obesity. Weight loss is the mainstay of therapy for these conditions. In this case report, we used a modification of the Dixon method to demonstrate normalization of hepatic fat content in an obese individual with fatty liver following weight reduction. This technique involves fast gradient echo instead of spin echo, which has been utilized previously, as the former provides an accurate and more rapid means of assessing hepatic fat content. This technique is recommended for the assessment of hepatic steatosis in at-risk subjects. (orig.)

  8. Rapid MRI using a modified Dixon technique: a non-invasive and effective method for detection and monitoring of fatty metamorphosis of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbein, M.H. [Pediatric Gastroenterology, Dept. of Pediatrics, Springfield, IL (United States); Stevens, W.R. [St. John' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Springfield, IL (United States)

    2001-11-01

    Fatty liver and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are frequently associated with obesity. Weight loss is the mainstay of therapy for these conditions. In this case report, we used a modification of the Dixon method to demonstrate normalization of hepatic fat content in an obese individual with fatty liver following weight reduction. This technique involves fast gradient echo instead of spin echo, which has been utilized previously, as the former provides an accurate and more rapid means of assessing hepatic fat content. This technique is recommended for the assessment of hepatic steatosis in at-risk subjects. (orig.)

  9. Multimodal Processes Rescheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocewicz, Grzegorz; Banaszak, Zbigniew A.; Nielsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic scheduling problems concerning multimodal processes are usually observed in FMSs producing multi-type parts where the Automated Guided Vehicles System (AGVS) plays a role of a material handling system. Schedulability analysis of concurrently flowing cyclic processes (SCCP) exe-cuted in the......Cyclic scheduling problems concerning multimodal processes are usually observed in FMSs producing multi-type parts where the Automated Guided Vehicles System (AGVS) plays a role of a material handling system. Schedulability analysis of concurrently flowing cyclic processes (SCCP) exe...

  10. Cardiac imaging. A multimodality approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, Manfred [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany); Erbel, Raimund [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany). Clinic and Polyclinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Barkhausen, Joerg (eds.) [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    An excellent atlas on modern diagnostic imaging of the heart Written by an interdisciplinary team of experts, Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach features an in-depth introduction to all current imaging modalities for the diagnostic assessment of the heart as well as a clinical overview of cardiac diseases and main indications for cardiac imaging. With a particular emphasis on CT and MRI, the first part of the atlas also covers conventional radiography, echocardiography, angiography and nuclear medicine imaging. Leading specialists demonstrate the latest advances in the field, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The book's second part features clinical chapters on heart defects, endocarditis, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, cardiac tumors, pericardial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, and diseases of the thoracic aorta. The authors address anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical features, and evaluate the various diagnostic options. Key features: - Highly regarded experts in cardiology and radiology off er image-based teaching of the latest techniques - Readers learn how to decide which modality to use for which indication - Visually highlighted tables and essential points allow for easy navigation through the text - More than 600 outstanding images show up-to-date technology and current imaging protocols Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach is a must-have desk reference for cardiologists and radiologists in practice, as well as a study guide for residents in both fields. It will also appeal to cardiac surgeons, general practitioners, and medical physicists with a special interest in imaging of the heart. (orig.)

  11. Cardiac imaging. A multimodality approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thelen, Manfred; Erbel, Raimund; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Barkhausen, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    An excellent atlas on modern diagnostic imaging of the heart Written by an interdisciplinary team of experts, Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach features an in-depth introduction to all current imaging modalities for the diagnostic assessment of the heart as well as a clinical overview of cardiac diseases and main indications for cardiac imaging. With a particular emphasis on CT and MRI, the first part of the atlas also covers conventional radiography, echocardiography, angiography and nuclear medicine imaging. Leading specialists demonstrate the latest advances in the field, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The book's second part features clinical chapters on heart defects, endocarditis, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, cardiac tumors, pericardial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, and diseases of the thoracic aorta. The authors address anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical features, and evaluate the various diagnostic options. Key features: - Highly regarded experts in cardiology and radiology off er image-based teaching of the latest techniques - Readers learn how to decide which modality to use for which indication - Visually highlighted tables and essential points allow for easy navigation through the text - More than 600 outstanding images show up-to-date technology and current imaging protocols Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach is a must-have desk reference for cardiologists and radiologists in practice, as well as a study guide for residents in both fields. It will also appeal to cardiac surgeons, general practitioners, and medical physicists with a special interest in imaging of the heart. (orig.)

  12. Multimode optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot-Astruc, Marianne; Molin, Denis; Sillard, Pierre

    2014-11-04

    A depressed graded-index multimode optical fiber includes a central core, an inner depressed cladding, a depressed trench, an outer depressed cladding, and an outer cladding. The central core has an alpha-index profile. The depressed claddings limit the impact of leaky modes on optical-fiber performance characteristics (e.g., bandwidth, core size, and/or numerical aperture).

  13. Multimodal training between agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    In the system Locator1, agents are treated as individual and autonomous subjects that are able to adapt to heterogenous user groups. Applying multimodal information from their surroundings (visual and linguistic), they acquire the necessary concepts for a successful interaction. This approach has...

  14. Multimodal news framing effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powell, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    Visuals in news media play a vital role in framing citizens’ political preferences. Yet, compared to the written word, visual images are undervalued in political communication research. Using framing theory, this thesis redresses the balance by studying the combined, or multimodal, effects of visual

  15. Multimodal Strategies of Theorization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartel, Melodie; Colombero, Sylvain; Boxenbaum, Eva

    This paper examines the role of multimodal strategies in processes of theorization. Empirically, we investigate the theorization process of a highly disruptive innovation in the history of architecture: reinforced concrete. Relying on archival data from a dominant French architectural journal from...... with well-known rhetorical strategies and develop a process model of theorization....

  16. In-situ fluorimetry: A powerful non-invasive diagnostic technique for natural dyes used in artefacts. Part II. Identification of orcein and indigo in Renaissance tapestries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, C.; Miliani, C.; Romani, A.; Santamaria, U.; Morresi, F.; Mlynarska, K.; Favaro, G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, three Renaissance tapestries depicting scenes painted by Raffaello Sanzio, conserved at the Vatican Museum, were investigated using in-situ UV-Visible fluorimetric measurements. The results show that this technique is suitable for the detection of natural organic colorants used for dyeing the threads woven in these tapestries. The emission signals detected on red-purple colours were assigned to the colorant orcein and those on different nuances of blue and green colours to indigo by comparison with data from reference laboratory samples. The assignments were supported by chromatographic experiments carried out on threads taken from the back side of the tapestry in the same points analysed by spectrofluorimentry.

  17. Recent progress in methods for non-invasive measurements of local strain in practical superconducting wires and conductors using quantum beam techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osamura, Kozo; Machiya, Shutaro; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Awaji, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kohki; Oguro, Hidetoshi; Harjo, Stefanus; Hemmi, Tsutomu; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Sugano, Michinaka; Jin, Xinzhe; Kajiwara, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Practical superconducting wires are designed with a composite structure to meet the desired engineering characteristics by expert selection of materials and design of the architecture. In practice, the local strain exerted on the superconducting component influences the electromagnetic properties. Here, recent progress in methods used to measure the local strain in practical superconducting wires and conductors using quantum beam techniques is introduced. Recent topics on the strain dependence of critical current are reviewed for three major practical wires: ITER-Nb 3 Sn strand, DI-BSCCO wires and REBCO tapes. (author)

  18. Noninvasive Positive Pressure Ventilatory Support Begins During Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, John R

    2017-12-01

    The goal of sleep doctors has been to titrate away apneas and hypopneas using noninvasive ventilation, a term that has become synonymous with continuous positive airway pressure and bilevel positive airway pressure at the lowest effective bilevel settings. It is now time to appreciate noninvasive ventilatory support as an alternative to invasive mechanical ventilation. This article discusses mechanisms of action, two paradigms, and ancillary techniques for noninvasive ventilatory support. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woertler, Klaus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Multimodality imaging of the postoperative shoulder includes radiography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR arthrography, computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, and ultrasound. Target-oriented evaluation of the postoperative shoulder necessitates familiarity with surgical techniques, their typical complications and sources of failure, knowledge of normal and abnormal postoperative findings, awareness of the advantages and weaknesses with the different radiologic techniques, and clinical information on current symptoms and function. This article reviews the most commonly used surgical procedures for treatment of anterior glenohumeral instability, lesions of the labral-bicipital complex, subacromial impingement, and rotator cuff lesions and highlights the significance of imaging findings with a view to detection of recurrent lesions and postoperative complications in a multimodality approach. (orig.)

  20. TU-H-CAMPUS-TeP2-01: A Comparison of Noninvasive Techniques to Assess Radiation-Induced Lung Damage in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubinstein, A; Kingsley, C; Melancon, A; Tailor, R; Pollard, J; Guindani, M; Followill, D; Hazle, J; Court, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of post-irradiation changes in respiratory rate and CBCT-based morphology as predictors of survival in mice. Methods: C57L/J mice underwent whole-thorax irradiation with a Co-60 beam to four different doses [0Gy (n=3), 9Gy (n=5), 11Gy (n=7), and 13Gy (n=5)] in order to induce varying levels of pneumonitis. Respiratory rate measurements, breath-hold CBCTs, and free-breathing CBCTs were acquired pre-irradiation and at six time points between two and seven months post-irradiation. For respiratory rate measurements, we developed a novel computer-vision-based technique. We recorded mice sleeping in standard laboratory cages with a 30 fps, 1080p webcam (Logitech C920). We calculated respiratory rate using corner detection and optical flow to track cyclical motion in the fur in the recorded video. Breath-hold and free-breathing CBCTs were acquired on the X-RAD225Cx system. For breathhold imaging, the mice were intubated and their breath was held at full-inhale for 20 seconds. Healthy lung tissue was delineated in the scans using auto-threshold contouring (0–0.7 g/cm"3). The volume of healthy lung was measured in each of the scans. Next, lung density was measured in a 6-mm"2 ROI in a fixed anatomic location in each of the scans. Results: Day-to-day variability in respiratory rate with our technique was 13%. All metrics except for breath-hold lung volume were correlated with survival: lung density on free-breathing (r=−0.7482,p<0.01) and breath-hold images (r=−0.5864,p<0.01), free-breathing lung volume (r=0.7179,p<0.01), and respiratory rate (r= 0.6953,p<0.01). Lung density on free-breathing scans was correlated with respiratory rate (r=0.7142,p<0.01) and lung density on breath-hold scans (r=0.5543,p<0.01). One significant practical hurdle in the CBCT measurements was that at least one lobe of the lung was collapsed in 36% of free-breathing scans and 45% of breath-hold scans. Conclusion: Lung density and lung volume on free-breathing CBCTs

  1. Office hysteroscopic-guided selective tubal chromopertubation: acceptability, feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of this new diagnostic non-invasive technique in infertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Gaspare; Palermo, Patrizia; Pasquale, Chiara; Conte, Valeria; Pulcinella, Ruggero; Necozione, Stefano; Cofini, Vincenza; Patacchiola, Felice

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate accuracy, tolerability and side effects of office hysteroscopic-guided chromoperturbations in infertile women without anaesthesia. Forty-nine infertile women underwent the procedure to evaluate tubal patency and the uterine cavity. Women with unilateral or bilateral tubal stenosis at hysteroscopy with chromoperturbation, and women with bilateral tubal patency who did not conceive during the period of six months, underwent laparoscopy with chromoperturbation. The results obtained from hysteroscopy and laparoscopy in the assessment of tubal patency were compared. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive-predictive value and negative-predictive value were used to describe diagnostic performance. Pain and tolerance were assessed during procedure using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Side effects or late complications and pregnancy rate were also recorded three and six months after the procedure. The specificity was 87.8% (95% CI: 73.80-95.90), sensitivity was 85.7% (95% CI 57.20-98.20), positive and negative predictive values were 70.6% (95% CI: 44.00-89) and 94.7% (95% CI: 82.30-99.40), respectively. Pregnancy rate (PR) within six months after performance of hysteroscopy with chromoperturbation was 27%. Office hysteroscopy-guided selective chromoperturbation in infertile patients is a valid technique to evaluate tubal patency and uterine cavity.

  2. Image-assisted non-invasive and dynamic biomechanical analysis of human joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhit, Abdullah A; Pickering, Mark R; Scarvell, Jennifer M; Ward, Tom; Smith, Paul N

    2013-01-01

    Kinematic analysis provides a strong link between musculoskeletal injuries, chronic joint conditions, treatment planning/monitoring and prosthesis design/outcome. However, fast and accurate 3D kinematic analysis still remains a challenge in order to translate this procedure into clinical scenarios. 3D computed tomography (CT) to 2D single-plane fluoroscopy registration is a promising non-invasive technology for biomechanical examination of human joints. Although this technique has proven to be very precise in terms of in-plane translation and rotation measurements, out-of-plane motion estimations have been a difficulty so far. Therefore, to enable this technology into clinical translation, precise and fast estimation of both in-plane and out-of-plane movements is crucial, which is the aim of this paper. Here, a fast and accurate 3D/2D registration technique is proposed to evaluate biomechanical/kinematic analysis. The proposed algorithm utilizes a new multi-modal similarity measure called ‘sum of conditional variances’, a coarse-to-fine Laplacian of Gaussian filtering approach for robust gradient-descent optimization and a novel technique for the analytic calculation of the required gradients for out-of-plane rotations. Computer simulations and in vitro experiments showed that the new approach was robust in terms of the capture range, required significantly less iterations to converge and achieved good registration and kinematic accuracy when compared to existing techniques and to the ‘gold-standard’ Roentgen stereo analysis. (paper)

  3. A Hybrid Technique for De-Noising Multi-Modality Medical Images by Employing Cuckoo’s Search with Curvelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qaisar Javaid

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available De-noising of the medical images is very difficult task. To improve the overall visual representation we need to apply a contrast enhancement techniques, this representation provide the physicians and clinicians a good and recovered diagnosis results. Various de-noising and contrast enhancements methods are develops. However, some of the methods are not good in providing the better results with accuracy and efficiency. In our paper we de-noise and enhance the medical images without any loss of information. We uses the curvelet transform in combination with ridglet transform along with CS (Cuckoo Search algorithm. The curvlet transform adapt and represents the sparse pixel informations with all edges. The edges play very important role in understanding of the images. Curvlet transform computes the edges very efficiently where the wavelets are failed. We used the CS to optimize the de-noising coefficients without loss of structural and morphological information. Our designed method would be accurate and efficient in de-noising the medical images. Our method attempts to remove the multiplicative and additive noises. Our proposed method is proved to be an efficient and reliable in removing all kind of noises from the medical images. Result indicates that our proposed approach is better than other approaches in removing impulse, Gaussian, and speckle noises.

  4. Multimodal EEG Recordings, Psychometrics and Behavioural Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeijinga, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    High spatial and temporal resolution measurements of neuronal activity are preferably combined. In an overview on how this approach can take shape, multimodal electroencephalography (EEG) is treated in 2 main parts: by experiments without a task and in the experimentally cued working brain. It concentrates first on the alpha rhythm properties and next on data-driven search for patterns such as the default mode network. The high-resolution volumic distributions of neuronal metabolic indices result in distributed cortical regions and possibly relate to numerous nuclei, observable in a non-invasive manner in the central nervous system of humans. The second part deals with paradigms in which nowadays assessment of target-related networks can align level-dependent blood oxygenation, electrical responses and behaviour, taking the temporal resolution advantages of event-related potentials. Evidence-based electrical propagation in serial tasks during performance is now to a large extent attributed to interconnected pathways, particularly chronometry-dependent ones, throughout a chain including a dorsal stream, next ventral cortical areas taking the flow of information towards inferior temporal domains. The influence of aging is documented, and results of the first multimodal studies in neuropharmacology are consistent. Finally a scope on implementation of advanced clinical applications and personalized marker strategies in neuropsychiatry is indicated. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Multimodal 2D Brain Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almajidy, Rand K; Boudria, Yacine; Hofmann, Ulrich G; Besio, Walter; Mankodiya, Kunal

    2015-08-01

    In this work we used multimodal, non-invasive brain signal recording systems, namely Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), disc electrode electroencephalography (EEG) and tripolar concentric ring electrodes (TCRE) electroencephalography (tEEG). 7 healthy subjects participated in our experiments to control a 2-D Brain Computer Interface (BCI). Four motor imagery task were performed, imagery motion of the left hand, the right hand, both hands and both feet. The signal slope (SS) of the change in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration measured by NIRS was used for feature extraction while the power spectrum density (PSD) of both EEG and tEEG in the frequency band 8-30Hz was used for feature extraction. Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) was used to classify different combinations of the aforementioned features. The highest classification accuracy (85.2%) was achieved by using features from all the three brain signals recording modules. The improvement in classification accuracy was highly significant (p = 0.0033) when using the multimodal signals features as compared to pure EEG features.

  6. Gestures and multimodal input

    OpenAIRE

    Keates, Simeon; Robinson, Peter

    1999-01-01

    For users with motion impairments, the standard keyboard and mouse arrangement for computer access often presents problems. Other approaches have to be adopted to overcome this. In this paper, we will describe the development of a prototype multimodal input system based on two gestural input channels. Results from extensive user trials of this system are presented. These trials showed that the physical and cognitive loads on the user can quickly become excessive and detrimental to the interac...

  7. The pivotal role of multimodality reporter sensors in drug discovery: from cell based assays to real time molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Pritha

    2011-04-01

    Development and marketing of new drugs require stringent validation that are expensive and time consuming. Non-invasive multimodality molecular imaging using reporter genes holds great potential to expedite these processes at reduced cost. New generations of smarter molecular imaging strategies such as Split reporter, Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, Multimodality fusion reporter technologies will further assist to streamline and shorten the drug discovery and developmental process. This review illustrates the importance and potential of molecular imaging using multimodality reporter genes in drug development at preclinical phases.

  8. Clinical application of noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Chuanlong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic fibrosis is the common outcome of chronic liver diseases of various causes. At present, liver biopsy is the “gold standard” for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis, but it has limitations and is invasive, which leads to the development of noninvasive assessment of liver fibrosis. The article mainly introduces the technology and application of noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis from the aspects of clinical manifestation, serology, and radiology. It has pointed out the clinical value of these noninvasive diagnosis techniques, and it discusses the progress in clinical research and its limitations for noninvasive diagnosis of liver fibrosis.

  9. General anaesthesia with multimodal principles versus intrathecal analgesia with conventional principles in total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harsten, Andreas; Hjartarson, Hjortur; Werner, Mads Utke

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative outcomes following major surgery are influenced by surgical and anaesthesiological factors. While techniques of minimal invasive surgery have been associated with improved outcome, the techniques of minimal invasive, multimodal anaesthesia have not been adequately investigated. The ...

  10. Noninvasive Body Contouring: A Male Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wat, Heidi; Wu, Douglas C; Goldman, Mitchel P

    2018-01-01

    Noninvasive body contouring is an attractive therapeutic modality to enhance the ideal male physique. Men place higher value on enhancing a well-defined, strong, masculine jawline and developing a V-shaped taper through the upper body. An understanding of the body contour men strive for allows the treating physician to focus on areas that are of most concern to men, thus enhancing patient experience and satisfaction. This article discusses noninvasive body contouring techniques, taking into account the unique aesthetic concerns of the male patient by combining an analysis of the existing literature with our own clinical experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multimodal imaging in health, disease, and man-made disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papineni, Rao V.L.

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances in the fields of molecular and functional imaging are rapidly emerging as potential advance research tools in health, Disease and drug discovery. Notable are the approaches utilizing multi-modal imaging strategies in preclinical studies that are becoming extremely useful in assessing the efficacy of the novel target molecules. This talk will focus on our efforts in bringing the multimodality to preclinical research with Optical, X-ray, and noninvasive nuclear imaging. The concepts and methods in molecular imaging to support drug targeting and drug discovery will be discussed along with a focus on its utilization in radiation induced changes in the bone physiology. Also, will discuss how such approaches can be employed in future as a biodosimetry for radiation disasters or in radiation threat. (author)

  12. A multimodal parallel architecture: A cognitive framework for multimodal interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Human communication is naturally multimodal, and substantial focus has examined the semantic correspondences in speech-gesture and text-image relationships. However, visual narratives, like those in comics, provide an interesting challenge to multimodal communication because the words and/or images can guide the overall meaning, and both modalities can appear in complicated "grammatical" sequences: sentences use a syntactic structure and sequential images use a narrative structure. These dual structures create complexity beyond those typically addressed by theories of multimodality where only a single form uses combinatorial structure, and also poses challenges for models of the linguistic system that focus on single modalities. This paper outlines a broad theoretical framework for multimodal interactions by expanding on Jackendoff's (2002) parallel architecture for language. Multimodal interactions are characterized in terms of their component cognitive structures: whether a particular modality (verbal, bodily, visual) is present, whether it uses a grammatical structure (syntax, narrative), and whether it "dominates" the semantics of the overall expression. Altogether, this approach integrates multimodal interactions into an existing framework of language and cognition, and characterizes interactions between varying complexity in the verbal, bodily, and graphic domains. The resulting theoretical model presents an expanded consideration of the boundaries of the "linguistic" system and its involvement in multimodal interactions, with a framework that can benefit research on corpus analyses, experimentation, and the educational benefits of multimodality. Copyright © 2015.

  13. Targeted, noninvasive blockade of cortical neuronal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a novel method to noninvasively modulate targeted brain areas through the temporary disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) via focused ultrasound, enabling focal delivery of a neuroactive substance. Ultrasound was used to locally disrupt the BBB in rat somatosensory cortex, and intravenous administration of GABA then produced a dose-dependent suppression of somatosensory-evoked potentials in response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve. No suppression was observed 1-5 days afterwards or in control animals where the BBB was not disrupted. This method has several advantages over existing techniques: it is noninvasive; it is repeatable via additional GABA injections; multiple brain regions can be affected simultaneously; suppression magnitude can be titrated by GABA dose; and the method can be used with freely behaving subjects. We anticipate that the application of neuroactive substances in this way will be a useful tool for noninvasively mapping brain function, and potentially for surgical planning or novel therapies.

  14. Investigating and comparing multimodal biometric techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    M.Sc. Determining the identity of a person has become vital in today’s world. Emphasis on security has become increasingly more common in the last few decades, not only in Information Technology, but across all industries. One of the main principles of security is that a system only be accessed by a legitimate user. According to the ISO 7498/2 document [1] (an international standard which defines an information security system architecture) there are 5 pillars of information security. Thes...

  15. Multimodal Authentication Techniques For Staff Identification And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2014-12-01

    Dec 1, 2014 ... securing and protecting our identity and valuable data have become areas of great concern ... authentication, verification, tracking and identification systems. It helps to ... managing access while protecting both the ..... Microsoft Operating System XP/Vista, ... range support of fingerprint readers and template.

  16. Multimodal human-machine interaction for service robots in home-care environments

    OpenAIRE

    Goetze, Stefan; Fischer, S.; Moritz, Niko; Appell, Jens-E.; Wallhoff, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This contribution focuses on multimodal interaction techniques for a mobile communication and assistance system on a robot platform. The system comprises of acoustic, visual and haptic input modalities. Feedback is given to the user by a graphical user interface and a speech synthesis system. By this, multimodal and natural communication with the robot system is possible.

  17. Multimodal fusion of polynomial classifiers for automatic person recgonition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broun, Charles C.; Zhang, Xiaozheng

    2001-03-01

    With the prevalence of the information age, privacy and personalization are forefront in today's society. As such, biometrics are viewed as essential components of current evolving technological systems. Consumers demand unobtrusive and non-invasive approaches. In our previous work, we have demonstrated a speaker verification system that meets these criteria. However, there are additional constraints for fielded systems. The required recognition transactions are often performed in adverse environments and across diverse populations, necessitating robust solutions. There are two significant problem areas in current generation speaker verification systems. The first is the difficulty in acquiring clean audio signals in all environments without encumbering the user with a head- mounted close-talking microphone. Second, unimodal biometric systems do not work with a significant percentage of the population. To combat these issues, multimodal techniques are being investigated to improve system robustness to environmental conditions, as well as improve overall accuracy across the population. We propose a multi modal approach that builds on our current state-of-the-art speaker verification technology. In order to maintain the transparent nature of the speech interface, we focus on optical sensing technology to provide the additional modality-giving us an audio-visual person recognition system. For the audio domain, we use our existing speaker verification system. For the visual domain, we focus on lip motion. This is chosen, rather than static face or iris recognition, because it provides dynamic information about the individual. In addition, the lip dynamics can aid speech recognition to provide liveness testing. The visual processing method makes use of both color and edge information, combined within Markov random field MRF framework, to localize the lips. Geometric features are extracted and input to a polynomial classifier for the person recognition process. A late

  18. Experiments in Multimodal Information Presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hooijdonk, Charlotte; Bosma, W.E.; Krahmer, Emiel; Maes, Alfons; Theune, Mariet; van den Bosch, Antal; Bouma, Gosse

    In this chapter we describe three experiments investigating multimodal information presentation in the context of a medical QA system. In Experiment 1, we wanted to know how non-experts design (multimodal) answers to medical questions, distinguishing between what questions and how questions. In

  19. Multimodality, politics and ideology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machin, David; Van Leeuwen, T.

    2016-01-01

    This journal's editorial statement is clear that political discourse should be studied not only as regards parliamentary type politics. In this introduction we argue precisely for the need to pay increasing attention to the way that political ideologies are infused into culture more widely...... of power, requires meanings and identities which can hold them in place. We explain the processes by which critical multimodal discourse analysis can best draw out this ideology as it is realized through different semiotics resources. © John Benjamins Publishing Company....

  20. : ventilators for noninvasive ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Fauroux , Brigitte; Leroux , Karl; Desmarais , Gilbert; Isabey , Daniel; Clément , Annick; Lofaso , Frédéric; Louis , Bruno

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance characteristics of all the ventilators proposed for home noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation in children in France. The ventilators (one volume-targeted, 12 pressure-targeted and four dual) were evaluated on a bench which simulated six different paediatric ventilatory patterns. For each ventilator, the quality of the inspiratory and expiratory trigger and the ability to reach and maintain the preset pre...

  1. Multimodal Speaker Diarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noulas, A; Englebienne, G; Krose, B J A

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel probabilistic framework that fuses information coming from the audio and video modality to perform speaker diarization. The proposed framework is a Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) that is an extension of a factorial Hidden Markov Model (fHMM) and models the people appearing in an audiovisual recording as multimodal entities that generate observations in the audio stream, the video stream, and the joint audiovisual space. The framework is very robust to different contexts, makes no assumptions about the location of the recording equipment, and does not require labeled training data as it acquires the model parameters using the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm. We apply the proposed model to two meeting videos and a news broadcast video, all of which come from publicly available data sets. The results acquired in speaker diarization are in favor of the proposed multimodal framework, which outperforms the single modality analysis results and improves over the state-of-the-art audio-based speaker diarization.

  2. Noninvasive imaging of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medarova, Z.

    2009-01-01

    With the development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies, it is highly advantageous to be able to determine their efficacy, to improve overall patient survival. Non-invasive imaging techniques are currently available for visualizing different pathological conditions of the human body, but their use for cancer monitoring is limited due to the lack of tumor-specific imaging probes. This review will attempt to summarize the current clinical diagnostic approaches for breast cancer detection, staging, and therapy assessment. In addition, I will present some novel concepts from the field of molecular imaging that form the basis of some of our research. We believe that this general imaging strategy has the potential of significantly advancing our ability to diagnose breast cancer at the earliest stages of the pathology, before any overt clinical symptoms have developed, as well as to better direct the development of molecularly-targeted individualized therapy protocols.

  3. Non-invasive biomedical research and diagnostics enabled by innovative compact lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, Karina S.; Rafailov, Ilya E.; Dunaev, Andrey V.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2017-11-01

    For over half a century, laser technology has undergone a technological revolution. These technologies, particularly semiconductor lasers, are employed in a myriad of fields. Optical medical diagnostics, one of the emerging areas of laser application, are on the forefront of application around the world. Optical methods of non- or minimally invasive bio-tissue investigation offer significant advantages over alternative methods, including rapid real-time measurement, non-invasiveness and high resolution (guaranteeing the safety of a patient). These advantages demonstrate the growing success of such techniques. In this review, we will outline the recent status of laser technology applied in the biomedical field, focusing on the various available approaches, particularly utilising compact semiconductor lasers. We will further consider the advancement and integration of several complimentary biophotonic techniques into single multimodal devices, the potential impact of such devices and their future applications. Based on our own studies, we will also cover the simultaneous collection of physiological data with the aid a multifunctional diagnostics system, concentrating on the optimisation of the new technology towards a clinical application. Such data is invaluable for developing algorithms capable of delivering consistent, reliable and meaningful diagnostic information, which can ultimately be employed for the early diagnosis of disease conditions in individuals from around the world.

  4. Operative and economic evaluation of a 'Laser Printer Multimodality' System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia, G.; Moscatelli, G.; Maroldi, R.; Chiesa, A.

    1991-01-01

    The increasing application of digital techniques to diagnostic imaging is causing significant changes in several related activities, such as a reproduction of digital images on film. In the Department of Diagnostic Imaging of the University of Brescia, about 70% of the whole of images are produced by digital techniques; at present, most of these images are reproduced on film with a Multimodality System interfacing CT, MR, DSA, and DR units with a single laser printer. Our analysis evaluates the operative and economics aspects of image reproduction, by comparing the 'single cassette' multiformat Camera and the Laser Printer Multimodality SAystem. Our results point out the advantages obtained by reproducing images with a Laser Printer Multimodality System: outstanding quality, reproduction of multiple originals, and marked reduction in the time needed for both image archiving and film handling. The Laser Printer Multimodality System allows over 5 hours/day to be saved -that is to say the working day of an operator, who can be thus shifted to other functions. The important economic aspect of the reproduction of digital images on film proves the Laser Printer Multimodality System to have some advantage over Cameras

  5. Multimodal responsive action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oshima, Sae

    ; Raymond 2003; Schegloff and Lerner 2009), including those with multimodal actions (e.g. Olsher 2004; Fasulo & Monzoni 2009). Some responsive actions can also be completed with bodily behavior alone, such as: when an agreement display is achieved by using only nonvocal actions (Jarmon 1996), when...... the recipient’s gaze shift becomes a significant part of the speaker’s turn construction (Goodwin 1980), and when head nods show the recipient’s affiliation with the speaker’s stance (Stivers 2008). Still, much room remains for extending our current understanding of responding actions that necessarily involve...... a hairstylist and a client negotiate the quality of the service that has been provided. Here, the first action is usually the stylist’s question and/or explanation of the new cut that invites the client’s assessment/(dis)agreement, accompanied with embodied actions that project an imminent self...

  6. Registration of deformed multimodality medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshfeghi, M.; Naidich, D.

    1989-01-01

    The registration and combination of images from different modalities have several potential applications, such as functional and anatomic studies, 3D radiation treatment planning, surgical planning, and retrospective studies. Image registration algorithms should correct for any local deformations caused by respiration, heart beat, imaging device distortions, and so forth. This paper reports on an elastic matching technique for registering deformed multimodality images. Correspondences between contours in the two images are used to stretch the deformed image toward its goal image. This process is repeated a number of times, with decreasing image stiffness. As the iterations continue, the stretched image better approximates its goal image

  7. Noninvasive dentistry: a dream or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, B H; Exterkate, R A M

    2015-01-01

    Various caries prevention and repair strategies are reviewed in this article ranging from the use of fluoride to nanohydroxyapatite particles. Several of the strategies which combine fluoride and calcium and phosphate treatments have both in vitro and in vivo data showing them to be efficacious if the surface integrity of the lesion is not breached. Once this has occurred, the rationale for cutting off the nutrient supplies to the pathogenic bacteria without the removal of the infected dentine, a noninvasive restorative technique, is discussed using existing clinical studies as examples. Finally two novel noninvasive restorative techniques using fluorohydroxyapatite crystals are described. The need for clinical data in support of emerging caries-preventive and restorative strategies is emphasized. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Multimodal Counseling of Childhood Encopresis: A Case Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumaer, Jim

    1990-01-01

    Provides information regarding childhood disorder of encopresis and presents multimodal therapy techniques for school counselors who cannot successfully refer clients. Presents a case study of a teenage boy suffering from encopresis who was referred for counseling. Suggests specific treatment strategies including behavior modification, nutrition…

  9. Noninvasive Transcranial Brain Stimulation and Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Rosen, Allyson C.; Ramkumar, Mukund; Nguyen, Tam; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2009-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are two noninvasive brain stimulation techniques that can modulate activity in specific regions of the cortex. At this point, their use in brain stimulation is primarily investigational; however, there is clear evidence that these tools can reduce pain and modify neurophysiologic correlates of the pain experience. TMS has also been used to predict response to surgically implanted stimulation for the tre...

  10. Current and future multimodal learning analytics data challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spikol, Daniel; Prieto, Luis P.; Rodriguez-Triana, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Multimodal Learning Analytics (MMLA) captures, integrates and analyzes learning traces from different sources in order to obtain a more holistic understanding of the learning process, wherever it happens. MMLA leverages the increasingly widespread availability of diverse sensors, high......-frequency data collection technologies and sophisticated machine learning and artificial intelligence techniques. The aim of this workshop is twofold: first, to expose participants to, and develop, different multimodal datasets that reflect how MMLA can bring new insights and opportunities to investigate complex...... learning processes and environments; second, to collaboratively identify a set of grand challenges for further MMLA research, built upon the foundations of previous workshops on the topic....

  11. Coronary plaque morphology on multi-modality imagining and periprocedural myocardial infarction after percutaneous coronary intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Sato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI may be complicated by periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI as manifested by elevated cardiac biomarkers such as creatine kinase (CK-MB or troponin T. The occurrence of PMI has been shown to be associated with worse short- and long-term clinical outcome. However, recent studies suggest that PMI defined by biomarker levels alone is a marker of atherosclerosis burden and procedural complexity but in most cases does not have independent prognostic significance. Diagnostic multi-modality imaging such as intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, coronary angioscopy, near-infrared spectroscopy, multidetector computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can be used to closely investigate the atherosclerotic lesion in order to detect morphological markers of unstable and vulnerable plaques in the patients undergoing PCI. With the improvement of technical aspects of multimodality coronary imaging, clinical practice and research are increasingly shifting toward defining the clinical implication of plaque morphology and patients outcomes. There were numerous published data regarding the relationship between pre-PCI lesion subsets on multi-modality imaging and post-PCI biomarker levels. In this review, we discuss the relationship between coronary plaque morphology estimated by invasive or noninvasive coronary imaging and the occurrence of PMI. Furthermore, this review underlies that the value of the multimodality coronary imaging approach will become the gold standard for invasive or noninvasive prediction of PMI in clinical practice.

  12. Multimodal brain monitoring in fulminant hepatic failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoal Jr, Fernando Mendes; Nogueira, Ricardo Carvalho; Ronconi, Karla De Almeida Lins; de Lima Oliveira, Marcelo; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure, also known as fulminant hepatic failure (FHF), embraces a spectrum of clinical entities characterized by acute liver injury, severe hepatocellular dysfunction, and hepatic encephalopathy. Cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension are common causes of mortality in patients with FHF. The management of patients who present acute liver failure starts with determining the cause and an initial evaluation of prognosis. Regardless of whether or not patients are listed for liver transplantation, they should still be monitored for recovery, death, or transplantation. In the past, neuromonitoring was restricted to serial clinical neurologic examination and, in some cases, intracranial pressure monitoring. Over the years, this monitoring has proven insufficient, as brain abnormalities were detected at late and irreversible stages. The need for real-time monitoring of brain functions to favor prompt treatment and avert irreversible brain injuries led to the concepts of multimodal monitoring and neurophysiological decision support. New monitoring techniques, such as brain tissue oxygen tension, continuous electroencephalogram, transcranial Doppler, and cerebral microdialysis, have been developed. These techniques enable early diagnosis of brain hemodynamic, electrical, and biochemical changes, allow brain anatomical and physiological monitoring-guided therapy, and have improved patient survival rates. The purpose of this review is to discuss the multimodality methods available for monitoring patients with FHF in the neurocritical care setting. PMID:27574545

  13. Quantitative multi-modal NDT data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heideklang, René; Shokouhi, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    A single NDT technique is often not adequate to provide assessments about the integrity of test objects with the required coverage or accuracy. In such situations, it is often resorted to multi-modal testing, where complementary and overlapping information from different NDT techniques are combined for a more comprehensive evaluation. Multi-modal material and defect characterization is an interesting task which involves several diverse fields of research, including signal and image processing, statistics and data mining. The fusion of different modalities may improve quantitative nondestructive evaluation by effectively exploiting the augmented set of multi-sensor information about the material. It is the redundant information in particular, whose quantification is expected to lead to increased reliability and robustness of the inspection results. There are different systematic approaches to data fusion, each with its specific advantages and drawbacks. In our contribution, these will be discussed in the context of nondestructive materials testing. A practical study adopting a high-level scheme for the fusion of Eddy Current, GMR and Thermography measurements on a reference metallic specimen with built-in grooves will be presented. Results show that fusion is able to outperform the best single sensor regarding detection specificity, while retaining the same level of sensitivity

  14. Investigation of protein selectivity in multimodal chromatography using in silico designed Fab fragment variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkov, Hanne Sophie; Krogh, Berit Olsen; Woo, James; Parimal, Siddharth; Ahmadian, Haleh; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a unique set of antibody Fab fragments was designed in silico and produced to examine the relationship between protein surface properties and selectivity in multimodal chromatographic systems. We hypothesized that multimodal ligands containing both hydrophobic and charged moieties would interact strongly with protein surface regions where charged groups and hydrophobic patches were in close spatial proximity. Protein surface property characterization tools were employed to identify the potential multimodal ligand binding regions on the Fab fragment of a humanized antibody and to evaluate the impact of mutations on surface charge and hydrophobicity. Twenty Fab variants were generated by site-directed mutagenesis, recombinant expression, and affinity purification. Column gradient experiments were carried out with the Fab variants in multimodal, cation-exchange, and hydrophobic interaction chromatographic systems. The results clearly indicated that selectivity in the multimodal system was different from the other chromatographic modes examined. Column retention data for the reduced charge Fab variants identified a binding site comprising light chain CDR1 as the main electrostatic interaction site for the multimodal and cation-exchange ligands. Furthermore, the multimodal ligand binding was enhanced by additional hydrophobic contributions as evident from the results obtained with hydrophobic Fab variants. The use of in silico protein surface property analyses combined with molecular biology techniques, protein expression, and chromatographic evaluations represents a previously undescribed and powerful approach for investigating multimodal selectivity with complex biomolecules. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Multimodal imaging of bone metastases: From preclinical to clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Ellmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the skeletal system are commonly observed in cancer patients, highly affecting the patients' quality of life. Imaging plays a major role in detection, follow-up, and molecular characterisation of metastatic disease. Thus, imaging techniques have been optimised and combined in a multimodal and multiparametric manner for assessment of complementary aspects in osseous metastases. This review summarises both application of the most relevant imaging techniques for bone metastasis in preclinical models and the clinical setting.

  16. Magnetic fields in noninvasive brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Dourado, Marcos; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Scaff, Milberto; Guilhoto, Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    The idea that magnetic fields could be used therapeutically arose 2000 years ago. These therapeutic possibilities were expanded after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry. In 1896, Arsène d'Arsonval reported his experience with noninvasive brain magnetic stimulation to the scientific French community. In the second half of the 20th century, changing magnetic fields emerged as a noninvasive tool to study the nervous system and to modulate neural function. In 1985, Barker, Jalinous, and Freeston presented transcranial magnetic stimulation, a relatively focal and painless technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been proposed as a clinical neurophysiology tool and as a potential adjuvant treatment for psychiatric and neurologic conditions. This article aims to contextualize the progress of use of magnetic fields in the history of neuroscience and medical sciences, until 1985.

  17. Multimodality Data Integration in Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Muzik

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An important goal of software development in the medical field is the design of methods which are able to integrate information obtained from various imaging and nonimaging modalities into a cohesive framework in order to understand the results of qualitatively different measurements in a larger context. Moreover, it is essential to assess the various features of the data quantitatively so that relationships in anatomical and functional domains between complementing modalities can be expressed mathematically. This paper presents a clinically feasible software environment for the quantitative assessment of the relationship among biochemical functions as assessed by PET imaging and electrophysiological parameters derived from intracranial EEG. Based on the developed software tools, quantitative results obtained from individual modalities can be merged into a data structure allowing a consistent framework for advanced data mining techniques and 3D visualization. Moreover, an effort was made to derive quantitative variables (such as the spatial proximity index, SPI characterizing the relationship between complementing modalities on a more generic level as a prerequisite for efficient data mining strategies. We describe the implementation of this software environment in twelve children (mean age 5.2±4.3 years with medically intractable partial epilepsy who underwent both high-resolution structural MR and functional PET imaging. Our experiments demonstrate that our approach will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of epileptogenesis and might ultimately have an impact on treatment. Moreover, our software environment holds promise to be useful in many other neurological disorders, where integration of multimodality data is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms.

  18. Advancing ecological understandings through technological transformations in noninvasive genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beja-Pereira, Albano; Oliveira, Rita; Alves, Paulo C; Schwartz, Michael K; Luikart, Gordon

    2009-09-01

    Noninvasive genetic approaches continue to improve studies in molecular ecology, conservation genetics and related disciplines such as forensics and epidemiology. Noninvasive sampling allows genetic studies without disturbing or even seeing the target individuals. Although noninvasive genetic sampling has been used for wildlife studies since the 1990s, technological advances continue to make noninvasive approaches among the most used and rapidly advancing areas in genetics. Here, we review recent advances in noninvasive genetics and how they allow us to address important research and management questions thanks to improved techniques for DNA extraction, preservation, amplification and data analysis. We show that many advances come from the fields of forensics, human health and domestic animal health science, and suggest that molecular ecologists explore literature from these fields. Finally, we discuss how the combination of advances in each step of a noninvasive genetics study, along with fruitful areas for future research, will continually increase the power and role of noninvasive genetics in molecular ecology and conservation genetics. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Multimodal Friction Ignition Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eddie; Howard, Bill; Herald, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The multimodal friction ignition tester (MFIT) is a testbed for experiments on the thermal and mechanical effects of friction on material specimens in pressurized, oxygen-rich atmospheres. In simplest terms, a test involves recording sensory data while rubbing two specimens against each other at a controlled normal force, with either a random stroke or a sinusoidal stroke having controlled amplitude and frequency. The term multimodal in the full name of the apparatus refers to a capability for imposing any combination of widely ranging values of the atmospheric pressure, atmospheric oxygen content, stroke length, stroke frequency, and normal force. The MFIT was designed especially for studying the tendency toward heating and combustion of nonmetallic composite materials and the fretting of metals subjected to dynamic (vibrational) friction forces in the presence of liquid oxygen or pressurized gaseous oxygen test conditions approximating conditions expected to be encountered in proposed composite material oxygen tanks aboard aircraft and spacecraft in flight. The MFIT includes a stainless-steel pressure vessel capable of retaining the required test atmosphere. Mounted atop the vessel is a pneumatic cylinder containing a piston for exerting the specified normal force between the two specimens. Through a shaft seal, the piston shaft extends downward into the vessel. One of the specimens is mounted on a block, denoted the pressure block, at the lower end of the piston shaft. This specimen is pressed down against the other specimen, which is mounted in a recess in another block, denoted the slip block, that can be moved horizontally but not vertically. The slip block is driven in reciprocating horizontal motion by an electrodynamic vibration exciter outside the pressure vessel. The armature of the electrodynamic exciter is connected to the slip block via a horizontal shaft that extends into the pressure vessel via a second shaft seal. The reciprocating horizontal

  20. Multimodal Discourse Analysis of the Movie "Argo"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Xu

    2018-01-01

    Based on multimodal discourse theory, this paper makes a multimodal discourse analysis of some shots in the movie "Argo" from the perspective of context of culture, context of situation and meaning of image. Results show that this movie constructs multimodal discourse through particular context, language and image, and successfully…

  1. Multimodal Network Equilibrium with Stochastic Travel Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The private car, unlike public traffic modes (e.g., subway, trolley running along dedicated track-ways, is invariably subject to various uncertainties resulting in travel time variation. A multimodal network equilibrium model is formulated that explicitly considers stochastic link capacity variability in the road network. The travel time of combined-mode trips is accumulated based on the concept of the mean excess travel time (METT which is a summation of estimated buffer time and tardy time. The problem is characterized by an equivalent VI (variational inequality formulation where the mode choice is expressed in a hierarchical logit structure. Specifically, the supernetwork theory and expansion technique are used herein to represent the multimodal transportation network, which completely represents the combined-mode trips as constituting multiple modes within a trip. The method of successive weighted average is adopted for problem solutions. The model and solution method are further applied to study the trip distribution and METT variations caused by the different levels of the road conditions. Results of numerical examples show that travelers prefer to choose the combined travel mode as road capacity decreases. Travelers with different attitudes towards risk are shown to exhibit significant differences when making travel choice decisions.

  2. Imaging the pancreas: from ex vivo to non-invasive technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, D; Ahlgren, U

    2008-01-01

    While many recently published reviews have covered non-invasive nuclear imaging techniques, the aim of this review is to focus on current developments in optical imaging technologies for investigating the pancreas. Several of these modalities are being developed into non-invasive, real-time monit......While many recently published reviews have covered non-invasive nuclear imaging techniques, the aim of this review is to focus on current developments in optical imaging technologies for investigating the pancreas. Several of these modalities are being developed into non-invasive, real...

  3. Multimodal Aspects of Corporate Social Responsibility Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Daniela Maier

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses how the multimodal persuasive strategies of corporate social responsibility communication can highlight a company’s commitment to gender empowerment and environmental protection while advertising simultaneously its products. Drawing on an interdisciplinary methodological framework related to CSR communication, multimodal discourse analysis and gender theory, the article proposes a multimodal analysis model through which it is possible to map and explain the multimodal persuasive strategies employed by Coca-Cola company in their community-related films. By examining the semiotic modes’ interconnectivity and functional differentiation, this analytical endeavour expands the existing research work as the usual textual focus is extended to a multimodal one.

  4. The Multimodal Possibilities of Online Instructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2006-01-01

    The WWW simplifies the process of delivering online instructions through multimodal channels because of the ease of use for voice, video, pictures, and text modes of communication built into it.  Given that instructions are being produced in multimodal format for the WWW, how do multi-modal analy......The WWW simplifies the process of delivering online instructions through multimodal channels because of the ease of use for voice, video, pictures, and text modes of communication built into it.  Given that instructions are being produced in multimodal format for the WWW, how do multi...

  5. Dual Channel Pulse Coupled Neural Network Algorithm for Fusion of Multimodality Brain Images with Quality Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha SRINIVASAN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the review of medical imaging techniques, an important fact that emerged is that radiologists and physicians still are in a need of high-resolution medical images with complementary information from different modalities to ensure efficient analysis. This requirement should have been sorted out using fusion techniques with the fused image being used in image-guided surgery, image-guided radiotherapy and non-invasive diagnosis. Aim: This paper focuses on Dual Channel Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN Algorithm for fusion of multimodality brain images and the fused image is further analyzed using subjective (human perception and objective (statistical measures for the quality analysis. Material and Methods: The modalities used in fusion are CT, MRI with subtypes T1/T2/PD/GAD, PET and SPECT, since the information from each modality is complementary to one another. The objective measures selected for evaluation of fused image were: Information Entropy (IE - image quality, Mutual Information (MI – deviation in fused to the source images and Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR – noise level, for analysis. Eight sets of brain images with different modalities (T2 with T1, T2 with CT, PD with T2, PD with GAD, T2 with GAD, T2 with SPECT-Tc, T2 with SPECT-Ti, T2 with PET are chosen for experimental purpose and the proposed technique is compared with existing fusion methods such as the Average method, the Contrast pyramid, the Shift Invariant Discrete Wavelet Transform (SIDWT with Harr and the Morphological pyramid, using the selected measures to ascertain relative performance. Results: The IE value and SNR value of the fused image derived from dual channel PCNN is higher than other fusion methods, shows that the quality is better with less noise. Conclusion: The fused image resulting from the proposed method retains the contrast, shape and texture as in source images without false information or information loss.

  6. Recent advances in noninvasive glucose monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So CF

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chi-Fuk So,1 Kup-Sze Choi,1 Thomas KS Wong,2 Joanne WY Chung2,31Centre for Integrative Digital Health, School of Nursing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, 2Department of Nursing and Health Sciences, Tung Wah College, Hong Kong, 3Department of Health and Physical Education, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong KongAbstract: The race for the next generation of painless and reliable glucose monitoring for diabetes mellitus is on. As technology advances, both diagnostic techniques and equipment improve. This review describes the main technologies currently being explored for noninvasive glucose monitoring. The principle of each technology is mentioned; its advantages and limitations are then discussed. The general description and the corresponding results for each device are illustrated, as well as the current status of the device and the manufacturer; internet references for the devices are listed where appropriate. Ten technologies and eleven potential devices are included in this review. Near infrared spectroscopy has become a promising technology, among others, for blood glucose monitoring. Although some reviews have been published already, the rapid development of technologies and information makes constant updating mandatory. While advances have been made, the reliability and the calibration of noninvasive instruments could still be improved, and more studies carried out under different physiological conditions of metabolism, bodily fluid circulation, and blood components are needed.Keywords: noninvasive, glucose monitoring, diabetes mellitus, blood glucose measurement

  7. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for single gene disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Stephanie; Young, Elizabeth; Bowns, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for single gene disorders is coming to fruition in its clinical utility. The presence of cell-free DNA in maternal plasma has been recognized for many years, and a number of applications have developed from this. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for single gene disorders has lagged behind due to complexities of technology development, lack of investment and the need for validation samples for rare disorders. Publications are emerging demonstrating a variety of technical approaches and feasibility of clinical application. Techniques for analysis of cell-free DNA including digital PCR, next-generation sequencing and relative haplotype dosage have been used most often for assay development. Analysis of circulating fetal cells in the maternal blood is still being investigated as a viable alternative and more recently transcervical trophoblast cells. Studies exploring ethical and social issues are generally positive but raise concerns around the routinization of prenatal testing. Further work is necessary to make testing available to all patients with a pregnancy at risk of a single gene disorder, and it remains to be seen if the development of more powerful technologies such as isolation and analysis of single cells will shift the emphasis of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis. As testing becomes possible for a wider range of conditions, more ethical questions will become relevant.

  8. Noninvasive coronary angioscopy using electron beam computed tomography and multidetector computed tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, PMA; Nieman, K; de Feyter, PJ; Oudkerk, M

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of noninvasive coronary imaging techniques like multidetector computed tomography and electron beam computed tomography, new representation methods such as intracoronary visualization. have been introduced. We explore the possibilities of these novel visualization techniques and

  9. A Learning Algorithm for Multimodal Grammar Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ulizia, A; Ferri, F; Grifoni, P

    2011-12-01

    The high costs of development and maintenance of multimodal grammars in integrating and understanding input in multimodal interfaces lead to the investigation of novel algorithmic solutions in automating grammar generation and in updating processes. Many algorithms for context-free grammar inference have been developed in the natural language processing literature. An extension of these algorithms toward the inference of multimodal grammars is necessary for multimodal input processing. In this paper, we propose a novel grammar inference mechanism that allows us to learn a multimodal grammar from its positive samples of multimodal sentences. The algorithm first generates the multimodal grammar that is able to parse the positive samples of sentences and, afterward, makes use of two learning operators and the minimum description length metrics in improving the grammar description and in avoiding the over-generalization problem. The experimental results highlight the acceptable performances of the algorithm proposed in this paper since it has a very high probability of parsing valid sentences.

  10. Multimodal network design and assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, Ties; Alkim, T.P.; van Eck, Gijs; van Arem, Bart; Arentze, T.

    2010-01-01

    A framework is proposed for the design of an optimal multimodal transport network for the Randstad area. This research framework consists of a multi-objective optimization heuristic and a fast network assessment module, which results in a set of Pareto optimal solutions. Subsequently, a proper

  11. Long-termserial non-invasive multislice computed tomography angiography with functional evaluation after coronary implantation of a bioresorbable everolimus-eluting scaffold: the ABSORB cohort BMSCT substudy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onuma, Yoshinobu; Collet, Carlos; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; de Bruyne, Bernard; Christiansen, Evald; Koolen, Jacques; Smits, Pieter; Chevalier, Bernard; McClean, Dougal; Dudek, Dariusz; Windecker, Stephan; Meredith, Ian; Nieman, Koen; Veldhof, Susan; Ormiston, John; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2017-01-01

    Aims Multimodality invasive imaging of the first-in-man cohort demonstrated at 5 years stable lumen dimensions and a low rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACE). However, the long-term non-invasive assessment of this device remains to be documented. The objective was to describe the 72-month

  12. Analysis of the harmonic and intermodulation distortion in a multimode fiber optic link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasulla, I; Capmany, J

    2007-07-23

    We present an analytical evaluation of the harmonic and the intermodulation distortion effects produced in the transmission of an analog signal composed of various RF tones through a multimode fiber link. It is based on the electric field propagation model previously published by the authors. Results show the possibility of implementing subcarrier multiplexing techniques (SCM) with Composite Second Order (CSO) values below -50 dBc over short and middle reach multimode fiber links.

  13. Multimodal quantitative phase and fluorescence imaging of cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinye; Zuo, Chao; Yan, Hao

    2017-06-01

    Fluorescence microscopy, utilizing fluorescence labeling, has the capability to observe intercellular changes which transmitted and reflected light microscopy techniques cannot resolve. However, the parts without fluorescence labeling are not imaged. Hence, the processes simultaneously happen in these parts cannot be revealed. Meanwhile, fluorescence imaging is 2D imaging where information in the depth is missing. Therefore the information in labeling parts is also not complete. On the other hand, quantitative phase imaging is capable to image cells in 3D in real time through phase calculation. However, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction and cannot observe intercellular changes below 200 nanometers. In this work, fluorescence imaging and quantitative phase imaging are combined to build a multimodal imaging system. Such system has the capability to simultaneously observe the detailed intercellular phenomenon and 3D cell morphology. In this study the proposed multimodal imaging system is used to observe the cell behavior in the cell apoptosis. The aim is to highlight the limitations of fluorescence microscopy and to point out the advantages of multimodal quantitative phase and fluorescence imaging. The proposed multimodal quantitative phase imaging could be further applied in cell related biomedical research, such as tumor.

  14. Discrimination of skin diseases using the multimodal imaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, N.; Heuke, S.; Akimov, D.; Latka, I.; Kluschke, F.; Röwert-Huber, H.-J.; Lademann, J.; Dietzek, B.; Popp, J.

    2012-06-01

    Optical microspectroscopic tools reveal great potential for dermatologic diagnostics in the clinical day-to-day routine. To enhance the diagnostic value of individual nonlinear optical imaging modalities such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second harmonic generation (SHG) or two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF), the approach of multimodal imaging has recently been developed. Here, we present an application of nonlinear optical multimodal imaging with Raman-scattering microscopy to study sizable human-tissue cross-sections. The samples investigated contain both healthy tissue and various skin tumors. This contribution details the rich information content, which can be obtained from the multimodal approach: While CARS microscopy, which - in contrast to spontaneous Raman-scattering microscopy - is not hampered by single-photon excited fluorescence, is used to monitor the lipid and protein distribution in the samples, SHG imaging selectively highlights the distribution of collagen structures within the tissue. This is due to the fact, that SHG is only generated in structures which lack inversion geometry. Finally, TPF reveals the distribution of autofluorophores in tissue. The combination of these techniques, i.e. multimodal imaging, allows for recording chemical images of large area samples and is - as this contribution will highlight - of high clinically diagnostic value.

  15. Non-Invasive in vivo Imaging in Small Animal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Koo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real time in vivo molecular imaging in small animal models has become the essential bridge between in vitro data and their translation into clinical applications. The tremendous development and technological progress, such as tumour modelling, monitoring of tumour growth and detection of metastasis, has facilitated translational drug development. This has added to our knowledge on carcinogenesis. The modalities that are commonly used include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Computed Tomography (CT, Positron Emission Tomography (PET, bioluminescence imaging, fluorescence imaging and multi-modality imaging systems. The ability to obtain multiple images longitudinally provides reliable information whilst reducing animal numbers. As yet there is no one modality that is ideal for all experimental studies. This review outlines the instrumentation available together with corresponding applications reported in the literature with particular emphasis on cancer research. Advantages and limitations to current imaging technology are discussed and the issues concerning small animal care during imaging are highlighted.

  16. Noninvasive transcranial brain stimulation and pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Allyson C; Ramkumar, Mukund; Nguyen, Tam; Hoeft, Fumiko

    2009-02-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) are two noninvasive brain stimulation techniques that can modulate activity in specific regions of the cortex. At this point, their use in brain stimulation is primarily investigational; however, there is clear evidence that these tools can reduce pain and modify neurophysiologic correlates of the pain experience. TMS has also been used to predict response to surgically implanted stimulation for the treatment of chronic pain. Furthermore, TMS and tDCS can be applied with other techniques, such as event-related potentials and pharmacologic manipulation, to illuminate the underlying physiologic mechanisms of normal and pathological pain. This review presents a description and overview of the uses of two major brain stimulation techniques and a listing of useful references for further study.

  17. Multimodal strategies to improve surgical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik; Wilmore, Douglas W

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of modifying perioperative care in noncardiac surgical patients on morbidity, mortality, and other outcome measures. BACKGROUND: New approaches in pain control, introduction of techniques that reduce the perioperative stress response, and the more frequent use...... anesthesia in elective operations, and pilot studies of fast track surgical procedures using the multimodality approach. RESULTS: The introduction of newer approaches to perioperative care has reduced both morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. In the future, most elective operations will become day...... surgical procedures or require only 1 to 2 days of postoperative hospitalization. Reorganization of the perioperative team (anesthesiologists, surgeons, nurses, and physical therapists) will be essential to achieve successful fast track surgical programs. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding perioperative...

  18. Multimode-singlemode-multimode fiber sensor for alcohol sensing application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofi'ah, Iftihatur; Hatta, A. M.; Sekartedjo, Sekartedjo

    2016-11-01

    Alcohol is volatile and flammable liquid which is soluble substances both on polar and non polar substances that has been used in some industrial sectors. Alcohol detection method now widely used one of them is the optical fiber sensor. In this paper used fiber optic sensor based on Multimode-Single-mode-Multimode (MSM) to detect alcohol solution at a concentration range of 0-3%. The working principle of sensor utilizes the modal interference between the core modes and the cladding modes, thus make the sensor sensitive to environmental changes. The result showed that characteristic of the sensor not affect the length of the single-mode fiber (SMF). We obtain that the sensor with a length of 5 mm of single-mode can sensing the alcohol with a sensitivity of 0.107 dB/v%.

  19. Multimodal nanoparticle imaging agents: design and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Benjamin P.; Cawthorne, Christopher; Archibald, Stephen J.

    2017-10-01

    Molecular imaging, where the location of molecules or nanoscale constructs can be tracked in the body to report on disease or biochemical processes, is rapidly expanding to include combined modality or multimodal imaging. No single imaging technique can offer the optimum combination of properties (e.g. resolution, sensitivity, cost, availability). The rapid technological advances in hardware to scan patients, and software to process and fuse images, are pushing the boundaries of novel medical imaging approaches, and hand-in-hand with this is the requirement for advanced and specific multimodal imaging agents. These agents can be detected using a selection from radioisotope, magnetic resonance and optical imaging, among others. Nanoparticles offer great scope in this area as they lend themselves, via facile modification procedures, to act as multifunctional constructs. They have relevance as therapeutics and drug delivery agents that can be tracked by molecular imaging techniques with the particular development of applications in optically guided surgery and as radiosensitizers. There has been a huge amount of research work to produce nanoconstructs for imaging, and the parameters for successful clinical translation and validation of therapeutic applications are now becoming much better understood. It is an exciting time of progress for these agents as their potential is closer to being realized with translation into the clinic. The coming 5-10 years will be critical, as we will see if the predicted improvement in clinical outcomes becomes a reality. Some of the latest advances in combination modality agents are selected and the progression pathway to clinical trials analysed. This article is part of the themed issue 'Challenges for chemistry in molecular imaging'.

  20. Multimodality image registration with software: state-of-the-art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slomka, Piotr J. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, AIM Program/Department of Imaging, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Baum, Richard P. [Center for PET, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Multimodality image integration of functional and anatomical data can be performed by means of dedicated hybrid imaging systems or by software image co-registration techniques. Hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) systems have found wide acceptance in oncological imaging, while software registration techniques have a significant role in patient-specific, cost-effective, and radiation dose-effective application of integrated imaging. Software techniques allow accurate (2-3 mm) rigid image registration of brain PET with CT and MRI. Nonlinear techniques are used in whole-body image registration, and recent developments allow for significantly accelerated computing times. Nonlinear software registration of PET with CT or MRI is required for multimodality radiation planning. Difficulties remain in the validation of nonlinear registration of soft tissue organs. The utilization of software-based multimodality image integration in a clinical environment is sometimes hindered by the lack of appropriate picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) infrastructure needed to efficiently and automatically integrate all available images into one common database. In cardiology applications, multimodality PET/single photon emission computed tomography and coronary CT angiography imaging is typically not required unless the results of one of the tests are equivocal. Software image registration is likely to be used in a complementary fashion with hybrid PET/CT or PET/magnetic resonance imaging systems. Software registration of stand-alone scans ''paved the way'' for the clinical application of hybrid scanners, demonstrating practical benefits of image integration before the hybrid dual-modality devices were available. (orig.)

  1. Multimodality image registration with software: state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slomka, Piotr J.; Baum, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Multimodality image integration of functional and anatomical data can be performed by means of dedicated hybrid imaging systems or by software image co-registration techniques. Hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) systems have found wide acceptance in oncological imaging, while software registration techniques have a significant role in patient-specific, cost-effective, and radiation dose-effective application of integrated imaging. Software techniques allow accurate (2-3 mm) rigid image registration of brain PET with CT and MRI. Nonlinear techniques are used in whole-body image registration, and recent developments allow for significantly accelerated computing times. Nonlinear software registration of PET with CT or MRI is required for multimodality radiation planning. Difficulties remain in the validation of nonlinear registration of soft tissue organs. The utilization of software-based multimodality image integration in a clinical environment is sometimes hindered by the lack of appropriate picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) infrastructure needed to efficiently and automatically integrate all available images into one common database. In cardiology applications, multimodality PET/single photon emission computed tomography and coronary CT angiography imaging is typically not required unless the results of one of the tests are equivocal. Software image registration is likely to be used in a complementary fashion with hybrid PET/CT or PET/magnetic resonance imaging systems. Software registration of stand-alone scans ''paved the way'' for the clinical application of hybrid scanners, demonstrating practical benefits of image integration before the hybrid dual-modality devices were available. (orig.)

  2. Multi-modal Behavioural Biometric Authentication for Mobile Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Saevanee , Hataichanok; Clarke , Nathan ,; Furnell , Steven ,

    2012-01-01

    Part 12: Authentication and Delegation; International audience; The potential advantages of behavioural biometrics are that they can be utilised in a transparent (non-intrusive) and continuous authentication system. However, individual biometric techniques are not suited to all users and scenarios. One way to increase the reliability of transparent and continuous authentication systems is create a multi-modal behavioural biometric authentication system. This research investigated three behavi...

  3. Multimode Interference: Identifying Channels and Ridges in Quantum Probability Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Ross C.; Loinaz, Will

    2004-01-01

    The multimode interference technique is a simple way to study the interference patterns found in many quantum probability distributions. We demonstrate that this analysis not only explains the existence of so-called "quantum carpets," but can explain the spatial distribution of channels and ridges in the carpets. With an understanding of the factors that govern these channels and ridges we have a limited ability to produce a particular pattern of channels and ridges by carefully choosing the ...

  4. Noninvasive physiologic assessment of coronary stenoses using cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Sun, Zhonghua; Fan, Zhanming

    2015-01-01

    Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) has become an important noninvasive imaging modality in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). CCTA enables accurate evaluation of coronary artery stenosis. However, CCTA provides limited information on the physiological significance of stenotic lesions. A noninvasive "one-stop-shop" diagnostic test that can provide both anatomical significance and functional significance of stenotic lesions would be beneficial in the diagnosis and management of CAD. Recently, with the introduction of novel techniques, such as myocardial CT perfusion, CT-derived fractional flow reserve (FFRCT), and transluminal attenuation gradient (TAG), CCTA has emerged as a noninvasive method for the assessment of both anatomy of coronary lesions and its physiological consequences during a single study. This review provides an overview of the current status of new CT techniques for the physiologic assessments of CAD.

  5. Noninvasive Physiologic Assessment of Coronary Stenoses Using Cardiac CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary CT angiography (CCTA has become an important noninvasive imaging modality in the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD. CCTA enables accurate evaluation of coronary artery stenosis. However, CCTA provides limited information on the physiological significance of stenotic lesions. A noninvasive “one-stop-shop” diagnostic test that can provide both anatomical significance and functional significance of stenotic lesions would be beneficial in the diagnosis and management of CAD. Recently, with the introduction of novel techniques, such as myocardial CT perfusion, CT-derived fractional flow reserve (FFRCT, and transluminal attenuation gradient (TAG, CCTA has emerged as a noninvasive method for the assessment of both anatomy of coronary lesions and its physiological consequences during a single study. This review provides an overview of the current status of new CT techniques for the physiologic assessments of CAD.

  6. A review of transcranial magnetic stimulation and multimodal neuroimaging to characterize post-stroke neuroplasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Michelle Auriat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Following stroke, the brain undergoes various stages of recovery where the central nervous system can reorganize neural circuitry (neuroplasticity both spontaneously and with the aid of behavioural rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation. Multiple neuroimaging techniques can characterize common structural and functional stroke-related deficits, and importantly, help predict recovery of function. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI typically reveals increased overall diffusivity throughout the brain following stroke, and is capable of indexing the extent of white matter damage. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS provides an index of metabolic changes in surviving neural tissue after stroke, serving as a marker of brain function. The neural correlates of altered brain activity after stroke have been demonstrated by abnormal activation of sensorimotor cortices during task performance, and at rest, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Electroencephalography (EEG has been used to characterize motor dysfunction in terms of increased cortical amplitude in the sensorimotor regions when performing upper-limb movement, indicating abnormally increased cognitive effort and planning in individuals with stroke. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS work reveals changes in ipsilesional and contralesional cortical excitability in the sensorimotor cortices. The severity of motor deficits indexed using TMS has been linked to the magnitude of activity imbalance between the sensorimotor cortices. In this paper we will provide a narrative review of data from studies utilizing DTI, MRS, fMRI, EEG and brain stimulation techniques focusing on TMS and its combination with uni and multi-modal neuroimaging methods to assess recovery after stroke. Approaches that delineate the best measures with which to predict or positively alter outcomes will be highlighted.

  7. A Review of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Multimodal Neuroimaging to Characterize Post-Stroke Neuroplasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriat, Angela M.; Neva, Jason L.; Peters, Sue; Ferris, Jennifer K.; Boyd, Lara A.

    2015-01-01

    Following stroke, the brain undergoes various stages of recovery where the central nervous system can reorganize neural circuitry (neuroplasticity) both spontaneously and with the aid of behavioral rehabilitation and non-invasive brain stimulation. Multiple neuroimaging techniques can characterize common structural and functional stroke-related deficits, and importantly, help predict recovery of function. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) typically reveals increased overall diffusivity throughout the brain following stroke, and is capable of indexing the extent of white matter damage. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides an index of metabolic changes in surviving neural tissue after stroke, serving as a marker of brain function. The neural correlates of altered brain activity after stroke have been demonstrated by abnormal activation of sensorimotor cortices during task performance, and at rest, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Electroencephalography (EEG) has been used to characterize motor dysfunction in terms of increased cortical amplitude in the sensorimotor regions when performing upper limb movement, indicating abnormally increased cognitive effort and planning in individuals with stroke. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) work reveals changes in ipsilesional and contralesional cortical excitability in the sensorimotor cortices. The severity of motor deficits indexed using TMS has been linked to the magnitude of activity imbalance between the sensorimotor cortices. In this paper, we will provide a narrative review of data from studies utilizing DTI, MRS, fMRI, EEG, and brain stimulation techniques focusing on TMS and its combination with uni- and multimodal neuroimaging methods to assess recovery after stroke. Approaches that delineate the best measures with which to predict or positively alter outcomes will be highlighted. PMID:26579069

  8. Advanced Contrast Agents for Multimodal Biomedical Imaging Based on Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Daniel; Ballesteros, Paloma; Cerdán, Sebastián

    2018-01-01

    Clinical imaging modalities have reached a prominent role in medical diagnosis and patient management in the last decades. Different image methodologies as Positron Emission Tomography, Single Photon Emission Tomography, X-Rays, or Magnetic Resonance Imaging are in continuous evolution to satisfy the increasing demands of current medical diagnosis. Progress in these methodologies has been favored by the parallel development of increasingly more powerful contrast agents. These are molecules that enhance the intrinsic contrast of the images in the tissues where they accumulate, revealing noninvasively the presence of characteristic molecular targets or differential physiopathological microenvironments. The contrast agent field is currently moving to improve the performance of these molecules by incorporating the advantages that modern nanotechnology offers. These include, mainly, the possibilities to combine imaging and therapeutic capabilities over the same theranostic platform or improve the targeting efficiency in vivo by molecular engineering of the nanostructures. In this review, we provide an introduction to multimodal imaging methods in biomedicine, the sub-nanometric imaging agents previously used and the development of advanced multimodal and theranostic imaging agents based in nanotechnology. We conclude providing some illustrative examples from our own laboratories, including recent progress in theranostic formulations of magnetoliposomes containing ω-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids to treat inflammatory diseases, or the use of stealth liposomes engineered with a pH-sensitive nanovalve to release their cargo specifically in the acidic extracellular pH microenvironment of tumors.

  9. Gastric Adenocarcinoma: A Multimodal Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humair S. Quadri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite its declining incidence, gastric cancer (GC remains a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. A multimodal approach to GC is critical to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Pretherapy fine resolution contrast-enhanced cross-sectional imaging, endoscopic ultrasound and staging laparoscopy play an important role in patients with newly diagnosed ostensibly operable GC to avoid unnecessary non-therapeutic laparotomies. Currently, margin negative gastrectomy and adequate lymphadenectomy performed at high volume hospitals remain the backbone of GC treatment. Importantly, adequate GC surgery should be integrated in the setting of a multimodal treatment approach. Treatment for advanced GC continues to expand with the emergence of additional lines of systemic and targeted therapies.

  10. Robustness of multimodal processes itineraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bocewicz, G.; Banaszak, Z.; Nielsen, Izabela Ewa

    2013-01-01

    itineraries for assumed (O-D) trip. Since itinerary planning problem, constitutes a common routing and scheduling decision faced by travelers, hence the main question regards of itinerary replanning and particularly a method aimed at prototyping of mode sequences and paths selections. The declarative model......This paper concerns multimodal transport systems (MTS) represented by a supernetworks in which several unimodal networks are connected by transfer links and focuses on the scheduling problems encountered in these systems. Assuming unimodal networks are modeled as cyclic lines, i.e. the routes...... of multimodal processes driven itinerary planning problem is our main contribution. Illustrative examples providing alternative itineraries in some cases of MTS malfunction are presented....

  11. Noninvasive Hemodynamic Measurements During Neurosurgical Procedures in Sitting Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Patrick; Tzanova, Irene; Gööck, Tilman; Hagen, Frank; Schmidtmann, Irene; Engelhard, Kristin; Pestel, Gunther

    2017-07-01

    Neurosurgical procedures in sitting position need advanced cardiovascular monitoring. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) to measure cardiac output (CO)/cardiac index (CI) and stroke volume (SV), and invasive arterial blood pressure measurements for systolic (ABPsys), diastolic (ABPdiast) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) are established monitoring technologies for these kind of procedures. A noninvasive device for continuous monitoring of blood pressure and CO based on a modified Penaz technique (volume-clamp method) was introduced recently. In the present study the noninvasive blood pressure measurements were compared with invasive arterial blood pressure monitoring, and the noninvasive CO monitoring to TEE measurements. Measurements of blood pressure and CO were performed in 35 patients before/after giving a fluid bolus and a change from supine to sitting position, start of surgery, and repositioning from sitting to supine at the end of surgery. Data pairs from the noninvasive device (Nexfin HD) versus arterial line measurements (ABPsys, ABPdiast, MAP) and versus TEE (CO, CI, SV) were compared using Bland-Altman analysis and percentage error. All parameters compared (CO, CI, SV, ABPsys, ABPdiast, MAP) showed a large bias and wide limits of agreement. Percentage error was above 30% for all parameters except ABPsys. The noninvasive device based on a modified Penaz technique cannot replace arterial blood pressure monitoring or TEE in anesthetized patients undergoing neurosurgery in sitting position.

  12. Noninvasive external cardiac pacing for thallium-201 scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, M.D.; Warren, S.E.; Gervino, E.V.

    1988-01-01

    Improvements in noninvasive external cardiac pacing have led to a technique with reliable electrical capture and tolerable patient discomfort. To assess the use of this modality of pacing in combination with thallium scintigraphy as a noninvasive pacing stress test, we applied simultaneous noninvasive cardiac pacing, hemodynamic monitoring, and thallium-201 scintigraphy in 14 patients undergoing cardiac catheterization for chest pain syndromes. Two patients had normal coronary arteries, while the remaining 12 had significant coronary artery disease. Thallium scintigraphic responses to pacing were compared to routine exercise thallium stress testing in nine of these 14 patients. All patients were noninvasively paced to more than 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate. Twelve patients demonstrated reversible thallium defects, which corresponded in 11 cases to significant lesions seen on coronary angiography. Of nine patients who underwent both pacing and exercise thallium stress tests, comparable maximal rate-pressure products were achieved. Moreover, thallium imaging at peak pacing and during delayed views did not differ significantly from exercise thallium scintigraphy. A limiting factor associated with the technique was local patient discomfort, which occurred to some degree in all patients. We conclude that noninvasive external cardiac pacing together with thallium scintigraphy is capable of detecting significant coronary artery disease and may be comparable to routine exercise thallium stress testing. This new modality of stress testing could be useful in patients unable to undergo the exercise required for standard exercise tolerance testing, particularly if improvements in the technology can be found to reduce further the local discomfort

  13. Inorganic Nanoparticles for Multimodal Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Swierczewska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal molecular imaging can offer a synergistic improvement of diagnostic ability over a single imaging modality. Recent development of hybrid imaging systems has profoundly impacted the pool of available multimodal imaging probes. In particular, much interest has been focused on biocompatible, inorganic nanoparticle-based multimodal probes. Inorganic nanoparticles offer exceptional advantages to the field of multimodal imaging owing to their unique characteristics, such as nanometer dimensions, tunable imaging properties, and multifunctionality. Nanoparticles mainly based on iron oxide, quantum dots, gold, and silica have been applied to various imaging modalities to characterize and image specific biologic processes on a molecular level. A combination of nanoparticles and other materials such as biomolecules, polymers, and radiometals continue to increase functionality for in vivo multimodal imaging and therapeutic agents. In this review, we discuss the unique concepts, characteristics, and applications of the various multimodal imaging probes based on inorganic nanoparticles.

  14. Non-invasive assessment of gastric activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smallwood, R.H.; Brown, B.H.

    1983-01-01

    There have been many suggestions for the routine clinical use of the electro-enterogram, but with the exception of the reported usage in the USSR no significant penetration into medical practice has been reported elsewhere. Amongst the many suggestions have been the possible application of electrical stimulation via surface electrodes to overcome post-operative inhibition of intestinal electrical activity, which can be recorded via surface electrodes. Gastric emptying studies have shown that duodenal ulceration is associated with changes in the rate and pattern of emptying of solid meals. Identifiable patterns in the electro-gastrogram following a metal might have diagnostic application. There is some evidence of correlations of electrical activity and pathology in the large intestine. In the colon diverticular disease has been shown to change the frequency content of the slow wave electrical activity and there is some evidence that this might be recorded from surface electrodes. A major obstacle to progress remains the inability to relate non-invasive recordings to intestinal motility. The best hope may be the use of direct and yet non-invasive methods of obtaining motility and in this context real-time ultrasound imaging is probably the most promising technique. The electro-gastrogram has certainly been shown to allow recording of gastric slow wave activity and there is a reasonable hope that further methods of analysis will allow inferential information on motility to be obtained. The following section makes brief mention of these techniques

  15. Non-invasive retinal imaging in mice with fluorescent Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy and Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Hossein-Javaheri, Nima

    2010-01-01

    Visualization of the internal structures of the retina is critical for clinical diagnosis and monitoring of pathology as well as for medical research investigating the root causes of retinal degeneration. The aim of this thesis is to develop multi-modal non-invasive imaging technology for studying retinal degeneration and gene therapy in mice. We have constructed a FD-OCT prototype and combined it with a Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscope (SLO) to permit real time alignment of the retinal field of...

  16. Evaluation of multimodal ground cues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf; Lecuyer, Anatole; Serafin, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents an array of results on the perception of ground surfaces via multiple sensory modalities,with special attention to non visual perceptual cues, notably those arising from audition and haptics, as well as interactions between them. It also reviews approaches to combining...... synthetic multimodal cues, from vision, haptics, and audition, in order to realize virtual experiences of walking on simulated ground surfaces or other features....

  17. Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, T.J.P.; Mortensen, K.H.; Gopalan, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A plethora of pulmonary and systemic disorders, often associated with grave outcomes, may cause pulmonary infarction. • A stereotypical infarct is a peripheral wedge shaped pleurally based opacity but imaging findings can be highly variable. • Multimodality imaging is key to diagnosing the presence, aetiology and complications of pulmonary infarction. • Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction together with any ancillary features often guide to early targeted treatment. • CT remains the principal imaging modality with MRI increasingly used alongside nuclear medicine studies and ultrasound. - Abstract: The impact of absent pulmonary arterial and venous flow on the pulmonary parenchyma depends on a host of factors. These include location of the occlusive insult, the speed at which the occlusion develops and the ability of the normal dual arterial supply to compensate through increased bronchial arterial flow. Pulmonary infarction occurs when oxygenation is cut off secondary to sudden occlusion with lack of recruitment of the dual supply arterial system. Thromboembolic disease is the commonest cause of such an insult but a whole range of disease processes intrinsic and extrinsic to the pulmonary arterial and venous lumen may also result in infarcts. Recognition of the presence of infarction can be challenging as imaging manifestations often differ from the classically described wedge shaped defect and a number of weighty causes need consideration. This review highlights aetiologies and imaging appearances of pulmonary infarction, utilising cases to illustrate the essential role of a multimodality imaging approach in order to arrive at the appropriate diagnosis

  18. Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, T.J.P., E-mail: timothyjpbray@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); Mortensen, K.H., E-mail: mortensen@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); University Department of Radiology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Hills Road, Box 318, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Gopalan, D., E-mail: deepa.gopalan@btopenworld.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A plethora of pulmonary and systemic disorders, often associated with grave outcomes, may cause pulmonary infarction. • A stereotypical infarct is a peripheral wedge shaped pleurally based opacity but imaging findings can be highly variable. • Multimodality imaging is key to diagnosing the presence, aetiology and complications of pulmonary infarction. • Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction together with any ancillary features often guide to early targeted treatment. • CT remains the principal imaging modality with MRI increasingly used alongside nuclear medicine studies and ultrasound. - Abstract: The impact of absent pulmonary arterial and venous flow on the pulmonary parenchyma depends on a host of factors. These include location of the occlusive insult, the speed at which the occlusion develops and the ability of the normal dual arterial supply to compensate through increased bronchial arterial flow. Pulmonary infarction occurs when oxygenation is cut off secondary to sudden occlusion with lack of recruitment of the dual supply arterial system. Thromboembolic disease is the commonest cause of such an insult but a whole range of disease processes intrinsic and extrinsic to the pulmonary arterial and venous lumen may also result in infarcts. Recognition of the presence of infarction can be challenging as imaging manifestations often differ from the classically described wedge shaped defect and a number of weighty causes need consideration. This review highlights aetiologies and imaging appearances of pulmonary infarction, utilising cases to illustrate the essential role of a multimodality imaging approach in order to arrive at the appropriate diagnosis.

  19. Diffusion Maps for Multimodal Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Piella

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal image registration is a difficult task, due to the significant intensity variations between the images. A common approach is to use sophisticated similarity measures, such as mutual information, that are robust to those intensity variations. However, these similarity measures are computationally expensive and, moreover, often fail to capture the geometry and the associated dynamics linked with the images. Another approach is the transformation of the images into a common space where modalities can be directly compared. Within this approach, we propose to register multimodal images by using diffusion maps to describe the geometric and spectral properties of the data. Through diffusion maps, the multimodal data is transformed into a new set of canonical coordinates that reflect its geometry uniformly across modalities, so that meaningful correspondences can be established between them. Images in this new representation can then be registered using a simple Euclidean distance as a similarity measure. Registration accuracy was evaluated on both real and simulated brain images with known ground-truth for both rigid and non-rigid registration. Results showed that the proposed approach achieved higher accuracy than the conventional approach using mutual information.

  20. Non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Haider, Ansab; Rhee, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Technology has transformed the practice of medicine and surgery in particular over the last several decades. This change in practice has allowed diagnostic and therapeutic tests to be performed less invasively. Hemoglobin monitoring remains one of the most commonly performed diagnostic tests in the United States. Recently, non-invasive hemoglobin monitoring technology has gained popularity. The aim of this article is to review the principles of how this technology works, pros and cons, and the implications of non-invasive hemoglobin technology particularly in trauma surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Multimodal Diversity of Postmodernist Fiction Text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. I. Tykha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of structural and functional manifestations of multimodal diversity in postmodernist fiction texts. Multimodality is defined as the coexistence of more than one semiotic mode within a certain context. Multimodal texts feature a diversity of semiotic modes in the communication and development of their narrative. Such experimental texts subvert conventional patterns by introducing various semiotic resources – verbal or non-verbal.

  2. Multimodal exemplification: The expansion of meaning in electronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Functional Multimodal Discourse Analysis (SF-MDA) and argues for improving their exemplifica-tion multimodally. Multimodal devices, if well coordinated, can help optimize e-dictionary exam-ples in informativity, diversity, dynamicity and ...

  3. Effects of non-invasive neurostimulation on craving: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Jochem M.; Daams, Joost G.; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Veltman, Dick J.; van den Brink, Wim; Goudriaan, Anna E.

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the available evidence regarding the effects of non-invasive neurostimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), on craving in substance dependence and craving for high palatable food. Non-invasive neurostimulation techniques were restricted

  4. Effects of non-invasive neurostimulation on craving: A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.M.; Daams, J.G.; Koeter, M.W.; Veltman, D.J.; van den Brink, W.; Goudriaan, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the available evidence regarding the effects of non-invasive neurostimulation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), on craving in substance dependence and craving for high palatable food. Non-invasive neurostimulation techniques were restricted

  5. Improving treatment planning accuracy through multimodality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sailer, Scott L.; Rosenman, Julian G.; Soltys, Mitchel; Cullip, Tim J.; Chen, Jun

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In clinical practice, physicians are constantly comparing multiple images taken at various times during the patient's treatment course. One goal of such a comparison is to accurately define the gross tumor volume (GTV). The introduction of three-dimensional treatment planning has greatly enhanced the ability to define the GTV, but there are times when the GTV is not visible on the treatment-planning computed tomography (CT) scan. We have modified our treatment-planning software to allow for interactive display of multiple, registered images that enhance the physician's ability to accurately determine the GTV. Methods and Materials: Images are registered using interactive tools developed at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). Automated methods are also available. Images registered with the treatment-planning CT scan are digitized from film. After a physician has approved the registration, the registered images are made available to the treatment-planning software. Structures and volumes of interest are contoured on all images. In the beam's eye view, wire loop representations of these structures can be visualized from all image types simultaneously. Each registered image can be seamlessly viewed during the treatment-planning process, and all contours from all image types can be seen on any registered image. A beam may, therefore, be designed based on any contour. Results: Nineteen patients have been planned and treated using multimodality imaging from November 1993 through August 1994. All registered images were digitized from film, and many were from outside institutions. Brain has been the most common site (12), but the techniques of registration and image display have also been used for the thorax (4), abdomen (2), and extremity (1). The registered image has been an magnetic resonance (MR) scan in 15 cases and a diagnostic CT scan in 5 cases. In one case, sequential MRs, one before treatment and another after 30 Gy, were used to plan

  6. The findings of noninvasive cardiovascular diagnosis with multihelical computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fed'kyiv, S.V.

    2009-01-01

    The patients aged of 25-82 underwent the multihelical computed tomography, 508 of them with coronary artery disease and 109 are under control. The findings of MHCT-analysis of the coronary arteries at their atherosclerotic involvement were presented with the use of quantitative assessment of coronary artery calcinosis according to Agatston's technique and noninvasive MHCT-coronagraphy.

  7. In vivo mapping of vascular inflammation using multimodal imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R Jarrett

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Plaque vulnerability to rupture has emerged as a critical correlate to risk of adverse coronary events but there is as yet no clinical method to assess plaque stability in vivo. In the search to identify biomarkers of vulnerable plaques an association has been found between macrophages and plaque stability--the density and pattern of macrophage localization in lesions is indicative of probability to rupture. In very unstable plaques, macrophages are found in high densities and concentrated in the plaque shoulders. Therefore, the ability to map macrophages in plaques could allow noninvasive assessment of plaque stability. We use a multimodality imaging approach to noninvasively map the distribution of macrophages in vivo. The use of multiple modalities allows us to combine the complementary strengths of each modality to better visualize features of interest. Our combined use of Positron Emission Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI allows high sensitivity PET screening to identify putative lesions in a whole body view, and high resolution MRI for detailed mapping of biomarker expression in the lesions.Macromolecular and nanoparticle contrast agents targeted to macrophages were developed and tested in three different mouse and rat models of atherosclerosis in which inflamed vascular plaques form spontaneously and/or are induced by injury. For multimodal detection, the probes were designed to contain gadolinium (T1 MRI or iron oxide (T2 MRI, and Cu-64 (PET. PET imaging was utilized to identify regions of macrophage accumulation; these regions were further probed by MRI to visualize macrophage distribution at high resolution. In both PET and MR images the probes enhanced contrast at sites of vascular inflammation, but not in normal vessel walls. MRI was able to identify discrete sites of inflammation that were blurred together at the low resolution of PET. Macrophage content in the lesions was confirmed by histology.The multimodal

  8. Preterm EEG: a multimodal neurophysiological protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stjerna, Susanna; Voipio, Juha; Metsäranta, Marjo; Kaila, Kai; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2012-02-18

    Since its introduction in early 1950s, electroencephalography (EEG) has been widely used in the neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for assessment and monitoring of brain function in preterm and term babies. Most common indications are the diagnosis of epileptic seizures, assessment of brain maturity, and recovery from hypoxic-ischemic events. EEG recording techniques and the understanding of neonatal EEG signals have dramatically improved, but these advances have been slow to penetrate through the clinical traditions. The aim of this presentation is to bring theory and practice of advanced EEG recording available for neonatal units. In the theoretical part, we will present animations to illustrate how a preterm brain gives rise to spontaneous and evoked EEG activities, both of which are unique to this developmental phase, as well as crucial for a proper brain maturation. Recent animal work has shown that the structural brain development is clearly reflected in early EEG activity. Most important structures in this regard are the growing long range connections and the transient cortical structure, subplate. Sensory stimuli in a preterm baby will generate responses that are seen at a single trial level, and they have underpinnings in the subplate-cortex interaction. This brings neonatal EEG readily into a multimodal study, where EEG is not only recording cortical function, but it also tests subplate function via different sensory modalities. Finally, introduction of clinically suitable dense array EEG caps, as well as amplifiers capable of recording low frequencies, have disclosed multitude of brain activities that have as yet been overlooked. In the practical part of this video, we show how a multimodal, dense array EEG study is performed in neonatal intensive care unit from a preterm baby in the incubator. The video demonstrates preparation of the baby and incubator, application of the EEG cap, and performance of the sensory stimulations.

  9. Noninvasive vaccination against infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhichao; Diaz-Arévalo, Diana; Guan, Hongbing; Zeng, Mingtao

    2018-04-06

    The development of a successful vaccine, which should elicit a combination of humoral and cellular responses to control or prevent infections, is the first step in protecting against infectious diseases. A vaccine may protect against bacterial, fungal, parasitic, or viral infections in animal models, but to be effective in humans there are some issues that should be considered, such as the adjuvant, the route of vaccination, and the antigen-carrier system. While almost all licensed vaccines are injected such that inoculation is by far the most commonly used method, injection has several potential disadvantages, including pain, cross contamination, needlestick injury, under- or overdosing, and increased cost. It is also problematic for patients from rural areas of developing countries, who must travel to a hospital for vaccine administration. Noninvasive immunizations, including oral, intranasal, and transcutaneous administration of vaccines, can reduce or eliminate pain, reduce the cost of vaccinations, and increase their safety. Several preclinical and clinical studies as well as experience with licensed vaccines have demonstrated that noninvasive vaccine immunization activates cellular and humoral immunity, which protect against pathogen infections. Here we review the development of noninvasive immunization with vaccines based on live attenuated virus, recombinant adenovirus, inactivated virus, viral subunits, virus-like particles, DNA, RNA, and antigen expression in rice in preclinical and clinical studies. We predict that noninvasive vaccine administration will be more widely applied in the clinic in the near future.

  10. Focusing and imaging with increased numerical apertures through multimode fibers with micro-fabricated optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, S; Rajamanickam, V P; Ferrara, L; Di Fabrizio, E; Liberale, C; Di Leonardo, R

    2013-12-01

    The use of individual multimode optical fibers in endoscopy applications has the potential to provide highly miniaturized and noninvasive probes for microscopy and optical micromanipulation. A few different strategies have been proposed recently, but they all suffer from intrinsically low resolution related to the low numerical aperture of multimode fibers. Here, we show that two-photon polymerization allows for direct fabrication of micro-optics components on the fiber end, resulting in an increase of the numerical aperture to a value that is close to 1. Coupling light into the fiber through a spatial light modulator, we were able to optically scan a submicrometer spot (300 nm FWHM) over an extended region, facing the opposite fiber end. Fluorescence imaging with improved resolution is also demonstrated.

  11. Focusing and imaging with increased numerical apertures through multimode fibers with micro-fabricated optics

    KAUST Repository

    Bianchi, Silvio; Rajamanickam, V.; Ferrara, Lorenzo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Liberale, Carlo; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The use of individual multimode optical fibers in endoscopy applications has the potential to provide highly miniaturized and noninvasive probes for microscopy and optical micromanipulation. A few different strategies have been proposed recently, but they all suffer from intrinsically low resolution related to the low numerical aperture of multimode fibers. Here, we show that two-photon polymerization allows for direct fabrication of micro-optics components on the fiber end, resulting in an increase of the numerical aperture to a value that is close to 1. Coupling light into the fiber through a spatial light modulator, we were able to optically scan a submicrometer spot (300 nm FWHM) over an extended region, facing the opposite fiber end. Fluorescence imaging with improved resolution is also demonstrated. © 2013 Optical Society of America.

  12. Modification of species-based differential evolution for multimodal optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrus, Said Iskandar Al; Syahputra, Hermawan; Firdaus, Muliawan

    2015-12-01

    At this time optimization has an important role in various fields as well as between other operational research, industry, finance and management. Optimization problem is the problem of maximizing or minimizing a function of one variable or many variables, which include unimodal and multimodal functions. Differential Evolution (DE), is a random search technique using vectors as an alternative solution in the search for the optimum. To localize all local maximum and minimum on multimodal function, this function can be divided into several domain of fitness using niching method. Species-based niching method is one of method that build sub-populations or species in the domain functions. This paper describes the modification of species-based previously to reduce the computational complexity and run more efficiently. The results of the test functions show species-based modifications able to locate all the local optima in once run the program.

  13. Multidimensional and Multimodal Separations by HPTLC in Phytochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesla, Lukasz; Waksmundzka-Hajnos, Monika

    HPTLC is one of the most widely applied methods in phytochemical analysis. It is due to its numerous advantages, e.g., it is the only chromatographic method offering the option of presenting the results as an image. Other advantages include simplicity, low costs, parallel analysis of samples, high sample capacity, rapidly obtained results, and possibility of multiple detection. HPTLC provides identification as well as quantitative results. It also enables the identification of adulterants. In case of complex samples, the resolving power of traditional one-dimensional chromatography is usually inadequate, hence special modes of development are required. Multidimensional and multimodal HPTLC techniques include those realized in one direction (UMD, IMD, GMD, BMD, AMD) as well as typical two-dimensional methods realized on mono- or bi-layers. In this manuscript, an overview on variable multidimensional and multimodal methods, applied in the analysis of phytochemical samples, is presented.

  14. Raman Plus X: Biomedical Applications of Multimodal Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nandan K; Dai, Yichuan; Liu, Peng; Hu, Chuanzhen; Tong, Lieshu; Chen, Xiaoya; Smith, Zachary J

    2017-07-07

    Raman spectroscopy is a label-free method of obtaining detailed chemical information about samples. Its compatibility with living tissue makes it an attractive choice for biomedical analysis, yet its translation from a research tool to a clinical tool has been slow, hampered by fundamental Raman scattering issues such as long integration times and limited penetration depth. In this review we detail the how combining Raman spectroscopy with other techniques yields multimodal instruments that can help to surmount the translational barriers faced by Raman alone. We review Raman combined with several optical and non-optical methods, including fluorescence, elastic scattering, OCT, phase imaging, and mass spectrometry. In each section we highlight the power of each combination along with a brief history and presentation of representative results. Finally, we conclude with a perspective detailing both benefits and challenges for multimodal Raman measurements, and give thoughts on future directions in the field.

  15. Multimode polymer waveguides for high-speed optical interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamiedakis, N.; Ingham, J. D.; Penty, R. V.; White, I. H.; DeGroot, J. V.; Clapp, T. V.

    2017-11-01

    Polymeric multimode waveguides are of particular interest for optical interconnections in short-reach data links. In some applications, for example in space-borne systems, the use of advanced materials with outstanding performance in extreme environments is required (temperature and radiation). In this paper therefore, we present novel siloxane polymers suitable for these applications. The materials are used to form straight, 90° bent and spiral polymer waveguides by low-cost conventional photolithographic techniques on FR4 substrates. The samples have been tested to investigate their propagation characteristics and demonstrate their potential for high-speed data links. Overall, there is strong evidence that these multimode waveguides can be successfully employed as high-speed short-reach data links. Their excellent thermal properties, their low cost and the simple fabrication process indicate their suitability for a wide range of space applications.

  16. Multimodality therapy for medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.R.M.; Duffner, P.K.; Cohen, M.E.; Sinks, L.F.; Tebbi, C.; Freeman, A.I.

    1980-01-01

    Eight patients with recurrent medulloblastoma were treated with a chemotherapy regimen consisting of vincristine, BCNU, dexamethasone and intrathecal and intermediate dose intravenous methotrexate (500 mg/m 2 ). Five also received local low dose radiotherapy (RT). All 8 patients responded to treatment; 6 completely and 2 partially. These latter 2 were in their second and third recurrences. Three remain in remission. The median duration of response was 18.8 months, and median time from start of chemotherapy to death was 32 months using the Kaplan-Meier technique. In addition, 9 other patients with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma were treated with craniospinal radiation and the same adjuvant chemotherapy as above. The first 5 patients also received intraventricular methotrexate and/or intravenous BCNU during radiotherapy. The toxicity in the 5 patients was very severe. There were three toxic deaths, one death from cancer; one patient survives disease-free, but he is demented. With the discontinuance of intraventricular methotrexate and the postponement of myelosuppressive chemotherapy until after the completion of radiotherapy, the regimen has been well tolerated. All 4 patients treated this way remain alive, well, and disease-free at intervals up to 36 months. We conclude that recurrent medulloblastomas are sensitive to multiagent chemotherapy and that prolonged remissions may occur. With primary adjuvant chemotherapy, extreme caution with myelosuppressive drugs must be exercised during the period of craniospinal radiotherapy. We also do not recommend the use of intraventricular methotrexate. When these two criteria were followed, the preliminary results with adjuvant chemotherapy appear encouraging

  17. Noninvasive measurement of an index of renal blood flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, T.A.; Rees, R.S.; Bowen, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    A new technique for the noninvasive measurement of an index of renal blood flow is described. The method utilizes ultrasound determined renal volume and radionuclide assessment of the mean transit time of a pertechnetate bolus through the kidneys. From this information a value for flow is calculated according to compartmental analysis principles. There is good correlation between renal blood flow estimated by this technique and that determined by microsphere injection

  18. Invasive and noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring of patients with cerebrovascular accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velmahos, G C; Wo, C C; Demetriades, D; Bishop, M H; Shoemaker, W C

    1998-01-01

    Seventeen patients with hemodynamic instability from acute cerebrovascular accidents were evaluated shortly after arrival at the emergency department of a university-run county hospital with both invasive Swan-Ganz pulmonary artery catheter placement and a new, noninvasive, thoracic electrical bioimpedance device. Values were recorded and temporal patterns of survivors and nonsurvivors were described. Cardiac indices obtained simultaneously by the 2 techniques were compared. Of the 17 patients, 11 (65%) died. Survivors had higher values than nonsurvivors for mean arterial pressure, cardiac index, and oxygen saturation, delivery, and consumption at comparable times. Cardiac index values, as measured by invasive and noninvasive methods, were correlated. We concluded that hemodynamic monitoring in an acute care setting may recognize temporal circulatory patterns associated with outcome. Noninvasive electrical bioimpedance technology offers a new method for early hemodynamic evaluation. Further research in this area is warranted. PMID:9682626

  19. Multimodal Pedagogies for Teacher Education in TESOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Youngjoo; Angay-Crowder, Tuba

    2016-01-01

    As a growing number of English language learners (ELLs) engage in digital and multimodal literacy practices in their daily lives, teachers are starting to incorporate multimodal approaches into their instruction. However, anecdotal and empirical evidence shows that teachers often feel unprepared for integrating such practices into their curricula…

  20. Modeling multimodal human-computer interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obrenovic, Z.; Starcevic, D.

    2004-01-01

    Incorporating the well-known Unified Modeling Language into a generic modeling framework makes research on multimodal human-computer interaction accessible to a wide range off software engineers. Multimodal interaction is part of everyday human discourse: We speak, move, gesture, and shift our gaze

  1. Filter. Remix. Make.: Cultivating Adaptability through Multimodality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenberry, Lisa; Hutter, Liz; Robinson, Joy

    2015-01-01

    This article establishes traits of adaptable communicators in the 21st century, explains why adaptability should be a goal of technical communication educators, and shows how multimodal pedagogy supports adaptability. Three examples of scalable, multimodal assignments (infographics, research interviews, and software demonstrations) that evidence…

  2. (Re-)Examination of Multimodal Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosa, N.E.; Werkhoven, P.J.; Hürst, W.O.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of augmented reality (AR) research has been concerned with visual perception, however the move towards multimodality is imminent. At the same time, there is no clear vision of what multimodal AR is. The purpose of this position paper is to consider possible ways of examining AR other

  3. Multimodal pain management after arthroscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sten

    Multimodal Pain Management after Arthroscopic Surgery By Sten Rasmussen, M.D. The thesis is based on four randomized controlled trials. The main hypothesis was that multimodal pain treatment provides faster recovery after arthroscopic surgery. NSAID was tested against placebo after knee arthroscopy...

  4. Drusen Characterization with Multimodal Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaide, Richard F.; Curcio, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Multimodal imaging findings and histological demonstration of soft drusen, cuticular drusen, and subretinal drusenoid deposits provided information used to develop a model explaining their imaging characteristics. Purpose To characterize the known appearance of cuticular drusen, subretinal drusenoid deposits (reticular pseudodrusen), and soft drusen as revealed by multimodal fundus imaging; to create an explanatory model that accounts for these observations. Methods Reported color, fluorescein angiographic, autofluorescence, and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images of patients with cuticular drusen, soft drusen, and subretinal drusenoid deposits were reviewed, as were actual images from affected eyes. Representative histological sections were examined. The geometry, location, and imaging characteristics of these lesions were evaluated. A hypothesis based on the Beer-Lambert Law of light absorption was generated to fit these observations. Results Cuticular drusen appear as numerous uniform round yellow-white punctate accumulations under the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Soft drusen are larger yellow-white dome-shaped mounds of deposit under the RPE. Subretinal drusenoid deposits are polymorphous light-grey interconnected accumulations above the RPE. Based on the model, both cuticular and soft drusen appear yellow due to the removal of shorter wavelength light by a double pass through the RPE. Subretinal drusenoid deposits, which are located on the RPE, are not subjected to short wavelength attenuation and therefore are more prominent when viewed with blue light. The location and morphology of extracellular material in relationship to the RPE, and associated changes to RPE morphology and pigmentation, appeared to be primary determinants of druse appearance in different imaging modalities. Conclusion Although cuticular drusen, subretinal drusenoid deposits, and soft drusen are composed of common components, they are distinguishable

  5. Adhesion of multimode adhesives to enamel and dentin after one year of water storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermelho, Paulo Moreira; Reis, André Figueiredo; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the ultramorphological characteristics of tooth-resin interfaces and the bond strength (BS) of multimode adhesive systems to enamel and dentin. Multimode adhesives (Scotchbond Universal (SBU) and All-Bond Universal) were tested in both self-etch and etch-and-rinse modes and compared to control groups (Optibond FL and Clearfil SE Bond (CSB)). Adhesives were applied to human molars and composite blocks were incrementally built up. Teeth were sectioned to obtain specimens for microtensile BS and TEM analysis. Specimens were tested after storage for either 24 h or 1 year. SEM analyses were performed to classify the failure pattern of beam specimens after BS testing. Etching increased the enamel BS of multimode adhesives; however, BS decreased after storage for 1 year. No significant differences in dentin BS were noted between multimode and control in either evaluation period. Storage for 1 year only reduced the dentin BS for SBU in self-etch mode. TEM analysis identified hybridization and interaction zones in dentin and enamel for all adhesives. Silver impregnation was detected on dentin-resin interfaces after storage of specimens for 1 year only with the SBU and CSB. Storage for 1 year reduced enamel BS when adhesives are applied on etched surface; however, BS of multimode adhesives did not differ from those of the control group. In dentin, no significant difference was noted between the multimode and control group adhesives, regardless of etching mode. In general, multimode adhesives showed similar behavior when compared to traditional adhesive techniques. Multimode adhesives are one-step self-etching adhesives that can also be used after enamel/dentin phosphoric acid etching, but each product may work better in specific conditions.

  6. Multifuel multimodal network design; Projeto de redes multicombustiveis multimodal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, Carolina; Dias, Gustavo; Bahiense, Laura; Ferreira Filho, Virgilio J.M. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Programa de Engenharia de Producao

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the Multi commodity Multimodal Network Project is the development of modeling tools and methodologies for the optimal sizing of production networks and multimodal distribution of multiple fuel and its incomes, considering investments and transportation costs. Given the inherently non-linear combinatory nature of the problem, the resolution of real instances by the complete model, in an exact way, becomes computationally intractable. Thus, the strategy for resolution should contain a combination of exacts and heuristics methods, that must be applied to subdivisions of the original problem. This paper deals with one of these subdivisions, tackling the problem of modeling a network of pipelines in order to drain the production of ethanol away from the producing plants. The objective consists in defining the best network topology, minimizing investment and operational costs, and attending the total demand. In order to do that, the network was considered a tree, where the nodes are the center of producing regions and the edges are the pipelines, trough where the ethanol produced by plants must be drained away. The main objective also includes the decision over the optimal diameter of each pipeline and the optimal size of the bombs, in order to minimize the pumping costs. (author)

  7. Metawidgets in the multimodal interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattner, M.M. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States) Anderson (M.D.) Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)); Glinert, E.P.; Jorge, J.A.; Ormsby, G.R. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    We analyze two intertwined and fundamental issues concerning computer-to-human communication in the multimodal interfaces: the interplay between sound and graphics, and the role of object persistence. Our observations lead us to introduce metawidgets as abstract entities capable of manifesting themselves to users as image, as sound, or as various combinations and/or sequences of the two media. We show examples of metawidgets in action, and discuss mechanisms for choosing among alternative media for metawidget instantiation. Finally, we describe a couple of experimental microworlds we have implemented to test out some of our ideas. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Multimodal approach to postoperative recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To provide updated information on recent developments within individual components of multimodal interventions to improve postoperative outcome (fast-track methodology). RECENT FINDINGS: The value of the fast-track methodology to improve recovery and decrease hospital stay...... and morbidity has been firmly consolidated, especially in colorectal procedures. An increasing amount of data from other procedures supports the value of the fast-track concept across procedures. Fast-track programs should be based on the analysis of procedure-specific factors that may influence outcome...

  9. Ketamina en analgesia multimodal postcesarea

    OpenAIRE

    Monzón Rubio, Eva María

    2011-01-01

    Mediante la analgesia multimodal influimos en las diferentes vías del dolor a la vez que minimizamos los potenciales efectos adversos de los diferentes fármacos administrados. En el caso del dolor postcesárea esto adquiere un importante matiz debido a la necesidad de disminuir el uso de opioides que pasan a la leche materna en caso de lactancia natural. El uso de dosis subanestésicas de Ketamina ha demostrado en diferentes estudios la disminución de requerimientos de opioides en las primer...

  10. Combined noninvasive language mapping by navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional MRI and its comparison with direct cortical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ille, Sebastian; Sollmann, Nico; Hauck, Theresa; Maurer, Stefanie; Tanigawa, Noriko; Obermueller, Thomas; Negwer, Chiara; Droese, Doris; Zimmer, Claus; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian; Krieg, Sandro M

    2015-07-01

    Repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is now increasingly used for preoperative language mapping in patients with lesions in language-related areas of the brain. Yet its correlation with intraoperative direct cortical stimulation (DCS) has to be improved. To increase rTMS's specificity and positive predictive value, the authors aim to provide thresholds for rTMS's positive language areas. Moreover, they propose a protocol for combining rTMS with functional MRI (fMRI) to combine the strength of both methods. The authors performed multimodal language mapping in 35 patients with left-sided perisylvian lesions by using rTMS, fMRI, and DCS. The rTMS mappings were conducted with a picture-to-trigger interval (PTI, time between stimulus presentation and stimulation onset) of either 0 or 300 msec. The error rates (ERs; that is, the number of errors per number of stimulations) were calculated for each region of the cortical parcellation system (CPS). Subsequently, the rTMS mappings were analyzed through different error rate thresholds (ERT; that is, the ER at which a CPS region was defined as language positive in terms of rTMS), and the 2-out-of-3 rule (a stimulation site was defined as language positive in terms of rTMS if at least 2 out of 3 stimulations caused an error). As a second step, the authors combined the results of fMRI and rTMS in a predefined protocol of combined noninvasive mapping. To validate this noninvasive protocol, they correlated its results to DCS during awake surgery. The analysis by different rTMS ERTs obtained the highest correlation regarding sensitivity and a low rate of false positives for the ERTs of 15%, 20%, 25%, and the 2-out-of-3 rule. However, when comparing the combined fMRI and rTMS results with DCS, the authors observed an overall specificity of 83%, a positive predictive value of 51%, a sensitivity of 98%, and a negative predictive value of 95%. In comparison with fMRI, rTMS is a more sensitive but less specific

  11. Multimodality localization of epileptic foci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desco, Manuel; Pascau, Javier; Pozo, M. A.; Santos, Andres; Reig, Santiago; Gispert, Juan D.; Garcia-Barreno, Pedro

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents a multimodality approach for the localization of epileptic foci using PET, MRI and EEG combined without the need of external markers. Mutual Information algorithm is used for MRI-PET registration. Dipole coordinates (provided by BESA software) are projected onto the MRI using a specifically developed algorithm. The four anatomical references used for electrode positioning (nasion, inion and two preauricular points) are located on the MRI using a triplanar viewer combined with a surface-rendering tool. Geometric transformation using deformation of the ideal sphere used for dipole calculations is then applied to match the patient's brain size and shape. Eight treatment-refractory epileptic patients have been studied. The combination of the anatomical information from the MRI, hipoperfusion areas in PET and dipole position and orientation helped the physician in the diagnosis of epileptic focus location. Neurosurgery was not indicated for patients where PET and dipole results were inconsistent; in two cases it was clinically indicated despite the mismatch, showing a negative follow up. The multimodality approach presented does not require external markers for dipole projection onto the MRI, this being the main difference with previous methods. The proposed method may play an important role in the indication of surgery for treatment- refractory epileptic patients.

  12. Non-invasive acoustic-based monitoring of uranium in solution and H/D ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantea, Cristian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beedle, Christopher Craig [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lakis, Rollin Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The primary objective of this project is to adapt existing non-invasive acoustic techniques (Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry and Gaussian-pulse acoustic technique) for the purpose of demonstrating the ability to quantify U or H/D ratios in solution. Furthermore, a successful demonstration will provide an easily implemented, low cost, and non-invasive method for remote and unattended uranium mass measurements for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

  13. Ultrasonography for Noninvasive Assessment of Portal Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Hitoshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2017-07-15

    Portal hypertension is a major pathophysiology in patients with cirrhosis. Portal pressure is the gold standard to evaluate the severity of portal hypertension, and radiological intervention is the only procedure for pressure measurement. Ultrasound (US) is a simple and noninvasive imaging modality available worldwide. B-mode imaging allows broad applications for patients to detect and characterize chronic liver diseases and focal hepatic lesions. The Doppler technique offers real-time observation of blood flow with qualitative and quantitative assessments, and the application of microbubble-based contrast agents has improved the detectability of peripheral blood flow. In addition, elastography for the liver and spleen covers a wider field beyond the original purpose of fibrosis assessment. These developments enhance the practical use of US in the evaluation of portal hemodynamic abnormalities. This article reviews the recent progress of US in the assessment of portal hypertension.

  14. A Multimodal Search Engine for Medical Imaging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Eduardo; Godinho, Tiago; Valente, Frederico; Costa, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    The use of digital medical imaging systems in healthcare institutions has increased significantly, and the large amounts of data in these systems have led to the conception of powerful support tools: recent studies on content-based image retrieval (CBIR) and multimodal information retrieval in the field hold great potential in decision support, as well as for addressing multiple challenges in healthcare systems, such as computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). However, the subject is still under heavy research, and very few solutions have become part of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) in hospitals and clinics. This paper proposes an extensible platform for multimodal medical image retrieval, integrated in an open-source PACS software with profile-based CBIR capabilities. In this article, we detail a technical approach to the problem by describing its main architecture and each sub-component, as well as the available web interfaces and the multimodal query techniques applied. Finally, we assess our implementation of the engine with computational performance benchmarks.

  15. FDTD simulation of microwave sintering of ceramics in multimode cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iskander, M.F.; Smith, R.L.; Andrade, A.O.M.; Walsh, L.M. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Kimrey, H. Jr. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1994-05-01

    At present, various aspects of the sintering process such as preparation of sample sizes and shapes, types of insulations, and the desirability of including a process stimulus such as SiC rods are considered forms of art and highly dependent on human expertise. The simulation of realistic sintering experiments in a multimode cavity may provide an improved understanding of critical parameters involved and allow for the development of guidelines towards the optimization of the sintering process. In this paper, the authors utilize the FDTD technique to model various geometrical arrangements and material compatibility aspects in multimode microwave cavities and to simulate realistic sintering experiments. The FDTD procedure starts with the simulation of a field distribution in multimode microwave cavities that resembles a set of measured data using liquid crystal sheets. Also included in the simulation is the waveguide feed as well as a ceramic loading plate placed at the base of the cavity. The FDTD simulation thus provides realistic representation of a typical sintering experiment. Aspects that have been successfully simulated include the effects of various types of insulation, the role of SiC rods on the uniformity of the resulting microwave fields, and the possible shielding effects that may result from excessive use of SiC. These results as well as others showing the electromagnetic fields and power-deposition patterns in multiple ceramic samples are presented.

  16. Practical multimodal care for cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, Matthew; Hopkinson, Jane; Conibear, John; Reeves, Annie; Shaw, Clare; Fearon, Ken C H

    2016-12-01

    Cancer cachexia is common and reduces function, treatment tolerability and quality of life. Given its multifaceted pathophysiology a multimodal approach to cachexia management is advocated for, but can be difficult to realise in practice. We use a case-based approach to highlight practical approaches to the multimodal management of cachexia for patients across the cancer trajectory. Four cases with lung cancer spanning surgical resection, radical chemoradiotherapy, palliative chemotherapy and no anticancer treatment are presented. We propose multimodal care approaches that incorporate nutritional support, exercise, and anti-inflammatory agents, on a background of personalized oncology care and family-centred education. Collectively, the cases reveal that multimodal care is part of everyone's remit, often focuses on supported self-management, and demands buy-in from the patient and their family. Once operationalized, multimodal care approaches can be tested pragmatically, including alongside emerging pharmacological cachexia treatments. We demonstrate that multimodal care for cancer cachexia can be achieved using simple treatments and without a dedicated team of specialists. The sharing of advice between health professionals can help build collective confidence and expertise, moving towards a position in which every team member feels they can contribute towards multimodal care.

  17. Versatile quantitative phase imaging system applied to high-speed, low noise and multimodal imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Antoine; Aknoun, Sherazade; Savatier, Julien; Wattellier, Benoit F.

    2017-02-01

    Quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry (QWLSI) is a well-established quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique based on the analysis of interference patterns of four diffraction orders by an optical grating set in front of an array detector [1]. As a QPI modality, this is a non-invasive imaging technique which allow to measure the optical path difference (OPD) of semi-transparent samples. We present a system enabling QWLSI with high-performance sCMOS cameras [2] and apply it to perform high-speed imaging, low noise as well as multimodal imaging. This modified QWLSI system contains a versatile optomechanical device which images the optical grating near the detector plane. Such a device is coupled with any kind of camera by varying its magnification. In this paper, we study the use of a sCMOS Zyla5.5 camera from Andor along with our modified QWLSI system. We will present high-speed live cell imaging, up to 200Hz frame rate, in order to follow intracellular fast motions while measuring the quantitative phase information. The structural and density information extracted from the OPD signal is complementary to the specific and localized fluorescence signal [2]. In addition, QPI detects cells even when the fluorophore is not expressed. This is very useful to follow a protein expression with time. The 10 µm spatial pixel resolution of our modified QWLSI associated to the high sensitivity of the Zyla5.5 enabling to perform high quality fluorescence imaging, we have carried out multimodal imaging revealing fine structures cells, like actin filaments, merged with the morphological information of the phase. References [1]. P. Bon, G. Maucort, B. Wattellier, and S. Monneret, "Quadriwave lateral shearing interferometry for quantitative phase microscopy of living cells," Opt. Express, vol. 17, pp. 13080-13094, 2009. [2] P. Bon, S. Lécart, E. Fort and S. Lévêque-Fort, "Fast label-free cytoskeletal network imaging in living mammalian cells," Biophysical journal, 106

  18. Multimodal integration in statistical learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Aaron; Christiansen, Morten Hyllekvist; Weiss, Dan

    2014-01-01

    , we investigated the ability of adults to integrate audio and visual input during statistical learning. We presented learners with a speech stream synchronized with a video of a speaker’s face. In the critical condition, the visual (e.g., /gi/) and auditory (e.g., /mi/) signals were occasionally...... facilitated participants’ ability to segment the speech stream. Our results therefore demonstrate that participants can integrate audio and visual input to perceive the McGurk illusion during statistical learning. We interpret our findings as support for modality-interactive accounts of statistical learning.......Recent advances in the field of statistical learning have established that learners are able to track regularities of multimodal stimuli, yet it is unknown whether the statistical computations are performed on integrated representations or on separate, unimodal representations. In the present study...

  19. Multimodality image analysis work station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratib, O.; Huang, H.K.

    1989-01-01

    The goal of this project is to design and implement a PACS (picture archiving and communication system) workstation for quantitative analysis of multimodality images. The Macintosh II personal computer was selected for its friendly user interface, its popularity among the academic and medical community, and its low cost. The Macintosh operates as a stand alone workstation where images are imported from a central PACS server through a standard Ethernet network and saved on a local magnetic or optical disk. A video digitizer board allows for direct acquisition of images from sonograms or from digitized cine angiograms. The authors have focused their project on the exploration of new means of communicating quantitative data and information through the use of an interactive and symbolic user interface. The software developed includes a variety of image analysis, algorithms for digitized angiograms, sonograms, scintigraphic images, MR images, and CT scans

  20. Multimodal signalling in estrildid finches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomes, A. C. R.; Funghi, C.; Soma, M.

    2017-01-01

    Sexual traits (e.g. visual ornaments, acoustic signals, courtship behaviour) are often displayed together as multimodal signals. Some hypotheses predict joint evolution of different sexual signals (e.g. to increase the efficiency of communication) or that different signals trade off with each other...... (e.g. due to limited resources). Alternatively, multiple signals may evolve independently for different functions, or to communicate different information (multiple message hypothesis). We evaluated these hypotheses with a comparative study in the family Estrildidae, one of the largest songbird...... compromise, but generally courtship dance also evolved independently from other signals. Instead of correlated evolution, we found that song, dance and colour are each related to different socio-ecological traits. Song complexity evolved together with ecological generalism, song performance with investment...

  1. New quantitative and multi-modal approach for in-vivo studies of small animals: coupling of the β-microprobe with magnetic techniques and development of voxelized rat and mouse phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbree, A.

    2005-09-01

    For the last 15 years, animal models that mimic human disorders have become ubiquitous participants to understand biological mechanisms and human disorders and to evaluate new therapeutic approaches. The necessity to study these models in the course of time has stimulated the development of instruments dedicated to in vivo small animal studies. To further understand physiopathological processes, the current challenge is to couple simultaneously several of these methods. Given this context, the combination of the magnetic and radioactive techniques remains an exciting challenge since it is still limited by strict technical constraints. Therefore we propose to couple the magnetic techniques with the radiosensitive Beta-Microprobe, developed in the IPB group and which shown to be an elegant alternative to PET measurements. In this context, the thesis was dedicated to the study of the coupling feasibility from a physical point of view, by simulation and experimental characterizations. Then, the determination of a biological protocol was carried out on the basis of pharmacokinetic studies. The experiments have shown the possibility to use the probe for radioactive measurements under intense magnetic field simultaneously to anatomical images acquisitions. Simultaneously, we have sought to improve the quantification of the radioactive signal using a voxelized phantom of a rat brain. Finally, the emergence of transgenic models led us to reproduce pharmacokinetic studies for the mouse and to develop voxelized mouse phantoms. (author)

  2. Non-invasive neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, William J.; Sanguinetti, Joseph L.; Fini, Maria; Hool, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Neurotechnologies for non-invasively interfacing with neural circuits have been evolving from those capable of sensing neural activity to those capable of restoring and enhancing human brain function. Generally referred to as non-invasive neural stimulation (NINS) methods, these neuromodulation approaches rely on electrical, magnetic, photonic, and acoustic or ultrasonic energy to influence nervous system activity, brain function, and behavior. Evidence that has been surmounting for decades shows that advanced neural engineering of NINS technologies will indeed transform the way humans treat diseases, interact with information, communicate, and learn. The physics underlying the ability of various NINS methods to modulate nervous system activity can be quite different from one another depending on the energy modality used as we briefly discuss. For members of commercial and defense industry sectors that have not traditionally engaged in neuroscience research and development, the science, engineering and technology required to advance NINS methods beyond the state-of-the-art presents tremendous opportunities. Within the past few years alone there have been large increases in global investments made by federal agencies, foundations, private investors and multinational corporations to develop advanced applications of NINS technologies. Driven by these efforts NINS methods and devices have recently been introduced to mass markets via the consumer electronics industry. Further, NINS continues to be explored in a growing number of defense applications focused on enhancing human dimensions. The present paper provides a brief introduction to the field of non-invasive neural stimulation by highlighting some of the more common methods in use or under current development today.

  3. Multimodal three-dimensional dynamic signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury E. Kozlov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Reliable authentication in mobile applications is among the most important information security challenges. Today, we can hardly imagine a person who would not own a mobile device that connects to the Internet. Mobile devices are being used to store large amounts of confidential information, ranging from personal photos to electronic banking tools. In 2009, colleagues from Rice University together with their collaborators from Motorola, proposed an authentication through in-air gestures. This and subsequent work contributing to the development of the method are reviewed in our introduction. At the moment, there exists a version of the gesture-based authentication software available for Android mobile devices. This software has not become widespread yet. One of likely reasons for that is the insufficient reliability of the method, which involves similar to its earlier analogs the use of only one device. Here we discuss the authentication based on the multimodal three-dimensional dynamic signature (MTDS performed by two independent mobile devices. The MTDS-based authentication technique is an advanced version of in-air gesture authentication. We describe the operation of a prototype of MTDS-based authentication, including the main implemented algorithms, as well as some preliminary results of testing the software. We expect that our method can be used in any mobile application, provided a number of additional improvements discussed in the conclusion are made.

  4. Multispectral analysis of multimodal images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvinnsland, Yngve; Brekke, Njaal (Dept. of Surgical Sciences, Univ. of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)); Taxt, Torfinn M.; Gruener, Renate (Dept. of Biomedicine, Univ. of Bergen, Bergen (Norway))

    2009-02-15

    An increasing number of multimodal images represent a valuable increase in available image information, but at the same time it complicates the extraction of diagnostic information across the images. Multispectral analysis (MSA) has the potential to simplify this problem substantially as unlimited number of images can be combined, and tissue properties across the images can be extracted automatically. Materials and methods. We have developed a software solution for MSA containing two algorithms for unsupervised classification, an EM-algorithm finding multinormal class descriptions and the k-means clustering algorithm, and two for supervised classification, a Bayesian classifier using multinormal class descriptions and a kNN-algorithm. The software has an efficient user interface for the creation and manipulation of class descriptions, and it has proper tools for displaying the results. Results. The software has been tested on different sets of images. One application is to segment cross-sectional images of brain tissue (T1- and T2-weighted MR images) into its main normal tissues and brain tumors. Another interesting set of images are the perfusion maps and diffusion maps, derived images from raw MR images. The software returns segmentation that seem to be sensible. Discussion. The MSA software appears to be a valuable tool for image analysis with multimodal images at hand. It readily gives a segmentation of image volumes that visually seems to be sensible. However, to really learn how to use MSA, it will be necessary to gain more insight into what tissues the different segments contain, and the upcoming work will therefore be focused on examining the tissues through for example histological sections.

  5. Gas detection by correlation spectroscopy employing a multimode diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiutao; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2008-05-01

    A gas sensor based on the gas-correlation technique has been developed using a multimode diode laser (MDL) in a dual-beam detection scheme. Measurement of CO(2) mixed with CO as an interfering gas is successfully demonstrated using a 1570 nm tunable MDL. Despite overlapping absorption spectra and occasional mode hops, the interfering signals can be effectively excluded by a statistical procedure including correlation analysis and outlier identification. The gas concentration is retrieved from several pair-correlated signals by a linear-regression scheme, yielding a reliable and accurate measurement. This demonstrates the utility of the unsophisticated MDLs as novel light sources for gas detection applications.

  6. Driver Education for New Multimodal Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-24

    Local and state transportation agencies are redesigning roads to accommodate multimodal travel, including the addition of new configurations, infrastructures, and rules that may be unfamiliar to current drivers and other road users. Education and out...

  7. Responsive Multimodal Transportation Management Strategies And IVHS

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-01

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO INVESTIGATE NEW AND INNOVATIVE WAYS TO INCORPORATE IVHS TECHNOLOGIES INTO MULTIMODAL TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES. MUCH OF THE IVHS RESEARCH DONE TO DATE HAS ADDRESSED THE MODES INDIVIDUALLY. THIS PROJECT FOCU...

  8. Influence of Blood Contamination During Multimode Adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... (μTBS) of multimode adhesives to dentin when using the self‑etch approach. Materials and Methods: ... adhesion, the collagen fibers collapse during the. Introduction ..... The failure mode was determined using an optical.

  9. Palmprint and Face Multi-Modal Biometric Recognition Based on SDA-GSVD and Its Kernelization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yu Yang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available When extracting discriminative features from multimodal data, current methods rarely concern themselves with the data distribution. In this paper, we present an assumption that is consistent with the viewpoint of discrimination, that is, a person’s overall biometric data should be regarded as one class in the input space, and his different biometric data can form different Gaussians distributions, i.e., different subclasses. Hence, we propose a novel multimodal feature extraction and recognition approach based on subclass discriminant analysis (SDA. Specifically, one person’s different bio-data are treated as different subclasses of one class, and a transformed space is calculated, where the difference among subclasses belonging to different persons is maximized, and the difference within each subclass is minimized. Then, the obtained multimodal features are used for classification. Two solutions are presented to overcome the singularity problem encountered in calculation, which are using PCA preprocessing, and employing the generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD technique, respectively. Further, we provide nonlinear extensions of SDA based multimodal feature extraction, that is, the feature fusion based on KPCA-SDA and KSDA-GSVD. In KPCA-SDA, we first apply Kernel PCA on each single modal before performing SDA. While in KSDA-GSVD, we directly perform Kernel SDA to fuse multimodal data by applying GSVD to avoid the singular problem. For simplicity two typical types of biometric data are considered in this paper, i.e., palmprint data and face data. Compared with several representative multimodal biometrics recognition methods, experimental results show that our approaches outperform related multimodal recognition methods and KSDA-GSVD achieves the best recognition performance.

  10. Palmprint and face multi-modal biometric recognition based on SDA-GSVD and its kernelization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiao-Yuan; Li, Sheng; Li, Wen-Qian; Yao, Yong-Fang; Lan, Chao; Lu, Jia-Sen; Yang, Jing-Yu

    2012-01-01

    When extracting discriminative features from multimodal data, current methods rarely concern themselves with the data distribution. In this paper, we present an assumption that is consistent with the viewpoint of discrimination, that is, a person's overall biometric data should be regarded as one class in the input space, and his different biometric data can form different Gaussians distributions, i.e., different subclasses. Hence, we propose a novel multimodal feature extraction and recognition approach based on subclass discriminant analysis (SDA). Specifically, one person's different bio-data are treated as different subclasses of one class, and a transformed space is calculated, where the difference among subclasses belonging to different persons is maximized, and the difference within each subclass is minimized. Then, the obtained multimodal features are used for classification. Two solutions are presented to overcome the singularity problem encountered in calculation, which are using PCA preprocessing, and employing the generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD) technique, respectively. Further, we provide nonlinear extensions of SDA based multimodal feature extraction, that is, the feature fusion based on KPCA-SDA and KSDA-GSVD. In KPCA-SDA, we first apply Kernel PCA on each single modal before performing SDA. While in KSDA-GSVD, we directly perform Kernel SDA to fuse multimodal data by applying GSVD to avoid the singular problem. For simplicity two typical types of biometric data are considered in this paper, i.e., palmprint data and face data. Compared with several representative multimodal biometrics recognition methods, experimental results show that our approaches outperform related multimodal recognition methods and KSDA-GSVD achieves the best recognition performance.

  11. Palmprint and Face Multi-Modal Biometric Recognition Based on SDA-GSVD and Its Kernelization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiao-Yuan; Li, Sheng; Li, Wen-Qian; Yao, Yong-Fang; Lan, Chao; Lu, Jia-Sen; Yang, Jing-Yu

    2012-01-01

    When extracting discriminative features from multimodal data, current methods rarely concern themselves with the data distribution. In this paper, we present an assumption that is consistent with the viewpoint of discrimination, that is, a person's overall biometric data should be regarded as one class in the input space, and his different biometric data can form different Gaussians distributions, i.e., different subclasses. Hence, we propose a novel multimodal feature extraction and recognition approach based on subclass discriminant analysis (SDA). Specifically, one person's different bio-data are treated as different subclasses of one class, and a transformed space is calculated, where the difference among subclasses belonging to different persons is maximized, and the difference within each subclass is minimized. Then, the obtained multimodal features are used for classification. Two solutions are presented to overcome the singularity problem encountered in calculation, which are using PCA preprocessing, and employing the generalized singular value decomposition (GSVD) technique, respectively. Further, we provide nonlinear extensions of SDA based multimodal feature extraction, that is, the feature fusion based on KPCA-SDA and KSDA-GSVD. In KPCA-SDA, we first apply Kernel PCA on each single modal before performing SDA. While in KSDA-GSVD, we directly perform Kernel SDA to fuse multimodal data by applying GSVD to avoid the singular problem. For simplicity two typical types of biometric data are considered in this paper, i.e., palmprint data and face data. Compared with several representative multimodal biometrics recognition methods, experimental results show that our approaches outperform related multimodal recognition methods and KSDA-GSVD achieves the best recognition performance. PMID:22778600

  12. Enhanced Learning through Multimodal Training: Evidence from a Comprehensive Cognitive, Physical Fitness, and Neuroscience Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, N; Paul, E; Watson, P; Cooke, G E; Hillman, C H; Cohen, N J; Kramer, A F; Barbey, A K

    2017-07-19

    The potential impact of brain training methods for enhancing human cognition in healthy and clinical populations has motivated increasing public interest and scientific scrutiny. At issue is the merits of intervention modalities, such as computer-based cognitive training, physical exercise training, and non-invasive brain stimulation, and whether such interventions synergistically enhance cognition. To investigate this issue, we conducted a comprehensive 4-month randomized controlled trial in which 318 healthy, young adults were enrolled in one of five interventions: (1) Computer-based cognitive training on six adaptive tests of executive function; (2) Cognitive and physical exercise training; (3) Cognitive training combined with non-invasive brain stimulation and physical exercise training; (4) Active control training in adaptive visual search and change detection tasks; and (5) Passive control. Our findings demonstrate that multimodal training significantly enhanced learning (relative to computer-based cognitive training alone) and provided an effective method to promote skill learning across multiple cognitive domains, spanning executive functions, working memory, and planning and problem solving. These results help to establish the beneficial effects of multimodal intervention and identify key areas for future research in the continued effort to improve human cognition.

  13. Multimodal Learning Analytics and Education Data Mining: Using Computational Technologies to Measure Complex Learning Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blikstein, Paulo; Worsley, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    New high-frequency multimodal data collection technologies and machine learning analysis techniques could offer new insights into learning, especially when students have the opportunity to generate unique, personalized artifacts, such as computer programs, robots, and solutions engineering challenges. To date most of the work on learning analytics…

  14. Tools for Multimode Quantum Information: Modulation, Detection, and Spatial Quantum Correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Delaubert, Vincent; Janousek, Jirí

    2007-01-01

    We present here all the tools required for continuous variable parallel quantum information protocols based on spatial multi-mode quantum correlations and entanglement. We describe techniques for encoding and detecting this quantum information with high efficiency in the individual modes. We use ...

  15. When to Intervene in Selective Mutism: The Multimodal Treatment of a Case of Persistent Selective Mutism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Shawn; Dalley, Mahlono

    1995-01-01

    An identification and treatment model differentiating transient mutism from persistent selective mutism is proposed. The case study of a six-year-old girl is presented, who was treated with a multimodal approach combining behavioral techniques with play therapy and family involvement. At posttreatment and follow-up, she was talking in a manner…

  16. An Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search Algorithm for the Multi-mode RCPSP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Laurent Flindt

    We present an Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search algorithm for the Multi-mode Resource-Constrained Project Scheduling Problem (MRCPSP). We incorporate techniques for deriving additional precedence relations and propose a new method, so-called mode-diminution, for removing modes during execution...

  17. Nanocrystal core high-density lipoproteins: a multimodality contrast agent platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cormode, David P.; Skajaa, Torjus; van Schooneveld, Matti M.; Koole, Rolf; Jarzyna, Peter; Lobatto, Mark E.; Calcagno, Claudia; Barazza, Alessandra; Gordon, Ronald E.; Zanzonico, Pat; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2008-01-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) is an important natural nanoparticle that may be modified for biomedical imaging purposes. Here we developed a novel technique to create unique multimodality HDL mimicking nanoparticles by incorporation of gold, iron oxide, or quantum dot nanocrystals for computed

  18. Quantifying Quality Aspects of Multimodal Interactive Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kühnel, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This book systematically addresses the quantification of quality aspects of multimodal interactive systems. The conceptual structure is based on a schematic view on human-computer interaction where the user interacts with the system and perceives it via input and output interfaces. Thus, aspects of multimodal interaction are analyzed first, followed by a discussion of the evaluation of output and input and concluding with a view on the evaluation of a complete system.

  19. First Trimester Noninvasive Prenatal Diagnosis: A Computational Intelligence Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neocleous, Andreas C; Nicolaides, Kypros H; Schizas, Christos N

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the potential value of using machine learning techniques such as artificial neural network (ANN) schemes for the noninvasive estimation, at 11-13 weeks of gestation, the risk for euploidy, trisomy 21 (T21), and other chromosomal aneuploidies (O.C.A.), from suitable sonographic, biochemical markers, and other relevant data. A database(1) (1)The dataset can become available for academic purposes by communicating directly with the authors.

  20. Noninvasive Test Detects Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA-developed Video Imaging Communication and Retrieval (VICAR) software laid the groundwork for analyzing images of all kinds. A project seeking to use imaging technology for health care diagnosis began when the imaging team considered using the VICAR software to analyze X-ray images of soft tissue. With marginal success using X-rays, the team applied the same methodology to ultrasound imagery, which was already digitally formatted. The new approach proved successful for assessing amounts of plaque build-up and arterial wall thickness, direct predictors of heart disease, and the result was a noninvasive diagnostic system with the ability to accurately predict heart health. Medical Technologies International Inc. (MTI) further developed and then submitted the technology to a vigorous review process at the FDA, which cleared the software for public use. The software, patented under the name Prowin, is being used in MTI's patented ArterioVision, a carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) test that uses ultrasound image-capturing and analysis software to noninvasively identify the risk for the major cause of heart attack and strokes: atherosclerosis. ArterioVision provides a direct measurement of atherosclerosis by safely and painlessly measuring the thickness of the first two layers of the carotid artery wall using an ultrasound procedure and advanced image-analysis software. The technology is now in use in all 50 states and in many countries throughout the world.

  1. Lymphography - an outdated technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    The indications for lymphography have changed with the availability of non-invasive techniques like ultrasonic techniques and computerized tomography. This review discusses: Recent results of lymphography in histologically verified patient collectives with lymphatic systemic diseases and lymphatic metastizing tumors. The present role of lymphography is derived from this status report as well as the future perspectives. (orig.) [de

  2. Log-Gabor Energy Based Multimodal Medical Image Fusion in NSCT Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal medical image fusion is a powerful tool in clinical applications such as noninvasive diagnosis, image-guided radiotherapy, and treatment planning. In this paper, a novel nonsubsampled Contourlet transform (NSCT based method for multimodal medical image fusion is presented, which is approximately shift invariant and can effectively suppress the pseudo-Gibbs phenomena. The source medical images are initially transformed by NSCT followed by fusing low- and high-frequency components. The phase congruency that can provide a contrast and brightness-invariant representation is applied to fuse low-frequency coefficients, whereas the Log-Gabor energy that can efficiently determine the frequency coefficients from the clear and detail parts is employed to fuse the high-frequency coefficients. The proposed fusion method has been compared with the discrete wavelet transform (DWT, the fast discrete curvelet transform (FDCT, and the dual tree complex wavelet transform (DTCWT based image fusion methods and other NSCT-based methods. Visually and quantitatively experimental results indicate that the proposed fusion method can obtain more effective and accurate fusion results of multimodal medical images than other algorithms. Further, the applicability of the proposed method has been testified by carrying out a clinical example on a woman affected with recurrent tumor images.

  3. Linking variability in brain chemistry and circuit function through multimodal human neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Patrick M; Hariri, A R

    2012-01-01

    and dopamine system and its effects on threat- and reward-related brain function, we review evidence for how such a multimodal neuroimaging strategy can be successfully implemented. Furthermore, we discuss how multimodal PET-fMRI can be integrated with techniques such as imaging genetics, pharmacological......Identifying neurobiological mechanisms mediating the emergence of individual differences in behavior is critical for advancing our understanding of relative risk for psychopathology. Neuroreceptor positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used...

  4. Biodistribution of arctigenin-loaded nanoparticles designed for multimodal imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Qingxin; Hou, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yanan; Li, Xu; Liu, Yang; Ma, Xiaoyao; Wang, Zengyong; Wang, Weiya; Tao, Jin; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Min; Chen, Dongyan; Feng, Xizeng; Bai, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Background Tracking targets of natural products is one of the most challenging issues in fields ranging from pharmacognosy to biomedicine. It is widely recognized that the biocompatible nanoparticle (NP) could function as a ?key? that opens the target ?lock?. Results We report a functionalized poly-lysine NP technique that can monitor the target protein of arctigenin (ATG) in vivo non-invasively. The NPs were synthesized, and their morphologies and surface chemical properties were characteriz...

  5. Improved multimodal biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment diagnosis: data from ADNI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Torteya, Antonio; Treviño-Alvarado, Víctor; Tamez-Peña, José

    2013-02-01

    The accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) confers many clinical research and patient care benefits. Studies have shown that multimodal biomarkers provide better diagnosis accuracy of AD and MCI than unimodal biomarkers, but their construction has been based on traditional statistical approaches. The objective of this work was the creation of accurate AD and MCI diagnostic multimodal biomarkers using advanced bioinformatics tools. The biomarkers were created by exploring multimodal combinations of features using machine learning techniques. Data was obtained from the ADNI database. The baseline information (e.g. MRI analyses, PET analyses and laboratory essays) from AD, MCI and healthy control (HC) subjects with available diagnosis up to June 2012 was mined for case/controls candidates. The data mining yielded 47 HC, 83 MCI and 43 AD subjects for biomarker creation. Each subject was characterized by at least 980 ADNI features. A genetic algorithm feature selection strategy was used to obtain compact and accurate cross-validated nearest centroid biomarkers. The biomarkers achieved training classification accuracies of 0.983, 0.871 and 0.917 for HC vs. AD, HC vs. MCI and MCI vs. AD respectively. The constructed biomarkers were relatively compact: from 5 to 11 features. Those multimodal biomarkers included several widely accepted univariate biomarkers and novel image and biochemical features. Multimodal biomarkers constructed from previously and non-previously AD associated features showed improved diagnostic performance when compared to those based solely on previously AD associated features.

  6. Computer Aided Analysis of TM-Multimode Planar Graded-index Optical Waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashry, M.; Nasr, A.S.; Abou El-Fadl, A.A.

    2000-01-01

    An algorithm is developed for analysis TM-Multimode Planar graded-index optical waveguides. A Modified Impedance Boundary Method of Moments (MIBMOM) for the analysis of planar graded-index optical waveguide structures is presented. The algorithm is used to calculate the dispersion characteristics and the field distribution of TM-multimode planar graded-index optical waveguides. The technique is based on Galerkin s procedure and the exact boundary condition at the interfaces between the graded index region and the step index cladding. Legendre polynomials are used as basis functions. The efficiency of this algorithm is examined with waveguides having various index profiles such as exponential, Gaussian and complementary error functions. The advantage of the MIBMOM is the complete solution of TM-multimode as presented which is very difficult by the other methods. With this algorithm a minimum number of basis functions to give accurate results is used. The obtained results show good agreement with the experimental results

  7. Analysis and synthesis of multi-qubit, multi-mode quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solgun, Firat

    2015-03-27

    In this thesis we propose new methods in multi-qubit multi-mode circuit quantum electrodynamics (circuit-QED) architectures. First we describe a direct parity measurement method for three qubits, which can be realized in 2D circuit-QED with a possible extension to four qubits in a 3D circuit-QED setup for the implementation of the surface code. In Chapter 3 we show how to derive Hamiltonians and compute relaxation rates of the multi-mode superconducting microwave circuits consisting of single Josephson junctions using an exact impedance synthesis technique (the Brune synthesis) and applying previous formalisms for lumped element circuit quantization. In the rest of the thesis we extend our method to multi-junction (multi-qubit) multi-mode circuits through the use of state-space descriptions which allows us to quantize any multiport microwave superconducting circuit with a reciprocal lossy impedance response.

  8. Applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy for noninvasive assessment of hepatic steatosis

    OpenAIRE

    van Werven, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    MR spectroscopy is a noninvasive technique to quantify hepatic steatosis. MR spectroscopy provides information about the chemical composition of tissues in a spectrum. Hepatic steatosis is characterized by accumulation of fat in the liver. The prevalence of hepatic steatosis is increasing due to its relation with obesity and insulin resistance in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This thesis describes the applications of MR spectroscopy (primarily on 3T) for noninvasive assessment of hepatic...

  9. Emerging non-invasive Raman methods in process control and forensic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Neil A; Matousek, Pavel

    2008-10-01

    This article reviews emerging Raman techniques (Spatially Offset and Transmission Raman Spectroscopy) for non-invasive, sub-surface probing in process control and forensic applications. New capabilities offered by these methods are discussed and several application examples are given including the non-invasive detection of counterfeit drugs through blister packs and opaque plastic bottles and the rapid quantitative analysis of the bulk content of pharmaceutical tablets and capsules without sub-sampling.

  10. Synthesis of magnetic resonance–, X-ray– and ultrasound-visible alginate microcapsules for immunoisolation and noninvasive imaging of cellular therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Brad P; Arepally, Aravind; Stuber, Matthias; Arifin, Dian R; Kraitchman, Dara L; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2011-01-01

    Cell therapy has the potential to treat or cure a wide variety of diseases. Non-invasive cell tracking techniques are, however, necessary to translate this approach to the clinical setting. This protocol details methods to create microcapsules that are visible by X-ray, ultrasound (US ) or magnetic resonance (MR) for the encapsulation and immunoisolation of cellular therapeutics. Three steps are generally used to encapsulate cellular therapeutics in an alginate matrix: (i) droplets of cell-containing liquid alginate are extruded, using an electrostatic generator, through a needle tip into a solution containing a dissolved divalent cation salt to form a solid gel; (ii) the resulting gelled spheres are coated with polycations as a cross-linker; and (iii) these complexes are then incubated in a second solution of alginate to form a semipermeable membrane composed of an inner and an outer layer of alginate. The microcapsules can be rendered visible during the first step by adding contrast agents to the primary alginate layer. Such contrast agents include superparamagnetic iron oxide for detection by 1H MR imaging (MRI); the radiopaque agents barium or bismuth sulfate for detection by X-ray modalities; or perfluorocarbon emulsions for multimodal detection by 19F MRI, X-ray and US imaging. The entire synthesis can be completed within 2 h. PMID:21799484

  11. Small-scale soft-bodied robot with multimodal locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqi; Lum, Guo Zhan; Mastrangeli, Massimo; Sitti, Metin

    2018-02-01

    Untethered small-scale (from several millimetres down to a few micrometres in all dimensions) robots that can non-invasively access confined, enclosed spaces may enable applications in microfactories such as the construction of tissue scaffolds by robotic assembly, in bioengineering such as single-cell manipulation and biosensing, and in healthcare such as targeted drug delivery and minimally invasive surgery. Existing small-scale robots, however, have very limited mobility because they are unable to negotiate obstacles and changes in texture or material in unstructured environments. Of these small-scale robots, soft robots have greater potential to realize high mobility via multimodal locomotion, because such machines have higher degrees of freedom than their rigid counterparts. Here we demonstrate magneto-elastic soft millimetre-scale robots that can swim inside and on the surface of liquids, climb liquid menisci, roll and walk on solid surfaces, jump over obstacles, and crawl within narrow tunnels. These robots can transit reversibly between different liquid and solid terrains, as well as switch between locomotive modes. They can additionally execute pick-and-place and cargo-release tasks. We also present theoretical models to explain how the robots move. Like the large-scale robots that can be used to study locomotion, these soft small-scale robots could be used to study soft-bodied locomotion produced by small organisms.

  12. Human Behavior Analysis by Means of Multimodal Context Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oresti Banos

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There is sufficient evidence proving the impact that negative lifestyle choices have on people’s health and wellness. Changing unhealthy behaviours requires raising people’s self-awareness and also providing healthcare experts with a thorough and continuous description of the user’s conduct. Several monitoring techniques have been proposed in the past to track users’ behaviour; however, these approaches are either subjective and prone to misreporting, such as questionnaires, or only focus on a specific component of context, such as activity counters. This work presents an innovative multimodal context mining framework to inspect and infer human behaviour in a more holistic fashion. The proposed approach extends beyond the state-of-the-art, since it not only explores a sole type of context, but also combines diverse levels of context in an integral manner. Namely, low-level contexts, including activities, emotions and locations, are identified from heterogeneous sensory data through machine learning techniques. Low-level contexts are combined using ontological mechanisms to derive a more abstract representation of the user’s context, here referred to as high-level context. An initial implementation of the proposed framework supporting real-time context identification is also presented. The developed system is evaluated for various realistic scenarios making use of a novel multimodal context open dataset and data on-the-go, demonstrating prominent context-aware capabilities at both low and high levels.

  13. Multimodal biometric approach for cancelable face template generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Padma Polash; Gavrilova, Marina

    2012-06-01

    Due to the rapid growth of biometric technology, template protection becomes crucial to secure integrity of the biometric security system and prevent unauthorized access. Cancelable biometrics is emerging as one of the best solutions to secure the biometric identification and verification system. We present a novel technique for robust cancelable template generation algorithm that takes advantage of the multimodal biometric using feature level fusion. Feature level fusion of different facial features is applied to generate the cancelable template. A proposed algorithm based on the multi-fold random projection and fuzzy communication scheme is used for this purpose. In cancelable template generation, one of the main difficulties is keeping interclass variance of the feature. We have found that interclass variations of the features that are lost during multi fold random projection can be recovered using fusion of different feature subsets and projecting in a new feature domain. Applying the multimodal technique in feature level, we enhance the interclass variability hence improving the performance of the system. We have tested the system for classifier fusion for different feature subset and different cancelable template fusion. Experiments have shown that cancelable template improves the performance of the biometric system compared with the original template.

  14. Noninvasive neuromodulation in migraine and cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, Amaal

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the currently available noninvasive neuromodulation devices for the treatment of migraine and cluster headache. Over the last decade, several noninvasive devices have undergone development and clinical trials to evaluate efficacy and safety. Based on this body of work, single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcutaneous supraorbital neurostimulation, and noninvasive vagal nerve stimulation devices have been cleared by the United States Food and Drug Administration and are available for clinical use for the treatment of primary headache disorders. Overall, these novel noninvasive devices appear to be safe, well tolerated, and have demonstrated promising results in clinical trials in both migraine and cluster headache. This narrative review will provide a summary and update of the proposed mechanisms of action, evidence, safety, and future directions of various currently available modalities of noninvasive neuromodulation for the treatment of migraine and cluster headache.

  15. Multimodality, creativity and children's meaning-making: Drawings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multimodality, creativity and children's meaning-making: Drawings, writings, imaginings. ... Framed by social semiotic theories of communication, multimodal ... to create imaginary worlds and express meanings according to their interests.

  16. Multimodal Behavior Therapy: Case Study of a High School Student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Linda

    1981-01-01

    A case study of a high school student concerned with weight problems illustrates multimodal behavior therapy and its use in a high school setting. Multimodal therapy allows the school counselor to maximize referral sources while emphasizing growth and actualization. (JAC)

  17. Polarization Characterization of a Multi-Moded Feed Structure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Polarization Characterization of a Multi-Moded Feed Structure projects characterize the polarization response of a multi-moded feed horn as an innovative...

  18. Noninvasive acceleration measurements to characterize knee arthritis and chondromalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, N P; Rothschild, B M; Mandal, M; Gupta, V; Suryanarayanan, S

    1995-01-01

    Devising techniques and instrumentation for early detection of knee arthritis and chondromalacia presents a challenge in the domain of biomedical engineering. The purpose of the present investigation was to characterize normal knees and knees affected by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and chondromalacia using a set of noninvasive acceleration measurements. Ultraminiature accelerometers were placed on the skin over the patella in four groups of subjects, and acceleration measurements were obtained during leg rotation. Acceleration measurements were significantly different in the four groups of subjects in the time and frequency domains. Power spectral analysis revealed that the average power was significantly different for these groups over a 100-500 Hz range. Noninvasive acceleration measurements can characterize the normal, arthritis, and chondromalacia knees. However, a study on a larger group of subjects is indicated.

  19. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm, Martin C., Jr.; Austen, William G., Jr.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-05-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases.

  20. Skin Rejuvenation with Non-Invasive Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Khan, Saiqa; Belov, Vasily; Quinn, Kyle P.; Albadawi, Hassan; Felix Broelsch, G.; Watkins, Michael T.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Papisov, Mikhail; Mihm Jr., Martin C.; Austen Jr., William G.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative skin diseases affect one third of individuals over the age of sixty. Current therapies use various physical and chemical methods to rejuvenate skin; but since the therapies affect many tissue components including cells and extracellular matrix, they may also induce significant side effects, such as scarring. Here we report on a new, non-invasive, non-thermal technique to rejuvenate skin with pulsed electric fields. The fields destroy cells while simultaneously completely preserving the extracellular matrix architecture and releasing multiple growth factors locally that induce new cells and tissue growth. We have identified the specific pulsed electric field parameters in rats that lead to prominent proliferation of the epidermis, formation of microvasculature, and secretion of new collagen at treated areas without scarring. Our results suggest that pulsed electric fields can improve skin function and thus can potentially serve as a novel non-invasive skin therapy for multiple degenerative skin diseases. PMID:25965851

  1. Multimodale trafiknet i GIS (Multimodal Traffic Network in GIS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronbak, Jacob; Brems, Camilla Riff

    1996-01-01

    The report introduces the use of multi-modal traffic networks within a geographical Information System (GIS). The necessary theory of modelling multi-modal traffic network is reviewed and applied to the ARC/INFO GIS by an explorative example.......The report introduces the use of multi-modal traffic networks within a geographical Information System (GIS). The necessary theory of modelling multi-modal traffic network is reviewed and applied to the ARC/INFO GIS by an explorative example....

  2. A non-invasive technique for age at death determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynnerup, N; Thomsen, I; Frohlich, B

    1990-01-01

    by identification of one of the five phases. An exact age determination of a single individual was not possible, but could be approximated to within 20 years. In forensic cases, however, where the removal of soft tissue is not always possible, this method can contribute to the final age determination when used...

  3. Noninvasive Intracranial Pressure Monitoring Using Advanced Machine Learning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    the ICP sequences with assistance of nurse records. Using a 5-minute-long moving window, we smoothed the continuous VS waveform by averaging... hemodynamics have common mechanisms between individuals, with some individual variation. This assumption would imply that two patients with similar

  4. Actinic Keratosis and Non-Invasive Diagnostic Techniques: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casari, Alice; Chester, Johanna; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    Actinic keratosis represents the earliest manifestation of non-melanoma skin cancer. Because of their risk of progression to invasive squamous cell carcinoma, an earlier diagnosis and treatment are mandatory. Their diagnosis sometimes could represent a challenge even for expert dermatologists. Dermoscopy, confocal laser microscopy and optical coherence tomography could help clinicians in diagnosis. PMID:29316678

  5. Prospective comparison of noninvasive techniques for amputation level selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, J.M.; Anderson, G.G.; Lalka, S.G.; Hagaman, R.M.; Henry, R.; McIntyre, K.E.; Bernhard, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    This study prospectively compared the following tests for their accuracy in amputation level selection: transcutaneous oxygen, transcutaneous carbon dioxide, transcutaneous oxygen-to-transcutaneous carbon dioxide, foot-to-chest transcutaneous oxygen, intradermal xenon-133, ankle-brachial index, and absolute popliteal artery Doppler systolic pressure. All metabolic parameters had a high degree of statistical accuracy in predicting amputation healing whereas none of the other tests had statistical reliability. Amputation site healing was not affected by the presence of diabetes mellitus nor were the test results for any of the metabolic parameters

  6. Investigating the Strain, Temperature and Humidity Sensitivity of a Multimode Graded-Index Perfluorinated Polymer Optical Fiber with Bragg Grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yulong; Bremer, Kort; Roth, Bernhard

    2018-05-05

    In this work we investigate the strain, temperature and humidity sensitivity of a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) inscribed in a near infrared low-loss multimode perfluorinated polymer optical fiber based on cyclic transparent optical polymer (CYTOP). For this purpose, FBGs were inscribed into the multimode CYTOP fiber with a core diameter of 50 µm by using a krypton fluoride (KrF) excimer laser and the phase mask method. The evolution of the reflection spectrum of the FBG detected with a multimode interrogation technique revealed a single reflection peak with a full width at half maximum (FHWM) bandwidth of about 9 nm. Furthermore, the spectral envelope of the single FBG reflection peak can be optimized depending on the KrF excimer laser irradiation time. A linear shift of the Bragg wavelength due to applied strain, temperature and humidity was measured. Furthermore, depending on irradiation time of the KrF excimer laser, both the failure strain and strain sensitivity of the multimode fiber with FBG can be controlled. The inherent low light attenuation in the near infrared wavelength range (telecommunication window) of the multimode CYTOP fiber and the single FBG reflection peak when applying the multimode interrogation set-up will allow for new applications in the area of telecommunication and optical sensing.

  7. Multimodality instrument for tissue characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Robert W. (Inventor); Andrews, Russell J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system with multimodality instrument for tissue identification includes a computer-controlled motor driven heuristic probe with a multisensory tip. For neurosurgical applications, the instrument is mounted on a stereotactic frame for the probe to penetrate the brain in a precisely controlled fashion. The resistance of the brain tissue being penetrated is continually monitored by a miniaturized strain gauge attached to the probe tip. Other modality sensors may be mounted near the probe tip to provide real-time tissue characterizations and the ability to detect the proximity of blood vessels, thus eliminating errors normally associated with registration of pre-operative scans, tissue swelling, elastic tissue deformation, human judgement, etc., and rendering surgical procedures safer, more accurate, and efficient. A neural network program adaptively learns the information on resistance and other characteristic features of normal brain tissue during the surgery and provides near real-time modeling. A fuzzy logic interface to the neural network program incorporates expert medical knowledge in the learning process. Identification of abnormal brain tissue is determined by the detection of change and comparison with previously learned models of abnormal brain tissues. The operation of the instrument is controlled through a user friendly graphical interface. Patient data is presented in a 3D stereographics display. Acoustic feedback of selected information may optionally be provided. Upon detection of the close proximity to blood vessels or abnormal brain tissue, the computer-controlled motor immediately stops probe penetration. The use of this system will make surgical procedures safer, more accurate, and more efficient. Other applications of this system include the detection, prognosis and treatment of breast cancer, prostate cancer, spinal diseases, and use in general exploratory surgery.

  8. Video genre classification using multimodal features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung Ho; Bae, Tae Meon; Choo, Jin Ho; Ro, Yong Man

    2003-12-01

    We propose a video genre classification method using multimodal features. The proposed method is applied for the preprocessing of automatic video summarization or the retrieval and classification of broadcasting video contents. Through a statistical analysis of low-level and middle-level audio-visual features in video, the proposed method can achieve good performance in classifying several broadcasting genres such as cartoon, drama, music video, news, and sports. In this paper, we adopt MPEG-7 audio-visual descriptors as multimodal features of video contents and evaluate the performance of the classification by feeding the features into a decision tree-based classifier which is trained by CART. The experimental results show that the proposed method can recognize several broadcasting video genres with a high accuracy and the classification performance with multimodal features is superior to the one with unimodal features in the genre classification.

  9. Emotional Design Tutoring System Based on Multimodal Affective Computing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Hung; Lin, Hao-Chiang Koong

    2018-01-01

    In a traditional class, the role of the teacher is to teach and that of the students is to learn. However, the constant and rapid technological advancements have transformed education in numerous ways. For instance, in addition to traditional, face to face teaching, E-learning is now possible. Nevertheless, face to face teaching is unavailable in…

  10. Reference Resolution in Multi-modal Interaction: Position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernando, T.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2002-01-01

    In this position paper we present our research on multimodal interaction in and with virtual environments. The aim of this presentation is to emphasize the necessity to spend more research on reference resolution in multimodal contexts. In multi-modal interaction the human conversational partner can

  11. Reference resolution in multi-modal interaction: Preliminary observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    González González, G.R.; Nijholt, Antinus

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present our research on multimodal interaction in and with virtual environments. The aim of this presentation is to emphasize the necessity to spend more research on reference resolution in multimodal contexts. In multi-modal interaction the human conversational partner can apply

  12. TDRSS multimode transponder program. Phase 2: Equipment development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnossen, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    This report contains a complete description of the TDRS Multimode Transponder and its associated ground support equipment. The transponder will demonstrate candidate modulation techniques to provide the required information for the design of an eventual VHF/UHF transponder suitable for installation in a user satellite, capable of operating as part of a Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) systems. Use of geosynchronous TDRS which can serve both low data rate users at VHF and high data rate users at other frequencies has been considered. The effects of radio frequency interference from the earth and of multipath propagation due to reflections from the earth are expected to pose problems for the TDRS system at VHF. Investigations have suggested several modulation techniques that offer promise to overcome these problems.

  13. Hyperspectral tomography based on multi-mode absorption spectroscopy (MUMAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jinghang; O'Hagan, Seamus; Liu, Hecong; Cai, Weiwei; Ewart, Paul

    2017-10-01

    This paper demonstrates a hyperspectral tomographic technique that can recover the temperature and concentration field of gas flows based on multi-mode absorption spectroscopy (MUMAS). This method relies on the recently proposed concept of nonlinear tomography, which can take full advantage of the nonlinear dependency of MUMAS signals on temperature and enables 2D spatial resolution of MUMAS which is naturally a line-of-sight technique. The principles of MUMAS and nonlinear tomography, as well as the mathematical formulation of the inversion problem, are introduced. Proof-of-concept numerical demonstrations are presented using representative flame phantoms and assuming typical laser parameters. The results show that faithful reconstruction of temperature distribution is achievable when a signal-to-noise ratio of 20 is assumed. This method can potentially be extended to simultaneously reconstructing distributions of temperature and the concentration of multiple flame species.

  14. Mode-selective mapping and control of vectorial nonlinear-optical processes in multimode photonic-crystal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming-Lie; Wang, Ching-Yue; Song, You-Jian; Li, Yan-Feng; Chai, Lu; Serebryannikov, Evgenii; Zheltikov, Aleksei

    2006-02-06

    We demonstrate an experimental technique that allows a mapping of vectorial nonlinear-optical processes in multimode photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs). Spatial and polarization modes of PCFs are selectively excited in this technique by varying the tilt angle of the input beam and rotating the polarization of the input field. Intensity spectra of the PCF output plotted as a function of the input field power and polarization then yield mode-resolved maps of nonlinear-optical interactions in multimode PCFs, facilitating the analysis and control of nonlinear-optical transformations of ultrashort laser pulses in such fibers.

  15. Noninvasive patient fixation for extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, Frank; Debus, Juergen; Frank, Claudia; Herfarth, Klaus; Pastyr, Otto; Rhein, Bernhard; Bahner, Malte L.; Schlegel, Wolfgang; Wannenmacher, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the setup accuracy that can be achieved with a novel noninvasive patient fixation technique based on a body cast attached to a recently developed stereotactic body frame during fractionated extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one CT studies (≥ 20 slices, thickness: 3 mm) from 5 patients who were immobilized in a body cast attached to a stereotactic body frame for treatment of para medullary tumors in the thoracic or lumbar spine were evaluated with respect to setup accuracy. The immobilization device consisted of a custom-made wrap-around body cast that extended from the neck to the thighs and a separate head mask, both made from Scotchcast. Each CT study was performed immediately before or after every second or third actual treatment fraction without repositioning the patient between CT and treatment. The stereotactic localization system was mounted and the isocenter as initially located stereo tactically was marked with fiducials for each CT study. Deviation of the treated isocenter as compared to the planned position was measured in all three dimensions. Results: The immobilization device can be easily handled, attached to and removed from the stereotactic frame and thus enables treatment of multiple patients with the same stereotactic frame each day. Mean patient movements of 1.6 mm ± 1.2 mm (laterolateral [LL]), 1.4 mm ± 1.0 mm (anterior-posterior [AP]), 2.3 mm ± 1.3 mm (transversal vectorial error [VE]) and < slice thickness = 3 mm (cranio caudal [CC]) were recorded for the targets in the thoracic spine and 1.4 mm ± 1.0 mm (LL), 1.2 mm ± 0.7 mm (AP), 1.8 mm ± 1.2 mm (VE), and < 3 mm (CC) for the lumbar spine. The worst case deviation was 3.9 mm for the first patient with the target in the thoracic spine (in the LL direction). Combining those numbers (mean transversal VE for both locations and maximum CC error of 3 mm), the mean three-dimensional vectorial patient movement and thus the mean overall

  16. PET-MRI and multimodal cancer imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Taisong; Zhao Jinhua; Song Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Multimodality imaging, specifically PET-CT, brought a new perspective into the fields of clinical imaging. Clinical cases have shown that PET-CT has great value in clinical diagnosis and experimental research. But PET-CT still bears some limitations. A major drawback is that CT provides only limited soft tissue contrast and exposes the patient to a significant radiation dose. MRI overcome these limitations, it has excellent soft tissue contrast, high temporal and spatial resolution and no radiation damage. Additionally, since MRI provides also functional information, PET-MRI will show a new direction of multimodality imaging in the future. (authors)

  17. Strategy development management of Multimodal Transport Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesterova Natalia S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a brief overview of works on the development of transport infrastructure for multimodal transportation and integration of Russian transport system into the international transport corridors. The technology for control of the strategy, that changes shape and capacity of Multi-modal Transport Network (MTN, is considered as part of the methodology for designing and development of MTN. This technology allows to carry out strategic and operational management of the strategy implementation based on the use of the balanced scorecard.

  18. Multimodal surveillance sensors, algorithms, and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhigang

    2007-01-01

    From front-end sensors to systems and environmental issues, this practical resource guides you through the many facets of multimodal surveillance. The book examines thermal, vibration, video, and audio sensors in a broad context of civilian and military applications. This cutting-edge volume provides an in-depth treatment of data fusion algorithms that takes you to the core of multimodal surveillance, biometrics, and sentient computing. The book discusses such people and activity topics as tracking people and vehicles and identifying individuals by their speech.Systems designers benefit from d

  19. Solar Retinopathy: A Multimodal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Bruè

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Solar retinopathy is a rare clinical disturbance, for which spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT findings are not always consistent. We report on two cases of solar retinopathy and discuss its differential diagnosis. Methods. This is an observational case study. Results. A 12-year-old female was referred to ophthalmology for bilateral scotoma. Visual acuity was 20/50 in both eyes. Fundus examination was unremarkable, except for slight yellowish material in the central macula, bilaterally. SD-OCT revealed juxtafoveal microcystic cavities in the outer retina, interruption of the external limiting membrane and the inner and outer segment junctions, with disorganized material in the vitelliform space. Fundus autofluorescence showed hypoautofluorescence surrounded by a relatively hyperautofluorescent ring, bilaterally. Similar clinical and morphological findings were detected in a 27-year-old male. Conclusions. Solar retinopathy has a subtle presentation and patients often deny sun-gazing. SD-OCT and fundus autofluorescence are noninvasive and useful tools for its diagnosis.

  20. A multimodal 3D framework for fire characteristics estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulouse, T.; Rossi, L.; Akhloufi, M. A.; Pieri, A.; Maldague, X.

    2018-02-01

    In the last decade we have witnessed an increasing interest in using computer vision and image processing in forest fire research. Image processing techniques have been successfully used in different fire analysis areas such as early detection, monitoring, modeling and fire front characteristics estimation. While the majority of the work deals with the use of 2D visible spectrum images, recent work has introduced the use of 3D vision in this field. This work proposes a new multimodal vision framework permitting the extraction of the three-dimensional geometrical characteristics of fires captured by multiple 3D vision systems. The 3D system is a multispectral stereo system operating in both the visible and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The framework supports the use of multiple stereo pairs positioned so as to capture complementary views of the fire front during its propagation. Multimodal registration is conducted using the captured views in order to build a complete 3D model of the fire front. The registration process is achieved using multisensory fusion based on visual data (2D and NIR images), GPS positions and IMU inertial data. Experiments were conducted outdoors in order to show the performance of the proposed framework. The obtained results are promising and show the potential of using the proposed framework in operational scenarios for wildland fire research and as a decision management system in fighting.

  1. Non-invasive means of measuring hepatic fat content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sanjeev-R; Thomas, E-Louise; Bell, Jimmy-D; Johnston, Desmond-G; Taylor-Robinson, Simon-D

    2008-06-14

    Hepatic steatosis affects 20% to 30% of the general adult population in the western world. Currently, the technique of choice for determining hepatic fat deposition and the stage of fibrosis is liver biopsy. However, it is an invasive procedure and its use is limited, particularly in children. It may also be subject to sampling error. Non-invasive techniques such as ultrasound, computerised tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) can detect hepatic steatosis, but currently cannot distinguish between simple steatosis and steatohepatitis, or stage the degree of fibrosis accurately. Ultrasound is widely used to detect hepatic steatosis, but its sensitivity is reduced in the morbidly obese and also in those with small amounts of fatty infiltration. It has been used to grade hepatic fat content, but this is subjective. CT can detect hepatic steatosis, but exposes subjects to ionising radiation, thus limiting its use in longitudinal studies and in children. Recently, magnetic resonance (MR) techniques using chemical shift imaging have provided a quantitative assessment of the degree of hepatic fatty infiltration, which correlates well with liver biopsy results in the same patients. Similarly, in vivo (1)H MRS is a fast, safe, non-invasive method for the quantification of intrahepatocellular lipid (IHCL) levels. Both techniques will be useful tools in future longitudinal clinical studies, either in examining the natural history of conditions causing hepatic steatosis (e.g. non-alcoholic fatty liver disease), or in testing new treatments for these conditions.

  2. Connecting multimodality in human communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenbogen, Christina; Habel, Ute; Kellermann, Thilo

    2013-01-01

    DCM analysis instead showed a pronounced top-down control. Remarkably, all connections from the dmPFC to the three other regions were modulated by the experimental conditions. This observation is in line with the presumed role of the dmPFC in the allocation of attention. In contrary, all incoming connections to the AG were modulated, indicating its key role in integrating multimodal information and supporting comprehension. Notably, the input from the FFG to the AG was enhanced when facial expressions conveyed emotional information. These findings serve as preliminary results in understanding network dynamics in human emotional communication and empathy.

  3. [Meta-analyses on measurement precision of non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring technologies in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestel, G; Fukui, K; Higashi, M; Schmidtmann, I; Werner, C

    2018-06-01

    An ideal non-invasive monitoring system should provide accurate and reproducible measurements of clinically relevant variables that enables clinicians to guide therapy accordingly. The monitor should be rapid, easy to use, readily available at the bedside, operator-independent, cost-effective and should have a minimal risk and side effect profile for patients. An example is the introduction of pulse oximetry, which has become established for non-invasive monitoring of oxygenation worldwide. A corresponding non-invasive monitoring of hemodynamics and perfusion could optimize the anesthesiological treatment to the needs in individual cases. In recent years several non-invasive technologies to monitor hemodynamics in the perioperative setting have been introduced: suprasternal Doppler ultrasound, modified windkessel function, pulse wave transit time, radial artery tonometry, thoracic bioimpedance, endotracheal bioimpedance, bioreactance, and partial CO 2 rebreathing have been tested for monitoring cardiac output or stroke volume. The photoelectric finger blood volume clamp technique and respiratory variation of the plethysmography curve have been assessed for monitoring fluid responsiveness. In this manuscript meta-analyses of non-invasive monitoring technologies were performed when non-invasive monitoring technology and reference technology were comparable. The primary evaluation criterion for all studies screened was a Bland-Altman analysis. Experimental and pediatric studies were excluded, as were all studies without a non-invasive monitoring technique or studies without evaluation of cardiac output/stroke volume or fluid responsiveness. Most studies found an acceptable bias with wide limits of agreement. Thus, most non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring technologies cannot be considered to be equivalent to the respective reference method. Studies testing the impact of non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring technologies as a trend evaluation on outcome, as well as

  4. Noninvasive Stimulation of the Human Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Rothwell, John; Capogna, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation methods, such as transcranial electric stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation are widely used tools for both basic research and clinical applications. However, the cortical circuits underlying their effects are poorly defined. Here we review the current...

  5. Noninvasive ventilation in hypoxemic respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Dhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive ventilation (NIV refers to positive pressure ventilation delivered through a noninvasive interface (nasal mask, facemask, or nasal plugs etc. Over the past decade its use has become more common as its benefits are increasingly recognized. This review will focus on the evidence supporting the use of NIV in various conditions resulting in acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF, that is, non-hypercapnic patients having acute respiratory failure in the absence of a cardiac origin or underlying chronic pulmonary disease. Outcomes depend on the patient's diagnosis and clinical characteristics. Patients should be monitored closely for signs of noninvasive ventilation failure and promptly intubated before a crisis develops. The application of noninvasive ventilation by a trained and experienced team, with careful patient selection, should optimize patient outcomes.

  6. Reading Multimodal Texts for Learning – a Model for Cultivating Multimodal Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Danielsson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The re-conceptualisation of texts over the last 20 years, as well as the development of a multimodal understanding of communication and representation of knowledge, has profound consequences for the reading and understanding of multimodal texts, not least in educational contexts. However, if teachers and students are given tools to “unwrap” multimodal texts, they can develop a deeper understanding of texts, information structures, and the textual organisation of knowledge. This article presents a model for working with multimodal texts in education with the intention to highlight mutual multimodal text analysis in relation to the subject content. Examples are taken from a Singaporean science textbook as well as a Chilean science textbook, in order to demonstrate that the framework is versatile and applicable across different cultural contexts. The model takes into account the following aspects of texts: the general structure, how different semiotic resources operate, the ways in which different resources are combined (including coherence, the use of figurative language, and explicit/implicit values. Since learning operates on different dimensions – such as social and affective dimensions besides the cognitive ones – our inclusion of figurative language and values as components for textual analysis is a contribution to multimodal text analysis for learning.

  7. Influence of Blood Contamination During Multimode Adhesive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The present study evaluated the effects of blood contamination performed at different steps of bonding on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of multimode adhesives to dentin when using the self-etch approach. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five molars were randomly assigned to three adhesive groups ...

  8. Multimodal representations in collaborative history learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prangsma, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the question: How does making and connecting different types of multimodal representations affect the collaborative learning process and the acquisition of a chronological frame of reference in 12 to 14-year olds in pre vocational education? A chronological frame of

  9. A Multimodal Interaction Framework for Blended Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidakis, Nikolaos; Kalafatis, Konstantinos; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Humans interact with each other by utilizing the five basic senses as input modalities, whereas sounds, gestures, facial expressions etc. are utilized as output modalities. Multimodal interaction is also used between humans and their surrounding environment, although enhanced with further senses ...... framework enabling deployment of a vast variety of modalities, tailored appropriately for use in blended learning environment....

  10. Multimodal Student Interaction Online: An Ecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Therese Ornberg

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the influence of tool and task design on student interaction in language learning at a distance. Interaction in a multimodal desktop video conferencing environment, FlashMeeting, is analyzed from an ecological perspective with two main foci: participation rates and conversational feedback strategies. The quantitative…

  11. Multimodal Dialogue Management - State of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bui Huu Trung, B.H.T.

    This report is about the state of the art in dialogue management. We first introduce an overview of a multimodal dialogue system and its components. Second, four main approaches to dialogue management are described (finite-state and frame-based, information-state based and probabilistic, plan-based,

  12. Multimode waveguide speckle patterns for compressive sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, George C; Sefler, George A; Justin Shaw, T

    2016-06-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) of sparse gigahertz-band RF signals using microwave photonics may achieve better performances with smaller size, weight, and power than electronic CS or conventional Nyquist rate sampling. The critical element in a CS system is the device that produces the CS measurement matrix (MM). We show that passive speckle patterns in multimode waveguides potentially provide excellent MMs for CS. We measure and calculate the MM for a multimode fiber and perform simulations using this MM in a CS system. We show that the speckle MM exhibits the sharp phase transition and coherence properties needed for CS and that these properties are similar to those of a sub-Gaussian MM with the same mean and standard deviation. We calculate the MM for a multimode planar waveguide and find dimensions of the planar guide that give a speckle MM with a performance similar to that of the multimode fiber. The CS simulations show that all measured and calculated speckle MMs exhibit a robust performance with equal amplitude signals that are sparse in time, in frequency, and in wavelets (Haar wavelet transform). The planar waveguide results indicate a path to a microwave photonic integrated circuit for measuring sparse gigahertz-band RF signals using CS.

  13. Single versus multimodality training basic laparoscopic skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, W.M.; Havermans, S.Y.; Buzink, S.N.; Botden, S.M.B.I.; Jakimowicz, J.J.; Schoot, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction - Even though literature provides compelling evidence of the value of simulators for training of basic laparoscopic skills, the best way to incorporate them into a surgical curriculum is unclear. This study compares the training outcome of single modality training with multimodality

  14. New two-port multimode interference reflectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijn, E.; Smit, M.K.; Wale, M.J.; Leijtens, X.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-mode interference reflectors (MIRs) are versatile components. Two new MIR designs with a fixed 50/50 reflection to transmission ratio are introduced. Measurements on these new devices and on devices similar to those in [1] are presented and compared to the design values. Measured losses are

  15. Scenemash: multimodal route summarization for city exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J. van den; Rudinac, S.; Worring, M.

    2016-01-01

    The potential of mining tourist information from social multimedia data gives rise to new applications offering much richer impressions of the city. In this paper we propose Scenemash, a system that generates multimodal summaries of multiple alternative routes between locations in a city. To get

  16. Naming Block Structures: A Multimodal Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Lynn; Uhry, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    This study describes symbolic representation in block play in a culturally diverse suburban preschool classroom. Block play is "multimodal" and can allow children to experiment with materials to represent the world in many forms of literacy. Combined qualitative and quantitative data from seventy-seven block structures were collected and analyzed.…

  17. Academic Knowledge Construction and Multimodal Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Douglas J., Ed.; Griffith, Bryant, Ed.; Bérci, Margaret E., Ed.; Ortlieb, Evan, Ed.; Sullivan, Pamela, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    While incorporating digital technologies into the classroom has offered new ways of teaching and learning into educational processes, it is essential to take a look at how the digital shift impacts teachers, school administration, and curriculum development. "Academic Knowledge Construction and Multimodal Curriculum Development" presents…

  18. Facilitating Multiple Intelligences Through Multimodal Learning Analytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha PERVEEN

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a theoretical framework for employing learning analytics in online education to trace multiple learning variations of online students by considering their potential of being multiple intelligences based on Howard Gardner’s 1983 theory of multiple intelligences. The study first emphasizes the need to facilitate students as multiple intelligences by online education systems and then suggests a framework of the advanced form of learning analytics i.e., multimodal learning analytics for tracing and facilitating multiple intelligences while they are engaged in online ubiquitous learning. As multimodal learning analytics is still an evolving area, it poses many challenges for technologists, educationists as well as organizational managers. Learning analytics make machines meet humans, therefore, the educationists with an expertise in learning theories can help technologists devise latest technological methods for multimodal learning analytics and organizational managers can implement them for the improvement of online education. Therefore, a careful instructional design based on a deep understanding of students’ learning abilities, is required to develop teaching plans and technological possibilities for monitoring students’ learning paths. This is how learning analytics can help design an adaptive instructional design based on a quick analysis of the data gathered. Based on that analysis, the academicians can critically reflect upon the quick or delayed implementation of the existing instructional design based on students’ cognitive abilities or even about the single or double loop learning design. The researcher concludes that the online education is multimodal in nature, has the capacity to endorse multiliteracies and, therefore, multiple intelligences can be tracked and facilitated through multimodal learning analytics in an online mode. However, online teachers’ training both in technological implementations and

  19. Noninvasive tomographic and velocimetric monitoring of multiphase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouki, J.; Dudukovic, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    A condensed review of recent advances accomplished in the development and the applications of noninvasive tomographic and velocimetric measurement techniques to multiphase flows and systems is presented. In recent years utilization of such noninvasive techniques has become widespread in many engineering disciplines that deal with systems involving two immiscible phases or more. Tomography provides concentration, holdup, or 2D or 3D density distribution of at least one component of the multiphase system, whereas velocimetry provides the dynamic features of the phase of interest such as the flow pattern, the velocity field, the 2D or 3D instantaneous movements, etc. The following review is divided into two parts. The first part summarizes progress and developments in flow imaging techniques using γ-ray and X-ray transmission tomography; X-ray radiography; neutron transmission tomography and radiography; positron emission tomography; X-ray diffraction tomography; nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; electrical capacitance tomography; optical tomography; microwave tomography; and ultrasonic tomography. The second part of the review summarizes progress and developments in the following velocimetry techniques: positron emission particle tracking; radioactive particle tracking; cinematography; laser-Doppler anemometry; particle image velocimetry; and fluorescence particle image velocimetry. The basic principles of tomography and velocimetry techniques are outlined, along with advantages and limitations inherent to each technique. The hydrodynamic and structural information yielded by these techniques is illustrated through a literature survey on their successful applications to the study of multiphase systems in such fields as particulate solids processes, fluidization engineering, porous media, pipe flows, transport within packed beds and sparged reactors, etc

  20. Multimodal nonlinear microscopy: A powerful label-free method for supporting standard diagnostics on biological tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Cicchi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The large use of nonlinear laser scanning microscopy in the past decade paved the way for potential clinical application of this imaging technique. Modern nonlinear microscopy techniques offer promising label-free solutions to improve diagnostic performances on tissues. In particular, the combination of multiple nonlinear imaging techniques in the same microscope allows integrating morphological with functional information in a morpho-functional scheme. Such approach provides a high-resolution label-free alternative to both histological and immunohistochemical examination of tissues and is becoming increasingly popular among the clinical community. Nevertheless, several technical improvements, including automatic scanning and image analysis, are required before the technique represents a standard diagnostic method. In this review paper, we highlight the capabilities of multimodal nonlinear microscopy for tissue imaging, by providing various examples on colon, arterial and skin tissues. The comparison between images acquired using multimodal nonlinear microscopy and histology shows a good agreement between the two methods. The results demonstrate that multimodal nonlinear microscopy is a powerful label-free alternative to standard histopathological methods and has the potential to find a stable place in the clinical setting in the near future.

  1. NaGdF4:Nd3+/Yb3+ Nanoparticles as Multimodal Imaging Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza, Francisco; Rightsell, Chris; Kumar, Ga; Giuliani, Jason; Monton, Car; Sardar, Dhiraj

    Medical imaging is a fundamental tool used for the diagnosis of numerous ailments. Each imaging modality has unique advantages; however, they possess intrinsic limitations. Some of which include low spatial resolution, sensitivity, penetration depth, and radiation damage. To circumvent this problem, the combination of imaging modalities, or multimodal imaging, has been proposed, such as Near Infrared Fluorescence imaging (NIRF) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Combining individual advantages, specificity and selectivity of NIRF with the deep penetration and high spatial resolution of MRI, it is possible to circumvent their shortcomings for a more robust imaging technique. In addition, both imaging modalities are very safe and minimally invasive. Fluorescent nanoparticles, such as NaGdF4:Nd3 +/Yb3 +, are excellent candidates for NIRF/MRI multimodal imaging. The dopants, Nd and Yb, absorb and emit within the biological window; where near infrared light is less attenuated by soft tissue. This results in less tissue damage and deeper tissue penetration making it a viable candidate in biological imaging. In addition, the inclusion of Gd results in paramagnetic properties, allowing their use as contrast agents in multimodal imaging. The work presented will include crystallographic results, as well as full optical and magnetic characterization to determine the nanoparticle's viability in multimodal imaging.

  2. Acute Parotitis as a Complication of Noninvasive Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaya, S; Mofredj, Ali; Tassaioust, K; Bahloul, H; Mrabet, A

    2016-09-01

    Several conditions, including oropharyngeal dryness, pressure sores, ocular irritation, epistaxis, or gastric distension, have been described during noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Although this technique has been widely used in intensive care units and emergency wards, acute swelling of the parotid gland remains a scarcely reported complication. We describe herein the case of an 82-year-old man who developed unilateral parotitis during prolonged NIV for acute heart failure. Intravenous antibiotics, corticosteroids, and adjusting the mask laces' position allowed rapid resolution of clinical symptoms. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish Reddy Gooty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants.

  4. Noninvasive measurement of lung carbon-11-serotonin extraction in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coates, G.; Firnau, G.; Meyer, G.J.; Gratz, K.F.

    1991-01-01

    The fraction of serotonin extracted on a single passage through the lungs is being used as an early indicator of lung endothelial damage but the existing techniques require multiple arterial blood samples. We have developed a noninvasive technique to measure lung serotonin uptake in man. We utilized the double indicator diffusion principle, a positron camera, 11 C-serotonin as the substrate, and 11 CO-erythrocytes as the vascular marker. From regions of interest around each lung, we recorded time-activity curves in 0.5-sec frames for 30 sec after a bolus injection of first the vascular marker 11 CO-erythrocytes and 10 min later 11 C-serotonin. A second uptake measurement was made after imipramine 25-35 mg was infused intravenously. In three normal volunteers, the single-pass uptake of 11 C-serotonin was 63.9% +/- 3.6%. This decreased in all subjects to a mean of 53.6% +/- 1.4% after imipramine. The rate of lung washout of 11 C was also significantly prolonged after imipramine. This noninvasive technique can be used to measure lung serotonin uptake to detect early changes in a variety of conditions that alter the integrity of the pulmonary endothelium

  5. Non-invasive Player Experience Estimation from Body Motion and Game Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burelli, Paolo; Triantafyllidis, George; Patras, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate on the relationship between player experience and body movements in a non-physical 3D computer game. During an experiment, the participants played a series of short game sessions and rated their experience while their body movements were tracked using a depth camera....... The data collected was analysed and a neural network was trained to find the mapping between player body movements, player in- game behaviour and player experience. The results reveal that some aspects of player experience, such as anxiety or challenge, can be detected with high accuracy (up to 81......%). Moreover, taking into account the playing context, the accuracy can be raised up to 86%. Following such a multi-modal approach, it is possible to estimate the player experience in a non-invasive fashion during the game and, based on this information, the game content could be adapted accordingly....

  6. Noninvasive measurement of blood flow and extraction fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, A.M.; Gunasekera, R.D.; Henderson, B.L.; Brown, J.; Lavender, J.P.; De Souza, M.; Ash, J.M.; Gilday, D.L.

    1987-10-01

    We describe the theory of a technique for the noninvasive measurement of organ blood flow which is based on the principle of fractionation of cardiac output and is applicable with any recirculating gamma emitting tracer. The technique effectively determines the count rate that would be recorded over the organ if the tracer behaved like radiolabelled microspheres and was completely trapped in the organ's vascular bed on first pass. After correction for organ depth, the estimated first pass activity plateau, expressed as a fraction of the injected dose is equal to the organ's fraction of the cardiac output (CO). By extending the theory, organ extraction fraction of extractable tracers or mean transit time of nonextractable tracers can be measured. The technique was applied to the measurement of renal blood flow in the native and transplanted kidney, splenic blood flow, the extraction fraction of DTPA by the kidney and of sulphur colloid by the spleen.

  7. Noninvasive measurement of blood flow and extraction fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, A.M.; Gunasekera, R.D.; Henderson, B.L.; Brown, J.; Lavender, J.P.; De Souza, M.; Ash, J.M.; Gilday, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    We describe the theory of a technique for the noninvasive measurement of organ blood flow which is based on the principle of fractionation of cardiac output and is applicable with any recirculating gamma emitting tracer. The technique effectively determines the count rate that would be recorded over the organ if the tracer behaved like radiolabelled microspheres and was completely trapped in the organ's vascular bed on first pass. After correction for organ depth, the estimated first pass activity plateau, expressed as a fraction of the injected dose is equal to the organ's fraction of the cardiac output (CO). By extending the theory, organ extraction fraction of extractable tracers or mean transit time of nonextractable tracers can be measured. The technique was applied to the measurement of renal blood flow in the native and transplanted kidney, splenic blood flow, the extraction fraction of DTPA by the kidney and of sulphur colloid by the spleen. (author)

  8. Semiautomated Multimodal Breast Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Curtis

    2012-01-01

    However, due to the highly deformable nature of breast tissues, comparison of 3D and 2D modalities is a challenge. To enable this comparison, a registration technique was developed to map features from 2D mammograms to locations in the 3D image space. This technique was developed and tested using magnetic resonance (MR images as a reference 3D modality, as MR breast imaging is an established technique in clinical practice. The algorithm was validated using a numerical phantom then successfully tested on twenty-four image pairs. Dice's coefficient was used to measure the external goodness of fit, resulting in an excellent overall average of 0.94. Internal agreement was evaluated by examining internal features in consultation with a radiologist, and subjective assessment concludes that reasonable alignment was achieved.

  9. Multimodality cardiac imaging of a ventricular septal rupture post myocardial infarction: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaliwal Surinder

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ventricular septal rupture (VSR, a mechanical complication following an acute myocardial infarction (MI, is thought to result from coagulation necrosis due to lack of collateral reperfusion. Although the gold standard test to confirm left-to-right shunting between ventricular cavities remains invasive ventriculography, two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography (TTE with color flow Doppler and cardiac MRI (CMR are reliable tests for the non-invasive diagnosis of VSR. Case presentation A 62-year-old Caucasian female presented with a late case of a VSR post inferior MI diagnosed by multimodality cardiac imaging including TTE, CMR and ventriculography. Conclusion We review the presentation, diagnosis and management of VSR post MI.

  10. Polarization-Sensitive Hyperspectral Imaging in vivo: A Multimode Dermoscope for Skin Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasefi, Fartash; MacKinnon, Nicholas; Saager, Rolf B.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Chave, Robert; Lindsley, Erik H.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2014-05-01

    Attempts to understand the changes in the structure and physiology of human skin abnormalities by non-invasive optical imaging are aided by spectroscopic methods that quantify, at the molecular level, variations in tissue oxygenation and melanin distribution. However, current commercial and research systems to map hemoglobin and melanin do not correlate well with pathology for pigmented lesions or darker skin. We developed a multimode dermoscope that combines polarization and hyperspectral imaging with an efficient analytical model to map the distribution of specific skin bio-molecules. This corrects for the melanin-hemoglobin misestimation common to other systems, without resorting to complex and computationally intensive tissue optical models. For this system's proof of concept, human skin measurements on melanocytic nevus, vitiligo, and venous occlusion conditions were performed in volunteers. The resulting molecular distribution maps matched physiological and anatomical expectations, confirming a technologic approach that can be applied to next generation dermoscopes and having biological plausibility that is likely to appeal to dermatologists.

  11. Multimodal approach to identifying malingered posttraumatic stress disorder: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shahid; Jabeen, Shagufta; Alam, Farzana

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this article is to aid clinicians in differentiating true posttraumatic stress disorder from malingered posttraumatic stress disorder. Posttraumatic stress disorder and malingering are defined, and prevalence rates are explored. Similarities and differences in diagnostic criteria between the fourth and fifth editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders are described for posttraumatic stress disorder. Possible motivations for malingering posttraumatic stress disorder are discussed, and common characteristics of malingered posttraumatic stress disorder are described. A multimodal approach is described for evaluating posttraumatic stress disorder, including interview techniques, collection of collateral data, and psychometric and physiologic testing, that should allow clinicians to distinguish between those patients who are truly suffering from posttraumatic disorder and those who are malingering the illness.

  12. Single-mode operation of a coiled multimode fiber amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Goldberg, Lew

    2000-01-01

    We report a new approach to obtaining single-transverse-mode operation of a multimode fiber amplifier in which the gain fiber is coiled to induce significant bend loss for all but the lowest-order mode. We demonstrated this method by constructing a coiled amplifier using Yb-doped, double-clad fiber with a core diameter of 25 μm and a numerical aperture of ∼0.1 (V≅7.4) . When the amplifier was operated as an amplified-spontaneous-emission source, the output beam had an M 2 value of 1.09±0.09 ; when seeded at 1064 nm, the slope efficiency was similar to that of an uncoiled amplifier. This technique will permit scaling of pulsed fiber lasers and amplifiers to significantly higher pulse energies and peak powers and cw fiber sources to higher average powers while maintaining excellent beam quality. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America

  13. A multimodal support group with Hispanic traumatic brain injury survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengol, C G

    1999-06-01

    (a) To design and pilot a culturally sensitive and neuropsychologically informed support group addressing barriers to emotional, social, and vocational adjustment among high-level functioning Hispanic/Latino TBI survivors. (b) To determine efficacy through outcome measures. Ten-week multimodal, culturally sensitive support group focusing on TBI sequelae education, relaxation techniques, coping skills development, behavioral goal setting and monitoring, and family participation. Six Spanish-speaking high-level functioning TBI survivors aged 20-42. Outpatient neuropsychological assessment and treatment center. Beck Hopelessness Scale; Purpose in Life Test; Perceived Self-Regulatory Ability Inventory. Participants' sense of personal destiny and feelings of hopelessness improved, as evidenced by objective measures and self-report. A telephone interview a year later indicated that gains had been maintained, and most participants were vocationally active. Results underscore the importance of considering linguistic and ethnic factors in developing support groups.

  14. Echocardiography in the Era of Multimodality Cardiovascular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Benoy Nalin

    2013-01-01

    Echocardiography remains the most frequently performed cardiac imaging investigation and is an invaluable tool for detailed and accurate evaluation of cardiac structure and function. Echocardiography, nuclear cardiology, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and cardiovascular-computed tomography comprise the subspeciality of cardiovascular imaging, and these techniques are often used together for a multimodality, comprehensive assessment of a number of cardiac diseases. This paper provides the general cardiologist and physician with an overview of state-of-the-art modern echocardiography, summarising established indications as well as highlighting advances in stress echocardiography, three-dimensional echocardiography, deformation imaging, and contrast echocardiography. Strengths and limitations of echocardiography are discussed as well as the growing role of real-time three-dimensional echocardiography in the guidance of structural heart interventions in the cardiac catheter laboratory. PMID:23878804

  15. Oxygen measurement by multimode diode lasers employing gas correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiutao; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2009-02-10

    Multimode diode laser (MDL)-based correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was used to measure oxygen in ambient air, thereby employing a diode laser (DL) having an emission spectrum that overlaps the oxygen absorption lines of the A band. A sensitivity of 700 ppm m was achieved with good accuracy (2%) and linearity (R(2)=0.999). For comparison, measurements of ambient oxygen were also performed by tunable DL absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technique employing a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. We demonstrate that, despite slightly degraded sensitivity, the MDL-based COSPEC-based oxygen sensor has the advantages of high stability, low cost, ease-of-use, and relaxed requirements in component selection and instrument buildup compared with the TDLAS-based instrument.

  16. Fourier domain asymmetric cryptosystem for privacy protected multimodal biometric security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Debesh

    2016-04-01

    We propose a Fourier domain asymmetric cryptosystem for multimodal biometric security. One modality of biometrics (such as face) is used as the plaintext, which is encrypted by another modality of biometrics (such as fingerprint). A private key is synthesized from the encrypted biometric signature by complex spatial Fourier processing. The encrypted biometric signature is further encrypted by other biometric modalities, and the corresponding private keys are synthesized. The resulting biometric signature is privacy protected since the encryption keys are provided by the human, and hence those are private keys. Moreover, the decryption keys are synthesized using those private encryption keys. The encrypted signatures are decrypted using the synthesized private keys and inverse complex spatial Fourier processing. Computer simulations demonstrate the feasibility of the technique proposed.

  17. The use of non-invasive fetal electrocardiography in diagnosing second-degree fetal atrioventricular block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhno, Igor; Behar, Joachim A; Oster, Julien; Shulgin, Vyacheslav; Ostras, Oleksii; Andreotti, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Complete atrioventricular block in fetuses is known to be mostly associated with autoimmune disease and can be irreversible if no steroids treatment is provided. Conventional methods used in clinical practice for diagnosing fetal arrhythmia are limited since they do not reflect the primary electrophysiological conduction processes that take place in the myocardium. The non-invasive fetal electrocardiogram has the potential to better support fetal arrhythmias diagnosis through the continuous analysis of the beat to beat variation of the fetal heart rate and morphological analysis of the PQRST complex. We present two retrospective case reports on which atrioventricular block diagnosis could have been supported by the non-invasive fetal electrocardiogram. The two cases comprised a 22-year-old pregnant woman with the gestational age of 31 weeks and a 25-year-old pregnant woman with the gestational age of 41 weeks. Both women were admitted to the Department of Maternal and Fetal Medicine at the Kyiv and Kharkiv municipal perinatal clinics. Patients were observed using standard fetal monitoring methods as well as the non-invasive fetal electrocardiogram. The non-invasive fetal electrocardiographic recordings were analyzed retrospectively, where it is possible to identify the presence of the atrioventricular block. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the feasibility of the non-invasive fetal electrocardiogram as a supplementary method to diagnose of the fetal atrioventricular block. Combined with current fetal monitoring techniques, non-invasive fetal electrocardiography could support clinical decisions.

  18. Non-invasive monitoring of chewing and swallowing for objective quantification of ingestive behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazonov, Edward; Schuckers, Stephanie; Lopez-Meyer, Paulo; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Sazonova, Nadezhda; Melanson, Edward L; Neuman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A methodology of studying of ingestive behavior by non-invasive monitoring of swallowing (deglutition) and chewing (mastication) has been developed. The target application for the developed methodology is to study the behavioral patterns of food consumption and producing volumetric and weight estimates of energy intake. Monitoring is non-invasive based on detecting swallowing by a sound sensor located over laryngopharynx or by a bone-conduction microphone and detecting chewing through a below-the-ear strain sensor. Proposed sensors may be implemented in a wearable monitoring device, thus enabling monitoring of ingestive behavior in free-living individuals. In this paper, the goals in the development of this methodology are two-fold. First, a system comprising sensors, related hardware and software for multi-modal data capture is designed for data collection in a controlled environment. Second, a protocol is developed for manual scoring of chewing and swallowing for use as a gold standard. The multi-modal data capture was tested by measuring chewing and swallowing in 21 volunteers during periods of food intake and quiet sitting (no food intake). Video footage and sensor signals were manually scored by trained raters. Inter-rater reliability study for three raters conducted on the sample set of five subjects resulted in high average intra-class correlation coefficients of 0.996 for bites, 0.988 for chews and 0.98 for swallows. The collected sensor signals and the resulting manual scores will be used in future research as a gold standard for further assessment of sensor design, development of automatic pattern recognition routines and study of the relationship between swallowing/chewing and ingestive behavior

  19. Non-invasive monitoring of chewing and swallowing for objective quantification of ingestive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, Edward; Schuckers, Stephanie; Lopez-Meyer, Paulo; Makeyev, Oleksandr; Sazonova, Nadezhda; Melanson, Edward L; Neuman, Michael

    2008-05-01

    A methodology of studying of ingestive behavior by non-invasive monitoring of swallowing (deglutition) and chewing (mastication) has been developed. The target application for the developed methodology is to study the behavioral patterns of food consumption and producing volumetric and weight estimates of energy intake. Monitoring is non-invasive based on detecting swallowing by a sound sensor located over laryngopharynx or by a bone-conduction microphone and detecting chewing through a below-the-ear strain sensor. Proposed sensors may be implemented in a wearable monitoring device, thus enabling monitoring of ingestive behavior in free-living individuals. In this paper, the goals in the development of this methodology are two-fold. First, a system comprising sensors, related hardware and software for multi-modal data capture is designed for data collection in a controlled environment. Second, a protocol is developed for manual scoring of chewing and swallowing for use as a gold standard. The multi-modal data capture was tested by measuring chewing and swallowing in 21 volunteers during periods of food intake and quiet sitting (no food intake). Video footage and sensor signals were manually scored by trained raters. Inter-rater reliability study for three raters conducted on the sample set of five subjects resulted in high average intra-class correlation coefficients of 0.996 for bites, 0.988 for chews and 0.98 for swallows. The collected sensor signals and the resulting manual scores will be used in future research as a gold standard for further assessment of sensor design, development of automatic pattern recognition routines and study of the relationship between swallowing/chewing and ingestive behavior.

  20. Non-invasive dendrochronology of late-medieval objects in Oslo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daly, Aoife; Streeton, Noëlle L.W.

    2017-01-01

    scanner. For these reasons, a combined approach was adopted, utilizing CT scanning where possible, but preceded by an ‘exposed-wood’ imaging technique. Both non-invasive techniques have yielded reliable results, and CT scanning has confirmed the reliability of the imaging technique alone. This paper...... presents the analytical methods, along with results from two of the 13 objects under investigation. Results for reliable dates and provenances provide new foundations for historical interpretations....

  1. Aspergillus infection monitored by multimodal imaging in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhacek, Tomas; Petrik, Milos; Luptakova, Dominika; Benada, Oldrich; Palyzova, Andrea; Lemr, Karel; Havlicek, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    Although myriads of experimental approaches have been published in the field of fungal infection diagnostics, interestingly, in 21st century there is no satisfactory early noninvasive tool for Aspergillus diagnostics with good sensitivity and specificity. In this work, we for the first time described the fungal burden in rat lungs by multimodal imaging approach. The Aspergillus infection was monitored by positron emission tomography and light microscopy employing modified Grocott's methenamine silver staining and eosin counterstaining. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry imaging has revealed a dramatic iron increase in fungi-affected areas, which can be presumably attributed to microbial siderophores. Quantitative elemental data were inferred from matrix-matched standards prepared from rat lungs. The iron, silver, and gold MS images collected with variable laser foci revealed that particularly silver or gold can be used as excellent elements useful for sensitively tracking the Aspergillus infection. The limit of detection was determined for both (107) Ag and (197) Au as 0.03 μg/g (5 μm laser focus). The selective incorporation of (107) Ag and (197) Au into fungal cell bodies and low background noise from both elements were confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray scattering utilizing the submicron lateral resolving power of scanning electron microscopy. The low limits of detection and quantitation of both gold and silver make ICP-MS imaging monitoring a viable alternative to standard optical evaluation used in current clinical settings. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Regional cerebral blood flow measurements using noninvasive 133Xe clearance method in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Maeda, Koji; Kagawa, Yukihide; Morozumi, Kunihiko; Hashimoto, Manami; Tsubokawa, Takashi.

    1985-01-01

    The noninvasive 133-Xe clearance method of estimating rCBF has been widely used in adult clinical studies. It is safe, noninvasive and reproducible, and has provided valuable insight into adult cerebrovascular pathophysiology. However, in children, this technique has not been used to measure rCBF for some fundamental problems. This study was performed to clarify these fundamental problems for applications of noninvasive 133-Xe clearance technique to children. The results showed that three fundamental problems concerning; (1) volume of dead spaces in airway circuits of the system, (2) increasing of look-through phenomenon and (3) correction methods for recirculated 133-Xe and airway artifacts to estimate rCBF are important for applications to children. These problems should be improved to measure as correct rCBF in children as in adults. (author)

  3. A Multimodal Dialog System for Language Assessment: Current State and Future Directions. Research Report. ETS RR-17-21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suendermann-Oeft, David; Ramanarayanan, Vikram; Yu, Zhou; Qian, Yao; Evanini, Keelan; Lange, Patrick; Wang, Xinhao; Zechner, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    We present work in progress on a multimodal dialog system for English language assessment using a modular cloud-based architecture adhering to open industry standards. Among the modules being developed for the system, multiple modules heavily exploit machine learning techniques, including speech recognition, spoken language proficiency rating,…

  4. A Pretargeted Approach for the Multimodal PET/NIRF Imaging of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adumeau, Pierre; Carnazza, Kathryn E; Brand, Christian; Carlin, Sean D; Reiner, Thomas; Agnew, Brian J; Lewis, Jason S; Zeglis, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    The complementary nature of positron emission tomography (PET) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging makes the development of strategies for the multimodal PET/NIRF imaging of cancer a very enticing prospect. Indeed, in the context of colorectal cancer, a single multimodal PET/NIRF imaging agent could be used to stage the disease, identify candidates for surgical intervention, and facilitate the image-guided resection of the disease. While antibodies have proven to be highly effective vectors for the delivery of radioisotopes and fluorophores to malignant tissues, the use of radioimmunoconjugates labeled with long-lived nuclides such as 89 Zr poses two important clinical complications: high radiation doses to the patient and the need for significant lag time between imaging and surgery. In vivo pretargeting strategies that decouple the targeting vector from the radioactivity at the time of injection have the potential to circumvent these issues by facilitating the use of positron-emitting radioisotopes with far shorter half-lives. Here, we report the synthesis, characterization, and in vivo validation of a pretargeted strategy for the multimodal PET and NIRF imaging of colorectal carcinoma. This approach is based on the rapid and bioorthogonal ligation between a trans -cyclooctene- and fluorophore-bearing immunoconjugate of the huA33 antibody (huA33-Dye800-TCO) and a 64 Cu-labeled tetrazine radioligand ( 64 Cu-Tz-SarAr). In vivo imaging experiments in mice bearing A33 antigen-expressing SW1222 colorectal cancer xenografts clearly demonstrate that this approach enables the non-invasive visualization of tumors and the image-guided resection of malignant tissue, all at only a fraction of the radiation dose created by a directly labeled radioimmunoconjugate. Additional in vivo experiments in peritoneal and patient-derived xenograft models of colorectal carcinoma reinforce the efficacy of this methodology and underscore its potential as an innovative and useful

  5. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Scheepbouwer

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics.

  6. Noninvasive prenatal testing: the future is now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwitz, Errol R; Levy, Brynn

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal detection of chromosome abnormalities has been offered for more than 40 years, first by amniocentesis in the early 1970s and additionally by chorionic villus sampling (CVS) in the early 1980s. Given the well-recognized association between increasing maternal age and trisomy,1-3 the primary utilization of prenatal testing has been by older mothers. This has drastically reduced the incidence of aneuploid children born to older mothers.4 Although younger women have relatively low risks of conceiving a child with aneuploidy, the majority of pregnant women are in their late teens, 20s, and early 30s. As such, most viable aneuploid babies are born to these younger mothers.5 Invasive prenatal diagnosis (CVS and amniocentesis) is not a feasible option for all low-risk mothers, as these procedures carry a small but finite risk and would ultimately cause more miscarriages than they would detect aneuploidy. For this reason, a number of noninvasive tests have been developed-including first-trimester risk assessment at 11 to 14 weeks, maternal serum analyte (quad) screening at 15 to 20 weeks, and sonographic fetal structural survey at 18 to 22 weeks-all of which are designed to give a woman an adjusted (more accurate) estimate of having an aneuploid fetus using as baseline her a priori age-related risk. Ultrasound and maternal serum analysis are considered screening procedures and both require follow up by CVS or amniocentesis in screen-positive cases for a definitive diagnosis of a chromosome abnormality in the fetus. The ability to isolate fetal cells and fetal DNA from maternal blood during pregnancy has opened up exciting opportunities for improved noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). Direct analysis of fetal cells from maternal circulation has been challenging given the scarcity of fetal cells in maternal blood (1:10,000-1:1,000,000) and the focus has shifted to the analysis of cell-free fetal DNA, which is found at a concentration almost 25 times higher than that

  7. Multimodal mechanisms of food creaminess sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianshe; Eaton, Louise

    2012-12-01

    In this work, the sensory creaminess of a set of four viscosity-matched fluid foods (single cream, evaporated milk, corn starch solution, and corn starch solution containing long chain free fatty acids) was tested by a panel of 16 assessors via controlled sensation mechanisms of smell only, taste only, taste and tactile, and integrated multimodal. It was found that all sensation channels were able to discriminate between creamy and non-creamy foods, but only the multimodal method gave creaminess ratings in agreement with the samples' fat content. Results from this study show that the presence of long chain free fatty acids has no influence on creaminess perception. It is certain that food creaminess is not a primary sensory property but an integrated sensory perception (or sensory experience) derived from combined sensations of visual, olfactory, gustatory, and tactile cues. Creamy colour, milky flavour, and smooth texture are probably the most important sensory features of food creaminess.

  8. Multimodal location estimation of videos and images

    CERN Document Server

    Friedland, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the field of multimodal location estimation, i.e. using acoustic, visual, and/or textual cues to estimate the shown location of a video recording. The authors' sample research results in this field in a unified way integrating research work on this topic that focuses on different modalities, viewpoints, and applications. The book describes fundamental methods of acoustic, visual, textual, social graph, and metadata processing as well as multimodal integration methods used for location estimation. In addition, the text covers benchmark metrics and explores the limits of the technology based on a human baseline. ·         Discusses localization of multimedia data; ·         Examines fundamental methods of establishing location metadata for images and videos (other than GPS tagging); ·         Covers Data-Driven as well as Semantic Location Estimation.

  9. Multimodal interaction in image and video applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sappa, Angel D

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Pattern Recognition (PR) and Computer Vision (CV) technologies have mainly focused on full automation, even though full automation often proves elusive or unnatural in many applications, where the technology is expected to assist rather than replace the human agents. However, not all the problems can be automatically solved being the human interaction the only way to tackle those applications. Recently, multimodal human interaction has become an important field of increasing interest in the research community. Advanced man-machine interfaces with high cognitive capabilities are a hot research topic that aims at solving challenging problems in image and video applications. Actually, the idea of computer interactive systems was already proposed on the early stages of computer science. Nowadays, the ubiquity of image sensors together with the ever-increasing computing performance has open new and challenging opportunities for research in multimodal human interaction. This book aims to show how existi...

  10. Semiconductor laser using multimode interference principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zisu; Yin, Rui; Ji, Wei; Wu, Chonghao

    2018-01-01

    Multimode interference (MMI) structure is introduced in semiconductor laser used in optical communication system to realize higher power and better temperature tolerance. Using beam propagation method (BPM), Multimode interference laser diode (MMI-LD) is designed and fabricated in InGaAsP/InP based material. As a comparison, conventional semiconductor laser using straight single-mode waveguide is also fabricated in the same wafer. With a low injection current (about 230 mA), the output power of the implemented MMI-LD is up to 2.296 mW which is about four times higher than the output power of the conventional semiconductor laser. The implemented MMI-LD exhibits stable output operating at the wavelength of 1.52 μm and better temperature tolerance when the temperature varies from 283.15 K to 293.15 K.

  11. Multimodality therapy of local regional esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, David P

    2005-12-01

    Recent trials regarding the use of multimodality therapy for patients with cancers of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction have not conclusively shown benefit. Regimens containing cisplatin and fluorouracil administered preoperatively appear to be tolerable and do not increase operative morbidity or mortality when compared with surgery alone. Yet clinical trials have not clearly shown that such regimens improve outcome as measured by survival. Likewise, trials of postoperative chemoradiation have not reported a significant improvement in median or overall survival. The reasons for the lack of clinical benefit from multimodality therapy are not completely understood, but improvements in systemic therapy will probably be necessary before disease-free or overall survival improves substantially. Some new single agents such as the taxanes (docetaxel or paclitaxel) and the camptothecan analog irinotecan have shown modest activity for palliative therapy.

  12. Pattern recognition of neurotransmitters using multimode sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Moldoveanu, Iuliana; van Staden, Jacobus Frederick

    2014-05-30

    Pattern recognition is essential in chemical analysis of biological fluids. Reliable and sensitive methods for neurotransmitters analysis are needed. Therefore, we developed for pattern recognition of neurotransmitters: dopamine, epinephrine, norepinephrine a method based on multimode sensing. Multimode sensing was performed using microsensors based on diamond paste modified with 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrine, hemin and protoporphyrin IX in stochastic and differential pulse voltammetry modes. Optimized working conditions: phosphate buffer solution of pH 3.01 and KCl 0.1mol/L (as electrolyte support), were determined using cyclic voltammetry and used in all measurements. The lowest limits of quantification were: 10(-10)mol/L for dopamine and epinephrine, and 10(-11)mol/L for norepinephrine. The multimode microsensors were selective over ascorbic and uric acids and the method facilitated reliable assay of neurotransmitters in urine samples, and therefore, the pattern recognition showed high reliability (RSDneurotransmitters on biological fluids at a lower determination level than chromatographic methods. The sampling of the biological fluids referees only to the buffering (1:1, v/v) with a phosphate buffer pH 3.01, while for chromatographic methods the sampling is laborious. Accordingly with the statistic evaluation of the results at 99.00% confidence level, both modes can be used for pattern recognition and quantification of neurotransmitters with high reliability. The best multimode microsensor was the one based on diamond paste modified with protoporphyrin IX. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The multimodal treatment of eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    HALMI, KATHERINE A.

    2005-01-01

    The treatment of eating disorders is based on a multimodal model, recognizing that these disorders do not have a single cause or a predictable course. The treatment strategy is determined by the severity of illness and the specific eating disorder diagnosis. For the treatment of anorexia nervosa, the key elements are medical management, behavioral therapy, cognitive therapy and family therapy, while pharmacotherapy is at best an adjunct to other therapies. In bulimia nervosa...

  14. A Multimodal Robot Game for Seniors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren Tranberg; Krogsager, Anders; Fredslund, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the initial findings of a multimodal game which has been implemented on a humanoid robot platform and tested with seniors suffering from dementia. Physical and cognitive activities can improve the overall wellbeing of seniors, but it is often difficult to motivate seniors...... feedback and includes animated gestures and sounds. The game has been tested in a nursing home with four seniors suffering from moderate to severe dementia....

  15. Speech Perception as a Multimodal Phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenblum, Lawrence D.

    2008-01-01

    Speech perception is inherently multimodal. Visual speech (lip-reading) information is used by all perceivers and readily integrates with auditory speech. Imaging research suggests that the brain treats auditory and visual speech similarly. These findings have led some researchers to consider that speech perception works by extracting amodal information that takes the same form across modalities. From this perspective, speech integration is a property of the input information itself. Amodal s...

  16. Learning new skills in Multimodal Enactive Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardy Benoît G.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A European consortium of researchers in movement and cognitive sciences, robotics, and interaction design developed multimodal technologies to accelerate and transfer the (relearning of complex skills from virtual to real environments. The decomposition of skill into functional elements — the subskills — and the enactment of informational variables used as accelerators are here described. One illustration of accelerator using virtual reality in team rowing is described.

  17. Frequency tripling with multimode-lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, H.; Roehr, H.; Wrobel, W.G.

    1978-10-01

    The presence of different modes with random phases in a laser beam leads to fluctuations in nonlinear optical interactions. This paper describes the influence of the linewidth of a dye laser on the generation of intensive Lyman-alpha radiation by frequency tripling. Using this Lyman-alpha source for resonance scattering on strongly doppler-broadened lines in fusion plasmas the detection limit of neutral hydrogen is nearly two orders higher with the multimode than the singlemode dye laser. (orig.) [de

  18. Digital Storytelling and Multimodal Literacy in Education

    OpenAIRE

    Gregori-Signes, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    This article argues in favour of using digital storytelling to encourage a critical socio-educational focus in education and include multimodal explicit teaching in the curriculum.The analysis of fifty digital stories indicates that the students developed a certain awareness of the issue chosen for their story (e.g. violence, racism, war) since the final product transmits a critical perspective on the topic itself. Further work, however, needs to be invested in the development of the digital ...

  19. 40Gbit/s MDM-WDM Laguerre-Gaussian Mode with Equalization for Multimode Fiber in Access Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazea, Yousef; Amphawan, Angela

    2018-04-01

    Modal dispersion is seen as the primary impairment for multimode fiber. Mode division multiplexing (MDM) is a promising technology that has been realized as a favorable technology for considerably upsurges the capacity and distance of multimode fiber in conjunction with Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) for fiber-to-the-home. This paper reveals the importance of an equalization technique in conjunction with controlling the modes spacing of mode division multiplexing-wavelength division multiplexing of Laguerre-Gaussian modes to alleviate modal dispersion for multimode fiber. The effects of channel spacing of 20 channels MDM-WDM were examined through controlling the azimuthal mode number and the radial mode number of Laguerre-Gaussian modes. A data rate of 40Gbit/s was achieved for a distance of 1,500 m for MDM-WDM.

  20. Noninvasive imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma: From diagnosis to prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Han-Yu; Chen, Jie; Xia, Chun-Chao; Cao, Li-Kun; Duan, Ting; Song, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary liver cancer and a major public health problem worldwide. Hepatocarcinogenesis is a complex multistep process at molecular, cellular, and histologic levels with key alterations that can be revealed by noninvasive imaging modalities. Therefore, imaging techniques play pivotal roles in the detection, characterization, staging, surveillance, and prognosis evaluation of HCC. Currently, ultrasound is the first-line imaging modality for screening and surveillance purposes. While based on conclusive enhancement patterns comprising arterial phase hyperenhancement and portal venous and/or delayed phase wash-out, contrast enhanced dynamic computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the diagnostic tools for HCC without requirements for histopathologic confirmation. Functional MRI techniques, including diffusion-weighted imaging, MRI with hepatobiliary contrast agents, perfusion imaging, and magnetic resonance elastography, show promise in providing further important information regarding tumor biological behaviors. In addition, evaluation of tumor imaging characteristics, including nodule size, margin, number, vascular invasion, and growth patterns, allows preoperative prediction of tumor microvascular invasion and patient prognosis. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the current state-of-the-art and recent advances in the comprehensive noninvasive imaging evaluation of HCC. We also provide the basic key concepts of HCC development and an overview of the current practice guidelines. PMID:29904242

  1. Non-invasive assessment of the liver using imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorling Thompson, Camilla; Wang, Haolu; Liu, Xin; Liang, Xiaowen; Crawford, Darrell H.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-12-01

    Chronic liver disease causes 2,000 deaths in Australia per year and early diagnosis is crucial to avoid progression to cirrhosis and end stage liver disease. There is no ideal method to evaluate liver function. Blood tests and liver biopsies provide spot examinations and are unable to track changes in function quickly. Therefore better techniques are needed. Non-invasive imaging has the potential to extract increased information over a large sampling area, continuously tracking dynamic changes in liver function. This project aimed to study the ability of three imaging techniques, multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, infrared thermography and photoacoustic imaging, in measuring liver function. Collagen deposition was obvious in multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging in fibrosis and cirrhosis and comparable to conventional histology. Infrared thermography revealed a significantly increased liver temperature in hepatocellular carcinoma. In addition, multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging and photoacoustic imaging could both track uptake and excretion of indocyanine green in rat liver. These results prove that non-invasive imaging can extract crucial information about the liver continuously over time and has the potential to be translated into clinic in the assessment of liver disease.

  2. Multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Kanji; Iida, Atsushi; Fujita, Takashi; Kobayashi, Taizo; Shinmoto, Syuichi; Hirose, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Akio; Yoshida, Masanori

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve in prognosis and quality of life (QOL), the multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancers were performed. Bypass surgery was carried out for unresectable pancreatic cancer with intraoperative irradiation (IOR). After surgery, patients were treated with the combination of CDDP (25 mg) and MMC (4 mg) administration, intravenously continuous injection of 5-FU (250 mg for 24 hours), external radiation by the high voltage X-ray (1.5 Gy per irradiation, 4 times a week, and during hyperthermia 3 Gy per irradiation) and hyperthermia using the Thermotron RF-8 warmer. Six out of 13 patients received hyperthermia at over 40degC, were obtained PR, and their survival periods were 22, 21, 19, 18, 11 and 8 months and they could return to work. For all patients with pain, the symptom was abolished or reduced. The survival periods in cases of the multimodal treatment were longer than those of only bypass-surgery or of the resective cases with the curability C. The multimodal treatment combined with radiation, hyperthermia and surgery is more useful for the removal of pain and the improvement of QOL, and also expected the improvement of the prognosis than pancreatectomy. And hyperthermia has an important role on the effect of this treatment. (K.H.)

  3. Multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Kanji; Iida, Atsushi; Fujita, Takashi; Kobayashi, Taizo; Shinmoto, Syuichi; Hirose, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Akio; Yoshida, Masanori [Fukui Medical School, Matsuoka (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    In order to improve in prognosis and quality of life (QOL), the multimodal treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancers were performed. Bypass surgery was carried out for unresectable pancreatic cancer with intraoperative irradiation (IOR). After surgery, patients were treated with the combination of CDDP (25 mg) and MMC (4 mg) administration, intravenously continuous injection of 5-FU (250 mg for 24 hours), external radiation by the high voltage X-ray (1.5 Gy per irradiation, 4 times a week, and during hyperthermia 3 Gy per irradiation) and hyperthermia using the Thermotron RF-8 warmer. Six out of 13 patients received hyperthermia at over 40degC, were obtained PR, and their survival periods were 22, 21, 19, 18, 11 and 8 months and they could return to work. For all patients with pain, the symptom was abolished or reduced. The survival periods in cases of the multimodal treatment were longer than those of only bypass-surgery or of the resective cases with the curability C. The multimodal treatment combined with radiation, hyperthermia and surgery is more useful for the removal of pain and the improvement of QOL, and also expected the improvement of the prognosis than pancreatectomy. And hyperthermia has an important role on the effect of this treatment. (K.H.)

  4. Optimal Face-Iris Multimodal Fusion Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Sharifi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal biometric systems are considered a way to minimize the limitations raised by single traits. This paper proposes new schemes based on score level, feature level and decision level fusion to efficiently fuse face and iris modalities. Log-Gabor transformation is applied as the feature extraction method on face and iris modalities. At each level of fusion, different schemes are proposed to improve the recognition performance and, finally, a combination of schemes at different fusion levels constructs an optimized and robust scheme. In this study, CASIA Iris Distance database is used to examine the robustness of all unimodal and multimodal schemes. In addition, Backtracking Search Algorithm (BSA, a novel population-based iterative evolutionary algorithm, is applied to improve the recognition accuracy of schemes by reducing the number of features and selecting the optimized weights for feature level and score level fusion, respectively. Experimental results on verification rates demonstrate a significant improvement of proposed fusion schemes over unimodal and multimodal fusion methods.

  5. Multimodal MRI for early diabetic mild cognitive impairment: study protocol of a prospective diagnostic trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Ying; Sun, Qian; Yan, Lin-Feng; Hu, Yu-Chuan; Nan, Hai-Yan; Yang, Yang; Liu, Zhi-Cheng; Wang, Wen; Cui, Guang-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for dementia. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), an intermediary state between normal cognition and dementia, often occurs during the prodromal diabetic stage, making early diagnosis and intervention of MCI very important. Latest neuroimaging techniques revealed some underlying microstructure alterations for diabetic MCI, from certain aspects. But there still lacks an integrated multimodal MRI system to detect early neuroimaging changes in diabetic MCI patients. Thus, we intended to conduct a diagnostic trial using multimodal MRI techniques to detect early diabetic MCI that is determined by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). In this study, healthy controls, prodromal diabetes and diabetes subjects (53 subjects/group) aged 40-60 years will be recruited from the physical examination center of Tangdu Hospital. The neuroimaging and psychometric measurements will be repeated at a 0.5 year-interval for 2.5 years’ follow-up. The primary outcome measures are 1) Microstructural and functional alterations revealed with multimodal MRI scans including structure magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI), resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI), diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), and three-dimensional pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (3D-pCASL); 2) Cognition evaluation with MoCA. The second outcome measures are obesity, metabolic characteristics, lifestyle and quality of life. The study will provide evidence for the potential use of multimodal MRI techniques with psychometric evaluation in diagnosing MCI at prodromal diabetic stage so as to help decision making in early intervention and improve the prognosis of T2DM. This study has been registered to ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02420470) on April 2, 2015 and published on July 29, 2015

  6. Gold Nanoconstructs for Multimodal Diagnostic Imaging and Photothermal Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Andrew James

    Cancer accounts for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths in the United States, and because conventional treatments are limited by morbidity and off-target toxicities, improvements in cancer management are needed. This thesis further develops nanoparticle-assisted photothermal therapy (NAPT) as a viable treatment option for cancer patients. NAPT enables localized ablation of disease because heat generation only occurs where tissue permissive near-infrared (NIR) light and absorbing nanoparticles are combined, leaving surrounding normal tissue unharmed. Two principle approaches were investigated to improve the specificity of this technique: multimodal imaging and molecular targeting. Multimodal imaging affords the ability to guide NIR laser application for site-specific NAPT and more holistic characterization of disease by combining the advantages of several diagnostic technologies. Towards the goal of image-guided NAPT, gadolinium-conjugated gold-silica nanoshells were engineered and demonstrated to enhance imaging contrast across a range of diagnostic modes, including T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, X-Ray, optical coherence tomography, reflective confocal microscopy, and two-photon luminescence in vitro as well as within an animal tumor model. Additionally, the nanoparticle conjugates were shown to effectively convert NIR light to heat for applications in photothermal therapy. Therefore, the broad utility of gadolinium-nanoshells for anatomic localization of tissue lesions, molecular characterization of malignancy, and mediators of ablation was established. Molecular targeting strategies may also improve NAPT by promoting nanoparticle uptake and retention within tumors and enhancing specificity when malignant and normal tissue interdigitate. Here, ephrinA1 protein ligands were conjugated to nanoshell surfaces for particle homing to overexpressed EphA2 receptors on prostate cancer cells. In vitro, successful targeting and subsequent photothermal ablation of

  7. Multimodal integration of anatomy and physiology classes: How instructors utilize multimodal teaching in their classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Gerald M., Jr.

    Multimodality is the theory of communication as it applies to social and educational semiotics (making meaning through the use of multiple signs and symbols). The term multimodality describes a communication methodology that includes multiple textual, aural, and visual applications (modes) that are woven together to create what is referred to as an artifact. Multimodal teaching methodology attempts to create a deeper meaning to course content by activating the higher cognitive areas of the student's brain, creating a more sustained retention of the information (Murray, 2009). The introduction of multimodality educational methodologies as a means to more optimally engage students has been documented within educational literature. However, studies analyzing the distribution and penetration into basic sciences, more specifically anatomy and physiology, have not been forthcoming. This study used a quantitative survey design to determine the degree to which instructors integrated multimodality teaching practices into their course curricula. The instrument used for the study was designed by the researcher based on evidence found in the literature and sent to members of three associations/societies for anatomy and physiology instructors: the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society; the iTeach Anatomy & Physiology Collaborate; and the American Physiology Society. Respondents totaled 182 instructor members of two- and four-year, private and public higher learning colleges collected from the three organizations collectively with over 13,500 members in over 925 higher learning institutions nationwide. The study concluded that the expansion of multimodal methodologies into anatomy and physiology classrooms is at the beginning of the process and that there is ample opportunity for expansion. Instructors continue to use lecture as their primary means of interaction with students. Email is still the major form of out-of-class communication for full-time instructors. Instructors with

  8. Non-invasive imaging of kupffer cell status using radiolabelled mannosylated albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahajan, V.; Hartimath, S.; Comley, R.; Stefan-Gueldner, M.; Roth, A.; Poelstra, K.; Reker-Smit, C.; Kamps, J.; Dierckx, R.; de Vries, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Kupffer cells are responsible for maintaining liver homeostasis and have a vital role in chronic hepatotoxicity and various liver diseases. Positron Imaging Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive imaging technique that allows quantification and visualization of biochemical processes

  9. Reflectance confocal microscopy: non-invasive distinction between actinic keratosis and squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peppelman, M.; Nguyen, K.P.; Hoogedoorn, L.; Erp, P.E.J. van; Gerritsen, M.J.P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early recognition of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is difficult. Non-invasive reflectance confocal microscopic (RCM) imaging of the skin is a promising diagnostic technique. Although several RCM features for SCC and AK have been described, it is not determined whether RCM has the ability

  10. Applications of magnetic resonance spectroscopy for noninvasive assessment of hepatic steatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Werven, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    MR spectroscopy is a noninvasive technique to quantify hepatic steatosis. MR spectroscopy provides information about the chemical composition of tissues in a spectrum. Hepatic steatosis is characterized by accumulation of fat in the liver. The prevalence of hepatic steatosis is increasing due to its

  11. A Noninvasive Imaging Approach to Understanding Speech Changes following Deep Brain Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Shalini; Jacks, Adam; Robin, Donald A.; Poizner, Howard; Zhang, Wei; Franklin, Crystal; Liotti, Mario; Vogel, Deanie; Fox, Peter T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the use of noninvasive functional imaging and "virtual" lesion techniques to study the neural mechanisms underlying motor speech disorders in Parkinson's disease. Here, we report the use of positron emission tomography (PET) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to explain exacerbated speech impairment following…

  12. NON-INVASIVE INVERSE PROBLEM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Havelka

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution we focus on recovery of spatial distribution of material parameters utilizing only non-invasive boundary measurements. Such methods has gained its importance as imaging techniques in medicine, geophysics or archaeology. We apply similar principles for non-stationary heat transfer in civil engineering. In oppose to standard technique which rely on external loading devices, we assume the natural fluctuation of temperature throughout day and night can provide sufficient information to recover the underlying material parameters. The inverse problem was solved by a modified regularised Gauss-Newton iterative scheme and the underlying forward problem is solved with a finite element space-time discretisation. We show a successful reconstruction of material parameters on a synthetic example with real measurements. The virtual experiment also reveals the insensitivity to practical precision of sensor measurements.

  13. Noninvasive detection of macular pigments in the human eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellermann, Werner; Bernstein, Paul S

    2004-01-01

    There is currently strong interest in developing noninvasive technologies for the detection of macular carotenoid pigments in the human eye. These pigments, consisting of lutein and zeaxanthin, are taken up from the diet and are thought to play an important role in the prevention of age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the Western world. It may be possible to prevent or delay the onset of this debilitating disease with suitable dietary intervention strategies. We review the most commonly used detection techniques based on heterochromatic flicker photometry, fundus reflectometry, and autofluorescense techniques and put them in perspective with recently developed more molecule-specific Raman detection methods. (c) 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  14. Non-invasive biological dosimetry of the skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, S.; Marks, R.; Charles, M.W.; Wells, J.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations designed to identify a potential biological dosimetry technique to examine the effects of X-ray doses down to 0.1 Gy on human skin, are described. In a variety of parameters assessed, the most important changes observed were a significant depression in epidermal cell production in the basal layer after X-ray doses between 0.5 Gy and 1 Gy and a concomitant reduction in the desquamation rate of corneocytes after doses above 1 Gy. Changes in non-specific esterase (NSE) activity were also observed. Further work is described which applies these results to several non-invasive techniques which may have potential for routine application. Preliminary data from irradiated human skin are presented on the measurement of forced desquamation, the evaluation of NSE activity from hair samples and the evaluation of stratum corneum turnover time using the fluorescent dye, dansyl chloride. (author)

  15. Targeting the Cerebellum by Noninvasive Neurostimulation: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dun, Kim; Bodranghien, Florian; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic and electric stimulation of the brain are novel and highly promising techniques currently employed in both research and clinical practice. Improving or rehabilitating brain functions by modulating excitability with these noninvasive tools is an exciting new area in neuroscience. Since the cerebellum is closely connected with the cerebral regions subserving motor, associative, and affective functions, the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathways are an interesting target for these new techniques. Targeting the cerebellum represents a novel way to modulate the excitability of remote cortical regions and their functions. This review brings together the studies that have applied cerebellar stimulation, magnetic and electric, and presents an overview of the current knowledge and unsolved issues. Some recommendations for future research are implemented as well.

  16. Non-invasive Blood Glucose Quantification Using a Hybrid Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundararajan JAYAPAL

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose levels which result from defects in insulin secretion. It is very important for the diabetics and normal people to have a correct blood glucose level. The HbA1c test is the most preferred test by renowned doctors for glucose quantification. But this test is an invasive one. At present, there are many available techniques for this purpose but these are mostly invasive or minimally non-invasive and most of these are under research. Among the different methods available, the photo acoustic (PA methods provide a reliable solution since the acoustical energy loss is much less compared to the optical or other techniques. Here a novel framework is presented for blood glucose level measurement using a combination of the HbA1c test and a PA method to get an absolutely consistent and precise, non-invasive technique. The setup uses a pulsed laser diode with pulse duration of 5-15 ns and at a repetition rate of 10 Hz as the source. The detector setup is based on the piezoelectric detection. It consists of a ring detector that includes two double ring sensors that are attached to the ring shaped module that can be worn around the finger. The major aim is to detect the photo acoustic signals from the glycated hemoglobin with the least possible error. The proposed monitoring system is designed with extreme consideration to precision and compatibility with the other computing devices. The results obtained in this research have been studied and analyzed by comparing these with those of in-vitro techniques like the HPLC. The comparison has been plotted and it shows a least error. The results also show a positive drive for using this concept as a basis for future extension in quantifying the other blood components.

  17. A Selective Review of Multimodal Fusion Methods in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eSui

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SZ is one of the most cryptic and costly mental disorders in terms of human suffering and societal expenditure (van Os and Kapur, 2009. Though strong evidences for functional, structural and genetic abnormalities associated with this disease exist, there is yet no replicable finding which has proven accurate enough to be useful in clinical decision making (Fornito et al., 2009, and its diagnosis relies primarily upon symptom assessment (Williams et al., 2010a. It is likely in part that the lack of consistent neuroimaging findings is because most models favor only one data type or do not combine data from different imaging modalities effectively, thus missing potentially important differences which are only partially detected by each modality (Calhoun et al., 2006a. It is becoming increasingly clear that multi-modal fusion, a technique which takes advantage of the fact that each modality provides a limited view of the brain/gene and may uncover hidden relationships, is an important tool to help unravel the black box of schizophrenia. In this review paper, we survey a number of multimodal fusion applications which enable us to study the schizophrenia macro-connectome, including brain functional, structural and genetic aspects and may help us understand the disorder in a more comprehensive and integrated manner. We also provide a table that characterizes these applications by the methods used and compare these methods in detail, especially for multivariate models, which may serve as a valuable reference that helps readers select an appropriate method based on a given research.

  18. Multimodal Registration and Fusion for 3D Thermal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulay A. Akhloufi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D vision is an area of computer vision that has attracted a lot of research interest and has been widely studied. In recent years we witness an increasing interest from the industrial community. This interest is driven by the recent advances in 3D technologies, which enable high precision measurements at an affordable cost. With 3D vision techniques we can conduct advanced manufactured parts inspections and metrology analysis. However, we are not able to detect subsurface defects. This kind of detection is achieved by other techniques, like infrared thermography. In this work, we present a new registration framework for 3D and thermal infrared multimodal fusion. The resulting fused data can be used for advanced 3D inspection in Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT&E applications. The fusion permits the simultaneous visible surface and subsurface inspections to be conducted in the same process. Experimental tests were conducted with different materials. The obtained results are promising and show how these new techniques can be used efficiently in a combined NDT&E-Metrology analysis of manufactured parts, in areas such as aerospace and automotive.

  19. Noninvasive Quantification of Pancreatic Fat in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Lingvay, Ildiko; Esser, Victoria; Legendre, Jaime L.; Price, Angela L.; Wertz, Kristen M.; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Zhang, Song; Unger, Roger H.; Szczepaniak, Lidia S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To validate magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) as a tool for non-invasive quantification of pancreatic triglyceride (TG) content and to measure the pancreatic TG content in a diverse human population with a wide range of body mass index (BMI) and glucose control.

  20. Noninvasive wearable sensor for indirect glucometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberstein, Gleb; Zilberstein, Roman; Maor, Uriel; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    2018-04-02

    A noninvasive mini-sensor for blood glucose concentration assessment has been developed. The monitoring is performed by gently pressing a wrist or fingertip onto the chemochromic mixture coating a thin glass or polymer film positioned on the back panel of a smart watch with PPG/HRM (photoplethysmographic/heart rate monitoring sensor). The various chemochromic components measure the absolute values of the following metabolites present in the sweat: acetone, acetone beta-hydroxybutirate, aceto acetate, water, carbon dioxide, lactate anion, pyruvic acid, Na and K salts. Taken together, all these parameters give information about blood glucose concentration, calculated via multivariate analysis based on neural network algorithms built into the sensor. The Clarke Error Grid shows an excellent correlation between data measured by the standard invasive glucose analyser and the present noninvasive sensor, with all points aligned along a 45-degree diagonal and contained almost exclusively in sector A. Graphs measuring glucose levels five times a day (prior, during and after breakfast and prior, during and after lunch), for different individuals (males and females) show a good correlation between the two curves of conventional, invasive meters vs. the noninvasive sensor, with an error of ±15%. This novel, noninvasive sensor for indirect glucometry is fully miniaturized, easy to use and operate and could represent a valid alternative in clinical settings and for individual, personal users, to current, invasive tools. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Multifocus confocal Raman microspectroscopy for fast multimode vibrational imaging of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Masanari; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2010-12-15

    We have developed a multifocus confocal Raman microspectroscopic system for the fast multimode vibrational imaging of living cells. It consists of an inverted microscope equipped with a microlens array, a pinhole array, a fiber bundle, and a multichannel Raman spectrometer. Forty-eight Raman spectra from 48 foci under the microscope are simultaneously obtained by using multifocus excitation and image-compression techniques. The multifocus confocal configuration suppresses the background generated from the cover glass and the cell culturing medium so that high-contrast images are obtainable with a short accumulation time. The system enables us to obtain multimode (10 different vibrational modes) vibrational images of living cells in tens of seconds with only 1 mW laser power at one focal point. This image acquisition time is more than 10 times faster than that in conventional single-focus Raman microspectroscopy.

  2. In-Building Wireless Distribution in legacy Multimode Fiber with an improved RoMMF system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visani, Davide; Petersen, Martin Nordal; Sorci, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    A radio over multimode fiber (RoMMF) system for in-building wireless distribution employing a directly modulated Fabry-Perot (FP) transmitter and the central launch technique is presented. The worst-case spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) exceeds 105 dB×Hz2/3 up to 525 m of OM2 multimode fiber (MMF......). Experimental and theoretical results are reported showing that this scheme outperforms a RoMMF system employing a distributed feed-back (DFB) laser diode (LD) and/or a mode scrambler to achieve overfilled launch (OFL). Long Term Evolution (LTE) signal transmission is achieved with high quality in terms...... of Adjacent Channel Leakage Ratio (ACLR) and Error Vector Magnitude (EVM)....

  3. A robo-pigeon based on an innovative multi-mode telestimulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junqing; Huai, Ruituo; Wang, Hui; Lv, Changzhi; Su, Xuecheng

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new multi-mode telestimulation system for brain-microstimulation for the navigation of a robo-pigeon, a new type of bio-robot based on Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) techniques. The multi-mode telestimulation system overcomes neuron adaptation that was a key shortcoming of the previous single-mode stimulation by the use of non-steady TTL biphasic pulses accomplished by randomly alternating pulse modes. To improve efficiency, a new behavior model ("virtual fear") is proposed and applied to the robo-pigeon. Unlike the previous "virtual reward" model, the "virtual fear" behavior model does not require special training. The performance and effectiveness of the system to alleviate the adaptation of neurons was verified by a robo-pigeon navigation test, simultaneously confirming the practicality of the "virtual fear" behavioral model.

  4. Image recovery from defocused 2D fluorescent images in multimodal digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xiangyu; Matoba, Osamu; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro

    2017-05-01

    A technique of three-dimensional (3D) intensity retrieval from defocused, two-dimensional (2D) fluorescent images in the multimodal digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is proposed. In the multimodal DHM, 3D phase and 2D fluorescence distributions are obtained simultaneously by an integrated system of an off-axis DHM and a conventional epifluorescence microscopy, respectively. This gives us more information of the target; however, defocused fluorescent images are observed due to the short depth of field. In this Letter, we propose a method to recover the defocused images based on the phase compensation and backpropagation from the defocused plane to the focused plane using the distance information that is obtained from a 3D phase distribution. By applying Zernike polynomial phase correction, we brought back the fluorescence intensity to the focused imaging planes. The experimental demonstration using fluorescent beads is presented, and the expected applications are suggested.

  5. Treatment of Neck Pain: Noninvasive Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragee, Eugene J.; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Carroll, Linda J.; Nordin, Margareta; Guzman, Jaime; Peloso, Paul M.; Holm, Lena W.; Côté, Pierre; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Cassidy, J. David; Haldeman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Study Design. Best evidence synthesis. Objective. To identify, critically appraise, and synthesize literature from 1980 through 2006 on noninvasive interventions for neck pain and its associated disorders. Summary of Background Data. No comprehensive systematic literature reviews have been published on interventions for neck pain and its associated disorders in the past decade. Methods. We systematically searched Medline and screened for relevance literature published from 1980 through 2006 on the use, effectiveness, and safety of noninvasive interventions for neck pain and associated disorders. Consensus decisions were made about the scientific merit of each article; those judged to have adequate internal validity were included in our best evidence synthesis. Results. Of the 359 invasive and noninvasive intervention articles deemed relevant, 170 (47%) were accepted as scientifically admissible, and 139 of these related to noninvasive interventions (including health care utilization, costs, and safety). For whiplash-associated disorders, there is evidence that educational videos, mobilization, and exercises appear more beneficial than usual care or physical modalities. For other neck pain, the evidence suggests that manual and supervised exercise interventions, low-level laser therapy, and perhaps acupuncture are more effective than no treatment, sham, or alternative interventions; however, none of the active treatments was clearly superior to any other in either the short-or long-term. For both whiplash-associated disorders and other neck pain without radicular symptoms, interventions that focused on regaining function as soon as possible are relatively more effective than interventions that do not have such a focus. Conclusion. Our best evidence synthesis suggests that therapies involving manual therapy and exercise are more effective than alternative strategies for patients with neck pain; this was also true of therapies which include educational interventions

  6. Exploration of Hand Grasp Patterns Elicitable Through Non-Invasive Proximal Nerve Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Henry; Watkins, Zach; Hu, Xiaogang

    2017-01-01

    Various neurological conditions, such as stroke or spinal cord injury, result in an impaired control of the hand. One method of restoring this impairment is through functional electrical stimulation (FES). However, traditional FES techniques often lead to quick fatigue and unnatural ballistic movements. In this study, we sought to explore the capabilities of a non-invasive proximal nerve stimulation technique in eliciting various hand grasp patterns. The ulnar and median nerves proximal to th...

  7. Multimodal follow-up questions to multimodal answers in a QA system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooten, B.W.; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing a dialogue manager (DM) for a multimodal interactive Question Answering (QA) system. Our QA system presents answers using text and pictures, and the user may pose follow-up questions using text or speech, while indicating screen elements with the mouse. We developed a corpus of

  8. [Noninvasive total hemoglobin monitoring based on multiwave spectrophotometry in obstetrics and gynecology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyregov, A V; Ovechkin, A Iu; Petrov, S V

    2012-01-01

    Results of prospective randomized comparative research of 2 total hemoglobin estimation methods are presented. There were laboratory tests and continuous noninvasive technique with multiwave spectrophotometry on the Masimo Rainbow SET. Research was carried out in two stages. At the 1st stage (gynecology)--67 patients were included and in second stage (obstetrics)--44 patients during and after Cesarean section. The standard deviation of noninvasive total hemoglobin estimation from absolute values (invasive) was 7.2 and 4.1%, an standard deviation in a sample--5.2 and 2.7 % in gynecologic operations and surgical delivery respectively, that confirms lack of reliable indicators differences. The method of continuous noninvasive total hemoglobin estimation with multiwave spectrophotometry on the Masimo Rainbow SET technology can be recommended for use in obstetrics and gynecology.

  9. Applicability of Non-Invasive Sampling in Population Genetic Study of Taiwanese Macaques (Macaca cyclopis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Hua Chu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a pilot study conducted to test the applicability of non-invasive sampling approach in population genetic studies of Taiwanese macaques (Macaca cyclopis. Monkey feces were collected in the field and used as non-invasive DNA sources. PCR success rates of both microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA markers were examined. When compared with other studies by non-invasive genetic sampling of different mammal species, success rate of microsatellite PCR amplification is low (42.4%, N = 181 while that of mtDNA PCR amplification is acceptable (66.5%, N = 334. The low PCR success rate and poor PCR repeatability of microsatellite alleles due to allelic dropout and false alleles make it difficult to obtain a reliable microsatellite data set. However, the difficulties may be overcome by new techniques.

  10. Noninvasive pulmonary artery pressure monitoring by EIT: a model-based feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Martin; Braun, Fabian; Solà, Josep; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Lemay, Mathieu

    2017-06-01

    Current monitoring modalities for patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) are limited to invasive solutions. A novel approach for the noninvasive and unsupervised monitoring of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) in patients with PH was proposed and investigated. The approach was based on the use of electrical impedance tomography (EIT), a noninvasive and safe monitoring technique, and was tested through simulations on a realistic 4D bio-impedance model of the human thorax. Changes in PAP were induced in the model by simulating multiple types of hypertensive conditions. A timing parameter physiologically linked to the PAP via the so-called pulse wave velocity principle was automatically estimated from the EIT data. It was found that changes in PAP could indeed be reliably monitored by EIT, irrespective of the pathophysiological condition that caused them. If confirmed clinically, these findings could open the way for a new generation of noninvasive PAP monitoring solutions for the follow-up of patients with PH.

  11. Elastography methods for the non-invasive assessment of portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccarina, Davide; Rosselli, Matteo; Genesca, Joan; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2018-02-01

    The gold standard to assess the presence and severity of portal hypertension remains the hepatic vein pressure gradient, however the recent development of non-invasive assessment using elastography techniques offers valuable alternatives. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic accuracy and utility of such techniques in patients with portal hypertension due to cirrhosis. Areas covered: A literature search focused on liver and spleen stiffness measurement with different elastographic techniques for the assessment of the presence and severity of portal hypertension and oesophageal varices in people with chronic liver disease. The combination of elastography with parameters such as platelet count and spleen size is also discussed. Expert commentary: Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis and portal hypertension is a validated tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients. Baveno VI recommended the combination of transient elastography and platelet count for ruling out varices needing treatment in patients with compensated advanced chronic liver disease. Assessment of aetiology specific cut-offs for ruling in and ruling out clinically significant portal hypertension is an unmet clinical need. The incorporation of spleen stiffness measurements in non-invasive algorithms using validated software and improved measuring scales might enhance the non-invasive diagnosis of portal hypertension in the next 5 years.

  12. Noninvasive continuous monitoring of digital pulse waves during hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkert, Antje; Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Intermittent hemodynamic instability during hemodialysis treatment is a frequent complication in patients with end-stage renal failure. A noninvasive method for continuous hemodynamic monitoring is needed. We used noninvasive digital photoplethysmography and an algorithm for continuous, investiga...

  13. Advanced Multimodal Solutions for Information Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Godfroy-Cooper, Martine

    2018-01-01

    High-workload, fast-paced, and degraded sensory environments are the likeliest candidates to benefit from multimodal information presentation. For example, during EVA (Extra-Vehicular Activity) and telerobotic operations, the sensory restrictions associated with a space environment provide a major challenge to maintaining the situation awareness (SA) required for safe operations. Multimodal displays hold promise to enhance situation awareness and task performance by utilizing different sensory modalities and maximizing their effectiveness based on appropriate interaction between modalities. During EVA, the visual and auditory channels are likely to be the most utilized with tasks such as monitoring the visual environment, attending visual and auditory displays, and maintaining multichannel auditory communications. Previous studies have shown that compared to unimodal displays (spatial auditory or 2D visual), bimodal presentation of information can improve operator performance during simulated extravehicular activity on planetary surfaces for tasks as diverse as orientation, localization or docking, particularly when the visual environment is degraded or workload is increased. Tactile displays offer a third sensory channel that may both offload information processing effort and provide a means to capture attention when urgently required. For example, recent studies suggest that including tactile cues may result in increased orientation and alerting accuracy, improved task response time and decreased workload, as well as provide self-orientation cues in microgravity on the ISS (International Space Station). An important overall issue is that context-dependent factors like task complexity, sensory degradation, peripersonal vs. extrapersonal space operations, workload, experience level, and operator fatigue tend to vary greatly in complex real-world environments and it will be difficult to design a multimodal interface that performs well under all conditions. As a

  14. The semiotics of typography in literary texts. A multimodal approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Nina

    2009-01-01

    to multimodal discourse proposed, for instance, by Kress & Van Leeuwen (2001) and Baldry & Thibault (2006), and, more specifically, the multimodal approach to typography suggested by Van Leeuwen (2005b; 2006), in order to sketch out a methodological framework applicable to the description and analysis...... of the semiotic potential of typography in literary texts....

  15. Validation of a multimodal travel simulator with travel information provision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chorus, C.G.; Molin, E.J.E.; Arentze, T.A.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Timmermans, H.J.P.; Wee, van G.P.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a computer based travel simulator for collecting data concerning the use of next-generation ATIS and their effects on traveler decision making in a multimodal travel environment. The tool distinguishes itself by presenting a completely abstract multimodal transport network, where

  16. A Multimodal Discourse Analysis of Tmall's Double Eleven Advertisement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunyu; Luo, Mengxi

    2016-01-01

    From the 1990s, the multimodal turn in discourse studies makes multimodal discourse analysis a popular topic in linguistics and communication studies. An important approach to applying Systemic Functional Linguistics to non-verbal modes is Visual Grammar initially proposed by Kress and van Leeuwen (1996). Considering that commercial advertisement…

  17. Deterministic multimode photonic device for quantum-information processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne E. B.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We propose the implementation of a light source that can deterministically generate a rich variety of multimode quantum states. The desired states are encoded in the collective population of different ground hyperfine states of an atomic ensemble and converted to multimode photonic states by exci...

  18. Interactivity in Educational Apps for Young Children: A Multimodal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz-Raith, Alexandra H.; Liu, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Interactivity is an important indicator of an educational app's reception. Since most educational apps are multimodal, it justifies a methodological initiative to understand meaningful involvement of multimodality in enacting and even amplifying interactivity in an educational app. Yet research so far has largely concentrated on algorithm…

  19. Cultural Shifts, Multimodal Representations, and Assessment Practices: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curwood, Jen Scott

    2012-01-01

    Multimodal texts involve the presence, absence, and co-occurrence of alphabetic text with visual, audio, tactile, gestural, and spatial representations. This article explores how teachers' evaluation of students' multimodal work can be understood in terms of cognition and culture. When teachers apply a paradigm of assessment rooted in print-based…

  20. Multimodal versus Unimodal Instruction in a Complex Learning Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellevij, Mark; van der Meij, Hans; de Jong, Ton; Pieters, Jules

    2002-01-01

    Compared multimodal instruction with text and pictures with unimodal text-only instruction as 44 college students used a visual or textual manual to learn a complex software application. Results initially support dual coding theory and indicate that multimodal instruction led to better performance than unimodal instruction. (SLD)

  1. Multimodal warnings to enhance risk communication and safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, E.C.; Erp, J.B.F. van

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal warnings incorporate audio and/or skin-based (tactile) cues to supplement or replace visual cues in environments where the user’s visual perception is busy, impaired, or nonexistent. This paper describes characteristics of audio, tactile, and multimodal warning displays and their role in

  2. Adaptive multimodal interaction in mobile augmented reality: A conceptual framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Rimaniza Zainal; Arshad, Haslina; Shukri, Saidatul A'isyah Ahmad

    2017-10-01

    Recently, Augmented Reality (AR) is an emerging technology in many mobile applications. Mobile AR was defined as a medium for displaying information merged with the real world environment mapped with augmented reality surrounding in a single view. There are four main types of mobile augmented reality interfaces and one of them are multimodal interfaces. Multimodal interface processes two or more combined user input modes (such as speech, pen, touch, manual gesture, gaze, and head and body movements) in a coordinated manner with multimedia system output. In multimodal interface, many frameworks have been proposed to guide the designer to develop a multimodal applications including in augmented reality environment but there has been little work reviewing the framework of adaptive multimodal interface in mobile augmented reality. The main goal of this study is to propose a conceptual framework to illustrate the adaptive multimodal interface in mobile augmented reality. We reviewed several frameworks that have been proposed in the field of multimodal interfaces, adaptive interface and augmented reality. We analyzed the components in the previous frameworks and measure which can be applied in mobile devices. Our framework can be used as a guide for designers and developer to develop a mobile AR application with an adaptive multimodal interfaces.

  3. Player/Avatar Body Relations in Multimodal Augmented Reality Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosa, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Augmented reality research is finally moving towards multimodal experiences: more and more applications do not only include visuals, but also audio and even haptics. The purpose of multimodality in these applications can be to increase realism or to increase the amount or quality of communicated

  4. Multimodal network design for sustainable household plastic recycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bing Xiaoyun, Xiaoyun; Groot, J.J.; Bloemhof, J.M.; Vorst, van der J.G.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – This research studies a plastic recycling system from a reverse logistics angle and investigates the potential benefits of a multimodality strategy to the network design of plastic recycling. This research aims to quantify the impact of multimodality on the network, to provide decision

  5. A Multimodal Database for Affect Recognition and Implicit Tagging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soleymani, Mohammad; Lichtenauer, Jeroen; Pun, Thierry; Pantic, Maja

    MAHNOB-HCI is a multimodal database recorded in response to affective stimuli with the goal of emotion recognition and implicit tagging research. A multimodal setup was arranged for synchronized recording of face videos, audio signals, eye gaze data, and peripheral/central nervous system

  6. The Big Five: Addressing Recurrent Multimodal Learning Data Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Mitri, Daniele; Schneider, Jan; Specht, Marcus; Drachsler, Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    The analysis of multimodal data in learning is a growing field of research, which has led to the development of different analytics solutions. However, there is no standardised approach to handle multimodal data. In this paper, we describe and outline a solution for five recurrent challenges in

  7. Composition at Washington State University: Building a Multimodal Bricolage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Patricia; Hunter, Leeann Downing; Macklin, Tialitha Michelle; Edwards, Elizabeth Sue

    2016-01-01

    Multimodal pedagogy is increasingly accepted among composition scholars. However, putting such pedagogy into practice presents significant challenges. In this profile of Washington State University's first-year composition program, we suggest a multi-vocal and multi-theoretical approach to addressing the challenges of multimodal pedagogy. Patricia…

  8. Multimodal Scaffolding in the Secondary English Classroom Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boche, Benjamin; Henning, Megan

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the topic of multimodal scaffolding in the secondary English classroom curriculum through the viewpoint of one teacher's experiences. With technology becoming more commonplace and readily available in the English classroom, we must pinpoint specific and tangible ways to help teachers use and teach multimodalities in their…

  9. Noninvasive Ph-telemetric Measurement of Gastrointestinal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietze, Karen J.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain experience with and validate the Heidelberg pH-telemetric methodology in order to determine if the pH-telemetric methodology would be a useful noninvasive measure of gastrointestinal transit time for future ground-based and in-flight drug evaluation studies. The Heidelberg pH metering system is a noninvasive, nonradioactive telemetric system that, following oral ingestion, continuously measures intraluminal pH of the stomach, duodenum, small bowel, ileocecal junction, and large bowel. Gastrointestinal motility profiles were obtained in normal volunteers using the lactulose breath-hydrogen and Heidelberg pH metering techniques. All profiles were obtained in the morning after an overnight fast. Heidelberg pH profiles were obtained in the fasting and fed states; lactulose breath-hydrogen profiles were obtained after a standard breakfast. Mouth-to-cecum transit time was measured as the interval from administration of lactulose (30 ml; 20 g) to a sustained increase in breath-hydrogen of 10 ppm or more. Gastric emptying time was measured as the interval from the administration of the Heidelberg capsule to a sustained increase in pH of three units or more.

  10. Use of Doppler ultrasound for non-invasive urodynamic diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Ozawa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A totally non-invasive transperineal urodynamic technique using Doppler ultrasonography has been developed. Methods: Since normal urine does not have blood cells, urine was thought not to produce the Doppler effects. However, basic studies confirmed that the decrease of pressure at high velocity (Bernouilli effect caused dissolved gas to form microbubbles, which are detected by Doppler ultrasonography. Subjects sat and the probe was advanced via remote control to achieve gentle contact with the perineal skin. The digital uroflow data signals and the color Doppler ultrasound video images were processed on a personal computer. The flow-velocity curves from two sites; the distal prostatic urethra just above the external sphincter (V1 and the sphincteric urethra (V2 were plotted against time. The parameters of both the pressure-flow studies and the Doppler ultrasound urodynamic studies were compared in men who had various degrees of obstruction. Results: Functional cross-sectional area at prostatic urethra (A1, calculated by Q max /V1, was lower in the group of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO vs. control group. Velocity ratio (VR, which was calculated by V1/V2, was the parameter having the best correlation with BOO index, though A1 had a similar correlation. This method is viable to diagnose the degree of BOO. Conclusions: The development of non-invasive Doppler ultrasound videourodynamics (Doppler UDS will dramatically expand the information on voiding function.

  11. Fecal Glucocorticoid Analysis: Non-invasive Adrenal Monitoring in Equids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnell, Kelly; Purcell, Rebecca S; Walker, Susan L

    2016-04-25

    Adrenal activity can be assessed in the equine species by analysis of feces for corticosterone metabolites. During a potentially aversive situation, corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) is released from the hypothalamus in the brain. This stimulates the release of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) from the pituitary gland, which in turn stimulates release of glucocorticoids from the adrenal gland. In horses the glucocorticoid corticosterone is responsible for several adaptations needed to support equine flight behaviour and subsequent removal from the aversive situation. Corticosterone metabolites can be detected in the feces of horses and assessment offers a non-invasive option to evaluate long term patterns of adrenal activity. Fecal assessment offers advantages over other techniques that monitor adrenal activity including blood plasma and saliva analysis. The non-invasive nature of the method avoids sampling stress which can confound results. It also allows the opportunity for repeated sampling over time and is ideal for studies in free ranging horses. This protocol describes the enzyme linked immunoassay (EIA) used to assess feces for corticosterone, in addition to the associated biochemical validation.

  12. MULTIMODAL ANALGESIA AFTER TOTAL HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Mukutsa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - to assess the effect of multimodal analgesia in the early rehabilitation of patients after hip replacement. Materials and methods. A prospective single-centre randomized research, which included 32 patients. Patients of the 1st group received paracetamol, ketorolac and tramadol, the 2nd group of patients - ketorolac intravenously and the 3rd group of patients - etoricoxib and gabapentin. Patients of the 2nd and the 3rd groups underwent epidural analgesia with ropivacaine. Multimodal analgesia was carried out for 48 hours after the surgery. Assessment of pain intensity was performed by the VAS (visual analogue scale, a neuropathic pain component - on the DN4 questionnaire . Time was recorded during the first and second verticalization of patients, using the distance walkers and by fixing the distance covered with in 2 minutes. Results. The intensity of pain for more than 50 mm on VAS at movement at least once every 48 hours after the surgery was occurred among 9% of the 1st group, 22% of patients from the 2nd group and 8% of patients of the 3rd group. Number of patients with neuropathic pain component decreased from 25% to 3% (p ≤ 0.05. The first verticalization was performed 10 ± 8 hours after the surgery, the second - 21 ± 8 hours later. Two-minute walk distance was 5 ± 3 and 8 ± 4 m, respectively. It is noted more frequent adverse events in patients of the 1st group was noted compared to patients of the 2nd and the 3rd groups during first (91%, 33% and 25%, p ≤ 0.05 and the second verticalization (70%, 25% and 17%, p ≤ 0.05. Multimodal analgesia allows to proceed with the successful activation of patients after hip replacement with in the first day after the surgery. The 3rd group patients are noted with a tendency for the optimal combination of efficient and safe of analgetic therapy.

  13. New developments in multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    80 years ago, the PhD student Maria Goeppert predicted in her thesis in Goettingen, Germany, two-photon effects. It took 30 years to prove her theory, and another three decades to realize the first two-photon microscope. With the beginning of this millennium, first clinical multiphoton tomographs started operation in research institutions, hospitals, and in the cosmetic industry. The multiphoton tomograph MPTflexTM with its miniaturized flexible scan head became the Prism-Award 2010 winner in the category Life Sciences. Multiphoton tomographs with its superior submicron spatial resolution can be upgraded to 5D imaging tools by adding spectral time-correlated single photon counting units. Furthermore, multimodal hybrid tomographs provide chemical fingerprinting and fast wide-field imaging. The world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph in spring 2010. In particular, nonfluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen have been imaged in patients with dermatological disorders. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution imaging tools such as ultrasound, optoacoustic, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer (malignant melanoma), optimization of treatment strategies (wound healing, dermatitis), and cosmetic research including long-term biosafety tests of ZnO sunscreen nanoparticles and the measurement of the stimulated biosynthesis of collagen by anti-ageing products.

  14. Label-free evaluation of hepatic microvesicular steatosis with multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuc T Le

    Full Text Available Hepatic microvesicular steatosis is a hallmark of drug-induced hepatotoxicity and early-stage fatty liver disease. Current histopathology techniques are inadequate for the clinical evaluation of hepatic microvesicular steatosis. In this paper, we explore the use of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy for the detection and characterization of hepatic microvesicular steatosis. We show that CARS microscopy is more sensitive than Oil Red O histology for the detection of microvesicular steatosis. Computer-assisted analysis of liver lipid level based on CARS signal intensity is consistent with triglyceride measurement using a standard biochemical assay. Most importantly, in a single measurement procedure on unprocessed and unstained liver tissues, multimodal CARS imaging provides a wealth of critical information including the detection of microvesicular steatosis and quantitation of liver lipid content, number and size of lipid droplets, and lipid unsaturation and packing order of lipid droplets. Such information can only be assessed by multiple different methods on processed and stained liver tissues or tissue extracts using current standard analytical techniques. Multimodal CARS microscopy also permits label-free identification of lipid-rich non-parenchymal cells. In addition, label-free and non-perturbative CARS imaging allow rapid screening of mitochondrial toxins-induced microvesicular steatosis in primary hepatocyte cultures. With its sensitivity and versatility, multimodal CARS microscopy should be a powerful tool for the clinical evaluation of hepatic microvesicular steatosis.

  15. Invariant measures on multimode quantum Gaussian states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, C.; Mancini, S.; De Pasquale, A.; Facchi, P.; Florio, G.; Pascazio, S.

    2012-12-01

    We derive the invariant measure on the manifold of multimode quantum Gaussian states, induced by the Haar measure on the group of Gaussian unitary transformations. To this end, by introducing a bipartition of the system in two disjoint subsystems, we use a parameterization highlighting the role of nonlocal degrees of freedom—the symplectic eigenvalues—which characterize quantum entanglement across the given bipartition. A finite measure is then obtained by imposing a physically motivated energy constraint. By averaging over the local degrees of freedom we finally derive the invariant distribution of the symplectic eigenvalues in some cases of particular interest for applications in quantum optics and quantum information.

  16. Invariant measures on multimode quantum Gaussian states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupo, C.; Mancini, S.; De Pasquale, A.; Facchi, P.; Florio, G.; Pascazio, S.

    2012-01-01

    We derive the invariant measure on the manifold of multimode quantum Gaussian states, induced by the Haar measure on the group of Gaussian unitary transformations. To this end, by introducing a bipartition of the system in two disjoint subsystems, we use a parameterization highlighting the role of nonlocal degrees of freedom—the symplectic eigenvalues—which characterize quantum entanglement across the given bipartition. A finite measure is then obtained by imposing a physically motivated energy constraint. By averaging over the local degrees of freedom we finally derive the invariant distribution of the symplectic eigenvalues in some cases of particular interest for applications in quantum optics and quantum information.

  17. Invariant measures on multimode quantum Gaussian states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupo, C. [School of Science and Technology, Universita di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Mancini, S. [School of Science and Technology, Universita di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); De Pasquale, A. [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Facchi, P. [Dipartimento di Matematica and MECENAS, Universita di Bari, I-70125 Bari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Florio, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Piazza del Viminale 1, I-00184 Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica and MECENAS, Universita di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Pascazio, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica and MECENAS, Universita di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    We derive the invariant measure on the manifold of multimode quantum Gaussian states, induced by the Haar measure on the group of Gaussian unitary transformations. To this end, by introducing a bipartition of the system in two disjoint subsystems, we use a parameterization highlighting the role of nonlocal degrees of freedom-the symplectic eigenvalues-which characterize quantum entanglement across the given bipartition. A finite measure is then obtained by imposing a physically motivated energy constraint. By averaging over the local degrees of freedom we finally derive the invariant distribution of the symplectic eigenvalues in some cases of particular interest for applications in quantum optics and quantum information.

  18. Sensory Substitution and Multimodal Mental Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanay, Bence

    2017-09-01

    Many philosophers use findings about sensory substitution devices in the grand debate about how we should individuate the senses. The big question is this: Is "vision" assisted by (tactile) sensory substitution really vision? Or is it tactile perception? Or some sui generis novel form of perception? My claim is that sensory substitution assisted "vision" is neither vision nor tactile perception, because it is not perception at all. It is mental imagery: visual mental imagery triggered by tactile sensory stimulation. But it is a special form of mental imagery that is triggered by corresponding sensory stimulation in a different sense modality, which I call "multimodal mental imagery."

  19. Multimodal Landscaping in Higher Education Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lueg, Klarissa

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce Multimodal Landscaping (ML) as a conceptual framework, and to illustrate how this approach can be applied within the field of higher education research. It is argued that ML is a suitable tool, especially, in studies investigating university...... internationalization, and in studies focusing on the agent level of higher education organizations. ML is argued to add to the diversity of methods within a social constructivist methodology. The author illustrates how ML is connected and/or different from kindred approaches. Pathways are proposed as to how...

  20. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajani, Ronak; Khattar, Rajdeep; Chiribiri, Amedeo; Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John

    2014-01-01

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses