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Sample records for nonhemolytic transfusion reactions

  1. The serology of febrile transfusion reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rie, M. A.; van der Plas-van Dalen, C. M.; Engelfriet, C. P.; von dem Borne, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    Sera from 40 patients with febrile, nonhemolytic transfusion reactions were tested for the presence of alloantibodies using a number of techniques, including immuno-fluorescence tests on granulocytes, lymphocytes and platelets, a modified NIH lymphocytotoxicity test and the leukocyte agglutination

  2. Transfusion reaction - hemolytic

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    ... Names Blood transfusion reaction Images Surface proteins causing rejection References Choate JD, Maitta RW, Tormey CA, Wu ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 177. Hall JE. Blood types; transfusion; tissue and organ transplantation. In: Hall JE, ...

  3. Respiratory transfusion reactions

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    Ivica Marić

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory transfusion-related reactions are not very frequent, partly also because recognition and reporting transfusion reactions is still underemphasized. Tis article describes the most important respiratory transfusion reactions, their pathophysiology, clinical picture and treatment strategies. Respiratory transfusion related reactions can be primary or secondary. The most important primary transfusion-related reactions are TRALI - transfusion-related acute lung injury, TACO – transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and TAD - transfusion-associated dyspnea. TRALI is immuneassociated injury of alveolar basal membrane, which becomes highly permeable and causes noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. Treatment of TRALI is mainly supportive with oxygen, fluids (in case of hypotension and in cases of severe acute respiratory failure also mechanic ventilation. TACO is caused by volume overload in predisposed individuals, such as patients with heart failure, the elderly, infants, patients with anemia and patients with positive fluid balance. Clinical picture is that of a typical pulmonary cardiogenic edema, and the therapy is classical: oxygen and diuretics, and in severe cases also non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. TAD is usually a mild reaction of unknown cause and cannot be classified as TACO or TRALI, nor can it be ascribed to patient’s preexisting diseases. Although the transfusion-related reactions are not very common, knowledge about them can prevent serious consequences. On the one hand preventive measures should be sought, and on the other early recognition is beneficial, so that proper treatment can take place.

  4. Septic transfusion reactions during blood transfusion via indwelling central venous catheters.

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    Ricci, Kristin S; Martinez, Fernando; Lichtiger, Benjamin; Han, Xiang Y

    2014-10-01

    Transfusion of blood products requires a vascular port. Use of an indwelling central venous catheter (CVC) provides this port readily and safely in general; however, potential risks require assessment. The objective was to examine septic reactions to blood transfusions performed via CVCs owing to subclinical microbial catheter colonization. All transfusion reactions that occurred from 2007 to 2011 at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center were analyzed and correlated with microbiology culture results. Data on the reactions, including vascular access via a catheter or peripheral venipuncture, were collected prospectively. A total of 999 reactions were reported, with an incidence of two per 1000 transfusion events. A total of 738 reactions occurred in 642 patients during transfusion through a CVC. Among them, 606 reactions occurred in patients that had cultures of blood samples drawn within 7 days before or after reaction. Sixty of these (9.9%) had at least one significant microorganism isolated from their catheters and/or peripheral blood. The blood culture results and timing suggested that these patients likely had catheter-related bloodstream infections caused by transfusion through a CVC with subclinical microbial colonization. Fever and chills occurred in 35 of these patients (58%), which resembled febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions. Culture results of the transfused blood products, although not performed in all cases, were mostly negative in these CVC-related reactions. Blood transfusion through an indwelling CVC may lead to septic reaction owing to subclinical microbial colonization. This risk should be considered before transfusion and during investigation of transfusion reactions. © 2014 AABB.

  5. Incidence of transfusion reactions: a multi-center study utilizing systematic active surveillance and expert adjudication

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    Hendrickson, Jeanne E.; Roubinian, Nareg H.; Chowdhury, Dhuly; Brambilla, Don; Murphy, Edward L.; Wu, Yanyun; Ness, Paul M.; Gehrie, Eric A.; Snyder, Edward L.; Hauser, R. George; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Kleinman, Steve; Kakaiya, Ram; Strauss, Ronald G.

    2017-01-01

    Background Prevalence estimates of serious hazards of transfusion vary widely. We hypothesized that the current reporting infrastructure in the United States fails to capture many transfusion reactions, and undertook a multi-center study utilizing active surveillance, data review, and adjudication to test this hypothesis. Study Design and Methods A retrospective record review was completed for a random sample of 17% of all inpatient transfusion episodes over 6 months at 4 academic tertiary care hospitals, with an episode defined as all blood products released to a patient in 6 hours. Data were recorded by trained clinical research nurses, and serious reactions were adjudicated by a panel of transfusion medicine experts. Results Of 4857 transfusion episodes investigated, 1.1% were associated with a serious reaction. Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) was the most frequent serious reaction noted, being identified in 1% of transfusion episodes. Despite clinical notes describing a potential transfusion association in 59% of these cases, only 5.1% were reported to the transfusion service. Suspected transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI/possible TRALI), anaphylactic, and hypotensive reactions were noted in 0.08%, 0.02%, and 0.02% of transfusion episodes. Minor reactions, including febrile non-hemolytic and allergic, were noted in 0.62% and 0.29% of transfusion episodes, with 30–50% reported to the transfusion service. Conclusion Underreporting of cardiopulmonary transfusion reactions is striking among academic, tertiary care hospitals. Complete and accurate reporting is essential to identify, define, establish pathogenesis, and mitigate/treat transfusion reactions. A better understanding of the failure to report may improve the accuracy of passive reporting systems. PMID:27460200

  6. Acute pain transfusion reaction.

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    Hardwick, Jody; Osswald, Michael; Walker, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH) received a double umbilical cord blood transplantation following a myeloablative chemotherapy preparative regimen with busulfan and cyclophosphamide. HLH is a rare, potentially fatal hematologic disorder characterized by the overactivation of histocytes and T lymphocytes, leading to organ infiltration and acute illness. On day 25 post-transplantation, the patient required a platelet transfusion for a platelet count of 6,000 per ml (normal range = 150,000-450,000 per ml). The patient's blood type prior to the cord blood transplantation was B positive and, although both umbilical cord blood donors were O positive, the patient was still B positive per blood bank testing on that day. Although the recipient of an allogenic stem cell transplantation will eventually become the blood type of the donor, the time for this process to occur varies for each person. That process must be monitored by the blood bank for the purpose of cross-matching blood products to decrease hemolysis as much as possible. The patient was premedicated with the facility's standard for platelet transfusions: acetaminophen 650 mg and diphenhydramine 25 mg about 30 minutes prior to the platelet transfusion.

  7. Comparing transfusion reaction rates for various plasma types: a systematic review and meta-analysis/regression.

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    Saadah, Nicholas H; van Hout, Fabienne M A; Schipperus, Martin R; le Cessie, Saskia; Middelburg, Rutger A; Wiersum-Osselton, Johanna C; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2017-09-01

    We estimated rates for common plasma-associated transfusion reactions and compared reported rates for various plasma types. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of peer-reviewed articles that reported plasma transfusion reaction rates. Random-effects pooled rates were calculated and compared between plasma types. Meta-regression was used to compare various plasma types with regard to their reported plasma transfusion reaction rates. Forty-eight studies reported transfusion reaction rates for fresh-frozen plasma (FFP; mixed-sex and male-only), amotosalen INTERCEPT FFP, methylene blue-treated FFP, and solvent/detergent-treated pooled plasma. Random-effects pooled average rates for FFP were: allergic reactions, 92/10 5 units transfused (95% confidence interval [CI], 46-184/10 5 units transfused); febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs), 12/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 7-22/10 5 units transfused); transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), 6/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 1-30/10 5 units transfused); transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), 1.8/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 1.2-2.7/10 5 units transfused); and anaphylactic reactions, 0.8/10 5 units transfused (95% CI, 0-45.7/10 5 units transfused). Risk differences between plasma types were not significant for allergic reactions, TACO, or anaphylactic reactions. Methylene blue-treated FFP led to fewer FNHTRs than FFP (risk difference = -15.3 FNHTRs/10 5 units transfused; 95% CI, -24.7 to -7.1 reactions/10 5 units transfused); and male-only FFP led to fewer cases of TRALI than mixed-sex FFP (risk difference = -0.74 TRALI/10 5 units transfused; 95% CI, -2.42 to -0.42 injuries/10 5 units transfused). Meta-regression demonstrates that the rate of FNHTRs is lower for methylene blue-treated compared with FFP, and the rate of TRALI is lower for male-only than for mixed-sex FFP; whereas no significant differences are observed between plasma types for allergic reactions, TACO

  8. Descriptions of Acute Transfusion Reactions in the Teaching Hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Iran

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    Payandeh, Mehrdad; Zare, Mohammad Erfan; Kansestani, Atefeh Nasir; Pakdel, Shirin Falah; Jahanpour, Firuzeh; Yousefi, Hoshang; Soleimanian, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Background Transfusion services rely on transfusion reaction reporting to provide patient care and protect the blood supply. Unnecessary discontinuation of blood is a major wastage of scarce blood, as well as man, hours and funds. The aim of the present study was to describe the main characteristics of acute transfusion reactions reported in the 4 hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. Material and Methods The study was carried out at 4 teaching hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran, over18 months from April 2010. All adult patients on admission in the hospitals who required blood transfusion and had establish diagnosis and consented were included in the study. Results In the year 2010 until 2012, a total of 6238 units of blood components were transfused. A total of 59 (0.94%) cases of transfusion reaction were reported within this 3 years period. The commonest were allergic reactions which presented with various skin manifestations such as urticarial, rashes and pruritus (49.2%), followed by increase in body temperature of > 1°C from baseline which was reported as febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (37.2%). pain at the transfusion site (6.8%) and hypotension (6.8%). Conclusion It is important that each transfusion of blood components to be monitor carefully. Many transfusion reactions are not recognized, because signs and symptoms mimic other clinical conditions. Any unexpected symptoms in a transfusion recipient should at least be considered as a possible transfusion reaction and be evaluated. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute transfusion reaction are crucial and would help in decreasing transfusion related morbidity and mortality, but prevention is preferable. PMID:24505522

  9. Descriptions of acute transfusion reactions in the teaching hospitals of kermanshah university of medical sciences, iran.

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    Payandeh, Mehrdad; Zare, Mohammad Erfan; Kansestani, Atefeh Nasir; Pakdel, Shirin Falah; Jahanpour, Firuzeh; Yousefi, Hoshang; Soleimanian, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion services rely on transfusion reaction reporting to provide patient care and protect the blood supply. Unnecessary discontinuation of blood is a major wastage of scarce blood, as well as man, hours and funds. The aim of the present study was to describe the main characteristics of acute transfusion reactions reported in the 4 hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (KUMS), Kermanshah, Iran. The study was carried out at 4 teaching hospital of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran, over18 months from April 2010. All adult patients on admission in the hospitals who required blood transfusion and had establish diagnosis and consented were included in the study. In the year 2010 until 2012, a total of 6238 units of blood components were transfused. A total of 59 (0.94%) cases of transfusion reaction were reported within this 3 years period. The commonest were allergic reactions which presented with various skin manifestations such as urticarial, rashes and pruritus (49.2%), followed by increase in body temperature of > 1°C from baseline which was reported as febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (37.2%). pain at the transfusion site (6.8%) and hypotension (6.8%). It is important that each transfusion of blood components to be monitor carefully. Many transfusion reactions are not recognized, because signs and symptoms mimic other clinical conditions. Any unexpected symptoms in a transfusion recipient should at least be considered as a possible transfusion reaction and be evaluated. Prompt recognition and treatment of acute transfusion reaction are crucial and would help in decreasing transfusion related morbidity and mortality, but prevention is preferable.

  10. Retrospective evaluation of adverse transfusion reactions following blood product transfusion from a tertiary care hospital: A preliminary step towards hemovigilance

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    Praveen Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The goal of hemovigilance is to increase the safety and quality of blood transfusion. Identification of the adverse reactions will help in taking appropriate steps to reduce their incidence and make blood transfusion process as safe as possible. Aims : To determine the frequency and type of transfusion reactions (TRs occurring in patients, reported to the blood bank at our institute. Materials and Methods : A retrospective review of all TRs reported to the blood bank at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, between December 2007 and April 2012 was done. All the TRs were evaluated in the blood bank and classified using standard definitions. Results: During the study period a total of 380,658 bloods and blood components were issued by our blood bank. Out of the total 196 adverse reactions reported under the hemovigilance system, the most common type of reaction observed was allergic 55.1% (n = 108, followed by febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR 35.7% (n = 70. Other less frequently observed reactions were Anaphylactoid reactions 5.1% (n = 10, Acute non-immune HTRs 2.6% (n = 5, Circulatory overload 0.5% (n = 1, Transfusion related acute lung injury 0.5% (n = 1, Delayed HTRs 0.5% (n = 1. Not a single case of bacterial contamination was observed. Conclusion: The frequency of TRs in our patients was found to be 0.05% (196 out of 380,658. This can be an underestimation of the true incidence because of under reporting. It should be the responsibility of the blood transfusion consultant to create awareness amongst their clinical counterpart about safe transfusion practices so that proper hemovigilance system can be achieved to provide better patient care.

  11. Transfusion-related adverse reactions in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital in India

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    Kunal J Ghataliya

    2017-01-01

    Results: A total of 411 pediatric and 433 surgical patients received 594 and 745 transfusions respectively during the study period. Of these, TRs were observed in 69 (11.6% children and 63 (8.4% surgical patients. Majority of reactions in children (48, 69.5% and surgical patients (51, 80.9% were acute, developing within 24 h of transfusion. TRs were observed with packed cells (13.2%, cryoprecipitate (10%, platelet concentrate (14.3% and fresh frozen plasma (1.3% in pediatric patients and with packed cells (7.2%, whole blood (25% and platelet concentrate (62.5% in surgical patients. Most common TRs included febrile nonhemolytic TRs (FNHTRs and allergic reactions. Reactions were more frequent in patients with a previous history of transfusion or those receiving more than one transfusion and in children, when transfusion was initiated after 30 min of issue of blood component. Majority of reactions were managed with symptomatic treatment, were nonserious, moderately severe, probably preventable and probably associated with the suspect blood component in both populations. Conclusion: Transfusion reactions in children and surgical patients are commonly observed with cellular blood components. Majority of reactions are acute and nonserious. FNHTRs and allergic reactions are the most common transfusion reactions. Risk of transfusion reactions is more in patients receiving multiple transfusions.

  12. Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program

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    Vasudev, Rahul; Sawhney, Vijay; Dogra, Mitu; Raina, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In this study we have evaluated the various adverse reactions related to transfusion occurring in our institution as a pilot institutional effort toward a hemovigilance program. This study will also help in understanding the problems faced by blood banks/Transfusion Medicine departments in implementing an effective hemovigilance program. Materials and Methods: All the adverse reactions related to transfusion of whole blood and its components in various clinical specialties were studied for a period of 1 year. Any transfusion-related adverse event was worked up in accordance with guidelines laid down by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) and departmental standard operating procedures. Results: During the study period from November 1, 2011 to October 31, 2012, 45812 components were issued [30939 WB/PRBC; 12704 fresh frozen plasma (FFP); 2169 platelets]. Risk estimation per 1000 units of red cells (WB/PRBC) transfused was estimated to be: 0.8 for febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR), 0.7 for allergic reaction, 0.19 for acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AcHTR), 0.002 for anaphylactoid reactions, 0.1 for bacterial sepsis, and 0.06 for hypervolemia and hypocalcemia. 0.09 is the risk for delayed transfusion reaction and 0.03 is the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Risk estimate per 1,000 units of platelets transfused was estimated to be 1.38 for FNHTR, 1.18 for allergic reaction, and 1 in case of bacterial sepsis. Risk estimation per 1,000 units of FFP was estimated to be 0.15 for FNHTR and 0.2 for allergic reactions. Conclusions: Factors such as clerical checks at various levels, improvement in blood storage conditions outside blood banks, leukodepletion, better inventory management, careful donor screening, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events may decrease transfusion-related adverse events. Better coordination between transfusion specialists and various clinical specialties

  13. Transfusion-related adverse reactions in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital in India.

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    Ghataliya, Kunal J; Kapadia, Jigar D; Desai, Mira K; Mehariya, K M; Rathod, G H; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Gajjar, M D

    2017-01-01

    Use of blood and its components is lifesaving. However, their use is often associated with adverse events. To analyze the pattern of adverse reactions associated with transfusion of blood and its components in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients receiving transfusion of blood or its components in a randomly selected unit each from Departments of Pediatrics, including thalassemia OPD and surgery, were monitored intensively for a period of 6 months. Clinical course, management, outcome, causality, severity, seriousness, and preventability of observed transfusion reactions (TRs) were analyzed. A total of 411 pediatric and 433 surgical patients received 594 and 745 transfusions respectively during the study period. Of these, TRs were observed in 69 (11.6%) children and 63 (8.4%) surgical patients. Majority of reactions in children (48, 69.5%) and surgical patients (51, 80.9%) were acute, developing within 24 h of transfusion. TRs were observed with packed cells (13.2%), cryoprecipitate (10%), platelet concentrate (14.3%) and fresh frozen plasma (1.3%) in pediatric patients and with packed cells (7.2%), whole blood (25%) and platelet concentrate (62.5%) in surgical patients. Most common TRs included febrile nonhemolytic TRs (FNHTRs) and allergic reactions. Reactions were more frequent in patients with a previous history of transfusion or those receiving more than one transfusion and in children, when transfusion was initiated after 30 min of issue of blood component. Majority of reactions were managed with symptomatic treatment, were nonserious, moderately severe, probably preventable and probably associated with the suspect blood component in both populations. Transfusion reactions in children and surgical patients are commonly observed with cellular blood components. Majority of reactions are acute and nonserious. FNHTRs and allergic reactions are the most common transfusion reactions. Risk of transfusion reactions is more in

  14. Transfusion-related adverse reactions in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital in India

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    Ghataliya, Kunal J.; Kapadia, Jigar D.; Desai, Mira K.; Mehariya, K. M.; Rathod, G. H.; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Gajjar, M. D.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Use of blood and its components is lifesaving. However, their use is often associated with adverse events. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the pattern of adverse reactions associated with transfusion of blood and its components in pediatric and surgical patients at a tertiary care teaching hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients receiving transfusion of blood or its components in a randomly selected unit each from Departments of Pediatrics, including thalassemia OPD and surgery, were monitored intensively for a period of 6 months. Clinical course, management, outcome, causality, severity, seriousness, and preventability of observed transfusion reactions (TRs) were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 411 pediatric and 433 surgical patients received 594 and 745 transfusions respectively during the study period. Of these, TRs were observed in 69 (11.6%) children and 63 (8.4%) surgical patients. Majority of reactions in children (48, 69.5%) and surgical patients (51, 80.9%) were acute, developing within 24 h of transfusion. TRs were observed with packed cells (13.2%), cryoprecipitate (10%), platelet concentrate (14.3%) and fresh frozen plasma (1.3%) in pediatric patients and with packed cells (7.2%), whole blood (25%) and platelet concentrate (62.5%) in surgical patients. Most common TRs included febrile nonhemolytic TRs (FNHTRs) and allergic reactions. Reactions were more frequent in patients with a previous history of transfusion or those receiving more than one transfusion and in children, when transfusion was initiated after 30 min of issue of blood component. Majority of reactions were managed with symptomatic treatment, were nonserious, moderately severe, probably preventable and probably associated with the suspect blood component in both populations. CONCLUSION: Transfusion reactions in children and surgical patients are commonly observed with cellular blood components. Majority of reactions are acute and nonserious. FNHTRs and allergic reactions are the most

  15. Patterns of Adverse Transfusion Reactions in a Tertiary Care Centre of North India: A Step Towards Hemovigilance.

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    Bassi, Rajni; Aggarwal, Shikha; Bhardwaj, Kanchan; Thakur, Kusum K

    2017-06-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood products is a double edged sword, so it should be used judiciously. The primary aim of the centralized Haemovigilance Program is to improve transfusion safety. To determine the incidence of adverse transfusion reactions (ATRs) in recipients of blood and blood components. Prospective study from January 2014 till April 2015 was done. ATRs reported to the Department of Transfusion Medicine were recorded and analyzed on the basis of their clinical features and lab tests. During the study period 25,099 units of blood and blood components were transfused and 100 ATRs (0.40 %) were reported. The incidence of febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTR) was maximum (73 %) followed by allergic reactions (24 %), bacterial sepsis (1 %), hypotension due to ACE inhibitors (1 %) and acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AHTR) (1 %). Of all the reported ATRs, 76 % occurred with packed red cells, 15 % occurred with whole blood, while platelets and Fresh Frozen Plasma transfusions were responsible for 8 % and 1 %, respectively. The majority of the reactions were FNHTRs followed by allergic reactions. Reporting of all adverse events and continuous medical education to medical and paramedical staff will help in strengthening hemovigilance system.

  16. Transfusion-related adverse reactions reported to the National Healthcare Safety Network Hemovigilance Module, United States, 2010 to 2012.

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    Harvey, Alexis R; Basavaraju, Sridhar V; Chung, Koo-Whang; Kuehnert, Matthew J

    2015-04-01

    In 2010, health care facilities in the United States began voluntary enrollment in the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) Hemovigilance Module. Participants report transfusion practices; red blood cell, platelet (PLT), plasma, and cryoprecipitate units transfused; and transfusion-related adverse reactions and process errors to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through a secure, Internet-accessible surveillance application available to transfusing facilities. Facilities submitting at least 1 month of transfused components data and adverse reactions from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012, were included in this analysis. Adverse reaction rates for transfused components, stratified by component type and collection and modification methods, were calculated. In 2010 to 2012, a total of 77 facilities reported 5136 adverse reactions among 2,144,723 components transfused (239.5/100,000). Allergic (46.8%) and febrile nonhemolytic (36.1%) reactions were most frequent; 7.2% of all reactions were severe or life-threatening and 0.1% were fatal. PLT transfusions (421.7/100,000) had the highest adverse reaction rate. Adverse transfusion reaction rates from the NHSN Hemovigilance Module in the United States are comparable to early hemovigilance reporting from other countries. Although severe reactions are infrequent, the numbers of transfusion reactions in US hospitals suggest that interventions to prevent these reactions are important for patient safety. Further investigation is needed to understand the apparent increased risk of reactions from apheresis-derived blood components. Comprehensive evaluation, including data validation, is important to continued refinement of the module. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Initiation and Regulation of Complement during Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

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    Stowell, Sean R.; Winkler, Anne M.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Smith, Nicole H.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Cummings, Richard D.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions represent one of the most common causes of transfusion-related mortality. Although many factors influence hemolytic transfusion reactions, complement activation represents one of the most common features associated with fatality. In this paper we will focus on the role of complement in initiating and regulating hemolytic transfusion reactions and will discuss potential strategies aimed at mitigating or favorably modulating complement during incompatible red blood cell transfusions. PMID:23118779

  18. Urticarial Reactions In Multi Transfused Patients In University Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The study was aimed at determining the pattern of urticarial transfusion reactions (UTR) among patients who received multiple blood transfusions at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital (UMTH) from 1997 2001. Materials and Methods: A total of 154 multi transfused patients who received transfusions ...

  19. Precautions and Adverse Reactions during Blood Transfusion

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    ... the Professional Version Blood Transfusion Overview of Blood Transfusion Blood Donation Process Blood Products Special Blood Donation Procedures ... CORTEF, SOLU-CORTEF Blood Transfusion Overview of Blood Transfusion Blood Donation Process Blood Products Special Blood Donation Procedures ...

  20. Adverse transfusion reactions in recipients transfused in out-of-hospital.

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    Moncharmont, P; Barday, G; Odent-Malaure, H; Benamara, H

    2018-03-16

    Transfusion in environments other than inpatient hospitalisation requires a specific management of the patient, particularly concerning adverse transfusion reactions. A three-year study was carried out in order to appreciate the nature of adverse transfusion reactions and their incidence in these patients. Adverse transfusion reaction reports of outpatient clinic, ambulatory hospital, health and dialysis centres and home-transfused patients in the Auvergne Rhône Alpes region were obtained. Diagnosis of adverse transfusion reactions, their incidence, their degree of severity, the imputability of the blood component concerned were evaluated. From 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2016, 3,284 reports were notified. Excluding allo-immunisations, 416 reports were obtained, including 376 (90.4%) in outpatient clinic. The febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reaction was the most frequent adverse transfusion reaction (119 cases, 28.6%) followed by allergy (112 cases, 26.9%). A transfusion-associated circulatory overload was notified in 26 cases (6.3%). Among the 416 reports, 363 were non-severe and in 251, a red blood cell concentrate was involved (60.3%). The imputability of the blood product was certain in 50 cases (12.0%) only. With the exception of inpatient hospitalisation and allo-immunisation, the majority of adverse transfusion reactions was notified in outpatient clinic. The febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reaction was the most frequent. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Recognition, Investigation and Management of Acute Transfusion Reactions

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    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Hashmi, Sabria; Al-Arimi, Zainab; Wadsworth, Louis D.; Al-Rawas, Abdulhakim; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Daar, Shahina

    2014-01-01

    The recognition and management of transfusion reactions (TRs) are critical to ensure patient safety during and after a blood transfusion. Transfusion reactions are classified into acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) or delayed transfusion reactions, and each category includes different subtypes. Different ATRs share common signs and symptoms which can make categorisation difficult at the beginning of the reaction. Moreover, TRs are often under-recognised and under-reported. To ensure uniform practice and safety, it is necessary to implement a national haemovigilance system and a set of national guidelines establishing policies for blood transfusion and for the detection and management of TRs. In Oman, there are currently no local TR guidelines to guide physicians and hospital blood banks. This paper summarises the available literature and provides consensus guidelines to be used in the recognition, management and reporting of ATRs. PMID:25097764

  2. Blood transfusion reactions in two neonatal intensive care units

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    Alex Jair Ortiz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Given the advances in neonatology have increased survival of premature infants, an increase in transfusions and thus their effects. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional observational study. We included neonates transfused with 2 red blood units in infants of Popayan for a year. We register demographic data, laboratory and hemodynamic before, during and in the first 24 hours post transfusion and adverse reactions. Results: The prevalence of transfusion was 17.3%. 50% were children, the average age at which transfusion was performed was 22 days, the average weight was 1350 g., Mean gestational age 30 weeks, 71% of the children had sepsis. 96.8% had a transfusion event, 85.5% had adverse reactions: metabolic rate 45.1% and 21% overload. Considering the attribution definite reaction was determined by 35.5%. Significant association was found (p

  3. Leukocytes and transfusion related adverse events: the effects of leuko-reduction process in the prevention of adverse reactions resulted from the transfusion of blood components: review article

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    Ehteramolsadat Hosseini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is commonly implemented to manage life and health-threatening conditions on a rapid and short-term basis. Over the years, ongoing technical advances have dramatically improved transfusion medicine to provide more safety and effectiveness. However, transfusion is still complicated with different adverse events that mainly induced by the presence of allogeneic leukocytes in the blood products. Several lines of evidence have shown that leukocytes in blood components are involved in the induction of febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs, HLA alloimmunization and platelet refractoriness as well as the increased risk of the infectious diseases transmitted by leukotropic viruses including cytomegalovirus (CMV, human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-I/II and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. During current decades, introducing various leuko-reduction techniques have shown to be associated with less transfusion related adverse events and improved clinical outcomes. The lower incidence and severity of febrile transfusion reactions; reduced risk of transfusion related transmission of CMV or other leukocyte-associated infections, lowered incidence of alloimmune platelet refractoriness in addition to reducing risk of mortality and morbidity in patients are considered as clinical benefits of leuko-reduced products. Currently, by the use of 3rd and 4th generation of filters, the highest levels of leukoreduction in blood components have been achieved. Filtration techniques have also the advantages of being performed shortly after preparation of components (pre-storage or post-storage even at the patient’s bedside. However, it seems that pre-storage depletion of leukocytes provides better protection than post-storage techniques due to the elimination of leukocyte-derived cytokines effects which are increasingly released during storage. Particularly in platelet products, the earlier depletion of leukocyte also favors less platelet

  4. A revised classification scheme for acute transfusion reactions.

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    Sanders, Robert P; Geiger, Terrence L; Heddle, Nancy; Pui, Ching-Hon; Howard, Scott C

    2007-04-01

    Although the standard classification system for acute transfusion reactions adequately describes the general features associated with the various types of reactions, it was not designed to provide strict criteria for diagnosis and classification. Consequently, its use to classify individual reactions can result in significant inter- and intraobserver variability, which can complicate patient management and clinical research. A total of 595 transfusion reactions that occurred at a single institution between January 1, 1996, and December 31, 2003, were reviewed and were initially classified according to the established conventions of the AABB. Each reaction was then reclassified with a revised system that refines and clarifies reaction categories, adds severity grades in the format of the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), and includes terminology to indicate the attribution or likelihood that the adverse event is related to the transfusion. Comparison of the two approaches as applied to these 595 transfusion reactions showed clear advantages for the revised system. Of 128 reactions classified by AABB criteria as inconclusive, a mixture of reaction types, or otherwise qualified, all but 5 were accommodated by discrete categories within our revised scheme. In each case with a classifiable reaction, the severity of the reaction could be readily graded. The advantages of this revised classification scheme for acute transfusion reactions warrant prospective evaluation and ultimately consideration of its incorporation into clinical practice.

  5. Platelet transfusion therapy in sub-Saharan Africa: bacterial contamination, recipient characteristics and acute transfusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Heather A.; Ddungu, Henry; Angom, Racheal; Baluku, Hannington; Kajumbula, Henry; Kyeyune-Byabazaire, Dorothy; Orem, Jackson; Ramirez-Arcos, Sandra; Tobian, Aaron A.R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Little data are available on bacterial contamination (BC) of platelet units or acute transfusion reactions to platelet transfusions (PT) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Methods This prospective observational study evaluated the rate of BC of whole blood derived platelet units (WB-PU), the utility of performing Gram stains (GS) to prevent septic reactions, characteristics of patients receiving PT and the rate of acute reactions associated with PT at the Uganda Cancer Institute in Kampala, Uganda. An aliquot of each WB-PU studied was taken to perform GS and culture using the Bactec™ 9120 instrument. Study participants were monitored for reactions. Results 337 WB-PU were evaluated for BC, of which 323 units were transfused in 151 transfusion episodes to 50 patients. The frequency of BC ranged from 0.3%–2.1% (according to criteria used to define BC). The GS had high specificity (99.1%), but low sensitivity to detect units with BC. The median platelet count prior to PT was 10,900 (IQR 6,000–18,900) cells/μL. 78% of PT were given to patients with no bleeding. Acute reactions occurred in 11 transfusion episodes, involving 13 WB-PU, for a rate of 7.3% (95%CI=3.7–12.7%) per transfusion episode. All recipients of units with positive bacterial cultures were receiving antibiotics at the time of transfusion; none experienced a reaction. Conclusions The rate of BC observed in this study is lower than previously reported in SSA, but still remains a safety issue. As GS appears to be an ineffective screening tool, alternate methods should be explored to prevent transfusing bacterially-contaminated platelets in SSA. PMID:27079627

  6. Estimation of the prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Benjamin P.L.; Lohrke, Britta; Wilkinson, Robert; Pitman, John P.; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Bock, Naomi; Lowrance, David W.; Kuehnert, Matthew J.; Mataranyika, Mary; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute transfusion reactions are probably common in sub-Saharan Africa, but transfusion reaction surveillance systems have not been widely established. In 2008, the Blood Transfusion Service of Namibia implemented a national acute transfusion reaction surveillance system, but substantial under-reporting was suspected. We estimated the actual prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia. Methods The percentage of transfusion events resulting in a reported acute transfusion reaction was calculated. Actual percentage and rates of acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units were estimated by reviewing patients’ records from six hospitals, which transfuse >99% of all blood in Windhoek. Patients’ records for 1,162 transfusion events occurring between 1st January – 31st December 2011 were randomly selected. Clinical and demographic information were abstracted and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network criteria were applied to categorize acute transfusion reactions1. Results From January 1 – December 31, 2011, there were 3,697 transfusion events (involving 10,338 blood units) in the selected hospitals. Eight (0.2%) acute transfusion reactions were reported to the surveillance system. Of the 1,162 transfusion events selected, medical records for 785 transfusion events were analysed, and 28 acute transfusion reactions were detected, of which only one had also been reported to the surveillance system. An estimated 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.3–4.4) of transfusion events in Windhoek resulted in an acute transfusion reaction, with an estimated rate of 11.5 (95% CI: 7.6–14.5) acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units. Conclusion The estimated actual rate of acute transfusion reactions is higher than the rate reported to the national haemovigilance system. Improved surveillance and interventions to reduce transfusion-related morbidity and mortality

  7. Is This a Blood Transfusion Reaction? Don't Hesitate; Check It Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisle, Julie

    Blood transfusions can be lifesaving. The majority are completed without incident. However, every transfusion recipient runs the risk of developing a transfusion reaction or adverse event. These reactions can be acute, occurring during or soon after transfusion, or delayed, occurring days to weeks later. Nurses need to be able to recognize and respond to these reactions appropriately.

  8. Analysis of immediate transfusion incidents reported in a regional blood bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Lemos de Sousa Neto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion is imperative when treating certain patients; however, it is not risk free. In addition to the possible transmission of contagious infectious diseases, incidents can occur immediately after transfusion and at a later time. AIMS: This study aimed to examine the immediate transfusion incidents reported in a regional blood bank in the state of Minas Gerais between December 2006 and December 2009. A retrospective quantitative epidemiological study was conducted. Data were obtained from 202 transfusion incident reports of 42 health institutions served by the blood bank. Data processing and analysis were carried out using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS software. RESULTS: The rate of immediate transfusion incidents reported in the period was 0.24%; febrile non-hemolytic reactions were the most common type of incident (56.4%. The most frequent clinical manifestations listed in transfusion incident reports were chills (26.9% and fever (21.6%. There was a statistically significant association (p-value < 0.05 between the infusion of platelet concentrates and febrile non-hemolytic reactions and between fresh frozen plasma and febrile non-hemolytic reaction. The majority (73.3% of transfused patients who suffered immediate transfusion incidents had already been transfused and 36.5% of the cases had previous transfusion incident reports. CONCLUSIONS: Data from the present study corroborate the implementation of new professional training programs aimed at blood transfusion surveillance. These measures should emphasize prevention, identification and reporting of immediate transfusion incidents aiming to increase blood transfusion quality and safety.

  9. Transfusion reaction and hemovigilance: An imperative discussion in Brazilian hemotherapy services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo dos Santos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion of blood components is considered safer, but it took years to reach this level. One of the most effective ways to make blood transfusion a safer practice is hemovigilance, which provides important data, including the history of feared transfusion reactions. In recent years in Brazil, there has been an improvement in the reporting of transfusion reactions, however due to the great diversity of hematology services, there are still transfusion reactions. The aims of this study were described the main types of transfusion reactions, as well as to evaluate the underreporting importance of transfusion occurrences of hemotherapy services in Brazil.

  10. Importance of haemovigilance and reports on transfusion reaction in blood component therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Grujić Jasmina; Gulan Zdravko; Budakov Zorana

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Application of blood and blood components throughout decades is very successful and mostly safe procedure in patients’ therapy. However, it may lead to unfavourable effects, such as transfusion reactions. Material and Methods. In the period from 2000 to 2009, 180 transfusion reactions were reported at the Department of Clinical Transfusion of the Service for Blood Transfusion of Vojvodina in Novi Sad. The aetiology of transfusion reactions was determined by examining pretr...

  11. Leukocyte and plasma activation profiles in chronically transfused patients with a history of allergic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Magali J; Shih, Hank; Schubert, Richard; Wong, Wendy; Andrews, Jennifer; Jeng, Michael; Tirouvanziam, Rabindra

    2017-11-01

    Allergic transfusion reactions are drawbacks to the benefits of transfusion. Classically, allergic transfusion reactions depend on histamine release from mast cells or basophils, but other leukocyte subsets may also be important. Thus, we propose to better define the exact leukocyte subsets involved in allergic transfusion reactions. The overall objective of the current study was to compare the activation of specific peripheral blood leukocyte subsets (monocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) in a cohort of 13 patients who received chronic transfusions and had a history of allergic transfusion reactions compared with a control group of patients who received chronic transfusions and had no history of allergic transfusion reactions. Leukocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry at baseline and after red blood cell transfusion, and cytokine levels in platelet-free plasma collected at the same time points were measured by Luminex assay. Flow cytometry and cytokine profiles before and after transfusion did not differ significantly between patients who did and did not have a history of allergic transfusion reactions (p > 0.05). However, post-transfusion samples from both groups showed a decrease in CD63 expression in basophils, monocytes, and eosinophils and a decrease in CD45 expression in all leukocyte subsets compared with pretransfusion samples. Interleukin 10 levels increased after transfusion in the group with a history of allergic transfusion reactions (p = 0.0469), and RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) was significantly decreased post-transfusion in all patients (p = 0.0122). None of the leukocyte subsets from patients who had a history of allergic transfusion reactions significantly increased in activation either before or after transfusion. All leukocyte subsets from patients who did and did not have a history of allergic transfusion reactions decreased in their activation profile upon

  12. Anti-M causing delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alperin, J.B.; Riglin, H.; Branch, D.R.; Gallagher, M.T.; Petz, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    A 52-year-old gravida 1, para 1 woman with M- red cells experienced a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction and exhibited an anti-M antibody following the infusion of four units of M+ red cells. Measurements of erythrocyte survival using 51 Cr-labeled donor M+ and M- red cells and in vitro studies of monocyte-macrophage phagocytosis of sensitized reagent red cells implicate anti-M in the pathogenesis of hemolysis

  13. Transfusion reactions in pediatric compared with adult patients: a look at rate, reaction type, and associated products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakley, Fredrick D; Woods, Marcella; Arnold, Shanna; Young, Pampee P

    2015-03-01

    The majority of reports on transfusion reactions address adult patients. Less is known about the types, incidence, and other clinical details of transfusion reactions in pediatric populations. Furthermore, to our knowledge, there have been no previous reports directly comparing these aspects between adults and pediatric patient populations to assess if there are differences. Between the period of January 1, 2011, and February 1, 2013, all reported adult and pediatric transfusion reactions at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) were evaluated by transfusion medicine clinical service. The information was subsequently shared with the hemovigilance database. Data provided to hemovigilance included age, sex, blood product associated with the reaction, severity of the reaction, and the type of transfusion reactions. These were collated with hospital and blood bank information system-acquired data on overall admission and product transfusion. A total of 133,671 transfusions were performed at VUMC during the study period including 20,179 platelet (PLT) transfusions, 31,605 plasma transfusions, 79,933 red blood cell (RBC) transfusions, and 2154 cryoprecipitate transfusions. Over the same period, 108 pediatric and 277 adult transfusion reactions were recorded. This corresponds to an incidence of 6.2 reactions per 1000 transfusions within the pediatric (age reactions per 1000 transfusions within the adult population. In both adult and pediatric populations, transfusion reactions were most commonly associated with PLT, followed by RBC, and then plasma transfusions. Within the pediatric population, subset analysis identified multiple differences when compared to the adult population, including an increased incidence of allergic transfusion reactions (2.7/1000 vs. 1.1/1000, p reactions (1.9/1000 vs. 0.47/1000, p reactions (0.29/1000 vs. 0.078/1000, p reaction incidence was the same between sexes in adults, in pediatric patients, reactions were more common in male

  14. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-Jk(a).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vucelic, D; Savic, N; Djordjevic, R

    2005-01-01

    Kidd antibodies are very heterogeneous and difficult to detect. They have been frequently implicated in delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions (DHTRs). A 64 year old female (6 pregnancies, 2 deliveries, 4 abortions) with none red cell (RBC) transfusions in the history was admitted to hospital due to pneumonia and severe anemia. On admittance hemoglobin (Hb) level was 63g/L and hematocrit (Ht) 0.21 L/L. The blood sample of the patient was sent to laboratory for serologic testing since RBC transfusions were required. Patient appeared to beO Rh(D)+ with negative both direct antiglobulin (DAT) and routine antibody screen (ID-DiaCell I+II+III-P). Three units of packed RBCs with negative crossmatch (tube method) were prepared. Patient received two units on Day 2 and one more on Day 3 without any discomfort. Hematological values after the third unit were: Hb 116g/L and Ht 0.37 L/L. On Day 6 she started to feel week, tired, with nausea and mild jaundice. Her Hb and Ht had dropped to 99 g/L and 0.33 L/L respectively, with tendency of dropping further (Day 7: Hb 83 g/L, Ht 0.26 L/L). Total serum bilirubin was 58.9 umol/L (normal range 20.5 umol/L) and direct fraction was 14.9 umol/L (normal range 7 umol/L). DTHR was suspected. Antibody identification performed by ID-DiaMed Gel Techique (GT) showed the presence of anti-Jk(a) with dosage phenomenon. All three previously transfused units were typed Jk(a) and the patient s RBCs were Jk(a-b+). She received two units of Jk(a) negative packed RBCs and was well enough to be discharged on Day 14. It is important to monitor clinical effect of transfusion regularly and to provide good team work between specialists of transfusion medicine and related medical staff. The policy of transfusion practice is to keep pretransfusion sample for three weeks and to perform cross-match tests on the samples no older then 24h and 48h respectively.

  15. Transfusion reaction in a case with the rare Bombay blood group

    OpenAIRE

    Shahshahani, Hayedeh Javadzadeh; Vahidfar, Mohamad Reza; Khodaie, Seyed Ali

    2013-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is extremely rare in Caucasian with an incidence of 1 in 250,000. When individuals with the Bombay phenotype need blood transfusion, they can receive only autologous blood or blood from another Bombay blood group. Transfusing blood group O red cells to them can cause a fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction. In this study, we report a case with the rare Bombay blood group that was misdiagnosed as the O blood group and developed a hemolytic transfusion reaction. This highlights ...

  16. Effect of premedication and other factors on the occurrence of acute transfusion reactions in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Joshua A; Kriese-Anderson, Lisa; Bruce, Ashley M; Pittman, Jennifer R

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of premedication on transfusion reactions (TRs) within 24 hours after blood product transfusions in dogs. Retrospective study between 2008 and 2011. Private veterinary referral hospital. Nine hundred and thirty-five transfusion events in 558 dogs. None. Medical records of dogs receiving blood product transfusions were reviewed. Information collected included signalment, weight, transfusion product type, reason for transfusion, first or subsequent transfusion, whether an acute reaction occurred, type of reaction, whether the reaction was treated, premedication prior to the transfusion and the premedication used, other medications the animal was given, whether the animal had an immune-mediated process, and whether the transfusion was administered in the perioperative period. A total of 144 (15%) acute TRs were documented in 136 dogs. The most common TRs were fever alone (77/144 [53%]) and vomiting alone (26/144 [18%]). Six dogs died due to the TR (4%). TR was not associated with age (P = 0.257), sex (P = 0.754), weight (P = 0.829), or premedication (P = 0.312). The type of blood product transfused (P reactions were documented following transfusions given in the perioperative period (P = 0.023). While most TRs were mild, there were some serious reactions observed including hemolysis, dyspnea, and 6 deaths. Immune-mediated disease was associated with development of a TR, while transfusion during the perioperative period was associated with lower likelihood of reaction. Packed RBC transfusions were associated with development of acute TRs. Overall occurrence of TR was not significantly altered with premedication; however, when evaluated alone, antihistamines decreased the incidence of acute allergic reactions. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  17. Transfusion reaction in a case with the rare Bombay blood group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayedeh Javadzadeh Shahshahani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bombay phenotype is extremely rare in Caucasian with an incidence of 1 in 250,000. When individuals with the Bombay phenotype need blood transfusion, they can receive only autologous blood or blood from another Bombay blood group. Transfusing blood group O red cells to them can cause a fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction. In this study, we report a case with the rare Bombay blood group that was misdiagnosed as the O blood group and developed a hemolytic transfusion reaction. This highlights the importance of both forward and reverse typing in ABO blood grouping and standard cross-matching and performing standard pretransfusion laboratory tests in hospital blood banks.

  18. Prevalence of acute blood transfusion reactions in Mazandaran Heart Center, Sari, Iran, 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Soheil; Tabary, Shervin Ziabakhsh; Soleimani, Arya

    2014-01-01

    Although blood transfusion is life saving for patients, it is responsible for a series of complications and exposes the patients to a variety of risks. Therefore knowing different adverse effects of blood transfusion represents a great issue in managing recipient patients. The aim of the present work was to study the prevalence of blood transfusion complications among patients in the Mazandaran Heart Center, Sari, Iran, during a period of 2 years. A retrospective review of all reported and evaluated acute transfusion reactions during a 2 years period in Mazandaran Heart Center was performed. Associated clinical signs and symptoms were evaluated. In 9193 transfused blood products, there was 34 (0.4%) acute transfusion reactions. The commonest were discomfort and restlessness (0.16%), dyspnea (0.16%), rigors (0.13%), fever (0.08%), chest pain (0.06%), rash or urticaria (0.04%), nausea and vomiting (0.03%), palpitation (0.03%), hypertension (0.03%) flashing (0.02%), hypotension (0.02%). Acute transfusion reaction is seen in %0.4 of transfused patients therefore, we recommend a well-structured program for monitoring adverse reactions associated with blood transfusion and blood product administration (Hemovigilance program).

  19. Fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-Ku in a Knull patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M; Wang, C L; Chen, F S; Ho, L H

    2003-01-01

    A fatal transfusion reaction due to anti-Ku in a Knull (Ko) patient is reported. The patient was transfused with 34 units of incompatible RBCs during 44 days of hospitalization. Apart from the first transfusion, all subsequent transfusions failed to raise the patient's Hb. No serum antibody was identified until he was transferred to another hospital for dialysis. A compatibility test demonstrated a weak antibody and autocontrol reacting at room temperature by a manual polybrene method. The antibody was considered to be a "cold agglutinin." A blood sample was sent to a reference laboratory where the patient was found to be Knull and the antibody was identified as anti-Ku.

  20. Transfusion as an Inflammation Hit: Knowns and Unknowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, Olivier; Tariket, S.; Sut, C.; Haddad, A.; Aloui, C.; Chakroun, T.; Laradi, S.; Cognasse, F.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion of blood cell components is frequent in the therapeutic arsenal; it is globally safe or even very safe. At present, residual clinical manifestations are principally inflammatory in nature. If some rare clinical hazards manifest as acute inflammation symptoms of various origin, most of them linked with conflicting and undesirable biological material accompanying the therapeutic component (infectious pathogen, pathogenic antibody, unwanted antigen, or allergen), the general feature is subtler and less visible, and essentially consists of alloimmunization or febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction. The present essay aims to present updates in hematology and immunology that help understand how, when, and why subclinical inflammation underlies alloimmunization and circumstances characteristic of red blood cells and – even more frequently – platelets that contribute inflammatory mediators. Modern transfusion medicine makes sustained efforts to limit such inflammatory hazards; efforts can be successful only if one has a clear view of each element’s role. PMID:27965664

  1. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following blood transfusion in a patient with factor X deficiency: Is it an unusual systemic manifestation of an adverse transfusion reaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anupam; Hemlata; Elhence, Priti; Phadke, Shubha R; Neyaz, Zafar

    2018-02-01

    Adverse neurological transfusion reactions including posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) following blood transfusion are rare. Our case an 18-year-female with known Factor X deficiency with menorrhagia developed severe hypertension, followed by generalised tonic clonic convulsions apparently after blood component transfusion. She had earlier received 4 units of red blood cells (RBC) for anaemia and 10 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) for menorrhagia (with prolonged PT and APTT) within short span of time at another hospital. There was no history of hypertension, convulsions, any cardiovascular, renal or neurological disease before transfusion. The clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging findings led to the diagnosis of PRES. Abnormal electroencephalogram and a hypercoagulable haemostatic profile on thromboelastography along with derangement in blood glucose and liver function tests were also observed. Patient responded well to the anticonvulsants and antihypertensive agents prescribed and was discharged in a stable condition. Our patient had a systemic transfusion reaction involving predominantly neurological system, however, cardiovascular, hepatic, haemostatic and endocrine systems were also affected. This case is unusual being the first report of PRES occurring in a patient with factor X deficiency presenting with an array of clinical and laboratory features which have not been reported in earlier studies involving PRES. Presumably the initial aggressive red cell transfusion to treat anaemia initiated the crisis and further large volumes of transfused FFP contributed to this adverse transfusion reaction in our case. Clinicians and Transfusion Medicine specialists should be aware about this uncommon clinical entity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An acute hemolytic transfusion reaction due to the "anti-c" rhesus antibody: A case report emphasizing the role of transfusion medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Sachan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhesus (Rh mediated hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTR are usually immunoglobulin G mediated and delayed onset. Rh antibodies being the cause of acute HTR (AHTR and intravascular hemolysis are still under debate. We report here a case of a 53-year-old male who developed AHTR due to "anti-c" antibodies within 3 h of blood transfusion, precipitating fatal acute liver failure in a patient with hepatitis C related chronic liver disease. This case emphasizes the need of inclusion of antibody screening in routine pretransfusion testing as well as a critical role of transfusion medicine specialists for early diagnosis and minimizing transfusion-related morbidity and mortality.

  3. Best practices in the differential diagnosis and reporting of acute transfusion reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillis CM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Christopher M Hillis,1–3,* Andrew W Shih,1,3,* Nancy M Heddle1,3,4 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Oncology, 3McMaster Transfusion Research Program, McMaster University, Hamilton, 4Centre for Innovation, Canadian Blood Services, Ottawa, ON, Canada  *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: An acute transfusion reaction (ATR is any reaction to blood, blood components, or plasma derivatives that occurs within 24 hours of a transfusion. The frequencies of ATRs and the associated symptoms, reported by the sentinel sites of the Ontario Transfusion Transmitted Injuries Surveillance System from 2008 to 2012, illustrate an overlap in presenting symptoms. Despite this complexity, the differential diagnosis of an ATR can be determined by considering predominant signs or symptoms, such as fever, dyspnea, rash, and/or hypotension, as these signs and symptoms guide further investigations and management. Reporting of ATRs locally and to hemovigilance systems enhances the safety of the blood supply. Challenges to the development of an international transfusion reaction reporting system are discussed, including the issue of jurisdiction and issues of standardization for definitions, investigations, and reporting requirements. This review discusses a symptom-guided approach to the differential diagnosis of ATRs, the evolution of hemovigilance systems, an overview of the current Canadian system, and proposes a best practice model for hemovigilance based on a World Health Organization patient safety framework. Keywords: blood transfusion, blood components, hemovigilance

  4. Increased alloimmunisation and transfusion reaction reporting in patients with solid-phase panreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofson, Andrea M; Chandler, Rachael M; Marx-Wood, Cynthia R; Babcock, Craig A; Dunbar, Nancy M

    2017-11-01

    Automated solid-phase antibody screening uses red blood cell (RBC) membranes immobilised on polystyrene test wells to detect RBC specific antibodies. Despite its time-saving and labour-saving benefits, this method produces a higher rate of nonspecific reactivity compared with manual screening. Solid-phase panreactivity (SPP) is characterised by panreactivity (ie, all test cells reacting) in solid-phase testing accompanied by a negative autocontrol and a lack of reactivity when the same screening cells are tested in tube. The mechanisms underlying SPP and its clinical significance remain unclear. The goals of this study were to describe the prevalence of SPP at our institution and determine the alloimmunisation and transfusion reaction rates within this population. Data were collected on all patients undergoing type and screen testing over a 6-year period. Study patients undergoing subsequent transfusion were evaluated for reported transfusion reactions and development of new alloantibodies. Of the 76 051 patients studied, 0.7% demonstrated SPP of which 11% developed new alloantibodies. The transfusion reaction reporting rate among patients with SPP was 2%. Our data suggest that patients with SPP have higher rates of reported transfusion reactions and alloantibody development compared with those without SPP. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amount of blood given. Although rare, a hemolytic transfusion reaction can occur when transfused red cells are damaged ... center staff needs to be aware of this reaction and take precautions if you undergo subsequent transfusions. Viral infection transmission . Since blood is a biological ...

  6. How we treat delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Kate; Hoppe, Carolyn; Mijovic, Aleksandar; Thein, Swee L

    2015-09-01

    Transfusion therapy is effective in the prevention and treatment of many complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). However, its benefits must be balanced against its risks, including delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions (DHTR). Not only is the relative rate of alloimmunization higher in patients with SCD than in other patient populations, but attendant risks associated with DHTR are even greater in SCD. Clinicians' awareness of DHTR events is poor because symptoms of DHTR mimic acute vaso-occlusive pain and immunohaematology findings are often negative. Transfusions delivered in the acute rather than elective setting appear to confer a higher risk of DHTR. Management of DHTR in SCD depends on the clinical severity, ranging from supportive care to immunosuppression, and optimization of erythropoiesis. DHTR must be considered in any recently transfused patient presenting with acute sickle cell pain. Meticulous documentation of transfusion and immunohaematology history is key. We anticipate an increase in DHTR events in SCD patients with the increasing use of red blood cell transfusion therapy. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Changes in circulating inflammatory markers following febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions to leucoreduced red cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, R; Sandhu, N; Heegaard, N H H

    2018-01-01

    It would be desirable to be able to distinguish fever as a result of febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTR) from other febrile conditions. To further characterize the inflammatory feature of FNHTR, we measured a large panel of inflammatory markers in pre- and posttransfusion plasma...... samples from patients with and without FNHTR following the transfusion of leucoreduced red blood cells. As FNHTR patients only displayed a significant increase in IL-6, we conclude that changes in plasma cytokine levels during FNHTR are unlikely to be used diagnostically. An incidental finding...

  8. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction presenting as a painful crisis in a patient with sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fabron Junior

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA are frequently transfused with red blood cells (RBC. Recently, we reported that the calculated risk of RBC alloimmunization per transfused unit in Brazilian patients with SCA is 1.15%. We describe a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR presenting as a painful crisis in a patient with SCA. CASE REPORT: A 35-year-old Brazilian female with homozygous SCA was admitted for a program of partial exchange transfusion prior to cholecystectomy. Her blood group was O RhD positive and no atypical RBC alloantibody was detected using the indirect antiglobulin technique. Pre-transfusional hemoglobin (Hb was 8.7 g/dL and isovolumic partial exchange transfusion was performed using 4 units of ABO compatible packed RBC. Five days after the last transfusion she developed generalized joint pain and fever of 39°C. Her Hb level dropped from 12.0 g/dL to 9.3 g/dL and the unconjugated bilirrubin level rose to 27 mmol/L. She was jaundiced and had hemoglobinuria. Hemoglobin electrophoresis showed 48.7% HbS, 46.6% HbA1, 2.7% HbA2, and 2.0% HbF. The patient’s extended RBC phenotype was CDe, K-k+, Kp(a-b+, Fy(a-b-, M+N+s+, Le(a+b-, Di(a-. An RBC alloantibody with specificity to the Rh system (anti-c, titer 1:16.384 was identified by the indirect antiglobulin test. The Rh phenotype of the RBC used in the last packed RBC transfusion was CcDEe. The patient was discharged, asymptomatic, 7 days after admission.

  9. Management of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sickle cell disease: Prevention, diagnosis, treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirenne, F; Bartolucci, P; Habibi, A

    2017-09-01

    Transfusion remains a key treatment of sickle cell disease complications. However, delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction, the most serious complication of transfusion, may be life-threatening if hyperhemolysis develops. This syndrome is generally underdiagnosed because its biological and clinical features resemble those of vaso-occlusive crisis, and red blood cell antibodies are frequently absent. Further transfusions may aggravate the symptoms, leading to severe multiple organ failure and death. It is therefore essential to prevent, diagnose and treat this syndrome efficiently. Prevention is based principally on the attenuation of allo-immunization through the provision of extended-matched RBCs or the use of rituximab. However, such treatment may be insufficient. Early diagnosis might make it possible to implement specific treatments in some cases, thereby avoiding the need for secondary transfusion. Diagnosis is dependent on the knowledge of the medical staff. Finally, many treatments, including steroids, immunoglobulins, erythropoietin and eculizumab, have been used to improve outcome. Improvements in our knowledge of the specific features of DHTR in SCD should facilitate management of this syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. [A delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction due to irregular antibodies with an anti-Kidd(a) specificity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörsdorf, S; Fritsch, E; Wagner, B; Seyfert, U T; Wenzel, E

    1997-10-24

    A 56-year-old woman was admitted for replacement of a previously implanted right hip prosthesis which had become loose (no infection). She limped painfully on a shortened leg whose mobility was markedly impaired. At the site of the previous operation the pelvis was lower by about 2 cm; the scar looked well healed. Routine laboratory tests were normal except for moderately raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (18/ 27 mm). There was complete loosening of the prosthesis on X-ray. Intraoperative bleeding from a branch of the inferior gluteal artery required blood transfusion and further erythrocyte infusions became necessary. Jaundice developed on the 4th postoperative day and 7 days later the direct Coombs test was positive with demonstrable agglutination. Free irregular erythrocytic anti-Kidd(a) (anti-jk[a]) antibodies were found in the serum. To counteract the delayed haemolytic transfusion reaction, exclusively jk(a)-negative erythrocytes were infused. The jaundice gradually disappeared and the bilirubin values became normal. Jaundice and signs of haemolysis after erythrocyte transfusion may be due to delayed transfusion reaction and should be investigated with the direct Coombs test.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of leucoreduction for prevention of febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsantes, Argirios E.; Kyriakou, Elias; Nikolopoulos, Georgios K.; Stylos, Dimitrios; Sidhom, Marlene; Bonovas, Stefanos; Douramani, Panagiota; Kalantzis, Dimitrios; Kokoris, Styliani; Valsami, Serena; Stamoulis, Konstantinos; Politou, Marianna; Foudoulaki-Paparizos, Leontini

    2014-01-01

    Background The cost-effectiveness of universal leucoreduction of blood components remains unclear. When using leucoreduced red blood cells, the decrease in the rate of febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTR) is the only proven, meaningful clinical benefit, whose relationship to costs can be calculated relatively easily. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of leucoreduction in avoiding FNHTR. Materials and methods Data were obtained from two large tertiary hospitals in Athens, Greece, over a 4-year period (2009–2012). The incidence of FNHTR in patients transfused with leucoreduced or non-leucodepleted red blood cells, the additional cost of leucoreduction and the cost to treat the FNHTR were estimated. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER), which is the ratio of the change in costs to the incremental benefits of leucoreduction, was calculated. Results In total, 86,032 red blood cell units were transfused. Of these, 53,409 were leucodepleted and 32,623 were non-leucoreduced. Among patients transfused with leucodepleted units, 25 cases (0.047%) met the criteria for having a FNHTR, while in patients treated with non-leucoreduced components, 134 FNHTR were observed (0.411%). The ICER of leucoreduction was € 6,916 (i.e., the cost to prevent one case of FNHTR). Conclusions Leucoreduction does not have a favourable cost-effectiveness ratio in relation to the occurrence of FNHTR. However, many factors, which could not be easily and accurately assessed, influence the long-term costs of transfusion. It is imperative to undertake a series of large, meticulously designed clinical studies across the entire spectrum of blood transfusion settings, to investigate most of the parameters involved. PMID:24931843

  12. IgE- and IgG mediated severe anaphylactic platelet transfusion reaction in a known case of cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Shanthi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic reactions occur commonly in transfusion practice. However, severe anaphylactic reactions are rare; anti-IgA (IgA: Immunoglobulin A in IgA-deficient patients is one of the well-illustrated and reported causes for such reactions. However, IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction through blood component transfusion may be caused in parasitic hyperimmunization for IgG and IgE antibodies. Case Report: We have evaluated here a severe anaphylactic transfusion reaction retrospectively in an 18year-old male, a known case of cerebral malaria, developed after platelet transfusions. The examination and investigations revealed classical signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis along with a significant rise in the serum IgE antibody level and IgG by hemagglutination method. Initial mild allergic reaction was followed by severe anaphylactic reaction after the second transfusion of platelets. Conclusion: Based on these results, screening of patients and donors with mild allergic reactions to IgE antibodies may help in understanding the pathogenesis as well as in planning for preventive desensitization and measures for safe transfusion.

  13. Demographic and epidemiologic characterization of transfusion recipients from four US regions: evidence from the REDS-III recipient database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karafin, Matthew S; Bruhn, Roberta; Westlake, Matt; Sullivan, Marian T; Bialkowski, Walter; Edgren, Gustaf; Roubinian, Nareg H; Hauser, Ronald G; Kor, Daryl J; Fleischmann, Debra; Gottschall, Jerome L; Murphy, Edward L; Triulzi, Darrell J

    2017-12-01

    Blood transfusion is one of the most common medical procedures during hospitalization in the United States. To understand the benefits of transfusion while mitigating potential risks, a multicenter database containing detailed information on transfusion incidence and recipient outcomes would facilitate research. The Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III (REDS-III) program has developed a comprehensive transfusion recipient database utilizing data from hospital electronic health records at 12 participating hospitals in four geographic regions. Inpatient and outpatient data on transfusion recipients from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2014 included patient age, sex, ethnicity, primary diagnosis, type of blood product provided, issue location, pretransfusion and post-transfusion hemoglobin (Hgb), and hospital outcomes. Transfusion incidence per encounter was calculated by blood product and various patient characteristics. During the 2-year study period, 80,362 (12.5%) inpatient encounters involved transfusion. Among inpatients, the most commonly transfused blood products were red blood cells (RBCs; 10.9% of encounters), followed by platelets (3.2%) and plasma (2.9%). Among patients who received transfusions, the median number of RBC units was one, the pretransfusion Hgb level was 7.6 g/dL, and the Hgb increment per unit was 1.4 g/dL. Encounter mortality increased with patient age, the number of units transfused, and the use of platelet or plasma products. The most commonly reported transfusion reaction was febrile nonhemolytic. The database contains comprehensive data regarding transfusion use and patient outcomes. The current report describes an evaluation of the first 2 years of a planned, 4-year, linked blood donor-component-recipient database, which represents a critical new resource for transfusion medicine researchers. © 2017 AABB.

  14. Development of enhancing agglutination reaction using gold nanoparticle for pre-transfusion testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choktaweesak, N; Krasathong, P; Ammaranond, P

    2016-10-01

    To explore an alternative way for antibody detection testing, the examination of gold nanoparticle solution for enhancing unexpected antibodies for pre-transfusion testing was investigated. Exposure of foreign antigens on red blood cells from transfusion can trigger the immune system to produce unexpected antibodies. This immunological response may cause the complication to future transfusion. For detection of unexpected antibodies, the antibody screening test is performed approximately 30-60 min. To reduce turnaround time, enhancing reagent, low-ionic strength solution (LISS), is widely used. However, cost of enhancing reagent is an issue which has concerned in resource limited countries. Gold nanoparticle solution can increase red blood cells agglutination reaction. To solve this issue, study of gold nanoparticle solution was investigated. Samples were performed comparing between LISS and gold nanoparticle solution at antiglobulin phase. After reading the agglutination reaction, supernatants were collected and measured at the optical density at 760 nm by spectrophotometer. The optical density in the tube of gold nanoparticle solution was higher than in the tube of 2-5% cell suspension and monoclonal antibody. It has been observed that gold nanoparticle solution enhanced the reaction of agglutination 98% while LISS enhanced the agglutination only 60·8%. Employing a commercially available enhancing reagent, parallel samples confirmed results providing validation of the assay. It approximately costs $1 US dollars compared to $30 for a commercially available reagent. The low cost and yet effective time-consuming test for antibody screening is a practical and viable solution alternative way for performing in antibody screening test in resource limited countries. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  15. Successful use of eculizumab for treatment of an acute hemolytic reaction after ABO-incompatible red blood cell transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstock, Christof; Möhle, Robert; Dorn, Christiane; Weisel, Katja; Höchsmann, Britta; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Kanz, Lothar

    2015-03-01

    Transfusion of ABO major-incompatible red blood cells (RBCs) can activate the complement system and can cause severe and even lethal acute hemolytic reactions. The activation of the complement system with formation of C3a and C5a (anaphylatoxins) and the release of hemoglobin from the lysed RBCs are thought to mediate clinical signs like fever, hypotension, pain, and acute renal failure. Therapeutic inhibition of the complement cascade in case of ABO-incompatible RBC transfusion would be desirable to ameliorate the signs and symptoms and to improve the outcome of the reaction. A patient with blood group B was erroneously transfused with a unit of group A2 RBCs. Within 1 hour after transfusion she received eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody that binds to the complement component C5 and blocks its cleavage. Clinical and immunohematologic observations are reported here. Hemoglobinemia and hemoglobinuria were present for several hours after transfusion, but she developed no hypotension, no renal failure, and no disseminated intravascular coagulation. As shown by flow cytometry, group A cells survived in the peripheral blood for more than 75 days. No immunoglobulin G was detectable by column agglutination technique on these cells. A low isoagglutinin titer and blood group A2 of the erroneously transfused cells most likely were the reason for the absence of clinical signs during and immediately after the ABO-incompatible transfusion. In the further course, eculizumab successfully protected the incompatible RBCs from hemolysis for several weeks. © 2014 AABB.

  16. Delayed and acute hemolytic transfusion reactions resulting from red cell antibodies and red cell-reactive HLA antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Chikako; Ohto, Hitoshi; Miura, Saori; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Ono, Satoshi; Ogata, Takashi

    2005-12-01

    It has been controversial whether HLA antibodies cause hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTR) or shortened red blood cell (RBC) survival. A patient is reported who had two episodes of HTR, the latter of which was likely due to RBC-reactive HLA antibodies. A 77-year-old woman, admitted for gastric varix rupture, had no RBC-irregular antibodies detected before transfusion. On Hospital Day 12, after transfusion of 2 units of RBCs and 2 units of fresh-frozen plasma, the first delayed hemolytic episode occurred and anti-E, anti-c, anti-Jk(a), and unidentified RBC-reactive antibodies were detected in a serum sample from Day 14. Two additional units of matched RBCs were transfused with a leukoreduction filter on Days 19 and 22. After 4 hours of starting a transfusion on Day 22, the patient had fever, and a second hemolytic episode was recorded. Multireactive HLA antibodies (reactive against 20 of 20 donor panel lymphocytes) were detected in serum samples from Day 15 to Day 21. These HLA antibodies reacted strongly with HLA-A2 and HLA-B7 antigens, corresponding to Bg(c) and Bg(a) antigens on RBCs, respectively. RBCs transfused on Day 22 were found to be HLA-A2 by genotyping. Strong HLA alloantibodies in this recipient appear to have caused a HTR. It is suggested that HLA antibodies be considered in patients with unexplained HTRs.

  17. Selection of GP. Mur antigen-negative RBC for blood recipients with anti-'Mia' records decreases transfusion reaction rates in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C-A; Lin, J-A; Chang, C-W; Wu, K-H; Yeh, S-P; Ho, C-M; Chang, J-G

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of GP. Mur antigen-negative blood selection for transfusion in patients with anti-'Mi a ' records. The GP. Mur RBC phenotype is prevalent (7·3%) in Taiwan. Antibodies against GP. Mur (anti-'Mi a ') are identified in 1·24% of our population, and anti-'Mi a ' screening using GP. Mur RBC has been routine for Taiwan's blood banks. However, due to the lack of commercial antibodies, only cross-matching was used to prevent transfusion of GP. Mur-positive blood to patients with anti-'Mi a ' in most hospitals. There is still a risk of GP. Mur-positive RBC exposure and subsequent anti-'Mi a '-related transfusion reactions. Since February 2014, GP. Mur antigen-negative RBCs identified by reaction with anti-'Mi a '-positive serum were selected for blood recipients with anti-'Mi a ' records. The transfusion reactions between January 2013 and January 2014 were compared with those that occurred between February 2014 and July 2015. The transfusion reaction rate was significantly higher in anti-'Mi a '-positive blood recipients compared to total subjects receiving an RBC transfusion before GP. Mur-negative donor RBC selection. After antigen-negative RBC selection, the transfusion reaction frequency in subjects with anti-'Mi a ' became similar to total blood recipients. IgG form anti-'Mi a ' antibodies were present in all cases of probable anti-'Mi a '-related transfusion reactions. The time required for anti-'Mi a ' boosting after transfusion was around 4-21 days. Selection of GP. Mur-negative RBC for transfusion to patients with anti-'Mi a ' records could decrease the rate of transfusion reaction and antibody boosting. This procedure should be incorporated into blood bank routines in areas where anti-'Mi a ' is prevalent. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  18. Acute respiratory distress after transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Jožef Gradišek

    2012-12-01

    Conclusions: Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO are clinical syndromes with predominant pulmonary injury and respiratory distress. Anaphylactic reaction, hemolytic transfusion reaction and transfusion of contaminated blood products also impair lung function but are less frequent. Transfusion in critically ill and injured patient is an independent risk factor for acute lung injury. It remains to be determined whether transfusion is the cause of increased mortality or only an indicator of disease severity

  19. A comparison of adverse reaction rates for PAS C versus plasma platelet units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Claudia S; Stubbs, James; Schwartz, Joseph; Francis, Richard; Goss, Cheryl; Cushing, Melissa; Shaz, Beth; Mair, David; Brantigan, Barbara; Heaton, W Andrew

    2014-08-01

    Plasma constituents have been implicated in some types of platelet (PLT) transfusion reactions. Leukoreduced apheresis PLTs stored in InterSol have 65% less plasma than apheresis PLTs stored in 100% plasma (PPs). This study compared transfusion reaction rates in InterSol PLTs (PLT additive solution [PAS] C) versus PPs. The study design was an open-label, nonrandomized retrospective review. Statistical methods were applied to substantiate noninferiority and superiority of PAS C compared to PP in terms of transfusion reaction rates. Adverse reactions (ARs) were categorized using the Biovigilance Component of the National Healthcare Safety Network. Active surveillance was used to monitor all transfusions, both with ARs and without ARs. A total of 14,005 transfusions from six study sites were included, with 9845 PP transfusions given to 2202 patients and 4160 PAS C to 1444 patients. A total of 165 ARs were reported. Percentages of transfusions with ARs were 1.37% for PPs, 0.55% for PAS C, and 1.13% overall. The relative risk (RR) for PAS C versus PPs was calculated as 0.403 with an upper confidence limit (UCL) of 0.663. Overall, ARs with the highest incidence were allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs), at 0.66 and 0.40% of total transfusions reported, respectively. The relative risks (UCLs) for ATRs and FNHTRs, respectively, were 0.350 (0.686) and 0.336 (0.827). PAS C PLTs were statistically superior and noninferior to PPs with respect to the transfusion-related AR rate. PAS C noninferiority and superiority were also demonstrated for ATRs and FNHTRs, separately. © 2014 AABB.

  20. Recurrent life-threatening reactions to platelet transfusion in an aplastic anaemia patient with a paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, M; Bates, G; Richardson, D; Burrows, L

    2014-09-01

    A 60-year-old woman was diagnosed with non-severe aplastic anaemia when she presented with anaemia and thrombocytopenia. She developed recurrent life-threatening hypotensive reactions during transfusion of leukodepleted platelet concentrates, and washed platelet concentrates prevented the development of such reactions subsequently. A paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria clone was detected on investigating for aplastic anaemia, which has been speculated to play a role in the recurrent hypotensive reactions. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  1. Transfusion Related Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Osborn, Megan Boysen; Tran, Min-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Audience: This exercise is appropriate for all emergency medicine learners (residents and medical students) and learners from other specialties (internal medicine, family medicine, anesthesia). Introduction: About 85 million red blood cell units are transfused worldwide each year. Transfusion reactions can complicate up to 8% of blood transfusions and can range from benign to life threatening. An emergency physician must be able to discuss the risks and benefits of blood transfusion...

  2. The IgE-dependent pathway in allergic transfusion reactions: involvement of donor blood allergens other than plasma proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Nobuki; Yasui, Kazuta; Amakishi, Etsuko; Hayashi, Tomoya; Kuroishi, Ayumu; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Matsukura, Harumichi; Tani, Yoshihiko; Furuta, Rika A; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-07-01

    On transfusion, several plasma proteins can cause anaphylaxis in patients deficient in the corresponding plasma proteins. However, little is known about other allergens, which are encountered much more infrequently. Although it has been speculated that an allergen-independent pathway underlying allergic transfusion reactions (ATRs) is elicited by biological response modifiers accumulated in blood components during storage, the exact mechanisms remain unresolved. Furthermore, it is difficult even to determine whether ATRs are induced via allergen-dependent or allergen-independent pathways. To distinguish these two pathways in ATR cases, we established a basophil activation test, in which the basophil-activating ability of supernatants of residual transfused blood of ATR cases to whole blood basophils was assessed in the presence or absence of dasatinib, an inhibitor of IgE-mediated basophil activation. Three of 37 supernatants from the platelet concentrates with ATRs activated panel blood basophils in the absence, but not in the presence, of dasatinib. The basophil activation was inhibited by treatment of anti-fish collagen I MoAb in one case, suggesting that the involvement of fish allergens may have been present in donor plasma. We concluded that unknown non-plasma proteins, some of which had epitopes similar to fish antigens, in blood component may be involved in ATRs via an allergen/IgE-dependent pathway.

  3. Reduction in adverse reactions to platelets by the removal of plasma supernatant and resuspension in a new additive solution (M-sol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Junichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Miura, Reiko; Kiyama, Yoshio; Imai, Kiyotoshi; Kasai, Masaharu; Koizumi, Kazuki; Kakinoki, Yasutaka; Makiguchi, Yusuke; Kubo, Koji; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Fujihara, Mitsuhiro; Homma, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Sadamitsu; Kato, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Hisami

    2009-02-01

    Leukodepletion reduces but does not eliminate adverse reactions to platelet concentrate (PC). As an alternative strategy, plasma reduction or washing of platelets should be considered. However, the efficacy of this strategy is still unclear. A total of 12 patients who experienced adverse reactions at a 29 to 100 percent reaction rate for plasma-PC were enrolled. The reactions were allergic reactions and nonhemolytic transfusion reactions, such as chills. Plasma-removed PC (W/R-PC), which was suspended in a recently developed additive solution (M-sol) containing less than 20 mL plasma, was prepared. W/R-PCs in M-sol were then transfused into patients after an overnight storage period; the occurrence of adverse reactions was monitored and 1- and 24-hour corrected count increment (CCI) values were evaluated. Although plasma-PC caused reaction in 12 patients, W/R-PC prevented reactions in 11 of 12 patients, with 1 patient having one minor allergic reaction of 15 transfusions. There was a significant difference in the incidence of reaction (p plasma-PC (117/276, 42%; 95% CI, 36%-48%; p plasma can be transfused safely and eliminate a wide range of adverse reactions to plasma-PC.

  4. Blood transfusion in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, A; Prakash, A; Saxena, P

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood components is a common practice in obstetric wards but it is not without risk. The incidence of transfusion reactions varies from 4 in every hundred transfusions for non-haemolytic reactions to one in every 40,000 for haemolytic transfusion reactions. The physiological basis of blood transfusion is outlined in this article. Most of the donated blood is processed into components: packed red cells (PRBCs), platelets, and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or cryoprecipitate. Various alternatives to blood transfusion exist and include autotransfusion, pre-autologous blood storage, use of oxygen carrying blood substitutes and intraoperative cell salvage. Despite the risks associated with transfusions, obstetricians are frequently too aggressive in transfusing blood and blood products to their patients. Acute blood loss in obstetrics is usually due to placenta praevia, postpartum blood loss and surgery related. An early involvement of a consultant obstetrician, anaesthetist, haematologist and the blood bank is essential. There are no established criteria for initiating red cell transfusions and the decision is purely based on clinical and haematological parameters, which have been discussed along with the general principles of blood transfusion in obstetrics and some practical guidelines.

  5. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with multiple alloantibody (Anti S, N, K) and a monospecific autoanti-JK(b) in intermediate β-thalassemia patient in Tabriz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatkhah, Roya; Esfahani, Ali; Torabi, Seyed Esmaeil; Kermani, Iraj Asvadi; Sanaat, Zohreh; Ziaei, Jamal Eivazei; Nikanfar, Alireza; Chavoshi, Seyed Hadi; Ghoreishi, Zohreh; Kermani, Atabak Asvadi

    2013-07-01

    It appears that delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions may occur several days after the administration of donor red cells is true even though they have been shown to be compatible in cross match tests by the antiglobulin technique. A specific case was observed in our center, which confirms the fact. The patient was a 37-year-old male suffering from intermediate β-thalassemia. He had a history of two previous transfusions, with unknown transfusion reaction. In the last transfusion, laboratory data showed: Hb 7.8 g/dL and Hematocrit (Hct) 24.2%. The patient received two units of cross matched, compatible concentrated red blood cells (RBCs). After eight days a severe reaction was observed with clinical evidence of tachycardia, fatigue, fever, back pain, chest discomfort, jaundice, nausea and anorexia. Accordingly delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction was suspected, and anti-RBC antibodies were tested. Laboratory tests revealed the presence of three alloantibodies: Anti-N, anti-S, anti-K, and a monospecific autoanti-JK(b).

  6. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with multiple alloantibody (Anti S, N, K and a monospecific autoanti-JK b in intermediate β-thalassemia patient in Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Dolatkhah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It appears that delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions may occur several days after the administration of donor red cells is true even though they have been shown to be compatible in cross match tests by the antiglobulin technique. A specific case was observed in our center, which confirms the fact. The patient was a 37-year-old male suffering from intermediate β-thalassemia. He had a history of two previous transfusions, with unknown transfusion reaction. In the last transfusion, laboratory data showed: Hb 7.8 g/dL and Hematocrit (Hct 24.2%. The patient received two units of cross matched, compatible concentrated red blood cells (RBCs. After eight days a severe reaction was observed with clinical evidence of tachycardia, fatigue, fever, back pain, chest discomfort, jaundice, nausea and anorexia. Accordingly delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction was suspected, and anti-RBC antibodies were tested. Laboratory tests revealed the presence of three alloantibodies: Anti-N, anti-S, anti-K, and a monospecific autoanti-JK b .

  7. An acute hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-IH in a patient with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S A; Shirey, R S; King, K E; Ness, P M

    2000-07-01

    A hemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) due to anti-IH is reported in a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD). An 18-year-old woman with SCD and a complete phenotype on file had been identified as group B-positive with negative antibody-screening tests and had received 1 unit of packed RBCs. Ten days later, she was readmitted in painful crisis with a Hb of 4.2 g per dL. Antibody-screening tests and panel cells were positive at all test phases with a negative autocontrol, which suggested alloantibodies. Phenotypically matched group O RBCs were issued emergently. After the transfusion of 100 mL, the patient had an HTR with chills, fever, and tachycardia and laboratory findings of hemoglobinemia, hemoglobinuria, and negative DATs. A high-titer, IgM anti-IH with a high thermal amplitude (reactive with group O, but not group B RBCs at 37 degrees C) was identified. Autologous RBCs appeared to have normal I antigen expression, but less H antigen than pooled group B RBCs. She was given group B RBCs, uneventfully, by use of a blood warmer. This is a rare case of anti-IH as the cause of a HTR, as a serologic problem that may be seen in SCD, and as an autoantibody that may mimic an alloantibody. Ironically, this HTR resulted from the effort to provide phenotypically matched RBCs, which necessitated the selection of group O RBCs.

  8. Exchange transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... count in a newborn (neonatal polycythemia) Rh-induced hemolytic disease of the newborn Severe disturbances in body chemistry Severe newborn jaundice ... exchange transfusion was performed to treat. Alternative Names Hemolytic disease - exchange transfusion Patient ... Exchange transfusion - series References Costa ...

  9. Reducing noninfectious risks of blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, Brian M; Looney, Mark R; Gropper, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, noninfectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion, respectively. These complications and others are reviewed, and several controversial methods for prevention of noninfectious complications of transfusion are discussed, including universal leukoreduction of erythrocyte units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of erythrocyte storage age.

  10. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to the...

  11. Blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000431.htm Blood transfusions To use the sharing features on this page, ... There are many reasons you may need a blood transfusion: After knee or hip replacement surgery, or other ...

  12. A Review of Haptoglobin Typing Methods for Disease Association Study and Preventing Anaphylactic Transfusion Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hyun Ko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Haptoglobin, the product of the gene, is a glycoprotein involved in the scavenging of free hemoglobin. Haptoglobin levels increase or decrease in response to various acquired conditions, and they are also influenced by genetic predisposition. There were 2 major alleles, and , and 1 minor allele, . Many researchers have attempted to study the haptoglobin types and their association with disease; however, no definitive conclusions have been reached yet. It is reported that patients who are genetically deficient in haptoglobin are at risk of anaphylaxis against blood components containing haptoglobin. Haptoglobin genotypes also affect the reference intervals of haptoglobin levels. Many studies have attempted to establish simple and accurate typing methods. In this paper, we have broadly reviewed several methods for haptoglobin typing—phenotyping, Southern blotting, conventional PCR, real-time PCR, and loop-mediated isothermal amplification. We discuss their characteristics, clinical applications, and limitations. The phenotyping methods are time consuming and labor intensive and not designed to detect patients harboring . The rapid and robust haptoglobin genotyping may help in preventing fatal anaphylactic reactions and in establishing the relationships between the haptoglobin phenotypes and diseases.

  13. [Etiologies of non-hemolytic jaundice in infants: a retrospective analysis of 3113 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaorong; Xu, Hongmei

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the causes of non-hemolytic jaundice among infants in Chongqing, China from the period of 1982 to 2011 and to determine whether the etiologies have changed over the past 30 years. The medical records of 3 113 infants,aged 1 month to 1 year,admitted to our hospital with non-hemolytic jaundice were collected and stratified according to decade-long time periods: group A (1982-1991), n=537; group B (1992-2001), n=786; group C (2002-2011), n=1 790. Data on sex, age, etiology and bilirubin level were retrospectively assessed using the chi-square test. In the three groups, boys consistently accounted for the majority of cases (group A:74.3%, group B:66.7%, group C:62.6%). In group A, 52% of the patients were 1-2 months of age; the peak age of patients in both group B and C was 2-3 months (group B:67.8%, group C:61.0%). Group A showed the highest level of patients with mildly elevated total bilirubin level (80.3%); however, moderately elevated total bilirubin level was most frequent in group B (53.4%) and group C (49.7%). The main etiologic diagnoses of the patients in group A were cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection (31.7%), sepsis (18.2%), hepatitis B virus (HBV) (1.3%), and biliary tract anomalies (1.3%); 46.6% of the cases had unclear cause. The main etiologic diagnoses of the cases in group B were CMV infection (36.0%), sepsis (21.5%), breast milk jaundice (2.0%), and HBV (1.9%); 37.9% of the cases had unclear cause. The main etiologic diagnoses of the cases in group C were CMV infection (42.6%), sepsis (7.5%), breast milk jaundice (17.7%), and biliary tract anomalies (2.46%); 29.1% of the cases had unclear cause. In Chongqing, infective factors, especially CMV, remain the main cause of nonhemolytic jaundice in infants, but bacterial etiologies have declined over the past 30 years.Non-infective factors, such as biliary tract anomalies and inherited metabolic diseases, have trended upwards. Although there has been great progress in the clinical management of

  14. The Effects of Leukocyte Filtration on Cell Salvaged Autologous Blood Transfusion on Lung Function and Lung Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Reactions in Elderly Patients Undergoing Lumbar Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lili; Shen, Jianjun; Sun, Jianliang; McQuillan, Patrick M; Hu, Zhiyong

    2018-02-21

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of leukocyte filtration of autologous salvaged blood on lung function, lung inflammatory reaction, and oxidative stress reaction in elderly patients undergoing lumbar spinal surgery. Sixty elderly patients undergoing lumbar spinal surgery were randomly divided into 2 groups: Leukocyte Filter group and Control group. Serum levels of inflammatory markers including white blood cell and polymorphonuclear count, neutrophil elastase, serum surfactant protein A, methane dicarboxylic aldehyde, superoxide dismutase, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-α, and respiratory function markers including dynamic respiratory system compliance, oxygenation index, and respiratory index were measured immediately before induction of anesthesia (T0), immediately before blood transfusion (T1), and 1 (T2), 6 (T3), and 12 hours (T4) after end of blood transfusion. The Leukocyte Filter group had higher dynamic respiratory system compliance at T2, oxygenation index at T2 and T3, respiratory index and superoxide dismutase at T2, T3, and T4 than those in the Control group (P<0.05). The Leukocyte Filter group had lower white blood cell, polymorphonuclear count, neutrophil elastase, serum surfactant protein A, methane dicarboxylic aldehyde, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α at T2, T3, and T4 than those in the Control group (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in adverse reactions related specifically to blood transfusion or postoperative respiratory complications within 72 hours. Salvaged autologous blood leukocyte filtration can improve ventilation, promote gas exchange and oxygenation, and inhibit lung inflammatory and oxidative stress reactions in elderly patients undergoing lumbar spinal surgery.

  15. Transfusion data: from collection to reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeven, L.R.

    2017-01-01

    Blood transfusion is an important medical treatment for many and diverse patients groups, saving lives but sometimes also causing adverse transfusion reactions in transfusion recipients. For this reason blood use should ideally be as low as possible. The fact that significant differences exist in

  16. Transfusion support in preterm neonates <1500 g and/or <32 weeks in a tertiary care center: A descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R A Shanmugha Priya

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: This study would serve as an audit for neonatal blood transfusion therapy. Close adherence to neonatal transfusion policy and restrictive transfusion guidelines helps reduce inappropriate use of blood products and adverse transfusion reactions.

  17. Reducing Non-Infectious Risks of Blood Transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.; Gropper, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, non-infectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion respectively. These complications and others are reviewed here and several controversial methods for prevention of non-infectious complications of transfusion are discussed; universal leukoreduction of red cell units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of red cell storage age. PMID:21792054

  18. A comparison of total amount of blood needed in patients taking autologous or homologous blood transfusion in coronary artery bypass grafting a clinical randomized case control trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhlagh, S.H.; Chohedri, A.H.; Bazojoo, A.; Nemati, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this clinical case-control trial was to compare the total amount of blood needed in patients taking autologous or homologous blood transfusion in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. Sixty patients scheduled for CABG were randomly allocated to ANH (Acute Normovulemic Hemodynamic) group (A group) or control group (B group). Hematocrit before operation and 24 hours after the operation were checked. The amount of the total blood needed in each group was measured at the end of the operation. There was no significant difference between the two groups as regards post operational hematocrit. The mean total blood infused to the control and ANH group was 2010 ml and 1815 ml respectively. However there was significant difference between the two groups as regards the total amount of the blood needed during operation. Our randomized, double blinded case control study demonstrated that autologous blood, beside carrying lower risks for hemolytic and nonhemolytic transfusion reactions decrease the total amount of blood needed for CABG. However larger studies with more patients are needed to confirm the results. (author)

  19. Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th. Smit Sibinga ID Consulting, Zuidhorn, The NetherlandsTransfusion Medicine is a bridging science, spanning the evidence-based practice at the bedside with the social sciences in the community.     Transfusion Medicine starts at the bedside. Surprisingly, only recently that has become rediscovered with the development of ‘patient blood management’ and ‘patient centered’ approaches to allow the growth of an optimal and rational patient care through supportive hemotherapy – safe and effective, affordable and accessible.1    Where transfusion of blood found its origin in the need of a patient, it has drifted away for a long period of time from the bedside and has been dominated for almost a century by laboratory sciences. At least the first ten editions of the famous and well reputed textbook Mollison’s Blood Transfusion in Clinical Medicine contained only a fraction on the actual bedside practice of transfusion medicine and did not focus at all on patient blood management.2    This journal will focus on all aspects of the transfusion chain that immediately relate to the bedside practice and clinical use of blood and its components, and plasma derivatives as integral elements of a human transplant tissue. That includes legal and regulatory aspects, medical, ethical and cultural aspects, pure science and pathophysiology of disease and the impact of transfusion of blood, as well as aspects of the epidemiology of blood transfusion and clinical indications, and cost-effectiveness. Education through timely and continued transfer of up to date knowledge and the application of knowledge in clinical practice to develop and maintain clinical skills and competence, with the extension of current educational approaches through e-learning and accessible ‘apps’ will be given a prominent place.

  20. Appliance of entersorbent Vaulen and extracorporally radiated autoblood transfusion for correction of leukopenia reactions in patients with Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muravskaya, G.V.; Krutilina, N.I.; Sinajko, V.V.; Morozova, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    Investigation of comparative effectiveness of different methods of leukostimulation has been conducted for 120 patients with II-III grade Hodkins disease developed in the process of radiotherapy of leukopenia. With every patient a course of intensive radiotherapy with the single seat dose 4 Gy and staged change of the modes of fractioning of dose has been conducted. 4 methods of treatment have been applied: traditional hemostimulated therapy; blood transfusion of 200-250 mg of autoblood, preliminarily irradiated with 20 MeV electrons of 220 Gy dose for dose power 2.2-2.7 Gy/min; application of fibrous carbon entersorbent Vaulen for dose 50 mg/kg of body mass three times a day; simultaneous application of irradiated autoblood and Vaulen. Effectiveness of the method of treatment was estimated over the following criteria: dynamics of the level of leukocytes of periphery blood during 14 day of treatment; frequency and duration of breaks in radiotherapy, necessary for correction of leukocytes number; requirements in traditional hemostimulation remedy. The most effective method is transfusion of extracorporally irradiated autoblood together with application of Vaulen-remedy, which permitted 2.2 times shorten the frequency of breaks in the radiotherapy and decrease 3-5 times the requirements in traditional hemostimulation means. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  1. Increased detection of clinically significant antibodies and decreased incidence of delayed haemolytic transfusion reaction with the indirect antiglobulin test potentiated by polyethylene glycol compared to albumin: a Japanese study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okutsu, Miho; Ohto, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Kawabata, Kinuyo; Ono, Satoshi; Saito, Shunnichi; Sugawara, Akiko; Kikuchi, Masami; Miura, Saori; Ishii, Youko; Watanabe, Kazuya; Tohyama, Yuriko; Nollet, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    Background The indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) can be potentiated by agents such as polyethylene glycol (PEG-IAT) and albumin (Alb-IAT). PEG-IAT is generally regarded as superior to Alb-IAT for the detection of clinically significant red blood cell (RBC) antibodies. However, supporting data come from Caucasian-dominant populations. Non-Caucasian populations should be investigated as well. Material and methods In this single-centre, retrospective, sequential study, Alb-IAT was used from 1989 to 1996 (8 years) and PEG-IAT from 1997 to 2008 (12 years). Pre-transfusion RBC alloantibody detection rates and specificity, post-transfusion alloantibody production, and the incidence of delayed haemolytic transfusion reaction were assessed and compared for the two periods. Results Although overall RBC alloantibody detection rates were comparable, PEG-IAT more frequently detected clinically significant antibodies such as anti-E, anti-Fyb, and anti-Jka, and less frequently detected insignificant antibodies such as anti-Leb and anti-P1. New alloantibodies emerged comparably during the two periods. Delayed haemolytic transfusion reaction was less frequent during the PEG-IAT period (0.30% versus 0.12%, ptransfusion reaction better than Alb-IAT among Japanese transfusion recipients in this retrospective survey of limited power. PMID:21251459

  2. [Safer and more appropriate blood transfusion therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    The risks associated with transfusion with blood components have been greatly reduced due to the implementation of innovative strategies for donor selection and testing, as well as safety measures such as universal prestorage leukocyte reduction. However, a variety of residual or unsolved risks, such as severe acute reaction of transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload and transfusion-transmitted infections, remain. Patients with hematological disorders are at high risk, since they receive therapeutic interventions frequently requiring transfusion. Thereby, balancing risk and benefit for patients, hematologists should prescribe blood components through evidence-based decision-making, minimize unnecessary transfusions and then conduct safe and error-free transfusion with a standard procedure involving the transfusion process at the bedside.

  3. Adverse events related to blood transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided. PMID:25535415

  4. Types of Blood Transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Blood Transfusion Blood Transfusion What Is A blood transfusion is a safe, ... store your blood for your use. Alternatives to Blood Transfusions Researchers are trying to find ways to make ...

  5. Identification of clinically relevant nonhemolytic Streptococci on the basis of sequence analysis of 16S-23S intergenic spacer region and partial gdh gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Dargis, Rimtas

    2009-01-01

    Nonhemolytic streptococci (NHS) cause serious infections, such as endocarditis and septicemia. Many conventional phenotypic methods are insufficient for the identification of bacteria in this group to the species level. Genetic analysis has revealed that single-gene analysis is insufficient...

  6. [Immunoreaction and blood transfusion--chairmen's introductory remarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Tsutomu; Matsushita, Tadashi

    2013-05-01

    Although blood transfusion is an extremely important therapeutic procedure that usually proceeds without complications, there are some risks associated with donated blood. Investigations into the causes of transfusion reactions and their prevention are important issues for transfusion therapy. In addition to nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) for infectious diseases and the irradiation of blood to prevent post-transfusion GVHD, prestorage leukocyte reduction and diversion of the first part of the donation of blood were recently introduced into transfusion therapy. This symposium, entitled "Immunoreaction and blood transfusion", reviewed the immune responses associated with blood transfusion, which is probably the most frequent medical procedure performed in allogeneic organ transplantation, with four themes provided by the four featured invited speakers: transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, transfusion-transmitted infectious disease surveillance, and transfusion-related immunomodulation.

  7. Concerted action of sphingomyelinase and non-hemolytic enterotoxin in pathogenic Bacillus cereus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria M Doll

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus causes food poisoning and serious non-gastrointestinal-tract infections. Non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe, which is present in most B. cereus strains, is considered to be one of the main virulence factors. However, a B. cereus ΔnheBC mutant strain lacking Nhe is still cytotoxic to intestinal epithelial cells. In a screen for additional cytotoxic factors using an in vitro model for polarized colon epithelial cells we identified B. cereus sphingomyelinase (SMase as a strong inducer of epithelial cell death. Using single and double deletion mutants of sph, the gene encoding for SMase, and nheBC in B. cereus we demonstrated that SMase is an important factor for B. cereus cytotoxicity in vitro and pathogenicity in vivo. SMase substantially complemented Nhe induced cytotoxicity in vitro. In addition, SMase but not Nhe contributed significantly to the mortality rate of larvae in vivo in the insect model Galleria mellonella. Our study suggests that the role of B. cereus SMase as a secreted virulence factor for in vivo pathogenesis has been underestimated and that Nhe and SMase complement each other significantly to cause full B. cereus virulence hence disease formation.

  8. Knowledge and acceptance of cord blood transfusion as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most frequent transfusion reaction observed was febrile reactions (51.5%) followed by urticaria (22.2%). Conclusion: This study has shown that majority of the respondents will accept cord blood transfusion. The main reason for rejecting cord blood transfusion was fear of medical complications. More patients will accept ...

  9. Perioperative blood transfusions in orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Karthikeyan E; Kim, Thomas J; Khanuja, Harpal S

    2014-11-05

    Blood transfusion after orthopaedic surgery accounts for 10% of all packed red blood-cell transfusions, but use varies substantially across hospitals and surgeons. Transfusions can cause systemic complications, including allergic reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, graft-versus-host disease, and infections. Tranexamic acid is a new cost-effective blood management tool to reduce blood loss and decrease the risk of transfusion after total joint arthroplasty. Current clinical evidence does not justify transfusions for a hemoglobin level of >8 g/dL in the absence of symptoms. Studies have also supported the use of this trigger in patients with a history or risk of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2014 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  10. Several aspects of some techniques avoiding homologous blood transfusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.S.M. van Woerkens (Liesbeth)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe use of homologous blood products during anesthesia and surgery is not without risks. Complications due to homologous blood transfusions include transfusion reactions, isosensitization, transmission of infections (including HIV, hepatitis, CMV) and immunosuppression (resuiting in

  11. Transfusion strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Carl-Johan

    2014-01-01

    Blood transfusion is associated with increased morbidity and mortality and numerous reports have emphasised the need for reduction. Following this there is increased attention to the concept of patient blood management. However, bleeding is relatively common following cardiac surgery and is further...... enhanced by the continued antiplatelet therapy policy. Another important issue is that cardiopulmonary bypass leads to haemodilution and a potential blood loss. The basic role of blood is oxygen transport to the organs. The determining factors of oxygen delivery are cardiac output, haemoglobin...... diseases tolerate moderate anaemia and may even benefit from a restrictive transfusion regimen. Further it has been shown that patients with reduced left ventricular function are able to compensate with increased cardiac output in response to bleeding and haemodilution if normovolaemia is maintained...

  12. Transfusion medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application

  13. Platelet transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The statement printed below was agreed at a consensus conference on platelet transfusion organised by the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and held in Edinburgh in November 1997. We publish this statement at the request of the organising committee to bring it to the attention of physicians who do not read the haematological literature. The statement will also appear in the British Journal of Haematology in 1998 with the scientific evidence upon which it is based.

  14. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people in the United States receive life-saving blood transfusions. During a transfusion, you receive whole blood or ... have liver failure or a severe infection. Most blood transfusions go very smoothly. Some infectious agents, such as ...

  15. An Attempt to Induce Transient Immunosuppression Pre-erythrocytapheresis in a Girl With Sickle Cell Disease, a History of Severe Delayed Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions and Need for Hip Prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Cattoni, Alessandro; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Perseghin, Paolo; Zatti, Giovanni; Gaddi, Diego; Cossio, Andrea; Biondi, Andrea; Corti, Paola; Masera, Nicoletta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We report on a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) occurred 7 days after an erythrocytapheresis or eritroexchange procedure (EEX) treated with rituximab and glucocorticoids in a 15-years old patient with sickle cell disease. EEX was performed despite a previous diagnosis of alloimmunization, in order to reduce hemoglobin S rate before a major surgery for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. A first dose of rituximab was administered before EEX. However, rituximab...

  16. Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance and progress is improving transfusion safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B; Cohen, Hannah

    2013-11-01

    The Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) UK confidential haemovigilance reporting scheme began in 1996. Over the 16 years of reporting, the evidence gathered has prompted changes in transfusion practice from the selection and management of donors to changes in hospital practice, particularly better education and training. However, half or more reports relate to errors in the transfusion process despite the introduction of several measures to improve practice. Transfusion in the UK is very safe: 2·9 million components were issued in 2012, and very few deaths are related to transfusion. The risk of death from transfusion as estimated from SHOT data in 2012 is 1 in 322,580 components issued and for major morbidity, 1 in 21,413 components issued; the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection is much lower. Acute transfusion reactions and transfusion-associated circulatory overload carry the highest risk for morbidity and death. The high rate of participation in SHOT by National Health Service organizations, 99·5%, is encouraging. Despite the very useful information gained about transfusion reactions, the main risks remain human factors. The recommendations on reduction of errors through a 'back to basics' approach from the first annual SHOT report remain absolutely relevant today. © 2013 The Authors. British Journal of Haematology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The Lost Art of Whole Blood Transfusion in Austere Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    risks of TTD and transfusion reactions in relation with the potential benefit of transfusion . In Norway, the serocon- version rate (HIV and hepatitis B...The Lost Art of Whole Blood Transfusion in Austere Environments Geir Strandenes, MD1,2; Tor A. Hervig, MD, PhD2; Christopher K. Bjerkvig, MD3; Steve...saving interventions must be performed quickly before hemorrhagic shock be- comes irreversible. Fresh whole blood transfusions in the field may be a

  18. Blood Transfusions (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Blood Transfusions KidsHealth / For Teens / Blood Transfusions What's in this ... in his or her body. What Is a Blood Transfusion? A transfusion is a simple medical procedure that ...

  19. Transfusion-associated circulatory overload: A survey among Dutch intensive care fellows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klanderman, R. B.; Attaye, I.; Bosboom, J. J.; Veelo, D. P.; Geerts, B. F.; Vlaar, A. P. J.

    2018-01-01

    Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a severe pulmonary transfusion reaction and leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality in Europe. TACO is of particular importance in critically ill patients, since they often receive blood transfusions and have multiple risk

  20. Comparison of intensive light-emitting diode and intensive compact fluorescent phototherapy in non-hemolytic jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takcı, Sahin; Yiğit, Sule; Bayram, Gülperi; Korkmaz, Ayşe; Yurdakök, Murat

    2013-01-01

    In severe and rapidly increasing jaundice, the use of intensive phototherapy provides greater effectiveness and a faster decrement in bilirubin levels compared to conventional phototherapy. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two types of intensive phototherapy: intensive compact fluorescent tube (CFT) and intensive light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy. Forty-three infants over 35 weeks of gestation with severe non-hemolytic hyperbilirubinemia were enrolled in the prospective study. All infants received multidirectional (circular-shaped) intensive phototherapy. Of these, 20 infants received CFT while 23 infants received LED phototherapy. Bilirubin levels and body temperatures were measured periodically, and the rates of bilirubin decrement were calculated. Mean serum bilirubin level of the 43 infants was 20.5±1.5 mg/dl at the beginning of the therapy and mean duration of phototherapy was 20.6±1.1 hours. The rate of mean bilirubin decline was 47.2% and the decrease was more prominent in the first four hours (0.84 ± 0.41 mg/dl/h). The rates of bilirubin decrement were comparable between the LED and CFT groups. Slightly elevated mean body temperature (37.1ºC) was determined in the CFT group (pphototherapy units with both LED and CFT were effective, showing a decline of half the initial value of bilirubin during the study period in infants with non-hemolytic jaundice. This study shows that intensive phototherapy with either CFT or LED can provide rapid decrease in bilirubin levels in the first few hours. This rapid decline is important in cases that have high risk of bilirubin encephalopathy.

  1. What Is a Blood Transfusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Blood Transfusion Blood Transfusion Also known as What Is A blood transfusion ... store your blood for your use. Alternatives to Blood Transfusions Researchers are trying to find ways to make ...

  2. Exchange transfusion - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100018.htm Exchange transfusion - series—Procedure To use the sharing features on ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Blood Transfusion and Donation Common Infant and Newborn Problems Jaundice ...

  3. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Blood Transfusions KidsHealth / For Parents / Blood Transfusions What's in this ... and help put your child at ease. About Blood Transfusions Blood is like the body's transportation system. As ...

  4. Epidemiology of Massive Transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmin, Märit; Chiesa, Flaminia; Vasan, Senthil K

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is an increasing focus on massive transfusion, but there is a paucity of comprehensive descriptions of the massively transfused patients and their outcomes. The objective of this study is to describe the incidence rate of massive transfusion, patient characteristics, and the mort...

  5. [Experimental Study on Neonatal ABO or RhD Compatible Blood Transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; LE, Ai-Ping; Liu, Jing-Han; Lan, Jiong-Cai

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the safety and effectiveness of neonatal ABO or Rh(D) by using compatible blood transfusion through retrospective analysis of data from cases received compatible blood transfusion and type matched blood transfusion. The clinical data of 26 cases of neonatal compatible blood transfusion in Chinese Nanchang area from January 2014 to October 2016 were collected, and 26 cases of neonatal type-matched blood transfusion were selected according to ratio of 1:1 cases. The efficiency and safety index of 26 patients compatible blood transfusion were compared with that of type-matched blood transfusion. The efficiency indexes included: patients' basic characteristics, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb) level, hematocrit (Hct), and the safety indexes contain Hb level and indirect bilirubin (IBiL) value before and after blood transfusion, irregular antibody screening, direct antiglobulin test (DAT) results and the adverse reactions of blood transfusion. The age, sex, days of hospitalization between compatible blood transfusion and type matched blood transfusion were not statistically significantly different (P>0.05). The Hb level before transfusion, blood transfusion volume and the increase of Hb, Hct and RBC were not statistically significantly different between two groups (P>0.05). The values of Hb, Hct and RBC in 2 groups significantly increased at the day 1 after blood transfusion (Ptransfusion adverse reaction occurred in 2 groups. The IBiL value significantly decreased in compatible blood transfusion patients at the day 1 after blood transfusion (Ptransfusion in all patients, and the others' DAT and screening for irregular antibodies were negative except 22 patients with neonatal hemolysis. The values of Hb and IBiL statistically significantly differenence were not in 12 patients between 1d, 3d, 7d after blood transfusion (P>0.05). The efficiency and safety between compatible blood transfusion and type matched blood transfusion are the same in

  6. Epidemiology of massive transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halmin, M. A. H.; Chiesa, F. C.; Vasan, S. K. V.

    2015-01-01

    and to describe characteristics and mortality of massively transfused patients. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study based on the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT2) database, linking data on blood donation, blood components and transfused patients with inpatient- and population....... Post-transfusion mortality was expressed as crude 30-days mortality and long-term mortality was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and as standardized mortality ratios. Results: 53,836 patients were included. Of all blood components transfused during the study period, 7.7% constituted massive...

  7. Survival after blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Ahlgren, Martin; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    of transfusion recipients in Denmark and Sweden followed for up to 20 years after their first blood transfusion. Main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,118,261 transfusion recipients were identified, of whom 62.0 percent were aged 65 years or older at the time of their first...... the SMR remained significantly 1.3-fold increased. CONCLUSION: The survival and relative mortality patterns among blood transfusion recipients were characterized with unprecedented detail and precision. Our results are relevant to assessments of the consequences of possible transfusion-transmitted disease......BACKGROUND: Long-term survival of transfusion recipients has rarely been studied. This study examines short- and long-term mortality among transfusion recipients and reports these as absolute rates and rates relative to the general population. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Population-based cohort study...

  8. Preliminary Clinical Observations Following Blood Transfusion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Immediately after collection, the blood was transfused to the recipients and observable clinical signs, reactions, and vital parameters changes recorded. Reactions observed in recipients included hyperthermia tachycardia, hyperpnoea and anorexia. A mean increase of 7.83 cycle/min, 6 beats/min and 3.83 was observed for ...

  9. Blood transfusion; additional historical aspects. Part 1. The birth of transfusion immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, F E

    2013-12-01

    The decades around the turn of the 19th into the 20th centuries covered a seminal period in the history of transfusion medicine as there was an increasing appreciation of a potential role in the management of surgical and obstetric bleeding, and also in severe non-surgical anaemias. The main obstacles to transfusing human blood were first the occasional devastating adverse reactions due, we now know, to ABO blood group incompatibility; and second the awkward propensity of shed blood to clot. This article describes in more detail how the pioneers in human transfusion immunology in the late 19th century and early 20th century learnt to recognise and avoid ABO incompatibility, and includes some hitherto obscure and rarely cited material. A companion article (Boulton, 2013, Submitted for publication) describes early attempts to find suitable anticoagulants. © 2013 The Author. Transfusion Medicine © 2013 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  10. Use of an identification system based on biometric data for patients requiring transfusions guarantees transfusion safety and traceability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennardello, Francesco; Fidone, Carmelo; Cabibbo, Sergio; Calabrese, Salvatore; Garozzo, Giovanni; Cassarino, Grazia; Antolino, Agostino; Tavolino, Giuseppe; Zisa, Nuccio; Falla, Cadigia; Drago, Giuseppe; Di Stefano, Giovanna; Bonomo, Pietro

    2009-07-01

    One of the most serious risks of blood transfusions is an error in ABO blood group compatibility, which can cause a haemolytic transfusion reaction and, in the most severe cases, the death of the patient. The frequency and type of errors observed suggest that these are inevitable, in that mistakes are inherent to human nature, unless significant changes, including the use of computerised instruments, are made to procedures. In order to identify patients who are candidates for the transfusion of blood components and to guarantee the traceability of the transfusion, the Securblood system (BBS srl) was introduced. This system records the various stages of the transfusion process, the health care workers involved and any immediate transfusion reactions. The patients and staff are identified by fingerprinting or a bar code. The system was implemented within Ragusa hospital in 16 operative units (ordinary wards, day hospital, operating theatres). In the period from August 2007 to July 2008, 7282 blood components were transfused within the hospital, of which 5606 (77%) using the Securblood system. Overall, 1777 patients were transfused. In this year of experience, no transfusion errors were recorded and each blood component was transfused to the right patient. We recorded 33 blocks of the terminals (involving 0.6% of the transfused blood components) which required the intervention of staff from the Service of Immunohaematology and Transfusion Medicine (SIMT). Most of the blocks were due to procedural errors. The Securblood system guarantees complete traceability of the transfusion process outside the SIMT and eliminates the possibility of mistaken identification of patients or blood components. The use of fingerprinting to identify health care staff (nurses and doctors) and patients obliges the staff to carry out the identification procedures directly in the presence of the patient and guarantees the presence of the doctor at the start of the transfusion.

  11. Precautions surrounding blood transfusion in autoimmune haemolytic anaemias are overestimated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yürek, Salih; Mayer, Beate; Almahallawi, Mohammed; Pruss, Axel; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Background It is very evident that many precautions are taken regarding transfusion of red blood cells in patients with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Frequently, considerable efforts are made to examine the indication and serological compatibility prior to transfusion in such patients. However, at times, this may unnecessarily jeopardize patients who urgently require a red blood cell transfusion. Materials and methods Thirty-six patients with warm-type autoimmune haemolytic anaemia were included in this study. All patients had reactive serum autoantibodies and required blood transfusion. Standard serological assays were employed for the detection and characterization of antibodies to red blood cells. Results A positive direct antiglobulin test was observed in all 36 patients, in addition to detectable antibodies in both the eluate and serum. Significant alloantibodies were detected in the serum samples of three patients (anti-c, anti-JKa, and anti-E). In 32 patients, red blood cell transfusion was administered with no significant haemolytic transfusion reactions due to auto- and/or allo-antibodies. Due to overestimation of positive cross-matches three patients received no transfusion or delayed transfusion and died, and one patient died due to unrecognised blood loss and anaemia which was attributed to an ineffective red blood cell transfusion. Discussion Many of the reported recommendations regarding transfusion of red blood cells in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia are highly questionable, and positive serological cross-matches should not result in a delay or refusal of necessary blood transfusions. PMID:26192772

  12. Detection of adverse events of transfusion in a teaching hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Ofori, A K; Owusu-Ofori, S P; Bates, I

    2017-06-01

    Monitoring the whole chain of events from the blood donors to recipients, documenting any undesirable or untoward effects and introducing measures to prevent their recurrence if possible are components of haemovigilance systems. Only few sub-Saharan African countries have haemovigilance systems, and there are very little data on adverse events of transfusion. Adverse events monitoring is an integral part of a haemovigilance system. Our study aimed to establish the incidence and types of adverse events of transfusions in Ghana and to identify interventions to improve effectiveness. This prospective observational 1-year study enrolled 372 recipients of 432 transfusions in a Ghanaian teaching hospital. Vital signs were monitored at 15, 30 and 60 min intervals during the transfusion, then 8 h until 24 h post-transfusion. Three investigators independently classified any new signs and symptoms according to Serious Hazards of Transfusion definitions. The adverse events incidence was 21·3% (92/432), predominantly mild acute transfusion reactions (84%). A total of 20 transfusions (4·6%) were stopped before completion, 60% of them for mild febrile reactions, which could have been managed with transfusion in situ. This prospective study indicates a high incidence of adverse events of transfusion in Kumasi, Ghana. The significant numbers of discontinued transfusions suggest that guidelines on how to manage transfusion reactions would help preserve scarce blood stocks. Gradual implementation of a haemovigilance system, starting with monitoring adverse transfusion events, is a pragmatic approach in resource-limited settings. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  13. Rhesus Negative Woman Transfused With Rhesus Positive Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinicians sometimes are confronted with the challenge of transfusing haemorrhaging Rhesus (Rh) D negative patients with Rh D positive blood to save their lives. There are concerns about alloimmunization and future haemolytic disease of the newborn in women of the reproductive age. Another fear is transfusion reaction ...

  14. Alexander Bogdanov: the forgotten pioneer of blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huestis, Douglas W

    2007-10-01

    Alexander Bogdanov was a Russian physician and polymath, a founder of Bolshevism who was later excluded from the party because he was unwilling to see communism ossify into dogma. He saw blood transfusion not only as replacement therapy, but also as a body stimulant and set out to demonstrate its mechanisms scientifically by establishing an institute of blood transfusion in 1926. Ironically, he died as a result of a hemolytic transfusion reaction. His successors put Russia in the forefront of the development of centralized national blood transfusion services.

  15. [Home blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, V; Prévôt, G; Amico, I; Bonnet, B; Mansard, M-O

    2010-12-01

    The development of alternatives to hospitalization including home medical care (HAD), an aging population and a more secure transfusion raises the question of the feasibility of home blood transfusion. The legislation allows the home blood transfusion under specified conditions, but when they are met, the texts on nursing care and the transfusion gesture may hamper this progress. We report our experience of 3 years: a protocol was established to do home blood transfusions by trained transfusion nurses from the HAD. Six patients were eligible for transfusion at home but only three of them could be treated at home. Moreover, since late 2009, the Nursing Department no longer allows this practice for legal reasons. At the same time, a questionnaire was sent to 224 HAD to find out about their practice on the subject. In the light of practices in different countries, earnings for the quality of life of the patient, lack of space in hospitals and the aging population, it seems essential to change the law to permit a rational transfusion, thoughtful, safe for the patient at home and for caregivers who are involved. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. [Transfusions in myelodysplastic syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, C

    2017-09-01

    PRBC transfusion remains the mainstay of treatment of anemia in MDS after failure of erythropoiesis stimulating agents. The most common transfusion trigger in transfusion-dependent MDS patients is 80g/L. This level is based only on expert consensus; a randomized controlled trial comparing restrictive against liberal policy is required to evaluate potential impact of transfusion policy on with QoL and survival. Prophylactic antigen matching for RhCE and K must be used in order to reduce the risk of red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization. Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is the first fatal complication of transfusion in MDS patients. Prevention, in this high risk group (older people with cardiac comorbidities) requires slow transfusion rates and rigorous monitoring of systolic blood pressure. Long-term transfusion in low risk MDS patients could also induce iron overload complications that could be prevent by iron chelating agents. These latter are usually not very well tolerated, however, a new formulation of Deferasirox ® seems to be able to improve patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Platelet alloimmunization after transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taaning, E; Simonsen, A C; Hjelms, E

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The frequency of platelet-specific antibodies after one series of blood transfusions has not been reported, and in multiply transfused patients is controversial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied the frequency of alloimmunization against platelet antigens in 117 patients...... who received a single series of blood transfusions. They received mostly saline-adenine-glucose+mannitol red blood cell components (poor in leukocytes and platelets) in connection with cardiac surgery. Platelet-specific antibodies were detected with the platelet ELISA and the monoclonal...... immunization. CONCLUSION: There was a low incidence of platelet-specific antibodies after one series of blood transfusions in this group of patients. This is similar to the results of some previous studies in multiply transfused patients, but not with those of others who found a higher incidence....

  18. Platelet alloimmunization after transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taaning, E; Simonsen, A C; Hjelms, E

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The frequency of platelet-specific antibodies after one series of blood transfusions has not been reported, and in multiply transfused patients is controversial. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied the frequency of alloimmunization against platelet antigens in 117 patients...... who received a single series of blood transfusions. They received mostly saline-adenine-glucose+mannitol red blood cell components (poor in leukocytes and platelets) in connection with cardiac surgery. Platelet-specific antibodies were detected with the platelet ELISA and the monoclonal...... (17.9%), of whom 18 (15.4%) had had no detectable antibodies before transfusion. There was a positive correlation between the transfused load of immunogenic materials and the frequency of alloimmunization against HLA antigens. In one third of the immunized patients, there was no history of previous...

  19. An attempt to induce transient immunosuppression pre-erythrocytapheresis in a girl with sickle cell disease, a history of severe delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions and need for hip prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Cattoni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR occurred 7 days after an erythrocytapheresis or eritroexchange procedure (EEX treated with rituximab and glucocorticoids in a 15-years old patient with sickle cell disease. EEX was performed despite a previous diagnosis of alloimmunization, in order to reduce hemoglobin S rate before a major surgery for avascular necrosis of the femoral head. A first dose of rituximab was administered before EEX. However, rituximab couldn’t prevent DHTR that occurred with acute hemolysis, hemoglobinuria and hyper-bilirubinemia. A further dose of rituximab and three boli of methylprednisolone were given after the onset of the reaction. It is likely that the combined use of rituximab and steroids managed to gradually improve both patient’s general conditions and hemoglobin levels. Nor early or late side effects were registered in a 33-months follow-up period. This report suggests the potential effectiveness and safety of rituximab in combination with steroids in managing and mitigating the symptoms of delayed post-transfusional hemolytic reactions in alloimmunized patients affected by sickle cell disease with absolute need for erythrocytapheresis.

  20. Bedside practice of blood transfusion in a large teaching hospital in Uganda : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, J D; Kajja, I; Bimenya, G S; Postma, Maarten; Smit Sibinga, C.Th.

    BACKGROUND: Adverse transfusion reactions can cause morbidity and death to patients who receive a blood transfusion. Blood transfusion practice in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda is analyzed to see if and when these practices play a role in the morbidity and mortality of patients. MATERIALS AND

  1. Improving transfusion practice in transfusion dependent thalassaemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chathupa Wickremaarachchi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to improve current transfusion practice in transfusiondependent thalassaemia patients by determining whether safe transition from triplewashed red cells (TWRC to leucodepleted red cells (LDRC, increasing transfusion rates, reducing the use of frusemide and creating uniform practice across patients is possible. In patients receiving regular transfusions (50, triple-washed red blood cells were changed to LDRC, transfusion rates were increased to 5 mL/kg/h (in line with the Cooley’s Foundation guidelines to a maximum of 300 mL/h and frusemide was ceased. Medical review occurred at completion of the transfusion. Of the 20 patients on TWRC, 18 were transitioned to leucodepleted red cells (90%. Recurrent allergic reactions in 2 patients required re-institution of TWRC. 7 of the 8 patients on regular frusemide ceased this practice with no documented transfusion-related fluid overload. One patient refused. Of the eligible 50 patients, 20 patients (40% were increased to the maximum transfusion rate of 300 mLs/h; 6 (12% increased rate but refused to go to the maximum; 9 (18% refused a change in practice and 15 (30% were already at the maximum rate. There was only one documented transfusion reaction (palpitations however this patient was able to tolerate a higher transfusion rate on subsequent transfusions. Thalassemia patients on TWRC were safely transitioned to LDRC. Transfusion rates were safely increased, with a calculated reduction in day-stay bed time of 17.45 h per month. This confirms a guideline of 5 mL/kg/h for transfusion-dependant thalassaemia patients with preserved cardiac function is well tolerated and may be translated to other centres worldwide.   本研究的目的是通过确定是否有可能进行从三洗红细胞(TWRC)到去白细胞红细胞(LDRC)的安全过渡,提高输血速率,减少速尿的使用,并在患者中实施统一规则,从而改进输血依赖型地中海贫血患者中

  2. Predonated autologous blood transfusion in elective orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The use of homologous blood carries significant risk of viral infections and immune-mediated reactions. Preoperative autologous blood donation is an attractive alternative to homologous transfusion and has become common in elective orthopaedic surgery. Objective: To present our experience with the use of ...

  3. Efficacy and Safety of Frozen Blood for Transfusion in Trauma Patients - A Multi-Center Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    physiologic significance by playing a role in inflammation, hemostasis, vascular dysfunction, and transfusion reactions [102,103]. Indeed, data from our...process can bring the WBC count below the 5 × 108 WBC threshold that is effective in reducing transfusion reactions [126]. 2.3.3 Clinical Use of CPRBCs...erythrocytes for freezing. The institution of frozen blood was associated with a decrease in the incidence of transfusion reactions from 0.57% to 0.11

  4. Surgery and transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Ramos-Peñafiel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Even though blood transfusion saves thousands of lives worldwide, it causes complications in some patients, and must therefore be correctly administered. As there is no universally accepted consensus on blood transfusion in surgical patients, we have reviewed the latest studies and gathered the best available evidence on blood management strategies. In this study, we discuss indicators for transfusion of erythrocytes and other blood products, haemostatic agents for cardiothoracic and orthopaedic interventions where it is imperative to regulate blood loss, and alternatives in specific situations such as Jehovah's Witnesses patients. Finally, we put forward an algorithm for the preoperative management of surgery patients with low haemoglobin levels.

  5. Transfusion Medicine in Sub-Saharan Africa: Conference Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzik, Walter Sunny; Kyeyune, Dorothy; Otekat, Grace; Natukunda, Bernard; Hume, Heather; Kasirye, Phillip G; Ddungu, Henry; Kajja, Isaac; Dhabangi, Aggrey; Mugyenyi, Godfrey R; Seguin, Claire; Barnes, Linda; Delaney, Meghan

    2015-07-01

    In November 2014, a 3-day conference devoted to transfusion medicine in sub-Saharan Africa was held in Kampala, Uganda. Faculty from academic institutions in Uganda provided a broad overview of issues pertinent to transfusion medicine in Africa. The conference consisted of lectures, demonstrations, and discussions followed by 5 small group workshops held at the Uganda Blood Transfusion Service Laboratories, the Ugandan Cancer Institute, and the Mulago National Referral Hospital. Highlighted topics included the challenges posed by increasing clinical demands for blood, the need for better patient identification at the time of transfusion, inadequate application of the antiglobulin reagent during pretransfusion testing, concern regarding proper recognition and evaluation of transfusion reactions, the expanded role for nurse leadership as a means to improve patient outcomes, and the need for an epidemiologic map of blood usage in Africa. Specialty areas of focus included the potential for broader application of transcranial Doppler and hydroxyurea therapy in sickle cell disease, African-specific guidelines for transfusion support of cancer patients, the challenges of transfusion support in trauma, and the importance of African-centered clinical research in pediatric and obstetric transfusion medicine. The course concluded by summarizing the benefits derived from an organized quality program that extended from the donor to the recipient. As an educational tool, the slide-audio presentation of the lectures will be made freely available at the International Society of Blood Transfusion Academy Web site: http://www.isbtweb.org/academy/. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI – acase report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Łata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury is defined as acute respiratory failure which develops during or within 6 hours after transfusion of a blood component in a patient with no risk factors for respiratory insufficiency. Transfusion-related acute lung injury is diagnosed based on clinical manifestation and by excluding other causes of acute lung injury. Unambiguous diagnosis is difficult. Looking for anti-HLA and/or anti-HNA antibodies in donors and sometimes in recipients plays an important role in lab tests. Negative antibody findings, either in a donor or in a recipient, do not exclude transfusion-related acute lung injury, which, however, does not exempt from performing leukocyte antibody tests since they are extremely important for transfusion-related acute lung injury prophylaxis. The ways to prevent this reaction include: disqualifying donors with anti-HLA/HNA antibodies, screening for antibodies in multiparous women and in individuals after transfusion, modifying the way blood components are prepared and limiting blood transfusion in clinical practice. The paper presents a case of a 38-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukaemia, hospitalised at the Department of Internal Diseases and Haematology of the Military Institute of Medicine for subsequent courses of chemotherapy. During treatment, the patient had red cells and platelets concentrates transfused several times with no transfusion-related reactions. Eight days after the last chemotherapy infusion, the patient developed high temperature and her platelet count was 14 × 103 /mL. Therefore, the patient received a platelet concentrate again. About 1 hour after transfusion, the patient complained about chest pain and dyspnoea. She needed oxygen therapy. Chest X-ray revealed lung oedema with no signs of left ventricular failure. Once other causes of acute lung injury were excluded, transfusion-related acute lung injury was diagnosed.

  7. Transfusion medicine in trauma patients: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthi, Sarah B; Stansbury, Lynn G; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2011-10-01

    In 2008, we reviewed the practical interface between transfusion medicine and the surgery and critical care of severely injured patients. Reviewed topics ranged from epidemiology of trauma to patterns of resuscitation to the problems of transfusion reactions. In the interim, trauma specialists have adopted damage control resuscitation and become much more knowledgeable and thoughtful about the use of blood products. This new understanding and the resulting changes in clinical practice have raised new concerns. In this update, we focus on which patients need damage control resuscitation, current views on the optimal form of damage control resuscitation with blood products, the roles of newer blood products, and appropriate transfusion triggers in the postinjury setting. We will also review the role of new technology in patient assessment, therapy and monitoring.

  8. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, J; Filipescu, D; Kozek-Langenecker, S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (p......RBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. METHODS: We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month...... period in 2013. RESULTS: The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone...

  9. Transcriptomic biomarkers of altered erythropoiesis to detect autologous blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamin, Olivier; Mignot, Jonathan; Kuuranne, Tiia; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    Autologous blood transfusion is a powerful means of improving performance and remains one of the most challenging methods to detect. Recent investigations have identified 3 candidate reticulocytes genes whose expression was significantly influenced by blood transfusion. Using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as an alternative quantitative method, the present study supports that delta-aminolevulinate synthase 2 (ALAS2), carbonic anhydrase (CA1), and solute carrier family 4 member 1 (SLC4A1) genes are down-regulated post-transfusion. The expression of these genes exhibited stronger correlation with immature reticulocyte fraction than with reticulocytes percentage. Moreover, the repression of reticulocytes' gene expression was more pronounced than the diminution of immature reticulocyte fraction and reticulocyte percentage following blood transfusion. It suggests that the 3 candidate genes are reliable predictors of bone marrow's response to blood transfusion and that they represent potential biomarkers for the detection of this method prohibited in sports. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are frequent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Nørgaard, Astrid; Burcharth, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Adverse effects to transfusion with red donor blood cells are potentially life-threatening. Due to screening, transmission of infectious diseases has decreased; however, the risk is still present. Various immune reactions are common including simple allergic reactions as well as devastating...... conditions such as transfusion-related acute lung injury and circulatory overload in patients with heart disease. Knowledge of the clinical signs of transfusion-related complications is important for clinicians in order to provide the best possible treatment....

  11. Microbes and blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan S

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion medicine has been constantly evolving through the years with improved technologies that enhance the capability of identifying existing and newer emerging transfusion transmissible infections (TTI. In spite of the efforts made by blood banks the risk of TTI remains. This article deals with the various steps involved in ensuring blood safety, i.e. donor selection, role of screening donated blood for known and emerging infections, issues and assessment of threat posed by the risk, methodologies employed for testing and possible suggestions to improve transfusion services. While the threat of TTI remains, with a concerted effort of private and government organisations, and co-operation from the diagnostic companies, it is possible to raise the levels of blood safety. A surveillance system is also essential to identify any new agents that might pose a threat in a geographic area and to include them too in the screening process.

  12. [Proteomics and transfusion medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, N; Prudent, M; Crettaz, D; Tissot, J-D

    2011-04-01

    The term "proteomics" covers tools and techniques that are used to analyze and characterize complex mixtures of proteins from various biological samples. In this short review, a typical proteomic approach, related to the study of particular and illustrative situation related to transfusion medicine is reported. This "case report" will allow the reader to be familiar with a practical proteomic approach of a real situation, and will permit to describe the tools that are usually used in proteomic labs, and, in a second part, to present various proteomic applications in transfusion medicine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. [European Union and blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, P

    2003-06-01

    Blood transfusion is progressing, Europe is growing, European blood transfusion organisations are developing rapidly. The first step was the publication of a new directive (2002/98/CE). The directive is the result of a compromise between technocracy, lobbying and blood transfusion professionals. European blood transfusion must be based on medical, scientific and social criteria. Two imperatives must be considered: the respect of ethics and; independence from the commercial system. The primary objective is to give satisfaction to patients while respecting blood donors.

  14. Presence of medication taken by blood donors in plasma for transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tilborgh-de Jong, A.J.W.; Wiersum-Osselton, J.C.; Touw, D.J.; Schipperus, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The TRIP national hemovigilance and biovigilance office receives reports on side-effects and incidents associated with transfusion of labile blood products. Anaphylactic reactions accounted for the largest number of serious transfusion reactions in the period 2008-2012. In

  15. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meier, J.; Filipescu, D.; Kozek-Langenecker, S.; Llau Pitarch, J.; Mallett, S.; Martus, P.; Matot, I.; Accurso, Giuseppe; Ahrens, Norbert; Akan, Mert; Åkeröy, Kristin; Aksoy, Omur; Alanoğlu, Zekeriyye; Alfredo, Merten; Alkis, Neslihan; Almeida, Valentina; Alousi, Mohammed; Alves, Claudia; Amaral, Joana; Ambrosi, Xavier; Ana, Izquierdo; Anastase, Denisa; Andersson, Mona; Andreou, Antonis; Anthopoulos, Georgios; Apanaviciute, Daiva; Arbelaez, Alejandro; Arcade, Anne-Laure; Arion-Balescu, Carmen; Arun, Oguzhan; Azenha, Marta; Bacalbasa, Nicolae; Baeten, Wannes; Balandin, Alina; Barquero López, Marta; Barsan, Victoria; Bascuas, Begona; Basora, Misericordia; Baumann, Holger; Bayer, Andreas; Bell, Andrea; Belmonte Cuenca, Julio; Bengisun, Zuleyha Kazak; Bento, Carlos; Beran, Maud; Bermudez Lopez, Maria; Bernardino, Ana; Berthelsen, Kasper Gymoese; Bigat, Zekiye; Bilshiene, Diana; Bilska, Marcela; Bisbe Vives, Elvira; Biscioni, Tamara; Björn, Heyse; Blom, Tommi; Bogdan Prodan, Alexandru; Bogdanovic Dvorscak, Matea; Boisson, Matthieu; Bolten, Jens; Bona, Francesco; Borg, Francis; Boros, Cristian; Borys, Michał; Boveroux, Pierre; Boztug Uz, Neval; Brettner, Florian; Brisard, Laurent; Britta, De Waal; Browne, Gail; Budow, Kristin; Buerkle, Hartmut; Buggy, Donal; Cain, Alistair; Calancea, Esenia; Calarasu, Florenta; Calder, Verity; Camci, Ali Emre; Campiglia, Laura; Campos, Beatriz; Camps, Angela; Carlos, Delgado; Carreira, Claudia; Carrilho, Alexandre; Carvalho, Peter; Cassinello, Concepcion; Cattan, Anat; Cenni, Leonardo; Cerny, Vladimir; Ceyda Meço, Başak; Chesov, Ion; Chishti, Ahmed; Chupin, Anne-Marie; Cikova, Andrea; Cindea, Iulia; Cintula, Daniel; Ciobanasu, Roxana; Clements, Deborah; Cobiletchi, Serghei; Coburn, Mark; Coghlan, Liz; Collyer, Thomas; Copotoiu, Sanda Maria; Copotoiu, Ruxandra; Corneci, Dan; Cortegiani, Andrea; Coskunfirat, O. Koray; Costea, Dan; Czuczwar, Mirosław; Davies, Katy; de Baerdemaeker, Luc; de Hert, Stefan; Debernardi, Felicino; Decagny, Sylvie; Deger Coskunfirat, Nesil; Diana, Toma; Diana, Gómez Martinez; Dias, Sandra; Dickinson, Matthew; Dobisova, Anna; Dragan, Anca; Droc, Gabriela; Duarte, Sonia; Dunk, Nigel; Ekelund, Kim; Ekmekçi, Perihan; Elena, Ciobanu; Ellimah, Tracey; Espie, Laura; Everett, Lynn; Ferguson, Andrew; Fernandes, Melissa; Fernández, J. A.; Ferner, Marion; Ferreira, Daniel; Ferrie, Rosemary; Filipescu, Daniela; Flassikova, Zora; Fleischer, Andreas; Font, A.; Galkova, Katarina; Garcia, Irene; Garner, Matt; Gasenkampf, Andrey; Gelmanas, Arunas; Gherghina, Viorel; Gilsanz, Fernando; Giokas, George; Goebel, Ulrich; Gomes, Piedade; Gonçalves Aguiar, José Manuel; Gonzalez Monzon, Veronica; Gottschalk, André; Gouraud, Jean-Pierre; Gramigni, Elena; Grintescu, Ioana; Grynyuk, Andriy; Grytsan, Alexey; Guasch, Emilia; Gustin, Denis; Hans, Grégory; Harazim, Hana; Hervig, Tore; Hidalgo, Francisco; Higham, Charley; Hirschauer, Nicola; Hoeft, Andreas; Innerhofer, Petra; Innerhofer-Pompernigg, Nicole; Jacobs, Stefan; Jakobs, Nicolas; Jamaer, Luc; James, Sarah; Jawad, Monir; Jesus, Joana; Jhanji, Shaman; Jipa Lavina, Nicoleta; Jokinen, Johanna; Jovanovic, Gordana; Jubera, Maria Pilar; Kahn, David; Karjagin, Juri; Kasnik, Darja; Katsanoulas, Konstantinos; Kelle, Hened; Kelleher, Mortimer; Kessler, Florian; Kirigin, Borana; Kiskira, Olga; Kivik, Peeter; Klimi, Pelagia; Klučka, Jozef; Koers, Lena; Kontrimaviciut, Egle; Koopman-van Gemert, A. W. M. M.; Korfiotis, Demetrios; Kosinová, Martina; Koursoumi, Eygenia; Kozek Langenecker, Sibylle; Kranke, Peter; Kresic, Marina; Krobot, Renatas; Kropman, Lucienne; Kulikov, Alexander; Kvolik, Slavica; Kvrgic, Ivana; Kyttari, Aikaterini; Lagarto, Filipa; Lance, Marcus D.; Laufenberg, Rita; Lauwick, Severine; Lecoq, Jean-Pierre; Leech, Leech; Lidzborski, Lionel; Liliana, Henao; Linda, Filipe; Llau Pitarch, Juan Vicente; Lopes, Ana; Lopez, Luis; Lopez Alvarez, Alexo; Lorenzi, Irene; Lorre, Gilbert; Lucian, Horhota; Lupis, Tamara; Lupu, Mary Nicoleta; Macas, Andrius; Macedo, Ana; Maggi, Genaro; Mallett, Susan; Mallor, Thomas; Manoleli, Alexandra; Manolescu, Rely; Manrique, Susana; Maquoi, Isabelle; Marios-Konstantinos, Tasoulis; Markovic Bozic, Jasmina; Markus W, Hollmann; Marques, Margarida; Martinez, Raul; Martinez, Ever; Martínez, Esther; Martinho, Helder; Martins, Diogo; Martires, Emilia; Martus, Peter; Matias, Francisco; Matot, Idit; Mauff, Susanne; Meale, Paula; Meier, Jens; Merz, Hannah; Meybohm, Patrick; Militello, Maria Grazia; Mincu, Natalia; Miranda, Maria Lina; Mirea, Liliana; Moghildea, Victoria; Moise, Alida; Molano Diaz, Pablo; Moltó, Luís; Monedero, Pablo; Moral, Victoria; Moreira, Zélia; Moret, Enrique; Mulders, Freya; Munteanu, Anna Maria; Nadia Diana, Kinast; Nair, Ashok; Neskovic, Vojislava; Ninane, Vincent; Nitu, Denisa; Oberhofer, Dagmar; Odeberg-Wernerman, Suzanne; Oganjan, Juri; Omur, Dilek; Orallo Moran, Marian Angeles; Ozkardesler, Sevda; Pacasová, Rita; Paklar, Nataša; Pandazi, Ageliki; Papaspyros, Fotios; Paraskeuopoulos, Tilemachos; Parente, Suzana; Paunescu, Marilena Alina; Pavičić Šarić, Jadranka; Pereira, Filipa; Pereira, Elizabete; Pereira, Luciane; Perry, Chris; Petri, Attila; Petrovic, Uros; Pica, Silvia; Pinheiro, Filipe; Pinto, José; Pinto, Fernando; Piwowarczyk, Paweł; Platteau, Sofie; Poeira, Rita; Popescu, Ravzan; Popica, Georgian; Poredos, Peter; Prasser, Christopher; Preckel, Benedikt; Prospiech, Audrey; Pujol, Roger; Raimundo, Ana; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Rakic, Dragana; Ramadan, Mohammed; Ramazanoğlu, Atilla; Rantis, Athanasios; Raquel, Ferrandis; Rätsep, Indrek; Real, Catia; Reikvam, Tore; Reis, Ligia; Rigal, Jean-Christophe; Rohner, Anne; Rokk, Alar; Roman Fernandez, Adriana; Rosenberger, Peter; Rossaint, Rolf; Rozec, Bertrand; Rudolph, Till; Saeed, Yousif; Safonov, Sergej; Saka, Esra; Samama, Charles Marc; Sánchez López, Óscar; Sanchez Perez, David; Sanchez Sanchez, Yvan Enrique; Sandeep, Varma; Sandu, Madalina Nina; Sanlı, Suat; Saraiva, Alexandra; Scarlatescu, Ecaterina; Schiraldi, Renato; Schittek, Gregor; Schnitter, Bettina; Schuster, Michael; Seco, Carlos; Selvi, Onur; Senard, Marc; Serra, Sofia; Serrano, Helena; Shmigelsky, Alexander; Silva, Luisa; Simeson, Karen; Singh, Rita; Sipylaite, Jurate; Skitek, Kornel; Skok, Ira; Smékalová, Olga; Smirnova, Nadezda; Sofia, Machado; Soler Pedrola, Maria; Söndergaard, Sören; Sõrmus, Alar; Sørvoll, Ingvild Hausberg; Soumelidis, Christos; Spindler Yesel, Alenka; Stefan, Mihai; Stevanovic, Ana; Stevikova, Jordana; Stivan, Sabina; Štourač, Petr; Striteska, Jana; Strys, Lydia; Suljevic, Ismet; Tania, Moreno; Tareco, Gloria; Tena, Beatriz; Theodoraki, Kassiani; Tifrea, Marius; Tikuisis, Renatas; Tolós, Raquel; Tomasi, Roland; Tomescu, Dana; Tomkute, Gabija; Tormos, Pilar; Trepenaitis, Darius; Troyan, Galina; Unic-Stojanovic, Dragana; Unterrainer, Axel; Uranjek, Jasna; Valsamidis, Dimitrios; van Dasselaar, Nick; van Limmen, Jurgen; van Noord, Peter; van Poorten, J. F.; Vanderlaenen, Margot; Varela Garcia, Olalla; Velasco, Ana; Veljovic, Milic; Vera Bella, Jorge; Vercauteren, Marcel; Verdouw, Bas; Verenkin, Vladimir; Veselovsky, Tomas; Vieira, Helena; Villar, Tania; Visnja, Ikic; Voje, Minca; von Dossow-Hanfstingl, Vera; Von Langen, Daniel; Vorotyntsev, Sergiy; Vujanovič, Vojislav; Vukovic, Rade; Watt, Philip; Werner, Eva; Wernerman, Jan; Wittmann, Maria; Wright, Margaret; Wunder, Christian; Wyffels, Piet; Yakymenko, Yevgen; Yıldırım, Çiğdem; Yılmaz, Hakan; Zacharowski, Kai; Záhorec, Roman; Zarif, Maged; Zielinska-Skitek, Ewa; Zsisku, Lajos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (pRBC) and

  16. Association between gene expression biomarkers of immunosuppression and blood transfusion in severely injured polytrauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Hew Dt; Brohi, Karim; Pearse, Rupert M; Mein, Charles A; Wozniak, Eva; Prowle, John R; Hinds, Charles J; OʼDwyer, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    To explore the hypothesis that blood transfusion contributes to an immunosuppressed phenotype in severely injured patients. Despite trauma patients using disproportionately large quantities of blood and blood products, the immunomodulatory effects of blood transfusion in this group are inadequately described. A total of 112 ventilated polytrauma patients were recruited. Messenger RNA (mRNA) was extracted from PAXGene tubes collected within 2 hours of the trauma, at 24 hours, and at 72 hours. T-helper cell subtype specific cytokines and transcription factors were quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Median injury severity score was 29. Blood transfusion was administered to 27 (24%) patients before the 2-hour sampling point. Transfusion was associated with a greater immediate rise in IL-10 (P = 0.003) and IL-27 (P = 0.04) mRNA levels. Blood products were transfused in 72 (64%) patients within the first 24 hours. There was an association between transfusion at 24 hours and higher IL-10 (P transfused. Multiple regression models confirmed that the transfusion of blood products was independently associated with altered patterns of gene expression. Blood stream infections occur in 15 (20.8%) of those transfused in the first 24 hours, compared with 1 patient (2.5%) not transfused (OR = 10.3 [1.3-81], P = 0.008). The primarily immunosuppressive inflammatory response to polytrauma may be exacerbated by the transfusion of blood products. Furthermore, transfusion was associated with an increased susceptibility to nosocomial infections.

  17. Neonatal transfusion practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindern, Jeannette Susanne von

    2011-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are probably the most frequently used drug given to very preterm infants; more than 90% of infants with a birth weight <1000 grams receive one or more RBC transfusions. Except for reduction of the amount of blood drawn for laboratory tests and use of a single donor program, no

  18. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the benefit and harm of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies to guide red blood cell transfusions. DESIGN: Systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane central register of controlled...... differences with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: 31 trials totalling 9813 randomised patients were included. The proportion of patients receiving red blood cells (relative risk 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.63, 8923 patients, 24 trials) and the number of red blood cell units transfused (mean...... were associated with a reduction in the number of red blood cell units transfused and number of patients being transfused, but mortality, overall morbidity, and myocardial infarction seemed to be unaltered. Restrictive transfusion strategies are safe in most clinical settings. Liberal transfusion...

  19. Autologous Blood Transfusion for Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenawalt, Julia A; Zernell, Denise

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a leading contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality in the United States and globally. Although the rate of PPH is generally decreasing nationally, severity of PPH appears to be increasing, potentially related to the various comorbidities associated with women of childbearing age. There is increasing evidence of risks associated with allogeneic blood transfusion, which has historically been the classic therapeutic approach for treatment to PPH. Pregnant women are particularly susceptible to the implications of sensitization to red cell antigens, a common sequela to allogenic blood transfusion. Autologous blood transfusion eliminates the potential of communicable disease transmission as well as the conceivable threat of a blood transfusion reaction. Recent technological advances allow cell salvage coupled with the use of a leukocyte filter to be used as an alternative approach for improving the outcome for women experiencing a PPH. Modest changes in standard operating procedure and continued training in use and application of cell salvaged blood may assist in minimizing negative outcomes from PPH. Salvaged blood has been demonstrated to be at least equal and often superior to banked blood. We discuss nursing implications for application of this technology for women with PPH. Continued research is warranted to evaluate the impact that application of cell salvage with filtration has on the patient experiencing a PPH.

  20. Transfusion-associated anaphylaxis during anaesthesia and surgery--a retrospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindsted, G; Larsen, R; Krøigaard, M

    2014-01-01

    at the Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre (DAAC). Based on the outcome of this investigation, the patients were classified as DAAC positive (confirmed hypersensitivity to identified agent, n = 112), or DAAC negative (no confirmed hypersensitivity, n = 133). Data on case history, details of blood transfusion...... and results of laboratory and clinical investigations were collected. TAA cases were identified according to the recommendations of the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT). RESULTS: Ten possible TAA cases (30% of all transfused patients) were identified, all DAAC negative. The frequency......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Transfusion-associated anaphylaxis (TAA) is a severe adverse reaction reported to occur in 1:9000-90 000 transfusions. According to the Danish Registration of Transfusion Risks (DART), the frequency is 1:300 000 transfusions, which suggests insufficient reporting of TAA...

  1. [Prospects in blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, P

    2003-04-01

    What will be the evolution of blood transfusion in the next 10 years? What are the scientific and medical arguments to help the decision makers to propose the developments? Many scientific and clinical studies show that blood substitutes are not ready for use in man. So, for a long time, blood collection in man will still be a necessity to prepare cell concentrates (red blood cells and platelets) and fresh frozen plasma. During this period, blood safety will be based on development of testing technics and preparation processes of blood products. Another major point will be a better clinical use of blood derivates. Cellular therapy will be probably only a way of diversification in blood transfusion centers in partnership with hospitals.

  2. Bedside practice of blood transfusion in a large teaching hospital in Uganda: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Graaf J

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adverse transfusion reactions can cause morbidity and death to patients who receive a blood transfusion. Blood transfusion practice in Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda is analyzed to see if and when these practices play a role in the morbidity and mortality of patients. Materials and Methods: An observational study on three wards of Mulago Hospital. Physicians, paramedics, nurses, medical students and nurse students were observed using two questionnaires. For comparison, a limited observational study was performed in the University Medical Centre Groningen (UMCG in Groningen, The Netherlands. Results: In Mulago Hospital guidelines for blood transfusion practice were not easily available. Medical staff members work on individual professional levels. Students perform poorly due to inconsistency in their supervision. Documentation of blood transfusion in patient files is scarce. There is no immediate bedside observation, so transfusion reactions and obstructions in the blood transfusion flow are not observed. Conclusion: The poor blood transfusion practice is likely to play a role in the morbidity and mortality of patients who receive a blood transfusion. There is a need for a blood transfusion policy and current practical guidelines.

  3. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury -A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI is a rare but life threatening complication of blood transfusion which is being increasingly recognized. It is caused by cross reaction between donor antibodies and host leucocytes or between donor leucocytes with host antibodies. TRALI usually presents as an Acute Lung Injury (ALI resulting in pulmonary congestion and edema, often leading to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. We report a case of TRALI in a patient who underwent laparotomy for ruptured corpus luteal cyst requiring blood transfusion. She presented with acute pulmonary edema about an hour after commencing a blood transfusion .This was managed conservatively with oxygen, steroids and diuretics. Patient improved rapidly and later discharged without any residual complications.

  4. [Ethical issues in transfusion medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, J-D; Danic, B; Cabaud, J-J; Garraud, O

    2016-09-01

    Ethics is on the cross road of off values that are present along the ways of transfusion medicine. This is an important tool to afford opinions as well as debates that always emerge when discussing transfusion medicine. The wording is particularly important; this was one among several others that characterized the soul of Jean-Jacques Lefrère when he opened the doors of the ethical issues of transfusion medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Blood transfusion safety: current progress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyez, E; Malherbe, P; Tiry-Lescut, C; Fontaine, O

    2004-01-01

    For the past ten years, a real improvement in knowledge and methods concerning blood transfusion safety has been made. In this observation, concerning a polytraumatism patient who received massive blood transfusion with no immunologic nor infectious complications occurring one year later, brings evidence of real progress on blood transfusion safety for improvement in short and long term prognosis for polytransfused patients. Copyright John Libbey Eurotext 2003.

  6. Transfusion Therapy in Critically Ill Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Tsung Chang

    2008-04-01

    most common agent used for DIC but the results are usually not satisfactory. Antithrombin III, protein C, or recombinant thrombomodu-lin has been used successfully to treat this condition. For reducing the risk of organism transmission and adverse reactions resulting from blood transfusion, the following measures have been suggested: (1 replacement therapy using products other than blood (e.g., erythropoietin, iron preparation, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor; (2 special component replacement therapy for specific diseases; (3 autotransfusion; (4 subdividing whole packed blood products into smaller volumes to reduce donor exposure; (5 advances in virus-inactivating procedures. To avoid viral transmission, vapor-heated or pasteurized products and genetic recombinant products are recom-mended. Cytomegalovirus (CMV-seronegative blood, leukoreduced and/or irradiated blood are recommended for prevention of CMV infection, graft-versus-host-disease and alloimmunization in neonate and immunocompromised patient transfusion. There is no reason to prescribe a plasma product for nutritional supplementation because of the risk of complications. The principle: complications of transfusion must be avoided, the rate of blood exposure should be reduced and the safety of the transfused agents or components should be maintained must always be kept in mind.

  7. Incidentes transfusionais imediatos: revisão integrativa da literatura Incidentes transfusionales inmediatos: revisión integrativa de la literatura Immediate transfusion incidents: an integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Lemos de Sousa Neto

    2012-01-01

    hemolítica y alérgica, avance en acciones de hemovigilancia y mayor preocupación por la calidad de la asistencia hemoterápica.This integrative literature review had the objective of analyzing research on the occurrence of immediate transfusion incidents and implemented hemovigilance actions. Data were obtained through database searches of LILACS, MEDLINE and PubMed, for the period of 1980 to 2009, in the Portuguese, English and Spanish languages. We identified 1382 articles, of which 29 met the established inclusion criteria. Of these articles, 20 (69.0% were retrospective transveral, 8 (27.5% were prospective, and one (3.5% was a case control study. In regard to approach, the studies were classified into two thematic foci: types of immediate transfusion incidents, and implemented hemovigilance actions associated with the types of immediate transfusion incidents. The analysis of this work highlighted the higher incidence of febrile nonhemolytic reactions and allergic reactions, the advancement in hemovigilance actions, and greater concern with the quality of care in hemotherapy.

  8. Adjusted transfusion triggers improve transfusion practice in orthopaedic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eindhoven, GB; Diercks, RL; Richardson, FJ; van Raaij, JJAM; Hagenaars, JAM; van Horn, [No Value; de Wolf, JTM

    Although blood transfusion has never been safer, there remains concern about adverse effects. We designed guidelines, the 6-8-10-Flexinorm, based on the conditions which are relevant to the decision to transfuse. To evaluate these new guidelines, we performed a case-control study in patients

  9. Blood transfusion exposure in Denmark and Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Edgren, Gustaf; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Although essential for the evaluation of blood transfusion safety, the prevalence of blood transfusion in the general population is not presently known. This study estimated the exposure to blood transfusion in the general Scandinavian population....

  10. Transfusion medicine on American television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, J K

    2014-02-01

    Television is a beloved American pastime and a frequent American export. As such, American television shapes how the global public views the world. This study examines how the portrayal of blood transfusion and blood donation on American television may influence how domestic and international audiences perceive the field of transfusion medicine. American television programming of the last quarter-century was reviewed to identify programmes featuring topics related to blood banking/transfusion medicine. The included television episodes were identified through various sources. Twenty-seven television episodes airing between 1991 and 2013 were identified as featuring blood bank/transfusion medicine topics. Although some accurate representations of the field were identified, most television programmes portrayed blood banking/transfusion medicine inaccurately. The way in which blood banking/transfusion medicine is portrayed on American television may assist clinicians in understanding their patient's concerns about blood safety and guide blood collection organisations in improving donor recruitment. © 2013 The Author. Transfusion Medicine © 2013 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  11. Transfusion regimens in thalassemia intermedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Karakas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thalassemia intermedia (TI is a heterogeneous disease, in terms of both clinical manifestations and underlying molecular defects. Some TI patients are asymptomatic until adult life, whereas others are symptomatic from early childhood. In contrast with patients with Thalassemia major (TM, the severity of anemia is less and the patients do not require transfusions during at least the first few years of life. Many patients with TI, especially older ones, have been exposed to the multiple long-term effects of chronic anemia and tissue hypoxia and their compensatory reactions, including enhanced erythropoiesis and increased iron absorption. Bone marrow expansion and extramedullary hematopoiesis lead to bone deformities and liver and spleen enlargement. Therapeutic strategies in TI are not clear and different criteria are used to decide the initiation of transfusion and chelation therapy, modulation of fetal hemoglobin production, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation on an individual basis. The clinical picture of well-treated TM patients with regular transfusionchelation therapy is better from TI patients who have not received adequate transfusion therapy. There is a significant role of early blood transfusion to prevent and treat complications commonly associated with TI, such as extramedullary erythropoiesis and bone deformities, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, leg ulcers, gallstones, pseudoxantoma elasticum, hyperuricosuria, gout and pulmonary hypertension, which are rarely seen in thalassemia major. Nowadays, indications of transfusion in patients with TI are chronic anemia (Hb < 7 g/dL, bone deformities, growth failure, extramedullary erythropoiesis, heart failure, pregnancy and preparation for surgical procedures. Conclusion: Adequate (regular or tailored transfusion therapy is an important treatment modality for increasing the quality of life in patients with thalassemia intermedia during childhood. 就临床表象和潜在的分子缺

  12. Platelet transfusions: the science behind safety, risks and appropriate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Bruce D

    2010-03-01

    Platelets are active metabolising cells that are evolved for the tasks of haemostasis, inflammatory reactions and wound healing. When platelet products are stored in the blood bank a complex series of changes occur, leading to partial activation, up-regulation of inflammatory mediators, cellular morphology changes, loss of cell membrane lipids and micro-particle formation, as well as apoptosis. The resultant coagulation transfusion product has a number of potential expected side effects including fever, alloimmunisation, sepsis, thrombosis and transfusion-related acute lung injury. Of course, these events are occasional side effects yet they are some of the most common potential disasters of transfusion. Platelet transfusions in patients bleeding from thrombocytopaenia or severe platelet suppression will most likely benefit from a platelet transfusion. However, outcome data (controversial) have shown in some populations that platelet transfusions are associated with worse patient outcomes. Such associations may be due to the biologic changes that have occurred during storage, lack of HLA matching as well as other causes or it could be a mismatch of the platelet products to patient's needs (over-use). Platelets are administered in the surgical arena often due to 'clinical judgement', which errs on the side of, perhaps, too frequent use.

  13. Platelet Transfusion – the Art and Science of Compromise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Joan; Harm, Sarah K.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many modern therapies depend on platelet (PLT) transfusion support. PLTs have a 4- to 7-day shelf life and are frequently in short supply. In order to optimize the inventory PLTs are often transfused to adults without regard for ABO compatibility. Hemolytic reactions are infrequent despite the presence of ‘high titer’ anti-A and anti-B antibodies in some of the units. Despite the low risk for hemolysis, some centers provide only ABO identical PLTs to their recipients; this practice might have other beneficial outcomes that remain to be proven. Strategies to mitigate the risk of hemolysis and the clinical and laboratory outcomes following ABO-matched and mismatched transfusions will be discussed. Although the PLTs themselves do not carry the D antigen, a small number of RBCs are also transfused with every PLT dose. The quantity of RBCs varies by the type of PLT preparation, and even a small quantity of D+ RBCs can alloimmunize a susceptible D− host. Thus PLT units are labeled as D+/–, and most transfusion services try to prevent the transfusion of D+ PLTs to D– females of childbearing age. A similar policy for patients with hematological diseases is controversial, and the elements and mechanisms of anti-D alloimmunization will be discussed. PMID:23922541

  14. Transfusion in critically ill children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, E L; Stensballe, J; Afshari, A

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood products is a cornerstone in managing many critically ill children. Major improvements in blood product safety have not diminished the need for caution in transfusion practice. In this review, we aim to discuss the interplay between benefits and potential adverse effects...... evidence-based medicine. Paediatric patients have explicit physiological challenges and requirements to be addressed. Critically ill children often suffer from anaemia, have substantial iatrogenic blood loss with subsequent transfusions, and are at a higher risk of complications, often due to human errors...... of transfusion in critically ill children by including 65 papers, which were evaluated based on previously agreed selection criteria. Current practice on transfusing critically ill children is mainly founded on the basis of adult studies, common practices with cut-off values, and expert opinions, rather than...

  15. Evaluation of two types of leukocyte removal filters on transfusion dependent thalassaemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, R; Mazeni, N R; Hussin, H

    2000-12-01

    The advent of leukocyte filters has enabled effective removal of leukocytes from certain blood products thus avoiding many adverse effects of blood transfusion. Many different materials have been incorporated into these filters to achieve >95% leukocyte removal. In this study we evaluated the efficacy of leukocyte removal of two different filters, using actual bedside transfusion settings involving patients with transfusion dependent thalassaemia. Fifty-one transfusion events were randomised to use either a polyurethane filter or a non-woven polyester filter. We found that the two filters achieved 98.4% and 96.2% leukocyte removal respectively (p = 0.022). We also found no significant correlation between pre-filtration white blood cell count and the volume transfused with the efficacy of leukodepletion. No untoward events or transfusion reactions were observed during the study.

  16. Improving transfusion education for junior doctors; exploring UK experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J E; Narayan, S; Pendry, K

    2017-04-01

    To provide evidence-based guidance on how transfusion education should be delivered to junior doctors by employing established qualitative research methodology. There is a global call for increased transfusion education for doctors to support the delivery of evidence-based practice. Education is reported as an effective measure to improve transfusion practice, although there is a paucity of research evaluating how this should be effectively delivered. Serial focus groups with junior doctors and relevant healthcare professionals explored experiences of, and reactions to, education and competency assessments in transfusion, which were audio-recorded and transcribed. Temporal and final analysis, performed by two independent assessors, informed subsequent recruitment, analysis and challenging of emerging theories - until saturation was reached. Eight focus groups were held involving 53 personnel, 77% of whom were junior doctors. Current transfusion education for doctors in the UK is reliant on e-learning and 'cascade training' (on-the-job from senior clinicians/nursing staff). E-learning is viewed as a 'tick box exercise'. There is a call for relevant and practical continuing education delivered face to face by good educators in an environment away from clinical practice. Preferred methods include small group and simulation learning based on real-life cases. In contrast to practical competency, the assessment of clinical competency is deemed unfeasible. Current methods of transfusion education employed in the UK are unsatisfactory to ensure safe transfusion practice. Ongoing education is deemed necessary throughout career progression, and suggested improvements include increased emphasis on face-to-face teaching and simulation training. Employed educational methods and decision support tools require appropriate evaluation. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  17. Improving blood safety: Errors management in transfusion medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujandrić Nevenka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The concept of blood safety includes the entire transfusion chain starting with the collection of blood from the blood donor, and ending with blood transfusion to the patient. The concept involves quality management system as the systematic monitoring of adverse reactions and incidents regarding the blood donor or patient. Monitoring of near-miss errors show the critical points in the working process and increase transfusion safety. Objective. The aim of the study was to present the analysis results of adverse and unexpected events in transfusion practice with a potential risk to the health of blood donors and patients. Methods. One-year retrospective study was based on the collection, analysis and interpretation of written reports on medical errors in the Blood Transfusion Institute of Vojvodina. Results. Errors were distributed according to the type, frequency and part of the working process where they occurred. Possible causes and corrective actions were described for each error. The study showed that there were not errors with potential health consequences for the blood donor/patient. Errors with potentially damaging consequences for patients were detected throughout the entire transfusion chain. Most of the errors were identified in the preanalytical phase. The human factor was responsible for the largest number of errors. Conclusion. Error reporting system has an important role in the error management and the reduction of transfusion-related risk of adverse events and incidents. The ongoing analysis reveals the strengths and weaknesses of the entire process and indicates the necessary changes. Errors in transfusion medicine can be avoided in a large percentage and prevention is costeffective, systematic and applicable.

  18. [Assessment of transfusion practice: assessing nurses' knowledge in transfusion medicine at Mohamed VI Hematology and Oncology Center of Marrakesh, Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahlimi, F Z; Tazi, I; Sifsalam, M; Bouchtia, M; Mahmal, L

    2015-03-01

    Blood transfusion is a complex activity, involving many actors. It is a high-risk activity which could not be controlled without the use of specific methods. Health care workers beliefs and organizational factors are two major issues for the blood transfusion safety. In our medical center, transfusion medicine care practices were evaluated by testing the nursing staff with a list of questions. We carried out a cross-sectional study. The information was gathered by using an anonymous questionnaire. The latter was developed by foreign teams and adapted to the local context. Forty-two nurses have participated to study. Only 25% have appropriate knowledge and practice with no negative consequences for the patient safety. In our sample, poor knowledge and practice concerned mainly (1) pre-transfusion compatibility check when receiving blood units (30%); (2) delay in preservation of blood unit in the ward (65%); and (3) recognition of abnormal reactions after transfusion (40%). These results showed on which topics the teaching program should emphasize so as to improve the quality of blood transfusion in the medical centers according to legal obligations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. [Ethics and blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, J-D; Garraud, O; Danic, B; Cabaud, J-J; Lefrère, J-J

    2013-09-01

    Blood donation is an act of solidarity. Most often, this act is done on a volunteer basis and, depending on countries and circumstances, is not remunerated. The increase in need, the always-greater number of deferral criteria, the safety issues and the changes in the structures of our societies are among the many subjects for ethical debates. Taking these into account, the actors of the transfusion must analyze certain parameters: the value of a donation, the meaning of volunteering, the appropriateness of remunerating the act of giving a part of one's self, no longer as a donation or an expression of altruism and solidarity, but as a commercial act regimented by economic laws. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  20. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the benefit and harm of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies to guide red blood cell transfusions. DESIGN: Systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane central register of controlled...... trials, SilverPlatter Medline (1950 to date), SilverPlatter Embase (1980 to date), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to present). Reference lists of identified trials and other systematic reviews were assessed, and authors and experts in transfusion were contacted to identify additional trials....... TRIAL SELECTION: Published and unpublished randomised clinical trials that evaluated a restrictive compared with a liberal transfusion strategy in adults or children, irrespective of language, blinding procedure, publication status, or sample size. DATA EXTRACTION: Two authors independently screened...

  1. Presence of medication taken by blood donors in plasma for transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tilborgh, A.J.W.; Touw, D.J.; Wiersum-Osselton, J.C.; Zijlker-Jansen, P.Y.; Hudig, F.; Schipperus, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The TRIP national hemovigilance and biovigilance office receives reports on side effects and incidents associated with the transfusion of labile blood products. The findings are publicly reported in annual hemovigilance reports. The category of anaphylactic reaction, defined as allergic

  2. Transfusion-associated hazards: A revisit of their presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, O; Sut, C; Haddad, A; Tariket, S; Aloui, C; Laradi, S; Hamzeh-Cognasse, H; Bourlet, T; Zeni, F; Aubron, C; Ozier, Y; Laperche, S; Peyrard, T; Buffet, P; Guyotat, D; Tavernier, E; Cognasse, F; Pozzetto, B; Andreu, G

    2018-04-03

    As a therapy or a support to other therapies, despite being largely beneficial to patients in general, transfusion it is not devoid of some risks. In a moderate number of cases, patients may manifest adverse reactions, otherwise referred to as transfusion-associated hazards (TAHs). The latest French 2016 haemovigilance report indicates that 93% of TAHs are minor (grade 1), 5.5% are moderate (grade 2) and 1.6% are severe (grade 3), with only five deaths (grade 4) being attributed to transfusion with relative certainty (imputability of level [or grade] 1 to 3). Health-care providers need to be well aware of the benefits and potential risks (to best evaluate and discuss the benefit-risk ratio), how to prevent TAHs, the overall costs and the availability of alternative therapeutic options. In high-income countries, most blood establishments (BEs) and hospital blood banks (HBBs) have developed tools for reporting and analysing at least severe transfusion reactions. With nearly two decades of haemovigilance, transfusion reaction databases should be quite informative, though there are four main caveats that prevent it from being fully efficient: (ai) reporting is mainly declarative and is thus barely exhaustive even in countries where it is mandatory by law; (aii) it is often difficult to differentiate between the different complications related to transfusion, diseases, comorbidities and other types of therapies in patients suffering from debilitating conditions; (aiii) there is a lack of consistency in the definitions used to describe and report some transfusion reactions, their severity and their likelihood of being related to transfusion; and (aiv) it is difficult to assess the imputability of a particular BC given to a patient who has previously received many BCs over a relatively short period of time. When compiling all available information published so far, it appears that TAHs can be analysed using different approaches: (bi) their pathophysiological nature; (bii

  3. Prolongation of rat heart allografts by donor-specific blood transfusion treated with ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oluwole, S.F.; Iga, C.; Lau, H.; Hardy, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of donor-specific blood transfusion was compared to that of UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion on heart allograft survival in inbred rats with major histocompatibility differences. In one series ACI rats received heterotopic heart grafts from Lewis rats and 1 mL transfusion of donor-type blood at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to the transplantation. Fifty percent of the grafts were permanently accepted (survival greater than 200 days). Following UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion, 55% of the grafts survived indefinitely. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction ACI lymphocytes are weak responders to Lewis lymphocytes. In another series, Lewis rats received ACI hearts. Donor-specific transfusions at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to transplantation did not significantly alter the survival of heart allografts. Lewis lymphocytes react strongly to ACI stimulator cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. However, when the donor blood was UVB-irradiated prior to transfusion, the ACI allograft survival was significantly prolonged in this ACI-to-Lewis strain combination. When Lewis rats received W/F hearts following either donor-specific or UVB-irradiated donor-specific transfusions, the hearts' survival was similarly and significantly prolonged, but did not become permanent. Mixed lymphocyte reaction reveals that the stimulation index of Lewis lymphocytes against W/F lymphocytes is greater than that of ACI versus Lewis, but is less than that between Lewis responder cells against ACI stimulators

  4. The outsider adverse event in transfusion: Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Eldad A; Godbey, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    In order to maintain adequate inventories of red blood cells (RBCs) for transfusion, RBC units are refrigerator-stored for variable amounts of time prior to transfusion. A subset of RBCs is damaged during prolonged storage. Clearance of these damaged RBCs is hypothesized to induce an inflammatory response in the transfusion recipient. However, there is controversy over whether RBC transfusions are in fact associated with inflammation, and more generally, whether current standards for maximal RBC storage times are safe. We will explore the evidence for and against this outsider adverse event in transfusion: whether certain RBC transfusions do or do not cause inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musallam, Khaled M.; Rivella, Stefano; Vichinsky, Elliott; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias include a variety of phenotypes that, unlike patients with beta (β)-thalassemia major, do not require regular transfusion therapy for survival. The most commonly investigated forms are β-thalassemia intermedia, hemoglobin E/β-thalassemia, and α-thalassemia intermedia (hemoglobin H disease). However, transfusion-independence in such patients is not without side effects. Ineffective erythropoiesis and peripheral hemolysis, the hallmarks of disease process, lead to a variety of subsequent pathophysiologies including iron overload and hypercoagulability that ultimately lead to a number of serious clinical morbidities. Thus, prompt and accurate diagnosis of non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia is essential to ensure early intervention. Although several management options are currently available, the need to develop more novel therapeutics is justified by recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of disease. Such efforts require wide international collaboration, especially since non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias are no longer bound to low- and middle-income countries but have spread to large multiethnic cities in Europe and the Americas due to continued migration. PMID:23729725

  6. Transfusion medicine in American undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Julie K; Weston, Christine M; King, Karen E

    2011-11-01

    Blood transfusion is the most common procedure performed in American hospitals, and transfusions are commonly ordered by physicians without formal training in transfusion medicine. Several transfusion medicine curricula have been proposed, including those developed through the Transfusion Medicine Academic Awards (TMAA). To our knowledge, no comprehensive study has assessed how transfusion medicine is incorporated into undergraduate medical education. We conducted an online survey to determine the manner in which transfusion medicine is incorporated into American undergraduate medical education. The survey was e-mailed to administrators of medical education at all of the 129 American medical schools accredited by the Association of American Medical Colleges. Eighty-six (67%) of the 129 identified medical school administrators responded. Seventy-one (83%) of the 86 administrators reported that their undergraduate medical education curriculum provides didactic lectures in transfusion medicine, with 48% of medical schools providing 1 or 2 hours of lecture-based instruction. A minority reported small group sessions devoted to transfusion medicine topics. While a slim majority reported the availability of transfusion medicine electives, only one of 84 administrators reported that such a rotation is required. Seventy-six of 83 (92%) administrators were unfamiliar with either the 1989 or the 1995 TMAA transfusion medicine curricula. Transfusion medicine content in American undergraduate medical education is variable and the influence of the TMAA program on contemporary medical school curricula is questionable. Future efforts in this area should focus on standardizing and improving undergraduate medical education in transfusion medicine. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  7. Detection of alloimmunization to ensure safer transfusion practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Sood

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Serological safety is an integral part of overall safety for blood banks. Emphasis is on the use of routinue Red Blood Cell (RBC antibody screen test, at set time intervals, to reduce risks related to alloantibodies. Also emphasis is on importance of issuing antigen negative blood to alloantibody positive patients. Effect of using leucodepleted blood on the rate of alloimmunization is highlighted. The concept of provision of phenotypically matched blood is suggested. Materials and Methods: Antibody screen test is important to select appropriate blood for transfusion. Repeat antibody screen testing, except if time interval between the earlier and subsequent transfusion was less than 72 hours, followed by antibody identification, if required, was performed in patients being treated with repeat multiple blood transfusions. Between February 2008 and June 2009, repeat samples of 306 multi-transfused patients were analyzed. Search for irregular antibodies and reading of results was conducted using RBC panels (three-cell panel of Column Agglutination Technology (CAT and two cell panel of the Solid Phase Red Cell Adherence Technology (SPRCAT. Specificities of antibodies were investigated using appropriate panels, 11 cell panel of CAT and 16 cell panel of SPRCA. These technologies, detecting agglutination in columns and reactions in solid phase, evaluate the attachment of irregular incomplete antibody to antigen in the first phase of immunological reaction more directly and hence improve the reading of agglutination. Three to four log leuco reduced red blood cells were transfused to patients in the study using blood collection bags with integral filters. Results: Alloimmunization rate of 4.24% was detected from 306 multiply transfused patients tested and followed up. The Transfusion therapy may become significantly complicated. Conclusion: Red cell antibody screening and identification and subsequent issue of antigen negative blood have a

  8. What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Blood Transfusion Blood Transfusion What Is A blood transfusion is a safe, ... store your blood for your use. Alternatives to Blood Transfusions Researchers are trying to find ways to make ...

  9. Blood transfusion practices in sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TVSP Murthy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a clinical syndrome characterised by systemic inflammation due to infection. There is a spectrum with severity ranging from sepsis to severe sepsis and septic shock. Even with optimal treatment, mortality due to severe sepsis or septic shock is significant and poses a challenge to management. Antibiotics, source control, resuscitation with fluids, vasopressor and inotropic agents are the main-stay of treatment for septic shock. These may be supplemented with transfusion of red blood cells and or blood products, in the case of anaemia to sustain sufficient oxygen delivery [1] or to manage associated haematological issues. Transfusion in sepsis has always been a debatable issue, especially in relation to choice of the fluid and the role of blood or blood product transfusion.

  10. [Economic environment and blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand-Zaleski, I

    2015-08-01

    The increasing pressure on healthcare resources affects blood donation and transfusion. We attempted a survey of the efficiency of different strategies, actual or proposed to improve the management of blood products. We found an important disconnect between the cost effectiveness ratio of strategies and their uptake by policy makers. In other words, the least efficient strategies are those which increase transfusion safety by increasing the number of biological markers and are those preferred by health authorities in developed countries. Other more efficient strategies are more slowly implemented and included a systematic use of transfusion guidelines, reducing blood losses or increasing pre operative blood levels in elective surgeries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  11. [Evaluation of non-compliance of transfusion requests of packed red blood cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Romdhane, Asma Rym; Ben Ayoub, Wided; Gouider, Emna

    2015-06-01

    Despite legislative acts develloped, many deficiencies were identified in blood requests at the National Blood TransfusionCenter impedding board and blood safety. to evaluate the conformity of the different topics of packed red blood cells requests to the legislation. Our study was prospective descriptive lasting six months (March-August 2011). It assessed all packed red blood cells requests which reached the national blood transfusion center. 16064 packed red blood cells requests from 21 public institutions and 28 private institutions were studied. There was different deficiencies in each item.The absence of birth date in 67.18% of request represented the largest non-compliance within administrative information. A predominance of shortcomings related to transfusion and obstetric history was recorded for clinical information with absence of date of the last transfusion in 91.72% cases, lack of accuracy of any previous transfusion reactions in 88.63% cases and absence of the number of previous pregnancies in 93.15% of transfusion requests prescribed to women. Non-conformities related to the prescribing physician concerned mainly the phone number which was absent in 55.82% of cases. This study revealed a significant lack of awareness of physicians in relation to the law governing transfusion. It is therefore essential to develop training for prescribers to improve transfusion safety.

  12. Clinical analysis of thoracoscopic surgery combined with intraoperative autologous blood transfusion in the treatment of traumatic hemothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu-Sai Ma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available From January 2013 to January 2015, 19 patients of traumatic hemothorax with hemorrhagic shock were treated in our department by thoracoscopic surgery combined with autologous blood transfusion. This study retrospectively analyzed the therapeutic effect and shared our experience. The average amount of blood transfused back was 662.41 ml ± 269.15 ml. None of the patients developed transfusion reaction and were all discharged uneventfully. Thoracoscopic surgery combined with autologous blood transfusion is effective in the rescue of patients with progressive hemothorax and hemorrhagic shock. When corresponding indications are well managed, treatment for these patients is quicker, safer, and more effective.

  13. Transfusion transmissible viral infections among potential blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    effective approach for prevention and control of transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs). Also, it has been documented that sub-standard test kits are mostly used in resource limited settings for transfusion related diagnosis. However, the role of ...

  14. Transfusion Support of the Transplant Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Nisbet-Brown, Eric

    1988-01-01

    Organ transplant has become a much more common procedure in recent years. Data suggest that blood transfusions prior to transplant can affect allograph survival. The author discusses blood transfusion in kidney and liver transplantation.

  15. Transfusion support of the transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet-Brown, E

    1988-11-01

    Organ transplant has become a much more common procedure in recent years. Data suggest that blood transfusions prior to transplant can affect allograph survival. The author discusses blood transfusion in kidney and liver transplantation.

  16. Transfusion-Associated Microchimerism in Combat Casualties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dunne, James R; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Burns, Christopher; Cardo, Lisa J; Curry, Kathleen; Busch, Michael P

    2007-01-01

    ...) in civilian trauma patients receiving allogenic red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. We explored the incidence of TA-MC in combat casualties receiving FrWB compared with patients receiving standard stored RBC transfusions. Methods...

  17. Transfusion complications:Estimate of the residual risk of transfusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Sub-Saharan Africa remains the epicenter of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pan- demic. However, there is a lack of multicenter data on the risk of transfusion-transmitted HIV from blood centers in sub-Saharan Africa. Study design and methods: The incidence of HIV infections in the blood donations ...

  18. Cardiovascular responses to blood transfusion in children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-02

    Feb 2, 2012 ... pre-transfusion and the intra-transfusion observations and by 0.39 cm between the intra-transfusion and immediate post-transfusion observations. The children with normal weight for age had a mean 2 cm reduction in liver size between the pre-transfusion and intra-transfusion observations compared with ...

  19. Health economics of blood transfusion safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, Marinus van

    2008-01-01

    The HIV/AIDS disaster in transfusion medicine shaped the future agendas for blood transfusion safety. More than ever before, the implementation of interventions which could improve blood transfusion safety was driven merely by availability of technology. The introduction of new expensive

  20. Proposed Formulae for Determining Blood Transfusion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood replacement remains a crucial component of the treatment of severe anaemia irrespective of the cause. The transfusion of an adequate amount of blood is important to prevent under- or over-transfusion. Existing formulae used for the calculation of blood transfusion requirements, while being useful, still ...

  1. Comparative analysis of autologous blood transfusion and allogeneic blood transfusion in surgical patients

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Miao-Yun; Liu, Zhong-Han; Zhu, Jian-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate application effects of autologous blood transfusion and allogeneic blood transfusion in surgically treated patients receiving spine surgery, abdomen surgery and ectopic pregnancy surgery. Methods: 130 patients who would undergo selective operations were divided into autologous transfusion group and allogeneic transfusion group. Both groups received the same anesthesia, and there was no significant difference in transfusion volume or fluid infusion volume. Results: Th...

  2. Nationwide outbreak of red eye syndrome associated with transfusion of leukocyte-reduced red blood cell units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Echanove, Juan; Sippy, Brian D; Chin, Arthur E; Cairns, Lisa; Haley, Rebecca; Epstein, Jay S; Richards, Michael J; Edelhauser, Henry; Hedberg, Katrina; Kuehnert, Matthew J; Jarvis, William R; Pearson, Michele L

    2006-11-01

    To characterize red eye reactions occurring within 24 hours after receipt of units of leukocyte-reduced red blood cells, determine their etiology, and investigate their potential link to transfusion. We conducted a survey of transfusion facilities nationwide to determine the scope and magnitude of the reactions; performed case-control and cohort studies among transfused patients at the facility where most reactions occurred; and performed animal experiments, using cellulose acetate derivatives extracted from leukocyte-reduction filters and filter precursors, to reproduce reactions. From January 1, 1997, through January 15, 1998, we identified 159 reactions in 117 patients from 17 states. Reactions were characterized by conjunctival erythema or hemorrhage (in 100% of patients), eye pain (in 62%), photophobia (in 46%), and decreased visual acuity (in 32%). Symptom onset occurred 1-24 hours after initiation of transfusion and resolved within a median of 5 days. Reactions were associated with transfusion sessions that included units of red blood cells filtered with a specific brand of filter, the LeukoNet filter (HemaSure) (odds ratio, 100.4; Psyndrome was elicited in rabbits injected with cellulose acetate derivatives extracted from unused LeukoNet filters or filter precursors. No reactions were reported after LeukoNet filters were withdrawn from the market. This transfusion-associated red eye syndrome was linked to a specific brand of leukocyte-reduction filter and likely resulted from cellulose acetate derivatives leached from the filter membrane.

  3. Blood transfusion and hepatitis viruses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    virus in blood donors: investigation of type-specific differences in serologic reactivity and rate of alanine aminotransferase abnormalities. Transfusion 1993;. 33: 7-13. 45. McFarlane IG, Smith HM, Johnson PJ, Bray GP, Vergani 0, Williams R. Hepatitis. C virus antibodies in chronic active hepatitis: pathogenetic factor or false-.

  4. 21 CFR 606.170 - Adverse reaction file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... it is determined that the product was at fault in causing a transfusion reaction, copies of all such... event of a transfusion reaction. [40 FR 53532, Nov. 18, 1975, as amended at 49 FR 23833, June 8, 1984... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adverse reaction file. 606.170 Section 606.170...

  5. Incidence and Risk Factors for Blood Transfusion in Total Joint Arthroplasty: Analysis of a Statewide Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slover, James; Lavery, Jessica A; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Iorio, Richard; Bosco, Joseph; Gold, Heather T

    2017-09-01

    Significant attempts have been made to adopt practices to minimize blood transfusion after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) because of transfusion cost and potential negative clinical consequences including allergic reactions, transfusion-related lung injuries, and immunomodulatory effects. We aimed to evaluate risk factors for blood transfusion in a large cohort of TJA patients. We used the all-payer California Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project data from 2006 to 2011 to examine the trends in utilization of blood transfusion among arthroplasty patients (n = 320,746). We performed descriptive analyses and multivariate logistic regression clustered by hospital, controlling for Deyo-Charlson comorbidity index, age, insurance type (Medicaid vs others), gender, procedure year, and race/ethnicity. Eighteen percent (n = 59,038) of TJA patients underwent blood transfusion during their surgery, from 15% with single knee to 45% for bilateral hip arthroplasty. Multivariate analysis indicated that compared with the referent category of single knee arthroplasty, single hip had a significantly higher odds of blood transfusion (odds ratio [OR], 1.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.68-1.83), as did bilateral knee (OR, 3.57; 95% CI, 3.20-3.98) and bilateral hip arthroplasty (OR, 6.17; 95% CI, 4.85-7.85). Increasing age (eg, age ≥80 years; OR, 2.99; 95% CI, 2.82-3.17), Medicaid insurance (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.27-1.45), higher comorbidity index (eg, score of ≥3; OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 2.22-2.45), and females (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.70-1.80) all had significantly higher odds of blood transfusion after TJA. Primary hip arthroplasties have significantly greater risk of transfusion than knee arthroplasties, and bilateral procedures have even greater risk, especially for hips. These factors should be considered when evaluating the risk for blood transfusions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The team focus on improving blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, D; Brady, P; Foot, C; Levy, R; Thomson, A

    2011-03-01

    The current literature pertaining to associated morbidity and mortality with homologous blood transfusion in the surgical patient seems to be pointing only in one direction, which is we must start reducing our patients exposure to homologous blood and products. There appears to be ever mounting evidence of increases in infraction, stroke, transfusion related lung injury, infection, and death that authors are associating with transfusion. A number of authors are reporting success in reducing their patients' requirements for homologous transfusion simply by working as a team or what is known as a multidisciplinary approach and following set transfusion protocols and algorithms. At our institution we have taken note of these reports and have taken the first steps in the formation of a Cardiac Surgical Transfusion Management Group where all specialties involved in the decision making process of transfusion in the cardiac surgical patient can have representation and be directly involved in the establishment of protocols, transfusion algorithms, and a transfusion audit system. The main goal of this group is to implement a change in transfusion practice and to assess the impact the change has had on transfusion requirements and make appropriate recommendations to the treating specialists.

  7. A comparative assessment of nursing students' cognitive knowledge of blood transfusion using lecture and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood, Lisa S; Higbie, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Professional nurses must have the knowledge and skills to safely administer blood products and monitor for life-threatening complications. Nurse educators should ensure that student nurses also learn how to safely administer blood products; however students rarely have the opportunity to witness and manage adverse transfusion reactions. Despite the low incidence of rare adverse transfusion reactions, nursing students must be able to immediately recognize transfusion reactions, implement appropriate interventions, and communicate effectively with health care providers. To reinforce blood transfusion knowledge, practice technical skills, and promote management of adverse reactions, a human patient simulation experience was created for baccalaureate nursing students to provide application of related classroom content. Using a quasi-experimental design, students who received a related didactic lecture preceding the simulation were compared with students who did not receive the lecture. The lecture group's pre/posttest mean scores (n = 42) were significantly higher than the no lecture group's mean scores (n = 44). This simulation design included proper blood administration procedures, patient monitoring, management of transfusion reactions, and practice with interdisciplinary communication. Participation in a human patient simulation following a related didactic lecture may be useful to strengthen cognitive learning and help bridge the didactic-clinic gap. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hemovigilance : is it making a difference to safety in the transfusion chain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersum-Osselton, Johanna Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Hemovigilance is the systematic monitoring of adverse reactions and incidents in the transfusion chain in order to make recommendations for safety improvement. EU member states must have a reporting system for serious adverse reactions or events which might have an effect on quality or safety of

  9. WHOLE BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS TO TREAT SEVERE ANEMIA IN SEVEN COWNOSE RAYS ( RHINOPTERA BONASUS) AND ONE SHORT-TAIL STINGRAY ( DASYATIS BREVICAUDATA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaune, Alexa J McDermott; Field, Cara L; Clauss, Tonya M

    2017-12-01

    Blood transfusions can provide life-saving treatment to severely anemic animals. Due to limited availability and the difficulty of storing whole blood and blood products, such as fresh frozen plasma and packed red blood cells, exotic animals often receive fresh whole blood transfusions. Little is known about elasmobranch blood types and transfusions. Conspecific cross-matches within several different elasmobranch species were negative, indicating that in an emergency situation a single whole blood transfusion may be possible without causing a transfusion reaction. Experimental transfusions between healthy conspecific Atlantic rays ( Dasyatis sabina) showed no adverse reactions and autotransfusions in marbled electric rays ( Torpedo marmorata) were successful. There are no published reports of blood transfusions performed on clinically abnormal elasmobranchs. The following case series documents blood transfusions performed on seven cownose rays ( Rhinoptera bonasus) and one short-tail stingray ( Dasyatis brevicaudata). All rays were treated with the same protocol, which included pretreatment with steroids and antibiotics followed by an intravenous transfusion of freshly collected, heparinized, whole blood. Three animals survived and currently exhibit no abnormal clinical signs. Two animals died 55 days and 100 days post transfusion. Three animals died 2-22 days post transfusion. Although complications from blood transfusions could not be ruled out, all five animals that died had other health problems that likely contributed to their demise. All eight animals would almost certainly have died without a blood transfusion as they were severely anemic and moribund at the time of presentation. The methods described in this paper may be useful in the treatment of severely anemic elasmobranchs and this is the first report of blood transfusions in clinically abnormal elasmobranchs.

  10. [Results of Training for Personnel Involved in Blood-Transfusion Testing Outside of Regular Work Hours at Saga University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Marie; Yamada, Naotomo; Higashitani, Takanori; Ohta, Shoichiro; Sueoka, Eisaburo

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory testing prior to blood transfusion outside of regular hours in many hospitals and clinics is frequently conducted by technicians without sufficient experience in such testing work. To obtain consistent test results regardless of the degree of laboratory experience with blood transfusion testing, the number of facilities introducing automated equipment for testing prior to blood transfusion is increasing. Our hospital's blood transfusion department introduced fully automated test equipment in October of 2010 for use when blood transfusions are conducted outside of regular hours. However, excessive dependence on automated testing can lead to an inability to do manual blood typing or cross-match testing when necessitated by breakdowns in the automated test equipment, in the case of abnormal specimen reactions, or other such case. In addition, even outside of normal working hours there are more than a few instances in which transfusion must take place based on urgent communications from clinical staff, with the need for prompt and flexible timing of blood transfusion test and delivery of blood products. To address this situation, in 2010 we began training after-hours laboratory personnel in blood transfusion testing to provide practice using test tubes manually and to achieve greater understanding of blood transfusion test work (especially in cases of critical blood loss). Results of the training and difficulties in its implementation for such after-hours laboratory personnel at our hospital are presented and discussed in this paper. [Original

  11. How I manage red cell transfusions in patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, David C; Robinson, Susan; Howard, Jo

    2018-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest serious inherited diseases in the world, and red cell transfusion is still one of the few effective treatments for acute and chronic complications. Transfusion corrects anaemia and dilutes out the number of red cells able to cause vaso-occlusion and vascular damage. Urgent red cell transfusions are used to correct acute anaemia, treat acute chest syndrome and patients with acute neurological symptoms. We use elective transfusions preoperatively for moderate risk surgery, and in some pregnant women. There is good evidence for the use of long-term regular transfusions in primary stroke prevention, with the aim of keeping the percentage of sickle haemoglobin below 30%. Long-term transfusions are also used in secondary stroke prevention, and the management of progressive organ damage, including renal impairment and pulmonary hypertension. Blood needs to be matched for ABO, RH and Kell, although alloantibodies may still develop and require more careful, extended cross-matching. Delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions are relatively common, difficult to diagnose and manage, and potentially fatal. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gagandeep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas′ disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply.

  13. Transfusion practice and knowledge in Mozambique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartford, Emily; Muanantatha, Olegario; Valigy, Valigy Ismael; Salimo, Sara; Ziman, Alyssa; DeUgarte, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In Mozambique, there is a limited supply of blood and elevated risks for transmission of infections. Prior studies have documented that many transfusions in Mozambique are potentially avoidable. Transfusion training workshops with a survey and exam were held for providers to understand their perceptions and to improve knowledge and clinical practice. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Health care providers completed a survey and a knowledge assessment. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was utilized to compare the relative importance of each factor in the survey, and pre- and posttraining exam scores were compared using Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS A total of 216 health care providers participated; the majority worked in a referral hospital (74%) and reported transfusing blood at least once per week (56%). Most acknowledged the limited blood supply and transfusion risks. Providers rated low hemoglobin (Hb) levels and pallor as significantly important indications for transfusion (p transfuse with age under 5 years when compared to other ages (p transfusion practice were increased reliability of the blood supply, education about transfusion indications, and assessment of perfusion. Before training, the majority of participants identified an incorrect Hb threshold for preoperative or critically ill patients. Overall exam scores improved from a mean of 58% to 74% (p blood transfusions. Preoperative patients, the critically ill, and children appear to be at highest risk for receiving an avoidable blood transfusion. These results will help guide planning for future provider training. PMID:25648912

  14. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies for red blood cell transfusion after hip or knee surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Tianli; Gao, Fuqiang; Han, Jun; Sun, Wei; Guo, Wanshou; Li, Zirong; Wang, Weiguo

    2017-06-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are commonly used in surgical patients, but accompanied by many risks such as metabolic derangement, and allergic and febrile reactions. Indications for transfusion in patients after hip or knee surgery have not been definitively evaluated and remain controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to compare the benefits and harms of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies in patients after hip or knee surgery. The PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for relevant studies through September 2015. The main clinical outcomes reported in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) included 30-day mortality, infection rate, cardiogenic complications, and length of hospital stay. The meta-analysis program of the Cochrane Collaboration (RevMan version 5.3.0) was used for data analysis. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed by both Cochran chi-squared test (Q test) and I test. Begg and Egger test were used to assess potential publication bias. We identified 10 eligible RCTs, involving 3788 patients in total. In patients undergoing hip or knee surgery, we found no differences in mortality, or the incidence rates of pneumonia, wound infection, myocardial infarction, or congestive heart failure, between restrictive and liberal thresholds for RBC transfusion (P > .05). Restrictive transfusion has no advantage over the liberal strategy. However, considerably less patients received blood transfusion via the restrictive strategy than with the liberal counterpart. Due to variations in the included studies, additional larger scale and well-designed studies are required to validate these conclusions.

  15. Lower versus higher hemoglobin threshold for transfusion in septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Lars B; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn; Wernerman, Jan; Guttormsen, Anne B; Karlsson, Sari; Johansson, Pär I; Aneman, Anders; Vang, Marianne L; Winding, Robert; Nebrich, Lars; Nibro, Helle L; Rasmussen, Bodil S; Lauridsen, Johnny R M; Nielsen, Jane S; Oldner, Anders; Pettilä, Ville; Cronhjort, Maria B; Andersen, Lasse H; Pedersen, Ulf G; Reiter, Nanna; Wiis, Jørgen; White, Jonathan O; Russell, Lene; Thornberg, Klaus J; Hjortrup, Peter B; Müller, Rasmus G; Møller, Morten H; Steensen, Morten; Tjäder, Inga; Kilsand, Kristina; Odeberg-Wernerman, Suzanne; Sjøbø, Brit; Bundgaard, Helle; Thyø, Maria A; Lodahl, David; Mærkedahl, Rikke; Albeck, Carsten; Illum, Dorte; Kruse, Mary; Winkel, Per; Perner, Anders

    2014-10-09

    Blood transfusions are frequently given to patients with septic shock. However, the benefits and harms of different hemoglobin thresholds for transfusion have not been established. In this multicenter, parallel-group trial, we randomly assigned patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) who had septic shock and a hemoglobin concentration of 9 g per deciliter or less to receive 1 unit of leukoreduced red cells when the hemoglobin level was 7 g per deciliter or less (lower threshold) or when the level was 9 g per deciliter or less (higher threshold) during the ICU stay. The primary outcome measure was death by 90 days after randomization. We analyzed data from 998 of 1005 patients (99.3%) who underwent randomization. The two intervention groups had similar baseline characteristics. In the ICU, the lower-threshold group received a median of 1 unit of blood (interquartile range, 0 to 3) and the higher-threshold group received a median of 4 units (interquartile range, 2 to 7). At 90 days after randomization, 216 of 502 patients (43.0%) assigned to the lower-threshold group, as compared with 223 of 496 (45.0%) assigned to the higher-threshold group, had died (relative risk, 0.94; 95% confidence interval, 0.78 to 1.09; P=0.44). The results were similar in analyses adjusted for risk factors at baseline and in analyses of the per-protocol populations. The numbers of patients who had ischemic events, who had severe adverse reactions, and who required life support were similar in the two intervention groups. Among patients with septic shock, mortality at 90 days and rates of ischemic events and use of life support were similar among those assigned to blood transfusion at a higher hemoglobin threshold and those assigned to blood transfusion at a lower threshold; the latter group received fewer transfusions. (Funded by the Danish Strategic Research Council and others; TRISS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01485315.).

  16. Blood transfusion for preventing primary and secondary stroke in people with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Winfred C; Dwan, Kerry

    2013-11-14

    terminated early. The transfusion group had a high complications rate, including iron overload, alloimmunisation, and transfusion reactions. The second trial (STOP II) investigated risk of stroke when transfusion was stopped after at least 30 months in this population. The trial closed early due to a significant difference in risk of stroke between participants who stopped transfusion and those who continued as measured by reoccurrence of abnormal velocities on Doppler examination or the occurrence of overt stroke in the group that stopped transfusion. The third trial (SWiTCH) was a non-inferiority trial comparing transfusion and iron chelation (standard management) with hydroxyurea and phlebotomy (alternative treatment) with the combination endpoint of prevention of stroke recurrence and reduction of iron overload. This trial was stopped early after enrolment and follow up of 133 children because of analysis showing futility in reaching the composite primary endpoint. The stroke rate (seven strokes on hydroxyurea and phlebotomy, none on transfusion and chelation, odds ratio 16.49 (95% confidence interval 0.92 to 294.84)) was within the non-inferiority margin, but the liver iron content was not better in the alternative arm. The STOP trial demonstrated a significantly reduced risk of stroke in participants with abnormal transcranial Doppler ultrasonography velocities receiving regular blood transfusions. The follow-up trial (STOP 2) indicated that individuals may revert to former risk status if transfusion is discontinued. The degree of risk must be balanced against the burden of chronic transfusions. The combination of hydroxyurea and phlebotomy is not as effective as "standard" transfusion and chelation in preventing secondary stroke and iron overload. Ongoing multicentre trials are investigating the use of chronic transfusion to prevent silent infarcts, the use of hydroxyurea as an alternative to transfusion in children with abnormal transcranial Doppler ultrasonography

  17. Cancer incidence in blood transfusion recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalgrim, Henrik; Edgren, Gustaf; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusions may influence the recipients' cancer risks both through transmission of biologic agents and by modulation of the immune system. However, cancer occurrence in transfusion recipients remains poorly characterized. METHODS: We used computerized files from Scandinavian...... blood banks to identify a cohort of 888,843 cancer-free recipients transfused after 1968. The recipients were followed from first registered transfusion until the date of death, emigration, cancer diagnosis, or December 31, 2002, whichever came first. Relative risks were expressed as ratios......, the standardized incidence ratios for cancers of the tongue, mouth, pharynx, esophagus, liver, and respiratory and urinary tracts and for squamous cell skin carcinoma remained elevated beyond 10 years after the transfusion. CONCLUSIONS: The marked increase in cancer risk shortly after a blood transfusion may...

  18. Red blood cell transfusion in septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosland, Ragnhild G; Hagen, Marte U; Haase, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treating anaemia with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequent, but controversial, in patients with septic shock. Therefore we assessed characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion in this group of high risk patients. METHODS: We did a prospective cohort study at 7...... general intensive care units (ICUs) including all adult patients with septic shock in a 5-month period. RESULTS: Ninety-five of the 213 included patients (45%) received median 3 (interquartile range 2-5) RBC units during shock. The median pre-transfusion haemoglobin level was 8.1 (7.4-8.9) g...... and SAPS II and SOFA-score on day 1. CONCLUSIONS: The decision to transfuse patients with septic shock was likely affected by disease severity and bleeding, but haemoglobin level was the only measure that consistently differed between transfused and non-transfused patients....

  19. Autologous blood transfusion - a review | Charles | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The discovery of HIV and other transfusion-transmissible infections has increased the demand for alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusion. One such alternative is autologous transfusion. This review presents an analysis of autologous transfusion. We conclude that autologous transfusion should form part of a strategy to ...

  20. Minimizing transfusion requirements for children undergoing craniosynostosis repair: the CHoR protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Rafael A; Lyon, Camila; Kierce, Jeannette F; Tye, Gary W; Ritter, Ann M; Rhodes, Jennifer L

    2014-08-01

    Children with craniosynostosis may require cranial vault remodeling to prevent or relieve elevated intracranial pressure and to correct the underlying craniofacial abnormalities. The procedure is typically associated with significant blood loss and high transfusion rates. The risks associated with transfusions are well documented and include transmission of infectious agents, bacterial contamination, acute hemolytic reactions, transfusion-related lung injury, and transfusion-related immune modulation. This study presents the Children's Hospital of Richmond (CHoR) protocol, which was developed to reduce the rate of blood transfusion in infants undergoing primary craniosynostosis repair. A retrospective chart review of pediatric patients treated between January 2003 and Febuary 2012 was performed. The CHoR protocol was instituted in November 2008, with the following 3 components; 1) the use of preoperative erythropoietin and iron therapy, 2) the use of an intraoperative blood recycling device, and 3) acceptance of a lower level of hemoglobin as a trigger for transfusion (protocol implementation served as controls. A total of 60 children were included in the study, 32 of whom were treated with the CHoR protocol. The control (C) and protocol (P) groups were comparable with respect to patient age (7 vs 8.4 months, p = 0.145). Recombinant erythropoietin effectively raised the mean preoperative hemoglobin level in the P group (12 vs 9.7 g/dl, p protocol that includes preoperative administration of recombinant erythropoietin, intraoperative autologous blood recycling, and accepting a lower transfusion trigger significantly decreased transfusion utilization (p < 0.001). A decreased length of stay (p < 0.001) was seen, although the authors did not investigate whether composite transfusion complication reductions led to better outcomes.

  1. Red blood cell alloimmunization after blood transfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Schonewille, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Current pretransfusion policy requires the patients’ serum to be tested for the presence of irregular red blood cell antibodies. In case of an antibody, red blood cells lacking the corresponding antigen are transfused after an antiglobulin crossmatch. The aim of the studies in this thesis is primarily to investigate whether this policy should change to improve transfusion safety. This thesis explores the risk on red blood cell alloimmunization after blood transfusion in oncohematologic patien...

  2. Prevention of Post Transfusion Hepatitis Employing Sensitive Assay for Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Screening(Topics in Transfusion Medicine 1990 : Autologous Transfusion and Post-Transfusion Hepatitis)

    OpenAIRE

    小島, 秀男; 大竹, 幸子; 富樫, 和枝; 石口, 重子; 山田, 恵子; 品田, 章二; Kojima, Hideo; Ohtake, Sachiko; Togashi, Kazue; Ishiguchi, Shigeko; Yamada, Keiko; Shinada, Shoji

    1990-01-01

    Post transfusion Hepatitis (PTH) is one of serious side effects and some times lead to fulminant hepatic failure in case transfused blood contain very low level (under the sensitivity of usual screening method) of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Redcross blood center and blood transfusion devision of our hospital have been employed reverse passive hemmaglutination method (RPHA) for HBsAg screening. Authors employed EIA for sensitive HBsAg test system and compared with RPHA method. Of 2,255 sera from...

  3. Pictorial representation of transfusion over the years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2009-05-01

    The writings of the 17th and 19th centuries about experiments and debates about transfusion were often analyzed and discussed in articles and books, but an analysis of illustrations of transfusion during this pioneering epoch can throw new light on the subject. The first transfusion attempts were as sensational as they were spectacular, and their illustration permitted both focusing attention and giving a scientific iconography, almost technical, to doctors and scholars of the time. We describe several illustrations of historical transfusions and point out common characteristics and differences, through the major elements used by illustrators. Nineteen illustrations are shown and commented upon. The transfusion imagery, through the representation of the three actors of transfusion (recipient, donor, doctor) varied considerably over time, as did representation of the procedures of transfusion. This series of illustrations over three centuries reveals what the use and function of picturing transfusion over the course of time were: on the one hand, a didactic intent, in offering a documentary source concerning procedures and necessary instruments, and on the other, the function of legitimization, representing the act with a subtext such as numbered titles or in a scientific article, brought transfusion into the category of technical practices that were regulated by rules.

  4. Transfusion-related adverse events at the tertiary care center in North India: An institutional hemovigilance effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Prasun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was designed to analyze the incidence and spectrum of adverse effects of blood transfusion so as to initiate measures to minimize risks and improve overall transfusion safety in the institute. Materials and Methods: During the period from July 2002 to July 2003 all the adverse events related to transfusion of blood and blood components in various clinical specialties were recorded. They were analyzed and classified on the basis of their clinical features and laboratory tests. Attempt was also made to study the predisposing risk factors. Results: During the study period 56,503 blood and blood components were issued to 29,720 patients. A total of 105 adverse reactions due to transfusion were observed during the study period. A majority of the adverse reactions was observed in hemato-oncology patients 43% (n = 45 and in presensitized patient groups 63% (n = 66. FNHTR 41% (n = 43 and allergic reactions 34% (n = 36 were the most common of all types of adverse transfusion reactions, followed by AcHTR 8.56% (n = 9. Majority of these AcHTR were due to unmonitored storage of blood in the refrigerator of wards resulting in hemolysis due to thermal injury. Less frequently observed reactions were anaphylactoid reactions (n = 4, bacterial sepsis (n = 4, hypervolemia (n = 2, hypocalcemia (n = 2, TRALI (n = 1, DHTR (n = 1, and TAGvHD (n = 1. Conclusion: Analysis of transfusion-related adverse outcomes is essential for improving safety. Factors such as improvement of blood storage conditions outside the blood bank, improvement in cross-matching techniques, careful donor screening, adherence to good manufacturing practices while component preparation, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events will help in reducing transfusion-related morbidity and mortality.

  5. INFECTIOUS-DISEASE TESTING FOR BLOOD-TRANSFUSIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DESFORGES, JF; ATHARI, F; COOPER, ES; JOHNSON, CS; LEMON, SM; LINDSAY, KL; MCCULLOUGH, J; MCINTOSH, K; ROSS, RK; WHITSETT, CF; WITTES, J; WRIGHT, TL

    1995-01-01

    Objective.-To provide physicians and other transfusion medicine professionals with a current consensus on infectious disease testing for blood transfusions. Participants.-A nonfederal, nonadvocate, 12-member consensus panel representing the fields of hematology, infectious disease, transfusion

  6. Perceptions about blood transfusion: a survey of surgical patients and their anesthesiologists and surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Thomas R; Adhami, Lalleh F; Porterfield, John R; Marques, Marisa B

    2014-06-01

    Although blood transfusion is a common therapeutic intervention and a mainstay of treating surgical blood loss, it may be perceived by patients and their physicians as having associated risk of adverse events. Practicing patient-centered care necessitates that clinicians have an understanding of an individual patient's perceptions of transfusion practice and incorporate this into shared medical decision-making. A paper survey was completed by patients during routine outpatient preoperative evaluation. An online survey was completed by attending anesthesiologists and surgeons at the same institution. Both surveys evaluated perceptions of the overall risk of transfusions, level of concern regarding 5 specific adverse events with transfusion, and perceptions of the frequency of those adverse events. Group differences were evaluated with conventional inferential biostatistics. A total of 294 patients and 73 physicians completed the surveys. Among the surveyed patients, 20% (95% confidence interval, 15%-25%) perceived blood transfusions as "very often risky" or "always risky." Greater perceived overall blood transfusion risk was associated with African American race (P = 0.028) and having a high school or less level of education (P = 0.022). Greater perceived risk of allergic reaction (P = 0.001), fever (P reaction (P = 0.009), fever (P = 0.039), dyspnea (P = 0.004), human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome and hepatitis (P = 0.003), and medical error (P = 0.039) were associated with having a high school or less level of education. Patients and physicians also differed significantly in their survey responses, with physicians reporting greater overall perceived risk with a blood transfusion (P = 0.001). Despite improvements in blood transfusion safety in the United States and other developed countries, the results of this study indicate that a sizeable percentage of patients still perceive transfusion as having significant associated risk

  7. A case of ABO-incompatible blood transfusion treated by plasma exchange therapy and continuous hemodiafiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Akio; Shibuya, Yuko; Ouchi, Haruki; Takahashi, Hiroko; Furuto, Yoshitaka

    2018-05-01

    ABO-incompatible blood transfusion is potentially a life-threatening event. A 74-year-old type O Rh-positive male was accidentally transfused with 280 mL type B Rh-positive red blood cells during open right hemicolectomy, causing ABO-incompatible blood transfusion. Immediately after the transfusion, the patient experienced a hypotension episode followed by acute hemolytic reaction, disseminated intravascular coagulation and acute kidney injury. Plasma exchange therapy was performed to remove anti-B antibody and free hemoglobin because they caused acute hemolytic reaction, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and acute kidney injury. Free hemoglobin levels decreased from 13 to 2 mg/dL for 2 h. Continuous hemodiafiltration was used to stabilize hemodynamics. The patient was successfully treated for acute hemolytic reaction, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and acute kidney injury. Plasma exchange therapy and continuous hemodiafiltration are likely to be effective treatments for ABO-incompatible blood transfusion, and further studies are required to assess this effectiveness in future.

  8. Transfusion in Haemoglobinopathies: Review and recommendations for local blood banks and transfusion services in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwa Z. Al-Riyami

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease and homozygous β-thalassaemia are common haemoglobinopathies in Oman, with many implications for local healthcare services. The transfusions of such patients take place in many hospitals throughout the country. Indications for blood transfusions require local recommendations and guidelines to ensure standardised levels of care. This article summarises existing transfusion guidelines for this group of patients and provides recommendations for blood banks and transfusion services in Oman. This information is especially pertinent to medical professionals and policy-makers developing required services for the standardised transfusion support of these patients.

  9. Evidence Based Studies in Clinical Transfusion Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.G. Jansen (Gerard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAfter the introduction of blood component therapy in the 1960s, more and more attention is given to clinical transfusion medicine. Although blood transfusion is an important treatment in different clinical settings, there are still lack of much randomized clinical trials. Nowadays

  10. PROGRESS IN BLOOD TRANSFUSION SERVICES IN KENYA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-12-02

    Dec 2, 2009 ... Background: Provision of safe and adequate supplies of blood is dependent on a well organised blood transfusion service with dedicated well-trained manpower and resources for the service. Objective: To provide an overview of the evolution of blood transfusion services in. Kenya, from the 1980s to date.

  11. [Blood transfusion: the challenges for tomorrow?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folléa, Gilles; Garraud, Olivier; Tiberghien, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. The availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all lead to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. The main tools available to improve transfusion and the transfusion chain management are the following: programs of patient blood management (PBM) to optimize the use of blood products with a patient centred approach, blood supply management tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, donor management tools to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, and coordination of these activities. A better understanding of these tools and their implementation will certainly be major challenges for transfusion medicine in the near future. Integrating these evolutions in regulations through the revision of the European Directives on blood and blood components (the review process is expected to be launched in 2015) should enroll them in the long term, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. [Ethics and transfusion--seminar report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, C; Tissot, J-D; Bouësseau, M-C; Pottier, R; Monsellier, M; Garraud, O; Hermine, O; Sannié, T; Cazenave, J-P; Cabaud, J-J; Lefrère, J-J

    2014-05-01

    This paper brings together the abstracts and proceedings of a seminar held on the topic of "ethics and transfusion", October 15, 2013 at the National Institute of Blood Transfusion, Paris. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  13. Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Blood Transfusion and Donation URL of this page: https://medlineplus. ... T U V W XYZ List of All Topics All Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages To use the sharing ...

  14. Blood transfusion knowledge of surgical residents: is an educational intervention effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Caitlin; Saidenberg, Elianna; Lampron, Jacinthe; Pugh, Debra

    2017-04-01

    Evidence-based transfusion education for surgical residents is crucial to improving practice. A pilot study was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of an education module for improving transfusion knowledge among surgical residents. Modules were developed and delivered by experts in surgery and transfusion medicine. They were delivered to residents in their first 2 years of training (Surgical Foundations), and to General Surgery residents across all years of training. Premodule and postmodule and retention knowledge assessments were used to assess efficacy. Median assessment scores for each group were compared using a two-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum analysis. Chi-square tests were used to compare each group's correct response rates for each question across the three tests. Median assessment scores of residents in the Surgical Foundations program improved from a mean of 60% premodule to 80% postmodule and remained at 80% in the retention assessment (p transfusion dose, preoperative blood management, management of reactions, and informed consent (p Transfusion knowledge of surgical residents was improved by a collaborative educational initiative. This could serve as a model for other training programs to improve resident knowledge of evidence-based transfusion practices. The efficacy of such interventions in changing practice remains untested. © 2017 AABB.

  15. Failure mode and effect analysis in blood transfusion: a proactive tool to reduce risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yao; Teng, Fang; Zhou, Jie; Wen, Aiqing; Bi, Yutian

    2013-12-01

    The aim of blood transfusion risk management is to improve the quality of blood products and to assure patient safety. We utilize failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), a tool employed for evaluating risks and identifying preventive measures to reduce the risks in blood transfusion. The failure modes and effects occurring throughout the whole process of blood transfusion were studied. Each failure mode was evaluated using three scores: severity of effect (S), likelihood of occurrence (O), and probability of detection (D). Risk priority numbers (RPNs) were calculated by multiplying the S, O, and D scores. The plan-do-check-act cycle was also used for continuous improvement. Analysis has showed that failure modes with the highest RPNs, and therefore the greatest risk, were insufficient preoperative assessment of the blood product requirement (RPN, 245), preparation time before infusion of more than 30 minutes (RPN, 240), blood transfusion reaction occurring during the transfusion process (RPN, 224), blood plasma abuse (RPN, 180), and insufficient and/or incorrect clinical information on request form (RPN, 126). After implementation of preventative measures and reassessment, a reduction in RPN was detected with each risk. The failure mode with the second highest RPN, namely, preparation time before infusion of more than 30 minutes, was shown in detail to prove the efficiency of this tool. FMEA evaluation model is a useful tool in proactively analyzing and reducing the risks associated with the blood transfusion procedure. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  16. Transfusion-induced bone marrow transplant rejection due to minor histocompatibility antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seema R; Zimring, James C

    2013-10-01

    Traditionally, alloimmunization to transfused blood products has focused exclusively on recipient antibodies recognizing donor alloantigens present on the cell surface. Accordingly, the immunologic sequelae of alloimmunization have been antibody mediated effects (ie, hemolytic transfusion reactions, platelet refractoriness, anti-HLA and anti-HNA effects, etc). However, in addition to the above sequelae, there is also a correlation between the number of antecedent transfusions in humans and the rate of bone marrow transplant (BMT) rejection-under reduced intensity conditioning with HLA-matched or HLA-identical marrow. Bone marrow transplant of this nature is the only existing cure for a series of nonmalignant hematologic diseases (eg, sickle cell disease, thalassemias, etc); however, rejection remains a clinical problem. It has been hypothesized that transfusion induces subsequent BMT rejection through immunization. Studies in animal models have observed the same effect and have demonstrated that transfusion-induced BMT rejection can occur in response to alloimmunization. However, unlike traditional antibody responses, sensitization in this case results in cellular immune effects, involving populations such as T cell or natural killer cells. In this case, rejection occurs in the absence of alloantibodies and would not be detected by existing immune-hematologic methods. We review human and animal studies in light of the hypothesis that, for distinct clinical populations, enhanced rejection of BMT may be an unappreciated adverse consequence of transfusion, which current blood bank methodologies are unable to detect. © 2013.

  17. Red blood cell transfusion in septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosland, Ragnhild G; Hagen, Marte U; Haase, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treating anaemia with red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is frequent, but controversial, in patients with septic shock. Therefore we assessed characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion in this group of high risk patients. METHODS: We did a prospective cohort study at 7...... general intensive care units (ICUs) including all adult patients with septic shock in a 5-month period. RESULTS: Ninety-five of the 213 included patients (45%) received median 3 (interquartile range 2-5) RBC units during shock. The median pre-transfusion haemoglobin level was 8.1 (7.4-8.9) g....../dl and independent of shock day and bleeding. Patients with cardiovascular disease were transfused at higher haemoglobin levels. Transfused patients had higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II (56 (45-69) vs. 48 (37-61), p = 0.0005), more bleeding episodes, lower haemoglobin levels days 1 to 5, higher...

  18. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the “material” itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing - after years of exhaustive haemovigilance - that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  19. Should pre-transfusion screening RBC panels contain Wr(a+) cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, S; De Nicolò, M C; Quattrocchi, L; Neri, A; Ferruzzi, I; Girelli, G

    2010-10-01

    Sometimes commercial RBC sets for the screening of irregular antibodies contain Wr(a+) cells. The aim of this study was to define the usefulness of employing RBC sets for the screening of irregular antibodies containing Wr(a+) cells in pre-transfusion tests. Anti-Wr(a) is a relatively common naturally occurring antibody in candidates to blood transfusion, although the risk of receiving a non-compatible unit is low. We have studied both the incidence of Wr(a) antibodies and the effects of having a Wr(a+) cell in the screening test on routine work in an unselected population of 787 patients requiring RBC transfusion and in 151 new blood donors. Irregular antibodies were found in 64 sera, 58 of which were specific for Wr(a) , 46 (5·8%) and 12 (7·9%) in patients and donors, respectively. The positive tested sera contained specific IgM in 16 cases, IgM + IgG in 13 cases and IgG in 27 cases. Anti-Wr(a) can usually be detected during cross-match procedures; therefore, the presence of Wr(a+) cells in pre-transfusion screening of blood recipients is not justified and it causes an undue increase in cost and time to unit release. Moreover, because of the rare association between anti-Wr(a) and haemolytic transfusion reaction, the use of Wr(a+) RBC-containing sets is also questionable in the countries that do not perform pre-transfusion cross-match tests. © 2010 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2010 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  20. Transfusion-transmitted malaria masquerading as sickle cell crisis with multisystem organ failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Cheryl L; Gross, Phillip J; Dean, Christina L; Chonat, Satheesh; Ip, Andrew; McLemore, Morgan; El Rassi, Fuad; Stowell, Sean R; Josephson, Cassandra D; Fasano, Ross M

    2018-03-09

    Fever accompanying vaso-occlusive crisis is a common presentation in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and carries a broad differential diagnosis. Here, we report a case of transfusion-transmitted malaria in a patient with SCD presenting with acute vaso-occlusive crisis and rapidly decompensating to multisystem organ failure (MSOF). An 18-year-old African American male with SCD was admitted after multiple days of fever and severe generalized body pain. He received monthly blood transfusions as stroke prophylaxis. A source of infection was not readily identified, but treatment was initiated with continuous intravenous fluids and empiric antibiotics. The patient developed acute renal failure, acute hypoxic respiratory failure, and shock. He underwent red blood cell (RBC) exchange transfusion followed by therapeutic plasma exchange and continuous veno-venous hemodialysis. A manual peripheral blood smear revealed intraerythrocytic inclusions suggestive of Plasmodium, and molecular studies confirmed Plasmodium falciparum infection. Intravenous artesunate was given daily for 1 week. A look-back investigation involving two hospitals, multiple blood suppliers, and state and federal public health departments identified the source of malaria as a unit of RBCs transfused 2 weeks prior to admission. Clinical suspicion for transfusion-related adverse events, including hemolytic transfusion reactions and transfusion-transmitted infections, should be high in typically and atypically immunocompromised patient populations (like SCD), especially those on chronic transfusion protocols. Manual blood smear review aids in the evaluation of patients with SCD presenting with severe vaso-occlusive crisis and MSOF and can alert clinicians to the need for initiating aggressive therapy like RBC exchange and artesunate therapy. © 2018 AABB.

  1. Patient blood management: a fresh look at a fresh approach to blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liumbruno, G M; Vaglio, S; Grazzini, G; Spahn, D R; Biancofiore, G

    2015-10-01

    The overall use of allogeneic blood transfusions in clinical practice remains relatively high and still varies widely among centres and practitioners. Moreover, allogeneic blood transfusions have historically been linked with risks and complications: some of them (e.g. transfusion reactions and transmission of pathogens) have been largely mitigated through advancements in blood banking whereas some others (e.g. immunomodulation and transfusion-related acute lung injury) appear to have more subtle etiologies and are more difficult to tackle. Furthermore, blood transfusions are costly and the supply of blood is limited. Finally, evidence indicates that a great number of the critically ill patients who are being transfused today may not be having tangible benefits from the transfusion. Patient blood management is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary, multimodal, and patient-tailored approach aimed at reducing or eliminating the need for allogeneic transfusion by managing anaemia, perioperative blood conservation, surgical haemostasis, and blood as well as plasma-derivative drug use. From this point of view, the reduction of allogeneic blood usage is not an end in itself but a tool to achieve better patient clinical outcome. This article focuses on the three-pillar matrix of patient blood management where the understanding of basic physiology and pathophysiology is at the core of evidence-based approaches to optimizing erythropoiesis, minimising bleeding and tolerating anemia. Anesthesiologists and critical care physicians clearly have a key role in patient blood management programmes are and should incorporate its principles into clinical practice-based initiatives that improve patient safety and clinical outcomes.

  2. Morbidity associated to the transfusion support in pediatric patients with acute leukemia in the National Cancer Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino Valderrama, Martha; Suarez Mattos, Amaranto; Hernandez Kunzel, Jorge Alberto; Restrepo, Alexandra

    2002-01-01

    Acute leukemia represents the most common cancer in pediatrics. The current treatments made necessary a hematological support which increases the risks of complications, like fever, immunologic reaction, infections and, graft versus host disease. The objective of the present study was to determine the morbidity associated with transfusion support in pediatric patients with acute leukemia. In the pediatric population with diagnosis of acute leukemia in the INC during one and half year, the morbidity associated with transfusions was low and couldn't be related to the treatment given to the transfused products

  3. Comparison of Efficacy of Prestorage with Poststorage Leukocytoreduction Filters in Transfusion Dependent Thalassemic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Isfahani

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Cellular blood products such as whole blood, packed RBC and platelet concentrate may contain a large number of donor leukocytes. These transfused cells are responsible for several transfusion reactions which include febrile reactions, platelet refractoriness due to alloimmunization and some cell associated virus transmission, especially cytomegalovirus. Advances in biotechnology resulted in production of filters capable of depleting residual leukocytes below the threshold receded to prevent these complications. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of prestorage and poststorage leukocyte reduction filters.Materials & Methods: In this experimental study 140 leukocyte filters used in patients with major thalassemia with age range of 1 to 18 years old were studied. They received packed RBC with pre storage or post storage filtration in pediatric hematology clinic of Be’sat hospital, Hamadan,Iran. In addition to filter efficiency, some transfusion reactions such as hypotension, urticaria, flushing, fever and chills were analyzed with chi-square and independent t-test.Results: Calculated efficiencies of pre storage and post storage filtration were 99.70%±69% and 92.74%±12.47% respectively, which is statistically significant (P=0.000. Fever, chills, urticaria and flushing which are some transfusion reactions, were not seen in any patients received filtrated packed RBC. No transfusion complication except hypotension (which was seen in 14 patients in both groups was seen. Maximum remained leukocyte in pre storage packed RBC was 20/mm3 and 524/mm3 in post storage blood.Conclusion: According to the calculated standard deviation, pre storage leukocyte filters are superior to post storage filters, and so post storage filtration is not a reliable method to reduce remaining white blood cells in transfused blood.

  4. Blood transfusion products contain mitochondrial DNA damage-associated molecular patterns: a potential effector of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yann-Leei; King, Madelyn B; Gonzalez, Richard P; Brevard, Sidney B; Frotan, M Amin; Gillespie, Mark N; Simmons, Jon D

    2014-10-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the most frequent and severe complication in patients receiving multiple blood transfusions. Current pathogenic concepts hold that proinflammatory mediators present in transfused blood products are responsible for the initiation of TRALI, but the identity of the critical effector molecules is yet to be determined. We hypothesize that mtDNA damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are present in blood transfusion products, which may be important in the initiation of TRALI. DNA was extracted from consecutive samples of packed red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma (FFP), and platelets procured from the local blood bank. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify ≈200 bp sequences from the COX1, ND1, ND6, and D-loop regions of the mitochondrial genome. A range of mtDNA DAMPs were detected in all blood components measured, with FFP displaying the largest variation. We conclude that mtDNA DAMPs are present in packed red blood cells, FFP, and platelets. These observations provide proof of the concept that mtDNA DAMPs may be mediators of TRALI. Further studies are needed to test this hypothesis and to determine the origin of mtDNA DAMPs in transfused blood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Anaphylaxis related with positively charged white-cell reduction filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Yaşar; Topal, Hatice; Çapanoğlu, Murat; Çetinkaya, Petek Uzay; Kocabas, Can Naci

    2014-04-01

    Allergic reactions related to blood transfusion frequently occur and most of them are mild reactions such as urticaria, erythema, pruritus and flushing. More severe and life threatening allergic reactions such as anaphylactic shock rarely occur. Application of white cell reduction filters during transfusions may prevent alloimmunization, febrile nonhemolytic reactions and transmission of intracellular infectious agents. Despite their beneficial effects, white-cell reduction filters may cause allergic reactions. In this article we present three patients who had anaphylactic reactions during blood transfusion with positively charged leucocyte filters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute hemolysis of transfused A2 red cells by an auto-HI antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, Kamran; Makar, Robert S

    2008-05-01

    Anti-HI is a common cold autoantibody that complicates serologic testing for underlying alloantibodies and has only rarely been associated with hemolysis. An unusual case of an acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AHTR) due to an anti-HI autoantibody in a subgroup A1 patient transfused with A2 red blood cells (RBCs) is reported. A 56-year-old man presented to the hospital with anemia and gastrointestinal tract bleeding. His medical history was significant for congestive heart failure, obesity, and pulmonary hypertension. On admission, he was noted to have a hemoglobin level of 7.7 g per dL and therefore transfusion of RBCs was ordered. The patient was group A, D- with a reactive antibody screen due to a cold autoantibody with HI specificity. Further serologic investigation did not detect any alloantibodies. The patient was issued an electronically cross-matched group A, D- unit of RBCs. Several hours after the transfusion, he was found to be producing "Coca-cola"-colored urine with gross hemoglobinemia visible in a posttransfusion specimen, indicating an AHTR. A transfusion reaction investigation excluded mistransfusion or a missed alloantibody and instead revealed that the patient's anti-HI had a high thermal amplitude and that the implicated unit of RBCs was from the A2 subgroup. The patient subsequently tolerated transfusion of a unit of group A1 RBCs through a blood warmer without any signs or symptoms of hemolysis. This case illustrates that anti-HI autoantibodies rarely may behave like alloantibodies and cause AHTRs. Subsequent RBC transfusion with an appropriate ABO group or subgroup through a blood warmer is well tolerated.

  7. Fototerapia simples versus dupla no tratamento de recém-nascidos a termo com hiperbilirrubinemia não-hemolítica Single vs. double phototherapy in the treatment of full-term newborns with nonhemolytic hyperbilirubinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacia Silva

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar a eficácia da fototerapia simples (1 painel versus dupla (2 painéis na redução da hiperbilirrubinemia não-hemolítica em recém-nascidos a termo. MÉTODOS: Os recém-nascidos a termo foram randomizados prospectivamente para receber fototerapia simples ou dupla. Os níveis de bilirrubina foram medidos no momento da internação e em intervalos de 12 horas, assim como em seguimento 48 horas após a alta. RESULTADOS: Trinta e sete pacientes receberam fototerapia simples, e 40, dupla. A redução média dos níveis de bilirrubina nas primeiras 24 horas de tratamento foi maior no grupo que recebeu fototerapia dupla (5,1±2,2 mg/dL versus 4,3±2,1 mg/dL, porém sem significância estatística (p = 0,18. As taxas de readmissão foram similares e nenhum dos grupos apresentou efeitos adversos. CONCLUSÃO: A fototerapia dupla não foi mais eficaz do que a fototerapia simples no tratamento da hiperbilirrubinemia não-hemolítica em recém-nascidos a termo. Entretanto, nossos resultados sugerem que a fototerapia dupla possa ser mais eficaz em recém-nascidos a termo com níveis de bilirrubina mais altos no momento da internação.OBJECTIVES: To compare the effectiveness of single (1 panel vs. double (2 panels phototherapy in reducing nonhemolytic hyperbilirubinemia in term newborns. METHODS: Term newborns with hyperbilirubinemia were prospectively randomized to receive double or single phototherapy. Bilirubin levels were measured at admission and at 12-hour intervals, as well as at a follow-up 48 hours after discharge. RESULTS: Thirty-seven patients received single and 40 double phototherapy. The mean decrease in bilirubin level in the first 24 hours of treatment was greater in the double phototherapy group (5.1±2.2 mg/dL vs. 4.3±2.1 mg/dL, but without statistical significance (p = 0.18. Readmission rates were similar and no adverse effects were found in either group. CONCLUSIONS: Double-surface was not more effective than single

  8. The transfusion medicine we want.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The Associação Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia (ABHH), through its Board of Directors, hosted a national symposium called "Forum: The Transfusion Medicine we want", to discuss proposed policies and techniques related to the area. This meeting was held in São Paulo on August 19 and 20, 2010, with the participation of experts, authorities and representatives of organized groups of patients and users. The discussions were organized around three specific issues selected from over 100 suggestions sent to the ABHH through public consultation on the web: 1. Strategies; 2. Financing; 3. Blood products. A plenary session, held at the end of the meeting, adopted recommendations that are relevant to the different discussion topics.This document contains actions proposed by the ABHH to meet the demands discussed.

  9. Effects of Prestorage Leukoreduction on the Rate of Febrile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Prestorage Leukoreduction on the Rate of Febrile Nonhemolytic Transfusion Reactions to Red Blood Cells in a Tertiary Care Hospital. ... units, leukoreduction was performed by using buffy coat method of component preparation by quadruple bags and integral bags containing SepacellR Pure RC filters (Fenwal.

  10. Long-Term follow up after intra-Uterine transfusionS; the LOTUS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduin, Esther P; Lindenburg, Irene T M; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E H J; van Klink, Jeanine M M; Schonewille, Henk; van Kamp, Inge L; Oepkes, Dick; Walther, Frans J; Kanhai, Humphrey H H; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Lopriore, Enrico; Brand, Anneke

    2010-12-01

    The Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC) is the Dutch national referral centre for pregnancies complicated by haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) caused by maternal alloimmunization. Yearly, 20-25 affected fetuses with severe anaemia are transfused with intra-uterine blood transfusions (IUT). Mothers of whom their fetus has undergone IUT for HDFN are considered high responders with regard to red blood cell (RBC) antibody formation. Most study groups report high perinatal survival, resulting in a shift in attention towards short- and long-term outcome in surviving children. We set up a large long-term observational follow-up study (LOTUS study), in cooperation with the Sanquin Blood Supply Foundation and the LUMC departments of Obstetrics, Neonatology and ImmunoHematology & Bloodtransfusion.The first part of this study addresses several putative mechanisms associated with blood group alloimmunization in these mothers. The second part of this study determines the incidence of long-term neurodevelopment impairment (NDI) and associated risk factors in children treated with IUT. All women and their life offspring who have been treated with IUT for HDFN in the LUMC from 1987-2008 are invited to participate and after consent, blood or saliva samples are taken. RBC and HLA antigen profile and antibodies are determined by serologic or molecular techniques. Microchimerism populations are tested by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR).All children are tested for their neurological, cognitive and psychosocial development using standardised tests and questionnaires. The primary outcome is neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI), a composite outcome defined as any of the following: cerebral palsy, cognitive or psychomotor development blindness and/or bilateral deafness. The LOTUS study includes the largest cohort of IUT patients ever studied and is the first to investigate post-IUT long-term effects in both mother and child. The results may lead to a change

  11. Long-Term follow up after intra-Uterine transfusionS; the LOTUS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanhai Humphrey HH

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC is the Dutch national referral centre for pregnancies complicated by haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN caused by maternal alloimmunization. Yearly, 20-25 affected fetuses with severe anaemia are transfused with intra-uterine blood transfusions (IUT. Mothers of whom their fetus has undergone IUT for HDFN are considered high responders with regard to red blood cell (RBC antibody formation. Most study groups report high perinatal survival, resulting in a shift in attention towards short- and long-term outcome in surviving children. Methods/Design We set up a large long-term observational follow-up study (LOTUS study, in cooperation with the Sanquin Blood Supply Foundation and the LUMC departments of Obstetrics, Neonatology and ImmunoHematology & Bloodtransfusion. The first part of this study addresses several putative mechanisms associated with blood group alloimmunization in these mothers. The second part of this study determines the incidence of long-term neurodevelopment impairment (NDI and associated risk factors in children treated with IUT. All women and their life offspring who have been treated with IUT for HDFN in the LUMC from 1987-2008 are invited to participate and after consent, blood or saliva samples are taken. RBC and HLA antigen profile and antibodies are determined by serologic or molecular techniques. Microchimerism populations are tested by real time polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR. All children are tested for their neurological, cognitive and psychosocial development using standardised tests and questionnaires. The primary outcome is neurodevelopmental impairment (NDI, a composite outcome defined as any of the following: cerebral palsy, cognitive or psychomotor development Discussion The LOTUS study includes the largest cohort of IUT patients ever studied and is the first to investigate post-IUT long-term effects in both mother and child. The

  12. Triggers of blood transfusion in percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zehri, A.K.; Biyabani, S.R.; Siddiqui, K.M.; Memon, A.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the triggers of blood transfusion in patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). The percutaneous surgery database was retrospectively reviewed to identify patients with postoperative haemorrhage and need for blood transfusion. Blood loss was estimated by the postoperative drop in haemoglobin factored by the quantity of any blood transfusion. Various patients and procedure-related factors were assessed for association with total blood loss or blood transfusion requirement using stepwise univariate, forward multivariate regression analysis. A total of 326 procedures were performed in 316 patients. Two hundred and thirty two procedures were included in the study. There were 167 males and 65 females. The mean age was 41+14 years. The mean haemoglobin drop was 1.68 +1.3 gm/dL. The overall blood transfusion rate was 14.2%. Stepwise multivariate regression analysis showed that female gender (p = 0.003), staghorn stone (p = 0.023), stone fragmentation with ultrasound (p = 0.054) and chronic renal failure (p = 0.001) were significantly predictive of the need for blood transfusion. Chronic renal failure, female gender, presence of staghorn calculi and stone fragmentation using ultrasonic device were predictive of blood transfusion in this cohort of patients. (author)

  13. Should Transfusion Trigger Thresholds Differ for Critical Care Versus Perioperative Patients? A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Matthew A; Krishnan, Rohin; Cheng, Davy; Martin, Janet

    2018-02-01

    To address the significant uncertainty as to whether transfusion thresholds for critical care versus surgical patients should differ. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Medline, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library searches were performed up to 15 June 2016. Trials had to enroll adult surgical or critically ill patients for inclusion. Studies had to compare a liberal versus restrictive threshold for the transfusion of allogeneic packed RBCs. The primary outcome was 30-day all-cause mortality, sub-grouped by surgical and critical care patients. Secondary outcomes included myocardial infarction, stroke, renal failure, allogeneic blood exposure, and length of stay. Odds ratios and weighted mean differences were calculated using random effects meta-analysis. To assess whether subgroups were significantly different, tests for subgroup interaction were used. Subgroup analysis by trials enrolling critically ill versus surgical patients was performed. Twenty-seven randomized controlled trials (10,797 patients) were included. In critical care patients, restrictive transfusion resulted in significantly reduced 30-day mortality compared with liberal transfusion (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.97). In surgical patients, a restrictive transfusion strategy led to the opposite direction of effect for mortality (odds ratio, 1.31; 95% CI, 0.94-1.82). The subgroup interaction test was significant (p = 0.04), suggesting that the effect of restrictive transfusion on mortality is statistically different for critical care (decreased risk) versus surgical patients (potentially increased risk or no difference). Regarding secondary outcomes, for critically ill patients, a restrictive strategy resulted in reduced risk of stroke/transient ischemic attack, packed RBC exposure, transfusion reactions, and hospital length of stay. In surgical patients, restrictive transfusion resulted in reduced packed RBC exposure. The safety of restrictive transfusion strategies likely differs for

  14. Internal medicine resident knowledge of transfusion medicine: results from the BEST-TEST international education needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haspel, Richard L; Lin, Yulia; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Tinmouth, Alan; Cid, Joan; Eichler, Hermann; Lozano, Miguel; van de Watering, Leo; Fisher, Patrick B; Ali, Asma; Parks, Eric

    2015-06-01

    Blood transfusion is the most common hospital procedure performed in the United States. While inadequate physician transfusion medicine knowledge may lead to inappropriate practice, such an educational deficit has not been investigated on an international scale using a validated assessment tool. Identifying specific deficiencies is critical for developing curricula to improve patient care. Rasch analysis, a method used in high-stakes testing, was used to validate an assessment tool consisting of a 23-question survey and a 20-question examination. The assessment tool was administered to internal medicine residents to determine prior training, attitudes, perceived ability, and actual knowledge related to transfusion medicine. A total of 474 residents at 23 programs in nine countries completed the examination. The overall mean score of correct responses was 45.7% (site range, 32%-56%). The mean score for Postgraduate Year (PGY)1 (43.9%) was significantly lower than for PGY3 (47.1%) and PGY4 (50.6%) residents. Although 89% of residents had participated in obtaining informed consent from a patient for transfusion, residents scored poorly (<25% correct) on questions related to transfusion reactions. The majority of residents (65%) would find additional transfusion medicine training "very" or "extremely" helpful. Internationally, internal medicine residents have poor transfusion medicine knowledge and would welcome additional training. The especially limited knowledge of transfusion reactions suggests an initial area for focused training. This study not only represents the largest international assessment of transfusion medicine knowledge, but also serves as a model for rigorous, collaborative research in medical education. © 2014 AABB.

  15. Indications for Blood Transfusion among Children in a Tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaemia is prevalent among children in our environment, often necessitating blood transfusions. Knowledge of the common reasons for blood transfusion and institution of preventive measures is likely to reduce transfusion rate in the region. We undertook a review of indications for blood transfusion in children ...

  16. Transfusion transmitted diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients in the perioperative period and intensive care unit are commonly exposed to blood transfusion (BT. They are at increased risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases. The risk of viral transmission has decreased steadily, but the risk of bacterial transmission remains same. Bacterial contamination is more in platelet concentrates than in red cells and least in plasma. The chances of sepsis, morbidity and mortality depend on the number of transfusions and underlying condition of the patient. Challenges to safe BT continue due to new emerging pathogens and various management problems. Strategies to restrict BT, optimal surgical and anaesthetic techniques to reduce blood loss and efforts to develop transfusion alternatives should be made. Literature search was performed using search words/phrases blood transfusion, transfusion, transfusion transmitted diseases, transfusion transmitted bacterial diseases, transfusion transmitted viral diseases, transfusion transmitted protozoal diseases or combinations, on PubMed and Google Scholar from 1990 to 2014.

  17. Effect of Blood Transfusions on the Outcome of Very Low Body Weight Preterm Infants under Two Different Transfusion Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Lin Chen

    2009-06-01

    Conclusion: Both criteria of PRBC transfusion had similar clinical outcomes, although liberal transfusion resulted in a greater amount of blood transfused and a low reticulocyte count at 30 days of age. We suggest restrictive criteria for minimizing the overall amount of transfusion to less than 30 mL may be a better way of preventing CLD in VLBW infants.

  18. [French training program for medical students in transfusion medicine. Transfusion Medicine Teachers' College].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wautier, J-L; Cabaud, J-J; Cazenave, J-P; Fialon, P; Fruchart, M-F; Joussemet, M; Leblond, V; Muller, J-Y; Rouger, P; Vignon, D; Waller, C; Lefrère, J-J; Worms, B; Vileyn, F

    2005-02-01

    In France, transfusion medicine training program has been updated. A national committee of professors in transfusion medicine propose a series of 13 items which represent the minimum knowledge that general practitioners should possess. This overview of transfusion medicine is far below the level that specialists should reach and they will need an additional specialized training. Several French universities have set up their own training program which is quite similar to the work of the committee of professors. The following recommendations are not strict guidelines but is a common basis which will be improved in 2005 according to new evidence based transfusion medicine.

  19. Allogeneic red blood cell transfusions: efficacy, risks, alternatives and indications

    OpenAIRE

    Madjdpour, C.; Spahn, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    Careful assessment of risks and benefits has to precede each decision on allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Currently, a number of key issues in transfusion medicine are highly controversial, most importantly the influence of different transfusion thresholds on clinical outcome. The aim of this article is to review current evidence on blood transfusions, to highlight ‘hot topics' with respect to efficacy, outcome and risks, and to provide the reader with transfusion guidelines. In a...

  20. Blood transfusion practices in obstetric anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Jadon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion is an essential component of emergency obstetric care and appropriate blood transfusion significantly reduces maternal mortality. Obstetric haemorrhage, especially postpartum haemorrhage, remains one of the major causes of massive haemorrhage and a prime cause of maternal mortality. Blood loss and assessment of its correct requirement are difficult in pregnancy due to physiological changes and comorbid conditions. Many guidelines have been used to assess the requirement and transfusion of blood and its components. Infrastructural, economic, social and religious constraints in blood banking and donation are key issues to formulate practice guidelines. Available current guidelines for transfusion are mostly from the developed world; however, they can be used by developing countries keeping available resources in perspective.

  1. Functional recovery of stored platelets after transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, Angela; Bouman, Esther; Sebastian, Silvie; Korporaal, Suzanne J A; Urbanus, Rolf T; Fijnheer, Rob; Boven, Leonie A; Roest, Mark

    BACKGROUND: Platelet (PLT) concentrates are prophylactically given to prevent major bleeding complications. The corrected count increment (CCI) is currently the only tool to monitor PLT transfusion efficacy. PLT function tests cannot be performed in patients with thrombocytopenia. Therefore, an

  2. Acute haemolysis, DIC and renal failure after transfusion of uncross-matched blood during trauma resuscitation: illustrative case and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorellino, J; Elahie, A L; Warkentin, T E

    2018-02-19

    The aims of this study were to report a patient with acute haemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) after transfusing uncross-matched red blood cell (RBC) units and to identify the frequency of this complication. Uncross-matched RBC units are commonly transfused in emergencies, but the frequency of acute HTR is unknown. We describe a male stabbing victim who received three units of uncross-matched RBC units complicated by acute intravascular HTR, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and renal failure. We identified 14 studies evaluating the frequency of acute HTR post-emergency transfusion of uncross-matched RBC units. Acute HTR was shown by haemoglobinuria, free-plasma haemoglobin and methemalbumin, with anti-K and anti-Fy a eluted from recipient red cells; acute DIC featured severe hypofibrinogenemia, thrombocytopenia, elevated fibrin D-dimer and multiple bilateral renal infarcts. Two of the three transfused units reacted with pre-existing RBC alloantibodies [anti-K (titre, 128), anti-Fy a (titre, 512)], explained by transfusion 25 years earlier. Our literature review found the frequency of acute HTR following emergency transfusion of uncross-matched RBC units to be 2/3998 [0·06% (95% CI, 0·01-0·21%)]. Although emergency transfusion of uncross-matched blood is commonly practiced at trauma centres worldwide, with low risk of acute HTR (acute HTR with severe complications. © 2018 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  3. Microchimerism decades after transfusion among combat-injured US veterans from the Vietnam, Korean, and World War II conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, Garth H; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Rivers, Ryan M; Montalvo, Lani; Wen, Li; Chafets, Daniel M; Reed, William F; Busch, Michael P

    2008-08-01

    Blood transfusion after traumatic injury can result in microchimerism (MC) of donor white cells (WBCs) in the recipient as late as 2 to 3 years postinjury, the longest prospective follow-up to date. The purpose of this study was to determine how long transfusion-associated MC lasts after traumatic injury. A group of US combat veterans who received transfusions who responded to a recruitment notice was retrospectively evaluated. Their blood was sampled, and MC was assessed by quantitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction detection of differences at the HLA-DR locus or a panel of insertion-deletion polymorphism loci. Results of veterans were compared to those from an age- and gender-matched blood donor control group, from whom WBCs were retrieved from leukoreduction filters. Among 163 combat veterans who received transfusion and 150 control subjects who did not receive transfusions, 16 (9.8%) of the veterans and 1 (0.7%) control subject had evidence of MC (relative risk, 14.7; 95% confidence interval, 2.0-110). The veterans with MC included 3 who served in WWII (7% of subjects from that conflict), 5 in Korea (18%), and 6 in Vietnam (7%). Transfusion for combat-related injury can result in MC that lasts for 60 years, suggesting that it may involve permanent engraftment. MC is rare among male blood donors who did not receive transfusions, who are probably representative of individuals who have not had postnatal allogeneic exposures.

  4. Functional recovery of stored platelets after transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikker, Angela; Bouman, Esther; Sebastian, Silvie; Korporaal, Suzanne J A; Urbanus, Rolf T; Fijnheer, Rob; Boven, Leonie A; Roest, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Platelet (PLT) concentrates are prophylactically given to prevent major bleeding complications. The corrected count increment (CCI) is currently the only tool to monitor PLT transfusion efficacy. PLT function tests cannot be performed in patients with thrombocytopenia. Therefore, an optimized agonist-induced assay was used to determine PLT function, in patients with severe thrombocytopenia before and after transfusion. PLT reactivity toward adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thrombin receptor-activating peptide SFLLRN (TRAP), and convulxin (CVX) was assessed by flow cytometry. P-selectin expression was measured on PLTs from 11 patients with thrombocytopenia before and 1 hour after transfusion, on stored PLTs, and on stored PLTs incubated for 1 hour in whole blood from patients ex vivo. The mean (±SEM) CCI after 1 hour was 11.4 (±1.5). After transfusion, maximal agonist-induced PLT P-selectin expression was on average 29% higher for ADP (p = 0.02), 25% higher for TRAP (p = 0.007), and 24% higher for CVX (p = 0.0008). ADP-induced reactivity of stored PLTs increased with 46% after ex vivo incubation (p = 0.007). These PLTs also showed an overall higher P-selectin expression compared to PLTs 1 hour after transfusion (p = 0.005). After normalization for this background expression, a similar responsiveness was observed. Our study shows recovery of PLT function after transfusion in patients with thrombocytopenia. The majority of functional PLTs measured after transfusion most likely represents stored transfused PLTs that regained functionality in vivo. The difference in baseline P-selectin expression in vivo versus ex vivo suggests a rapid clearance from circulation of PLTs with increased P-selectin expression. © 2016 AABB.

  5. Transfusion support in patients with dengue fever

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever has emerged as a global public health problem in the recent decades. The clinical spectrum of the disease ranges from dengue fever to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The disease is characterized by increased capillary permeability, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Thrombocytopenia with hemorrhagic manifestations warrants platelet transfusions. There is lack of evidence-based guidelines for transfusion support in patients with dengue fever. This contributes t...

  6. [Beginning Knowledge of Transfusion in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazda, Toshio; Shimizu, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Blood components and plasma derivatives are two of the most useful tools in modern medicine. When the Portuguese opened the maritime routes to the Far East in the 16th century. Western medicine traveled to Japan on the trading vessels that carried physicians and barber-surgeons to care for the body and Christian missionaries to care for the soul. Skilled interpreters such as Kōgyū Yoshio translated and studied Dutch editions of early medical books, like Lorenz Heister's "Chirurgie" (Nürnberg, 1719), that illustrate the concept of transfusion. The oldest description of transfusion originating in Japan is a handwritten manuscript entitled "Bansui Sensi Chojutsu Shomoku" by Masamichi Nishijima, a student of Bansui Otsuki. It is a list of Otsuki's translated works. He described book names and chapter names in the manuscript, and when he finished translation of a chapter, he marked a circle on the chapter name. The transfusion chapter had a circle. That dates the earliest writing on transfusion in Japanese to 1804, shortly after the death of Kōgyū. Unfortunately, the manuscript translation no longer exists. In 1814, Shunzō Yoshio, grandson of Kōgyū, and in 1820, Tokki Koshimura, translated the figure legends of "Chirurgie." Soon afterwards, after the first report of transfusion from human-to-human by James Blundell in London in 1818, Western medical books published on the subject began to arrive. The works of Christoph Wilhelm Hufeland, Georg Friedrich Most and Carl Canstatt all mentioning transfusion, albeit without details, were translated by Kōan Ogata and Shinryō Tsuboi. During the Edo period, Japan was a closed country; only open to the Dutch through a tiny island in Nagasaki. But Japanese doctors in the Edo period learned about blood transfusion through Dutch-translated versions of Western medical Books. Transfusion began being practiced in Japan in 1919, almost exactly 100 years after the concept was introduced

  7. Red blood cell transfusion in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsler, Stefan; Ketter, Ralf; Eichler, Hermann; Schwerdtfeger, Karsten; Steudel, Wolf-Ingo; Oertel, Joachim

    2012-07-01

    The necessity of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in neurosurgical procedures is under debate. Although detailed recommendations exist for many other surgical disciplines, there are very limited data on the probability of transfusions during neurosurgical procedures. Three-thousand and twenty-six consecutive adult patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures at Saarland University Hospital from December 2006 to June 2008 were retrospectively analyzed for administration of RBCs. The patients were grouped into 11 main diagnostic categories for analysis. The transfusion probability and cross-match to transfusion ratio (C/T ratio) were calculated. Overall, the transfusion probability for neurosurgical procedures was 1.7 % (52/3,026). The probability was 6.5 % for acute subdural hematoma (7/108), 6.2 % for spinal tumors (5/80), 4.6 % for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, 4/98), 2.8 % for abscess (3/108), 2.4 % for traumatic brain injury (4/162), 2.3 % for cerebral ischemia (1/44), 1.9 % for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) /aneurysms (4/206), 1.4 % for brain tumors (10/718), 0.8 % for hydrocephalus (2/196), 0.4 % for degenerative diseases of the spine (5/1290), including 3.6 % (3/82) for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and 0 % for epidural hematoma (0/15). The transfusion probabilities for clipping and coiling of SAH were 2.9 % (2/68) and 1.7 % (2/120) respectively. The probability of blood transfusion during neurosurgical procedures is well below the 10 % level which is generally defined as the limit for preoperative appropriation of RBCs. Patients with spinal tumors, acute subdural hematomas or ICH, i.e., patients undergoing large decompressive procedures of bone or soft tissue, had a higher probability of transfusion.

  8. Risk factors for blood transfusion after shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padegimas, E M; Clyde, C T; Zmistowski, B M; Restrepo, C; Williams, G R; Namdari, S

    2016-02-01

    Currently, there is little information about the need for peri-operative blood transfusion in patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty. The purpose of this study was to identify the rate of transfusion and its predisposing factors, and to establish a blood conservation strategy. We identified all patients who had undergone shoulder arthroplasty at our hospital between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013. The rate of transfusion was determined from the patient's records. While there were exceptions, patients typically underwent transfusion if they had a level of haemoglobin of transfusion. High- and low-risk cohorts for transfusion were identified from a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Of 1174 shoulder arthroplasties performed on 1081 patients, 53 cases (4.5%) required transfusion post-operatively. Predictors of blood transfusion were a lower pre-operative haematocrit (p transfusion. In total 48 of the 436 (11%) shoulder arthroplasties with a pre-operative haematocrit transfusion compared with five of the 738 (0.70%) shoulder arthroplasties with a haematocrit above this level. We found that transfusion was needed less frequently than previously described for shoulder arthroplasty. Patients with a pre-operative haematocrit blood transfusion, while those with a haematocrit above this level are unlikely to require transfusion. The rate of transfusion after shoulder arthroplasty is under 5%, and those with a pre-operative haematocrit greater than or equal to 39.6% have a very low likelihood (transfusion. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  9. Blood Transfusion Delay and Outcome in County Hospitals in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Julius; Ayieko, Philip; Ogero, Morris; Gachau, Susan; Makone, Boniface; Nyachiro, Wycliffe; Mbevi, George; Chepkirui, Mercy; Malla, Lucas; Oliwa, Jacquie; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2017-02-08

    Severe anemia is a leading indication for blood transfusion and a major cause of hospital admission and mortality in African children. Failure to initiate blood transfusion rapidly enough contributes to anemia deaths in sub-Saharan Africa. This article examines delays in accessing blood and outcomes in transfused children in Kenyan hospitals. Children admitted with nonsurgical conditions in 10 Kenyan county hospitals participating in the Clinical Information Network who had blood transfusion ordered from September 2013 to March 2016 were studied. The delay in blood transfusion was calculated from the date when blood transfusion was prescribed to date of actual transfusion. Five percent (2,875/53,174) of admissions had blood transfusion ordered. Approximately half (45%, 1,295/2,875) of children who had blood transfusion ordered at admission had a documented hemoglobin transfusions, 82% were administered and documented in clinical records, and three-quarters of these (75%, 1,760/2,352) were given on the same day as ordered but these proportions varied from 71% to 100% across the 10 hospitals. Children who had a transfusion ordered but did not receive the prescribed transfusion had a mortality of 20%, compared with 12% among those transfused. Malaria-associated anemia remains the leading indication for blood transfusion in acute childhood illness admissions. Delays in transfusion are common and associated with poor outcomes. Variance in delay across hospitals may be a useful indicator of health system performance. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. Platelet transfusion for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Craig H; DomBourian, Melkon G; Millward, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is a critical and often necessary aspect of managing cancer. Low platelet counts frequently lead to bleeding complications; however, the drugs used to combat malignancy commonly lead to decreased production and destruction of the very cell whose function is essential to stop bleeding. The transfusion of allogeneic platelet products helps to promote hemostasis, but alloimmunization may make it difficult to manage other complications associated with cancer. The literature relating to platelet transfusion in patients with cancer was reviewed. Platelet storage, dosing, transfusion indications, and transfusion response are essential topics for health care professionals to understand because many patients with cancer will require platelet transfusions during the course of treatment. The workup and differentiation of non-immune-mediated compared with immune-mediated platelet refractoriness are vital because platelet management is different between types of refractoriness. A combination of appropriate utilization of platelet inventory and laboratory testing coupled with communication between those caring for patients with cancer and those providing blood products is essential for effective patient care.

  11. The Non-Hemostatic Aspects of Transfused Platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sut, Caroline; Tariket, Sofiane; Aubron, Cécile; Aloui, Chaker; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Berthelot, Philippe; Laradi, Sandrine; Greinacher, Andreas; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2018-01-01

    Platelets transfusion is a safe process, but during or after the process, the recipient may experience an adverse reaction and occasionally a serious adverse reaction (SAR). In this review, we focus on the inflammatory potential of platelet components (PCs) and their involvement in SARs. Recent evidence has highlighted a central role for platelets in the host inflammatory and immune responses. Blood platelets are involved in inflammation and various other aspects of innate immunity through the release of a plethora of immunomodulatory cytokines, chemokines, and associated molecules, collectively termed biological response modifiers that behave like ligands for endothelial and leukocyte receptors and for platelets themselves. The involvement of PCs in SARs—particularly on a critically ill patient’s context—could be related, at least in part, to the inflammatory functions of platelets, acquired during storage lesions. Moreover, we focus on causal link between platelet activation and immune-mediated disorders (transfusion-associated immunomodulation, platelets, polyanions, and bacterial defense and alloimmunization). This is linked to the platelets’ propensity to be activated even in the absence of deliberate stimuli and to the occurrence of time-dependent storage lesions. PMID:29536007

  12. The Non-Hemostatic Aspects of Transfused Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Sut

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Platelets transfusion is a safe process, but during or after the process, the recipient may experience an adverse reaction and occasionally a serious adverse reaction (SAR. In this review, we focus on the inflammatory potential of platelet components (PCs and their involvement in SARs. Recent evidence has highlighted a central role for platelets in the host inflammatory and immune responses. Blood platelets are involved in inflammation and various other aspects of innate immunity through the release of a plethora of immunomodulatory cytokines, chemokines, and associated molecules, collectively termed biological response modifiers that behave like ligands for endothelial and leukocyte receptors and for platelets themselves. The involvement of PCs in SARs—particularly on a critically ill patient’s context—could be related, at least in part, to the inflammatory functions of platelets, acquired during storage lesions. Moreover, we focus on causal link between platelet activation and immune-mediated disorders (transfusion-associated immunomodulation, platelets, polyanions, and bacterial defense and alloimmunization. This is linked to the platelets’ propensity to be activated even in the absence of deliberate stimuli and to the occurrence of time-dependent storage lesions.

  13. Preoperative blood transfusions for sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estcourt, Lise J; Fortin, Patricia M; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is one of the commonest severe monogenic disorders in the world, due to the inheritance of two abnormal haemoglobin (beta globin) genes. Sickle cell disease can cause severe pain, significant end-organ damage, pulmonary complications, and premature death. Surgical interventions are more common in people with sickle cell disease, and occur at much younger ages than in the general population. Blood transfusions are frequently used prior to surgery and several regimens are used but there is no consensus over the best method or the necessity of transfusion in specific surgical cases. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001. Objectives To determine whether there is evidence that preoperative blood transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery reduces mortality and perioperative or sickle cell-related serious adverse events. To compare the effectiveness of different transfusion regimens (aggressive or conservative) if preoperative transfusions are indicated in people with sickle cell disease. Search methods We searched for relevant trials in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases; all searches current to 23 March 2016. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register: 18 January 2016. Selection criteria All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing preoperative blood transfusion regimens to different regimens or no transfusion in people with sickle cell disease undergoing elective or emergency surgery. There was no restriction by outcomes examined, language or publication status. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed trial eligibility and the risk of bias and extracted data. Main results Three trials with 990 participants were eligible for inclusion in the review. There were no

  14. Do autologous blood transfusion systems reduce allogeneic blood transfusion in total knee arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawaskar, Aditya; Salunke, Abhijeet Ashok; Kekatpure, Aashay; Chen, Yongsheng; Nambi, G I; Tan, Junhao; Sonawane, Dhiraj; Pathak, Subodhkumar

    2017-09-01

    To study whether autologus blood transfusion systems reduce the requirement of allogneic blood transfusion in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty. A comprehensive search of the published literature with PubMed, Scopus and Science direct database was performed. The following search terms were used: (total knee replacement) OR (total knee arthroplasty) OR (TKA) AND (blood transfusion) OR (autologous transfusion) OR (autologous transfusion system). Using search syntax, a total of 748 search results were obtained (79 from PubMed, 586 from Science direct and 83 from Scopus). Twenty-one randomized control trials were included for this meta-analysis. The allogenic transfusion rate in autologus blood transfusion (study) group was significantly lower than the control group (28.4 and 53.5 %, respectively) (p value 0.0001, Relative risk: 0.5). The median units of allogenic blood transfused in study control group and control group were 0.1 (0.1-3.0) and 1.3 (0.3-2.6), respectively. The median hospital stay in study group was 9 (6.7-15.6) days and control group was 8.7 (6.6-16.7) days. The median cost incurred for blood transfusion per patient in study and control groups was 175 (85.7-260) and 254.7 (235-300) euros, respectively. This meta-analysis demonstrates that the use of auto-transfusion systems is a cost-effective method to reduce the need for and quantity of allogenic transfusion in elective total knee arthroplasty. Level I.

  15. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A C; D'addario, V

    2009-04-01

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a condition unique to monochorionic pregnancies, although very few case reports described the syndrome in dichorionic placentas. The aetiology of TTTS relies in the presence of at least 1 arterio-venous placental anastomosis, through which unequal blood exchange from one twin (donor) to the co-twin (recipient) occurs. The diagnosis of TTTS relies on the sonographic detection of oligohydramnios in the donor's sac and polyhydramnios in the recipient's sac in the second trimester, although signs of TTTS are present since the first trimester. Treatment options for TTTS include serial amnioreduction, septostomy, selective feticide of the apparently sick twin, and selective photocoagulation of placental vessels (SLPCV). Because of the growing evidence that SLPCV is the most efficacious therapy compared to amnioreduction with/without septostomy, the authors reviewed in details the effects of SLPCV on fetal growth and circulation. The authors further explore literature with regard to the prognostic factors. Finally, because Quintero staging system is actually under debate, they discuss the most recent findings on this topic and propose a new staging system to assess severity of TTTS at presentation (Rossi staging system). New topics for future research, which would probably further clarify the natural history of TTTS, are also proposed.

  16. Approach to transfusion support in patients with positive compatibility tests and in those with autoimmune hemolytic anemia Transfusiones en pacientes con pruebas de compatibilidad positivas y en aquellos con anemia hemolítica autoinmune

    OpenAIRE

    José Domingo Torres; Julián Miguel Aristizábal Aristizábal

    2007-01-01

    Positive compatibility tests in patients who need blood transfusions are common. Patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia may have warm or cool autoantibodies that react with red blood cell antigens and produce hemolytic transfusion reactions. Multitransfused patients, and those with either chronic renal disease or sickle cell disease, have alloantibodies that make blood transfusion difficult. In some series the frequency of such antibodies is as high as 32%. Detection and determination of s...

  17. Blood transfusion in cats: ABCD guidelines for minimising risks of infectious iatrogenic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Hartmann, Katrin; Addie, Diane D; Lutz, Hans; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Egberink, Herman; Frymus, Tadeusz; Horzinek, Marian C; Hosie, Margaret J; Lloret, Albert; Marsilio, Fulvio; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Möstl, Karin

    2015-07-01

    The availability of blood components has increased the number of indications for transfusing cats, and fresh whole blood is readily accessible to clinicians because it can be taken from in-house donor cats or 'volunteer' feline blood donors. A certain amount of risk remains to the recipient cat, as immediate or delayed adverse reactions can occur during or after transfusion, related to immunemediated mechanisms. This article, however, focuses on adverse events caused by infectious agents, which may originate either from contamination of blood following incorrect collection, storage or transfusion, or from transfusion of contaminated blood obtained from an infected donor. In cats, blood cannot be collected through a closed system and, therefore, collection of donor blood requires a multi-step manipulation of syringes and other devices. It is crucial that each step of the procedure is performed under the strictest aseptic conditions and that bacterial contamination of blood bags is prevented, as bacterial endotoxins can cause an immediate febrile reaction or even fatal shock in the recipient cat. With a view to preventing transmission of blood-borne infectious diseases, the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine has adopted basic criteria for selecting pathogens to be tested for in donor pets. The worldwide core screening panel for donor cats includes feline leukaemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus, Bartonella species and feline haemoplasma. The list should be adapted to the local epidemiological situation concerning other vector-borne feline infections. The most practical, rapid and inexpensive measure to reduce transfusion risk is to check the risk profile of donor cats on the basis of a written questionnaire. Blood transfusion can never, however, be considered entirely safe. © Published by SAGE on behalf of ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  18. Blood transfusion : Transfusion-related acute lung injury: back to basics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening disease affecting the lungs. TRALI can develop within 6 hours after transfusion and almost all patients with TRALI require mechanical ventilation at the intensive care department. Nevertheless up to 40% of patients do not recover

  19. Transfusion practice in coronary artery bypass surgery in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan J.; Westen, Mikkel; Pallesen, Peter Appel

    2007-01-01

    Transfusion rates in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) continue to vary substantially, although guidelines for allogeneic transfusion have been developed. In order to evaluate ongoing transfusion practices, we performed a multicenter audit in four Danish hospitals regarding the use of alloge......Transfusion rates in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) continue to vary substantially, although guidelines for allogeneic transfusion have been developed. In order to evaluate ongoing transfusion practices, we performed a multicenter audit in four Danish hospitals regarding the use......-related factors. Interesting differences in transfusion rates exists in Danish hospitals and these differences may reflect true variations in transfusion practices. Audits create a basis for educational efforts among surgeons and anesthesiologists to standardize transfusion practices...

  20. [Transfusion in sickle cell anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, S; Brahimi, L; Rohrlich, P; Benkerrou, M; Gerota, I; Ballerini, P

    1999-01-01

    Although blood transfusion (BT) therapy remains a key component of the weaponry used to treat acute and chronic sickle cell disease complications, its indications and modalities are currently the focus of a critical reappraisal prompted by the introduction of hydroxyurea, recent improvements in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, and increasing attention to safety concerns. Expected benefits of each BT should be carefully weighed against the risks of infections, immunologic complications, and iron overload. Simple or exchange BT can be used. In emergency situations, the only effective means of improving tissue oxygenation and limiting blood vessel occlusion is dilution or removal of HbS by simple or exchange BT, respectively; simple BT is indicated in severe anemia or acute hypovolemia and exchange BT in acute vasoocclusive crisis or acute infection. In nonemergency situations, long-term exchange BT programs geared to maintain the HbS level around 30% are used to stabilize existing lesions and to prevent recurrences; they have been proved effective in preventing recurrent stroke in patients who are not candidates for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Situations in which BT therapy is widely used despite controversy regarding its value and modalities include the prevention of complications of pregnancy, the prevention of perioperative complications, and the prevention of recurrences of severe vaso occlusive crisis in patients eligible for hydroxyurea therapy. Advances have been made in the minimization of BT-related complications (alloimmunization, viral infections, iron overload) through critical appraisal of the need for each BT, careful selection of the most appropriate blood product, and a change in BT technique resulting in a reduction in the number of blood donors.

  1. Identification of Clinical Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates among other Alpha and Nonhemolytic Streptococci by Use of the Vitek MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segonds, Christine; Prere, Marie-Françoise; Marty, Nicole; Oswald, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Discrimination between Streptococcus pneumoniae and its close relatives of the viridans group is a common difficulty in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry-based identification. In the present study, the performances of the Vitek MS MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry system were assessed using 334 pneumococci, 166 other S. mitis group streptococci, 184 non-S. mitis group streptococci, and 19 related alpha- and nonhemolytic aerobic Gram-positive catalase-negative coccal isolates. Pneumococci had been identified by means of optochin susceptibility and bile solubility or serotyping, and other isolates mainly by use of RapidID32 Strep strips. In case of discordant or low-discrimination results, genotypic methods were used. The sensitivity of the Vitek MS for the identification of S. pneumoniae was 99.1%, since only three bile-insoluble isolates were misidentified as Streptococcus mitis/Streptococcus oralis. Conversely, two optochin-resistant pneumococci were correctly identified (specificity, 100%). Three Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae isolates were also correctly identified. Among nonpneumococcal isolates, 90.8% (n = 335) were correctly identified to the species or subspecies level and 2.4% (n = 9) at the group level. For the remaining 25 isolates, the Vitek MS proposed a bacterial species included in the list of possible species suggested by genotypic methods, except for 4 isolates which were not identified due to the absence of the species in the database. According to our study, the Vitek MS displays performance similar to that of the optochin susceptibility test for routine identification of pneumococcal isolates. Moreover, the Vitek MS is efficient for the identification of other viridans group streptococci and related isolates, provided that the species are included in the database. PMID:23576536

  2. Diagnosis of Beta-thalassaemia major in previously transfused patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Rehman, Z.; Karamat, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of blood transfusion(s) on the haematological picture of beta-thalassaemia major. Results: Out of the 280 patients 109 (39%) had received one or more blood transfusions (cases). The remaining 171 patients who did not receive any transfusion served as controls. The mean MCV, MCH and Hb-F in cases were significantly higher than in the controls (p 4 transfusions (17%) (p=0.016). In the occasionally transfused patients Hb-F level was directly related to the time since last transfusion. In 44/109 (40%) transfused patients (Hb-F>30%) the diagnosis of thalassaemia was not difficult. In 54/109 (50%) patients (Hb-:5-30%) the diagnosis was aided by parent's study, while PCR for thalassaemia mutation was required in 11/109 (10%) patients (Hb-F <5%). Conclusion: In most transfused patients of thalassaemia major MCV and MCH were significantly higher while Hb-F was lower than in the un-transfused patients. There was a linear correlation between Hb-F level and time since last transfusion in the occasionally transfused patients. However, the reduction in Hb-F level was more marked and sustained in multipally transfused patients. Parent's study and PCR are useful aids in establishing the correct diagnosis in these patients. (author)

  3. Quality indicators for the hospital transfusion chain : A national survey conducted in 100 dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlker-Jansen, Pauline Y.; Janssen, M. P.; van Tilborgh-de Jong, A. J W; Schipperus, M. R.; Wiersum-Osselton, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The 2011 Dutch Blood Transfusion Guideline for hospitals incorporates seven internal quality indicators for evaluation of the hospital transfusion chain. The indicators aim to measure guideline compliance as shown by the instatement of a hospital transfusion committee and transfusion

  4. Transmission of Neurodegenerative Disorders Through Blood Transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    : Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios for dementia of any type, Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease in patients receiving blood transfusions from donors who were later diagnosed with any of these diseases versus patients who received blood from healthy donors. Whether.......9% received a transfusion from a donor diagnosed with one of the studied neurodegenerative diseases. No evidence of transmission of any of these diseases was found, regardless of approach. The hazard ratio for dementia in recipients of blood from donors with dementia versus recipients of blood from healthy......BACKGROUND: The aggregation of misfolded proteins in the brain occurs in several neurodegenerative disorders. Aberrant protein aggregation is inducible in rodents and primates by intracerebral inoculation. Possible transfusion transmission of neurodegenerative diseases has important public health...

  5. [Blood transfusion and supply chain management safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Jean-François; Caldani, Cyril; Cabaud, Jean-Jacques; Chavarin, Patricia; Rochette-Eribon, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    The level of safety attained in blood transfusion now makes this a discipline better managed care activities. This was achieved both by scientific advances and policy decisions regulating and supervising the activity, as well as by the quality system, which we recall that affects the entire organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, processes and resources in place to achieve quality management. So, an effective quality system provides a framework within which activities are established, performed in a quality-focused way and continuously monitored to improve outcomes. This system quality has to irrigate all the actors of the transfusion, just as much the establishments of blood transfusion than the health establishments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Redefining massive transfusion when every second counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Stephanie A; Zarzaur, Ben L; Croce, Martin A; Fabian, Timothy C

    2013-02-01

    The massive transfusion (MT) concept (>10-U packed red blood cells per 24 hours) is retrospective, arbitrary, and prone to survivor bias. Accounting for rate and timing is a more accurate conceptual framework. We redefined MT as a critical administration threshold (CAT) of 3 U/h, which is clinically pertinent and reflects hemorrhagic shock. The purpose of this study was to compare the traditional form of MT to a CAT definition in predicting mortality. Patients receiving transfusion in the first 24 hours were included. Precise transfusion times for each unit, in minutes, were calculated from time of injury. MT and CAT were compared to determine risk of death. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine inpatient mortality. A total of 169 patients(70%, >10 New Injury Severity Score [NISS]) were studied; 46% were CAT+; 22% met the MT criteria. With logistic regression, a CAT of 3 U/h (CAT+) was more predictive of death compared with 2, 4, 5, or 6 U/h. CAT was met once (CAT 1), twice (CAT 2) or more than 3 times (CAT 3) in 21%, 14%, and 11%, respectively. Increasing CAT was associated with increased mortality. CAT identified 75% of all deaths; MT only identified 33% and failed to identify 42% of CAT+ deaths. CAT (relative risk [RR] 3.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.80-7.15) had a stronger association with mortality compared with MT(RR, 1.82; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-3.26). The traditional definition of MT is inadequate to reflect illness severity. Using CATs allows prospective identification of critically ill trauma patients and eliminates survivor bias. CAT may serve as an activation trigger for transfusion protocols, allowing early identification of patients with critical transfusion requirements. Clinical trials involving transfusion strategies should consider CAT as an instrument for evaluating outcomes. Diagnostic/prognostic study, level II.

  7. Blood transfusion in burn patients: Triggers of transfusion in a referral burn center in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavousi, S H; Ahmadabadi, A; Sedaghat, A; Khadem-Rezaiyan, M; Yaghoubi Moghaddam, Z; Behrouzian, M J; Nemati, S; Saghafi, H

    2018-02-01

    Blood and its derivatives are one of the most lifesaving products in the modern medicine practice. However, it is not an absolutely safe prescription. Many adverse effects such as infection, transfusion-related acute lung injury, immunosuppression, multi-organ dysfunction, acute respiratory syndrome, transfusion errors, transmission of infectious agents such as HIV, HBV, HCV are attributable to blood transfusion. The aim of this study was to describe how and when blood products were transfused in a referral burn center. This cross-sectional study was performed on medical records of all admitted patients in the Department of Burns and Reconstructive Surgery of Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad, Iran during September 2014 up to August 2015. Transfusion measures such as Hb, Hct and demographic data were extracted from patient records. SPSS version 11.5 was used for data analysis. During the study period, 701 acute burnt patients were admitted with the mean age of 25.5±20.5 years. Sixty-four percent were male and burnt percentage of total body surface area (TBSA) was 30.9±24.3%. About one third (240) of patients received at least one blood product. Mean of the transfused packed red blood cell was 274.1±674.6mL per patient and 8.85mL per 1% of burnt TBSA. Anemia was the most common transfusion trigger. Mortality in burnt patients who received blood products was two folds more than patients who did not receive any blood products. We prescribed less blood products compared with other reviewed burn centers. However, following a written blood transfusion protocol by all clinicians may reduce blood transfusion in unnecessary situations even more significantly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. One-year period prevalence of blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J T; Kimper-Karl, M L; Sprogøe, U

    2010-01-01

    was 9.2/1000 citizens. Most of the transfused patients had a main diagnosis of neoplasm (22% of recipients), diseases of the circulatory system (15%), the digestive system (15%), injuries (13%) and diseases of the blood (8%). Age standardization reversed the relation between sex specific 1-YPPRs......Transfusion practice is reported to differ considerably between countries. Comparisons often rely on transfusion rates, incidence - or prevalence rates. In this paper, the one-year period prevalence rate (1-YPPR) of transfusion of red cells (RBC) is presented. Transfusion data, demographic data...... and patient data were retrospectively combined to calculate sex and diagnosis specific and age standardized 1-YPPR s of RBC transfusion for the complete population in a Danish county. During the calendar year of 2006, 4427 patients received RBC transfusion in Funen County. The crude 1-YPPR of RBC transfusion...

  9. Association of blood transfusion with increased mortality in myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Saurav; Wetterslev, Jørn; Sharma, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The benefit of blood transfusion in patients with myocardial infarction is controversial, and a possibility of harm exists.......The benefit of blood transfusion in patients with myocardial infarction is controversial, and a possibility of harm exists....

  10. Reappraising the concept of massive transfusion in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanworth, Simon J; Morris, Timothy P; Gaarder, Christine

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT : INTRODUCTION : The massive-transfusion concept was introduced to recognize the dilutional complications resulting from large volumes of packed red blood cells (PRBCs). Definitions of massive transfusion vary and lack supporting clinical evidence. Damage-control resuscitation regimens o...

  11. [Indications and surveillance of platelet transfusions in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, C; Bardiaux, L; Couteret, Y; Devillers, M; Leroy, M; Morel, P; Pouthier-Stein, F; Hervé, P

    1995-01-01

    Surgery, after hematology, is the biggest consumer of homologous platelet concentrates. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent or control bleeding associated with deficiencies in platelet number or function. In surgery, general patterns (in function of pre-surgery platelet count) can be adopted in most of the indications for platelets. In emergency situations, and in some particular cases (related to the patient, the type of operation, etc.), the transfusion procedure depends on the team's experience, the results of the available clinical and biological tests, and the drugs. Strict monitoring is required during the transfusion procedure. The efficacy of the transfusion must be controlled 1 h and 24 hours after the transfusion, and a number of factors must be assessed, namely the immunological impact of the transfusion (on red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets) and the occurrence of infectious diseases transmitted via transfusion. In addition, for a possible future transfusion, a strategy must be proposed.

  12. Thromboelastometry versus standard coagulation tests versus restrictive protocol to guide blood transfusion prior to central venous catheterization in cirrhosis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Neto, Ary Serpa; do Prado, Rogerio Ruscitto; Silva, Eliezer; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Correa, Thiago Domingos

    2017-02-27

    Liver failure patients have traditionally been empirically transfused prior to invasive procedures. Blood transfusion is associated with immunologic and nonimmunologic reactions, increased risk of adverse outcomes and high costs. Scientific evidence supporting empirical transfusion is lacking, and the best approach for blood transfusion prior to invasive procedures in cirrhotic patients has not been established so far. The aim of this study is to compare three transfusion strategies (routine coagulation test-guided - ordinary or restrictive, or thromboelastometry-guided) prior to central venous catheterization in critically ill patients with cirrhosis. Design and setting: a double-blinded, parallel-group, single-center, randomized controlled clinical trial in a tertiary private hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. adults (aged 18 years or older) admitted to the intensive care unit with cirrhosis and an indication for central venous line insertion. Patients will be randomly assigned to three groups for blood transfusion strategy prior to central venous catheterization: standard coagulation tests-based, thromboelastometry-based, or restrictive. The primary efficacy endpoint will be the proportion of patients transfused with any blood product prior to central venous catheterization. The primary safety endpoint will be the incidence of major bleeding. Secondary endpoints will be the proportion of transfusion of fresh frozen plasma, platelets and cryoprecipitate; infused volume of blood products; hemoglobin and hematocrit before and after the procedure; intensive care unit and hospital length of stay; 28-day and hospital mortality; incidence of minor bleeding; transfusion-related adverse reactions; and cost analysis. This study will evaluate three strategies to guide blood transfusion prior to central venous line placement in severely ill patients with cirrhosis. We hypothesized that thromboelastometry-based and/or restrictive protocols are safe and would significantly

  13. Analysis of economic and social costs of adverse events associated with blood transfusions in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribed-Sánchez, Borja; González-Gaya, Cristina; Varea-Díaz, Sara; Corbacho-Fabregat, Carlos; Bule-Farto, Isabel; Pérez de-Oteyza, Jaime

    2018-02-16

    To calculate, for the first time, the direct and social costs of transfusion-related adverse events in order to include them in the National Healthcare System's budget, calculation and studies. In Spain more than 1,500 patients yearly are diagnosed with such adverse events. Blood transfusion-related adverse events recorded yearly in Spanish haemovigilance reports were studied retrospectively (2010-2015). The adverse events were coded according to the classification of Diagnosis-Related Groups. The direct healthcare costs were obtained from public information sources. The productivity loss (social cost) associated with adverse events was calculated using the human capital and hedonic salary methodologies. In 2015, 1,588 patients had adverse events that resulted in direct health care costs (4,568,914€) and social costs due to hospitalization (200,724€). Three adverse reactions resulted in patient death (at a social cost of 1,364,805€). In total, the cost of blood transfusion-related adverse events was 6,134,443€ in Spain. For the period 2010-2015: the trends show a reduction in the total amount of transfusions (2 vs. 1.91M€; -4.4%). The number of adverse events increased (822 vs. 1,588; +93%), as well as their related direct healthcare cost (3.22 vs. 4.57M€; +42%) and the social cost of hospitalization (110 vs 200M€; +83%). Mortality costs decreased (2.65 vs. 1.36M€; -48%). This is the first time that the costs of post-transfusion adverse events have been calculated in Spain. These new figures and trends should be taken into consideration in any cost-effectiveness study or trial of new surgical techniques or sanitary policies that influence blood transfusion activities. Copyright © 2018 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Transfusion thresholds and other strategies for guiding allogeneic red blood cell transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jeffrey L; Carless, Paul A; Hebert, Paul C

    2012-04-18

    Most clinical practice guidelines recommend restrictive red cell transfusion practices, with the goal of minimising exposure to allogeneic blood. The purpose of this review is to compare clinical outcomes in patients randomised to restrictive versus liberal transfusion thresholds (triggers). To examine the evidence for the effect of transfusion thresholds on the use of allogeneic and/or autologous red cell transfusion, and the evidence for any effect on clinical outcomes. We identified trials by searching; The Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register (searched 01 Feb 2011), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials 2011, issue 1 (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (Ovid) 1948 to January Week 3 2011, EMBASE (Ovid) 1980 to 2011 (Week 04), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (1970 to Feb 2011), ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index- Science (1990 to Feb 2011). We checked reference lists of other published reviews and relevant papers to identify any additional trials. Controlled trials in which patients were randomised to an intervention group or to a control group. Trials were included where intervention groups were assigned on the basis of a clear transfusion 'trigger', described as a haemoglobin (Hb) or haematocrit (Hct) level below which a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion was to be administered. Risk ratios of requiring allogeneic blood transfusion, transfused blood volumes and other clinical outcomes were pooled across trials, using a random effects model. Data extraction and assessment of the risk of bias was performed by two people. Nineteen trials involving a total of 6264 patients were identified, and were similar enough that the results could be combined. Restrictive transfusion strategies reduced the risk of receiving a RBC transfusion by 39% (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.72). This equates to an average absolute risk reduction (ARR) of 34% (95% CI 24% to 45%). The volume of RBCs transfused was reduced on average by 1

  15. Current trends in platelet transfusions practice: The role of ABO-RhD and human leukocyte antigen incompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Valsami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet transfusions have contributed to the revolutionary modern treatment of hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. Despite the long-term application of platelet transfusion in therapeutics, all aspects of their optimal use (i.e., in cases of ABO and/or Rh (D incompatibility have not been definitively determined yet. We reviewed the available data on transfusion practices and outcome in ABO and RhD incompatibility and platelet refractoriness due to anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA antibodies. Transfusion of platelets with major ABO-incompatibility is related to reduced posttransfusion platelet (PLT count increments, compared to ABO-identical and minor, but still are equally effective in preventing clinical bleeding. ABO-minor incompatible transfusions pose the risk of an acute hemolytic reaction of the recipient that is not always related to high anti-A, B donor titers. ABO-identical PLT transfusion seems to be the most effective and safest therapeutic strategy. Exclusive ABO-identical platelet transfusion policy could be feasible, but alternative approaches could facilitate platelet inventory management. Transfusion of platelets from RhD positive donors to RhD negative patients is considered to be effective and safe though is associated with low rate of anti-D alloimmunization due to contaminating red blood cells. The prevention of D alloimmunization is recommended only for women of childbearing age. HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of platelet refractoriness. Managing patients with refractoriness with cross-matched or HLA-matched platelets is the current practice although data are still lacking for the efficacy of this practice in terms of clinical outcome. Leukoreduction contributes to the reduction of both HLA and anti-D alloimmunization.

  16. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: a change of perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, A. P.; Schultz, M. J.; Juffermans, N. P.

    2009-01-01

    Two decades ago, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was considered a rare complication of transfusion medicine. Nowadays, TRALI has emerged as the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality, presumably as a consequence of reaching international agreement on defining TRALI with

  17. Blood Discards in a Nigerian Transfusion Service Centre: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood discards have not attracted much attention in transfusion practice in Nigeria, where pre-donation screening is the practice in most health facilities with its attendant deferral of donors reactive to transfusion transmissible infections. The National Blood Transfusion Service of Nigeria lays emphasis on ...

  18. Red blood cell transfusion during septic shock in the ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Smith, S H; Carlsen, S

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) remains controversial in patients with septic shock, but current practice is unknown. Our aim was to evaluate RBC transfusion practice in septic shock in the intensive care unit (ICU), and patient characteristics and outcome associated with RBC transfusion....

  19. Transfusion associated hepatitis B virus infection among sickle cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Transfusion of blood products is a recognised way of transmitting infections particularly viruses. The extent to which blood transfusion contributes to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections in transfused patients with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) has been found to be 20% in Lagos, Nigeria. Mamman in Zaria however ...

  20. Blood Transfusion In Surgical Children: The Advantages And Hazards

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increasing opposition to blood transfusion makes the management of surgical children who require blood very challenging. This retrospective study reviews records of blood transfusion so as to determine the advantages and hazards in surgical children. The advantages and hazards of blood transfusion in surgical ...

  1. Anemia of prematurity : time for a change in transfusion management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khodabux, Chantal Muriel

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we investigated clinical effects of allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusions in premature infants, different transfusion volumes in relation to neonatal outcome in premature infants and the use of autologous cord blood (CB) as an alternative for allogeneic transfusions. Despite

  2. Review of autologous blood transfusion at the Kenyatta National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autologous blood transfusion refers to transfusion of blood and/or blood components that are donated by the intended recipient (1). It is considered as one of the safest methods of blood transfusion (1,2). Different types of autologous blood include: preoperative blood deposit, preoperative haemodilution,intraope.

  3. Transfusion transmitted dengue: One donor infects two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Farheen; Nasir, Nadia; Moiz, Bushra

    2017-04-01

    Dengue virus can be transmitted via blood transfusion. We report an interesting case where two surgical patients developed possible transfusion transmitted dengue when transfused blood components of the same donor. Dengue remains a threat to blood supply especially in endemic region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical and immunological aspects of pretransplant blood transfusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waanders, Marloes Maria

    2009-01-01

    Blood transfusions can lead to immunization or tolerance in the recipient. The latter is characterized by an improved transplant outcome after pretransplant blood transfusions. First observations of improved kidney graft outcome after blood transfusion date 35 years back, however no exclusive

  5. Liberal transfusion strategies still the trend in burn surgery | Allorto ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Blood is a limited resource in middle-income countries such as South Africa. Transfusion is associated with complications and expense. We aimed to understand our transfusion practices in burn surgery as well as ascertain the opinion of a broader group of surgeons and anaesthetists regarding transfusion ...

  6. Blood Transfusion Strategies in Patients Undergoing Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Soo Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO is frequently associated with bleeding and coagulopathy complications, which may lead to the need for transfusion of multiple blood products. However, blood transfusions are known to increase morbidity and mortality, as well as hospital cost, in critically ill patients. In current practice, patients on ECMO receive a transfusion, on average, of 1-5 packed red blood cells (RBCs/day, with platelet transfusion accounting for the largest portion of transfusion volume. Generally, adult patients require more transfusions than neonates or children, and patients receiving venovenous ECMO for respiratory failure tend to need smaller transfusion volumes compared to those receiving venoarterial ECMO for cardiac failure. Observation studies have reported that a higher transfusion volume was associated with increased mortality. To date, the evidence for transfusion in patients undergoing ECMO is limited; most knowledge on transfusion strategies was extrapolated from studies in critically ill patients. However, current data support a restrictive blood transfusion strategy for ECMO patients, and a low transfusion trigger seems to be safe and reasonable.

  7. Unexpected effects of transfusion in the critically ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straat, M.

    2016-01-01

    Since the first recorded successful blood transfusion was performed in 1665 and the first Intensive Care Unit (ICU) was founded in 1952, a transfusion has gradually become a common medical procedure in the ICU. However, recent studies have shown an association between transfusion and adverse

  8. An audit of blood transfusion in elective neuro-surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Bhatnagar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurosurgery is generally believed to be associated with major blood loss and large volumes transfusion of blood and blood product. Recent advances in neurosurgical techniques and concepts relating to blood transfusions have helped to decrease the need for intraoperative transfusions. In the present audit conducted in an advanced tertiary neurological centre performing the entire range of neurosurgery, 31% of patients undergoing surgery required blood product transfusion. Surgery on inracranial tumors was associated with a significantly higher blood loss (P< 0.006 and transfusion than surgery on other lesions. Spinal surgery re-quired the lowest rates of transfusion. Among the intracranial tumors, meningiomas required the highest vol-umes of transfusion (P< 0.001. Rates of blood transfusion in paediatric patients were the same as those for the entire group. In children less than 15 years, surgery for intracranial tumors and craniosynostosis were the main procedures requiring blood transfusion, while no blood transfusion was required for surgical procedures for hydrocephalus and spinal myelomeningoceles. Single unit transfusions, which accounted for 34% of all blood products transfused, were more frequent in paediatric patients (22 out of 45 in children ≤15 years and intrac-ranial tumors(24 out of 45.

  9. Hepatitis C and blood transfusion among children attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-06-02

    Jun 2, 2013 ... Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) accounts for 90% of post-transfusion hepatitis. In Uganda, there has been limited research ... Of these, 159 (65%) had a history of blood transfusion. Among the transfused, five patients were .... 6.4 computer software package. Analysis was done using SPSS Version 11,.

  10. Survey of blood transfusion needs in a tertiary Nigerian institute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Inappropriate blood transfusion has been reported from all over the world. Objectives: This survey examined the use of blood and blood products in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital with a view of assessing appropriateness of transfusion, so as to suggest ways of minimizing inappropriate transfusion if they occur ...

  11. Why was this transfusion given? Identifying clinical indications for blood transfusion in health care data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Hoeven LR

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Loan R van Hoeven,1,2 Aukje L Kreuger,3,4 Kit CB Roes,1 Peter F Kemper,2,4 Hendrik Koffijberg,5 Floris J Kranenburg,3,4,6 Jan MM Rondeel,7 Mart P Janssen1,2 1Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 2Transfusion Technology Assessment Department, Sanquin Research, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 3Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; 4Center for Clinical Transfusion Research, Sanquin Research, Leiden, the Netherlands; 5Department of Health Technology & Services Research, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands; 6Department of Intensive Care, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; 7Department of Clinical Chemistry, Isala, Zwolle, the Netherlands Background: To enhance the utility of transfusion data for research, ideally every transfusion should be linked to a primary clinical indication. In electronic patient records, many diagnostic and procedural codes are registered, but unfortunately, it is usually not specified which one is the reason for transfusion. Therefore, a method is needed to determine the most likely indication for transfusion in an automated way.Study design and methods: An algorithm to identify the most likely transfusion indication was developed and evaluated against a gold standard based on the review of medical records for 234 cases by 2 experts. In a second step, information on misclassification was used to fine-tune the initial algorithm. The adapted algorithm predicts, out of all data available, the most likely indication for transfusion using information on medical specialism, surgical procedures, and diagnosis and procedure dates relative to the transfusion date.Results: The adapted algorithm was able to predict 74.4% of indications in the sample correctly (extrapolated to the full data set 75.5%. A kappa

  12. Massive transfusion protocols: current best practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu YM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yen-Michael S Hsu,1 Thorsten Haas,2 Melissa M Cushing1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: Massive transfusion protocols (MTPs are established to provide rapid blood replacement in a setting of severe hemorrhage. Early optimal blood transfusion is essential to sustain organ perfusion and oxygenation. There are many variables to consider when establishing an MTP, and studies have prospectively evaluated different scenarios and patient populations to establish the best practices to attain improved patient outcomes. The establishment and utilization of an optimal MTP is challenging given the ever-changing patient status during resuscitation efforts. Much of the MTP literature comes from the trauma population, due to the fact that massive hemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable trauma-related death. As we come to further understand the positive and negative clinical impacts of transfusion-related factors, massive transfusion practice can be further refined. This article will first discuss specific MTPs targeting different patient populations and current relevant international guidelines. Then, we will examine a wide selection of therapeutic products to support MTPs, including newly available products and the most suitable of the traditional products. Lastly, we will discuss the best design for an MTP, including ratio-based MTPs and MTPs based on the use of point-of-care coagulation diagnostic tools. Keywords: hemorrhage, MTP, antifibrinolytics, coagulopathy, trauma, ratio, logistics, guidelines, hemostatic

  13. Red blood cell alloimmunization after blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Henk

    2008-01-01

    Current pretransfusion policy requires the patients’ serum to be tested for the presence of irregular red blood cell antibodies. In case of an antibody, red blood cells lacking the corresponding antigen are transfused after an antiglobulin crossmatch. The aim of the studies in this thesis is

  14. Transfusion Transmissible Infections among Voluntary Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: HIV1&2, HBsAg, anti-HCV and syphilis antibody are mandatory disease marker tests of Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTIs) conducted on every donated unit of blood in Zambia. Blood is donated by first time voluntary donors and repeat/regular donors of ages between 16 and 65 years. Both first time ...

  15. Prevalence of exchange blood transfusion in severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Exchange blood transfusion (EBT) is carried out for the treatment of conditions presenting with severe hyperbilirubinaemia and anaemia, such as ABO incompatibility, sepsis, prematurity and birth trauma among others. While it is fast being abandoned as treatment modality for severe neonatal jaundice in the ...

  16. Intraoperative transfusion threshold and tissue oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K; Dahl, B; Johansson, P I

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion with allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) may be needed to maintain oxygen delivery during major surgery, but the appropriate haemoglobin (Hb) concentration threshold has not been well established. We hypothesised that a higher level of Hb would be associated with improved subcutaneous...

  17. 1. Transfusion Transmissible Infections among Voluntary Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    ABSTRACT. Background: HIV1&2, HBsAg, anti-HCV and syphilis antibody are mandatory disease marker tests of Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTIs) conducted on every donated unit of blood in Zambia. Blood is donated by first time voluntary donors and repeat/regular donors ofages between 16 and 65 years.

  18. Utilization Management in the Blood Transfusion Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Jeremy Ryan Andrew; Dzik, Walter “Sunny”

    2015-01-01

    The scope of activity of the Blood Transfusion Service (BTS) makes it unique among the clinical laboratories. The combination of therapeutic and diagnostic roles necessitates a multi-faceted approach to utilization management in the BTS. We present our experience in utilization management in large academic medical center. PMID:24080431

  19. Detrimental effects of perioperative blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    cell concentrate, or leucocyte- and buffy coat-reduced red cells in artificial medium or their own plasma, may reduce postoperative immunosuppression. It was also anticipated that the use of autologous blood might minimize the risk of perioperative transfusion, but studies have unexpectedly shown...

  20. Blood transfusions and prognosis in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busch, O. R.; Hop, W. C.; Hoynck van Papendrecht, M. A.; Marquet, R. L.; Jeekel, J.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusions may adversely affect the prognosis of patients treated surgically for cancer, although definite proof of this adverse effect has not been reported. METHODS: We carried out a randomized trial to investigate whether the prognosis in patients with colorectal cancer would

  1. Anemia, apnea of prematurity, and blood transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagol, Kelley; Lake, Douglas E; Vergales, Brooke; Moorman, Marion E; Paget-Brown, Alix; Lee, Hoshik; Rusin, Craig G; Delos, John B; Clark, Matthew T; Moorman, J Randall; Kattwinkel, John

    2012-09-01

    To compare the frequency and severity of apneic events in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants before and after blood transfusions using continuous electronic waveform analysis. We continuously collected waveform, heart rate, and oxygen saturation data from patients in all 45 neonatal intensive care unit beds at the University of Virginia for 120 weeks. Central apneas were detected using continuous computer processing of chest impedance, electrocardiographic, and oximetry signals. Apnea was defined as respiratory pauses of >10, >20, and >30 seconds when accompanied by bradycardia (apnea rates for the previous 12 hours were quantified and differences for 12 hours before and after transfusion were compared. In the hematocrit cohort, 1453 hematocrit values from all VLBW infants admitted and breathing spontaneously during the time period were retrieved, and the association of hematocrit and apnea in the next 12 hours was tested using logistic regression. Sixty-seven infants had 110 blood transfusions during times when complete monitoring data were available. Transfusion was associated with fewer computer-detected apneic events (P apnea occurring within 12 hours increased with decreasing hematocrit values (P apnea in VLBW infants, and apneas are less frequent at higher hematocrits. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Perioperative Haemorrhage and Transfusion in Musculoskeletal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgery for benign bone tumors accounted for 55% of the procedures performed, while primary malignant lesions were the diagnosis in 41% of cases. ... Adoption of standard blood management strategies by individual units, the use of autologous blood transfusion, and recombinant erythropoietin may reduce the attendant ...

  3. Preoperative Anaemia and Blood Transfusion Requirements in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The complications of anemia and its' treatment include pulmonary oedema, hypotension, prolong recovery and urticaria (n=35 i.e. 44%, p<0.05). A significant number of patients of paediatric age undergoing surgery and general anaesthesia who had preoperative anaemia required blood transfusion when compared to ...

  4. Phototherapy and exchange transfusion for neonatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    phototherapy and exchange transfusion in newborn infants in South Africa reflects the same lack of consensus that exists ... level of the phototherapy it must have been low because he used a bank of only 12 white fluorescent bulbs. ..... increasing the intensity did not result in significantly faster rates of fall of bilirubin levels.

  5. blood transfusion requirement during caesarean delivery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pregnant patient. Factors predisposing to increased risk for blood transfusion identified from previous studies include preoperative anaemia, previous Caesarean ... abnormalities such as bone marrow depression, anaemia9 and ... study which could fall into either of the following conditions: satisfactory post- operative ...

  6. European strategies against the parasite transfusion risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink, H. W.

    2005-01-01

    Protozoal infections are endemic in mainly tropical low income countries, affecting millions of people. Malaria, American trypanosomiasis (Trypanosoma cruzi/Chagas disease) and protozoal tickborne diseases (e.g. Babesia) can be efficiently transmitted by transfusion of cellular blood components. In

  7. Complications following an unnecessary peri-operative plasma transfusion and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay S Raval

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma is used to correct coagulopathies, but not all coagulation abnormalities are clinically significant enough to require correction before an invasive procedure. We report an 82-year-old female who, in response to a mildly prolonged INR of unknown etiology, was unnecessarily transfused with plasma in advance of elective surgery. The patient suffered a moderately severe transfusion reaction, including hives and voice hoarseness, which caused a 4-week delay in her surgery. This delay and adverse reaction could have been avoided had the principles of evidence based plasma therapy, which we herein review, been followed and if the etiology of the mildly elevated INR been investigated before the day of her surgery.

  8. The risk of transfusion-transmitted viral infections at the Gabonese National Blood Transfusion Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rerambiah, Leonard Kounegnigan; Rerambiah, Laurence Essola; Bengone, Calixte; Djoba Siawaya, Joel F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood transfusions carry the risk of transmitting blood-borne infections. In contrast to the situation in the developed world, there is a limited number of studies examining this problem in sub-Saharan Africa. In this study we aimed to calculate the risks of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection from units of blood issued by the Gabonese Blood Transfusion Centre between 2009 and 2011. Materials and methods All the donations were tested for infectious diseases and the seroconversion incidence rates of HIV, HBV and HCV were calculated. The residual risk of transfusion-associated transmission for each virus was calculated by multiplying the seroconversion rates by the window period expressed in fractions of a year. Results The risks of becoming infected with HIV, HCV, and HBV in subjects receiving units of blood from the Gabonese Blood Transfusion Centre were 64.7, 207.94 and 534.53 per million donations, respectively. Conclusions This study, which is the first to quantify the true risks of transfusion-transmitted infections in Gabon, reveals and confirms the need to reinforce preventative and screening strategies to improve transfusion safety in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:24333085

  9. Serial haematology results in transfused and non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Scheepers

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This prospective longitudinal study investigated the progression of haematological changes in 32 transfused and 54 non-transfused dogs naturally infected with Babesia rossi over the 1st 6 days following diagnosis and treatment. The effect of patient age on the results of complete blood counts was determined. Haematology data were analysed at presentation and at 24 hours, 3 days and 6 days after presentation. Dogs were treated with diminazene aceturate at diagnosis and a blood transfusion was given if deemed clinically required. Mildly to moderately regenerative normocytic normochromic anaemia was observed in all dogs throughout the study period. Transfused dogs more often had an inflammatory leukogram at presentation and at 24 hours, than dogs that were not transfused. In dogs with a left shift, a concurrent normal or decreased segmented neutrophil count was found more commonly than neutrophilia. Severe thrombocytopenia that resolved within a week was common. Blood transfusion alleviated the anaemia, but had no significant effect on white blood cell or platelet responses. Blood cell responses were not significantly influenced by age. In conclusion, the red blood cell and white blood cell responses were less than expected in dogs with babesiosis, given the degree of anaemia and inflammation present. The magnitude of thrombocytopenia and rapid return of the platelet count to normal suggested a possible immune-mediated mechanism for the thrombocytopenia.

  10. Liberal or restrictive transfusion after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Gavin J; Pike, Katie; Rogers, Chris A; Wordsworth, Sarah; Stokes, Elizabeth A; Angelini, Gianni D; Reeves, Barnaby C

    2015-03-12

    Whether a restrictive threshold for hemoglobin level in red-cell transfusions, as compared with a liberal threshold, reduces postoperative morbidity and health care costs after cardiac surgery is uncertain. We conducted a multicenter, parallel-group trial in which patients older than 16 years of age who were undergoing nonemergency cardiac surgery were recruited from 17 centers in the United Kingdom. Patients with a postoperative hemoglobin level of less than 9 g per deciliter were randomly assigned to a restrictive transfusion threshold (hemoglobin level liberal transfusion threshold (hemoglobin level liberal-threshold group. Transfusion rates after randomization were 53.4% and 92.2% in the two groups, respectively. The primary outcome occurred in 35.1% of the patients in the restrictive-threshold group and 33.0% of the patients in the liberal-threshold group (odds ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91 to 1.34; P=0.30); there was no indication of heterogeneity according to subgroup. There were more deaths in the restrictive-threshold group than in the liberal-threshold group (4.2% vs. 2.6%; hazard ratio, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.00 to 2.67; P=0.045). Serious postoperative complications, excluding primary-outcome events, occurred in 35.7% of participants in the restrictive-threshold group and 34.2% of participants in the liberal-threshold group. Total costs did not differ significantly between the groups. A restrictive transfusion threshold after cardiac surgery was not superior to a liberal threshold with respect to morbidity or health care costs. (Funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment program; Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN70923932.).

  11. Design of a Mobile Application for Transfusion Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albornoz, M A; Márquez, S; Rubin, L; Luna, D

    2017-01-01

    One of the most frequent error in transfusion medicine is the failure in verifying the patient's identity prior to transfusion. This paper describes the design and development of a Mobile Application (MA) for transfusion medicine. The app uses barcode and QR reading technology for the verification of the patient's identity and the administration of blood components when making a blood transfusion. Physicians, developers, technicians of transfusion medicine and a User Centered Design team participated in the design. The inclusion of end users was fundamental to get full representativeness of their workflow. The project was based on agile methodologies of project management and software development.

  12. Anemia and Blood Transfusions in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kamran Athar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is common in critically ill patients. As a consequence packed red blood cell (PRBC transfusions are frequent in the critically ill. Over the past two decades a growing body of literature has emerged, linking PRBC transfusion to infections, immunosuppression, organ dysfunction, and a higher mortality rate. However, despite growing evidence that risk of PRBC transfusion outweighs its benefit, significant numbers of critically ill patients still receive PRBC transfusion during their intensive care unit (ICU stay. In this paper, we summarize the current literature concerning the impact of anemia on outcomes in critically ill patients and the potential complications of PRBC transfusions.

  13. Comparison of a commercial blood cross-matching kit to the standard laboratory method for establishing blood transfusion compatibility in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Leo Roa; Streeter, Elizabeth; Malandra, Allison

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of a commercial blood transfusion cross-match kit when compared to the standard laboratory method for establishing blood transfusion compatibility. A prospective observational in intro study performed from July 2009 to July 2013. Private referral veterinary center. Ten healthy dogs, 11 anemic dogs, and 24 previously transfused dogs. None. Forty-five dogs were enrolled in a prospective study in order to compare the standard blood transfusion cross-match technique to a commercial blood transfusion cross-matching kit. These dogs were divided into 3 different groups that included 10 healthy dogs (control group), 11 anemic dogs in need of a blood transfusion, and 24 sick dogs that were previously transfused. Thirty-five dogs diagnosed with anemia secondary to multiple disease processes were cross-matched using both techniques. All dogs cross-matched via the kit had a compatible major and minor result, whereas 16 dogs out of 45 (35%) had an incompatible cross-match result when the standard laboratory technique was performed. The average time to perform the commercial kit was 15 minutes and this was 3 times shorter than the manual cross-match laboratory technique that averaged 45-50 minutes to complete. While the gel-based cross-match kit is quicker and less technically demanding than standard laboratory cross-match procedures, microagglutination and low-grade hemolysis are difficult to identify by using the gel-based kits. This could result in transfusion reactions if the gel-based kits are used as the sole determinant of blood compatibility prior to transfusion. Based on our results, the standard manual cross-match technique remains the gold standard test to determine blood transfusion compatibility. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  14. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Furthermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfusion of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion or irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted

  15. Critical Value Reporting in Transfusion Medicine: A Survey of Communication Practices in US Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Erika M; Nelson, Randin C; Flegel, Willy A; Byrne, Karen M; Booth, Garrett S

    2017-05-01

    While critical value procedures have been adopted in most areas of the clinical laboratory, their use in transfusion medicine has not been reviewed in detail. The results of this study present a comprehensive overview of critical value reporting and communication practices in transfusion medicine in the United States. A web-based survey was developed to collect data on the prevalence of critical value procedures and practices of communicating results. The survey was distributed via email to US hospital-based blood banks. Of 123 facilities surveyed, 84 (68.3%) blood banks had a critical value procedure. From a panel of 23 common blood bank results, nine results were selected by more than 70% of facilities as either a critical value or requiring rapid communication as defined by an alternate procedure. There was overlap among results communicated by facilities with and without a critical value procedure. The most frequently communicated results, such as incompatible crossmatch for RBC units issued uncrossmatched, delay in finding compatible blood due to a clinically significant antibody, and transfusion reaction evaluation suggestive of a serious adverse event, addressed scenarios associated with the leading reported causes of transfusion-related fatalities. American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. [Decreased transfusions in preterm infants with anemia treated with erythropoietin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Catzín, José Francisco; Bolado-García, Patricia Berenice; Gamboa-López, Gonzalo Jesús; Medina-Escobedo, Carolina Elizabeth; Cambranes-Catzima, Leydi Rubí

    2016-01-01

    Treating anemia of prematurity is transfused red blood cells and the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. The aim of this article is to determine the correlation between the number of blood transfusions and the use of recombinant human erythropoietin in preterm infants with anemia. A correlation study was performed in 80 cases of patients with anemia treated with transfusions and erythropoietin, were randomized into two groups: one was treated with transfusions (T) and one with transfusions and erythropoietin (E). Demographic variables, hemoglobin and hematocrit at the beginning and end of treatment and number of transfusions received were measured. The correlation was obtained through Spearman Rho, considering p infants with anemia. Its use does not preclude the transfusion, the patient remains exposed to the risk of communicable diseases in this way.

  17. Filling a gap in transfusion medicine education and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibinga, Cees Th Smit

    2009-10-01

    After the outbreak of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, attention was focused on the restructuring and reorganization of nationally supported safe and sustainable blood supply systems. Networking and human capacity building in transfusion medicine were developed through World Health Organization initiatives. Educational materials were created for the core elements of the blood transfusion chain. However, the management aspects of transfusion medicine as well as applied health science research in transfusion medicine were not addressed. In 2000, the World Health Organization initiated the creation of the Academic Institute for International Development of Transfusion Medicine (IDTM). This would focus on the development of a postgraduate master's course in management of transfusion medicine (MMTM) and the development of research programs for transfusion medicine-related health sciences. The Academic Institute IDTM was created at the University of Groningen Faculty of Medical Sciences, The Netherlands. The MMTM course was thus established, and since September 2007 fourteen fellows from economically restricted countries have entered the course.

  18. Transfusion practice in hip arthroplasty - a nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jans, Øivind; Kehlet, H; Hussain, Zubair Butt

    2011-01-01

    ) in Denmark. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of all patients undergoing THA or RTHA in Denmark in 2008. Primary outcomes were intercentre variation in red blood cell (RBC) transfusion rates and the timing of transfusion related to surgery. Results Six thousand nine hundred......Background and Objectives The optimal transfusion strategy in hip arthroplasty remains controversial despite existing guidelines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the transfusion practice in patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or revision total hip arthroplasty (RTHA...... thirty-two THA patients and 1132 RTHA patients were included for analysis of which 1674 (24%) THA and 689 (61%) RTHA patients received RBC transfusion. Of these, 47% of THA and 73% of RTHA patients received transfusion on the day of surgery. Transfusion rates between centres varied from 7 to 71...

  19. Establishment of the first International Repository for Transfusion-Relevant Bacteria Reference Strains: ISBT Working Party Transfusion-Transmitted Infectious Diseases (WP-TTID), Subgroup on Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Störmer, M.; Arroyo, A.; Brachert, J.; Carrero, H.; Devine, D.; Epstein, J. S.; Gabriel, C.; Gelber, C.; Goodrich, R.; Hanschmann, K.-M.; Heath, D. G.; Jacobs, M. R.; Keil, S.; de Korte, D.; Lambrecht, B.; Lee, C.-K.; Marcelis, J.; Marschner, S.; McDonald, C.; McGuane, S.; McKee, M.; Müller, T. H.; Muthivhi, T.; Pettersson, A.; Radziwon, P.; Ramirez-Arcos, S.; Reesink, H. W.; Rojo, J.; Rood, I.; Schmidt, M.; Schneider, C. K.; Seifried, E.; Sicker, U.; Wendel, S.; Wood, E. M.; Yomtovian, R. A.; Montag, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs) still remains a significant problem in transfusion with potential important clinical consequences, including death. The International Society of Blood Transfusion Working Party on Transfusion-Transmitted Infectious Diseases, Subgroup

  20. Survey of the information given to patients about blood transfusion and the need for consent before transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, M F; Docherty, S; Greenfield, P

    1997-12-01

    There is no current requirement in the United Kingdom to provide patients with information about blood transfusion or to seek their written consent to transfusion. To study patients' attitudes to these questions, a questionnaire survey was carried out on 51 patients during an admission to hospital in which they received a blood transfusion. The patients in this survey, although mostly satisfied about the information they were given before they were transfused, would have welcomed more general information about transfusion, mainly because of concerns about the risk of viral infections. Nearly 40% of patients thought that written consent should be obtained before transfusion, but the ethical and practical aspects of this issue are complex. Further debate would be required before implementation of written consent to transfusion could be considered as a routine policy.

  1. Prediction of Packed Cell Volume after Whole Blood Transfusion in Small Ruminants and South American Camelids: 80 Cases (2006-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luethy, D; Stefanovski, D; Salber, R; Sweeney, R W

    2017-11-01

    Calculation of desired whole blood transfusion volume relies on an estimate of an animal's circulating blood volume, generally accepted to be 0.08 L/kg or 8% of the animal's body weight in kilograms. To use packed cell volume before and after whole blood transfusion to evaluate the accuracy of a commonly used equation to predict packed cell volume after transfusion in small ruminants and South American camelids; to determine the nature and frequency of adverse transfusion reactions in small ruminants and camelids after whole blood transfusion. Fifty-eight small ruminants and 22 alpacas that received whole blood transfusions for anemia. Retrospective case series; medical record review for small ruminants and camelids that received whole blood transfusions during hospitalization. Mean volume of distribution of blood as a fraction of body weight in sheep (0.075 L/kg, 7.5% BW) and goats (0.076 L/kg, 7.6% BW) differed significantly (P camelids is low. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Changing blood transfusion policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupnyckyj, Catherine; Smolarek, Sheryl; Reeves, Colleen; McKeith, Judith; Magnan, Morris

    2014-12-01

    It is often an accepted practice that a 20-gauge-or-larger catheter is used for the safe transfusion of blood in adult patients, but it is unclear what evidence supports this practice. This article tells the story of how a small team of oncology nurses designed and implemented an evidence-based practice project to challenge that convention. A literature search and a consultation with the standards of the American Association of Blood Banks and the Infusion Nurses Society determined that a smaller-than-20-gauge catheter can be used safely to transfuse blood in adults, a discovery that led to a change in policy and practice at the authors' institution.

  3. Detrimental effects of perioperative blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    Evidence suggests that perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion increases the risk of infectious complications after major surgery and of cancer recurrence after curative operation. This has been attributed to immunosuppression. Several authors have suggested that filtered whole blood and/or red...... cell concentrate, or leucocyte- and buffy coat-reduced red cells in artificial medium or their own plasma, may reduce postoperative immunosuppression. It was also anticipated that the use of autologous blood might minimize the risk of perioperative transfusion, but studies have unexpectedly shown...... similar postoperative infectious complications and cancer recurrence and/or survival rates in patients receiving autologous blood donated before operation and those receiving allogeneic blood. Future studies should identify common risk factors associated with blood storage....

  4. Transfusion support in patients with dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-09-01

    Dengue fever has emerged as a global public health problem in the recent decades. The clinical spectrum of the disease ranges from dengue fever to dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. The disease is characterized by increased capillary permeability, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. Thrombocytopenia with hemorrhagic manifestations warrants platelet transfusions. There is lack of evidence-based guidelines for transfusion support in patients with dengue fever. This contributes to inappropriate use of blood components and blood centers constantly face the challenge of inventory management during dengue outbreaks. The current review is aimed to highlight the role of platelets and other blood components in the management of dengue. The review was performed after searching relevant published literature in PubMed, Science Direct, Google scholar and various text books and journal articles.

  5. Detrimental effects of perioperative blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    similar postoperative infectious complications and cancer recurrence and/or survival rates in patients receiving autologous blood donated before operation and those receiving allogeneic blood. Future studies should identify common risk factors associated with blood storage.......Evidence suggests that perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion increases the risk of infectious complications after major surgery and of cancer recurrence after curative operation. This has been attributed to immunosuppression. Several authors have suggested that filtered whole blood and/or red...... cell concentrate, or leucocyte- and buffy coat-reduced red cells in artificial medium or their own plasma, may reduce postoperative immunosuppression. It was also anticipated that the use of autologous blood might minimize the risk of perioperative transfusion, but studies have unexpectedly shown...

  6. Pediatric trauma transfusion and cognitive aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clebone, Anna

    2018-04-01

    Trauma is the most common cause of pediatric mortality. Much of the research that led to life-saving interventions in adults, however, has not been replicated in the pediatric population. Children have important physiologic and anatomic differences from adults, which impact hemostasis and transfusion. Hemorrhage is a leading cause of death in trauma, and children have important differences in their coagulation profiles. Transfusion strategies, including the massive transfusion protocol and use of antifibrinolytics, are still controversial. In addition to the blood that is lost from the injury itself, trauma leads to inflammation and to a dysfunction in hemostasis, causing coagulopathy. In one study in which children suffered from mainly blast and penetrating injuries in a combat setting (PEDTRAX trial), the early administration of tranexamic acid was associated with decreased mortality. Some authors suggest that this result may not apply to blunt trauma, which is much more common in children in noncombat settings. Using thromboelastography to guide the administration of recombinant Factor VIIa has been done in selected cases and may represent a future avenue of research. This article explores new research from the past year in pediatric trauma, starting with the physiologic differences in pediatric red blood cells and coagulation profiles. We also looked at the dramatic change in thinking over the past decade in the tolerable level of anemia in critically ill pediatric patients, as well as scales for determining the need for massive transfusion and exploring if the concepts of damage control resuscitation apply to children. Other strategies, such as avoiding hypothermia, and the selective administration of antifibriniolytics, are important in pediatric trauma as well. Future research that is pediatric focused is needed for the optimal care of our youngest patients.

  7. [Transfusion safety: emergent or hypothetical risks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, P

    2000-02-01

    Three categories of emerging risks are studied: 1) A new variant of Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, different from its sporadic form; limited to the British isles (48 of 51 cases), it affects younger patients, and has a higher duration with a predominance of psychiatric symptoms. Environmental risk factors include a previous stay in the British isles and oral transmission via contaminated food. No link has been made evident between blood component (BC) transfusion and occurrence of the disease. A potential risk exists if its agent is found in blood and peripheral lymphoid tissues and if buffy coat from infected animals has been inoculated intracerebrally. Since 1993, prevention measures have been taken: exclusion of donors with a potential risk as well as transfused donors, systematic leukocyte reduction and implementation of disease surveillance. Excluding donors after a several month-stay in the British Isles is being discussed. 2) Novel hepatitis viruses. Hepatitis G virus (HGV) has been detected in 2-4% of blood donors. Ten percent of patients with chronic non-A-E hepatitis are HGV RNA positive. The incidence of HGV infection is higher than expected from PCR studies. HGV has a high prevalence in the world. Novel DNA non-enveloped virus (TTV) has a normal distribution. Its prevalence varies from 2 to 80%, depending on the country. Although it has not been shown to be aggressive for the liver, prolonged follow-up is required. 3) Human herpes virus 8 (HHV8) is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma in 80% of cases. Its prevalence (0-20%) varies depending on the country. Kaposi's sarcoma has never been reported after BC transfusion. PCR-based viral DNA searches have yielded negative results in 19 poly-transfused subjects. Continuous monitoring is required for recipients at risk (e.g., immunosuppressed). In response to a possible health risk, emerging risks govern the "Precaution Principle", so difficult to implement.

  8. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted

  9. Transfusion in sickle cell disease: experience from a Gujarat centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Vishal; Mistry, Abhishek; Raicha, Bhavesh; Italia, Yazdi; Serjeant, Graham

    2014-03-01

    Following impressions that the use of blood transfusion in sickle cell disease may be inappropriately high, transfusion practice at a major blood bank in an area of high prevalence of sickle cell disease was assessed. Retrospective review of blood usage in sickle cell disease at a major blood bank in south Gujarat in 2010 was conducted with prospective more detailed data collection over 18 wk period (April 7 through August 15) in 2011. The results were compared with transfusion usage in the Jamaican Sickle Cell Clinic. In 2010, this blood bank processed a total of 19,037 units of which 384 (5.2 %) units were for patients with sickle cell disease. Median transfusion use was 1 unit but 16 patients (4.2 %) of those transfused received 10 units or more and five patients received over 20 units. More detailed prospective analysis revealed that most transfusions occurred between ages 5-15 y, 40 % of subjects had pretransfusion hemoglobin levels below 6 g/dL, symptoms were generally vague such as fever, bone pain, weakness and that 26 % denied any specific symptoms. Transfusion usage greatly exceeds that in the Jamaican Sickle Cell Clinic. Transfusion therapy carries risks and cost and more detailed investigation and diagnosis of anemic episodes is necessary to define the role of transfusion among other potential therapies. Eventually, guidelines evolved by Indian specialists should determine the indications for transfusion in sickle cell disease.

  10. Risk Factors for Blood Transfusion With Primary Posterior Lumbar Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basques, Bryce A; Anandasivam, Nidharshan S; Webb, Matthew L; Samuel, Andre M; Lukasiewicz, Adam M; Bohl, Daniel D; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2015-11-01

    Retrospective cohort study. To identify factors associated with blood transfusion for primary posterior lumbar fusion surgery, and to identify associations between blood transfusion and other postoperative complications. Blood transfusion is a relatively common occurrence for patients undergoing primary posterior lumbar fusion. There is limited information available describing which patients are at increased risk for blood transfusion, and the relationship between blood transfusion and short-term postoperative outcomes is poorly characterized. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database was used to identify patients undergoing primary posterior lumbar fusion from 2011 to 2013. Multivariate analysis was used to find associations between patient characteristics and blood transfusion, along with associations between blood transfusion and postoperative outcomes. Out of 4223 patients, 704 (16.7%) had a blood transfusion. Age 60 to 69 (relative risk [RR] 1.6), age greater than equal to 70 (RR 1.7), American Society of Anesthesiologists class greater than equal to 3 (RR 1.1), female sex (RR 1.1), pulmonary disease (RR 1.2), preoperative hematocrit less than 36.0 (RR 2.0), operative time greater than equal to 310 minutes (RR 2.9), 2 levels (RR 1.6), and 3 or more levels (RR 2.1) were independently associated with blood transfusion. Interbody fusion (RR 0.9) was associated with decreased rates of blood transfusion. Receiving a blood transfusion was significantly associated with any complication (RR 1.7), sepsis (RR 2.6), return to the operating room (RR 1.7), deep surgical site infection (RR 2.6), and pulmonary embolism (RR 5.1). Blood transfusion was also associated with an increase in postoperative length of stay of 1.4 days (P blood transfusion while undergoing primary posterior lumbar fusion, and risk factors for these occurrences were characterized. Strategies to minimize blood loss might be considered in these

  11. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: transfusion challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros MM

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Melca M O Barros, Dante M Langhi Jr, José O Bordin Department of Clinical and Experimental Oncology, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA is defined as the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs in the presence of anti-RBC autoantibodies and/or complement. Classification of AIHA is based on the optimal auto-RBC antibody reactivity temperatures and includes warm, cold-reactive, mixed AIHA, and drug-induced AIHA subtypes. AIHA is a rare disease, and recommendations for transfusion are based mainly on results from retrospective data and relatively small cohort studies, including heterogeneous patient samples or single case reports. In this article, we will review the challenges and solutions to safely transfuse AIHA patients. We will reflect on the indication for transfusion in AIHA and the difficulty in the accomplishment of immunohematological procedures for the selection of the safest and most compatible RBC units. Keywords: hemolytic anemia, RBC autoantibodies, autoimmunity, hemolysis, direct ­antiglobulin test

  12. Sixty years of blood transfusion: a memoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Paul J

    2012-07-01

    Paul Schmidt was born in 1925 into the Greatest Generation. Events during military service decided him on the study of medicine. Early research training in red cell preservation that continued during his medical studies opened a 20-year career at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Beginning in 1954 at the Blood Bank of the NIH Clinical Center, he had exposure to the pioneers who had translated transfusion's wartime beginnings into civilian applications. Work inside the unique NIH clinical research atmosphere together with many of his students provided a fertile field for the growth of what has become transfusion medicine. Topics described range from early studies on platelets and on hepatitis to the background in Washington health politics leading to the National Blood Policy. National and global organizational activity and a second career in community blood service added to his 65 years of experience. The story as transfusion history is presented as a template for future progress. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Approaches to minimize infection risk in blood banking and transfusion practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Paul F; Annen, Kyle; Ramsey, Glenn

    2011-02-01

    The use of blood donor history and state-of-the-art FDA-licensed serological and nucleic acid testing (NAT) assays have greatly reduced the "infectious window" for several transfusion-transmitted pathogens. Currently transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV), hepatitis viruses and West Nile Virus are rare events. The seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus in the donor population is high and cytomegalovirus infection can cause significant complications for immunocompromised recipients of blood transfusion. Careful use of CMV seronegative blood resources and leukoreduction of blood products are able to prevent most CMV infections in these patients. Currently, bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates is the greatest remaining infectious disease risk in blood transfusion. Specialized donor collection procedures reduce the risk of bacterial contamination of blood products; blood culture and surrogate testing procedures are used to detect potential bacterially contaminated platelet products prior to transfusion. A rapid quantitative immunoassay is now available to test for the presence of lipotechoic acid and lipopolysaccharide bacterial products prior to platelet transfusion. Attention has now turned to emerging infectious diseases including variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, dengue, babesiosis, Chagas' disease and malaria. Challenges are presented to identify and prevent transmission of these agents. Several methods are being used or in development to reduce infectivity of blood products, including solvent-detergent processing of plasma and nucleic acid cross-linking via photochemical reactions with methylene blue, riboflavin, psoralen and alkylating agents. Several opportunities exist to further improve blood safety through advances in infectious disease screening and pathogen inactivation methods.

  14. Safety and efficacy of allogeneic umbilical cord red blood cell transfusion for children with severe anaemia in a Kenyan hospital: an open-label single-arm trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassall, Oliver W; Thitiri, Johnstone; Fegan, Greg; Hamid, Fauzat; Mwarumba, Salim; Denje, Douglas; Wambua, Kongo; Mandaliya, Kishor; Maitland, Kathryn; Bates, Imelda

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background In sub-Saharan Africa, children are frequently admitted with severe anaemia needing an urgent blood transfusion, but blood is often unavailable. When conventional blood supplies are inadequate, allogeneic umbilical cord blood could be a feasible alternative. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of cord blood transfusion in children with severe anaemia. Methods Between June 26, 2007, and May 20, 2008, 413 children needing an urgent blood transfusion were admitted to Kilifi District Hospital in Kenya. Of these, 87 children were eligible for our study—ie, younger than 12 years, no signs of critical illness, and haemoglobin 100 g/L or lower (if aged 3 months or younger) or 40 g/L or lower (if older than 3 months). Cord blood was donated at Coast Provincial General Hospital, Mombasa, and screened for transfusion-transmitted infections and bacterial contamination. Red blood cells were stored vertically at 2–6°C to enable sedimentation. After transfusion, children were monitored closely for adverse events and followed up for 28 days. The primary outcome measure was the frequency and nature of adverse reactions associated with the transfusion. Secondary outcomes were the changes in haemoglobin concentrations 24 h and 28 days after transfusion, compared with pretransfusion levels. This trial is registered on ISRCTN.com, number ISRCTN66687527. Findings Of the 87 children eligible for the study, cord blood was unavailable for 24, six caregivers declined consent, and two children were withdrawn before transfusion. Therefore, 55 children received umbilical cord red blood cells from 74 donations. Ten (18%) children had ten serious adverse events and 43 (78%) had 94 adverse events; the most frequent adverse events were anaemia (n=14), weight loss (n=12), and vomiting (n=10). An independent expert panel judged none of these adverse events to be probably or certainly caused by the cord blood transfusion (one-sided 97·5% CI 0–6·5

  15. A preliminary study of placental umbilical cord whole blood transfusion in under resourced patients with malaria in the background of anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Niranjan

    2006-03-01

    two units of freshly collected cord blood transfusion was 0.5 gm/dl to 1.6 gm/dl. Each patient received two to six units of freshly collected cord blood transfusion (two units at a time, depending on availability and compatibility. No clinical immunological or non-immunological reaction has been encountered in this series. Conclusion Properly screened cord blood is safe for transfusion, in victims of severe malarial anaemia who need transfusion support.

  16. A therapeutic-only versus prophylactic platelet transfusion strategy for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crighton, Gemma L; Estcourt, Lise J; Wood, Erica M; Trivella, Marialena; Doree, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon

    2015-01-01

    whether there was any difference in the number of participants with severe or life-threatening bleeding between a therapeutic-only transfusion policy and a prophylactic platelet transfusion policy (two RCTs; 801 participants; risk ratio (RR) 4.91, 95% CI 0.86 to 28.12; low-quality evidence). Two RCTs (801 participants) reported time to first bleeding episode. As there was considerable heterogeneity between the studies, we were unable to perform a meta-analysis. Both studies individually found that time to first bleeding episode was shorter in the therapeutic-only group compared with the prophylactic platelet transfusion group. There was insufficient evidence to determine any difference in all-cause mortality within 30 days of the start of the study using a therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy compared with a prophylactic platelet transfusion policy (two RCTs; 629 participants). Mortality was a rare event, and therefore larger studies would be needed to establish the effect of these alternative strategies. There was a clear reduction in the number of platelet transfusions per participant in the therapeutic-only arm (two RCTs, 991 participants; standardised mean reduction of 0.50 platelet transfusions per participant, 95% CI −0.63 to −0.37; moderate-quality evidence). None of the studies reported quality of life. There was no evidence of any difference in the frequency of adverse events, such as transfusion reactions, between a therapeutic-only and prophylactic platelet transfusion policy (two RCTs; 991 participants; RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.68), although the confidence intervals were wide. Authors’ conclusions We found low- to moderate-grade evidence that a therapeutic-only platelet transfusion policy is associated with increased risk of bleeding when compared with a prophylactic platelet transfusion policy in haematology patients who are thrombocytopenic due to myelosuppressive chemotherapy or HSCT. There is insufficient evidence to determine any difference

  17. A computer-assisted transfusion management system and changed transfusion practices contribute to appropriate management of blood components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsaka, Akimichi; Abe, Katsumi; Ohsawa, Toshiya; Miyake, Noriko; Sugita, Shio; Tojima, Ikuko

    2008-08-01

    ABO-incompatible blood transfusions attributable to inadequate identification (ID) of the patient or the blood unit are among the most serious of transfusion hazards. It has been unclear whether a computer-assisted transfusion management system connected to a bar code ID system could contribute to the appropriate management of blood components, as well as to the prevention of mistransfusions. A transfusion management system has been developed that links the hospital information system, a bar code patient-blood unit ID system, and an automated device for pretransfusion testing. The guidelines for issuing blood components from the transfusion service were also changed. The appropriateness of blood management was evaluated by monitoring the time to initiate transfusion after issuing a blood unit from the transfusion service (time after issuing [TAI]) and by calculating the number of units issued and subsequently returned, as well as the rate of date-expired red cell (RBC) components. From July 2002 to December 2006, a total of 49,974 blood components were transfused without a single mistransfusion. The monitoring of TAI and the notice to use the issued blood immediately had the effect of shortening TAI in the inpatient ward. The number of issued and subsequently returned RBC components, as well as the rate of date-expired RBC components, decreased significantly after the introduction of the system. A computer-assisted transfusion management system and changing transfusion practices appear useful in preventing mistransfusions and in contributing to the appropriate management of blood components.

  18. Blood transfusion indications in neurosurgical patients: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwe, Shefali; Chung, Lawrance K; Lagman, Carlito; Voth, Brittany L; Barnette, Natalie E; Elhajjmoussa, Lekaa; Yang, Isaac

    2017-04-01

    Neurosurgical procedures can be complicated by significant blood losses that have the potential to decrease tissue perfusion to critical brain tissue. Red blood cell transfusion is used in a variety of capacities both inside, and outside, of the operating room to prevent untoward neurologic damage. However, evidence-based guidelines concerning thresholds and indications for transfusion in neurosurgery remain limited. Consequently, transfusion practices in neurosurgical patients are highly variable and based on institutional experiences. Recently, a paradigm shift has occurred in neurocritical intensive care units, whereby restrictive transfusion is increasingly favored over liberal transfusion but the ideal strategy remains in clinical equipoise. The authors of this study perform a systematic review of the literature with the objective of capturing the changing landscape of blood transfusion indications in neurosurgical patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Indications and Effects of Plasma Transfusions in Critically Ill Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karam, Oliver; Demaret, Pierre; Shefler, Alison

    2015-01-01

    : To identify patient characteristics and to characterize indications leading to plasma transfusions in critically ill children, and to assess the effect of plasma transfusions on coagulation tests. METHODS: Point-prevalence study in 101 pediatric intensive care units in 21 countries, on 6 predefined weeks. All......RATIONALE: Plasma transfusions are frequently prescribed for critically ill children, although their indications lack a strong evidence base. Plasma transfusions are largely driven by physician conceptions of need, and these are poorly documented in pediatric intensive care patients. OBJECTIVES...... critically ill children admitted to a participating unit were included if they received at least one plasma transfusion. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: During the 6 study weeks, 13,192 children were eligible. Among these, 443 (3.4%) received at least one plasma transfusion and were included. The primary...

  20. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    OpenAIRE

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approache...

  1. Testing of Some Canine Blood Types in Transfusion Compatibility Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Ognean

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood types were determined using SHIGETA (n=136 and DEA1.1 (n=25 kits, in two groups of dogs, consisting of patients that underwent blood transfusions and healthy donors. The tests were conducted in accordance with the procedures established by the manufacturers, using specific monoclonal antibodies kits, heparinized blood for the tube agglutination (TUBE and slide (SLIDE methods, and EDTA treated blood for the CARD and chromatographic (CHROM methods. The clear expression of tube agglutination reaction in the SHIGETA kit provided a good detection of antigens. Positive reactions with anti-DEA1.1 were clear and evident with the CHROM test. SHIGETA tests revealed a predominance 1.1B (47.05% of blood type, common in Rotweilers (81.81% and Romanian Shepherds (73.68% and group 1(-B (24.26%, frequently found in German Shepherds (54.16%, these also representing an important source of compatible blood. DEA1.1 type test, revealed a high frequency of positive dogs (75%, associated with lower number of potential donors. Extrapolation of SHIGETA groups into the DEA system, confirmed the 1(-B positive dogs as DEA 1.1 negative, and their prevalence in German Shepherds also confirmed their known tendency to be “ideal donors”. The CHROME test showed a good efficiency in auto agglutination control and detecting DEA1.1 positive dogs, including patients with severe forms of anemia.

  2. Hydroxyurea for reducing blood transfusion in non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Wai Cheng; Ho, Jacqueline J; Loh, C Khai; Viprakasit, Vip

    2016-10-18

    Non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia is a subset of inherited haemoglobin disorders characterised by reduced production of the beta globin chain of the haemoglobin molecule leading to anaemia of varying severity. Although blood transfusion is not a necessity for survival, it is required when episodes of chronic anaemia occur. This chronic anaemia can impair growth and affect quality of life. People with non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia suffer from iron overload due to their body's increased capability of absorbing iron from food sources. Iron overload becomes more pronounced in those requiring blood transfusion. People with a higher foetal haemoglobin level have been found to require fewer blood transfusions. Hydroxyurea has been used to increase foetal haemoglobin level; however, its efficacy in reducing transfusion, chronic anaemia complications and its safety need to be established. To assess the effectiveness, safety and appropriate dose regimen of hydroxyurea in people with non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia (haemoglobin E combined with beta thalassaemia and beta thalassaemia intermedia). We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of relevant journals. We also searched ongoing trials registries and the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 30 April 2016. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of hydroxyurea in people with non-transfusion dependent beta thalassaemia comparing hydroxyurea with placebo or standard treatment or comparing different doses of hydroxyurea. Two authors independently applied the inclusion criteria in order to select trials for inclusion. Both authors assessed the risk of bias of trials and extracted the data. A third author verified these assessments. No trials comparing hydroxyurea with placebo or standard care were found. However, we included

  3. Predicting blood transfusion in patients undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Crispin; Boddy, Alex P; Fukuta, Junaid; Groom, William D; Streets, Christopher G

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate predictors of allogenic blood transfusion requirements in patients undergoing minimal invasive oesophagectomy at a tertiary high volume centre for oesophago-gastric surgery. Retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing minimal access oesophagectomy in our department between January 2010 and December 2011. Patients were divided into two groups depending on whether they required a blood transfusion at any time during their index admission. Factors that have been shown to influence perioperative blood transfusion requirements in major surgery were included in the analysis. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the impact of patient and perioperative characteristics on transfusion requirements during the index admission. A total of 80 patients underwent minimal access oesophagectomy, of which 61 patients had a laparoscopic assisted oesophagectomy and 19 patients had a minimal invasive oesophagectomy. Perioperative blood transfusion was required in 28 patients at any time during hospital admission. On binary logistic regression analysis, a lower preoperative haemoglobin concentration (p blood transfusion requirements. It has been reported that requirement for blood transfusion can affect long-term outcomes in oesophageal cancer resection. Two factors which could be addressed preoperatively; haemoglobin concentration and type of oesophageal resection, may be valuable in predicting blood transfusions in patients undergoing minimally invasive oesophagectomy. Our analysis revealed that preoperative haemoglobin concentration, occurrence of significant complications and type of minimal access oesophagectomy predicted blood transfusion requirements in the patient population examined. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Desmopressin use for minimising perioperative blood transfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desborough, Michael J; Oakland, Kathryn; Brierley, Charlotte; Bennett, Sean; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Stanworth, Simon J; Estcourt, Lise J

    2017-01-01

    Background Blood transfusion is administered during many types of surgery, but its efficacy and safety are increasingly questioned. Evaluation of the efficacy of agents, such as desmopressin (DDAVP; 1-deamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin), that may reduce perioperative blood loss is needed. Objectives To examine the evidence for the efficacy of DDAVP in reducing perioperative blood loss and the need for red cell transfusion in people who do not have inherited bleeding disorders. Search methods We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (2017, issue 3) in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) (from 1937), the Transfusion Evidence Library (from 1980), and ongoing trial databases (all searches to 3 April 2017). Selection criteria We included randomised controlled trials comparing DDAVP to placebo or an active comparator (e.g. tranexamic acid, aprotinin) before, during, or immediately after surgery or after invasive procedures in adults or children. Data collection and analysis We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Main results We identified 65 completed trials (3874 participants) and four ongoing trials. Of the 65 completed trials, 39 focused on adult cardiac surgery, three on paediatric cardiac surgery, 12 on orthopaedic surgery, two on plastic surgery, and two on vascular surgery; seven studies were conducted in surgery for other conditions. These trials were conducted between 1986 and 2016, and 11 were funded by pharmaceutical companies or by a party with a commercial interest in the outcome of the trial. The GRADE quality of evidence was very low to moderate across all outcomes. No trial reported quality of life. DDAVP versus placebo or no treatment Trial results showed considerable heterogeneity between surgical settings for total volume of red cells transfused (low

  5. Simulation-based education for transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Shanna; Rioux-Masse, Benjamin; Oancea, Cristina; Cohn, Claudia; Harmon, James; Konia, Mojca

    2015-04-01

    The administration of blood products is frequently determined by physicians without subspecialty training in transfusion medicine (TM). Education in TM is necessary for appropriate utilization of resources and maintaining patient safety. Our institution developed an efficient simulation-based TM course with the goal of identifying key topics that could be individualized to learners of all levels in various environments while also allowing for practice in an environment where the patient is not placed at risk. A 2.5-hour simulation-based educational activity was designed and taught to undergraduate medical students rotating through anesthesiology and TM elective rotations and to all Clinical Anesthesia Year 1 (CA-1) residents. Content and process evaluation of the activity consisted of multiple-choice tests and course evaluations. Seventy medical students and seven CA-1 residents were enrolled in the course. There was no significant difference on pretest results between medical students and CA-1 residents. The posttest results for both medical students and CA-1 residents were significantly higher than pretest results. The results of the posttest between medical students and CA-1 residents were not significantly different. The TM knowledge gap is not a trivial problem as transfusion of blood products is associated with significant risks. Innovative educational techniques are needed to address the ongoing challenges with knowledge acquisition and retention in already full curricula. Our institution developed a feasible and effective way to integrate TM into the curriculum. Educational activities, such as this, might be a way to improve the safety of transfusions. © 2014 AABB.

  6. Long-term detection of microchimaerism in peripheral blood after pretransplantation blood transfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoordeldonk, S. F.; Doumaid, K.; Remmerswaal, E. B.; ten Berge, I. J.; Wilmink, J. M.; de Waal, L. P.; Boog, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    Renal allograft survival is prolonged after pretransplantation blood transfusion. The aim of this study was to test retrospectively the development and persistence of microchimaerism after pretransplantation blood transfusion and to assess whether the type of blood transfusion (partially matched [=

  7. Severe iron intoxication treated with exchange transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Marcella; Cortes, Dina; Jepsen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    An 18-month-old previous healthy girl who had ingested 442 mg elemental iron/kg was admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit. The child was treated with gastric lavage, whole bowel irrigation and intravenous deferoxamine. After 2 h of standard therapy serum iron had risen threefold to 1362 mi...... microg/dl (244 micromol/l). The child was treated with exchange transfusion (ET; 52 ml/kg) and serum iron fell to 134 microg/dl (24 micromol/l). The patient made an uncomplicated recovery. ET should be considered in severe iron poisoning when standard therapy is inadequate....

  8. Severe iron intoxication treated with exchange transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, M; Cortes, D; Jepsen, S

    2009-01-01

    An 18-month-old previous healthy girl who had ingested 442 mg elemental iron/kg was admitted to a paediatric intensive care unit. The child was treated with gastric lavage, whole bowel irrigation and intravenous deferoxamine. After 2 h of standard therapy serum iron had risen threefold to 1362 µg....../dl (244 µmol/l). The child was treated with exchange transfusion (ET; 52 ml/kg) and serum iron fell to 134 µg/dl (24 µmol/l). The patient made an uncomplicated recovery. ET should be considered in severe iron poisoning when standard therapy is inadequate....

  9. Thrombocytopenia responding to red blood cell transfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubarak, Ahmad A.; Awidi, Abdalla; Rasul, Kakil I.; Al-Homsi, Ussama

    2004-01-01

    Three patients with severe symptomatic iron defficiency anemia and thrombocytopenia had a significant rise in the platelet count a few days following packed red blood cell transfusion. Pretransfusion platelet count of of patient one was 17x10/L. 22x10/Lin patient two and 29x10/L in patient three. On the 6th day of post tranfusion, the platelet count rose to 166x10/Lin patient one, 830x10/L in patient two and 136x10/L in patient three. The possible mechcnism behind such an unreported observation are discussed. (author)

  10. History of blood transfusion in sub-saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, William H

    2013-01-01

    The adequacy and safety of blood transfusion in sub-Saharan Africa is the subject of much concern, yet there have been very few studies of its history. An overview of that record finds that transfusions were first reported in Africa (sub-Saharan and excluding South Africa) in the early 1920s, and organized transfusion practices were established before the Second World War. Blood transfusion grew rapidly after 1945, along with the construction of new hospitals and expanded health services in Africa. Significant differences existed between colonial powers in the organization of transfusion services, but these converged after independence as their use continued to grow and decentralized and hospital-based practices were adopted. It was only after the oil crisis in the mid-1970s that health spending declined and the collection, testing, and transfusion of blood began to level off. Thus, when the AIDS crisis hit transfusion services, they were already struggling to meet the needs of patients. At this time, foreign assistance as well as the World Health Organization and the League of Red Cross Societies helped respond to both the immediate problem of testing blood, and for some countries, support existed for the broader reorganization of transfusion. Overall, the history shows that transfusion was adopted widely and quickly, limited mainly by the availability of knowledgeable doctors and hospital facilities. There was less resistance than expected by Africans to receive transfusions, and the record shows a remarkable flexibility in obtaining blood. The dangers of disease transmission were recognized from an early date but were balanced against the potential lifesaving benefits of transfusion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Measuring the impact of a restrictive transfusion guideline in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeg, R T; Leinoe, E B; Andersen, P

    2013-01-01

    Interventions to change physician transfusion behavior are often evaluated by examining the amount of red blood cell (RBC) units transfused or the proportion of patients transfused before and after the intervention. The pre-transfusion haemoglobin concentration is a sensitive measure of transfusi...... concentration fell significantly. Pre-transfusion haemoglobin determination is a sensitive measure of the effect of an intervention to change physician transfusion behaviour....

  12. Methodologic quality assessment of red blood cell transfusion guidelines and the evidence base of more restrictive transfusion thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Remoortel, Hans; De Buck, Emmy; Dieltjens, Tessa; Pauwels, Nele S; Compernolle, Veerle; Vandekerckhove, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Recent literature suggests that more restrictive red blood cell (RBC) transfusion practices are equivalent or better than more liberal transfusion practices. The methodologic quality of guidelines recommending more restrictive transfusion thresholds and their underlying scientific evidence is unclear. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the quality of the development process of RBC transfusion guidelines and to investigate the underlying evidence of guidelines recommending a more restrictive hemoglobin (Hb) threshold. Via systematic literature screening of relevant databases (NGC, GIN, Medline, and Embase), RBC transfusion guidelines recommending a more restrictive Hb level (methodologic quality by scoring the rigor of development domain (AGREE II checklist). The level of evidence served as a reference for the quality of the underlying evidence. The methodologic quality of 13 RBC transfusion guidelines was variable (18%-72%) but highest for those developed by Advancing Transfusion and Cellular Therapies Worldwide (72%), the Task Force of Advanced Bleeding Care in Trauma (70%), and the Dutch Institute for Healthcare Improvement (61%). A Hb level of less than 7 g/dL (intensive care unit patients) or less than 8 g/dL (postoperative patients) were the only thresholds based on high-quality evidence. Only four of 32 recommendations had a high-quality evidence base. Methodologic quality should be guaranteed in future RBC transfusion guideline development to ensure that the best available evidence is captured when recommending restrictive transfusion strategies. More high-quality trials are needed to provide a stronger scientific basis for RBC transfusion guidelines that recommend more restrictive transfusion thresholds. © 2015 AABB.

  13. Hepatitis C and blood transfusion among children attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) accounts for 90% of post-transfusion hepatitis. In Uganda, there has been limited research of prevalence of HCV among sickle cell anaemia (SS) patients, a group at risk for multiple transfusions. Objectives: To establish prevalence of HCV infection and determine whether blood ...

  14. Profiles of blood and blood component transfusion recipients in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Hassall, Oliver; Faragher, Brian E.; Kajja, Isaac; Mvere, David A.; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Background. There are limited published data on the characteristics of blood transfusion recipients in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the demographic characteristics of blood transfusion recipients and patterns of blood and blood component use in Zimbabwe. Materials and methods. Data on

  15. Cardiovascular responses to blood transfusion in children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: This study evaluated the cardiovascular responses to blood transfusion in children with anemic heart failure using mostly clinical parameters. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients with anemic heart failure presenting to a childrenfs emergency room and requiring blood transfusion were assessed for ...

  16. Blood transfusion requirement in surgery for femoral artery aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, N; Schroeder, T V

    1997-01-01

    Audit of blood usage in various surgical specialities have shown that over-ordering of blood is widespread, causing unnecessary pressure on the transfusion facilities and giving growing concern over the expense of cross-matching blood. The aim of this study was to assess the blood transfusion...

  17. Blood transfusion and hepatitis viruses | Bird | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transmission of hepatitis viruses has been recognised as an undesirable effect of blood transfusion since the 1940s, when large outbreaks occurred following inoculation with a yellow fever vaccine which contained pooled human plasma. Further reports followed of jaundice occurring several months after transfusions with ...

  18. Genetically Determined Hazards of Blood Transfusion Within and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The risks of sensitizing the recipient of a blood transfusion to the antigens on the red blood cells of the donor have been calculated for the various populations of Southern Africa. Although many of these antigens vary markedly in their frequencies in different populations, the theoretical risks of incompatible transfusion with ...

  19. Blood transfusion in obstetrics: attitude and perceptions of pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obstetrics haemorrhage is the leading cause of preventable maternal deaths worldwide. Blood transfusion is pivotal to death reduction, but are the women aware of its importance? Objectives: The study investigated the view of a population of pregnant women on obstetrics related blood transfusion. Methods: ...

  20. blood transfusion requirement during caesarean delivery: risk factors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Operative delivery poses the risk of excessive blood loss and possible need for blood transfusion in the pregnant patient. Factors predisposing to increased risk for blood transfusion identified from previous studies include preoperative anaemia, previous Caesarean section and antepartum haemorrhage among others.1-.

  1. Rational use of blood transfusion during open reduction and internal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood transfusion can be a life saving intervention. However, if blood is given when it is not needed, the patient receives no benefit and is exposed to unnecessary risk. Therefore, transfusion should be prescribed only when the benefits to the patient are likely to outweigh the risks. Objective: To evaluate the ...

  2. Audit of blood transfusion practice during anaesthesia for spine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood loss during spine surgery is often considerable, necessitating blood transfusion. The elective nature and other peculiarities of most spine surgeries, however, make them amenable to several blood conservation techniques, such that reduction in allogeneic blood transfusion is considered high priority in ...

  3. Donor blood procurement and the risk of transfusion transmissible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood and blood products are scarce commodities. The demand often outweighs the supply. This study is directed at investigating the blood procurement sources and the risk of viral transfusion transmissible infection. Materials and Methods: The records of the blood transfusion unit of a tertiary health facility in ...

  4. Pattern of requests for interspousal donation and transfusion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The cases of 66 female patients who needed transfusion and requested for interspousal directed blood donations from their husbands at the UMTH Blood Bank from 1997 to 2001 were reviewed. The patients required blood for elective procedures, and wanted to be transfused with the blood of their husbands ...

  5. Hepatitis B Surface AntigenemiaAmong Transfused Children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients with sickle cell anaemia (SCA), a common haematological disorder inNigeria,may have complications that require blood transfusion, thus exposing them to the risk. Objective: To determine the prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) among transfused childrenwith SCAin Enugu. Subjects and Method: ...

  6. Collection and Transfusion of Blood in Jos University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was embarked on to investigate the pattern of blood collection and transfusion in Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH), Jos between 2000 and 2005 in the face of the present human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic. Methodology: Blood bank records of blood donors and transfusions were ...

  7. Reappraising the concept of massive transfusion in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanworth, Simon J; Morris, Timothy P; Gaarder, Christine

    2010-01-01

    transfusion requirements could allow early activation of blood bank protocols. METHODS : Datasets on trauma admissions over a 1 or 2-year period were obtained from the trauma registries of five large trauma research networks. A fractional polynomial was used to model the transfusion-associated probability...

  8. Pattern and determinants of blood transfusion in a Nigerian neonatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... severe anemia (40.2%), and bleeding disorders (4.4%). Weight < 2.5 kg, outside delivery, and jaundice were independent determinants of neonatal transfusion. Conclusion: The blood transfusion rate in this facility was remarkably high. Improved standard of newborn care and infrastructural support are required to reduce ...

  9. Age of blood and survival after massive transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, C C; Pereira, A

    2017-11-01

    Massive transfusion is the clinical scenario where the presumed adverse effects of stored blood are expected to be more evident because the whole patient's blood volume is replaced by stored blood. To analyse the association between age of transfused red blood cells (RBC) and survival in massively transfused patients. In this retrospective study, clinical and transfusion data of all consecutive patients massively transfused between 2008 and 2014 in a large, tertiary-care hospital were electronically extracted from the Transfusion Service database and the patients' electronic medical records. Prognostic factors for in-hospital mortality were investigated by multivariate logistic regression. A total of 689 consecutive patients were analysed (median age: 61 years; 65% males) and 272 died in-hospital. Projected mortality at 2, 30, and 90 days was 21%, 35% and 45%, respectively. The odds ratio (OR) for in-hospital mortality among patients who survived after the 2nd day increased with patient age (OR: 1.037, 95% CI: 1.021-1.054; per year Ptransfused in the first 48hours (OR: 1.060; 95% CI: 1.038-1.020 per unit; Ptransfusion was associated with a higher proportion of old RBCs transfused in the first 48hours. Other factors associated with poor prognosis were older patient's age and larger volumes of transfused RBCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Knowledge and acceptance of cord blood transfusion as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Voluntary Adult blood donor panel is low in Nigeria. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a common chronic disease which requires regular blood transfusion. Cord blood has been shown to be physiologically suitable as an alternative to adult blood transfusion. Aim: To assess the knowledge and acceptance of cord ...

  11. Reappraising the concept of massive transfusion in trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanworth, Simon J.; Morris, Timothy P.; Gaarder, Christine; Goslings, J. Carel; Maegele, Marc; Cohen, Mitchell J.; König, Thomas C.; Davenport, Ross A.; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Johansson, Pär I.; Allard, Shubha; Johnson, Tony; Brohi, Karim

    2010-01-01

    The massive-transfusion concept was introduced to recognize the dilutional complications resulting from large volumes of packed red blood cells (PRBCs). Definitions of massive transfusion vary and lack supporting clinical evidence. Damage-control resuscitation regimens of modern trauma care are

  12. Post-transfusion viral hepatitis in sickle Cell Anaemia: Retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several complications of sickle cell anaemia (SCA) are well known including hepatobiliary dysfunction. We here present a study 151 randomly selected SCA patients to highlight the contributory role of blood transfusion to the development of viral hepatitis in them. Twenty (13.2%) had not received blood transfusion and no ...

  13. Blood Transfusion in Surgery in Africa | Jani | East and Central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many changes have occurred in transfusion practices in Africa and in Western countries since this topic was first reviewed in 2005. Blood transfusion remains a key component in the resuscitation of surgical patients suffering, whether from operative losses, trauma, GI bleeding, or obstetrics. Nothing has replaced the ...

  14. Transfusion medicine in paediatrics | Yakubu | Annals of Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transfusion Medicine involves all activities of bleeding donors, ensuring safe techniques for bleedings, conservation of the donated blood or blood products up to and including actual safety transfusion to the recipients. This life saving procedure has been challenged by yet other life threatening complications such as ...

  15. Overview of Blood Transfusion in Orthopaedic Trauma in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood transfusion in orthopaedic trauma is very important, its safety and risks are to be balanced. Objective: To determine the blood transfusion rate of orthopaedic trauma requiring operations. Method: All patients admitted to Ela Memorial Medical Centre, Ilorin from 1st January, 2001 to 31st May 2006 were ...

  16. Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS.

  17. [Hepatitis E virus: Blood transfusion implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallian, P; Piquet, Y; Assal, A; Djoudi, R; Chiaroni, J; Izopet, J; Tiberghien, P

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a non-enveloped RNA virus transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Autochthonous hepatitis E occurring in developed countries is caused by genotypes 3 and 4 and is a zoonotic infection. Humans are infected mostly after ingestion of undercooked meat from infected animals. Most HEV 3 and 4 infections are clinically inapparent. However, genotype 3 (HEV 3) can lead to chronic hepatitis in immuno-compromised patients such as organ-transplant recipients and patients with haematological malignancies. In Europe, HEV 3 is implicated in transfusion-transmitted HEV infection. In France, as observed in several European countries, prevalence of HEV RNA and specific IgG antibodies are high indicating that viral circulation is important. The systematic HEV NAT screening of blood donations used for preparation of solvent detergent plasma indicate that 1 to 2218 donation is infected by HEV RNA. The need or implementation's impacts of safety measures to prevent HEV transmission by blood transfusion are under reflexion by French's health authorities. The HEV NAT screening is the only available tool of prevention. Alternative strategies are under investigation including individual or mini pool NAT testing all or part of blood donations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Management of patients who refuse blood transfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Kiran Chand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A small group of people belonging to a certain religion, called Jehovah′s witness do not accept blood transfusion or blood products, based on biblical readings. When such group of people are in need of health care, their faith and belief is an obstacle for their proper treatment, and poses legal, ethical and medical challenges for attending health care provider. Due to the rapid growth in the membership of this group worldwide, physicians attending hospitals should be prepared to manage such patients. Appropriate management of such patients entails understanding of ethical and legal issues involved, providing meticulous medical management, use of prohaemostatic agents, essential interventions and techniques to reduce blood loss and hence, reduce the risk of subsequent need for blood transfusion. An extensive literature search was performed using search engines such as Google scholar, PubMed, MEDLINE, science journals and textbooks using keywords like ′Jehovah′s witness′, ′blood haemodilution′, ′blood salvage′ and ′blood substitutes′.

  19. Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil V.; Raval, Jay S.; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Benjamin, Richard J.; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2011-01-01

    The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS. PMID:21383927

  20. Contemporary issues in transfusion medicine informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Parwani, Anil V; Raval, Jay S; Triulzi, Darrell J; Benjamin, Richard J; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2011-01-07

    The Transfusion Medicine Service (TMS) covers diverse clinical and laboratory-based services that must be delivered with accuracy, efficiency and reliability. TMS oversight is shared by multiple regulatory agencies that cover product manufacturing and validation standards geared toward patient safety. These demands present significant informatics challenges. Over the past few decades, TMS information systems have improved to better handle blood product manufacturing, inventory, delivery, tracking and documentation. Audit trails and access to electronic databases have greatly facilitated product traceability and biovigilance efforts. Modern blood bank computing has enabled novel applications such as the electronic crossmatch, kiosk-based blood product delivery systems, and self-administered computerized blood donor interview and eligibility determination. With increasing use of barcoding technology, there has been a marked improvement in patient and specimen identification. Moreover, the emergence of national and international labeling standards such as ISBT 128 have facilitated the availability, movement and tracking of blood products across national and international boundaries. TMS has only recently begun to leverage the electronic medical record to address quality issues in transfusion practice and promote standardized documentation within institutions. With improved technology, future growth is expected in blood bank automation and product labeling with applications such as radio frequency identification devices. This article reviews several of these key informatics issues relevant to the contemporary practice of TMS.

  1. Cancer risk among 21st century blood transfusion recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T O; Cairns, B J; Reeves, G K; Green, J; Beral, V

    2017-02-01

    Some carcinogenic viruses are known to be transmissible by blood transfusion. Intensive viral screening of transfused blood now exists in most countries. In the UK, high-sensitivity nucleic acid amplification tests for hepatitis C virus were introduced in 1999 and it was thought that this would reduce, and possibly eliminate, transfusion-related liver cancer. We aimed to investigate cancer risk in recipients of blood transfusion in 2000 or after. A total of 1.3 million UK women recruited in 1998 on average were followed for hospital records of blood transfusion and for cancer registrations. After excluding women with cancer or precancerous conditions before or at the time of transfusion, Cox regression yielded adjusted relative risks of 11 site-specific cancers for women with compared to without prior blood transfusion. During follow up, 11 274 (0.9%) women had a first recorded transfusion in 2000 or after, and 1648 (14.6%) of them were subsequently diagnosed with cancer, a mean 6.8 years after the transfusion. In the first 5 years after transfusion there were significant excesses for most site-specific cancers examined, presumably because some had preclinical cancer. However, 5 or more years (mean 8 years) after blood transfusion, there were significant excess risks only for liver cancer (adjusted relative risk = 2.63, 95%CI 1.45-4.78) and for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (adjusted relative risk = 1.74, 1.21-2.51). When analyses were restricted to those undergoing hip or knee replacement surgery, the commonest procedure associated with transfusion, these relative risks were not materially altered. In a large cohort of UK women, transfusions in the 21st century were associated with long-term increased risks of liver cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Some of these malignancies may have been caused by carcinogenic agents that are not currently screened for in transfused blood. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society

  2. Hemoglobin Variants Acquired Post-Exchange Transfusion in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Soumya; Cottler-Fox, Michele; Drobena, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Many SCD patients receive chronic transfusions for prevention or treatment of disease related complications. Complications of the chronic transfusion noted in these patients include allergic reactions, transfusion transmitted infections, iron overload, and alloantibody formation. Even though hemoglobin (Hb) variants are prevalent in the general population, reports of transfusion-acquired Hb variants are rare. We performed a retrospective analysis on all SCD patients who underwent red cell exchange (RBCEx) transfusions at our institution during 2011-2013 to identify the presence of Hb variants acquired as a result of RBCEx. We found 66 occurrences of acquired Hb variants in 30 SCD patients during the period examined. The most commonly acquired Hb variant was Hemoglobin C (HbC) (64/66 occurrences). More than half of the patients (19/30) acquired HbC on multiple occasions (2-6 times). One patient acquired HbJ and another patient acquired HbD/G in addition to HbC. The segments from donor units were available in some of these cases and hemoglobin electrophoresis (HBE) was performed to confirm the presence of the variant Hb in the donor segments corresponding to that seen on the post-RBCEx sample. Heterozygous donors are asymptomatic and show no abnormalities during donor screening. Since HBE is not routinely performed on the donor specimen, it may go unrecognized until the post-transfusion recipient results pose diagnostic difficulties. There are no definitive guidelines on deferring these donors; hence one should be cognizant of these findings to prevent misdiagnosis. In a population where HbS negative blood is routinely requested, the effect of other Hb variants remains unknown. None of the patients in our study showed any adverse events due to the acquired Hb variants; however, this is of special concern in the pediatric population where a single RBC unit can contribute a significant portion of the exchanged blood volume. Additionally, donor centers may need

  3. Transfusion: -80°C Frozen Blood Products Are Safe and Effective in Military Casualty Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plat, Marie-Christine J.; Badloe, John F.; Hess, John R.; Hoencamp, Rigo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Netherlands Armed Forces use -80°C frozen red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and platelets combined with regular liquid stored RBCs, for the treatment of (military) casualties in Medical Treatment Facilities abroad. Our objective was to assess and compare the use of -80°C frozen blood products in combination with the different transfusion protocols and their effect on the outcome of trauma casualties. Materials and Methods Hemovigilance and combat casualties data from Afghanistan 2006–2010 for 272 (military) trauma casualties with or without massive transfusions (MT: ≥6 RBC/24hr, N = 82 and non-MT: 1–5 RBC/24hr, N = 190) were analyzed retrospectively. In November 2007, a massive transfusion protocol (MTP; 4:3:1 RBC:Plasma:Platelets) for ATLS® class III/IV hemorrhage was introduced in military theatre. Blood product use, injury severity and mortality were assessed pre- and post-introduction of the MTP. Data were compared to civilian and military trauma studies to assess effectiveness of the frozen blood products and MTP. Results No ABO incompatible blood products were transfused and only 1 mild transfusion reaction was observed with 3,060 transfused products. In hospital mortality decreased post-MTP for MT patients from 44% to 14% (P = 0.005) and for non-MT patients from 12.7% to 5.9% (P = 0.139). Average 24-hour RBC, plasma and platelet ratios were comparable and accompanying 24-hour mortality rates were low compared to studies that used similar numbers of liquid stored (and on site donated) blood products. Conclusion This report describes for the first time that the combination of -80°C frozen platelets, plasma and red cells is safe and at least as effective as standard blood products in the treatment of (military) trauma casualties. Frozen blood can save the lives of casualties of armed conflict without the need for in-theatre blood collection. These results may also contribute to solutions for logistic problems in civilian blood supply in

  4. Autologous transfusion of drain contents in elective primary knee arthroplasty: its value and relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vinay Kumar; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Javed, Sadaf; Kumar, Kuldeep; Tomar, Juhi

    2011-07-01

    Total knee arthroplasty is associated with significant post-operative blood loss often necessitating blood transfusions. Blood transfusions may be associated with transfusion reactions and may transmit human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus, with devastating consequences. After total knee arthroplasty, transfusion of the contents of an autologous drain is becoming common practice. The aim of our study was to look at the effectiveness of these drains in elective primary total knee arthroplasty. A prospective study was conducted including 70 non-randomised patients. A normal suction drain was used in 35 patients (group A), whereas in the other 35 patients, a CellTrans™ drain was used (group B). All the operations were performed by four surgeons using a tourniquet with a medial parapatellar approach. Pre- and post-operative haemoglobin concentrations were recorded in both groups. A Student's t-test was applied to determine the statistical significance of the data collected. The average fall in post-operative haemoglobin was 3.66 g/dL (SD 1.46; range, 0.6-7.0) among patients in whom the simple drain was used (group A) and 2.29 g/dL (SD 0.92; range, 0.6-5.9) among those in whom the CellTrans™ drain was used (group B) (p<0.0001). Twenty-five units of allogeneic blood were required in group A compared to four units in group B. The rate of transfusion was 5.7% (2 patients) in the group in which CellTrans™ drain was used and 25.7% (9 patients) in the group in which a simple suction drain was used. Total knee arthroplasty is associated with significant post-operative blood loss despite best operative technique. Autologous reinfusion of the contents of a CellTrans™ drain significantly reduces the rate of post-operative blood transfusion. This study indicates that the use of an autologous drain could be recommended as routine practice in primary total knee arthroplasty.

  5. Red blood-cell alloantibodies in multiply transfused patients in the occupied Palestinian territory: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Ahmad; Suleiman, Sa'd; Zenah, Omar Abu; Abu Taha, Adham

    2018-02-21

    Red blood-cell transfusion has greatly reduced the mortality and morbidity in multiply transfused patients with thalassaemia and sickle cell disease. However, this can result in red blood-cell isoimmunisation with autoantibodies and alloantibodies, which can lead to serious complications such as delayed haemolytic transfusion reaction. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and types of alloantibodies in multiply transfused patients living in the north of the West Bank. This pilot study was done at three thalassaemia centres in Nablus, Jenin, and Tulkarm in the occupied Palestinian territory where 300 patients with thalassaemia and sickle cell anaemia regularly receive blood transfusions. Alloantibody screening and identification were done using three-cell and eleven-cell panels (DiaPanel, Bio-rad, Switzerland) respectively. Ethical approval was obtained from Institutional Review Board Centre at Najah University. Written consent was obtained from participants. 131 patients were enrolled. Of the 20 (15%) patients with alloantibodies, 14 (70%) were diagnosed with β-thalassaemia major, three (15%) were diagnosed with sickle cell anaemia, two (10%) were diagnosed with thalassaemia intermedia, and one (5%) was diagnosed with sickle cell thalassaemia. 13 (65%) patients had alloantibodies that belonged to the Rh blood group system (nine [45%] patients had anti-D; two [10%] had anti-E; one [5%] had anti Rh-C; and one [5%] had anti-c). Anti-Kell was found in seven (35%) patients. Our data showed a quite high prevalence of alloimmunisation in multiply transfused patients. Rh and Kell blood group system antibodies were the only alloantibodies identified in this study. To reduce alloimmunisation, it will be essential to introduce a policy for extended red blood-cell phenotyping of these patients and for the issuing of antigen-matched blood (at least for Rh and Kell antigen). Najah National University. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Absence of Transfusion-Associated Microchimerism in Pediatric and Adult Recipients of Leukoreduced and Gamma Irradiated Blood Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Rosa; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Wen, Li; Montalvo, Leilani; Schechterly, Cathy; Colvin, Camilla; Alter, Harvey J.; Luban, Naomi L. C.; Busch, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transfusion-associated microchimerism (TA-MC), the persistence of significant levels of donor leukocytes in blood recipients for prolonged periods, has been demonstrated following non-leukoreduced and leukoreduced transfusion to patients with severe traumatic injury. Development of TA-MC has not been rigorously studied in settings that do not involve massive trauma where the blood is leukoreduced and irradiated. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS A cohort of 409 prospectively followed medical and surgical adult and pediatric female recipients of leukoreduced and mostly irradiated allogeneic red blood cell and platelet transfusions were evaluated to determine development of TA-MC. Four and eight-week post-transfusion samples were analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for Y-chromosome sequences in leukocyte DNA, the marker for microchimeric cells in female blood recipients. Repeat testing was performed on Y-chromosome positive samples to confirm microchimerism (MC), and subsequent post-transfusion samples were tested to investigate persistence of MC. RESULTS On initial testing, forty of 207 (19%) adult and forty-four of 202 (22%) pediatric female blood recipients demonstrated low level MC. On repeat testing of these and additional specimens, twelve (3%) recipients demonstrated low level transient MC, but none had persistent TA-MC similar to that seen in transfused trauma patients. CONCLUSION Persistence of MC was not demonstrated in adult and pediatric recipients of leukoreduced and mostly irradiated blood components. The risk of TA-MC appears to be dependent on the clinical setting and is rare other than in patients sustaining severe traumatic injury. PMID:21981710

  7. Prediction of postpartum blood transfusion – risk factors and recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikkelsø, Anne J; Hjortøe, Sofie; Gerds, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    in a hospital that reported transfusion of red blood cells to a national database: A total of 96 545 women were included. RESULTS: Retained placental tissue explained more than all other risk factors in vaginal deliveries. Retained placental tissue at first delivery was associated with postpartum transfusion...... transfusion is difficult. Retained placental tissue is the strongest predictor of postpartum blood transfusion in vaginal deliveries. Retained placental tissue is usually diagnosed for the first time when the bleeding starts, which limits the clinical value of prediction. We need tools for an early diagnosis......OBJECTIVE: The aim was to find clinically useful risk factors for postpartum transfusion and to assess the joint predictive value in a population of women with a first and second delivery. METHODS: All Danish women with a first and second delivery from January 2001 to September 2009 who gave birth...

  8. Ranitidine prevents postoperative transfusion-induced depression of delayed hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Hammer, J H; Moesgaard, F

    1989-01-01

    The influence of perioperative blood transfusion on postoperative depression of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and the effect of ranitidine on transfusion-induced changes in postoperative CMI were investigated. CMI was assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by skin testing with seven common...... delayed-type antigens in 83 consecutive patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery. Sixty-six of these patients were randomly divided into ranitidine or no-ranitidine-treatment groups, and the remaining 17 patients were operated on without ranitidine. Thus, 50 patients were operated on without...... ranitidine therapy, and whole blood transfusion was given to 24 of these patients. Postoperative skin test response was more reduced in transfused vs nontransfused patients (-57% vs -38%, p less than 0.0001). Fourteen of the 24 patients receiving blood transfusion could be exactly matched to 14 patients...

  9. Higher vs. lower haemoglobin threshold for transfusion in septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygård, S L; Holst, L B; Wetterslev, J

    2017-01-01

    . a lower haemoglobin threshold. METHODS: In post-hoc analyses of the full trial population of 998 patients from the Transfusion Requirements in Septic Shock (TRISS) trial, we investigated the intervention effect on 90-day mortality in patients with severe comorbidity (chronic lung disease, haematological......BACKGROUND: Using a restrictive transfusion strategy appears to be safe in sepsis, but there may be subgroups of patients who benefit from transfusion at a higher haemoglobin level. We explored if subgroups of patients with septic shock and anaemia had better outcome when transfused at a higher vs.......51), in those who had undergone surgery (P = 0.99) or in patients with septic shock by the new definition (P = 0.20). CONCLUSION: In exploratory analyses of a randomized trial in patients with septic shock and anaemia, we observed no survival benefit in any subgroups of transfusion at a haemoglobin threshold...

  10. Reappraising the concept of massive transfusion in trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanworth, Simon J; Morris, Timothy P; Gaarder, Christine

    2010-01-01

    transfusion requirements could allow early activation of blood bank protocols. METHODS : Datasets on trauma admissions over a 1 or 2-year period were obtained from the trauma registries of five large trauma research networks. A fractional polynomial was used to model the transfusion-associated probability......ABSTRACT : INTRODUCTION : The massive-transfusion concept was introduced to recognize the dilutional complications resulting from large volumes of packed red blood cells (PRBCs). Definitions of massive transfusion vary and lack supporting clinical evidence. Damage-control resuscitation regimens...... of modern trauma care are targeted to the early correction of acute traumatic coagulopathy. The aim of this study was to identify a clinically relevant definition of trauma massive transfusion based on clinical outcomes. We also examined whether the concept was useful in that early prediction of massive...

  11. The new Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions database (SCANDAT2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgren, Gustaf; Rostgaard, Klaus; Vasan, Senthil K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Risks of transfusion-transmitted disease are currently at a record low in the developed world. Still, available methods for blood surveillance might not be sufficient to detect transmission of diseases with unknown etiologies or with very long incubation periods. STUDY DESIGN...... AND METHODS: We have previously created the anonymized Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT) database, containing data on blood donors, blood transfusions, and transfused patients, with complete follow-up of donors and patients for a range of health outcomes. Here we describe the re......-creation of SCANDAT with updated, identifiable data. We collected computerized data on blood donations and transfusions from blood banks covering all of Sweden and Denmark. After data cleaning, two structurally identical databases were created and the entire database was linked with nationwide health outcomes...

  12. [Immunologic risk analysis of blood transfusion: 1991-1998].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouger, P; Le Pennec, P Y; Noizat-Pirenne, F

    2000-02-01

    The immunologic risk associated to erythrocyte transfusions is bound to the polymorphism of blood group systems and to the respect of blood transfusion regulations. The results of three studies are presented, which were carried out respectively by the French Society of Blood Transfusion, the National Institute of Blood Transfusion and the National Haemovigilance Network. Two hundred and twenty-seven cases of immunologic accidents are analysed using the Kaplan's interpretation model and the traditional method of process analysis. The results show three critical factors in the occurrence of this type of incident: the relevance of the clinical examinations prescribed, the way in which the biological results are taken into account, and the relationship/exchange of information between private and public hospitals, and blood transfusion centers.

  13. [Teaching transfusion medicine research in the francophone world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, J-J; Shiboski, C; Fontanet, A; Murphy, E L

    2009-01-01

    A two-week, French language, clinical research course in transfusion medicine has recently been created at the Pasteur Institute in Paris under the joint leadership of faculty members from the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), the Blood Systems Research Institute (BSRI) and the National Institute of Transfusion of Paris. The goal is to train transfusion professionals from the developing world to conduct clinical research that will contribute to improving the quality of care and safety in transfusion practices in their respective countries. The course provides training on clinical and epidemiological research methods and their potential applications in transfusion medicine. As part of the course, each student develops a study protocol that can be implemented in his/her blood center of hospital.

  14. The increasing importance of Intellectual Property in Transfusion Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Ian D; Rooney, Catherine

    2011-08-01

    The Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service (SNBTS) originated in Edinburgh in the 1920's by dentist Jack Copland. Since that time the scope of Transfusion Medicine has broadened significantly to accommodate advances in technologies such as cell isolation, culture and manipulation. Many transfusion services, including SNBTS, now provide expertise both in the traditional field of blood transfusion and the newer, wider field of human cell (including 'adult' and embryonic stem cells) and tissue procurement and culture - in all the new science of "regenerative medicine". This paper describes the importance of Intellectual Property in the provision of Transfusion Medicine today and provides guidance on the management of Intellectual Property so that advances in the field have the best chance of successful translation into clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevention of blood transfusion with intravenous iron in gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athibovonsuk, Punnada; Manchana, Tarinee; Sirisabya, Nakarin

    2013-12-01

    To compare the efficacy of intravenous iron and oral iron for prevention of blood transfusions in gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy. Sixty-four non anemic gynecologic cancer patients receiving adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy were stratified and randomized according to baseline hemoglobin levels and chemotherapy regimen. The study group received 200mg of intravenous iron sucrose immediately after each chemotherapy infusion. The control group received oral ferrous fumarate at a dose of 200mg three times a day. Complete blood count was monitored before each chemotherapy infusion. Blood transfusions were given if hemoglobin level was below 10mg/dl. There were 32 patients in each group. No significant differences in baseline hemoglobin levels and baseline characteristics were demonstrated between both groups. Nine patients (28.1%) in the study group and 18 patients (56.3%) in the control group required blood transfusion through 6 cycles of chemotherapy (p=0.02). Fewer median number of total packed red cell units were required in the study group compared to the control group (0 and 0.5 unit, respectively, p=0.04). Serious adverse events and hypersensitivity reactions were not reported. However, constipation was significantly higher in the control group (3.1% and 40.6%, p=gynecologic cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy, associated with less constipation than the oral formulation. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anemia, bleeding, and blood transfusion in the intensive care unit: causes, risks, costs, and new strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Michael T; Shander, Aryeh

    2013-11-01

    The definition of anemia is controversial and varies with the sex, age, and ethnicity of the patient. Anemia afflicts half of hospitalized patients and most elderly hospitalized patients. Acute anemia in the operating room or intensive care unit is associated with increased morbidity as well as other adverse outcomes, including death. The risks of anemia are compounded by the added risks associated with transfusion of red blood cells, the most common treatment for severe anemia. The causes of anemia in hospitalized patients include iron deficiency, suppression of erythropoietin and iron transport, trauma, phlebotomy, coagulopathies, adverse effects of and reactions to medications, and stress-induced gastrointestinal bleeding. The types and causes of anemia and the increased health care utilization and costs associated with anemia and undetected internal bleeding are described. The potential benefits and risks associated with transfusion of red blood cells also are explored. Last, the strategies and new tools to help prevent anemia, allow earlier detection of internal bleeding, and avoid unnecessary blood transfusions are discussed.

  17. Infusion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Types, Characteristics, Adverse and Transfusion Reactions and the Implications for Nursing Infusión de células madre hematopoyéticas: tipos, características, reacciones adversas y de transfusión y sus implicaciones para la enfermería Infusão de células-tronco hematopoéticas: tipos, características, reações adversas e transfusionais e implicações para a enfermagem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina de Jesus Vieira Curcioli

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell infusion is an important procedure in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT. This study identifies transfusion and other adverse reactions that can occur during infusion and the nursing care related to the procedure. This epidemiologic study used transplantations performed between 2006 and 2008. A total of 166 transplantations were performed: 114 were autologous, 47 allogeneic and five haploidentical. Three transfusion reactions and 96 adverse reactions were observed. Adverse reactions were related to the presence of cryoprotectant, though the infusion rate and quantity of infused cryoprotectant were not related to the occurrence of reactions. The products were fresh and infused within the recommended time when transfusion reactions occurred. In regard to cell source, lower engraftment time was found in peripheral blood. Nursing documentation is relevant for patients' safety as well to planning an infusion in order to minimize the occurrence of reactions.La infusión de las células madre hematopoyéticas es un importante procedimiento en el trasplante de células madre hematopoyéticas. Este estudio se propuso identificar las reacciones adversas y de transfusión que pueden ocurrir durante la infusión y los cuidados de enfermería inherentes al procedimiento. Se trata de un estudio epidemiológico en trasplantes ocurridos en los años de 2006 a 2008. En ese período ocurrieron 166 trasplantes, siendo 114 autólogos, 47 alogénicos y 5 haploidénticos. Se observaron tres reacciones de transfusión y 96 reacciones adversas. Las reacciones adversas están ligadas a presencia del crioprotector. Sin embargo, la velocidad de infusión y la cantidad del crioprotector infundido, no tuvieron relación con la ocurrencia de las reacciones. En las reacciones de transfusión, los productos eran frescos e infundidos con la velocidad preconizada. En cuanto a las fuentes de células, hubo menor tiempo de injerto en la sangre

  18. Transfusão de hemácias em terapia intensiva: controvérsias entre evidências Red blood cell transfusion in the intensive care setting: controversies amongst evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Carmo Costa Filho

    2009-08-01

    com hemoglobina superiores a 7 g/dL. Não existe um consenso sobre o limiar transfusional em pacientes críticos. Os pacientes com doença cardiovascular parecem apresentar um maior risco de morte do que aqueles sem doença cardiovascular, para qualquer nível de hemoglobina. A transfusão guiada por níveis de hemoglobina e parâmetros fisiológicos, oxi-hemodinâmicos individualizados e contexto clínico parece ser atualmente estratégia mais aceita do que a correção arbitrária e isolada da hemoglobina.Anemia is a prevalent issue in intensive care units. It appears in the first days, and may continue or worsen during hospital stay. Its etiology is generally multifactorial. Red blood cell transfusion is the most common intervention for treating anemia. Approximately 12 million blood units are used for transfusions in the United States, 25% to 30% in the intensive care units. Due to reduction of transfusion infections the increased safety has allowed an expansion of clinical indications. However, transfusion therapy is associated with other adverse effects such as nosocomial infections, immunological impairment, lung injury, hemolytic reactions and higher cancer incidence. Various papers have tried to show an association between correction of anemia and mortality-morbidity, but no consensus has been reached in literature. One of the current World Health Organization's proposals is to reduce potentially unnecessary transfusions, promoting a rational transfusion attitude. The primary objective of this narrative review is to approach controversies regarding the transfusion threshold according to recent studies, and as a secondary objective, it aims to discuss iatrogenic anemia aspects and the different behaviors among intensivists on the best practices for implementation of transfusion practices. It is not within our objectives to discuss transfusion complications, although they are mentioned. A search was conducted on electronic literature databases (Pub

  19. Transfusion-transmitted virus infection in hemodialysis patients in Arar, Saudi Arabia: Prevalence, predictors and genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheref M El-taher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-transmitted virus (TTV is a single-stranded DNA virus that was identified in patients with post-transfusion hepatitis of non-A-to-G type. Patients with chronic renal failure on maintenance hemodialysis (HD have a higher risk of viral infections, and the prevalence of TTV infection is common. The aim of our study was to detect TTV-DNA and its genotype in HD patients. A case-control study compromising of 63 patients on maintenance HD therapy at the Nephrology Center of Central Arar Hospital and 100 healthy individuals who were tested for TTVDNA and its genotype by semi nested-polymerase chain reaction with primers derived from the conserved open reading frame 1 (ORF1 region followed by digestion with NdeI and PstI restriction enzyme. The results show that the prevalence of TTV in HD patients was high and statistically significant; 42.9% compared with 19% in the control group. History of blood transfusion was the only significant predictor, and we found that age of patients, duration of HD, hepatitis B and C infection, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were not significant predictors of TT virus positivity in HD patients. TTV genotype 1 (G1 was found to be the most common genotype among both HD and healthy controls. The prevalence of TTV among HD patients was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals. History of blood transfusion was the only significant predictor of TTV positivity among them. Genotype 1 was the most predominant type among HD and healthy individuals. Further studies on TTV in peritoneal dialysis patients and transplant patients are needed.

  20. Restrictive blood transfusion protocol in liver resection patients reduces blood transfusions with no increase in patient morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehry, John; Cannon, Robert; Scoggins, Charles R; Puffer, Lisa; McMasters, Kelly M; Martin, Robert C G

    2015-02-01

    Management of anemia in surgical oncology patients remains one of the key quality components in overall care and cost. Continued reports demonstrate the effects of hospital transfusion, which has been demonstrated to lead to a longer length of stay, more complications, and possibly worse overall oncologic outcomes. The hypothesis for this study was that a dedicated restrictive transfusion protocol in patients undergoing hepatectomy would lead to less overall blood transfusion with no increase in overall morbidity. A cohort study was performed using our prospective database from January 2000 to June 2013. September 2011 served as the separation point for the date of operation criteria because this marked the implementation of more restrictive blood transfusion guidelines. A total of 186 patients undergoing liver resection were reviewed. The restrictive blood transfusion guidelines reduced the percentage of patients that received blood from 31.0% before January 9, 2011 to 23.3% after this date (P = .03). The liver procedure that was most consistently associated with higher levels of transfusion was a right lobectomy (16%). Prior surgery and endoscopic stent were the 2 preoperative interventions associated with receiving blood. Patients who received blood before and after the restrictive period had similar predictive factors: major hepatectomies, higher intraoperative blood loss, lower preoperative hemoglobin level, older age, prior systemic chemotherapy, and lower preoperative nutritional parameters (all P blood did not have worse overall progression-free survival or overall survival. A restrictive blood transfusion protocol reduces the incidence of blood transfusions and the number of packed red blood cells transfused. Patients who require blood have similar preoperative and intraoperative factors that cannot be mitigated in oncology patients. Restrictive use of blood transfusions can reduce cost and does adversely affect patients undergoing liver resection

  1. Lack of effect of unrefrigerated young whole blood transfusion on patient outcomes after massive transfusion in a civilian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kwok M; Leonard, Anton D

    2011-08-01

    Warm fresh whole blood has been advocated for critical bleeding in the military setting. This study assessed whether unrefrigerated young whole blood transfusion, from donation to transfusion less than 24 hours, could reduce mortality of patients with critical bleeding in a civilian setting. A linked data cohort study was conducted on a total of 353 consecutive patients requiring massive transfusion, defined as 10 units or more of red blood cells or whole blood transfusion within 24 hours, in a quaternary health care center in Australia. Of the 353 patients with massive blood transfusion in the study, 77 received unrefrigerated young whole blood transfusion (mean, 4.0 units; interquartile range, 2-6). The diagnosis, severity of acute illness, age, sex, and ABO blood group were not significantly different between the patients who received unrefrigerated young whole blood and those who did not. Unrefrigerated young whole blood transfusions were associated with a slightly improved coagulation profile (lowest fibrinogen concentrations 1.7g/L vs. 1.4g/L, p=0.006; worst international normalization ratio, 2.4 vs. 2.8, p=0.05) but did not reduce the total utilization of allogeneic blood products and subsequent use of recombinant Factor VIIa (27% vs. 22%, p=0.358). Thirty-day mortality and 8-year survival after hospital discharge (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.41-2.65; p=0.93) were also not different after the use of unrefrigerated young whole blood transfusion. Unrefrigerated young whole blood transfusion was not associated with a reduced mortality of patients requiring massive transfusion in a civilian setting when other blood products were readily available. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  2. Transfusion therapy in paediatric trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nystrup, Kristin Brønnum; Stensballe, Jakob; Bøttger, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Haemorrhage is a leading cause of death in paediatric trauma patients. Predefined massive transfusion protocols (MTP) have the potential to significantly reduce mortality by treating haemorrhagic shock and coagulopathy, in adhering to the principles of haemostatic resuscitation with rapid...... administration of balanced ratios of packed red blood cells (RBC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and platelets (PLT).Because of their substantial physiological reserve, initial vital signs may not be good predictors of early haemorrhage in paediatric patients. Determining the triggers for MTP activation...... in paediatric trauma patients is challenging, and the optimal blood product ratio that will increase survival in massively bleeding paediatric trauma patients has yet to be determined. To date, only a few small descriptive studies and case reports have investigated the use of predefined MTP in paediatric trauma...

  3. Automated exchange transfusion and exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funato, M; Shimada, S; Tamai, H; Taki, H; Yoshioka, Y

    1989-10-01

    An automated blood exchange transfusion (BET) with a two-site technique has been devised by Goldmann et al and by us, using an infusion pump. With this method, we successfully performed exchange transfusions 189 times in the past four years on 110 infants with birth weights ranging from 530 g to 4,000 g. The exchange rate by the automated method was compared with the rate by Diamond's method. Serum bilirubin (SB) levels before and after BET and the maximal SB rebound within 24 hours after BET were: 21.6 +/- 2.4, 11.5 +/- 2.2, and 15.0 +/- 1.5 mg/dl in the automated method, and 22.0 +/- 2.9, 11.2 +/- 2.5, and 17.7 +/- 3.2 mg/dl in Diamond's method, respectively. The result showed that the maximal rebound of the SB level within 24 hours after BET was significantly lower in the automated method than in Diamond's method (p less than 0.01), though SB levels before and after BET were not significantly different between the two methods. The exchange rate was also measured by means of staining the fetal red cells (F cells) both in the automated method and in Diamond's method, and comparing them. The exchange rate of F cells in Diamond's method went down along the theoretical exchange curve proposed by Diamond, while the rate in the automated method was significantly better than in Diamond's, especially in the early stage of BET (p less than 0.01). We believe that the use of this automated method may give better results than Diamond's method in the rate of exchange, because this method is performed with a two-site technique using a peripheral artery and vein.

  4. Predeposit autologous blood transfusion: Do we require to promote it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Safest blood a patient can receive is his own. Quest for safe blood transfusion has remained of prime concern. To meet this aspiration, various forms of autologous blood transfusions can be practiced. It is especially suitable for patients with rare blood groups and religious sects such as Jehovah′s witness autologous transfusion is extremely safe. Cross matching is not required; iso-immunization to a foreign body is excluded. Fear of transfusion transmissible disease can be ignored. Therefore, autologous blood transfusion is required to be revisited. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study carried out at Padmashree Dr. D. Y. Patil Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Pune between July 2010 and May 2012. Study comprised of 100 patients divided into two groups, autologous and homologous. Benefits of autologous transfusion were studied. Results: There was no significant change in hematocrit and blood parameters after blood donation. That is mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (P < 0.001 after blood donation. Only one complication of vasovagal syncope was observed at the time of blood donation. Conclusion: Autologous blood transfusion is safe. Easy alternative to be practiced in elective surgeries, especially in patients with rare blood group or believers of Jehovah′s witness faith. It helps to reduce the shortfall in national blood inventory. Autologous blood donation should be practiced whenever possible.

  5. Preventing blood transfusion failures: FMEA, an effective assessment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Zhila; Hasoumi, Mojtaba; Behzadi, Faranak; Mohamadi, Efat; Jafary, Mohamadreza; Saeedi, Morteza

    2017-06-30

    Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) is a method used to assess the risk of failures and harms to patients during the medical process and to identify the associated clinical issues. The aim of this study was to conduct an assessment of blood transfusion process in a teaching general hospital, using FMEA as the method. A structured FMEA was recruited in our study performed in 2014, and corrective actions were implemented and re-evaluated after 6 months. Sixteen 2-h sessions were held to perform FMEA in the blood transfusion process, including five steps: establishing the context, selecting team members, analysis of the processes, hazard analysis, and developing a risk reduction protocol for blood transfusion. Failure modes with the highest risk priority numbers (RPNs) were identified. The overall RPN scores ranged from 5 to 100 among which, four failure modes were associated with RPNs over 75. The data analysis indicated that failures with the highest RPNs were: labelling (RPN: 100), transfusion of blood or the component (RPN: 100), patient identification (RPN: 80) and sampling (RPN: 75). The results demonstrated that mis-transfusion of blood or blood component is the most important error, which can lead to serious morbidity or mortality. Provision of training to the personnel on blood transfusion, knowledge raising on hazards and appropriate preventative measures, as well as developing standard safety guidelines are essential, and must be implemented during all steps of blood and blood component transfusion.

  6. Profiles of blood and blood component transfusion recipients in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Hassall, Oliver; Faragher, Brian E.; Kajja, Isaac; Mvere, David A.; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited published data on the characteristics of blood transfusion recipients in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the demographic characteristics of blood transfusion recipients and patterns of blood and blood component use in Zimbabwe. Materials and methods Data on the characteristics of the blood transfusion recipients (age, sex, blood group), blood components received (type, quantity), discharge diagnoses and outcomes following transfusion (discharge status, duration of stay in hospital), were retrospectively collected from four major hospitals for the period from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Diagnoses were grouped into broad categories according to the disease headings of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Surgical procedures were grouped into broad categories according to organ system using ICD-9. Results Most of the 1,793 transfusion recipients studied were female (63.2%) and in the reproductive age group, i.e. 15–49 years (65.3%). The median age of the recipients was 33 years (range, 0–93). The majority of these recipients (n=1,642; 91.6%) received a red blood cell transfusion. The majority of the patients were diagnosed with conditions related to pregnancy and childbirth (22.3%), and diseases of blood and blood-forming organs (17.7%). The median time spent in hospital was 8 days (range, 0–214) and in-hospital mortality was 15.4%. Discussion Our sample of blood transfusion recipients were fairly young and most of them received red blood cell transfusions. The majority of patients in the reproductive age group received blood transfusions for pregnancy and childbirth-related diagnoses. PMID:26192782

  7. Suppression of graft-versus-host reactivity by a single host-specific blood transfusion to prospective donors of hemopoietic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knulst, A.C.; Bril-Bazuin, C.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Benner, R.

    1991-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses against recipient's histocompatibility antigens can occur early in the course of a graft-versus-host reaction in lethally irradiated allogeneically reconstituted mice. This reactivity could be suppressed by a single host-specific blood transfusion to the

  8. Blood transfusion in children with sickle cell disease undergoing tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Carlyn M; Gnagi, Sharon H; Teufel, Ronald J; Nguyen, Shaun A; White, David R

    2017-12-01

    Tonsillectomy is the second most common surgery in children with sickle cell disease. These children are at an increased risk of perioperative complications due to vaso-occlusive events. Although controversial, preoperative blood transfusions are sometimes given in an effort to prevent such complications. The purpose of this study is to analyze trends in the use of blood transfusion for management of children with sickle cell disease (SCD) undergoing tonsillectomy in a national database. Patients in the 1997-2012 KID with a primary procedure matching the ICD-9 procedure code for tonsillectomy (28.2-28.3) and diagnosis code for SCD (282.60-282.69) were examined. Patients were split into groups by blood transfusion status and compared across variables including complication rate, length of stay (LOS), and hospital charges. Statistical analysis included chi-square test for trend, Mann-Whitney U test, and independent t-test. 1133 patients with SCD underwent tonsillectomy. There was a strong positive correlation between increasing chronologic year and the proportion of patients receiving blood transfusions, 47 (30.1%) in 1997 to 78 (42.5%) in 2012 (r = 0.94, p = 0.005). During this period, there was no significant change in the rate of complications (r = -0.1, p = 0.87). Overall, patients receiving blood transfusion had a longer mean LOS (3.1 ± 2.4 days vs. 2.5 ± 2.2 days, p blood transfusion. The rate of complications in the transfusion group, 18 of 352(5.1%), was not significantly different (p = 0.48) from the group without transfusion, 40 of 626 (6.4%). From 1997 to 2012, there was a significant increase in the proportion of patients with SCD receiving perioperative blood transfusions for tonsillectomy. While the frequency of transfusion rose, those who received a transfusion had similar complication rates with increased charges and length of hospital stays compared to those who did not receive a transfusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  9. Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rappeport, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The clinical pathologic syndrome of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is usually a sequela of bone marrow transplantation. This disorder occurs as a result of recognition by engrafted donor-derived lymphocytes of foreign recipient transplantation antigens. GVHD may also result from engraftment of lymphocytes from other sources, including (1) transfusion of lymphocytes containing blood components, (2) transplacental maternal fetal transfusion, and (3) passive transfer of lymphocytes in solid organ transplantation. The recipients are usually severely immunodeficient and thus incapable of rejecting the transfused lymphocytes. This syndrome may, however, also develop in immunologically competent patients receiving blood products from individuals with histocompatibility antigens not recognized as foreign. 58 refs

  10. The prevalence and assessment of blood transfusions in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajieh Borna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood transfusion is common in infants. Due to the weakened immune system of newborns and the risk of blood transfusion complications, it is necessary to pay more attention following or after to blood transfusion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and risk factors of blood transfusions in hospitalized neonates. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 1106 infants admitted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU of Mustafa Khomeini University Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from spring 2009 to 2012. Frequency and the reason for of blood components transfusion including fresh frozen plasma, platelets, whole blood, packed red blood cells, cryoprecipitate and relationship with gestational age, sex, birth weight, Apgar score, duration of hospitalization, use of mechanical ventilation were assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS statistical software, version 16 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA and statistical test, chi-square test, independent t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results: Among 1106 infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, 221 infants (%19.98 received blood products. 82 of all (37% were female and 139 (%63 were female. 113 (51% of neonate were preterm and 108 (48% were term. From 361 times of blood transfusions, 121 infant (54.75% received at least one blood product. The frequency of blood transfusion was between 39 and 1 times, with an average of 3.65 times per infant. Frequency of fresh frozen plasma infusion was 173 (47.9%, packed cell 122 (33%, platelet 32 (8.8%, cryoprecipitate 20 (5.1% and whole blood 3 unit (0.83%. The most common causes for fresh frozen plasma transfusion was replacement therapy 140 (80%, for packed cell, to correct symptomatic anemia 68 (55.6%, for platelet transfusions was to prevent bleeding in  neonates with thrombocytopenia 20 (62.5% and cryoprecipitate for bleeding caused by DIC in 18 infant (90%. There was significant relation between frequency of

  11. Red blood cell transfusion in preterm neonates: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirico G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gaetano ChiricoNeonatology and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Children Hospital, Spedali Civili, Brescia, ItalyAbstract: Preterm neonates, especially very low birth weight infants, remain a category of patients with high transfusion needs; about 90% of those with <1,000 g birth weight may be transfused several times during their hospital stay. However, neonatal red blood cells (RBC transfusion is not without risks. In addition to well-known adverse events, several severe side effects have been observed unique to preterm infants, such as transfusion-related acute gut injury, intraventricular hemorrhage, and increased mortality risk. It is therefore important to reduce the frequency of RBC transfusion in critically ill neonates, by delayed clamping or milking the umbilical cord, using residual cord blood for initial laboratory investigations, reducing phlebotomy losses, determining transfusion guidelines, and ensuring the most appropriate nutrition, with the optimal supplementation of iron, folic acid, and vitamins. Ideally, RBC transfusion should be tailored to the individual requirements of the single infant. However, many controversies still remain, and the decision on whether to transfuse or not is often made on an empirical basis. Recently, a few clinical trials have been performed with the aim to compare the risk/benefit ratio of restrictive versus liberal transfusion criteria. No significant differences in short-term outcomes were observed, suggesting that the restrictive criteria may reduce the need for transfusion and the related side effects. Neurodevelopmental long-term outcome seemed more favorable in the liberal group at first evaluation, especially for boys, and significantly better in the restrictive group at a later clinical investigation. Magnetic resonance imaging scans, performed at an average age of 12 years, showed that intracranial volume was substantially smaller in the liberal group compared with controls. When sex effects

  12. A Survey on Transfusion Status in Orthopedic Surgery at a Trauma Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Soleimanha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increased costs and mortality associated with inappropriate blood transfusions have led to investigations about blood request and blood transfusion techniques. We investigated the transfusion status in patients who underwent orthopedic surgery in Poursina Hospital (Rasht, Iran to optimizing blood usage and determine if a scheduled transfusion program for every orthopedic surgery could improve blood transfusion management. Method: In this descriptive-prospective study, all orthopedic surgeries in Poursina Hospital, Rasht, between April to June 2013 were reviewed. All patient information was recorded, including: demographics, type of surgery, hemoglobin level, cross-match test, duration of surgery, and blood loss, and transfusion. Based on the one-way ANOVA and independent samples test analysis, cross-match to transfusion ratio and transfusion possibility, the transfusion index, and maximal surgical blood order schedule were calculated to determine blood transfusion status. Results: Among 872 selected orthopedic surgery candidates, 318 of them were cross-matched and among those, 114 patients received a blood transfusion. In this study, the cross-match to transfusion ratio was 6.4, transfusion possibility 36.47%, transfusion index 0.6, and maximal surgical blood order schedule 0.9. Conclusion: We found that blood ordering was moderately higher than the standard; so it is highly recommended to focus on the knowledge of evidence based on transfusion and standard guidelines for blood transfusion to avoid over-ordering.

  13. Protocol for a national blood transfusion data warehouse from donor to recipient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeven, Loan R; Hooftman, Babette H; Janssen, Mart P; de Bruijne, Martine C; de Vooght, Karen M K; Kemper, Peter; Koopman, Maria M W

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Blood transfusion has health-related, economical and safety implications. In order to optimise the transfusion chain, comprehensive research data are needed. The Dutch Transfusion Data warehouse (DTD) project aims to establish a data warehouse where data from donors and transfusion

  14. Development and evaluation of a new paediatric blood transfusion protocol for Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheema, B.; Molyneux, E. M.; Emmanuel, J. C.; M'baya, B.; Esan, M.; Kamwendo, H.; Kalilani-Phiri, L.; Boele van Hensbroek, M.

    2010-01-01

    Severe anaemia is a common childhood emergency in developing countries. Practical evidence-based guidance on when to transfuse, volume of transfusion and ideal duration of transfusion is lacking. The aim of this study is to develop a paediatric transfusion protocol for use in under-resourced

  15. Postnatal cytomegalovirus infection: a pilot comparative effectiveness study of transfusion safety using leukoreduced-only transfusion strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Meghan; Mayock, Dennis; Knezevic, Andrea; Norby-Slycord, Colette; Kleine, Elizabeth; Patel, Ravi; Easley, Kirk; Josephson, Cassandra

    2016-08-01

    The optimal mitigation strategy to prevent transfusion transmission of cytomegalovirus (TT-CMV) in preterm very low birthweight infants remains debated. Hospitals caring for this patient population have varied practices. A prospective observational comparative effectiveness pilot study was conducted to determine the feasibility for a larger study. The pilot was carried out at hospitals using a leukoreduction (LR)-only transfusion strategy. Specimen and data collection for this study was performed in a similar approach to a study completed at Emory University that employed the CMV-seronegative plus LR approach. All testing was performed at one laboratory. The rates of TT-CMV using the two transfusion strategies were compared. Zero incidence of TT-CMV was detected in infants (n = 20) transfused with LR-only blood (0/8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0-25.3%) and is consistent with the previously reported zero incidence of TT-CMV finding in a cohort of infants transfused with CMV-negative plus LR blood (0/310; 95% CI, 0%-0.9%). The seroprevalence rate among enrolled mothers (n = 17) was 60%. Forty percent of those infants (8/20) received 43 transfusions; five were transfused with one or more CMV-seropositive blood components. One infant had tested positive for CMV before receiving blood transfusions; the infant's mother was CMV immunoglobulin (Ig)G positive and IgM negative. Using the LR-only transfusion approach, zero cases of TT-CMV were detected in this pilot study. A larger study is needed to reliably determine the most effective strategy for prevention of TT-CMV in this population. © 2016 AABB.

  16. Investigation of the status quo of massive blood transfusion in China and a synopsis of the proposed guidelines for massive blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiang-Cun; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Dang, Qian-Li; Sun, Yang; Xu, Cui-Xiang; Jin, Zhan-Kui; Ma, Ting; Liu, Jing

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to provide an overview of massive transfusion in Chinese hospitals, identify the important indications for massive transfusion and corrective therapies based on clinical evidence and supporting experimental studies, and propose guidelines for the management of massive transfusion. This multiregion, multicenter retrospective study involved a Massive Blood Transfusion Coordination Group composed of 50 clinical experts specializing in blood transfusion, cardiac surgery, anesthesiology, obstetrics, general surgery, and medical statistics from 20 tertiary general hospitals across 5 regions in China. Data were collected for all patients who received ≥10 U red blood cell transfusion within 24 hours in the participating hospitals from January 1 2009 to December 31 2010, including patient demographics, pre-, peri-, and post-operative clinical characteristics, laboratory test results before, during, and after transfusion, and patient mortality at post-transfusion and discharge. We also designed an in vitro hemodilution model to investigate the changes of blood coagulation indices during massive transfusion and the correction of coagulopathy through supplement blood components under different hemodilutions. The experimental data in combination with the clinical evidence were used to determine the optimal proportion and timing for blood component supplementation during massive transfusion. Based on the findings from the present study, together with an extensive review of domestic and international transfusion-related literature and consensus feedback from the 50 experts, we drafted the guidelines on massive blood transfusion that will help Chinese hospitals to develop standardized protocols for massive blood transfusion.

  17. [Perioperative transfusion of erythrocyte concentrates during elective surgery: introduction of a protocol for indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega Andrés, M C; Abad Gosálbez, A; López Sánchez, P; Martínez Aparisi, A; Ortí Lucas, R; Aranda Arrufat, A; Madrid Rondón, V

    1999-10-01

    The aim of this paper is, first, to know the actual situation of the perioperatory red cell transfusion for elective surgery in our hospital. In a second phase and prospectively, we tested guidelines for red cell perioperatory transfusion in order to observe the change of transfusions. Then, we compared the results between the basal and postintervention periods. We performed an aleatory assay with two periods, basal and interventionist. Basal period: 151 patients undergoing elective surgery with perioperatory blood requested and general anesthesia. Intervention period: We applied a transfusion guidelines protocol for perioperatory red cell transfusion from the Hospital's Transfusion Committee, also a questionnaire to evaluate the medical indication; We studied 164 patients with clinical features like the basal period. Study/results variables: preoperative blood request, perioperatively transfusion, number of packed red-cell units transfused, crossmatch--to--transfusion ratio, haemoglobin level pre and posttransfusion. No significant drop of the cross match-transfusion ratio was observed after intervention. There is a slight reduction of the crossmatch--to--transfusion ratio, although these value is high (4.48), due to an increase of the transfusion keeping the percentage of appropriate transfusions. The most frequent reason (53%) of inadequate transfusion is the active bleeding. 1) The transfusional activity of the Marina Alta Hospital supposes approximately 17% of the request and 6% of the global transfusion. 2) The introduction of a protocol of perioperative transfusion instructions suppose a small decrease of the crossmatch--to--transfusion ratio, without statistical significance. This slight reduction is due to an increase of transfusion in the post-intervention period, since in this period there is a group of older age patients and with greater percentage of associated pathology. 3) The rate of appropriate transfusions in both periods is similar. 4) The

  18. A Survey on Transfusion Status in Orthopedic Surgery at a Trauma Center

    OpenAIRE

    Soleimanha, Mehran; Haghighi, Mohammad; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Sedighinejad, Abbas; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Naderi-Nabi, Bahram; Chavoshi, Tahereh; Mehrnoosh, Mehrnoosh Ghandili

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased costs and mortality associated with inappropriate blood transfusions have led to investigations about blood request and blood transfusion techniques. We investigated the transfusion status in patients who underwent orthopedic surgery in Poursina Hospital (Rasht, Iran) to optimizing blood usage and determine if a scheduled transfusion program for every orthopedic surgery could improve blood transfusion management. Method: In this descriptive-prospective study, all orthop...

  19. The Efficacy and Safety of Autologous Transfusion in Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Moon-Jib; Park, Hee-Gon; Ryu, Jee-Won; Kim, Jeong-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although allogeneic blood transfusion is the most common method of transfusion in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), there are reports showing significant decrease in the amount of allogeneic transfusion and incidence of side effects after combined use of autologous transfusion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of using an autologous transfusion device in TKA. Materials and Methods Patients who underwent TKA at our institution from January 2003 to January 2014 were...

  20. Transfusion-related mortality after primary hip arthroplasty - an analysis of mechanisms and confounders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jans, O; Kehlet, H; Johansson, P I

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Bleeding and postoperative anaemia after total hip arthroplasty (THA) may trigger transfusion of red blood cells (RBC). However, large observational studies have reported associations between RBC transfusion and increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. As major...... bleeding or severe postoperative anaemia is intrinsically linked with RBC transfusion, direct causality between transfusion and adverse outcomes remains unclear. This study aimed to identify possible relations between RBC transfusion, severe bleeding or anaemia and mortality in all patients who died...

  1. Utilisation of blood transfusion service in north eastern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . However, people still die or remain at risk of transfusion-transmissible infections due to poor donor recruitment and selection, use of poorly screened blood and inappropriate use of blood and blood components. Objectives: To evaluate the ...

  2. Soluble vascular endothelial growth factor in various blood transfusion components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Werther, K; Mynster, T

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion may reduce survival after curative surgery for solid tumors. This may be related to extracellular content of cancer growth factors present in transfusion components. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent stimulator of angiogenesis in solid tumors....... The potential content of VEGF in various blood components for transfusion was evaluated. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Soluble VEGF (sVEGF, isotype 165) was determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) in serum and plasma samples and in lysed cells from healthy volunteers. Subsequently, total content......-reduced PRP. The sVEGF accumulated significantly in WB, SAGM blood, and BCP pools, depending on the storage time. CONCLUSION: The sVEGF (isotype 165) appears to be present in various blood transfusion components, depending on storage time....

  3. Lower versus higher hemoglobin threshold for transfusion in septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusions are frequently given to patients with septic shock. However, the benefits and harms of different hemoglobin thresholds for transfusion have not been established. METHODS: In this multicenter, parallel-group trial, we randomly assigned patients in the intensive care...... were similar in the two intervention groups. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with septic shock, mortality at 90 days and rates of ischemic events and use of life support were similar among those assigned to blood transfusion at a higher hemoglobin threshold and those assigned to blood transfusion....... The primary outcome measure was death by 90 days after randomization. RESULTS: We analyzed data from 998 of 1005 patients (99.3%) who underwent randomization. The two intervention groups had similar baseline characteristics. In the ICU, the lower-threshold group received a median of 1 unit of blood...

  4. Restrictive or Liberal Red-Cell Transfusion for Cardiac Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazer, C David; Whitlock, Richard P; Fergusson, Dean A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of a restrictive versus liberal red-cell transfusion strategy on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery remains unclear. METHODS: In this multicenter, open-label, noninferiority trial, we randomly assigned 5243 adults undergoing cardiac surgery who had......, stroke, or new-onset renal failure with dialysis, with less blood transfused. (Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and others; TRICS III ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02042898 .)....... a European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) I of 6 or more (on a scale from 0 to 47, with higher scores indicating a higher risk of death after cardiac surgery) to a restrictive red-cell transfusion threshold (transfuse if hemoglobin level was

  5. Perioperative transfusion threshold and ambulation after hip revision surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kamilla; Johansson, Pär I; Dahl, Benny

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion with red blood cells (RBC) may be needed during hip revision surgery but the appropriate haemoglobin concentration (Hb) threshold for transfusion has not been well established. We hypothesized that a higher transfusion threshold would improve ambulation after hip revision...... surgery. METHODS: The trial was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov ( NCT00906295). Sixty-six patients aged 18 years or older undergoing hip revision surgery were randomized to receive RBC at a Hb threshold of either 7.3 g/dL (restrictive group) or 8.9 g/dL (liberal group). Postoperative ambulation...... received RBC. CONCLUSIONS: A Hb transfusion threshold of 8.9 g/dL was associated with a statistically significantly faster TUG after hip revision surgery compared to a threshold of 7.3 g/dL but the clinical importance is questionable and the groups did not differ in Hb at the time of testing....

  6. [Guidelines for blood transfusion teaching to medical laboratory technology students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncharmont, P; Tourlourat, M; Fourcade, C; Julien, E; Peyrard, T; Cabaud, J-J

    2012-02-01

    The new French law about clinical laboratory medicine, the requirements of the ISO/CEI 15189 standard, the numerous abilities expected from the medical laboratory technologists and their involvement in blood bank management has led the working group "Recherche et démarche qualité" of the French Society of Blood Transfusion to initiate an inventory of blood transfusion teaching syllabus for medical laboratory technology students and to propose transfusion medicine teaching guidelines. Seven worksheets have been established for that purpose including red blood cell antigen typing and antibody screening, blood sampling in immunohaematology, automation, clinical practices, blood products, blood delivery and haemovigilance. These guidelines aim at contributing to the harmonization of transfusion medicine teaching and at providing objective elements to the medical laboratory managers regarding the practical and theoretical skills of theirs collaborators. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. A suspected case of transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Sherif

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a rare but serious complication of blood transfusion. We present a suspected case of TRALI in a 39-year-old female patient who underwent total abdominal hysterectomy under uneventful general anesthesia. The patient developed acute desaturation due to noncardiogenic pulmonary edema while receiving compatible blood transfusion on the second postoperative day. As her symptoms were refractory to supportive treatment, she was mechanically ventilated for 3 days and successfully extubated on the fourth day. By exclusion, a clinical diagnosis of TRALI was made. The treatment for TRALI requires discontinuing transfusion and giving respiratory and cardiovascular support. Most cases show clinical improvement in first few hours and resolve completely within 96 h.

  8. Reappraising the concept of massive transfusion in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanworth, Simon J; Morris, Timothy P; Gaarder, Christine; Goslings, J Carel; Maegele, Marc; Cohen, Mitchell J; König, Thomas C; Davenport, Ross A; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Johansson, Pär I; Allard, Shubha; Johnson, Tony; Brohi, Karim

    2010-01-01

    The massive-transfusion concept was introduced to recognize the dilutional complications resulting from large volumes of packed red blood cells (PRBCs). Definitions of massive transfusion vary and lack supporting clinical evidence. Damage-control resuscitation regimens of modern trauma care are targeted to the early correction of acute traumatic coagulopathy. The aim of this study was to identify a clinically relevant definition of trauma massive transfusion based on clinical outcomes. We also examined whether the concept was useful in that early prediction of massive transfusion requirements could allow early activation of blood bank protocols. Datasets on trauma admissions over a 1 or 2-year period were obtained from the trauma registries of five large trauma research networks. A fractional polynomial was used to model the transfusion-associated probability of death. A logistic regression model for the prediction of massive transfusion, defined as 10 or more units of red cell transfusions, was developed. In total, 5,693 patient records were available for analysis. Mortality increased as transfusion requirements increased, but the model indicated no threshold effect. Mortality was 9% in patients who received none to five PRBC units, 22% in patients receiving six to nine PRBC units, and 42% in patients receiving 10 or more units. A logistic model for prediction of massive transfusion was developed and validated at multiple sites but achieved only moderate performance. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.81, with specificity of only 50% at a sensitivity of 90% for the prediction of 10 or more PRBC units. Performance varied widely at different trauma centers, with specificity varying from 48% to 91%. No threshold for definition exists at which a massive transfusion specifically results in worse outcomes. Even with a large sample size across multiple trauma datasets, it was not possible to develop a transportable and clinically useful

  9. [Transfusion and its specific problems in pediatrics and neonatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérel, Y; Runel, C; Huguenin, Y; Renesme, L; Aladjidi, N

    2017-09-01

    Principles of transfusion strategy have been used for neonates and children similar to adults. However, due to substantial discrepancies between physiology/pathology in children and in their adult counterparts, decisions, indications, and doses are different from those of adults, especially in neonates. Specific data and practice guidelines for blood product transfusion are reported owing to the experience of pediatrics and neonatology units and partners of the French Blood product bank. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  10. The Effects of Blood Transfusion on Delirium Incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zanden, Vera; Beishuizen, Sara J; Scholtens, Rikie M; de Jonghe, Annemarieke; de Rooij, Sophia E; van Munster, Barbara C

    2016-08-01

    Both anemia and blood transfusion could be precipitating factors for delirium; hence in postoperative patients with anemia at high risk for delirium, it is controversial whether transfusion is the best option. The aim of this study is to investigate the association of anemia and delirium and the role of blood transfusion within the multicomponent prevention strategy of delirium. We conducted a substudy of a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Four hundred fifteen patients aged 65 to 102 years old admitted for hip fracture surgery were enrolled. Delirium was assessed daily using criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition. Data on hemoglobin values and transfusion were collected from the electronic medical records. One hundred fifteen (32.5%) patients experienced delirium during hospitalization, 238 (57.5%) had a hemoglobin level ≤ 6.0 mmol/L (9.7 g/dL) at any time during hospitalization, and 140 (33.7%) received a blood transfusion. Anemia (a hemoglobin level ≤ 6.0 mmol/L [9.7 g/dL]) was associated with delirium (odds ratio, 1.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.15-2.86). Blood transfusion was a protective factor for delirium in patients with the lowest measured hemoglobin level ≤ 6.0 mmol/L (9.7 g/dL) (odds ratio, 0.26; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.70). Low hemoglobin level is associated with delirium, and receiving a blood transfusion is associated with a lower delirium incidence. It would be interesting to investigate the effect of blood transfusion as part of the multicomponent treatment of delirium in patients with anemia. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prion diseases are efficiently transmitted by blood transfusion in sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Houston, F.; McCutcheon, S.; Goldmann, W.; Chong, A.; Foster, J.; Siso, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Jeffrey, M.; Hunter, N.

    2008-01-01

    The emergence of variant Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, following on from the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) epidemic, led to concerns about the potential risk of iatrogenic transmission of disease by blood transfusion and the introduction of costly control measures to protect blood supplies. We previously reported preliminary data demonstrating the transmission of BSE and natural scrapie by blood transfusion in sheep. The final results of this experiment, reported here, give unexpectedly ...

  12. Transfusion requirements in elective cardiopulmonary bypass surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivapalan, Praleene; Bäck, Anne Caroline; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye

    2017-01-01

    Managing haemostasis in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery remains a challenge. There is no established laboratory test to predict transfusion requirements in cardiac surgery. We investigated whether preoperative Thromboelastography (TEG) with Platelet Mapping Assay (PMA......) or Multiple Electrode Aggrometry (MEA) could predict transfusion requirements in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or combined CABG with aortic or mitral valve replacement. We prospectively investigated 199 patients undergoing elective CABG or combined procedures. PMA and MEA...

  13. Restrictive or Liberal Red-Cell Transfusion for Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, C David; Whitlock, Richard P; Fergusson, Dean A; Hall, Judith; Belley-Cote, Emilie; Connolly, Katherine; Khanykin, Boris; Gregory, Alexander J; de Médicis, Étienne; McGuinness, Shay; Royse, Alistair; Carrier, François M; Young, Paul J; Villar, Juan C; Grocott, Hilary P; Seeberger, Manfred D; Fremes, Stephen; Lellouche, François; Syed, Summer; Byrne, Kelly; Bagshaw, Sean M; Hwang, Nian C; Mehta, Chirag; Painter, Thomas W; Royse, Colin; Verma, Subodh; Hare, Gregory M T; Cohen, Ashley; Thorpe, Kevin E; Jüni, Peter; Shehata, Nadine

    2017-11-30

    The effect of a restrictive versus liberal red-cell transfusion strategy on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery remains unclear. In this multicenter, open-label, noninferiority trial, we randomly assigned 5243 adults undergoing cardiac surgery who had a European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) I of 6 or more (on a scale from 0 to 47, with higher scores indicating a higher risk of death after cardiac surgery) to a restrictive red-cell transfusion threshold (transfuse if hemoglobin level was liberal red-cell transfusion threshold (transfuse if hemoglobin level was liberal-threshold group (absolute risk difference, -1.11 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.93 to 0.72; odds ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.76 to 1.07; Pliberal-threshold group (odds ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.62 to 1.16). Red-cell transfusion occurred in 52.3% of the patients in the restrictive-threshold group, as compared with 72.6% of those in the liberal-threshold group (odds ratio, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.47). There were no significant between-group differences with regard to the other secondary outcomes. In patients undergoing cardiac surgery who were at moderate-to-high risk for death, a restrictive strategy regarding red-cell transfusion was noninferior to a liberal strategy with respect to the composite outcome of death from any cause, myocardial infarction, stroke, or new-onset renal failure with dialysis, with less blood transfused. (Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and others; TRICS III ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02042898 .).

  14. Pratique de la transfusion sanguine perioperatoire au Togo: etude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But: relever les différents types, les indications, les modalités et les complications de la transfusion sanguine périopératoire. Patients et méthodes : étude prospective, descriptive multicentrique sur 6 mois (1er août 2013 au 31 janvier 2014) sur les transfusions sanguines faites durant la préparation pré opératoire, en per ...

  15. Risk of Erectile Dysfunction in Transfusion-naive Thalassemia Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Guang; Lin, Te-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Li; Dai, Ming-Shen; Ho, Ching-Liang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Based on the mechanism of pathophysiology, thalassemia major or transfusion-dependent thalassemia patients may have an increased risk of developing organic erectile dysfunction resulting from hypogonadism. However, there have been few studies investigating the association between erectile dysfunction and transfusion-naive thalassemia populations. We constructed a population-based cohort study to elucidate the association between transfusion-naive thalassemia populations and organic erectile dysfunction This nationwide population-based cohort study involved analyzing data from 1998 to 2010 obtained from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database, with a follow-up period extending to the end of 2011. We identified men with transfusion-naive thalassemia and selected a comparison cohort that was frequency-matched with these according to age, and year of diagnosis thalassemia at a ratio of 1 thalassemia man to 4 control men. We analyzed the risks for transfusion-naive thalassemia men and organic erectile dysfunction by using Cox proportional hazards regression models. In this study, 588 transfusion-naive thalassemia men and 2337 controls were included. Total 12 patients were identified within the thalassaemia group and 10 within the control group. The overall risks for developing organic erectile dysfunction were 4.56-fold in patients with transfusion-naive thalassemia men compared with the comparison cohort after we adjusted for age and comorbidities. Our long-term cohort study results showed that in transfusion-naive thalassemia men, there was a higher risk for the development of organic erectile dysfunction, particularly in those patients with comorbidities. PMID:25837766

  16. THREAT helps to identify epistaxis patients requiring blood transfusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of patients who needed a blood transfusion due to epistaxis-caused anemia and to define potential risk factors. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting A total cohort of 591 epistaxis patients, prospectively included between March 2007 and April 2008 at the ENT department of the University Hospital of Zurich, was evaluated concerning the need for blood transfusions. Methods The clinical charts and medical histories of these patients were evaluated. Main outcome measures Common parameters that increase the risk for severe anemia due to epistaxis. Results Twenty-two patients required blood transfusions due to their medical condition. 22.7% suffered from traumatic nosebleeds. Another 27.3% had a known medical condition with an increased bleeding tendency. These proportions were significantly higher than in the group of patients without need of blood transfusion. The odds ratio for receiving a blood transfusion was 14.0 in patients with hematologic disorders, 4.3 in traumatic epistaxis and 7.7 in posterior bleeders. The transfusion-dependent epistaxis patients suffered significantly more often from severe posterior nosebleeds with the need for a surgical therapeutic approach. Conclusions Patients with severe nosebleeds either from the posterior part of the nose or with known hematologic disorders or traumatic epistaxis should be closely monitored by blood parameter analyses to evaluate the indication for hemotransfusion. The acronym THREAT (Trauma, Hematologic disorder, and REAr origin of bleeding → Transfusion) helps to remember and identify the factors associated with an increased risk of receiving blood transfusion. PMID:23663751

  17. Impact of perioperative blood transfusion on immune function and prognosis in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Li; Wang, Dao-Rong; Zhang, Xiang-Yun; Gao, Shan; Li, Xiao-Xia; Sun, Gong-Ping; Lu, Xiao-Bo

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the impacts of perioperative blood transfusion on the immune function and prognosis in colorectal cancer (CC) patients. A retrospective analysis was conducted in 1404 CC patients, including 1223 sporadic colorectal cancer (SCC) patients and 181 hereditary colorectal cancer (HCC) patients. Among them, 701 SCC and 102 HCC patients received perioperative blood transfusion. The amount of T lymphocyte subsets and natural killer (NK) cells was measured. All patients received a 10-year follow-up and relapse, metastasis and curative conditions were recorded. In SCC group, mortality, local recurrence and distant metastasis rate of transfused patients were significantly higher than non-transfused patients (all P transfused patients than non-transfused patients (P = 0.002). SCC patients transfused with ≥3 U of blood had significantly higher mortality than patients transfused with blood transfusion in SCC and HCC patients (all P blood transfusion (P blood transfusion had markedly lower 10-year survival rates as compared with those who did not receive (both P transfused with ≥3 U of blood had remarkably lower survival rates compared with SCC patients transfused with blood transfusion could impact immune function, increased postoperative mortality, local recurrence rate and distant metastasis rate in CC patients; and survival rate of CC patients is negatively related to blood transfusion volume. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Zika virus and blood transfusion: the experience of French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierlaire, Damien; Mauguin, Sylvie; Broult, Julien; Musso, Didier

    2017-03-01

    Between October 2013 and March 2014, French Polynesia experienced the largest Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak ever described before the emergence of ZIKV in the Americas in 2015. As arbovirus transfusion-transmitted (TT) infections have been previously reported, we hypothesized that transfusion of blood products could also transmit ZIKV. Mitigation strategies to prevent ZIKV-TT infections included nonspecific measures and the implementation of a laboratory developed ZIKV-specific nucleic acid testing (NAT) assay. Donor sera were tested in pools of 3 and constitutive sera of ZIKV-reactive pools were tested individually. Donor sera were tested prospectively and retrospectively. A posttransfusion follow-up of a patient transfused with ZIKV RNA-reactive blood products was implemented. NAT detected 42 blood donor sera as ZIKV RNA reactive of 1505 tested (2.8%). Thirty ZIKV RNA-reactive blood products collected before the implementation of NAT were transfused to 26 recipients. Posttransfusion investigations were conducted by the hemovigilance unit and data were available for 12 recipients. Symptomatic ZIKV-TT infections were not reported. Predonation screening of blood donors, postdonation information, products discard, and quarantine of blood products were not effective enough to prevent transfusion of ZIKV RNA-reactive blood products. ZIKV NAT was an effective measure once implemented to prevent transfusion of ZIKV RNA-reactive blood products but it is difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of this measure to prevent ZIKV-TT infection, which is a rare event. © 2017 AABB.

  19. Improved survival of newborns receiving leukocyte transfusions for sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairo, M.S.; Rucker, R.; Bennetts, G.A.; Hicks, D.; Worcester, C.; Amlie, R.; Johnson, S.; Katz, J.

    1984-01-01

    To determine the role of polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte transfusions in neonates with sepsis, 23 consecutive newborns were prospectively randomly selected during an 18-month period in a treatment plan to receive polymorphonuclear leukocyte transfusions with supportive care or supportive care alone. Thirteen neonates received transfusions every 12 hours for a total of five transfusions. Each transfusion consisting of 15 mL/kg of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was subjected to 1,500 rads of radiation. The polymorphonuclear leukocytes were obtained by continuous-flow centrifugation leukapheresis and contained 0.5 to 1.0 X 10(9) granulocytes per 15 mL with less than 10% lymphocytes. Positive findings on blood cultures were obtained in 14/23 patients and seven were randomly selected for each treatment group. Absolute granulocyte counts were less than 1,500/microL in 13 patients but tibial bone marrow examinations revealed that the neutrophil supply pool was depleted in only three patients. The survival was significantly greater in the treatment group compared with the group that did not receive transfusions

  20. Blood transfusion safety; current status and challenges in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Aneke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The attainment of blood transfusion safety in Nigeria (and probably the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa remains an uphill task due to a number of factors, ranging from shortage of blood, poor implementation of blood transfusion guidelines, infrastructural deficits to high prevalence of transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs, particularly hepatitis and human immune deficiency viruses. We reviewed available data on blood transfusion practices and safety in Nigeria using the PubMed, PubMed Central, Google Scholar, and African Index Medicus search engines, through a combination of word and phrases relevant to the subject. The World Health Organization has been in the forefront of efforts to establish safe, available, and affordable blood transfusion services in most parts of Africa through encouraging adequate blood donor recruitment, donor blood testing, and collection as well developing strategies for the rational use of blood. Even though modest improvement has been recorded, particularly with regards to donor blood screening for common TTIs, considerable efforts are needed in the form of robust public enlightenment campaigns (on blood donation and continuous system improvement to drive the current transfusion practices in the country toward safety and self-sustenance.

  1. [New viral risks in blood transfusion by 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzetto, B; Garraud, O

    2016-02-01

    Viral safety remains a major concern in transfusion of blood products. Over years, the control measures applied to blood products were made more and more sophisticated; however, the number of infectious agents, and notably of viruses, that can be transmitted by transfusion is increasing continuously. The aim of this review paper is to actualize that published in the same journal by the same authors in 2011 with more details on some of actual vs virtual viral threats that were identified recently in the field of blood transfusion. The main subjects that are covered successively concern the transmission via transfusion of hepatitis E virus, the frequency of transfusion transmitted arboviruses, transfusion at the time of the Ebola epidemics in West Africa, the debated role of Marseillevirus (giant viruses infecting amoebae and suspected to infect human blood latently), and, finally, the recent report of the identification in blood donors of a new member of the Flaviviridae family. The addition of these new viral risks to those already identified-partially controlled or not-pleads for the urgent need to move forward to considering inactivation of infectious agents in blood products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Blood transfusion safety; current status and challenges in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneke, John C.; Okocha, Chide E.

    2017-01-01

    The attainment of blood transfusion safety in Nigeria (and probably the rest of Sub-Saharan Africa) remains an uphill task due to a number of factors, ranging from shortage of blood, poor implementation of blood transfusion guidelines, infrastructural deficits to high prevalence of transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs), particularly hepatitis and human immune deficiency viruses. We reviewed available data on blood transfusion practices and safety in Nigeria using the PubMed, PubMed Central, Google Scholar, and African Index Medicus search engines, through a combination of word and phrases relevant to the subject. The World Health Organization has been in the forefront of efforts to establish safe, available, and affordable blood transfusion services in most parts of Africa through encouraging adequate blood donor recruitment, donor blood testing, and collection as well developing strategies for the rational use of blood. Even though modest improvement has been recorded, particularly with regards to donor blood screening for common TTIs, considerable efforts are needed in the form of robust public enlightenment campaigns (on blood donation) and continuous system improvement to drive the current transfusion practices in the country toward safety and self-sustenance. PMID:28316432

  3. A rare case of anti-jk3 antibody detected on pre-transfusion investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousuf, Rabeya; Abdul Aziz, Suria; Yusof, Nurasyikin; Leong, Chooi-Fun

    2014-09-01

    We report a 47-year-old Malay lady, para 4 + 1, with known medical history of hypertension whom presented at Emergency Department with severe anaemia, most likely secondary to menorrhagia caused by uterine fibroids. Her haemoglobin was 5.5 g/dl and she was transfused with three units of packed cell without any adverse reaction, her haemoglobin level increased to 9.8 g/dl. She was then planned for total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy later. Four months later when she came for the elective surgery, her pre transfusion investigations showed blood group as B Rh D positive, with a probable R1R1 phenotype. Her antibody screening was positive in all the three panel cells. Further testings showed a negative Direct Coomb's test and negative autocontrol, antibody identification showed pan-agglutination reaction on all 11 panel cells with enzyme enhancement. Patient's red cell phenotype was Jk(a-b-). Anti-Jk3 was suspected and further confirmed in the reference laboratory by phenotyping as well as negative urea lysis test. This case report highlights an extremely rare but clinically significant anti-JK3 antibody detected during pretransfusion testing. This phenotype is rare in the white population, more commonly seen in various polynesians. Increased awareness among the blood bank personnel regarding the variability of the blood group phenotype and the capricious nature of the Kidd antibodies may contribute to the better management of these patients.

  4. The Ratio of Blood Products Transfused Affects Mortality in Patients Receiving Massive Transfusions at a Combat Support Hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Borgman, Matthew A; Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Grathwohl, Kurt W; Repine, Thomas; Beekley, Alec C; Sebesta, James; Jenkins, Donald; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B

    2007-01-01

    ...:1 ratio of plasma to red blood cell (RBC) units. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of 246 patients at a US Army combat support hospital, each of who received a massive transfusion...

  5. The regulatory pendulum in transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Albert

    2002-10-01

    Blood banking and the manufacture of blood products have been relatively outside the influence of regulatory authorities. Several developments contributed to a revision of this environment. The transmission of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome by blood products changed the perception of blood product safety and also spawned litigation and governmental inquiries. The blood banking industry has embraced, with varying degrees of enthusiasm, the principles of systematic quality management and good manufacturing practice, which has created a substantial subindustry and has contributed to a disproportionate focus on product quality. Conventional market forces have also gradually penetrated the traditional blood economies. The public and political focus has resulted in regulatory and policy efforts being concentrated on inappropriate areas. Several of the safety efforts can be arguably described as cost-ineffective while diverting attention and resources from more important issues. An improved integration into mainstream public health policy and incorporation of objectively measured risks into regulatory policy would do much to enhance the quality of the transfusion system. This can be achieved if regulators themselves are overseen through a process that ensures performance and accountability against objective and predefined standards. A further beneficial outcome from this approach could be the harmonization of blood safety and policy measures, the need for which is being felt increasingly worldwide. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA)

  6. Platelet transfusions can induce transplantation tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claas, F.H.J.; Blankert, J.J.; Ruigrok, R.; Moerel, L.

    1982-01-01

    Recently it was shown that the induction of antibodies against the H-2 antigens after multiple platelet transfusions is due to leukocyte contamination of the platelet suspensions. Pure platelets are not able to induce a primary antibody response. The present study shows that the platelets, however, can be recognized by the immune system but they induce a suppression of the response. Mice pretreated with donor platelets will not give a primary antibody response upon a subsequent injection of donor leukocytes and the survival of donor skin grafts will be prolonged. Similar results were obtained by pretreatment of the responder mice with heat-treated donor leukocytes. Furthermore, repeated injections of heat-treated leukocytes of the recipient strain to the donor before bone marrow grafting, will graft-versus-host mortality. The recipient mice were irradiated and received spleen cell injections. These data show that cells which have only class I antigens on their surface and no activating class II antigens, induce a suppression of the response against class I antigens. (Auth.)

  7. Monitoring compliance with transfusion guidelines in hospital departments by electronic data capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Astrid; de Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Nielsen, Jens; Johansson, Pär I.

    2014-01-01

    Background The practice of transfusing red blood cells is still liberal in some centres suggesting a lack of compliance with guidelines recommending transfusion of red blood cells at haemoglobin levels of 6–8 g/dL in the non-bleeding patient. Few databases provide ongoing feedback of data on pre-transfusion haemoglobin levels at the departmental level. In a tertiary care hospital, no such data were produced before this study. Our aim was to establish a Patient Blood Management database based on electronic data capture in order to monitor compliance with transfusion guidelines at departmental and hospital levels. Materials and methods Hospital data on admissions, diagnoses and surgical procedures were used to define the populations of patients. Data on haemoglobin measurements and red blood cell transfusions were used to calculate pre-transfusion haemoglobin, percentage of transfused patients and transfusion volumes. Results The model dataset include 33,587 admissions, of which 10% had received at least one unit of red blood cells. Haemoglobin measurements preceded 96.7% of the units transfused. The median pre-transfusion haemoglobin was 8.9 g/dL (interquartile range 8.2–9.7) at the hospital level. In only 6.5% of the cases, transfusion was initiated at 7.3 g/dL or lower as recommended by the Danish national transfusion guideline. In 27% of the cases, transfusion was initiated when the haemoglobin level was 9.3 g/dL or higher, which is not recommended. A median of two units was transfused per transfusion episode and per hospital admission. Transfusion practice was more liberal in surgical and intensive care units than in medical departments. Discussion We described pre-transfusion haemoglobin levels, transfusion rates and volumes at hospital and departmental levels, and in surgical subpopulations. Initial data revealed an extensive liberal practice and low compliance with national transfusion guidelines, and identified wards in need of intervention. PMID

  8. Study on effectiveness of transfusion program in thalassemia major patients receiving multiple blood transfusions at a transfusion centre in Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Children suffering from beta-thalassemia major require repeated blood transfusions which may be associated with dangers like iron overload and contraction of infections such as HIV, HCV, and HBsAg which ultimately curtail their life span. On the other hand, inadequate transfusions lead to severe anemia and general fatigue and debility. Materials and Methods: Data were obtained from 142 beta-thalassemia major patients aged 3 years or more receiving regular blood transfusions at a transfusion centre in Western India from 1 April 2009 to 30 June 2009. The clinical data and laboratory results were subsequently analyzed. Results: Of the 142 patients, 76 (53.5% were undertransfused (mean Hb <10 gm%. 96 (67% of the patients were taking some form of chelation therapy but out of them only 2 (2% were adequately chelated (S. ferritin <1000 ng/ml. 5 (3.5% of the patients were known diabetics on insulin therapy. 103 (72% of the patients were retarded in terms of growth. The prevalence of transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs such as HCV, HIV, and HBsAg was respectively 45%, 2%, and 2%, with the prevalence of HCV being significantly more than the general population. The HCV prevalence showed positive correlation with the age of the patients and with the total no of blood transfusions received. As many as 15% (6 out of 40 children who were born on or after 2002 were HCV positive despite the blood they received being subjected to screening for HCV. Conclusions: The study suggests the need to step up the transfusions to achieve hemoglobin goal of 10 gm% (as per the moderate transfusion regimen and also to institute urgent and effective chelation measures with the aim of keeping serum ferritin levels below 1000 ng/ml to avoid the systemic effects of iron overload. In addition, strict monitoring of the children for endocrinopathy and other systemic effects of iron overload should be done. Rigid implementation of quality control measures for the

  9. Incidence of blood transfusion requirement and factors associated with transfusion following liver lobectomy in dogs and cats: 72 cases (2007-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kayla R; Pigott, Armi M; J Linklater, Andrew K

    2017-10-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the incidence of blood transfusion, mortality rate, and factors associated with transfusion in dogs and cats undergoing liver lobectomy. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 63 client-owned dogs and 9-client owned cats that underwent liver lobectomy at a specialty veterinary practice from August 2007 through June 2015. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed and data extracted regarding dog and cat signalment, hematologic test results before and after surgery, surgical method, number and identity of lobes removed, concurrent surgical procedures, hemoabdomen detected during surgery, incidence of blood transfusion, and survival to hospital discharge (for calculation of mortality rate). Variables were compared between patients that did and did not require transfusion. RESULTS 11 of 63 (17%) dogs and 4 of 9 cats required a blood transfusion. Mortality rate was 8% for dogs and 22% for cats. Pre- and postoperative PCV and plasma total solids concentration were significantly lower and mortality rate significantly higher in dogs requiring transfusion than in dogs not requiring transfusion. Postoperative PCV was significantly lower in cats requiring transfusion than in cats not requiring transfusion. No significant differences in any other variable were identified between dogs and cats requiring versus not requiring transfusion. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Dogs and cats undergoing liver lobectomy had a high requirement for blood transfusion, and a higher requirement for transfusion should be anticipated in dogs with perioperative anemia and cats with postoperative anemia. Veterinarians performing liver lobectomies in dogs and cats should have blood products readily available.

  10. Blood transfusion at the time of the First World War--practice and promise at the birth of transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, F; Roberts, D J

    2014-12-01

    The centenary of the start of the First World War has stirred considerable interest in the political, social, military and human factors of the time and how they interacted to produce and sustain the material and human destruction in the 4 years of the war and beyond. Medical practice may appear distant and static and perhaps seems to have been somewhat ineffectual in the face of so much trauma and in the light of the enormous advances in medicine and surgery over the last century. However, this is an illusion of time and of course medical, surgical and psychiatric knowledge and procedures were developing rapidly at the time and the war years accelerated implementation of many important advances. Transfusion practice lay at the heart of resuscitation, and although direct transfusion from donor to recipient was still used, Geoffrey Keynes from Britain, Oswald Robertson from America and his namesake Lawrence Bruce Robertson from Canada, developed methods for indirect transfusion from donor to recipient by storing blood in bottles and also blood-banking that laid the foundation of modern transfusion medicine. This review explores the historical setting behind the development of blood transfusion up to the start of the First World War and on how they progressed during the war and afterwards. A fresh look may renew interest in how a novel medical speciality responded to the needs of war and of post-war society. © 2015 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  11. Prevention of MHC-alloimmunization by UV-B irradiation in a murine model: effects of UV dose and number of transfused cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grijzenhout, M.A.; Claas, F.H.J.

    1994-01-01

    The optimal dose of UV-B radiation for prevention of in vivo alloimmunization (AI) against major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens was investigated in a murine transfusion model. Two groups with five C57BL/6 mice (H-2 b ) each were transfused at weekly intervals with 1 x 10 5 or 1 x 10 6 DBA/2 (H-2 d ) leucocytes. Both suspensions induced anti-H-2 d antibodies in all mice after the second transfusion. The minimal UV-B dose required for abolition of alloreactivity in the mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR) was 0.6 J/cm 2 . This dose completely prevented the onset of MHC-AI in all five mice transfused with six suspensions containing 1 x 10 5 leucocytes. In contrast, suspensions with 1 x 10 6 leucocytes and exposed to 0.6 J/cm 2 induced immunization in 4/5 mice. Further increase of the dose to 1.8 or 5.4 J/cm 2 did not prevent the onset of MHC-AI. We conclude that the number of leucocytes per transfusion determines the efficacy of UV irradiation for the prevention of MHC-AI. For UV irradiation of human platelet concentrates (PCs) we propose to reduce the number of leucocytes by centrifugation prior to UV exposure. UV-B irradiation of PCs with high numbers of leucocytes may not be effective for prevention of alloimmunization. (Author)

  12. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn owing to anti-U, successfully treated with repeated intrauterine transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strindberg, Johanna; Lundahl, Joachim; Ajne, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) owing to anti-U has rarely been reported. U is part of the MNS system.M and N glycoproteins are located on glycophorin A (GPA); Sand s antigens are on glycophorin B (GPB). Individuals who lack GPB are S- and s- and also lack U. The U- phenotype occurs almost exclusively in the African population and has a very low frequency (0.25%). Anti-U is of immunoglobulin G class and can cause hemolytic transfusion reaction and HDFN. In this report we present the use of a noninvasive method to detect anemia in the fetus and the subsequent use of intrauterine transfusion(IUT) with blood of a very rare phenotype. For the first time, we used deglycerolized and 3-week-old red blood cell units for IUT without signs of adverse reactions and with the expected effect on the hemoglobin value. We conclude that this transfusion strategy could be applied safely.

  13. Different doses of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in people with haematological disorders after myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Blanco, Patricia; Murphy, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    ); low-dose and high-dose groups (one study; 849 participants; RR 1.20, 95% CI 0.82 to 1.77; low-quality evidence); or high-dose and standard-dose groups (one study; 855 participants; RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.68; low-quality evidence). Two studies reported the time to first bleeding episodes; we were unable to perform a meta-analysis. Both studies (959 participants) individually found that the time to first bleeding episode was either the same, or longer, in the low-dose group compared to the standard-dose group. One study (855 participants) found that the time to the first bleeding episode was the same in the high-dose group compared to the standard-dose group. Three studies reported all-cause mortality within 30 days from the start of the study. There was no difference in all-cause mortality between treatment arms (low-dose versus standard-dose: three studies; 1070 participants; RR 2.04, 95% CI 0.70 to 5.93; low-quality evidence; low-dose versus high-dose: one study; 849 participants; RR 1.33, 95% CI 0.50 to 3.54; low-quality evidence; and high-dose versus standard-dose: one study; 855 participants; RR 1.71, 95% CI 0.51 to 5.81; low-quality evidence). Six studies reported the number of platelet transfusions; we were unable to perform a meta-analysis. Two studies (959 participants) out of three (1070 participants) found that a low-dose transfusion strategy led to more transfusion episodes than a standard-dose. One study (849 participants) found that a low-dose transfusion strategy led to more transfusion episodes than a high-dose strategy. One study (855 participants) out of three (1007 participants) found no difference in the number of platelet transfusions between the high-dose and standard-dose groups. One study reported on transfusion reactions. This study’s authors suggested that a high-dose platelet transfusion strategy may lead to a higher rate of transfusion-related adverse events. None of the studies reported quality-of-life. Authors’ conclusions In

  14. Allogeneic blood transfusion and prognosis following total hip replacement: a population-based follow up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Alma B; Mehnert, Frank; Overgaard, Søren

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allogeneic red blood cell transfusion is frequently used in total hip replacement surgery (THR). However, data on the prognosis of transfused patients are sparse. In this study we compared the risk of complications following THR in transfused and non-transfused patients. METHODS......: A population-based follow-up study was performed using data from medical databases in Denmark. We identified 28,087 primary THR procedures performed from 1999 to 2007, from which we computed a propensity score for red blood cell transfusion based on detailed data on patient-, procedure-, and hospital......-related characteristics. We were able to match 2,254 transfused with 2,254 non-transfused THR patients using the propensity score. RESULTS: Of the 28,087 THR patients, 9,063 (32.3%) received at least one red blood cell transfusion within 8 days of surgery. Transfused patients had higher 90-day mortality compared...

  15. Platelet transfusion in chemotherapy patients: comparison of the effect of intravenous infusion pumps versus gravity transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meess, A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are given to patients suffering with severe thrombocytopenia usually by a gravity transfusion procedure. Increasing patient numbers that are in need of this treatment increase the pressure on hospital staff and space. In order to combat time issues, the use of medical devices such as intravenous infusion pumps are thought to be beneficial for time and simultaneously for safety in transfusion practices. By using infusion pumps, platelet concentrates can be transfused in less time and provide accurate volume measurements. Manufacturers of infusion pumps claim that these devices are safe to be used for blood products including platelet concentrates. However, published studies were performed on older models and newer devices are on the market now. The purpose of this study is to evaluate infusion pumps, which are claimed to be suitable for blood products and to investigate the impact the pumps had on platelets. Furthermore, the study revealed if the intravenous infusion pumps are safe to be used for platelet transfusion as claimed by manufacturers. A simulated transfusion was performed using the Carefusion Alaris GP Plus volumetric pump and Fresenius Kabi Volumat Agilia infusion pump. Samples were taken from expired platelet concentrates before and after passage through the pump. All samples were investigated for full blood count that included platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and a plateletcrit (PCT). The samples were then centrifuged to achieve platelet-poor plasma and then tested for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A power calculation performed on the statistical power analysis program G*power indicated a requirement of 82 samples for a power of 80%. Statistical analysis was performed with the IBM SPSS statistic software. A paired sample t-test was used to calculate mean, standard deviation and P values for the infusion pumps used. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to evaluate results that had a non

  16. Low transfusion transmission of hepatitis E among 25,637 single-donation, nucleic acid-tested blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harritshøj, Lene H.; Holm, Dorte K.; Sækmose, Susanne G.

    2016-01-01

    was investigated among Danish blood donors, and the prevalence of HEV transfusion-transmitted infection (TTI) was investigated among recipients. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Samples from 25,637 consenting donors collected during 1 month in 2015 were screened retrospectively using an individual-donation HEV RNA......BACKGROUND: Hepatitis E virus genotype-3 (HEV-gt-3) causes autochthonous infections in western countries, with a primary reservoir in animals, especially pigs. HEV transfusion transmission has been reported, and HEV-gt-3 prevalence is high in some European countries. The prevalence of HEV RNA...... nucleic acid test with a 95% detection probability of 7.9 IU/mL. HEV-positive samples were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and genotyped. Transmission was evaluated among recipients of HEV RNA-positive blood components. Phylogenetic analyses compared HEV sequences from blood donors...

  17. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease following exchange transfusion 96 newborn

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    Khatami S.F

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease of the newborn is a common cause of clinical jaundice and causes two-thirds of the hemolytic disease in newborns. This study was undertaken to determine the frequency of ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease and its complications in newborns undergoing exchange transfusion.Methods: This prospective and descriptive study was performed in jaundiced newborn infants during a three-year period. Inclusion criteria were: maternal blood type O, newborn blood type A or B, rising indirect hyperbilirubinemia in the first two days of life, positive immunohematologic test for newborns and exchange transfusion. Exclusion criteria were: incomplete information, other accompanying diseases that induce hyperbilirubinemia. All newborn infants received phototherapy before and after exchange transfusion. We did not use intravenous immunoglobulin, hemoxygenase inhibitor drugs and blood products before exchange transfusion.Results: Double-volume exchange transfusion via umbilical cord catheter was performed in 96 patients, 19 (20% of whom suffered from ABO incompatibility. Of these 19 newborns, two-thirds (13 were preterm infants. The minimum level of serum bilirubin was 10 mg/dl and the maximum serum bilirubin level was 35 mg/dl. In six patients (32% serum bilirubin levels were >25mg/dl. The most common blood group was type A for newborns. Immunohematologic tests were positive in 84% of the mothers. ABO incompatibility hemolytic disease was the fourth and second most common reasons for blood exchange transfusion in preterm and term infants, respectively. Laboratory complications were more common than clinical complications. The etiology of 48% of the alloimmunization and 42% of the hemolytic disease in these newborns was ABO incompatibility.Conclusions: Mothers with blood group O and newborns with blood group A or B with positive immunohematologic tests in first hours of life are at high risk for hemolytic disease

  18. Blood Transfusion Practices in Total Joint Arthroplasties in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, RE Christopher; Crichlow, Ayana; Walters, Christine; Ameerally, Andrew; Gordon-Strachan, Georgiana

    2009-01-01

    Background Major blood loss usually occurs in both hip and knee arthroplasty, frequently leading to the need for blood transfusion. This study was performed to determine blood transfusion rates and analyze the factors which affected the need for blood transfusion in patients who underwent primary unilateral total knee and hip arthroplasties at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica. Methods A prospective study of 118 patients who underwent unilateral total knee and total hip arthroplasties between January 2004 and July 2009 was undertaken. Data collected was analyzed using Microsoft Excel 2008, SPSS version 12 and Stata version 7.0. Results Of the 118 patients, 90 (70%) were females. Mean ± standard deviation (SD) age was 65.2 ± 11.5 years (range 32 - 85 years). Osteoarthritis accounted for the majority (88%) of arthroplasties. Mean ± SD estimated blood loss for all arthroplasties was 1195.0 ± 855.6 ml (range 100 - 6000 ml). Mean ± SD duration of surgery for all joint arthroplasties was 226.1 ± 63.5 minutes (range 110 - 392 minutes). Mean ± SD preoperative hemoglobin was 12.09 g/dl (range 7.3 - 15.6 g/dl). Average body mass index was 28.9 kg/m2 (range 17.9 - 68.3 kg/m2). Seventy-five (64%) patients were transfused and of these, 44 patients received allogenic blood only; 20 patients received autologous blood only, and eleven patients received both allogenic and autologous blood.  The overall blood transfusion rate was 63%. Conclusion In our study, the multivariate analysis showed a significant relationship (p = 0.000) only between postoperative transfusion and the estimated blood loss. Keywords Blood transfusion practices; Total joint arthroplasties PMID:22481988

  19. Platelet transfusion practice in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Z.; Alam, M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Pakistan is a developing country where platelet concentrates are prepared and administered to patients in only a few large centres of the country. A study was designed for appraisal of the current situation and to review the progress made so far. Design: It was a prospective, non-interventional study. Place and duration of study: The study was conducted at PNS Shifa, Karachi from January, 1995 to December, 1998. Subjects and Methods: During this study 588 random donor platelet concentrates were transfused to 66 patients 148 occasions. Random donor platelet concentrates were prepared by fractionation of whole blood using triple blood collecting bags. Pre-transfusion and one hour posttransfusion platelet counts of the patients were done. The efficacy of the platelet transfusion was monitored by noting the clinical response as well as doing one hour posttransfusion corrected counts increment (CCI).Results: On 114 (77%) occasions platelets were transfused prophylactically and 34 (23%) times therapeutically to stop major bleeding episodes. The mean pre-transfusion platelet count varied from 15.5 x 10/sup 9/1 to 28.5 x 10/sup 9/l in different clinical conditions. On average, 4 random donor platelet concentrates were administered on each occasion. The best response was observed in patients of aplastic anaemia and worst in cases of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Conclusion: Platelet concentrates administration was inappropriate in significant number of patients, therefore, each hospital should form transfusion committee to review transfusion practices guidelines for blood components usage and compliance to these guidelines by the clinicians. (author)

  20. Survival of red blood cells after transfusion: processes and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giel eBosman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The currently available data suggest that efforts towards improving the quality of red blood cell (RBC blood bank products should concentrate on: (1 preventing the removal of a considerable fraction of the transfused RBCs that takes place within the first hours after transfusion; (2 minimizing the interaction of the transfused RBCs with the patient's immune system. These issues are important in reducing the number and extent of the damaging side effects of transfusions, such as generation of alloantibodies and autoantibodies and iron accumulation, especially in transfusion-dependent patients. Thus, it becomes important for blood bank research not only to assess the classical RBC parameters for quality control during storage, but even more so to identify the parameters that predict RBC survival, function and behaviour in the patient after transfusion. These parameters are likely to result from elucidation of the mechanisms that underly physiological RBC aging in vivo, and that lead to the generation of senescent cell antigens and the accumulation of damaged molecules in vesicles. Also, study of RBC pathology-related mechanisms, such as encountered in various hemoglobinopathies and membranopathies, may help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying a storage-associated increase in susceptibility to physiological stress conditions. Recent data indicate that a combination of new approaches in vitro to mimick RBC behaviour in vivo, the growing knowledge of the signaling networks that regulate RBC structure and function, and the rapidly expanding set of proteomic and metabolomic data, will be instrumental to identify the storage-associated processes that control RBC survival after transfusion.

  1. [Situation and perspectives of blood transfusion in Togo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ségbéna, A Y; Fétéké, L; Bikandou, B; Awitala, E J; Koura, A G

    2009-01-01

    We report the successive stages of the reorganization of the blood transfusion sector in Togo. The starting point was the elaboration of the national policy of blood transfusion, then the adoption of a decree organizing the sector as well the various decree of application, particularly that related to transfusion good practices. The current policy recommends two poles of qualification of the blood ant its components and the creation of six stations of collection and distribution attached to these poles. The reorganization started with the rehabilitation of the National Blood Transfusion Centre (CNTS) in Lomé. If the problem of human resources is alarming, especially the availability of hemobiologists, the rehabilitation allowed the increase of the blood collection passing from 5272 donations in December 2003 to 18 164 in December 2008. However, the requirement of blood products is satisfied in 50% in all the country. In 2003, 24% of the blood products were rejected for positive viral markers against 8.37% in 2008 in relation with the improvement of blood safety. Efforts must be continued to reinforce it in the CNTS and to make a better selection of the donors at the Regional Blood Transfusion Centre (CRTS) de Sokodé. The analysis of the weak points of the sector (human resource insufficiency, shortage of the blood products, blood safety) made it possible to indicate solutions to improve the sector of blood transfusion sector. Future outcome is funded in the blood transfusion safety development project in Togo financed by the Agence française de développement (AFD, French development agency).

  2. Lesão pulmonar aguda associada à transfusão Transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fabron Junior

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Lesão pulmonar aguda associada à transfusão (transfusion-related acute lung injury, TRALI é uma complicação clínica grave relacionada à transfusão de hemocomponentes que contêm plasma. Recentemente, TRALI foi considerada a principal causa de morte associada à transfusão nos Estados Unidos e Reino Unido. É manifestada tipicamente por dispnéia, hipoxemia, hipotensão, febre e edema pulmonar não cardiogênico, que ocorre durante ou dentro de 6 h, após completada a transfusão. Embora o exato mecanismo não tenha sido totalmente elucidado, postula-se que TRALI esteja associada à infusão de anticorpos contra antígenos leucocitários (classes I ou II ou aloantígenos específicos de neutrófilos e a mediadores biologicamente ativos presentes em componentes celulares estocados. A maioria dos doadores implicados em casos da TRALI são mulheres multíparas. TRALI, além de ser pouco diagnosticada, pode ainda ser confundida com outras situações de insuficiência respiratória aguda. Um melhor conhecimento sobre TRALI pode ser crucial na prevenção e tratamento desta severa complicação transfusional.Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI is a serious clinical syndrome associated with the transfusion of plasma-containing blood components. Recently, TRALI has come to be recognized as the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States and United Kingdom. This complication typically presents as shortness of breath, hypoxemia, hypotension, fever and noncardiogeneic pulmonary edema, all occurring during or within 6 h after transfusion. Although the mechanism of TRALI has not been fully elucidated, it has been associated with human leukocyte antigen antibodies (class I, class II or neutrophil alloantigens and with biologically active mediators in stored cellular blood components. Most of the donors implicated in cases of TRALI are multiparous women. Rarely diagnosed, TRALI can be confused with other causes of acute

  3. Ross River virus in Australian blood donors: possible implications for blood transfusion safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faddy, Helen M; Tran, Thu V; Hoad, Veronica C; Seed, Clive R; Viennet, Elvina; Chan, Hiu-Tat; Harley, Robert; Hewlett, Elise; Hall, Roy A; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Flower, Robert L P; Prow, Natalie A

    2018-02-01

    Emerging transfusion-transmissible pathogens, including arboviruses such as West Nile, Zika, dengue, and Ross River viruses, are potential threats to transfusion safety. The most prevalent arbovirus in humans in Australia is Ross River virus (RRV); however, prevalence varies substantially around the country. Modeling estimated a yearly risk of 8 to 11 potentially RRV-viremic fresh blood components nationwide. This study aimed to measure the occurrence of RRV viremia among donors who donated at Australian collection centers located in areas with significant RRV transmission during one peak season. Plasma samples were collected from donors (n = 7500) who donated at the selected collection centers during one peak season. Viral RNA was extracted from individual samples, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed. Regions with the highest rates of RRV transmission were not areas where donor centers were located. We did not detect RRV RNA among 7500 donations collected at the selected centers, resulting in a zero risk estimate with a one-sided 95% confidence interval of 0 to 1 in 2019 donations. Our results suggest that the yearly risk of collecting a RRV-infected blood donation in Australia is low and is at the lower range of previous risk modeling. The majority of Australian donor centers were not in areas known to be at the highest risk for RRV transmission, which was not taken into account in previous models based on notification data. Therefore, we believe that the risk of RRV transfusion transmission in Australia is acceptably low and appropriately managed through existing risk management, including donation restrictions and recall policies. © 2018 AABB.

  4. Transfusão de plaquetas: do empirismo ao embasamento científico Platelet transfusion: from empiricism to scientific evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline A. Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite major advances in Brazilian blood transfusion therapy with a growing number of scientific publications, an increased number of repeat donors and a decline in serological ineligibility, a lack of conformity in the application of pre-transfusion tests that may compromise transfusion safety is still observed at transfusion agencies in the fringes of the blood transfusion therapy system. Additionally, although high rates of platelet transfusion refractoriness and significant rates of alloimmunization have been demonstrated in the international literature, few Brazilian centers have been concerned with the study of platelet alloimmunization and even fewer centers have evaluated the efficacy of platelet concentrate transfusion. As more than one million Brazilians, including many repeat blood donors, are listed in the National Bone Marrow Donor Registry (Redome, why not grant transfusion therapy services access to the HLA typing of these blood and marrow donors after obtaining their consent? And why not make use of the Redome data to evaluate the HLA compatibility of donors for alloimmunized patients who are candidates for bone marrow transfusion and who have already been typed? These measures, together with the identification of ABO and HPA antigens, will permit a complete assessment of platelet immunology, will guarantee the transfusion safety of this blood component, and will put Brazil at the same level as the so-called developed countries in terms of transfusion medicine.

  5. Profile of Blood Transfusion Requests from Hospitals to Bandung Blood Transfusion Unit, Indonesian Red Cross in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahla Nisaa Amalia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood transfusion as a part health services should be provided under appropriate indications and in a safe manner. In Indonesia, blood collection is run by the Blood Transfusion Unit of Indonesian Red Cross, where the blood is screened, processed into blood components, and finally distributed to hospitals. The purpose of this study was to describe the profile of blood transfusion requests from hospitals that do not have blood bank facility to the Bandung Blood Transfusion Unit, Indonesian Red Cross. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out using secondary data from Bandung Blood Transfusion Unit Indonesian Red Cross (UTD PMI Bandung. All blood request forms from hospitals during 2011 were collected and analyzed. Variables in this study were the amount of blood units, blood components, blood type, and indications of blood transfusion. Results: The number of blood units requested by hospitals were 35,841 units. The most blood units requested was in August 2011. The blood component requested was the packed red cell (61.1%, whole blood (17.4%, thrombocyte concentrate (10.6%, and fresh frozen plasma (7%. The total percentage of O, A, B and AB blood types were 36.1%, 28.6%, 27.5%, and 7.9% respectively. The most frequent indication for transfusion was anemia (61.7%, followed by surgery and other causes of bleeding. Conclusions: The total blood units requested by hospitals vary each month. The most blood component requested is Packed Red Cell and the type of blood is O blood type. The most frequent indication is anemia.

  6. Tranexamic Acid Reduces Blood Transfusions in Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwan J; Couch, Cory G; Edwards, Paul K; Siegel, Eric R; Mears, Simon C; Barnes, C Lowry

    2016-12-01

    The use of tranexamic acid (TEA) can significantly reduce the need for allogenic blood transfusions in elective primary joint arthroplasty. Revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) requires increased utilization of postoperative blood transfusions for acute blood loss anemia compared with elective primary hip arthroplasty. There is limited literature to support the routine use of TEA in revision THA. We performed a retrospective review of 161 consecutive patients who underwent revision THA from 2012 to 2014 at a single institution by 2 fellowship-trained surgeons. We compared the transfusion requirements and the postoperative hemoglobin drop of the TEA group (109 patients, 114 hips) vs the no-TEA group (52 patients, 56 hips). Our standard protocol for administering TEA is 1000 mg IV at incision and the same dose repeated 2 hours later. The no-TEA group did not receive the medication because of previous hospital contraindication criteria. The transfusion rate was significantly less for the TEA group (7%) compared with the no-TEA group (34%; P revision THA demonstrated a significant reduction in allogenic blood transfusion rates. The postoperative hemoglobin drop was also significantly less with the use of TEA. We recommend the routine use of TEA during revision THA. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Placental Transfusion and Cardiovascular Instability in the Preterm Infant

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    Zbynĕk Straňák

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal adaptation in preterm newborn comprises complex physiological processes that involve significant changes in the circulatory and respiratory system. Increasing hemoglobin level and blood volume following placental transfusion may be of importance in enhancing arterial oxygen content, increasing cardiac output, and improving oxygen delivery. The European consensus on resuscitation of preterm infants recommends delayed cord clamping (DCC for at least 60 s to promote placenta–fetal transfusion in uncompromised neonates. Recently, published meta-analyses suggest that DCC is associated with fewer infants requiring transfusions for anemia, a lower incidence of intraventricular hemorrhage, and lower risk for necrotizing enterocolitis. Umbilical cord milking (UCM has the potential to avoid some disadvantages associated with DCC including the increased risk of hypothermia or delay in commencing manual ventilation. UCM represents an active form of blood transfer from placenta to neonate and may have some advantages over DCC. Moreover, both methods are associated with improvement in hemodynamic parameters and blood pressure within first hours after delivery compared to immediate cord clamping. Placental transfusion appears to be beneficial for the preterm uncompromised infant. Further studies are needed to evaluate simultaneous placental transfusion with resuscitation of deteriorating neonates. It would be of great interest for future research to investigate advantages of this approach further and to assess its impact on neonatal outcomes, particularly in extremely preterm infants.

  8. [Blood transfusion in emergency settings: French military health service experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailliol, A; Ausset, S; Peytel, E

    2010-12-01

    Blood transfusion is required in a number of emergency settings and the French military health service (FMHS) has issued specific guidelines for the treatment of war casualties. These guidelines take into account European standards and laws, NATO standards, and also public sentiment regarding transfusion. These guidelines reflect a determination to control the process and to avoid the improvisation frequently associated with wartime transfusion. The evolution in warfare (terrorism and bombing more frequent than gunshot) and the wide use of body armor have deeply changed the clinical presentation of war injuries. These now involve the extremities in 80% of cases, with extensive tissue damage and heavy blood loss. The FMHS recommends that war casualties with hemorrhagic shock be brought quickly to a medical treatment facility (MTF) after first-line treatment applied through buddy aid or by medics. In the MTF, before an early Medevac, a damage control surgery will be performed, with resuscitation using freeze-dried plasma, red blood cells and fresh whole blood. The French military blood bank is responsible for blood product supply, training and medical advice regarding transfusion therapy during wartime, as well as hemovigilance. All transfusion therapy practices are periodically assessed but research on whole blood pathogen reduction is being conducted in order to reduce the residual infectious risk associated with this product. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Decreasing Prevalence of Transfusion Transmitted Infection in Indian Scenario

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    Tulika Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion transmitted infections are major problem associated with blood transfusion. Accurate estimates of risk of TTIs are essential for monitoring the safety of blood supply and evaluating the efficacy of currently employed screening procedures. The present study was carried out to assess the percentage of voluntary donors and replacement donors and to find out prevalence and changing trends of various TTIs blood donors in recent years. A study was carried out on blood units of voluntary and replacement donors which were collected from January 2008 to December 2012. On screening of 180,371 replacement units, seropositivity of transfusion transmitted disease in replacement donors was 0.15% in HIV, 1.67% in hepatitis B surface antigen, 0.49% in hepatitis C virus, 0.01% in VDRL, and 0.009% in malaria. Of 11,977 voluntary units, seropositivity of transfusion transmitted disease in voluntary donors was 0.08% in HIV, 0.24% in hepatitis B surface antigen, 0.001% in hepatitis C virus, 0.008% in VDRL (sexually transmitted disease, and 0.01% in malaria. From results it has been concluded that prevalence of transfusion transmitted infection (HIV, HBV, HCV, VDRL, and malaria was more in replacement donors in comparison to voluntary donors. Extensive donor selection and screening procedures will help in improving the blood safety.

  10. Open Craniosynostosis Surgery: Effect of Early Intraoperative Blood Transfusion on Postoperative Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnik, Nicole M; Bristol, Ruth; Maneri, Celia; Singhal, Raj; Singh, Davinder J

    2017-07-01

    Correction of craniosynostosis can result in blood loss when the patient already has physiologic anemia. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients benefit from early blood transfusion and whether the timing of blood transfusion affects metabolic disturbances and the postoperative course. In this retrospective review, 71 patients who underwent open calvarial vault remodeling for correction of craniosynostosis were separated into 2 groups according to whether they received blood transfusions early (within the first 30 minutes of surgery) or later (after the first 30 minutes of surgery). Patients were further separated into nonsyndromic and syndromic cohorts. Tracked variables included hemoglobin, hematocrit, arterial blood gas values, lactate level, length of stay, estimated blood loss, and amount of blood transfused in the operating room, amount transfused postoperatively, and total amount transfused.Among all patients, the early transfusion group had a higher hemoglobin nadir overall and received less postoperative blood. Within the nonsyndromic cohort, the early transfusion group had a higher estimated blood loss and received more transfused blood. In the syndromic cohort, the early transfusion group had a hemoglobin nadir that was significantly higher than in the late transfusion group and a lower estimated blood loss, shorter pediatric intensive care unit stay, and less postoperative blood transfused. Syndromic patients also received significantly more blood overall. For syndromic patients undergoing open calvarial vault remodeling, transfusion within the first 30 minutes of surgery should be considered.

  11. Hospital Blood Transfusion Patterns During Major Noncardiac Surgery and Surgical Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alicia; Trivedi, Amal N; Jiang, Lan; Vezeridis, Michael; Henderson, William G; Wu, Wen-Chih

    2015-08-01

    We retrospectively examined intraoperative blood transfusion patterns at US veteran's hospitals through description of national patterns of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion in the elderly; assessment of temporal trends in the use of intraoperative blood transfusion; and relationship of institutional use of intraoperative blood transfusion to hospital 30-day risk-adjusted postoperative mortality rates.Limited data exist on the pattern of intraoperative blood transfusion by indication for transfusion at the hospital level, and the relationship between intraoperative transfusion rates and institutional surgical outcomes.Using the Department of Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, we assigned 424,015 major noncardiac operations among elderly patients (≥65 years) in 117 veteran's hospitals, from 1997 to 2009, into groups based on indication for intraoperative blood transfusion according to literature and clinical guidelines. We then examined institutional variations and temporal trends in surgical blood use based on these indications, and the relationship between these institutional patterns of transfusion and 30-day postoperative mortality.Intraoperative transfusion occurred in 38,056/424,015 operations (9.0%). Among the 64,390 operations with an indication for transfusion, there was wide variation (median: 49.9%, range: 8.7%-76.2%) in hospital transfusion rates, a yearly decline in transfusion rates (average 1.0%/y), and an inverse relationship between hospital intraoperative transfusion rates and hospital 30-day risk-adjusted mortality (adjusted mortality of 9.8 ± 2.8% vs 8.3 ± 2.1% for lowest and highest tertiles of hospital transfusion rates, respectively, P = 0.02). In contrast, for the 225,782 operations with no indication for transfusion, there was little variation in hospital transfusion rates (median 0.7%, range: 0%-3.4%), no meaningful temporal change in transfusion (average 0.0%/y), and

  12. Usefulness of blood irradiation before transfusion to avoid transfusion associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Koki

    1997-01-01

    We summarize the pathology of the transfusion associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD) and examine the usefulness of the blood irradiation before transfusion as more widely used prophylaxis. The symptom of TA-GVHD was as follows: after (asymptomatic phase) for 1 to 2 weeks after blood transfusion, pyrexia and erythema appeared. Furthermore, hepatic disorder, diarrhea and bloody stool occurred. In no longer time, pancytopenia by aplastic crisis of the bone marrow appeard, and severe granulocytopenia occurred. Finally, by the complication with severe infectious disease such as septicemia, almost all the patients died with in 3 to 4 weeks after blood transfusion. TA-GVHD was found in some patients without immune deficiency syndrome. The cause of the frequent occurrence of the disease in Japan was shown by the probability of the one-way matching analysis. As the countermeasure of TA-GVHD, we examined the effectiveness of the blood irradiation before transfusion under the consideration of the safety and the emergency. After the responder cells were beforehand irradiated with various doses of radiation (X-ray or g-ray), the proliferative response was investigated through the uptake of 3 H-thymidine, and we obtained 15-50 Gy as the optimum dose of the radiation. We discuss the establishment of the countermeasure for the TA-GVHD and the formation of the nationwide support system for TV-GVHD (K.H.). 33 refs

  13. Experimental models of transfusion-related acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, Brian M; Looney, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approaches. Experimental models suggest that TRALI occurs when a host, with a primed immune system, is exposed to an activating agent such as anti-leukocyte antibody or a biologic response modifier such as lysophosphatidylcholines. Recent work has suggested a critical role for platelets in antibody-based experimental models and identified potential therapeutic strategies for TRALI. PMID:21134622

  15. Syphilis screening practices in blood transfusion facilities in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarkodie, Francis; Hassall, Oliver; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The primary objective of this study was to compare laboratory practices for screening blood donors for syphilis at blood transfusion facilities in Ghana with the recommendations of the World Health Organization and the National Blood Service, Ghana (NBSG). The prevalence of syphilis...... antibodies in blood donors in Ghana was also estimated. METHODS: Over an 11-month period, from February 2014 to January 2015, a semi-structured questionnaire was administered to 122 laboratory technical heads out of a total of 149 transfusion facilities in Ghana. The response rate was 81.9%. RESULTS: A total.......9%, compared to 4.0% in family donations (p=0.001). Only 6.9% of the health facilities were using standard operating procedures (SOPs). CONCLUSIONS: Despite international and national recommendations, more than half of the studied health facilities that provide blood transfusions in Ghana are not screening...

  16. Problems and Approaches for Blood Transfusion in the Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David J; Field, Stephen; Delaney, Meghan; Bates, Imelda

    2016-04-01

    A safe supply of blood and the knowledge, skill, and resources for the appropriate use of blood are essential for medical services. Many problems are faced in the development of transfusion services in low- or medium-income countries (LMICs). Unfortunately, in many countries, providing safe blood is made more difficult by a lack of blood donors and the high frequency of transfusion-transmissible infections. The problems are compounded by the frequent need for urgent life-saving transfusions. This article examines the problems in supply, safety, and use of blood and how they are being addressed in LMICs, predominantly focusing on sub-Saharan Africa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Practical aspects of out-of-hospital transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridey, J L

    1997-04-01

    Out-of-hospital transfusion (OOHT) occurs in nontraditional settings, such as a patient's home, a physician's office, or a convalescent facility. Requests to issue components for OOHT present new challenges to some blood centers and transfusion services that are accustomed to issuing blood for use only in the hospital setting. Concerns about patient safety, a paucity of practical information on establishing programs, and a lack of specific practice guidelines may discourage some organizations from offering these services. Participation in OOHT programs, however, may present new patient care and customer service opportunities to blood centers and transfusion services. The purpose of this article is to familiarize readers with the essential elements for establishing a safe program. Relevant regulatory, legal, and financial issues are also addressed.

  18. Potassium load from blood transfusion in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malament, I B; Uhlman, W; Eisinger, R P

    1975-01-01

    When a transfusion of packed red blood cells is given, the net potassium load results from lysis of some cells and absorption of potassium by surviving cells. Potassium load was calculated which results from administration of 1 unit (200 cc.) of packed RBC and also that resulting from administration of sufficient packed cells to yield 200 cc. of surviving RBC. Although the acute load of potassium due to cell lysis increases as blood is stored for longer periods, the absorption of potassium by surviving cells also increases. Thus, net potassium load may be least if blood is stored for about one week. Hence the acute potassium load and the net potassium burden a patient receives from a transfusion can be considered when transfusion therapy is selected.

  19. [Ratio of erythrocyte and plasma in massive blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xian-Hui; Liu, Feng-Xia; Zhang, Jun-Hua; Gui, Rong

    2014-06-01

    This study was purposed to explore the suitable ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte by retrospective analysis of coagulation in patients with massive blood transfusion. The clinical data of 151 cases with massive blood transfusion from January 2011 to January 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. According to coagulation, patients were divided into coagulation normal group (138 cases) and coagulation dysfunction group (13 cases). Based on the ratio of 1:1 of fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte, the patients were divided into high plasma group(2:1), medium plasma group (1:1) and low plasma (blood transfusion. The results showed that prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and thrombin time (TT) were prolonged, fibrinogen (FIB) level decreased significantly (all P blood transfusion 24 h; the high plasma and the medium plasma group of coagulation normal group had no significant changes in coagulation (P > 0.05); prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time and fibrinogen level in the medium plasma and low plasma subgroup of coagulation dysfunction group after massive transfusion was still in abnormal levels (P > 0.05), coagulation function in high plasma subgroup was improved significantly (P blood transfusion, the ratio between fresh frozen plasma and erythrocyte is recommended to be 2:1 in patients of coagulation dysfunction in order to improve the patient's coagulation function and to reduce the incidence of adverse event, the ratio of fresh frozen plasma to erythrocyte is recommended to be 1:1 in patients with normal coagulation so as to reduce the dilutional coagulopathy and hypervolemia of blood.

  20. [Evaluation of the quality control system in blood transfusion service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, R

    2000-01-01

    Implementation of quality system improvement at the Blood Transfusion Institute Novi Sad, included adjustments in practice to the request of ISO 9001 standard. Quality improvement must be a permanent activity of the Institute. The audit is a management tool for monitoring the quality assurance system and is either a quality audit or a medical audit. A well planned, comprehensive quality audit covers each activity of the Blood Transfusion Institute. The procedures may be internal or external. Quality manager is responsible for annual internal quality audits. The purpose of internal audits is to check the efficiency of the quality system in terms of realization of quality policy, fulfullment of designed targets and implementation of quality system documents. An internal quality audit is performed in accordance with the procedure and audit findings are reported to the management in a form of internal quality report as a part of quality system review. The findings must be communicated to all persons responsible for the controlled area. Quality manager can initiate an internal quality audit whenever it is realized that problems about the quality system have occurred. Audits are conducted by the quality manager or an audit team. The accurate list of internal auditors is kept in the Institute archive. Medical audit carried out by a transfusion committee, evaluates the quality of blood transfusion for determining the degree of compliance with established local or national guidelines, in order to promote optimal transfusion practice. Audits are not only used for determining further quality management activities, but also make basis for creating and maintenance of excellent relations with product and service users. Considering all this, Blood Transfusion Institute exceeds the requirements of ISO 9000 standards series.

  1. How do we reduce plasma transfusion in Rhode Island?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Christian P; Tavares, Maria F; Sweeney, Joseph D

    2017-08-01

    Plasma transfusions are given to patients with coagulopathy, either prophylactically, before an invasive procedure; or therapeutically, in the presence of active bleeding; and as an exchange fluid in therapeutic plasma exchange for disorders such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. There is consensus that many prophylactic plasma transfusions are non-efficacious, and the misdiagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura results in unnecessary therapeutic plasma exchange. Beginning in 2001, programs to reduce plasma transfusion in the three major teaching hospitals in Rhode Island were initiated. The programs evolved through the establishment of guidelines, education for key prescribers of plasma, screening of plasma prescriptions, and engagement of individual prescribing physicians for out-of-guidelines prescriptions with modification or cancellation. Establishment of an in-house ADAMTS13 (ADAM metallopeptidase with thrombospondin type 1, motif 13) assay in 2013 was used to prevent therapeutic plasma exchange in patients with non-thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura microangiopathy. Transfusion service data were gathered at the hospital level regarding blood component use, hospital data for discharges, inpatient mortality, and mean case-mix index, and, at the state level, for units of plasma shipped from the community blood center to in-state hospitals. Between 2006 and 2016, a reduction in plasma use from 11,805 to 2677 units (a 77% decrease) was observed in the three hospitals and was mirrored in the state as a whole. This decline was not associated with any increase in red blood cell transfusion. Inpatient mortality either declined or was unchanged. An active program focused on education and interdiction can achieve a large decrease in plasma transfusions without evidence of patient harm. © 2017 AABB.

  2. Study of behavioral problems in multi-transfused thalassemic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongally, Chandrashekar; Benakappa, Asha D; Reena, Shankar

    2012-10-01

    Beta-thalassemia major is a chronic disorder of blood, having an extensive impact on the affected child. It involves lifelong therapeutic regime, with repeated blood transfusions. With improved life expectancy, due to improved medical management psychosocial aspects of thalassemia are gaining importance. To assess the behavioral problems in multi-transfused thalassemic children and psychosocial factors affecting them. The study was conducted in a tertiary care level hospital and research institute catering mainly to a population of low socioeconomic status. The study was a cross-sectional study involving 50 multi-transfused thalassemic children of age 5-10 years. Fifty multi-transfused thalassemic children, aged 5-10 years, not suffering from any other major medical illness, were included. Child Behavior Check List (Achenbach) (CBCL) was used to collect data from each parent regarding the child's behavior. Parental Attitude Scale (Rangaswamy 1989) was applied. Descriptive statistical analysis was used with analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student's t test to find the significance of data. The CBCL total scores were high in 32% patients, indicating the presence of behavioral problems. Higher CBCL scores were found in children of older age group, those with poor school performance, whose mothers' education was more than eighth standard, had history of death of thalassemic relative in family, greater duration of diagnosed illness, poor pre-transfusion hemoglobin level, and who had longer periods of school absenteeism. Behavioral problems are common in multi-transfused thalassemic children. Early diagnosis and intervention of behavioral problems in these children would make them cope with thalassemia better.

  3. Antibody screening in multitransfused patients: a prerequisite before each transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamba, Divjot S; Mittal, Kshitija; Sood, Tanvi; Bedi, Ravneet Kaur; Kaur, Paramjit; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2014-10-01

    Life-long red blood cell (RBC) transfusions remain the main treatment for severe thalassemia. We hereby report a case of anti S and anti Lu(a) in a β-thalassemia major patient detected incidentally on antibody screening. The patient was a known case of β-thalassemia major and was on regular blood transfusion every 3 weeks from the institute from the age of 6 months. Subsequently, on one occasion, patient's crossmatch was compatible despite positive antibody screen using microcolumn gel technique. Autocontrol and direct antiglobulin test were negative on microcolumn gel. Anti S and anti Lu(a) antibodies were identified. Blood unit found compatible was negative for S and Lu(a) antigens. Antibody titers were 1:1 for both anti S and anti Lu(a) in AHG phase using tube technique and antibodies were of IgG type. Blood unit was transfused uneventfully to the patient. Donors were traced back (last three donations) and called for repeat blood sample testing for S and Lu(a) antigen. Two out of three donors were found to be S antigen positive and one out of these two was Lu(a) antigen positive. Anti S and anti Lu(a) antibodies were again identified on patient's subsequent visit for transfusion. The present case re-emphasize the importance of antibody screening at each visit in earlier detection of antibodies in multi transfused patients. Encouraging patients to receive transfusion from one center and dedicating donors could reduce alloimmunization rate but larger studies are required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Relevance of blood groups in transfusion of sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2013-03-01

    Blood groups are clinically significant in sickle cell disease (SCD) as transfusion remains a key treatment in this pathology. The occurrence of a delayed haemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) is not rare and is a life-threatening event. The main cause of DHTR is the production of alloantibodies against red blood cell antigens. The high rate of alloimmunization in SCD patients is mainly due to the differences of red blood groups between patients of African descent, and the frequently Caucasian donors. From an immuno-haematological point of view, DHTR in SCD patients has specific features: classical antibodies known to be haemolytic can be encountered, but otherwise non significant antibodies, autoantibodies and antibodies related to partial and rare blood groups are also frequently found in individuals of African descent. In some cases, there are no detectable antibodies. As alloimmunization remains the main cause of DHTR, it is extremely important to promote blood donation by individuals of African ancestry to make appropriate blood available. Copyright © 2012 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. ABO and D typing and alloantibody screening in marrow samples: relevance to intraosseous blood transfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckman, Sari; Ångerman-Haasmaa, Susanne; Jousi, Milla; Siitonen, Sanna; Salmela, Katja

    2018-03-01

    Blood transfusion through the intraosseous route is gaining popularity in emergency medicine. Pretransfusion peripheral blood (PB) samples are usually not available in these patients, leading to discrepancies in blood group typing and a possible delay in transferring to group-specific blood products. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of ABO and D typing and red blood cell alloantibody screening in marrow (BM) samples. Direct and reverse ABO typing, D typing, and a two-cell alloantibody screen were performed in EDTA-anticoagulated BM samples with standard manual column agglutination techniques. EDTA-anticoagulated PB samples were used as controls. The mean age of the study subjects (n = 71) was 47 years (range, 1-82 years). All ABO groups and both D+ and D- types were represented. In all subjects, concordant results were observed for all analyses in BM and PB samples. In 15 (21%) of the samples, a discrepancy of one reaction strength step (1+) was observed in at least one of the analyses (Cohen's weighted κ = 0.993); this did not affect interpretation of the results. Blood group typing and alloantibody screening are feasible in BM samples, providing proof-of-concept that intraosseous samples for blood group serologic analyses can be collected from emergency patients before intraosseous blood transfusion. This will enable a timely transfer to group-specific blood products and enable conservation of the valuable universal-donor blood products. © 2018 AABB.

  6. Effectiveness of autologous transfusion system in primary total hip and knee arthroplasty.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Schneider, Marco M

    2014-01-01

    Autologous transfusion has become a cost-efficient and useful option in the treatment of patients with high blood loss following major orthopaedic surgery. However, the effectiveness of autologous transfusion in total joint replacement remains controversial.

  7. Age of transfused blood is not associated with increased postoperative adverse outcome after cardiac surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKenny, M

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that storage age of transfused red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with adverse outcome after cardiac surgery, and examined association between volume of RBC transfusions and outcome after cardiac surgery.

  8. Monitoring compliance with transfusion guidelines in hospital departments by electronic data capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Astrid; De Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    . MATERIALS AND METHODS: Hospital data on admissions, diagnoses and surgical procedures were used to define the populations of patients. Data on haemoglobin measurements and red blood cell transfusions were used to calculate pre-transfusion haemoglobin, percentage of transfused patients and transfusion......BACKGROUND: The practice of transfusing red blood cells is still liberal in some centres suggesting a lack of compliance with guidelines recommending transfusion of red blood cells at haemoglobin levels of 6-8 g/dL in the non-bleeding patient. Few databases provide ongoing feedback of data on pre-transfusion...... haemoglobin levels at the departmental level. In a tertiary care hospital, no such data were produced before this study. Our aim was to establish a Patient Blood Management database based on electronic data capture in order to monitor compliance with transfusion guidelines at departmental and hospital levels...

  9. Factors influencing plasma transfusion practices in paediatric intensive care units around the world

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karam, Oliver; Demaret, Pierre; Duhamel, Alain

    2017-01-01

    % of the centres transfused plasma to >5% of their patients, whereas another 25% transfused plasma to transfusion practices in these centres. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Online survey sent to the local...... investigators of the 101 participating centres, in February 2016. Four areas were explored: beliefs regarding plasma transfusion, patients' case-mix in each unit, unit's characteristics, and local blood product transfusion policies and processes. RESULTS: The response rate was 82% (83/101). 43......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Plasma transfusions are a frequent treatment worldwide, but many studies have reported a wide variation in the indications to transfuse. Recently, an international paediatric study also showed wide variation in frequency in the use of plasma transfusions: 25...

  10. Screening for hemosiderosis in patients receiving multiple red blood cell transfusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, Adriaan D; van Beers, E J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314670793; de Vooght, K M K|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817961; Schutgens, R E G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/258752084

    2017-01-01

    Background: The dramatic impact of hemosiderosis on survival in chronically transfused patients with hereditary anemia is well known. We evaluated whether patients receiving multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are adequately screened for hemosiderosis. Methods: We retrospectively assessed

  11. Thrombelastography (TEG) or thromboelastometry (ROTEM) to monitor haemotherapy versus usual care in patients with massive transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Wikkelsø, Anne; Brok, Jesper Sune

    2011-01-01

    Severe bleeding and coagulopathy as a result of massive transfusion are serious clinical conditions that are associated with high mortality. Thromboelastography (TEG) and thromboelastometry (ROTEM) are increasingly used to guide transfusion strategy but their roles remain disputed....

  12. Transfusions of blood and blood products and viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Wróblewska

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfusions of blood and blood products are commonly used in medicine, but being biological materials they carry a risk of transmitting infections--viral, bacterial, parasitic, as well as prions. Laboratory tests used for screening of donated blood for viral infections at present cannot detect all infectious units. Criteria for selection of blood donors therefore must be very strict, while methods of inactivation of viruses and laboratory assays for detection of their presence must be improved. Indications for blood transfusion should be restricted.

  13. Direct antiglobulin test positivity in multi-transfused thalassemics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Red cell allo- and auto-immunization is a well recognized problem in multi-transfused thalassemic patients. We conducted this study on 301 multi-transfused thalassemic patients under the Thalassemia Transfusion Programme of Advanced Pediatric Centre of PGIMER. Aims and Objectives: The study was designed to determine the frequency of alloimmunization and autoimmunization in multi-transfused thalassemic patients and to establish the specificity of alloantibody to red cell antigens, if alloimmunization is detected. Materials and Methods: The antibody screening was performed by the conventional tube technique using commercially available three cell screening panel (Diamed Switzerland by saline, low ionic strength solution (LISS and albumin indirect antiglobulin test (IAT. Samples with alloantibodies were then tested with red cell identification panel to determine the alloantibody specificity. Autoantibody screening was performed by direct antiglobulin test (DAT during pre-transfusion testing. Results: Of the 301 patients, 52 (17.28% were found to have antibodies (-allo and –autoantibodies. A total of 11 red cell alloantibodies were detected in 10 patients and the specificities were anti-Kell in 6(54.5%, anti-D in 2(18.2%, anti-c in 1(9.1% and a combination of anti-E (9.1% and anti-Jkb in 1 (9.1% patients. DAT was positive in 48 (15.9% patients. The frequency of autoantibody was significantly higher in alloimmunized group as compared to non-alloimmunized group (60% V/s 14.4%. Also, the pre-transfusion hemoglobin was significantly lower in the immunized group (8.5 gm/dl V/s 9.0 gm/dl; p=0.03 than the non-immunized group. Conclusion: Based on these observations, we suggest antigen typing of all thalassemia major patients for ABO, Rh and Kell antigens before initiating transfusion therapy. Also, screening for allo- and auto-antibodies at regular intervals should be done prior to each transfusion.

  14. Neonatal Platelet Transfusions and Future Areas of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola-Visner, Martha; Bercovitz, Rachel S

    2016-10-01

    Thrombocytopenia affects approximately one fourth of neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units, and prophylactic platelet transfusions are commonly administered to reduce bleeding risk. However, there are few evidence-based guidelines to inform clinicians' decision-making process. Developmental differences in hemostasis and differences in underlying disease processes make it difficult to apply platelet transfusion practices from other patient populations to neonates. Thrombocytopenia is a risk factor for common preterm complications such as intraventricular hemorrhage; however, a causal link has not been established, and platelet transfusions have not been shown to reduce risk of developing intraventricular hemorrhage. Platelet count frequently drives the decision of whether to transfuse platelets, although there is little evidence to demonstrate what a safe platelet nadir is in preterm neonates. Current clinical assays of platelet function often require large sample volumes and are not valid in the setting of thrombocytopenia; however, evaluation of platelet function and/or global hemostasis may aid in the identification of neonates who are at the highest risk of bleeding. Although platelets' primary role is in establishing hemostasis, platelets also carry pro- and antiangiogenic factors in their granules. Aberrant angiogenesis underpins common complications of prematurity including intraventricular hemorrhage and retinopathy of prematurity. In addition, platelets play an important role in host immune defenses. Infectious and inflammatory conditions such as sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis are commonly associated with late-onset thrombocytopenia in neonates. Severity of thrombocytopenia is correlated with mortality risk. The nature of this association is unclear, but preclinical data suggest that thrombocytopenia contributes to mortality rather than simply being a proxy for disease severity. Neonates are a distinct patient population in whom

  15. The majority of patients in septic shock are transfused with fresh-frozen plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, Nanna; Wesche, Nikolaj; Perner, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion may be widely used in patients in septic shock, but the use is not well-described. Our aim was to describe the current use of FFP transfusion in medical patients with septic shock.......Fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) transfusion may be widely used in patients in septic shock, but the use is not well-described. Our aim was to describe the current use of FFP transfusion in medical patients with septic shock....

  16. Blood transfusion practices in a tertiary care center in Northern India

    OpenAIRE

    Kumari, Sonam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusion plays vital roles in the medical and surgical practice. To achieve optimum use of blood, transfusion has to be appropriate and judicious consuming minimal resources and manpower. Objective: To evaluate the pattern of blood transfusion requests and utilization with the aim of determining transfusion practice. Materials and Methods: Blood request forms and cross-match worksheets at the blood bank were analyzed over a 6-month period. Numbers of requisitions, b...

  17. [Chagas' disease in patients in chronic hemodialysis. Prevalence and risk of transmission by blood transfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorca, M; Lorca, E; Atías, A; Plubins, L

    1989-06-01

    A serologic study of Chagas disease was performed in 110 patients submitted to chronic hemodialisis and blood transfusions. Immunofluorescence antibody testing (IgG and IgM) was positive in 6 out of 62 patients receiving multiple blood transfusions (9.7%), but negative in all 48 subjects without transfusions. Thus, repeated blood transfusion is a significant risk for T cruzi infection in chronic hemodialized patients.

  18. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: Current understanding and preventive strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaar, A. P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is the most serious complication of transfusion medicine. TRALI is defined as the onset of acute hypoxia within 6 hours of a blood transfusion in the absence of hydrostatic pulmonary oedema. The past decades have resulted in a better understanding of the

  19. Effect of perioperative blood transfusions on long term graft outcomes in renal transplant patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Frank J

    2012-06-01

    It is established that blood transfusions will promote sensitization to human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antigens, increase time spent waiting for transplantation and may lead to higher rates of rejection. Less is known about how perioperative blood transfusion influence patient and graft outcome. This study aims to establish if there is an association between perioperative blood transfusion and graft or patient survival.

  20. The risk of transfusion-transmissible viral infections in the Niger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives: Million\\'s of lives are saved each year through blood transfusion. Nevertheless people have increased risk of becoming infected with transfusion - transmissible viral infections through transfusion of blood and blood products that have not been tested correctly. This study was undertaken to ...