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Sample records for nonepileptic psychogenic pseudoseizures

  1. Terminology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Ausserer, Harald; Nardone, Raffaele; Tezzon, Frediano; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Michele; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-03-01

    Several different terms have been used to describe "psychogenic nonepileptic seizures" (PNES) in the literature. In this study, we evaluated the most common English terms used to describe PNES on Google and in PubMed using multiple search terms (https://www.google.com and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). The information prevalence of the five terms most frequently used to refer to PNES in PubMed were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by pseudo(-)seizure(s), non(-)epileptic seizure(s), psychogenic seizure(s), and non(-)epileptic event(s). The five most frequently adopted terms to describe PNES in Google were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by non(-)epileptic event(s), psychogenic attack(s), non(-)epileptic attack(s), and psychogenic non(-)epileptic attack(s). The broad spectrum of synonyms used to refer to PNES in the medical literature reflects a lack of internationally accepted, uniform terminology for PNES. In addition to "seizure(s)," lay people use the word "attack(s)" to describe PNES. Although considered obsolete, some terms, e.g., pseudoseizure(s), are still used in the recent medical literature. Adopting a uniform terminology to describe PNES could facilitate communication between epileptologists, physicians without specific expertise in epilepsy, and patients. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  2. A comparison of personality disorder characteristics of patients with nonepileptic psychogenic pseudoseizures with those of patients with epilepsy.

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    Harden, Cynthia L; Jovine, Luydmilla; Burgut, Fadime T; Carey, Bridget T; Nikolov, Blagovest G; Ferrando, Stephen J

    2009-03-01

    We sought to determine the type of personality disorder cluster associated with patients with nonepileptic psychogenic seizures (NES) compared with that of patients with epileptic seizures (ES). Consecutive adult patients admitted for video/EEG monitoring found to have NES were compared with a simultaneously admitted patient with confirmed epilepsy. Personality was assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis II Personality Disorders. Personality disorders were then divided into personality clusters described in the DSM-IV-TR: A = paranoid, schizotypal, schizoid; B = borderline, histrionic, antisocial, narcissistic; or C = avoidant, dependent, obsessive-compulsive. Thirteen of 16 patients with NES and 12 of 16 patients with ES met criteria for personality disorders. Patients with NES were more likely to meet criteria for a personality disorder in Cluster A or B, compared with patients with ES, who were more likely to have Cluster C personality disorders (chi(2) test, P=0.007). We propose that the personality traits of patients with NES contribute to the development of nonepileptic psychogenic seizures. However, the large proportion of patients with ES with Cluster C personality disorders was unexpected, and further, for the patients with epilepsy, the direction of the association of their personality traits with the development of epilepsy is unknown.

  3. Factitious psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes

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    Alissa Romano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mistaking psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes (PNEPEs for epileptic seizures (ES is potentially dangerous, and certain features should alert physicians to a possible PNEPE diagnosis. Psychogenic nonepileptic paroxysmal episodes due to factitious seizures carry particularly high risks of morbidity or mortality from nonindicated emergency treatment and, often, high costs in wasted medical treatment expenditures. We report a case of a 28-year-old man with PNEPEs that were misdiagnosed as ES. The patient had been on four antiseizure medications (ASMs with therapeutic serum levels and had had multiple intubations in the past for uncontrolled episodes. He had no episodes for two days of continuous video-EEG monitoring. He then disconnected his EEG cables and had an episode of generalized stiffening and cyanosis, followed by jerking and profuse bleeding from the mouth. The manifestations were unusually similar to those of ES, except that he was clearly startled by spraying water on his face, while he was stiff in all extremities and unresponsive. There were indications that he had sucked blood from his central venous catheter to expel through his mouth during his PNEPEs while consciously holding his breath. Normal video-EEG monitoring; the patient's volitional and deceptive acts to fabricate the appearance of illness, despite pain and personal endangerment; and the absence of reward other than remaining in a sick role were all consistent with a diagnosis of factitious disorder.

  4. Psychogenic chemical sensitivity: psychogenic pseudoseizures elicited by provocation challenges with fragrances.

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    Staudenmayer, H; Kramer, R E

    1999-08-01

    A middle-aged woman with a 10-year history of disability attributed to chemical sensitivities complained that exposure to specific fragrances immediately elicited seizures. Video-EEG monitoring was performed in a hospital neurodiagnostic laboratory during provocative challenge studies employing fragrances identified by the patient as reliably inducing symptoms. The baseline clinical EEG was normal. Immediately after each provocation with air deodorant and perfume, she consistently showed both generalized tonic/clonic and multifocal myoclonic jerking, at times was nonresponsive, spoke with slurred speech, and complained of right-sided paralysis and lethargy. None of these events were associated with any EEG abnormalities. Psychological assessment (MMPI-2, MCMI-II) revealed personality traits that predisposed her to somatization and beliefs about environmental sensitivities. The convulsions were a manifestation of psychogenic pseudoseizures that had been iatrogenically reinforced.

  5. Evidence of brain abnormality in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

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    Reuber, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Bauer, J.; Singh, D.D.; Elger, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    Markers of brain abnormalities in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) were studied to explore whether physical brain disorder is associated with an increased risk of PNES. Evidence of epileptiform EEG changes, MRI abnormalities, and neuropsychological (NPS)

  6. Basal hypercortisolism and trauma in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

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    Bakvis, P.; Spinhoven, P.; Giltay, E.J.; Kuyk, J.; Edelbroek, P.M.; Zitman, F.G.; Roelofs, K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have indicated that psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are associated with psychological trauma, but only a few studies have examined the associations with neurobiologic stress systems, such as the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and its end-product cortisol.

  7. Interictal EEG abnormalities in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

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    Reuber, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Bauer, J.; Singh, D.D.; Elger, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine interictal EEG abnormalities in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). METHODS: (a) Retrospective study of EEG reports of 187 consecutive patients with PNES seen at the Department of Epileptology, Bonn, Germany; (b) Blinded, multirater comparison of EEGs of all

  8. The Role of Emotions in Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Mai Bjørnskov; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka

    Dysregulated emotions have been implied as factors contributing to psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES). The present study explored patients with PNES’ inclusion of emotions in their narratives of their seizures. Results revealed that patients focus more on their physical experience than...

  9. Recognition of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: a curable neurophobia?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2013-02-01

    Diagnosing psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) remains challenging. The majority of \\'PNES status\\' cases are likely to be seen in the emergency department or similar non-specialised units, where patients are initially assessed and managed by physicians of varying expertise in neurology.

  10. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and psychogenic movement disorders: two sides of the same coin?

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    Luciano De Paola

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES and psychogenic movement disorders (PMD are commonly seen in Neurology practice and are categorized in the DSM-5 as functional neurological disorders/conversion disorders. This review encompasses historical and epidemiological data, clinical aspects, diagnostic criteria, treatment and prognosis of these rather challenging and often neglected patients. As a group they have puzzled generations of neurologists and psychiatrists and in some ways continue to do so, perhaps embodying and justifying the ultimate and necessary link between these specialties.

  11. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures as a manifestation of psychological distress associated with undiagnosed autism spectrum disorder

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    Miyawaki D

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dai Miyawaki,1 Yoshihiro Iwakura,1 Toshiyuki Seto,2 Hiroto Kusaka,1 Ayako Goto,1 Yu Okada,1 Nobuyoshi Asada,1 Erika Yanagihara,1 Koki Inoue1 1Department of Neuropsychiatry, 2Department of Pediatrics, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka, Japan Abstract: Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES are observable changes in behavior or consciousness that are similar to epileptic seizures but are not associated with electrophysiologic changes. PNES occur in children with underlying psychological distress and are especially frequent in those with epilepsy. Because PNES are heterogeneous, comprehensive treatment tailored to each patient is required to reduce psychosocial stress. Currently, reports regarding children with PNES concomitant with autism spectrum disorder (ASD do not exist, and effective treatment strategies for these children are lacking. In this case report, we describe a 10-year-old Japanese girl with undiagnosed ASD who developed PNES while undergoing treatment for benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. She exhibited hypersensitivity to sound and interpersonal conflicts caused by social communication deficits. The PNES symptoms improved shortly after our intervention, which was designed to reduce her distress caused by auditory hypersensitivity and impaired social communication, both characteristics of ASD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing PNES in a child with ASD. Our findings suggest that PNES can result from psychological distress in children with undiagnosed ASD and highlight the importance of examining ASD traits in patients with PNES. Keywords: pseudoseizures, autism spectrum disorders, undiagnosed, children

  12. Semiology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: age-related differences.

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    Alessi, Rudá; Vincentiis, Silvia; Rzezak, Patricia; Valente, Kette D

    2013-05-01

    The few studies addressing semiology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) in children showed that this group differs from adults, considering the classical signs described. Our study with systematic assessment provides a direct comparison of the classical signs of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs) in children and adults in order to establish the usefulness of the most important signs described for adults in children. Video-EEG recordings of patients with PNESs from 2006 to 2011 were analyzed. Twenty-five signs were selected as the most prevalent in literature, and their presence was evaluated. Events were categorized as either of the following: catatonic, major motor, minor motor, and subjective (Griffith et al., 2007 [11]). One hundred and fifteen patients were included; 63.5% were adults, 73.2% were females, and 14.4% had epilepsy. Adults presented more ictal eye closure (p=0.006), convulsions lasting >2 min (psemiological categories, major motor activity was the main feature in adults, and minor motor activity was more prevalent among children (52.9% and 38.1%, respectively; p=0.01). Our data showed that research about the distinct ictal features of PNESs, such as minor motor events that are more typical in children, is likely to be useful in promoting earlier recognition of PNESs in this population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Providers' perspectives on treating psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: frustration and hope.

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    McMillan, Katharine K; Pugh, Mary Jo; Hamid, Hamada; Salinsky, Martin; Pugh, Jacqueline; Noël, Polly H; Finley, Erin P; Leykum, Luci K; Lanham, Holly J; LaFrance, W Curt

    2014-08-01

    Recent diagnostic and treatment advances in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) have the potential to improve care for patients, but little is known about the current state of PNES care delivery in the Veterans Health Administration (VA). We conducted semistructured interviews with 74 health-care clinicians and workers in the VA, eliciting provider perceptions of PNES care. Data were analyzed according to principles of Grounded Theory. The results revealed variation in care and two emergent domain themes of frustration and hope. Frustration was manifest in subthemes including Complexity, Patient Acceptance, Uncertainty About Treatment, Need for Evidence-based Treatment, and Failure of Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration between neurologists and mental health providers. Hope encompassed subthemes of Positive Attitudes, Developing Cross-Disciplinary Treatment, and Specific PNES Care. Increased resources for diagnosing, treating, and researching PNES have improved awareness of the disorder. More research is needed to understand patients' and caregivers' perceptions of PNES care. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

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    Goldstein, L.H.; Chalder, T.; Chigwedere, C.; Khondoker, M.R.; Moriarty, J.; Toone, B.K.; Mellers, J.D.C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and standard medical care (SMC) as treatments for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Methods: Our randomized controlled trial (RCT) compared CBT with SMC in an outpatient neuropsychiatric setting. Sixty-six PNES patients were randomized to either CBT (plus SMC) or SMC alone, scheduled to occur over 4 months. PNES diagnosis was established by video-EEG telemetry for most patients. Exclusion criteria included comorbid history of epilepsy, <2 PNES/month, and IQ <70. The primary outcome was seizure frequency at end of treatment and at 6-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included 3 months of seizure freedom at 6-month follow-up, measures of psychosocial functioning, health service use, and employment. Results: In an intention-to-treat analysis, seizure reduction following CBT was superior at treatment end (group × time interaction p < 0.0001; large to medium effect sizes). At follow-up, the CBT group tended to be more likely to have experienced 3 months of seizure freedom (odds ratio 3.125, p = 0.086). Both groups improved in some health service use measures and on the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Mood and employment status showed no change. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that cognitive-behavioral therapy is more effective than standard medical care alone in reducing seizure frequency in PNES patients. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that CBT in addition to SMC, as compared to SMC alone, significantly reduces seizure frequency in patients with PNES (change in median monthly seizure frequency: baseline to 6 months follow-up, CBT group, 12 to 1.5; SMC alone group, 8 to 5). GLOSSARY AED = antiepileptic drug; CBT = cognitive-behavioral therapy; CI = confidence interval; DSM-IV = Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition; HADS = Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; IQR = interquartile range; ITT = intention-to-treat; OR = odds ratio; PNES

  15. Patients' and neurologists' perception of epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

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    Whitehead, Kimberley; Kandler, Rosalind; Reuber, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Although differences in illness perceptions between neurologists and patients with epilepsy or psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are likely to be clinically relevant, this is the first study to attempt a direct comparison. In addition, this study compares the illness perceptions of patients with epilepsy with those of patients with PNES. Thirty-four patients with epilepsy, 40 patients with PNES, and 45 neurologists were recruited. All patient participants completed versions of the illness perception questionnaire revised (IPQ-R) adapted for epileptic or nonepileptic seizure disorders, single-item symptom attribution question (SAQ), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Quality of Life in Epilepsy-31 (QOLIE-31), and Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS). Participating neurologists completed two versions of the IPQ-R and two SAQs for epileptic and nonepileptic seizure disorders. Differences in illness perceptions between patients with epilepsy and patients with PNES were minor compared to those between patients with either seizure disorder and neurologists. Neurologists considered both seizure disorders more treatable and more amenable to personal control than did the patients themselves. Neurologists had much more polarized views of the etiology of both conditions; whereas patients mostly considered the causes of their seizure disorders as partially "physical" and partially "psychological," neurologists perceived epilepsy as an essentially "physical" and PNES as a clearly "psychological" problem. There are considerable differences between the illness perceptions of patients with seizure disorders and their doctors, which could represent barriers to successful clinical management. In particular, a discrepancy between neurologists' and patients' beliefs about the personal control that patients may be able to exert over PNES could contribute to the confusion or anger some patients report after the diagnosis has been explained to them. Furthermore

  16. Basal hypercortisolism and trauma in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

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    Bakvis, Patricia; Spinhoven, Philip; Giltay, Erik J; Kuyk, Jarl; Edelbroek, Peter M; Zitman, Frans G; Roelofs, Karin

    2010-05-01

    Several studies have indicated that psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are associated with psychological trauma, but only a few studies have examined the associations with neurobiologic stress systems, such as the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and its end-product cortisol. We tested several relevant HPA-axis functions in patients with PNES and related them to trauma history. Cortisol awakening curve, basal diurnal cortisol, and negative cortisol feedback (using a 1 mg dexamethasone suppression test) were examined in 18 patients with PNES and 19 matched healthy controls (HCs) using saliva cortisol sampling on two consecutive days at 19 time points. Concomitant sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity was assessed by analyzing saliva alpha-amylase (sAA). Patients with PNES showed significantly increased basal diurnal cortisol levels compared to HCs. This effect was driven mainly by patients reporting sexual trauma who showed a trend toward higher cortisol levels as compared to patients without a sexual trauma report. Importantly, the increased basal diurnal cortisol levels in patients were not explained by depression, medication, or smoking, or by current seizures or group differences in SNS activity. This is the first study showing that basal hypercortisolism in patients with PNES is independent of the acute occurrence of seizures. In addition, basal hypercortisolism was more pronounced in traumatized patients with PNES as compared to nontraumatized patients with PNES. These findings suggest that HPA-axis activity provides a significant neurobiologic marker for PNES.

  17. Theory of mind abilities in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

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    Schönenberg, Michael; Jusyte, Aiste; Höhnle, Nina; Mayer, Sarah Verena; Weber, Yvonne; Hautzinger, Martin; Schell, Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) have been frequently linked to deficits in affect regulation and altered processing of emotionally salient information. However, less is known about how patients suffering from PNES actually process and interpret affective social stimuli. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate basal facial affect recognition as well as mind-reading skills in a sample of patients with PNES and matched control subjects. Patients with PNES (N=15) and healthy controls (N=15) completed self-report questionnaires that measured alexithymia and perceived stress vulnerability. Affect perception was tested using a series of computerized movies of models whose facial expressions slowly change from neutral to full-blown emotions (anger, fear, sadness, happiness, disgust, and surprise), allowing for a fine-grained assessment of facial emotion recognition impairments. Further, all participants were presented with the Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition, a well-validated video-based test for the evaluation of subtle mind-reading deficits. Data analyses revealed increased alexithymic traits and, impaired mentalizing skills in individuals with PNES, while basal facial expression recognition was not compromised. The present findings are the first to demonstrate that patients with PNES exhibit several deficits in reasoning about their own and other people's mental states. Patients with PNES may benefit from psychotherapeutic interventions that focus on disturbed affect regulation and aim to enhance emotional awareness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: our video-EEG experience.

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    Nežádal, Tomáš; Hovorka, Jiří; Herman, Erik; Němcová, Iveta; Bajaček, Michal; Stichová, Eva

    2011-09-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the number of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) in our patients with a refractory seizure disorder, to determine the 'typical' PNES semiology using video-EEG monitoring and describe other PNES parameters. We evaluated prospectively 596 patients with pharmacoresistant seizures. All these patients underwent continuous video-EEG monitoring. In consenting patients, we used suggestive seizure provocation. We assessed seizure semiology, interictal EEG, brain MRI, psychiatric co-morbidities, personality profiles, and seizure outcome. In the sample of 596 monitored patients, we detected 111 (19.3%) patients with PNES. Of the 111 patients with PNES, 86.5% had spontaneous and 76.5% had provoked seizures. The five most typical symptoms were: initially closed eyelids (67.6%), rapid tremor (47.7%), asynchronous limb movement (37.8%), preictal pseudosleep (33.3%), and side-to-side head movement (32.4%). Interictal EEG was rated as abnormal in 46.2% and with epileptiform abnormality in 9%. Brain MRI was abnormal in 32 (28.8%) patients. Personality disorders (46.8%), anxiety (39.6%), and depression (12.6%) were the most frequent additional psychiatric co-morbidities. PNES outcome after at least 2 years is reported; 22.5% patients was seizure-free; one-third had markedly reduced seizure frequency. We have not seen any negative impact of the provocative testing on the seizure outcome. Video-EEG monitoring with suggestive seizure provocation supported by clinical psychiatric and psychological evaluation significantly contributes to the correct PNES diagnosis, while interictal EEG and brain MRI are frequently abnormal. Symptoms typical for PNES, as opposed to epileptic seizures, could be distinguished.

  19. Can semiology predict psychogenic nonepileptic seizures? A prospective study.

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    Syed, Tanvir U; LaFrance, W Curt; Kahriman, Emine S; Hasan, Saba N; Rajasekaran, Vijayalakshmi; Gulati, Deepak; Borad, Samip; Shahid, Asim; Fernandez-Baca, Guadalupe; Garcia, Naiara; Pawlowski, Matthias; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Amina, Shahram; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z

    2011-06-01

    Reducing health and economic burdens from diagnostic delay of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) requires prompt referral for video electroencephalography (VEEG) monitoring, the diagnostic gold standard. Practitioners make VEEG referrals when semiology suggests PNES, although few semiological signs are supported by well-designed studies, and most VEEG studies neglect to concurrently measure how accurately seizure witnesses can ascertain semiology. In this study, we estimate the value of eyewitness-reported and video-documented semiology for predicting PNES, and we measure accuracy of eyewitness reports. We prospectively interviewed eyewitnesses of seizures in patients referred for VEEG monitoring, to inquire about 48 putative PNES and ES signs. Multiple, EEG-blinded, epileptologists independently evaluated seizure videos and documented the presence/absence of signs. We used generalized estimating equations to identify reliable video-documented PNES and ES signs, and we compared eyewitness reports with video findings to assess how accurately signs are reported. We used logistic regression to determine whether eyewitness reports could predict VEEG-ascertained seizure type. We analyzed 120 seizures (36 PNES, 84 ES) from 35 consecutive subjects. Of 45 video-documented signs, only 3 PNES signs ("preserved awareness," "eye flutter," and "bystanders can intensify or alleviate") and 3 ES signs ("abrupt onset," "eye-opening/widening," and postictal "confusion/sleep") were significant and reliable indicators of seizure type. Eyewitness reports of these 6 signs were inaccurate and not statistically different from guessing. Consequentially, eyewitness reports of signs did not predict VEEG-ascertained diagnosis. We validated our findings in a second, prospective cohort of 36 consecutive subjects. We identified 6 semiological signs that reliably distinguish PNES and ES, and found that eyewitness reports of these signs are unreliable. We offer suggestions to improve the

  20. Socialization characteristics in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES).

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    Vaidya-Mathur, Urmi; Myers, Lorna; Laban-Grant, Olgica; Lancman, Marcelo; Lancman, Martin; Jones, Jace

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe social behaviors and preferences in adults with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) including self-reported use of various socialization mediums (face-to-face and indirect communication) as well as perceived social barriers. One hundred forty-one consecutive patients with a diagnosis of PNES that was later confirmed through inpatient video-EEG monitoring were administered a questionnaire on the day of their first outpatient appointment. The questionnaire was designed to assess preferences in socialization practices, frequency of interpersonal contact, use of social media, and perceived barriers to socialization. The survey was developed to gain a better understanding of the socialization behaviors and preferences of our patients for the future development of customized activities in our wellness program. Contrary to prevalent assumptions that patients with PNES tend to be socially isolated, our responders reported that they were in fact quite socially connected (72.2% reported daily communication with friends and family via telephone, 68.54% saw relatives in person weekly, 65.28% saw friends weekly, and 51.2% reported using the computer daily to socialize). Facebook was the preferred online social media. Indoor/solitary activities were most common with 57.44% stating that they watch TV/read/use the computer. The primary barriers to socialization that respondents endorsed were driving prohibition and medication side effects. Respondents expressed the greatest interest in online support groups or educational programs (29.46%), office-based support groups (28.57%), and volunteering (23.21%). Although it has been speculated that social isolation is a significant problem for patients with PNES, considerable participation in social activities was reported. Characteristics of socialization practices may be more nuanced than first believed. When addressing therapeutic interventions with this group of patients in the future, it

  1. Recent developments in our understanding of the semiology and treatment of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

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    Goldstein, Laura H; Mellers, John D C

    2012-08-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) pose clinical challenges in terms of diagnosis and management. Recent studies have thrown further light on the extent to which features of PNES semiology may distinguish PNES patients from those with epilepsy. Management of this patient group will include discussion of the diagnosis, withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs, and psychological intervention when PNES persist. However, the evidence base for these different stages remains limited, although recent studies are beginning to provide guidance for clinicians and future research.

  2. Phenomenology and psychiatric origin of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

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    Ristić Aleksandar J.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Psychogenic nonepileptic seizure (PNES is a sudden change in a person's behavior, perception, thinking, or feeling that is usually time limited and resembles, or is mistaken for, epilepsy but does not have the characteristic electroencephalographic (EEG changes that accompanies a true epileptic seizure [1]. It is considered that PNES is a somatic manifestation of mental distress, in response to a psychological conflict or other Stressors [2]. A wide spectrum of clinical presentation includes syncope, generalized tonic-clonic seizure, simple and complex partial seizure, myoclonic seizure, frontal lobe seizures and status epilepticus [3]. Coexistence of epilepsy and PNES is seen in approximately 9% of cases [5]. Between 25-30% of patients referred to tertiary centers and initially diagnosed as refractory epilepsy were on further examination diagnosed as PNES [6,7]. In DSM-IV [12] PNES are usually categorized under conversion disorder with seizures or convulsions. However, psychiatric basis of PNES may be anxiousness (panic attack, somatization or factitious disorder, simulation, dissociative disorders and psychosis [1]. AIM The aim of the study was to establish clinical phenomenology and EEG characteristics as well as basic psychiatric disorder in patients with PNES. METHOD In a retrospective study covering the period from January 1st 1999 till April 31 st 2003, 24 patients (22 female, 2 male treated at the Institute of Neurology in Belgrade were analyzed. PNES were defined as sudden change in behavior incoherent with epileptiform activity registered on EEG. Possible PNES were determined on the basis of history data and clinical examination during the attack but definitive confirmation was established only by the finding of no ictal EEG changes during typical seizure of each patient. Patients with coexisting epilepsy were included in the study, too. At least two standard EEG (range 2-6, median 4 were performed at the beginning of

  3. A systematic review of suggestive seizure induction for the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

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    Popkirov, Stoyan; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Suggestive seizure induction is a widely used method for diagnosing psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Despite seven decades of multidisciplinary research, however, there is still no unified protocol, no definitive agreement on the ethical framework and no consensus on diagnostic utility. This systematic review surveys the evidence at hand and addresses clinically relevant aspects of suggestive seizure induction. In addition to its use for facilitating the diagnostic process, its mechanism of action and utility in elucidating the psychopathology of PNES will be discussed. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Similar semiology of epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures recorded during stereo-EEG.

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    Ostrowsky-Coste, Karine; Montavont, Alexandra; Keo-Kosal, Pascale; Guenot, Marc; Chatillon, Claude-Edouard; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    We report two adolescents with refractory seizure disorders in whom both epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) were recorded with intracerebral EEG. The ictal phenomenology of epileptic seizures (ES) and PNES, consisting of hypermotor attacks in the first patient and left-sided painful episodes in the second patient, proved remarkably similar in both cases, highlighting the difficulties which can arise with the distinction of epileptic seizures and PNES based on ictal phenomenology alone. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Childhood trauma and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: A review of findings with speculations on the underlying mechanisms.

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    Beghi, Massimiliano; Cornaggia, Isotta; Magaudda, Adriana; Perin, Cecilia; Peroni, Federica; Cornaggia, Cesare Maria

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this review was to examine the possible link between psychological trauma in a patient's medical history and the onset of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). An electronic search of published reports was made using the search engines PubMed-MedLine, EBSCO, PsycINFO, SFX, and Embase and the keywords "PNES", "psychogenic seizures", "sexual abuse", and "trauma". A correlation emerged between history of childhood trauma and the presence of PNES. Antecedent trauma was more frequent in females than in males and in patients exhibiting psychiatric disorders but was inversely correlated with cognitive impairment. In the presence of PNES, it is important to accurately investigate the patient's medical history in search of psychological trauma, particularly in women and in patients with psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Which patients with epilepsy are at risk for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES)? A multicenter case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissel, Benjamin D.; Dwivedi, Alok K.; Gaston, Tyler E.; Rodriguez-Porcel, Federico J.; Aljaafari, Danah; Hopp, Jennifer L.; Krumholz, Allan; van der Salm, Sandra M. A.; Andrade, Danielle M.; Borlot, Felippe; Moseley, Brian D.; Cavitt, Jennifer L.; Williams, Stevie; Stone, Jon; LaFrance, W. Curt; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.; Espay, Alberto J.

    2016-01-01

    We sought to examine the clinical and electrographic differences between patients with combined epileptic (ES) and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and age- and gender-matched patients with ES-only and PNES-only. Data from 138 patients (105 women [77%]), including 46 with PNES/ES

  7. Thoughts, emotions, and dissociative features differentiate patients with epilepsy from patients with psychogenic nonepileptic spells (PNESs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Rick; Popescu, Alexandra; Ghearing, Gena; Bagic, Anto

    2015-10-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic spells (PNESs) are often very difficult to treat, which may be, in part, related to the limited information known about what a person experiences while having PNESs. For this retrospective study, thoughts, emotions, and dissociative features during a spell were evaluated in 351 patients diagnosed with PNESs (N=223) or epilepsy (N=128). We found that a statistically higher number of thoughts, emotions, and dissociative symptoms were endorsed by patients with PNESs versus patients with epilepsy. Patients with PNESs reported significantly more anxiety and frustration, but not depression, compared with those with epilepsy. Emotions and dissociations, but not thoughts, and a history of any type of abuse were endorsed significantly more often by patients with PNESs. Patients with PNESs are prone to having poor outcomes, and interventions focusing on their actual experiences may be helpful for treatment planning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. People with Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: A South African perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisma Pretorius

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES is a disabling disorder which has a negative effect on the quality of life of individuals with PNES. A clear understanding of the disorder is necessary, however, to date, research about PNES in South Africa is limited.Objectives: The aims of this study were to explore the demographic variables of individuals with PNES in South Africa, to review the available body of research on PNES, and to compare it with our results.Method: Twenty-two people with PNES, with confirmed video EEG, were recruited by means of convenience sampling from two hospitals. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the demographic variables of the participants.Results: Internationally comparable results revealed misdiagnoses and low treatment delivery amongst a primarily female population.Conclusion: This study provided greater insight into individuals with PNES in South Africa, highlighting the need for more information, support, effective treatment and accurate diagnosis of PNES.

  9. Clinical characteristics and outcome of patients diagnosed with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: a 5-year review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of this article was to describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients diagnosed with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of patients diagnosed with PNES in a 5-year period. RESULTS: Fifty patients with PNES were identified, giving an estimated incidence of 0.91\\/100,000 per annum. Thirty-eight were included for review, 15 of whom were male (39%). Eighteen patients had been diagnosed with epilepsy as well as PNES (47%). We demonstrated a gender difference in our patients, with males having higher seizure frequencies, more antiepileptic drug use, and a longer interval before diagnosis of PNES. Females were diagnosed with other conversion disorders more often than males. Impaired social function was observed in PNES, as was resistance to psychological interventions with a subsequent poor response to treatments. CONCLUSIONS: PNES remains a difficult condition to treat, and may affect males in proportions higher than those described in previous studies.

  10. Are psychogenic non-epileptic seizures just another symptom of conversion disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaan, Richard A A; Duncan, Roderick; Goldstein, Laura H; Jankovic, Joseph; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2017-05-01

    Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are classified with other functional neurological symptoms as 'Conversion Disorder', but there are reasons to wonder whether this symptomatology constitutes a distinct entity. We reviewed the literature comparing PNES with other functional neurological symptoms. We find eight studies that directly examined this question. Though all but one found significant differences-notably in presenting age, trauma history, and dissociation-they were divided on whether these differences represented an important distinction. We argue that the aetiological and mechanistic distinctions they support, particularly when bolstered by additional data, give reason to sustain a separation between these conditions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Conversion disorder as psychogenic nonepileptic seizures in suspected cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Xavier F; Sharma, Jennifer S; Dar, Syma A

    2014-01-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), a form of conversion disorder, are paroxysmal episodes resembling epilepsy while lacking electrographic correlation. The phenomenon has rarely been reported in elderly patients and has not been associated with a new-onset medical diagnosis. We present the case of an 81-year-old female with no past psychiatric or traumatic history who developed PNES within the context of a new, suspected cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first such reported case of a suspected cancer (or otherwise medical) diagnosis contributing directly and temporally to the development of PNES. Discussion of involved psychosocial variables follows the vignette, and a brief review of relevant literature is offered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Understanding psychogenic nonepileptic seizures-Phenomenology, semiology and the Integrative Cognitive Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, Markus; Brown, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures (PNES) are one of the commonest differential diagnoses of epilepsy. This paper provides a narrative review of what has been learnt in the last 25 years regarding the visible manifestations, physiological features, subjective experiences and interactional aspects of PNES. We then explore how current insights into PNES semiology and phenomenology map onto the Integrative Cognitive Model (ICM), a new account of these phenomena that unifies previous approaches within a single explanatory framework. We discuss to what extent recent psychological and neurophysiological research is consistent with the ICM and indicate how the more detailed analysis of physiological data, connectivity analyses of EEG and functional or structural MRI data may provide greater insights into the biopsychosocial underpinnings of a disabling and under-researched disorder. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Vulnerability to psychogenic non-epileptic seizures is linked to low neuropeptide Y levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winterdahl, Michael; Miani, Alessandro; Vercoe, Moana

    2017-01-01

    ) and PNES symptoms in women with a history of sexual abuse. NPY has been associated with resilience to stress and we hypothesized that low levels would increase the extent and severity of PNES symptoms in this patient population. Serum levels of NPY, and related hormones were measured in fifteen female PNES......Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) is a conversion disorder that reflects underlying psychological distress. Female patients with PNES often present with a history of prolonged stressors, especially sexual abuse. In the current study, we studied the relationship between neuropeptide Y (NPY...... patients and sixty female controls. PNES patients reported more severe abuse histories, feeling of abandonment, and decreased perception of quality of life than controls. Importantly, they also had lower NPY levels. Our analysis indicates that low levels of NPY in PNES may confer greater vulnerability...

  14. Seizure metaphors differ in patients' accounts of epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plug, Leendert; Sharrack, Basil; Reuber, Markus

    2009-05-01

    To increase understanding of the subjective symptomatology of seizure experiences and improve differential diagnosis by studying the seizure metaphors used by patients with (psychogenic) nonepileptic seizures (NES) and epilepsy. Twenty-one unselected patients taking part in this study were admitted for 48 h of video-EEG (electroenceophalography) observation because of uncertainty about the diagnosis. Eight were proven to have epilepsy, 13 to have psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). During their admission, patients were interviewed by a neurologist. A linguist blinded to the medical diagnosis identified and categorized all seizure metaphors in verbatim transcripts. Between-group comparisons and logistic regression analysis were carried out. Of 382 metaphors identified, 80.8% conceptualized seizures as an agent/force, event/situation, or space/place. Most patients used metaphors from all categories, but patients with epilepsy and PNES showed preferences for different metaphoric concepts (differences p = 0.009 to p = 0.039). Patients with epilepsy preferred metaphors depicting the seizure as an agent/force or event/situation. PNES patients more often used metaphors of space/place. Logistic regression analyses predicted the diagnosis of PNES or epilepsy correctly in 85.7% of cases (based on different metaphor types in the each category) or 81.0% (based on all metaphor tokens). Patients with epilepsy and PNES have different preferences in the metaphoric conceptualization of their seizures. Epileptic seizures are described as a more external, self-directed entity than PNES, which are depicted as a state or place patients go through. The differentiating value of metaphoric conceptualizations suggests that metaphor preference could form the basis of future diagnostic questionnaires or other diagnostic tools.

  15. Diagnosing psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Video-EEG monitoring, suggestive seizure induction and diagnostic certainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkirov, Stoyan; Jungilligens, Johannes; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2017-08-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) can remain undiagnosed for many years, leading to unnecessary medication and delayed treatment. A recent report by the International League Against Epilepsy Nonepileptic Seizures Task Force recommends a staged approach to the diagnosis of PNES (LaFrance, et al., 2013). We aimed to investigate its practical utility, and to apply the proposed classification to evaluate the role of long-term video-EEG monitoring (VEEG) and suggestive seizure induction (SSI) in PNES workup. Using electronic medical records, 122 inpatients (mean age 36.0±12.9years; 68% women) who received the diagnosis of PNES at our epilepsy center during a 4.3-year time period were included. There was an 82.8% agreement between diagnostic certainty documented at discharge and that assigned retroactively using the Task Force recommendations. In a minority of cases, having used the Task Force criteria could have encouraged the clinicians to give more certain diagnoses, exemplifying the Task Force report's utility. Both VEEG and SSI were effective at supporting high level diagnostic certainty. Interestingly, about one in four patients (26.2%) had a non-diagnostic ("negative") VEEG but a positive SSI. On average, this subgroup did not have significantly shorter mean VEEG recording times than VEEG-positive patients. However, VEEG-negative/SSI-positive patients had a significantly lower habitual seizure frequency than their counterparts. This finding emphasizes the utility of SSI in ascertaining the diagnosis of PNES in patients who do not have a spontaneous habitual event during VEEG due to, for example, low seizure frequency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Semiological and psychiatric characteristics of children with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Gender-related differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Say, Gökçe Nur; Taşdemir, Haydar Ali; İnce, Hülya

    2015-09-01

    To compare semiological characteristics, precipitating stress factors and psychiatric diagnoses of girls and boys with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). We retrospectively reviewed medical records of children diagnosed with PNES and who also underwent psychiatric evaluation. Sixty-two children (44 girls, 18 boys), aged 11-18 years (mean age 14.19 ± 1.96 years) were included. Diagnosis of PNES was established by any of the following: (1) observation of the seizure by a neurologist and routine EEG, (2) evaluation of amateur video records of the typical seizure and routine EEG, or (3) video-EEG monitoring. Psychiatric examinations of patients were performed using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version (KSADS-PL). Tremor was the most prevalent ictal motor sign in both girls and boys. Atonic falls and longer episodes were significantly more frequent in girls than boys. Tonic-clonic-like movements of the extremities were significantly more prevalent in boys than girls. No gender-specific differences were observed in the rates of semiological types. Academic underachievement was the most prevalent precipitating stressor for boys, and was significantly more prevalent in boys than girls. The rate of major depression was significantly higher in girls than boys. The most prominent diagnosis in boys was attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and this was significantly more prevalent than in girls. PNES in males of juvenile age may be a distinct entity from that in girls with different semiological and psychogenic correlates. Consideration of these gender-related differences may be beneficial for the early recognition and treatment of PNES. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acceptability and effectiveness of a strategy for the communication of the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Patch, Lindsey; Brown, Richard; House, Allan; Howlett, Stephanie; Kemp, Steven; Lawton, Gemma; Mayor, Rebecca; Smith, Phil; Reuber, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Communicating the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) is a challenging task. This study was carried out to assess the acceptability and effectiveness of a new communication procedure consisting of a patient information leaflet and a communication strategy for neurologists. In a multicenter prospective study, 50 patients newly diagnosed with PNES were informed about the diagnosis by 10 different neurologists using the communication procedure. Follow-up data were gathered by telephone interview and completion of a questionnaire about symptom attributions (psychological/physical) and illness cognitions (Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised, IPQ-R). Ninety-four percent of patients found the leaflet easy to understand. Ninety-four percent stated their questions were answered by the doctor; 70% got what they wanted from the consultation; only 4% reported feeling angry during the consultation. Eighty-six percent of patients acknowledged that psychological factors were at least contributing to their seizures. On the IPQ-R, "emotional" causes for the seizures were endorsed more commonly than "nonemotional" causes (p 50% reduction in seizure frequency. We conclude that our procedure is acceptable and effectively communicates a psychological etiologic model for PNES.

  18. The opinion of the general practitioner toward clinical management of patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this work was to assess the opinion of general practitioners (GPs) regarding the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and the role they feel they should play in the management of the disorder. METHODS: Patients with PNES were identified from hospital records. Seizure and patient characteristics were recorded. Their GPs were surveyed regarding their understanding of the diagnosis and ongoing management of PNES. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients were identified over a 3-year period as having been diagnosed with PNES. Sixty-five percent of GPs agreed with the diagnosis, and when asked to grade their understanding of the diagnosis (poor = 1, excellent = 10), the mean score was 5.7 (+\\/-SD 2.3). Thirty-five percent of GPs felt psychological input was of benefit to their patients. Fifty-two percent of GPs felt comfortable following up these patients, either with or without neurology outpatient services. CONCLUSIONS: PNES remains a difficult disease to manage. There is a high level of uncertainty regarding the optimum management of PNES among primary care physicians, for which further education is needed.

  19. Risk factors for learning problems in youth with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Julia; Caplan, Rochelle; Siddarth, Prabha; Bursch, Brenda; Falcone, Tatiana; Forgey, Marcy; Hinman, Kyle; Curt LaFrance, W; Laptook, Rebecca; Shaw, Richard; Weisbrot, Deborah; Willis, Matthew; Plioplys, Sigita

    2017-05-01

    This study examined the risk factors for learning problems (LP) in pediatric psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and their specificity by comparing psychopathology, medical, cognitive/linguistic/achievement, bullying history, and parent education variables between subjects with PNES with and without LP and between subjects with PNES and siblings with LP. 55 subjects with PNES and 35 siblings, aged 8-18years, underwent cognitive, linguistic, and achievement testing, and completed somatization and anxiety sensitivity questionnaires. A semi-structured psychiatric interview about the child was administered to each subject and parent. Child self-report and/or parent report provided information on the presence/absence of LP. Parents also provided each subject's medical, psychiatric, family, and bullying history information. Sixty percent (33/55) of the PNES and 49% (17/35) of the sibling subjects had LP. A multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that bullying and impaired formulation of a sentence using a stimulus picture and stimulus word were significantly associated with increased likelihood of LP in the PNES youth. In terms of the specificity of the LP risk factors, a similar analysis comparing LP in the youth with PNES and sibling groups identified anxiety disorder diagnoses and bullying as the significant risk factors associated with LP in the PNES youth. These findings emphasize the need to assess youth with PNES for LP, particularly if they have experienced bullying, have linguistic deficits, and meet criteria for anxiety disorder diagnoses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: so-called psychiatric comorbidity and underlying defense mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghi, Massimiliano; Negrini, Paola Beffa; Perin, Cecilia; Peroni, Federica; Magaudda, Adriana; Cerri, Cesare; Cornaggia, Cesare Maria

    2015-01-01

    In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) do not have a unique classification as they can be found within different categories: conversion, dissociative, and somatization disorders. The ICD-10, instead, considers PNES within dissociative disorders, merging the dissociative disorders and conversion disorders, although the underlying defense mechanisms are different. The literature data show that PNES are associated with cluster B (mainly borderline) personality disorders and/or to people with depressive or anxiety disorders. Defense mechanisms in patients with PNES with a prevalence of anxious/depressive symptoms are of "neurotic" type; their goal is to lead to a "split", either vertical (dissociation) or horizontal (repression). The majority of patients with this type of PNES have alexithymia traits, meaning that they had difficulties in feeling or perceiving emotions. In subjects where PNES are associated with a borderline personality, in which the symbolic function is lost, the defense mechanisms are of a more archaic nature (denial). PNES with different underlying defense mechanisms have different prognoses (despite similar severity of PNES) and need usually a different treatment (pharmacological or psychological). Thus, it appears superfluous to talk about psychiatric comorbidity, since PNES are a different symptomatic expression of specific psychiatric disorders.

  1. Number of patient-reported allergies helps distinguish epilepsy from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Nathaniel M; Larimer, Phillip; Bourgeois, James A; Lowenstein, Daniel H

    2016-02-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are relatively common, accounting for 5-40% of visits to tertiary epilepsy centers. Inpatient video-electroencephalogram (vEEG) monitoring is the gold standard for diagnosis, but additional positive predictive tools are necessary given vEEG's relatively scarce availability. In this study, we investigated if the number of patient-reported allergies distinguishes between PNES and epilepsy. Excessive allergy-reporting, like PNES, may reflect somatization. Using electronic medical records, ICD-9 codes, and text-identification algorithms to search EEG reports, we identified 905 cases of confirmed PNES and 5187 controls with epilepsy but no PNES. Patients with PNES averaged more self-reported allergies than patients with epilepsy alone (1.93 vs. 1.00, pallergies, each additional allergy linearly increased the percentage of patients with PNES by 2.98% (R(2)=0.71) such that with ≥12 allergies, 12/28 patients (42.8%) had PNES compared to 349/3368 (11.6%) of the population with no allergies (odds ratio=6.49). This relationship remained unchanged with logistic regression analysis. We conclude that long allergy lists may help identify patients with PNES. We hypothesize that a tendency to inaccurately self-report allergies reflects a maladaptive externalization of psychologic distress and that a similar mechanism may be responsible for PNES in some patients with somatic symptom disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Seizure semiology in males with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures is associated with somatic complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Shawn D; Hill, Stacy W; Pearson, Caleb

    2015-09-01

    Psychopathology has been studied in patients with epileptic or psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in the context of diagnosis and treatment. Unfortunately, most PNES studies include few males and do not consider possible gender differences, making findings less generalizable to males with PNES. In this study we specifically compare males with PNES to females with PNES and to males with epilepsy. Males with PNES (n=58), males with epilepsy (n=86), females with PNES (n=147), and females with ES (n=142) were evaluated on an inpatient epilepsy monitoring unit. Self-reported objective measures of psychopathology, demographics, and PNES seizure semiology were compared. Personality Assessment Inventory profiles revealed marked differences, particularly in somatic symptoms, between PNES and epilepsy. Females with PNES had higher levels of physiological depressive symptoms but lower antisocial features. Males with PNES who had clinically significant elevations on the somatic complaints scale were much more likely to have motor seizures while females with PNES classified similarly were equally likely to have either motor or non-motor events. Gender difference in PNES seizure semiology was associated with whether or not clinically significant somatic symptoms were present; males with elevated somatic symptoms were much more likely to have motor PNES. However, we did not find evidence of greater psychopathology in males with PNES compared to females with PNES. Gender differences in the behavioral manifestation of PNES in the context of presence or absence of somatization may have implications for diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship between semiology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Nathan M; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Schefft, Bruce K; Isaradisaikul, David; Meckler, Jason M; McNally, Kelly A; Privitera, Michael D

    2007-08-01

    Subtypes of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) have emerged via classification of seizure semiology, psychological variables, or both. PNES subtypes that differ with respect to etiology may be amenable to targeted treatment strategies. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between semiology type and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) profile among patients with PNES. We did so by modifying a classification scheme proposed by Selwa et al. Our main hypothesis was that there would be significant associations of semiology-based subtypes with psychological profiles among patients with PNES. We found significant differences in mean scores on MMPI-2 clinical scales 1 (Hypochondriasis) and 3 (Hysteria) and Harris-Lingoes subscales D5 (Brooding) and Sc5 (Lack of Ego Mastery, Defective Inhibition) across PNES subtypes (catatonic, minor motor, major motor). The results of the present study enhance understanding of the nosology of PNES by identifying psychopathological correlates of semiology-based subtypes of PNES. Our study also may inform the methodology of future investigations of psychopathology among patients with PNES by providing support for content-based interpretation of the MMPI.

  4. What patients think about psychogenic nonepileptic seizures in Buenos Aires, Argentina: A qualitative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarudiansky, Mercedes; Lanzillotti, Alejandra Inés; Areco Pico, María Marta; Tenreyro, Cristina; Scévola, Laura; Kochen, Silvia; D'Alessio, Luciana; Korman, Guido Pablo

    2017-10-01

    To analyse the methods of reasoning with regard to patients' experiences of living with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) in Buenos Aires, Argentina. A qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews was used to gain an in-depth and contextual understanding of the perspectives of five patients with PNES. Data collection and analysis were followed by an inductive and interpretive approach informed by the principles of thematic analysis. Explanatory models and prototypes were identified from the patients' narratives. Four patients related their suffering regarding psychosocial causes -family conflicts, sexual harassment, and life changes, among others-. Hereditary and organic hypotheses appeared to be unspecific. Folk explanations were common to all participants (magic, witchcraft, energetic causes). Four patients used the term epilepsy as an illness prototype, focusing on seizures and the use of antiepileptic drugs. Three of them also compared their illness to other people's "attacks" (heart attacks, panic attacks, nervous breakdown). Only one of them referred to someone who was suspected of having epilepsy. Patients' psychosocial explanatory models are different from the results of previous studies because these studies indicate that most patients support somatic explanations. Patients also use folk explanations related to traditional medicine, which highlights the interpersonal aspects of the disease. Doctor-patient communication is essential for a correct understanding of PNES, resulting in better outcomes. It could also help to reduce the cultural distance between professionals and patients, leading to narrowing inequalities present in multicultural healthcare services. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Rating scale for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: scale development and clinimetric testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianci, Vittoria; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Condino, Francesca; Mauvais, Hélène Somma; Farnarier, Guy; Labate, Angelo; Latella, Maria Adele; Gasparini, Sara; Branca, Damiano; Pucci, Franco; Vazzana, Francesco; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2011-06-01

    Our aim was to develop a clinimetric scale evaluating motor phenomena, associated features, and severity of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Sixty video/EEG-recorded PNES induced by suggestion maneuvers were evaluated. We examined the relationship between results from this scale and results from the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale to validate this technique. Interrater reliabilities of the PNES scale for three raters were analyzed using the AC1 statistic, Kendall's coefficient of concordance (KCC), and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). The relationship between the CGI and PNES scales was evaluated with Spearman correlations. The AC1 statistic demonstrated good interrater reliability for each phenomenon analyzed (tremor/oscillation, tonic; clonic/jerking, hypermotor/agitation, atonic/akinetic, automatisms, associated features). KCC and the ICC showed moderate interrater agreement for phenomenology, associated phenomena, and total PNES scores. Spearman's correlation of mean CGI score with mean total PNES score was 0.69 (Pscale described here accurately evaluates the phenomenology of PNES and could be used to assess and compare subgroups of patients with PNES. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quality of life in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and epilepsy: the role of somatization and alexithymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Laurie Dempsey; Hentz, Joseph G; Ziemba, Kristine S; Kirlin, Kristin A; Noe, Katherine H; Hoerth, Matthew T; Crepeau, Amy Z; Sirven, Joseph I; Drazkowski, Joseph F; Locke, Dona E C

    2015-02-01

    It is clear that many individuals with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs) often present with poorer quality of life compared with those with epileptic seizures (ESs). However, the mechanisms linking seizure diagnosis to quality-of-life outcomes are much less clear. Alexithymia and somatization are emotional markers of psychological functioning that may explain these differences in quality of life. In the current study, patients from an epilepsy monitoring unit with vEEG-confirmed diagnosis of PNESs or ESs were compared on measures of alexithymia, somatization, quality of life, and a variety of demographic and medical variables. Two models using alexithymia and somatization individually as mediators of the relations between diagnosis and quality of life were tested. Results indicated that patients with PNESs had significantly poorer quality of life compared with those with ESs. Alexithymia was associated with poor quality of life in both groups but did not differentiate between diagnostic groups. Further, alexithymia did not mediate the relationship between diagnosis and quality of life. Somatization was associated with poor quality of life, and patients with PNESs reported greater somatization compared with patients with ESs. Somatization also significantly mediated the relationship between diagnosis and quality of life. In conclusion, somatization may be one mechanism affecting poor quality of life among patients with PNESs compared with ESs and should be a target of comprehensive treatments for PNESs. Alexithymia proved to be an important factor impacting quality of life in both groups and should also be targeted in treatment for patients with PNESs and patients with ESs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of biomarkers in differentiating new-onset seizures from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendra Javali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Review of literature revealed very limited studies considering a combination of serum prolactin (PRL and serum creatine kinase (CK as markers for differentiating epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES. Therefore, in the present study, we analyzed the role of serum PRL and serum CK, individually and in combination. Methodology: This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary care medical teaching hospital over a period of 18 months. Patients aged over 15 years suspected to have new-onset seizures presenting within 5 h of ictus were included in this study. CK, serum PRL was measured at 0–1, 1–3, and 3–5 h after seizures. Results: Hundred subjects were studied for the role of serum PRL and serum CK in differentiating epileptic and PNES. The mean age was 42.24 years with a male:female ratio of 1.27:1. All patients of generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTCS, who presented within 1 h, had elevated PRL, whereas 75% of patients with partial seizures had elevated PRL within 1 h of presentation. Nearly 91.66% of patients with GTCS who presented within 1 h had elevated CPK, whereas 70% of patients with partial seizures had elevated CPK. None of the patients diagnosed with PNES showed rise in either of the markers. Conclusion: In the present study, none of the patients with PNES showed raise in either serum PRL or CK. However, there was no correlation between the types of seizure and PRL or serum CK levels.

  8. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: a treatment review. What have we learned since the beginning of the millennium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baslet G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Gaston BasletDepartment of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES can significantly affect an individual’s quality of life, the health care system, and even society. The first decade of the new millennium has seen renewed interest in this condition, but etiological understanding and evidence-based treatment availability remain limited. After the diagnosis of PNES is established, the first therapeutic step includes a presentation of the diagnosis that facilitates engagement in treatment. The purpose of this review is to present the current evidence of treatments for PNES published since the year 2000 and to discuss further needs for clinical treatment implementation and research. This article reviews clinical trials that have evaluated the efficacy of structured, standardized psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacological interventions. The primary outcome measure in clinical trials for PNES is event frequency, although it is questionable whether this is the most accurate indicator of functional recovery. Cognitive behavioral therapy has evidence of efficacy, including one pilot randomized, controlled trial where cognitive behavioral therapy was compared with standard medical care. The antidepressant sertraline did not show a significant difference in event frequency change when compared to placebo in a pilot randomized, double-blind, controlled trial, but it did show a significant pre- versus posttreatment decrease in the active arm. Other interventions that have shown efficacy in uncontrolled trials include augmented psychodynamic interpersonal psychotherapy, group psychodynamic psychotherapy, group psychoeducation, and the antidepressant venlafaxine. Larger clinical trials of these promising treatments are necessary, while other psychotherapeutic interventions such as hypnotherapy, mindfulness-based therapies, and eye movement desensitization and

  9. Semiology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: An international cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi-Pooya, Ali A; Valente, Kette; Alessi, Ruda; Tinker, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    We compared the semiology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) between patients from the USA and Brazil. This international cross-cultural comparative study may expand understanding of PNES across the borders. We retrospectively investigated all patients with PNES admitted to one epilepsy center in the USA and one in Brazil. We classified their seizures into four classes: generalized motor, akinetic, focal motor, and subjective symptoms. All patients were interviewed by an epileptologist in both countries and were administered psychological assessment measures, including questions about PNES risk factors. For the statistical analyses, we compared patients from the two nations. Eighty-nine patients (49 from the USA and 40 from Brazil) were studied. Patients from the two countries were not significantly different with regard to sex and age, but patients from Brazil had earlier age at onset (26years vs. 34years; P=0.004) and a significantly greater delay in diagnosis (9.9years vs. 5.6years; P=0.001). Some characteristics of PNES were different between the two groups; patients from the USA had generally more seizure types and more often reported subjective seizures (55% in the USA vs. 10% in Brazil; P=0.0001). Clinical and historical characteristics of the patients were not significantly different. Delay in diagnosis of PNES may represent a major factor in resource-limited countries. Large multicenter cross-cultural studies may reveal subtle but significant cross-cultural differences with respect to the semiological, clinical, and historical aspects of PNES; however, patients with PNES share more similarities than differences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Implicit and explicit self-esteem discrepancies in people with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimaro, Lian V; Roberts, Nicole A; Moghaddam, Nima G; Dawson, David L; Brown, Ian; Reuber, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Self-esteem (SE), or one's sense of competence and worth, is reduced in many mental and physical disorders. Low SE is associated with perceived stigma and disability and poor treatment outcomes. The present study examined implicit and explicit SE (automatic and deliberate views about the self) in people with epilepsy and people with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). Discrepancies between implicit SE and explicit SE have been found to correlate with psychological distress in disorders often associated with PNESs but are relatively unexplored in PNESs. We hypothesized that, compared with epilepsy, PNESs would be associated with lower self-reported SE and greater discrepancies between implicit SE and explicit SE. Thirty adults with PNESs, 25 adults with epilepsy, and 31 controls without a history of seizures were asked to complete the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale as a measure of explicit SE and an Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure as a measure of implicit SE. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (a somatic symptom inventory) were also administered. We found significant group differences in explicit (p<0.001) but not implicit SE. Patients with PNESs reported lower SE than the other groups. No group differences were found in implicit SE. Implicit-explicit SE discrepancies were larger in the group with PNESs than in the other groups (p<0.001). Higher frequency of PNESs (but not epileptic seizures) was associated with lower explicit SE (rs=-.83, p<0.01) and greater SE discrepancies (i.e., lower explicit relative to implicit SE; rs=.65, p<0.01). These relationships remained significant when controlling for anxiety and somatization. Patients with PNESs had lower explicit SE than those with epilepsy or healthy controls. In keeping with our expectations, there were greater discrepancies between implicit SE and explicit SE among patients with PNESs than in the other groups. Our results, including the strong relationship between

  11. Positron emission tomography in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures

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    McGonigal A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aileen McGonigal,1–3 Marie Arthuis,3 Jean-Arthur Micoulaud-Franchi,4,5 Fabrice Bartolomei,1–3 Eric Guedj6–8 1Institut de Neurosciences des Systèmes, INSERM UMR 1106, Marseille, France; 2Aix Marseille University, Faculty of Medicine, Marseille, France; 3Clinical Neurophysiology Department, Timone Hospital, Marseille, France; 4Department of Functional Investigation of the Nervous System, Sleep Clinic, Bordeaux University Hospital, Bordeaux, France; 5USR CNRS 3413, University of Bordeaux, France; 6Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine Department, Timone Hospital, Marseille, France; 7Aix-Marseille University, CERIMED, Marseille, France; 8Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, UMR7289, INT, Marseille, FranceWe have read with interest the recent review entitled “Uncovering the etiology of conversion disorder: insights from functional neuroimaging” by Maryam Ejareh dar and Richard AA Kanaan,1 published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. Our paper on resting state brain metabolism measured by positron emission tomography (PET was included and discussed.2 We were most surprised to see that the authors of the review seem to have misunderstood the findings of our study, which concerned patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES. The authors state that the 16 patients included in our study “were later found to have PNES with comorbid epilepsy”. This is incorrect, since our study included only patients with PNES in whom comorbid epilepsy was excluded. This crucial point is indeed detailed in the Methods section of our article and clearly stated in the abstract: “in all patients, the diagnosis was subsequently confirmed to be PNES with no coexisting epilepsy.” It is thus on the basis of incorrect understanding of our results that Drs Ejareh dar and Kanaan discuss the possible significance of hypometabolism in the anterior cingulate region described in our paper, and erroneously suggest that interpretation of PET findings is

  12. Brief group psychoeducation for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: a neurologist-initiated program in an epilepsy center.

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    Chen, David K; Maheshwari, Atul; Franks, Romay; Trolley, Gregory C; Robinson, Jordan S; Hrachovy, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate therapeutic efficacy upon augmenting the initial communication to patients regarding the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) with a novel, brief group psychoeducation administered by the same team that provided the video-electroencephalography (VEEG) confirmed diagnosis and within 4 weeks of the diagnosis. Prior to discharge from the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU), a standardized communication strategy was utilized to explain the diagnosis of PNES to all patients prior to enrollment. Enrolled patients were then randomized to either participation in three successive and monthly group psychoeducational sessions (intervention group), or routine seizure clinic follow-up visits (control group). Both groups completed questionnaires at time of enrollment, and then at approximately 3 months (follow-up 1) and 6 months (follow-up 2) after discharge, assessing for: (1) primary outcomes that include a measure of psychosocial functioning, as well as interval difference in seizure frequency/intensity; and (2) secondary outcomes that include interval seizure-related emergency room visits or hospitalizations, development of new and medically unexplained symptoms, and results of an internal measure of knowledge and perception outcomes. The majority (73%) of patients from the intervention group commenced on therapy sessions within 4 weeks after learning of the diagnosis. Although we did not observe significant group difference in seizure frequency/intensity, patients from the intervention group showed significant improvement on the Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS) scores at both follow-up 1 (p = 0.013) and follow-up 2 (p = 0.038) after discharge from the EMU. In addition, we observed a trend toward lesser likelihood for seizure-related emergency room visits or hospitalizations for the intervention group (p = 0.184), as well as meaningful insights from an internal measure of intervention outcomes. These findings suggest that our cost

  13. Emotional stimuli-provoked seizures potentially misdiagnosed as psychogenic non-epileptic attacks: A case of temporal lobe epilepsy with amygdala enlargement

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    Hidetaka Tamune

    Full Text Available The association between emotional stimuli and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is largely unknown. Here, we report the case of a depressed, 50-year-old female complaining of episodes of a “spaced out” experience precipitated by emotional stimuli. Psychogenic non-epileptic attacks were suspected. However, video-EEG coupled with emotional stimuli-provoked procedures and MRI findings of amygdala enlargement, led to the diagnosis of left TLE. Accurate diagnosis and explanation improved her subjective depression and seizure frequency. This case demonstrated that emotional stimuli can provoke seizures in TLE and suggested the involvement of the enlarged amygdala and the modulation of emotion-related neural circuits. Keywords: Video-EEG, Psychogenic non-epileptic attacks, Temporal lobe epilepsy, Amygdala enlargement, Reflex seizure, Provoked seizure

  14. Hyperventilation and photic stimulation are useful additions to a placebo-based suggestive seizure induction protocol in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

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    Popkirov, Stoyan; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    The early and definitive diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures is a common challenge in epileptology practice. Suggestive seizure induction is a valuable tool to aid the differentiation between epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, especially when long-term video-EEG monitoring is inconclusive or unavailable. In this retrospective analysis, we compared the diagnostic yield of a classical, placebo-based induction protocol with that of an extended protocol that includes hyperventilation and photic stimulation as means of suggestion while also implementing more open, standardized patient information. We investigated whether the diversification of suggestive seizure induction has an effect on diagnostic yield and whether it preempts the administration of placebo. Data from 52 patients with confirmed psychogenic nonepileptic seizures were analyzed. While suggestive seizure induction using only placebo-based suggestion provoked a typical event in 13 of 20 patients (65%), the extended protocol was positive in 27 of 34 cases (84%); this improvement was not significant (p=0.11). Noninvasive suggestion techniques accounted for 78% of inductions, avoiding placebo administration in a majority of patients. Still, placebo remains an important part of suggestive seizure induction, responsible for 22% (6 out of 27) of successful inductions using our extended protocol. Our study demonstrates that the diversification of suggestive seizure induction is feasible and beneficial for both patients and diagnosticians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The semiology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures revisited: Can video alone predict the diagnosis? Preliminary data from a prospective feasibility study.

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    Erba, Giuseppe; Giussani, Giorgia; Juersivich, Adam; Magaudda, Adriana; Chiesa, Valentina; Laganà, Angela; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Bianchi, Elisa; Langfitt, John; Beghi, Ettore

    2016-05-01

    To investigate if, when, and to what extent visual information contained in a video-recorded event allows experienced epileptologists to predict the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) without the aid of electroencephalography (EEG). Five neurologists actively practicing in epilepsy centers in Italy and the United States were asked to review 23 videos capturing representative events of 21 unselected consecutive patients admitted for long-term video-EEG monitoring (VEM). Four raters were blind to EEG and clinical information; one rater was not. They were requested to (1) rate the videos for quality and content; (2) choose among four diagnoses: (a) epileptic seizures (ES); (b) PNES; (c) Other nonepileptic seizures (NES; (syncope, movement disorder, migraine, etc.); (d) "Cannot Say"; and (3) explain in their own words the main reasons leading to the diagnosis of choice. All raters predicted the diagnosis correctly in 7 of 23 videos (all ES or PNES) (30.4%), whereas all raters failed in 5 of 23 cases (three Other NES, one PNES, one Cannot Say) (21.7%). The conditions that facilitate, and those that interfere with, a confident diagnosis were predictable. Degree of accuracy among raters was not uniform and was consistently better in three raters. Two among the four blind raters were as accurate as the rater who was not blinded. Interrater agreement was "moderate" (k = 0.52) for the overall group; "moderate" for ES (k = 0.53); "substantial" for PNES (k = 0.63); "fair" for Other NES (k = 0.21)-similar to the results obtained in a previous study evaluating the reliability of combined video-EEG. In about one third of cases, a confident diagnosis of PNES/ES can be established on clinical grounds based on video data alone. Our results benefit all affected patients, particularly those with no access to video-EEG monitoring units. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. Induction of psychogenic nonepileptic events: success rate influenced by prior induction exposure, ictal semiology, and psychological profiles.

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    Chen, David K; Izadyar, Shahram; Collins, Robert L; Benge, Jared F; Lemaire, Ashley W; Hrachovy, Richard A

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate whether certain preinduction clinical characteristics may influence the success rate of induction. We prospectively enrolled and attempted inductions on 51 patients who were suspected to have psychogenic nonepileptic events based on clinical grounds. In addition to careful examination of the reported ictal semiology, we administered a battery of four psychological instruments to our enrolled patients. We found that among 42 cases of successful induction, 92.9% (n=39) of these cases were successfully induced on the first attempt (i.e., without prior induction exposure). We observed that induction showed significantly higher rate of success in cases that demonstrate: (1) hypermotor ictal semiology (p=0.029); (2) more prevalent self-reporting of uncommon cognitive and affective symptoms (p=0.035); or (3) higher tendency to rely on coping strategies of "instrumental support" (p=0.013) and "active coping" (p=0.027), when compared to noninducible cases. Singular administration of placebo induction on preselected patients with these clinical characteristics may reduce costs by shortening video electroencephalography-(EEG) monitoring sessions and improve the diagnostic yield of video-EEG even for patients with very infrequent events. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2011 International League Against Epilepsy.

  17. Panic symptoms in transient loss of consciousness: Frequency and diagnostic value in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, epilepsy and syncope.

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    Rawlings, G H; Jamnadas-Khoda, J; Broadhurst, M; Grünewald, R A; Howell, S J; Koepp, M; Parry, S W; Sisodiya, S M; Walker, M C; Reuber, M

    2017-05-01

    Previous studies suggest that ictal panic symptoms are common in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). This study investigates the frequency of panic symptoms in PNES and if panic symptoms, just before or during episodes, can help distinguish PNES from the other common causes of transient loss of consciousness (TLOC), syncope and epilepsy. Patients with secure diagnoses of PNES (n=98), epilepsy (n=95) and syncope (n=100) were identified using clinical databases from three United Kingdom hospitals. Patients self-reported the frequency with which they experienced seven symptoms of panic disorder in association with their episodes. A composite panic symptom score was calculated on the basis of the frequency of symptoms. 8.2% of patients with PNES reported "never" experiencing any of the seven panic symptoms in their episodes of TLOC. Patients with PNES reported more frequent panic symptoms in their attacks than those with epilepsy (pepilepsy from syncope. Patients with PNES report TLOC associated panic symptoms more commonly than those with epilepsy or syncope. Although panic symptoms are reported infrequently by most patients with PNES, a composite symptom score may contribute to the differentiation between PNES and the other two common causes of TLOC. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Proposal for best practice in the use of video-EEG when psychogenic non-epileptic seizures are a possible diagnosis

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    Kimberley Whitehead

    Full Text Available The gold-standard for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES is capturing an attack with typical semiology and lack of epileptic ictal discharges on video-EEG. Despite the importance of this diagnostic test, lack of standardisation has resulted in a wide variety of protocols and reporting practices. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of research findings on the diagnostic video-EEG procedure, in both the adult and paediatric literature. We discuss how uncertainties about the ethical use of suggestion can be resolved, and consider what constitutes best clinical practice. We stress the importance of ictal observation and assessment and consider how diagnostically useful information is best obtained. We also discuss the optimal format of video-EEG reports; and of highlighting features with high sensitivity and specificity to reduce the risk of miscommunication. We suggest that over-interpretation of the interictal EEG, and the failure to recognise differences between typical epileptic and nonepileptic seizure manifestations are the greatest pitfalls in neurophysiological assessment of patients with PNES. Meanwhile, under-recognition of semiological pointers towards frontal lobe seizures and of the absence of epileptiform ictal EEG patterns during some epileptic seizure types (especially some seizures not associated with loss of awareness, may lead to erroneous PNES diagnoses. We propose that a standardised approach to the video-EEG examination and the subsequent written report will facilitate a clear communication of its import, improving diagnostic certainty and thereby promoting appropriate patient management. Keywords: Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, Nonepileptic attack disorder, Suggestion, EEG

  19. Psychogenic non-epileptic seizure in patients with intellectual disability with special focus on choice of therapeutic intervention.

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    Kanemoto, Kousuke; Goji, Hiroko; Tadokoro, Yukari; Kato, Etsushi; Oshima, Tomohiro

    2017-02-01

    There have been a number of studies exploring treatments for psychogenic non-epileptic seizure (PNES) but largely neglecting the sizable subgroup of patients with intellectual disability (ID). In the present study, we attempted to demonstrate effects and preferred modes of therapeutic intervention in PNES patients with ID being treated at a Japanese municipal center with a short referral chain. We examined 46 PNES patients with ID (ID group) and 106 PNES patients without ID (non-ID group) retrospectively in case charts. In addition to examining basic demographic and clinical data, effects of different therapeutic intervention were examined as a function of decrease or disappearance of PNES attacks in the ID group. Age at the first visit as well as PNES onset was younger in the ID than in the non-ID group (t=2.651, p=0.009; t=3.528, p=0.001, respectively). PNES-free ratio at the last visit tended to be higher in the non-ID group (chi square=3.455; p=0.063). Psychosis was more often encountered in the ID group (chi square=13.443; p=0.001). Although cognitive therapy and pharmaco-therapeutic approaches were quite similarly distributed in both groups, environmental adjustment was often introduced in the ID group (44%) as compared to the non-ID group (15%) (chi square=14.299; p=0.001). Brief weekly visit service is also more often utilized by the patients with ID (54%) than by those without ID (35%) (chi square=5.021, p=0.025). Optimal treatment approaches in this sizable patient subgroup should be the subject of future prospective studies. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparing maximum autonomic activity of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and epileptic seizures using heart rate variability.

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    Jeppesen, Jesper; Beniczky, Sándor; Johansen, Peter; Sidenius, Per; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    The semiology of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) can resemble epileptic seizures, and differentiation between epileptic seizures with no EEG-correlate and PNES can be challenging even for trained experts. Therefore, there has been a search for a quantitative measure, other than EEG and semiology that could distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures. We used ECG to measure heart rate variability (HRV) in order to compare maximum autonomic activity of epileptic seizures and PNES. These comparisons could potentially serve as biomarkers for distinguishing these types of clinical episodes. Forty-nine epileptic seizures from 17 patients and 24 PNES from 7 patients with analyzable ECG were recorded during long-term video-EEG monitoring. Moving windows of 100 R-R intervals throughout each seizure were used to find maximum values of Cardiac Sympathetic Index (CSI) (sympathetic tonus) and minimum values of Cardiac Vagal Index (CVI), Root-Mean-Square-of-Successive-Differences (RMSSD) and HF-power (parasympathetic tonus). In addition, non-seizure recordings of each patient were used to compare HRV-parameters between the groups. The maximum CSI for epilepsy seizures were higher than PNES (P=0.015). The minimum CVI, minimum RMSSD and HF-power did not show significant difference between epileptic seizures and PNES (P=0.762; P=0.152; P=0.818). There were no statistical difference of non-seizure HRV-parameters between the PNES and epilepsy patients. We found the maximum sympathetic activity accompanying the epileptic seizures to be higher, than that during the PNES. However, the great variation of autonomic response within both groups makes it difficult to use these HRV-measures as a sole measurement in distinguishing epileptic seizures from PNES. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An analysis of quality of life (QOL) in patients with epilepsy and comorbid psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) after vagus nerve stimulation (VNS).

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    Vivas, Andrew C; Reitano, Christian J; Waseem, Hena; Benbadis, Selim R; Vale, Fernando L

    2017-08-01

    Patients with epilepsy (PWE) may suffer from comorbid psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). The efficacy of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in the treatment of epilepsy and depression is established, however the impact on PNES is unknown. Since many patients with PNES have comorbid depression, we explored the impact on quality of life (QOL) that VNS has on PWE and PNES. The video electroencephalogram (vEEG) of all patients who underwent VNS at our institution was reviewed. Patients diagnosed with both psychogenic seizures and epileptic seizures on their vEEG were included in this study. These patients were contacted, and given a QOLIE-31 survey to assess their quality of life after VNS. Patients also completed a separate survey created by our group to categorize the quartile of their improvement. Pre-operative psychiatric disease was retrospectively reviewed. From a period of 2001 to 2016, 518 patients underwent placement of VNS for drug resistant epilepsy (DRE) at our institution. In total, 16 patients were diagnosed with both epilepsy and PNES. 11/16 patients responded to our questionnaire and survey. 9 out of 11 patients felt that their epileptic seizures had improved after VNS, while 7 of the 11 patients felt that their psychogenic episodes had improved. 2(28.6%), 1 (14.3%), and 4 (57.1%) of participants said their PNES improved by 25-50%, 50-75%, and 75-100%, respectively. 3(27.3%), 3 (27.3%), 1 (9.1%), and 4 (36.4%) of the participants said their epileptic seizures improved by 0-25%, 25-50%, 50-75%, and 75-100%, respectively. The average overall score for quality of life for the study participants was found to be 51 (±8) out of 100. Patients with epilepsy and comorbid PNES may benefit from VNS. It is unclear whether the benefit is conferred strictly from decreased epileptic seizure burden. The possible effect on PNES may be related to the known effect of VNS on depression. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the role of VNS in the treatment of PNES

  2. Prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of patients diagnosed with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

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    Myers, Lorna; Vaidya-Mathur, Urmi; Lancman, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are treated with psychotherapy, the effectiveness of most psychotherapeutic modalities remains understudied. In this treatment series of 16 patients dually diagnosed with PNES and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we evaluated the effect of prolonged exposure therapy (PE) on reduction of PNES. Secondary measures included Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Post-Traumatic Disorder Diagnostic Scale (PDS). Subjects diagnosed with video EEG-confirmed PNES and PTSD confirmed through neuropsychological testing and clinical interview were treated with traditional PE psychotherapy with certain modifications for the PNES. Treatment was conducted over the course of 12-15 weekly sessions. Seizure frequency was noted in each session by examining the patients' seizure logs, and mood and PTSD symptomatology was assessed at baseline and on the final session. Eighteen subjects enrolled, and 16 (88.8%) completed the course of treatment. Thirteen of the 16 (81.25%) therapy completers reported no seizures by their final PE session, and the other three reported a decline in seizure frequency (Z=-3.233, p=0.001). Mean scores on scales of depression (M=-13.56, SD=12.27; t (15)=-4.420, ptraumatic symptomatology. Follow-up revealed that gains made in seizure control on the last day of treatment were maintained over time. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A pilot study of reduction in healthcare costs following the application of intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

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    Russell, Leo A; Abbass, Allan A; Allder, Steven J; Kisely, Steve; Pohlmann-Eden, Bernd; Town, Joel M

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine preliminary evidence of intensive short-term dynamic psychotherapy (ISTDP) as a treatment option for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) in terms of impact on healthcare costs, emotional wellbeing, and somatic symptoms. Drawn from a sample of patients treated in a tertiary psychiatric service over a nine-year period, this naturalistic pilot study compared within-group changes from pretreatment with each year up to three years posttreatment, in physician visits, physician costs, hospital admissions, and overall hospital costs. Twenty-eight patients with PNES received ISTDP with average treatment duration of 3.6 sessions. Healthcare costs significantly reduced in follow-up compared with those in baseline, with patient costs falling below the healthy population means, and reductions in healthcare costs compared with those in baseline by 88% in year one, 90% in year two, and 81% in year three. This was accompanied by significant reductions in symptoms and interpersonal problems. These preliminary findings indicate the potential for short-term and long-term healthcare savings and improvements in emotional wellbeing, for patients with PNES from the application of ISTDP. Further research evaluating the impact of ISTDP on seizure reduction and comparing this approach with control conditions is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Self-esteem and psychiatric features of Turkish adolescents with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: a comparative study with epilepsy and healthy control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Say, Gokçe N; Tasdemir, Haydar A; Akbas, Seher; Yüce, Murat; Karabekiroglu, Koray

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and epilepsy are known to have psychosocial problems. The aim of the present study was to compare the psychosocial difficulties, history of stressful life events/abuse, psychiatric diagnosis, and self-esteem of adolescents with PNES to the ones with epilepsy and healthy controls at a tertiary care center in Turkey. Thirty-four adolescents with PNES diagnosed by video-EEG were compared with 23 adolescents that have epilepsy and 35 healthy volunteers. Comorbid psychiatric diagnoses of participants were examined by semi-structured interviews using Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version (KSADS-PL). Self-esteem of adolescents was evaluated by Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale (RSES). No differences in sociodemographic features were observed between the groups. The PNES group showed significantly higher rates of parental conflicts, difficulties in relationship with siblings/peers, school under-achievement, and history of stressful events/abuse. The rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders were 64.7% in PNES and 47.8% in epilepsy group. The most common disorders in both groups were attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depressive disorder. The rate of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was significantly increased in the PNES group. Additionally, adolescents with PNES displayed significantly lower levels of self-esteem than the other groups. It could be concluded that both disorders involved a high risk for developing psychiatric disorders; additionally, adolescents with PNES have higher rates of stressors and lower levels of self-esteem. Findings from this investigation point to the importance of psychiatric interventions in pediatric PNES and also epilepsy.

  5. Comparisons of childhood trauma, alexithymia, and defensive styles in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures vs. epilepsy: Implications for the etiology of conversion disorder.

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    Kaplan, Marcia J; Dwivedi, Alok K; Privitera, Michael D; Isaacs, Kelly; Hughes, Cynthia; Bowman, Michelle

    2013-08-01

    It has been theorized that conversion disorder is the result of emotion that cannot be experienced consciously as feeling states or put into words (i.e., alexithymia), but there is little confirming empirical evidence. We sought to characterize subjects with conversion disorder compared to subjects with a distinct medical illness, using the model of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) vs. epilepsy (ES), on measures of childhood traumatic experience, alexithymia and maturity of psychological defensive strategies. All subjects admitted to the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center were offered self-report questionnaires (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, Toronto Alexithymia Scale-20 and Response Evaluation Measure-71) at the outset of evaluation. Diagnosis of each subject was confirmed by video-EEG and we compared subjects with PNES to those with ES on these measures. 82 subjects had ES AND 96 had PNES. Those with PNES were significantly more likely to have experienced childhood trauma in all domains (p=.005 to p=.05), and were significantly more likely to have alexithymia (p=.0267). There was a significant difference in the capacity to identify feelings, and a trend towards significance in capacity to describe feelings. There were no differences in defensive styles between the two groups. PNES diagnosis was associated with female sex, higher alexithymia scores and higher rates of childhood trauma, but not with differences in defensive styles compared to ES. These findings add empirical evidence for theories regarding the cause of conversion disorder and may aid in the design of prospective treatment trials in patients with conversion disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Validity of the clinical and content scales of the Multiphasic Personality Inventory Minnesota 2 for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Barrio, A; Jiménez-Huete, A; Toledano, R; García-Morales, I; Gil-Nagel, A

    2016-03-01

    The use of the Multiphasic Personality Inventory Minnesota 2 (MMPI-2) for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) is controversial. This study examines the validity of the clinical scales and, unlike previous works, the content scales. Cross-sectional study of 209 patients treated in the epilepsy unit. We performed a logistic regression analysis, taking video-electroencephalography as the reference test, and as predictor variables age, sex, IQ and clinical (model A) or content scales (model B) of the MMPI-2. The models were selected according to the Aikake index and compared using the DeLong test. We analyzed 37 patients with PNES alone, or combined with seizures, and 172 patients with seizures only. The model consisting of sex, Hs (hypochondriasis) and Pa (paranoia) showed a sensitivity of 77.1%, a specificity of 76.8%, a percentage of correct classification of 76.8%, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.836 for diagnosing CNEP. Model B, consisting of sex, HEA (health concerns) and FRS (fears), showed a sensitivity of 65.7%, a specificity of 78.0%, a percentage of correct classification of 75.9% and an AUC of 0.840. DeLong's test did not detect significant differences. The MMPI-2 has a moderate validity for the diagnosis of PNES in patients referred to an epilepsy unit. Using content scales does not significantly improve results from the clinical scales. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Diurnal patterns and relationships between physiological and self-reported stress in patients with epilepsy and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Barbora; Harris, Peter R; Reuber, Markus

    2017-05-01

    Patients with epilepsy and those with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) experience high levels of stress and stress is one of the most frequently self-identified seizure precipitants. Although stress is a multifaceted phenomenon, few studies have systematically examined its different components in patients with seizures. The aim of this study was therefore to describe diurnal patterns of psychological and physiological measures of stress in patients with epilepsy and patients with PNES, and explore their relationships to each other in order to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying stress and seizure occurrence in these patients. A range of stress markers including self-reported stress, salivary cortisol, and heart rate variability (HRV) were explored in adult patients with refractory epilepsy (N=22) and those with PNES (N=23) undergoing three- to five-day video-telemetry. A diurnal pattern was observed in the physiological measures, characterized by higher levels of physiological arousal in the mornings and lower levels at night in both patients with epilepsy and PNES. The physiological measures (cortisol and HRV) were associated with each other in patients with epilepsy; no close relationship was found with self-reported stress in either of the two patient groups. The findings contribute to and expand on previous studies of the patterns of stress in patients with seizures. The results also indicate a discrepancy between patients' physiological responses and their subjective stress perceptions, suggesting that simple self-reports cannot be used as a proxy of physiological arousal in patients with seizures and stress. Stress in these patient groups should be studied using a combination of complementary measures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A multicenter evaluation of a brief manualized psychoeducation intervention for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures delivered by health professionals with limited experience in psychological treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Hannah; Mousa, Saafi; Howlett, Stephanie; Reuber, Markus

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to add to our understanding of the impact of psychoeducation on patients' acceptance of the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs), the frequency of their seizures, and their quality of life. The study also aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of brief manualized psychoeducation interventions for PNESs, delivered by a more diverse range of clinicians and in a wider range of treatment settings. The final sample consisted of 25 patients diagnosed with PNESs by a neurologist specializing in the treatment of seizure disorder and referred to the psychotherapy service. The study included patients from four centers, using a manualized psychoeducation intervention delivered over 4 sessions by specialist epilepsy nurses and assistant psychologists. All patients completed self-measure questionnaires for Seizure Frequency, Impaired Functioning (WSAS), Psychological Distress (CORE-OM), Illness Perception (BIPQ), Health-Related Quality of Life: general (ED-QOL) and epilepsy-specific (NewQOL-6D), Symptom Attribution, and patient's perception of usefulness and relevance of the intervention. All measures were collected at baseline and after the completion of the fourth session. All measures improved from baseline to postintervention, but this improvement was only significant for CORE-OM (ppsychological distress, and have an effect on patients' illness perceptions that should help them engage with a more extended psychotherapy program if that was necessary. The intervention was carried out successfully by staff with relatively little training in delivering psychological interventions. Further controlled studies are required to provide proof of efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Epilepsy in patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures Epilepsia em pacientes com crises não epilépticas psicogênicas

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    Renato Luiz Marchetti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of epilepsy in patients who presented psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES. The evaluation was carried out during intensive VEEG monitoring in a diagnostic center for epilepsy in a university hospital. The difficulties involved in reaching this diagnosis are discussed. Ninety-eight patients underwent intensive and prolonged video-electroencephalographic (VEEG monitoring; out of these, a total of 28 patients presented PNES during monitoring. Epilepsy was defined as present when the patient presented epileptic seizures during VEEG monitoring or when, although not presenting epileptic seizures during monitoring, the patient presented unequivocal interictal epileptiform discharges. The frequency of epilepsy in patients with PNES was 50% (14 patients. Our findings suggest that the frequency of epilepsy in patients with PNES is much higher than that of previous studies, and point out the need, at least in some cases, for prolonging the evaluation of patients with PNES who have clinical histories indicating epilepsy.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a frequência de epilepsia em pacientes que apresentaram crises não epilépticas psicogênicas (CNEP. Isto foi realizado durante monitoração intensiva por video-EEG num centro diagnóstico de epilepsia em um hospital universitário. As dificuldades envolvidas para se chegar a este diagnóstico são discutidas. Noventa e oito pacientes foram submetidos a monitoração intensiva por video-EEG; 28 destes pacientes apresentaram CNEP durante a monitoração. Epilepsia foi considerada presente quando o paciente apresentou crises epilépticas durante a avaliação pelo video-EEG ou quando, apesar da não ocorrência de crises epilépticas durante a avaliação, descargas epilépticas interictais inequívocas estavam presentes. A frequência de epilepsia em pacientes com CNEP foi 50% (14 pacientes. Nossos achados sugerem que a frequência de epilepsia em

  10. Neuropsychological and psychiatric correlates of intractable pseudoseizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, M E; Pakalnis, A; Phillips, B B

    1992-03-01

    Psychogenic seizures can mimic convulsive epilepsy and with repetitive attacks, iatrogenic complications from aggressive treatment of status epilepticus can occur. We studied neuropsychiatric features of 20 patients in whom psychogenic seizures were intractable and at times continuous. Nineteen of 20 patients seen were female, and all but one were under 40 years of age. All had convulsive attacks resistant to various medications, normal neurological examinations, and negative imaging studies and electroencephalograms (EEGs). Sixteen had previous evidence of epilepsy and the other four had epileptic relatives. Seizures were atypically prolonged, included back arching and pelvic thrusting, and persisted despite intravenous diazepam and therapeutic phenytoin and phenobarbital levels. Seizures terminated spontaneously in five, were stopped by suggestion in four, and persisted until respiratory arrest or elective intubation in 11. Ten patients had conversion disorder, six borderline or mixed personality disorder and four mental retardation. Fifteen had had some precipitating stressor and the remainder had histories of exhibiting attention-seeking behaviour. Nine of 10 patients with conversion disorder had 'conversion V' Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) profiles, while personality disorder patients had elevation of several psychopathological scales. Patients with conversion disorder gradually improved with anticonvulsant discontinuation, while retarded individuals were helped by behaviour modification, situational change or neuroleptics. Personality disorder patients continued to have attacks and eventually discontinued follow-up. Clinical evidence of non-epileptic seizures includes clinical atypicality and long duration, exacerbation by medications and frequent attacks despite normal examination and studies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Crise não epiléptica psicogênica: história e crítica de um conceito Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: history and critique of a concept

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    Daniela Kurcgant

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Discute o desenvolvimento do conhecimento psiquiátrico sobre a crise não epiléptica psicogênica (CNEP, buscando iluminar os pressupostos epistemológicos do conceito e suas implicações práticas. Em sua definição atual, crises ou ataques recorrentes são manifestações comportamentais semelhantes às da epilepsia, mas que dela diferem por não serem consequentes de descargas elétricas cerebrais anormais, podendo ter origem psicogênica. Em direção inversa da metafísica, investiga-se a emergência histórica do conceito de CNEP nos últimos quarenta anos. Conceitos de comorbidade psiquiátrica, abuso e dissociação foram discutidos devido a sua participação na trajetória conceitual de CNEP.This discussion of the evolution of psychiatric knowledge concerning psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES sheds light on the epistemological assumptions underlying the concept and on its practical implications as well. PNES are defined as repeated seizures or attacks which can be mistaken for epilepsy because of the similar behavioral changes displayed, but which differ in that they are not the result of abnormal electrical activity in the brain and may be psychogenic in origin. The article investigates the historical development of the concept of PNES over the past forty years. The concepts of psychiatric comorbidity, abuse, and dissociation enter the discussion owing to their roles in the checkered development of the concept of PNES.

  12. Automated differentiation between epileptic and non-epileptic convulsive seizures

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    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was the clinical validation of an automated algorithm based on surface electromyography (EMG) for differentiation between convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). Forty-four consecutive episodes with convulsive events were automatically analyzed with the a......%) and 18 PNESs (95%). The overall diagnostic accuracy was 95%. This algorithm is useful for distinguishing between epileptic and psychogenic convulsive seizures....

  13. Quantitative analysis of surface electromyography during epileptic and nonepileptic convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of sustained muscle activation during convulsive epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), as compared to voluntary muscle activation. The main goal was to find surface electromyography (EMG) features that can distinguish between convuls...

  14. PSEUDOSEIZURES AND EPILEPSY IN NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS

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    Ibañez-Valdés L de F.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied 32 rural patients from the poorest regions in South Africa, diagnosed as epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis presenting pseudoseizures. We found that the common clinical characteristics of this series and its psychological profile such as: duration of events, history of sexual abuse in females, absent of focal neurological signs, vocalization in the middle of the seizures, and lack of post-ictal symptoms were very useful for its differential diagnosis, and the possible difference between the clinical features and psychological profile of those patients and others without PS. Finally, some advices for the management of this condition by family doctors are suggested. ______________ RESUMEN: Estudiamos 32 pacientes provenientes de las áreas rurales mas pobres de Sudáfrica en los cuales se diagnosticó una epilepsia secundaria a neurocisticercosis cerebral y que además presentaban seudo crisis epilépticas. Encontramos un número de características clínicas y psicológicas comunes en este grupo tales como la duracion de las crisis, historia de abuso sexual en las hembras, ausencia de signos neurológicos focales, vocalización en el intervalo entre las crisis y la falta de signos postictales que resultó ser muy útil en el diagnóstico diferencial. Se encontraron además diferencias en las características clínicas y psicológicas estos pacientes con relación a otros que no presentaban pseudocrisis.

  15. Stress and avoidance in Pseudoseizures: testing the assumptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances, P L; Baker, G A; Appleton, P L

    1999-04-01

    Twenty women and 10 men with Pseudoseizures were matched by age and gender with an epilepsy- and a healthy-control group. In response to clinical and research evidence of a relationship between Pseudoseizures and the experience of stress, it was hypothesised that people with Pseudoseizures would perceive their ongoing lives as more stressful, and use more avoidant and distancing coping, and less problem-focused coping, than people in the two control groups. Using the Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen et al., J. Health Soc. Behav. 24, 1983, 385-396) and the Ways of Coping, revised version (Folkman and Lazarus, Manual for Ways of Coping Questionnaire, Consulting Psychologist Press, Paola Alto, CA, 1988) the study found that people with Pseudoseizures: (1) perceived their ongoing lives as significantly more stressful; (2) were significantly more likely to use a maladaptive (escape-avoidant) coping strategy; and (3) were significantly less likely to use an adaptive (planful problem solving) approach to coping than healthy controls. The study findings indicate that people with Pseudoseizures experience lives as stressful as do people with epilepsy, and are likely to employ maladaptive coping responses. Implications for diagnosis, intervention and future research are discussed.

  16. [Psychogenic amenorrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowsky, M; Winaver, D

    2007-01-01

    Any amenorrhoea noticed outside pregnancy, lactation and menopause periods might be of organic or functional origin. Today, non organic amenorrhoea are either called hypothalamic amenorrhoea, more exactly supra hypothalamic amenorrhoea; functional amenorrhoea--this definition being characterized by its lack of any anatomic substratum; or, psychogenic amenorrhoea--an etiologic definition. Like any amenorrhoea, functional or psychogenic amenorrhoea is the consequence of either anovulation or endometrial hypotrophy. Neuroendocrine sciences do open new exciting research perspectives but other ways all the more promising since hormonal mechanics would not be the explanation. Work on the unconscious is indeed the other road leading to these psychogenic amenorrhoea. The term "psychogenic"--of psychological origin--does not mean of unknown origin, provided we recognize the strong link between psyche and soma. Treatment for this kind of amenorrhoea is twofold: medical and psychotherapeutic. Even though psychological etiology is obvious, clinical examination must be rigorous and completed by complementary exams which will guide the therapeutics. This is reassuring to the patient for the gynaecologist she chose to consult is implied, and not the psychotherapist. This reassures us too, because what we care for, as doctors, is first of all the body. Psychotherapeutic support can be provided by the general practitioner or the gynaecologist, both with psychosomatics training, but a multidisciplinary approach must often be worked out.

  17. Psychogenic dyspnea

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    Tushar R Sahasrabudhe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyspnea is a very common presenting complaint of a patient. Though commonly due to an organic disease, dyspnea can be a manifestation of underlying anxiety disorder. Three typical patterns of psychogenic dyspnea, viz. panic attack, psychogenic hyperventilation, and compulsive sighing, have been reviewed in this article. The article also comments on the diagnostic features and treatment of these patterns. The overlap with organic causes of dyspnea such as bronchial asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD has also been discussed. For literature review, a Medline and Pubmed search was conducted using appropriate keywords. Articles were also identified from the authors′ own knowledge of the literature as well as reference lists in articles retrieved.

  18. Clinical and psychosocial characteristics of children with nonepileptic seizures

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    Chinta Sri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to present a comprehensive profile of clinical and psychosocial characteristics of children with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and to assess the short-term outcome of these patients. Materials and Methods: The subjects were consecutive cases of children with a diagnosis of nonepileptic seizures (N=17, mean age = 10.7 years, S.D. = 1.26 and two groups of control groups matched on age and sex: true seizure group and healthy controls. All the children were recruited from the out-patient services of the Department of Pediatrics of a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India. Detailed history taking and clinical examination was done in the case of every child. A standard 18 channel EEG was done in all the children and a video EEG was done in 12 cases of children with nonepileptic seizures. The Childhood Psychopathology Measurement Schedule (CPMS and Life Events Scale for Indian Children (LESIC were used to measure the children′s emotional and behavioral functioning at home, and the number of life events and the stress associated with these events in the preceding year and the year before that. Short-term outcome was examined three to six months after the diagnosis of nonepileptic seizures was made. Results: Unresponsiveness without marked motor manifestations was the most common "ictal" characteristic of the nonepileptic seizures. Pelvic thrusting, upper and lower limb movements, head movements, and vocalization were observed in less than one-third of the patients. Increased psychosocial stress and significantly higher number of life events in the preceding year were found to characterize children with nonepileptic seizures, as compared to the two control groups. The nonepileptic seizures and true seizures groups had a higher proportion of children with psychopathology scores in the clinically significant maladjustment range, as compared to those in the healthy control group. A majority of the patients

  19. Nonepileptic Seizures: An Updated Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L.; LaFrance, W. Curt

    2016-01-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures are a Functional Neurological Disorder/ Conversion Disorder subtype, which are neurobehavioral conditions at the interface of Neurology and Psychiatry. Significant advancements over the past decade have been made in the diagnosis, management and neurobiological understanding of PNES. This article reviews published PNES research focusing on semiologic features that distinguish PNES from epileptic seizures, consensus diagnostic criteria, the intersection of PNES and other comorbidities, neurobiological studies, evidence-based treatment interventions and outcome studies. Epidemiology and health care utilization studies highlight a continued unmet medical need in the comprehensive care of PNES. Consensus guidelines for diagnostic certainty are based on clinical history, semiology of witnessed typical event(s), and EEG findings. While certain semiologic features may aid the diagnosis of PNES, the gold standard remains capturing a typical event on video electroencephalography (EEG) showing the absence of epileptiform activity with history and semiology consistent with PNES. Medical-neurologic and psychiatric comorbidities are prevalent in PNES and should be assessed in diagnostic evaluations, and integrated into treatment interventions and prognostic considerations. Several studies, including a pilot multicenter, randomized clinical trial, have now demonstrated that a cognitive behavioral therapy informed psychotherapy is an efficacious treatment for PNES, and additional efforts are necessary to evaluate the utility of pharmacologic and other psychotherapy treatments. Neuroimaging studies, while requiring replication, suggest that PNES may occur in the context of alterations within and across sensorimotor, emotion regulation/processing, cognitive control and multimodal integration brain systems. Future research could investigate similarities and differences between PNES and other somatic symptom disorders. PMID:26996600

  20. Psychogenic Nonepileptic Seizures after Head Injury: A Case Report

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    Laura Scévola

    2009-01-01

    another medical illness. The gold standard for PNES diagnosis is video electroencephalogram (Video-EEG. PNESs are defined by modern psychiatry as conversion and dissociative disorders but these disorders may coexist with many others psychiatric disorders, including depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and personality disorders. It is well known that epileptic seizures are a frequent and well-studied complication of traumatic head injury (THI. However, THI may also generate psychic symptoms including PNES. In this paper we describe a patient who developed PNES after THI in a bus accident and received a diagnosis of refractory epilepsy for 24 years until she underwent Video-EEG.

  1. Importance of Video-EEG Monitoring in the Diagnosis of Epilepsy in a Psychiatric Patient

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    Batool F. Kirmani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic medical condition which is disabling to both patients and caregivers. The differential diagnosis of epilepsy includes psychogenic nonepileptic spells or “pseudoseizures.” Epilepsy is due to abnormal electrical activity in the brain, and pseudoseizure is a form of conversion disorder. The brain waves remain normal in pseudoseizures. The problem arises when a patient with significant psychiatric history presents with seizures. Pseudoseizures become high on the differential diagnosis without extensive work up. This is a case of woman with significant psychiatric issues which resulted in a delay in the diagnosis of epilepsy.

  2. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgante, Francesca; Edwards, Mark J.; Espay, Alberto J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review describes the main clinical features of psychogenic (functional) movement disorders and reports recent advances in diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment. Recent Findings The terminology and definition of patients with psychogenic movement disorders remain subjects of controversy; the term “functional” has been used more frequently in the literature in recent years regarding the neurobiological substrate underpinning these disorders. Correct diagnosis of psychogenic movement disorders should rely not on the exclusion of organic disorders or the sole presence of psychological factors but on the observation or elicitation of clinical features related to the specific movement disorder (ie, a positive or inclusionary rather than exclusionary diagnosis). Sudden onset, spontaneous remissions, and variability over time or during clinical examination are useful “red flags” suggestive of a psychogenic movement disorder. Imaging studies have demonstrated impaired connectivity between limbic and motor areas involved in movement programming and hypoactivity of a brain region that compares expected data with actual sensory data occurring during voluntary movement. Treatment of psychogenic movement disorders begins with ensuring the patient’s acceptance of the diagnosis during the initial debriefing and includes nonpharmacologic (cognitive-behavioral therapy, physiotherapy) and pharmacologic options. Summary Psychogenic movement disorders represent a challenging disorder for neurologists to diagnose and treat. Recent advances have increased understanding of the neurobiological mechanism of psychogenic movement disorders. Treatment with cognitive strategies and physical rehabilitation can benefit some patients. As short duration of disease correlates with better prognosis, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment are critical. PMID:24092294

  3. Psychogenic Pruritus - Review

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    Adem Köşlü

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychogenic pruritus, which is derived from a psychogenic/psychiatric basis, is a variety of pruritus; it appears with scratching and/or picking at normal skin and causes to secondary lesions on the skin. It may coexist with some psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder and psychosis. The distinction from other pruritus varieties poses a clinical challenge to the dermatologist and the psychiatrist. The nosological status, psychiatric comorbidities, diagnostic and therapeutic features of psychogenic pruritus have been evaluated in this article.

  4. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

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    Chakravarty Ambar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychogenic movement Disorders (PMD may result from somatoform disorders, factitious disorders, malingering, depression anxiety disorders and less frequently, histrionic personality disorders. First recognized by Henry Head in early twentieth century, PMD s commonly encountered and clues to their differentiation from organic disease. A generally accepted management protocol has been outlined.

  5. Nonepileptic paroxysmal sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenette, Eric; Guilleminault, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Events occurring during nighttime sleep in children can be easily mislabeled, as witnesses are usually not immediately available. Even when observers are present, description of the events can be sketchy, as these individuals are frequently aroused from their own sleep. Errors of perception are thus common and can lead to diagnosis of epilepsy where other sleep-related conditions are present, sometimes initiating unnecessary therapeutic interventions, especially with antiepileptic drugs. Often not acknowledged, paroxysmal nonepileptic behavioral and motor episodes in sleep are encountered much more frequently than their epileptic counterpart. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD) 2nd edition displays an extensive list of such conditions that can be readily mistaken for epilepsy. The most prevalent ones are reviewed, such as nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep parasomnias, comprised of sleepwalking, confusional arousals and sleep terrors, periodic leg movements of sleep, repetitive movement disorders, benign neonatal myoclonus, and sleep starts. Apnea of prematurity is also briefly reviewed. Specific issues regarding management of these selected disorders, both for diagnostic consideration and for therapeutic intervention, are addressed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. YouTube as a potential learning tool to help distinguish tonic-clonic seizures from nonepileptic attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammed, Louwai; Adcock, Jane E; Sen, Arjune

    2014-08-01

    Medical students are increasingly turning to the website YouTube as a learning resource. This study set out to determine whether the videos on YouTube accurately depict the type of seizures that a medical student may search for. Two consultant epileptologists independently assessed the top YouTube videos returned following searches for eight terms relating to different categories of seizures. The videos were rated for their technical quality, concordance of diagnosis with an epileptologist-assigned diagnosis, and efficacy as a learning tool for medical education. Of the 200 videos assessed, 106 (63%) met the inclusion criteria for further analysis. Technical quality was generally good and only interfered with the diagnostic process in 8.5% of the videos. Of the included videos, 40.6-46.2% were judged to depict the purported diagnosis with moderate agreement between raters (75% agreement, κ=0.50). Of the videos returned after searching "tonic-clonic seizure", 28.6-35.7% were judged to show nonepileptic seizures with almost perfect interrater agreement (92.9% agreement, κ=0.84). Of the videos returned following the search "pseudoseizure", 77.8-88.9% of videos were judged to show nonepileptic seizures with substantial agreement (88.9% agreement, κ=0.61). Across all search terms, 19.8-33% of videos were judged as potentially useful as a learning resource, with fair agreement between raters (75.5% agreement, κ=0.38). These findings suggest that the majority of videos on YouTube claiming to show specific seizure subtypes are inaccurate, and YouTube should not be recommended as a learning tool for students. However, a small group of videos provides excellent demonstrations of tonic-clonic and nonepileptic seizures, which could be used by an expert teacher to demonstrate the difference between epileptic and nonepileptic seizures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Paroxysmal belching: Epileptic or nonepileptic?

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    Stoyan Popkirov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and localizing value of ictal belching are yet unknown. We present the case of a patient with medically refractory focal epilepsy with simple and complex partial seizures, as well as generalized seizures. One presumed seizure type comprised frequent episodes of repetitive belching. Video-EEG monitoring during these attacks showed no ictal changes. The belching episodes were inducible and terminable through suggestion. The diagnosis of excessive supragastric belching, a previously described psychogenic condition, was made.

  8. Paroxysmal belching: Epileptic or nonepileptic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkirov, Stoyan; Grönheit, Wenke; Wellmer, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and localizing value of ictal belching are yet unknown. We present the case of a patient with medically refractory focal epilepsy with simple and complex partial seizures, as well as generalized seizures. One presumed seizure type comprised frequent episodes of repetitive belching. Video-EEG monitoring during these attacks showed no ictal changes. The belching episodes were inducible and terminable through suggestion. The diagnosis of excessive supragastric belching, a previously described psychogenic condition, was made.

  9. Consciousness in Non-Epileptic Attack Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Reuber, M.; Kurthen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD) is one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. Impairment of\\ud consciousness is the key feature of non-epileptic attacks (NEAs). The first half of this review summarises the clinical research\\ud literature featuring observations relating to consciousness in NEAD. The second half places this evidence in the wider context\\ud of the recent discourse on consciousness in neuroscience and the philosophy of mind. We argue that studies of consci...

  10. Video-ambulatory EEG in a secondary care center: A retrospective evaluation of utility in the diagnosis of epileptic and nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Andrew; Manfredonia, Francesco; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2016-04-01

    The development and optimization of protocols using simultaneous video recording alongside long-term electroencephalography (EEG), such as ambulatory EEG (AEEG), expanded the range of available techniques for the investigation of paroxysmal clinical events. In particular, video-AEEG has received increasing attention over the last few years because of its potential to further improve diagnostic utility in the differential diagnosis between epileptic and nonepileptic seizures. We retrospectively evaluated 88 video-AEEG studies in order to assess the diagnostic utility of video-AEEG in 87 patients consecutively referred to a neurophysiology department. Typical clinical events occurred during 55 studies (62.5%). In 26 of these, at least one event was also clearly seen on video recording, contributing to a confident diagnosis. Clinical events were classified according to three diagnostic categories: epileptic seizures (6 studies, 6.8%), physiologic nonepileptic events (13 studies, 14.8%), or psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (36 studies, 40.9%). Of the studies with an event not recorded on video, a confident diagnosis could be reached in 55.2% of cases. The main reason for unsuccessful video recording was failure to activate the camcorder by the patient or carer. We found an overall diagnostic utility of 67.0%, which confirms the findings of previous reports evaluating the diagnostic yield of AEEG. Implementation of video-AEEG protocols in a secondary care center appears to have high diagnostic utility, particularly for patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. Our findings prompt further research into the potential applications of video-AEEG, in consideration of important implications for successful patient management and healthcare resource allocation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [What the patient's history tells us about their nonepileptic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, M; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Gülich, E; Bartolomei, F; McGonigal, A

    2014-10-01

    The aetiology of "psychogenic" non-epileptic seizures (NES) remains poorly understood and the differentiation of NES from epilepsy can be a difficult. In the first part of this review article we focus on recent insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of NES. We summarise a number of studies demonstrating the importance of abnormalities of emotion regulation in patients with NES. Evidence for abnormal emotion regulation comes from both self-report and experimental studies of pre-conscious cognitive processes. These studies show that NES are not the only manifestation of abnormal mental processing in these patients and that excessive social threat avoidance and emotional dysregulation are also evident between seizures and may therefore contribute to disability beyond the seizures themselves. In the second part of this review, we describe the findings of a number of studies, which have examined differences between the communication behaviour of patients with NES and those with epilepsy. We argue, that, whilst these studies initially aimed to help clinicians with the differential diagnosis of NES and epilepsy, close sociolinguistic analysis of patient's talk can also provide clues about the aetiology of NES. We conclude that the interaction of patient with NES with the doctor can be interpreted as a manifestation of avoidance and a demonstration of helplessness perhaps intended to secure active support from the doctor. In the third part of this review, we suggest that a close reading of a transcript of the interaction between a patient with NES and her doctor (and perhaps attentive listening to how patients' talk about themselves and their disorder) can yield clues to the causes of NES in individual cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Approximate Entropies for Stochastic Time Series and EKG Time Series of Patients with Epilepsy and Pseudoseizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnalek, Brian; Zurcher, Ulrich; O'Dwyer, Rebecca; Kaufman, Miron

    2009-10-01

    A wide range of heart rate irregularities have been reported in small studies of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy [TLE]. We hypothesize that patients with TLE display cardiac dysautonomia in either a subclinical or clinical manner. In a small study, we have retrospectively identified (2003-8) two groups of patients from the epilepsy monitoring unit [EMU] at the Cleveland Clinic. No patients were diagnosed with cardiovascular morbidities. The control group consisted of patients with confirmed pseudoseizures and the experimental group had confirmed right temporal lobe epilepsy through a seizure free outcome after temporal lobectomy. We quantified the heart rate variability using the approximate entropy [ApEn]. We found similar values of the ApEn in all three states of consciousness (awake, sleep, and proceeding seizure onset). In the TLE group, there is some evidence for greater variability in the awake than in either the sleep or proceeding seizure onset. Here we present results for mathematically-generated time series: the heart rate fluctuations ξ follow the γ statistics i.e., p(ξ)=γ-1(k) ξ^k exp(-ξ). This probability function has well-known properties and its Shannon entropy can be expressed in terms of the γ-function. The parameter k allows us to generate a family of heart rate time series with different statistics. The ApEn calculated for the generated time series for different values of k mimic the properties found for the TLE and pseudoseizure group. Our results suggest that the ApEn is an effective tool to probe differences in statistics of heart rate fluctuations.

  13. People with Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: A South African perspective

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    Chrisma Pretorius

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to explore the demographic variables of individuals with PNES in South Africa, to review the available body of research on PNES, and to compare it with our results. Method: Twenty-two people with PNES, with confirmed video EEG, were recruited by means of convenience sampling from two hospitals. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the demographic variables of the participants. Results: Internationally comparable results revealed misdiagnoses and low treatment delivery amongst a primarily female population. Conclusion: This study provided greater insight into individuals with PNES in South Africa, highlighting the need for more information, support, effective treatment and accurate diagnosis of PNES.

  14. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures mimicking gelastic seizures: A description of two cases

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    Addolorata Mascia

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe the cases of two patients with a prolonged history of laughter attacks mistaken for epilepsy and unresponsive to AED treatment. Brain MRI and interictal EEG were unremarkable. Video-EEG monitoring allowed us to document the spontaneous and suggestion-induced habitual episodes that were then diagnosed as PNES.

  15. Patients with epilepsy and patients with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Katherine; Piazzini, Ada; Chiesa, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    and neuropsychological functions among patients with PNES, patients with epilepsy associated with PNES and patients with epilepsy. METHODS: We evaluated 66 consecutive in-patients with video-EEG recordings: 21 patients with epilepsy, 22 patients with PNES and 10 patients with epilepsy associated with PNES; 13 patients....... We observed fewer mood and anxiety disorders in patients with PNES compared with those with epilepsy. We did not find statistically significant differences in neuropsychological profiles among the 3 patient groups. CONCLUSION: This study can help to contribute to a better understanding of the impact...

  16. Crises não-epilépticas: clínica e terapêutica Nonepileptic seizures: clinical features and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Nogueira Mendes de Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Discutir as crises ou os eventos paroxísticos que simulem crises epilépticas, enfatizando as diferenças semiológicas entre elas e as perspectivas terapêuticas. Realizamos uma revisão da literatura, selecionando artigos nas bases de dados Medline e Bireme, a partir dos unitermos: "non-epileptic seizures", "psychogenic seizures". As crises não-epilépticas (CNE podem ser classificadas em fisiológicas (síncope, migrânea, ataque isquêmico transitório e em psicogênicas (voluntárias ou não. O padrão-ouro para a diferenciação entre as crises epilépticas e as CNE é o videoeletroencefalograma, mas vários dados semiológicos podem auxiliar esse processo. O tratamento das CNE baseia-se em psicoterapia e em farmacoterapia direcionadas aos transtornos psiquiátricos comórbidos. Apesar de a alta prevalência das CNE e de sua elevada morbidade, são escassos os estudos na literatura nacional. São muitos os desafios diagnósticos e terapêuticos. Assim, o psiquiatra atentar-se à sua ocorrência, evitando iatrogenia, como o uso desnecessário de drogas antiepilépticas.To discuss paroxysmal events that mimic epileptic seizures with emphasis on their semiologic differences and therapeutic perspectives. We did a narrative review of the literature based on selected papers in Medline and Bireme after searching for the uniterms "non-epileptic seizures" and "psychogenic seizures". Nonepileptic seizures (NES can be classified in physiological (syncope, migraine, transitory ischemic attack and psychogenic (voluntary or involuntary. The gold-standard in the differentiation of epileptic and nonepileptic seizures is the video-electroencefalogram, but many semiologic features can contribute to this process. The treatment of NES is based mainly on psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy directed to comorbid psychiatric disorders. Despite the high prevalence and elevated morbidity of the NES, there are just few studies on this subject in the Brazilian

  17. Childhood trauma and dissociation in women with pseudoseizure-type conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcetin, Adnan; Belli, Hasan; Ertem, Umit; Bahcebasi, Talat; Ataoglu, Ahmet; Canan, Fatih

    2009-11-01

    Conversion disorder is thought to be associated with psychological factors because of the presence of conflict and other stressors prior to the condition. The aim of this study is to compare adult patients with pseudoseizure-type conversion disorder with healthy control group in terms of childhood trauma, dissociative disorder and family history of psychiatric disorders. 56 female patients were admitted to the general psychiatry hospital outpatient clinic between January and July 2005. All patients had a negative experience about their families just before having the conversion. Diagnosis was made according to the DSM-IV criteria. A control group consisting of similar patient demographics of the disease group has been selected. Socio-demographic information forms, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and Dissociation Questionnaire (DIS-Q), were completed on the patients. CTQ total (t=12.12, Pconversion group. DIS-Q mean points were statistically higher in the conversion group (t=11.05, Pconversion disorder) should be included within dissociative disorders in DSM system as in ICD. It is usually uncommon for the patient to tell about childhood trauma without being specially questioned about this issue. Thus, it would be helpful to uncover these experiences by using related scales in conversion disorder patients.

  18. De novo psychogenic seizures after epilepsy surgery: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MONTENEGRO MARIA AUGUSTA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of de novo psychogenic seizures after epilepsy surgery is rare, and is estimated in 1.8% to 3.6%. Seizures after epilepsy surgery should be carefully evaluated, and de novo psychogenic seizures should be considered especially when there is a change in the ictal semiology. We report a patient with de novo psychogenic seizures after anterior temporal lobe removal for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Once psychogenic seizures were diagnosed and psychiatric treatment was started, seizures stopped.

  19. Consciousness in non-epileptic attack disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, Markus; Kurthen, M

    2011-01-01

    Non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD) is one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. Impairment of consciousness is the key feature of non-epileptic attacks (NEAs). The first half of this review summarises the clinical research literature featuring observations relating to consciousness in NEAD. The second half places this evidence in the wider context of the recent discourse on consciousness in neuroscience and the philosophy of mind. We argue that studies of consciousness should not only distinguish between the 'level' and `content' of consciousness but also between 'phenomenal consciousness' (consciousness of states it somehow "feels to be like") and 'access consciousness' (having certain 'higher' cognitive processes at one's disposal). The existing evidence shows that there is a great intra- and interindividual variability of NEA experience. However, in most NEAs phenomenal experience - and, as a precondition for that experience, vigilance or wakefulness - is reduced to a lesser degree than in those epileptic seizures involving impairment of consciousness. In fact, complete loss of "consciousness" is the exception rather than the rule in NEAs. Patients, as well as external observers, may have a tendency to overestimate impairments of consciousness during the seizures.

  20. Consciousness in Non-Epileptic Attack Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuber, M.; Kurthen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD) is one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. Impairment of consciousness is the key feature of non-epileptic attacks (NEAs). The first half of this review summarises the clinical research literature featuring observations relating to consciousness in NEAD. The second half places this evidence in the wider context of the recent discourse on consciousness in neuroscience and the philosophy of mind. We argue that studies of consciousness should not only distinguish between the ‘level’ and ‘content’ of consciousness but also between ‘phenomenal consciousness’ (consciousness of states it somehow “feels to be like”) and ‘access consciousness’ (having certain ‘higher’ cognitive processes at one’s disposal). The existing evidence shows that there is a great intra- and interindividual variability of NEA experience. However, in most NEAs phenomenal experience – and, as a precondition for that experience, vigilance or wakefulness – is reduced to a lesser degree than in those epileptic seizures involving impairment of consciousness. In fact, complete loss of “consciousness” is the exception rather than the rule in NEAs. Patients, as well as external observers, may have a tendency to overestimate impairments of consciousness during the seizures. PMID:21447903

  1. Mass psychogenic illness after vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, C John

    2003-01-01

    When vaccines are administered to groups, the physical reactions of the recipients may be similar, causing a form of mass reaction, the mechanism for which is the same as that for mass reactions from other causes. These phenomena have been categorised as mass psychogenic illness (MPI), and have been defined as the collective occurrence of a constellation of symptoms suggestive of organic illness but without an identified cause in a group of people with shared beliefs about the cause of the symptom(s). A review of the literature shows that such outbreaks have been reported in differing cultural and environmental settings including developing and industrialised countries, in the work place, on public transport, in schools, and the military. The perceived threats have been against agents such as food poisoning, fire and toxic gases. Whatever the place or perceived threat, the response seems to be similar. The symptoms generally included headache, dizziness, weakness, and loss of consciousness. Once under way, MPIs are not easy to stop. Incidents reported in the literature show that they can quickly gather momentum and can be amplified by the press who disseminate information rapidly, escalating the events. Management of such mass events can be extremely difficult. Should the public health official in charge continue to try and determine the cause, or should this person call off the entire investigation? It is suggested here that once vaccines are identified as a probable cause of the phenomenon, a dismissive approach may actually be harmful. Unless the spokesperson has already earned a high level of trust, the public are not likely to be convinced easily that nothing was wrong with the vaccine until it has been tested. An increased awareness of MPIs on the part of organisers of future mass vaccination campaigns seems appropriate. Immunisation managers should be aware that mass immunisation campaigns could generate such mass reactions. It is therefore essential that

  2. Early childhood trauma and hippocampal volumes in patients with epileptic and psychogenic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Benjamin; Velakoulis, Dennis; Yuan, Cheng Yi; Ang, Anthony; Steward, Chris; Desmond, Patricia; O'Brien, Terence J

    2016-11-01

    Exposure to early life childhood trauma has been implicated as resulting in a vulnerability to epileptic and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), hippocampal atrophy, and psychiatric disorders. This study aimed to explore the relationships between childhood trauma, epilepsy, PNES, and hippocampal volume in patients admitted to a video-electroencephalogram monitoring (VEM) unit. One hundred thirty-one patients were recruited from the Royal Melbourne Hospital VEM unit. The diagnostic breakdown of this group was: temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) (32), other epilepsy syndromes (35), PNES (47), other nonepileptic syndromes (5), both epilepsy and PNES (6), and uncertain diagnosis (6). All patients completed a questionnaire assessing exposure to childhood trauma, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ), as well as questionnaires assessing psychiatric symptomatology (SCL-90-R), Anxiety and Depression (HADS), quality of life (QOLIE-98) and cognition (NUCOG). Volumetric coronal T1 MRI scans were available for 84 patients. Hippocampal volumes were manually traced by a blinded operator. The prevalence of childhood trauma in patients with PNES was higher than in patients with other diagnoses (p=0.005), and the group with PNES overall scored significantly higher on the CTQ (p=0.002). No association was found between CTQ scores and hippocampal volumes; however, patients with a history of sexual abuse were found to have smaller left hippocampal volumes than patients who had not (p=0.043). Patients reporting having experienced childhood trauma scored lower on measures of quality of life and higher on measures of psychiatric symptomatology. Patients with PNES report having experienced significantly more childhood trauma than those with epileptic seizures, and in both groups there was a relationship between a history of having experienced sexual abuse and reduced left hippocampal volume. Patients with PNES and those with epilepsy who have a history of childhood trauma have overall

  3. Psychogenic Balance Disorders: Is It a New Entity of Psychogenic Movement Disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Sam Baik

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The various reported psychogenic dyskinesias include tremor, dystonia, myoclonus, gait disorder, Parkinsonism, tics, and chorea. It is not easy to diagnose psychogenic movement disorders, especially in patients with underlying organic disease. We describe three patients with balance and/or posture abnormalities that occur when they stand up, start to move, or halt from walking, although their gaits are normal. One had an underlying unilateral frontal lobe lesion. All patients improved dramatically after receiving a placebo-injection or medication. These abnormal features differ from the previously reported features of astasia without abasia and of psychogenic gait disorders, including recumbent gait. We describe and discuss the patients’ unique clinical characteristics.

  4. Assessing quantitative EEG spectrograms to identify non-epileptic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goenka, Ajay; Boro, Alexis; Yozawitz, Elissa

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of quantitative EEG (QEEG) spectrograms in order to distinguish epileptic from non-epileptic events. Seventeen patients with paroxysmal non-epileptic events, captured during EEG monitoring, were retrospectively assessed using QEEG spectrograms. These patients were compared to a control group of 13 consecutive patients (ages 25-60 years) with epileptic seizures of similar semiology. Assessment of raw EEG was employed as the gold standard against which epileptic and non-epileptic events were validated. QEEG spectrograms, available using Persyst 12 EEG system integration software, were each assessed with respect to their usefulness to distinguish epileptic from non-epileptic seizures. The given spectrogram was interpreted as indicating a seizure if, at the time of the clinically identified event, it showed a visually significant change from baseline. Eighty-two clinically identified paroxysmal events were analysed (46 non-epileptic and 36 epileptic). The "seizure detector trend analysis" spectrogram correctly classified 33/46 (71%) non-epileptic events (no seizure indicated during a clinically identified event) vs. 29/36 (81%) epileptic seizures (seizure indicated during a clinically identified event) (p=0.013). Similarly, "rhythmicity spectrogram", FFT spectrogram, "asymmetry relative spectrogram", and integrated-amplitude EEG spectrogram detected 28/46 (61%), 30/46 (65%), 22/46 (48%) and 27/46 (59%) non-epileptic events vs. 27/36 (75%), 25/36 (69%), 25/36 (69%) and 27/36 (75%) epileptic events, respectively. High sensitivities and specificities for QEEG seizure detection analyses suggest that QEEG may have a role at the bedside to facilitate early differentiation between epileptic seizures and non-epileptic events in order to avoid unnecessary administration of antiepileptic drugs and possible iatrogenic consequences.

  5. Anion gap can differentiate between psychogenic and epileptic seizures in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Matzka, Liesl; Maranda, Louise; Weber, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Differentiation between psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and generalized convulsive epileptic seizures (ES) is important for appropriate triaging in the emergency department (ED). This can be difficult in the ED, as the event is often not witnessed by a medical professional. In the current study, we investigated whether anion gap (AG), bicarbonate, and the Denver Seizure Score (DSS) could differentiate between PNES and ES. Of a total of 1,354 subjects reviewed from a tertiary care medical center, 27 PNES and 27 ES patients were identified based on clinical description and subsequent electroencephalogram. Multivariate logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine whether there was an association between seizure type and AG, bicarbonate, or DSS (24-bicarbonate + 2 × [AG-12]) when samples were drawn within 24 h of the concerning event. The result showed that sensitivity and negative predictive value dropped markedly for all measures if samples were drawn >2 h after the event; the sensitivity was similar for AG and DSS and higher than for bicarbonate. We propose that AG > 10 (sensitivity of 81.8%, specificity of 100%) in the first 2 h after the event could be used as a potential tool in the ED to help differentiate between PNES and ES. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Foreign Accent Syndrome As a Psychogenic Disorder: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulen, Stefanie; Verhoeven, Jo; De Witte, Elke; De Page, Louis; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Mariën, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the majority of cases published between 1907 and 2014, FAS is due to a neurogenic etiology. Only a few reports about FAS with an assumed psychogenic origin have been published. The present article discusses the findings of a careful database search on psychogenic FAS. This review may be particularly relevant as it is the first to analyze the salient features of psychogenic FAS cases to date. This article hopes to pave the way for the view that psychogenic FAS is a cognate of neurogenic FAS. It is felt that this variant of FAS may have been underreported, as most of the psychogenic cases have been published after the turn of the century. This review may improve the diagnosis of the syndrome in clinical practice and highlights the importance of recognizing psychogenic FAS as an independent taxonomic entity. PMID:27199699

  7. Psychogenic amnesia: syndromes, outcome, and patterns of retrograde amnesia

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Neil A; Johnston, Kate; Corno, Federica; Casey, Sarah J; Friedner, Kimberley; Humphreys, Kate; Jaldow, Eli Joseph; Pitkanen, Mervi; Kopelman, Michael D

    2017-01-01

    There are very few case series of patients with acute psychogenic memory loss (also known as dissociative/functional amnesia), and still fewer studies of outcome, or comparisons with neurological memory-disordered patients. Consequently, the literature on psychogenic amnesia is somewhat fragmented and offers little of prognostic value for individual patients. In the present study, we reviewed the case records and neuropsychological findings in 53 psychogenic amnesia cases (3M:1F), in comparis...

  8. Treatment of Functional (Psychogenic) Movement Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ricciardi, Luciana; Edwards, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Functional (psychogenic) movement disorders are a common source of disability and distress. Despite this, little systematic evidence is available to guide treatment decisions. This situation is likely to have been influenced by the “no man’s land” that such patients occupy between neurologists and psychiatrists, often with neither side feeling a clear responsibility or ability to direct management. The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview of the current state of the evidence...

  9. Cochlear implant candidates with psychogenic hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompis, Martin; Senn, Pascal; Mantokoudis, Georgios; Caversaccio, Marco

    2015-04-01

    Specific requests for cochlear implantations by persons with psychogenic hearing loss are a relatively new phenomenon. A number of features seems to be over-represented in this group of patients. The existence of these requests stresses the importance of auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurements before cochlear implantation. To describe the phenomenon of patients with psychogenic hearing losses specifically requesting cochlear implantation, and to gain first insights into the characteristics of this group. Analysis of all cases seen between 2004 and 2013 at the University Hospital of Bern, Switzerland. Four cochlear implant candidates with psychogenic hearing loss were identified. All were female, aged 23-51 years. Hearing thresholds ranged from 86 dB to 112 dB HL (pure-tone average 500-4000 Hz). ABRs and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) showed bilaterally normal hearing in two subjects, and hearing thresholds between 30 and 50 dB in the other two subjects. Three subjects suffered from depression and one from a pathologic fear of cancer. Three had a history of five or more previous surgeries. Three were smokers and three reported other close family members with hearing losses. All four were hearing aid users at the time of presentation.

  10. Recognizing Uncommon Presentations of Psychogenic (Functional Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fidel Baizabal-Carvallo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychogenic or functional movement disorders (PMDs pose a challenge in clinical diagnosis. There are several clues, including sudden onset, incongruous symptoms, distractibility, suggestibility, entrainment of symptoms, and lack of response to otherwise effective pharmacological therapies, that help identify the most common psychogenic movements such as tremor, dystonia, and myoclonus.Methods: In this manuscript, we review the frequency, distinct clinical features, functional imaging, and neurophysiological tests that can help in the diagnosis of uncommon presentations of PMDs, such as psychogenic parkinsonism, tics, and chorea; facial, palatal, and ocular movements are also reviewed. In addition, we discuss PMDs at the extremes of age and mass psychogenic illness.Results: Psychogenic parkinsonism (PP is observed in less than 10% of the case series about PMDs, with a female–male ratio of roughly 1:1. Lack of amplitude decrement in repetitive movements and of cogwheel rigidity help to differentiate PP from true parkinsonism. Dopamine transporter imaging with photon emission tomography can also help in the diagnostic process. Psychogenic movements resembling tics are reported in about 5% of PMD patients. Lack of transient suppressibility of abnormal movements helps to differentiate them from organic tics. Psychogenic facial movements can present with hemifacial spasm, blepharospasm, and other movements. Some patients with essential palatal tremor have been shown to be psychogenic. Convergence ocular spasm has demonstrated a high specificity for psychogenic movements. PMDs can also present in the context of mass psychogenic illness or at the extremes of age.Discussion: Clinical features and ancillary studies are helpful in the diagnosis of patients with uncommon presentations of psychogenic movement disorders.

  11. Coping Strategies and IQ in Psychogenic Movement Disorders and Paralysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, M.; Griffioen, Brecht T.; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2009-01-01

    Inadequate coping strategies may cause some patients to develop psychogenic symptoms in periods of stress. This may be more prominent in patients with lower intelligence levels. Twenty-six patients with psychogenic neurological disorders (PND) were tested for coping abilities and intelligence and

  12. Psychogenic Foreign Accent Syndrome: a new case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eKeulen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the case of a 33-year-old, right-handed, French-speaking Belgian lady who was involved in a car accident as a pedestrian. Six months after the incident she developed a German/Flemish-like accent. The patient’s medical history, the onset of the FAS and the possible psychological causes of the accent change are analyzed. Relevant neuropsychological, neurolinguistic and psychodiagnostic test results are presented and discussed. The psychodiagnostic interview and testing will receive special attention, because these have been underreported in previous FAS case reports. Furthermore, an accent rating experiment was carried out in order to assess the foreign quality of the patient’s speech. Pre- and post-morbid spontaneous speech samples were analyzed phonetically to identify the pronunciation characteristics associated with this type of FAS. Several findings were considered essential in the diagnosis of psychogenic FAS: the psychological assessments as well as the clinical interview confirmed the presence of psychological problems, while neurological damage was excluded by means of repeated neuroimaging and neurological examinations. The type and nature of the speech symptoms and the accent fluctuations associated with the patient's psychological state cannot be explained by a neurological disorder. Moreover, the indifference of the patient towards her condition may also suggest a psychogenic etiology, as the opposite is usually observed in neurogenic FAS patients.

  13. Psychogenic Foreign Accent Syndrome: A New Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulen, Stefanie; Verhoeven, Jo; De Page, Louis; Jonkers, Roel; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Mariën, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the case of a 33-year-old, right-handed, French-speaking Belgian lady who was involved in a car accident as a pedestrian. Six months after the incident she developed a German/Flemish-like accent. The patient's medical history, the onset of the FAS and the possible psychological causes of the accent change are analyzed. Relevant neuropsychological, neurolinguistic, and psychodiagnostic test results are presented and discussed. The psychodiagnostic interview and testing will receive special attention, because these have been underreported in previous FAS case reports. Furthermore, an accent rating experiment was carried out in order to assess the foreign quality of the patient's speech. Pre- and post-morbid spontaneous speech samples were analyzed phonetically to identify the pronunciation characteristics associated with this type of FAS. Several findings were considered essential in the diagnosis of psychogenic FAS: the psychological assessments as well as the clinical interview confirmed the presence of psychological problems, while neurological damage was excluded by means of repeated neuroimaging and neurological examinations. The type and nature of the speech symptoms and the accent fluctuations associated with the patient's psychological state cannot be explained by a neurological disorder. Moreover, the indifference of the patient toward her condition may also suggest a psychogenic etiology, as the opposite is usually observed in neurogenic FAS patients. PMID:27148003

  14. Late-Onset Psychogenic Chronic Phonic-Tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Thiago Cardoso; Pedroso, José Luiz; Knobel, Marcos; Knobel, Elias

    2016-01-01

    Tics beginning in late adulthood often have an identifiable etiology. Psychogenic tics with onset around 60 years of age are rarely described in the literature. A 67-year-old female had experienced phonic tics for 8 years. Episodes occurred without premonitory sensations and precipitant factors, and she could not suppress them. She had no history of childhood tic disorder, and secondary causes of tics were excluded. She was diagnosed with psychogenic tics and treated with quetiapine with mild improvement. When physicians are faced with no identifiable cause of tics combined with certain clinical clues, a psychogenic disorder must be suspected.

  15. Dopamine Transporter Imaging in Psychogenic Parkinsonism and Neurodegenerative Parkinsonism with Psychogenic Overlay: A Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chizoba C. Umeh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Differentiating psychogenic parkinsonism from neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease (PD with psychogenic features is a diagnostic challenge.Case report: We report a detailed longitudinal clinical description of three cases presenting with suspected psychogenic parkinsonism. Dopamine transporter single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT was used as a supplemental diagnostic study and influenced clinical management.Discussion: DAT-SPECT quantified the integrity of the striatal dopaminergic system in these cases of clinically uncertain parkinsonism and supported clinical decision-making.

  16. Psychogenic amnesia: syndromes, outcome, and patterns of retrograde amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Neil A; Johnston, Kate; Corno, Federica; Casey, Sarah J; Friedner, Kimberley; Humphreys, Kate; Jaldow, Eli J; Pitkanen, Mervi; Kopelman, Michael D

    2017-09-01

    There are very few case series of patients with acute psychogenic memory loss (also known as dissociative/functional amnesia), and still fewer studies of outcome, or comparisons with neurological memory-disordered patients. Consequently, the literature on psychogenic amnesia is somewhat fragmented and offers little prognostic value for individual patients. In the present study, we reviewed the case records and neuropsychological findings in 53 psychogenic amnesia cases (ratio of 3:1, males:females), in comparison with 21 consecutively recruited neurological memory-disordered patients and 14 healthy control subjects. In particular, we examined the pattern of retrograde amnesia on an assessment of autobiographical memory (the Autobiographical Memory Interview). We found that our patients with psychogenic memory loss fell into four distinct groups, which we categorized as: (i) fugue state; (ii) fugue-to-focal retrograde amnesia; (iii) psychogenic focal retrograde amnesia following a minor neurological episode; and (iv) patients with gaps in their memories. While neurological cases were characterized by relevant neurological symptoms, a history of a past head injury was actually more common in our psychogenic cases (P = 0.012), perhaps reflecting a 'learning episode' predisposing to later psychological amnesia. As anticipated, loss of the sense of personal identity was confined to the psychogenic group. However, clinical depression, family/relationship problems, financial/employment problems, and failure to recognize the family were also statistically more common in that group. The pattern of autobiographical memory loss differed between the psychogenic groups: fugue cases showed a severe and uniform loss of memories for both facts and events across all time periods, whereas the two focal retrograde amnesia groups showed a 'reversed' temporal gradient with relative sparing of recent memories. After 3-6 months, the fugue patients had improved to normal scores for facts

  17. Review: Psychogenic Aspect of Pain & Coceptualization of Psychogenic Pain in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Jazayeri

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain is the sensory and emotional experience of discomfort whiehis usually associated with actual or threatened physical damsge or irritation . Virtvally all people experience pain at all ages. Children also experience pain from the moment of birth through childhood years. Underestaning pain in children is very important , because of treatment implication and its influence in child physical and psychological development . Experienced researchers have found that pain is a concequence of emotional disorder which is observed in some patients . in many cases we have seen that a patient says to his / her clinician that she has no pain because there is no evidence of somatic disease. Dicomfont involved in psychogenic pain seems to resort primerly from psychological process. Many of physicion are familiar with unpleasant and avoidant concequences of these distortions . In these cases , it s better for us to agree with patients , experience of pain and not to prob somatic risk factors and their mechanism all the time. The researches hove recognized that psychological factors cam cause pain which is named psychogenic pain. It means that the cause of pain has psychological roots , versus organic pain which is related to discomfort is caused by tissue damage . In this study , theorical , psychological , psychoanalytical and psycho social approaches and personality characteristics description related to pain and the relations among these approaches in this area have been studied . Also, the perception of pain among children with different gender have been probed

  18. Psychogenic chronic pelvic pain: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D P; Wiesner, M G; Reiter, R C

    1990-03-01

    By the time that the pelvalgia patient seeks treatment, her chronic tension, anxiety, stress, and related somatic symptoms, which usually have moderated her fear of repeat assault or punishment by the aggressor-parent, has begun to disintegrate. The patient usually has little or no insight into the fact that her feelings of being trapped, helpless, and victimized in her marriage, job, or other interpersonal relationships can be symbols of the original sexual trauma. The depressed patient may be unaware that suicidal thoughts and actions, if present, are a reflection of her sense of helplessness, hopelessness, and victimization. Hence, CPP may be a symptom of a wide spectrum of disorders, both organic and psychological. While the patient is undergoing evaluation of pelvic pain, it is essential that clinicians remain aware that the patient's psychogenic symptoms are an attempt to reinforce a faltering ego. Additionally, it is important that they recognize that previous attempts at diagnosis and therapy of CPP and other somatic complaints usually have reinforced the belief that the symptoms are physically based and unrelated to any psychological factors. A number of prospective studies currently are underway to characterize further the relationships between complaints of chronic pelvic pain, personality functioning, and history of sexual trauma. Without data on very long-term follow-up, our understanding of the precise psychodevelopmental pathophysiology and long-term prognosis of CPP currently remains incomplete.

  19. Neurobiology of functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark J; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini; Pareés, Isabel

    2013-08-01

    This review explores recent developments in understanding the neurobiological mechanism of functional (psychogenic) movement disorders (FMDs). This is particularly relevant given the resurgence of academic and clinical interest in patients with functional neurological symptoms and the clear shift in diagnostic and treatment approaches away from a pure psychological model of functional symptoms. Recent research findings implicate three key processes in the neurobiology of FMD (and by extension other functional neurological symptoms): abnormal attentional focus, abnormal beliefs and expectations, and abnormalities in sense of agency. These three processes have been combined in recent neurobiological models of FMD in which abnormal predictions related to movement are triggered by self-focused attention, and the resulting movement is generated without the normal sense of agency that accompanies voluntary movement. New understanding of the neurobiology of FMD forms an important part of reappraising the way that patients with FMD (and other functional disorders) are characterized and treated. It also provides a testable framework for further exploring the pathophysiology of these common causes of ill health.

  20. A positive diagnosis of functional (psychogenic) tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demartini, B; Ricciardi, L; Parees, I; Ganos, C; Bhatia, K P; Edwards, M J

    2015-03-01

    Functional tics, also called psychogenic tics or pseudo-tics, are difficult to diagnose because of the lack of diagnostic criteria and their clinical similarities to organic tics. The aim of the present study was to report a case series of patients with documented functional tics and to describe their clinical characteristics, risk factors and psychiatric comorbidity. Also clinical tips are suggested which might help the differential diagnosis in clinical practice. Eleven patients (mean age at onset 37.2, SD 13.5; three females) were included with a documented or clinically established diagnosis of functional tics, according to consultant neurologists who have specific expertise in functional movement disorders or in tic disorders. Adult onset, absent family history of tics, inability to suppress the movements, lack of premonitory sensations, absence of pali-, echo- and copro-phenomena, presence of blocking tics, the lack of the typical rostrocaudal tic distribution and the coexistence of other functional movement disorders were common in our patients. Our data suggest that functional tics can be differentiated from organic tics on clinical grounds, although it is also accepted that this distinction can be difficult in certain cases. Clinical clues from history and examination described here might help to identify patients with functional tics. © 2014 EAN.

  1. [Psychogenic tics: clinical characteristics and prevalence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, Piotr; Milanowski, Lukasz; Szejko, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Clinical characteristics and the prevalence of psychogenic tics (PT) METHODS: 268 consecutively examined patients aged 4 to 54 years (221 men, 47 females; 134 children, 134 adults) with tic phenotype: Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS, n = 255), chronic motor tics (n = 6), chronic vocal tics (n= 1), transient tics (n = 1), tics unclassified (n = 2), PT (n= 5) were analyzed. The diagnosis of tic disorders was made on the DSM-IV-TR criteria and mental disorders by psychiatrists. PT were found in 5 patients (1.9%), aged 17 to 51 years, four men and one woman. The phenotype included vocalizations and complex movements. In none of the patients simple motor facial tics, inability to tic suppress, unchanging clinical pattern, peak severity from the beginning of the disease, lack of concern about the disease were present. The absence of premonitory urges, regression in unexpected positions, and the presence of atypical for GTS mental disorders were found in two persons. PT occurred in three persons in whom organic tics were present in childhood. Pharmacological treatment and psychotherapy were unsuccessful. In two persons spontaneous resolution occurred, in two patients the tics persist, in one person the course of PT is unknown. PT are rare and may occur in patients with organic tics. The most typical features of PT are: early onset in adulthood, lack of simple motor tics, inability to tic suppress. The diagnosis is established if a few atypical symptoms for organic tics occur.

  2. Late-Onset Psychogenic Chronic Phonic-Tics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago C. Vale

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tics beginning in late adulthood often have an identifiable etiology. Psychogenic tics with onset around 60 years of age are rarely described in the literature. Case Report: A 67-year-old female had experienced phonic tics for 8 years. Episodes occurred without premonitory sensations and precipitant factors, and she could not suppress them. She had no history of childhood tic disorder, and secondary causes of tics were excluded. She was diagnosed with psychogenic tics and treated with quetiapine with mild improvement. Discussion: When physicians are faced with no identifiable cause of tics combined with certain clinical clues, a psychogenic disorder must be suspected. 

  3. Placing erection in context: the reflexogenic-psychogenic dichotomy reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, B D

    1995-01-01

    Penile erections are usually classified as arising from "reflexogenic" or "psychogenic" causes. In practice this dichotomy has translated, somewhat circularly, to a distinction between spinal vs. supraspinal mediation, pelvic vs. hypogastric neural mediation, and perineal somesthetic stimulation vs. stimulation of receptors innervated by the cranial nerves. Evidence for differential regulation of erection in different contexts is reviewed. Research ascribing a physiological role to the hypogastric nerves in psychogenic erection, exemplified by classic studies of cats and spinally injured men, is suggestive but not compelling. Somewhat stronger is evidence that erection in some contexts (e.g., nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) in humans or touch-stimulated erection in rats) is more sensitive to androgen levels than in other contexts (e.g., visual erotic stimuli in men or copulation in rats). However, some of these differences may arise from the relative erectogenic strength of the stimuli, rather than from qualitative differences in androgen sensitivity of different contexts. More compelling is the possibility that conflicting interpretations of the role of dopamine in erection may stem in large part from differences among laboratories in the context in which erection is evoked. In light of the evidence reviewed, it seems unlikely that the conventional reflexogenic-psychogenic dichotomy should be retained, at least in its present form. As a first step, it may be worth considering that reflexive erections may not be limited to somesthetic perineal stimulation, but rather may also include stimuli received via the cranial nerves. Two alternatives to the standard reflexogenic-psychogenic dichotomy are proposed. The first is a minor revision in which two senses of psychogenic erection are distinguished: the weak, commonly used, sense would include erection resulting from any extrinsic nonsomesthetic stimulation, whether visual, auditory, or chemosensory. In this sense

  4. Conversion disorder and mass psychogenic illness in child neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mink, Jonathan W

    2013-11-01

    A common problem faced by neurologists is the existence of disorders that present with neurological symptoms but do not have identifiable neurological bases. Conversion disorder is the most common of these disorders. In some situations, members of a cohesive social group will develop the same or similar symptoms. This review discusses conversion disorder in children, with an emphasis on function movement disorders. It also reviews a recent occurrence of mass psychogenic illness in New York State with discussion of the key features of mass psychogenic illness. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Functional MR imaging of psychogenic amnesia: a case report

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    Yang, Jong Chul; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Lee, Moo Suk; Kang, Heoung Keun; Eun, Sung Jong; Lee, Yo Han [Chonnam National Univeristy Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Ku [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    We present here a case in which functional MR imaging (fMRI) was done for a patient who developed retrograde psychogenic amnesia for a four year period of her life history after a severe stressful event. We performed the fMRI study for a face recognition task using stimulation with three kinds of face photographs: recognizable familiar faces, unrecognizable friends' faces due to the psychogenic amnesia, and unfamiliar control faces. Different activation patterns between the recognizable faces and unrecognizable faces were found in the limbic area, and especially in the amygdala and hippocampus.

  6. Functional MR imaging of psychogenic amnesia: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jong Chul; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Lee, Moo Suk; Kang, Heoung Keun; Eun, Sung Jong; Lee, Yo Han; Kim, Yong Ku

    2005-01-01

    We present here a case in which functional MR imaging (fMRI) was done for a patient who developed retrograde psychogenic amnesia for a four year period of her life history after a severe stressful event. We performed the fMRI study for a face recognition task using stimulation with three kinds of face photographs: recognizable familiar faces, unrecognizable friends' faces due to the psychogenic amnesia, and unfamiliar control faces. Different activation patterns between the recognizable faces and unrecognizable faces were found in the limbic area, and especially in the amygdala and hippocampus

  7. Video electroencephalography monitoring differentiates between epileptic and non-epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Mette Borch; Erdal, Jesper; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is often misdiagnosed and approximately one in every four patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy does not have epilepsy, but instead non-epileptic seizures. Video electroencephalography monitoring (VEM) is the gold standard for differentiation between epileptic and non...

  8. Comprehensive Management of Psychogenic Dysphonia: A Case Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Paulomi M.; Chandra, Prabha S.; Shivashankar, N.; Yamini, B. K.

    2009-01-01

    Psychogenic dysphonia refers to the loss of voice, in the absence of apparent structural or neurological pathology. It is a disorder seen more often in women and is usually associated with significant life events and emotional difficulties that may lead to conflict over speaking. Therapeutic interventions in voice disorders recommend the adoption…

  9. Semiologic classification of psychogenic non epileptic seizures (PNES) based on video EEG analysis: do we need new classification systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadwekar, Vaibhav; Nair, Pradeep Pankajakshan; Murgai, Aditya; Thirunavukkarasu, Sibi; Thazhath, Harichandrakumar Kottyen

    2014-03-01

    Different studies have described useful signs to diagnose psychogenic non-epileptic seizure (PNES). A few authors have tried to describe the semiologic groups among PNES patients; each group consisting of combination of features. But there is no uniformity of nomenclature among these studies. Our aim was to find out whether the objective classification system proposed by Hubsch et al. was useful and adequate to classify PNES patient population from South India. We retrospectively analyzed medical records and video EEG monitoring data of patients, recorded during 3 year period from June 2010 to July 2013. We observed the semiologic features of each PNES episode and tried to group them strictly adhering to Hubsch et al. classification. Minor modifications were made to include patients who were left unclassified. A total of 65 patients were diagnosed to have PNES during this period, out of which 11 patients were excluded due to inadequate data. We could classify 42(77.77%) patients without modifying the defining criteria of the Hubsch et al. groups. With minor modification we could classify 94.96% patients. The modified groups with patient distribution are as follows: Class 1--dystonic attacks with primitive gestural activities [3(5.6%)]. Class 2 – paucikinetic attacks with or without preserved responsiveness [5(9.3%)]. Class 3--pseudosyncope with or without hyperventilation [21(38.9%)]. Class 4--hyperkinetic prolonged attacks with hyperventilation, involvement of limbs and/or trunk [14(25.9%)]. Class 5--axial dystonic attacks [8(14.8%)]. Class 6--unclassified type [3(5.6%)]. This study demonstrates that the Hubsch's classification with minor modifications is useful and adequate to classify PNES patients from South India. Copyright © 2013 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Knowledge about psychogenic dysphonias among speech and language therapists and other health care workers

    OpenAIRE

    Krizmancic, Nikol

    2017-01-01

    Psychogenic dysphonias are voice disorders stemming from psychological imbalances of the individual. They are classified as functional voice disorders because they occur despite normal organic state of the vocal apparatus i.e. absence of structural damage and/or neurological disorders. The data about the frequency of psychogenic voice disorders in Slovenia are not known. Due to their complex profile and not systematical therapeutic procedures, psychogenic dysphonias are little and poorly res...

  11. Misclassification of Patients with Spinocerebellar Ataxia as having Psychogenic Postural Instability based on Computerized Dynamic Posturography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J Herdman

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Specific criteria have been developed based on computerized dynamic posturography (CDP to assist clinicians in identifying patients with psychogenic balance problems1-4. Patients with known Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA meet several of the criteria for psychogenic balance problem and risk being misclassified as having imbalance of psychogenic origin. However, our research shows that patients with SCA may be distinguished from patients with psychogenic balance problems in several ways. We compared test performance on CDP and the observation of specific behaviors that are associated with psychogenic balance problems in patients with SCA (n = 43 and patients with known psychogenic balance problems (n = 40. Chi square analysis was used to determine if there were significant differences between the groups for the frequency of each criterion for psychogenic CDP and Observed Behaviors. Level of significance was Bonferroni corrected for multiple comparisons. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratios were calculated for each criterion. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to examine whether the two patient groups demonstrated similar groupings of criteria. Comparison of the results of these analyses identified two criteria that were significantly more frequent in the Psychogenic group than in the SCA group: Regular Periodicity of sway and Circular Sway. Sensitivity, specificity and positive likelihood ratios identified two additional criteria, Inconsistent Motor Responses and Large lateral Sway that also seem to suggest a psychogenic component to a person’s imbalance. Prospective studies are needed to validate the usefulness of these findings.

  12. Inferences from a community study about non-epileptic events Inferências de estudo populacional sobre eventos não epilépticos

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    Marleide da Mota Gomes

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the epidemiological importance of the different types of non-epileptic events (NEE in a low-income urban community. METHOD: The patients suspected of having epilepsy, who were detected in the first phase (screening one of this prevalence study, were interviewed by a neurologist in a non-structured neurological interview. These NEE were classified as physiological and psychogenic, subdivided by various types. The psychogenic NEE were classified according to the DSM-IV criteria. RESULTS: We compared the cases suspected of having epilepsy (n=176 with those not suspected (n=806 and discovered that those cases suspected of having epilepsy had a greater median age (OBJETIVO: Demonstrar a importância epidemiológica dos diferentes tipos de eventos não epilépticos (ENE em uma comunidade urbana de baixa renda. METODO: Os casos suspeitos de terem epilepsia foram detectados na primeira fase de um estudo de prevalência de epilepsia, de triagem. Na segunda fase, eles foram entrevistados por um neurologista em entrevista não estruturada. Os casos de ENE foram classificados como fisiológicos ou psicogênicos e divididos em vários tipos. Esses últimos foram classificados segundo o DSM-IV. RESULTADOS: Entre os suspeitos de terem epilepsia (176, mais idosos do que os outros casos, <0.01, com predominância feminina, p<0.01 existem diferentes diagnósticos: eventos epilépticos sem causa aguda subjacente conhecida (20 ou com (convulsão febril e eclâmpsia. O diagnóstico mais prevalente é o de síncope (n=63; 35,8%, crises epilépticas, fenômeno tóxico paroxístico (incluso alcoolismo e trauma craniano, nos eventos fisiológicos, e transtornos dissociativos, ansiedade, entre os psicogênicos. O predomínio masculino está relacionado aos fenômenos tóxicos (p=0,02, e o feminino, aos fenômenos dissociativos (p=0,01. CONCLUSÃO: Dentre os ENE, sugere-se a importância populacional (epidemiológica da síncope, como j

  13. A psychogenic dystonia perfect responsive to antidepressant treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Volkan Solmaz; Durdane Aksoy; Betul Cevik; Semiha Gulsum Kurt; Elmas Pekdas; Sema inanir

    2014-01-01

    After ruling out of organic causes, movement disorders are named as psychogenic movement disorders, it can mimic perfectly Organic movement disorders, but with a good history, clinical observations and detailed examination is very helpful in the diagnosis of this disease. In here we will present a 15 years old male patient, he was complaining of urinary incontinence at night, emerging dystonic posture especially in crowded environments, eating, and during activities that require attention, fo...

  14. Psychogenic eating disorders in infants and ways of their correction

    OpenAIRE

    O. N. Komarova; A. I. Khavkin

    2015-01-01

    Eating disorder is observed in infants at different developmental stages. This condition may be caused by comorbidities, organic diseases, or psychogenic causes. After birth, a child’s eating behavior evolves, which largely depends on the relations arising between him, his mother, and other family members. Eating disorders may be caused by an impaired child-mother relationship: inadequate maternal behavior, excessive or poor parenteral attention. The treatment of eating disorders involves a c...

  15. A psychogenic dystonia perfect responsive to antidepressant treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Solmaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available After ruling out of organic causes, movement disorders are named as psychogenic movement disorders, it can mimic perfectly Organic movement disorders, but with a good history, clinical observations and detailed examination is very helpful in the diagnosis of this disease. In here we will present a 15 years old male patient, he was complaining of urinary incontinence at night, emerging dystonic posture especially in crowded environments, eating, and during activities that require attention, for 5 years. Self and family history was unremarkable. His physical and neurological examination was normal except for dystonic posture esipecially writing and when doing skilled jobs. All the tests were normal for the differential diagnosis. Taking into account the patient\\s clinical findings and cilinical test, the patient was diagnosed as psychogenic dystonia. He gave a very good response to treatment with antidepressants and psychotherapy. As a result, in clinical practice both the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges the psychogenic movement disorders is an important problem, and to get rid of the negative effects of unnecessary diagnostic test and side efects of treatment, you need to keep in mind this diagnosis. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(1.000: 29-31

  16. Mental Development of Children with Non-epileptic Paroxysmal States in Medical History

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    Turovskaya N.G.,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The author studied mental functions disorders in children with a history of paroxysmal states of various etiologies and compared mental development disorder patterns in patients with epileptic and non-epileptic paroxysms. Study sample were 107 children, aged 6 to 10 years. The study used experimental psychological and neuropsychological techniques. According to the empirical study results, non-epileptic paroxysms unlike epileptic much less combined with a number of mental functions disorders and intelligence in general. However, non-epileptic paroxysmal states as well as epileptic seizure associated with increasing activity exhaustion and abnormal function of the motor analyzer (dynamic and kinesthetic dyspraxia. Visual memory disorders and modal-nonspecific memory disorders have more pronounced importance in the mental ontogenesis structure in children with convulsive paroxysms compared to children with cerebral pathology without paroxysms history

  17. The Dancing Manias: Psychogenic Illness as a Social Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2018-01-01

    The dancing mania erupted in the 14th century in the wake of the Black Death, and recurred for centuries in central Europe - particularly Germany, the Netherlands, and Belgium - finally abating in the early 17th century. The term "dancing mania" was derived from "choreomania," a concatenation of choros (dance) and mania (madness). A variant, tarantism, was prevalent in southern Italy from the 15th to the 17th centuries, and was attributed at the time to bites from the tarantula spider. Affected individuals participated in continuous, prolonged, erratic, often frenzied and sometimes erotic, dancing. In the 14th century, the dancing mania was linked to a corruption of the festival of St. John's Day by ancient pagan customs, but by the 16th century it was commonly considered an ordeal sent by a saint, or a punishment from God for people's sins. Consequently, during outbreaks in the 14th and 15th centuries, the dancing mania was considered an issue for magistrates and priests, not physicians, even though the disorder proved intractable to decrees and exorcisms. However, in the 16th century Paracelsus discounted the idea that the saints caused or interceded in the cure of the dancing mania; he instead suggested a psychogenic or malingered etiology, and this reformulation brought the dancing mania within the purview of physicians. Paracelsus advocated various mystical, psychological, and pharmacological approaches, depending on the presumptive etiologic factors with individual patients. Only music provided any relief for tarantism. Later authors suggested that the dancing mania was a mass stress-induced psychosis, a mass psychogenic illness, a culturally determined form of ritualized behavior, a manifestation of religious ecstasy, or even the result of food poisoning caused by the toxic and psychoactive chemical products of ergot fungi. In reality, dancing manias did not have a single cause, but component causes likely included psychogenic illness, malingering, and

  18. Psychogenic stuttering and other acquired nonorganic speech and language abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Laurence M; Spector, Jack; Youngjohn, James R

    2012-08-01

    Three cases are presented of peculiar speech and language abnormalities that were evaluated in the context of personal injury lawsuit or workers compensation claims of brain dysfunction after mild traumatic brain injuries. Neuropsychological measures of effort and motivation showed evidence of suboptimal motivation or outright malingering. The speech and language abnormalities of these cases probably were not consistent with neurogenic features of dysfluent speech including stuttering or aphasia. We propose that severe dysfluency or language abnormalities persisting after a single, uncomplicated, mild traumatic brain injury are unusual and should elicit suspicion of a psychogenic origin.

  19. A Case of Psychogenic Dizziness Mimicking Vestibular Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Jae; Jeong, Seong-Hae; Baek, In Chul; Lee, Ae Young; Kim, Jae-Moon

    2012-01-01

    A 28-year-old patient presented with frequent episodes of clockwise whirling vertigo, with no ear symptoms or anxiety. He had a previous history of encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis from Moyamoya disease 3 years ago. We assumed that the ictus was a manifestation of vestibular epilepsy. Although the patient was monitored continuously with video and computerized electroencephalography equipment for 24 hours, his vertigo was not accompanied by electroencephalographic discharges. And thorough vestibular evaluation was normal. His symptom was alleviated by psychological support. Psychogenic dizziness may also manifest as recurrent whirling vertigo with unilateral directionality. PMID:24649463

  20. Psychogenic eating disorders in infants and ways of their correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Komarova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eating disorder is observed in infants at different developmental stages. This condition may be caused by comorbidities, organic diseases, or psychogenic causes. After birth, a child’s eating behavior evolves, which largely depends on the relations arising between him, his mother, and other family members. Eating disorders may be caused by an impaired child-mother relationship: inadequate maternal behavior, excessive or poor parenteral attention. The treatment of eating disorders involves a comprehensive approach, including behavioral and dietary correction that is considered in this paper. 

  1. Objectification of psychogenic postural instability by trunk sway analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsegger, Thomas; Pischinger, Barbara; Topakian, Raffi

    2013-11-15

    The attribution of balance or gait disorders to psychogenic origin can be exceedingly challenging, as clinical tests involving distraction maneuvers are prone to subjective bias. We tested the value of biomechanical balance analysis to identify psychogenic balance and gait (PBG) disorders. We quantified and compared the effects of distraction maneuvers on balance based on four stance conditions (eyes open, EO; eyes closed, EC; EO on foam, EOF; and EC on foam; ECF) in subjects with suspected PBG (n = 12), subjects with balance and gait disorder due to multiple sclerosis (MS; n = 12) and healthy controls (n = 12). We measured trunk inclination in transverse plane (°)(2) and the corresponding body angular velocity (°/s). Distractibility of postural stability was analysed using ANOVA with repeated measures. In evident contrast to the MS group and healthy controls, the PBG group showed increased values of (°)(2) and (°/s) and significant distractibility in all four stance conditions. Biomechanical balance analysis can help clinicians to get objective, quantified results of distraction maneuvers and confirm a positive diagnosis of PBG disorders. Large prospective studies are needed to confirm these results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mass Psychogenic Illness: Demography and Symptom Profile of an Episode

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    Binoy Krishna Tarafder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mass psychogenic illness has been a recurrent phenomenon in Bangladesh over recent times. Objectives. This study was aimed at investigating the demographic characteristics and symptom profile of an outbreak of mass psychogenic illness occurring in a girls’ high school. Methods and Materials. In 14 April 2013, a total of 93 students of a girls’ high school suddenly developed various symptoms following intake of tiffin cake which resulted in panic and hospital admission. A descriptive, cross-sectional observational survey was done to define various characteristics of the outbreak. Results. No organic explanation for the reported illnesses was found. 93 female students were included who were hospitalized during the incident. Trigger factor was found in 98% of students. Most of the students were 13 years old. Average interval between exposure to the trigger and onset of symptoms was 151.5 minutes. Commonest symptoms were abdominal pain (83%, headache (73%, chest pain (69%, body ache (63%, nausea (69%, and generalized weakness and fatigue (61%. Hospital stay following the incident was about 12 hours on average. Conclusion. To avoid unnecessary panic in the community a prompt, coordinated response is important in resolving widespread community anxiety surrounding these episodes.

  3. Mass Psychogenic Illness: Demography and Symptom Profile of an Episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Binoy Krishna; Khan, Mohammad Ashik Imran; Islam, Md. Tanvir; Mahmud, Sheikh Abdullah Al; Sarker, Md. Humayun Kabir; Faruq, Imtiaz; Miah, Md. Titu; Arafat, S. M. Yasir

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mass psychogenic illness has been a recurrent phenomenon in Bangladesh over recent times. Objectives. This study was aimed at investigating the demographic characteristics and symptom profile of an outbreak of mass psychogenic illness occurring in a girls' high school. Methods and Materials. In 14 April 2013, a total of 93 students of a girls' high school suddenly developed various symptoms following intake of tiffin cake which resulted in panic and hospital admission. A descriptive, cross-sectional observational survey was done to define various characteristics of the outbreak. Results. No organic explanation for the reported illnesses was found. 93 female students were included who were hospitalized during the incident. Trigger factor was found in 98% of students. Most of the students were 13 years old. Average interval between exposure to the trigger and onset of symptoms was 151.5 minutes. Commonest symptoms were abdominal pain (83%), headache (73%), chest pain (69%), body ache (63%), nausea (69%), and generalized weakness and fatigue (61%). Hospital stay following the incident was about 12 hours on average. Conclusion. To avoid unnecessary panic in the community a prompt, coordinated response is important in resolving widespread community anxiety surrounding these episodes. PMID:27294104

  4. [Dynamic psychopathology for a unified approach to psychogenic eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, M; Giordani, L; Rizzardi, F; Amore, M

    1991-01-01

    The paper focuses on psychopathological problems relating to psychogenic dietary disorders. Using a psychodynamic approach, the Authors hypothesise the existence of a structural "continuum" which links these diseases to the contexts of either exaggerated food consumption or reduced or insufficient food intake. The discussion in centered on the dynamic-genetic aspect, also taking into account intermediate psychopathological morphologies, which underlies this branch of clinical psychiatry. The failure to overcome "infantile dependence" is identified as the most important genetic factor. The type and efficacy of strategy used to neutralise the persistent anxiety caused by this unresolved "separation/identification" of the Ego shape the individual symptomatology of each dietary disorder described in the study.

  5. Advantageous Use of Hypnosis in a Case of Psychogenic Vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrashekhar, Roopa

    2016-04-01

    This case study describes in detail the role of hypnosis in treatment of a case of psychogenic vomiting. The patient, a 60-yearold woman, had been suffering for 9 months from episodes of vomiting which resulted in weight loss, dehydration, and hypokalemia. She was a conscientious woman with high standards of behavior, which did not allow an expression of the extreme hostility she felt toward her daughter-in-law. Hypnotherapeutic sessions reduced her anxiety, restored her sleep, improved mood, and helped deepen rapport, all of which created the ideal setting for Gestalt's empty chair technique. Integrating hypnosis greatly enhanced the quality of the empty chair dialogue, which by bringing about a shift in the patient's emotions from hostility to sympathy, facilitated recovery.

  6. The semiology of tilt-induced psychogenic pseudosyncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannemaat, Martijn R; van Niekerk, Julius; Reijntjes, Robert H; Thijs, Roland D; Sutton, Richard; van Dijk, J Gert

    2013-08-20

    To provide a detailed semiology to aid the clinical recognition of psychogenic pseudosyncope (PPS), which concerns episodes of apparent transient loss of consciousness (TLOC) that mimic syncope. We analyzed all consecutive tilt-table tests from 2006 to 2012 showing proven PPS, i.e., apparent TLOC had occurred without EEG changes or a decrease in heart rate (HR) or blood pressure (BP). We analyzed baseline characteristics, video data, EEG, ECG, and continuous BP measurements on a 1-second time scale. Data were compared with those of 69 cases of tilt-induced vasovagal syncope (VVS). Of 800 tilt-table tests, 43 (5.4%) resulted in PPS. The majority (74%) were women. The median duration of apparent TLOC was longer in PPS (44 seconds) than in VVS (20 seconds, p semiology of PPS as a clinical entity is vital to ensure accurate diagnosis.

  7. [Intensive psychiatric care of patients with psychogenic eating disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faltus, F; Janecková, E; Papezová, H

    1992-06-01

    The authors summarize their therapeutic results in anorexia nervosa achieved at the unit of specialized care for eating disorders at the Psychiatric Clinic of the First Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague. They find that applications for hospitalization of these patients have a rising trend and that in recent years in the unit mainly patients with severe forms of these diseases are admitted. During the past 7 years in the unit a total of 147 patients were hospitalized. By comprehensive regime treatment 84% of the patients with bulimia nervosa. As to basic symptoms, in bulimia nervosa the results were achieved in vomiting and bulimic attacks and in anorexia nervosa as regards appetite, hunger and general attitude to food. Finally the authors summarize the advantages of the unit specialized care for psychogenic eating disorders.

  8. Psychogenic dysphonia: diversity of clinical and vocal manifestations in a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Helena Garcia Martins

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychogenic dysphonia is a functional disorder with variable clinical manifestations. Objective: To assess the clinical and vocal characteristics of patients with psychogenic dysphonia in a case series. Methods: The study included 28 adult patients with psychogenic dysphonia, evaluated at a University hospital in the last ten years. Assessed variables included gender, age, occupation, vocal symptoms, vocal characteristics, and videolaryngostroboscopic findings. Results: 28 patients (26 women and 2 men were assessed. Their occupations included: housekeeper (n = 17, teacher (n = 4, salesclerk (n = 4, nurse (n = 1, retired (n = 1, and psychologist (n = 1. Sudden symptom onset was reported by 16 patients and progressive symptom onset was reported by 12; intermittent evolution was reported by 15; symptom duration longer than three months was reported by 21 patients. Videolaryngostroboscopy showed only functional disorders; no patient had structural lesions or changes in vocal fold mobility. Conversion aphonia, skeletal muscle tension, and intermittent voicing were the most frequent vocal emission manifestation forms. Conclusions: In this case series of patients with psychogenic dysphonia, the most frequent form of clinical presentation was conversion aphonia, followed by musculoskeletal tension and intermittent voicing. The clinical and vocal aspects of 28 patients with psychogenic dysphonia, as well as the particularities of each case, are discussed.

  9. Psychogenic dysphonia: diversity of clinical and vocal manifestations in a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Regina Helena Garcia; Tavares, Elaine Lara Mendes; Ranalli, Paula Ferreira; Branco, Anete; Pessin, Adriana Bueno Benito

    2014-01-01

    Psychogenic dysphonia is a functional disorder with variable clinical manifestations. To assess the clinical and vocal characteristics of patients with psychogenic dysphonia in a case series. The study included 28 adult patients with psychogenic dysphonia, evaluated at a University hospital in the last ten years. Assessed variables included gender, age, occupation, vocal symptoms, vocal characteristics, and videolaryngostroboscopic findings. 28 patients (26 women and 2 men) were assessed. Their occupations included: housekeeper (n=17), teacher (n=4), salesclerk (n=4), nurse (n=1), retired (n=1), and psychologist (n=1). Sudden symptom onset was reported by 16 patients and progressive symptom onset was reported by 12; intermittent evolution was reported by 15; symptom duration longer than three months was reported by 21 patients. Videolaryngostroboscopy showed only functional disorders; no patient had structural lesions or changes in vocal fold mobility. Conversion aphonia, skeletal muscle tension, and intermittent voicing were the most frequent vocal emission manifestation forms. In this case series of patients with psychogenic dysphonia, the most frequent form of clinical presentation was conversion aphonia, followed by musculoskeletal tension and intermittent voicing. The clinical and vocal aspects of 28 patients with psychogenic dysphonia, as well as the particularities of each case, are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuropsychological profile of psychogenic jerky movement disorders : Importance of evaluating non-credible cognitive performance and psychopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heintz, Carolien E. J.; van Tricht, Mirjam J.; van der Salm, Sandra M. A.; van Rootselaar, A. F.; Cath, Danielle; Schmand, Ben; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychogenic movement disorders are disorders of movements that cannot be explained by a known neurological disorder and are assumed to be associated with psychiatric symptoms such as depression and anxiety. Objective To examine the neuropsychological profile of patients with psychogenic

  11. Neuropsychological profile of psychogenic jerky movement disorders: importance of evaluating non-credible cognitive performance and psychopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heintz, Carolien E. J.; van Tricht, Mirjam J.; van der Salm, Sandra M. A.; van Rootselaar, A. F.; Cath, Danielle; Schmand, Ben; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychogenic movement disorders are disorders of movements that cannot be explained by a known neurological disorder and are assumed to be associated with psychiatric symptoms such as depression and anxiety. Objective To examine the neuropsychological profile of patients with psychogenic

  12. Neuropsychological profile of psychogenic jerky movement disorders: Importance of evaluating non-credible cognitive performance and psychopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heintz, C.E.J.; van Tricht, M.J.; van der Salm, S.M.A.; van Rootselaar, A.F.; Cath, D.; Schmand, B.; Tijssen, M.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Psychogenic movement disorders are disorders of movements that cannot be explained by a known neurological disorder and are assumed to be associated with psychiatric symptoms such as depression and anxiety. Objective: To examine the neuropsychological profile of patients with psychogenic

  13. A challenging empirical question: What are the effects of media on psychogenic illness during a community crisis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Elizabeth; Kaplan-Liss, Evonne; Dorf, Dennis; Broderick, Joan E

    2012-01-01

    Psychogenic illness during disasters can cripple emergency healthcare services. Almost all research into this phenomenon has been retrospective and observational, and much of it suggests that media coverage can amplify psychogenic outbreaks. But there is little empirical evidence that this is true or that, conversely, media reports can mitigate psychogenic symptoms. In their work experimentally inducing psychogenic illness, the authors became sharply aware that it is difficult to experimentally mimic real-time media coverage. Yet clarifying media's effects on psychogenic illness is important if we want to prevent psychological disturbance. To meet this challenge, the authors advocate the funding and development of research protocols in advance of public emergencies, ready to be implemented in real-time. Coupled with digital media, which can track the reading and viewing behavior of millions of people, this approach can help us better understand media's impact on public health during an emergency, for better or for worse.

  14. Modification of Anxious Behavior after Psychogenic Trauma and Treatment with Galanin Receptor Antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyudyno, V I; Tsikunov, S G; Abdurasulova, I N; Kusov, A G; Klimenko, V M

    2015-07-01

    Effects of blockage of central galanin receptors on anxiety manifestations were studied in rats with psychogenic trauma. Psychogenic trauma was modeled by exposure of a group of rats to the situation when the partner was killed by a predator. Antagonist of galanin receptors was intranasally administered before stress exposure. Animal behavior was evaluated using the elevated-plus maze test, free exploratory paradigm, and open-field test. Psychogenic trauma was followed by an increase in anxiety level and appearance of agitated behavior. Blockage of galanin receptors aggravated behavioral impairment, which manifested in the pathological anxious reactions - manifestations of hypervigilance and hyperawareness. The results suggest that endogenous pool of galanin is involved into prevention of excessive CNS response to stressful stimuli typical of posttraumatic stress disorder.

  15. Clinico-psychological analysis of systematic (vestibular and nonsystematic (psychogenic vertigo, therapy optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Mikhailovna Illarionova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the clinical and psychoemotional characteristics in patients with systematic and nonsystematic vertigo and to optimize therapy. Patients and methods. The clinical features were analyzed in 25 patients with systematic vertigo and 25 patients with psychogenic vertigo. Their psychoemotional sphere was studied using the Beck depression inventory, the Spielberger-hanin personality- and situation-related anxiety inventory, and the vestibular inventory. Results. There were statistically significant clinical differences and a higher degree of anxiety-depressive disorders in the patients with psychogenic vertigo. Drug therapy in combination with stabilometric platform exercises based on the biological feedback principle was stated to be effective in patients with different types of vertigo, in those with psychogenic dizziness in particular.

  16. Psychogenic Movement Disorders and Motor Conversion: A roadmap for collaboration between Neurology and Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranick, Sarah M.; Gorrindo, Tristan; Hallett, Mark

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are a host of vague terms to describe psychologically-mediated symptoms that mimic neurological disease, such as “functional,” “non-organic,” “psychogenic,” or “medically unexplained.” None of these terms have a direct translation in psychiatric classification, and psychiatrists are often faced with patients who do not believe in a psychological origin for their symptoms. OBJECTIVE Within the framework of psychogenic movement disorders, we discuss the roadblocks to effective collaboration and treatment in these patients and the current state of the literature regarding diagnosis and treatment. RESULTS We describe the approach to these patients from the perspective of neurology and psychiatry, illustrating the differences in terminology and categorization. CONCLUSION Psychogenic movement disorders represent a unique opportunity for these fields to collaborate in the care of a potentially curable but significantly disabling disorder. PMID:21397102

  17. Psychogenic pseudo-syncope: Not always a diagnosis of exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kathleen E; Baneck, Trisha; Page, Richard L; Brignole, Michele; Hamdan, Mohamed H

    2018-02-24

    Psychogenic pseudo-syncope (PPS) frequently mimics syncope. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and clinical features of PPS and its relationship to vasovagal syncope (VVS). We examined retrospectively the medical records of 1401 consecutive patients referred to a syncope unit. We identified patients who had the final diagnosis of PPS. In these patients, we retrieved the initial diagnosis made during their first visit and the subsequent tests performed leading to the final diagnosis. Fourteen (1.0%) patients (mean age 35±14; 11 females) were diagnosed as having PPS: 7 had a diagnosis of PPS alone and 7 had both VVS and PPS. High frequency of attacks (53±35 attacks during the previous year), prolonged loss of consciousness (LOC)(minutes to > 1 hour), and a history of psychiatric disorders characterized PPS patients. Tilt test reproduced a PPS attack in the presence of normal blood pressure and heart rate in 7 patients (50%), and induced VVS in another 3 patients who had the final diagnosis of both PPS and VVS. In 2 patients, one or more events occurred during the clinic visits and were directly witnessed by the clinic personnel. We have shown that 1% of referrals to a syncope unit have the final diagnosis of PPS and that 50% of cases presented with a different initial diagnosis, namely VVS. Our findings suggest that causality between syncope and psychiatric disorders is likely bi-directional. The presence of a multidisciplinary team is important to address this often unrecognized relationship. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonepileptic seizures under levetiracetam therapy: a case report of forced normalization process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anzellotti F

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Francesca Anzellotti, Raffaella Franciotti, Holta Zhuzhuni, Aurelio D'Amico, Astrid Thomas, Marco Onofrj Department of Neuroscience and Imaging, Aging Research Centre, Gabriele d'Annunzio University Foundation, Gabriele d'Annunzio University, Chieti, Italy Abstract: Nonepileptic seizures (NES apparently look like epileptic seizures, but are not associated with ictal electrical discharges in the brain. NES constitute one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. They have been recognized as a distinctive clinical phenomenon for centuries, and video/electroencephalogram monitoring has allowed clinicians to make near-certain diagnoses. NES are supposedly unrelated to organic brain lesions, and despite the preponderance of a psychiatric/psychological context, they may have an iatrogenic origin. We report a patient with NES precipitated by levetiracetam therapy; in this case, NES was observed during the disappearance of epileptiform discharges from the routine video/electroencephalogram. We discuss the possible mechanisms underlying NES with regard to alternative psychoses associated with the phenomenon of the forced normalization process. Keywords: nonepileptic seizures, forced normalization, levetiracetam, behavioral side effects

  19. Acupuncture therapy: mechanism of action, efficacy, and safety: a potential intervention for psychogenic disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Scientific bases for the mechanism of action of acupuncture in the treatment of pain and the pathogenic mechanism of acupuncture points are briefly summarized. The efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy is discussed based on the results of German clinical trials. A conclusion on the role for acupuncture in the treatment of psychogenic disorders could not be reached. PMID:24444292

  20. Psychogenic fever in a patient with small cell lung cancer: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Mengdan; Zhang, Xiaoye; Xu, Zhaoguo; Cui, Guoyuan; Yu, Li; Qi, Xiaoying; Lin, Jia; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Fever is common in malignant tumors. We report an exceptional case of psychogenic fever in a patient with small cell lung cancer. This is the first case report of psychogenic fever in a patient with small cell lung cancer. A 61-year-old Chinese man diagnosed with small cell carcinoma on June 30, 2012, came to our department with a complaint of fever lasting more than 1 month. He had undergone chemoradiotherapy for lung cancer 6 months previously. After admission, his body temperature fluctuated in the range of 37 °C to 39 °C. Somatic symptoms associated with anxiety were obvious. A 24-item Hamilton Anxiety Scale was used to assess the patient’s condition. A score of 32 confirmed a diagnosis of severe anxiety. After a week of antianxiety treatment, the patient’s temperature returned to normal. Psychogenic fever is common in cancer patients and deserves more attention. Patients with psychogenic fever must be distinguished from patients with infectious fever (including neutropenic fever), and tumor fever. Additionally, antianxiety or antidepression treatment should be provided. A concern is that continual anxiety may adversely affect anticancer therapy

  1. Shell Shock: Psychogenic Gait and Other Movement Disorders - A Film Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Moscovich

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The psychological pressure on soldiers during World War I (WWI and other military conflicts has resulted in many reported cases of psychogenic gait as well as other movement disorders. In this paper, psychogenic movement disorders captured in the WWI film footage "War Neuroses" is reanalyzed. Methods: Two movement disorders specialists re-examined film images of 21 WWI patients with various and presumed psychogenic manifestations, pre- and post treatment. The film was recorded by Arthur Hurst, a general physician with an interest in neurology. Results: All 21 subjects were males, and all presented with symptoms relating to war trauma or a psychological stressor (e.g., being buried, shrapnel wounds, concussion, or trench fever. The most common presenting feature was a gait disorder, either pure or mixed with another movement disorder (15, followed by retrograde amnesia (2, abnormal postures (pure dystonia (1, facial spasm (1, head tremor (1, "hyperthyroidism-hyperadrenalism" (1. Nineteen patients received treatment, and the treatment was identified in nine cases. In most cases, treatment was short and patients improved almost immediately. Occupational therapy was the most common treatment. Other effective methods were hypnosis (1, relaxation (1, passive movements (2, and probable "persuasion and re-education" (6. Discussion: The high success rate in treating psychogenic disorders in Hurst's film would be considered impressive by modern standards, and has raised doubt in recent years as to whether parts of the film were staged and/or acted.

  2. Early Motor Unit Disease Masquerading as Psychogenic Breathy Dysphonia: A Clinical Case Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Arnold E.

    1971-01-01

    Presented is a study of a 20-year-old girl with mild, breathy dysphonia, previously diagnosed as psychogenic. In actuality, her voice change was a sign of early myasthenia gravis. It is pointed out that voice changes can be a first and only sign of early neurologic disease. (Author/KW)

  3. Psychogenic fever: how psychological stress affects body temperature in the clinical population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Takakazu

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic fever is a stress-related, psychosomatic disease especially seen in young women. Some patients develop extremely high core body temperature (Tc) (up to 41°C) when they are exposed to emotional events, whereas others show persistent low-grade high Tc (37–38°C) during situations of chronic stress. The mechanism for psychogenic fever is not yet fully understood. However, clinical case reports demonstrate that psychogenic fever is not attenuated by antipyretic drugs, but by psychotropic drugs that display anxiolytic and sedative properties, or by resolving patients' difficulties via natural means or psychotherapy. Animal studies have demonstrated that psychological stress increases Tc via mechanisms distinct from infectious fever (which requires proinflammatory mediators) and that the sympathetic nervous system, particularly β3-adrenoceptor-mediated non-shivering thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue, plays an important role in the development of psychological stress-induced hyperthermia. Acute psychological stress induces a transient, monophasic increase in Tc. In contrast, repeated stress induces anticipatory hyperthermia, reduces diurnal changes in Tc, or slightly increases Tc throughout the day. Chronically stressed animals also display an enhanced hyperthermic response to a novel stress, while past fearful experiences induce conditioned hyperthermia to the fear context. The high Tc that psychogenic fever patients develop may be a complex of these diverse kinds of hyperthermic responses. PMID:27227051

  4. Regional brain responses associated with thermogenic and psychogenic sweating events in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Michael J; Trevaks, David; Taylor, Nigel A S; McAllen, Robin M

    2015-11-01

    Sweating events occur in response to mental stress (psychogenic) or with increased body temperature (thermogenic). We previously found that both were linked to activation of common brain stem regions, suggesting that they share the same output pathways: a putative common premotor nucleus was identified in the rostral-lateral medulla (Farrell MJ, Trevaks D, Taylor NA, McAllen RM. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 304: R810-R817, 2013). We therefore looked in higher brain regions for the neural basis that differentiates the two types of sweating event. Previous work has identified hemispheric activations linked to psychogenic sweating, but no corresponding data have been reported for thermogenic sweating. Galvanic skin responses were used to measure sweating events in two groups of subjects during either psychogenic sweating (n = 11, 35.3 ± 11.8 yr) or thermogenic sweating (n = 11, 34.4 ± 10.2 yr) while regional brain activation was measured by BOLD signals in a 3-Tesla MRI scanner. Common regions activated with sweating events in both groups included the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, insula, premotor cortex, thalamus, lentiform nuclei, and cerebellum (P(corrected) thermogenic than with psychogenic sweating events. However, a discrete cluster of activation in the anterior hypothalamus/preoptic area was seen only with thermogenic sweating events. These findings suggest that the expected association between sweating events and brain regions implicated in "arousal" may apply selectively to psychogenic sweating; the neural basis for thermogenic sweating events may be subcortical. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Psychogenic Polydipsia: The Result, or Cause of, Deteriorating Psychotic Symptoms? A Case Report of the Consequences of Water Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Gill

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Water intoxication is a rare condition characterised by overconsumption of water. It can occur in athletes engaging in endurance sports, users of MDMA (ecstasy, and patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. This case outlines water intoxication in a patient with psychogenic polydipsia. When the kidney’s capacity to compensate for exaggerated water intake is exceeded, hypotonic hyperhydration results. Consequences can involve headaches, behavioural changes, muscular weakness, twitching, vomiting, confusion, irritability, drowsiness, and seizures. Cerebral oedema can lead to brain damage and eventual death. In this case, psychogenic polydipsia led to significant hyponatraemia, cerebral oedema, and tonic-clonic seizures. Differential diagnoses for hyponatraemia are outlined. The aetiology of psychogenic polydipsia is uncertain, but postulated hypotheses are explored. Psychogenic polydipsia occurs in up 20% of psychiatric patients and this case serves to remind us to be cognizant of water overconsumption.

  6. Dissociative experiences and quality of life in patients with non-epileptic attack disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, James W; Ali, Fizzah; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2012-11-01

    Dissociative experiences are commonly reported by patients with non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD). This cross-sectional study examined the prevalence and characteristics of dissociative experiences in patients with NEAD and assessed their association with health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Fifty-three patients diagnosed with NEAD were consecutively recruited (70.0% female, mean age=42 years, 22.0% with comorbid epilepsy) from a specialist neuropsychiatric clinic. Our sample reported high levels of dissociative experiences, with 36.7% of patients scoring ≥30 on the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). Significant negative correlations were found between total DES scores and HRQoL, as measured by the QOLIE-31 questionnaire (r=-0.64, pdissociative experiences in this patient population, highlighting the importance of routinely screening patients for dissociative symptoms and their impact on patients' lives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Trichotillomania and non-epileptic seizures as sleep-related dissociative phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo-Franco, Melina; Bush-Martínez, Alejandra; Nenclares-Portocarrero, Alejandro; Jiménez-Genchi, Alejandro

    2015-03-15

    The occurrence of non-epileptic seizures (NES) and trichotillomania during sleep is rare. We describe the case of an adult woman with a personal history of childhood maltreatment and psychiatric morbidity (major depression, trichotillomania, and conversion disorder), who was referred to the sleep unit because of nocturnal hair-pulling and psychomotor agitation during sleep. An all-night PSG recording with audiovisual monitoring documented seven episodes of trichotillomania and one NES, all of which arose from unequivocal wakefulness. Improvement of nocturnal behaviors was observed after long-term psychotherapy. This case illustrates that nocturnal trichotillomania and NES may be symptoms of a sleep-related dissociative disorder. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  8. Nonepileptic seizures under levetiracetam therapy: a case report of forced normalization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Franciotti, Raffaella; Zhuzhuni, Holta; D'Amico, Aurelio; Thomas, Astrid; Onofrj, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Nonepileptic seizures (NES) apparently look like epileptic seizures, but are not associated with ictal electrical discharges in the brain. NES constitute one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. They have been recognized as a distinctive clinical phenomenon for centuries, and video/electroencephalogram monitoring has allowed clinicians to make near-certain diagnoses. NES are supposedly unrelated to organic brain lesions, and despite the preponderance of a psychiatric/psychological context, they may have an iatrogenic origin. We report a patient with NES precipitated by levetiracetam therapy; in this case, NES was observed during the disappearance of epileptiform discharges from the routine video/electroencephalogram. We discuss the possible mechanisms underlying NES with regard to alternative psychoses associated with the phenomenon of the forced normalization process.

  9. Using the Minnesota Multiphasic Inventory 2, EEGs, and clinical data to predict nonepileptic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramke, Carol J; Valeri, April; Valeriano, James P; Kelly, Kevin M

    2007-11-01

    Minnesota Multiphasic Inventory 2 (MMPI-2) scale 3, duration of illness, and routine EEGs have been used to predict nonepileptic events (NEEs) with a high degree of accuracy in patients referred for video/EEG (vEEG) monitoring. This study tested the Storzbach logistic regression equation in our patients with definitive epileptic seizures (n=57) or NEEs without evidence of epileptiform activity (n=51) during vEEG monitoring, yielding an overall classification accuracy of 81%, sensitivity of 80%, and specificity of 81%. This study also replicated previous findings of significant group differences in duration (years) of spells, number of elevations on the MMPI-2, MMPI-2 elevations on scales 1, 2, 3, and 8, and incidence of the conversion valley on the MMPI-2. Our findings indicated that combined use of the MMPI-2 and clinical variables was most predictive of patients with NEEs.

  10. Metabolic Hyperactivity of the Medial Posterior Parietal Lobes in Psychogenic Tremor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hedera

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The pathophysiology of psychogenic movement disorders, including psychogenic tremor (PT, is only emerging. Case Report: This is a single case report of a patient who met diagnostic criteria for PT. He underwent positron emission tomography (PET of brain with 18F-deoxyglucose at resting state. His PET study showed symmetrically increased 18F-deoxyglucose uptake in both posterior medial parietal lobes. There was no corresponding abnormality on structural imaging. Discussion: Hypermetabolism of the medial aspects of posterior parietal lobes bilaterally may reflect abnormal activity of sensory integration that is important in the pathogenesis of PT. This further supports the idea that non-organic movement disorders may be associated with detectable functional brain abnormalities.

  11. [Writer's cramp--focal dystonia or psychogenic movement disorder? A critical literature study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, A

    1989-08-01

    For more than 100 years there has been a discussion as to whether writer's cramp is caused by a disease of the central nervous system, or if it is to be considered as a disturbance of psychogenic origin. Whereas before 1982 there seemed to be a lot of evidence for the psychogenic theory many authors now tend to stress the opinion of Sheehy and Marsden who had explained that "writer's cramp" should be seen as a "focal dystonia". This article discusses the statements of Sheehy and Marsden in comparison with other scientific findings regarding the occupational cramps--above all "writer's cramp". It is concluded that there are different therapeutic approaches derived from the respective theory and which are considered to lessen the movement disorder. Scientific literature suggests that psychotherapy or some therapeutic approaches of behaviour therapy are more effectful in mastering this "mysterious" disorder than any pharmacological substance tested upto now.

  12. The use of hypnosis in the treatment of psychogenic oral pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, H P

    1997-10-01

    Psychogenic pain has been described in many parts of the body such as limbs, digestive system, respiratory organs, and obstetrics. Computer searches have not found a single published case of psychogenic pain of dental origin. Two such cases are described within this paper, which describes pain severe enough to interfere with normal daily activity. The first describes a situation which resulted in 5 operations being performed before an adequate diagnosis was made and treatment started with hypnosis. The second was an inability to work, sleep, and lead a normal existence because of pain which had no organic origin. Hypnosis treatment allowed the patient to have a proper diagnosis before any operative treatment was given and resume normal activity.

  13. From psychogenic movement disorder to functional movement disorder: it's time to change the name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon; Lang, Anthony E

    2014-06-01

    Successive attempts at rebranding may be behind at least some of the proliferation of terms we have at our disposal when describing patients with what are now most often referred to as "psychogenic," "conversion," or "somatoform" symptoms. The most popular term in the movement disorder literature, "psychogenic," provides the aetiology of the disorder within the name, indicating that the symptoms are "born of the mind." Here we argue that it is logical to stop using a term that defines the disorder with regard to a poorly defined aetiology that is not supported by current evidence, and, instead, to use a broad term-functional-not as a "polite eponym" but as a term that is freer from such assumptions and does not reinforce dualistic thinking. The main argument for change is not political or even practical, but scientific. © 2013 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Comparative prediction of nonepileptic events using MMPI-2 clinical scales, Harris Lingoes subscales, and restructured clinical scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamout, Karim Z; Heinrichs, Robin J; Baade, Lyle E; Soetaert, Dana K; Liow, Kore K

    2017-03-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) is a psychological testing tool used to measure psychological and personality constructs. The MMPI-2 has proven helpful in identifying individuals with nonepileptic events/nonepileptic seizures. However, the MMPI-2 has had some updates that enhanced its original scales. The aim of this article was to test the utility of updated MMPI-2 scales in predicting the likelihood of non-epileptic seizures in individuals admitted to an EEG video monitoring unit. We compared sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios of traditional MMPI-2 Clinical Scales against more homogenous MMPI-2 Harris-Lingoes subscales and the newer Restructured Clinical (RC) scales. Our results showed that the Restructured Scales did not show significant improvement over the original Clinical scales. However, one Harris-Lingoes subscale (HL4 of Clinical Scale 3) did show improved predictive utility over the original Clinical scales as well as over the newer Restructured Clinical scales. Our study suggests that the predictive utility of the MMPI-2 can be improved using already existing scales. This is particularly useful for those practitioners who are not invested in switching over to the newly developed MMPI-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2 RF). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Motor excitability during movement imagination and movement observation in psychogenic lower limb paresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepert, Joachim; Hassa, Thomas; Tüscher, Oliver; Schmidt, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Patients with a psychogenic paresis have difficulties performing voluntary movements. Typically, diagnostic interventions are normal. We tested whether patients with a psychogenic lower limb paresis exhibit abnormal motor excitability during motor imagery or movement observation. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with single and paired pulses was used to explore motor excitability at rest, during imagination of ankle dorsiflexions and during watching another person perform ankle dorsiflexions. Results obtained in ten patients with a flaccid psychogenic leg paresis were compared with a healthy age-matched control group. In addition, results of two patients with a psychogenic fixed dystonia of the leg are presented. During rest, motor excitability evaluated by motor thresholds, size of motor-evoked potentials (MEP) by single pulse TMS, intracortical inhibition and intracortical facilitation tested by paired-pulse TMS were similar in patients and healthy subjects. MEPs recorded in five patients during movement observation were also comparable across the two groups. During motor imagery, patient MEPs were significantly smaller than in the control group and smaller than during rest, indicating an inhibition. In patients with motor conversion disorder, the imagination of own body movements induces a reduction of corticospinal motor excitability whereas it induces an excitability increase in healthy subjects. This discrepancy might be the electrophysiological substrate of the inability to move voluntarily. Watching another person perform movements induces a normal excitability increase, indicating a crucial role of the perspective and suggesting that focusing the patient's attention on a different person might become a therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Efficacy of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera Dunal. Linn.) in the management of psychogenic erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamidi, Prasad; Thakar, A B

    2011-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) has been defined as the persistent inability to attain and maintain an erection sufficient to permit satisfactory sexual performance. By 2025, men with ED will be approximately 322 million, an increase of nearly 170 million men from 1995. The present study was aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) in the management of psychogenic erectile dysfunction. In this study, a total of 95 patients with psychogenic erectile dysfunction satisfying the DSM IV TR diagnostic criteria were selected, out of them 86 patients completed the course of treatment. In Trial Group, Ashwagandha root powder and in Control group, Placebo (Wheat powder) were given for 60 days. Treatment selection and its allocation were done by following computerized randomization plan. Criterion of assessment was based on the scoring of International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) Scale. Paired and Unpaired t test were used for statistical analysis. In Trial group (n=41), 12.6% and in Control group (n=45), 19.11% of improvement was observed with the significance of (P0.05) found in between the two groups. Both Ashwagandha and Placebo provided no relief (<25% improvement on IIEF) in psychogenic erectile dysfunction.

  17. Psychogenic Stress in Hospitalized Dogs: Cross Species Comparisons, Implications for Health Care, and the Challenges of Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica P. Hekman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence to support the existence of health consequences of psychogenic stress has been documented across a range of domestic species. A general understanding of methods of recognition and means of mitigation of psychogenic stress in hospitalized animals is arguably an important feature of the continuing efforts of clinicians to improve the well-being and health of dogs and other veterinary patients. The intent of this review is to describe, in a variety of species: the physiology of the stress syndrome, with particular attention to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; causes and characteristics of psychogenic stress; mechanisms and sequelae of stress-induced immune dysfunction; and other adverse effects of stress on health outcomes. Following that, we describe general aspects of the measurement of stress and the role of physiological measures and behavioral signals that may predict stress in hospitalized animals, specifically focusing on dogs.

  18. Non-psychogenic polydipsia in 45-year-old man with primary hyperparathyroidism and recurrent bilateral nephrolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmat Cahyanur

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-psychogenic polydipsia with hyponatremia is a rare clinical presentation. Primary hyperparathyroidism is a disorder of calcium, phosphate, and bone metabolism caused by increased level of parathyroid hormone (PTH. It is estimated the incidence of primary hyperparathyroidism are 21.6 per 100,000 person a year. This case report describe a 45-year-old man presented with non-psychogenic polydipsia. This patient drank a lot of water out of the fear of recurrent kidney stones. He had history of recurrent nephrolithiasis with hypercalcemia. We investigate further the cause of hypercalcemia and we diagnosed primary hyperparathryoidism as the cause. (Med J Indones. 2012;21:230-4Keywords: Hyponatremia, non-psychogenic polydipsia, primary hyperparathyroidism

  19. Illness perceptions of neurologists and psychiatrists in relation to epilepsy and nonepileptic attack disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Kimberley; Reuber, Markus

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the illness perceptions of doctors can affect treatment outcomes. This is likely to be particularly relevant in chronic disorders such as epilepsy or nonepileptic attack disorder (NEAD) in which treatment success depends on adherence to tablet treatments with significant side effects or a potentially difficult process of engagement in psychological treatment. This study describes the illness perceptions of neurologists and psychiatrists to epilepsy and NEAD. 85 doctors (45 neurologists and 40 psychiatrists) completed the adapted Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised (IPQ-R) and the Symptom Attribution Question for epilepsy and NEAD. Both groups of doctors thought that patients with NEAD had greater personal control over their condition than patients with epilepsy (pIPQ-R and Symptom Attribution Question demonstrated important differences in attitudes of neurologists and psychiatrists towards epilepsy and NEAD. Different attitudes towards the two seizure disorders may cause problems with communication and treatment if patients are referred from one speciality to the other. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy of brief interdisciplinary psychotherapeutic intervention for motor conversion disorder and nonepileptic attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubschmid, M; Aybek, S; Maccaferri, G E; Chocron, O; Gholamrezaee, M M; Rossetti, A O; Vingerhoets, F; Berney, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to compare a brief interdisciplinary psychotherapeutic intervention to standard care as treatments for patients recently diagnosed with severe motor conversion disorder or nonepileptic attacks. This randomized controlled trial of 23 consecutive patients compared (a) an interdisciplinary psychotherapeutic intervention group receiving four to six sessions by a consultation liaison psychiatrist, the first and last sessions adding a neurological consultation and a joint psychiatric and neurological consultation, and (b) a standard care group. After intervention, patients were assessed at 2, 6 and 12 months with the Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ-20), Clinical Global Impression scale, Rankin scale, use of medical care, global mental health [Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, mental health component of Short Form (SF)-36] and quality of life (SF-36). We calculated linear mixed models. Our intervention brought a statistically significant improvement of physical symptoms [as measured by the SDQ-20 (P<.02) and the Clinical Global Impression scale (P=.02)] and psychological symptoms [better scores on the mental health component of the SF-36 (P<.05) and on the Beck Depression Inventory (P<.05)] and a reduction in new hospital stays after intervention (P<.05). A brief psychotherapeutic intervention taking advantage of a close collaboration with neurology consultants in the setting of consultation liaison psychiatry appears effective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Using patient history to distinguish between patients with non-epileptic and patients with epileptic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramke, Carol J; Kay, Kelly A; Valeriano, James P; Kelly, Kevin M

    2010-11-01

    Information obtained during psychological evaluations of 93 patients with epileptic events (EEs) and 63 with nonepileptic events (NEEs) was used to test the relative contributions of multiple risk factors to prediction of NEEs during video/EEG monitoring. The best group of independent predictors of NEEs comprised: (1) age at first spell, (2) symptoms of a psychiatric diagnosis other than anxiety or depression, (3) marital instability, (4) symptoms of an anxiety disorder other than panic disorder, and (5) years of education. Report of childhood abuse or neglect and taking psychotropic medication correlated with most of the other risk factors for NEEs. It may not be necessary to gather data on all of the variables shown to be associated with NEEs. Although there is a high prevalence of risk factors for psychopathology in patients with EEs, it is lower compared with that of patients with NEEs, and patients with EEs are less likely to report multiple risk factors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An augmented model of brief psychodynamic interpersonal therapy for patients with nonepileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Stephanie; Reuber, Markus

    2009-03-01

    Nonepileptic seizures (NES) are one of the most common functional (medically unexplained) symptoms seen by neurologists. Although most experts consider psychotherapy the treatment of choice, few therapeutic approaches have been described in detail. Given that NES occur in the context of many different psychopathologies, it remains uncertain whether there is 1 intervention that can benefit all comers or whether it is necessary to offer individualized psychotherapy. This article describes an approach grounded in psychodynamic interpersonal therapy but augmented with elements of cognitive-behavioral therapy, somatic trauma therapy, and the involvement of caregivers and family members. The approach was developed in the setting of a specialist psychotherapy service for patients with functional neurological disorders presenting to British hospital-based neurologists. The authors have previously shown that it is associated with significant improvements in psychological functioning, health-related functioning, and a symptom count. Three case reports illustrate how the treatment can be adapted to meet different patients' needs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Attention in Parkinson’s Disease Mimicking Suggestion in Psychogenic Movement Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Sam Baik

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The various reported psychogenic movement disorders (PMDs include tremor, dystonia, myoclonus, gait disorder, Parkinsonism, tics, and chorea. Although it is not easy to diagnose PMDs, several features such as distractibility, entrainment, suggestion and placebo trial are quite helpful to diagnose. Especially, distractibility or suggestion is a good tool to do in outpatient clinic easily. We describe a patient with parkinsonian features which were improved by internal suggestion to focusing attention. Initially, we suspected her diagnosis as PMDs; however she was confirmed with organic Parkinson’s disease later.

  4. Brain networks during free viewing of complex erotic movie: new insights on psychogenic erectile dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Cera

    Full Text Available Psychogenic erectile dysfunction (ED is defined as a male sexual dysfunction characterized by a persistent or recurrent inability to attain adequate penile erection due predominantly or exclusively to psychological or interpersonal factors. Previous fMRI studies were based on the common occurrence in the male sexual behaviour represented by the sexual arousal and penile erection related to viewing of erotic movies. However, there is no experimental evidence of altered brain networks in psychogenic ED patients (EDp. Some studies showed that fMRI activity collected during non sexual movie viewing can be analyzed in a reliable manner with independent component analysis (ICA and that the resulting brain networks are consistent with previous resting state neuroimaging studies. In the present study, we investigated the modification of the brain networks in EDp compared to healthy controls (HC, using whole-brain fMRI during free viewing of an erotic video clip. Sixteen EDp and nineteen HC were recruited after RigiScan evaluation, psychiatric, and general medical evaluations. The performed ICA showed that visual network (VN, default-mode network (DMN, fronto-parietal network (FPN and salience network (SN were spatially consistent across EDp and HC. However, between-group differences in functional connectivity were observed in the DMN and in the SN. In the DMN, EDp showed decreased connectivity values in the inferior parietal lobes, posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, whereas in the SN decreased and increased connectivity was observed in the right insula and in the anterior cingulate cortex respectively. The decreased levels of intrinsic functional connectivity principally involved the subsystem of DMN relevant for the self relevant mental simulation that concerns remembering of past experiences, thinking to the future and conceiving the viewpoint of the other's actions. Moreover, the between group differences in the SN nodes

  5. Thermogenic and psychogenic recruitment of human eccrine sweat glands: Variations between glabrous and non-glabrous skin surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Moreira, Christiano A; Taylor, Nigel A S

    2017-04-01

    Human eccrine sweat-gland recruitment and secretion rates were investigated from the glabrous (volar) and non-glabrous hand surfaces during psychogenic (mental arithmetic) and thermogenic stimuli (mild hyperthermia). It was hypothesised that these treatments would activate glands from both skin surfaces, with the non-thermal stimulus increasing secretion rates primarily by recruiting more sweat glands. Ten healthy men participated in two seated, resting trials in temperate conditions (25-26°C). Trials commenced under normothermic conditions during which the first psychogenic stress was applied. That was followed by passive heating (0.5°C mean body temperature elevation) and thermal clamping, with a second cognitive challenge then applied. Sudomotor activity was evaluated from both hands, with colourimetry used to identify activated sweat glands, skin conductance to determine the onset of precursor sweating and ventilated sweat capsules to measure rates of discharged sweating. From glandular activation and sweat rate data, sweat-gland outputs were derived. These psychogenic and thermogenic stimuli activated sweat glands from both the glabrous and non-glabrous skin surfaces, with the former dominating at the glabrous skin and the latter at the non-glabrous surface. Indeed, those stimuli individually accounted for ~90% of the site-specific maximal number of activated sweat glands observed when both stimuli were simultaneously applied. During the normothermic psychological stimulation, sweating from the glabrous surface was elevated via a 185% increase in the number of activated glands within the first 60s. The hypothetical mechanism for this response may involve the serial activation of additional eccrine sweat glands during the progressive evolution of psychogenic sweating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Neuropsychological profile of psychogenic jerky movement disorders: importance of evaluating non-credible cognitive performance and psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Carolien E J; van Tricht, Mirjam J; van der Salm, Sandra M A; van Rootselaar, A F; Cath, Danielle; Schmand, Ben; Tijssen, Marina A J

    2013-08-01

    Psychogenic movement disorders are disorders of movements that cannot be explained by a known neurological disorder and are assumed to be associated with psychiatric symptoms such as depression and anxiety. To examine the neuropsychological profile of patients with psychogenic movement disorders. We examined cognitive functioning using neuropsychological tests in 26 patients with clinically established psychogenic jerky movement disorders (PMD). We included 16 patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) who served as a patient control group, in addition to 22 healthy control subjects. Non-credible test performance was detected using a Symptom Validity Test (SVT). Psychopathology was also assessed. Apart from a worse performance on a verbal memory task, no evidence of neuropsychological impairments was found in our PMD sample. Interestingly however, patients with PMD reported more cognitive complaints in daily life and performed worse on the SVT than the two other groups. Patients with GTS did not report, or show, cognitive impairments. In patients with PMD, we found associations between verbal learning, SVT performance and severity of depression and anxiety complaints. We conclude that some patients with PMD show non-credible cognitive symptoms. In contrast, no evident cognitive impairments were present in patients with PMD or GTS. Our study underlines the importance of assessment of non-credible response in patients with PMD. Additionally, non-credible response might aid in the differentiation of PMD from other movement disorders.

  7. Distonia psicogênica: relato de dois casos Psychogenic dystonia: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTONIO PEDRO VARGAS

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Desordens de movimento raramente podem ser devidas a distúrbios psiquiátricos. A distonia psicogênica caracteriza-se pela inconsistência dos achados, presença de fatores precipitantes, manifestar-se inicialmente nos membros inferiores, associar-se a dor, a outros movimentos anormais incaracterísticos e a somatizações múltiplas. Descrevemos duas pacientes com diagnóstico de distonia psicogênica clinicamente estabelecida. Paciente 1, feminina, apresentou episódio súbito de perda de força dos quatro membros, evoluiu com distonia nos pés, laterocolo alternante, tremor generalizado, irregular, e hipertonia dos membros inferiores que desapareciam a distração; a avaliação psicológica evidenciou depressão, hipocondria, transtorno obsessivo. Paciente 2, feminina, há nove anos começou a ter tremor irregular nos membros inferiores, que desaparecia com a distração, e distonia no pé esquerdo associada a dor; progressivamente perdeu a marcha; a avaliação psicológica revelou comportamento infantilizado, com baixa tolerância a frustração, impulsividade e auto-agressão. Os exames complementares de ambas não mostraram alterações e a resposta ao tratamento farmacológico foi nula. Distonia raramente é de origem psicogênica. A inconstância e a incongruência com o quadro clássico, associadas a outras somatizações ou a distúrbios psiquiátricos, sugerem o diagnóstico.Movement disorders have rarely been the result of psychiatric disturbances. Psychogenic dystonia is caracterized by inconsistent findings, a known precipitant factor, onset in legs, pain , multiple somatizations and incongruent association with other movement disorders. We report two patients with clinically established psychogenic dystonia. Patient 1: a female that presented sudden loss of strength in her four limbs; she developed feet dystonia, alternant laterocollis, generalized and irregular tremor, and limb hypertonia that disappeared with distraction

  8. Perceptual Accent Rating and Attribution in Psychogenic FAS: Some Further Evidence Challenging Whitaker's Operational Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulen, Stefanie; Verhoeven, Jo; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Mariën, Peter; Jonkers, Roel; Mavroudakis, Nicolas; Paquier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old, non-aphasic, right-handed, and polyglot (L1: French, L2: Dutch, and L3: English) woman with a 12-year history of addiction to opiates and psychoactive substances, and clear psychiatric problems, presented with a foreign accent of sudden onset in L1. Speech evolved toward a mostly fluent output, despite a stutter-like behavior and a marked grammatical output disorder. The psychogenic etiology of the accent foreignness was construed based on the patient's complex medical history and psychodiagnostic, neuropsychological, and neurolinguistic assessments. The presence of a foreign accent was affirmed by a perceptual accent rating and attribution experiment. It is argued that this patient provides additional evidence demonstrating the outdatedness of Whitaker's (1982) definition of foreign accent syndrome, as only one of the four operational criteria was unequivocally applicable to our patient: her accent foreignness was not only recognized by her relatives and the medical staff but also by a group of native French-speaking laymen. However, our patient defied the three remaining criteria, as central nervous system damage could not conclusively be demonstrated, psychodiagnostic assessment raised the hypothesis of a conversion disorder, and the patient was a polyglot whose newly gained accent was associated with a range of foreign languages, which exceeded the ones she spoke.

  9. Psychogenic Alopecia in Rhesus Macaques Presenting as Focally Extensive Alopecia of the Distal Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Joshua A; Mansfield, Keith G; Simmons, Joe H; Bernstein, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Focally extensive alopecia affecting the distal limbs is a common clinical finding in rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) colonies and is both a regulatory and colony-health concern. We performed diagnostic examinations including physical exams, bloodwork, skin scrapes, surface cytology, and surface bacterial–fungal cultures on 17 rhesus macaques with this presentation of alopecia. Skin biopsies from alopecic skin obtained from each macaque were compared with those of normal skin from the same animal. Immunohistochemistry and metachromatic staining for inflammatory cells were performed to compare alopecic and normal skin. In addition, we compared these biopsies with those previously obtained from macaques with generalized alopecia and dermal inflammatory infiltrates consistent with cutaneous hypersensitivity disorders and with those from animals with normal haircoats. Bacterial and fungal cultures, skin scrapes, surface cytology, and bloodwork were unremarkable. Affected skin showed only mild histologic alteration, with rare evidence of trichomalacia and follicular loss. Numbers of mast cells and CD3+ lymphocytes did not differ between alopecic and normally haired skin from the same animal. The number of mast cells in alopecic skin from animals in the current cohort was significantly lower than that in skin of animals previously diagnosed with a cutaneous hypersensitivity disorder. Numbers of both mast cells and CD3+ lymphocytes in alopecic skin from the current cohort were similar to those from biopsies of animals with normal haircoats. Together, the clinical findings and pathology are consistent with a psychogenic origin for this pattern of alopecia in rhesus macaques. PMID:21819697

  10. DNA damage in a human population affected by chronic psychogenic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroglou, Eva; Zafiropoulou, Maria; Messini-Nikolaki, Niki; Doudounakis, Stavros; Tsilimigaki, Smaragdi; Piperakis, Stylianos M

    2003-01-01

    The effects of chronic psychogenic stress on the expression of DNA damage and cellular response to the damage were investigated. Using the comet assay, basal DNA damage was found to be similar in lymphocytes of both affected and non-affected populations (n = 30 in both groups). The induction of DNA damage in lymphocytes by external factors (H2O2 and gamma-irradiation), was also investigated. In these studies, cells were treated with 50, 100 and 150 microM H2O2 for 5 minutes or with 0.8, 2.5 and 4.2 Gy gamma-rays. A significant difference was found between the chronically stressed and the control populations, indicating the enhanced sensitivity of the former population. Cells were also held for 2 hours after the treatment, allowing time for the cells to deal with the induced DNA damage. Based on the level of residual DNA strand breaks, cells from the stressed population had more breaks than the controls. Gender does not alter these findings. In conclusion, our data indicate that cells from the stressed population were more sensitive to the induction of DNA damage and had higher level of residual damage. Therefore, stress conditions may cause the affected individuals to be susceptible to environmental mutagenic agents.

  11. Clinical Features of Psychogenic Voice Disorder and the Efficiency of Voice Therapy and Psychological Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezcaner, Zahide Çiler; Gökmen, Muhammed Fatih; Yıldırım, Sibel; Dursun, Gürsel

    2017-11-06

    The aim of this study was to define the clinical features of psychogenic voice disorder (PVD) and explore the treatment efficiency of voice therapy and psychological evaluation. Fifty-eight patients who received treatment following the PVD diagnosis and had no organic or other functional voice disorders were assessed retrospectively based on laryngoscopic examinations and subjective and objective assessments. Epidemiological characteristics, accompanying organic and psychological disorders, preferred methods of treatment, and previous treatment outcomes were examined for each patient. A comparison was made based on voice disorders and responses to treatment between patients who received psychotherapy and patients who did not. Participants in this study comprised 58 patients, 10 male and 48 female. Voice therapy was applied in all patients, 54 (93.1%) of whom had improvement in their voice. Although all patients were advised to undergo psychological assessment, only 60.3% (35/58) of them underwent psychological assessment. No statistically significant difference was found between patients who did receive psychological support concerning their treatment responses and patients who did not. Relapse occurred in 14.7% (5/34) of the patients who applied for psychological assessment and in 50% (10/20) of those who did not. There was a statistically significant difference in relapse rates, which was higher among patients who did not receive psychological support (P psychological assessment. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Social participation in young people with nonepileptic seizures (NES): A qualitative study of managing legitimacy in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karterud, Hilde Nordahl; Haavet, Ole Rikard; Risør, Mette Bech

    2016-04-01

    This qualitative study explored social participation in young people with nonepileptic seizures (NES), particularly how legitimacy of illness is managed in everyday life. Young people with NES, all female and aged between 14 and 24 years (N=11), were interviewed and followed up over a 14-month period. The transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Four main themes were elaborated: 1) Delegitimizing experiences from families, schoolteachers, colleagues, and employers were part of everyday life. 2) Fear of being exposed to delegitimizing events resulted in the young people trying to conceal the diagnosis; for some, this resulted in isolation from all social arenas, apart from their closest relationships. 3) Support from close relationships was protective against delegitimization and contributed towards greater social participation. 4) Perceiving NES as a legitimate disorder contributed to increased social participation. We found a relationship between legitimacy of illness experienced by the participants and the extent to which they either participated or retreated socially. Those who had an illness perception that was personally meaningful experienced their condition as being more legitimate and participated more socially. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Nasiri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful.

  14. Cognitive-analytical therapy for a patient with functional neurological symptom disorder-conversion disorder (psychogenic myopia): A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Hamid; Ebrahimi, Amrollah; Zahed, Arash; Arab, Mostafa; Samouei, Rahele

    2015-05-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorder commonly presents with symptoms and defects of sensory and motor functions. Therefore, it is often mistaken for a medical condition. It is well known that functional neurological symptom disorder more often caused by psychological factors. There are three main approaches namely analytical, cognitive and biological to manage conversion disorder. Any of such approaches can be applied through short-term treatment programs. In this case, study a 12-year-old boy with the diagnosed functional neurological symptom disorder (psychogenic myopia) was put under a cognitive-analytical treatment. The outcome of this treatment modality was proved successful.

  15. The T-type calcium channel antagonist Z944 disrupts prepulse inhibition in both epileptic and non-epileptic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Wendie N; Greba, Quentin; Cain, Stuart M; Snutch, Terrance P; Howland, John G

    2016-09-22

    The role of T-type calcium channels in brain diseases such as absence epilepsy and neuropathic pain has been studied extensively. However, less is known regarding the involvement of T-type channels in cognition and behavior. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is a measure of sensorimotor gating which is a basic process whereby the brain filters incoming stimuli to enable appropriate responding in sensory rich environments. The regulation of PPI involves a network of limbic, cortical, striatal, pallidal and pontine brain areas, many of which show high levels of T-type calcium channel expression. Therefore, we tested the effects of blocking T-type calcium channels on PPI with the potent and selective T-type antagonist Z944 (0.3, 1, 3, 10mg/kg; i.p.) in adult Wistar rats and two related strains, the Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) and Non-Epileptic Control (NEC). PPI was tested using a protocol that varied prepulse intensity (3, 6, and 12dB above background) and prepulse-pulse interval (30, 50, 80, 140ms). Z944 decreased startle in the Wistar strain at the highest dose relative to lower doses. Z944 dose-dependently disrupted PPI in the Wistar and GAERS strains with the most potent effect observed with the higher doses. These findings suggest that T-type calcium channels contribute to normal patterns of brain activity that regulate PPI. Given that PPI is disrupted in psychiatric disorders, future experiments that test the specific brain regions involved in the regulation of PPI by T-type calcium channels may help inform therapeutic development for those suffering from sensorimotor gating impairments. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of outpatient ambulatory electroencephalography in the diagnosis and management of adults with epilepsy or nonepileptic attack disorder: A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Andrew; Evans, Shaun; Manfredonia, Francesco; Cavanna, Andrea E

    2015-12-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an established diagnostic tool with important implications for the clinical management of patients with epilepsy or nonepileptic attack disorder. Different types of long-term EEG recording strategies have been developed over the last decades, including the widespread use of ambulatory electroencephalography (AEEG), which holds great potential in terms of both clinical usefulness and cost-effectiveness. In this paper, we present the results of a systematic review of the scientific literature on the use of AEEG in the diagnosis of epilepsy and nonepileptic attacks in adult patients. Taken together, our findings confirmed that AEEG is a useful diagnostic tool in patients with equivocal findings on routine EEG studies and influences management decisions in the majority of studies. There is evidence that AEEG is also more likely to capture events than sleep-deprived EEG; however, there are currently insufficient data available to compare the diagnostic utility of modern AEEG technology with inpatient video-telemetry. Further research on the combined use of AEEG and home-video recording is, therefore, warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of a naturalistic psychogenic stressor in periadolescent mice: effect on serum corticosterone levels differs by strain but not sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Laura C

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a first step in determining whether psychogenic stressors might be incorporated into periadolescent mouse models of stress, we evaluated whether a commonly used psychogenic stressor, exposure to red fox urine, alters serum corticosterone levels in periadolescent C57BL/6J and DBA/2J mice. Findings In a 1-day experiment, forty-eight 38-day-old C57BL/6J (N = 12 males; N = 12 females and DBA/2J (N = 12 males; N = 12 females mice were exposed to 10-min of red fox urine via cotton ball (N = 12 C57BL/6J mice; N = 12 DBA/2J mice or to a non-saturated cotton ball (N = 12 C57BL/6J mice; N = 12 DBA/2J mice. All mice were sacrificed 15-min after cotton ball exposure and serum was collected for corticosterone assessment. Overall, there was a main effect for strain such that C57BL/6J male and female mice displayed higher corticosterone levels than did male and female DBA/2J mice. There were no main effects for sex or odor exposure. However, there was a significant strain by odor exposure interaction, whereby, within odor-exposed mice, DBA/2J mice displayed lower corticosterone levels (ng/mL compared to C57BL/6J mice, regardless of sex. Further, among DBA/2J mice, predator odor exposure reduced corticosterone levels compared to no odor exposure. Conclusions Findings indicate that mouse strain, but not sex, may play an important role in the efficacy of a predator odor among periadolescent mice.

  18. Distúrbios paroxísticos não-epilépticos Paroxysmal non-epileptic events

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    Márcio A. Sotero de Menezes

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: este artigo tem como objetivo discutir um dos principais problemas com os quais um pediatra geral tem que lidar no campo da neurologia infantil, que são os distúrbios paroxísticos não-epilépticos. Estes episódios também são uma causa freqüente de consultas aos neuropediatras e de internação em unidades de monitorização por vídeo-eletrencefalograma. Fontes dos dados: revisão da literatura sobre o assunto na Medline. Vários compêndios de neurologia pediátrica também foram usados, por conterem informações importantes sobre o assunto. Síntese dos dados: muitas das entidades discutidas neste artigo são freqüentes na população pediátrica, como, por exemplo, a síncope, as crises de perda do choro, e os movimentos patológicos associados ao refluxo gastroesofágico. Outras entidades são mais raras, como as distonias paroxísticas e a distonia com flutuação diurna. Conclusões: o conhecimento básico das várias síndromes associadas com distúrbios paroxísticos não-epilépticos é extremamente importante para o pediatra geral, porque pode evitar exames desnecessários e o diagnóstico errôneo de epilepsia, expondo as crianças às medicações que não vão melhorar o quadro clínico, e que podem causar efeitos colaterais.Objective: this publication aims at reviewing one of the most important problems faced by the pediatrician in the field of child neurology. The paroxistic non-epileptic events are also a frequent reason for pediatric neurology consultations and admission for diagnostic video-eletroencephalogram monitoring. Methods: literature review on the subject was perform on Medline, data was also collected from the main Pediatric Neurology Textbooks, which were found to be important and unique source of information on the subject. Results: many of entities discussed in this paper are very common in the pediatric population like syncope, breath-holding spells and the movement disorders associated with

  19. PATTERNS OF SEVEN AND COMPLICATED MALARIA IN CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    nonepileptic seizures. Psychotherapy, 2009; 46:125e38. 16. Mayor R, Howlett S, Gruenewald R, Reuber M. Long-term outcome of brief augmented psychodynamic interpersonal therapy for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: Seizure control and health care utilization. Epilepsia,. 2010;51:1169–1176,.doi: 10.1111/j.1528-.

  20. Psychogenic or neurogenic origin of agrammatism and foreign accent syndrome in a bipolar patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fossard Marion

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foreign accent syndrome (FAS is a rare speech disorder characterized by the appearance of a new accent, different from the speaker's native language and perceived as foreign by the speaker and the listener. In most of the reported cases, FAS follows stroke but has also been found following traumatic brain injury, cerebral haemorrhage and multiple sclerosis. In very few cases, FAS was reported in patients presenting with psychiatric disorders but the link between this condition and FAS was confirmed in only one case. Case presentation In this report, we present the case of FG, a bipolar patient presenting with language disorders characterized by a foreign accent and agrammatism, initially categorized as being of psychogenic origin. The patient had an extensive neuropsychological and language evaluation as well as brain imaging exams. In addition to FAS and agrammatism, FG also showed a working memory deficit and executive dysfunction. Moreover, these clinical signs were related to altered cerebral activity on an FDG-PET scan that showed diffuse hypometabolism in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes bilaterally as well as a focal deficit in the area of the anterior left temporal lobe. When compared to the MRI, these deficits were related to asymmetric atrophy, which was retrospectively seen in the left temporal and frontal opercular/insular region without a focal lesion. Discussion To our knowledge, FG is the first case of FAS imaged with an 18F-FDG-PET scan. The nature and type of neuropsychological and linguistic deficits, supported by neuroimaging data, exclude a neurotoxic or neurodegenerative origin for this patient's clinical manifestations. For similar reasons, a psychogenic etiology is also highly improbable. Conclusion To account for the FAS and agrammatism in FG, various explanations have been ruled out. Because of the focal deficit seen on the brain imaging, involving the left insular and anterior temporal cortex

  1. Paroxysmal Nonepileptic Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Paroxysmal events that mimic epilepsy, and their precipitants, prodromes, and distinguishing features are reviewed by researchers at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, and American University of Beirut, New York.

  2. Perceptual Accent Rating and Attribution in Psychogenic FAS: Some Further Evidence Challenging Whitaker’s Operational Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulen, Stefanie; Verhoeven, Jo; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Mariën, Peter; Jonkers, Roel; Mavroudakis, Nicolas; Paquier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old, non-aphasic, right-handed, and polyglot (L1: French, L2: Dutch, and L3: English) woman with a 12-year history of addiction to opiates and psychoactive substances, and clear psychiatric problems, presented with a foreign accent of sudden onset in L1. Speech evolved toward a mostly fluent output, despite a stutter-like behavior and a marked grammatical output disorder. The psychogenic etiology of the accent foreignness was construed based on the patient’s complex medical history and psychodiagnostic, neuropsychological, and neurolinguistic assessments. The presence of a foreign accent was affirmed by a perceptual accent rating and attribution experiment. It is argued that this patient provides additional evidence demonstrating the outdatedness of Whitaker’s (1982) definition of foreign accent syndrome, as only one of the four operational criteria was unequivocally applicable to our patient: her accent foreignness was not only recognized by her relatives and the medical staff but also by a group of native French-speaking laymen. However, our patient defied the three remaining criteria, as central nervous system damage could not conclusively be demonstrated, psychodiagnostic assessment raised the hypothesis of a conversion disorder, and the patient was a polyglot whose newly gained accent was associated with a range of foreign languages, which exceeded the ones she spoke. PMID:26973488

  3. Mass psychogenic illness: psychological predisposition and iatrogenic pseudo-vocal cord dysfunction and pseudo-reactive airways disease syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudenmayer, Herman; Christopher, Kent L; Repsher, Lawrence; Hill, Ronald H

    2011-06-01

    A multidisciplinary team assessed five patients who alleged chronic medically unexplained multiorgan system symptoms described by idiopathic environmental intolerance allegedly triggered by exposure to solvents used in membrane roofing repair work on an office building. The event precipitated an incident of mass psychogenic illness (MPI). Treating physicians diagnosed irritant-associated vocal cord dysfunction (IVCD) and reactive airways disease syndrome (RADS) resulting from exposure. The authors conducted medical, psychological, and industrial hygiene evaluations. Air monitoring data for total volatile organic compounds obtained during the 2-day exposure period, measurements of emissions during membrane roofing repair at a similar site, mathematical modeling of air contaminant concentrations, and injection of tracer gas into the incident building revealed exposure levels well below those doses anticipated to cause clinical symptoms. There was no objective medical evidence validating symptoms. Review of the medical records indicated that the video laryngoscopy data, pulmonary function tests, and medical examinations relied upon by the treating physicians were inconsistent with published criteria for IVCD and RADS. Psychological evaluation identified defensiveness and self-serving misrepresentations of exaggerated health concerns associated with somatization and malingering. Each case had personality traits associated with at least one personality disorder. Social histories identified premorbid life events and stressors associated with distress. This is the first study to assess psychological predisposition, social interaction among the plaintiffs, and iatrogenic reinforcement of beliefs by diagnoses of pseudo-disorders associated with patient misrepresentation of exaggerated health concerns in an incident of MPI.

  4. Perceptual accent rating and attribution in psychogenic FAS: some further evidence challenging Whitaker’s operational definition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eKeulen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old, non-aphasic, right-handed, and polyglot (L1: French, L2: Dutch, L3: English woman with a 12 year history of addiction to opiates and psychoactive substances, and clear psychiatric problems, presented with a foreign accent of sudden onset in L1. Speech evolved towards a mostly fluent output, despite a stutter-like behavior and a marked grammatical output disorder. The psychogenic etiology of the accent foreignness was construed based upon the patient’s complex medical history, and psychodiagnostic, neuropsychological, and neurolinguistic assessments. The presence of a foreign accent was affirmed by a perceptual accent rating and attribution experiment. It is argued that this patient provides additional evidence demonstrating the outdatedness of Whitaker’s (1982 definition of Foreign Accent Syndrome, as only one of the four operational criteria was unequivocally applicable to our patient: her accent foreignness was not only recognized by her relatives and the medical staff, but also by a group of native French-speaking laymen. However, our patient defied the three remaining criteria, as central nervous system damage could not conclusively be demonstrated, psychodiagnostic assessment raised the hypothesis of a conversion disorder, and the patient was a polyglot whose newly gained accent was associated with a range of foreign languages, which exceeded the ones she spoke.

  5. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (pFibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described.

  6. Severe psychogenic tremor of both wrists in a 13-year-old girl treated successfully with a customized wrist brace: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schafflhuber Caroline

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Psychogenic movement disorders in childhood have been little researched. As there are few courses of treatment which have been evaluated, further examination and case studies about the treatment and clinical course of this rare occurrence of severe psychogenic tremor in childhood and adolescence are much needed. Case presentation A 13-year-old Caucasian girl with tremor in both wrists, severe enough to prevent her from attending school, was sent to our hospital. After a complete neurological and psychiatric examination, in-patient child-psychotherapeutic treatment was started, with careful consideration given to both chronic and acute stress factors which constitute her performance and exam anxiety in school as well as the girl's parents' conflicted relationship. With the aid of a customized wrist brace our patient was able to go to school and write despite the presence of a marked tremor, which in turn reduced her avoidance behavior and exam anxiety. By the end of her in-patient treatment, the tremor was still noticeable, but markedly reduced in severity (reduction 80%. Two weeks after she was discharged from hospital, the tremor had completely disappeared. Conclusion After careful clinical diagnostics, this kind of dissociative disorder should be treated appropriately with age-adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy to achieve positive and lasting benefits.

  7. Role of Short Term Video Encephalography with Induction by Verbal Suggestion in Diagnosis of Suspected Paroxysmal Nonepileptic Seizure-Like Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soaham Dilip Desai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the diagnostic yield and utility of STVEEG with verbal suggestion in diagnosis of patients presenting with transient unresponsiveness and suspected psychogenic nonepileptiform seizures. Methods. A retrospective analysis of STVEEG records of patients with transient unresponsiveness and suspected PNES between 1 Jan 2009 and 28 Feb 2014 was done. Results. Amongst 155 patients [38 males, 117 females], with mean age 32 [8–67], PNES were identified in 109 [70.3%], focal epilepsy was identified in 24 [15.4%], and actual seizure was recorded in 7 [4.5%]. Nine [5.8%] patients were found to have both epilepsy and PNES. Primary generalized epilepsy was diagnosed in 2 [1.2%]. A diagnosis of other paroxysmal nonepileptiform events [tachyarrhythmia and heart block] was done in 3 [1.9%]. A normal EEG and no inducible episode and hence an uncertain diagnosis at the end of STVEEG were seen in only 17 [10.9%] patients. A STVEEG of approximately one hour duration was able to establish the diagnosis in 138 [89.1%] patients with transient unresponsiveness. Conclusion. STVEEG with verbal suggestion is a useful and cost effective diagnostic test for diagnosis of PNES. It can be a good modality for diagnosis in patients with transient abnormalities in sensorium in the outpatient settings in developing countries.

  8. Health related quality of life of people with non-epileptic seizures: The role of socio-demographic characteristics and stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Catherine; Myers, Lorna; Pretorius, Chrisma; Lian, Olaug S; Reuber, Markus

    2018-02-01

    People with non-epileptic seizures (NES) consistently report poorer Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) than people with epilepsy. Yet, unlike in epilepsy, knowledge of how social factors influence the HRQoL of adults with NES is limited. To add to the evidence base, this study explores the relationship between HRQoL and perceived stigma among adults with NES, and the role of socio-demographic characteristics. Data was gathered from a survey of 115 people living with the condition, recruited from online support groups. Participants provided socio-demographic and health-related data and completed a series of questions investigating their HRQoL (QOLIE-31) and stigma perceptions (10-item Epilepsy Stigma Scale). Participants were found to experience high levels of perceived stigma (median 5.2, mean 4.9). A significant and moderate inverse correlation was observed between HRQoL and stigma (r s  - 0.474, p = stigma contribute to poorer HRQoL among adults with NES. Stigma perceptions were found to be most strongly associated with the seizure worry (r s  = - 0.479), emotional wellbeing (r s  = - 0.421), and social functioning (r s  = 0.407) HRQoL domains. Participants who reported being in employment or education were found to have significantly better HRQoL than those who were not (p = < 0.001). More (qualitative and quantitative) research is justified to understand how - and why - those with the condition experience stigmatisation, and the factors that impede and help facilitate the participation of people with NES in education and employment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The pattern of complaints about Australian wind farms does not match the establishment and distribution of turbines: support for the psychogenic, 'communicated disease' hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Simon; St George, Alexis; Waller, Karen; Cakic, Vince

    2013-01-01

    With often florid allegations about health problems arising from wind turbine exposure now widespread, nocebo effects potentially confound any future investigation of turbine health impact. Historical audits of health complaints are therefore important. We test 4 hypotheses relevant to psychogenic explanations of the variable timing and distribution of health and noise complaints about wind farms in Australia. All Australian wind farms (51 with 1634 turbines) operating 1993-2012. Records of complaints about noise or health from residents living near 51 Australian wind farms were obtained from all wind farm companies, and corroborated with complaints in submissions to 3 government public enquiries and news media records and court affidavits. These are expressed as proportions of estimated populations residing within 5 km of wind farms. There are large historical and geographical variations in wind farm complaints. 33/51 (64.7%) of Australian wind farms including 18/34 (52.9%) with turbine size >1 MW have never been subject to noise or health complaints. These 33 farms have an estimated 21,633 residents within 5 km and have operated complaint-free for a cumulative 267 years. Western Australia and Tasmania have seen no complaints. 129 individuals across Australia (1 in 254 residents) appear to have ever complained, with 94 (73%) being residents near 6 wind farms targeted by anti wind farm groups. The large majority 116/129(90%) of complainants made their first complaint after 2009 when anti wind farm groups began to add health concerns to their wider opposition. In the preceding years, health or noise complaints were rare despite large and small-turbine wind farms having operated for many years. The reported historical and geographical variations in complaints are consistent with psychogenic hypotheses that expressed health problems are "communicated diseases" with nocebo effects likely to play an important role in the aetiology of complaints.

  10. The Pattern of Complaints about Australian Wind Farms Does Not Match the Establishment and Distribution of Turbines: Support for the Psychogenic, ‘Communicated Disease’ Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Simon; St. George, Alexis; Waller, Karen; Cakic, Vince

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives With often florid allegations about health problems arising from wind turbine exposure now widespread, nocebo effects potentially confound any future investigation of turbine health impact. Historical audits of health complaints are therefore important. We test 4 hypotheses relevant to psychogenic explanations of the variable timing and distribution of health and noise complaints about wind farms in Australia. Setting All Australian wind farms (51 with 1634 turbines) operating 1993–2012. Methods Records of complaints about noise or health from residents living near 51 Australian wind farms were obtained from all wind farm companies, and corroborated with complaints in submissions to 3 government public enquiries and news media records and court affidavits. These are expressed as proportions of estimated populations residing within 5 km of wind farms. Results There are large historical and geographical variations in wind farm complaints. 33/51 (64.7%) of Australian wind farms including 18/34 (52.9%) with turbine size >1 MW have never been subject to noise or health complaints. These 33 farms have an estimated 21,633 residents within 5 km and have operated complaint-free for a cumulative 267 years. Western Australia and Tasmania have seen no complaints. 129 individuals across Australia (1 in 254 residents) appear to have ever complained, with 94 (73%) being residents near 6 wind farms targeted by anti wind farm groups. The large majority 116/129(90%) of complainants made their first complaint after 2009 when anti wind farm groups began to add health concerns to their wider opposition. In the preceding years, health or noise complaints were rare despite large and small-turbine wind farms having operated for many years. Conclusions The reported historical and geographical variations in complaints are consistent with psychogenic hypotheses that expressed health problems are “communicated diseases” with nocebo effects likely to play an

  11. PSYCHOGENIC INFERTILITY AND ADOPTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-07-03

    Jul 3, 1971 ... a behaviour disturbance or a personality disorder. The fantasies of the ... The mother's ego is protected by blaming hereditary for the child's disturbed behaviour. Problems of identity in adoptees are obviously encoun- tered. The fact that they .... mother-daughter relationship is always an ambivalent one,.

  12. PSYCHOGENIC INFERTILITY AND ADOPTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-07-03

    Jul 3, 1971 ... to consider their parenthood artificial and uncomfortable. Toussieng leads one to the conclusion that it is the adoptive parents' unresolved resistance to parenthood that con titutes the major factor in causing emotional disturb- ance in the adoptive child. In the course of treating emotionally disturbed young.

  13. Psychogenic "HIV infection"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sno, H. N.; Storosum, J. G.; Wortel, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    The case of a man who falsely represented himself as being HIV positive is reported. In less than one year he was admitted twice with symptoms suggestive of HIV infection. The diagnoses malingering and factitious disorder were consecutively made. Early recognition of Factitious Disorder is essential

  14. COgnitive behavioural therapy vs standardised medical care for adults with Dissociative non-Epileptic Seizures (CODES): a multicentre randomised controlled trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Laura H; Mellers, John D C; Landau, Sabine; Stone, Jon; Carson, Alan; Medford, Nick; Reuber, Markus; Richardson, Mark; McCrone, Paul; Murray, Joanna; Chalder, Trudie

    2015-06-27

    The evidence base for the effectiveness of psychological interventions for patients with dissociative non-epileptic seizures (DS) is currently extremely limited, although data from two small pilot randomised controlled trials (RCTs), including from our group, suggest that Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) may be effective in reducing DS occurrence and may improve aspects of psychological status and psychosocial functioning. The study is a multicentre, pragmatic parallel group RCT to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of specifically-tailored CBT plus standardised medical care (SMC) vs SMC alone in reducing DS frequency and improving psychological and health-related outcomes. In the initial screening phase, patients with DS will receive their diagnosis from a neurologist/epilepsy specialist. If patients are eligible and interested following the provision of study information and a booklet about DS, they will consent to provide demographic information and fortnightly data about their seizures, and agree to see a psychiatrist three months later. We aim to recruit ~500 patients to this screening stage. After a review three months later by a psychiatrist, those patients who have continued to have DS in the previous eight weeks and who meet further eligibility criteria will be told about the trial comparing CBT + SMC vs SMC alone. If they are interested in participating, they will be given a further booklet on DS and study information. A research worker will see them to obtain their informed consent to take part in the RCT. We aim to randomise 298 people (149 to each arm). In addition to a baseline assessment, data will be collected at 6 and 12 months post randomisation. Our primary outcome is monthly seizure frequency in the preceding month. Secondary outcomes include seizure severity, measures of seizure freedom and reduction, psychological distress and psychosocial functioning, quality of life, health service use, cost effectiveness and adverse

  15. [The contribution of systems theory and "existential integrative psychotherapy" to the relationship of the concepts "endogenous", "exogenous", "psychogenic", and "sociogenic" in psychic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, K E; Wyss, D

    1980-01-01

    Proof is given that the "atomistic" concepts of sickness lead to insolvable contradictions of methodic and logic origin. In this study these contradictions are exemplified and critically analysed, and historical aspects are included. We then propose the dimensions "Interior--Exterior" and "Psychogenous--Somatogeneous" as an heuristic model, dimensions on which any sickness is to be located according to its basic causes. The General System Theory had developed a new formal concept of sickness based on a relatively complete and integral vision of the human being. Nevertheless, the constructs of the General System Theory remain incomplete as they include only objects and their relations, never individual subjects. Wyss however has established explicitely an anthropology of the subject which he connects with his communication orientated concept of sickness. This concept does not judge sickness to be contradictory to health, but both, sickness and health together, form a functional whole on a higher level of abstraction. On this level the organism and its functions, the "interior", represent an inherent component of the "exterior". "Interior" and "exterior"--differentiated in various items--attempt to establish an equilibrium that is always in danger of being desquilibrized.

  16. Avaliação pelo P300 de crianças com e sem epilepsia e rendimento escolar Assessment through P300 of epileptic and non-epileptic children and school performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUCELEI F. VISIOLI-MELO

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Dificuldade de aprendizagem é situação comum em crianças com epilepsia. Distúrbios da inteligência têm sido associados com epilepsia. O potencial cognitivo (P300 é um adjunto clínico para mensurar neurofisiologicamente o processo cognitivo. Foram estudadas 99 crianças com 10 anos a 11 anos e 11 meses. Do Grupo I, sem epilepsia, faziam parte 64 crianças, das quais 32 com bom rendimento e outras 32 com mau rendimento escolar. Do Grupo II, com epilepsia, faziam parte 35 crianças, sendo 21 com bom rendimento escolar e 15 com mau rendimento escolar. Não foi encontrada diferença significativa na latência do P300 entre os dois grupos. Quando foram estratificados segundo o desempenho escolar, as crianças do Grupo I, com bom rendimento escolar, apresentaram latência do P300 de 336 ms e as com mau rendimento escolar, latência de 382 ms; as crianças do Grupo II, com bom rendimento escolar, apresentaram latência do P300 de 363 ms e as com mau rendimento escolar, latência de 400 ms, com diferença significativa. Essa diferença estava localizada entre as crianças não epilépticas com bom desempenho escolar e as com mau desempenho escolar, epilépticas ou não.Learning disability is common in epileptic children. Epilepsy has been associated with disorders of intelligence. Cognitive potential (P300 is considered to be a clinical aid in the neurophysiological measurement of the cognitive process. Ninety-nine children between the ages of 10 years and 11 years and 11 months formed our sample, with good and poor school performance. Group I, non-epileptic, had 64 children of whom 32 had good and 32 poor school performance. Group II, epileptic, had 35 children, of whom 21 had good and 15 poor school performance. No significant difference in P300 latency was found between Groups I and II. When groups were stratified based on school performance, Group I children with good school performance had P300 latency of 336 ms, while the ones with poor

  17. [The psychophysiological features of nonepileptic paroxysmal disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, S A; Kovrov, G V; Posokhov, S I; Katenko, S V

    2014-01-01

    22 patients with panic disorder without agoraphobia, 19 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and 43 healthy control subjects with use clinic technique, psychometric, neuropsychological, neurophysiological methods (quantitative EEG and auditory event-related potentials P300) were examined. Patients with panic disorder was differed from patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation by higher level of anxiety and greater degree cognitive functions disturbances. In comparison with healthy control subjects at panic disorders increased of P300 peak amplitude and the spectral power of EEG beta and theta bands in the right hemisphere was observed, at paroxysmal atrial fibrillation--decreased of P300 peak amplitude and the spectral power of EEG beta band in the both hemispheres. Obtained data may indicate various origin mechanisms of paroxysmal states or neurotic condition (panic disorder) and psychosomatic (paroxysmal atrial fibrillation).

  18. Psychiatric presentation of voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    PARTHASARATHI, U. D.; HARROWER, T.; TEMPEST, M.; HODGES, J. R.; WALSH, C.; McKENNA, P. J.; FLETCHER, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody encephalopathy, a rare cause of limbic encephalopathy, typically presents with memory impairment and seizures. Psychiatric symptoms have not been emphasised in the literature. Here we describe a 58-year-old man who presented with panic attacks and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures and, later on, developed delusions and hallucinations and then confusion.He was found to have antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels.Treatment with immuno-modulatory...

  19. Psychogenic Dyspnea and Therapeutic Chest Radiograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Kenneth R.; Endres, Jennifer K.; Kaufman, Nathaniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Conversion disorders, the physical expression of unresolved psychological pain, can be associated with mourning. This case report is third in a series of articles by the authors on childhood mourning reflecting the effects of multiple losses (K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2005; K. R. Kaufman & N. D. Kaufman, 2006). In this case report, perception…

  20. Analyzing reliability of seizure diagnosis based on semiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bo; Wu, Han; Xu, Jiahui; Yan, Jianwei; Ding, Yao; Wang, Z Irene; Guo, Yi; Wang, Zhongjin; Shen, Chunhong; Chen, Zhong; Ding, Meiping; Wang, Shuang

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the accuracy of seizure diagnosis by semiological analysis and to assess the factors that affect diagnostic reliability. A total of 150 video clips of seizures from 50 patients (each with three seizures of the same type) were observed by eight epileptologists, 12 neurologists, and 20 physicians (internists). The videos included 37 series of epileptic seizures, eight series of physiologic nonepileptic events (PNEEs), and five series of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). After observing each video, the doctors chose the diagnosis of epileptic seizures or nonepileptic events for the patient; if the latter was chosen, they further chose the diagnosis of PNESs or PNEEs. The overall diagnostic accuracy rate for epileptic seizures and nonepileptic events increased from 0.614 to 0.660 after observations of all three seizures (p semiological diagnosis of seizures is greatly affected by the seizure type as well as the doctor's experience. Although the overall reliability is limited, it can be improved by observing more seizures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of opium as antiepileptic in patient with frontal lobe epilepsy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Nebhinani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE manifests with brief, nocturnal seizures arising in the frontal lobe along with unusual behavioral symptoms or postures, frequently misdiagnosed as a psychogenic nonepileptic seizure (PNES or a sleep disorder. Ancient literature has rarely mentioned the antiepileptic effect of opium or different opioids. Here we are presenting a case with FLE, though initially diagnosed PNES, who had significant relief in his symptoms on using opium, and this led to opium dependence. Index case further emphasizes concern and caution as misdiagnosis of FLE may lead to substance dependenc.

  2. Psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities in epilepsy: A critical reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Anne T; Altalib, Hamada H; Devinsky, Orrin

    2017-07-01

    Psychiatric and behavioral disorders are important aspects of epilepsy and have received increasing attention in the last several years. The literature upon which most of the field relies contains some biases that must be carefully examined and resolved in future studies. First, in the pediatric epilepsy literature, many reports find that children with epilepsy have high levels of behavioral and psychiatric disorders when compared to appropriate controls. Most of these studies rely on parent-proxy completed instruments to assess these behavioral endpoints. Parents' reports are not objective but reflect parents' reactions and emotions. Increasing evidence suggests inherent biases in proxy reports and highlights the need to assess children directly. Second, periictal phenomena may be mischaracterized as underlying mood disorders. Third, many studies report elevated levels of psychiatric morbidity before and after the diagnosis of epilepsy, suggesting an inherent relation between the two types of disorders. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, while widely recognized as posing a diagnostic dilemma in the clinic, may account for some of these research findings. Diagnostic errors between epilepsy and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures need careful consideration when evaluating studies demonstrating associations between psychiatric disorders and epilepsy or poorer seizure control in association with psychiatric disorders in people who have epilepsy. Mental health concerns are important for everyone. An accurate, undistorted understanding of the relation between mental health disorders and epilepsy is essential to ensure appropriate therapy and to avoid unnecessary and potentially harmful treatments and common misconceptions. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  3. Information-seeking behaviour for epilepsy: an infodemiological study of searches for Wikipedia articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Otte, Willem M; Igwe, Stanley C; Ausserer, Harald; Nardone, Raffaele; Tezzon, Frediano; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-12-01

    Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopaedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. Our aim was to evaluate information-seeking behaviour of English-speaking internet users searching Wikipedia for articles related to epilepsy and epileptic seizures. Using Wiki Trends, which provides quantitative information on daily viewing of articles, data on global search queries for Wikipedia articles related to epilepsy and seizures were analysed. The daily Wikipedia article views on syncope, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, migraine, and multiple sclerosis served as comparative data. The period of analysis covered was from January 2008 to December 2014. Overall, the Wikipedia article "epilepsy and driving" was found to be more frequently visited than the articles "epilepsy and employment" or "epilepsy in children". Since January 2008, the Wikipedia article "multiple sclerosis" was more often visited compared to the articles "epilepsy", "syncope", "psychogenic non-epileptic seizures" or "migraine"; the article "epilepsy" ranked 3,779 and was less frequently visited than "multiple sclerosis", ranked at 571, in traffic on Wikipedia. The highest peak in search volume for the article "epilepsy" coincided with the news of a celebrity having seizures. Fears and worries about epileptic seizures, their impact on driving and employment, and news about celebrities with epilepsy might be major determinants in searching Wikipedia for information.

  4. A Chronic Psychogenic Vomiting Case of Dramatic Response to Escitalopram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur OZTURK

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the treatment of an interesting patient with vomiting for years. The patient admitted to the family health center with chronic vomiting and weight loss. Her physical examination was unremarkable. The complaint of patient in who organic pathogen were excluded by biochemical and radiological examinations was evaluated psychologically; her complaints were ended following the initiation of escitalopram therapy unlike previous treatment. In this report, we represent a specific patient for the escitalopram treatment and thanks to this, it contributes a unique sample to the literature about escitalopram usage in the treatment of chronic vomiting.

  5. Role of the Chaplain in Ministry Related to Psychogenic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    nervous system: those bodily activities such as the digestive, respiratory, and vascular functions which were once thought to be unavailable to conscious...disease, but also in receiving instructions on the control of tne disease. Lamont also reports on some unique work with hypnotism and acupuncture , and the...some unique work with hypnotism and acupuncture , and the control of chronic pain and pain during surgery. Autogenics can be viewed as a self--induced

  6. [Habitual abortions: psychogenic and/or induced psychopathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachowsky, M

    1998-10-01

    Infertility is felt nowadays as a personal affront, quite intolerable, and RSA are an emblematic example of that personal and social failure, failure of the woman and of the couple, failure of the doctor too, failure of their common project. No wonder if those recurrences open the way to the problem of cause and/or consequences for those women whose pregnancy regularly begins and as regularly sees its evolution thwarted. The hypothesis of a psychological factor not excluding but rather potentialising a somatic one, should work as an incentive to important predictive studies, the best means for prevention. Whatever our present medical possibilities, the emphasis should always be on attentive listening and counselling, so as to mingle in judicious harmony "hightech" science and "tender love and care".

  7. Can I go out for a smoke? A nursing challenge in the epilepsy monitoring unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, M; McLachlan, R S; Burneo, J G

    2009-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is common in patients with intractable epilepsy. As a preliminary assessment of epilepsy and smoking, we evaluated the impact of breaks for smoking on the investigation of epilepsy patients admitted to our epilepsy monitoring unit. Absences from the epilepsy unit at the London Health Sciences Center were monitored for 6 months by nursing personnel. During these absences, events that occurred were registered as well. This is possible using portable EEG recorders (XLTEK) that patients carry with them all the time. A disadvantage is that video recording is not available if the patient has a seizure outside the unit. Information was entered consecutively in a datasheet. Diagnosis, duration of hospital stay, frequency of breaks, and time outside the unit were recorded. Descriptive and statistical analysis was performed. Two thousand two hundred and ninety trips were recorded. Mean duration of stay was 10 days for smokers and 8.5 for non-smokers. Non-smokers had a total of 439 seizures of which 6 (1.4%) were not recorded, while the smokers had 213, of which 11 (5.2%) were not recorded. Five events did not have electroencephalographic correlation, raising a suspicion of non-epileptic events (pseudoseizures). Despite the low number of events missed, precious information may be lost during smoking trips by patients admitted to the epilepsy unit. Ways to avoid such trips should be implemented in epilepsy monitoring units allowing smoking breaks for patients.

  8. Interval analysis of interictal EEG: pathology of the alpha rhythm in focal epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrzowski, Jan; Siemiński, Mariusz; Sarnowska, Anna; Jedrzejczak, Joanna; Nyka, Walenty M.

    2015-01-01

    The contemporary use of interictal scalp electroencephalography (EEG) in the context of focal epilepsy workup relies on the visual identification of interictal epileptiform discharges. The high-specificity performance of this marker comes, however, at a cost of only moderate sensitivity. Zero-crossing interval analysis is an alternative to Fourier analysis for the assessment of the rhythmic component of EEG signals. We applied this method to standard EEG recordings of 78 patients divided into 4 subgroups: temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE), psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) and nonepileptic patients with headache. Interval-analysis based markers were capable of effectively discriminating patients with epilepsy from those in control subgroups (AUC~0.8) with diagnostic sensitivity potentially exceeding that of visual analysis. The identified putative epilepsy-specific markers were sensitive to the properties of the alpha rhythm and displayed weak or non-significant dependences on the number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) taken by the patients. Significant AED-related effects were concentrated in the theta interval range and an associated marker allowed for identification of patients on AED polytherapy (AUC~0.9). Interval analysis may thus, in perspective, increase the diagnostic yield of interictal scalp EEG. Our findings point to the possible existence of alpha rhythm abnormalities in patients with epilepsy. PMID:26553287

  9. The epileptic and nonepileptic spectrum of paroxysmal dyskinesias: Channelopathies, synaptopathies, and transportopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erro, Roberto; Bhatia, Kailash P; Espay, Alberto J; Striano, Pasquale

    2017-03-01

    Historically, the syndrome of primary paroxysmal dyskinesias was considered a group of disorders as a result of ion channel dysfunction. This proposition was primarily based on the discovery of mutations in ion channels, which caused other episodic neurological disorders such as epilepsy and migraine and also supported by the frequent association between paroxysmal dyskinesias and epilepsy. However, the discovery of the genes responsible for the 3 classic forms of paroxysmal dyskinesias disproved this ion channel theory. On the other hand, novel gene mutations implicating ion channels have been recently reported to produce episodic movement disorders clinically similar to the classic paroxysmal dyskinesias. Here, we review the clinical and pathophysiological aspects of the paroxysmal dyskinesias, further proposing a pathophysiological framework according to which they can be classified as synaptopathies (proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 and myofibrillogenesis regulator gene), channelopathies (calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1 and voltage-gated sodium channel type 8), or transportopathies (solute carrier family 2 member 1). This proposal might serve to explain similarities and differences among the various paroxysmal dyskinesias in terms of clinical features, treatment response, and natural history. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  10. The epileptic and non-epileptic spectrum of paroxysmal dyskinesias: channelopathies, synaptopathies, and transportopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erro, Roberto; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Espay, Alberto J.; Striano, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the syndrome of primary paroxysmal dyskinesias was considered a group of disorders due to ion channel dysfunction. This proposition was primarily based on the discovery of mutations in ion channels, which caused other episodic neurological disorders such as epilepsy and migraine and also supported by the frequent association between paroxysmal dyskinesias and epilepsy. However, the discovery of the genes responsible for the three classic forms of paroxysmal dyskinesias disproved this ion channel theory. On the other hand, novel gene mutations implicating ion channels have been recently reported to produce episodic movement disorders clinically similar to the classical paroxysmal dyskinesias. Here, we review the clinical and pathophysiological aspects of the paroxysmal dyskinesias, further proposing a pathophysiological framework according to which they can be classified as synaptopathies (PRRT2 and MR1), channelopathies (KCNMA1 and SCN8A) or transportopathies (SLC2A1). This proposal might serve to explain similarities and differences among the various paroxysmal dyskinesias in terms of clinical features, treatment response, and natural history. PMID:28090678

  11. Impact of cognitive stimulation on ripples within human epileptic and non-epileptic hippocampus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázdil, M.; Cimbálník, J.; Roman, R.; Shaw, D. J.; Stead, M.; Daniel, P.; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, JULY 25 (2015), 47:1-9 ISSN 1471-2202 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0933; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : high-frequency oscillations * hippocampal ripples * epilepsy * human cognition Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.304, year: 2015

  12. Marijuana use in adults admitted to a Canadian epilepsy monitoring unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot-Tarrús, Andreu; McLachlan, Richard S

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiologic evidence supporting antiseizure properties of cannabis is limited and controversial. We determined the prevalence of marijuana use and its perceived effects in patients with and without epilepsy. Information was collected over 14months from consecutive adult patients admitted to an epilepsy monitoring unit using a 27-item anonymous questionnaire. Patients with cognitive impairment unable to understand the questions or give informed consent and readmissions were not recruited. Subjects were divided into 4 groups, those with epileptic seizures, those with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), those with both epileptic and PNES, and those with other nonepileptic events. Patients with exclusively epileptic seizures were compared with those with exclusively PNES. From 310 patients, 18 undiagnosed cases were excluded leaving a cohort of 292 patients with median age 35 (range: 27-49) years; 57.2% female. Epilepsy was documented in 190 (65.1%), PNES in 64 (21.9%), and both types of seizures in 26 (8.9%). Median duration of seizure disorder was longer (2 [1-9] vs. 13 [5.7-25] years; pepilepsy compared with those in patients with PNES. Overall, 166 (57%) had tried marijuana, and 36.2% used it over the past year. Utilization was 57.1% in sole epilepsy and 64.1% in sole PNES, but daily use was more likely in epilepsy (59% vs. 33.3%). Estimated mean dose was 1g/day. Marijuana use was associated with tobacco smoking (pepilepsy and 72.7% in those with PNES. In the 2 groups, stress was decreased in 84.9% and 88%, sleep improved in 77.3% and 88%, and memory/concentration was better in 32% and 28%, respectively. Antiepileptic drug side effects were decreased in 53.2% of marijuana users. Perceived effect on epileptic seizures correlated with effect on stress (r=0.35, p=0.004). Adverse effects of marijuana were mild and reported in 30.7% but included possible seizure precipitation in 5 patients with epilepsy. Patients with uncontrolled epilepsy or nonepileptic events

  13. Perceptual Accent Rating and Attribution in Psychogenic FAS : Some Further Evidence Challenging Whitaker's Operational Definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, Stefanie; Verhoeven, Jo; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Mariën, Peter; Jonkers, Roel; Mavroudakis, Nicolas; Paquier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old, non-aphasic, right-handed, and polyglot (L1: French, L2: Dutch, and L3: English) woman with a 12-year history of addiction to opiates and psychoactive substances, and clear psychiatric problems, presented with a foreign accent of sudden onset in L1. Speech evolved toward a mostly

  14. Brain circuits implicated in psychogenic paralysis in conversion disorders and hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuilleumier, P

    2014-10-01

    Conversion disorders are defined as neurological symptoms arising without organic damage to the nervous system, presumably in relation to various emotional stress factors, but the exact neural substrates of these symptoms and the mechanisms responsible for their production remain poorly understood. In the past 15 years, novel insights have been gained with the advent of functional neuroimaging studies in patients suffering from conversion disorders in both motor and non-motor (e.g. somatosensory, visual) domains. Several studies have also compared brain activation patterns in conversion to those observed during hypnosis, where similar functional losses can be evoked by suggestion. The current review summarizes these recent results and the main neurobiological hypotheses proposed to account for conversion symptoms, in particular motor deficits. An emerging model points to an important role of ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC), precuneus, and perhaps other limbic structures (including amygdala), all frequently found to be hyperactivated in conversion disorders in parallel to impaired recruitment of primary motor and/or sensory pathways at the cortical or subcortical (basal ganglia) level. These findings are only partly shared with hypnosis, where increases in precuneus predominate, together with activation of attentional control systems, but without any activation of VMPFC. Both VMPFC and precuneus are key regions for access to internal representations about the self, integrating information from memory and imagery with affective relevance (in VMPFC) and sensory or agency representations (in precuneus). It is therefore postulated that conversion deficits might result from an alteration of conscious sensorimotor functions and self-awareness under the influence of affective and sensory representations generated in these regions, which might promote certain patterns of behaviors in response to self-relevant emotional states. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Effectiveness of Morita Therapy-Based Consultation for a School-Refusing Adolescent with Psychogenic Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Morita therapy, developed by Shoma Morita (1874-1938) in Japan, is a type of psychotherapy that has been applied to deal with neurotic symptoms. This therapeutic approach is based on the conviction that neurotic symptoms are universal issues that eventually subside if the symptoms are accepted and everyday activities are carried out. By examining…

  16. Impaired emotion processing in functional (psychogenic tremor: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto J. Espay

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: In response to emotional stimuli, functional tremor is associated with alterations in activation and functional connectivity in networks involved in emotion processing and theory of mind. These findings may be relevant to the pathophysiology of functional movement disorders.

  17. Psychogenic and neural visual-cue response in PD dopamine dysregulation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loane, Clare; Wu, Kit; O'Sullivan, Sean S; Lawrence, Andrew D; Woodhead, Zoe; Lees, Andrew J; Piccini, Paola; Politis, Marios

    2015-11-01

    Dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS) in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients refers to the compulsive use of dopaminergic replacement therapy and has serious psycho-social consequences. Mechanisms underlying DDS are not clear although has been linked to dysfunctional brain reward networks. With fMRI, we investigate behavioral and neural response to drug-cues in six PD DDS patients and 12 PD control patients in both the ON and OFF medication state. Behavioral measures of liking, wanting and subjectively 'feeling ON medication' were also collected. Behaviorally, PD DDS patients feel less ON and want their drugs more at baseline compared to PD controls. Following drug-cue exposure, PD DDS patients feel significantly more ON medication, which correlates with significant increases in reward related regions. The results demonstrate that exposure to drug-cues increases the subjective feeling of being 'ON' medication which corresponds to dysfunctional activation in reward related regions in PD DDS patients. These findings should be extended in future studies. Visual stimuli being sufficient to elicit behavioral response through neuroadaptations could have direct implications to the management of addictive behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The eye of the beholder : Inter-rater agreement among experts on psychogenic jerky movement disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Salm, Sandra M A; de Haan, Rob J; Cath, Daniëlle C; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Tijssen, Marina A J

    Objective The current criteria for conversion disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders rely on the assumption that neurological disorders can be distinguished from conversion disorders through clinical assessment. This study aims to assess inter-rater agreement among

  19. Effect of chronic psychogenic stress on characteristics of some rat brain synaptic membrane receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikuradze, V.O.; Kozlovskaya, M.M.; Rozhanets, V.V.; Val'dman, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies characteristics of alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptors, and imipramine and bensodiazepine receptors in brain synaptic membranes of rats after exposure to combined stress for 15 days by a modified Hecht's method. Before the experiment the suspension was thawed and centrifuged. Specific binding of tritium-WB-4101 (30 Ci/mmole), tritium-dihydroalprenolol, tritium-flunitrazepam, and tritium-imipramine was carried out by known methods with certain modifications. The results suggest that pathology of behavior in rats observed in the model may be classed as a depressive-like state rather than a neurosis-like state, and the model itself may be more appropriate for the study of the mechanisms of action of compounds with marked tranquilizing activity

  20. Effect of chronic psychogenic stress on characteristics of some rat brain synaptic membrane receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikuradze, V.O.; Kozlovskaya, M.M.; Rozhanets, V.V.; Val' dman, A.V.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies characteristics of alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptors, and imipramine and bensodiazepine receptors in brain synaptic membranes of rats after exposure to combined stress for 15 days by a modified Hecht's method. Before the experiment the suspension was thawed and centrifuged. Specific binding of tritium-WB-4101 (30 Ci/mmole), tritium-dihydroalprenolol, tritium-flunitrazepam, and tritium-imipramine was carried out by known methods with certain modifications. The results suggest that pathology of behavior in rats observed in the model may be classed as a depressive-like state rather than a neurosis-like state, and the model itself may be more appropriate for the study of the mechanisms of action of compounds with marked tranquilizing activity.

  1. Genetic or Psychogenic? A Case Study of “Folie à Quatre” Including Twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Ohnuma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shared psychotic disorder, characterized by shared delusion among two or more subjects (termed “Folie à deux,” “trois,” etc., is often associated with strong religious beliefs or social isolation, factors creating strong psychological sympathy. Recently, we treated a rare familial case of “Folie à quatre” in central Tokyo without such influences. The proband was a schizophrenia patient and younger brother within monozygotic twins. Positive symptoms were “transmitted” to remaining family members, his elder brother, mother, and father father, in a relatively short period of three months. Although the pathophysiology of these positive symptoms (delusions and hallucinations remains unclear, the transmission pattern suggests the primacy of social and environmental factors (and/or their interaction, while genetics appeared less influential in this “Folie à famille.” Although undiagnosed psychoses in the whole family cannot be excluded, they did not share the other negative schizophrenia symptoms of the proband. A strong familial connection appeared to be the most important factor for the common delusion and hallucination.

  2. Neurologic approaches to hysteria, psychogenic and functional disorders from the late 19th century onwards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J

    2016-01-01

    The history of functional neurologic disorders in the 20th century from the point of view of the neurologist is U-shaped. A flurry of interest between the 1880s and early 1920s gave way to lack of interest, skepticism, and concern about misdiagnosis. This was mirrored by increasing professional and geographic divisions between neurology and psychiatry after the First World War. In the 1990s the advent of imaging and other technology highlighted the positive nature of a functional diagnosis. Having been closer in the early 20th century but later more separate, these disorders are now once again the subject of academic and clinical interest, although arguably still very much on the fringes of neurology and neuropsychiatry. Revisiting older material provides a rich source of ideas and data for today's clinical researcher, but also offers cautionary tales of theories and treatments that led to stagnation rather than advancement of the field. Patterns of treatment do have a habit of repeating themselves, for example, the current enthusiasm for transcranial magnetic stimulation compared to the excitement about electrotherapy in the 19th century. For these reasons, an understanding of the history of functional disorders in neurology is arguably more important than it is for other areas of neurologic practice. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Case of Functional (Psychogenic Monocular Hemianopia Analyzed by Measurement of Hemifield Visual Evoked Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Yoneda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Functional monocular hemianopia is an extremely rare condition, for which measurement of hemifield visual evoked potentials (VEPs has not been previously described. Methods: A 14-year-old boy with functional monocular hemianopia was followed up with Goldmann perimetry and measurement of hemifield and full-field VEPs. Results: The patient had a history of monocular temporal hemianopia of the right eye following headache, nausea and ague. There was no relative afferent pupillary defect, and a color perception test was normal. Goldmann perimetry revealed a vertical monocular temporal hemianopia of the right eye; the hemianopia on the right was also detected with a binocular visual field test. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MR angiography of the brain including the optic chiasm as well as orbital MRI revealed no abnormalities. On the basis of these results, we diagnosed the patient's condition as functional monocular hemianopia. Pattern VEPs according to the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision (ISCEV standard were within the normal range. The hemifield pattern VEPs for the right eye showed a symmetrical latency and amplitude for nasal and temporal hemifield stimulation. One month later, the visual field defect of the patient spontaneously disappeared. Conclusions: The latency and amplitude of hemifield VEPs for a patient with functional monocular hemianopia were normal. Measurement of hemifield VEPs may thus provide an objective tool for distinguishing functional hemianopia from hemifield loss caused by an organic lesion.

  4. Chasing as a model of psychogenic stress: characterization of physiological and behavioral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Kimm, Sunwhi; Han, Jung-Soo; Choi, June-Seek

    2018-03-25

    Being chased by a predator or a dominant conspecific can induce significant stress. However, only a limited number of laboratory studies have employed chasing by itself as a stressor. In this study, we developed a novel stress paradigm in which rats were chased by a fast-moving object in an inescapable maze. In Experiment 1, defensive behaviors and stress hormone changes induced by chasing stress were measured. During the chasing stress, the chasing-stress group (n = 9) froze and emitted 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), but the no-chasing control group (n = 10) did not. Plasma corticosterone levels significantly increased following the chasing and were comparable to those of the restraint-stress group (n = 6). In Experiment 2, the long-lasting memory of the chasing event was tested after three weeks. The chasing-stress group (n = 15) showed higher levels of freezing and USV than the no-chasing group (n = 14) when they were presented with the tone associated with the object's chasing action. Subsequently, the rats were subjected to Pavlovian threat conditioning with a tone as a conditioned stimulus and footshock as an unconditioned stimulus. The chasing-stress group showed higher levels of freezing and USV during the conditioning session than the no-chasing group, indicating sensitized defensive reactions in a different threat situation. Taken together, the current results suggest that chasing stress can induce long-lasting memory and sensitization of defensive responses to a new aversive event as well as immediate, significant stress responses.

  5. Insomnia in epilepsy is associated with continuing seizures and worse quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigg, Mark; Gharai, Sean; Ruland, Jeff; Schroeder, Catherine; Hodges, Matthew; Ingersoll, Karen S; Thorndike, Frances P; Yan, Guofen; Ritterband, Lee M

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate how insomnia is associated with seizure control and quality of life in patients with epilepsy. Consecutive patients with epilepsy attending clinical visits were surveyed with the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Patients had to be treated with at least one anticonvulsant and could not have had documented psychogenic pseudoseizure. The presence or absence of seizures and quality of life (QOLIE-P-10) within the past 4 weeks was recorded. Other variables included demographic and clinical data, sleep-wake timing, the Hörne-Östberg Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ), sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and mood (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, CES-D). 207 patients completed surveys. 43% had clinically significant insomnia, and 51% had at least mild insomnia. 58% were seizure free. Mean ISI scores were significantly worse for those with continuing seizures, and more severe ISI scores correlated strongly with worse QOL. Younger age, shorter duration of epilepsy, use of sedative/hypnotics, medical and sleep comorbidities, delayed sleep timing and chronotype, excessive sleepiness, and depression were all associated with more severe insomnia. Those with unexpected health care visits over the most recent 4 weeks had worse insomnia. After adjustment for these covariates, more severe insomnia remained significantly associated with lack of seizure freedom and with worse QOL. Insomnia is common in epilepsy, and is associated with short term poor seizure control and worse QOL. Future studies must evaluate cause-and-effect relationships. Assessment of insomnia may be important in the comprehensive care of epilepsy and may influence control of epileptic seizures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of Interictal Epileptiform Discharges Using Signal Envelope Distribution Modelling: Application to Epileptic and Non-Epileptic Intracranial Recordings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janča, R.; Ježdík, P.; Čmejla, R.; Tomášek, M.; Worrell, G. A.; Stead, M.; Wagenaar, J.; Jefferys, J. G. R.; Kršek, P.; Komárek, V.; Jiruška, Přemysl; Marusič, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2015), s. 172-183 ISSN 0896-0267 Grant - others:GA Mzd(CZ) NT11460 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : spike detection * interictal epileptiform discharges * intracranial recording * automatic detection * Hilbert transform * principal component analysis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.727, year: 2015

  7. "Are You Saying She's Mentally Ill Then?" Explaining Medically Unexplained Seizures in Clinical Encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Robson

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bodily phenomena that are difficult to identify, localize, explain and cure with the aid of modern biomedical knowledge and technology leave ample room for cultural influence. That makes them a perfect case for studying the cultural dimension of medical knowledge and practice. Building on this assumption we qualitatively explore the communication between neurologists and women with seizure disorders of uncertain etiology, often labeled psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES, in a specialist clinic in England. Based on an interpretation of film-recordings of eight naturally-occurring clinical consultations we discuss the following questions: How do neurologists explain the name, the cause and the treatment options to these patients? How do patients and their companions respond to these explanations? And finally, what makes these interactions so difficult? Our interpretation of the data is inspired by critical discourse analysis, and framed within a social constructionist perspective on medical knowledge and practice. We found that the neurologists presented the diagnosis and its cause—inappropriate stress management—through objective language that conveyed a high degree of certainty. Patient-parties often disagreed, and found it hard to believe that these physical symptoms had a psychological origin. Companions often acted as advocates for the patients in negotiations with the doctors. The polarized debate between psychogenic and somatic understandings of the seizures that emerged illuminates how the Cartesian dualism between body and mind complicates clinical encounters—a dualism doctors explicitly reject, but presumably accept. We argue that it is impossible to overcome this polarization without acknowledging the cultural dimension of medical knowledge and practice. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs160122

  8. Functional Movement Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Psychogenic movement may develop as part of a conversion disorder (in which a psychological event causes physical symptoms ... distracted. Many individuals with psychogenic tremor have a conversion disorder. Psychogenic dystonia involves involuntary muscle contractions that cause ...

  9. 4h versus 1h-nap-video-EEG monitoring in an Epileptology Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Michel, Vi-Huong; Dinkelacker, Vera; Solano, Ovidio; Levy, Pierre-P; Lambrecq, Virginie; Adam, Claude; Dupont, Sophie; Naccache, Lionel; Fournier, Emmanuel; Baulac, Michel; Navarro, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    To compare the performance of 4h-video EEG monitoring (VEEG) and 1h-nap-VEEG in an Epileptology Unit. We examined short-term VEEG data from 196 patients admitted to characterize their: (i) clinical events; (ii) epileptic syndromes or (iii) state after status epilepticus or surgery. We compared the 4h-VEEG and 1h-nap-VEEG performances using three measures: (i) the capability to detect epileptic seizures (ES), psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES), interictal epileptiform abnormalities (IEA) and sleep-related IEA; (ii) the usefulness to answer questions on referral; (iii) the sensitivity for the final diagnosis. The 4h-VEEG test recorded clinical events in 53.6% of 196 patients, IEA in 41.3%, sleep-related IEA in 34.7%, and was judged as useful in 66.8%. The 4h-VEEG was compared to the 1h-nap-VEEG in 129 patients. 4h-VEEG had a better capability to record clinical events (50.3% vs. 6.2%, pnap-EEG. This work found 4h-VEEG records were superior to the 1h-nap-VEEG test on the basis of three complementary measures, capability, usefulness and sensitivity. 4h-VEEG is a useful alternative investigation tool in an Epileptology Unit. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Narrative Medicine perspectives on patient identity and integrative care in neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Robert B; Howard, Tracy A; Villano, John L

    2017-09-01

    Narrative Medicine sessions can encourage patients to rediscover personal identity and meaning by telling or writing their stories. We explored this process to improve care and quality of life for brain cancer patients in an academic neuro-oncology program. Brain cancer and its treatments may threaten a patient's quality of life and sense of self in many ways, including impaired cognitive skills, loss of memory, reduced coordination, and limited capacity for self-expression. The impact of symptoms and side effects on quality of life must be evaluated in terms of each patient's identity and may be understood in terms of each patient's story. Insights from Narrative Medicine visits may also be helpful for the treatment team as they seek to assess patient needs, attitudes, and abilities. We provide case-based histories demonstrating applications of Narrative Medicine in the care of patients with brain tumors whose sense of self and quality of life are challenged. The cases include managing frontal lobe syndrome of loss of initiative and pervasive emotional apathy with his wife and young children, regaining a meaningful activity in a patient, re-establishing self-identity in a young woman with ependymoma, and improving spells with coexistent epilepsy and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES).

  11. Evaluation of the patient with spells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornes, Susannah Brock; Shih, Tina

    2011-10-01

    : The neurologic consultant is frequently called to evaluate the patient with transient neurologic deficits, or spells. Spells can present with a broad array of clinical features, making a systematic evaluation challenging. Familiarity with a variety of key features for different spell types will help the consultant create an appropriate differential diagnosis to guide the diagnostic evaluation. : Recent practice parameters outline the appropriate evaluation for patients presenting with first unprovoked seizure, and an update in the International League Against Epilepsy classification scheme for seizures has shifted the terminology used to describe these spells. When a spell cannot be unambiguously identified as a seizure, recent studies propose features to help distinguish syncope, sleep disorders, and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. For patients who are critically ill, extended EEG monitoring is increasingly available, and there is a growing appreciation for the high burden of seizures and status epilepticus in the intensive care unit population. : This article reviews the most common paroxysmal spell types encountered on the acute care ward and in the intensive care unit, discusses clinical features that help distinguish various spell types, and proposes a systematic evaluation for use by the neurologic consultant.

  12. The influence of impression management scales on the Personality Assessment Inventory in the epilepsy monitoring unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdom, Catherine L; Kirlin, Kristin A; Hoerth, Matthew T; Noe, Katherine H; Drazkowski, Joseph F; Sirven, Joseph I; Locke, Dona E C

    2012-12-01

    The Somatic Complaints scale (SOM) and Conversion subscale (SOM-C) of the Personality Assessment Inventory perform best in classifying psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) from epileptic seizures (ES); however, the impact of positive impression management (PIM) and negative impression management (NIM) scales on SOM and SOM-C classification has not been examined. We studied 187 patients from an epilepsy monitoring unit with confirmed PNES or ES. On SOM, the best cut score was 72.5 T when PIM was elevated and 69.5 T when there was no bias. On SOM-C, when PIM was elevated, the best cut score was 67.5 T and 76.5 T when there was no bias. Negative impression management elevations (n=9) were too infrequent to analyze separately. Despite similarities in classification accuracy, there were differences in sensitivity and specificity with and without PIM, impacting positive and negative predictive values. The presence of PIM bias generally increases positive predictive power of SOM and SOM-C but decreases negative predictive power. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Frequency of a false positive diagnosis of epilepsy: A systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Nguyen, Dennis; Mohamed, Armin; Carcel, Cheryl; Li, Qiang; Kutlubaev, Mansur A; Anderson, Craig S; Hackett, Maree L

    2016-10-01

    To determine the frequency of false positive diagnoses of epilepsy and to explore its imitators and consequences. A systematic review of all published observational studies (to November 2015) was conducted to determine the proportion of false positive diagnoses of epilepsy. We included studies of people of all ages receiving a diagnosis of epilepsy. All observational study designs were included with the exception of case-reports and case series with fewer than 3 participants. Data were available from 27 studies (31 reports), reporting considerably varied frequencies of false positive diagnoses. The frequency of false positive diagnosis range from 2% to 71%. The data also suggest that syncope and psychogenic non-epileptic paroxysmal events were the commonest imitators of epilepsy. Misdiagnosis led to mismanagement with anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) and affected legal driving status and employment. False positive diagnosis of epilepsy is common, even though there is considerable heterogeneity across studies. All potential imitators should be considered and clinicians should be cautious introducing AEDs without a definite diagnosis given the risk of side effects, and the possible impact on legal driving status and employment. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis in patients with symptomatic epilepsy and epilepsy of unknown etiology ('cryptogenic').

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauser, S; Soellner, C; Bien, C G; Tumani, H

    2017-09-01

    To compare the frequency of intrathecal immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis in patients with symptomatic epilepsy and epilepsy of unknown etiology ('cryptogenic'). Patients with epileptic (n = 301) and non-epileptic (n = 10) seizures were retrospectively screened for autochthonous intrathecal Ig synthesis and oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid. Intrathecal IgG/OCBs were detected in 8% of patients with epilepsies of unknown etiology, 5% of patients with first seizures of unknown cause and 0-4% of patients with epilepsy due to brain tumors, cerebrovascular disease or other etiologies. Intrathecal IgG/OCBs were not seen in patients with psychogenic seizures. Identical OCBs in serum and cerebrospinal fluid were more common in all patient groups (10-40% depending on underlying etiology). Intrathecal IgG synthesis/OCBs were observed slightly more frequently in patients with 'cryptogenic' epilepsy and with first seizures of unknown etiology than in other patient groups. However, this remained an infrequent finding and thus we could not confirm humoral immunity as a leading disease mechanism in patients with epilepsy in general or with unknown etiology in particular. © 2017 EAN.

  15. Dissociation in patients with dissociative seizures: relationships with trauma and seizure symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pick, S; Mellers, J D C; Goldstein, L H

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to extend the current understanding of dissociative symptoms experienced by patients with dissociative (psychogenic, non-epileptic) seizures (DS), including psychological and somatoform types of symptomatology. An additional aim was to assess possible relationships between dissociation, traumatic experiences, post-traumatic symptoms and seizure manifestations in this group. A total of 40 patients with DS were compared with a healthy control group (n = 43), matched on relevant demographic characteristics. Participants completed several self-report questionnaires, including the Multiscale Dissociation Inventory (MDI), Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire-20, Traumatic Experiences Checklist and the Post-Traumatic Diagnostic Scale. Measures of seizure symptoms and current emotional distress (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were also administered. The clinical group reported significantly more psychological and somatoform dissociative symptoms, trauma, perceived impact of trauma, and post-traumatic symptoms than controls. Some dissociative symptoms (i.e. MDI disengagement, MDI depersonalization, MDI derealization, MDI memory disturbance, and somatoform dissociation scores) were elevated even after controlling for emotional distress; MDI depersonalization scores correlated positively with trauma scores while seizure symptoms correlated with MDI depersonalization, derealization and identity dissociation scores. Exploratory analyses indicated that somatoform dissociation specifically mediated the relationship between reported sexual abuse and DS diagnosis, along with depressive symptoms. A range of psychological and somatoform dissociative symptoms, traumatic experiences and post-traumatic symptoms are elevated in patients with DS relative to healthy controls, and seem related to seizure manifestations. Further studies are needed to explore peri-ictal dissociative experiences in more detail.

  16. Definition and diagnostic criteria of sleep-related hypermotor epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinuper, Paolo; Bisulli, Francesca; Cross, J H; Hesdorffer, Dale; Kahane, Philippe; Nobili, Lino; Provini, Federica; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Tassi, Laura; Vignatelli, Luca; Bassetti, Claudio; Cirignotta, Fabio; Derry, Christopher; Gambardella, Antonio; Guerrini, Renzo; Halasz, Peter; Licchetta, Laura; Mahowald, Mark; Manni, Raffaele; Marini, Carla; Mostacci, Barbara; Naldi, Ilaria; Parrino, Liborio; Picard, Fabienne; Pugliatti, Maura; Ryvlin, Philippe; Vigevano, Federico; Zucconi, Marco; Berkovic, Samuel; Ottman, Ruth

    2016-05-10

    The syndrome known as nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy is recognized worldwide and has been studied in a wide range of clinical and scientific settings (epilepsy, sleep medicine, neurosurgery, pediatric neurology, epidemiology, genetics). Though uncommon, it is of considerable interest to practicing neurologists because of complexity in differential diagnosis from more common, benign sleep disorders such as parasomnias, or other disorders like psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. Moreover, misdiagnosis can have substantial adverse consequences on patients' lives. At present, there is no consensus definition of this disorder and disagreement persists about its core electroclinical features and the spectrum of etiologies involved. To improve the definition of the disorder and establish diagnostic criteria with levels of certainty, a consensus conference using formal recommended methodology was held in Bologna in September 2014. It was recommended that the name be changed to sleep-related hypermotor epilepsy (SHE), reflecting evidence that the attacks are associated with sleep rather than time of day, the seizures may arise from extrafrontal sites, and the motor aspects of the seizures are characteristic. The etiology may be genetic or due to structural pathology, but in most cases remains unknown. Diagnostic criteria were developed with 3 levels of certainty: witnessed (possible) SHE, video-documented (clinical) SHE, and video-EEG-documented (confirmed) SHE. The main research gaps involve epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatment, and prognosis. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Perceptual Accent Rating and Attribution in Psychogenic FAS : Some Further Evidence Challenging Whitaker’s Operational Definition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, Stefanie; Verhoeven, Jo; Bastiaanse, Yvonne; Marien, P.; Jonkers, Roel; Mavroudakis, Nicolas; Paquier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    A 40-year-old, non-aphasic, right-handed, and polyglot (L1: French, L2: Dutch, and L3: English) woman with a 12-year history of addiction to opiates and psychoactive substances, and clear psychiatric problems, presented with a foreign accent of sudden onset in L1. Speech evolved toward a mostly

  18. Cingulo-insular structural alterations associated with psychogenic symptoms, childhood abuse and PTSD in functional neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L; Matin, Nassim; Barsky, Arthur; Costumero-Ramos, Victor; Makaretz, Sara J; Young, Sigrid S; Sepulcre, Jorge; LaFrance, W Curt; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2017-06-01

    Adverse early-life events are predisposing factors for functional neurological disorder (FND) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cingulo-insular regions are implicated in the biology of both conditions and are sites of stress-mediated neuroplasticity. We hypothesised that functional neurological symptoms and the magnitude of childhood abuse would be associated with overlapping anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insular volumetric reductions, and that FND and PTSD symptoms would map onto distinct cingulo-insular areas. This within-group voxel-based morphometry study probes volumetric associations with self-report measures of functional neurological symptoms, adverse life events and PTSD symptoms in 23 mixed-gender FND patients. Separate secondary analyses were also performed in the subset of 18 women with FND to account for gender-specific effects. Across the entire cohort, there were no statistically significant volumetric associations with self-report measures of functional neurological symptom severity or childhood abuse. In women with FND, however, parallel inverse associations were observed between left anterior insular volume and functional neurological symptoms as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 and the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms Conversion Disorder subscale. Similar inverse relationships were also appreciated between childhood abuse burden and left anterior insular volume. Across all subjects, PTSD symptom severity was inversely associated with dorsal ACC volume, and the magnitude of lifetime adverse events was inversely associated with left hippocampal volume. This study reveals distinct cingulo-insular alterations for FND and PTSD symptoms and may advance our understanding of FND. Potential biological convergence between stress-related neuroplasticity, functional neurological symptoms and reduced insular volume was identified. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. „I talked to nobody about it” — Ericksonian hypnosis in psychotherapy of patient with psychogenic stuttering

    OpenAIRE

    Kleszcz-Szczyrba, Renata

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the initial stage (first 10 sessions) over a two-year spanning process of psychotherapy of a 29-year-old patient with a symptom of sharp stuttering. The patient, after many medical consultations and following an initial period of symptomatic treatment, was referred for psychotherapy. A suggestion about trauma in the past appeared. This article aims at showing the initial phase of therapy connected with working with trauma using the Ericksonian model of hypnosis. An import...

  20. Neonatal nonepileptic myoclonus is a prominent clinical feature of KCNQ2 gain-of-function variants R201C and R201H

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulkey, S.B.; Ben-Zeev, B.; Nicolai, J.; Carroll, J.L.; Gronborg, S.; Jiang, Y.H.; Joshi, N.; Kelly, M.; Koolen, D.A.; Mikati, M.A.; Park, K.; Pearl, P.L.; Scheffer, I.E.; Spillmann, R.C.; Taglialatela, M.; Vieker, S.; Weckhuysen, S.; Cooper, E.C.; Cilio, M.R.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze whether KCNQ2 R201C and R201H variants, which show atypical gain-of-function electrophysiologic properties in vitro, have a distinct clinical presentation and outcome. METHODS: Ten children with heterozygous, de novo KCNQ2 R201C or R201H variants were identified worldwide,

  1. Neonatal nonepileptic myoclonus is a prominent clinical feature of KCNQ2 gain-of-function variants R201C and R201H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulkey, Sarah B; Ben-Zeev, Bruria; Nicolai, Joost

    2017-01-01

    patients had encephalopathy from birth and presented with prominent startle-like myoclonus, which could be triggered by sound or touch. In seven patients, electroencephalography (EEG) was performed in the neonatal period and showed a burst-suppression pattern. However, myoclonus did not have an EEG......-of-function variants, supporting the value of in vitro functional screening. These findings suggest that gain-of-function and loss-of-function variants need different targeted therapeutic approaches....

  2. Definition and classification of epilepsy. Classification of epileptic seizures 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases, especially in childhood and adolescence. The incidence varies from 15 to 113 cases per 100 000 population with the maximum among children under 1 year old. The prevalence of epilepsy is high, ranging from 5 to 8 cases (in some regions – 10 cases per 1000 children under 15 years old. Classification of the disease has great importance for diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. The article presents a novel strategy for classification of epileptic seizures, developed in 2016. It contains a number of brand new concepts, including a very important one, saying that some seizures, previously considered as generalized or focal only, can be, in fact, both focal and generalized. They include tonic, atonic, myoclonic seizures and epileptic spasms. The term “secondarily generalized seizure” is replace by the term “bilateral tonic-clonic seizure” (as soon as it is not a separate type of epileptic seizures, and the term reflects the spread of discharge from any area of cerebral cortex and evolution of any types of focal seizures. International League Against Epilepsy recommends to abandon the term “pseudo-epileptic seizures” and replace it by the term “psychogenic non-epileptic seizures”. If a doctor is not sure that seizures have epileptic nature, the term “paroxysmal event” should be used without specifying the disease. The conception of childhood epileptic encephalopathies, developed within this novel classification project, is one of the most significant achievements, since in this case not only the seizures, but even epileptiform activity can induce severe disorders of higher mental functions. In addition to detailed description of the new strategy for classification of epileptic seizures, the article contains a comprehensive review of the existing principles of epilepsy and epileptic seizures classification.

  3. Functional movement disorders are not uncommon in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batla, Amit; Stamelou, Maria; Edwards, Mark J; Pareés, Isabel; Saifee, Tabish A; Fox, Zoe; Bhatia, Kailash P

    2013-04-01

    Functional movement disorders (FMDs) are thought to be rare in the elderly. Clinical characteristics of the elderly people who develop FMDs are rarely reported. The objective of this study was to highlight the clinical characteristics of FMD in the elderly and compared these with a cohort of patients with a younger age of onset. The authors performed a retrospective review of the clinical records of patients with FMD who were seen at their center in the last 5 years and had consented to be included in research studies. Patients fulfilling currently accepted diagnostic criteria for FMD as documented, clinically established, or probable were included. Of 151 patients with FMD who were identified and had sufficient information, 21.0% (n=33) had an onset after age 60 years (elderly group). The mean age of onset of FMD was 63.5 years (standard deviation, 5.2 years) in the elderly group and 35.5 years (standard deviation, 12.6 years) in the younger group. Tremor was the most common movement disorder in both groups (elderly group, 33.3%; younger group: 38.9%). Fixed dystonia was not observed in any patient who had an FMD onset after age 60 years. Gait abnormalities were significantly more common in the elderly group (69.7%) than in younger patients (23.5%; Pelderly patients (18.2%) compared with younger patients (13%; P=0.06). Contrary to common perceptions, FMDs are not uncommon in the elderly, and 1 in 5 patients in the current cohort, onset of FMD occurred after age 60 years. Gait abnormalities and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures may be more common in older patients. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  4. Work-related upper limb “overuse” syndromes:A review of historical descriptions and interpretations suggesting a psychogenic origin

    OpenAIRE

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    A previous review of historical descriptions and theories about the character and pathogenesis of writer’s cramp and other comparable chronic upper limb “overuse” work-related pain syndromes has indicated that somatic dysfunctions explain symptoms and findings. The first case studies and case series suggested that these conditions were caused by pathology affecting the peripheral nerves. The general perception gradually changed, however, with symptoms becoming attributed to central nervous sy...

  5. Stress affects a gastrin-releasing peptide system in the spinal cord that mediates sexual function: implications for psychogenic erectile dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Sakamoto

    Full Text Available Many men suffering from stress, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, report sexual dysfunction, which is traditionally treated via psychological counseling. Recently, we identified a gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP system in the lumbar spinal cord that is a primary mediator for male reproductive functions.To ask whether an acute severe stress could alter the male specific GRP system, we used a single-prolonged stress (SPS, a putative rat model for PTSD in the present study. Exposure of SPS to male rats decreases both the local content and axonal distribution of GRP in the lower lumbar spinal cord and results in an attenuation of penile reflexes in vivo. Remarkably, pharmacological stimulation of GRP receptors restores penile reflexes in SPS-exposed males, and induces spontaneous ejaculation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, although the level of plasma testosterone is normal 7 days after SPS exposure, we found a significant decrease in the expression of androgen receptor protein in this spinal center.We conclude that the spinal GRP system appears to be a stress-vulnerable center for male reproductive functions, which may provide new insight into a clinical target for the treatment of erectile dysfunction triggered by stress and psychiatric disorders.

  6. Visual stimulation facilitates penile responses to vibration in men with and without erectile disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, E.; Everaerd, W.; van Lunsen, R. H.; Oerlemans, S.

    1994-01-01

    This study compared reflexogenic and psychogenic penile responses in men with and without erectile disorder. It was hypothesized that men with psychogenic erectile dysfunction respond minimally to vibrotactile stimulation. An enhancement of penile responses was expected when vibration was combined

  7. Mass hysteria among South African primary school learners in Kwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-08-03

    Aug 3, 2009 ... In the Kwa-Dukuza school, the affected children displayed typical symptoms and signs of an unusual odour, weakness, palpitations, chest and abdominal pains, hyperventilation, dizziness, tremors, pseudo-seizures and blackouts. This was in keeping with an outbreak of mass hysteria. Management of mass ...

  8. Prevalence of epilepsy in 74,949 school children in Khartoum State, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Inaam N; Elseed, Maha A; Hamed, Ahlam A; Abdel-Rahman, Manar E; El-Sadig, Sarah M; Omer, Ilham M; Osman, Abdelgadir H; Ahmed, Ammar E; Karrar, Zein A; Salih, Mustafa A

    2017-08-01

    epilepsy in Khartoum State was estimated to be 4/1000. The highest prevalence was in Jabal Awliya Locality (4.87/1000) and the lowest was in Khartoum Locality (3.35/1000). Twenty-nine (8.7%) patients proved to have non-epileptic seizures. The majority (15, 51.6%) had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and four (13.6%) had syncope. The majority (171, 56.43%) of patients had generalised epilepsy, 109 (35.97%) had focal epilepsy, and 23 (7.6%) had unclassified epilepsy. The prevalence of epilepsy in school children in Khartoum State (4/1000) is higher than that reported previously from Khartoum Province in 1983 (0.9/1000).

  9. A prospective observational longitudinal study of new-onset seizures and newly diagnosed epilepsy in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredsø, N; Toft, Nils; Sabers, A.

    2017-01-01

    Seizures are common in dogs and can be caused by non-epileptic conditions or epilepsy. The clinical course of newly diagnosed epilepsy is sparsely documented. The objective of this study was to prospectively investigate causes for seizures (epileptic and non-epileptic) in a cohort of dogs with ne...

  10. Epilepsy and violence: case series concerning physical trauma in children of persons with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauffin H

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Helena Gauffin1,2 Anne-Marie Landtblom1–4 1Department of Neurology, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 2Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 3Neurology Unit, Department of Medical Specialist, General Hospital, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, IMM, County Council, Linköping University, Motala, Sweden; 4Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Abstract: Historically, epilepsy has been associated with violence, but more recent studies have emphasized genetic and psychosocial factors as more important. The case series presented here aim to highlight the difficult situation the affected children are in. We report on three cases when children have been traumatized and, in one case, even been killed by their parent who was diagnosed with epilepsy. In the first case, we describe a woman with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy who was sentenced to forensic psychiatry care for killing her child. She lived under difficult psychosocial circumstances and a suicide attempt contributed to what happened. The second case describes a man with post-traumatic seizures who was sentenced for child abuse. Ictal or postictal violence was considered in these two cases but a causal link between the violence and epilepsy has not been established. In the third case, we describe a woman with focal epilepsy and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNESs. Her child was hurt and frightened in relation to violent seizures, which were regarded as PNESs. This case series demonstrates that children of parents with epilepsy can be in a vulnerable situation. No causality has been established between the seizures and these events, so consequently other factors such as psychosocial stress, low cognitive function, and a suicide attempt must also be considered as important. When a child is hurt by a parent with epilepsy the patient must be closely examined to determine the role of the seizures

  11. Pre- and post-surgical psychiatric assessments and intervention by major epilepsy centers in Japan - Nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goji, Hiroko; Fukuchi, Toshihiko; Kanemoto, Kousuke

    2017-05-01

    Although psychiatric issues following epilepsy surgery are now widely recognized as a major problem, actual awareness of these issues by epilepsy centers remains to be elucidated. This is the first known report regarding the use of psychiatric assessments and interventions by epilepsy centers throughout Japan. At the beginning of 2016, we sent a questionnaire regarding psychiatric assessments performed before and after epilepsy surgery, psychiatric intervention after surgery, and future plans for dealing with psychiatric issues in relation to epilepsy surgery, which consisted of a total of 24 items, to all members of the Japan Epilepsy Center Association (JEPICA). Nearly all major epilepsy centers in Japan are included in JEPICA, which had 31 members in 2016. Twenty-four (77%) of the 31 centers responded to the questionnaire. Seventeen (70.8%) centers answered that a psychiatrist was incorporated as part of their epilepsy surgery unit. In addition, 17 (70.8%) noted that psychiatric assessments were obtained prior to surgery, which were performed by psychiatrists in 8 (33.3%) centers and psychologists in 11 (45.8%). In 23 (95.8%) of the centers, the risk of occurrence of psychiatric illness following surgery was routinely explained prior to surgery, at least to surgical candidates with high susceptibility. In total, cases of psychiatric illness following surgery had been experienced in 16 (66.7%) centers, with depression as the most commonly encountered (41.7%), followed by anxiety (33.3%), psychosis (25.0%), and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (8.3%). Strong points of epilepsy centers in Japan include serious concern regarding post-surgical psychiatric illness by nearly all members of JEPICA and explanation of the risk of psychiatric adverse events provided beforehand to their patients. On the other hand, the small size of some epilepsy centers, along with lack of a standardized method for evaluation of psychiatric symptoms as well as dependence on the

  12. Administrative management of the soldier with seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, C H

    1991-07-01

    Based on improvement in our understanding of the prognosis of young adults with new onset seizures, and cumulative experience with the rules in effect for the last 30 years, a substantial change in the regulations affecting the fitness and profiling of these soldiers has been made. In general, these liberalize retention and profiling, set limits on the duration of trials of duty, provide for fitness determinations in soldiers with pseudo-seizures, and specify when neurologic consultation is required.

  13. Retrobulbar Hematoma from Warfarin Toxicity and the Limitations of Bedside Ocular Sonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    and progressive swelling. She had a complicated medical history, including the recent diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis with associated pulmonary...pseudoseizures, chronic lymphadenopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and fibromyalgia . The physical exam was remarkable for slight left eye proptosis, left...need for CT scan if the diagnosis can be made. In this case, the CT scan demonstrates a fairly significant RBH (Figure 2), yet the focused bedside

  14. Religious convictions in patients with epilepsy-associated affective disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaler, Arne E; Kondziella, Daniel; Morken, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy often have different mood symptoms and behavioral trait characteristics compared to the non-epileptic population. In the present prospective study, we aimed to assess differences in behavioral trait characteristics between acutely admitted, psychiatric in-patients with epil......Patients with epilepsy often have different mood symptoms and behavioral trait characteristics compared to the non-epileptic population. In the present prospective study, we aimed to assess differences in behavioral trait characteristics between acutely admitted, psychiatric in...

  15. Distúrbios de atenção em pacientes com crises parciais complexas

    OpenAIRE

    Stella, Florindo; Maciel, Jayme Antunes

    2003-01-01

    A study of concentrated attention patterns in epileptic patients was conducted with the objectives: characterization of the patients' epileptic condition; assessment of the concentrated attention levels in epileptic and nonepileptic individuals; comparison of the attention levels of the two groups. An evaluation was performed of 50 adult outpatients with complex partial seizures and 20 non-epileptic individuals (comparative group) at the Neuroepilepsy Ambulatory Unit, State University of Camp...

  16. Recurrent rhabdomyolysis in a teenager with psychosis-intermittent hyponatremia-polydipsia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoi, Asha N; Stockwell, Jana

    2015-04-01

    To report a case of recurrent hyponatremia and rhabdomyolysis in a teenager with psychogenic polydipsia. A 16-year-old boy was admitted with recurrent episodes of hyponatremia and rhabdomyolysis secondary to psychogenic polydipsia. He was treated with hypertonic saline, intravenous fluids, and supportive care. Psychogenic polydipsia is a condition characterized by compulsive drinking. Severe hyponatremia is a rare, but serious complication in patients with psychogenic polydipsia. Failure in cell volume regulatory mechanisms, defective osmoregulation, defective urinary dilution, and enhanced secretion of vasopressin are believed to play a role in the development of hyponatremia. Rhabdomyolysis can complicate severe hyponatremia, although the exact mechanism is not known. Antipsychotic drugs are also implicated in rhabdomyolysis. Severe hyponatremia and rhabdomyolysis can complicate psychogenic polydipsia. Patients receiving antipsychotic drugs with concomitant severe hyponatremia need to be monitored for rhabdomyolysis.

  17. Human brain evolution and the "Neuroevolutionary Time-depth Principle:" Implications for the Reclassification of fear-circuitry-related traits in DSM-V and for studying resilience to warzone-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracha, H Stefan

    2006-07-01

    exception and are likely to be followed by PTSD rates approaching those that follow warzone exposure. During bioevents, Amygdala-driven and locus-coeruleus-driven epidemic pseudosomatic symptoms may be an order of magnitude more common than infection-caused cytokine-driven symptoms. Implications for the red cross and FEMA are discussed. It is also argued that hospital phobia as well as dog phobia, bird phobia and bat phobia require re-taxonomization in DSM-V in a new "overconsolidational disorders" category anchored around PTSD. The overconsolidational spectrum category may be conceptualized as straddling the fear circuitry spectrum disorders and the affective spectrum disorders categories, and may be a category for which Pitman's secondary prevention propranolol regimen may be specifically indicated as a "morning after pill" intervention. Predictions are presented regarding obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) (e.g., female-pattern hoarding vs. male-pattern hoarding) and "culture-bound" acute anxiety symptoms (taijin-kyofusho, koro, shuk yang, shook yong, suo yang, rok-joo, jinjinia-bemar, karoshi, gwarosa, Voodoo death). Also discussed are insights relevant to pseudoneurological symptoms and to the forthcoming Dissociative-Conversive disorders category in DSM-V, including what the author terms fright-triggered acute pseudo-localized symptoms (i.e., pseudoparalysis, pseudocerebellar imbalance, psychogenic blindness, pseudoseizures, and epidemic sociogenic illness). Speculations based on studies of the human abnormal-spindle-like, microcephaly-associated (ASPM) gene, the microcephaly primary autosomal recessive (MCPH) gene, and the forkhead box p2 (FOXP2) gene are made and incorporated into what is termed "The pre-FOXP2 Hypothesis of Blood-Injection-Injury Phobia." Finally, the author argues for a non-reductionistic fusion of "distal (evolutionary) neurobiology" with clinical "proximal neurobiology," utilizing neurological heuristics. It is noted that the value of re

  18. A neuro-fuzzy system to support in the diagnostic of epileptic events and non-epileptic events using different fuzzy arithmetical operations Um sistema neuro-difuso para auxiliar no diagnóstico de eventos epilépticos e eventos não epilépticos utilizando diferentes operações aritméticas difusas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar M.F. de Carvalho

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate different fuzzy arithmetical operations to support in the diagnostic of epileptic events and non epileptic events. METHOD: A neuro-fuzzy system was developed using the NEFCLASS (NEuro Fuzzy CLASSIfication architecture and an artificial neural network with backpropagation learning algorithm (ANNB. RESULTS: The study was composed by 244 patients with a bigger frequency of the feminine sex. The number of right decisions at the test phase, obtained by the NEFCLASS and ANNB was 83.60% and 90.16%, respectively. The best sensibility result was attained by NEFCLASS (84.90%; the best specificity result were attained by ANNB with 95.65%. CONCLUSION: The proposed neuro-fuzzy system combined the artificial neural network capabilities in the pattern classifications together with the fuzzy logic qualitative approach, leading to a bigger rate of system success.OBJETIVO: Investigar diferentes operações aritméticas difusas para auxíliar no diagnóstico de eventos epilépticos e eventos não-epilépticos. MÉTODO: Um sistema neuro-difuso foi desenvolvido utilizando a arquitetura NEFCLASS (NEuro Fuzzy CLASSIfication e uma rede neural artificial com o algoritmo de aprendizagem backpropagation (RNAB. RESULTADOS: A amostra estudada foi de 244 pacientes com maior freqüência no sexo feminino. O número de decisões corretas na fase de teste, obtidas através do NEFCLASS e RNAB foi de 83,60% e 90,16%, respectivamente. O melhor resultado de sensibilidade foi obtido com o NEFCLASS (84,90%; o melhor resultado de especificidade foi obtido com a RNAB (95,65%. CONCLUSÃO: O sistema neuro-difuso proposto combinou a capacidade das redes neurais artificiais na classificação de padrões juntamente com a abordagem qualitativa da logica difusa, levando a maior taxa de acertos do sistema.

  19. Amnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... permanent amnesia. Another rare type of amnesia, called dissociative (psychogenic) amnesia, stems from emotional shock or trauma, such as being the victim of a violent crime. In this disorder, a person may lose personal memories and autobiographical ...

  20. Self-inflicted lesions in dermatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gieler, Uwe; Consoli, Sylvie G; Tomás-Aragones, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    ; simulation; pathomimicry; skin picking syndrome and related skin damaging disorders; compulsive and impulsive skin picking; impulse control disorders; obsessive compulsive spectrum disorders; trichotillomania; dermatitis artefacta; factitial dermatitis; acne excoriée; and neurotic and psychogenic...

  1. Bristow-Latarjet Technique: Still a Very Successful Surgery for Anterior Glenohumeral Instability - A Forty Year One Clinic Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilson Ruci

    2015-05-01

    CONCLUSION: The Bristow-Latarjet procedure is a very good surgical treatment for recurrent anterior-inferior instability of the glenohumeral joint. It must not be used for multidirectional instability or psychogenic habitual dislocations.

  2. Tablets and talking—A spurious contrast in psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praag, H.M. van

    1979-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy of psychiatric patients are not given equal appreciation. Particularly in syndromes with marked psychogenic or psychosocial overtones, psychotherapy is regarded as the causal therapy par excellence. In these cases (the vast majority), psychotropic drugs are believed

  3. Perspectives on functional and hyperkinetic movement disorders : Phenomenology & pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Salm, S.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Functional movement disorders (FMD), previously known as conversion disorders or psychogenic movement disorders, are abnormal movements which cannot be attributed to other neurological disorders. FMD are frequently encountered in movement disorder outpatient clinics. Yet, most neurologists consider

  4. Uncommon presentation of neuro-cysticercosis | Dewan | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-epileptic manifestations of neurocysticercosis (NCC) include intellectual deterioration, dementia and parkinsonian behaviour. We report on a child with NCC presenting with abnormal choreiform movement. The case report highlights an uncommon presentation of NCC, and also draws attention to an unusual cause of ...

  5. Erratum to “The WAG/Rij strain: A genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with comorbidity of depression” [Prog Neuro-Psychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 35 (4) 854-876

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkisova, K.Y.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2012-01-01

    The Publisher regrets that an error occurred in the spelling of the word ‘depression’ in the title of this paper. It incorrectly appeared as 12 ‘depressiony’. There is also an error in Fig.3. The text reads as follows "The open field test measures in non-epileptic and absence-epileptic Wistar

  6. Epileptogenic side effects of psychotropic drugs. Practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itil, T M; Soldatos, C

    1980-09-26

    Patient- and drug-related factors influence the inherent epileptogenic properties of psychotropic drugs. This article suggests measures to deal with these properties prophylactically and therapeutically in epileptic and nonepileptic psychiatric patients. The appropriate use of psychotropic drugs is emphasized in light of their epileptogenic potential.

  7. Sleep Disorders in Children with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep and behavior disorders in 55 children with epilepsy (mean age 10 years; range 4-16 years were compared with those in their non-epileptic siblings of the same ages and sex ratio and correlated with epilepsy-specific factors, in a study at Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.

  8. The role of placebo in the diagnosis and treatment of functional neurologic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelfanger, K S

    2016-01-01

    Placebo therapy can produce meaningful, clinical relief for a variety of conditions. While placebos are not without their ethically fraught history, they continue to be used, largely covertly, even today. Because the prognosis for psychogenic disorders is often poor and recovery may be highly dependent on the patient's belief in the diagnosis and treatment regimen, some physicians find placebo therapy for psychogenic disorders compelling, but also particularly contentious. Yet placebos also have a long tradition of being used for provocative diagnosis (wherein placebo is used to elicit and/or terminate the symptoms as a way of diagnosing symptoms as "psychogenic"). In this chapter we discuss cases describing placebo as therapy for psychogenic disorders and the challenges related to embedded Cartesian beliefs in Western medicine. The legitimate ethical reservations against placebo therapy, in general, have been related to assumptions about their "inertness" and a requirement for deception, both which are being refuted by emerging data. In this chapter, we also re-evaluate the concerns associated with placebo therapy for psychogenic disorders by asking, "Are we harming patients by withholding placebo treatment?" © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tic disorders in the differential diagnosis of chronic cough in children in relation to four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, Işık; Şişmanlar, Şahika Gülen

    2015-09-01

    Chronic cough is a frequent reason for medical referrals in childhood. In patients who do not have signs or symptoms of an underlying respiratory system disease and who do not respond to experimental treatment, psychogenic cough should be considered. In this paper, four patients who were referred to our department with a prediagnosis of psychogenic cough, found to have tic disorder as a result of the assessments performed and improved with antipsychotic medication are presented. The differantial diagnosis of chronic cough in children should include tic disorders as well as psychogenic cough. Tic disorders can be diagnosed easily with detailed history and their response to medical treatment is rather satisfactory. Recognition of these disorders by pediatricians will minimize erroneous diagnoses and inappropriate therapies in children with a complaint of chronic cough.

  10. Efektivitas "Cognitive Behavior Therapy" terhadap Penurunan Derajat Stres

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuf, Umar; Setianto, Luki

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) is an effective way to decrease the degree of stress in patients with chronic Low Back Pain (LBP). Chronic LBP can be divided to physical and psychogenical view. Psychogenical LBP was result of cognitive process associated with stress. This study is conducted to get an idea of how the effects of CBT can help reducing the degree of stress in patients with chronic LBP in hospital 'X' Bandung.According to the results of this study, it can be concluded that Cognit...

  11. The Arjenyattah epidemic. A mass phenomenon: spread and triggering factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modan, B; Swartz, T A; Tirosh, M; Costin, C; Weissenberg, E; Donagi, A; Acker, C; Revach, M; Vettorazzi, G

    A massive epidemic of psychogenic aetiology occurred in three districts of the West Bank over two weeks in March-April, 1983. It affected 949 individuals, 727 (77%) of them adolescent females. The symptoms were not accompanied by positive physical signs or by laboratory findings. The epidemiological pattern was pathognomonic of that of a psychogenic disorder. The initial trigger was probably the odour of H2S escaping from a faulty latrine in the schoolyard of the first affected school. Subsequent spread of the disease was due to psychological and extra-medical factors, including publicity by the mass media. Spread was stopped immediately after closure of schools.

  12. Survey of 37 cases with basal ganglia calcification. Relationship to CT-scan findings, underlying diseases, and epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, Akira; Ishida, Shiro; Wada, Toyoji (National Epilepsy Center, Shizuoka Higashi Hospital (Japan))

    1984-11-01

    Of 5,987 patients (5,196 epileptic patients and 791 non-epileptic patients) undergoing CT-scan, calcification of the bilateral basal ganglia was detected in 28 epileptic patients and 9 non-epileptic patients. Relationship among CT-scan findings, underlying diseases and epilepsy was studied. CT-scan findings could be classified into the localized type in which calcification was limited to the globus pallidus in 33 patients and diffuse type in which it extended to the putamen in 4 patients. Localized type increased with age. It was about 70 times higher in patients above the age of 50 than in patients below the age of 10. The female to male ratio was 2:1. Underlying diseases were idiopathic or familial in cases of localized type, and hypoparathyroidism in cases of diffuse type. Seventy-five percent of the epileptic patients had partial epilepsy. There seems not to be direct correlation between basal ganglia calcification and epilepsy.

  13. Video-EEG recording: a four-year clinical audit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Rourke, K

    2012-02-03

    In the setting of a regional neurological unit without an epilepsy surgery service as in our case, video-EEG telemetry is undertaken for three main reasons; to investigate whether frequent paroxysmal events represent seizures when there is clinical doubt, to attempt anatomical localization of partial seizures when standard EEG is unhelpful, and to attempt to confirm that seizures are non-epileptic when this is suspected. A clinical audit of all telemetry performed over a four-year period was carried out, in order to determine the clinical utility of this aspect of the service and to determine means of improving effectiveness in the unit. Analysis of the data showed a high rate of negative studies with no attacks recorded. Of the positive studies approximately 50% showed non-epileptic attacks. Strategies for improving the rate of positive investigations are discussed.

  14. Acute loss of vision in a young woman: A case report on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute loss of vision needs urgent attention and treatment. We report on a young Ethiopian woman who experienced acute bilateral blindness. In the presence of normal ophthalmological findings psychogenic blindness has to be considered. Case Details: A 21 years old woman was admitted to the psychiatry ...

  15. Aetiology of vertigo in a Nigerian tertiary health facility, a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trauma occurred in 4(8.7%), Ocular pathology in 3(6.5%), while Vestibulotoxicity was found in 2(4.3%). Others include, Psychogenic causes in 2(4.3%) and vestibular neuronitis was the least found in 1(2.2%) of the patients. Laboratory investigations were unremarkable in all of the cases. Fasting blood sugar was found to ...

  16. "Krakende kaken"; psychiatrische beschouwingen over het syndroom van het pijnlijke, slecht functionerende kaakgewricht (Arthrosis deformans van het kaakgewricht of het syndroom van Costen)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuler, Jacques

    1966-01-01

    Naar aanleiding van klinische indrukken en mede op grond van literatuurgegevens werd een psychiatrisch onderzoek verricht naar het aandeel van psychogene factoren bij het tot stand komen van kaakgewrichtsklachten. Het klachtencomplex dat van stoornissen in de functie van het kaakgewricht het gevolg

  17. Psychological problems of atomic bomb survivors from the medical social worker's standpoint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoike, Toshio

    1994-01-01

    Mental data from 80 A-bomb survivors were available during a 20-year period 1973-1992. Types of A-bomb survivors were classified into (1) directly exposed A-bomb survivors, (2) A-bomb survivors living in the United States, (3) those living in prefectures other than Nagasaki, (4) ex-soldiers, (5) A-bomb survivors having family problems and others, (6) the demented elderly, (7) the alcoholic, and (8) others. Mental problems were judged as psychogenic, endogenous, and exogenous. Mental problems were most frequently associated with Type 1 (34.9%), followed by Type 8 (21.0%), Type 2 (18.6%), and Type 3 (7.0%). Noticeable finding was that Type 1 A-bomb survivors suffered from psychogenic and exogenous mental problems in an extremely high incidence, as compared with the non-exposed group (66.3% vs 24%). The incidence of both exogenous and endogenous problems was higher in the non-exposed group (32.6% and 24.5%) than the exposed group (23.2% and 10.5%). There was no significant gender difference in the development of mental problems. According to types of A-bomb survivors, both psychogenic and exogenous mental problems were most common for Type 1. The incidence of psychogenic problems was 2.85 times higher than that of exogenous problems. (N.K.)

  18. Premature Ejaculation, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor (ssri) Induced Delayed Ejaculation In The Framework Of The Emotional Motor System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waldinger, Marcel D; Berendsen, Hemmie H.G.; Blok, Bertil F.M.; Olivier, Berend; Holstege, Gert

    1998-01-01

    Premature ejaculation has generally been considered a psychosexual disorder with psychogenic aetiology. Although still mainly treated by behavioural therapy, in recent years double-blind studies have indicated the beneficial effects of some of the serotonergic anti depressants (SSRIs) in delaying

  19. 75 FR 6260 - Notice of Intent To Grant an Exclusive License

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ...Notice is hereby given that the Department of Veterans Affairs, Office of Research and Development, intends to grant to PsychoGenics, Inc., 765 Old Saw Mill River Road, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA, an exclusive license to practice the following patent application: U.S. Patent Application Serial No. 11/713,156 filed February 28, 2007, entitled ``Pharmacological Treatment of Parkinson's Disease.''

  20. A Primer on Persistent Postconcussion Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantz, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    The existence of persistent postconcussion symptoms (PPCS) is controversial, and there is ongoing debate as to whether the etiology of PPCS is psychogenic or physiogenic. In addition, there is a lack of agreement on diagnostic definitions of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and concussion and the terms are used interchangeably in the research…

  1. Use of Self-Induced Hypnosis to Modify Thermal Balance during Cold Water Immersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    34Effects of caffeine and cold on exercise metabolism." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise , Vol. 20, (Suppl), pp. 84, 1988. 15 18. Jackson, J.A...Physiology, Vol. 56, pp. 1572-1577, 1984. 23. Morgan, W.P., "Psychogenic factors and exercise metabolism: a review." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise , Vol

  2. Xerostomia Due to Systemic Disease: A Review of 20 Conditions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xerostomia is a common complaint of nearly half of the elderly population and about one‑fifth of younger adults. It causes several signs and symptoms, and compromise oral functions and health‑related quality‑of‑life. Multiple reasons are proposed to describe the etiology of xerostomia such as local factors, psychogenic ...

  3. The Effects of Noxious Subliminal Suggestion upon Smoking Attitudes and Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutto, Franklin N.; Galli, Nicholas

    The efforts of smoking cessation programs have met with various degrees of success and fresh approaches to the problem are needed. An innovative technique that interrupts the psychogenic drives of smokers was employed to determine the effect of noxious subliminal suggestion on smoking attitudes and behavior. Adult smokers (N=60) were shown…

  4. Mass hysteria among South African primary school learners in Kwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-08-03

    Aug 3, 2009 ... later, to anxiety disorders. The goal should be to restore individuals and the community to routine function as quickly as possible. Prompt, definitive identification and labelling may help to terminate the symptoms. References. 1. Jones TF, Craig AS, Hoy D, et al. Mass psychogenic illness attributed to toxic.

  5. Use of Hypnotherapy for Assertive Training and Behavioral Rehearsal: An Active Mode of Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoge, Susan D.

    This paper describes a treatment approach which uses hypnotherapy techniques in combination with assertive training and behavioral rehearsal. It discusses the use of this treatment with a client who exhibited psychogenic symptoms due to personal anxiety. At the beginning of the treatment the client was shy, non-assertive and extremely…

  6. Nihilism: Belief Crisis of Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John J.

    1979-01-01

    The author identifies three distinct variations of youthful nihilism. Transitory nihilism refers to a temporary adolescent condition brought about by intellectual and moral growth. Reflective nihilism refers to the attempt to make nihilism a legitimate philosophy. Psychogenic nihilism refers to a condition of psychic instability brought about by…

  7. Mass Hysteria or Toxic Fumes? A Case Study for University Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engs, Ruth C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Traces the historical background and describes the symptomology relating to mass hysteria and psychogenic illness. After prescribing a case study of an incident of such behavior at a mid-western university, explores the implications for staff training in student areas. (Author/KW)

  8. ABC Article

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    102640

    hospital admissions and 3% of emergency department visits with a reported mortality and major morbidity rate of ... cause. The causes of syncope can be classified into six groups including vascular, cardiac, neurological, psychogenic, metabolic, and syncope of unknown origin. ..... syncope (e.g., dehydration, stress, alcohol.

  9. The relationship of reactive psychosis and ICD-10 acute and transient psychotic disorders: evidence from a case register-based comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castagnini, Augusto; Bertelsen, Aksel; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: ICD-10 introduced a new diagnostic category, F23 'acute and transient psychotic disorders' (ATPD), to embrace clinical concepts such as bouffée délirante, cycloid psychosis, psychogenic (reactive) psychosis and schizophreniform psychosis. The purpose of this study was to examine...

  10. Tourette Syndrome: A Review and Educational Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Anne M.; Shea, Thomas M.

    1984-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome, a condition characterized by involuntary muscular and verbal tics, is defined, its course described, incidence noted (possibly 1.6 percent of the population), etiology considered (from viewpoints of psychogenic and organic theories), treatment (primarily pharmaceutical therapy) discussed, and educational approaches examined.…

  11. [Water intoxication and hyponatremia: report of two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado, J; Hernández, M; Juárez, C; González-Llera, F

    2000-01-01

    Two psychiatric patients suffering from psychogenic polydipsia, hyponatremia and water intoxication were evaluated at emergency room. Both of them showed organic psychiatric disease which improve with medical treatment. We illustrated the physiological and clinical features of polydipsia, hyponatremia and water intoxication as well as treatment modalities.

  12. Two Routes to Losing One’s Past Life: A Brain Trauma, an Emotional Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Ouellet

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic and psychogenic retrograde amnesia have long been considered as distinct entities and as such, studied separately. However, patterns of neuropsychological impairments in organic and psychogenic amnesia can bear interesting resemblances despite different aetiologies. In this paper, two cases with profound, selective and permanent retrograde amnesia are presented, one of an apparent organic origin and the other with an apparent psychogenic cause. The first case, DD, lost his memory after focal brain injury from a nail gun to the right temporal lobe. The second case, AC, lost her memory in the context of intense psychological suffering. In both cases, pre-morbid autobiographical memory for people, places and events was lost, and no feeling of familiarity was experienced during relearning. In addition, they both lost some semantic knowledge acquired prior to the onset of the amnesia. This contrasts with the preservation of complex motor skills without any awareness of having learned them. Both DD and AC showed mild deficits on memory tests but neither presented any anterograde amnesia. The paradox of these cases–opposite causes yet similar clinical profile–exemplifies the hypothesis that organic and psychogenic amnesia may be two expressions of the same faulty mechanism in the neural circuitry.

  13. Functional sensory symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, J.; Vermeulen, M.

    2017-01-01

    Functional (psychogenic) sensory symptoms are those in which the patient genuinely experiences alteration or absence of normal sensation in the absence of neurologic disease. The hallmark of functional sensory symptoms is the presence of internal inconsistency revealing a pattern of symptoms

  14. Reorganization of Dentate Gyrus Microcircuits During Epileptogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Ryan Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a form of acquired epilepsy characterized by recurrent and unprovoked seizures. TLE often develops following a precipitating neurological insult, such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, infection, prolonged febrile seizures or status epilepticus. These insults can initiate a constellation of genetic, functional, network and systems level reorganization that transforms a normal non-epileptic brain into one capable of generating recurrent and unprovoked seizures....

  15. The effectiveness of the Latarjet procedure for shoulder instability in patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erşen, A; Bayram, S; Birişik, F; Atalar, A C; Demirhan, M

    2017-12-01

    Powerful contractions during epileptic seizures may cause shoulder dislocation and instability. The aim of the study is to evaluate the functional and radiographic results of the Latarjet procedure for anterior shoulder dislocation in patients with epilepsy and compare the functional results of these patients with the results of patients without epilepsy. Is latarjet procedure effective in epileptic patients as non-epileptic patients with anterior shoulder instability? Eleven shoulders of 9 patients with epileptic seizures causing anterior shoulder instability were evaluated retrospectively. All patients had a Latarjet procedure after neurologic evaluation and treatment arrangement. Epileptic seizures after the operation and shoulder dislocation after a seizure were investigated. For functional evaluation, ROWE, ASES and Constant scores were utilized whereas standard X-ray views were used for radiologic evaluation. The results of epileptic patients with Latarjet procedure were compared with non-epileptic patients (53 patients, 54 shoulders) for anterior shoulder instability. Three (33%) of the 9 epileptic patients had recurrent seizures after Latarjet procedure, whereas 1 of the 11 shoulders (9%) had dislocation after an epileptic seizure. Functional scores were found to be significantly improved in epileptic (PLatarjet procedure for anterior instability (P>0.05). One shoulder of 11 in the patients with epilepsy group (9%) and one shoulder of the 54 shoulders non-epileptic patients group (1.8%) had a redislocation. The rate of postoperative redislocation was significantly higher in patients with epilepsy (P=0.008). Epileptic patients have a high rate of recurrent seizures even with proper medical treatment. Significant functional improvements and shoulder stability may be achieved after Latarjet procedure in epileptic patients. These functional results were comparable with those of non-epileptic patients with Latarjet procedure for anterior shoulder instability

  16. A Confusing Coincidence: Neonatal Hypoglycemic Seizures and Hyperekplexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat Demir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperekplexia is a rare, nonepileptic, genetic, or sporadic neurologic disorder characterized by startle responses to acoustic, optic, or tactile stimuli. Genetic defects in glycine receptors as well as encephalitis, tumors, inflammation, and disgenesis are among the etiologic causes of the disease. The main problem in hyperekplexia is the incomplete development of inhibitory mechanisms or exaggerated stimulation of excitatory mediators. Hyperekplexia is often confused with epileptic seizures. Here we present a case with hypoglycemic convulsions coexisting with hyperekplexia, causing diagnostic difficulty.

  17. Neuroethological approach to frontolimbic epileptic seizures and parasomnias: The same central pattern generators for the same behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassinari, C A; Cantalupo, G; Högl, B; Cortelli, P; Tassi, L; Francione, S; Nobili, L; Meletti, S; Rubboli, G; Gardella, E

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this report is not to make a differential diagnosis between epileptic nocturnal seizures and non-epileptic sleep-related movement disorders, or parasomnias. On the contrary, our goal is to emphasize the commonly shared semiological features of some epileptic seizures and parasomnias. Such similar features might be explained by the activation of the same neuronal networks (so-called 'central pattern generators' or CPG). These produce the stereotypical rhythmic motor sequences - in other words, behaviours - that are adaptive and species-specific (such as eating/alimentary, attractive/aversive, locomotor and nesting habits). CPG are located at the subcortical level (mainly in the brain stem and spinal cord) and, in humans, are under the control of the phylogenetically more recent neomammalian neocortical structures, according to a simplified Jacksonian model. Based on video-polygraphic recordings of sleep-related epileptic seizures and non-epileptic events (parasomnias), we have documented how a transient "neomammalian brain" dysfunction - whether epileptic or not - can 'release' (disinhibition?) the CPG responsible for involuntary motor behaviours. Thus, in both epileptic seizures and parasomnias, we can observe: (a) oroalimentary automatisms, bruxism and biting; (b) ambulatory behaviours, ranging from the classical bimanual-bipedal activity of 'frontal' hypermotor seizures, epileptic and non-epileptic wanderings, and somnambulism to periodic leg movements (PLM), alternating leg muscle activation (ALMA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS); and (c) various sleep-related events such as ictal fear, sleep terrors, nightmares and violent behaviour.

  18. The role of long-term video EEG in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha HUANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the diagnostic value of long-term video EEG (LT-VEEG in epileptic and non-epileptic seizure disorders.  Methods The LT-VEEG data of 279 patients who was diagnosed as epilepsy or suspected epilepsy due to paroxysmal events were analyzed retrospectively.  Results Among 279 cases, 122 cases (43.73% were detected clinical seizures. Among them, 84 cases who had been found synchronous epileptic discharge in fit period were diagnosed as epilepsy, and 38 cases without synchronous epileptic discharge were diagnosed as non-epileptic seizures. In 157 cases (56.27% who were not detected seizures, there were 102 cases being monitored interictal epileptiform discharges. In 188 patients who had been monitored epileptic attack or interictal epileptic discharge, 97 cases were identified seizure types, among whom 75 cases were further diagnosed as epilepsy syndrome.  Conclusions The LT-VEEG has important clinical value in the diagnosis and typing of epilepsy and differential diagnosis with non-epileptic seizures. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.11.012

  19. Current status of the New Antiepileptic drugs in chronic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Singh Sidhu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs are extensively used worldwide to treat a wide range of disorders other than epilepsy, such as neuropathic pain, migraine and bipolar disorder. Due to this situation more than 20 new third-generation AEDs have been introduced in the market recently. The future design of new AEDs must also have potential to help in the non-epileptic disorders. The wide acceptance of second generation AEDs for the management of various Non-epileptic disorders has caused the emergence of generics in the market. The wide use of approved AEDs outside epilepsy is based on both economic and scientific reasons. Bipolar disorders, migraine prophylaxis, fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain represent the most attractive indication expansion opportunities for anticonvulsant developers, providing blockbuster revenues. Strong growth in non-epilepsy conditions will see Pfizer’s Lyrica become the market leading brand by 2018. In this review we mainly focus on the current status of new AEDs in the treatment of chronic pain and migraine prophylaxis. AEDs have a strong analgesic potential and this is demonstrated by the wide use of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia and sodium valproate in migraine prophylaxis. At present, data on the new AEDs for non-epileptic conditions are inconclusive. Not all AEDs are effective in the management of neuropathic pain and migraine. Only those AEDs whose mechanisms of action are match with pathophysiology of the disease, have potential to show efficacy in non-epileptic disorder. For this better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease and mechanisms of action of new AEDs are essential requirement before initiating pre-clinical and clinical trials. Many new AEDs show good results in the animal model and open-label studies but fail to provide strong evidence at randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The final decision regarding the clinical efficacy of the particular AEDs in a specific non-epileptic disorder

  20. Rigiscan®-Monitoring der Erektion unter audiovisueller sexueller Stimulation ohne/mit Viagra™ bei Patienten mit erektiler Dysfunktion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perabo FGE

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Die orale Medikation mit Sildenafil (Viagra™ hat sich zur Therapie der erektilen Dysfunktion etabliert und relativiert die Differentialdiagnose zwischen psychogener und organischer Dysfunktion mit den entsprechenden therapeutischen Konsequenzen. Diesem Problem widmet sich diese Studie zur Prüfung der erektilen Antwort unter RigiScan®-Monitoring ohne/mit 50 mg Viagra™. 64 Patienten (mittleres Alter 48 Jahre mit einer erektilen Dysfunktion arteriogener (n = 10, venöser (n = 7, gemischt neurogen/vaskulärer (n = 15 und psychogener (n = 32 Genese von mehr als 6 Monaten Dauer wurden in die Studie aufgenommen. Alle Patienten wurden eingehend diagnostisch abgeklärt, inklusive Hormonlabor, dynamischer Pharmako-Duplexsonographie und, falls indiziert, mit einer Cavernosometrie/ -graphie. Zur Testung der penilen Rigidität und zur Objektivierung der Erektion wurde das "real-time" RigiScan® verwendet. In zwei konsekutiven Messungen wurden sowohl die direkte erektile Antwort auf visuelle Stimulation als auch die nächtlichen Erektionen abgeleitet und die Meßergebnisse mit den Begleiterkrankungen, "lifestyle"-Faktoren und dem Ergebnis der Pharmako-Duplexsonographie korreliert. Es fand sich keine Korrelation zwischen der Ätiologie der erektilen Dysfunktion in bezug auf organische oder psychogene Genese und dem Alter der Patienten, der Dauer der Erektionsstörung, dem Nikotinabusus, den Blutfetten, den Testosteronwerten, dem klinischen Ergebnis der Pharmakotestung (Erektionsgrad und dem duplexsonographisch gemessenen Fluß der penilen Arterien. Hingegen zeigte sich eine positive Korrelation zwischen Genese der erektilen Dysfunktion (organisch bzw. psychogen und dem RigiScan®-Meßergebnis (r = 0,29. Patienten mit psychogen bedingter Erektionsstörung profitierten am meisten von Viagra™, während Patienten mit vaskulärer Genese oder gemischt neurogener/vaskulärer Genese deutlich schlechter auf Viagra™ ansprachen. Es bestand keine Korrelation

  1. Formation of stress students in the process of notions of martial arts in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Uskov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Various aspects of the development of resistance to psychophysiological stress among students in the classroom arts. In the experiment involved 40 students (20 - boys, 20 girls. In the experiment, teaching methods and means of special psychological training in the martial arts. Disclosed the specifics of individual psycho-oriented methodology in the modern system of martial arts. The possibility of its use in physical education classes. It is noted that not all stress are barriers health, and only excessive. The most destructive are excessive psychogenic stresses caused by adverse of psychological factors. Psychogenic stress has a great destructive impact on health. It is a major cause of morbidity students. Recommended didactically well-designed prevention techniques.

  2. Hydration and beyond: neuropeptides as mediators of hydromineral balance, anxiety and stress-responsiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Andrew Smith

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Challenges to body fluid homeostasis can have a profound impact on hypothalamic regulation of stress responsiveness. Deficiencies in blood volume or sodium concentration leads to the generation of neural and humoral signals relayed through the hindbrain and circumventricular organs that apprise the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH of hydromineral imbalance. Collectively, these neural and humoral signals converge onto PVH neurons, including those that express corticotrophin-releasing factor, oxytocin, and vasopressin, to influence their activity and initiate compensatory responses that alleviate hydromineral imbalance. Interestingly, following exposure to perceived threats to homeostasis, select limbic brain regions mediate behavioral and physiological responses to psychogenic stressors, in part, by influencing activation of the same PVH neurons that are known to maintain body fluid homeostasis. Here, we review past and present research examining interactions between hypothalamic circuits regulating body fluid homeostasis and those mediating behavioral and physiological responses to psychogenic stress.

  3. Single-photon emission computed tomography in human immunodeficiency virus encephalopathy: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masdeu, J.C.; Yudd, A.; Van Heertum, R.L.; Grundman, M.; Hriso, E.; O'Connell, R.A.; Luck, D.; Camli, U.; King, L.N.

    1991-01-01

    Depression or psychosis in a previously asymptomatic individual infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be psychogenic, related to brain involvement by the HIV or both. Although prognosis and treatment differ depending on etiology, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are usually unrevealing in early HIV encephalopathy and therefore cannot differentiate it from psychogenic conditions. Thirty of 32 patients (94%) with HIV encephalopathy had single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings that differed from the findings in 15 patients with non-HIV psychoses and 6 controls. SPECT showed multifocal cortical and subcortical areas of hypoperfusion. In 4 cases, cognitive improvement after 6-8 weeks of zidovudine (AZT) therapy was reflected in amelioration of SPECT findings. CT remained unchanged. SPECT may be a useful technique for the evaluation of HIV encephalopathy

  4. Pain, Affect, and Attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Eduard Scheidt

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Various psychodynamic processes may underlie the development of psychogenic pain disorder such as conversion, the displacement of affect, or narcissistic defenses. However, many of the processes suggested are related to a disorder of affect regulation. The term affect regulation in psychoanalytic literature refers to phenomena which are often described by the concept of alexithymia. Empirical observations suggest that alexithymia is correlated to insecure attachment, especially an insecure dismissing representation of attachment. Psychodynamic psychotherapy in psychogenic pain disorder should focus on the reintegration of split-off affects which may provoke intensive counter-transference and which in order to be used therapeutically must be linked to attachment experiences within and outside of the therapeutic relationship.

  5. Suspected Perinatal Depression Revealed to be Hereditary Diffuse Leukoencephalopathy with Spheroids

    OpenAIRE

    Blume, Josefine; Weissert, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Early motor symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases often appear in combination with psychiatric symptoms, such as depression or personality changes, and are in danger of being misdiagnosed as psychogenic in young patients. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman who presented with rapid-onset depression, followed by a hypokinetic movement disorder and cognitive decline during pregnancy. Genetic testing revealed a mutation in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene, which led to the d...

  6. Komorbidnost depresije in spolne disfunkcije pri pacientih ambulante za zdravljenje spolnih motenj: Comorbidity of depression and sexual dysfunction among patients of outpatient clinic for sexual disorders' treatment:

    OpenAIRE

    Lučovnik, Miha; Prokšelj, Tatjana

    2006-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction and depression often occur together, however the causal relation is unclear and has not been studied enough. Sexual dysfunction secondary to depression has been well studied, but less is known about prevalence of depressive symptoms among patients with sexual dysfunction. The aim of our study was to find out whether the depression was more common among young people with psychogenic sexual dysfunction waiting to be treated at the clinic for sexual disorders than among young ...

  7. Hemichorea, parkinson's disease or somatoform disorder? A hard differential diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gonçalves Nordon

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of movement disorders can be quite complex, as its causes may be both organic and psychogenic. We present the case of a 62 year old woman, with a 12 year old history of movement disorder, whose treatment has been insufficient and possibly inadequate, and her diagnosis has been doubtful and not yet defined. We discuss our diagnostic methods and empirical treatments, looking for the best for our patient.

  8. Characterization of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone neurons in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus of Crh-IRES-Cre Mutant Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Wamsteeker Cusulin, Jaclyn I.; F?zesi, Tam?s; Watts, Alan G.; Bains, Jaideep S.

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-containing neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) initiate and control neuroendocrine responses to psychogenic and physical stress. Investigations into the physiology of CRH neurons, however, have been hampered by the lack of tools for adequately targeting or visualizing this cell population. Here we characterize CRH neurons in the PVN of mice that express tdTomato fluorophore, generated by crosses of recently developed Crh-IRES-...

  9. Asthenia in Children with Chronic Viral Hepatitis

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    I.S. Lembryk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In the article results of own researches concerning peculiarities of the course of asthenic syndrome in school-aged children with chronic hepatitis B, C and mixed forms are provided. It is established that chronic hepatitis C as well as a mixed hepatitis are accompanied by more evident symptoms of deadaptation and somatogenic asthenia than hepatitis B in which psychogenic manifestations prevailed. The degree of endogenous intoxication was also higher at hepatitis C.

  10. A Guide to the Computerized Medical Data Resources of the Naval Health Research Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-09

    disorders and their possible association with specified risk factors completed in response to inquiries include Guillian - Barre 15 .161Syndrome , knee...81 Hospitalized 1 Day Alcohol Dependence Syndrome 28 8/7/83 Transfer to USS Narwhal (SSN-671) 29 9/4/84 Transfer to Naval Station Charleston, SC...of Presum Psychogenic Origin 286 01-52 Special Symptoms or Syndromes , not Elsewhere Classified 287 01-29 Transient Sit Disturbances 288 01 Character

  11. A Case of Bipolar Affective Disorder and Aspiration Pneumonia

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    Alessandro Gerada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adults with mental illness are at a higher risk of aspiration pneumonia than the general population. We describe the case of a patient with bipolar affective disorder and two separate episodes of aspiration pneumonia associated with acute mania. We propose that he had multiple predisposing factors, including hyperverbosity, sedative medications, polydipsia (psychogenic and secondary to a comorbidity of diabetes insipidus, and neuroleptic side effects.

  12. DSM-IV-TR “Pain Disorder Associated with Psychological Factors” as a Nonhysterical Form of Somatization

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    Massimiliano Aragona

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI scores on the hysteria (Hy scale are reported in several forms of pain. Previous results were possibly biased by diagnostic heterogeneity (psychogenic, somatic and mixed pain syndromes included in the same index sample or Hy heterogeneity (failure to differentiate Hy scores into clinically meaningful sub-scales, such as admission of symptoms [Ad] and denial of symptoms [Dn].

  13. FOOD HYPERSENSITIVITY AND PRODUCTS OF ANIMAL ORIGIN RESOURCES

    OpenAIRE

    A. B. Lisitsyn; I. M. Chernukha; O. I. Lunina

    2017-01-01

    The number of people with food hypersensitivity, namely food intolerance and food allergies, grows every year. Food intolerance is classified into following types: enzymopathy; leaky gut syndrome; psychogenic food intolerance; detoxification insufficiency and true food intolerance. Food allergens mainly are glycoproteins, haptensor polypeptides. Most cases of food allergy are IgE-mediated allergic reactions. Recent discoveries in medicine, detailing and classification of food hypersensitivity...

  14. Somatization in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrozzino, Danilo; Bech, Per; Patierno, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The current systematic review study is aimed at critically analyzing from a clinimetric viewpoint the clinical consequence of somatization in Parkinson's Disease (PD). By focusing on the International Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we...... consequence of such psychiatric symptom should be further evaluated by replacing the clinically inadequate diagnostic label of psychogenic parkinsonism with the psychosomatic concept of persistent somatization as conceived by the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research (DCPR)....

  15. Response of spinal myoclonus to a combination therapy of autogenic training and biofeedback

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    Kempuraj Duraisamy

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Clinical evidence indicates that certain types of movement disorders are due to psychosomatic factors. Patients with myoclonic movements are usually treated by a variety of therapeutic agents. Autogenic training (AT, a recognized form of psychosomatic therapies, is suitable for certain types of neurological diseases. We describe a patient with myoclonus who failed to respond to conventional medical therapy. His symptoms were exaggerated by psychogenic factors, especially anger. Case presentation A 42-year-old man was admitted to our hospital, Preventive Welfare Clinic, for severe paroxysmal axial myoclonus of the left shoulder and abdominal muscles. The initial diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus". The myoclonic movements did not occur during sleep but were aggravated by bathing, alcohol drinking, and anger. Psychological examination indicated hostile attribution. Although considered not to be a case of psychogenic myoclonus, a "psychogenic factor" was definitely involved in the induction of the organic myoclonus. The final diagnosis was "combination of spinal segmental myoclonus and propriospinal myoclonus accompanied by features of psychosomatic disorders". The patient underwent psychosomatic therapy including AT and surface electromyography (EMG-biofeedback therapy and treatment with clonazepam and carbamazepine. Results AT and EMG-biofeedback resulted in shortening the duration and reducing the amplitude and frequency of the myoclonic discharges. Conclusion Psychosomatic therapy with AT and surface EMG-biofeedback produced excellent improvement of myoclonic movements and allowed the reduction of the dosage of conventional medications.

  16. Astasia-Abasia and Ganser syndrome in a preadolescent girl: A case report

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    Stanković Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Astasia is the inability to maintain an upright body position without assistance in the absence of motor weakness or sensory loss. Abasia is described as the inability to walk or as uncoordinated walking, while preserving mobility of the lower limbs. Ganser syndrome is described as a dissociative disorder characterized by approximate answers, somatic conversion symptoms, clouding of consciousness, as well as visual and auditory pseudohallucinations. The aim of this study is to present a case that seemed like a combination of neurological and internal disturbances, but actually represented a psychogenic disorder. Case Outline. This paper presents the case of a 13-year-old patient with the first manifestation of the inability to walk and stand. Medical history, diagnostic instruments and differential diagnostic methods have been presented in detail. The clinical manifestation was initially interpreted as a neurological disorder. However, after the application of diagnostic procedures and a change in family circumstances, the patient was diagnosed with a psychogenic movement disorder, astasia-abasia, with progressive clinical presentation that included dissociative psychotic reactions (Ganser syndrome. Differential diagnosis as well as the elements of the therapeutic approach have been discussed. Conclusion. Presenting a case of psychogenic astasia-abasia in children contributes to a better understanding and differentiating between conditions with a clinical presentation of signs and symptoms dealt with by other branches of medicine.

  17. Examination of validity in spoken language evaluations: Adult onset stuttering following mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Carole R; Cornis-Pop, Micaela; Beach, Woodford A

    2015-01-01

    Reports of increased incidence of adult onset stuttering in veterans and service members with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) from combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan lead to a reexamination of the neurogenic vs. psychogenic etiology of stuttering. This article proposes to examine the merit of the dichotomy between neurogenic and psychogenic bases of stuttering, including symptom exaggeration, for the evaluation and treatment of the disorder. Two case studies of adult onset stuttering in service members with mTBI from improvised explosive device blasts are presented in detail. Speech fluency was disrupted by abnormal pauses and speech hesitations, brief blocks, rapid repetitions, and occasional prolongations. There was also wide variability in the frequency of stuttering across topics and conversational situations. Treatment focused on reducing the frequency and severity of dysfluencies and included educational, psychological, environmental, and behavioral interventions. Stuttering characteristics as well as the absence of objective neurological findings ruled out neurogenic basis of stuttering in these two cases and pointed to psychogenic causes. However, the differential diagnosis had only limited value for developing the plan of care. The successful outcomes of the treatment serve to illustrate the complex interaction of neurological, psychological, emotional, and environmental factors of post-concussive symptoms and to underscore the notion that there are many facets to symptom presentation in post-combat health.

  18. Stepwise evaluation of unexplained syncope in a large ambulatory population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Juan F; Graf, Denis; Forclaz, Andrei; Schlaepfer, Juerg; Fromer, Martin; Pruvot, Etienne

    2009-03-01

    Up to 60% of syncopal episodes remain unexplained. We report the results of a standardized, stepwise evaluation of patients referred to an ambulatory clinic for unexplained syncope. We studied 939 consecutive patients referred for unexplained syncope, who underwent a standardized evaluation, including history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, head-up tilt testing (HUTT), carotid sinus massage (CSM) and hyperventilation testing (HYV). Echocardiogram and stress test were performed when underlying heart disease was initially suspected. Electrophysiological study (EPS) and implantable loop recorder (ILR) were used only in patients with underlying structural heart disease or major unexplained syncope. We identified a cause of syncope in 66% of patients, including 27% vasovagal, 14% psychogenic, 6% arrhythmias, and 6% hypotension. Noninvasive testing identified 92% and invasive testing an additional 8% of the causes. HUTT yielded 38%, CSM 28%, HYV 49%, EPS 22%, and ILR 56% of diagnoses. On average, patients with arrhythmic causes were older, had a lower functional capacity, longer P-wave duration, and presented with fewer prodromes than patients with vasovagal or psychogenic syncope. A standardized stepwise evaluation emphasizing noninvasive tests yielded 2/3 of causes in patients referred to an ambulatory clinic for unexplained syncope. Neurally mediated and psychogenic mechanisms were behind >50% of episodes, while cardiac arrhythmias were uncommon. Sudden syncope, particularly in older patients with functional limitations or a prolonged P-wave, suggests an arrhythmic cause.

  19. Psychiatric Illness and Behavioural Problems in Adults with Learning Disability and Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoumitro Deb

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively collected data on the rate and type of psychiatric illness and behavioural problems on 143 adults with learning disability and epilepsy. 55% behavioural problems. 19% verbal aggression and temper tantrums, and 13% injurious behaviour. The overall rates of behavioural problems and different types of behaviours found in the current study cohort are similar to what was found before in learning disabled adults in general, as well as in epileptic and non-epileptic learning disabled adults. Psychiatric diagnosis was made in 12.6% combined diagnosis of schizophrenia, delusional disorder and schizo-affective disorder was most common (5% diagnosis of depressive episode (3% bipolar affective disorder.

  20. Sleeping in fits and starts: a practical guide to distinguishing nocturnal epilepsy from sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Christopher P

    2014-12-01

    Accurately diagnosing sleep-related events, and particularly distinguishing nocturnal frontal lobe seizures from other sleep disorders such as parasomnias, can be challenging. This article reviews the differential diagnosis of paroxysmal events from sleep, epileptic and non-epileptic, considers important diagnostic points in the history, and evaluates the role of investigations in this setting. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. [Sleep disorders in epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, O V; Akarachkova, E S

    2014-01-01

    The review of the literature on sleep disorders in epilepsy over the last two decades is presented. Paroxysmal phenomena of epileptic origin, nonepileptic paroxysms, antiepileptic drugs, polypragmasia and comorbid depression may affect sleep in epilepsy.Shortening of sleep time may cause seizures, hallucinations and depression because sleep plays an important role in the regulation of excitatory and inhibitory processes in the brain both in healthy people and in patients with epilepsy. According to the literature data, drugs (short treatment courses of hypnotics) or nonpharmacological methods should be used for treatment insomnia inpatients with epilepsy.

  2. Prenuptial seizures: a report of five cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, H; Valeriano, J; Brillman, J

    1995-01-01

    The cases of 5 patients with seizures occurring the day of or shortly before their weddings are presented. Major life events may precipitate or exacerbate epileptic or nonepileptic seizures as a result of 1) missed medications, 2) sleep deprivation, 3) alcohol or concomitant medications, 4) hyperventilation, or 5) the emotional state directly or stress indirectly. Seizures occurring at times of psychological stress may be either neurological or psychiatric in origin. The physician treating patients with a new onset or exacerbation of seizures around a major life event must consider all of these factors in the evaluation.

  3. Olanzapine-induced electroencephalographic changes reversed by lamotrigine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasuna L Velur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The atypical neuroleptic, olanzapine (OLZ, may induce electroencephalographic (EEG abnormalities. The anticonvulsant, lamotrigine (LMG, reduces interictal epileptiform discharges and is effective in seizures in patients with both primary and partial epilepsy syndromes. The effect of LMG on neuroleptic-induced EEG abnormalities has not been previously reported. We describe the case of a 13-year-old male with paroxysmal nonepileptic spells who underwent diagnostic video-EEG telemetry, whose abnormal OLZ-induced EEG findings were strikingly affected by LTG withdrawal and reintroduction. The effect of LTG in normalizing EEG changes in suspected epilepsy caused by atypical neuroleptics is discussed.

  4. Attentional disorders in patients with complex partial epilepsy Distúrbios de atenção em pacientes com crises parciais complexas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florindo Stella

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A study of concentrated attention patterns in epileptic patients was conducted with the objectives: characterization of the patients' epileptic condition; assessment of the concentrated attention levels in epileptic and nonepileptic individuals; comparison of the attention levels of the two groups. An evaluation was performed of 50 adult outpatients with complex partial seizures and 20 non-epileptic individuals (comparative group at the Neuroepilepsy Ambulatory Unit, State University of Campinas SP, Brazil. METHOD: characterization of seizure types, frequency and duration; concentrated attention assessment (Concentrated Attention Test - Toulouse-Piéron; comparison of the epileptic with non-epileptic individuals. RESULTS: A statistically significant difference was observed between the groups with regard to Correct Response, Wrong Response and No Response. A difference was observed in relation to Time, but it was statistically insignificant. The epileptic patients presented inferior cognitive performance in relation to concentrated attention when compared with the non-epileptic individuals, findings compatible with the clinical complaints.Estudou-se o padrão da atenção concentrada em pacientes epilépticos, com o objetivo de se caracterizar a condição epiléptica, avaliar os níveis de atenção concentrada em epilépticos e em sujeitos não-epilépticos e comparar esses níveis entre os grupos. Foram avaliados 50 pacientes adultos com crises parciais complexas em atendimento no Ambulatório de Neuroepilepsia da Universidade Estadual de Campinas SP, Brasil. Também foram estudados 20 sujeitos sem epilepsia, para efeito comparativo. MÉTODO: caracterização tipológica, freqüência e duração das crises; avaliação da atenção concentrada (Teste de Atenção Concentrada - Toulouse-Piéron; e comparação dos resultados dos pacientes dos pacientes com os sujeitos não-epilépticos. RESULTADOS: Houve diferença estatisticamente

  5. Cortical myoclonus during IV thrombolysis for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bentes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with an acute middle cerebral artery ischemic stroke developing subtle involuntary movements of the paretic upper limb with cortical origin during rt-PA perfusion. Despite the multiple potential pathophysiological mechanisms for the relationship between thrombolysis and epileptic activity, seizures during this procedure are scarcely reported. Our hypothesis is that subtle and transient clinical seizures, like those described in our patient, may not be detected or are misdiagnosed as nonepileptic involuntary movements. We aimed to draw attention to the recognition challenge of this paroxysmal motor behavior, highlighting this clinical and neurophysiological identification using video recording and back-average analysis of the EEG.

  6. TRAVEL TO COUNTRY IATROGENIC (Message 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Dvoretsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of iatrogenesis inevitably dictates the need for not only an exhaustive definition (which in principle is impossible, but also classification with a division into different species. The article deals with the main types of iatrogenia, the classification of iatrogenic proposed by I.A. Kassirsky, E.M. Tareev, S.Ya. Doletsky, A.V. Smolyannikov, V.V. Nekatchalov, and others, which are based on various principles and approaches. Given the expanded interpretation of iatrogenic and the need for a multidisciplinary approach to this problem among iatrogenic events, it is suggested to distinguish the following types of iatrogenic: psychogenic, hospital, therapeutic and preventive, iatrogenic diagnostic studies. Particular attention is paid in the article to psychogenic iatrogenia, which often arises in the process of communication between a doctor and patients. They consider not only iatrogenia, «having a starting point for the behavior of a doctor», but also iatrogenia, caused by certain traits of the patient’s character (insecurity, propensity to anxiety fears, increased attention to the slightest changes in health, emotional vulnerability, etc., predetermining inadequate reactions to any Medical information. Of no small importance in the development of psychogenic iatrogenia is the quality of the medical documentation issued by the doctor to the patient (extracts from the case histories, advisory opinions, descriptions of research results, recommendations, etc.. In this case, it is necessary to avoid formulations that, without proper explanation, may be inadequately perceived by the patient and alert him or her. To the sources of psychogenic iatrogenic, some authors also refer to improperly conducted medical education, the publication of contentious, nonscientific results that do not meet the requirements of evidence-based medicine, although the doctor may not directly participate in this. The author of the article encourages

  7. The value of electroencephalography in differential diagnosis of altered mental status in emergency departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, L.; Yardan, T.; Kati, C.; Akdemir, H. U.; Altuntas, M.; Balci, K.; Karadas, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of electroencephalography in patients with altered mental status in emergency departments. Methods: Demographical characteristics, types and aetiologies of seizures, and clinical outcomes of the patients were recorded. Patients were divided into 4 groups according to the complaints of admission: findings and symptoms of seizure; stroke and symptoms of stroke-related seizures; syncope; and metabolic abnormalities and other causes of altered mental status. The electroencephalography findings were classified into 3 groups: epileptiform discharges; paroxysmal electroencephalography abnormalities; and background slowing. Electroencephalography abnormalities in each subgroup were evaluated. SPSS 21 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 190 patients in the study, 117(61.6%) had pathological electroencephalography findings. The main reason for electroencephalography in the emergency department was the presence of seizure findings and symptoms in 98(51.6%) patients. The ratio of electroencephalography abnormality was higher in patients who were admitted with complaints of metabolic abnormality-related consciousness disturbances (p<0.001). A total of 124(65.3%) patients had neuroimagings. Electroencephalography abnormalities were found to be significantly higher in patients with neuroimagings compared to those without neuroimagings (p<0.003). Conclusion: Despite advanced neuroimaging techniques, electroencephalography is still an important tool in the differential diagnosis of altered mental status such as epileptic seizures, metabolic abnormalities, pseudo-seizures and syncope. (author)

  8. Outlining the psychopathology behind a case of conversion syndrome: Is a holistic approach beneficial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, Francesca Falzon; Fondacaro, Daniel Vella

    2016-03-01

    Conversion disorder refers to a set of symptoms where no relevant organic cause is found. These include sensory/motor disturbances, and other neurological symptoms, such as pseudoseizures. Patients with this condition may, by having it, achieve a primary or secondary gain. The condition should be diagnosed when all the relevant investigations are inconclusive. In this case, we use the bio-psycho-social model for the interpretation and guidance of treatment. We also demonstrate how a holistic approach is beneficial when it comes to a multi-dimensional interpretation of such a case. This review outlines a case of a patient with several neurological and orthopedic problems who failed to improve with several treatment plans and surgical interventions. After several years of medical and surgical consultations, a thorough analysis by psychiatrists was made, resulting in a diagnosis of conversion syndrome. The patient gradually improved on psychiatric treatment, including psychotherapy, and with the necessary psychiatric follow-ups. © 2016 The Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) in childhood epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, Sheffali; Kalra, Veena; Bal, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    The success of epilepsy surgery is determined strongly by the precise location of the epileptogenic focus. The information from clinical electrophysiological data needs to be strengthened by functional neuroimaging techniques. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) available locally has proved useful as a localising investigation. It evaluates the regional cerebral blood flow and the comparison between ictal and interictal blood flow on SPECT has proved to be a sensitive nuclear marker for the site of seizure onset. Many studies justify the utility of SPECT in localising lesions to possess greater precision than interictal scalp EEG or anatomic neuroimaging. SPECT is of definitive value in temporal lobe epilepsy. Its role in extratemporal lobe epilepsy is less clearly defined. It is useful in various other generalized and partial seizure disorders including epileptic syndromes and helps in differentiating pseudoseizures from true seizures. The need for newer radiopharmaceutical agents with specific neurochemical properties and longer shelf life are under investigation. Subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI is a promising new modality. (author)

  10. Response of human epileptic temporal lobe cortical blood flow to hyperventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinand, M E; Carter, L P; Oommen, K J; Hutzler, R; Labiner, D M; Talwar, D; el-Saadany, W; Ahern, G L

    1995-07-01

    Bilateral long-term surface cortical cerebral blood flow (CBF) and electrocorticographic (ECoG) monitoring were performed in eight patients with complex partial seizures. In each patient, the epileptic temporal lobe was localized using ictal ECoG. Mean seizure interval (frequency-1) off anticonvulsant medication, a clinical measure of epileptogenicity, was 1.0 +/- 0.3 h (range: 0.4 to 2.5 h). During 13 interictal hyperventilation periods, 3.6 +/- 0.6 min in duration, the mean decrease in epileptic and nonepileptic temporal cortical CBF was 13.7 +/- 2.3 versus 6.4 +/- 1.9 ml/(100 g min) (t = 2.230, d.f. = 16, P e. frequency increased) with increasing magnitude of seizure focus CBF reduction during hyperventilation. Seizure interval was significantly correlated with epileptic temporal lobe CBF decrease during hyperventilation (R = 0.763, d.f. = 5, P < 0.05). The data suggest that, compared to nonepileptic brain, epileptic temporal lobe is particularly prone to hypoperfusion during hyperventilation. Epileptogenicity is a function of this seizure focus susceptibility to ischemia. The finding of abnormal seizure focus autoregulation during hyperventilation has implication for epileptic focus localization with cerebral blood flow analysis.

  11. Study on expressions of heat shock 27-associated protein 1 and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 5 in drug-resistant epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Yun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the expressions of heat shock 27-associated protein 1 (HSPBAP1 and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 5 (EML5 in cerebrospinal fluid of drug-resistant epilepsy, and to explore the value in early diagnosis of epilepsy. Methods According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 79 patients admitted in Department of Neurology, Hubei Xinhua Hospital and the First and Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University were divided into drug-resistant epilepsy group (n = 39 and non-epileptic control group (n = 40. Cerebrospinal fluid (every sample 4 ml were collected by lumbar puncture specimens, and HSPBAP1 and EML5 were detected by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. SPSS 13.0 software was used for statistical analysis, and P ≤ 0.05 indicated significant differences. Results The expressions of HSPBAP1 and EML5 were 0.17 ± 0.03 and 0.13 ± 0.02 in drug-resistant epilepsy group, while were 0.10 ± 0.03 and 0.08 ± 0.02 in non-epileptic control group. There was significant difference between 2 groups (t = 3.239, P = 0.002; t = 3.294, P = 0.002, respectively. Conclusion The expressions of HSPBAP1 and EML5 were increased in drug-resistant epilepsy patients. This provides a new way for early diagnosis of drug-resistant epilepsy.

  12. Recurrence of conversion disorder symptoms in a successfully treated 16-year-old female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Michael; Mehta, Anuja; Avila, Jorge; Nguyen, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 16-year-old Caucasian female with a history of major depressive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder who was admitted to an inpatient adolescent psychiatric unit with symptoms of conversion disorder, including non-epileptic seizures, an inability to speak or walk, and not eating on her own. She has a history of multiple previous medical and psychiatric hospitalizations without any significant resolution of symptoms, and extensive medical workups have all been negative. Treatment ultimately involved reassuring the patient and family that there was no underlying medical condition and emphasizing the conversion disorder diagnosis. The patient participated daily in physical therapy to improve mobility, deconditioning, and functioning. Hospital staff was instructed on the nature of the non-epileptic seizures, which continued to occur during the hospitalization. After one month, the patient was discharged home fully functional: walking, speaking, and eating on her own. One week after discharge, the patient presented with the same symptoms and was readmitted to the psychiatric facility. She subsequently never regained her previous level of functioning, and she was ultimately transferred to a residential treatment facility. We will discuss factors that led to the initial improvement and the factors that led to recurrence and persistence of symptoms. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Survey of 37 cases with basal ganglia calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Akira; Ishida, Shiro; Wada, Toyoji

    1984-01-01

    Of 5,987 patients (5,196 epileptic patients and 791 non-epileptic patients) undergoing CT-scan, calcification of the bilateral basal ganglia was detected in 28 epileptic patients and 9 non-epileptic patients. Relationship among CT-scan findings, underlying diseases and epilepsy was studied. CT-scan findings could be classified into the localized type in which calcification was limited to the globus pallidus in 33 patients and diffuse type in which it extended to the putamen in 4 patients. Localized type increased with age. It was about 70 times higher in patients above the age of 50 than in patients below the age of 10. The female to male ratio was 2:1. Underlying diseases were idiopathic or familial in cases of localized type, and hypoparathyroidism in cases of diffuse type. Seventy-five percent of the epileptic patients had partial epilepsy. There seems not to be direct correlation between basal ganglia calcification and epilepsy. (Namekawa, K)

  14. Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus - a common developmental anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajic, Dragan; Wang, Chen; Raininko, Raili [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Kumlien, Eva; Mattsson, Peter [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Uppsala (Sweden); Lundberg, Staffan; Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Child Neurology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-01-15

    Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus, an imperfect fetal development, has been described in patients with epilepsy or severe midline malformations. We studied this condition in a nonepileptic population without obvious developmental anomalies. We analyzed the coronal MR images of 50 women and 50 men who did not have epilepsy. Twenty of them were healthy volunteers and 80 were patients without obvious intracranial developmental anomalies, intracranial masses, hydrocephalus or any condition affecting the temporal lobes. If the entire hippocampus (the head could not be evaluated) were affected, the incomplete inversion was classified as total, otherwise as partial. Incomplete inversion of the hippocampus was found in 19/100 subjects (9 women, 10 men). It was unilateral, always on the left side, in 13 subjects (4 women, 9 men): 9 were of the total type, 4 were partial. It was bilateral in six subjects (five women, one man): four subjects had total types bilaterally, two had a combination of total and partial types. The collateral sulcus was vertically oriented in all subjects with a deviating hippocampal shape. We conclude that incomplete inversion of the hippocampus is not an unusual morphologic variety in a nonepileptic population without other obvious intracranial developmental anomalies. (orig.)

  15. [Differential diagnoses of West syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejerman, Natalio

    2013-09-06

    This study describes the clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of epileptic spasms, and more especially those that occur during the first two years of life (infantile spasms). West syndrome has been clearly defined as the association between infantile spasms with an electroencephalographic pattern of hypsarrhythmia. Although intellectual deficit appears in almost all cases in which infantile spasms are not controlled with medication, this is a developmental aspect of the condition and not a manifestation that must necessarily be present in order to define the syndrome. The analysis of the interictal and ictal electroencephalogram readings, together with the clinical characteristics of the spasms and the neurological examination of patients, provides some orientation as regards the causations. Despite the spectrum that the title of this work focuses on, the study does not cover the treatment of early infants with West syndrome. Emphasis is placed on the differential diagnoses of West syndrome with other epileptic syndromes that manifest in the first two years of life, and more especially with a series of abnormal non-epileptic motor phenomena that occur in early infants. All these last non-epileptic disorders are displayed in a table, but benign myoclonus of early infancy or Fejerman syndrome is given as a paradigmatic example for the differential diagnosis. The primordial aim is to prevent neurologically healthy early infants from receiving antiepileptic drugs and even adrenocorticotropic hormone or corticoids due to a mistaken diagnosis.

  16. Unihemispheric burst suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward C. Mader Jr.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression (BS consists of bursts of high-voltage slow and sharp wave activity alternating with periods of background suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG. When induced by deep anesthesia or encephalopathy, BS is bihemispheric and is often viewed as a non-epileptic phenomenon. In contrast, unihemispheric BS is rare and its clinical significance is poorly understood. We describe here two cases of unihemispheric BS. The first patient is a 56-year-old woman with a left temporoparietal tumor who presented in convulsive status epilepticus. EEG showed left hemispheric BS after clinical seizure termination with lorazepam and propofol. The second patient is a 39-year-old woman with multiple medical problems and a vague history of seizures. After abdominal surgery, she experienced a convulsive seizure prompting treatment with propofol. Her EEG also showed left hemispheric BS. In both cases, increasing the propofol infusion rate resulted in disappearance of unihemispheric BS and clinical improvement. The prevailing view that typical bihemispheric BS is non-epileptic should not be extrapolated automatically to unihemispheric BS. The fact that unihemispheric BS was associated with clinical seizure and resolved with propofol suggests that, in both cases, an epileptic mechanism was responsible for unihemispheric BS.

  17. Organic and Non-Organic Language Disorders after Awake Brain Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke De Witte

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Awake surgery with Direct Electrical Stimulation (DES is considered the ‘gold standard’ to resect brain tumours in the language dominant hemisphere (De Witte & Mariën, 2013. Although transient language impairments are common in the immediate postoperative phase, permanent postoperative language deficits seem to be rare (Duffau, 2007. Milian et al. (2014 stated that most patients tolerate the awake procedure well and would undergo a similar procedure again. However, postoperative psychological symptoms including recurrent distressing dreams and persistent avoidance of stimuli have been recorded following awake surgery (Goebel, Nabavi, Schubert, & Mehdorn, 2010; Milian et al., 2014. To the best of our knowledge, psychogenic language disturbances have never been described after awake surgery. In general, only a handful of non-organic, psychogenic language disorders have been reported in the literature (De Letter et al., 2012. We report three patients with left brain tumours (see table 1 who presented linguistic symptoms after awake surgery that were incompatible with the lesion location, suggesting a psychogenic origin. METHODS: Neurocognitive (language, memory, executive functions investigations were carried out before, during and after awake surgery (6 weeks, 6 months postsurgery on the basis of standardised tests. Pre- and postoperative (fMRI images, DTI results and intraoperative DES findings were analysed. A selection of tasks was used to map language intraoperatively (De Witte et al., 2013. In the postoperative phase spontaneous speech and behavioural phenomena to errors were video-recorded. RESULTS: Preoperative language tests did not reveal any speech or language problems. Intraoperatively, eloquent sites were mapped and preserved enabling good language skills at the end of the awake procedure. However, assessments in the first weeks postsurgery disclosed language and behavioural symptoms that support the hypothesis of a

  18. Evaluation of the Causes of Erectile Dysfunction in Patients Undergoing Penile Doppler Ultrasonography in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Khanzada

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In patients with erectile dysfunction, it is important to differentiate psychogenic from organic causes. Penile Doppler ultrasonography is a relatively inexpensive and minimally invasive tool for this purpose. This study was conducted to evaluate the causes of erectile dysfunction in an adult male population, using penile Doppler ultrasonography. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in a single center. All patients who presented with complaints of erectile dysfunction and underwent penile Doppler ultrasonography between July 2014 and June 2016 were included in this study. All examinations were performed using GE Voluson S6 and GE Logiq P5 devices. Following baseline scans, an intracavernosal injection of 20 μg of prostaglandin E1 was given. Peak systolic and end diastolic velocities were measured in each cavernosal artery. Patients with a peak systolic velocity of <25 cm/s were considered to have arterial insufficiency, while an end diastolic velocity of >5 cm/s was considered to indicate venous incompetence. Results: Out of 97 patients (mean age, 37.09±11.59 years; range, 19∼69 years, 50 patients (51.5% had normal findings, 24 patients (24.7% had arterial insufficiency, 15 patients (15.5% had a venous leak, and 8 patients (8.2% patients had arterial insufficiency with a venous leak. Psychogenic erectile dysfunction was significantly higher among patients aged ≤40 years, while arterial insufficiency with or without a venous leak was significantly higher among patients aged >40 years (p=0.022. Conclusions: A majority of the studied individuals demonstrated no organic cause of erectile dysfunction, thus confirming a high prevalence of the psychogenic etiology, particularly in relatively young individuals.

  19. Radionuclide studies in impotence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilson, A.J.; Lewis, C.A. (St. Peter' s Hospitals, London (England))

    1991-04-01

    Impotence may be of physiological origin with causes including vascular or neurological pathology. Alternatively, it may be of psychogenic origin. Clinicians can distinguish between psychological and organic impotence by observing nocturnal penile tumescence. Non-radionuclide investigations for organic impotence include penile plethysmography or pulse Doppler analysis for arterial supply, cavernosometry for venous drainage, and biothesiometry or evoked potentials for neurological pathology. Radionuclide studies are primarily based on the use of technetium 99m-pertechnetate, 99mTc-red blood cells, or xenon 133 to study the blood flow, with or without pharmacological intervention, commonly papaverine. 26 references.

  20. [Respiratory therapy in childhood asthma. Part 2. Eutonic training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baar, B; Deutsch, J; Götz, M

    1977-01-01

    Children with obstruction mainly due to spasms of bronchial smooth muscle will benefit most from breathing exercises. Attainment of the individual physiological balance of muscular, nervous and psychogenic tensions--the eutonic tension--is of great importance for control of regular unhurried breathing. This will be supported by stimulation of nasal breathing which increases diaphragmatic excursion. The eutonic state is the fundamental basis for success of chest rotations and rhythmic movements to stimulate further relaxation. Awareness of the fact that breaths come by themselves -- "automatically" -- reduces anxiety of shortness of breath. Observations of a group of asthmatic children in a summer camp support this form of treatment of asthma.

  1. Neuroimmunological mechanisms of chronic pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Vyshlova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the mechanisms of chronic low back pain. Three pathophysiological mechanisms: nociceptive, neurogenic (neuropathic, and psychogenic are noted to be involved in the development of pain syndrome. The role of cellular and molecular changes in the posterior horn and in the somatosensory dysregulated mechanism of neuropathic pain is shown. Immunological processes, including neurohumoral (serotoninergic and hormonal (sex hormones and specific proteins ones, play an important role in the development of pain. The generalization and further study of these mechanisms are embodied in approaches to therapy for pain syndromes and hence these require analysis and further investigation. 

  2. Dorsolateral frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ricky W; Worrell, Greg A

    2012-10-01

    Dorsolateral frontal lobe seizures often present as a diagnostic challenge. The diverse semiologies may not produce lateralizing or localizing signs and can appear bizarre and suggest psychogenic events. Unfortunately, scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are often unsatisfactory. It is not uncommon that these traditional diagnostic studies are either unhelpful or even misleading. In some cases, SPECT and positron emission tomography imaging can be an effective tool to identify the origin of seizures. However, these techniques and other emerging techniques all have limitations, and new approaches are needed to improve source localization.

  3. Outbreak of Mysterious Illness Among Hospital Staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Peter; Ebbehøj, Niels Erik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospitals are rarely reported as settings for mass psychogenic illness (MPI). The present report scrutinizes an outbreak of probable MPI among hospital staff, with medical intervention reinforcing the course of the illness. CASE REPORT: Four of seven staff members in an emergency...... the following 9 days, 14 possible poisoning victims were identified, 6 of whom were transferred for HBO. After hospital stays with repeated HBO treatment and examinations without identification of significant physical disease, the majority of the 10 HBO-treated victims remained symptomatic, some on prolonged....... Outbreaks of illness in a group of symptomatic victims without indication of significant physical disease should be managed by observation and limited intervention....

  4. Alzheimer's disease camouflaged by histrionic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Sabine; Dykierek, Petra; Hellwig, Bernhard; Zwernemann, Stefan; Meyer, Philipp T

    2012-02-01

    A common condition in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is unawareness of deficits. Different concepts try to elucidate the nature of this symptom. An essential question relates to the interaction of organic and psychogenic factors. Here we present a patient who displayed her cognitive deficits as attention-seeking behaviour. There was a history of histrionic personality disorder according to ICD-10 criteria. Unexpectedly, the final diagnosis after extensive diagnostic work-up was AD. The unusual coincidence of AD and a histrionic personality disorder hampered the clinical process of diagnosing dementia. We discuss unawareness as a complex concept incorporating neuroanatomical, psychiatric, and psychosocial aspects.

  5. Diseases and medical disabilities of enslaved Barbadians, from the seventeenth century to around 1838 part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, J S

    2009-01-01

    The disease environment, health problems and causes of mortality of enslaved Barbadians are described. Data are derived mainly from documentary sources; also included are bio-archaeological data from analyses of skeletons recovered from Newton Plantation cemetery. Major topics include infectious diseases transmitted from person to person, as well as those contracted through water soil, and other environmental contaminations, and diseases transmitted by insects, parasites and other animals; nutritional diseases, including protein energy malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies, anaemia, and geophagy or "dirt eating"; dental pathologies, lead poisoning, alcoholism, traumas, and other disorders, including psychogenic death or illness caused by beliefs in witchcraft or sorcery.

  6. Diseases and medical disabilities of enslaved Barbadians from the seventeenth century to around 1838. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, J S

    2008-12-01

    The disease environment, health problems and causes of mortality of enslaved Barbadians are described. Data are derived mainly from documentary sources; also included are bio-archaeological data from analyses of skeletons recovered from Newton Plantation cemetery. Major topics include infectious diseases transmitted from person to person, as well as those contracted through water soil, and other environmental contaminations, and diseases transmitted by insects, parasites, and other animals; nutritional diseases, including protein energy malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies, anaemia, and geophagy or "dirt eating"; dental pathologies; and lead poisoning, alcoholism, traumas, and other disorders, including psychogenic death or illness caused by beliefs in witchcraft or sorcery.

  7. Diagnostic politics: the curious case of Kanner's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Kurt

    2010-12-01

    The consensus US (not European) narrative regarding diagnosis and aetiology of autism posits that misguided 'parent-blaming' psychogenic causes were supplanted due to solid research proving the presence of organic causes.Yet, upon scrutiny, it is questionable that the high-functioning, often high-IQ minority--about 15% of those labelled autistic--whose condition Kanner in 1943 first dubbed 'infantile autism' were absorbed into the 'autistic spectrum' on the basis of scientific evidence. Extra-scientific factors must be addressed in order to understand the status of the category today.

  8. Eating Disorders in Connection with other Diagnoses

    OpenAIRE

    Vavrušková, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Poruchy příjmu potravy ve spojitosti s jinými diagnózami. Eating Disorders in Connection with other Diagnoses Bc. Marie Vavrušková The aim of this thesis, which focuses on the topic "Eating Disorders in Connection with Other Diagnoses," is to introduce the different types of eating disorders that have been previously diagnosed (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, psychogenic overeating and new forms of eating disorders), to specify the medical treatment offered to patients in the Czech Republi...

  9. [Psychogenetic neurological disorders in draft age personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetianov, L A; Ovchinnikov, A V

    2012-07-01

    The tendency of psychogenetic neurological disorders increases with predominance in young persons being students of high schools, students of military, technical and other lyceum was shown. The origin of diseases are psychotraumas (family, work), stress. Also genetic and hereditary factors take place that are indicative for individual rehabilitation organization. The basics of psychosomatic diseases pathogenesis are the disintegration mechanisms in brain structure activity,the disorders of integrative apparatus which provides the relationship between somatic, emotional and vegetative functions. The confirmation of brain work disintegration is achieved by modern computer diagnostic systems. As psychogenic diseases increase the need in methods of computer electroencephalography, evoked potentials, and rheoencephalography application is more actual.

  10. ANIMAL MODELS OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER: FACE VALIDITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONAL eGOSWAMI

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is a debilitating condition that develops in a proportion of individuals following a traumatic event. Despite recent advances, ethical limitations associated with human research impede progress in understanding PTSD. Fortunately, much effort has focused on developing animal models to help study the pathophysiology of PTSD. Here, we provide an overview of animal PTSD models where a variety of stressors (physical, psychosocial, or psychogenic are used to examine the long-term effects of severe trauma. We emphasize models involving predator threat because they reproduce human individual differences in susceptibility to, and in the long-term consequences of, psychological trauma.

  11. Eyelid closure at death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A D Macleod

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To observe the incidence of full or partial eyelid closure at death. Materials and Methods: The presence of ptosis was recorded in 100 consecutive hospice patient deaths. Results: Majority (63% of the patients died with their eyes fully closed, however, 37% had bilateral ptosis at death, with incomplete eye closure. In this study, central nervous system tumor involvement and/or acute hepatic encephalopathy appeared to be pre-mortem risk factors of bilateral ptosis at death. Conclusion: Organicity and not psychogenicity is, therefore, the likely etiology of failure of full eyelid closure at death.

  12. Atypical odontalgia--a diagnostic dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorburn, D N; Polonowita, A D

    2012-06-01

    Atypical odontalgia (AO) is a chronic orofacial pain condition of unclear pathophysiology, often presenting as toothache or pain at an extraction site. Idiopathic, psychogenic, vascular, and neuropathic causes have been proposed. In view of demonstrable somatosensory changes, and responses to management proposed for other forms of neuropathic pain, the best current evidence supports a neuropathic hypothesis. It is proposed that certain individuals with as-yet-undefined genetic vulnerability can develop AO when exposed to certain risk factors, including invasive dental treatment. The diagnosis and treatment of AO can be challenging, but can be aided by a multidisciplinary approach. Two cases of differing complexity are presented in this paper.

  13. Animal models of post-traumatic stress disorder: face validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sonal; Rodríguez-Sierra, Olga; Cascardi, Michele; Paré, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating condition that develops in a proportion of individuals following a traumatic event. Despite recent advances, ethical limitations associated with human research impede progress in understanding PTSD. Fortunately, much effort has focused on developing animal models to help study the pathophysiology of PTSD. Here, we provide an overview of animal PTSD models where a variety of stressors (physical, psychosocial, or psychogenic) are used to examine the long-term effects of severe trauma. We emphasize models involving predator threat because they reproduce human individual differences in susceptibility to, and in the long-term consequences of, psychological trauma. PMID:23754973

  14. Liberation of plasma histamine after application of non-ionic contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, H.D.; Jansen, O.; Schallock, J.

    1989-01-01

    In 94 patients the levels of plasmahistamine have been measured after application of three non-ionic contrast media (Iopromid, Iopamidol, Iohexol) and after application of blood-isotonic saline solution. A significant liberation of histamine could be observed after administration of contrast media and also after administration of saline solution. Neither between the three nonionic contrast media nor between the contrast media and the saline solution significant differences could be measured. Administering contrast media after subsequently saline solution the levels of histamine were lower than in case of pure contrast media application. A psychogen induced histamine liberation is discussed. (orig.) [de

  15. Hyponatraemia-induced rhabdomyolysis complicated by anuric acute kidney injury: a renal replacement conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secombe, Paul; Milne, Chris

    2016-12-13

    Hyponatraemia-induced rhabdomyolysis is a rare, but reported phenomenon, particularly in patients with chronic schizophrenia on depot antipsychotics prone to psychogenic polydipsia. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of hyponatraemia-induced rhabdomyolysis complicated by oligo-anuric acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). The initiation of CRRT is complicated in severe hyponatraemia, predominantly due to the need to avoid rapid changes in tonicity associated with rapid changes in sodium. We report a case of severe hyponatraemia (104 mmol/L) complicated by oligo-anuric rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI and our management of the renal prescription. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Cannabinoid Hyperemesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Sullivan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome is characterized by chronic, heavy use of cannabis, recurrent episodes of severe nausea and intractable vomiting, and abdominal pain. Temporary relief of symptoms is achieved by taking a hot bath or shower, and resolution of the problem when cannabis use is stopped. Failure to recognize the syndrome leads to misdiagnoses such as psychogenic vomiting, the cyclic vomiting syndrome, an eating disorder or ‘drug-seeking behaviour’, and may lead to extensive, expensive and unproductive investigations, psychiatric referrals and ineffective treatments. Other than stopping cannabis use, there is no proven treatment. Why a substance known for its antiemetic properties should cause such a syndrome is unknown.

  17. Implacable images: why epileptiform events continue to be featured in film and television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerson, Toba Schwaber; Kerson, Lawrence A

    2006-06-01

    Epileptiform events have been portrayed in film since 1900 and on television since the 1950's. Over time, portrayals have not reflected medicine's understanding of epilepsy. At present, it is unlikely that individuals who do not have a close relationship with someone with a seizure-disorder will witness a seizure. Because fictive and often incorrect images appear increasingly, many think of them as accurate depictions. The research addresses three questions in relation to these images: How do directors use the images? Why do uses of seizures in visual media not reflect contemporary scientific knowledge? Why have they persisted and increased in use? Data consist of material from 192 films and television episodes. The general category of seizures includes seizures in characters said to have epilepsy or some other condition, seizures related to drug or alcohol use, pseudoseizures and feigned seizures, and, a category in which, for example, someone is described as "having a fit." The research demonstrates how epileptiform events drive the narrative, support the genre, evoke specific emotional reactions, accentuate traits of characters with seizures, highlight qualities of other characters through their responses to the seizures, act as catalysts for actions, and enhance the voyeuristic experience of the audience. Twenty video sequences are included in the manuscript. The authors conclude that the visual experience of seizures remains so enthralling that its use is most likely to increase particularly on television, and that as the public has less experience with real seizures, depictions in film will continue to be more concerned with what the image can do for the show and less interested in accurate portrayals. Ways to influence depictions are suggested.

  18. Truly enthralling: epileptiform events in film and on television--why they persist and what we can do about them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerson, Toba Schwaber; Kerson, Lawrence A

    2008-01-01

    Seizures and epilepsy have been portrayed in film since 1900 and on television since the 1950s, but unlike many other conditions, their depictions have not improved with increased scientific understanding. At this time, most individuals who are under 45 years of age will never witness a seizure. Thus, their information about what seizures are comes from depictions in film and on television. Because especially on television these fictive and often erroneous images are increasing, many think of them as accurate. The research addresses three questions in relation to these images: How do directors use the images? Why do uses of seizures in visual media not reflect contemporary scientific knowledge? Why have they persisted and increased in use? Data consist of material from 242 films and television episodes. The general category of seizures includes seizures in characters said to have epilepsy or some other condition, seizures related to alcohol/drug use, feigned or pseudoseizures, and a "throwaway" category. The research demonstrates how epileptiform events drive the narrative, support the genre, evoke emotional reactions, highlight traits of characters with seizures, accentuate traits of other characters through their responses, act as catalysts for action, and enhance voyeuristic experience. Through connecting categories, we explain a basic social process (Glaser, 2007). The conclusion is that these images are so enthralling that their use is likely to persist. The authors suggest that advocates acknowledge this and then find ways to have more continuing characters with correctly depicted epilepsy be part of television series as a way of exploring the truly enthralling dimensions of the condition.

  19. [Conversion Disorder in Children and Adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Paula Andrea; Vásquez, Rafael; Cote, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Conversion disorder is diagnosed late, by exclusion and with a high risk of complications. There is a wide experience in adults that is not extrapolated to paediatric patients. According to the literature, the prognosis is better in children, but this changes when other variables such are included, such as comorbidities, late diagnosis and a very convincing social image of the neurological disease. To review the medical literature on the clinical features, diagnosis, comorbidities and treatment of this disorder. A literature research was performed on Medline and Pubmed, the terms used were "conversion disorder", pseudoseizures, treatment, clinic, children ("conversion disorder" OR hysteria OR hysterical) (child OR children OR childhood OR pediatric OR paediatric). The most relevant material found is included in this review. Conversion disorder is often an imprecise diagnosis in high complexity paediatric services. No consensus was found in the literature search on how to treat patients after the initial diagnosis. The evidence that it becomes chronic is not strong enough, just as the evidence is not convincing enough to argue that comorbidity factors are those maintained over time. Clearly, there is no medical experience of the natural history of this disorder in children and adolescents. It is only known is that it is a complex condition, on which there is experience only in the diagnosis and treatment of the acute state, but not so in the long-term care. It is proposed that each patient is studied in detail in order to define the psychiatric diagnosis and its treatment. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. [Psychiatric Disorders in Pediatric Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in a Reference Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuñiga Zambrano, Yenny Carolina; Vásquez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    To describe the psychiatric manifestations in pediatric patients with systemic erythematous lupus seen in the Fundación Hospital de la Misericordia. Observational descriptive study. Medical charts and test results of inpatients and outpatients between 2007 and2013 were reviewed; 39 patients were selected. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was considered with P=.05. Mean age was 13.7 (2.33), with 78.9% female. The most frequent psychiatric manifestation was anxiety (52.6%), followed by adjustment disorder and depression (36.8% each one), psychosis (10%), conversion disorder (7.9%), and obsessive compulsive disorder (5.3%). The mean SLICC score was 2.76 (2.8), and the mean SLEDAI score was 20.81 (20.82). Antinuclear antibodies were positive in 81.25%. Neuropsychiatric lupus was diagnosed in 65.8% of patients; seizures were observed in 23.7%, headache in 36.8%, stroke in 13.2%, vasculitis, chorea 5.3%, and meningitis 5.3% of patients. The mean time from lupus diagnosis was 20.47 (22.2) months, with the shortest period for adjustment disorder and the longest period in patients with conversion disorder (pseudo-seizures) being 15 months and 31 months, respectively. The highest SLEDAI score was in patients with psychosis (35.5 [16.21] vs 19.08 [13.72]; P=.032), and also the highest disease damage (SLICC, 4.25 [4.03] vs 2.58 [2.67]; P=.27) in comparison with the other manifestations. The most frequent psychiatric manifestations were anxiety, depression, and adjustment disorder, with a higher frequency than other studies, and with lupus activity principally in patients with psychosis. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Difference in anxiety symptoms between children and their parents facing a first seizure or epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Save-Pédebos, Jessica; Bellavoine, Vanina; Goujon, Estelle; Danse, Marion; Merdariu, Dana; Dournaud, Pascal; Auvin, Stéphane

    2014-02-01

    Many studies have shown that anxiety disorders are common in children with epilepsy. We explored symptoms of anxiety simultaneously in children and their parents. We conducted a cross-sectional study using the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale in children and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Adult in parents. We included 118 parents and 67 children, who were divided into three groups: (1) first seizure, (2) epilepsy, and (3) nonepileptic paroxysmal event. We found that the level of anxiety in parents and children differed. We observed a significant increase in the anxiety level of parents whose children have had a first seizure, while we found a significant increase in the anxiety level of children and adolescents followed for epilepsy. These findings suggest that there is no direct relationship in the anxiety of the parents and their child. Further studies are needed to understand this variation over time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Breath-holding spells in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ran D

    2015-02-01

    I have children in my clinic who experience seizurelike episodes in which they cry and hold their breath to the point of cyanosis and loss of consciousness. Their examination or investigation findings are normal and referral to a pediatric specialist results in no further investigation. Are breath-holding spells common, and what type of investigation is needed? A breath-holding spell is a benign paroxysmal nonepileptic disorder occurring in healthy children 6 to 48 months of age. The episodes start with a provocation such as emotional upset or minor injury, and might progress to breath holding, cyanosis, and syncope. The episodes are extremely frightening to watch but have benign consequences. Once a clinical diagnosis is made, it is recommended to conduct an electrocardiogram and to rule out anemia, but no further investigation or referral is warranted. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  3. Neurology check list. 5. rev. and enl. ed.; Checkliste Neurologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grehl, Holger [Evangelisches und Johanniter Klinikum, Duisburg (Germany). Neurologische Klinik; Reinhardt, Frank

    2013-02-01

    The neurology check list covers the following issues, organized in four parts: Grey part - diagnostic fundamentals, therapeutic principles: clinical neurological examination, liquor puncture, specific laboratory diagnostics, neurophysical diagnostics, imaging techniques, therapeutic principles, legal aspects, neurological assessment. Green Part - leading syndromes and leading symptoms. Blue part - neurological disease appearance: pains in head and face, pain syndrome, congenital and development disturbances, liquor circulation disturbances, ZNS hemorrhages, tumors and neoplasm, paraneoplastic syndromes, inflammatory diseases of the nervous system, dementia diseases, metabolic and other encephalopathy, cerebellum diseases and system surmounting processes, movement degeneration, basal ganglion diseases, epilepsy, non-epileptic attacks, medulla diseases, brain nerve diseases, plexus lesions, radicular lesions, peripheric neuropathy, neuromuscular transfer disturbances, muscular diseases. Red part: neurological intensive medicine.

  4. Frequency of EEG abnormalities in age-matched siblings of autistic children with abnormal sleep EEG patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chez, Michael G; Buchanan, Thomas; Aimonovitch, Mary; Mrazek, Susan; Krasne, Valerie; Langburt, Wayne; Memon, Shoaib

    2004-04-01

    Epileptiform activity in sleep has been described even in the absence of clinical seizures in 43-68% of patients with autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). Genetic factors may play a significant role in the frequency of epilepsy, yet the frequency in normal age-matched controls is unknown. We studied overnight ambulatory electroencephalograms (EEGs) in 12 nonepileptic, nonautistic children with a sibling with both ASDs and an abnormal EEG. EEG studies were read and described independently by two pediatric epileptologists; 10 were normal studies and 2 were abnormal. The occurrence of abnormal EEGs in our sample (16.6%) was lower than the reported occurrence in children with ASDs. Further, the two abnormal EEGs were of types typically found in childhood and were different from those found in the ASD-affected siblings. The lack of similarity between sibling EEGs suggests that genetic factors alone do not explain the higher frequency of EEG abnormalities reported in ASDs.

  5. Hypoglycemia-occipital syndrome: a specific neurologic syndrome following neonatal hypoglycemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Tabarestani, Sepideh; Ghofrani, Mohammad

    2011-02-01

    This study attempted to elaborate the existence of a specific neurologic pattern observed in children who experienced neonatal hypoglycemia. Twenty-seven patients with seizure and history of neonatal hypoglycemia were compared with 28 children suffering from idiopathic occipital epilepsy. In both groups the most common type of seizure activities included eye movements and impaired consciousness responding well to treatment; however, ictal vomiting was more common in controls. Subjects were in epileptic and nonepileptic groups. Ninety percent of cases showed abnormal signal of the posterior head region on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A large number showed posterior abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG). Visual loss with abnormal visual evoked potential was the most frequent visual finding. Fifty-five percent showed mild psychomotor retardation. This study demonstrates that neonatal hypoglycemia can induce a syndrome with a specific clinical spectrum consisting of epilepsy, visual disturbances, and psychomotor retardation. Hypoglycemia-occipital syndrome is an entity without statistically significant semiologic differences from the idiopathic type.

  6. Differential diagnoses of nocturnal fear and movement paroxysm: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Peter; Jüngling, Freimut; Datta, Alexandre Niklaus

    2012-09-01

    Recurrent nocturnal behavioural and movement paroxysms are a diagnostic challenge for the clinical pediatrician. We report on an adolescent girl who presents recurrent stereotypical nightmare-like episodes occurring during non-REM sleep stages 1-2 (N1 and N2). We discuss the differential diagnoses between epileptic and nonepileptic events and between nocturnal frontal and temporal seizures. The pathophysiological and unusual electroencephalographical features are discussed with respect to clinical features and results of interictal FDG-PET. Conclusion In case of stereotypical nightmare-like episodes in children or adolescents, an epileptic origin has to be ruled out before a parasomnia is diagnosed. In addition, a normal awake EEG or interictal sleep EEG in the diagnostic workup may not exclude an epileptic disorder. In case of nightly stereotypic motor or affective events, an epileptic disorder should be discussed.

  7. Hand-biting and hand-waving paroxysms in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selikhova, Marianna; Scott, Catherine; Silva, Mark; Rugg-Gunn, Furgus

    2012-01-01

    A 20-year-old ambidextrous female student with a 15-year history of refractory seizures was admitted to the epilepsy department for a second opinion on her diagnosis and treatment. She developed frequent motor paroxysms at the age of 4–5 years, which appeared resistant to antiepileptic therapy and which have continued to the present day. Over the last 8 years she also had five generalised tonic-clonic seizures. There is a family history of epilepsy on the maternal side. The first type of episode is characterised by left-hand flickering, associated with head turning and loss of awareness. During the second type of attack the patient demonstrates vigorous hand biting which starts without warning. The patient appears disorientated subsequently. EEG telemetry was performed and confirmed the diagnosis of both epilepsy and non-epileptic attacks. Literature reports of the relevant cases are discussed. PMID:22814977

  8. Febrile seizures - semiology in humans and animal models: evidence of focality and heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Brian G R; Gindner, Diane

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between febrile seizures and hippocampal sclerosis has been the subject of longstanding discussion. Animal models for prolonged seizures have shown a clear causal relationship with focal limbic features at low dose and hippocampal damage at high dose. Careful history taking of febrile seizure semiology has shown focal early features often with clear temporal lobe elements. This would suggest that many febrile seizures are secondarily generalised hippocampal seizures. There is evidence of varying levels of epileptogenicity in specific infective causes of febrile seizures. Seizure semiology also suggests that a proportion of such seizures may be non-epileptic reflex asystolic attacks. Seizure semiology in febrile seizures deserves closer scrutiny. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Advantages of respiratory monitoring during video-EEG evaluation to differentiate epileptic seizures from other events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Milena; Abdennadher, Myriam; Singh, Kanwaljit; Katz, Eliot; Llewellyn, Nichelle; Zarowsly, Marcin; White, David P.; Dworetzky, Barbara A.; Kothare, Sanjeev V.

    2014-01-01

    Distinction between epileptic (ES) and seizure-like events of non-epileptic nature(SLNE) is often difficult using descriptions of seizure semiology. Cardiopulmonary dysfunction is frequent in ES but has not been objectively examined in relationship to SLNE. Our purpose was to compare cardiopulmonary dysfunction between ES and SLNE. We prospectively recorded cardio-pulmonary function using pulse-oximetry, EKG and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) in 52 ES and 22 SLNE. Comparison of cardiopulmonary complications between ES and SLNE was done using two-sample t-tests and logistic regression. Ictal bradypnea and pre-ictal bradycardia were more frequent in ES than SLNE (p1.0). Cardio-respiratory dysfunction, specifically bradypnea, apnea, pre-ictal bradycardia, and oxygen desaturation, is more frequently seen in ES than in SLNE. Tachycardia was not discriminant between ES and SLNE. PMID:24561659

  10. Neurology check list. 5. rev. and enl. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grehl, Holger; Reinhardt, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The neurology check list covers the following issues, organized in four parts: Grey part - diagnostic fundamentals, therapeutic principles: clinical neurological examination, liquor puncture, specific laboratory diagnostics, neurophysical diagnostics, imaging techniques, therapeutic principles, legal aspects, neurological assessment. Green Part - leading syndromes and leading symptoms. Blue part - neurological disease appearance: pains in head and face, pain syndrome, congenital and development disturbances, liquor circulation disturbances, ZNS hemorrhages, tumors and neoplasm, paraneoplastic syndromes, inflammatory diseases of the nervous system, dementia diseases, metabolic and other encephalopathy, cerebellum diseases and system surmounting processes, movement degeneration, basal ganglion diseases, epilepsy, non-epileptic attacks, medulla diseases, brain nerve diseases, plexus lesions, radicular lesions, peripheric neuropathy, neuromuscular transfer disturbances, muscular diseases. Red part: neurological intensive medicine.

  11. Advantages of respiratory monitoring during video-EEG evaluation to differentiate epileptic seizures from other events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Milena; Abdennadher, Myriam; Singh, Kanwaljit; Katz, Eliot; Llewellyn, Nichelle; Zarowsky, Marcin; White, David P; Dworetzky, Barbara A; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2014-03-01

    Differentiating between epileptic seizures (ES) and seizure-like nonepileptic events (SLNE) is often difficult using descriptions of seizure semiology. Cardiopulmonary dysfunction is frequent in ES but has not been objectively examined in relation to SLNE. Our purpose was to compare cardiopulmonary dysfunction between ES and SLNE. We prospectively recorded cardiopulmonary function using pulse oximetry, EKG, and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) in 52 ES and 22 SLNE. Comparison of cardiopulmonary complications between ES and SLNE was done using two-sample T-tests and logistic regression. Ictal bradypnea and preictal bradycardia were more frequent in ES than SLNE (p1.0). Cardiorespiratory dysfunction, specifically bradypnea, apnea, preictal bradycardia, and oxygen desaturation, is more frequently seen in ES than in SLNE. Tachycardia was not discriminant between ES and SLNE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The problem of mental disorders and psychological effects of antitumour treatment in children with cancer pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Оксана Владимировна Пионтковская

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim – analysis of the problem of psychological and psychiatrical aspects of impact of cancer disease on child and its parents for detection of the main directions of medical and psychological help to this contingent.Results. In the younger age group the most stress factors that provoke the development of psychogenic fears, anxiety states and the derivative mood disorders are the “hospital routine” – limitation of activity (playing, motor, subjectively heavy procedures and manipulations, pain. In the group of elder children and teenagers the main stress stimulus is connected with a fear of social consequences of disease and the fact of mortally dangerous disease is interpreted in mind as a threat to the successful social functioning as something that spread its negative impact on the future life. Reactively caused mood disorders prevail in this age group over the other psychogenic formations. Behavior reactions in these cases are the secondary ones relating to the mood disorders – to the acceptance or rejection the situation of disease (as an anxious hypochondriacal fixation or as an emotional denial and ignoring the possible grave effects of cancer process.Conclusion. The diversity of problems in child psycho-oncology causes the multilevelness and versatility of medical, psychological and psychosocial help and psycho rehabilitation of children and their parents

  13. [Usefulness of the neuroandrologic profile study in patients with erectile dysfunction: review of a series of 180 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas Casado, J; Vírseda Chamorro, M; Samblas García, R; Esteban Fuertes, M; Aristizábal Agudelo, J M; Blázquez Izquierdo, J; Delgado Martín, J A; Resel Estévez, L

    1996-10-01

    To determine the usefulness of a complete neuroandrologic evaluation and SPACE (Single Potential Analysis Cavernous Electromyography) in the study of impotence. We performed a clinical study, erection test with papaverine-phentolamine and neuroandrologic evaluation (bulbocavernous EMG, S2-S4 evoked potentials, evoked somatosensorial potentials, SPACE, D10-L2 skin sympathetic potentials, cystometrogram, and filling videocystography) in 180 patients consulting for impotence. We observed a relationship between the clinical diagnosis of impotence and the data from the neuroandrogenic study. The results of the study were classified as normal [in the clinical diagnosis of psychogenic impotence (100%), hormonal (80%) and vascular (60%)], abnormal [prevalent in the clinical diagnosis of structural impotence (87%)]. The erection test was mainly negative in all clinical diagnoses of impotence, except in psychogenic and vascular impotence (60% positive tests). The clinical data are useful in the diagnosis of impotence. The pharmacological erection test was not found to be very reliable. Complete neuroandrologic evaluation is indicated in non typified and mixed impotence, and can be performed in neurogenic impotence to identify the level of the lesion. Alone, SPACE does not appear to be useful as a screening test for neurologic lesions, but can be useful as a screening test for neuromuscular cavernous lesions. SPACE is indicated in structural, vascular and hormonal impotence. If SPACE is abnormal, the differential diagnosis between neurogenic and myogenic lesion can be made through a complete neuroandrologic evaluation.

  14. A study of skin disorders in patients with primary psychiatric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuruvila Maria

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The skin occupies a powerful position as an organ of communication and plays an important role in socialization throughout life. The interface between dermatology and psychiatry is complex and of clinical importance. AIMS: To document the incidence of cutaneous disorders in patients with primary psychiatric conditions. METHODS: Three hundred patients with a primary psychiatric condition who had cutaneous disease were entered into the study group. The patients were classified appropriately based on the classification of psychocutaneous disorders. The control group included 300 patients presenting with a skin disorder and without any known psychiatric complaint. RESULTS: The majority of the cases in the study group were in the 3rd-5th decade. In this study, the most common primary psychiatric conditions were manic depressive psychosis (53.33%, depression (36.33%, schizophrenia (8.33% and anxiety (2%. Of the study group, 68.66% patients had infective dermatoses and the rest had non-infective dermatoses. A high incidence of pityriasis versicolor and dermatophyte infections was noted in males from the study group. Among non-infective dermatoses, 8% had eczema, and psychogenic skin disorders were seen in 4.67% of the study group. Of these, delusions of parasitosis were the commonest (2% followed by venereophobia (1%. CONCLUSIONS: A statistically significant higher incidence of tinea versicolor and dermatophyte infections was seen in the study group. Delusion of parasitosis was the most common psychogenic skin disorder seen in the study group, followed by venereophobia.

  15. Normal sensorimotor plasticity in complex regional pain syndrome with fixed posture of the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgante, Francesca; Naro, Antonino; Terranova, Carmen; Russo, Margherita; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Risitano, Giovanni; Girlanda, Paolo; Quartarone, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    Movement disorders associated with complex regional pain syndrome type I have been a subject of controversy over the last 10 years regarding their nature and pathophysiology, with an intense debate about the functional (psychogenic) nature of this disorder. The aim of this study was to test sensorimotor plasticity and cortical excitability in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type I who developed a fixed posture of the hand. Ten patients with complex regional pain syndrome type I in the right upper limb and a fixed posture of the hand (disease duration less than 24 months) and 10 age-matched healthy subjects were enrolled. The following parameters of corticospinal excitability were recorded from the abductor pollicis brevis muscle of both hands by transcranial magnetic stimulation: resting and active motor thresholds, short-interval intracortical inhibition and facilitation, cortical silent period, and short- and long-latency afferent inhibition. Sensorimotor plasticity was tested using the paired associative stimulation protocol. Short-interval intracortical inhibition and long-latency afferent inhibition were reduced only in the affected right hand of patients compared with control subjects. Sensorimotor plasticity was comparable to normal subjects, with a preserved topographic specificity. Our data support the view that motor disorder in complex regional pain syndrome type I is not associated with abnormal sensorimotor plasticity, and it shares pathophysiological abnormalities with functional (psychogenic) dystonia rather than with idiopathic dystonia. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  16. Conversion disorder: A systematic review of current terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Juen Mei; Kanaan, Richard Antony Alexander

    It has been argued that the label given to unexplained neurological symptoms is an important contributor to their often poor acceptance, and there has been recent debate on proposals to change the name from conversion disorder. There have been multiple studies of layperson and clinician preference and this article aimed to review these. Multiple databases were searched using terms including "conversion disorder" and "terminology", and relative preferences for the terms extracted. Seven articles were found which looked at clinician or layperson preferences for terminology for unexplained neurological symptoms. Most neurologists favoured terms such as "functional" and "psychogenic", while laypeople were comfortable with "functional" but viewed "psychogenic" as more offensive; "non-epileptic/organic" was relatively popular with both groups. "Functional" is a term that is relatively popular with both clinicians and the public. It also meets more of the other criteria proposed for an acceptable label than other popular terms - however the views of neither psychiatrists nor actual patients with the disorder were considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical classification and neuro-vestibular evaluation in chronic dizziness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Do-Hyung; Yang, Tae-Ho; Shin, Byoung-Soo; Jeong, Seul-Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study attempts to clarify the clinical characteristics of chronic dizziness and its relationships with specific vestibular, oculomotor, autonomic and psychiatric dysfunctions. 73 Patients with idiopathic chronic dizziness were recruited and classified based on history taking and clinical examination into the following four clinical subgroups; vestibular migraine (VM), dysautonomia, psychogenic, and unspecified groups. They were also evaluated using oculomotor, otolithic and autonomic function tests, and psychologic investigation. Patients in the VM group showed a high proportion of abnormality on smooth pursuit and otolithic function testing compared to the other groups. The dysautonomia group revealed significant abnormalities in sympathetic and cardiovagal autonomic function, while the psychogenic group had a high frequency of abnormality in sympathetic autonomic testing and in Beck's anxiety inventory scale. The unspecified group showed abnormalities on saccade, smooth pursuit and autonomic function testing. Clinical classification of patients with chronic dizziness was relevant and they showed a correlation with disease-specific abnormal results in oculomotor, otolithic, autonomic function and psychology testing. Appropriate diagnostic investigation based on precise clinical diagnosis of chronic dizziness reduces the need for extensive laboratory testing, neuroimaging, and other low-yield tests. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. PACAP/Receptor System in Urinary Bladder Dysfunction and Pelvic Pain Following Urinary Bladder Inflammation or Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice M. Girard

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Complex organization of CNS and PNS pathways is necessary for the coordinated and reciprocal functions of the urinary bladder, urethra and urethral sphincters. Injury, inflammation, psychogenic stress or diseases that affect these nerve pathways and target organs can produce lower urinary tract (LUT dysfunction. Numerous neuropeptide/receptor systems are expressed in the neural pathways of the LUT and non-neural components of the LUT (e.g., urothelium also express peptides. One such neuropeptide receptor system, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP; Adcyap1 and its cognate receptor, PAC1 (Adcyap1r1, have tissue-specific distributions in the LUT. Mice with a genetic deletion of PACAP exhibit bladder dysfunction and altered somatic sensation. PACAP and associated receptors are expressed in the LUT and exhibit neuroplastic changes with neural injury, inflammation, and diseases of the LUT as well as psychogenic stress. Blockade of the PACAP/PAC1 receptor system reduces voiding frequency in preclinical animal models and transgenic mouse models that mirror some clinical symptoms of bladder dysfunction. A change in the balance of the expression and resulting function of the PACAP/receptor system in CNS and PNS bladder reflex pathways may underlie LUT dysfunction including symptoms of urinary urgency, increased voiding frequency, and visceral pain. The PACAP/receptor system in micturition pathways may represent a potential target for therapeutic intervention to reduce LUT dysfunction.

  19. Pacemaker in complicated and refractory breath-holding spells: when to think about it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartori, Stefano; Nosadini, Margherita; Leoni, Loira; de Palma, Luca; Toldo, Irene; Milanesi, Ornella; Cerutti, Alessia; Suppiej, Agnese

    2015-01-01

    Breath-holding spells (BHS) are benign non-epileptic paroxysmal events of infancy, rarely occurring with high frequency and complicated by prolonged syncope, convulsions and even status epilepticus. In these cases response to medical treatment is often unsatisfactory. Pacemaker implantation is a possible therapeutic option, but its indications, efficacy and complications have not been clarified yet. To report a new case of BHS treated with pacemaker and to review its indications and efficacy in patients with severe BHS. We extensively searched the literature in PubMed on cardiac pacing in patients with BHS and we described a new case. A previously healthy boy presented at the age of 4 months with frequent BHS inconstantly associated to prolonged syncope and post-anoxic non-epileptic and epileptic seizures. Parental reassurance, iron supplementation and piracetam were ineffective. After cardiac pacing at the age of 16 months, BHS and their complications disappeared. We identified 47 patients with BHS treated with pacemaker in the literature. Based on the available data, in all patients asystole or marked bradycardia were documented during BHS or stimulating maneuvers; syncope complicated BHS in 100% of cases and post-anoxic convulsions in 78.3%. Medical treatment before pacing, when administered, was ineffective or poorly tolerated. After pacing, BHS complications disappeared in 86.4% of cases, and decreased in 13.6%. Technical problems with the device were reported in 25.7% of patients and mild medical complications in 11.4%. Pacemaker could be reasonably considered in subjects with frequent and severe BHS, poor response to medications, and demonstration of cardioinhibition during spells. Copyright © 2014 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Epilepsy is associated with ventricular alterations following convulsive status epilepticus in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Wail; Bubolz, Beth A; Nguyen, Linh; Castro, Danny; Coss-Bu, Jorge; Quach, Michael M; Kennedy, Curtis E; Anderson, Anne E; Lai, Yi-Chen

    2017-12-01

    Convulsive status epilepticus can exert profound cardiovascular effects in adults including ventricular depolarization-repolarization abnormalities. Whether status epilepticus adversely affects ventricular electrical properties in children is less understood. Therefore, we sought to characterize ventricular alterations and the associated clinical factors in children following convulsive status epilepticus. We conducted a 2-year retrospective, case-control study. Children between 1 month and 21 years of age were included if they were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with primary diagnosis of convulsive status epilepticus and had 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) within 24 hours of admission. Children with heart disease, ion channelopathy, or on vasoactive medications were excluded. Age-matched control subjects had no history of seizures or epilepsy. The primary outcome was ventricular abnormalities represented by ST segment changes, abnormal T wave, QRS axis deviation, and corrected QT (QTc) interval prolongation. The secondary outcomes included QT/RR relationship, beat-to-beat QTc interval variability, ECG interval measurement between groups, and clinical factors associated with ECG abnormalities. Of 317 eligible children, 59 met the inclusion criteria. History of epilepsy was present in 31 children (epileptic) and absent in 28 children (non-epileptic). Compared with the control subjects (n = 31), the status epilepticus groups were more likely to have an abnormal ECG with overall odds ratio of 3.8 and 7.0 for the non-epileptic and the epileptic groups respectively. Simple linear regression analysis demonstrated that children with epilepsy exhibited impaired dependence and adaptation of the QT interval on heart rate. Beat-to-beat QTc interval variability, a marker of ventricular repolarization instability, was increased in children with epilepsy. Convulsive status epilepticus can adversely affect ventricular electrical properties and stability in children

  1. Improvement of healthcare quality in pediatric neurology by crowd technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Guzeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Crowdsourcing and crowdfunding in public health should be considered as an untraditional process of gathering new ideas and assets. Theirefficiency is associated with that a large number of people may be involved in using their specific knowledge to solve complex problems and projects. According to statistics, the annual incidence rate for epilepsy averages 70 per 100,000 population and the disease starts in childhood innearly half of the cases. So the early differential diagnosis of paroxysmal states in children at the early stage of the disease is a necessary condition for adequate drug therapy.Patients and methods. Only in the period from 2007 to 2009, the Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Epilepsy and Sleep Disorders in Children and Adolescents, Department of Nervous System Diseases, Saint Petersburg State Pediatric Medical University, examined 259 children aged several weeks to 18 years with paroxysmal disorders of consciousness. Among them, there were 156 (60.23% boys and 103 (39.77% girls.Results and discussion. Based on the results obtained during the children's  comprehensive examinations using video-EEG monitoring, the investigators specified diagnoses in all the examinees and changed treatment in the vast majority of cases. Many nonepileptic paroxysms with external manifestations resemble epileptic seizures; these are rather frequently qualified as erroneous and treated as such. Only the comprehensive examination involving video-EEG monitoring may avoid misdiagnosis in children with different epilepsy types and nonepileptic paroxysms. Video-EEG combines the video monitoring recording of EEG readings and makes it possible to reveal epileptic activity during a seizure, to compare the clinical presentation of the latter with EEG changes, to locate an epileptogenic focus, and to differentiate epileptic seizures fromnonepileptic ones. The effective diagnosis of paroxysmal states in childhood is a complex scientific and social problem

  2. [Persistent vomiting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballmer, P E

    1993-04-17

    Vomiting is a physiological reflex to protect the body from harmful influences, whereas "pathological vomiting" occurs irrespective of its primary purpose or causes secondary disturbances. Artificially induced vomiting and enemas were prophylactic and therapeutic procedures to purge the body that were employed in ancient times and reached their zenith by the end of the 18th century. The act of vomiting is regulated by the vomiting centre, where neural afferents from the chemoreceptor trigger zone, vagal and sympathetic nerve system, and from other trigger areas, are coordinated. Differential diagnosis of vomiting, emphasizing metabolic/endocrine and psychogenic vomiting--including anorexia nervosa and bulimia--are briefly discussed. Symptomatic treatment of vomiting primarily consists of the use of receptor antagonists, e.g. dopamine, histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 antagonists. Acupuncture/-pressure are also discussed as an alternative treatment method.

  3. Suspected Perinatal Depression Revealed to be Hereditary Diffuse Leukoencephalopathy with Spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Josefine; Weissert, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Early motor symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases often appear in combination with psychiatric symptoms, such as depression or personality changes, and are in danger of being misdiagnosed as psychogenic in young patients. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman who presented with rapid-onset depression, followed by a hypokinetic movement disorder and cognitive decline during pregnancy. Genetic testing revealed a mutation in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene, which led to the diagnosis of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids. Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) is probably an under-recognized disease. HDLS should be considered in patients with rapidly progressing parkinsonian symptoms and dementia accompanied by white matter lesions.

  4. Suspected Perinatal Depression Revealed to be Hereditary Diffuse Leukoencephalopathy with Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefine Blume

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early motor symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases often appear in combination with psychiatric symptoms, such as depression or personality changes, and are in danger of being misdiagnosed as psychogenic in young patients. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman who presented with rapid-onset depression, followed by a hypokinetic movement disorder and cognitive decline during pregnancy. Genetic testing revealed a mutation in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene, which led to the diagnosis of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids. Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS is probably an under-recognized disease. HDLS should be considered in patients with rapidly progressing parkinsonian symptoms and dementia accompanied by white matter lesions.

  5. Nothing new under the sun: post-traumatic stress disorders in the ancient world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hamid, Walid Khalid; Hughes, Jamie Hacker

    2014-01-01

    Herodotus' account of the Athenian spear carrier Epizelus' psychogenic mutism following the Marathon Wars is usually cited as the first documented account of post-traumatic stress disorders in historical literature. This paper describes much earlier accounts of post combat disorders that were recorded as occurring in Mesopotamia (present day Iraq) during the Assyrian dynasty (1300-609 BC). The descriptions in this paper include many symptoms of what we would now identify in current diagnostic classification systems as post-traumatic stress disorders; including flashbacks, sleep disturbance and low mood. The Mesopotamians explain the disorder in terms of spirit affliction; the spirit of those enemies whom the patient had killed during battle causing the symptoms.

  6. Sexual revictimization: double betrayal and the risk associated with dissociative amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Nadia M

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify new treatment targets in order to develop more empirically informed initiatives to prevent sexual revictimization. A retrospective Web-based survey employing a mixed-methods design attracted a self-selecting sample of 481 community respondents, 183 of whom indicated a history of childhood sexual abuse. Seventy-four percent were females whose ages ranged from 16 to 69 years (mean = 31.2 years). Betrayal trauma referred to CSA committed by a trusted perpetrator (often caregivers). Disclosure experiences in childhood were reported though open-dialogue boxes. Double betrayal referred to high-betrayal trauma being combined with a negative response to a disclosure. This was associated with both higher incidences of prior psychogenic amnesia for CSA and sexual revictimization in later life. The findings have implications for educating the guardians of children about the prevalence and implications of CSA as well as the importance of early recognition and appropriate responding.

  7. Functional limb weakness and paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J; Aybek, S

    2016-01-01

    Functional (psychogenic) limb weakness describes genuinely experienced limb power or paralysis in the absence of neurologic disease. The hallmark of functional limb weakness is the presence of internal inconsistency revealing a pattern of symptoms governed by abnormally focused attention. In this chapter we review the history and epidemiology of this clinical presentation as well as its subjective experience highlighting the detailed descriptions of authors at the end of the 19th and early 20th century. We discuss the relevance that physiological triggers such as injury and migraine and psychophysiological events such as panic and dissociation have to understanding of mechanism and treatment. We review many different positive diagnostic features, their basis in neurophysiological testing and present data on sensitivity and specificity. Diagnostic bedside tests with the most evidence are Hoover's sign, the hip abductor sign, drift without pronation, dragging gait, give way weakness and co-contraction. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Psychocutaneous disease: Clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Helena; Mennella, Constance; Magid, Michelle; Stamu-O'Brien, Caroline; Kroumpouzos, George

    2017-05-01

    Psychocutaneous disease, defined in this review as primary psychiatric disease with skin manifestations, is commonly encountered in dermatology. Dermatologists can play an important role in the management of psychocutaneous disease because patients visit dermatology for treatment of their skin problems but often refuse psychiatric intervention. This review describes common psychocutaneous syndromes, including delusional, factitious, obsessive-compulsive and related, and eating disorders, as well as psychogenic pruritus, cutaneous sensory (pain) syndromes, posttraumatic stress disorder, and sleep-wake disorders. The updated classification of these disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition is included. Strategies for management are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Somatoform respiratory disorders in children and adolescents-proposals for a practical approach to definition and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüber, Christoph; Lehmann, Christine; Weiss, Christa; Niggemann, Bodo

    2012-02-01

    Somatoform respiratory disorders represent conditions with dysfunctional breathing unexplained by structural abnormalities. This heterogeneous group includes disorders with neural dysregulation of respiration (vocal cord dysfunction) or with dysregulation of the respiratory pattern (hyperventilation, sighing dyspnea), psychogenic disorders such as unjustified anxiety of suffocation, and stereotype conditions such as throat clearing or habit cough. Many symptoms are nonspecific and largely overlap with respiratory disease symptoms of somatic etiology. Most patients will present in a nonspecialized clinical setting. This article provides symptom-based criteria for the definition of somatoform respiratory disorders and their differentiation from somatic disease. Emphasis is put on clinical criteria which can be easily integrated in a routine setting. Owing to the multifaceted etiology of somatoform respiratory disorders therapeutic approaches integrating somatic medicine, respiratory therapy and psychology are crucial. The introduction of defined clinical criteria may facilitate the discrimination of somatoform respiratory disorders from somatic disorders in routine patient encounters and avoid therapeutic detours. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. LOS ALUCINÓGENOS: SU HISTORIA, ANTROPOLOGÍA, QUÍMICA Y FARMACOLOGÍA - THE HALLUCINOGENS: THEIR HISTORY, ANTHROPOLOGY, CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MANUEL MARTÍNEZ HERRERA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paperexposes hallucinogens from several points of view. These diverse lateralities indicate the basic lack of scientifici and antropological support for the psychogenic nature of a hallucinogen. This paper seeks to de-demonize that reputation and expose its history, anthropology, chemistry and pharmacology. It is possible that hallucinatory plants were amongst the first botanical specimens used by mankind in his religious ceremonies. Uses such as divination, weather prediction, contact with spirit and ancestral worlds, were among some of those shamanic functions. The study engages in chemical analysis of the different structures that appear principally responsible for hallucinatory experiences. The latter as respects LSD-25 as a special case. The pharmacology of hallucinogens is quite vast and the present paper discusses only some of the compounds. A three phase classification is also mentioned as an explanation of the hallucinatory experience itself.

  11. [An etiological analysis of 367 neurological outpatients with complaint of vertigo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Feng; Qi, Xiao-Kun

    2012-05-01

    To explore the etiology of patients with chief complaint of vertigo in the department of neurology in order to reduce the rate of misdiagnosis. A total of 367 patients with chief complaint of vertigo in our department of neurology were followed up. The associated medical history, symptoms and physical examination were obtained. The main diagnoses for the 367 patients were benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) (219, 59.7%), posterior circulation ischemia (PCI) (65, 17.7%), migraine (31, 8.4%), hypertension (18, 4.9%) and psychogenic vertigo (17, 4.6%). Presentation of vertigo can be clinically diagnosed in most diseases, with the most common cause of BPPV. Combination of the prominent clinical features, physical examinations and especially Dix-Hallpike maneuver may guide the general physicians to a most proper cause of vertigo.

  12. A case of tail self-mutilation in a cat

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    Zita Talamonti

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes a case of distal tail self-mutilation in a 5-year-old neutered male domestic short-hair cat. The cat started licking his tail few months before the behavioural visit. Because of the severity of the self-induced injuries, the veterinarian performed a surgical partial caudectomy. After 3 months, the excessive self-grooming of the tail recurred. Neurological and dermatological examinations, radiographs, urine and blood tests did not show any abnormalities. During the behavioural visit, through direct observation of the cat’s posture and behavioural history, the pet received a diagnosis of psychogenic alopecia. The cat was treated with clomipramine for 2 months (0.5 mg/kg/PO SID along with behaviour modification and environmental changes. After 1 month, the cat no longer showed excessive self-grooming. Even if no other systemic pathologies were identified, it is always recommended to address these patients with a multidisciplinary approach.

  13. Report of seven neurological patients with misidentification syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson José Amâncio

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present clinical, neuropsychological and laboratorydata on 7 patients with misidentification syndrome and to discussits possible etiologies and pathophysiology. Methods: Sevenpatients presenting misidentification syndrome, 6 female and 1male, aged 64-78 years were studied. All had a brain diseasediagnosed by clinical and laboratory data. All patients weresubmitted to general clinical examination, neurological andneuropsychological examinations, and brain magnetic resonanceimaging. Results: All patients were capable to recognizephotographs of relatives or famous persons. They presented goodvisual acuity that allowed them reading texts with small print andpreserved visual field. The etiologies of brain lesions were ischemicstroke, left temporal lobe tumor, idiopathic hydrocephalus in elderlypatients, Parkinson’s disease and probable Alzheimer’s disease.None presented enough cognitive disorders to characterize seniledementia. Conclusion: Misidentification syndromes are notnecessarily related to one single psychogenic etiology; on thecontrary, many organic causes may be related with the clinicalpicture. Most patients improved when submitted to treatmentwith typical or atypical neuroleptic drugs.

  14. Somatoform disorders in the family doctor's practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prykhodko V.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Somatoform disorders – psychogenic diseases are characterized by pathological physical symptoms that resemble somatic illness. Thus, any organic manifestations, which can be attributed to known diseases are not detected, but there are non-specific functional impairments. Somatoform disorders include somatization disorder, undifferentiated somatoform disorder, hypocho¬n¬driacal disorder, somatoform dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system and stable somatoform pain disorder. The first part of the article reviewes features of the clinical manifestations of somatization disorder and undifferentiated somatoform disorder. Role of non-benzodiazepine tranquilizers (ADAPTOL and metabolic drugs (VASONAT in the treatment of patients with somatoform disorders is discussed. In review article data of neurologists and cardiologists on the effectiveness of anxiolytic drug ADAPTOL and metabolic drug VASONAT in different clinical groups of patients (coronary artery disease, chronic ischemia of the brain, which can significantly improve quality of life, increase exercise tolerance, improve cognitive function and correct mental and emotional disorders are presented.

  15. A curious case of sweating blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Saugato; Surana, Trupti; De, Abhishek; Nag, Falguni

    2013-11-01

    Hematohidrosis is a very rare condition in which an individual sweats blood. It may occur in an individual who is suffering from extreme levels of stress. Various causative factors have been suggested like component of systemic disease, vicarious menstruation, excessive exertion, psychogenic, and unknown causes. Fear and intense mental contemplation are the most frequent causes. It may also occur in bleeding disorders. We here report a case where bloody sweat was discharged from the forehead, face, and body episodically in a 12-year-old healthy girl with no bleeding disorder or any other underlying cause. All investigations done were within normal limits, except low intelligent quotient and loss of insight. The patient was given atropine sulphate transdermal patch with marked improvement in severity.

  16. A curious case of sweating blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saugato Biswas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematohidrosis is a very rare condition in which an individual sweats blood. It may occur in an individual who is suffering from extreme levels of stress. Various causative factors have been suggested like component of systemic disease, vicarious menstruation, excessive exertion, psychogenic, and unknown causes. Fear and intense mental contemplation are the most frequent causes. It may also occur in bleeding disorders. We here report a case where bloody sweat was discharged from the forehead, face, and body episodically in a 12-year-old healthy girl with no bleeding disorder or any other underlying cause. All investigations done were within normal limits, except low intelligent quotient and loss of insight. The patient was given atropine sulphate transdermal patch with marked improvement in severity.

  17. [Chronic urticaria. Etiologic and therapeutic evaluation of 150 cases. (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynadier, J; Guilhou, J J; Meyn-Adier, J; Lavanture, N

    1979-02-01

    The study of one hundred and fifty cases of chronic urticaria observed, gave the following results: higher female frequency, usual beginning at adult age, relative absence of digestive problems. For the last of these results we nevertheless noted numerous insignificant functional features, a few examples of colitis, a number of cases of non-functioning gall-bladder. Frequency of sensitivity to foods, preservatives, colouring agents, medical substances, principally shown by provocation tests (the latter present a considerable interest, and merit frequent use); importance of bacterian, mycotic, parasitic origins; little importance of atopy; frequency of minor psychogenic disorders. A contributing role might be played by spasmophily. The therapy includes the following basic treatment; antihistaminic drugs (mainly hydroxyzine hydrochloride and cyproheptadine hydrochloride) and a diet which eliminates recognized urticaria causing foods. In addition, a supplementary treatment destined to eliminate the factors shown to be responsible for the outbreak, must be prescribed.

  18. [Hyperhidrosis. Hypnotherapy of 2 patients with hyperhidrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariae, B; Bjerring, P

    1990-09-24

    Two cases of hypnotherapeutic treatment of psychogenic hyperhidrosis are presented. In both cases, organic aetiology could be excluded and conventional medical treatment modalities had no effect. In both cases, it was possible to modulate sweating in the trance state within less than a minute, thus supporting other reported cases of the effect of hypnotically induced modulation of autonomic responses. In the first case the psychological dynamics behind the physiological symptoms seemed unrelated to fundamental emotional and personal problems and relaxation and conditioning techniques in hypnosis had a positive effect in reducing the sweating to both objectively and subjectively socially acceptable standards. In the second case the hyperhidrosis was related to more fundamental personality problems and short term hypnotherapy proved ineffective in treating the condition.

  19. [Cognitive-behavioral therapy of conversion aphonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuljić, Blagoje

    2004-01-01

    Although a common disease, conversion disorder still calls attention in the clinical practice. A case of conversion disorder, diagnosed as a psychogenic aphonia that persisted for a week, was reported in this paper. A 21-year-old woman developed symptoms after breaking off a long-lasting relationship with her boy-friend. History revealed that she was introvert with high neuroticism and communication problems. Cognitive-behavioral therapy was used. After the positive reinforcement in the therapy of her aphonia, assertion training for the development of communication skills was performed. In the end, cognitive restructuring was used to prevent relapse in regard to her actual life situation of being a refugee preparing for immigration to Australia.

  20. Cognitive-behavioral therapy of conversion aphonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljić Blagoje

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Although a common disease, conversion disorder still calls attention in the clinical practice. A case of conversion disorder, diagnosed as a psychogenic aphonia that persisted for a week, was reported in this paper. A 21-year-old woman developed symptoms after breaking off a long-lasting relationship with her boy-friend. History revealed that she was introvert with high neuroticism and communication problems. Cognitive-behavioral therapy was used. After the positive reinforcement in the therapy of her aphonia, assertion training for the development of communication skills was performed. In the end, cognitive restructuring was used to prevent relapse in regard to her actual life situation of being a refugee preparing for immigration to Australia.

  1. Sexual function disorders after local radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Heeringen, C.; Verbeek, E.; De Schryver, A.

    1988-01-01

    In order to contribute some insight into the extent to which local radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate is followed by disorders in sexual functioning, 18 patients whose age ranged from 60 to 82, were interviewed 4 to 45 months after their Radiotherapy (RT). Our results confirmed the fact that RT was followed by impotence as such in only a minority of cases (3 out of 12 or 0.25). However, when other aspects of sexuality were taken into account, a higher proportion appeared to have problems. In a substantial number of patients, psychogenic factors seemed to be (at least partly) responsible. More attention to these facts and, when necessary, psychiatric assistance, may help reduce the incidence of sexual disorders following RT to the prostate

  2. Psychiatric approach in the treatment of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in an adolescent girl: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaya, Işik; Coşkun, Ayşen; Agaoglu, Belma; Işeri, Pervin; Inanir, Murat; Canatay, Hakan

    2006-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is an unusual diagnosis in the pediatric age group. It is a syndrome characterized by pain in one or more extremities with a significant morbidity in childhood. Patients with RSD have frequently undergone many unnecessary investigations such that the diagnosis and treatment may be considerably delayed. The pathophysiology remains unclear; however, a number of psychological problems were frequently suggested to play a role in this disorder. We describe a 13-year-old girl diagnosed as pediatric RSD who was admitted to a child and adolescent psychiatry unit with a history of severe pain in the right hand, increasing disability and symptoms of nervousness and withdrawal from social activities. In this report, we discuss psychogenic factors underlying the disorder of an adolescent girl and psychiatric approach as a part of a multimodal treatment of pediatric RSD.

  3. Atypical odontalgia - pathophysiology and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baad-Hansen, L

    2008-01-01

    Atypical odontalgia (AO) is a chronic form of dental pain without signs of pathology. Several hypotheses have been put forward regarding the pathophysiology. AO has been proposed to be psychogenic, vascular, neuropathic or idiopathic. The scientific evidence supporting or rejecting these hypotheses are reviewed in this paper. At this time, the best supported hypothesis is that AO is a neuropathic pain condition. Relevant differential diagnoses, such as odontogenic pain, sinusitis, trigeminal neuralgia among others, are presented and the evidence regarding possible management strategies is reviewed. A treatment algorithm for AO is proposed based on the rather scarce scientific evidence available and inspired by a similar treatment algorithm for peripheral neuropathic pain. The proposed strategy involves an interdisciplinary approach including patient education, psychological counselling, topical and systemic medication and, importantly, avoidance of invasive treatments like surgery and endodontics. Two illustrative cases are presented.

  4. Oral lichen planus and stress: An appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simarpreet V Sandhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral lichen planus (OLP is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by bilateral white striations or plaques on the buccal mucosa, tongue or gingiva that has a multifactorial etiology, where the psychogenic factors seem to play an important role. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the existing relation between the OLP and psychological alterations of the patient, such as stress, anxiety, and depression. Materials and Methods: Hospital anxiety and depression scale was applied for psychometric analysis. Results: The study indicates a definitive relationship between a stressful life event and onset and progression of OLP. Conclusion: Stress management and bereavement counseling should be a part of management protocol of OLP.

  5. Persistent dysphonia in two performers affecting the singing and projected speaking voice: a report on a collaborative approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Janet

    2002-01-01

    The projected speaking voice and the singing voice are highly sensitive to external and internal influences, and teachers of spoken voice and singing are in a unique position to identify subtle and more serious vocal difficulties in their students. Persistent anomalies may herald early onset of changes in vocal fold structure, neurophysiological control, or emotional stability. Two cases are presented to illustrate the benefits of a collaborative approach to diagnosis and management. The first, a 21-year-old male drama and singing student with an abnormally high speaking voice and falsetto singing voice was found to have a psychogenic dysphonia referred to as "puberphonia" or "mutational falsetto". The second, a 34-year-old female alto with strained phonation and perceived stutter of the vocal folds was diagnosed with "adductor spasmodic dysphonia" or "focal laryngeal dystonia" of neurological origin.

  6. Pica - an eating disorder: A report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Vijayendranath Nayak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pica disorder is considered to be an inappropriate behavior characterized by an appetite pattern and craving for non-nutritive substances. Pica usually does not exhibit life-threatening situations, but at times it can create severe complications due to this psychogenic behavior of an individual. Clinical presentation of pica is highly variable and can be associated with the specific characteristics of the resulting medical conditions and the ingested substances. Weird consumption pattern can lead to various changes in the hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity, which can further lead to ulcerations and pulpal pain. Herein, we report a case of pica syndrome with oral manifestation due to consumption of mud.

  7. Isolated paroxysmal dysarthria caused by a single demyelinating midbrain lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codeluppi, Luca; Bigliardi, Guido; Chiari, Annalisa; Meletti, Stefano

    2013-10-16

    Paroxysmal dysarthria is an unusual condition characterised by brief episodes of dysarthria with the sudden onset and frequent recurrence. It has been mainly reported in multiple sclerosis and an association with midbrain lesions has been claimed; however, most of the reported patients had multiple brain alterations so it was difficult to associate this symptom with a specific lesion site. We illustrate the cases of two patients with an isolated demyelinating midbrain lesion presenting paroxysmal dysarthria as the only symptom; both participants had oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid and an unremarkable follow-up. Both patients had benefit from carbamazepine treatment, similarly to previously reported cases. Our report confirms that a demyelinating midbrain lesion is sufficient to provoke paroxysmal dysarthria. It is noteworthy that an erroneous diagnosis of psychogenic disorders was initially made in both cases, highlighting the importance not to underestimate isolated paroxysmal symptoms in clinical practice.

  8. Four Cases of Parkinson Disease Diagnosed During the Postpartum Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltête, David; Grangeon, Lou; Le Goff, Floriane; Ozel, Gulden; Fetter, Damien; Ahtoy, Patrick; Temgoua, Olivier; Rouillé, Audrey; Lefaucheur, Romain

    2017-07-01

    There is little experience with the effect of pregnancy on Parkinson disease because the number of women with Parkinson disease who are of childbearing age is small. We report four cases beginning during the postpartum period and discuss the potential contribution of different factors that may influence the occurrence of Parkinson disease in this time period. Four women aged 29-35 years developed arm tremor, shoulder pain, dizziness, or decreased dexterity of the hand in the first few days or months after childbirth. They were initially diagnosed with postpartum depression or psychogenic parkinsonism. Finally, dopamine transporter imaging confirmed the diagnosis of young-onset Parkinson disease. Early-onset Parkinson disease may present in postpartum women. In women with atypical motor symptoms in addition to depression, this diagnosis should be considered.

  9. Post-traumatic shoulder movement disorders: A challenging differential diagnosis between organic and functional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjay; Nahab, Fatta; Aldred, Jason; Nutt, John; Hallett, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral trauma may be a trigger for the development of various movement disorders though the pathophysiology remains controversial and some of these patients have a functional (psychogenic) disorder. We report 3 cases of shoulder movement disorders following trauma to the shoulder region. Physiology was done in all the patients to extend the physical examination. Two patients had history of recurrent shoulder dislocation and were diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. One patient had shoulder injury following repeated falls while performing as a cheerleader. In two patients there were some clinical features suggesting a functional etiology, but physiological studies in all three failed to produce objective evidence of a functional nature. Shoulder movement following trauma is uncommon. Diagnosis in such cases is challenging considering the complex pathophysiology. The movements can be associated with prolonged pain and handicap, and once established they appear resistant to treatment. PMID:25197686

  10. Medical management of epileptic seizures: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma AK

    2016-02-01

    deals with the acute management of seizures may encounter. The document also highlights the numerous avenues for new research that would help practitioners optimize epilepsy management. Keywords: epilepsy, pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, psychiatric, pseudoseizures, management

  11. Importance of Rett syndrome in child neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, H G

    2001-12-01

    The syndrome of brain atrophy in girls described by Andreas Rett in 1966 [Rett, Wien Klin Wochenschr, 1966;116:723-726] was brought to the attention of the English-speaking world by Hagberg et al. in 1983 [Hagberg et al., Ann Neurol, 1983;14:471-479]. Four clinical stages after the age of 6 months were described in classical cases of Rett syndrome (RS), namely early onset stagnation at 6 months to 1(1/2) years, the rapid destructive stage at 1-3 years, the pseudo-stationary stage from pre-school to school years, and the late motor deterioration stage at 15-30 or more years. The rapid destructive stage causes profound dementia with loss of speech and hand skills, stereotypic movements, ataxia, apraxia, irregular breathing with hyperventilation while awake, and frequently seizures. Most cases are isolated in their families, apart from identical twins. However, linkage studies in rare familial cases suggested a critical region at Xq28. In 1999 American investigators found several mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2 encoding Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 in a proportion of Rett patients. The protein MeCP2 can bind methylated DNA and when mutated may interfere with transcriptional silencing of other genes and result in abnormal chromatin assembly. Many different mutations of the protein are being studied in humans and in mice. Neuropathological studies have shown decreased brain growth and decreased size of individual neurons, with thinned dendrites in some cortical layers, and abnormalities in substantia nigra, suggestive of deficient synaptogenic development, probably starting before birth. Electrophysiology demonstrates progressively abnormal electroencephalograms (EEG) in the first three stages of the syndrome, with some subsequent improvement and occurrence of pseudoseizures. Neurometabolic factors are discussed in detail, particularly reduced levels of dopamine, serotonin, noradrenaline and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in brain, also estimation of nerve growth

  12. Early Illustrations of Geste Antagoniste in Cervical and Generalized Dystonia

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    Emmanuel Broussolle

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Geste antagoniste, or sensory trick, is a voluntary maneuver that temporarily reduces the severity of dystonic postures or movements. We present a historical review of early reports and illustrations of geste antagoniste.Results: In 1894, Brissaud described this phenomenon in Paris in patients with torticollis. He noted that a violent muscular contraction could be reversed by a minor voluntary action. He considered the improvement obtained by what he called “simple mannerisms, childish behaviour or fake pathological movements” was proof of the psychogenic origin of what he named mental torticollis. This concept was supported by photographical illustrations of the patients. The term geste antagoniste was used by Brissaud’s pupils, Meige and Feindel, in their 1902 monograph on movement disorders. Other reports and illustrations of this sign were published in Europe between 1894 and 1906. Although not mentioned explicitly, geste antagoniste was also illustrated in a case report of generalized dystonia in Oppenheim’s 1911 seminal description of dystonia musculorum deformans in Berlin.Discussion: Brissaud-Meige’s misinterpretation of the geste antagoniste unfortunately anchored the psychogenic origin of dystonia for decades. In New York, Herz brought dystonia back into the realm of organic neurology in 1944. Thereafter, it was given prominence by other authors, notably Fahn and Marsden in the 1970–1980s. Nowadays, neurologists routinely investigate for geste antagoniste when a dystonic syndrome is suspected, because it provides a further argument in favor of dystonia. The term alleviating maneuver was proposed in 2014 to replace sensory trick or geste antagoniste. This major sign is now part of the motor phenomenology of the 2013 Movement Disorder Society’s classification of dystonia.

  13. [Neurological disorders in the narrative works of Benito Pérez Galdós].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvaro, L C; Martín del Burgo, A

    2007-06-01

    Benito Pérez Galdós was a realistic writer. As such, he was devoted to displaying reality in its full complexity. He shared the traits of experimental medicine of Claude Bernard (Introduction à l'étude de la médecine expérimentale). The writer was a close friend of famous contemporary doctors (Gregorio Marañón, Manuel Tolosa Latour), had textbooks with neurological content, and was familiar with Charcot. With this background, we have foreseen neurological descriptions in his works. To search for them, we have reviewed three paramount novels: Fortunata y Jacinta, La de Bringas and Tormento. We found: a) headache, usually migraine with and without aura; common precipitants and inheritance are present. The novelist himself suffered from severe migraine; b) movement disorders: Parkinson syndrome and hemifacial spasm; c) convulsive and non-convulsive epilepsy in a girl as well as syncope and psychogenic loss of consciousness; d) congenital syphilis, based on a typical physical appearance in a character with madness (paranoid schizophrenia); the reason was probably that syphilis was regarded as the most common cause of "dementia praecox"; e) alcoholism: acute intoxication, deprivation, behavior disorders, hepatic encephalopathy and a likely pellagra; f) sleep disorders: parasomnias (somnambulism, somniloquy) and sleep paralysis, and g) stroke and also inverted metamorphopsia of psychogenic origin. Ailments and disease pervaded life in the 19th century. Neurological disorders were highly prevalent and are fully integrated into Galdos realistic works. Many of them fulfill criteria of disorders contemplated according to degeneration theories. Nevertheless, humanitarian features raise the characters above their tragic destiny. Biographical factors, particularly his many love affairs and his political implication as a liberal, could have contributed to the plethora of precise descriptions.

  14. Comparison of two treatments for coxarthrosis: local hyperthermia versus radio electric asymmetrical brain stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castagna A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Alessandro Castagna1, Salvatore Rinaldi1,2, Vania Fontani1, Piero Mannu1, Matteo Lotti Margotti11Rinaldi Fontani Institute, Department of Neuro Psycho Physio Pathology, 2Medical School of Occupational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, ItalyBackground: It is well known that psychological components are very important in the aging process and may also manifest in psychogenic movement disorders, such as coxarthrosis. This study analyzed the medical records of two similar groups of patients with coxarthrosis (n = 15 in each who were treated in two different clinics for rehabilitation therapy.Methods: Patients in Group A were treated with a course of traditional physiotherapy, including sessions of local hyperthermia. Group B patients were treated with only a course of radioelectric asymmetrical brain stimulation (REAC to improve their motor behavior.Results: Group A showed a significant decrease in symptoms of pain and stiffness, and an insignificant improvement in range of motion and muscle bulk. A single patient in this group developed worsened symptoms, and pain did not resolve completely in any patient. The patients in Group B had significantly decreased levels of pain and stiffness, and a significant improvement in range of motion and muscle bulk. No patients worsened in Group B, and the pain resolved completely in one patient.Conclusion: Both treatments were shown to be tolerable and safe. Patients who underwent REAC treatment appeared to have slightly better outcomes, with an appreciable improvement in both their physical and mental states. These aspects are particularly important in the elderly, in whom functional limitation is often associated with or exacerbated by a psychogenic component.Keywords: coxarthrosis, anti-aging, motor behavior, radioelectric asymmetric brain stimulation

  15. [Conversion disorder in an internal medicine department: A series of 37 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régny, P; Cathébras, P

    2016-04-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics of a series of patients presenting conversion disorder in a general internal medicine ward and outpatient clinic, the arguments retained by the physicians in favour of the diagnosis, the somatic and psychiatric co-morbidities, the management and the outcome of the disorder. We report the study of 37 patients diagnosed with conversion disorder in an internal medicine department of a French university hospital over a period of 14 years. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of the patients and contacted their primary care physicians to obtain follow-up data. No structured instrument was used for the diagnosis of conversion disorder or for the assessment of psychiatric comorbidities. As expected, patients were mostly young females, although a great variety of age, gender, and socio-cultural background was observed. Motor symptoms predominated (62%). A relevant psychogenic factor was explicitly mentioned in only 43% of the cases. In many cases, organic disease was also present, and an organic cause for the symptom initially considered as conversion was suspected in 3 cases. Depressive and anxious disorders were present respectively in 38% and 35% of cases. A pain complaint was associated in half of the cases. Among patients for whom follow-up data is available, conversion symptoms persisted or recurred in 70% of cases and were associated with a poor quality of life. This case series confirms that the DSM-IV-TR criterion of "psychogenicity" (later abandoned in DSM-5) is highly problematic in clinical practice. It suggests a close relationship between conversion disorder and unexplained chronic pain. Copyright © 2015 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Pathogenesis of reduced or increased bladder sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoyama, Kuniko; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Yamaguchi, Chiharu; Uchiyama, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Tatsuya; Yamanishi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Osamu; Sugiyama, Megumi; Kishi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Emina

    2011-03-01

    Pathogenesis of reduced or increased bladder sensation is not well known. Hence, we systematically investigated the frequency of reduced or increased bladder sensation in neurologic/mental diseases. We analyzed 911 patients who were referred from within our hospital. Data registries included a diagnosis, a lower urinary tract symptom questionnaire, a urodynamic study, and neurological examinations. Reduced bladder sensation is defined as bladder volume at the first sensation >300 ml. Increased bladder sensation is defined as bladder volume at the first sensation sensation (33.3-43.8% in diabetic neuropathy, etc.). Myelopathies are the second most common cause (17.4-25.0% in multiple sclerosis, etc.). Less common is brain diseases (9.6% in multiple system atrophy, etc.). In contrast, myelopathies are the most common cause of increased bladder sensation without DO (25.0-40.0% in spinal forms of systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren's syndrome, etc.). Neuropathies are the second most common (17.3-22.2% in post-pelvic organ surgery, diabetic neuropathy, etc.). Less common is brain/mental diseases (20.0% in psychogenic bladder dysfunction, 8.1% in Parkinson's disease, etc.). The present study revealed that neuropathies are the most common cause of reduced bladder sensation in neurologic/mental diseases. Increased bladder sensation without DO occurs mainly in peripheral and central sensory pathway lesions, as well as in basal ganglia lesions and psychogenic bladder dysfunction. Reduced and increased bladder sensation should be a major treatment target for maximizing patients' quality of life. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Stress during adolescence increases novelty seeking and risk taking behavior in male and female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eToledo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a period of major physical, hormonal and psychological change. It is also characterized by a significant increase in the incidence of psychopathologies and this increase is gender-specific. Likewise, stress during adolescence is associated with the development of psychiatric disorders later in life. Previously, using a rat model of psychogenic stress (exposure to predator odor followed by placement on an elevated platform during the pre-pubertal period (postnatal days 28-30, we reported sex-specific effects on auditory and contextual fear conditioning. Here, we study the short-term impact of psychogenic stress before and during puberty (postnatal days 28-42 on behavior (novelty seeking, risk taking, anxiety and depression and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis activation during late adolescence (postnatal days 45-51. Peri-pubertal stress decreased anxiety-like behavior and increased risk taking and novelty seeking behaviors during late adolescence (measured with the elevated plus maze, open field and exposure to novel object tests and intake of chocopop pellets before or immediate after stress. Finally neither depressive-like behavior (measured at the forced swim test nor HPA response to stress (blood corticosterone and glucose were affected by peri-pubertal stress. Nevertheless, when controlling for the basal anxiety of the mothers, animals exposed to peri-pubertal stress showed a significant decrease in corticosterone levels immediate after an acute stressor. The results from this study suggest that exposure to mild stressors during the peri-pubertal period induces a broad spectrum of behavioral changes in late adolescence, which may exacerbate the independence-building behaviors naturally happening during this transitional period (increase in curiosity, sensation-seeking and risk taking behaviors.

  18. General Medical, Mental Health, and Demographic Risk Factors Associated With Suicide by Firearm Compared With Other Means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Jennifer M; Beck, Arne; Hubley, Sam; Peterson, Edward L; Hu, Yong; Williams, L Keoki; Prabhakar, Deepak; Rossom, Rebecca C; Lynch, Frances L; Lu, Christine Y; Waitzfelder, Beth E; Owen-Smith, Ashli A; Simon, Gregory E; Ahmedani, Brian K

    2018-02-15

    Mitigation of suicide risk by reducing access to lethal means, such as firearms and potentially lethal medications, is a highly recommended practice. To better understand groups of patients at risk of suicide in medical settings, the authors compared demographic and clinical risk factors between patients who died by suicide by using firearms or other means with matched patients who did not die by suicide (control group). In a case-control study in 2016 from eight health care systems within the Mental Health Research Network, 2,674 suicide cases from 2010-2013 were matched to a control group (N=267,400). The association between suicide by firearm or other means and medical record information on demographic characteristics, general medical disorders, and mental disorders was assessed. The odds of having a mental disorder were higher among cases of suicide involving a method other than a firearm. Fourteen general medical disorders were associated with statistically significant (psuicide by firearm, including traumatic brain injury (TBI) (odds ratio [OR]=23.53), epilepsy (OR=3.17), psychogenic pain (OR=2.82), migraine (OR=2.35), and stroke (OR=2.20). Fifteen general medical disorders were associated with statistically significant (psuicide by other means, with particularly high odds for TBI (OR=7.74), epilepsy (OR=3.28), HIV/AIDS (OR=6.03), and migraine (OR=3.17). Medical providers should consider targeting suicide risk screening for patients with any mental disorder, TBI, epilepsy, HIV, psychogenic pain, stroke, and migraine. When suicide risk is detected, counseling on reducing access to lethal means should include both firearms and other means for at-risk groups.

  19. Disfunção erétil e psicopatologia: um estudo clínico

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    Maria Virgínia Filomena Cremasco

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study psychopathological aspects in subjects with symptoms of psychogenic erectile dysfunction (ED, from a psychoanalytic perspective. Method:Evaluation and psychotherapeutic treatment (three-year follow-up – 1998-2001 on 25 men with diagnosis of psychogenic (ED, carried out at the psychiatric out-patient clinic at the UNICAMP, Brazil.Results: Of the 25 men studied, one showed ego-dissonance in aspects regarding his sexual preference (homosexual, and another was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and substance abuse. Almost all presented high anxiety (23, low self-esteem (20 and depression (23 in facing life in general, with growing difficulties in their relationships as of the onset of the symptom. For 23 of the men, the fears associated with sexual failure revealed insecurities regarding their own masculinity, based psychically on their sexual performance by means of erection. Conclusion: The symptom of ED raises the issue of masculinity, affecting the men’s basic being and confirming the subjective feeling of sexual “impotence”. Both male subject and symptom become involved in the erective failure as “impotent”. We were able to observe the close correlation between sexual symptoms and their counterpart, the constitution of masculine identity. No attempt was made to exhaust all the symbolic possibilities of understanding the psychopathology of ED. Our purpose was rather to open up a field of dialogue and discussion of pathos, as the patients’ psychic suffering, and symptomatic expression.   Keywords: erectile dysfunction; psychopathology; psychoanalysis.

  20. Specific Organ Targeted Vestibular Physiotherapy: The Pivot in the Contemporary Management of Vertigo and Imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Anirban; Barui, Bibhas

    2017-12-01

    Advancements in our understanding of vestibular physiology and how it is changes in different diseases have established that of the three therapeutic approaches to treat disorders of the vestibular system viz. pharmacotherapy, surgery and physical therapy, it is the later i.e., physical therapy which is the most efficacious modality in the management of balance disorders. The futility of vestibular sedatives in the correction of vestibular disorders and in the restoration of balance and the very limited role of surgery has now been recognised. Advancements in vestibulometry now enable us to localise any lesion in the vestibular system with utmost precision and also determine the exact cause of the balance disorder. The site of lesion and the specific organ that is defective can now be very precisely identified. Treatment modalities especially that for physical therapy hence have to be organ specific, and if possible, also disease specific. The study aims at evaluating the efficacy of physiotherapy in the management of balance disorders and also assesses the efficacy of organ targeted physical therapy, a new concept in restoring balance after vestibulometry has identified the offending organ. The study was conducted in the specialised physical therapy unit for balance and gait disorder patients which is a part of Vertigo and Deafness Clinic in Kolkata, India. Special instruments for physical therapy devised by the first author were used for stimulation of specific sense organs in the vestibular labyrinth that were found to be defective in vestibulometry. Specially made Virtual reality programs were used in patients suffering from psychogenic balance disorders. The pre and post therapy status was evaluated by different standard scales to assess balance and dizziness. Very promising results were obtained. Organ targeted physiotherapy where defective sense organs were specifically stimulated showed remarkable improvement in different measures. Virtual reality exercises

  1. Association Between Infertility and Sexual Dysfunction in Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael H; Messore, Marisa; Pastuszak, Alexander W; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2016-10-01

    The relation between infertility and sexual dysfunction can be reciprocal. Causes of sexual dysfunction that affect fertility include erectile dysfunction, Peyronie's disease (abnormal penile curvature), low libido, ejaculatory disorders in men, and genito-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPPPD) and low sexual desire in women. To review the association between infertility and sexual dysfunction and discuss current management strategies to address sexual disorders in couples with infertility. Peer-reviewed publications from PubMed published from 1980 through February 2016 were identified that related to sexual dysfunction and infertility in men and women. Pathophysiology and management approach of erectile dysfunction, Peyronie's disease, low libido, ejaculatory disorders in men, and GPPPD and low sexual desire in women and how each etiology contributes to sexual dysfunction and infertility in the couple. Treating the infertile couple with sexual dysfunction involves addressing underlying conditions such as psychogenic erectile dysfunction, low testosterone, Peyronie's disease in men, and GPPPD and low sexual desire in women. Psychogenic erectile dysfunction can be successfully treated with phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Low testosterone is often identified in men with infertility, but testosterone therapy is contraindicated in men attempting conception. Men with Peyronie's disease have a new treatment option to address their penile curvature-collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection directly into the penile plaque. GPPPD is a broad disorder that includes vulvodynia and vaginismus and can be treated with topical lubricants and moisturizers. We must address psychosocial factors in women with low sexual desire. Flibanserin and transdermal testosterone (off-label) are novel therapies for women with low sexual desire. Sexual dysfunction in a couple with infertility is a complex issue. Management of infertility and sexual dysfunction should involve appropriate

  2. Qualitative and Quantitative Hippocampal MRI Assessments in Intractable Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramdeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To acquire normative data of hippocampal volumes and T2 relaxation times, to evaluate and compare qualitative and quantitative assessments in evaluating hippocampi in patients with different durations of intractable epilepsy, and to propose an imaging protocol based on performance of these techniques. Methods. MRI analysis was done in 50 nonepileptic controls and 30 patients with intractable epilepsy on 1.5T scanner. Visual assessment and hippocampal volumetry were done on oblique coronal IR/T2W and T1W MP-RAGE images, respectively. T2 relaxation times were measured using 16-echo Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. Volumetric data was normalized for variation in head size between individuals. Patients were divided into temporal ( and extratemporal ( groups based on clinical and EEG localization. Results. In controls, right hippocampal volume was slightly more than the left with no effect of age or gender. In TLE patients, hippocampal volumetry provided maximum concordance with EEG. Visual assessment of unilateral pathology concurred well with measured quantitative values but poorly in cases with bilateral pathologies. There were no significant differences of mean values between extratemporal group and controls group. Quantitative techniques detected mild abnormalities, undetected on visual assessment. Conclusions. Quantitative techniques are more sensitive to diagnose bilateral and mild unilateral hippocampal abnormalities.

  3. Retrospective study of concussive convulsions in elite Australian rules and rugby league footballers: phenomenology, aetiology, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrory, P R; Bladin, P F; Berkovic, S F

    1997-01-18

    To study the ictal phenomenology, aetiology, and outcome of convulsions occurring within seconds of impact in violent collision sport. Retrospective identification of convulsions associated with concussive brain injury from case records from medical officers of football clubs over a 15 year period. Elite Australian rules and rugby league footballers. Neuroimaging studies, electroencephalography, neuropsychological test data, and statistics on performance in matches to determine presence of structural or functional brain injury. Clinical follow up and electroencephalography for evidence of epilepsy. Twenty two cases of concussive convulsions were identified with four events documented on television videotape. Convulsions began within 2 seconds of impact and comprised an initial period of tonic stiffening followed by myoclonic jerks of all limbs lasting up to 150 seconds. Some asymmetry in the convulsive manifestations was common, and recovery of consciousness was rapid. No structural or permanent brain injury was present on clinical assessment, neuropsychological testing, or neuroimaging studies. All players returned to elite competition within two weeks of the incident. Epilepsy did not develop in any player over a mean (range) follow up of 3.5 (1-13) years. These concussive or impact convulsions are probably a non-epileptic phenomenon, somewhat akin to convulsive syncope. The mechanism may be a transient traumatic functional decerebration. In concussive convulsions the outcome is universally good, antiepileptic treatment is not indicated, and prolonged absence from sport is unwarranted.

  4. [Diagnosis and management of de novo epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louise, Tyvaert

    2018-03-01

    The diagnosis of de novo epilepsy is complex. An accurate diagnostic approach has to be followed based on specific key steps. Epileptic seizure or non-epileptic malaise: risk of diagnosis error around 20%. Facing a first unprovoked seizure, the practitioner has to know the risk factors specifically linked to an increase risk of seizure recurrence. In presence of these factors, an antiepileptic drug would be indicated. The first antiepileptic drug has to be highly selected according to the epilepsy type and causes but also to the patient characteristics (sex, age, comorbidities, associated drugs, profession, and way of life…) An exhaustive patient Education needs to support the first antiepileptic drug prescription: (sleep and nutritional advices, benefit of observance, antiepileptic drugs features and side effects, follow-up, prognosis…) A regular follow-up is essential to control the observance, tolerability and efficacy of the antiepileptic drug, and to control also the good acceptance of the disease. A systematic research of common comorbidities may be also performed. Electroencephalogram and antiepileptic drugs levels are unnecessary in the classical follow up of known epileptic patients (except specific cases). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. From nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy to Sleep-Related Hypermotor Epilepsy: A 35-year diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinuper, Paolo; Bisulli, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is a focal epilepsy with seizures arising mainly during sleep and characterized by complex, often bizarre, motor behavior or sustained dystonic posturing. First described in 1981, it was initially considered a motor disorder of sleep and was named nocturnal paroxysmal dystonia (NPD). The unusual seizure semiology, onset during sleep, and often uninformative scalp EEG and brain MRI make it difficult to distinguish NPD attacks from other non-epileptic nocturnal paroxysmal events, namely parasomnias. The long-debated epileptic origin of the condition was finally demonstrated in 1990 and the term NFLE introduced. Even though many aspects of parasomnias and NFLE have been clarified in the last two decades, the differential diagnosis remains a challenge for clinicians. To address controversial issues and define the diagnostic criteria for NFLE, a Consensus Conference was held in Bologna, Italy in 2014. Major points of agreement emerged on: (i) the relationship of the seizures with sleep and not with the circadian pattern of seizure occurrence; (ii) the possible extrafrontal origin of hypermotor seizures, without substantial differences in seizure semiology. In the wake of the Consensus, the syndrome was renamed Sleep-Related Hypermotor Epilepsy (SHE). Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Incomplete hippocampal inversion - is there a relation to epilepsy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajic, Dragan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Kumlien, Eva; Mattsson, Peter [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Neuroscience, Neurology, Uppsala (Sweden); Lundberg, Staffan [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Women' s and Children' s Health, Uppsala (Sweden); Wang, Chen [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Raininko, Raili [Uppsala University, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2009-10-15

    Incomplete hippocampal inversion (IHI) has been described in patients with epilepsy or severe midline malformations but also in nonepileptic subjects without obvious developmental anomalies. We studied the frequency of IHI in different epilepsy syndromes to evaluate their relationship. Three hundred patients were drawn from the regional epilepsy register. Of these, 99 were excluded because of a disease or condition affecting the temporal lobes or incomplete data. Controls were 150 subjects without epilepsy or obvious intracranial developmental anomalies. The coronal MR images were analysed without knowledge of the clinical data. Among epilepsy patients, 30% had IHI (40 left-sided, 4 right-sided, 16 bilateral). Of controls, 18% had IHI (20 left-sided, 8 bilateral). The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients, 25% had IHI, which was not a significantly higher frequency than in controls (P=0.34). There was no correlation between EEG and IHI laterality. A total of 44% of Rolandic epilepsy patients and 57% of cryptogenic generalised epilepsy patients had IHI. The IHI frequency was very high in some epileptic syndromes, but not significantly higher in TLE compared to controls. No causality between TLE and IHI could be found. IHI can be a sign of disturbed cerebral development affecting other parts of the brain, maybe leading to epilepsy. (orig.)

  7. GLUT1 deficiency syndrome: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, D; Roze, E; Caillet, S; Méneret, A; Doummar, D; Billette de Villemeur, T; Vidailhet, M; Mochel, F

    2014-02-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is caused by heterozygous, mostly de novo, mutations in the SLC2A1 gene encoding the glucose transporter GLUT1. Mutations in this gene limit brain glucose availability and lead to cerebral energy deficiency. The phenotype is characterized by the variable association of mental retardation, acquired microcephaly, complex motor disorders, and paroxysmal manifestations including seizures and non-epileptic paroxysmal episodes. Clinical severity varies from mild motor dysfunction to severe neurological disability. In patients with mild phenotypes, paroxysmal manifestations may be the sole manifestations of the disease. In particular, the diagnosis should be considered in patients with paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia or with early-onset generalized epilepsy. Low CSF level of glucose, relative to blood level, is the best biochemical clue to the diagnosis although not constantly found. Molecular analysis of the SLC2A1 gene confirms the diagnosis. Ketogenic diet is the cornerstone of the treatment and implicates a close monitoring by a multidisciplinary team including trained dieticians. Non-specific drugs may be used as add-on symptomatic treatments but their effects are often disappointing. Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome is likely under diagnosed due to its complex and pleiotropic phenotype. Proper identification of the affected patients is important for clinical practice since the disease is treatable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. State dependent properties of epileptic brain networks: comparative graph-theoretical analyses of simultaneously recorded EEG and MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstmann, Marie-Therese; Bialonski, Stephan; Noennig, Nina; Mai, Heinke; Prusseit, Jens; Wellmer, Jörg; Hinrichs, Hermann; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    To investigate whether functional brain networks of epilepsy patients treated with antiepileptic medication differ from networks of healthy controls even during the seizure-free interval. We applied different rules to construct binary and weighted networks from EEG and MEG data recorded under a resting-state eyes-open and eyes-closed condition from 21 epilepsy patients and 23 healthy controls. The average shortest path length and the clustering coefficient served as global statistical network characteristics. Independent on the behavioral condition, epileptic brains exhibited a more regular functional network structure. Similarly, the eyes-closed condition was characterized by a more regular functional network structure in both groups. The amount of network reorganization due to behavioral state changes was similar in both groups. Consistent findings could be achieved for networks derived from EEG but hardly from MEG recordings, and network construction rules had a rather strong impact on our findings. Despite the locality of the investigated processes epileptic brain networks differ in their global characteristics from non-epileptic brain networks. Further methodological developments are necessary to improve the characterization of disturbed and normal functional networks. An increased regularity and a diminished modulation capability appear characteristic of epileptic brain networks. Copyright (c) 2009 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cerebral blood flow during paroxysmal EEG activation induced by sleep in patients with complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gozukirmizi, E.; Meyer, J.S.; Okabe, T.; Amano, T.; Mortel, K.; Karacan, I.

    1982-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements were combined with sleep polysomnography in nine patients with complex partial seizures. Two methods were used: the 133Xe method for measuring regional (rCBF) and the stable xenon CT method for local (LCBF). Compared to nonepileptic subjects, who show diffuse CBF decreases during stages I-II, non-REM sleep onset, patients with complex partial seizures show statistically significant increases in CBF which are maximal in regions where the EEG focus is localized and are predominantly seen in one temporal region but are also propagated to other cerebral areas. Both CBF methods gave comparable results, but greater statistical significance was achieved by stable xenon CT methodology. CBF increases are more diffuse than predicted by EEG paroxysmal activity recorded from scalp electrodes. An advantage of the 133Xe inhalation method was achievement of reliable data despite movement of the head. This was attributed to the use of a helmet which maintained the probes approximated to the scalp. Disadvantages were poor resolution (7 cm3) and two-dimensional information. The advantage of stable xenon CT method is excellent resolution (80 mm3) in three dimensions, but a disadvantage is that movement of the head in patients with seizure disorders may limit satisfactory measurements

  10. Response inhibition in motor conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Valerie; Ekanayake, Vindhya; Wiggs, Edythe; Kranick, Sarah; Ameli, Rezvan; Harrison, Neil A; Hallett, Mark

    2013-05-01

    Conversion disorders (CDs) are unexplained neurological symptoms presumed to be related to a psychological issue. Studies focusing on conversion paralysis have suggested potential impairments in motor initiation or execution. Here we studied CD patients with aberrant or excessive motor movements and focused on motor response inhibition. We also assessed cognitive measures in multiple domains. We compared 30 CD patients and 30 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy volunteers on a motor response inhibition task (go/no go), along with verbal motor response inhibition (color-word interference) and measures of attention, sustained attention, processing speed, language, memory, visuospatial processing, and executive function including planning and verbal fluency. CD patients had greater impairments in commission errors on the go/no go task (P conversion. Patients with nonepileptic seizures, a different form of conversion disorder, are commonly reported to have lower IQ and multiple cognitive deficits. Our results point toward potential differences between conversion disorder subgroups. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  11. Not EEG abnormalities but epilepsy is associated with autistic regression and mental functioning in childhood autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrdlicka, Michal; Komarek, Vladimir; Propper, Lukas; Kulisek, Robert; Zumrova, Alena; Faladova, Ludvika; Havlovicova, Marketa; Sedlacek, Zdenek; Blatny, Marek; Urbanek, Tomas

    2004-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the potential association of epilepsy and EEG abnormalities with autistic regression and mental retardation. We examined a group of 77 autistic children (61 boys, 16 girls) with an average age of 9.1 +/- 5.3 years. Clinical interview, neurological examination focused on the evaluation of epilepsy, IQ testing, and 21-channel EEG (including night sleep EEG recording) were performed. Normal EEGs were observed in 44.4% of the patients, non-epileptiform abnormal EEGs in 17.5%, and abnormal EEGs with epileptiform discharges in 38.1% of the patients. Epilepsy was found in 22.1% of the subjects. A history of regression was reported in 25.8% of the patients, 54.8% of the sample had abnormal development during the first year of life, and 79.7% of the patients were mentally retarded. Autistic regression was significantly more frequent in patients with epilepsy than in non-epileptic patients (p = 0.003). Abnormal development during the first year of life was significantly associated with epileptiform EEG abnormalities (p = 0.014). Epilepsy correlated significantly with mental retardation (p = 0.001). Although the biological basis and possible causal relationships of these associations remain to be explained, they may point to different subgroups of patients with autistic spectrum disorders.

  12. EEG signal classification using PSO trained RBF neural network for epilepsy identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Satapathy

    Full Text Available The electroencephalogram (EEG is a low amplitude signal generated in the brain, as a result of information flow during the communication of several neurons. Hence, careful analysis of these signals could be useful in understanding many human brain disorder diseases. One such disease topic is epileptic seizure identification, which can be identified via a classification process of the EEG signal after preprocessing with the discrete wavelet transform (DWT. To classify the EEG signal, we used a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN. As shown herein, the network can be trained to optimize the mean square error (MSE by using a modified particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. The key idea behind the modification of PSO is to introduce a method to overcome the problem of slow searching in and around the global optimum solution. The effectiveness of this procedure was verified by an experimental analysis on a benchmark dataset which is publicly available. The result of our experimental analysis revealed that the improvement in the algorithm is significant with respect to RBF trained by gradient descent and canonical PSO. Here, two classes of EEG signals were considered: the first being an epileptic and the other being non-epileptic. The proposed method produced a maximum accuracy of 99% as compared to the other techniques. Keywords: Electroencephalography, Radial basis function neural network, Particle swarm optimization, Discrete wavelet transform, Machine learning

  13. Assessment of estrous cycle, ovarian and uterine tissue and fetal parameters of Wistar rats treated with Topiramate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Cherici Camargo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Topiramate (TPM is included in the newer generation of antiepileptic drugs and is known to have multiple mechanisms of action. The drug has also been used for reducing body weight. Its effect on reproductive tissues and estrous cycle deserve greater attention. Then, this study aimed to investigate possible effects of the drug on ovarian and uterine tissues, estrous cycle and some fetal parameters of non-epileptic Wistar rats. In Experiment I, females received tap water (C - Control group; n=8 or Topiramate (TPM group; 100 mg/kg; n=8, orally for 6 weeks. The estrous cycle and food consumption were monitored. Ovarian and uterine sections were examined under light microscopy. In Experiment II, pregnant rats of C and TPM groups received treatments during the pre-implantation, implantation or organogenesis period. In females of Experiment I, TPM had no effect on the food consumption, final body weight, weekly body weight and estrous cycle. Ovarian and uterine weight was similar in both groups. The kinetics of folliculogenesis was unaffected by treatment with the drug. There was a significant (p<0.05 decrease in endometrial thickness of TPM-group. In Experiment II, fetal weight was decreased (p<0.05 in all periods of TPM exposure. There was no effect of treatment on fetal external morphology. In conclusion, the findings indicate that TPM promotes discrete alterations in the uterine tissue, and causes decrease on the fetus weight after exposure in different gestational periods.

  14. Computerized tomographic studies in cerebral palsy. Analysis of 200 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugie, Y. (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1981-09-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings in 200 children with cerebral palsy (CP) were analysed from the viewpoint of clinical manifestations, disease complications and etiological factors. CT scans of 135 cases (67.5%) were found to be abnormal and there were 14 (7%) borderline cases. The major abnormality found on CT scans was cerebral atrophy. Other important changes included focal or diffuse low density area in the brain tissue, congenital malformation, and cerebellar atrophy. From the clinical point of view, a large number of patients with spastic tetraplegia and spastic diplegia showed highly abnormal CT scans. On the other hand, in patients with spastic monoplegia, spastic paraplegia, and athetotic type, CT findings were normal or revealed only minor cerebral atrophy. Most children showing asymmetric clinical symptoms had corresponding asymmetric CT abnormalities which included ventricular enlargement, low density area in the brain tissue, and hemispherical volume. There was a significant correlation between the severity of physical impairment and the extent of CT abnormalities. Severely affected children had grossly abnormal CT scans such as hydranencephaly, polycystic change, and extensive cerebral atrophy. In the patients complicated with epilepsy, the incidence and severity of abnormal CT were higher than those of non-epileptic patients. Mentally retarded patients had variable enlargement of the subarachnoidal space depending on the severity of their mental retardation. Patients with suspected postnatal etiology also had high incidence of severe CT abnormality. CT scan is a valuable tool for evaluating patients with CP and in some cases, possible etiology of the disease may be discovered.

  15. Nootropic nefiracetam inhibits proconvulsant action of peripheral-type benzodiazepines in epileptic mutant EL mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Yurie; Shiotani, Tadashi; Watabe, Shigeo; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Yoshii, Mitsunobu

    2004-10-01

    Piracetam and structurally related nootropics are known to potentiate the anticonvulsant effects of antiepileptic drugs. It remains to be seen, however, whether these nootropics inhibit proconvulsant actions of many toxic agents including Ro 5-4864, a specific agonist for peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR). The present study was designed to address this issue using EL mice, an animal model of epilepsy. In behavioral pharmacological experiments, EL mice were highly susceptible to convulsions induced by Ro 5-4864 (i.p.) in comparison with nonepileptic DDY mice. Nefiracetam administered orally to EL mice inhibited spontaneous seizures. In DDY mice, convulsions induced by Ro 5-4864 were prevented by nefiracetam when administered by i.v. injection. Aniracetam (i.v.) was partially effective, but piracetam and oxiracetam were ineffective as anticonvulsants. Binding assay for brain tissues revealed a higher density of mitochondrial PBR in EL mice compared with DDY mice. Binding of the PBR ligands Ro 5-4864 to either EL or DDY mouse brain was inhibited by micromolar concentrations of these nootropic agents in the sequence of nefiracetam > aniracetam > oxiracetam, piracetam. This rank order is identical to potency as anticonvulsants. These data suggest that nefiracetam may prevent toxic effects of PBR agonists through interacting with PBR.

  16. Melatonin and Angelman Syndrome: Implications and Mathematical Model of Diurnal Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Paprocka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the study was to compare the melatonin rhythms in subjects with Angelman syndrome (n=9 and in children with (n=80 and without (n=40 epilepsy (nonepileptic patients diagnosed with peripheral nerve palsies, myopathy, and back pain using our mathematical model of melatonin circadian secretion. The characteristics describing the diurnal hormone secretion such as minimum melatonin concentration, release amplitude, phase shift of melatonin release, and sleep duration as well as the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO of melatonin secretion and the γ shape parameter allow analyzing the fit and deducing about how much the measured melatonin profile differs from a physiological bell-shaped secretion. The estimated sleep duration and phase shift of melatonin release as well as the DMLO offsets at 25% and 50% relative thresholds are the key characteristic of Angelman syndrome children. As revealed from the γ shape parameter, the melatonin secretion profiles are disturbed in majority of the AG subjects revealing rather a triangular course instead of the bell-like one.

  17. Drug-resistant parietal epilepsy: polymorphic ictal semiology does not preclude good post-surgical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francione, Stefano; Liava, Alexandra; Mai, Roberto; Nobili, Lino; Sartori, Ivana; Tassi, Laura; Scarpa, Pina; Cardinale, Francesco; Castana, Laura; Cossu, Massimo; Lo Russo, Giorgio

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the anatomo-electro-clinical features and clinical outcome of surgical resections strictly confined to the parietal lobe in 40 consecutive patients who received surgery for pharmacoresistant seizures. The population was subcategorized into a paediatric (11 subjects; mean age at surgery: 7.2+/-3.7 years) and an adult group (29 patients; mean age at surgery: 30+/-10.8 years). The paediatric group more frequently exhibited personal antecedents, neurological impairment, high seizure frequency, and dysplastic lesions. Nonetheless, compared with adults, children had better outcome and more frequently reached definitive drug discontinuation after surgery. After a mean follow-up of 9.4 years (range: 3.1-16.7), 30 subjects (75%) were classified as Engel Class I. The presence of multiple types of aura in the same patient, as well as a high incidence of secondary generalization, represented a characteristic feature of parietal seizures and did not correlate negatively with surgical outcome. A total resection of the epileptogenic zone and a localizing/regional interictal EEG were statistically significant predictive factors of outcome. Intracerebral investigation, performed in 55% of cases, contributed to complete tailored resections of the epileptogenic area and determination of prognosis. Frequent subjective manifestations of parietal lobe seizures, such as vertiginous, cephalic and visual-moving sensations, underscore their potential misdiagnosis as non-epileptic events.

  18. Presurgical evaluation for partial epilepsy: Relative contributions of chronic depth-electrode recordings versus FDG-PET and scalp-sphenoidal ictal EEG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, J. Jr.; Henry, T.R.; Risinger, M.W.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Sutherling, W.W.; Levesque, M.F.; Phelps, M.E.

    1990-11-01

    One hundred fifty-three patients with medically refractory partial epilepsy underwent chronic stereotactic depth-electrode EEG (SEEG) evaluations after being studied by positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and scalp-sphenoidal EEG telemetry. We carried out retrospective standardized reviews of local cerebral metabolism and scalp-sphenoidal ictal onsets to determine when SEEG recordings revealed additional useful information. FDG-PET localization was misleading in only 3 patients with temporal lobe SEEG ictal onsets for whom extratemporal or contralateral hypometabolism could be attributed to obvious nonepileptic structural defects. Two patients with predominantly temporal hypometabolism may have had frontal epileptogenic regions, but ultimate localization remains uncertain. Scalp-sphenoidal ictal onsets were misleading in 5 patients. For 37 patients with congruent focal scalp-sphenoidal ictal onsets and temporal hypometabolic zones, SEEG recordings never demonstrated extratemporal or contralateral epileptogenic regions; however, 3 of these patients had nondiagnostic SEEG evaluations. The results of subsequent subdural grid recordings indicated that at least 1 of these patients may have been denied beneficial surgery as a result of an equivocal SEEG evaluation. Weighing risks and benefits, it is concluded that anterior temporal lobectomy is justified without chronic intracranial recording when specific criteria for focal scalp-sphenoidal ictal EEG onsets are met, localized hypometabolism predominantly involves the same temporal lobe, and no other conflicting information has been obtained from additional tests of focal functional deficit, structural imaging, or seizure semiology.

  19. Regularity and Matching Pursuit feature extraction for the detection of epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Z-Flores, Emigdio; Trujillo, Leonardo; Sotelo, Arturo; Legrand, Pierrick; Coria, Luis N

    2016-06-15

    The neurological disorder known as epilepsy is characterized by involuntary recurrent seizures that diminish a patient's quality of life. Automatic seizure detection can help improve a patient's interaction with her/his environment, and while many approaches have been proposed the problem is still not trivially solved. In this work, we present a novel methodology for feature extraction on EEG signals that allows us to perform a highly accurate classification of epileptic states. Specifically, Hölderian regularity and the Matching Pursuit algorithm are used as the main feature extraction techniques, and are combined with basic statistical features to construct the final feature sets. These sets are then delivered to a Random Forests classification algorithm to differentiate between epileptic and non-epileptic readings. Several versions of the basic problem are tested and statistically validated producing perfect accuracy in most problems and 97.6% accuracy on the most difficult case. A comparison with recent literature, using a well known database, reveals that our proposal achieves state-of-the-art performance. The experimental results show that epileptic states can be accurately detected by combining features extracted through regularity analysis, the Matching Pursuit algorithm and simple time-domain statistical analysis. Therefore, the proposed method should be considered as a promising approach for automatic EEG analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Incomplete hippocampal inversion - is there a relation to epilepsy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajic, Dragan; Kumlien, Eva; Mattsson, Peter; Lundberg, Staffan; Wang, Chen; Raininko, Raili

    2009-01-01

    Incomplete hippocampal inversion (IHI) has been described in patients with epilepsy or severe midline malformations but also in nonepileptic subjects without obvious developmental anomalies. We studied the frequency of IHI in different epilepsy syndromes to evaluate their relationship. Three hundred patients were drawn from the regional epilepsy register. Of these, 99 were excluded because of a disease or condition affecting the temporal lobes or incomplete data. Controls were 150 subjects without epilepsy or obvious intracranial developmental anomalies. The coronal MR images were analysed without knowledge of the clinical data. Among epilepsy patients, 30% had IHI (40 left-sided, 4 right-sided, 16 bilateral). Of controls, 18% had IHI (20 left-sided, 8 bilateral). The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients, 25% had IHI, which was not a significantly higher frequency than in controls (P=0.34). There was no correlation between EEG and IHI laterality. A total of 44% of Rolandic epilepsy patients and 57% of cryptogenic generalised epilepsy patients had IHI. The IHI frequency was very high in some epileptic syndromes, but not significantly higher in TLE compared to controls. No causality between TLE and IHI could be found. IHI can be a sign of disturbed cerebral development affecting other parts of the brain, maybe leading to epilepsy. (orig.)

  1. [Conversion syndromes in neurology. A psychopathological and psychodynamic differentiation of conversion disorder, somatization disorder and factitious disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapfhammer, H P; Dobmeier, P; Mayer, C; Rothenhäusler, H B

    1998-12-01

    Conversion syndromes are frequent among medically unexplained somatic symptoms in neurology. A careful differential diagnosis must be carried out in a psychiatric consultation service. In a prospective study lasting for over four years 169 patients with pseudoneurological signs of conversion were included. From a clinical point of view the following conversion syndromes were presented: astasia/abasia: 27.2%, paresis/plegia: 24.3%, aphonia: 1.8%, hyp-/anaesthesia: 21.9%, blindness: 5.3%, non-epileptic seizures: 19.5%. According to the diagnostic criteria of DSM-III-R three subgroups were differentiated: conversion disorder (n = 132), somatisation disorder (n = 28), factitious disorder (n = 9). Intermittent courses of illness were prevailing in conversion disorder, whereas chronic courses predominated in the other two subgroups. High rates of psychiatric comorbidity were typical signs of somatisation disorder. Frequent autodestructive motives (suicidality, deliberate and covert self-harm, chronic pain, high rate of operations) in illness behaviour had to be registered in somatisation and factitious disorder. Both subgroups were characterised by frequent traumatic events during early development. Important socio-economic aspects of illness behaviour above all in somatisation and factitious disorder were underlined. The results are discussed in terms of psychiatric differential diagnosis and psychiatric comorbidity, psychodynamic evaluation, illness behaviour and therapeutic options in a C/L-service.

  2. Anoxic seizures: self-terminating syncopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, J B

    2001-01-01

    This review focuses on anoxic seizures induced by self terminating syncopes in the young. Anoxic seizures are nonepileptic events consequent upon abrupt interruption of the energy supply to metabolically active cerebral neurones. Anoxic seizures are the most common paroxysmal events misdiagnosed as epilepsy. Neurally mediated syncopes have numerous appellations, especially in the young. This proliferation of terminology likely results from uncertainty regarding pathophysiology. The most important type of self-limiting syncope from the point of view of diagnostic difficulty has been called neurocardiogenic or vasovagal syncope and reflex anoxic seizure, amongst other names: this review includes a video clip of such a child with prolonged asystole. It also includes a detailed case history emphasising the feelings of a patient with this type of syncope who was misdiagnosed as having epilepsy for many years. The second class of self-terminating syncope discussed and illustrated on video is the so-called breath-holding spell of young children. The third example illustrated is the compulsive Valsalva manoeuvre of individuals with autistic spectrum disorder, in which anoxic seizures - as shown on the video clips - are easily misdiagnosed as epileptic seizures, with unfortunate consequences.

  3. Melatonin and Angelman Syndrome: Implications and Mathematical Model of Diurnal Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijonka, Marek; Wojcieszek, Piotr; Pęcka, Marcin; Emich-Widera, Ewa; Sokół, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The main aim of the study was to compare the melatonin rhythms in subjects with Angelman syndrome (n = 9) and in children with (n = 80) and without (n = 40) epilepsy (nonepileptic patients diagnosed with peripheral nerve palsies, myopathy, and back pain) using our mathematical model of melatonin circadian secretion. The characteristics describing the diurnal hormone secretion such as minimum melatonin concentration, release amplitude, phase shift of melatonin release, and sleep duration as well as the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) of melatonin secretion and the γ shape parameter allow analyzing the fit and deducing about how much the measured melatonin profile differs from a physiological bell-shaped secretion. The estimated sleep duration and phase shift of melatonin release as well as the DMLO offsets at 25% and 50% relative thresholds are the key characteristic of Angelman syndrome children. As revealed from the γ shape parameter, the melatonin secretion profiles are disturbed in majority of the AG subjects revealing rather a triangular course instead of the bell-like one. PMID:29379523

  4. Corpus callosum and epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unterberger, Iris; Bauer, Richard; Walser, Gerald; Bauer, Gerhard

    2016-04-01

    Corpus callosum (CC) is the largest forebrain commissure. This review focuses on the significance of CC for seizure disorders, the role of CC in seizure spread and the surgical disruption of callosal fibers (callosotomy) for treatment of patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Personal experience/extensive literature review. Structural CC pathologies comprise developmental abnormalities, callosal involvement in identified disorders, transient imaging findings and microstructural changes. Epilepsies are reported in up to two thirds of patients with complete or partial CC agenesis (AgCC). However, AgCC per se is not indicative for seizure disorders. Moreover, additional malformations of cortical development (MCD) are causal. Microstructural CC abnormalities are detected by advanced imaging techniques, are part of diffuse white matter disturbances and are related to cognitive deficits. The etiological significance remains unexplained. However, they are also found in non-epileptic benign and transient disorders. In drug-resistant epilepsies with violent drops to the floor ("drop seizures") callosotomy may be beneficial in seizure reduction. Since the EEG after callosotomy exhibits a single seizure focus in up to 50% of patients, consecutive resective surgical methods might be successful. CC is part of cerebral white matter and anomalies cannot act per se as seizure onset zone. Imaging techniques demonstrate additional lesions in patients with epilepsies. CC is the major pathway for seizure generalization. Therefore, callosotomy is used to prevent generalized drop seizures. Copyright © 2016 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical characteristics of patients seizure following the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inatomi, Yuichiro; Nakajima, Makoto; Yonehara, Toshiro; Ando, Yukio

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with seizure following the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake. We retrospectively studied patients with seizure admitted to our hospital for 12weeks following the earthquake. We compared the clinical backgrounds and characteristics of the patients: before (the same period from the previous 3years) and after the earthquake; and the early (first 2weeks) and late (subsequent 10weeks) phases. A total of 60 patients with seizure were admitted to the emergency room after the earthquake, and 175 (58.3/year) patients were admitted before the earthquake. Of them, 35 patients with seizure were hospitalized in the Department of Neurology after the earthquake, and 96 (32/year) patients were hospitalized before the earthquake. In patients after the earthquake, males and non-cerebrovascular diseases as an epileptogenic disease were seen more frequently than before the earthquake. During the early phase after the earthquake, female, first-attack, and non-focal-type patients were seen more frequently than during the late phase after the earthquake. These characteristics of patients with seizure during the early phase after the earthquake suggest that many patients had non-epileptic seizures. To prevent seizures following earthquakes, mental stress and physical status of evacuees must be assessed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Synaptic Changes in AMPA Receptor Subunit Expression in Cortical Parvalbumin Interneurons in the Stargazer Model of Absence Epilepsy

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    Nadia K. Adotevi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Feedforward inhibition is essential to prevent run away excitation within the brain. Recent evidence suggests that a loss of feed-forward inhibition in the corticothalamocortical circuitry may underlie some absence seizures. However, it is unclear if this aberration is specifically linked to loss of synaptic excitation onto local fast-spiking parvalbumin-containing (PV+ inhibitory interneurons, which are responsible for mediating feedforward inhibition within cortical networks. We recently reported a global tissue loss of AMPA receptors (AMPARs, and a specific mistrafficking of these AMPARs in PV+ interneurons in the stargazer somatosensory cortex. The current study was aimed at investigating if cellular changes in AMPAR expression were translated into deficits in receptors at specific synapses in the feedforward inhibitory microcircuit. Using western blot immunolabeling on biochemically isolated synaptic fractions, we demonstrate a loss of AMPAR GluA1–4 subunits in the somatosensory cortex of stargazers compared to non-epileptic control mice. Furthermore, using double post-embedding immunogold-cytochemistry, we show a loss of GluA1–4-AMPARs at excitatory synapses onto cortical PV+ interneurons. Altogether, these data indicate a loss of synaptic AMPAR-mediated excitation of cortical PV+ inhibitory neurons. As the cortex is considered the site of initiation of spike wave discharges (SWDs within the corticothalamocortical circuitry, loss of AMPARs at cortical PV+ interneurons likely impairs feed-forward inhibitory output, and contributes to the generation of SWDs and absence seizures in stargazers.

  7. Erectile Dysfunction in Young Men-A Review of the Prevalence and Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang Minh Tue; Gabrielson, Andrew T; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2017-10-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is an important health concern that can significantly affect a man's psychosocial well-being. ED has traditionally been considered a disease of old age; however, contemporary evidence suggests a growing incidence of ED in men younger than 40 years. The process of achieving an erection is multifaceted; there are many potential mechanisms that can be disrupted. It is critical to identify the specific causes of ED before proceeding with potentially costly and invasive therapeutic options. Advances in diagnostic and treatment modalities offer opportunities to identify and manage young men with ED. To provide an update on the prevalence and risk factors of ED in young men and to provide a framework to guide clinicians in identifying and managing the affected young man. Comprehensive review of the literature pertaining to ED in young men. ED in young men was assessed by outlining the prevalence according to recent epidemiologic studies. The pathophysiology, diagnostic considerations, risk factors, and etiologies were reviewed. Large multinational studies have estimated the prevalence of ED in young men to be as high as 30%. Several studies have stratified the etiologies of ED into psychogenic and organic causes. Psychogenic etiologies of ED include depression, anxiety, and partner-related difficulties. These patients tend to experience sudden onset of symptoms, with decreased libido and good quality of spontaneous or self-stimulated erections. Organic etiologies include vasculogenic, endocrinologic, neurogenic, iatrogenic, and structural components. These patients usually experience gradual onset of symptoms and a low to normal libido. Conservative treatments such as phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors continue to be the mainstay treatment. ED in young men is an increasingly common condition. A careful diagnostic evaluation should focus on the identification of any underlying etiology to ensure appropriate management of patients. Nguyen HMT

  8. Avoiding diagnostic errors in psychosomatic medicine: a case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Atsuko; Ohtake, Yoichi; Yasuda, Kanae; Sakai, Kiyohiro; Sakamoto, Ryo; Matsuoka, Hiromichi; Okumi, Hirokuni; Yasuda, Toshiko

    2018-01-01

    Non-organic lesions or diseases of unknown origin are sometimes misdiagnosed as "psychogenic" disorders or "psychosomatic" diseases. For the quality of life and safety of patients, recent attention has focused on diagnostic error. The aim of this study was to clarify the factors that affected misdiagnoses in psychosomatic medicine by examining typical cases and to explore strategies that reduce diagnostic errors. The study period was from January 2001 to August 2017. The data of patients who had visited the Department of Psychosomatic Medicine, Kindai University Hospital and its branches, Sakai Hospital and Nihonbashi Clinic, were collected. All patients were aged 16 years or over. Multiple factors, such as age, sex, presenting symptoms, initial diagnosis, final diagnosis, sources of re-diagnosis and types of diagnostic errors were retrospectively analyzed from the medical charts of 20 patients. Among them, four typical cases can be described as follows. Case 1; a 79-year-old woman, initially diagnosed with psychogenic vomiting due to depression that was changed to gastric torsion as the final diagnosis. Case 2; a 24-year-old man, diagnosed with an eating disorder that was later changed to esophageal achalasia. Case 10; a 60-year-old woman's diagnosis changed from conversion disorder to localized muscle atrophy. Case 19; a 68-year-old man, appetite loss from depression due to cancer changed to secondary adrenal insufficiency, isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD). This study showed that multiple factors related to misdiagnoses were combined and had a mutual influence. However, they can be summarized into two important clinical observations, diagnostic system-related problems and provider issues. Provider issues contain mainly cognitive biases such as Anchoring, Availability, Confirmation bias, Delayed diagnosis, and Representativeness. In order to avoid diagnostic errors, both a diagnostic system approach and the reduction of cognitive biases are needed. Psychosomatic

  9. Papel de la monitorización electroencefalográfica continua en el diagnóstico de la epilepsia pediátrica Role of continuous EEG monitoring in the diagnosis of pediatric epilepsy

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    Agustín Legido

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El diagnóstico de la epilepsia es fundamentalmente clínico, pero frecuentemente se plantea el diagnóstico diferencial con fenómenos no epilépticos. El desarrollo de la monitorización EEG continua (MEEGC en las últimas dos décadas ha permitido mejorar el diagnóstico de pacientes epilépticos de todas las edades. En este trabajo se revisan los datos de la literatura sobre la eficacia de los distintos tipos de MEEGC en el diagnóstico de la epilepsia pediátrica, resaltando especialmente nuestra experiencia personal. En nuestros estudios, la MEEGC ambulatoria suplementada con video permitió contestar la pregunta que determinó su petición en el 80% de pacientes diagnosticados de epilepsia y en el 83% de aquéllos con sospecha diagnóstica de epilepsia. Con la MEEGC ambulatoria asistida por ordenador, dichas cifras fueron 88% y 89%, respectivamente y con la MEEGC intrahospitalaria con video fueron 82% y 51%, respectivamente. La MEEGC intrahospitalaria con video es crucial en la evaluación de pacientes con epilepsia, candidatos al tratamiento quirúrgico. La MEEGC es también importante en pacientes con encefalopatías agudas ingresados en las unidades de cuidados intensivos. La MEEGC, tanto ambulatoria como intrahospitalaria, es muy útil en el diagnóstico diferencial de fenómenos clínicos epilépticos y no epilépticos y en la confirmación del tipo de epilepsia o síndrome epiléptico. Los avances tecnológicos y el desarrollo de nuevas modalidades de EEG en el futuro, harán que la electroencefalografía siga siendo una técnica muy importante en el estudio de la función cerebral en pacientes con enfermedades neurológicas agudas o crónicas.The diagnosis of epilepsy is basically clinical, but it frequently raises the differential diagnosis with non-epileptic events. The development of continuous EEG monitoring (CEEGM in the past decades has allowed a better diagnosis of epileptic patients of all ages. In this paper we review the

  10. The contemporary spectrum of multiple sclerosis misdiagnosis: A multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Andrew J; Bourdette, Dennis N; Cross, Anne H; Applebee, Angela; Skidd, Philip M; Howard, Diantha B; Spain, Rebecca I; Cameron, Michelle H; Kim, Edward; Mass, Michele K; Yadav, Vijayshree; Whitham, Ruth H; Longbrake, Erin E; Naismith, Robert T; Wu, Gregory F; Parks, Becky J; Wingerchuk, Dean M; Rabin, Brian L; Toledano, Michel; Tobin, W Oliver; Kantarci, Orhun H; Carter, Jonathan L; Keegan, B Mark; Weinshenker, Brian G

    2016-09-27

    To characterize patients misdiagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS). Neurologists at 4 academic MS centers submitted data on patients determined to have been misdiagnosed with MS. Of 110 misdiagnosed patients, 51 (46%) were classified as "definite" and 59 (54%) "probable" misdiagnoses according to study definitions. Alternate diagnoses included migraine alone or in combination with other diagnoses 24 (22%), fibromyalgia 16 (15%), nonspecific or nonlocalizing neurologic symptoms with abnormal MRI 13 (12%), conversion or psychogenic disorders 12 (11%), and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder 7 (6%). Duration of misdiagnosis was 10 years or longer in 36 (33%) and an earlier opportunity to make a correct diagnosis was identified for 79 patients (72%). Seventy-seven (70%) received disease-modifying therapy and 34 (31%) experienced unnecessary morbidity because of misdiagnosis. Four (4%) participated in a research study of an MS therapy. Leading factors contributing to misdiagnosis were consideration of symptoms atypical for demyelinating disease, lack of corroborative objective evidence of a CNS lesion as satisfying criteria for MS attacks, and overreliance on MRI abnormalities in patients with nonspecific neurologic symptoms. Misdiagnosis of MS leads to unnecessary and potentially harmful risks to patients. Misinterpretation and misapplication of MS clinical and radiographic diagnostic criteria are important contemporary contributors to misdiagnosis. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Adaptation or pathology? The role of prenatal stressor type and intensity in the developmental programing of adult phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Cyr, Sophie; McGowan, Patrick O

    2017-12-13

    The mother is the major interface between the offspring and its prenatal environment. Prenatal toxins and stress-inducing physical agents are important factors programming the developmental trajectory of mammals that likely involve epigenetic modifications. However, prenatal stressors commonly-used in the laboratory (e.g. prenatal restraint stress and prenatal chronic variable stress) are typically administered at high intensities. These exposures typically lead to pathological phenotypes supporting the development origin of health and disease hypothesis. In this review, we compare the phenotypic outcomes of these commonly-used prenatal stressors to an ecologically-relevant, psychogenic stressor that has been present over evolutionary times, predator or predator cues presence. Prenatal stress by predator threat results in behavioral, physiological, endocrine, transcript abundance and epigenetic (DNA methylation) modifications. These phenotypic modifications are consistent with developmental forecasting according to the Predictive Adaptive Response hypothesis, yielding adaptive responses in environments where such predation stress is present. The evidence described in this review suggests that the type of prenatal stress agent and its intensity modifies the phenotype expressed, which can range from adaptive to pathological. Prenatal Bisphenol A exposure studies are presented as an example where graded intensities (concentrations) of prenatal toxin exposure can be compared directly. Finally, we emphasize the importance of studying both sexes in these studies, as sex differences appear to be a common feature of the response to prenatal stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 'Birdwatching and baby-watching': Niko and Elisabeth Tinbergen's ethological approach to autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Chloe

    2010-06-01

    Biographers have largely dismissed Nikolaas 'Niko' Tinbergen's late research into the causes and treatment of autism, describing it as a deviation from his previous work, influenced by his personal desires.They have pointed to the incoherence of Tinbergen's assertions about best practices for treating autism, his lack of experience with children with autism, and his apparent embracing of psychogenic theories that the medical research community had largely abandoned. While these critiques have value, it is significant that Tinbergen himself saw his research as a logical extension of his seminal findings in the field of ethology, the science of animal behaviour. The reception of his theories, both positive and negative, was due less to their strengths or faults than to the fact that Tinbergen had inserted himself into a pre-existing and acrimonious debate in the autism research community. Debates about the relative role of environmental and hereditary factors in the aetiology of autism, and the implications of both for the efficacy of different treatments, had political and material significance for the success of parent organizations' lobbying efforts and financial support for research programmes. Tinbergen's approach was welcomed and even championed by a significant minority, who saw no problem with his ideas or methods.

  13. Early post-stressor intervention with minocycline, a second-generation tetracycline, attenuates post-traumatic stress response in an animal model of PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkovitz, Yechiel; Fenchel, Daphna; Kaplan, Zeev; Zohar, Joseph; Cohen, Hagit

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the effects of minocycline, a tetracycline with anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective capacities, in an animal model of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Rats were exposed to psychogenic stress and treated 1h later with minocycline or saline. Behavioral measures included the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and acoustic startle response (ASR) 7 days post stress-exposure. One day after behavioral testing, animals were exposed to a trauma cue and freezing response was assessed. Local levels of cytokines interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the hippocampus, frontal cortex (FC) and hypothalamus were then examined. Minocycline attenuated anxious-like behaviors in stress-exposed rats. In addition, decreased levels of cytokines were measured in exposed rats treated with minocycline compared to their counterparts treated with saline. This study suggests a potential use of minocycline in preventing physiological and behavioral alternations resulting from acute exposure to psychological stress. As this is the first study to report beneficial outcomes for minocycline treatment in an animal model of PTSD, further investigations of the use of minocycline in stress-related conditions with emphasis on PTSD is needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  14. A Foreign Speech Accent in a Case of Conversion Disorder

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    Jo Verhoeven

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this paper is to report the psychiatric, neuroradiological and linguistic characteristics in a native speaker of Dutch who developed speech symptoms which strongly resemble Foreign Accent Syndrome. Background: Foreign Accent Syndrome is a rare speech production disorder in which the speech of a patient is perceived as foreign by speakers of the same speech community. This syndrome is generally related to focal brain damage. Only in few reported cases the Foreign Accent Syndrome is assumed to be of psychogenic and/or psychotic origin. Method: In addition to clinical and neuroradiological examinations, an extensive test battery of standardized neuropsychological and neurolinguistic investigations was carried out. Two samples of the patient's spontaneous speech were analysed and compared to a 500,000-words reference corpus of 160 normal native speakers of Dutch. Results: The patient had a prominent French accent in her pronunciation of Dutch. This accent had persisted over the past eight years and has become progressively stronger. The foreign qualities of her speech did not only relate to pronunciation, but also to the lexicon, syntax and pragmatics. Structural as well as functional neuroimaging did not reveal evidence that could account for the behavioural symptoms. By contrast psychological investigations indicated conversion disorder. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of a foreign accent like syndrome in conversion disorder.

  15. A Foreign Speech Accent in a Case of Conversion Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Jo; Mariën, Peter; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; D’Haenen, Hugo; De Deyn, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this paper is to report the psychiatric, neuroradiological and linguistic characteristics in a native speaker of Dutch who developed speech symptoms which strongly resemble Foreign Accent Syndrome. Background: Foreign Accent Syndrome is a rare speech production disorder in which the speech of a patient is perceived as foreign by speakers of the same speech community. This syndrome is generally related to focal brain damage. Only in few reported cases the Foreign Accent Syndrome is assumed to be of psychogenic and/or psychotic origin. Method: In addition to clinical and neuroradiological examinations, an extensive test battery of standardized neuropsychological and neurolinguistic investigations was carried out. Two samples of the patient's spontaneous speech were analysed and compared to a 500,000-words reference corpus of 160 normal native speakers of Dutch. Results: The patient had a prominent French accent in her pronunciation of Dutch. This accent had persisted over the past eight years and has become progressively stronger. The foreign qualities of her speech did not only relate to pronunciation, but also to the lexicon, syntax and pragmatics. Structural as well as functional neuroimaging did not reveal evidence that could account for the behavioural symptoms. By contrast psychological investigations indicated conversion disorder. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of a foreign accent like syndrome in conversion disorder. PMID:16518013

  16. Management of Severe Rhabdomyolysis and Exercise-Associated Hyponatremia in a Female with Anorexia Nervosa and Excessive Compulsive Exercising

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    Marwan El Ghoch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes the management of a 49-year-old female with restricting-type anorexia nervosa and excessive compulsive exercising associated with rhabdomyolysis, high levels of serum creatine kinase (CK (3,238 U/L, and marked hyponatremia (Na+: 123 mEq/L in the absence of purging behaviours or psychogenic polydipsia; it is the first case report to describe exercise-associated hyponatremia in a patient with anorexia nervosa. The patient, who presented with a body mass index (BMI of 13.4 kg/m2, was successfully treated by means of an adapted inpatient version of an enhanced form of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT-E. Within a few days, careful water restriction, solute refeeding, and the specific cognitive behavioural strategies and procedures used to address the patient’s excessive compulsive exercising and undereating produced a marked reduction in CK levels, which normalised within one week. Exercise-associated hyponatremia also gradually improved, with serum sodium levels returning to normal within two weeks. The patient thereby avoided severe complications such as cerebral or pulmonary oedema or acute renal failure and was discharged after 20 weeks of treatment with a BMI of 19.0 kg/m2 and improved eating disorder psychopathology.

  17. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia With Chronic Fatigue After HPV Vaccination as Part of the “Autoimmune/Auto-inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants”

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    Lucija Tomljenovic PhD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 14-year-old girl who developed postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS with chronic fatigue 2 months following Gardasil vaccination. The patient suffered from persistent headaches, dizziness, recurrent syncope, poor motor coordination, weakness, fatigue, myalgias, numbness, tachycardia, dyspnea, visual disturbances, phonophobia, cognitive impairment, insomnia, gastrointestinal disturbances, and a weight loss of 20 pounds. The psychiatric evaluation ruled out the possibility that her symptoms were psychogenic or related to anxiety disorders. Furthermore, the patient tested positive for ANA (1:1280, lupus anticoagulant, and antiphospholipid. On clinical examination she presented livedo reticularis and was diagnosed with Raynaud’s syndrome. This case fulfills the criteria for the autoimmune/auto-inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA. Because human papillomavirus vaccination is universally recommended to teenagers and because POTS frequently results in long-term disabilities (as was the case in our patient, a thorough follow-up of patients who present with relevant complaints after vaccination is strongly recommended.

  18. Evaluation of dizziness at Jordan University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul-Baqi, Khader J.; Moamed, Faisal I.; Shubair, Kandil S.; Sarhan, Yusuf S.; Tawalbeh, Mohmed I.

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed prospectively to the dizzy patients in the Neurotology Outpatient Clinic at Jordan University Hospital, Amman, Jordan during the period 1993-2000 and to discuss the prevalence and and etiology of dizziness. Data were collected from 108 patients (52 male and 56 female) with a mean age of 45.6-years. diagnosis was made on the basis of history, physical, otolarygological and neurological examination and confirmed by relevant investigation including laboratory, radiological and audio vestibular tests. Secure diagnosis was made in 98% of patients (14% had one cause alone and 84% had multiple causes). Cardivascular disorders accounted for 31.5% of primary and 49% of secondary causes, perpheral vestibular disorders, 25% of primary and 3% of secondary causes, central vestibular disorders 17% of primary and 9% of secondary causes, metabolic endocrine 13% of primary and 38% of secondary causes and psychogenic 4.6% of primary and 6.5% of secondary causes.Our findings demonstrate that vertigo is most common subtype of dizziness (50%). Multiple causes are more prevalent in older age and single cause is more prevalent in younger age. Cardiovascular was the most common cause of dizziness followed by vestibular disorders, metabolic and cervical osteoarthritis. Vestibular disorders are primary causes and non vestibular are predominantly secondary causes of dizziness. Hyperlipidemia, diabetes and cervical causes are major secondary contributionsto dizziness. We recommend a a multi disciplinary setting and application of a comprehensive diagnostic and treatment approach without unnecessary protracted investigative schemeand installment of rehabilitatioon facilities. (author)

  19. Adult-onset Idiopathic Focal Lower Extremity Dystonia: A Rare Task-Specific Dystonia

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    Ritesh Ramdhani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:Adult-onset focal lower extremity (LE dystonia is rare, but there have recently been a number of case series that have reported an idiopathic variant triggered during ambulation.Methods:We describe nine patients with idiopathic, focal task-specific LE dystonia. We conducted a comparative analysis that included our cohort and several recently published case series to further characterize the disorder.Results:A total of 48 patients (37 female, 11 male were compared. The average age of onset was 48 years; 36 patients had distal extremity involvement (75%, 5 proximal (10%, and 7 both proximal and distal (15%. Among 33 patients in which the dystonic side was known, 20 were affected on the left (61%. Inversion of the foot with flexion of one or more toes was the most prevalent pattern in those with distal extremity involvement. Discussion:This is a novel task-specific dystonia triggered during ambulation that is often misdiagnosed as an orthopedic or psychogenic issue.

  20. Personality characteristics of emigrants and re-emigrants with depressive disorders

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    Олена Петрівна Венгер

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Migration is considered as one of the factors that affect the mental health of the population. The accumulation of psychological and social problems provoke personal transformation reaction and exclusion personality, and considering emigration as a factor that provoke manifestation or exacerbation of endogenous mental diseases. Given the paucity and inconsistency of scientific data on the characteristics of psycho-emotional disorders, and personality characteristics of immigrants, and the almost complete lack of information about re-emigrants, the aim of our work was to study the mechanisms of psychosocial adaptation (de-adaptation re-emigrants and immigrants, as well as developing programs of social, psychological, psychotherapeutic and mental health support workers.Methods. We used a standardized method of investigating the person (SMIP for realization of tasks.Result. Results suggest the presence in examined patients of patocharacterological features of hypothymic (disthymic type. Significant differences were found in terms of fixed scales SMIP test most pronounced in the group of psychogenic depression, the least - organic. In general, immigrants are inherent traits of anxiety and emotional breadth, re-emigrants - schizoidness and apathy.Conclusions. Identified patterns should be considered when developing therapeutic, rehabilitative and preventive measures

  1. Burning Mouth Syndrome due to Television Moans, an Enigma for Oral Physician: Treatment with Counseling

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    Deepak Gupta

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a relatively common disease that can severely affect the quality of life of the patient. It causes chronic orofacial pain or oral burning sensation even in the absence of any detectable organic cause. The etiology of BMS is complex and multifactorial. It has been associated with menopause, trigger events and even genetic polymorphisms. Although its etiology remains unclear, there is still much evidence that psychological elements like stress, anxiety or depression do play a significant role. There are several studies in the literature which only report the association of BMS with psychological factors. But to the best of our knowledge, there is no such case reported in the literature which has actually highlighted the management of such a case with psychogenic elements involved. In this case report, apart from discussing the role of psychological factors, the treatment of BMS with emphasis on counseling is also emphasized. Further, it is of interest to know that such patients with psychologically induced burning mouth syndrome have to be evaluated to their deepest details. Even their commonly overlooked gestures and habits like watching a particular television soap opera may be involved in their disease process. It can be concluded that psychological counseling in general dental practice can provide an effective cure for chronic oral burning sensation with psychological factors involved.

  2. Characterization of corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of Crh-IRES-Cre mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsteeker Cusulin, Jaclyn I; Füzesi, Tamás; Watts, Alan G; Bains, Jaideep S

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-containing neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) initiate and control neuroendocrine responses to psychogenic and physical stress. Investigations into the physiology of CRH neurons, however, have been hampered by the lack of tools for adequately targeting or visualizing this cell population. Here we characterize CRH neurons in the PVN of mice that express tdTomato fluorophore, generated by crosses of recently developed Crh-IRES-Cre driver and Ai14 Cre-reporter mouse strains. tdTomato containing PVN neurons in Crh-IRES-Cre;Ai14 mice are readily visualized without secondary-detection methods. These neurons are predominantly neuroendocrine and abundantly express CRH protein, but not other PVN phenotypic neuropeptides. After an acute stress, a large majority of tdTomato cells express neuronal activation marker c-Fos. Finally, tdTomato PVN neurons exhibit homogenous intrinsic biophysical and synaptic properties, and can be optogenetically manipulated by viral Cre-driven expression of channelrhodopsin. These observations highlight basic cell-type characteristics of CRH neurons in a mutant mouse, providing validation for its future use in probing neurophysiology of endocrine stress responses.

  3. Characterization of corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of Crh-IRES-Cre mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn I Wamsteeker Cusulin

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH-containing neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN initiate and control neuroendocrine responses to psychogenic and physical stress. Investigations into the physiology of CRH neurons, however, have been hampered by the lack of tools for adequately targeting or visualizing this cell population. Here we characterize CRH neurons in the PVN of mice that express tdTomato fluorophore, generated by crosses of recently developed Crh-IRES-Cre driver and Ai14 Cre-reporter mouse strains. tdTomato containing PVN neurons in Crh-IRES-Cre;Ai14 mice are readily visualized without secondary-detection methods. These neurons are predominantly neuroendocrine and abundantly express CRH protein, but not other PVN phenotypic neuropeptides. After an acute stress, a large majority of tdTomato cells express neuronal activation marker c-Fos. Finally, tdTomato PVN neurons exhibit homogenous intrinsic biophysical and synaptic properties, and can be optogenetically manipulated by viral Cre-driven expression of channelrhodopsin. These observations highlight basic cell-type characteristics of CRH neurons in a mutant mouse, providing validation for its future use in probing neurophysiology of endocrine stress responses.

  4. The clinical pattern of diabetes Insipidus in a large university hospital in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Amir M I; Al Jurayyan, Nasir A M; Al Jurayyan, Rushaid N A; Al Gadi, Iman; Drop, Stenvert L S

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a rare but serious endocrine disorder. Paediatric patients were evaluated for polyuria at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, over a decade (2000-13). Relevant clinical examination and/or a triad of high serum osmolality, hypernatremia and low urine osmolality due to increased urine output confirmed the diagnosis. Water deprivation test was required in some cases with non-classic presentations. Appropriate brain imaging was performed whenever central diabetes insipidus (CDI) was suspected. Twenty-eight patients, 15 males (53.6%) and 13 females (46.4%), aged 0-17 years (mean: 6 years) were included. The calculated period prevalence was 7 in 10,000. In our cohort, 60.7% (17 of 28 patients) had CDI, 21.4% (6 of 28) were diagnosed with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) and 17.9% (5 of 30) had psychogenic polydipsia. CDI was due to variable aetiology. Though CDI was the commonest, NDI was not a rare encounter in our community, possibly because of high consanguineous marriages. © The Author [2015]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Does chronic idiopathic dizziness reflect an impairment of sensory predictions of self-motion?

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    Joern K Pomper

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Most patients suffering from chronic idiopathic dizziness do not present signs of vestibular dysfunction or organic failures of other kinds. Hence, this kind of dizziness is commonly seen as psychogenic in nature, sharing commonalities with specific phobias, panic disorder and generalized anxiety. A more specific concept put forward by Brandt and Dieterich (1986 states that these patients suffer from dizziness because of an inadequate compensation of self-induced sensory stimulation. According to this hypothesis self-motion-induced reafferent visual stimulation is interpreted as motion in the world since a predictive signal reflecting the consequences of self-motion, needed to compensate the reafferent stimulus, is inadequate. While conceptually intriguing, experimental evidence supporting the idea of an inadequate prediction of the sensory consequences of own movements has as yet been lacking. Here we tested this hypothesis by applying it to the perception of background motion induced by smooth-pursuit eye movements. As a matter of fact, we found the same mildly undercompensating prediction, responsible for the perception of slight illusory world motion („Filehne illusion in the 15 patients tested and their age-matched controls. Likewise, the ability to adapt this prediction to the needs of the visual context was not deteriorated in patients. Finally, we could not find any correlation between measures of the individual severity of dizziness and the ability to predict. In sum, our results do not support the concept of a deviant prediction of self-induced sensory stimulation as cause of chronic idiopathic dizziness.

  6. Lactic acidosis in patients with diabetes.

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    Krzymień, Janusz; Karnafel, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is a relatively rare complication diagnosed in patients with diabetes. The aim of this study was to identify causes of lactic acidosis in patients with diabetes and to measure the extent of metabolic disturbances based on the available laboratory test results. A total of 29 diabetic patients aged 20-87 years were admitted to the Intensive Diabetes Care Unit of the Warsaw Medical University in the years 2007-2012 with the diagnosis of lactic acidosis (lactate level >5 mmol/l). A detailed medical history was taken from all patients or their caregivers. Lactate levels, glycemia, acetonuria, and gasometry were measured on admission. Eight patients with type 1 diabetes, 18 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 3 patients with other types of diabetes were hospitalized with the diagnosis of lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis (lactate levels, 5.2-27 mmol/l) was associated with increased glycemia (13.3-91.7 mmol/l) and low pH (6.73-7.28). Alcohol abuse was reported in 12 subjects based on medical history. In 3 women, acute diabetic complication was caused by psychogenic eating disorders. There were 5 fatal cases including 3 cases of metformin treatment. Alcohol abuse and its effects on health seem to be the main cause of lactic acidosis in diabetic patients. Metformin-treated patients, especially elderly ones, are at a risk of sudden deterioration of renal function, which in turn may increase the risk of lactic acidosis.

  7. Risk factors associated with sexual dysfunction after transurethral resection of the prostate.

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    Ibrahim, A I A; El-Malik, E M A; Ismail, G; Rashid, M; Al Zahrani, A B

    2002-01-01

    The effect of transurethral resection of prostate (TURP) for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) on sexual function continues to be a controversial issue. The aim of this study was to evaluate sexual functions in Saudi patients suffering from BPH before and after TURP. The influence of TURP on libido, erection and ejaculation was prospectively studied in 179 patients undergoing TURP for BPH. The risk factors studied for erectile dysfunction (ED) were old age, polygamy, comorbidities, late presentation, intraoperative bleeding, intraoperative capsular perforation and bacteriuria. Patients reporting ED underwent intracavernosal injection (ICI) of 20-40 AA(1/4)g of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) before and/or after surgery. Before surgery, ED was present in 33/179 patients (18%) and was significantly associated with old age and comorbidities but not with polygamy or late presentation. In the patients with normal erection before surgery, dry ejaculation, ED and diminished libido developed after TURP in 71/134 (53%), 20/137 (15%), and 22/137 (16%), respectively. Postoperative ED was significantly associated with diminished libido (P=0.001), but not with postoperative dry ejaculation. The only significant risk factor associated with ED following TURP was capsular perforation. The response to ICI before and after TURP was comparable. ED associated with TURP is most likely of neurogenic origin due to capsular perforation, or of psychogenic nature as suggested by the significant association with diminished libido.

  8. St. Valentine--patron saint of epilepsy: illustrating the semiology of seizures over the course of six centuries.

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    Kluger, Gerhard; Kudernatsch, Verena

    2009-01-01

    From the 15th century to the present day, Christian art has portrayed people who suffer from epilepsy as attributes in illustrations of Saint Valentine (SV). The objective of our study was to interpret the works of art from a modern epileptological perspective on the basis of a collection of portrayals of SV in Europe that was as comprehensive as possible. The people depicted as attributes were analyzed with respect to their age, gender, social status, and possible seizure semiology. Three hundred forty-one illustrations of SV from Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Poland, Scotland, Slovakia, and Switzerland were systematically analyzed. Irrespective of the age of the work of art, among the 143 pictures of people with possible epilepsy characteristics, there were more males than females from various levels of society. As far as could be interpreted, there were 17 infants, 35 children, 7 adolescents, and 84 adults. With respect to possible seizure semiology, infantile spasms (n=10), atonic seizures (n=13), tonic seizures (n=53), absences (n=2), psychogenic seizures (n=4), and postictal or undefinable states (n=61) were differentiated in a subjective assessment. Despite the fact that from a modern perspective, the 15th to 20th centuries in Europe seemed to be dominated by a rather superstitious attitude toward epilepsy, there is striking accuracy in the detail of the semiology in many of the historic portrayals, and a well-founded knowledge of epilepsy is apparent.

  9. PROSES PEMEROLEHAN BAHASA ANAK

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    Muzaiyanah Muzaiyanah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Language and communication disorders can be caused by medical factors and environmental factors. Medical factors implicated in disorders of speech, language disorders and impaired thinking.  The examples of medical factors that disruption as a result of a brain injury that causes damage to the nervous system, psychogenic disorders, and disorders of the organ mechanism speech system. Similarly, damage to the nervous system that causes a network disconnection between the production area of auditory and speech said that the message was not delivered. In general, there are two opinions regarding second language acquisition. First, children are born already familiarized exposed to various languages. Secondly, children learn a second language as their mother tongue can be pronounced properly. These two arguments are just as good, but nevertheless still have drawbacks. The first method can result in the emergence of speech delay due to a child's brain is working hard to map the language that is spoken by people who asked children to speak. But this does  not last longer, when children are growing, their abilities will be honed by themselves. The second method results in the pronunciation of the second language would be worse than a child with the first method. Children in the first method will be familiar with the pronunciation and accent clearer. However, both of these methods can be used, by paying attention the condition of language acquisition that are interactive, motivating and attractive.

  10. Sexual concerns after Spinal Cord Injury: An update on management.

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    Alexander, Marcalee Sipski; Aisen, Carrie Mlynarczyk; Alexander, Sterling Morrison; Aisen, Mindy Lipson

    2017-01-01

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) causes neurological impairment with resultant neurogenic sexual dysfunction which can compound preexisting psychological and medical sexual concerns. Understanding these concerns is important in managing the lifelong needs of persons with SCIs. To provide an overview of the impact of SCI on sexuality along with a framework for treatment of sexual concerns. To briefly review male infertility and its treatments and pregnancy in females after SCI. Interdisciplinary literature review and synthesis of information. The average age at SCI is increased, thus persons with SCIs may have preexisting sexual concerns. Sexual activity and satisfaction are decreased after SCI. Psychogenic sexual arousal is related to remaining sensation in the T11-L2 dermatomes. Orgasm occurs in approximately 50% of persons with SCIs with all injuries except subjects with complete lower motor neuron (LMN) injuries affecting the lowest sacral segments A structured approach to treatment including assessing preinjury function, determining the impact of injury, education, assessing and treating iatrogenic sexual dysfunction and treatment of concomitant problems is recommended. Basic and advanced methods to improve sexual arousal and orgasm are discussed and treatment of anejaculation and issues associated with pregnancy and SCI are reviewed. Sexual satisfaction is impaired after SCI; however, education and new therapies can improve responsiveness. Future research is warranted to improve sexual function and fertility potential in persons with SCIs.

  11. [Diagnosis and differential diagnosis in psychiatry and the question of situation referred prognostic diagnosis].

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    Meyendorf, R

    1980-01-01

    To diagnose--in its true meaning--is a search for etiology. The different sides of psychiatric diagnoses in this century do reflect the various attempts of this search. Examples are: Kraepelin's concept of etiological unity (morbus) of a disease, Bonhoeffer's attempt of separating exogenous from endogenous psychoses, K. Schneider's definition of psychiatric illness in terms of medical disease, Kretschmer's and Rümke's multidimensional diagnoses and Essen-Möller's principle of separating (postponing) etiology from psychopathological syndromes. The situationa prognostic diagnosis plays its main role in everyday diagnosing. It presupposes that one can recognize, distinguish and differentiate between different symptoms and diseases. The decision for a specific treatment reveals which etiology one thinks to be the main one. It presupposes that one has constantly to consider the kind, the severity and the course of psychiatric disease, Nosological thinking is necessary. The term etiology has a twofold meaning in Greek. 1. cause = causa and 2. accusation, guilt = culpa. In diagnosing psychiatric illnesses this double aspect plays an important role, though unconsciously and unwillingly. Though somatogenic (metabolic) as well as psychogenic (reactive) etiologies are etiologies in the sense of causa there is a fundamental difference between them. They have a common causa materialis but a different causa efficiens. In the first instance it is the non-personal side (related to pure matter), in the second instance the personal side which makes the difference. Only a person can be responsible. Where responsibility does play a role, there also accusation and guilt play a role.

  12. A survey on relative frequency of metabolic syndrome and testosterone deficiency in men with erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi Madani, Ali; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Akbari Parsa, Niloofar; Khosravi Darestani, Fatemeh; Hamidi Madani, Zahra

    2012-06-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common male sexual dysfunction and affects the individual's physical and psychological well-being. It has been classified as organic and psychogenic. Men with low testosterone levels have an increased risk of ED. On the other hand, direct detrimental effect of metabolic syndrome on the endothelium, smooth muscle and nerves of the vascular system of the penis is what causes ED to develop in men with metabolic syndrome. Therefore, it is supposed that a large number of men with erectile dysfunction are patients who have ED, metabolic syndrome and testosterone deficiency as a triad. The aim of this study is determining relative frequencies of metabolic syndrome and testosterone deficiency in a group of men with ED. Men suffering from ED who were referred to a certain private urology clinic between 22.11.2009 and 22.9.2010 were evaluated for metabolic syndrome criteria; their morning free testosterone levels were measured, and then the related questionnaires were filled out. Of 241 men with ED, the relative frequency of metabolic syndrome was 41.5%, of testosterone deficiency was 36.5% and of metabolic syndrome in combination with testosterone deficiency was 19.5%. The relative frequencies of metabolic syndrome and testosterone deficiency in men with ED seem to be significant, and it is the time that we should evaluate ED not as a disease but as a presentation of multiple underlying pathologies which needs medical attention to general health.

  13. Voice production during a weightlifting and support task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlikoff, Robert F

    2008-01-01

    Although effort closure techniques have a long history in the treatment of hypofunctional and psychogenic voice disorders, there have been surprisingly few studies of their specific laryngeal and phonatory effects. The present study was designed to provide preliminary data on physiologic changes in voice production associated with a weightlifting and support maneuver. Twenty vocally healthy subjects (10 men and 10 women) lifted hand-held weights and steadily supported them with outstretched arms as they either sustained comfortable phonation or repeated the syllable /pi/. Both the male and female subjects showed an increase in the electroglottographic contact quotient, long-term F(0) variability, and estimated laryngeal airway resistance attributable to an elevated driving pressure. Conversely, there were no significant changes in mean F(0), pitch perturbation quotient (jitter), or phonatory airflow between the pre-lift and lift portions of their voice production, regardless of the amount of weight supported. The results of this study indicate that simultaneous phonation and weightlifting is associated with increased laryngeal airway resistance characterized by an elevation in driving pressure and medial compression of the vocal folds. Implications for an improved understanding of normal vocal physiology and for the therapeutic use of such air-trapping exercises are addressed. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

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    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  15. [A case of Asperger's disorder with catatonia originally suspected of being catatonic schizophrenia].

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    Saito, Shinnosuke; Yamaga, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Kato, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of an adolescent male who presented with mutism, immobility, catalepsy, and mannerisms. The patient was admitted to our hospital with suspected catatonic schizophrenia; however, he was subsequently diagnosed with catatonia due to Asperger's disorder. The patient was a 16-year-old male. More than six months before presentation, his grandfather displayed bizarre and violent behavior. Subsequently, he began to experience catatonia, which eventually led to hospitalization. Treatment with diazepam improved his condition and, as no causal disorders other than Asperger's disorder were identified, he was diagnosed with catatonia. The patient had experienced persistent abuse by his mother during childhood; therefore, it is important to consider reactive attachment disorder (DSM-IV-TR) as a differential diagnosis. Among child and adolescent psychiatrists, catatonia is considered to occur at a high frequency among patients with autistic spectrum disorders. In contrast, general psychiatrists tend to consider catatonia as related to schizophrenia, which may be the reason why the diagnosis of our patient was difficult. We assume that the pathogenesis of catatonia in this case was death mimicry due to the subjective perception of a life-threatening situation. For the treatment of catatonia with autistic spectrum disorders, the efficacy of benzodiazepines and electroconvulsive therapy has been established. When a patient with an autistic spectrum disorder presents with motor functional disturbances, it is important to consider these disturbances as catatonia. Furthermore, it is also important to begin the treatment mentioned above even in the presence of definite psychogenic or situational factors.

  16. Stress before Puberty Exerts a Sex- and Age-Related Impact on Auditory and Contextual Fear Conditioning in the Rat

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    Maria Toledo-Rodriguez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a period of major physical, hormonal, and psychological changes. It is also characterized by a significant increase in the incidence of psychopathologies and this increase is gender-specific. Stress during adolescence is associated with the development of psychiatric disorders later in life. In this study, we evaluated the impact of psychogenic stress (exposure to predator odor followed by placement on an elevated platform experienced before puberty (days 28–30 on fear memories and hormonal response of male and female rats during adolescence and early adulthood. Stress before puberty impacted in a sex- and age-specific way on the responses to auditory and contextual fear conditioning in adolescence and adulthood: (a increased conditioned fear to the tone in males during adolescence but not during adulthood; (b impaired extinction to the tone in adult males; and (c reduced freezing responses to the context in adolescent females. Stress before puberty did not influence the corticosterone levels 30 minutes after an additional stressor given in adulthood. These results indicate that stress experienced prior to puberty can exert a sex-related differential impact on fear-related behaviors displayed by individuals during late adolescence and early adulthood.

  17. Skin Picking Disorder

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    Pinar Cetinay Aydin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin picking disorder is not a dermatological disorder and it is a table characterized with picking skin excessively and repetitively, leading to damage in skin tissue. Unlike normal picking behaviour, psychogenic skin picking is repetitive and it can lead to severe damage in the skin and even complications which constitute vital danger. While some patients define frequent but short lasting picking attacks, others define rarer attacks which last a few hours. Skin picking disorder, which is not included in the classification systems up to DSM-5 as a separate diagnosis category, is included as an independent diagnosis in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Associated Disorders category in DSM-5. In case reports, open label studies and double blind studies selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are shown to be effective in the treatment of skin picking disorder. Mostly, cognitive-behaviourial techniques are used and have been proven to be useful in psychotherapy. Habit reversal is one of the behaviourial techniques which are frequently applied, give positive results in which well-being state can be maintained. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(4.000: 401-428

  18. Latent Factor Structure of DSM-5 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentes, Emily; Dennis, Paul A.; Kimbrel, Nathan A.; Kirby, Angela C.; Hair, Lauren P.; Beckham, Jean C.; Calhoun, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined the latent factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) based on DSM-5 criteria in a sample of participants (N = 374) recruited for studies on trauma and health. Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) were used to compare the fit of the previous 3-factor DSM-IV model of PTSD to the 4-factor model specified in DSM-5 as well as to a competing 4-factor “dysphoria” model (Simms, Watson, & Doebbeling, 2002) and a 5-factor (Elhai et al., 2011) model of PTSD. Results indicated that the Elhai 5-factor model (re-experiencing, active avoidance, emotional numbing, dysphoric arousal, anxious arousal) provided the best fit to the data, although substantial support was demonstrated for the DSM-5 4-factor model. Low factor loadings were noted for two of the symptoms in the DSM-5 model (psychogenic amnesia and reckless/self-destructive behavior), which raises questions regarding the adequacy of fit of these symptoms with other core features of the disorder. Overall, the findings from the present research suggest the DSM-5 model of PTSD is a significant improvement over the previous DSM-IV model of PTSD. PMID:26366290

  19. Comorbidity of posttraumatic stress disorder and mild closed head injury in war veterans: Endocrinological and psychological profiles

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    Špirić Željko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the degree of psychological and endocrinological changes in war veterans with the diagnosis of Chronic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD regarding presence/absence of comorbid mild closed head injury (mCHI caused by explosive devices. Methods. Two groups of PTSD inpatients, with (n = 37, and without (n = 86 sustained blast trauma followed by mCHI were formed during the psychiatric treatment. Participants were interviewed by experienced clinicians who used the PTSD Interview (PTSD-I. In addition, patients completed the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R. Serum levels of ten hormones were assessed: triiodothyronine, thyroxine, thyrotropin-stimulating hormone, prolactin, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, and insulin, by radioimmunoassays and hydrocortisone, growth hormone and testosterone by fluoroimmunoassays. Results. Veterans with comorbid mCHI and PTSD showed significantly higher level of amnesia for traumatic event as well as of somatization on the SCL-90-R. Significant differences of hormone levels were not found. Conclusion. The results didn't support the hypothesis on specific PTSD subgroup characterized by history of mCHI and consecutive postconcussion syndrome. The absence of differences in levels of hormones indicated the dominant role of psychogenic trauma in the etiology of hormone disbalance in chronic PTSD. Amnesia for traumatic event in war veterans with comorbid PTSD and mCHI was easily explained by neurogenic peritraumatic amnesia due to the blast trauma, but it did not affect either quality of intensity or posttraumatic symptoms as well as endocrinological parameters.

  20. [Impotence in a urologic service].

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    Sarramon, J P; Rischmann, P; Elman, B; Bournel, P

    1989-01-01

    In a recent experience we have studied 297 patients for impotence. 102 were considered psychogenic and 195 organic; 105 of the latter had isolated or associated arterial or venous lesions. The remaining 81 patients had preponderant organic pathology: Peyronie's disease, neurological disease, diabetes and pelvic trauma. All patients were explored by NPT (nocturnal penile tumescence), Doppler examination, intra-cavernous papaverine test, angiography and erectile flow associated with cavernography. We report our microvascular surgery results from the last seven years. 80 reconstructive vascular procedures were performed on a population of patients who averaged 50 years of age. 50 epigastric-cavernous by-passes were performed. Complete recovery has been observed in 14% with an average of 42 months follow-up. Erection improvement with possibility of vaginal intromission in 58%. Immediate or secondary thrombosis and priapism in 28%. 21 arterial epigastric-dorsal unilateral by-passes were performed with an average follow-up of 20 months. In 11 cases the arterial micro-revascularization was associated with deep dorsal vein ligature. Results are as follows: 10 excellent, 4 significant improvement, 3 failures and too short follow-up in three. 9 isolated venous ligature with a mean follow-up of 15 months. Complete recovery was observed in 3 patients, improvement in 3 and failure in 2. The author emphasizes the interest of a better selection of surgical indications, improvement of microsurgical techniques with epigastric-dorsal anastomosis associated with postoperative anticoagulant therapy whenever possible.