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Sample records for noncovalent dna interactions

  1. Introduction: Noncovalent Interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobza, Pavel; Řezáč, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 9 (2016), s. 4911-4912 ISSN 0009-2665 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : noncovalent interactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 47.928, year: 2016

  2. Non-covalent interactions of cadmium sulphide and gold nanoparticles with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Z.; Biver, T.; Corti, A.; Eltugral, N.; Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A.; Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M.

    2010-08-01

    Mercaptoethanol-capped CdS nanoparticles (CdSnp) and monohydroxy-(1-mercaptoundec-11-yl)tetraethylene-glycol-capped Au nanoparticles (Aunp) were synthesised, characterised and their interactions with DNA were investigated. Aunp are stable in different aqueous solvents, whereas CdSnp do precipitate in 0.1 M NaCl and form two different cluster types in 0.1 M NaNO3. As regards the CdSnp/DNA interaction, absorbance and fluorescence titrations, ethidium bromide displacement assays and gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the CdSnp external surface does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be equal to (2.2 ± 0.5) × 105 M-1. On the contrary, concerning Aunp, no direct interaction with DNA could be observed. Possible interaction with serum albumin was also checked, but no effects could be observed for either CdSnp or Aunp. Finally, short-time exposure of cultured cells to nanoparticles revealed the ability of CdSnp to enter the cells and allocate both in cytosol and nucleus, thus promoting cell proliferation at low concentration ( p resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth, accompanied by apoptotic cell death. Aunp neither enter the cells, nor do affect cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data indicate that CdSnp can strongly interact with living cells and nucleic acid while no effects or interactions were observed for Aunp.

  3. Noncovalent interactions in biochemistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riley, Kevin Eugene; Hobza, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2011), s. 3-17 ISSN 1759-0876 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Grant - others:NSF EPSCORE(US) EPS-0701525; Korea Science and Engineering Foundation(KR) R32-2008-000-10180-0 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : noncovalent interactions * WFT calculations * DFT calculations * applications Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  4. An NMR study of the covalent and noncovalent interactions of CC-1065 and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scahill, T.A.; Jensen, R.M.; Swenson, D.H.; Hatzenbuhler, N.T.; Petzold, G.; Wierenga, W.; Brahme, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of the antitumor drug CC-1065 has been studied with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This study involves two parts, the elucidation of the covalent binding site of the drug to DNA and a detailed investigation of the noncovalent interactions of CC-1065 with a DNA fragment through analysis of 2D NOE (NOESY) experiments. A CC-1065-DNA adduct was prepared, and an adenine adduct was released upon heating. NMR ( 1 H and 13 C) analysis of the adduct shows that the drug binds to N3 of adenine by reaction of its cyclopropyl group. The reaction pathway and product formed were determined by analysis of the 13 C DEPT spectra. An octamer duplex, d(CGATTAGC·GCTAATCG), was synthesized and used in the interaction study of CC-1065 and the oligomer. The duplex and the drug-octamer complex were both analyzed by 2D spectroscopy (COSY, NOESY). The relative intensity of the NOEs observed between the drug (CC-1065) and the octamer duplex shows conclusively that the drug is located in the minor groove, covalently attached to N3 of adenine 6 and positioned from the 3' → 5' end in relation to strand A [d(CGATTA 6 GC)]. A mechanism for drug binding and stabilization can be inferred from the NOE data and model-building studies

  5. Insight into the Interaction between DNA Bases and Defective Graphenes: Covalent or Non-covalent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenfeng; Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Eustache, Darnashley; Wang, Yixuan

    2013-01-01

    Although some metal clusters and molecules were found to more significantly bind to defective graphenes than to pristine graphenes, exhibiting chemisorptions on defective graphenes, the present investigation shows that the adsorption of DNA bases on mono- and di-vacant defective graphenes does not show much difference from that on pristine graphene, and is still dominantly driven by noncovalent interactions. In the present study the adsorptions of the nucleobases, adenine (A), cytosine (C), guanine, (G), and thymine (T) on pristine and defective graphenes, are fully optimized using a hybrid-meta GGA density functional theory (DFT), M06-2X/6-31G*, and the adsorption energies are then refined with both M06-2X and B97-D/6-311++G**. Graphene is modeled as nano-clusters of C72H24, C71H24, and C70H24 for pristine, mono- and divacant defective graphenes, respectively, supplemented by a few larger ones. The result shows that guanine has the maximum adsorption energy in all of the three adsorption systems; and the sequence of the adsorption strength is G>A>T>C on the pristine and di-vacant graphene and G>T>A>C on the mono-vacant graphene. In addition, the binding energies of the DNA bases with the pristine graphene are less than the corresponding ones with di-vacant defective graphene; however, they are greater than those of mono-vacant graphene with guanine and adenine, while it is dramatic that the binding energies of mono-vacant graphene with thymine and cytosine appear larger than those of pristine graphene. PMID:24215998

  6. Covalent and Non-Covalent DNA-Gold-Nanoparticle Interactions: New Avenues of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnerero, Jose M; Jimenez-Ruiz, Aila; Castillo, Paula M; Prado-Gotor, Rafael

    2017-01-04

    The interactions of DNA, whether long, hundred base pair chains or short-chained oligonucleotides, with ligands play a key role in the field of structural biology. Its biological activity not only depends on the thermodynamic properties of DNA-ligand complexes, but can and often is conditioned by the formation kinetics of those complexes. On the other hand, gold nanoparticles have long been known to present excellent biocompatibility with biomolecules and are themselves remarkable for their structural, electronic, magnetic, optical and catalytic properties, radically different from those of their counterpart bulk materials, and which make them an important asset in multiple applications. Therefore, thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the interactions of DNA with nanoparticles acting as small ligands are key for a better understanding of those interactions to allow for their control and modulation and for the opening of new venues of research in nanomedicine, analytic and biologic fields. The interactions of gold nanoparticles with both DNA polymers and their smaller subunits; special focus is placed on those interactions taking place with nonfunctionalized gold nanoparticles are reviewed in the present work. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Modulation of the genotoxicity of bleomycin by amines through noncovalent DNA interactions and alteration of physiological conditions in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, George R. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States)], E-mail: ghoffmann@holycross.edu; Gessner, Gabrielle S.; Hughes, Jennifer F.; Ronan, Matthew V.; Sylvia, Katelyn E.; Willett, Christine J. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States)

    2007-10-01

    The effects of amines on the induction of mitotic gene conversion by bleomycin (BLM) were studied at the trp5 locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D7. BLM induces double-strand breaks in DNA and is a potent recombinagen in this assay. The polyamine spermidine causes concentration-dependent protection against the genotoxicity of BLM, reducing the convertant frequency by over 90% under the most protective conditions. Spermine, diethylenetriamine, ethylenediamine, putrescine, and ethylamine were also antigenotoxic in combined treatments with BLM. There was a general correspondence between the protective effect and the number of amino groups, suggesting that more strongly cationic amines tend to be stronger antirecombinagens. Electrostatic association of the amines with DNA probably hinders BLM access to the 4' position of deoxyribose where it generates a free radical. Other amines interact with BLM differently from these unbranched aliphatic amines. The aminothiol cysteamine inhibits the genotoxicity of BLM under hypoxic conditions but increases it under euoxic conditions. In contrast, pargyline potentiates the genotoxicity of BLM under hypoxic conditions but not under euoxic conditions. The antirecombinagenic effect of cysteamine apparently involves DNA binding and depletion of oxygen needed for BLM activity, whereas its potentiation of BLM entails its serving as an electron source for the activation of BLM. Pargyline may enhance BLM indirectly by preventing the depletion of oxygen by monoamine and polyamine oxidase. The planar 9-aminoacridine weakly induces gene conversion in strain D7, but it is strongly synergistic with BLM. Enhancement of BLM activity by this compound and by the related nitroacridine Entozon is apparently mediated by intercalation of the acridine ring system into DNA. Thus, the influence of amines on the genotoxicity of BLM in yeast encompasses antigenotoxic, potentiating, and synergistic interactions. The underlying mechanisms involve

  8. Noncovalent Interactions in Specific Recognition Motifs of Protein-DNA Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stasyuk, Olga A.; Jakubec, Dávid; Vondrášek, Jiří; Hobza, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2017), s. 877-885 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * side chain interactions * interaction energies Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 5.245, year: 2016

  9. Non-Covalent Interactions: Complexes of Guanidinium with DNA and RNA Nucleobases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blanco, F.; Kelly, B.; Sanchez-Sanz, Goar; Trujillo, Cristina; Alkorta, I.; Elguero, J.; Rozas, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 39 (2013), s. 11608-11616 ISSN 1520-6106 Grant - others:Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union(XE) FP7-274988 People Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : molecular -orbital methods * cation-pi interactions * minor-groove binders Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  10. Theoretical exploration of pnicogen bond noncovalent interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 10. Theoretical ... Keywords. Noncovalent interaction; pnicogen bond; natural bond orbital theory; natural resonance theory; electron density topological property. ... The natural bond orbital interactions in the ZBs are mainly LP1,2 (O) → * (P-X). The P-X ...

  11. Noncovalent Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Ravva, Mahesh Kumar

    2017-06-29

    In this chapter, we provide an overview of how noncovalent interactions, determined by the chemical structure of π-conjugated molecules and polymers, govern essential aspects of the electronic, optical, and mechanical characteristics of organic semiconductors. We begin by describing general aspects of materials design, including the wide variety of chemistries exploited to control the electronic and optical properties of these materials. We then discuss explicit examples of how the study of noncovalent interactions can provide deeper chemical insights that can improve the design of new generations of organic electronic materials.

  12. Calculations on Noncovalent Interactions and Databases of Benchmark Interaction Energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobza, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2012), s. 663-672 ISSN 0001-4842 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non-covalent interactions * covalent interactions * quantum chemical approach Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 20.833, year: 2012

  13. The origins of the directionality of noncovalent intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changwei; Guan, Liangyu; Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason; Mo, Yirong

    2016-01-05

    The recent σ-hole concept emphasizes the contribution of electrostatic attraction to noncovalent bonds, and implies that the electrostatic force has an angular dependency. Here a set of clusters, which includes hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding, chalcogen bonding, and pnicogen bonding systems, is investigated to probe the magnitude of covalency and its contribution to the directionality in noncovalent bonding. The study is based on the block-localized wavefunction (BLW) method that decomposes the binding energy into the steric and the charge transfer (CT) (hyperconjugation) contributions. One unique feature of the BLW method is its capability to derive optimal geometries with only steric effect taken into account, while excluding the CT interaction. The results reveal that the overall steric energy exhibits angular dependency notably in halogen bonding, chalcogen bonding, and pnicogen bonding systems. Turning on the CT interactions further shortens the intermolecular distances. This bond shortening enhances the Pauli repulsion, which in turn offsets the electrostatic attraction, such that in the final sum, the contribution of the steric effect to bonding is diminished, leaving the CT to dominate the binding energy. In several other systems particularly hydrogen bonding systems, the steric effect nevertheless still plays the major role whereas the CT interaction is minor. However, in all cases, the CT exhibits strong directionality, suggesting that the linearity or near linearity of noncovalent bonds is largely governed by the charge-transfer interaction whose magnitude determines the covalency in noncovalent bonds. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Benchmark Calculations of Noncovalent Interactions of Halogenated Molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Riley, Kevin Eugene; Hobza, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 11 (2012), s. 4285-4292 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : halogenated molecules * noncovalent interactions * benchmark calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.389, year: 2012

  15. Noncovalent cation-π interactions – their role in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Fink

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-covalent interactions play an extremely important role in organisms. The main non-covalent interactions in nature are: ion-ion interactions, dipole-dipole interactions, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals interactions. A new kind of intermolecular interactions – cation-π interactions – is gaining increasing attention. These interactions occur between a cation and a π system. The main contributors to cation-π interactions are electrostatic, polarization and, to a lesser extent, dispersion interactions. At first, cation-π interactions were studied in a gas phase, with metal cation–aromatic system complexes. The characteristics of these complexes are as follows: an increase of cation atomic number leads to a decrease of interaction energy, and an increase of cation charge leads to an increase of interaction energy. Aromatic amino acids bind with metal cations mainly through interactions with their main chain. Nevertheless, cation-π interaction with a hydrophobic side chain significantly enhances binding energy. In water solutions most cations preferentially interact with water molecules rather than aromatic systems. Cation-π interactions occur in environments with lower accessibility to a polar solvent. Cation-π interactions can have a stabilizing role on the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure of proteins. These interactions play an important role in substrate or ligand binding sites in many proteins, which should be taken into consideration when the screening of effective inhibitors for these proteins is carried out. Cation-π interactions are abundant and play an important role in many biological processes.

  16. Understanding substituent effects in noncovalent interactions involving aromatic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Steven E

    2013-04-16

    Noncovalent interactions involving aromatic rings such as π-stacking, cation/π, and anion/π interactions are central to many areas of modern chemistry. Decades of experimental studies have provided key insights into the impact of substituents on these interactions, leading to the development of simple intuitive models. However, gas-phase computational studies have raised some doubts about the physical underpinnings of these widespread models. In this Account we review our recent efforts to unravel the origin of substituent effects in π-stacking and ion/π interactions through computational studies of model noncovalent dimers. First, however, we dispel the notion that so-called aromatic interactions depend on the aromaticity of the interacting rings by studying model π-stacked dimers in which the aromaticity of one of the monomers can be "switched off". Somewhat surprisingly, the results show that not only is aromaticity unnecessary for π-stacking interactions, but it actually hinders these interactions to some extent. Consequently, when thinking about π-stacking interactions, researchers should consider broader classes of planar molecules, not just aromatic systems. Conventional models maintain that substituent effects in π-stacking interactions result from changes in the aryl π-system. This view suggests that π-stacking interactions are maximized when one ring is substituted with electron-withdrawing groups and the other with electron donors. In contrast to these prevailing models, we have shown that substituent effects in π-stacking interactions can be described in terms of direct, local interactions between the substituents and the nearby vertex of the other arene. As a result, in polysubstituted π-stacked dimers the substituents operate independently unless they are in each other's local environment. This means that in π-stacked dimers in which one arene is substituted with electron donors and the other with electron acceptors the interactions will

  17. Noncovalent Interactions between Dopamine and Regular and Defective Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ana C Rossi; Castellani, Norberto J

    2017-08-05

    The role of noncovalent interactions in the adsorption of biological molecules on graphene is a subject of fundamental interest regarding the use of graphene as a material for sensing and drug delivery. The adsorption of dopamine on regular graphene and graphene with monovacancies (GV) is theoretically studied within the framework of density functional theory. Several adsorption modes are considered, and notably those in which the dopamine molecule is oriented parallel or quasi-parallel to the surface are the more stable. The adsorption of dopamine on graphene implies an attractive interaction of a dispersive nature that competes with Pauli repulsion between the occupied π orbitals of the dopamine ring and the π orbitals of graphene. If dopamine adsorbs at the monovacancy in the A-B stacking mode, a hydrogen bond is produced between one of the dopamine hydroxy groups and one carbon atom around the vacancy. The electronic charge redistribution due to adsorption is consistent with an electronic drift from the graphene or GV surface to the dopamine molecule. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Non-covalent ligand conjugation to biotinylated DNA nanoparticles using TAT peptide genetically fused to monovalent streptavidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenchao; Fletcher, David; van Heeckeren, Rolf Christiaan; Davis, Pamela B.

    2014-01-01

    DNA nanoparticles (DNA NPs), which self-assemble from DNA plasmids and poly-L-lysine (pLL)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) block copolymers, transfect several cell types in vitro and in vivo with minimal toxicity and immune response. To further enhance the gene transfer efficiency of DNA NP and control its tropism, we established a strategy to efficiently attach peptide ligands to DNA NPs. The non-covalent biotin–streptavidin (SA) interaction was used for ligand conjugation to overcome problems associated with covalent conjugation methods. A fusion protein of SA with the HIV-1 TAT peptide was cloned, expressed, purified and attached to biotinylated DNA NPs. A modified SA system with tetrameric structure but monovalent biotin binding capacity was adopted and shown to reduce the aggregation of biotinylated DNA NPs compared to neutravidin. Compared to unmodified DNA NPs, TAT modified DNA NPs significantly enhanced in vitro gene transfer, particularly at low DNA concentrations. Studies of cellular uptake and cellular distribution of the DNA NPs indicated that attaching TAT enhanced binding of DNA NPs to cell surface but not internalization at high DNA concentrations. In vivo studies showed that TAT modified DNA NPs mediated equal level of gene transfer to the mouse airways via the luminal route compared to unmodified DNA NPs. PMID:22845840

  19. Non-Covalent Binding of DNA to Carbon Nanotubes Controlled by Biological Recognition Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goux-Capes, Laurence; Filoramo, Arianna; Cote, Denis; Valentin, Emmanuel; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Patillon, Jean-Nöel

    2004-09-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) occupy a special place within molecular electronics. Indeed, they exist as semiconducting or metallic wires and have been used to demonstrate molecular devices like transistors, diodes or SET (single electron transistor). However, the future of this class of SWNT-based devices is strictly related to the development of a bottom-up self-assembly technique. The exceptional recognition properties of DNA molecule make it an ideal candidate for this task. Here, we describe a non-covalent method to connect carbon nanotubes to DNA strands using the streptavidin/biotin complex. Control experiments show that in absence of biotin, the DNA strand do not bind to SWNT. The binding of SWNT to DNA strand has also been carefully checked by washing experiments, showing the strength of the DNA anchorage on SWNTs. Combining this approach with molecular combing enable us to align nanotubes on substrate.

  20. Attractive Noncovalent Interactions in the Mechanism of Grubbs Second-Generation Ru Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2007-05-10

    Second-generation ruthenium carbenoid catalysts for olefin metathesis are a hundred to a thousand times more active than first-generation catalysts, despite a slower initiation step. A new density functional capable of treating medium-range correlation energy shows that the relative rates of generation of the catalyst are determined by attractive noncovalent interactions.

  1. DNA Linked To Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes: Covalent Versus Non-Covalent Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, C.-L.; Nguyen, K.; Lyonnais, S.; Streiff, S.; Campidelli, S.; Goux-Capes, L.; Bourgoin, J.-P.; Filoramo, A.

    2008-10-01

    Nanometer-scale structures represent a novel and intriguing field, where scientists and engineers manipulate materials at the atomic and molecular scale levels to produce innovative materials. Carbon nanotubes constitute a relatively new class of materials exhibiting exceptional mechanical and electronic properties and were found to be promising candidates for molecular electronics, sensing or biomedical applications. Considering the bottom-up strategy in nanotechnology, the combination of the recognition properties of DNA with the electronic properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) seems to be a promising approach for the future of electronics. With the aim to assemble DNA with SWNTs, two complementary strategies have been envisioned: the covalent linkage of DNA on carboxylic groups of SWNTs under classical coupling condition and the non-covalent approach based on biotin-streptavidin molecular recognition properties. Here, we present and compare the results that we obtained with these two different methods; we want to objectively show the advantages and disadvantages of each approach.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of noncovalent interactions between polyphosphate and dissolved humic acids in aqueous conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Wang, Long-Fei; Ye, Xiao-Dong; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    As one kind of phosphorus species, polyphosphate (poly-P) is ubiquitous in natural environments, and the potential interactions between poly-P and humic substances in the sediments or natural waters would influence the fate of poly-P in the environments. However, the mechanism of the interactions has not yet been understood clearly. In this work, the characteristics and mechanisms of the interactions between humic acids (HA) and two model poly-P compounds with various chain lengths have been investigated. Results show that a stable polyphosphate-HA complex would be formed through the noncovalent interactions, and hydrogen bond might be the main driving force for the binding process, which might be formed between the proton-accepting groups of poly-P (e.g., P=O and P–O − ) and the oxygen containing functional groups in HA. Our findings implied that the presence of humic substances in natural waters, soils and sediments would influence the potential transport and/or mobility of environmental poly-P. - Highlights: • Noncovalent interactions between polyphosphate and HA were quantitatively evaluated. • Hydrogen bonding was the main driving force in the interaction between HA and poly-P. • The association played important roles in the environmental fate of poly-P in waters. - Stable polyP-HA complex would be formed through the noncovalent interactions and thus influence the poly-P fates in the natural environments.

  3. 25th anniversary article: reversible and adaptive functional supramolecular materials: "noncovalent interaction" matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Kang, Yuetong; Wang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xi

    2013-10-18

    Supramolecular materials held together by noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, host-guest interactions, and electrostatic interactions, have great potential in material science. The unique reversibility and adaptivity of noncovalent intreractions have brought about fascinating new functions that are not available by their covalent counterparts and have greatly enriched the realm of functional materials. This review article aims to highlight the very recent and important progresses in the area of functional supramoleuclar materials, focusing on adaptive mechanical materials, smart sensors with enhanced selectivity, soft luminescent and electronic nanomaterials, and biomimetic and biomedical materials with tailored structures and functions. We cannot write a complete account of all the interesting work in this area in one article, but we hope that it can in a way reflect the current situation and future trends in this prosperously developing area of functional supramolecular materials. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Description of Non-Covalent Interactions in SCC-DFTB Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miriyala, Vijay Madhav; Řezáč, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 10 (2017), s. 688-697 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ16-11321Y Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional tight binding * DFTB3 * non-covalent interactions * dispersion correction * hydrogen bonding correction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 3.229, year: 2016

  5. Non-covalent O⋅⋅⋅O interactions among isopolyanions using a cis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    2008-05-09

    May 9, 2008 ... N–H⋅⋅⋅O and C–H⋅⋅⋅O hydrogen bonds, in which the protonated organic cation plays a significant role. The crystal structure also reveals an unusual cluster–cluster (non-covalent O⋅⋅⋅O) interaction using cis-. (MoO2} moieties of the isopolyanion. N–H⋅⋅⋅O hydrogen bonds, originated from ...

  6. Non-Covalent Interaction: Revealed by Rotational Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Gou, Qian

    2014-01-01

    The pulsed jet Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy have been applied to several molecular complexes involving H2O, freons, methane, carboxylic acids, and rare gas. The obtained results showcase the suitability of this technique for studying the intermolecular interactions. The rotational spectra of three water adducts of halogenated organic molecules, i.e. chlorotrifluoroethylene, isoflurane and alfa,alfa,alfa,-trifluoroanisole, have been investigated. It has been found that, the halo...

  7. Correlating Nitrile IR Frequencies to Local Electrostatics Quantifies Noncovalent Interactions of Peptides and Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Pranab; Haldar, Tapas; Kashid, Somnath M; Banerjee, Subhrashis; Chakrabarty, Suman; Bagchi, Sayan

    2016-05-05

    Noncovalent interactions, in particular the hydrogen bonds and nonspecific long-range electrostatic interactions are fundamental to biomolecular functions. A molecular understanding of the local electrostatic environment, consistently for both specific (hydrogen-bonding) and nonspecific electrostatic (local polarity) interactions, is essential for a detailed understanding of these processes. Vibrational Stark Effect (VSE) has proven to be an extremely useful method to measure the local electric field using infrared spectroscopy of carbonyl and nitrile based probes. The nitrile chemical group would be an ideal choice because of its absorption in an infrared spectral window transparent to biomolecules, ease of site-specific incorporation into proteins, and common occurrence as a substituent in various drug molecules. However, the inability of VSE to describe the dependence of IR frequency on electric field for hydrogen-bonded nitriles to date has severely limited nitrile's utility to probe the noncovalent interactions. In this work, using infrared spectroscopy and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we have reported for the first time a linear correlation between nitrile frequencies and electric fields in a wide range of hydrogen-bonding environments that may bridge the existing gap between VSE and H-bonding interactions. We have demonstrated the robustness of this field-frequency correlation for both aromatic nitriles and sulfur-based nitriles in a wide range of molecules of varying size and compactness, including small molecules in complex solvation environments, an amino acid, disordered peptides, and structured proteins. This correlation, when coupled to VSE, can be used to quantify noncovalent interactions, specific or nonspecific, in a consistent manner.

  8. Self-assembly of bridged silsesquioxanes: modulating structural evolution via cooperative covalent and noncovalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creff, Gaelle; Pichon, Benoît P; Blanc, Christophe; Maurin, David; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Carcel, Carole; Moreau, Joël J E; Roy, Pascale; Bartlett, John R; Man, Michel Wong Chi; Bantignies, Jean-Louis

    2013-05-07

    The self-assembly of a bis-urea phenylene-bridged silsesquioxane precursor during sol-gel synthesis has been investigated by in situ infrared spectroscopy, optical microscopy, and light scattering. In particular, the evolution of the system as a function of processing time was correlated with covalent interactions associated with increasing polycondensation and noncovalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding. A comprehensive mechanism based on the hydrolysis of the phenylene-bridged organosilane precursor prior to the crystallization of the corresponding bridged silsesquioxane via H-bonding and subsequent irreversible polycondensation is proposed.

  9. Noncovalent Interactions Accompanying Encapsulation of Resorcinol within Azacalix[4]pyridine Macrocycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lande, Dipali N; Bhadane, Smita A; Gejji, Shridhar P

    2017-03-02

    Electronic structure and noncovalent interactions within the inclusion complexes of resorcinol and calix[4]pyridine (CXP[4]) or azacalix[4]pyridine (N-CXP[4]) macrocycles have been analyzed by employing hybrid M06-2X density functional theory. It has been demonstrated that substitution of a heteroatom (-NH-) at the bridging position of the CXP[4] alters the shape of the cavity from a "box-shaped" to funnel-like one. Penetration of resorcinol guest within the CXP[4] cavity renders a "butterfly-like" structure to the complex, whereas the N-CXP[4] complex reveals distorted geometry with the guest being nearer to one of the pyridine rings at the upper rim of the host. Underlying hydrogen bonding, π···π, and other weak interactions are characterized using the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and Noncovalent Interactions Reduced Density Gradient (NCI-RDG) methods. The coexistence of multiple intermolecular interactions is envisaged through the frequency shifts of the characteristic -NH and -OH vibrations in their calculated vibrational spectra. The guest protons confined to the host cavity exhibit shielding, while those facilitating hydrogen bonding engender the downfield signals in their calculated 1 H NMR spectra.

  10. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-10-30

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π-conjugated molecules, oligomers, and polymers. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of noncovalent intermolecular interactions and briefly discuss the computational chemistry approaches used to understand the magnitude of these interactions. These methodologies are then exploited to illustrate how noncovalent intermolecular interactions impact important electronic properties-such as the electronic coupling between adjacent molecules, a key parameter for charge-carrier transport-through a comparison between the prototype organic semiconductor pentacene with a series of N-substituted heteropentacenes. Incorporating an understanding of these interactions into the design of organic semiconductors can assist in developing novel materials systems from this fascinating molecular class. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  11. Specific noncovalent interactions at protein-ligand interface: implications for rational drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P; Huang, J; Tian, F

    2012-01-01

    Specific noncovalent interactions that are indicative of attractive, directional intermolecular forces have always been of key interest to medicinal chemists in their search for the "glue" that holds drugs and their targets together. With the rapid increase in the number of solved biomolecular structures as well as the performance enhancement of computer hardware and software in recent years, it is now possible to give more comprehensive insight into the geometrical characteristics and energetic landscape of certain sophisticated noncovalent interactions present at the binding interface of protein receptors and small ligands based on accumulated knowledge gaining from the combination of two quite disparate but complementary approaches: crystallographic data analysis and quantum-mechanical ab initio calculation. In this perspective, we survey massive body of published works relating to structural characterization and theoretical investigation of three kinds of strong, specific, direct, enthalpy-driven intermolecular forces, including hydrogen bond, halogen bond and salt bridge, involved in the formation of protein-ligand complex architecture in order to characterize their biological functions in conferring affinity and specificity for ligand recognition by host protein. In particular, the biomedical implications of raised knowledge are discussed with respect to potential applications in rational drug design.

  12. Stereodynamic tetrahydrobiisoindole “NU-BIPHEP(O”s: functionalization, rotational barriers and non-covalent interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golo Storch

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stereodynamic ligands offer intriguing possibilities in enantioselective catalysis. “NU-BIPHEPs” are a class of stereodynamic diphosphine ligands which are easily accessible via rhodium-catalyzed double [2 + 2 + 2] cycloadditions. This study explores the preparation of differently functionalized “NU-BIPHEP(O” compounds, the characterization of non-covalent adduct formation and the quantification of enantiomerization barriers. In order to explore the possibilities of functionalization, we studied modifications of the ligand backbone, e.g., with 3,5-dichlorobenzoyl chloride. Diastereomeric adducts with Okamoto-type cellulose derivatives and on-column deracemization were realized on the basis of non-covalent interactions. Enantioselective dynamic HPLC (DHPLC allowed for the determination of rotational barriers of ΔG‡298K = 92.2 ± 0.3 kJ mol−1 and 99.5 ± 0.1 kJ mol−1 underlining the stereodynamic properties of “NU-BIPHEPs” and “NU-BIPHEP(Os”, respectively. These results make the preparation of tailor-made functionalized stereodynamic ligands possible and give an outline for possible applications in enantioselective catalysis.

  13. Core/Shell Conjugated Polymer/Quantum Dot Composite Nanofibers through Orthogonal Non-Covalent Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad W. Watson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructuring organic polymers and organic/inorganic hybrid materials and controlling blend morphologies at the molecular level are the prerequisites for modern electronic devices including biological sensors, light emitting diodes, memory devices and solar cells. To achieve all-around high performance, multiple organic and inorganic entities, each designed for specific functions, are commonly incorporated into a single device. Accurate arrangement of these components is a crucial goal in order to achieve the overall synergistic effects. We describe here a facile methodology of nanostructuring conjugated polymers and inorganic quantum dots into well-ordered core/shell composite nanofibers through cooperation of several orthogonal non-covalent interactions including conjugated polymer crystallization, block copolymer self-assembly and coordination interactions. Our methods provide precise control on the spatial arrangements among the various building blocks that are otherwise incompatible with one another, and should find applications in modern organic electronic devices such as solar cells.

  14. Using PyMOL to Explore the Effects of ph on Noncovalent Interactions between Immunoglobulin G and Protein A: A Guided-Inquiry Biochemistry Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche Allred, Zahilyn D.; Tai, Heeyoung; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Page, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Students' understandings of foundational concepts such as noncovalent interactions, pH and pK[subscript a] are crucial for success in undergraduate biochemistry courses. We developed a guided-inquiry activity to aid students in making connections between noncovalent interactions and pH/pK[subscript a]. Students explore these concepts by examining…

  15. Study of the non-covalent interactions of ginsenosides and lysozyme using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun; Fu, Qiang; Cui, Meng; Xing, Junpeng; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2015-11-15

    Ginsenosides are an important class of natural products extracted from ginseng that possess various important biological activities. Studies of interactions of ginsenosides with proteins are essential for comprehensive understanding of the biological activities of ginsenosides. In this study, the interactions of ginsenosides with lysozyme were investigated by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Both protopanaxadiol-type and protopanaxatriol-type ginsenosides were chosen to explore the interactions of ginsenosides towards lysozyme near the physiological conditions by direct ESI-MS, respectively. Comparative experiments were conducted to confirm the interactions were specific. In addition, the dissociation constants of ginsenoside-lysozyme complexes were determined by a ESI-MS titration strategy. The results showed ginsenosides bound to lysozyme at the stoichiometries of 1:1 and 2:1. The association constants of ginsenosides to lysozyme were in the order of Re>Rd>Rf>Rg2 >Rg3 . According to their structures, the binding affinities associated with the type of aglycone and the type and the number of sugar moieties linked on the aglycone. It has been demonstrated that ESI-MS is a powerful tool to probe the non-covalent interactions between lysozyme and ginsenosides. These results provide insights into the interaction of ginsenosides with lysozyme at the molecular level. The developed strategy could be applied to determine the interactions of proteins with other natural products. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. DNA Condensing Effects and Sequence Selectivity of DNA Binding of Antitumor Noncovalent Polynuclear Platinum Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malina, Jaroslav; Farrell, N. P.; Brabec, Viktor

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2014), s. 1662-1671 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08273S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH13096 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : INTERSTRAND CROSS-LINKS * LASER-LIGHT SCATTERING * CALF THYMUS DNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.762, year: 2014

  17. Exploring the "intensity fading" phenomenon in the study of noncovalent interactions by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanes, Oscar; Aviles, Francesc X; Roepstorff, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The difficulties to detect intact noncovalent complexes involving proteins and peptides by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry have hindered a widespread use of this approach. Recently, "intensity fading MS" has been presented as an alternative strategy to detect noncovalent interactions in solution...... the intensity fading phenomenon, as well as a comparison with the strategy based on the direct detection of intact complexes by MALDI MS. For this purpose, the study is focused on two different protease-inhibitor complexes naturally occurring in solution, together with a heterogeneous mixture of nonbinding...

  18. Microsolvation and the Effects of Non-Covalent Interactions on Intramolecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foguel, Lidor; Vealey, Zachary; Vaccaro, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Physicochemical processes brought about by non-covalent interactions between neighboring molecules are undeniably of crucial importance in the world around us, being responsible for effects ranging from the subtle (yet precise) control of biomolecular recognition events to the very existence of condensed phases. Of particular interest is the differential ability of distinct non-covalent forces, such as those mediated by dispersion-dominated aryl (π-π) coupling and electrostatically-driven hydrogen bonding, to affect unimolecular transformations by altering potential surface topographies and the nature of reaction coordinates. A concerted experimental and computational investigation of "microsolvation" (solvation at the molecular level) has been undertaken to elucidate the site-specific coupling between solute and solvent degrees of freedom, as well as attendant consequences for the efficiency and pathway of intrinsic proton-transfer dynamics. Targeted species have been synthesized in situ under "cold" supersonic free-jet expansion conditions (T_{rot} ≈ 1-2K) by complexing an active (proton-transfer) substrate with various ligands (e.g., water isotopologs and benzene derivatives) for which competing interaction mechanisms can lead to unique binding motifs. A series of fluorescence-based spectroscopic measurements have been performed on binary adducts formed with the prototypical 6-hydroxy-2-formylfulvene (HFF) system, where a quasi-linear intramolecular O-H...O bond and a zero-point energy that straddles the proton-transfer barrier crest synergistically yield the largest tunneling-induced splitting ever reported for the ground electronic state of an isolated neutral molecule. Such characteristics afford a localized metric for unraveling incipient changes in unimolecular reactivity, with comparison of experimentally observed and quantum-chemical predicted rovibronic landscapes serving to discriminate complexes built upon electrostatic (hydrogen-bonding) and

  19. Equilibrium isotope effects on noncovalent interactions in a supramolecular host-guest system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugridge, Jeffrey S; Bergman, Robert G; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2012-02-01

    The self-assembled supramolecular complex [Ga(4)L(6)](12-) (1; L = 1,5-bis[2,3-dihydroxybenzamido]naphthalene) can act as a molecular host in aqueous solution and bind cationic guest molecules to its highly charged exterior surface or within its hydrophobic interior cavity. The distinct internal cavity of host 1 modifies the physical properties and reactivity of bound guest molecules and can be used to catalyze a variety of chemical transformations. Noncovalent host-guest interactions in large part control guest binding, molecular recognition and the chemical reactivity of bound guests. Herein we examine equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs) on both exterior and interior guest binding to host 1 and use these effects to probe the details of noncovalent host-guest interactions. For both interior and exterior binding of a benzylphosphonium guest in aqueous solution, protiated guests are found to bind more strongly to host 1 (K(H)/K(D) > 1) and the preferred association of protiated guests is driven by enthalpy and opposed by entropy. Deuteration of guest methyl and benzyl C-H bonds results in a larger EIE than deuteration of guest aromatic C-H bonds. The observed EIEs can be well explained by considering changes in guest vibrational force constants and zero-point energies. DFT calculations further confirm the origins of these EIEs and suggest that changes in low-frequency guest C-H/D vibrational motions (bends, wags, etc.) are primarily responsible for the observed EIEs. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  20. Non-covalent conjugates of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid for interaction with cells overexpressing folate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Novoa, Leidy V.

    2013-01-01

    We here present amethod to form a noncovalent conjugate of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid aimed to interact with cells over-expressing folate receptors. The bonding was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple, rapid “one pot” synthesis method. The zeta p...

  1. Non-covalent synthesis of calix[4]arene-capped porphyrins in polar solvents via ionic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiammengo, R.; Timmerman, P.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Versluis, Kees; Heck, Albert J.R.; Reinhoudt, David

    2002-01-01

    Non-covalent synthesis of calix[4]arene capped porphyrins can be achieved in polar solvents (up to 45% molar fraction of water) via ionic interaction. Thus tetracationic meso-tetrakis(N-alkylpyridinium-3-yl) porphyrins 1a–d and tetra anionic 25,26,27,28-tetrakis(2-ethoxyethoxy)-calix[4]arene

  2. Noncovalent Interaction Energies in Covalent Complexes: TEM-1 beta-Lactamase and beta-Lactams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Minasov, George; Shoichet, Brian K. (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    The class A {beta}-lactamase TEM-1 is a key bacterial resistance enzyme against {beta}-lactam antibiotics, but little is known about the energetic bases for complementarity between TEM-1 and its inhibitors. Most inhibitors form a covalent adduct with the catalytic Ser70, making the measurement of equilibriumconstants, and hence interaction energies, technically difficult. This study evaluates noncovalent interactions withincovalent complexes by examining the differential stability of TEM-1 and its inhibitor adducts. The thermal denaturation of TEM-1 follows a two-state, reversible model with a melting temperature (T{sub m}) of 51.6 C and a van't Hoff enthalpy of unfolding ({Delta}H{sub VH}) of 146.2 kcal/mol at pH 7.0. The stability of the enzyme changes on forming an inhibitor adduct. As expected, some inhibitors stabilize TEM-1; transition-state analogues increase the T{sub m} by up to 3.7 C(1.7 kcal/mol). Surprisingly, all {beta}-lactam covalent acyl-enzyme complexes tested destabilize TEM-1 significantly relative to the apoenzyme. For instance, the clinically used inhibitor clavulanic acid and the {beta}-lactamase-resistant {beta}-lactams moxalactam and imipenem destabilize TEM-1 by over 2.6 C (1.2 kcal/mol) in their covalent adducts. Based on the structure of the TEM-1/imipenem complex (Maveyraud et al., J Am Chem Soc 1998;120:9748-52), destabilization by moxalactam and imipenem is thought to be caused by a steric clash between the side-chain of Asn132 and the 6(7)-{alpha} group of these {beta}-lactams. To test this hypothesis, the mutant enzyme N132A was made. In contrast with wild-type, the covalent complexes between N132A and both imipenem and moxalactam stabilize the enzyme, consistent with the hypothesis. To investigate the structural bases of this dramatic change instability, the structure of N132A/imipenem was determined by X-ray crystallography. In the complex with N132A, imipenemadopts a very different conformation from that observed in the wild

  3. Noncovalent interactions of metal cations and arenes probed with thallium(I) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurca, Titel; Korobkov, Ilia; Gorelsky, Serge I; Richeson, Darrin S

    2013-05-20

    The synthesis, characterization, and computational analysis of Tl(I) complexes bearing the bis(imino)pyridine scaffold, [{ArN═CPh}2(NC5H3)]Tl(+)(OTf)(-) (Ar = 2,6-Et2C6H33, 2,5-(t)Bu2C6H3, 4), are reported. The cations of these species showed long Tl-N and Tl-OTf distances indicating only weak or no ligand coordination. Computational analysis of the interactions between the Tl cation and the ligands (orbital populations, bond order, and energy decomposition analysis) point to only minimal covalent interactions of the cation with the ligands. The weak ligand-to-metal donation allows for additional interactions between the Tl cation and arene rings that are either intramolecular, in the case of 3, or intermolecular. From benzene or toluene, 4 crystallizes with inverted sandwich structures having two [{(2,5-(t)Bu2C6H3)N═CPh}2(NC5H3)]Tl(+) cations bridged by either benzene or toluene. A density functional computational description of these Tl-arene contacts required exchange-correlation functionals with long-range exchange corrections (e.g., CAM-B3LYP or LC-PBE) and show that Tl-arene contacts are stabilized by noncovalent interactions.

  4. Noncovalent interactions from electron density topology and solvent effects on spectral properties of Schiff bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhimathi, S.; Balakrishnan, C.; Theetharappan, M.; Neelakantan, M. A.; Venkataraman, R.

    2017-03-01

    Two Schiff bases were prepared by the condensation of o-allyl substituted 2,4-dihydroxy acetophenone with 1,2-diaminopropane (L1) and ethanediamine (L2) and characterized by elemental analysis, and ESI-MS, IR, UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectral techniques. The effect of solvents with respect to different polarities on UV-Vis and emission spectra of L1 and L2 was investigated at room temperature show that the compounds exist in keto and enol forms in solution and may be attributed to the intramolecular proton transfer in the ground state. The solute-solvent interactions, change in dipole moment and solvatochromic properties of the compounds were studied based on the solvent polarity parameters. For L1 and L2, the ground and excited state electronic structure calculations were carried out by DFT and TD-DFT at B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level, respectively. The IR, NMR and electronic absorption spectra computed were compared with the experimental observations. The intramolecular charge transfer within the molecule is evidenced from the HOMO and LUMO energy levels and surface analysis. The noncovalent interactions like hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions were identified from the molecular geometry and electron localization function. These interactions in molecules have been studied by using reduced density gradient and graphed by Multiwfn.

  5. Inverting Steric Effects: Using "Attractive" Noncovalent Interactions To Direct Silver-Catalyzed Nitrene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minxue; Yang, Tzuhsiung; Paretsky, Jonathan D; Berry, John F; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2017-12-06

    Nitrene transfer (NT) reactions represent powerful and direct methods to convert C-H bonds into amine groups that are prevalent in many commodity chemicals and pharmaceuticals. The importance of the C-N bond has stimulated the development of numerous transition-metal complexes to effect chemo-, regio-, and diastereoselective NT. An ongoing challenge is to understand how subtle interactions between catalyst and substrate influence the site-selectivity of the C-H amination event. In this work, we explore the underlying reasons why Ag(tpa)OTf (tpa = tris(pyridylmethyl)amine) prefers to activate α-conjugated C-H bonds over 3° alkyl C(sp 3 )-H bonds and apply these insights to reaction optimization and catalyst design. Experimental results suggest possible roles of noncovalent interactions (NCIs) in directing the NT; computational studies support the involvement of π···π and Ag···π interactions between catalyst and substrate, primarily by lowering the energy of the directed transition state and reaction conformers. A simple Hess's law relationship can be employed to predict selectivities for new substrates containing competing NCIs. The insights presented herein are poised to inspire the design of other catalyst-controlled C-H functionalization reactions.

  6. π-Donors microstructuring on surface of polymer film by their noncovalent interactions with iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traven, Valerii F., E-mail: valerii.traven@gmail.com [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, Moscow 125047, Miusskaya sq., 9 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Ivan V.; Dolotov, Sergei M. [Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology, Moscow 125047, Miusskaya sq., 9 (Russian Federation); Veciana, Jaume Miro; Lebedev, Victor S. [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona–CSIC, Campus de la UAB, 08193, Bellaterra (Spain); Shulga, Yurii M.; Khasanov, Salavat S. [Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Acad. N.N. Semenov Prosp., 1, Chernogolovka, 142432 (Russian Federation); Medvedev, Michael G. [A. N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991, Vavilova str., 28 (Russian Federation); Laukhina, Elena E. [The Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, ICMAB-CSIC, Bellaterra, 08193 (Spain)

    2015-06-15

    Noncovalent (charge transfer) interaction between perylene and iodine in polycarbonate film provides formation of microstructured perylene layer on the polymer surface upon exposure of polymer film which contains dissolved perylene to solvent + iodine vapors. The prepared bilayer film possesses a sensing effect to iodine vapors which can be observed by both fluorescence and electrical conductivity changes. Similar bilayer films have been prepared also with anthracene and phenothiazine as π-donors with use of different polymer matrixes. Interaction of iodine with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) has also been studied by the M06-2x DFT calculations for better understanding of phenomenon of π-donors microstructuring on surface of polymer film. - Highlights: • Preparation of bilayer polymer films with π-donors on surface for the first time. • π-Donor phase purity is confirmed by XRD, IR spectroscopy, SEM. • Perylene bilayer polymer films possess fluorescence. • Perylene bilayer polymer films loss fluorescence under iodine vapors. • Perylene bilayer polymer films possess electrical conductivity when treated by iodine vapors.

  7. Atomic Ensemble Effects and Non-Covalent Interactions at the Electrode–Electrolyte Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Cuesta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide-modified Pt(111 electrodes have been recently employed to study atomic ensemble effects in electrocatalysis. This work, which will be briefly reviewed, reveals that the smallest site required for methanol dehydrogenation and formic acid dehydration is composed of three contiguous Pt atoms. By blocking these trigonal sites, the specific adsorption of anions, such as sulfate and phosphate, can be inhibited, thus increasing the rate of oxygen reduction reaction by one order of magnitude or more. Moreover, alkali metal cations affect hydrogen adsorption on cyanide-modified Pt(111. This effect is attributed to the non-covalent interactions at the electrical double layer between specifically adsorbed anions or dipoles and the alkali metal cations. A systematic investigation is conducted on the effect of the concentration of alkali metal cations. Accordingly, a simple model that reproduces the experimental observations accurately and enables the understanding of the trends in the strength of the interaction between M+ and CNad when moving from Li+ to Cs+, as well as the deviations from the expected trends, is developed. This simple model can also explain the occurrence of super-Nernstian shifts of the equilibrium potential of interfacial proton-coupled electron transfers. Therefore, the model can be generally applied to explain quantitatively the effect of cations on the properties of the electrical double layer. The recently reported effects of alkali metal cations on several electrocatalytic reactions must be mediated by the interaction between these cations and chemisorbed species. As these interactions seem to be adequately and quantitatively described by our model, we expect the model to also be useful to describe, explain, and potentially exploit these effects.

  8. Inter- and intramolecular non-covalent interactions in 1-methylimidazole-2-carbaldehyde complexes of copper, silver, and gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Laura; Jääskeläinen, Sirpa; Hirva, Pipsa; Haukka, Matti

    2014-09-01

    Three new imidazole compounds, [CuBr2(mimc)2] (1), [Ag(mimc)2][CF3SO3] (2), and [AuCl3(mimc)] (3) (mimc = 1-methylimidazole-2-carbaldehyde), have been synthesized, structurally characterized, and further analyzed using the QTAIM analysis. The compounds exhibit self-assembled 3D networks arising from intermolecular non-covalent interactions such as metallophilic interactions, metal-π contacts, halogens-halogen interactions, and hydrogen bonds. These weak interactions have a strong impact on the coordination sphere of the metal atoms and on the packing of compounds 1, 2, and 3.

  9. Materials Design via Optimized Intramolecular Noncovalent Interactions for High-Performance Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiaojie; Liao, Qiaogan; Manley, Eric F.; Wu, Zishan; Wang, Yulun; Wang, Weida; Yang, Tingbin; Shin, Young-Eun; Cheng, Xing; Liang, Yongye; Chen, Lin X.; Baeg, Kang-Jun; Marks, Tobin J.; Guo, Xugang

    2016-03-15

    We report the design, synthesis, and implemention in semiconducting polymers of a novel head-to-head linkage containing the TRTOR (3-alkyl-3'-alkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene) donor subunit having a single strategically optimized, planarizing noncovalent S···O interaction. Diverse complementary thermal, optical, electrochemical, X-ray scattering, electrical, photovoltaic, and electron microscopic characterization techniques are applied to establish structure-property correlations in a TRTOR-based polymer series. In comparison to monomers having double S···O interactions, replacing one alkoxy substituent with a less electron-donating alkyl one yields TRTOR-based polymers with significantly depressed (0.2-0.3 eV) HOMOs. Furthermore, the weaker single S···O interaction and greater TRTOR steric encumberance enhances materials processability without sacrificing backbone planarity. From another perspective, TRTOR has comparable electronic properties to ring-fused 5Hdithieno[ 3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyran (DTP) subunits, but a centrosymmetric geometry which promotes a more compact and ordered structure than bulkier, axisymmetric DTP. Compared to monosubstituted TTOR (3-alkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene), alkylation at the TRTOR bithiophene 3-position enhances conjugation and polymer crystallinity with contracted π-π stacking. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) data reveal that the greater steric hindrance and the weaker single S···O interaction are not detrimental to close packing and high crystallinity. As a proof of materials design, copolymerizing TRTOR with phthalimides yields copolymers with promising thin-film transistor mobility as high as 0.42 cm2/(V·s) and 6.3% power conversion efficiency in polymer solar cells, the highest of any phthalimide copolymers reported to date. The depressed TRTOR HOMOs imbue these polymers with substantially increased Ion/Ioff ratios and Voc’s versus analogous subunits with multiple electron donating

  10. Materials Design via Optimized Intramolecular Noncovalent Interactions for High-Performance Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiaojie [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Liao, Qiaogan [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Manley, Eric F. [Department; Chemical; Wu, Zishan [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Wang, Yulun [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Wang, Weida [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Yang, Tingbin [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Shin, Young-Eun [Department; Cheng, Xing [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Liang, Yongye [Shenzhen Key Laboratory; Chen, Lin X. [Department; Chemical; Baeg, Kang-Jun [Department; Marks, Tobin J. [Department; Guo, Xugang [Shenzhen Key Laboratory

    2016-03-15

    We report the design, synthesis, and implemention in semiconducting polymers of a novel head-to-head linkage containing the TRTOR (3-alkyl-3'-alkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene) donor subunit having a single strategically optimized, planarizing noncovalent S···O interaction. Diverse complementary thermal, optical, electrochemical, X-ray scattering, electrical, photovoltaic, and electron microscopic characterization techniques are applied to establish structure–property correlations in a TRTOR-based polymer series. In comparison to monomers having double S···O interactions, replacing one alkoxy substituent with a less electron-donating alkyl one yields TRTOR-based polymers with significantly depressed (0.2–0.3 eV) HOMOs. Furthermore, the weaker single S···O interaction and greater TRTOR steric encumberance enhances materials processability without sacrificing backbone planarity. From another perspective, TRTOR has comparable electronic properties to ring-fused 5H-dithieno[3,2-b:2',3'-d]pyran (DTP) subunits, but a centrosymmetric geometry which promotes a more compact and ordered structure than bulkier, axisymmetric DTP. Compared to monosubstituted TTOR (3-alkoxy-2,2'-bithiophene), alkylation at the TRTOR bithiophene 3-position enhances conjugation and polymer crystallinity with contracted π–π stacking. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS) data reveal that the greater steric hindrance and the weaker single S···O interaction are not detrimental to close packing and high crystallinity. As a proof of materials design, copolymerizing TRTOR with phthalimides yields copolymers with promising thin-film transistor mobility as high as 0.42 cm2/(V·s) and 6.3% power conversion efficiency in polymer solar cells, the highest of any phthalimide copolymers reported to date. The depressed TRTOR HOMOs imbue these polymers with substantially increased Ion/Ioff ratios and Voc’s versus analogous subunits with multiple electron

  11. Supramolecular catalysis. Part 1: non-covalent interactions as a tool for building and modifying homogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynal, Matthieu; Ballester, Pablo; Vidal-Ferran, Anton; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2014-03-07

    Supramolecular catalysis is a rapidly expanding discipline which has benefited from the development of both homogeneous catalysis and supramolecular chemistry. The properties of classical metal and organic catalysts can now be carefully tailored by means of several suitable approaches and the choice of reversible interactions such as hydrogen bond, metal-ligand, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The first part of these two subsequent reviews will be dedicated to catalytic systems for which non-covalent interactions between the partners of the reaction have been designed although mimicking enzyme properties has not been intended. Ligand, metal, organocatalyst, substrate, additive, and metal counterion are reaction partners that can be held together by non-covalent interactions. The resulting catalysts possess unique properties compared to analogues lacking the assembling properties. Depending on the nature of the reaction partners involved in the interactions, distinct applications have been accomplished, mainly (i) the building of bidentate ligand libraries (intra ligand-ligand), (ii) the building of di- or oligonuclear complexes (inter ligand-ligand), (iii) the alteration of the coordination spheres of a metal catalyst (ligand-ligand additive), and (iv) the control of the substrate reactivity (catalyst-substrate). More complex systems that involve the cooperative action of three reaction partners have also been disclosed. In this review, special attention will be given to supramolecular catalysts for which the observed catalytic activity and/or selectivity have been imputed to non-covalent interaction between the reaction partners. Additional features of these catalysts are the easy modulation of the catalytic performance by modifying one of their building blocks and the development of new catalytic pathways/reactions not achievable with classical covalent catalysts.

  12. Advances in oral controlled drug delivery: the role of drug-polymer and interpolymer non-covalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Simona; Bonferoni, Maria Cristina; Elviri, Lisa; Sandri, Giuseppina; Caramella, Carla; Bettini, Ruggero

    2015-03-01

    After more than four decades of intense research, oral controlled drug delivery systems (DDSs) still represent a topic of major interest for pharmaceutical scientist and formulators. This can be explained in part by considering the economic value of oral DDSs whose market accounts for more than half of the overall drug delivery market. Polymeric systems based on drug-polymer non-covalent interaction represent a limited, but growing part of the field. Despite the large amount of literature and published reviews covering specific aspects, there is still need for a review of the relevant literature providing a general picture of the topic. The present review aims at presenting the latest findings in drug-polymer and interpolymer non-covalent interactions in oral controlled delivery while providing a specific perspective and a critical point of view, particularly on the tools and methods used for the study of these DDSs. Four main sections are considered: i) ionic interactions between drugs and polymers; ii) interpolymer complexes; iii) hydrogen bond; and iv) hydrophobic interactions. The largest part of the scientific literature deals with systems based on drug-polymer ionic interactions while hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interaction though, very promising, are more difficult to exploit, and therefore less studied. An accurate and exhaustive representation of the specific role of the chemical functions in establishing predictable interactions between drug and polymers is still required.

  13. Noncovalent DNA Binding Drives DNA Alkylation by Leinamycin. Evidence That the Z,E-5-(Thiazol-4-yl)-penta-2,4-dienone Moiety of the Natural Product Serves As An Atypical DNA Intercalator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekry, Mostafa I.; Szekely, Jozsef; Dutta, Sanjay; Breydo, Leonid; Zang, Hong; Gates, Kent S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular recognition and chemical modification of DNA are important in medicinal chemistry, toxicology, and biotechnology. Historically, natural products have revealed many interesting and unexpected mechanisms for noncovalent DNA binding and covalent DNA modification. The studies reported here characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the efficient alkylation of duplex DNA by the Streptomyces-derived natural product leinamycin. Previous studies suggested that alkylation of duplex DNA by activated leinamycin (2) is driven by noncovalent association of the natural product with the double helix. This is striking because leinamycin does not contain a classical noncovalent DNA-binding motif such as an intercalating unit, a groove binder, or a polycation. The experiments described here provide evidence that leinamycin is an atypical DNA-intercalating agent. A competition binding assay involving daunomycin-mediated inhibition of DNA alkylation by leinamycin provided evidence that activated leinamycin binds to duplex DNA with an apparent binding constant of approximately 4.3 ± 0.4 × 103 M−1. Activated leinamycin caused duplex unwinding and hydrodynamic changes in DNA-containing solutions that are indicative of DNA intercalation. Characterization of the reaction of activated leinamycin with palindromic duplexes containing 5'-CG and 5'-GC target sites, bulge-containing duplexes, and 5-methylcytosine-containing duplexes provided evidence regarding the orientation of leinamycin with respect to target guanine residues. The data allows construction of a model for the leinamycin-DNA complex suggesting how a modest DNA-binding constant combines with proper positioning of the natural product to drive efficient alkylation of guanine residues in the major groove of duplex DNA. PMID:21954957

  14. Non-covalent interactions between thio-caffeine derivatives and water-soluble porphyrin in ethanol-water environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipke, Agnieszka; Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena; Sierakowska, Arleta; Jasiewicz, Beata

    2018-03-01

    To determine the binding interactions and ability to form the non-covalent systems, the association process between 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP) and a series of five structurally diverse thio-caffeine analogues has been studied in ethanol and ethanol-water solutions, analyzing its absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra. The porphyrin fluorescence lifetimes in the systems studied were established as well. During the titration with thio-caffeine compounds the slight bathochromic effect and considerable hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret band maximum can be noted. The fluorescence quenching effect observed for interactions in H2TTMePP - thio-caffeine derivative systems, as well as the order of binding and fluorescence quenching constants (of 105-103 mol- 1) suggest the existence of the mechanism of static quenching due to the formation of non-covalent and non-fluorescent stacking complexes. In all the systems studied the phenomenon of the fractional accessibility of the fluorophore for the quencher was observed as well. Additionally, the specific binding interactions, due to the changes in reaction environment polarity, can be observed. It was found that thio-caffeine compounds can quench the porphyrin fluorescence according to the structure of thio-substituent in caffeine molecule. The obtained results can be potentially useful from scientific, therapeutic or environmental points of view.

  15. Effects of non-covalent interactions with 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (chlorogenic acid) on the heat denaturation and solubility of globular proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.; Gruppen, H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Koningsveld, G.A. van; Jong, G.A.H. de; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The non-covalent interactions between the monomeric phenolic compound chlorogenic acid (5-CQA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin were characterized, and their effect on protein properties was examined. 5-CQA had a low affinity for all three proteins, and these interactions

  16. Thermal solid-state Z/E isomerization of 2-alkylidene-4-oxothiazolidines: effects of non-covalent interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZDRAVKO DŽAMBASKI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Configurational isomerization of stereo-defined 5-substituted and unsubstituted 2-alkylidene-4-oxothiazolidines (1 in the solid state, giving the Z/E mixtures in various ratios, was investigated by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, X-ray powder crystallography and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The Z/E composition can be rationalized in terms of non-covalent interactions, involving intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding and directional non-bonded 1,5-type S×××O interactions. X-Ray powder crystallography, using selected crystalline (Z-4-oxothiazolidine substrates, revealed transformation to the amorphous state during the irreversible Z®E process. A correlation between previous results on the Z/E isomerization in solution and now in the solid state was established.

  17. The BioFragment Database (BFDb): An open-data platform for computational chemistry analysis of noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lori A.; Faver, John C.; Zheng, Zheng; Marshall, Michael S.; Smith, Daniel G. A.; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Merz, Kenneth M.; Sherrill, C. David

    2017-10-01

    Accurate potential energy models are necessary for reliable atomistic simulations of chemical phenomena. In the realm of biomolecular modeling, large systems like proteins comprise very many noncovalent interactions (NCIs) that can contribute to the protein's stability and structure. This work presents two high-quality chemical databases of common fragment interactions in biomolecular systems as extracted from high-resolution Protein DataBank crystal structures: 3380 sidechain-sidechain interactions and 100 backbone-backbone interactions that inaugurate the BioFragment Database (BFDb). Absolute interaction energies are generated with a computationally tractable explicitly correlated coupled cluster with perturbative triples [CCSD(T)-F12] "silver standard" (0.05 kcal/mol average error) for NCI that demands only a fraction of the cost of the conventional "gold standard," CCSD(T) at the complete basis set limit. By sampling extensively from biological environments, BFDb spans the natural diversity of protein NCI motifs and orientations. In addition to supplying a thorough assessment for lower scaling force-field (2), semi-empirical (3), density functional (244), and wavefunction (45) methods (comprising >1M interaction energies), BFDb provides interactive tools for running and manipulating the resulting large datasets and offers a valuable resource for potential energy model development and validation.

  18. Non-Covalent Interactions and Impact of Charge Penetration Effects in Linear Oligoacene Dimers and Single Crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-05-18

    Non-covalent interactions determine in large part the thermodynamic aspects of molecular packing in organic crystals. Using a combination of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) and classical multipole electrostatics, we describe the interaction potential energy surfaces for dimers of the oligoacene family, from benzene to hexacene. An analysis of these surfaces and a thorough assessment of dimers extracted from the reported crystal structures underline that high-order interactions (i.e., three-body non-additive interactions) must be considered in order to rationalize the details of the crystal structures. A comparison of the SAPT electrostatic energy with the multipole interaction energy demonstrates the importance of the contribution of charge penetration, which is shown to account for up to 50% of the total interaction energy in dimers extracted from the experimental single crystals; in the case of the most stable co-facial model dimers, this contribution is even larger than the total interaction energy. Our results highlight the importance of taking account of charge penetration in studies of the larger oligoacenes.

  19. Using PyMOL to Explore the Effects of pH on Noncovalent Interactions between Immunoglobulin G and Protein A: A Guided-Inquiry Biochemistry Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche Allred, Zahilyn D; Tai, Heeyoung; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Page, Richard C

    2017-11-01

    Students' understandings of foundational concepts such as noncovalent interactions, pH and pK a are crucial for success in undergraduate biochemistry courses. We developed a guided-inquiry activity to aid students in making connections between noncovalent interactions and pH/pK a . Students explore these concepts by examining the primary and tertiary structures of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and Protein A. Students use PyMOL, an open source molecular visualization application, to (1) identify hydrogen bonds and salt bridges between and within the proteins at physiological pH and (2) apply their knowledge of pH/pK a to association rate constant data for these proteins at pH 4 and pH 11. The laboratory activity was implemented within a one semester biochemistry laboratory for students majoring in allied health disciplines, engineering, and biological sciences. Several extensions for more advanced students are discussed. Students' overall performance highlighted their ability to successfully complete tasks such as labeling and identifying noncovalent interactions and revealed difficulties with analyzing noncovalent interactions under varying pH/pK a conditions. Students' evaluations after completing the activity indicated they felt challenged but also recognized the potential of the activity to help them gain meaningful understanding of the connections between noncovalent interactions, pH, pK a , and protein structure. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(6):528-536, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. How do non-covalent complexes dissociate in droplets? A case study of the desolvation of dsDNA from a charged aqueous nanodrop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharawy, Mahmoud; Consta, Styliani

    2015-10-14

    We present the desolvation mechanism of a double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotide (dsDNA) from an aqueous nanodrop studied by using atomistic molecular dynamics methods. The central theme of this study is the stability of a non-covalently bound complex, in general, and that of a dsDNA in particular, in a droplet environment. Among the factors that may affect the stability of a complex in an evaporating droplet we examine the increase in ion concentration and the distinct droplet morphologies arising from the charge-induced instability. We explore in detail a large set of aqueous nanodrops with excess negative charge, which comprise a dsDNA and Na(+), Cl(-) ions at various concentrations. We find that for a square of the charge to volume ratio above that of the Rayleigh limit the droplet attains distinct "spiky" morphologies that disperse the charge in larger volume relative to that of the spherical drop. Moreover, it is found that it is possible for a non-covalent complex to remain associated in an unstable droplet as long as there is enough solvent to accommodate the instability. In the presence of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions, the Na(+) ions form adducts with the double helical DNA in the minor groove, which help stabilise the duplex state in the gas phase. The negative ions may be released from the droplet. In a DNA-containing droplet with a net charge that is less negative than 50% of the dsDNA charge, the DNA maintains a double-stranded state in the gas phase. Several of our findings are in good agreement with experiments, while the spiky droplet morphology due to the charge-induced instability calls for new experiments. The results shed light on the association properties of complexes of macromolecules in droplet environments, which are critical intermediates in electrospray ionisation experiments.

  1. Recognition of anions using urea and thiourea substituted calixarenes: A density functional theory study of non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athar, Mohd; Lone, Mohsin Y.; Jha, Prakash C.

    2018-02-01

    Designing of new calixarene receptors for the selective binding of anions is an age-old concept; even though expected outcomes from this field are at premature stage. Herein, we have performed quantum chemical calculations to provide structural basis of anion binding with urea and thiourea substituted calixarenes (1, 2, and 3). In particular, spherical halides (F-, Cl-, Br-) and linear anions (CN-, N3-, SCN-) were modelled for calculating binding energies with receptor 1, 2 and 3 followed by their marked IR vibrations; taking the available experimental information into account. We found that the thiourea substitutions have better capability to stabilize the anions. Results have suggested that the structural behaviour of macrocyclic motifs were responsible for displaying the anion binding potentials. Moreover, second order "charge transfer" interactions of n-σ∗NH and n-σ∗OH type along the H-bond axis played critical role in developing hydrogen bonds. The present work also examines the role of non-covalent interactions (NCI) and their effects on thermodynamic and chemical-reactivity descriptors.

  2. Affinity capillary electrophoresis and density functional theory study of noncovalent interactions of cyclic peptide [Gly6]-antamanide with small cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangavhane, Sachin; Böhm, Stanislav; Makrlík, Emanuel; Ruzza, Paolo; Kašička, Václav

    2017-08-01

    ACE and density functional theory were employed to study the noncovalent interactions of cyclic decapeptide glycine-6-antamanide ([Gly 6 ]AA), synthetic derivative of native antamanide (AA) peptide from the deadly poisonous fungus Amanita phalloides, with small cations (Li + , Rb + , Cs + , NH 4 + , and Ca 2+ ) in methanol. The strength of these interactions was quantified by the apparent stability constants of the appropriate complexes determined by ACE. The stability constants were calculated using the nonlinear regression analysis of the dependence of the effective electrophoretic mobility of [Gly 6 ]AA on the concentration of the above ions in the BGE (methanolic solution of 20 mM chloroacetic acid, 10 mM Tris, pH MeOH 7.8, containing 0-70 mM concentrations of the above ions added in the form of chlorides). Prior to stability constant calculation, the effective mobilities measured at actual temperature inside the capillary and at variable ionic strength of the BGEs were corrected to the values corresponding to the reference temperature of 25°C and to the constant ionic strength of 10 mM. From the above ions, Rb + and Cs + cations interacted weakly with [Gly 6 ]AA but no interactions of [Gly 6 ]AA with univalent Li + and NH 4 + ions and divalent Ca 2+ ion were observed. The apparent stability constants of [Gly 6 ]AA-Rb + and [Gly 6 ]AA-Cs + complexes were found to be equal to 13 ± 4 and 22 ± 3 L/mol, respectively. The structural characteristics of these complexes, such as position of the Rb + and Cs + ions in the cavity of the [Gly 6 ]AA molecule and the interatomic distances within these complexes, were obtained by the density functional theory calculations. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. MP2.5 and MP2.X: Approaching CCSD(T) Quality Description of Noncovalent Interaction at the Cost of a Single CCSD Iteration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, Robert; Riley, K. E.; Řezáč, Jan; Pitoňák, M.; Hobza, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2013), s. 698-707 ISSN 1439-4235 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:European Social Fund(XE) CZ1.05/2.1.00/03/0058 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : benchmark dataset * complete basis set limit * correlation energy * MOllerPlesset perturbation theory * noncovalent interactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.360, year: 2013

  4. Guanidine-phosphate non-covalent interaction in LAP crystal growth solution evidenced from spectroscopy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Zhang, G. H.; Wang, X. Q.; Zhu, L. Y.; Xu, D.

    2015-09-01

    The similar L-arginine molecule aggregation has been found in L-arginine (LA) and L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) aqueous solutions. The special fluorescence emission at 380 nm of LA aggregates in LAP solution has been found, compared with the emission of LA solution at 415 nm, which has an obvious blue shift. By comparing the fluorescence spectra of several solutions for L-arginine and L-lysine salts, the interaction between phosphate and guanidine in LAP solution was considered to be the cause of its special fluorescence emission. Meanwhile, when LAP molecule formed in solution, the fluorescence emission wavelength and the UV absorption intensity at 296 nm of L-arginine solutions have mutated. Therefore, the group interaction involved by guanidine has changed the fluorescence properties of L-arginine aggregates in LAP solution, indicating that the specific interaction between phosphate and guanidine exists in LAP molecule.

  5. Optimizing Noncovalent Interactions Between Lignin and Synthetic Polymers to Develop Effective Compatibilizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Nathan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Harper, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Center for Renewable Carbon; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Experiments are designed and completed to identify an effective polymeric compatibilizer for lignin polystyrene blends. Copolymers of styrene and vinylphenol are chosen as the structure of the compatibilizer as the VPh unit can readily form intermolecular hydrogen bonds with the lignin molecule. Electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and neutron refl ectivity results demonstrate that among these compatibilizers, a copolymer of styrene and VPh with 20% 30% VPh most readily forms intermolecular interactions with the lignin molecule and results in the most well-dispersed blends with lignin. This behavior is explained by invoking the competition of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding and functional group accessibility in forming intermolecular interactions.

  6. Benchmark Calculations of Interaction Energies in Noncovalent Complexes and Their Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Hobza, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 9 (2016), s. 5038-5071 ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * coupled cluster theory * intermolecular interaction energies Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 47.928, year: 2016

  7. Range-separated density-functional theory with random phase approximation applied to noncovalent intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wuming; Toulouse, Julien; Savin, Andreas; Angyán, János G

    2010-06-28

    Range-separated methods combining a short-range density functional with long-range random phase approximations (RPAs) with or without exchange response kernel are tested on rare-gas dimers and the S22 benchmark set of weakly interacting complexes of Jurecka et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)]. The methods are also compared to full-range RPA approaches. Both range separation and inclusion of the Hartree-Fock exchange kernel largely improve the accuracy of intermolecular interaction energies. The best results are obtained with the method called RSH+RPAx, which yields interaction energies for the S22 set with an estimated mean absolute error of about 0.5-0.6 kcal/mol, corresponding to a mean absolute percentage error of about 7%-9% depending on the reference interaction energies used. In particular, the RSH+RPAx method is found to be overall more accurate than the range-separated method based on long-range second-order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory (RSH+MP2).

  8. Quantum Mechanical Calculation of Noncovalent Interactions: A Large-Scale Evaluation of PMx, DFT, and SAPT Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations of noncovalent interactions are uniquely useful as tools to test and improve molecular mechanics force fields and to model the forces involved in biomolecular binding and folding. Because the more computationally tractable QM methods necessarily include approximations, which risk degrading accuracy, it is essential to evaluate such methods by comparison with high-level reference calculations. Here, we use the extensive Benchmark Energy and Geometry Database (BEGDB) of CCSD(T)/CBS reference results to evaluate the accuracy and speed of widely used QM methods for over 1200 chemically varied gas-phase dimers. In particular, we study the semiempirical PM6 and PM7 methods; density functional theory (DFT) approaches B3LYP, B97-D, M062X, and ωB97X-D; and symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) approach. For the PM6 and DFT methods, we also examine the effects of post hoc corrections for hydrogen bonding (PM6-DH+, PM6-DH2), halogen atoms (PM6-DH2X), and dispersion (DFT-D3 with zero and Becke–Johnson damping). Several orders of the SAPT expansion are also compared, ranging from SAPT0 up to SAPT2+3, where computationally feasible. We find that all DFT methods with dispersion corrections, as well as SAPT at orders above SAPT2, consistently provide dimer interaction energies within 1.0 kcal/mol RMSE across all systems. We also show that a linear scaling of the perturbative energy terms provided by the fast SAPT0 method yields similar high accuracy, at particularly low computational cost. The energies of all the dimer systems from the various QM approaches are included in the Supporting Information, as are the full SAPT2+(3) energy decomposition for a subset of over 1000 systems. The latter can be used to guide the parametrization of molecular mechanics force fields on a term-by-term basis. PMID:24803867

  9. Impact of processing on the noncovalent interactions between procyanidin and apple cell wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourvellec, Carine; Watrelot, Aude A; Ginies, Christian; Imberty, Anne; Renard, Catherine M G C

    2012-09-19

    Procyanidins can bind cell wall material in raw product, and it could be supposed that the same mechanism of retention of procyanidins by apple cell walls takes place in cooked products. To evaluate the influence of cell wall composition and disassembly during cooking on the cell walls' capacity to interact with procyanidins, four cell wall materials differing in their protein contents and physical characteristics were prepared: cell wall with proteins, cell wall devoid of protein, and two processed cell walls differing by their drying method. Protein contents varied from 23 to 99 mg/g and surface areas from 1.26 to 3.16 m(2)/g. Apple procyanidins with an average polymerization degree of 8.7 were used. The adsorption of apple procyanidins on solid cell wall material was quantified using the Langmuir isotherm formulation. The protein contents in cell wall material had no effect on procyanidin/cell wall interactions, whereas modification of the cell wall material by boiling, which reduces pectin content, and drying decreased the apparent affinity and increased the apparent saturation levels when constants were expressed relative to cell wall weight. However, boiling and drying increased apparent saturation levels and had no effect on apparent affinity when the same data were expressed per surface units. Isothermal titration calorimetry indicated strong affinity (K(a) = 1.4 × 10(4) M(-1)) between pectins solubilized by boiling and procyanidins. This study higllights the impact of highly methylated pectins and drying, that is, composition and structure of cell wall in the cell wall/procyanidin interactions.

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo for noncovalent interactions: an efficient protocol attaining benchmark accuracy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubecký, M.; Derian, R.; Jurečka, P.; Mitas, L.; Hobza, Pavel; Otyepka, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 38 (2014), s. 20915-20923 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/10/1742; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0058; European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0004; European Social Fund(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0058 Program:GA; ED Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : basis set limit * interaction energies * CCSD(T) Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.493, year: 2014

  11. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-01-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA 20 , poly dT 20 , poly dC 20 and the duplex poly dA 20 :dT 20 . Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their purification using strong

  12. Non-Covalent Interactions in the Crystal Structure of Methyl 4-Hydroxy-3-Nitrobenzoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Simpson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Methyl 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzoate, (I, C8H7NO5, crystallizes with two unique molecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit of the triclinic unit cell. The space group was assigned as P-1, with lattice parameters a = 0.72831(15, b = 1.0522(2, c = 1.1410(2 nm, α = 83.38(3, β = 80.83(3, γ = 82.02(3°, Z = 4, V = 0.8510(3 nm3, Mr = 197.15, Dc = 1.539 g/m3, µ= 0.131 mm−1, F(000 = 408, R = 0.1002 and wR = 0.2519. In the crystal structure, 12 hydrogen bonding and two p-stacking interactions link the molecules into infinite stacked sheets parallel to (101.

  13. Influence of Alkylammonium Acetate Buffers on Protein-Ligand Noncovalent Interactions Using Native Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xiaoyu; Gavriilidou, Agni F. M.; Zenobi, Renato

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the influence of three volatile alkylammonium acetate buffers on binding affinities for protein-ligand interactions determined by native electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Four different types of proteins were chosen for this study. A charge-reduction effect was observed for all the cases studied, in comparison to the ions formed in ammonium acetate solution. When increasing the collision energy, the complexes of trypsin and the ligand were found to be more stable when sprayed from alkylammonium acetate buffers than from ammonium acetate. The determined dissociation constant (Kd) also exhibited a drop (up to 40%) when ammonium acetate was replaced by alkylammonium acetate buffers for the case of lysozyme and the ligand. The prospective uses of these ammonium acetate analogs in native ESI-MS are discussed in this paper as well.

  14. Revised M06-L functional for improved accuracy on chemical reaction barrier heights, noncovalent interactions, and solid-state physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Jin, Xinsheng; Yu, Haoyu S; Truhlar, Donald G; He, Xiao

    2017-08-08

    We present the revM06-L functional, which we designed by optimizing against a larger database than had been used for Minnesota 2006 local functional (M06-L) and by using smoothness restraints. The optimization strategy reduced the number of parameters from 34 to 31 because we removed some large terms that increased the required size of the quadrature grid and the number of self-consistent-field iterations. The mean unsigned error (MUE) of revM06-L on 422 chemical energies is 3.07 kcal/mol, which is improved from 3.57 kcal/mol calculated by M06-L. The MUE of revM06-L for the chemical reaction barrier height database (BH76) is 1.98 kcal/mol, which is improved by more than a factor of 2 with respect to the M06-L functional. The revM06-L functional gives the best result among local functionals tested for the noncovalent interaction database (NC51), with an MUE of only 0.36 kcal/mol, and the MUE of revM06-L for the solid-state lattice constant database (LC17) is half that for M06-L. The revM06-L functional also yields smoother potential curves, and it predicts more-accurate results than M06-L for seven out of eight diversified test sets not used for parameterization. We conclude that the revM06-L functional is well suited for a broad range of applications in chemistry and condensed-matter physics.

  15. Understanding solution-state noncovalent interactions between xenobiotics and natural organic matter using 19F/1H heteronuclear saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaffe, James G; Simpson, André J

    2011-08-01

    A combination of forward and reverse heteronuclear ((19)F/(1)H) saturation transfer difference (STD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques were applied to characterize the noncovalent interactions between perfluorinated aromatic xenobiotics and dissolved humic acid. These NMR techniques produce detailed molecular-level descriptions of weak noncovalent associations between components in complex environmental mixtures, allowing the mechanisms underlying these interactions to be explored; (19)F observed heteronuclear STD (H-STD) is used to describe the average molecular orientation of the xenobiotics during their interactions with humic acid, whereas (1)H observed reverse-heteronuclear STD (RH-STD) is used to both identify and quantify preferences exhibited by xenobiotics for interactions at different types of humic acid moieties. First, by using H-STD, it is shown that selected aromatic organofluorides orient with their nonfluorine functional groups (OH, NH(2), and COOH) directed away from humic acid during the interactions, suggesting that these functional groups are not specifically involved. Second, the RH-STD experiment is shown to be sensitive to subtle differences in preferred interaction sites in humic acid and is used here to demonstrate preferential interactions at aromatic humic acid sites for selected aromatic xenobiotics, C(10)F(7)OH, and C(6)F(4)X(2), (where X = F, OH, NH(2), NO(2), or COOH), that can be predicted from the electrostatic potential density maps of the xenobiotic. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  16. Role of charge transfer interaction and the chemical physics behind effective fulleropyrrolidine/porphyrin non-covalent interaction in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Ashis; Santhosh, Kotni; Bauri, Ajoy; Bhattacharya, Sumanta

    2014-01-01

    The present paper reports the photophysical insights on supramolecular interaction of a monoporphyrin derivative, namely, 1, with C60 pyrrolidine tris-acid ethyl ester (PyC60) in toluene and benzonitrile. The ground state interaction between PyC60 and 1 is facilitated through charge transfer interaction. Both UV-Vis and steady state measurements elicit almost similar magnitude of binding constant for the PyC60/1 complex in toluene and benzonitrile, viz., 6825 and 6540 dm(3 )mol(-1), respectively. Life time measurement evokes that rate of charge separation is fast in benzonitrile. Both hybrid-DFT and DFT calculations provide very good support in favor of electronic charge-separation in PyC60/1 system in vacuo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulating DNA Self-assembly by DNA-Surface Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longfei; Li, Yulin; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Jianwei; Mao, Chengde

    2017-12-14

    DNA self-assembly provides a powerful approach for preparation of nanostructures. It is often studied in bulk solution and involves only DNA-DNA interactions. When confined to surfaces, DNA-surface interactions become an additional, important factor to DNA self-assembly. However, the way in which DNA-surface interactions influence DNA self-assembly is not well studied. In this study, we showed that weak DNA-DNA interactions could be stabilized by DNA-surface interactions to allow large DNA nanostructures to form. In addition, the assembly can be conducted isothermally at room temperature in as little as 5 seconds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Nature of noncovalent interactions in catenane supramolecular complexes: calibrating the MM3 force field with ab initio, DFT, and SAPT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Tomekia M; Ratner, Mark A; Schatz, George C

    2013-08-22

    The design and assembly of mechanically interlocked molecules, such as catenanes and rotaxanes, are dictated by various types of noncovalent interactions. In particular, [C-H···O] hydrogen-bonding and π-π stacking interactions in these supramolecular complexes have been identified as important noncovalent interactions. With this in mind, we examined the [3]catenane 2·4PF6 using molecular mechanics (MM3), ab initio methods (HF, MP2), several versions of density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP, M0X), and the dispersion-corrected method DFT-D3. Symmetry adapted perturbation theory (DFT-SAPT) provides the highest level of theory considered, and we use the DFT-SAPT results both to calibrate the other electronic structure methods, and the empirical potential MM3 force field that is often used to describe larger catenane and rotaxane structures where [C-H···O] hydrogen-bonding and π-π stacking interactions play a role. Our results indicate that the MM3 calculated complexation energies agree qualitatively with the energetic ordering from DFT-SAPT calculations with an aug-cc-pVTZ basis, both for structures dominated by [C-H···O] hydrogen-bonding and π-π stacking interactions. When the DFT-SAPT energies are decomposed into components, we find that electrostatic interactions dominate the [C-H···O] hydrogen-bonding interactions, while dispersion makes a significant contribution to π-π stacking. Another important conclusion is that DFT-D3 based on M06 or M06-2X provides interaction energies that are in near-quantitative agreement with DFT-SAPT. DFT results without the D3 correction have important differences compared to DFT-SAPT, while HF and even MP2 results are in poor agreement with DFT-SAPT.

  19. The Nature of Noncovalent Interactions in Catenane Supramolecular Complexes: Calibrating the MM3 Force Field with ab initio, DFT and SAPT Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Tomekia M.; Ratner, Mark A.; Schatz, George C.

    2013-01-01

    The design and assembly of mechanically interlocked molecules, such as catenanes and rotaxanes, are dictated by various types of noncovalent interactions. In particular, [C-H⋯O] hydrogen-bonding and π-π stacking interactions in these supramolecular complexes have been identified as important noncovalent interactions. With this in mind, we examined the [3] catenane 2·4PF6 using molecular mechanics (MM3), ab initio methods (HF, MP2), several versions of density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP, M0X), and the dispersion-corrected method DFT-D3. Symmetry adapted perturbation theory (DFT-SAPT) provides the highest level of theory considered, and we use the DFT-SAPT results both to calibrate the other electronic structure methods, and the empirical potential MM3 force field that is often used to describe larger catenane and rotaxane structures where [C-H⋯O] hydrogen-bonding and π-π stacking interactions play a role. Our results indicate that the MM3 calculated complexation energies agree qualitatively with the energetic ordering from DFT-SAPT calculations with an aug-cc-pVTZ basis, both for structures dominated by [C-H⋯O] hydrogen-bonding and π-π stacking interactions. When the DFT-SAPT energies are decomposed into components, and we find that electrostatic interactions dominate the [C-H⋯O] hydrogen-bonding interactions while dispersion makes a significant contribution to π-π stacking. Another important conclusion is that DFT-D3 based on M06 or M06-2X provides interactions energies that are in near-quantitative agreement with DFT-SAPT. DFT results without the D3 correct have important differences compared to DFT-SAPT while HF and even MP2 results are in poor agreement with DFT-SAPT. PMID:23941280

  20. Computational Mechanistic Study of Redox-Neutral Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Activation Reactions of Arylnitrones with Alkynes: Role of Noncovalent Interactions in Controlling Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yang-Yang; Liu, Jian-Biao; Tian, Ying-Ying; Sun, Chuan-Zhi; Huang, Fang; Chen, De-Zhan

    2016-11-23

    The mechanism of redox-neutral Rh(III)-catalyzed coupling reactions of arylnitrones with alkynes was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The free energy profiles associated with the catalytic cycle, involving C(sp 2 )-H activation, insertion of alkyne, transfer of O atom, cyclization and protodemetalation, are presented and analyzed. An overwhelming preference for alkyne insertion into Rh-C over Rh-O is observed among all pathways, and the most favorable route is determined. The pivalate-assisted C-H activation step is turnover-limiting, and the cyclization step determines the diastereoselectivity of the reaction, with the stereoselectivity arising mainly from the difference of noncovalent interactions in key transition states. The detailed mechanism of O atom transfer, Rh III -Rh I -Rh III versus Rh III -Rh V -Rh III cycle, is discussed.

  1. Dispersion-Corrected Spin-Component-Scaled Double-Hybrid Density Functional Theory: Implementation and Performance for Non-covalent Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, Loïc M; Baldridge, Kim K

    2017-06-13

    The implementation of 300 combinations of generalized gradient approximation/local density approximation exchange-correlation dispersion-corrected spin-component-scaled double-hybrid (DSD) density functional theory (DFT) methods has been carried out and the performance assessed against several DFT and post-Hartree-Fock methods, enabling further advancements toward the long-standing challenge of accurate prediction of interaction energies and associated properties. The resulting framework is flexible and has been further extended to include the resolution of identity (RI) approximation for solving the critical four-center two-electron repulsion integrals in the basis of the Kohn-Sham orbitals for cost effectiveness. To evaluate the performance of this set of new cost-effective methods, denoted as RI-DSD-DFTs, seven validation data sets were designed to cover a broad range of non-covalent interactions with characteristic stabilizing contributions. Inclusion of the perturbative treatment of correlation effects is shown to significantly improve the description of weak interactions. The set of DSD-DFTs provide interaction energies with root-mean-square deviations and mean absolute errors within 0.5 kcal/mol. The cost-effective RI-DSD-DFT counterparts deviate by less than 0.18 kcal/mol on average with only 2% of the computational cost.

  2. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments; Interacao de nanotubos de carbono com segmentos de DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-07-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA{sub 20}, poly dT{sub 20}, poly dC{sub 20} and the duplex poly dA{sub 20}:dT{sub 20}. Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their

  3. Investigation of Non-Covalent Interactions of Aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1, G2, and M1 with Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Poór

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are widely spread mycotoxins produced mainly by Aspergillus species. Consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated foods and drinks causes serious health risks for people worldwide. It is well-known that the reactive epoxide metabolite of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 forms covalent adducts with serum albumin. However, non-covalent interactions of aflatoxins with human serum albumin (HSA are poorly characterized. Thus, in this study the complex formation of aflatoxins was examined with HSA applying spectroscopic and molecular modelling studies. Our results demonstrate that aflatoxins form stable complexes with HSA as reflected by binding constants between 2.1 × 104 and 4.5 × 104 dm3/mol. A binding free energy value of −26.90 kJ mol−1 suggests a spontaneous binding process between AFB1 and HSA at room-temperature, while the positive entropy change of 55.1 JK−1 mol−1 indicates a partial decomposition of the solvation shells of the interacting molecules. Modeling studies and investigations with site markers suggest that Sudlow’s Site I of subdomain IIA is the high affinity binding site of aflatoxins on HSA. Interaction of AFB1 with bovine, porcine, and rat serum albumins was also investigated. Similar stabilities of the examined AFB1-albumin complexes were observed suggesting the low species differences of the albumin-binding of aflatoxins.

  4. Non-Covalent Interactions in Hydrogen Storage Materials LiN(CH32BH3 and KN(CH32BH3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Sagan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, an in-depth, qualitative and quantitative description of non-covalent interactions in the hydrogen storage materials LiN(CH32BH3 and KN(CH32BH3 was performed by means of the charge and energy decomposition method (ETS-NOCV as well as the Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA approach. It was determined that both crystals are stabilized by electrostatically dominated intra- and intermolecular M∙∙∙H–B interactions (M = Li, K. For LiN(CH32BH3 the intramolecular charge transfer appeared (B–H→Li to be more pronounced compared with the corresponding intermolecular contribution. We clarified for the first time, based on the ETS-NOCV and IQA methods, that homopolar BH∙∙∙HB interactions in LiN(CH32BH3 can be considered as destabilizing (due to the dominance of repulsion caused by negatively charged borane units, despite the fact that some charge delocalization within BH∙∙∙HB contacts is enforced (which explains H∙∙∙H bond critical points found from the QTAIM method. Interestingly, quite similar (to BH∙∙∙HB intermolecular homopolar dihydrogen bonds CH∙∙∙HC appared to significantly stabilize both crystals—the ETS-NOCV scheme allowed us to conclude that CH∙∙∙HC interactions are dispersion dominated, however, the electrostatic and σ/σ*(C–H charge transfer contributions are also important. These interactions appeared to be more pronounced in KN(CH32BH3 compared with LiN(CH32BH3.

  5. A look at the density functional theory zoo with the advanced GMTKN55 database for general main group thermochemistry, kinetics and noncovalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerigk, Lars; Hansen, Andreas; Bauer, Christoph; Ehrlich, Stephan; Najibi, Asim; Grimme, Stefan

    2017-12-13

    We present the GMTKN55 benchmark database for general main group thermochemistry, kinetics and noncovalent interactions. Compared to its popular predecessor GMTKN30 [Goerigk and Grimme J. Chem. Theory Comput., 2011, 7, 291], it allows assessment across a larger variety of chemical problems-with 13 new benchmark sets being presented for the first time-and it also provides reference values of significantly higher quality for most sets. GMTKN55 comprises 1505 relative energies based on 2462 single-point calculations and it is accessible to the user community via a dedicated website. Herein, we demonstrate the importance of better reference values, and we re-emphasise the need for London-dispersion corrections in density functional theory (DFT) treatments of thermochemical problems, including Minnesota methods. We assessed 217 variations of dispersion-corrected and -uncorrected density functional approximations, and carried out a detailed analysis of 83 of them to identify robust and reliable approaches. Double-hybrid functionals are the most reliable approaches for thermochemistry and noncovalent interactions, and they should be used whenever technically feasible. These are, in particular, DSD-BLYP-D3(BJ), DSD-PBEP86-D3(BJ), and B2GPPLYP-D3(BJ). The best hybrids are ωB97X-V, M052X-D3(0), and ωB97X-D3, but we also recommend PW6B95-D3(BJ) as the best conventional global hybrid. At the meta-generalised-gradient (meta-GGA) level, the SCAN-D3(BJ) method can be recommended. Other meta-GGAs are outperformed by the GGA functionals revPBE-D3(BJ), B97-D3(BJ), and OLYP-D3(BJ). We note that many popular methods, such as B3LYP, are not part of our recommendations. In fact, with our results we hope to inspire a change in the user community's perception of common DFT methods. We also encourage method developers to use GMTKN55 for cross-validation studies of new methodologies.

  6. In Vitro Interactions between 17β-Estradiol and DNA Result in Formation of the Hormone-DNA Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbynek Heger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Beyond the role of 17β-estradiol (E2 in reproduction and during the menstrual cycle, it has been shown to modulate numerous physiological processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation and ion transport in many tissues. The pathways in which estrogens affect an organism have been partially described, although many questions still exist regarding estrogens’ interaction with biomacromolecules. Hence, the present study showed the interaction of four oligonucleotides (17, 20, 24 and/or 38-mer with E2. The strength of these interactions was evaluated using optical methods, showing that the interaction is influenced by three major factors, namely: oligonucleotide length, E2 concentration and interaction time. In addition, the denaturation phenomenon of DNA revealed that the binding of E2 leads to destabilization of hydrogen bonds between the nitrogenous bases of DNA strands resulting in a decrease of their melting temperatures (Tm. To obtain a more detailed insight into these interactions, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was employed. This study revealed that E2 with DNA forms non-covalent physical complexes, observed as the mass shifts for app. 270 Da (Mr of E2 to higher molecular masses. Taken together, our results indicate that E2 can affect biomacromolecules, as circulating oligonucleotides, which can trigger mutations, leading to various unwanted effects.

  7. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2005-01-01

    Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA...... denaturation (bubble breathing), deriving its dynamic response to external physical parameters and the DNA sequence in terms of the bubble relaxation time spectrum and the autocorrelation function of bubble breathing. The interaction with binding proteins that selectively bind to the DNA single strand exposed...

  8. Synthesis and structure of 1,3-dimethyl-5-(p-sulfonamide-phenylazo)-6-aminouracil and its Ni(II) complex: Topological insights and investigation for noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Diptanu; Roy, Subhadip; Purkayastha, Atanu; Bauzá, Antonio; Choudhury, Rupasree; Ganguly, Rakesh; Frontera, Antonio; Misra, Tarun Kumar

    2017-08-01

    The azo-derivative, 1,3-dimethyl-5-(p-sulfonamide-phenylazo)-6-aminouracil (HL) containing 6-aminouracil (a biomolecule) and sulfonamide functionality (commonly found in sulfa-drugs), and its Ni(II) complex, NiIIL2 were synthesized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show that the ligand (HL) consists of an E conformation about the azo-linkage with a nearly planar geometry and the complex possesses distorted square planar geometry. The H-bonded underlying networks of HL and NiIIL2 were topologically classified revealing distinct topological types, namely tts and hxl, respectively. Moreover, topology of molecular packings in HL and NiIIL2 has also been discussed. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, at the M06-2X/def2TZVP level of theory, are employed to characterize a great variety of non-covalent interactions that explicitly show the importance of antiparallel stacking interactions established by π--π+ interactions and H-bonds in the self-assembled dimmers in HL and lp-π/C-H⋯π interactions in NiIIL2. The results of NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies evidence that the ligand exists in hydrazone-imine-keto (B) tautomeric form in solution. The ligand absorption bands consist of the overlapping bands of π→π* and n→π* transitions. The complex experiences electronic transitions that consist of basically ILCT in character with some sort of participation of the atomic d-orbitals of the nickel. The pKa value of the ligand is found to be 4.09.

  9. Solid-State [2+2] Photodimerization and Photopolymerization of α,ω-Diarylpolyene Monomers: Effective Utilization of Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoriko Sonoda

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available [2+2] Photocycloaddition of olefins is a very useful reaction in synthetic organic chemistry to obtain cyclobutane-containing molecules, which are almost inaccessible by other methods. The reaction, when performed in the crystalline state, occurs more efficiently and selectively than in homogeneous solution due to tight and regular molecular arrangement in the crystal state. Despite numerous examples for the solid-state [2+2] photodimerization of monoenes, however, it is still a challenge to prepare not only dimers but also higher oligomers and polymers from conjugated polyenes, which have multiple reactive double bonds in a molecule. In our recent studies of the solid-state photoreactions of α,ω-diarylpolyenes, noncovalent intermolecular interactions in crystals were effectively utilized to prealign molecules in stacking arrangements, suitable for the [2+2] reaction. With appropriate ring-substituents, [2+2] photodimerization and photopolymerization of the polyenes took place, although the degree of polymerization was relatively low. This review will describe the details of these reactions.

  10. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2005-01-01

    denaturation (bubble breathing), deriving its dynamic response to external physical parameters and the DNA sequence in terms of the bubble relaxation time spectrum and the autocorrelation function of bubble breathing. The interaction with binding proteins that selectively bind to the DNA single strand exposed......Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA...... in a denaturation bubble are shown to involve an interesting competition of time scales, varying between kinetic blocking of protein binding up to full binding protein-induced denaturation of the DNA. We will also address the potential to use DNA physics for the design of nanosensors. Finally, we report recent...

  11. Off-Center Gaussian Functions, an Alternative Atomic Orbital Basis Set for Accurate Noncovalent Interaction Calculations of Large Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melicherčík, M.; Pitoňák, M.; Kellö, V.; Hobza, Pavel; Neogrády, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 12 (2013), s. 5296-5304 ISSN 1549-9618 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : interaction energies * dimer * complexes * electron Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  12. Controlling noncovalent interactions between a lysine-rich α-helical peptide and self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on Au through functional group diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raigoza, Annette F.; Onyirioha, Kristeen; Webb, Lauren J.

    2017-02-01

    Reliably attaching a structured biomolecule to an inorganic substrate would enable the preparation of surfaces that incorporate both biological and inorganic functions and structures. To this end, we have previously developed a procedure using the copper(I)-catalyzed click reaction to tether synthetic α-helical peptides carrying two alkyne groups to well-ordered alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on a Au(111) surface, in which the SAM is composed of a mixture of methyl and azide termination. Proteins, however, are composed of many diverse functional groups, and this composition directly effects protein structure, interactions, and reactivity. Here, we explore the utility of mixed SAMs with alternative terminating functional groups to tune and direct the reactivity of the surface through noncovalent peptide-surface interactions. We study both polar surfaces (OH-terminated) and charged surfaces (COOH- and NH3-terminated, which are negatively and positively charged, respectively, under our reaction conditions). Surfaces were functionalized with a bipolar peptide composed of Lys and Leu residues that could express different interactions through either hydrophilic and/or charge (Lys) or hydrophobic (Leu) influences. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize surfaces at all stages of the peptide functionalization procedure. This strategy resulted in a high density of surface-bound α-helices without aggregation. Mixed SAMs that included a positively charged alkanethiol along with the azide-terminated thiol resulted in a more efficient reaction and better alignment of the peptide with the azide on the surface. Negatively charged surfaces increased physisorption of the peptide, which was then removed during sample rinsing. This work demonstrates that varying easily controlled chemical inputs during the functionalization steps allows the reaction conditions to be balanced for the chemical needs of a

  13. Accurate Open-Shell Noncovalent Interaction Energies from the Orbital-Optimized Møller-Plesset Perturbation Theory: Achieving CCSD Quality at the MP2 Level by Orbital Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soydaş, Emine; Bozkaya, Uğur

    2013-11-12

    The accurate description of noncovalent interactions is one of the most challenging problems in modern computational chemistry, especially those for open-shell systems. In this study, an investigation of open-shell noncovalent interactions with the orbital-optimized MP2 and MP3 (OMP2 and OMP3) is presented. For the considered test set of 23 complexes, mean absolute errors in noncovalent interaction energies (with respect to CCSD(T) at complete basis set limits) are 0.68 (MP2), 0.37 (OMP2), 0.59 (MP3), 0.23 (OMP3), and 0.38 (CCSD) kcal mol(-1) . Hence, with a greatly reduced computational cost, one may achieve CCSD quality at the MP2 level by orbital optimization [scaling formally as O(N(6)) for CCSD compared to O(N(5)) for OMP2, where N is the number of basis functions]. Further, one may obtain a considerably better performance than CCSD using the OMP3 method, which has also a lower cost than CCSD.

  14. Stabilization and Structure Calculations for Noncovalent Interactions in Extended Molecular Systems Based on Wave Function and Density Functional Theories

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riley, K. E.; Pitoňák, Michal; Jurečka, P.; Hobza, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 9 (2010), s. 5023-5063 ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : non covalent interactions * wave function theories * DFT Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 33.033, year: 2010

  15. On the performance of the semiempirical quantum mechanical PM6 and PM7 methods for noncovalent interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hostaš, Jiří; Řezáč, Jan; Hobza, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 568, May 1 (2013), s. 161-166 ISSN 0009-2614 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:Operational Program Research and Development for Innovations(XE) CZ1.05/2.1.00/03/0058 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : basis-set limit * interaction energies * wave-function * NDDO approximations * benchmark database Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.991, year: 2013

  16. Hirshfeld surface analyses and crystal structures of supramolecular self-assembly thiourea derivatives directed by non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Ilkay; Solmaz, Ummuhan; Binzet, Gun; Keskin, Ebru; Arslan, Birdal; Arslan, Hakan

    2018-04-01

    The novel N-(bis(3,5-dimethoxybenzyl)carbamothioyl)-4-R-benzamide (R: H, Cl, CH3 and OCH3) compounds have been synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Their crystal structures were also determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Hirshfeld surfaces analysis and their associated two dimensional fingerprint plots of compounds were used as theoretical approach to assess driving force for crystal structure formation via the intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattices of synthesized compounds. The study of X-ray single crystal diffraction and Hirshfeld surfaces analysis of the prepared compounds shows that hydrogen bonding and other weaker interactions such as Nsbnd H⋯S, weak Csbnd H⋯S, Csbnd H⋯O, Csbnd H⋯N and Csbnd H···π intermolecular interactions and π-π stacking, among molecules of synthesized compounds participate in a cooperative way to stabilize the supramolecular structures.

  17. Assessment of the Performance of MP2 and MP2 Variants for the Treatment of Noncovalent Interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riley, Kevin Eugene; Platts, J. A.; Řezáč, Jan; Hobza, Pavel; Hill, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 116, č. 16 (2012), s. 4159-4169 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:European Social Fund(XE) CZ1.05/2.1.00/03/0058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : plesset perturbation-theory * density-functional-theory * intermolecular interaction energies * molecular-orbital methods * auxiliary basis-sets * ab-initio Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.771, year: 2012

  18. A machine learning correction for DFT non-covalent interactions based on the S22, S66 and X40 benchmark databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ting; Li, Hongzhi; Li, Wenze; Li, Lin; Fang, Chao; Li, Hui; Hu, LiHong; Lu, Yinghua; Su, Zhong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Non-covalent interactions (NCIs) play critical roles in supramolecular chemistries; however, they are difficult to measure. Currently, reliable computational methods are being pursued to meet this challenge, but the accuracy of calculations based on low levels of theory is not satisfactory and calculations based on high levels of theory are often too costly. Accordingly, to reduce the cost and increase the accuracy of low-level theoretical calculations to describe NCIs, an efficient approach is proposed to correct NCI calculations based on the benchmark databases S22, S66 and X40 (Hobza in Acc Chem Rev 45: 663-672, 2012; Řezáč et al. in J Chem Theory Comput 8:4285, 2012). A novel type of NCI correction is presented for density functional theory (DFT) methods. In this approach, the general regression neural network machine learning method is used to perform the correction for DFT methods on the basis of DFT calculations. Various DFT methods, including M06-2X, B3LYP, B3LYP-D3, PBE, PBE-D3 and ωB97XD, with two small basis sets (i.e., 6-31G* and 6-31+G*) were investigated. Moreover, the conductor-like polarizable continuum model with two types of solvents (i.e., water and pentylamine, which mimics a protein environment with ε = 4.2) were considered in the DFT calculations. With the correction, the root mean square errors of all DFT calculations were improved by at least 70 %. Relative to CCSD(T)/CBS benchmark values (used as experimental NCI values because of its high accuracy), the mean absolute error of the best result was 0.33 kcal/mol, which is comparable to high-level ab initio methods or DFT methods with fairly large basis sets. Notably, this level of accuracy is achieved within a fraction of the time required by other methods. For all of the correction models based on various DFT approaches, the validation parameters according to OECD principles (i.e., the correlation coefficient R (2), the predictive squared correlation coefficient q (2) and [Formula

  19. Controlling noncovalent interactions between a lysine-rich α-helical peptide and self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on Au through functional group diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raigoza, Annette F.; Onyirioha, Kristeen; Webb, Lauren J., E-mail: lwebb@cm.utexas.edu

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Functional variety in SAMs control covalent binding of proteins to surfaces. • Peptide density on Au(111) surfaces controlled by SAM functional groups. • Affinity between biomolecule and SAM surface follows a Langmuir isotherm. • Surface chemistry can mimic functional group diversity in proteins and peptides. - Abstract: Reliably attaching a structured biomolecule to an inorganic substrate would enable the preparation of surfaces that incorporate both biological and inorganic functions and structures. To this end, we have previously developed a procedure using the copper(I)-catalyzed click reaction to tether synthetic α-helical peptides carrying two alkyne groups to well-ordered alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on a Au(111) surface, in which the SAM is composed of a mixture of methyl and azide termination. Proteins, however, are composed of many diverse functional groups, and this composition directly effects protein structure, interactions, and reactivity. Here, we explore the utility of mixed SAMs with alternative terminating functional groups to tune and direct the reactivity of the surface through noncovalent peptide-surface interactions. We study both polar surfaces (OH-terminated) and charged surfaces (COOH- and NH{sub 3}-terminated, which are negatively and positively charged, respectively, under our reaction conditions). Surfaces were functionalized with a bipolar peptide composed of Lys and Leu residues that could express different interactions through either hydrophilic and/or charge (Lys) or hydrophobic (Leu) influences. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize surfaces at all stages of the peptide functionalization procedure. This strategy resulted in a high density of surface-bound α-helices without aggregation. Mixed SAMs that included a positively charged alkanethiol along with the azide-terminated thiol resulted in a more efficient reaction and better

  20. DNA-DNA interaction beyond the ground state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D J; Wynveen, A; Kornyshev, A A

    2004-11-01

    The electrostatic interaction potential between DNA duplexes in solution is a basis for the statistical mechanics of columnar DNA assemblies. It may also play an important role in recombination of homologous genes. We develop a theory of this interaction that includes thermal torsional fluctuations of DNA using field-theoretical methods and Monte Carlo simulations. The theory extends and rationalizes the earlier suggested variational approach which was developed in the context of a ground state theory of interaction of nonhomologous duplexes. It shows that the heuristic variational theory is equivalent to the Hartree self-consistent field approximation. By comparison of the Hartree approximation with an exact solution based on the QM analogy of path integrals, as well as Monte Carlo simulations, we show that this easily analytically-tractable approximation works very well in most cases. Thermal fluctuations do not remove the ability of DNA molecules to attract each other at favorable azimuthal conformations, neither do they wash out the possibility of electrostatic "snap-shot" recognition of homologous sequences, considered earlier on the basis of ground state calculations. At short distances DNA molecules undergo a "torsional alignment transition," which is first order for nonhomologous DNA and weaker order for homologous sequences.

  1. Electrophilic-Nucleophilic Dualism of Nickel(II) toward Ni···I Noncovalent Interactions: Semicoordination of Iodine Centers via Electron Belt and Halogen Bonding via σ-Hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikbaeva, Zarina M; Ivanov, Daniil M; Novikov, Alexander S; Ananyev, Ivan V; Bokach, Nadezhda A; Kukushkin, Vadim Yu

    2017-11-06

    The nitrosoguanidinate complex [Ni{NH═C(NMe 2 )NN(O)} 2 ] (1) was cocrystallized with I 2 and sym-trifluorotriiodobenzene (FIB) to give associates 1·2I 2 and 1·2FIB. Structures of these solid species were studied by XRD followed by topological analysis of the electron density distribution within the framework of Bader's approach (QTAIM) at the M06/DZP-DKH level of theory and Hirshfeld surface analysis. Our results along with inspection of XRD (CCDC) data, accompanied by the theoretical calculations, allowed the identification of three types of Ni···I contacts. The Ni···I semicoordination of the electrophilic nickel(II) center with electron belt of I 2 was observed in 1·2I 2 , the metal-involving halogen bonding between the nucleophilic nickel(II)-d z 2 center and σ-hole of iodine center was recognized and confirmed theoretically in the structure of [FeNi(CN) 4 (IPz)(H 2 O)] n (IPz = 4-N-coordinated 2-I-pyrazine), whereas the arrangement of FIB in 1·2FIB provides a boundary case between the semicoordination and the halogen Ni···I bondings. In 1·2I 2 and 1·2FIB, noncovalent interactions were studied by variable temperature XRD detecting the expansion of noncovalent contacts with preservation of covalent bond lengths upon the temperature increase from 100 to 300 K. The nature and energies of all identified types of the Ni···I noncovalent interactions in the obtained (1·2I 2 and 1·2FIB) and in the previously reported ([FeNi(CN) 4 (IPz)(H 2 O)] n , [NiL 2 ](I 3 ) 2 ·2I 2 (L = o-phenylene-bis(dimethylphosphine), [NiL]I 2 (L = 1,4,8,11-tetra-azacyclotetradecane), Ni(en) 2 ] n [AgI 2 ] 2n (en = ethylenediamine), and [NiL](ClO 4 ) (L = 4-iodo-2-((2-(2-(2-pyridyl)ethylsulfanyl)ethylimino)methyl)-phenolate)) structures were studied theoretically. The estimated strengths of these Ni···I noncovalent contacts vary from 1.6 to 4.1 kcal/mol and, as expected, become weaker on heating. This work is the first emphasizing electrophilic-nucleophilic dualism

  2. DNA Interaction Studies of Selected Polyamine Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szumilak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of polyamine conjugates with DNA double helix has been studied. Binding properties were examined by ethidium bromide (EtBr displacement and DNA unwinding/topoisomerase I/II (Topo I/II activity assays, as well as dsDNA thermal stability studies and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Genotoxicity of the compounds was estimated by a comet assay. It has been shown that only compound 2a can interact with dsDNA via an intercalative binding mode as it displaced EtBr from the dsDNA-dye complex, with Kapp = 4.26 × 106 M−1; caused an increase in melting temperature; changed the circular dichroism spectrum of dsDNA; converted relaxed plasmid DNA into a supercoiled molecule in the presence of Topo I and reduced the amount of short oligonucleotide fragments in the comet tail. Furthermore, preliminary theoretical study has shown that interaction of the discussed compounds with dsDNA depends on molecule linker length and charge distribution over terminal aromatic chromophores.

  3. Interaction of Iron II Complexes with B-DNA. Insights from Molecular Modeling, Spectroscopy and Cellular Biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo eGattuso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the characterization of the interaction between B-DNA and three terpyridin iron II complexes. Relatively long time-scale molecular dynamics is used in order to characterize the stable interaction modes. By means of molecular modeling and UV-vis spectroscopy, we prove that they may lead to stable interactions with the DNA duplex. Furthermore, the presence of larger π-conjugated moieties also leads to the appearance of intercalation binding mode. Non-covalent stabilizing interactions between the iron complexes and the DNA are also characterized and evidenced by the analysis of the gradient of the electronic density. Finally, the structural deformations induced on the DNA in the different binding modes are also evidenced. The synthesis and chemical characterization of the three complexes is reported, as well as their absorption spectra in presence of DNA duplexes to prove the interaction with DNA. Finally, their effects on human cell cultures have also been evidenced to further enlighten their biological effects.

  4. Interaction of Sulforaphane with DNA and RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassi Joozdani, Farzaneh; Yari, Faramarz; Abassi Joozdani, Parvaneh; Nafisi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. However, the antioxidant and anticancer mechanism of sulforaphane is not well understood. In the present research, we reported binding modes, binding constants and stability of SFN–DNA and -RNA complexes by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and UV–Visible spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed DNA intercalation with some degree of groove binding. SFN binds minor and major grooves of DNA and backbone phosphate (PO2), while RNA binding is through G, U, A bases with some degree of SFN–phosphate (PO2) interaction. Overall binding constants were estimated to be K(SFN–DNA)=3.01 (± 0.035)×104 M-1 and K(SFN–RNA)= 6.63 (±0.042)×103 M-1. At high SFN concentration (SFN/RNA = 1/1), DNA conformation changed from B to A occurred, while RNA remained in A-family structure. PMID:26030290

  5. Interaction of sulforaphane with DNA and RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Abassi Joozdani

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. However, the antioxidant and anticancer mechanism of sulforaphane is not well understood. In the present research, we reported binding modes, binding constants and stability of SFN-DNA and -RNA complexes by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and UV-Visible spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed DNA intercalation with some degree of groove binding. SFN binds minor and major grooves of DNA and backbone phosphate (PO2, while RNA binding is through G, U, A bases with some degree of SFN-phosphate (PO2 interaction. Overall binding constants were estimated to be K(SFN-DNA=3.01 (± 0.035×10(4 M(-1 and K(SFN-RNA= 6.63 (±0.042×10(3 M(-1. At high SFN concentration (SFN/RNA = 1/1, DNA conformation changed from B to A occurred, while RNA remained in A-family structure.

  6. HMGB proteins: Interactions with DNA and chromatin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štros, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1799, 1-2 (2010), s. 101-113 ISSN 1874-9399 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/08/1530; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : HMG-box * DNA-protein interaction * chromatin Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.000, year: 2010

  7. Contribution of phenylalanine side chain intercalation to the TATA-box binding protein-DNA interaction: molecular dynamics and dispersion-corrected density functional theory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Manas; Mukherjee, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2014-11-01

    Deformation of DNA takes place quite often due to binding of small molecules or proteins with DNA. Such deformation is significant due to minor groove binding and, besides electrostatic interactions, other non-covalent interactions may also play an important role in generating such deformation. TATA-box binding protein (TBP) binds to the minor groove of DNA at the TATA box sequence, producing a large-scale deformation in DNA and initiating transcription. In order to observe the interactions of protein residues with DNA in the minor groove that produce the deformation in the DNA structure, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the TBP-DNA system. The results reveal consistent partial intercalation of two Phe residues, distorting stacking interactions at two dinucleotide step sites. We carried out calculations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory to understand the source of such stabilization. We observed favorable interaction energies between the Phe residues and the base pairs with which they interact. We suggest that salt-bridge interactions between the phosphate groups and Lys or Arg residues, along with the intercalation of Phe residues between two base pair stacks, stabilize the kinked and opened-up DNA conformation.

  8. Particle Interactions in DNA-laden Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bybee, M D; Miller, G H; Trebotich, D

    2005-01-01

    Microfluidic devices are becoming state-of-the-art in many significant applications including pathogen detection, continuous monitoring, and drug delivery. Numerical algorithms which can simulate flows of complex fluids within these devices are needed for their development and optimization. A method is being developed at LLNL by Trebotich et. al. [30] for simulations of DNA-laden flows in complex microscale geometries such as packed bed reactors and pillar chips. In this method an incompressible Newtonian fluid is discretized with Cartesian grid embedded boundary methods, and the DNA is represented by a bead-rod polymer model. The fluid and polymer are coupled through a body force. In its current state, polymer-surface interactions are treated as elastic collisions between beads and surface, and polymer-polymer interactions are neglected. Implementation of polymer-polymer interactions is the main objective of this work. It is achieved by two methods: (1) a rigid constraint whereby rods elastically bounce off one another, and (2) a smooth potential acting between rods. In addition, a smooth potential is also implemented for the polymer-surface interactions. Background information will also be presented as well as related work by other researchers

  9. Making the Bend: DNA Tertiary Structure and Protein-DNA Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Sabrina Harteis; Sabine Schneider

    2014-01-01

    DNA structure functions as an overlapping code to the DNA sequence. Rapid progress in understanding the role of DNA structure in gene regulation, DNA damage recognition and genome stability has been made. The three dimensional structure of both proteins and DNA plays a crucial role for their specific interaction, and proteins can recognise the chemical signature of DNA sequence (“base readout”) as well as the intrinsic DNA structure (“shape recognition”). These recognition mechanisms do not e...

  10. Pharmacogenomic study using bio- and nanobioelectrochemistry: Drug-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2016-04-01

    Small molecules that bind genomic DNA have proven that they can be effective anticancer, antibiotic and antiviral therapeutic agents that affect the well-being of millions of people worldwide. Drug-DNA interaction affects DNA replication and division; causes strand breaks, and mutations. Therefore, the investigation of drug-DNA interaction is needed to understand the mechanism of drug action as well as in designing DNA-targeted drugs. On the other hand, the interaction between DNA and drugs can cause chemical and conformational modifications and, thus, variation of the electrochemical properties of nucleobases. For this purpose, electrochemical methods/biosensors can be used toward detection of drug-DNA interactions. The present paper reviews the drug-DNA interactions, their types and applications of electrochemical techniques used to study interactions between DNA and drugs or small ligand molecules that are potentially of pharmaceutical interest. The results are used to determine drug binding sites and sequence preference, as well as conformational changes due to drug-DNA interactions. Also, the intention of this review is to give an overview of the present state of the drug-DNA interaction cognition. The applications of electrochemical techniques for investigation of drug-DNA interaction were reviewed and we have discussed the type of qualitative or quantitative information that can be obtained from the use of each technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ionizing radiation interactions with DNA: nanodosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bug, Marion; Nettelbeck, Heidi; Hilgers, Gerhard; Rabus, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The metrology of ionizing radiation is based on measuring values that are averaged over macroscopic volume elements, for instance the energy dose is defined as ratio of the energy deposited on the absorber and the absorber mass. For biological or medical radiation effects the stochastic nature of radiation interaction id of main importance, esp. the interaction of ionizing radiation with the DNA as the genetic information carrier. For radiotherapy and risk evaluation purposes a comprehensive system of radiation weighing factors and other characteristics, like radiation quality or relative biological efficacy was developed. The nanodosimetry is aimed to develop a metrological basis relying on physical characteristics of the microscopic structure of ionizing radiation tracks. The article includes the development of experimental nanodosimetric methods, the respective calibration techniques, Monte-Carlo simulation of the particle track microstructure and the correlation nanodosimetry and biological efficiency.

  12. DNA interactions and biocidal activity of metal complexes of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narendrula Vamsikrishna

    cancer agents, and the binding between DNA and metal complexes were used in understanding the interaction between the drugs and DNA. In general, the tumour cells can be smashed by stopping the replication of the unnatural DNA. Using Schiff base transition metal complex in particular, affected DNA may be dented by.

  13. Noncovalent Labeling of Biomolecules with Red and Near- Infrared Dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucjan Strekowski

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids can be labeled with a fluorescent marker to allow for their detection. Covalent labeling is achieved by the reaction of an appropriately functionalized dye marker with a reactive group on a biomolecule. The recent trend, however, is the use of noncovalent labeling that results from strong hydrophobic and/or ionic interactions between the marker and biomolecule of interest. The main advantage of noncovalent labeling is that it affects the functional activity of the biomolecule to a lesser extent. The applications of luminescent cyanine and squarylium dyes are reviewed.

  14. Screening for protein-DNA interactions by automatable DNA-protein interaction ELISA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luise H Brand

    Full Text Available DNA-binding proteins (DBPs, such as transcription factors, constitute about 10% of the protein-coding genes in eukaryotic genomes and play pivotal roles in the regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression by binding to short stretches of DNA. Despite their number and importance, only for a minor portion of DBPs the binding sequence had been disclosed. Methods that allow the de novo identification of DNA-binding motifs of known DBPs, such as protein binding microarray technology or SELEX, are not yet suited for high-throughput and automation. To close this gap, we report an automatable DNA-protein-interaction (DPI-ELISA screen of an optimized double-stranded DNA (dsDNA probe library that allows the high-throughput identification of hexanucleotide DNA-binding motifs. In contrast to other methods, this DPI-ELISA screen can be performed manually or with standard laboratory automation. Furthermore, output evaluation does not require extensive computational analysis to derive a binding consensus. We could show that the DPI-ELISA screen disclosed the full spectrum of binding preferences for a given DBP. As an example, AtWRKY11 was used to demonstrate that the automated DPI-ELISA screen revealed the entire range of in vitro binding preferences. In addition, protein extracts of AtbZIP63 and the DNA-binding domain of AtWRKY33 were analyzed, which led to a refinement of their known DNA-binding consensi. Finally, we performed a DPI-ELISA screen to disclose the DNA-binding consensus of a yet uncharacterized putative DBP, AtTIFY1. A palindromic TGATCA-consensus was uncovered and we could show that the GATC-core is compulsory for AtTIFY1 binding. This specific interaction between AtTIFY1 and its DNA-binding motif was confirmed by in vivo plant one-hybrid assays in protoplasts. Thus, the value and applicability of the DPI-ELISA screen for de novo binding site identification of DBPs, also under automatized conditions, is a promising approach for a

  15. Molecular electrostatic potential analysis of non-covalent complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and acceptor atoms due to complex formation) and interaction energy, Eint for a large variety of the non- covalent dimers in the categories HB, DHB, and XB. The MESP based eDA concept proposed by Mohan and. Suresh has unified the HB, DHB, and XB non-covalent complexes in a single category, the eDA complex.61.

  16. Noncovalent synthesis of nanostructures: combining coordination chemistry and hydrogen bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huck, W.T.S.; Huck, Wilhelm T.S.; Hulst, A.J.R.L.; Timmerman, P.; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Reinhoudt, David

    1997-01-01

    Rosettes that are held together by hydrogen bonds (see sketch on the right) were synthesized from metallodendrimers constructed by coordination chemistry. Two orthogonal, noncovalent interactions (metal-ligand and hydrogen bonding) were employed to build these nanosized dendrimers (M 7-28 kDa).

  17. DNA-Conjugated Organic Chromophores in DNA Stacking Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2009-01-01

    Since the discovery of the intercalation of acridine derivatives into DNA (1961), chemists have synthesized many intercalators tethered to DNA. Advances in the chemical synthesis of modified nucleosides along with progress in oligonucleotide synthesis have made it possible to introduce organic ch...

  18. Pseudohalide Tectons within the Coordination Sphere of the Uranyl Ion: Experimental and Theoretical Study of C-H···O, C-H···S, and Chalcogenide Noncovalent Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Stefano; Twamley, Brendan; Platts, James A; Baker, Robert J

    2018-03-15

    A series of uranyl thiocyanate and selenocyanate of the type [R 4 N] 3 [UO 2 (NCS) 5 ] (R 4 = n Bu 4 , Me 3 Bz, Et 3 Bz), [Ph 4 P][UO 2 (NCS) 3 (NO 3 )] and [R 4 N] 3 [UO 2 (NCSe) 5 ] (R 4 = Me 4 , n Pr 4 , Et 3 Bz) have been prepared and structurally characterized. The resulting noncovalent interactions have been examined and compared to other examples in the literature. The nature of these interactions is determined by the cation so that when the alkyl groups are small, chalcogenide···chalcogenide interactions are present, but this "switches off" when R = n Pr and charge assisted U═O···H-C and S(e)···H-C hydrogen bonding remain the dominant interaction. Increasing the size of the chain to n Bu results in only S···H-C interactions. The spectroscopic implications of these chalcogenide interactions have been explored in the vibrational and photophysical properties of the series [R 4 N] 3 [UO 2 (NCS) 5 ] (R 4 = Me 4 , Et 4 , n Pr 4 , n Bu 4 , Me 3 Bz, Et 3 Bz), [R 4 N] 3 [UO 2 (NCSe) 5 ] (R 4 = Me 4 , n Pr 4 , Et 3 Bz) and [Et 4 N] 4 [UO 2 (NCSe) 5 ][NCSe]. The data suggest that U═O···H-C interactions are weak and do not perturb the uranyl moiety. While the chalcogenide interactions do not influence the photophysical properties, a coupling of the U═O and δ(NCS) or δ(NCSe) vibrational modes is observed in the 77 K solid state emission spectra. A theoretical examination of representative examples of Se···Se, C-H···Se, and C-H···O═U by molecular electrostatic potentials and NBO and AIM methodologies gives a deeper understanding of these weak interactions. C-H···Se are individually weak but C-H···O═U interactions are even weaker, supporting the idea that the -yl oxo's are weak Lewis bases. An Atoms in Molecules study suggests that the chalcogenide interaction is similar to lone pair···π or fluorine···fluorine interactions. An oxidation of the NCS ligands to form [(UO 2 )(SO 4 ) 2 (H 2 O) 4 ]·3H 2 O was also noted.

  19. Synthesis of 1D-glyconanomaterials by a hybrid noncovalent-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes: a study of their selective interactions with lectins and with live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernía Leal, M; Assali, M; Cid, J J; Valdivia, V; Franco, J M; Fernández, I; Pozo, D; Khiar, N

    2015-12-07

    To take full advantage of the remarkable applications of carbon nanotubes in different fields, there is a need to develop effective methods to improve their water dispersion and biocompatibility while maintaining their physical properties. In this sense, current approaches suffer from serious drawbacks such as loss of electronic structure together with low surface coverage in the case of covalent functionalizations, or instability of the dynamic hybrids obtained by non-covalent functionalizations. In the present work, we examined the molecular basis of an original strategy that combines the advantages of both functionalizations without their main drawbacks. The hierarchical self-assembly of diacetylenic-based neoglycolipids into highly organized and compacted rings around the nanotubes, followed by photopolymerization leads to the formation of nanotubes covered with glyconanorings with a shish kebab-type topology exposing the carbohydrate ligands to the water phase in a multivalent fashion. The glyconanotubes obtained are fully functional, and able to establish specific interactions with their cognate receptors. In fact, by taking advantage of this selective binding, an easy method to sense lectins as a working model of toxin detection was developed based on a simple analysis of TEM images. Remarkably, different experimental settings to assess cell membrane integrity, cell growth kinetics and cell cycle demonstrated the cellular biocompatibility of the sugar-coated carbon nanotubes compared to pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes.

  20. Studies of interaction between two alkaloids and double helix DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yantao; Peng, Tingting; Zhao, Lei; Jiang, Dayu; Cui, Yuncheng

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the study on the interaction of two alkaloids (matrine and evodiamine) and hs-DNA by absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), DNA melting and viscosity experiments. The spectroscopic studies suggested that two alkaloids can bind to DNA through an intercalative mode. The viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation also indicated that two alkaloids can intercalate to DNA. The binding constants (K A ) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined. At the same time, some significant thermodynamic parameters of the binding of the alkaloids to DNA were obtained. Competitive binding studies revealed that alkaloids had an effect on ethidium bromide (EB) bound DNA. In addition, it was also proved that the fluorescence quenching was influenced by ionic strength. - Highlights: • Interaction between two alkaloids and DNA is studied by spectral methods. • The binding constant and the binding sites between two alkaloids and DNA are obtained. • There are a classical intercalative mode between alkaloids and DNA. • The binding of matrine with DNA is weaker than that of evodiamine. • It is important for us to understand the alkaloids–DNA interactions at a molecular level

  1. Ab initio study on the noncovalent adsorption of camptothecin anticancer drug onto graphene, defect modified graphene and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Nabanita; Deka, Ramesh C

    2013-09-01

    The application of graphene and related nanomaterials like boron nitride (BN) nanosheets, BN-graphene hybrid nanomaterials, and graphene oxide (GO) for adsorption of anticancer chemotherapeutic camptothecin (CPT) along with the effect on electronic properties prior to functionalization and after functionalization has been reported using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The inclusion of dispersion correction to DFT is instrumental in accounting for van der Waals π-π stacking between CPT and the nanomaterial. The adsorption of CPT exhibits significant strain within the nanosheets and noncovalent adsorption of CPT is thermodynamically favoured onto the nanosheets. In case of GO, surface incorporation of functional groups result in significant crumpling along the basal plane and the interaction is basically mediated by H-bonding rather than π-π stacking. Docking studies predict the plausible binding of CPT, CPT functionalized graphene and GO with topoisomerase I (top 1) signifying that CPT interacts through π stacking with AT and GC base pairs of DNA and in presence of nano support, DNA bases preferentially gets bound to the basal plane of graphene and GO rather than the edges. At a theoretical level of understanding, our studies point out the noncovalent interaction of CPT with graphene based nanomaterials and GO for loading and delivery of anticancer chemotherapeutic along with active binding to Top1 protein.

  2. Interaction of E. coli DNA with tobacco mesophyll protoplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyn, R.F.

    1975-01-01

    This chapter is part of a dissertation dealing with the interaction of DNA with protoplasts. Having established the length of time during which tobacco mesophyll protoplasts do not synthesize DNA following their isolation, it is important to know the extent of DNA uptake just before the onset of DNA synthesis (and possible integration) and to find optimal conditions for this uptake. Therefore, the association of E. coli DNA with tobacco protoplasts was studied. Care should be taken with the interpretation of ''uptake'' results: adsorption phenomena play a very important role and may do so at the plasmalemma of naked protoplasts. To solve the problems involved, the use of radiation-damaged DNA was attempted. With E. coli DNA possessing a large number of thymine containing pyrimidine dimers, the loss of dimers from DNA recovered from treated protoplasts was tested in order to obtain an indication of ''real'' uptake. The results are reported

  3. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masudur; Neff, David; Green, Nathaniel; Norton, Michael L

    2016-10-31

    Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material.

  4. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masudur Rahman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material.

  5. On the nature of non-covalent interactions in isomers of 2,5-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone dimers - ground- and excited-state properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pandiyan, B. V.; Deepa, Palanisamy; Kolandaivel, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 37 (2014), s. 19928-19940 ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : hydrogen bonding interactions * density functional theory * circular dichroism Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.493, year: 2014

  6. Accuracy of Several Wave Function and Density Functional Theory Methods for Description of Noncovalent Interaction of Saturated and Unsaturated Hydrocarbon Dimers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Granatier, Jaroslav; Pitoňák, M.; Hobza, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 7 (2012), s. 2282-2292 ISSN 1549-9618 Grant - others:APVV(SK) APVV-0059-10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : intermolecular interaction energies * Plesset perturbation-theory * molecular-orbital methods * protein rubredoxin Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.389, year: 2012

  7. Solvent-dependent dihydrogen/dihydride stability for [Mo(CO)(Cp*)H(2)(PMe(3))(2)](+)[BF(4)](-) determined by multiple solvent...anion...cation non-covalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dub, Pavel A; Belkova, Natalia V; Filippov, Oleg A; Daran, Jean-Claude; Epstein, Lina M; Lledós, Agustí; Shubina, Elena S; Poli, Rinaldo

    2010-01-04

    Low-temperature (200 K) protonation of [Mo(CO)(Cp*)H(PMe(3))(2)] (1) by Et(2)OHBF(4) gives a different result depending on a subtle solvent change: The dihydrogen complex [Mo(CO)(Cp*)(eta(2)-H(2))(PMe(3))(2)](+) (2) is obtained in THF, whereas the tautomeric classical dihydride [Mo(CO)(Cp*)(H)(2)(PMe(3))(2)](+) (3) is the only observable product in dichloromethane. Both products were fully characterised (nu(CO) IR; (1)H, (31)P, (13)C NMR spectroscopies) at low temperature; they lose H(2) upon warming to 230 K at approximately the same rate (ca. 10(-3) s(-1)), with no detection of the non-classical form in CD(2)Cl(2), to generate [Mo(CO)(Cp*)(FBF(3))(PMe(3))(2)] (4). The latter also slowly decomposes at ambient temperature. One of the decomposition products was crystallised and identified by X-ray crystallography as [Mo(CO)(Cp*)(FHFBF(3))(PMe(3))(2)] (5), which features a neutral HF ligand coordinated to the transition metal through the F atom and to the BF(4) (-) anion through a hydrogen bond. The reason for the switch in relative stability between 2 and 3 was probed by DFT calculations based on the B3LYP and M05-2X functionals, with inclusion of anion and solvent effects by the conductor-like polarisable continuum model and by explicit consideration of the solvent molecules. Calculations at the MP4(SDQ) and CCSD(T) levels were also carried out for calibration. The calculations reveal the key role of non-covalent anion-solvent interactions, which modulate the anion-cation interaction ultimately altering the energetic balance between the two isomeric forms.

  8. Unveiling the non-covalent interactions of molecular homodimers by dispersion-corrected DFT calculations and collision-induced broadening of ro-vibrational transitions: application to (CH2F2)2 and (SO2)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasinato, Nicola; Grimme, Stefan

    2015-02-28

    Thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties of molecular complexes featuring non-covalent interactions, such as van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds, are of fundamental interest in many fields, ranging from chemistry and biology to nanotechnology. In the present work the homodimers of difluoromethane (CH2F2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) are investigated theoretically using dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D3) and experimentally by tunable diode laser (TDL) infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The dissociation energies of (CH2F2)2 and (SO2)2 are determined experimentally from the broadening of the ro-vibrational transitions of the corresponding monomers collisionally perturbed by a range of damping gases. The resulting dissociation energies are 2.79 ± 0.32 and 2.62 ± 0.16 kcal mol(-1) for the CH2F2 and SO2 dimers, respectively. Six to nine different stationary points on the PES of the two complexes are investigated theoretically at the DFT-D3 level, retrieving the corresponding dissociation energies, structures and rotational constants. Computations are carried out by employing six different density functionals (BLYP, TPSS, B3LYP, PBE0, TPSSh, and PW6B95) in conjunction with def2-TZVP and in a few cases def2-QZVP basis sets. DFT-D3 dissociation energies are benchmarked against reference values from CCSD(T)/CBS computations, and furthermore compared to experimental ones. A very good agreement between theory and experiment is attained, showing that DFT-D3 provides a significant improvement over standard DFT. This work shows that dissociation energies of homodimers can be consistently derived from collisional broadening cross sections and that interaction energies at various DFT-D3 levels (nearly) reach the accuracy of highly correlated wavefunction methods.

  9. DNA binding properties, histidine interaction and cytotoxicity studies of water soluble ruthenium(ii) terpyridine complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazić, Dejan; Arsenijević, Aleksandar; Puchta, Ralph; Bugarčić, Živadin D; Rilak, Ana

    2016-03-21

    In this study, two representatives of previously synthesized ruthenium(ii) terpyridine complexes, i.e., [Ru(Cl-tpy)(en)Cl][Cl] (1) and [Ru(Cl-tpy)(dach)Cl][Cl] (2), were chosen and a detailed study of the kinetic parameters of their reactivity toward l-histidine (l-His), using the UV-Vis and (1)H NMR techniques, was developed. The inner molecular rearrangement from N3-coordinated l-His to the N1 bound isomer, observable in the NMR data, was corroborated by DFT calculations favoring N1 coordination by nearly 4 kcal mol(-1). These two ruthenium(ii) terpyridine complexes were investigated for their interactions with DNA employing UV-Vis spectroscopy, DNA viscosity measurements and fluorescence quenching measurements. The high binding constants obtained in the DNA binding studies (Kb = 10(4)-10(5) M(-1)) suggest a strong binding of the complexes to calf thymus (CT) DNA. Competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) showed that the complexes can displace DNA-bound EB, suggesting strong competition with EB (Ksv = 1.5-2.5 × 10(4) M(-1)). In fact, the results indicate that these complexes can bind to DNA covalently and non-covalently. In order to gain insight of the behavior of a neutral compound, besides the four previously synthesized cationic complexes [Ru(Cl-tpy)(en)Cl][Cl] (1), [Ru(Cl-tpy)(dach)Cl][Cl] (2), [Ru(Cl-tpy)(bpy)Cl][Cl] (3) and [Ru(tpy)Cl3] (P2), a new complex, [Ru(Cl-tpy)(pic)Cl] (4), was used in the biological studies. Their cytotoxicity was investigated against three different tumor cell lines, i.e., A549 (human lung carcinoma cell line), HCT116 (human colon carcinoma cell line), and CT26 (mouse colon carcinoma cell line), by the MTT assay. Complexes 1 and 2 showed higher activity than complexes 3, 4 and P2 against all the selected cell lines. The results on in vitro anticancer activity confirmed that only compounds that hydrolyze the monodentate ligand at a reasonable rate show moderate activity, provided that the chelate ligand is a hydrogen bond

  10. Synergistic effect of non-covalent interaction in colloidal nematic liquid crystal doped with magnetic functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalir, Nima; Javadian, Soheila

    2018-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), CNT@Fe3O4, and Fe3O4 nanocomposites were doped to eutectic uniaxial nematic liquid crystal (NLC's) (E5CN7) to improve physiochemical properties such as phase transition temperature, activation energy (Ea), dielectric anisotropy, and electro-optical properties. The thermal study of nematic phase shows a decrease in the nematic to isotropic phase transition temperature as CNT is doped. However, higher doping concentration of CNTs leads to the further increase in transition temperature. The anchoring effect or π-π interaction plays a key role in N-I phase transition. The functionalization of SWCNTs with Fe3O4 diminishes the CNT aggregation while the magnetic susceptibility is increased. The functionalized CNT doping to NLC's decrease significantly the phase transition temperature compared to doping of non-functionalized CNTs. Attractive interaction between guest and host molecules by magnetic and geometry effect increased the enthalpy and entropy of phase transition in the SWCNT@Fe3O4 sample compared to non-functionalized CNT doped system. Also, the Ea values are decreased as SWCNT@Fe3O4 is doped to pure E5CN7. The difference of N-I phase transition temperature was observed in Fe3O4 and CNT@Fe3O4 compared to SWCNT doped systems. Finally, dielectric anisotropy was increased in the doped system compared to pure NLC.

  11. Charge-transfer interactions of Cr species with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Anna M; Matysiak-Brynda, Edyta; Hepel, Maria

    2017-10-01

    Interactions of Cr species with nucleic acids in living organisms depend strongly on Cr oxidation state and the environmental conditions. As the effects of these interactions range from benign to pre-mutagenic to carcinogenic, careful assessment of the hazard they pose to human health is necessary. We have investigated methods that would enable quantifying the DNA damage caused by Cr species under varying environmental conditions, including UV, O 2 , and redox potential, using simple instrumental techniques which could be in future combined into a field-deployable instrumentation. We have employed electrochemical quartz crystal nanogravimetry (EQCN), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to evaluate the extent of DNA damage expressed in terms of guanine oxidation yield (η) and changes in specific characteristics provided by these techniques. The effects of the interactions of Cr species with DNA were analyzed using a model calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) film on a gold electrode (Au@ctDNA) in different media, including: (i) Cr(VI), (ii) Cr(VI) reduced at -0.2V, (iii) Cr(III)+UV radiation+O 2 , and Cr(III), obtaining the η values: 7.4±1.4, 1.5±0.4, 1.1±0.31%, and 0%, respectively, thus quantifying the hazard posed. The EIS measurements have enabled utilizing the decrease in charge-transfer resistance (R ct ) for ferri/ferrocyanide redox probe at an Au@ctDNA electrode to assess the oxidative ctDNA damage by Cr(VI) species. In this case, circular dichroism indicates an extensive damage to the ctDNA hydrogen bonding. On the other hand, Cr(III) species have not induced any damage to ctDNA, although the EQCN measurements show an electrostatic binding to DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Automated protein-DNA interaction screening of Drosophila regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, Korneel; Feuz, Jean-Daniel; Isakova, Alina; Iagovitina, Antonina; Massouras, Andreas; Bryois, Julien; Callaerts, Patrick; Celniker, Susan E; Deplancke, Bart

    2011-10-30

    Drosophila melanogaster has one of the best characterized metazoan genomes in terms of functionally annotated regulatory elements. To explore how these elements contribute to gene regulation, we need convenient tools to identify the proteins that bind to them. Here we describe the development and validation of a high-throughput yeast one-hybrid platform, which enables screening of DNA elements versus an array of full-length, sequence-verified clones containing over 85% of predicted Drosophila transcription factors. Using six well-characterized regulatory elements, we identified 33 transcription factor-DNA interactions of which 27 were previously unidentified. To simultaneously validate these interactions and locate the binding sites of involved transcription factors, we implemented a powerful microfluidics-based approach that enabled us to retrieve DNA-occupancy data for each transcription factor throughout the respective target DNA elements. Finally, we biologically validated several interactions and identified two new regulators of sine oculis gene expression and hence eye development.

  13. Lipopolythiourea/DNA interaction: A biophysical study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kral, Teresa; Leblond, J.; Hof, Martin; Scherman, D.; Hersovici, J.; Mignet, N.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 148, 1-3 (2010), s. 68-73 ISSN 0301-4622 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400621; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : lipopolythiourea * FCS * plasmid DNA compaction * 31P NMR Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.108, year: 2010

  14. Interaction of vanadium compounds with DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Butenko, Nataliya

    2013-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade do Algarve, 2013 The DNA cleavage activity of several vanadium complexes (VC) was studied. The focus was on vanadium acetylacetonate, VIVO(acac)2, 1, and several β-diketonate oxidovanadium(IV/V) derivatives: VIVO(hd)2 (2, hd = 3,5-heptanedione), VIVO(Cl-acac) 2, (3, Cl-acac = 3-chloro-2,4-pentanedione), VIVO(Et-acac)2 (4, Et-acac = 3-ethyl- 2,4- pentanedione) and VIVO(Me-acac)2 (5, Me-acac = 3-methyl-2,4-pentan...

  15. Interaction mechanism of 2-aminobenzothiazole with herring sperm DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Yajing [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Ji Fanying [Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University, People' s Hospital of Linyi City, No. 27 Jiefang, Road, Linyi, Shandong Province 276003 (China); Liu Rutao, E-mail: rutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Lin Jing; Xu Qifei; Gao Canzhu [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, China-America CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2012-02-15

    The toxic interaction of 2-aminobenzothiazole (2-ABT) with herring sperm DNA (hs-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated that 2-ABT interacted with hs-DNA in a minor groove binding mode. The binding constant and the number of binding sites were 7.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} L mol{sup -1} and 0.95, respectively. Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was employed to measure the conformation change of hs-DNA in the presence of 2-ABT, which verified the minor groove binding mode. The molecular modeling results illustrated that 2-ABT tended to bind in the region of rich A-T base pairs through the hydrogen bond between A 18 and amino group of 2-ABT. Sequence specificity was confirmed by comparison on the interactions of 2-ABT with four kinds of bases. This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the toxic interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with biomacromolecules, which contributes to clarify the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2-ABT interacts with hs-DNA in minor groove binding mode to form complex in the ratio 1:1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA conformation changes after binding with 2-ABT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ABT-DNA complex is simulated using Autodock and binding free energy is also calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Besides Van der Waals force, hydrogen bond between adenine and 2-ABT plays an important role. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequence specificity of the binding is verified by the effect of DNA bases on 2-ABT.

  16. Spectroscopic, electrochemical and molecular docking study of the binding interaction of a small molecule 5H-naptho[2,1-f][1,2] oxathieaphine 2,2-dioxide with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhijit; Mondal, Shovan; Singh, Bula

    2017-08-01

    The interaction of 5H-naptho[2,1-f][1,2]oxathieaphine2,2-dioxide (NOTD) with calf thymus DNA in Tris-HCl buffer at physiological pH was investigated with the help of various spectroscopic and electrochemical methods along with molecular docking study. Studying the non-covalent binding interaction of a neutral fluorophore with ctDNA has become an active field of research at the interface between medicinal chemistry and biological science. NOTD is known for its various toxicological, skin sensitization, and antiviral properties. Still, to date, its interaction style with ctDNA is not well elucidated. UV-vis absorption, fluorescence emission and circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) suggest the complex formation between NOTD and ctDNA with binding constant value in the order of 3.12-4.1(×10 4 )M -1 . Binding nature of NOTD with ctDNA is affirmed from the DNA helix melting experiment, comparative displacement assay using known DNA intercalator, cyclic voltammetry and finally molecular docking study. It was evident from experimental result that the probe NOTD binds with ctDNA in groove binding mode as manifested by a decrease in iodide quenching effect, spectral change in CD, a substantial increase in denaturing temperature in DNA and change in potential value. Furthermore, the molecular docking study insisted the above mentioned experimental result in a very affectionate way. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactions of acetylated histones with DNA as revealed by UV laser induced histone-DNA crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovsky, V.Yu.; Dimitrov, S.I.; Angelov, D.; Pashev, I.G.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction of acetylated histones with DNA in chromatin has been studied by UV laser-induced crosslinking histones to DNA. After irradiation of the nuclei, the covalently linked protein-DNA complexes were isolated and the presence of histones in them demonstrated immunochemically. When chromatin from irradiated nuclei was treated with clostripain, which selectively cleaved the N-terminal tails of core histones, no one of them was found covalently linked to DNA, thus showing that crosslinking proceeded solely via the N-terminal regions. However, the crosslinking ability of the laser was preserved both upon physiological acetylation of histones, known to be restricted to the N-terminal tails, and with chemically acetylated chromatin. This finding is direct evidence that the postsynthetic histone acetylation does not release the N-terminal tails from interaction with DNA

  18. Theoretical exploration of pnicogen bond noncovalent interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the Science Research Foundation of Educational. Department of Gansu Province (2013A-102), and the “QingLan” Talent Engineering Funds of Tianshui. Normal University. References. 1. Michael G C, Corey A M and Mark S T 2011 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133 10559. 2. Vazquez J, De S K, Chen L H, Riel-Mehan M, Emdadi.

  19. DNA Structure and Stability Tutorial: Interactive animations of the DNA three-dimensional structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Assis Barony Valadares Fonseca

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The tutorial "DNA Structure and Stability" was developed articulating Ausubel's Theory of Meaningful Learning and Mayer's Multimedia principles, in order to favor the DNA structure significant learning through the guided and gradual exploration of the DNA three-dimensional structure interactive animations. In this sense, conceptual units with auxiliary medias have been established, such as texts, diagrams and tables, which assist in the explanation of animations. Several chemical and biochemical concepts are explained in order to favor understanding of DNA as a biopolymer determined by its intra/intermolecular chemical interactions that consequently establish the structure/stability relationships and structure/biological activity. In this way, was developed an interactive tutorial that can be used in several teaching and learning situations in order to favor the construction of knowledge by the learner.

  20. Synthesis, DNA interaction and antimicrobial activities of three rimantadine analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing-Mi; Zhang, Jun [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Wang, Xin, E-mail: wangxinlnu@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Zhang, Li-Ping; Liu, Yang [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Niu, Hua-Ying [Jinan Dachpharm Development Co., Ltd., Jinan 250100 (China); Liu, Bin, E-mail: liubinzehao@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2015-03-15

    The interactions of three rimantadine analogues (RAs) with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA) in buffer solution (pH 7.4) were investigated using berberine (BR) as a probe by various methods. Fluorescence studies revealed that the RAs interacted with DNA in vitro and the quenchings were all static. Furthermore, the binding modes of these compounds to DNA were disclosed as groove binding supported by absorption spectroscopy, viscosity measurement and denatured DNA experiment. The antimicrobial activities of the RAs were also evaluated in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, and they all exhibited good bacteriostasic effects. The results might provide an important reference for investigation of the molecular mechanism associated with the DNA binding of the RAs. - Highlights: • Three rimantadine analogues were synthesized. • The RAs effectively quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of DNA via a static combination. • These analogues can bind to DNA via groove binding mode. • The antimicrobial activities of three analogues were also evaluated by the disk diffusion method.

  1. Energetics of the protein-DNA-water interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marabotti Anna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the energetics of the interaction between protein and DNA we analyzed 39 crystallographically characterized complexes with the HINT (Hydropathic INTeractions computational model. HINT is an empirical free energy force field based on solvent partitioning of small molecules between water and 1-octanol. Our previous studies on protein-ligand complexes demonstrated that free energy predictions were significantly improved by taking into account the energetic contribution of water molecules that form at least one hydrogen bond with each interacting species. Results An initial correlation between the calculated HINT scores and the experimentally determined binding free energies in the protein-DNA system exhibited a relatively poor r2 of 0.21 and standard error of ± 1.71 kcal mol-1. However, the inclusion of 261 waters that bridge protein and DNA improved the HINT score-free energy correlation to an r2 of 0.56 and standard error of ± 1.28 kcal mol-1. Analysis of the water role and energy contributions indicate that 46% of the bridging waters act as linkers between amino acids and nucleotide bases at the protein-DNA interface, while the remaining 54% are largely involved in screening unfavorable electrostatic contacts. Conclusion This study quantifies the key energetic role of bridging waters in protein-DNA associations. In addition, the relevant role of hydrophobic interactions and entropy in driving protein-DNA association is indicated by analyses of interaction character showing that, together, the favorable polar and unfavorable polar/hydrophobic-polar interactions (i.e., desolvation mostly cancel.

  2. Effect of water-DNA interactions on elastic properties of DNA self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Carmen M; Ramos, Daniel; Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Fierro, José L G; Mendieta, Jesús; Tamayo, Javier; Calleja, Montserrat

    2017-04-03

    DNA-water interactions have revealed as very important actor in DNA mechanics, from the molecular to the macroscopic scale. Given the particularly useful properties of DNA molecules to engineer novel materials through self-assembly and by bridging organic and inorganic materials, the interest in understanding DNA elasticity has crossed the boundaries of life science to reach also materials science and engineering. Here we show that thin films of DNA constructed through the self-assembly of sulfur tethered ssDNA strands demonstrate a Young's modulus tuning range of about 10 GPa by simply varying the environment relative humidity from 0% up to 70%. We observe that the highest tuning range occurs for ssDNA grafting densities of about 3.5 × 10 13 molecules/cm 2 , where the distance between the molecules maximizes the water mediated interactions between the strands. Upon hybridization with the complementary strand, the DNA self-assembled monolayers significantly soften by one order of magnitude and their Young's modulus dependency on the hydration state drastically decreases. The experimental observations are in agreement with molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. Binding and thermodynamics of REV peptide-ctDNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar

    2017-03-01

    The thermodynamics of DNA-ligand binding is important as it provides useful information to understand the details of binding processes. HIV-1 REV response element (RRE) located in the env coding region of the viral genome is reported to be well conserved across different HIV-1 isolates. In this study, the binding characteristics of Calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) and REV peptide from HIV-1 were investigated using spectroscopic (UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD)) and isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) techniques. Thermal stability and ligand binding properties of the ctDNA revealed that native ctDNA had a T m of 75.5 °C, whereas the ctDNA-REV peptide complex exhibited an incremental shift in the T m by 8 °C, indicating thermal stability of the complex. CD data indicated increased ellipticity due to large conformational changes in ctDNA molecule upon binding with REV peptide and two binding stoichiometric modes are apparent. The ctDNA experienced condensation due to large conformational changes in the presence of REV peptide and positive B→Ψ transition was observed at higher molar charge ratios. Fluorescence studies performed at several ligand concentrations revealed a gradual decrease in the fluorescence intensity of EtBr-bound ctDNA in response to increasing ligand concentrations. The fluorescence data further confirmed two stoichiometric modes of binding for ctDNA-REV peptide complex as previously observed with CD studies. The binding enthalpies were determined using ITC in the temperature range of 293 K-308 K. The ITC binding isotherm was exothermic at all temperatures examined, with low ΔH values indicating that the ctDNA-REV peptide interaction is driven largely by entropy. The heat capacity change (ΔC p ) was insignificant, an unusual finding in the area of DNA-peptide interaction studies. The variation in the values obtained for ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG with temperature further suggests that ctDNA-REV peptide interaction is entropically

  4. DNA-graphene interactions during translocation through nanogaps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiral N Patel

    Full Text Available We study how double-stranded DNA translocates through graphene nanogaps. Nanogaps are fabricated with a novel capillary-force induced graphene nanogap formation technique. DNA translocation signatures for nanogaps are qualitatively different from those obtained with circular nanopores, owing to the distinct shape of the gaps discussed here. Translocation time and conductance values vary by ∼ 100%, which we suggest are caused by local gap width variations. We also observe exponentially relaxing current traces. We suggest that slow relaxation of the graphene membrane following DNA translocation may be responsible. We conclude that DNA-graphene interactions are important, and need to be considered for graphene-nanogap based devices. This work further opens up new avenues for direct read of single molecule activitities, and possibly sequencing.

  5. New environment-sensitive multichannel DNA fluorescent label for investigation of the protein-DNA interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A Kuznetsova

    Full Text Available Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu, pyrrolocytosine (Cpy and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO. For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5'-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU, which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified.

  6. New environment-sensitive multichannel DNA fluorescent label for investigation of the protein-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra A; Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Vorobjev, Yuri N; Barthes, Nicolas P F; Michel, Benoît Y; Burger, Alain; Fedorova, Olga S

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the study of a new multichannel DNA fluorescent base analogue 3-hydroxychromone (3HC) to evaluate its suitability as a fluorescent reporter probe of structural transitions during protein-DNA interactions and its comparison with the current commercially available 2-aminopurine (aPu), pyrrolocytosine (Cpy) and 1,3-diaza-2-oxophenoxazine (tCO). For this purpose, fluorescent base analogues were incorporated into DNA helix on the opposite or on the 5'-side of the damaged nucleoside 5,6-dihydrouridine (DHU), which is specifically recognized and removed by Endonuclease VIII. These fluorophores demonstrated different sensitivities to the DNA helix conformational changes. The highest sensitivity and the most detailed information about the conformational changes of DNA induced by protein binding and processing were obtained using the 3HC probe. The application of this new artificial fluorescent DNA base is a very useful tool for the studies of complex mechanisms of protein-DNA interactions. Using 3HC biosensor, the kinetic mechanism of Endonuclease VIII action was specified.

  7. Protein and Drug Interactions in the Minor Groove of DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morávek, Z.; Neidle, S.; Schneider, Bohdan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 5 (2002), s. 1182-1191 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : protein * DNA * interactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.051, year: 2002

  8. Human exonuclease 1 and BLM helicase interact to resect DNA and initiate DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimonkar, Amitabh V.; Özsoy, A. Zeynep; Genschel, Jochen; Modrich, Paul; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    The error-free repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination requires processing of broken ends. These processed ends are substrates for assembly of DNA strand exchange proteins that mediate DNA strand invasion. Here, we establish that human BLM helicase, a member of the RecQ family, stimulates the nucleolytic activity of human exonuclease 1 (hExo1), a 5′→3′ double-stranded DNA exonuclease. The stimulation is specific because other RecQ homologs fail to stimulate hExo1. Stimulation of DNA resection by hExo1 is independent of BLM helicase activity and is, instead, mediated by an interaction between the 2 proteins. Finally, we show that DNA ends resected by hExo1 and BLM are used by human Rad51, but not its yeast or bacterial counterparts, to promote homologous DNA pairing. This in vitro system recapitulates initial steps of homologous recombination and provides biochemical evidence for a role of BLM and Exo1 in the initiation of recombinational DNA repair. PMID:18971343

  9. DNA-inspired hierarchical polymer design: electrostatics and hydrogen bonding in concert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemp, Sean T; Long, Timothy E

    2012-01-01

    Nucleic acids and proteins, two of nature's biopolymers, assemble into complex structures to achieve desired biological functions and inspire the design of synthetic macromolecules containing a wide variety of noncovalent interactions including electrostatics and hydrogen bonding. Researchers have incorporated DNA nucleobases into a wide variety of synthetic monomers/polymers achieving stimuli-responsive materials, supramolecular assemblies, and well-controlled macromolecules. Recently, scientists utilized both electrostatics and complementary hydrogen bonding to orthogonally functionalize a polymer backbone through supramolecular assembly. Diverse macromolecules with noncovalent interactions will create materials with properties necessary for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Noncovalent Intermediate of Thymidylate Synthase: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodar, Svetlana A; Kohen, Amnon

    2016-07-06

    Thymidylate synthase is an attractive target for antibiotic and anticancer drugs due to its essential role in the de novo biosynthesis of the DNA nucleotide thymine. The enzymatic reaction is initiated by a nucleophilic activation of the substrate via formation of a covalent bond to an active site cysteine. The traditionally accepted mechanism is then followed by a series of covalently bound intermediates, where that bond is only cleaved upon product release. Recent computational and experimental studies suggest that the covalent bond between the protein and substrate is actually quite labile. Importantly, these findings predict the existence of a noncovalently bound bisubstrate intermediate, not previously anticipated, which could be the target of a novel class of drugs inhibiting DNA biosynthesis. Here we report the synthesis of the proposed intermediate and findings supporting its chemical and kinetic competence. These findings substantiate the predicted nontraditional mechanism and the potential of this intermediate as a new drug lead.

  11. The free-energy cost of interaction between DNA loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lifang; Liu, Peijiang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Zhou, Tianshou; Yu, Jianshe

    2017-10-03

    From the viewpoint of thermodynamics, the formation of DNA loops and the interaction between them, which are all non-equilibrium processes, result in the change of free energy, affecting gene expression and further cell-to-cell variability as observed experimentally. However, how these processes dissipate free energy remains largely unclear. Here, by analyzing a mechanic model that maps three fundamental topologies of two interacting DNA loops into a 4-state model of gene transcription, we first show that a longer DNA loop needs more mean free energy consumption. Then, independent of the type of interacting two DNA loops (nested, side-by-side or alternating), the promotion between them always consumes less mean free energy whereas the suppression dissipates more mean free energy. More interestingly, we find that in contrast to the mechanism of direct looping between promoter and enhancer, the facilitated-tracking mechanism dissipates less mean free energy but enhances the mean mRNA expression, justifying the facilitated-tracking hypothesis, a long-standing debate in biology. Based on minimal energy principle, we thus speculate that organisms would utilize the mechanisms of loop-loop promotion and facilitated tracking to survive in complex environments. Our studies provide insights into the understanding of gene expression regulation mechanism from the view of energy consumption.

  12. Histone H1--DNA interaction. On the mechanism of DNA strands crosslinking by histone H1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotov, B O; Nikolaev, L G; Severin, E S

    1978-01-01

    Crosslinking of DNA fibers by histone H1 or phosphorylated on Ser-37 histone H1, and by the individual fragments of the H1 polypeptide chain was studied by the method of turbidimetry. The dependence of the turbidity of DNA-protein complexes on the ionic strength in solution suggests that the condensation of H1.DNA complexes in vitro is apparently due to both specific histone-DNA interactions with the contribution of hydrogen and/or hydrophobic bonds and the formation of polycationic "bridges" fastening the DNA fibers. The effectiveness of the condensation is postulated to be a function of a proportion between the two mechanisms which in turn can be controlled by slight changes in ionic surroundings. The sharp dependence of shrinkage of H1.DNA complexes on ionic strength at "physiological" salt concentrations could provide a mechanism to regulate density and consequently the total activity of chromatin in the cell nuclei. The phosphorylation of histone H1 on Ser-37 by a specific histone kinase does not noticeably affect the pattern of DNA crosslinking by the H1. Images PMID:27766

  13. NMR studies of DNA oligomers and their interactions with minor groove binding ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagan, Patricia A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    The cationic peptide ligands distamycin and netropsin bind noncovalently to the minor groove of DNA. The binding site, orientation, stoichiometry, and qualitative affinity of distamycin binding to several short DNA oligomers were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The oligomers studied contain A,T-rich or I,C-rich binding sites, where I = 2-desaminodeoxyguanosine. I•C base pairs are functional analogs of A•T base pairs in the minor groove. The different behaviors exhibited by distamycin and netropsin binding to various DNA sequences suggested that these ligands are sensitive probes of DNA structure. For sites of five or more base pairs, distamycin can form 1:1 or 2:1 ligand:DNA complexes. Cooperativity in distamycin binding is low in sites such as AAAAA which has narrow minor grooves, and is higher in sites with wider minor grooves such as ATATAT. The distamycin binding and base pair opening lifetimes of I,C-containing DNA oligomers suggest that the I,C minor groove is structurally different from the A,T minor groove. Molecules which direct chemistry to a specific DNA sequence could be used as antiviral compounds, diagnostic probes, or molecular biology tools. The author studied two ligands in which reactive groups were tethered to a distamycin to increase the sequence specificity of the reactive agent.

  14. Studies on sildenafil citrate (Viagra) interaction with DNA using electrochemical DNA biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Sakandar; Nawaz, Haq; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Ghauri, Muhammad A; Khalid, Ahmad M

    2007-05-15

    The interaction of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) with DNA was studied by using an electrochemical DNA biosensor. The binding mechanism of sildenafil citrate was elucidated by using constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry at DNA-modified glassy carbon electrode. The decrease in the guanine oxidation peak area or peak current was used as an indicator for the interaction in 0.2M acetate buffer (pH 5). The binding constant (K) values obtained were 2.01+/-0.05 x 10(5) and 1.97+/-0.01 x 10(5)M(-1) with constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry, respectively. A linear dependence of the guanine peak area or peak current was observed within the range of 1-40 microM sildenafil citrate with slope=-2.74 x 10(-4)s/microM, r=0.989 and slope=-2.78 x 10(-3)microA/microM, r=0.995 by using constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry, respectively. Additionally, binding constant values for sildenafil citrate-DNA interaction were determined for the pH range of 4-8 and in biological fluids (serum and urine) at pH 5. The influence of sodium and calcium ions was also studied to elucidate the mechanism of sildenafil citrate-DNA interaction under different solution conditions. The present study may prove to be helpful in extending our understanding of the anticancer activity of sildenafil citrate from cellular to DNA level.

  15. Dual-Specific Interaction to Detect DNA on Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Tobias Aveling Jenkins

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An approach to selectively and efficiently detect single strand DNA is developed by using streptavidin coated gold nanoparticles (StAuNPs as efficient quenchers. The central concept for the successful detection is the combination the of streptavidin-biotin interaction with specific probe-target DNA hybridization. Biotin labeled probe DNAs act as “bridges” to bring Cy5 labeled targets to the particle surface and the fluorophore dye can be rapidly and efficiently quenched by StAuPNs. By measuring the changes of photoluminescence intensity of Cy5, an efficient, selective, and reversed detection of DNA hybridization is realized. The methodology may pave a new way for simple and rapid detections of biomolecules.

  16. Assessment of density functionals and paucity of non-covalent interactions in aminoylyne complexes of molybdenum and tungsten [(η(5)-C5H5)(CO)2M≡EN(SiMe3)(R)] (E = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb): a dispersion-corrected DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Krishna K; Patidar, Pankaj; Bariya, Pankaj K; Patidar, Sunil K; Vishwakarma, Ravi

    2014-07-14

    Electronic, molecular structure and bonding energy analyses of the metal-aminosilylyne, -aminogermylyne, -aminostannylyne and -aminoplumbylyne complexes [(η(5)-C5H5)(CO)2M[triple bond, length as m-dash]EN(SiMe3)(Ph)] (M = Mo, W) and [(η(5)-C5H5)(CO)2Mo[triple bond, length as m-dash]GeN(SiMe3)(Mes)] have been investigated at DFT, DFT-D3 and DFT-D3(BJ) levels using BP86, PBE, PW91, RPBE, TPSS and M06-L functionals. The performance of metaGGA functionals for the geometries of aminoylyne complexes is better than GGA functionals. Significant dispersion interactions between OH, EC(O) and EH pairs appeared in the dispersion-corrected geometries. The non-covalent distances of these interactions follow the order DFT > DFT-D3(BJ) > DFT-D3. The values of Nalewajski-Mrozek bond order (1.22-1.52) and Pauling bond order (2.23-2.59) of the optimized structures at BP86/TZ2P indicate the presence of multiple bonds between metal and E atoms. The overall electronic charges transfer from transition-metal fragments to ligands. The topological analysis based on QTAIM has been performed to determine the analogy of non-covalent interactions. The strength of M[triple bond, length as m-dash]EN(SiMe3)(R) bonds has been evaluated by energy decomposition analysis. The electrostatic interactions are almost equal to orbital interactions. The M ← E σ-donation is smaller than the M → E π-back donation. Upon going from E = Si to E = Pb, the M-E bond orders decrease as Si > Ge > Sn > Pb, consistent with the observed geometry trends. The M-E uncorrected bond dissociation energies vary with the density functionals as RPBE DFT-D3 dispersion corrections to the BDEs correspond to the BP86 functional, ranging between 5.6-8.1 kcal mol(-1), which are smaller than the DFT-D3(BJ) dispersion corrections (10.1-12.0 kcal mol(-1)). The aryl substituents on nitrogen have an insignificant effect on M-E-N bending. The bending of the M-E-N bond angle has been discussed in terms of Jahn-Teller distortion. The

  17. Non-bonding interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects play a critical role in the relative stability of group 12 complexes arising from interaction of diethanoldithiocarbamate with the cations of transition metals Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II): a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-07-01

    The chelating properties of diethanoldithiocarbamate (DEDC) and π-electron flow from the nitrogen atom to the sulfur atom via a plane-delocalized π-orbital system (quasi ring) was studied using a density functional theory method. The molecular structure of DEDC and its complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) were also considered. First, the geometries of this ligand and DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) were optimized, and the formation energies of these complexes were then calculated based on the electronic energy, or sum of electronic energies, with the zero point energy of each species. Formation energies indicated the DEDC-Zn(II) complex as the most stable complex, and DEDC-Cd(II) as the least stable. Structural data showed that the N1-C2 π-bond was localized in the complexes rather than the ligand, and a delocalized π-bond over S7-C2-S8 was also present. The stability of DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) complexes increased in the presence of the non-specific effects of the solvent (PCM model), and their relative stability did not change. There was π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 and along S7-C2-S8 in the ligand. The π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 was abolished when the metal interacted with sulfur atoms. Energy belonging to van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand was calculated for each complex. The results of nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) indicated a decreasing trend as Zn(II) Hg(II) for the aromaticity of the quasi-rings. Finally, by ignoring van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand, the relative stability of the complexes was changed as follows:[Formula: see text] Graphical Abstract Huge electronic cloud localized on Hg(II) in the Hg(II)-DEDC complex.

  18. Micromechanical study of protein-DNA interactions and chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John

    I will discuss micromechanics experiments that our group has used to analyze protein-DNA interactions and chromosome organization. In single-DNA experiments we have found that a feature of protein-DNA complexes is that their dissociation rates can depend strikingly on bulk solution concentrations of other proteins and DNA segments; I will describe experiments which demonstrate this effect, which can involve tens-fold changes in off-rates with submicromolar changes in solution concentrations. Second, I will discuss experiments aimed at analyzing large-scale human chromosome structure; we isolate metaphase chromosomes, which in their native form behave as remarkably elastic networks of chromatin. Exposure to DNA-cutting restriction enzymes completely eliminates this elasticity, indicating that there is not a mechanically contiguous protein ''scaffold'' from which the chromosome gains its stability. I will show results of siRNA experiments indicating that depletion of condensin proteins leads to destabilization of chromosome mechanics, indicating condensin's role as the major chromatin ''cross-linker'' in metaphase chromosomes. Finally I will discuss similar experiments on human G1 nuclei, where we use genetic and chemical modifications to separate the contributions of the nuclear lamina and chromatin to the mechanical stiffness of the nucleus as a whole. Supported by the NSF (DMR-1206868, MCB-1022117) and the NIH (GM105847, CA193419).

  19. DNA requirements for interaction of the C-terminal region of Ku80 with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Sarvan Kumar; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2017-09-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. Critical to NHEJ is the DNA-dependent interaction of the Ku70/80 heterodimer with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to form the DNA-PK holoenzyme. However, precisely how Ku recruits DNA-PKcs to DSBs ends to enhance its kinase activity has remained enigmatic, with contradictory findings reported in the literature. Here we address the role of the Ku80 C-terminal region (CTR) in the DNA-dependent interaction of Ku70/80 with DNA-PKcs using purified components and defined DNA structures. Our results show that the Ku80 CTR is required for interaction with DNA-PKcs on short segments of blunt ended 25bp dsDNA or 25bp dsDNA with a 15-base poly dA single stranded (ss) DNA extension, but this requirement is less stringent on longer dsDNA molecules (35bp blunt ended dsDNA) or 25bp duplex DNA with either a 15-base poly dT or poly dC ssDNA extension. Moreover, the DNA-PKcs-Ku complex preferentially forms on 25 bp DNA with a poly-pyrimidine ssDNA extension.Our work clarifies the role of the Ku80 CTR and dsDNA ends on the interaction of DNA-PKcs with Ku and provides key information to guide assembly and biology of NHEJ complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Interactions of Escherichia coli molecular chaperone HtpG with DnaA replication initiator DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Grudniak, Anna M.; Markowska, Katarzyna; Wolska, Krystyna I.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial chaperone high-temperature protein G (HtpG), a member of the Hsp90 protein family, is involved in the protection of cells against a variety of environmental stresses. The ability of HtpG to form complexes with other bacterial proteins, especially those involved in fundamental functions, is indicative of its cellular role. An interaction between HtpG and DnaA, the main initiator of DNA replication, was studied both in vivo, using a bacterial two-hybrid system, and in vitro with a...

  1. Direct Visualization of Dynamic Protein-DNA Interactions with a Dedicated Atomic Force Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, S.J.T.; van der Werf, Kees; Eker, Andre P.M.; Wyman, Claire; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Photolyase DNA interactions and the annealing of restriction fragment ends are directly visualized with the atomic force microscope (AFM). To be able to interact with proteins, DNA must be loosely bound to the surface. When MgCl2 is used to immobilize DNA to mica, DNA is attached to the surface at

  2. Noncovalent Attachment of PbS Quantum Dots to Single- and Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Das

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Attachment of PbS quantum dots (QD to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT is described; wherein commercially obtained PbS-QD of size 2.7 nm, stabilized by oleic acid, are added to a suspension of single- or multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNT prefunctionalized noncovalently with 1,2-benzenedimethanethiol (1,2-BDMT in ethanol. The aromatic part of 1,2-BDMT attaches to the CNT by π-π stacking interactions, noncovalently functionalizing the CNT. The thiol part of the 1,2-BDMT on the functionalized CNT replaces oleic acid on the surface of the QD facilitating the noncovalent attachment of the QD to the CNT. The composites were characterized by TEM and FTIR spectroscopy. Quenching of NIR fluorescence of the PbS-QD on attachment to the carbon nanotubes (CNT was observed, indicating FRET from the QD to the CNT.

  3. Biological activities and DNA interactions of Amanita ovoidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Hasan Hüseyin; Arslan, Emine

    2015-01-01

    Amanita ovoidea (Bull.) Link (Amanitaceae) is a well-known species due to its pleasant aroma and flavor since ancient times in the worldwide. This species is also known in Turkey and people consume it extensively. To evaluate medicinal importance of A. ovoidea for human health, to explain the effect of mushroom extracts on bacterial DNA, and to find preventive role on bacterial disease. Chloroform, acetone, and methanol extracts of A. ovoidea were tested for the antimicrobial activities against four Gram-positive bacteria, five Gram-negative bacteria, and yeast using a micro-dilution method. In addition, DNA binding, DNA cleavage activity, and restriction enzyme digestion of the methanol extract of A. ovoidea were examined at different concentrations (40.000-78.125 µg/mL). The highest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value observed against the test micro-organisms was with the chloroform extract (MIC 19.5 µg/mL concentration) against Candida albicans. Other highest antimicrobial effects observed against the test micro-organisms were with the methanol extracts against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Streptococcus pyogenes, Candida albicans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, and Salmonella enteritidis (MICs, 78 µg/mL concentrations). All concentrations reduced the mobility of plasmid DNA. BamHI and HindIII targeted specially to supercoils and cut them. Amanita ovoidea extract prevented cutting with HindIII by binding especially to the AA region in open circular DNA. Present results demonstrated that A. ovoidea has excellent antimicrobial and antifungal activities by its DNA interaction activity on pBR322.

  4. Nonadiabatic tapered optical fiber sensor for measuring interaction nicotine with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Pourbeyram, H.; Gholami, M.; Taghipour, Z.; Saeedian, Z.; Hosseini, S. M.

    2011-05-01

    A nonadiabatic tapered optical fiber sensor was utilized for studying of bimolecular interactions including DNA-DNA and DNA-Drug interaction. This work presents a simple evanescent wave sensing system based on an interferometric approach, suitable to meet the requirements of lable-free sensor systems for detecting biomolecular interactions. We have demonstrated the measuring refractive index and the real time detection of interactions between biomolecules. Furthermore basic experiments were carried out, for detecting the hybridization of 25-mer DNA with an immobilized counterpart on the surface. The overall shift after the successful DNA hybridization was 9.5 nm. In this work, a new approach for studying DNA-drug interactions was successfully tested. Nicotine as a carcinogenic compound in cigarette smoke plays an important role in interaction with DNA. Different concentrations of nicotine were applied to observe the Longmuir interaction with DNA.

  5. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Detecting molecules and their interactions lies at the heart of all biosensor devices, which have important applications in health, environmental monitoring and biomedicine. Achieving biosensing capability at the single molecule level is, moreover, a particularly important goal since single molecule biosensors would not only operate at the ultimate detection limit by resolving individual molecular interactions, but they could also monitor biomolecular properties which are otherwise obscured in ensemble measurements. For example, a single molecule biosensor could resolve the fleeting interaction kinetics between a molecule and its receptor, with immediate applications in clinical diagnostics. We have now developed a label-free biosensing platform that is capable of monitoring single DNA molecules and their interaction kinetics[1], hence achieving an unprecedented sensitivity in the optical domain, Figure 1. We resolve the specific contacts between complementary oligonucleotides, thereby detecting DNA strands with less than 2.4 kDa molecular weight. Furthermore we can discern strands with single nucleotide mismatches by monitoring their interaction kinetics. Our device utilizes small glass microspheres as optical transducers[1,2, 3], which are capable of increasing the number of interactions between a light beam and analyte molecules. A prism is used to couple the light beam into the microsphere. Ourr biosensing approach resolves the specific interaction kinetics between single DNA fragments. The optical transducer is assembled in a simple three-step protocol, and consists of a gold nanorod attached to a glass microsphere, where the surface of the nanorod is further modified with oligonucleotide receptors. The interaction kinetics of an oligonucleotide receptor with DNA fragments in the surrounding aqueous solution is monitored at the single molecule level[1]. The light remains confined inside the sphere where it is guided by total internal reflections along a

  6. Visualizing Chemical Interaction Dynamics of Confined DNA Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Gilead; Berard, Daniel; Stabile, Frank; Leslie, Sabrina

    We present a novel nanofluidic approach to controllably introducing reagent molecules to interact with confined biopolymers and visualizing the reaction dynamics in real time. By dynamically deforming a flow cell using CLiC (Convex Lens-induced Confinement) microscopy, we are able to tune reaction chamber dimensions from micrometer to nanometer scales. We apply this gentle deformation to load and extend DNA polymers within embedded nanotopographies and visualize their interactions with other molecules in solution. Quantifying the change in configuration of polymers within embedded nanotopographies in response to binding/unbinding of reagent molecules provides new insights into their consequent change in physical properties. CLiC technology enables an ultra sensitive, massively parallel biochemical analysis platform which can acces a broader range of interaction parameters than existing devices.

  7. DNMT1-interacting RNAs block gene specific DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Benoukraf, Touati; Amabile, Giovanni; Goff, Loyal A.; Terragni, Joylon; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; De Figureido Pontes, Lorena Lobo; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Zhang, Pu; Wu, Mengchu; D’Alò, Francesco; Melnick, Ari; Leone, Giuseppe; Ebralidze, Konstantin K.; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Rinn, John L.; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation was described almost a century ago. However, the rules governing its establishment and maintenance remain elusive. Here, we present data demonstrating that active transcription regulates levels of genomic methylation. We identified a novel RNA arising from the CEBPA gene locus critical in regulating the local DNA methylation profile. This RNA binds to DNMT1 and prevents CEBPA gene locus methylation. Deep sequencing of transcripts associated with DNMT1 combined with genome-scale methylation and expression profiling extended the generality of this finding to numerous gene loci. Collectively, these results delineate the nature of DNMT1-RNA interactions and suggest strategies for gene selective demethylation of therapeutic targets in disease. PMID:24107992

  8. Noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with porphyrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassiouk, María; Basiuk, Vladimir A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Basiuk, Elena V., E-mail: elenagd@unam.mx [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Álvarez-Zauco, Edgar [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Martínez-Herrera, Melchor [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Rojas-Aguilar, Aaron [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco, 07360 México D.F. (Mexico); Puente-Lee, Iván [Facultad de Química, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior C.U., 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2013-06-15

    The covalent and noncovalent interactions of porphyrins and related tetraazamacrocyclic compounds with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is a subject of increasing research effort, directed toward the design of novel hybrid nanomaterials combining unique electronic and optical properties of both molecular species. In this report, we used different experimental techniques as well as molecular mechanics (MM) calculations to analyze the adsorption of meso-tetraphenylporphine (or 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine, H{sub 2}TPP) and its complexes with Ni(II) and Co(II) (NiTPP and CoTPP, respectively), as well as hemin (a natural porphyrin), onto the surface of SWNTs. Altogether, the results suggested that all four porphyrin species noncovalently interact with SWNTs, forming hybrid nanomaterials. Nevertheless, of all four porphyrin species, the strongest interaction with SWNTs occurs in the case of CoTPP, which is able to intercalate and considerably disperse SWNT bundles, and therefore absorb onto the surface of individual SWNTs. In contrast, NiTPP, CoTPP and hemin, due to a weaker interaction, are unable to do so and therefore are only capable to adsorb onto the surface of SWNT bundles. According to the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging and MM results, the adsorption of CoTPP onto SWNT sidewalls results in the formation of porphyrin arrays in the shape of long-period interacting helixes with variable periodicity, possibly due to different diameters and chiralities of SWNTs present in the samples. Since the remaining porphyrin species were found to adsorb onto the surface of SWNT bundles, the precise geometry of the corresponding porphyrin/SWNT complexes is difficult to characterize.

  9. Noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with porphyrins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassiouk, María; Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Basiuk, Elena V.; Álvarez-Zauco, Edgar; Martínez-Herrera, Melchor; Rojas-Aguilar, Aaron; Puente-Lee, Iván

    2013-01-01

    The covalent and noncovalent interactions of porphyrins and related tetraazamacrocyclic compounds with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is a subject of increasing research effort, directed toward the design of novel hybrid nanomaterials combining unique electronic and optical properties of both molecular species. In this report, we used different experimental techniques as well as molecular mechanics (MM) calculations to analyze the adsorption of meso-tetraphenylporphine (or 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphine, H 2 TPP) and its complexes with Ni(II) and Co(II) (NiTPP and CoTPP, respectively), as well as hemin (a natural porphyrin), onto the surface of SWNTs. Altogether, the results suggested that all four porphyrin species noncovalently interact with SWNTs, forming hybrid nanomaterials. Nevertheless, of all four porphyrin species, the strongest interaction with SWNTs occurs in the case of CoTPP, which is able to intercalate and considerably disperse SWNT bundles, and therefore absorb onto the surface of individual SWNTs. In contrast, NiTPP, CoTPP and hemin, due to a weaker interaction, are unable to do so and therefore are only capable to adsorb onto the surface of SWNT bundles. According to the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging and MM results, the adsorption of CoTPP onto SWNT sidewalls results in the formation of porphyrin arrays in the shape of long-period interacting helixes with variable periodicity, possibly due to different diameters and chiralities of SWNTs present in the samples. Since the remaining porphyrin species were found to adsorb onto the surface of SWNT bundles, the precise geometry of the corresponding porphyrin/SWNT complexes is difficult to characterize.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, DNA/protein interaction and cytotoxicity studies of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes derived from dipyridyl triazole ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yao, Di; Wei, Yi; Tang, Jie; Bian, He-Dong; Huang, Fu-Ping; Liang, Hong

    2016-06-15

    Four different transition metal complexes containing dipyridyl triazole ligands, namely [Cu(abpt)2Cl2]·2H2O (1), [Cu(abpt)2(ClO4)2] (2), [Co2(abpt)2(H2O)2Cl2]·Cl2·4H2O (3) and [Co2(Hbpt)2(CH3OH)2(NO3)2] (4) have been designed, synthesized and further structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography, ESI-MS, elemental analysis, IR and Raman spectroscopy. In these complexes, the both ligands act as bidentate ligands with N, N donors. DNA binding interactions with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) of the ligand and its complexes 1~4 were investigated via electronic absorption, fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism and viscosity measurements as well as confocal Laser Raman spectroscopy. The results show these complexes are able to bind to DNA via the non-covalent mode i.e. intercalation and groove binding or electrostatic interactions. The interactions with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were also studied using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopic methods which indicated that fluorescence quenching of BSA by these compounds was the presence of both static and dynamic quenching. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxic effects of the complexes against four cell lines SK-OV-3, HL-7702, BEL7404 and NCI-H460 showed the necessity of the coordination action on the biological properties on the respective complex and that all four complexes exhibited substantial cytotoxic activity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Biophysics of DNA-Protein Interactions From Single Molecules to Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Mark C

    2011-01-01

    This book presents a concise overview of current research on the biophysics of DNA-protein interactions. A wide range of new and classical methods are presented by authors investigating physical mechanisms by which proteins interact with DNA. For example, several chapters address the mechanisms by which proteins search for and recognize specific binding sites on DNA, a process critical for cellular function. Single molecule methods such as force spectroscopy as well as fluorescence imaging and tracking are described in these chapters as well as other parts of the book that address the dynamics of protein-DNA interactions. Other important topics include the mechanisms by which proteins engage DNA sequences and/or alter DNA structure. These simple but important model interactions are then placed in the broader biological context with discussion of larger protein-DNA complexes . Topics include replication forks, recombination complexes, DNA repair interactions, and ultimately, methods to understand the chromatin...

  12. Interaction between DNA Polymerase β and BRCA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Masaoka

    Full Text Available The breast cancer 1 (BRCA1 protein is a tumor suppressor playing roles in DNA repair and cell cycle regulation. Studies of DNA repair functions of BRCA1 have focused on double-strand break (DSB repair pathways and have recently included base excision repair (BER. However, the function of BRCA1 in BER is not well defined. Here, we examined a BRCA1 role in BER, first in relation to alkylating agent (MMS treatment of cells and the BER enzyme DNA polymerase β (pol β. MMS treatment of BRCA1 negative human ovarian and chicken DT40 cells revealed hypersensitivity, and the combined gene deletion of BRCA1 and pol β in DT40 cells was consistent with these factors acting in the same repair pathway, possibly BER. Using cell extracts and purified proteins, BRCA1 and pol β were found to interact in immunoprecipitation assays, yet in vivo and in vitro assays for a BER role of BRCA1 were negative. An alternate approach with the human cells of immunofluorescence imaging and laser-induced DNA damage revealed negligible BRCA1 recruitment during the first 60 s after irradiation, the period typical of recruitment of pol β and other BER factors. Instead, 15 min after irradiation, BRCA1 recruitment was strong and there was γ-H2AX co-localization, consistent with DSBs and repair. The rapid recruitment of pol β was similar in BRCA1 positive and negative cells. However, a fraction of pol β initially recruited remained associated with damage sites much longer in BRCA1 positive than negative cells. Interestingly, pol β expression was required for BRCA1 recruitment, suggesting a partnership between these repair factors in DSB repair.

  13. Physical manipulation of single-molecule DNA using microbead and its application to analysis of DNA-protein interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Katsura, Shinji; Mizuno, Akira

    2009-01-01

    We carried out an individual DNA manipulation using an optical trapping for a microbead. This manipulation system is based on a fluorescent microscopy equipped with an IR laser. Both ends of linear DNA molecule were labeled with a biotin and a thiol group, respectively. Then the biotinylated end was attached to a microbead, and the other was immobilized on a thiol-linkable glass surface. We controlled the form of an individual DNA molecule by moving the focal point of IR laser, which trapped the microbead. In addition, we applied single-molecule approach to analyze DNA hydrolysis. We also used microchannel for single-molecule observation of DNA hydrolysis. The shortening of DNA in length caused by enzymatic hydrolysis was observed in real-time. The single-molecule DNA manipulation should contribute to elucidate detailed mechanisms of DNA-protein interactions

  14. DNA Encoding Training Using 3D Gesture Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Stelian; Handrea, Flavia-Laura; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara

    2017-01-01

    The work described in this paper summarizes the development process and presents the results of a human genetics training application, studying the 20 amino acids formed by the combination of the 3 nucleotides of DNA targeting mainly medical and bioinformatics students. Currently, the domain applications using recognized human gestures of the Leap Motion sensor are used in molecules controlling and learning from Mendeleev table or in visualizing the animated reactions of specific molecules with water. The novelty in the current application consists in using the Leap Motion sensor creating new gestures for the application control and creating a tag based algorithm corresponding to each amino acid, depending on the position in the 3D virtual space of the 4 nucleotides of DNA and their type. The team proposes a 3D application based on Unity editor and on Leap Motion sensor where the user has the liberty of forming different combinations of the 20 amino acids. The results confirm that this new type of study of medicine/biochemistry using the Leap Motion sensor for handling amino acids is suitable for students. The application is original and interactive and the users can create their own amino acid structures in a 3D-like environment which they could not do otherwise using traditional pen-and-paper.

  15. Investigation of the interaction of sertraline with calf thymus DNA by spectroscopic methods

    OpenAIRE

    Dorraji,Parisa S.; Jalali,Fahimeh

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of the antidepressant drug, sertraline, with calf thymus double stranded DNA (dsDNA) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) was investigated by UV-Vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), viscosity measurements and DNA melting studies. The absorption spectra of the drug with DNA showed a hyperchromic effect. Using Hoechst reagent as a fluorescence probe, quenching of the emission peak occurred in the DNA-Hoechst m...

  16. Cytotoxic and DNA-topoisomerase effects of lapachol amine derivatives and interactions with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Esteves-Souza

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxic activity of amino (3a-e, aza-1-antraquinone (4a-e lapachol derivatives against Ehrlich carcinoma and human K562 leukemia cells was investigated. Cell viability was determined using MTT assay, after 48 (Ehrlich or 96 h (K562 of culture, and vincristine (for K562 leukemia and quercetin (for Ehrlich carcinoma were used as positive controls. The results showed dose-dependent growth-inhibiting activities and that the amino derivatives were active against the assayed cells, whereas the 4a-e derivatives were not. The allylamine derivative 3a was the most active against Ehrlich carcinoma, with IC50 = 16.94 ± 1.25 µM, and against K562 leukemia, with IC50 = 14.11 ± 1.39 µM. The analogous lawsone derivative, 5a, was also active against Ehrlich carcinoma (IC50 = 23.89 ± 2.3 µM, although the 5d and 5e derivatives showed lower activity. The interaction between 3a-d and calf thymus DNA was investigated by fluorimetric titration and the results showed a hyperchromic effect indicating binding to DNA as presented of ethidium bromide, used as positive control. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase II-a was also evaluated by a relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid, and the etoposide (200 µM was used as positive control. Significant inhibitory activities were observed for 3a-d at 200 µM and a partial inhibitory action was observed for lapachol and methoxylapachol.

  17. Cytotoxic and DNA-topoisomerase effects of lapachol amine derivatives and interactions with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves-Souza, A; Figueiredo, D V; Esteves, A; Câmara, C A; Vargas, M D; Pinto, A C; Echevarria, A

    2007-10-01

    The cytotoxic activity of amino (3a-e), aza-1-antraquinone (4a-e) lapachol derivatives against Ehrlich carcinoma and human K562 leukemia cells was investigated. Cell viability was determined using MTT assay, after 48 (Ehrlich) or 96 h (K562) of culture, and vincristine (for K562 leukemia) and quercetin (for Ehrlich carcinoma) were used as positive controls. The results showed dose-dependent growth-inhibiting activities and that the amino derivatives were active against the assayed cells, whereas the 4a-e derivatives were not. The allylamine derivative 3a was the most active against Ehrlich carcinoma, with IC50 = 16.94 +/- 1.25 microM, and against K562 leukemia, with IC50 = 14.11 +/- 1.39 microM. The analogous lawsone derivative, 5a, was also active against Ehrlich carcinoma (IC50 = 23.89 +/- 2.3 microM), although the 5d and 5e derivatives showed lower activity. The interaction between 3a-d and calf thymus DNA was investigated by fluorimetric titration and the results showed a hyperchromic effect indicating binding to DNA as presented of ethidium bromide, used as positive control. The inhibitory action on DNA-topoisomerase II-a was also evaluated by a relaxation assay of supercoiled DNA plasmid, and the etoposide (200 microM) was used as positive control. Significant inhibitory activities were observed for 3a-d at 200 microM and a partial inhibitory action was observed for lapachol and methoxylapachol.

  18. Interactions between nucleic acids and antibodies to Z-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng, M.; Hartmann, B.; Malfoy, B.; Pilet, J.; Ramstein, J.; Sage, E.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we report some properties of the antibodies to Z-DNA. To determine more precisely the antigenic determinant, the interactions between the antibodies and several polynucleotides have been studied. We found that the antibodies bind very weakly to poly(dI-br 5 dC).(dI-br 5 dC). This polynucleotide can adopt the Z conformation in high salt concentration, as we have demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, from the study of the exchange rate of the protons involved in hydrogen bonds in this polynucleotide and from previous studies on poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) (Ramstein and Leng 1980; Pilet and Leng 1982), we propose a quantitative description of the dynamic structure of the Z form. 34 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  19. A General Method for Discovering Inhibitors of Protein–DNA Interactions Using Photonic Crystal Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Leo L.; Pineda, Maria; Heeres, James T.; Hergenrother, Paul J.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2008-01-01

    Protein–DNA interactions are essential for fundamental cellular processes such as transcription, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis. As such, small molecule disruptors of these interactions could be powerful tools for investigation of these biological processes, and such compounds would have great potential as therapeutics. Unfortunately, there are few methods available for the rapid identification of compounds that disrupt protein–DNA interactions. Here we show that photonic crystal (PC) techn...

  20. Uracil DNA glycosylase BKRF3 contributes to Epstein-Barr virus DNA replication through physical interactions with proteins in viral DNA replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Mei-Tzu; Liu, I-Hua; Wu, Chia-Wei; Chang, Shu-Ming; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Yang, Pei-Wen; Chuang, Yu-Chia; Lee, Chung-Pei; Chen, Mei-Ru

    2014-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BKRF3 shares sequence homology with members of the uracil-N-glycosylase (UNG) protein family and has DNA glycosylase activity. Here, we explored how BKRF3 participates in the DNA replication complex and contributes to viral DNA replication. Exogenously expressed Flag-BKRF3 was distributed mostly in the cytoplasm, whereas BKRF3 was translocated into the nucleus and colocalized with the EBV DNA polymerase BALF5 in the replication compartment during EBV lytic replication. The expression level of BKRF3 increased gradually during viral replication, coupled with a decrease of cellular UNG2, suggesting BKRF3 enzyme activity compensates for UNG2 and ensures the fidelity of viral DNA replication. In immunoprecipitation-Western blotting, BKRF3 was coimmuno-precipitated with BALF5, the polymerase processivity factor BMRF1, and the immediate-early transactivator Rta. Coexpression of BMRF1 appeared to facilitate the nuclear targeting of BKRF3 in immunofluorescence staining. Residues 164 to 255 of BKRF3 were required for interaction with Rta and BALF5, whereas residues 81 to 166 of BKRF3 were critical for BMRF1 interaction in glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown experiments. Viral DNA replication was defective in cells harboring BKRF3 knockout EBV bacmids. In complementation assays, the catalytic mutant BKRF3(Q90L,D91N) restored viral DNA replication, whereas the leucine loop mutant BKRF3(H213L) only partially rescued viral DNA replication, coupled with a reduced ability to interact with the viral DNA polymerase and Rta. Our data suggest that BKRF3 plays a critical role in viral DNA synthesis predominantly through its interactions with viral proteins in the DNA replication compartment, while its enzymatic activity may be supplementary for uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) function during virus replication. Catalytic activities of both cellular UDG UNG2 and viral UDGs contribute to herpesviral DNA replication. To ensure that the enzyme activity executes at

  1. Interaction of large DNA viruses with dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenne, L; Thumann, P; Steinkasserer, A

    2001-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) with their unique capacity to prime naïve T cells are crucial in the induction of immunological responses, including anti-tumoral and anti-viral immunity. DC based immunotherapies are thus currently considered a particularly promising approach for cellular immunotherapy. The cloning of tumor associated antigens (TAAs) together with the possibility of manipulating viral genomes by biotechnological techniques has sparked the interest of using genetically modified viruses to transduce DC in order to achieve antigenic expression of TAA with the aim of inducing a protective immune response. An increasing number of modified viral vectors has been designed for gene therapy purposes and consecutively has been used for the ex vivo transduction of DC. It has been shown that viral vectors genetically engineered to express TAA or immune modifiers like cytokines or costimulatory molecules can lead to a high level of transgene expression. Furthermore, these studies have also revealed that viruses have developed several immune evasion mechanisms specifically targeting DC. Therefore, analysing the interactions of viruses with DC is crucial for the development of new viral vectors suitable for the transduction of DC. In this report we describe the interaction of two large DNA viruses, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and vaccinia virus (VV), with DC generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  2. Interaction of E. coli Hsp90 with DnaK Involves the DnaJ Binding Region of DnaK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravats, Andrea N; Doyle, Shannon M; Hoskins, Joel R; Genest, Olivier; Doody, Erin; Wickner, Sue

    2017-03-24

    The 90-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) is a widely conserved and ubiquitous molecular chaperone that participates in ATP-dependent protein remodeling in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. It functions in conjunction with Hsp70 and the Hsp70 cochaperones, an Hsp40 (J-protein) and a nucleotide exchange factor. In Escherichia coli, the functional collaboration between Hsp90 Ec and Hsp70, DnaK, requires that the two chaperones directly interact. We used molecular docking to model the interaction of Hsp90 Ec and DnaK. The top-ranked docked model predicted that a region in the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of DnaK interacted with a region in the middle domain of Hsp90 Ec . We then made substitution mutants in DnaK residues suggested by the model to interact with Hsp90 Ec . Of the 12 mutants tested, 11 were defective or partially defective in their ability to interact with Hsp90 Ec in vivo in a bacterial two-hybrid assay and in vitro in a bio-layer interferometry assay. These DnaK mutants were also defective in their ability to function collaboratively in protein remodeling with Hsp90 Ec but retained the ability to act with DnaK cochaperones. Taken together, these results suggest that a specific region in the NBD of DnaK is involved in the interaction with Hsp90 Ec , and this interaction is functionally important. Moreover, the region of DnaK that we found to be necessary for Hsp90 Ec binding includes residues that are also involved in J-protein binding, suggesting a functional interplay among DnaK, DnaK cochaperones, and Hsp90 Ec . Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Analysis of Protein-DNA Interaction by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and DNA Tiling Microarray (ChIP-on-chip).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Zhao, Chunyan

    2018-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) has become the most effective and widely used tool to study the interactions between specific proteins or modified forms of proteins and a genomic DNA region. Combined with genome-wide profiling technologies, such as microarray hybridization (ChIP-on-chip) or massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq), ChIP could provide a genome-wide mapping of in vivo protein-DNA interactions in various organisms. Here, we describe a protocol of ChIP-on-chip that uses tiling microarray to obtain a genome-wide profiling of ChIPed DNA.

  4. Chronopotentiometric sensing of specific interactions between lysozyme and the DNA aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostatná, Veronika; Kasalová-Vargová, Veronika; Kékedy-Nagy, László; Černocká, Hana; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2017-04-01

    Specific DNA-protein interactions are vital for cellular life maintenance processes, such as transcriptional regulation, chromosome maintenance, replication and DNA repair, and their monitoring gives valuable information on molecular-level organization of those processes. Here, we propose a new method of label-free electrochemical sensing of sequence specific binding between the lysozyme protein and a single stranded DNA aptamer specific for lysozyme (DNA apta ) that exploits the constant current chronopotentiometric stripping (CPS) analysis at modified mercury electrodes. Specific lysozyme-DNA apta binding was distinguished from nonspecific lysozyme-DNA interactions at thioglycolic acid-modified mercury electrodes, but not at the dithiothreitol-modified or bare mercury electrodes. Stability of the surface-attached lysozyme-DNA apta layer depended on the stripping current (I str ) intensity, suggesting that the integrity of the layer critically depends on the time of its exposure to negative potentials. Stabilities of different lysozyme-DNA complexes at the negatively polarized electrode surface were tested, and it was shown that structural transitions of the specific lysozyme-DNA apta complexes occur in the I str ranges different from those observed for assemblies of lysozyme with DNA sequences capable of only nonspecific lysozyme-DNA interactions. Thus, the CPS allows distinct discrimination between specific and non-specific protein-DNA binding and provides valuable information on stability of the nucleic acid-protein interactions at the polarized interfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A Novel Open Tubular Capillary Electrochromatographic Method for Differentiating the DNA Interaction Affinity of Environmental Contaminants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia D'Ulivo

    Full Text Available The interaction of chemicals with DNA may lead to genotoxicity, mutation or carcinogenicity. A simple open tubular capillary electrochromatographic method is proposed to rapidly assess the interaction affinity of three environmental contaminants (1,4-phenylenediamine, pyridine and 2,4-diaminotoluene to DNA by measuring their retention in the capillaries coated with DNA probes. DNA oligonucleotide probes were immobilized on the inner wall of a fused silica capillary that was first derivatized with 3-(aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES. The difference in retention times and factors was considered as the difference in interaction affinity of the contaminants to the DNA probes. The interaction of the contaminants with both double-stranded (dsDNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA coatings was compared. Retention factors of 1,4-phenylenediamine, pyridine and 2,4-diaminotoluene in the capillary coated with ssDNA probe were 0.29, 0.42, and 0.44, respectively. A similar trend was observed in the capillary coated with dsDNA, indicating that 2,4-diaminotoluene has the highest affinity among the three contaminants. The relative standard deviation (RSD for the retention factors was in the range of 0.05-0.69% (n = 3. The results demonstrated that the developed technique could be applied for preliminary screening purpose to provide DNA interaction affinity information of various environmental contaminants.

  6. DNA interactions with a Methylene Blue redox indicator depend on the DNA length and are sequence specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjami, Elaheh; Clima, Lilia; Gothelf, Kurt V; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2010-06-01

    A DNA molecular beacon approach was used for the analysis of interactions between DNA and Methylene Blue (MB) as a redox indicator of a hybridization event. DNA hairpin structures of different length and guanine (G) content were immobilized onto gold electrodes in their folded states through the alkanethiol linker at the 5'-end. Binding of MB to the folded hairpin DNA was electrochemically studied and compared with binding to the duplex structure formed by hybridization of the hairpin DNA to a complementary DNA strand. Variation of the electrochemical signal from the DNA-MB complex was shown to depend primarily on the DNA length and sequence used: the G-C base pairs were the preferential sites of MB binding in the duplex. For short 20 nts long DNA sequences, the increased electrochemical response from MB bound to the duplex structure was consistent with the increased amount of bound and electrochemically readable MB molecules (i.e. MB molecules that are available for the electron transfer (ET) reaction with the electrode). With longer DNA sequences, the balance between the amounts of the electrochemically readable MB molecules bound to the hairpin DNA and to the hybrid was opposite: a part of the MB molecules bound to the long-sequence DNA duplex seem to be electrochemically mute due to long ET distance. The increasing electrochemical response from MB bound to the short-length DNA hybrid contrasts with the decreasing signal from MB bound to the long-length DNA hybrid and allows an "off"-"on" genosensor development.

  7. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Chicago Univ., IL; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1993-01-01

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the DNA-nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) plays an important role in radiation response. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure may exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and maintaining DNA ends in close proximity for more rapid and accurate rejoining. In addition, the open configuration at these matrix attachment sites may serve to facilitate rapid DNA processing of breaks by providing (1) sites for repair proteins to collect and (2) energy to drive enzymatic reactions

  8. Studies on the arctiin and its interaction with DNA by spectral methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yantao; Zhang Hanqi; Bi Shuyun; Zhou Xiaofu; Wang Liang; Yan Yongsheng

    2011-01-01

    The emission spectra of arctiin were determined under various experimental conditions. In addition, a fluorescence method was developed to obtain the binding constants and sites of the interaction between arctiin and DNA. A competitive binding experiment and melting temperature mensuration were carried out to investigate the binding mechanism of arctiin and DNA. The experimental results showed that the interaction between arctiin and DNA belongs to a groove binding mode. - Highlights: → Determined the emission spectra of arctiin by fluorescence spectrometry. → Obtain the binding constants and sites of interaction between arctiin and DNA. → Calculate the binding parameters according an improved calculation method.

  9. Comparison on the interaction of Al3+/nano-Al13 with calf thymus DNA /salmon sperm DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Ma, Yue; Du, Changwen; Yang, Xiaodi; Shen, Renfang

    2015-11-01

    The conformation change, binding mode and binding site between Al3+/nano-Al13 and calf thymus DNA/salmon sperm DNA were investigated by UV-vis absorption, FTIR spectra, Raman spectroscopy and CD spectra, as well as melting curves measurement. The UV-vis spectra and circular dichroism spectra results suggested that the phosphate group structure was changed when Al3+ interacted with DNA, while the double-helix was distorted when nano-Al13 interacted with DNA. The FTIR and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the binding sites were Al3+ … PO2, Al3+ … N7/guanine PO2 … Al13 … N7-C8/guanine with calf thymus DNA, and Al3+ … N3-O2/cytosine, Al3+ … N7-C8/guanine, PO2 … Al13 … N7-C8/guanine, PO2 … Al13 … N1/adenine with salmon sperm DNA, respectively. The electrostatic binding was existed between Al3+ and DNA, and the electrostatic binding and complexing were found between nano-Al13 and DNA.

  10. Geometric Shape Regulation and Noncovalent Synthesis of One-Dimensional Organic Luminescent Nano-/Micro-Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Zuolun; Zhang, Shoufeng; Wei, Jinbei; Ye, Kaiqi; Liu, Yu; Marder, Todd B; Wang, Yue

    2017-08-03

    Noncovalent synthesis of one-dimensional (1D) organic nano-/micro-materials with controllable geometric shapes or morphologies and special luminescent and electronic properties is one of the greatest challenges in modern chemistry and material science. Control of noncovalent interactions is fundamental for realizing desired 1D structures and crucial for understanding the functions of these interactions. Here, a series of thiophene-fused phenazines composed of a halogen-substituted π-conjugated plate and a pair of flexible side chains is presented, which displays halogen-dependent 1D self-assemblies. Luminescent 1D twisted wires, straight rods, and zigzag wires, respectively, can be generated in sequence when the halogen atoms are varied from the lightest F to the heaviest I. It was demonstrated that halogen-dependent anisotropic noncovalent interactions and mirror-symmetrical crystallization dominated the 1D-assembly behaviors of this class of molecules. The methodology developed in this study provides a potential strategy for constructing 1D organic materials with unique optoelectronic functions.

  11. Electrochemical and calorimetric investigation of interaction of novel biscationic anticancer agents with DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Láuris Lucia da; Donnici, Claudio Luis; Lopes, Júlio César Dias; Goulart, Marília Oliveira Fonseca; Abreu, Fabiane Caxico de; Paula, Francine Santos de; Bravo, Carlos E. Salas; Santoro, Marcelo Matos; Denadai, Ângelo Márcio Leite; Santos, Alexandre Martins Costa; Montanari, Carlos Alberto

    2012-01-01

    ELECTROCHEMICAL AND CALORIMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF INTERACTION OF NOVEL BISCATIONIC ANTICANCER AGENTS WITH DNA. Biscationic amidines bind in the DNA minor groove and present biological activity against a range of infectious diseases. Two new biscationic compounds (bis-alpha,omega-S-thioureido, amino and sulfide analogues) were synthesized in good yields and fully characterized, and their interaction with DNA was also investigated. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to measure the ...

  12. Simulating Molecular Interactions of Carbon Nanoparticles with a Double-Stranded DNA Fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions between carbon nanoparticles (CNPs and a double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (dsDNA fragment were investigated using molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Six types of CNPs including fullerenes (C60 and C70, (8,0 single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT, (8,0 double-walled carbon nanotube (DWNT, graphene quantum dot (GQD, and graphene oxide quantum dot (GOQD were studied. Analysis of the best geometry indicates that the dsDNA fragment can bind to CNPs through pi-stacking and T-shape. Moreover, C60, DWNT, and GOQD bind to the dsDNA molecules at the minor groove of the nucleotide, and C70, SWNT, and GQD bind to the dsDNA molecules at the hydrophobic ends. Estimated interaction energy implies that van der Waals force may mainly contribute to the mechanisms for the dsDNA-C60, dsDNA-C70, and dsDNA-SWNT interactions and electrostatic force may contribute considerably to the dsDNA-DWNT, dsDNA-GQD, and dsDNA-GOQD interactions. On the basis of the results from large-scale MD simulations, it was found that the presence of the dsDNA enhances the dispersion of C60, C70, and SWNT in water and has a slight impact on DWNT, GQD, and GOQD.

  13. Biological significance of facilitated diffusion in protein-DNA interactions. Applications to T4 endonuclease V-initiated DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowd, D.R.; Lloyd, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Facilitated diffusion along nontarget DNA is employed by numerous DNA-interactive proteins to locate specific targets. Until now, the biological significance of DNA scanning has remained elusive. T4 endonuclease V is a DNA repair enzyme which scans nontarget DNA and processively incises DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers which are produced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. In this study we tested the hypothesis that there exists a direct correlation between the degree of processivity of wild type and mutant endonuclease V molecules and the degree of enhanced UV resistance which is conferred to repair-deficient Eshcerichia coli. This was accomplished by first creating a series of endonuclease V mutants whose in vitro catalytic activities were shown to be very similar to that of the wild type enzyme. However, when the mechanisms by which these enzymes search nontarget DNA for its substrate were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the mutants displayed varying degrees of nontarget DNA scanning ranging from being nearly as processive as wild type to randomly incising dimers within the DNA population. The ability of these altered endonuclease V molecules to enhance UV survival in DNA repair-deficient E. coli then was assessed. The degree of enhanced UV survival was directly correlated with the level of facilitated diffusion. This is the first conclusive evidence directly relating a reduction of in vivo facilitated diffusion with a change in an observed phenotype. These results support the assertion that the mechanisms which DNA-interactive proteins employ in locating their target sites are of biological significance

  14. The importance of pKa in an analysis of the interaction of compounds with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Mouli; Nandy, Promita; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Das, Piyal; Das, Saurabh

    2018-05-01

    pK a of a compound is crucial for determining the contributions of different forms of it towards overall binding with DNA. Hence it is important to use correct pK a values in DNA interaction studies. This study takes a look at the importance of pK a values to realize binding of compounds with DNA. Since pK a of a compound determined in the presence of DNA is quite different from that determined in its absence hence, presence of different forms of a compound during interaction with DNA is different from that realized if the determination of pK a is done in normal aqueous solution in absence of DNA. Hence, calculations determining contributions of different forms of a compound interacting with DNA are affected accordingly. Two simple analogues of anthracyclines, alizarin and purpurin, were used to investigate the influence DNA has on pK a values. Indeed, they were different in presence of DNA than when determined in normal aqueous solution. pK a1 for alizarin and purpurin determined in the absence and presence of calf thymus DNA were used in equations that determine contributions of two forms (neutral and anionic) towards overall binding with DNA. The study concludes that correct pK a values, determined correctly i.e. under appropriate conditions, must be used for DNA binding experiments to evaluate contributions of individual forms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Interaction of vasicine with calf thymus DNA: Molecular docking, spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. S., Sai Murali; R. S., Sai Siddhardha; Rajesh Babu, D.; Venketesh, S.; Basavaraju, R.; Nageswara Rao, G.

    2017-06-01

    The present study brings out the interaction between vasicine, an alkaloid and Adhatoda vasica Nees with double stranded DNA. The physico-chemical interaction between small molecules and nucleic acids is a major area of focus in screening drugs against various cancers. Molecular probing in our study using Molecular Operating Environment (MOE) has revealed interaction of vasicine with DNA double helix. Here we report the interaction of vasicine with Calf thymus DNA. We present for the first time the results obtained from UV-visible, fluorescence spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric techniques that suggest a moderate to strong electrostatic, hydrophobic and van der Waals interactions mediating the DNA binding properties of vasicine, leading to disruption of DNA secondary structure.

  16. Interactions of quercetin-uranium complexes with biomembranes and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attia, Enas Mohammed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    has been also confirmed from the DFT calculations. Finally, interaction experiments of uranyl-quercetin complex with DNA have been performed to assess an alternative uranyl-trapping and photoreduction system. The data show that consecutive addition of quercetin and uranyl destabilizes DNA. However, a preformed uranyl quercetin complex has very little effect on DNA structure. On the other hand, quercetin and uranyl appear to bind to DNA as a preformed complex in the loop portion of hairpin DNA. Therefore, also HP DNA is expected to be a suitable but less effective trapping system for the uranyl quercetin complex and its potential photoproducts.

  17. Dynamic DNA Helicase-DNA Polymerase Interactions Assure Processive Replication Fork Movement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdan, Samir M.; Johnson, Donald E.; Tanner, Nathan A.; Lee, Jong-Bong; Qimron, Udi; Tabor, Stanley; Oijen, Antoine M. van; Richardson, Charles C.

    2007-01-01

    A single copy of bacteriophage T7 DNA polymerase and DNA helicase advance the replication fork with a processivity greater than 17,000 nucleotides. Nonetheless, the polymerase transiently dissociates from the DNA without leaving the replisome. Ensemble and single-molecule techniques demonstrate that

  18. Cytotoxicity and DNA interaction of brucine and strychnine-Two alkaloids of semen strychni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Xiaolin; Han, Xu; Tan, Xiaoxin; Kang, Weijun

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxicities of the two alkaloids strychnine and brucine from the seed of Strychnos nux-vomica and their interaction with DNA were investigated. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrasolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to examine the growth inhibitory effects of these alkaloids on Vero cells after 24, 48 and 72h of incubation. The cytotoxicities of strychnine and brucine were found to be time- and concentration-dependent. Strychnine was determined to be more toxic to Vero cells than brucine. At the same time, the interactions of strychnine and brucine with DNA were investigated using neutral red (NR) dye as a probe by UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and an examination of the ionic strength effect, and the effects of alkaloids on DNA melting were also examined. The results indicated that a DNA-brucine mixture but not a DNA-strychnine mixture could be extracted from Vero cells after treatment with brucine and strychnine, respectively. Brucine competitively intercalated into the DNA double-helix causing fluorescence quenching of the DNA-NR system. UV absorption spectroscopy and the melting temperature (Tm) curve also provided evidence that brucine interacted with DNA through intercalation. Furthermore, the results of the ionic strength effect experiment suggested that electrostatic interactions between brucine and phosphate groups in the DNA backbone might also play an important role in the binding of brucine to DNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Study on the interaction of anthracenyl-methyl homospermidine conjugate (ANTMHspd) with DNA by spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiyong; Zhao, Luyao; Dong, Huanyang; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yijuan; Ren, Qianlei; Shao, Shuangyu; Huang, Yingying; Song, Lina; Guo, Tao; Xu, Xuejun; Wang, Chaojie

    2017-04-01

    The interaction between anthracenyl-methyl homospermidine conjugate (ANTMHspd) with herring sperm DNA was investigated by UV/vis absorption, fluorescent spectra, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and 1 HNMR under physiological conditions (pH=7.4). The observed hypochromism effect and fluorescence quenching of ANTMHspd by DNA, and the displacement of EB from DNA-EB system by ANTMHspd suggested that ANTMHspd might interact with DNA by the combined mode of intercalation and groove binding. Further fluorescent tests at different temperatures revealed that the quenching mechanism was a static type. The quenching constant, binding constant and thermodynamic parameter obtained from fluorescence showed that the type of interaction force included mainly hydrogen bonding and van der Waals, which promoted the binding process. The CD test revealed that ANTMHspd could cause the B to A-like conformational change while ANTMHspd is not a typical DNA intercalator. The 1 H NMR tests showed that ANTMHspd partially intercalated DNA. The effect of NaCl and KI on ANTMHspd-DNA interaction provided additional evidences of intercalation. Molecular docking simulation was carried out and the docking model in silico suggested that the binding modes of ANTMHspd and DNA were groove binding and intercalation, with the anthracene moiety inserted in DNA base pairs and the polyamine chain embedded in the DNA groove. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. synthesis, DNA interaction and comparison of lipase inhibition propert

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GÜNAY KAYA KANTAR

    Abstract. Novel eugenol-substituted zinc(II) azaphthalocyanines (ZnAzaPcs) were synthesised and their lipase inhibition and DNA binding properties compared with phthalocyanines (Pcs) containing eugenol. This is the first study on lipase inhibition and DNA binding of Pcs and AzaPcs containing a pharmacophore group, ...

  1. Spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on the interaction of antiviral drug nevirapine with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Neda Hosseinpour; Salehzadeh, Sadegh; Shahabadi, Nahid

    2017-09-02

    The interaction of calf thymus DNA with nevirapine at physiological pH was studied by using absorption, circular dichroism, viscosity, differential pulse voltammetry, fluorescence techniques, salt effect studies and computational methods. The drug binds to ct-DNA in a groove binding mode, as shown by slight variation in the viscosity of ct-DNA. Furthermore, competitive fluorimetric studies with Hoechst 33258 indicate that nevirapine binds to DNA via groove binding. Moreover, the structure of nevirapine was optimized by DFT calculations and was used for the molecular docking calculations. The molecular docking results suggested that nevirapine prefers to bind on the minor groove of ct-DNA.

  2. New mixed ligand palladium(II) complexes based on the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate and bioactive nitrogen-donor ligands: Synthesis, structural characterization, binding interactions with DNA and BSA, in vitro cytotoxicity studies and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Leila; Chiniforoshan, Hossein; Tavakol, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    The complexes [Pd(valp)2(imidazole)2] (1), [Pd(valp)2(pyrazine)2] (2) (valp is sodium valproate) have been synthesized and characterized using IR, 1H NMR, 13C{1H} NMR and UV-Vis spectrometry. The interaction of complexes with CT-DNA has been investigated using spectroscopic tools and viscosity measurement. In each case, the association constant (Kb) was deduced from the absorption spectral study and the number of binding sites (n) and the binding constant (K) were calculated from relevant fluorescence quenching data. As a result, a non-covalent interaction between the metal complex and DNA was suggested, which could be assigned to an intercalative binding. In addition, the interaction of 1 and 2 was ventured with bovine serum albumin (BSA) with the help of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. Through these techniques, the apparent association constant (Kapp) and the binding constant (K) could be calculated for each complex. Evaluation of cytotoxic activity of the complexes against four different cancer cell lines proved that the complexes exhibited cytotoxic specificity and significant cancer cell inhibitory rate. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to provide more evidence about the observed data. The majority of trans isomers were supported not only by energies, but also by the similarity of its calculated IR frequencies, UV adsorptions and NMR chemical shifts to the experimental values.

  3. DNAproDB: an interactive tool for structural analysis of DNA-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagendorf, Jared M; Berman, Helen M; Rohs, Remo

    2017-07-03

    Many biological processes are mediated by complex interactions between DNA and proteins. Transcription factors, various polymerases, nucleases and histones recognize and bind DNA with different levels of binding specificity. To understand the physical mechanisms that allow proteins to recognize DNA and achieve their biological functions, it is important to analyze structures of DNA-protein complexes in detail. DNAproDB is a web-based interactive tool designed to help researchers study these complexes. DNAproDB provides an automated structure-processing pipeline that extracts structural features from DNA-protein complexes. The extracted features are organized in structured data files, which are easily parsed with any programming language or viewed in a browser. We processed a large number of DNA-protein complexes retrieved from the Protein Data Bank and created the DNAproDB database to store this data. Users can search the database by combining features of the DNA, protein or DNA-protein interactions at the interface. Additionally, users can upload their own structures for processing privately and securely. DNAproDB provides several interactive and customizable tools for creating visualizations of the DNA-protein interface at different levels of abstraction that can be exported as high quality figures. All functionality is documented and freely accessible at http://dnaprodb.usc.edu. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Studies of DNA dumbbells VII: evaluation of the next-nearest-neighbor sequence-dependent interactions in duplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarzy, R; Vallone, P M; Goldstein, R F; Benight, A S

    1999-01-01

    Melting experiments were conducted on 22 DNA dumbbells as a function of solvent ionic strength from 25-115 mM Na(+). The dumbbell molecules have short duplex regions comprised of 16-20 base pairs linked on both ends by T(4) single-strand loops. Only the 4-8 central base pairs of the dumbbell stems differ for different molecules, and the six base pairs on both sides of the central sequence and adjoining loops on both ends are the same in every molecule. Results of melting analysis on the 22 new DNA dumbbells are combined with our previous results on 17 other DNA dumbbells, with stem lengths containing from 14-18 base pairs, reported in the first article of this series (Doktycz, Goldstein, Paner, Gallo, and Benight, Biopoly 32, 1992, 849-864). The combination of results comprises a database of optical melting parameters for 39 DNA dumbbells in ionic strengths from 25-115 mM Na(+). This database is employed to evaluate the thermodynamics of singlet, doublet, and triplet sequence-dependent interactions in duplex DNA. Analysis of the 25 mM Na(+) data reveals the existence of significant sequence-dependent triplet or next-nearest-neighbor interactions. The enthalpy of these interactions is evaluated for all possible triplets. Some of the triplet enthalpy values are less than the uncertainty in their evaluation, indicating no measurable interaction for that particular sequence. This finding suggests that the thermodynamic stability of duplex DNA depends on solvent ionic strength in a sequence-dependent manner. As a part of the analysis, the nearest-neighbor (base pair doublet) interactions in 55, 85, and 115 mM Na(+) are also reevaluated from the larger database. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Investigation on the toxic interaction of typical plasticizers with calf thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiaojing [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100, Shandong Province (China); Zong, Wansong, E-mail: gaocz@sdu.edu.cn [College of Population, Resources and Environment, Shandong Normal University, 88# East Wenhua Road, Jinan 250014 (China); Liu, Chunguang; Liu, Yang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100, Shandong Province (China); Gao, Canzhu, E-mail: rutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100, Shandong Province (China); Liu, Rutao [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100, Shandong Province (China)

    2015-05-15

    The interactions of typical plasticizers dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. Experimental results indicated that the characteristic fluorescence intensity of phthalic acid rose with the increase of DNA concentration; while the characteristic fluorescence intensities of plasticizers decreased with the increase of DNA concentration. Experiments on native and denatured DNA determined that plasticizers interacted with DNA both in groove and electrostatic binding mode. The molecular modeling results further illustrated that there is groove binding between them; hydrogen bonding and Van der Waals interactions were the main forces. With the extension of branched-chains, the binding effects between plasticizers and DNA were weakened, which could be related to the increased steric hindrance. - Highlights: • This work established the binding mode of plasticizers with DNA on molecular level. • The mechanism was explored by fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. • There are two kinds of binding mode between DMP, DEP, DBP and DNA, electrostatic and groove. • With the branched chain extension, the binding effect of plasticizers and DNA has been weakened.

  6. Synthesis of furan-based DNA binders and their interaction with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voege, Andrea; Hoffmann, Sascha; Gabel, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, many substances, based on naturally occurring DNA-binding molecules have been developed for the use in cancer therapy and as virostatica. Most of these substances are binding specifically to A-T rich sequences in the DNA minor groove. Neutral and positively charged DNA-binders are known. BNCT is most effective, which the boron is directly located in the cellular nucleus, so that the intercation with thermal neutrons can directly damage the DNA. To reach this aim, we have connected ammonioundecahydrododecaborate(1-) to DNA-binding structures such as 2,5-bis(4-formylphenyl)furan via a Schiff-Base reaction followed by a reduction of the imine to a secondary amine. In a following step the amine can be alkylated to insert positive charges to prevent repulsion between the compounds and the negatively charged sugar-phosphate-backbone of the DNA. (author)

  7. Interactions of photoactive DNAs with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase: Identification of peptides in the DNA binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, Y.J.K.; Evans, R.K.; Beach, C.M.; Coleman, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (terminal transferase) was specifically modified in the DNA binding site by a photoactive DNA substrate (hetero-40-mer duplex containing eight 5-azido-dUMP residues at one 3' end). Under optimal photolabeling conditions, 27-40% of the DNA was covalently cross-linked to terminal transferase. The specificity of the DNA and protein interaction was demonstrated by protection of photolabeling at the DNA binding domain with natural DNA substrates. In order to recover high yields of modified peptides from limited amounts of starting material, protein modified with 32 P-labeled photoactive DNA and digested with trypsin was extracted 4 times with phenol followed by gel filtration chromatography. All peptides not cross-linked to DNA were extracted into the phenol phase while the photolyzed DNA and the covalently cross-linked peptides remained in the aqueous phase. The 32 P-containing peptide-DNA fraction was subjected to amino acid sequence analysis. Two sequences, Asp 221 -Lys 231 (peptide B8) and Cys 234 -Lys 249 (peptide B10), present in similar yield, were identified. Structure predictions placed the two peptides in an α-helical array of 39 angstrom which would accommodate a DNA helix span of 11 nucleotides. These peptides share sequence similarity with a region in DNA polymerase β that has been implicated in the binding of DNA template

  8. Lichen secondary metabolites as DNA-interacting agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plšíková, J.; Štěpánková, Jana; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Bačkor, M.; Kozurková, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2014), s. 182-186 ISSN 0887-2333 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Lichens * DNA-binding * Topoisomerase I, II Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.903, year: 2014

  9. Nano-mechanical measurements of protein-DNA interactions with a silicon nitride pulley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Min Ju; Cohen, Adam E

    2016-01-08

    Proteins adhere to DNA at locations and with strengths that depend on the protein conformation, the underlying DNA sequence and the ionic content of the solution. A facile technique to probe the positions and strengths of protein-DNA binding would aid in understanding these important interactions. Here, we describe a 'DNA pulley' for position-resolved nano-mechanical measurements of protein-DNA interactions. A molecule of λ DNA is tethered by one end to a glass surface, and by the other end to a magnetic bead. The DNA is stretched horizontally by a magnet, and a nanoscale knife made of silicon nitride is manipulated to contact, bend and scan along the DNA. The mechanical profile of the DNA at the contact with the knife is probed via nanometer-precision optical tracking of the magnetic bead. This system enables detection of protein bumps on the DNA and localization of their binding sites. We study theoretically the technical requirements to detect mechanical heterogeneities in the DNA itself. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Binding characteristics and interactive region of 2-phenylpyrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yonghai; Zhong, Dandan; Luo, Jinhui; Tan, Hongliang; Chen, Shouhui; Li, Ping; Wang, Li; Wang, Tao

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between 2-phenylpyrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline (PQ) and DNA under physiological conditions was investigated using multi-spectroscopic techniques, atomic force microscopy and gel electrophoresis. The thermodynamic parameters were estimated and were discussed in detail. The results of fluorescence-quenching experiments indicated that the main interactive force between PQ and DNA was a hydrophobic interaction and that it was a static quenching process. Potassium iodide and single-strand (ss)DNA quenching studies, together with circular dichroism spectra implied groove binding of PQ with DNA. Atomic force microscopy and gel electrophoresis experiments suggested that there were no major conformational changes in DNA upon interaction with PQ. In addition, UV/vis absorption titration of DNA bases confirmed that PQ bound with DNA mainly through a minor groove interaction and preferentially interacted with adenine and thymine. We anticipate that this work will provide useful information for the application of quinazoline derivatives in the fields of medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with Pfu DNA polymerase and effect on polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L-P; Wang, S; Zhang, Z-W; Ma, Y-Y; Lai, Y-Q; Weng, J; Zhang, Q-Q

    2011-03-01

    The interaction of gold nanoparticles with Pfu DNA polymerase has been investigated by a number of biological, optical and electronic spectroscopic techniques. Polymerase chain reaction was performed to show gold nanoparticles' biological effect. Ultraviolet-visible and circular dichroism spectra analysis were applied to character the structure of Pfu DNA polymerase after conjugation with gold nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the bond properties of the polymerase-gold nanoparticles complex. The authors demonstrate that gold nanoparticles do not affect the amplification efficiency of polymerase chain reaction using Pfu DNA polymerase, and Pfu DNA polymerase displays no significant changes of the secondary structure upon interaction with gold nanoparticles. The adsorption of Pfu DNA polymerase to gold nanoparticles is mainly through Au-NH(2) bond and electrostatic interaction. These findings may have important implications regarding the safety issue as gold nanoparticles are widely used in biomedical applications.

  12. Studies on the Interaction between Zinc-Hydroxybenzoite Complex and Genomic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacali Necefoglu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Zinc-Hydroxybenzoite ([Zn (H206] (p-HO-C6H4COO22H20 complex which wassynthesized and characterized by instrumental methods and the DNA samples which hadbeen isolated from cattle were allowed to interact at 37 oC for different time periods. Theinteraction of genomic DNA with this complex has been followed by agarose gelelectrophoresis at 50 V for 2 h. When DNA samples were allowed to interact with this metalcomplex, it was found that band intensities changed with the concentrations of the complex.In the result of interaction between this complex and genomic DNA samples, it wasdetermined that the intensities of bands were changed at the different concentrations of thecomplex. The brightness of the bands was increased and mobility of the bands wasdecreased, indicating the occurrence of increased covalent binding of the metal complexwith DNA. In this study it was concluded that the damage effect of ascorbate was reducedby Zinc-Hydroxybenzoite.

  13. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusinska, Maria; Staruchova, Marta; Horska, Alexandra; Smolkova, Bozena; Collins, Andrew; Bonassi, Stefano; Volkovova, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  14. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusinska, Maria, E-mail: Maria.DUSINSKA@nilu.no [CEE-Health Effects Group, NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Staruchova, Marta; Horska, Alexandra [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Smolkova, Bozena [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Collins, Andrew [Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo (Norway); Bonassi, Stefano [Unit of Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome (Italy); Volkovova, Katarina [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  15. Modification of gelatin-DNA interaction for optimised DNA extraction from gelatin and gelatin capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Nurhidayatul Asma; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; El Sheikha, Aly Farag; Khairil Mokhtar, Nur Fadhilah; Ismail, Amin; Ali, Md Eaqub

    2016-05-01

    Poor quality and quantity of DNA extracted from gelatin and gelatin capsules often causes failure in the determination of animal species using PCR. Gelatin, which is mainly derived from porcine and bovine, has been a matter of concern among customers in order to fulfill religious obligation and safety precaution against several transmissible infectious diseases associated with bovine species. Thus, optimised DNA extraction from gelatin is very important for successful real-time PCR detection of gelatin species. In this work, the DNA extraction method was optimised in terms of lysis incubation period and inclusion of pre-treatment pH modification of samples. The yield of DNA extracted from porcine gelatin was significantly increased when the pH of the samples was adjusted to pH 8.5 prior to DNA precipitation with isopropanol. The optimal pH for DNA precipitation from bovine gelatin solution was then determined at the original pH range of solution: pH 7.6 to 8. A DNA fragment of approximately 300 base pairs was available for PCR amplification. DNA extracted from gelatin and commercially available capsules has been successfully utilised for species detection using real-time PCR assay. However, significant adulterations of porcine and bovine in pure gelatin and capsules have been detected, which require further analytical techniques for validation. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Molecular spectroscopic studies on the interaction of ferulic acid with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shufang; Sun, Xuejun; Qu, Fengli; Kong, Rongmei

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between ferulic acid and calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) under physiological conditions (Tris-HCl buffer solutions, pH 7.4) was investigated by UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, DNA melting techniques, and viscosity measurements. Results indicated that a complex of ferulic acid with ctDNA was formed with a binding constant of K290K = 7.60 × 104 L mol-1 and K310K = 4.90 × 104 L mol-1. The thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change (ΔH°), entropy change (ΔS°) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG°) were calculated to be -1.69 × 104 J mol-1, 35.36 J K-1 mol-1 and -2.79 × 104 J mol-1 at 310 K, respectively. The acting forces between ferulic acid and DNA mainly included hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonds. Acridine orange displacement studies revealed that ferulic acid can substitute for AO probe in the AO-DNA complex which was indicative of intercalation binding. Thermal denaturation study suggested that the interaction of ferulic acid with DNA could result in the increase of the denaturation temperature, which indicated that the stabilization of the DNA helix was increased in the presence of ferulic acid. Spectroscopic techniques together with melting techniques and viscosity determination provided evidences of intercalation mode of binding for the interaction between ferulic acid and ctDNA.

  17. Interaction of water with oriented DNA in the A- and B-form conformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandes, R.; Rupprecht, A.; Kearns, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    High resolution 2 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to investigate the interaction of D 2 O with solid samples of uniaxially oriented Li-DNA (B-form DNA) and Na-DNA (A- and B-form DNA). At low levels of hydration, 0 approximately 4 D 2 O/nucleotide, the 2 H spectra shows a very weak (due to short T2) broad single resonance, suggestive of unrestricted rotational diffusion of the water. At approximately 5 or more D 2 O/nucleotide, the Li-DNA (B-form) spectra suddenly exhibit a large doublet splitting, characteristic of partially ordered water. With increasing hydration, the general trend is a decrease of this splitting. From our analysis we show that the DNA water structure reorganizes as the DNA is progressively hydrated. The D 2 O interaction with Na-DNA is rather different than with Li-DNA. Below 10 D 2 O/nucleotide Na-DNA is normally expected to be in the A-form, and a small, or negligible splitting is observed. In the range 9-19 D 2 O/nucleotide, the splitting increases with increasing hydration. Above approximately 20 D 2 O/nucleotide Na-DNA converts entirely to the B-form and the D 2 O splittings are then similar to those found in Li-DNA. We show that the complex Na-DNA results obtained in the range 0-20 D 2 O/nucleotide are caused by a mixture of A- and B-DNA in those samples

  18. The dynamics of the monomeric restriction endonuclease BcnI during its interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, Georgij; Dikic, Jasmina; Schwarz, Friedrich W; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Seidel, Ralf; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2017-06-02

    Endonucleases that generate DNA double strand breaks often employ two independent subunits such that the active site from each subunit cuts either DNA strand. Restriction enzyme BcnI is a remarkable exception. It binds to the 5΄-CC/SGG-3΄ (where S = C or G, '/' designates the cleavage position) target as a monomer forming an asymmetric complex, where a single catalytic center approaches the scissile phosphodiester bond in one of DNA strands. Bulk kinetic measurements have previously shown that the same BcnI molecule cuts both DNA strands at the target site without dissociation from the DNA. Here, we analyse the BcnI DNA binding and target recognition steps at the single molecule level. We find, using FRET, that BcnI adopts either 'open' or 'closed' conformation in solution. Next, we directly demonstrate that BcnI slides over long distances on DNA using 1D diffusion and show that sliding is accompanied by occasional jumping events, where the enzyme leaves the DNA and rebinds immediately at a distant site. Furthermore, we quantify the dynamics of the BcnI interactions with cognate and non-cognate DNA, and determine the preferred binding orientation of BcnI to the target site. These results provide new insights into the intricate dynamics of BcnI-DNA interactions. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Protoparvovirus Interactions with the Cellular DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinjal Majumder

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Protoparvoviruses are simple single-stranded DNA viruses that infect many animal species. The protoparvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM infects murine and transformed human cells provoking a sustained DNA damage response (DDR. This DDR is dependent on signaling by the ATM kinase and leads to a prolonged pre-mitotic cell cycle block that features the inactivation of ATR-kinase mediated signaling, proteasome-targeted degradation of p21, and inhibition of cyclin B1 expression. This review explores how protoparvoviruses, and specifically MVM, co-opt the common mechanisms regulating the DDR and cell cycle progression in order to prepare the host nuclear environment for productive infection.

  20. Protoparvovirus Interactions with the Cellular DNA Damage Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Kinjal; Etingov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Protoparvoviruses are simple single-stranded DNA viruses that infect many animal species. The protoparvovirus minute virus of mice (MVM) infects murine and transformed human cells provoking a sustained DNA damage response (DDR). This DDR is dependent on signaling by the ATM kinase and leads to a prolonged pre-mitotic cell cycle block that features the inactivation of ATR-kinase mediated signaling, proteasome-targeted degradation of p21, and inhibition of cyclin B1 expression. This review explores how protoparvoviruses, and specifically MVM, co-opt the common mechanisms regulating the DDR and cell cycle progression in order to prepare the host nuclear environment for productive infection. PMID:29088070

  1. DNA interaction with platinum-based cytostatics revealed by DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerkova, Kristyna; Vaculovic, Tomas; Vaculovicova, Marketa; Kynicky, Jindrich; Brtnicky, Martin; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie; Hubalek, Jaromir; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-12-15

    The main mechanism of action of platinum-based cytostatic drugs - cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin - is the formation of DNA cross-links, which restricts the transcription due to the disability of DNA to enter the active site of the polymerase. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed as a simplified model of the amplification process in the cell nucleus. PCR with fluorescently labelled dideoxynucleotides commonly employed for DNA sequencing was used to monitor the effect of platinum-based cytostatics on DNA in terms of decrease in labeling efficiency dependent on a presence of the DNA-drug cross-link. It was found that significantly different amounts of the drugs - cisplatin (0.21 μg/mL), oxaliplatin (5.23 μg/mL), and carboplatin (71.11 μg/mL) - were required to cause the same quenching effect (50%) on the fluorescent labelling of 50 μg/mL of DNA. Moreover, it was found that even though the amounts of the drugs was applied to the reaction mixture differing by several orders of magnitude, the amount of incorporated platinum, quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, was in all cases at the level of tenths of μg per 5 μg of DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Li; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2009-08-18

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have attracted much attention on account of their potential to be transformed into new materials that can be employed to address a wide range of applications. The insolubility of the SWNTs in most solvents and the difficulties of handling these highly intractable carbon nanostructures, however, are restricting their real-life applications at the present time. To improve upon the properties of the SWNTs, low-cost and industrially feasible approaches to their modifications are constantly being sought by chemists and materials scientists. Together, they have shown that noncovalent functionalization of the SWNTs can do much to preserve the desired properties of the SWNTs while remarkably improving their solubilities. This Account describes recent advances in the design, synthesis, and characterization of SWNT hybrids and evaluates applications of these new hybrid materials based on noncovalently functionalized SWNTs. Their solubilization enables the characterization of these hybrids as well as the investigation of the properties of the SWNTs using solution-based techniques. Cognizant of the structural properties of the functional molecules on the SWNTs, we present some of the recent work carried out by ourselves and others under the umbrella of the following three subtopics: (i) aromatic small-molecule-based noncovalent functionalization, (ii) biomacromolecule-based noncovalent functionalization, and (iii) polymer-based noncovalent functionalization. Several examples for the applications of noncovalently functionalized SWNT hybrids in the fabrication of field-effect transistor (FET) devices, chemical sensors, molecular switch tunnel junctions (MSTJs), and photovoltaic devices are highlighted and discussed. The blossoming of new methods for the noncovalent functionalization of the SWNTs promises a new generation of SWNT hybrid-based integrated multifunctional sensors and devices, an outcome which is essential for the development of

  3. Thermodynamics of the Interaction between Alzheimer's Disease Related Tau Protein and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camero, Sergio; Benítez, María J.; Cuadros, Raquel; Hernández, Félix; Ávila, Jesús; Jiménez, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    Tau hyperphosphorylation can be considered as one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease and other tauophaties. Besides its well-known role as a microtubule associated protein, Tau displays a key function as a protector of genomic integrity in stress situations. Phosphorylation has been proven to regulate multiple processes including nuclear translocation of Tau. In this contribution, we are addressing the physicochemical nature of DNA-Tau interaction including the plausible influence of phosphorylation. By means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) we measured the equilibrium constant and the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes associated to the Tau-DNA complex formation. Our results show that unphosphorylated Tau binding to DNA is reversible. This fact is in agreement with the protective role attributed to nuclear Tau, which stops binding to DNA once the insult is over. According to our thermodynamic data, oscillations in the concentration of dephosphorylated Tau available to DNA must be the variable determining the extent of Tau binding and DNA protection. In addition, thermodynamics of the interaction suggest that hydrophobicity must represent an important contribution to the stability of the Tau-DNA complex. SPR results together with those from Tau expression in HEK cells show that phosphorylation induces changes in Tau protein which prevent it from binding to DNA. The phosphorylation-dependent regulation of DNA binding is analogous to the Tau-microtubules binding inhibition induced by phosphorylation. Our results suggest that hydrophobicity may control Tau location and DNA interaction and that impairment of this Tau-DNA interaction, due to Tau hyperphosphorylation, could contribute to Alzheimer's pathogenesis. PMID:25126942

  4. Dissection of DNA damage responses using multiconditional genetic interaction maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guénolé, Aude

    2013-01-01

    To protect the genome, cells have evolved a diverse set of pathways designed to sense, signal, and repair multiple types of DNA damage. To assess the degree of coordination and crosstalk among these pathways, we systematically mapped changes in the cell's genetic network across a panel of different

  5. synthesis, DNA interaction and comparison of lipase inhibition propert

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GÜNAY KAYA KANTAR

    first study on lipase inhibition and DNA binding of Pcs and AzaPcs containing a pharmacophore group, such as eugenol. The novel ZnAzaPcs were characterised using a combination of FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, UV–Vis,. MS and elemental analysis. The crystal structures of two pyrazine compounds were also determined ...

  6. DNMT1-interacting RNAs block gene-specific DNA methylation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Di Ruscio, A.; Ebralidze, A.; Benoukraf, T.; Amabile, G.; Goff, L.A.; Terragni, J.; Figueroa, M.E.; Pontes, L.L.D.; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Zhang, P.; Wu, M.C.; D´Alo, F.; Melnick, A.; Leone, G.; Ebralidze, K.K.; Pradhan, S.; Rinn, J.L.; Tenen, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 503, č. 7476 (2013), s. 371-376 ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LK21307 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DNA methylation * non-coding RNA * DNMT1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 42.351, year: 2013

  7. Non-covalent interaction between dietary stilbenoids and human serum albumin: Structure-affinity relationship, and its influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Jia, Xueping; Shi, Jian; Xiao, Jianbo; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2016-07-01

    Dietary stilbenoids are associated with many benefits for human health, which depend on their bioavailability and bioaccessibility. The stilbenoid-human serum albumin (HSA) interactions are investigated to explore the structure-affinity relationship and influence on the stability, free radical scavenging activity and cell uptake of stilbenoids. The structure-affinity relationship of the stilbenoids-HSA interaction was found as: (1) the methoxylation enhanced the affinity, (2) an additional hydroxyl group increases the affinity and (3) the glycosylation significantly weakened the affinity. HSA obviously masked the free radical scavenging potential of stilbenoids. The stabilities of stilbenoids in different medium were determined as: HSA solution>human plasma>Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. It appears that the milk enhanced the cell uptake of stilbenoids with multi-hydroxyl groups and weakened the cell uptake of stilbenoids with methoxyl group on EA.hy 926 endothelial cells. The stilbenoids are hardly absorbed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells in the presence of milk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Loss of DNA-membrane interactions and cessation of DNA synthesis in myeloperoxidase-treated Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, H.; Orman, J.; Rakita, R.M.; Michel, B.R.; VanDevanter, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes employ a diverse array of antimicrobial effector systems to support their host defense functions. The mechanisms of action of most of these systems are incompletely understood. The present report indicates that microbicidal activity by a neutrophil-derived antimicrobial system, consisting of myeloperoxidase, enzymatically generated hydrogen peroxide, and chloride ion, is accompanied by prompt cessation of DNA synthesis in Escherichia coli, as determined by markedly reduced incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into trichloracetic acid-precipitable material. Simultaneously, the myeloperoxidase system mediates a decline in the ability of E. coli membranes to bind hemimethylated DNA sequences containing the E. coli chromosomal origin of replication (oriC). Binding of oriC to the E. coli membrane is an essential element of orderly chromosomal DNA replication. Comparable early changes in DNA synthesis and DNA-membrane interactions were not observed with alternative oxidant or antibiotic-mediated microbicidal systems. It is proposed that oxidants generated by the myeloperoxidase system modify the E. coli membrane in such a fashion that oriC binding is markedly impaired. As a consequence chromosomal DNA replication is impaired and organisms can no longer replicate

  9. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of eugenol with salmon sperm DNA in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi Shuyun, E-mail: sy_bi@sina.com [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China); Yan Lili; Wang Yu; Pang Bong; Wang Tianjiao [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Fluorescence spectra, absorption spectra, melting temperature, ionic strength effect, and viscosity experiments were described that characterize the interaction of eugenol with salmon sperm DNA in vitro. Eugenol was found to bind but weakly to DNA, with binding constants of 4.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, 3.62 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} and 2.47 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} L mol{sup -1} at 18, 28 and 38 Degree-Sign C respectively. The Stern-Volmer plots at different temperatures suggested that the quenching type of fluorescence of eugenol by DNA was a static quenching. Both the relative viscosity and the melting temperature of DNA were increased by the addition of eugenol. The changes of ionic strength had no affect on the binding. In addition, the binding constant of eugenol with single stranded DNA (ssDNA) was larger than that of eugenol with double stranded DNA (dsDNA). These results revealed that the binding mode of eugenol to DNA was intercalative binding. The thermodynamic parameters {Delta}H, {Delta}G and {Delta}S were also obtained according to the Van't Hoff equations, which suggested that hydrogen bond or van der Waals force might play an important role in a binding of eugenol to DNA. Based on the theory of the Foerster energy transference, the binding distance between DNA and eugenol was determined as 4.40 nm, indicating that the static fluorescence quenching of eugenol by DNA was also a non-radiation energy transfer process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA quenched the fluorescence of eugenol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding constant, binding site and binding force were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding mode of eugenol to DNA was intercalative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer occurred between eugenol and DNA.

  10. Probing protein: DNA interactions using a uniform monolayer of DNA and surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer S.; Campbell, Charles T.; Stormo, Gary D.; Silbaq, Fauzi S.; Aebersold, Rudolf H.

    2000-04-01

    A method is described for immobilizing double-stranded DNAs to a planar gold surface with high density and uniform spacing. This is accomplished by adsorbing biotinylated DNAs onto a nearly close-packed monolayer of the protein streptavidin. This streptavidin monolayer, which offers approximately 5 X 1012 biotin sites per cm2, is prepared first by adsorbing it onto a mixed self-assembled monolayer on gold which contains biotin-terminated and oligo-terminated alkylthiolates in a 3/7 ratio. This DNA- functionalized surface resists non-specific protein adsorption and is useful for probing the kinetics and equilibrium binding of proteins to DNA with surface plasmon resonance. This is demonstrated with the Mnt protein, which is found to bind in 3.8:1 ratio to its immobilized DNA operator sequence. This is consistent with its behavior in homogeneous solution, where it binds as a tetramer to its DNA. A sequence with a single base-pair mutation shows nearly as much Mnt binding, but a completely random DNA sequence shows only 5 percent of this binding. This proves that DNA-binding proteins bind sequence-specifically to double-stranded DNAs which are immobilized to gold with this streptavidin linker layer.

  11. Electrochemical and calorimetric investigation of interaction of novel biscationic anticancer agents with DNA; Investigacao eletroquimica e calorimetrica da interacao de novos agentes antitumorais biscationicos com DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Lauris Lucia da; Donnici, Claudio Luis; Lopes, Julio Cesar Dias, E-mail: cdonnici@terra.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Quimica; Goulart, Marilia Oliveira Fonseca; Abreu, Fabiane Caxico de; Paula, Francine Santos de [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil). Campus A.C. Simoes. Inst. de Quimica e Biotecnologia; Bravo, Carlos E. Salas; Santoro, Marcelo Matos [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Denadai, Angelo Marcio Leite [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica, Timoteo, MG (Brazil). Campus VII; Santos, Alexandre Martins Costa [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Fisiologicas; Montanari, Carlos Alberto [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Biscationic amidines bind in the DNA minor groove and present biological activity against a range of infectious diseases. Two new biscationic compounds (bis-{alpha}-{omega}-S-thioureido, amino and sulfide analogues) were synthesized in good yields and fully characterized, and their interaction with DNA was also investigated. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to measure the thermodynamic properties of binding interactions between DNA and these ligands. A double stranded calf thymus DNA immobilized on an electrode surface was used to study the possible DNA-interacting abilities of these compounds towards dsDNA in situ. A remarkable interaction of these compounds with DNA was demonstrated and their potential application as anticancer agents was furthered. (author)

  12. Representative Amino Acid Side-Chain Interactions in Protein-DNA Complexes: A Comparison of Highly Accurate Correlated Ab Initio Quantum Mechanical Calculations and Efficient Approaches for Applications to Large Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hostaš, Jiří; Jakubec, Dávid; Laskowski, R. A.; Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran; Řezáč, Jan; Vondrášek, Jiří; Hobza, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 9 (2015), s. 4086-4092 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : basis set limit * noncovalent interactions * interaction energies Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.301, year: 2015

  13. DNA damage in human lymphocytes due to synergistic interaction between ionizing radiation and pesticide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. K.; Lee, K. H.; Lee, B. H.; Chun, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    Biological risks may arise from the possibility of the synergistic interaction between harmful factors such as ionizing radiation and pesticide. The effect of pesticide on radiation-induced DNA damage in human in human blood lymphocytes was evaluated by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay. The lymphocytes, with or without pretreatment of the pesticide, were exposed to 2.0 Gy of gamma ray. Significantly increased tail moment, which was a marker of DNA strand breaks in SCGE assay, showed an excellent dose-response relationship. The present study confirms that the pesticide has the cytotoxic effect on lymphocytes and that it interacts synergistically with ionizing radiationon DNA damage, as well

  14. Interaction of diethyl aniline methylphosphonate with DNA: Spectroscopic and isothermal titration calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yan; Xu Meihua; Wang Gongke; Zheng Yun

    2011-01-01

    In this study the diethyl aniline methylphosphonate (DAM) was synthesized, the interaction of DAM with ct-DNA has been investigated by fluorescence spectra, UV spectra, molecular modeling and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The binding constant of DAM to ct-DNA calculated from both isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence spectra were found to be in the 10 4 M -1 range. According to the ethidium bromide displacement studies, UV spectra and isothermal titration calorimetry experimental results, it can be concluded that DAM is an intercalator that can slide into the G-C rich region of ct-DNA. Furthermore, the results obtained from molecular modeling corroborated the experimental results obtanied from spectroscopic and ITC investigations. At the same time, fluorescence spectra suggested that the mechanism of the interaction of DAM to ct-DNA was a static enhancing type. ITC data showed that ct-DNA/DAM binding is enthalpy controlled. - Research highlights: → The interaction of DAM with ct-DNA is a static enhancing type. → DAM can slide into the G-C rich region of ct-DNA. → The binding of DAM to ct-DNA is enthalpy controlled. → The hydrogen bonding forces play an essential role in the binding process.

  15. Mechanism and stoichiometry of interaction of DnaG primase with DnaB helicase of Escherichia coli in RNA primer synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitkova, Atanaska V; Khopde, Sujata M; Biswas, Subhasis B

    2003-12-26

    Initiation and synthesis of RNA primers in the lagging strand of the replication fork in Escherichia coli requires the replicative DnaB helicase and the DNA primase, the DnaG gene product. In addition, the physical interaction between these two replication enzymes appears to play a role in the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication. In vitro, DnaB helicase stimulates primase to synthesize primers on single-stranded (ss) oligonucleotide templates. Earlier studies hypothesized that multiple primase molecules interact with each DnaB hexamer and single-stranded DNA. We have examined this hypothesis and determined the exact stoichiometry of primase to DnaB hexamer. We have also demonstrated that ssDNA binding activity of the DnaB helicase is necessary for directing the primase to the initiator trinucleotide and synthesis of 11-20-nucleotide long primers. Although, association of these two enzymes determines the extent and rate of synthesis of the RNA primers in vitro, direct evidence of the formation of primase-DnaB complex has remained elusive in E. coli due to the transient nature of their interaction. Therefore, we stabilized this complex using a chemical cross-linker and carried out a stoichiometric analysis of this complex by gel filtration. This allowed us to demonstrate that the primase-helicase complex of E. coli is comprised of three molecules of primase bound to one DnaB hexamer. Fluorescence anisotropy studies of the interaction of DnaB with primase, labeled with the fluorescent probe Ru(bipy)3, and Scatchard analysis further supported this conclusion. The addition of DnaC protein, leading to the formation of the DnaB-DnaC complex, to the simple priming system resulted in the synthesis of shorter primers. Therefore, interactions of the DnaB-primase complex with other replication factors might be critical for determining the physiological length of the RNA primers in vivo and the overall kinetics of primer synthesis.

  16. Spectroscopic studies of the interaction between pirimicarb and calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guowen; Hu, Xing; Pan, Junhui

    2011-02-01

    The interaction between pirimicarb and calf thymus DNA in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) was investigated with the use of Neutral Red (NR) dye as a spectral probe by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, as well as viscosity measurements and DNA melting techniques. The results revealed that an intercalation binding should be the interaction mode of pirimicarb to DNA. CD spectra indicated that pirimicarb induced conformational changes of DNA. The binding constants of pirimicarb with DNA were obtained by the fluorescence quenching method. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (Δ Hθ) and entropy change (Δ Sθ) were calculated to be -52.13 ± 2.04 kJ mol -1 and -108.8 ± 6.72 J mol -1 K -1 according to the van't Hoff equation, which suggested that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces might play a major role in the binding of pirimicarb to DNA. Further, the alternative least squares (ALS) method was applied to resolve a complex two-way array of the absorption spectra data, which provided simultaneously the concentration information for the three reaction components, pirimicarb, NR and DNA-NR. This ALS analysis indicated that the intercalation of pirimicarb into the DNA by substituting for NR in the DNA-NR complex.

  17. Probing the dynamics of restriction endonuclease NgoMIV-DNA interaction by single-molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutkus, Marijonas; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Rutkauskas, Danielis

    2017-12-01

    Many type II restriction endonucleases require two copies of their recognition sequence for optimal activity. Concomitant binding of two DNA sites by such an enzyme produces a DNA loop. Here we exploit single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) of surface-immobilized DNA fragments to study the dynamics of DNA looping induced by tetrameric endonuclease NgoMIV. We have employed a DNA fragment with two NgoMIV recognition sites and a FRET dye pair such that upon protein-induced DNA looping the dyes are brought to close proximity resulting in a FRET signal. The dynamics of DNA-NgoMIV interactions proved to be heterogeneous, with individual smFRET trajectories exhibiting broadly different average looped state durations. Distinct types of the dynamics were attributed to different types of DNA-protein complexes, mediated either by one NgoMIV tetramer simultaneously bound to two specific sites ("slow" trajectories) or by semi-specific interactions of two DNA-bound NgoMIV tetramers ("fast" trajectories), as well as to conformational heterogeneity of individual NgoMIV molecules. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Binding and interaction of di- and tri-substituted organometallic triptycene palladium complexes with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Rina; Bhowmick, Sourav; Das, Neeladri; Das, Prolay

    2014-10-01

    Two triptycene-based ligands with pendant bromophenyl units have been prepared. These triptycene derivatives have been used as synthons for the synthesis of di and tri nuclear palladium complexes. The organic molecules and their corresponding organometallic complexes have been fully characterized using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The mode of binding and effect of the complexes on pUC19 plasmid, calf thymus DNA and oligomer duplex DNA have been investigated by a host of analytical methods. The complexes brought about unwinding of supercoiled plasmid and the unwinding angle was found to be related to the binding affinity of the complexes with DNA, where both these parameters were guided by the structure of the complexes. Concentration-dependent inhibition of endonuclease activity of SspI and BamHI by the complexes indicates preference for G/C sequence for binding to DNA. However, neither the complexes did not introduce any cleavage at abasic site in oligomer duplex DNA, nor they created linear form of the plasmid upon co-incubation with the DNA samples. The interactions of the complexes with DNA were found to be strongly guided by the structure of the complexes, where intercalation as well as groove binding was observed, without inflicting any damage to the DNA. The mode of interaction of the complexes with DNA was further confirmed by isothermal calorimetry.

  19. Interaction of DNA and Proteins with Single Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasianowicz, J. J.

    2006-03-01

    The bacterial toxins Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin and Bacillus anthracis protective antigen kill cells in part by forming ion channels in target membranes. We are using electrophysiology, molecular biology/protein biochemistry and computer modeling to study how biopolymers (e.g., single-stranded DNA and proteins) bind to and transport through these nanometer-scale pores. The results provide insight into the mechanism by which these toxins work and are the basis for several potential nanobiotechnology applications including ultra-rapid DNA sequencing, the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes and high throughput screening of therapeutic agents against several anthrax toxins. In collaboration with V.M. Stanford, M. Misakian, B. Nablo, S.E. Henrickson, NIST, EEEL, Gaithersburg, MD; T. Nguyen, R. Gussio, NCI, Ft. Detrick, MD; and K.M. Halverson, S. Bavari, R.G. Panchal, USAMRIID, Ft. Detrick, MD.

  20. Immunoglobulins acquire the ability to interact with DNA after chromatography on QAE-Sephadex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaeva, N.I.; Lekakh, I.V.; Poverennyi, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    It was established that IgG isolated from the sera of healthy humans contains a substantial number of antibodies that react with native DNA. Their ability to interact with DNA is manifested only after chromatography on an anion exchange resin, as a result of which IgG is divided into two portions - acid and basic immunoglobulins. The peculiarities of the interaction of both fractions with DNA and the specificity of this reaction were investigated. It was shown that the investigated IgG can react with native and denatured DNA, dextran sulfate, poly(G), and poly(I). The question of the possibility of the interaction of the antibodies studied with the charged structures of the cell and that of the role of these antibodies in the normal and pathological states are discussed

  1. Interaction of anthraquinone anti-cancer drugs with DNA:Experimental and computational quantum chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Jamelah S.; Teesdale Spittle, Paul; El Gogary, Tarek M.

    2017-01-01

    Anthraquinones form the basis of several anticancer drugs. Anthraquinones anticancer drugs carry out their cytotoxic activities through their interaction with DNA, and inhibition of topoisomerase II activity. Anthraquinones (AQ4 and AQ4H) were synthesized and studied along with 1,4-DAAQ by computational and experimental tools. The purpose of this study is to shade more light on mechanism of interaction between anthraquinone DNA affinic agents and different types of DNA. This study will lead to gain of information useful for drug design and development. Molecular structures were optimized using DFT B3LYP/6-31 + G(d). Depending on intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions two conformers of AQ4 were detected and computed as 25.667 kcal/mol apart. Molecular reactivity of the anthraquinone compounds was explored using global and condensed descriptors (electrophilicity and Fukui functions). Molecular docking studies for the inhibition of CDK2 and DNA binding were carried out to explore the anti cancer potency of these drugs. NMR and UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra of anthraquinones/DNA were investigated at the physiological pH. The interaction of the three anthraquinones (AQ4, AQ4H and 1,4-DAAQ) were studied with three DNA (calf thymus DNA, (Poly[dA].Poly[dT]) and (Poly[dG].Poly[dC]). NMR study shows a qualitative pattern of drug/DNA interaction in terms of band shift and broadening. UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra were employed to measure the affinity constants of drug/DNA binding using Scatchard analysis.

  2. Annonalide and derivatives: Semisynthesis, cytotoxic activities and studies on interaction of annonalide with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Ricardo A; Gomes, Akenaton O C V; de Brito, Maria V; Dos Santos, Ana L P; da Silva, Gladyane S; de Lima, Leandro B; Nunes, Fátima M; de Mattos, Marcos C; de Oliveira, Fátima C E; do Ó Pessoa, Cláudia; de Moraes, Manoel O; de Fátima, Ângelo; Franco, Lucas L; Silva, Marina de M; Dantas, Maria Dayanne de A; Santos, Josué C C; Figueiredo, Isis M; da Silva-Júnior, Edeíldo F; de Aquino, Thiago M; de Araújo-Júnior, João X; de Oliveira, Maria C F; Leslie Gunatilaka, A A

    2018-02-01

    The cytotoxic activity of the pimarane diterpene annonalide (1) and nine of its semisynthetic derivatives (2-10) was investigated against the human tumor cell lines HL-60 (leukemia), PC-3 (prostate adenocarcinoma), HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma), SF-295 (glioblastoma) and HCT-116 (colon cancer), and normal mouse fibroblast (L929) cells. The preparation of 2-10 involved derivatization of the side chain of 1 at C-13. Except for 2, all derivatives are being reported for the first time. Most of the tested compounds presented IC 50 s below 4.0 μM, being considered potential antitumor agents. The structures of all new compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses including 2D NMR and HRMS. Additionally, the interaction of annonalide (1) with ctDNA was evaluated using spectroscopic techniques, and the formation of a supramolecular complex with the macromolecule was confirmed. Competition assays with fluorescent probes (Hoechst and ethidium bromide) and theoretical studies confirmed that 1 interacts preferentially via DNA intercalation with stoichiometric ratio of 1:1 (1:ctDNA). The ΔG value was calculated as -28.24 kJ mol -1 , and indicated that the interaction process occurs spontaneously. Docking studies revealed that van der Walls is the most important interaction in 1-DNA and EB-DNA complexes, and that both ligands (1 and EB) interact with the same DNA residues (DA6, DA17 and DT19). Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Facilitated Unbinding via Multivalency-Enabled Ternary Complexes: New Paradigm for Protein-DNA Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tai-Yen; Cheng, Yu-Shan; Huang, Pei-San; Chen, Peng

    2018-01-25

    Dynamic protein-DNA interactions constitute highly robust cellular machineries to fulfill cellular functions. A vast number of studies have focused on how DNA-binding proteins search for and interact with their target DNA segments and on what cellular cues can regulate protein binding, for which protein concentration is a most obvious one. In contrast, how protein unbinding could be regulated by protein concentration has evaded attention because protein unbinding from DNA is typically a unimolecular reaction and thus concentration independent. Recent single-molecule studies from multiple research groups have uncovered that protein concentration can facilitate the unbinding of DNA-bound proteins, revealing regulation of protein unbinding as another mechanistic paradigm for gene regulation. In this Account, we review these recent in vitro and in vivo single-molecule experiments that uncovered the concentration-facilitated protein unbinding by multiple types of DNA-binding proteins, including sequence-nonspecific DNA-binding proteins (e.g., nucleoid-associated proteins, NAP), sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins (e.g., metal-responsive transcription regulators CueR and ZntR), sequence-neutral single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (e.g., Replication protein A, RPA), and DNA polymerases. For the in vitro experiments, Marko's group investigated the exchange of GFP-tagged DNA-bound NAPs with nontagged NAPs in solution of increasing concentration using single-molecule magnetic-tweezers fluorescence microscopy. The faster fluorescence intensity decrease with higher nontagged NAP concentrations suggests that DNA-bound NAPs undergo faster exchange with higher free NAP concentrations. Chen's group used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements to study the unbinding of CueR from its cognate oligomeric DNA. The average microscopic dwell times of DNA-bound states become shorter with increasing CueR concentrations in the surroundings, demonstrating that

  4. Correlation between the thermodynamic stability of DNA duplexes and the interaction and solvation energies of DNA building blocks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Hobza, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 2 (2008), s. 161-174 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/05/0009; GA ČR(CZ) GD203/05/H001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : DNA duplex * interaction energy * stability Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.784, year: 2008

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Interactions of Indolicidin with Model Membranes and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojan, Peter; Gurevich, Leonid

    2017-01-01

    The cell membrane is the first barrier and quite often the primary target that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have to destroy or penetrate to fulfill their mission. Upon penetrating through the membrane, the peptides can further attack intracellular targets, in particular DNA. Studying the interaction of an antimicrobial peptide with a cell membrane and DNA holds keys to understanding its killing mechanisms. Commonly, these interactions are studied by using optical or scanning electron microscopy and appropriately labeled peptides. However, labeling can significantly affect the hydrophobicity, conformation, and size of the peptide, hence altering the interaction significantly. Here, we describe the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a label-free study of the interactions of peptides with model membranes under physiological conditions and DNA as a possible intracellular target.

  6. Destabilization of the PCNA trimer mediated by its interaction with the NEIL1 DNA glycosylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Aishwarya; Moharana, Kedar; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2016-12-19

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway repairs oxidized lesions in the DNA that result from reactive oxygen species generated in cells. If left unrepaired, these damaged DNA bases can disrupt cellular processes such as replication. NEIL1 is one of the 11 human DNA glycosylases that catalyze the first step of the BER pathway, i.e. recognition and excision of DNA lesions. NEIL1 interacts with essential replication proteins such as the ring-shaped homotrimeric proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA). We isolated a complex formed between NEIL1 and PCNA (±DNA) using size exclusion chromatography (SEC). This interaction was confirmed using native gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Stokes radii measured by SEC hinted that PCNA in complex with NEIL1 (±DNA) was no longer a trimer. Height measurements and images obtained by atomic force microscopy also demonstrated the dissociation of the PCNA homotrimer in the presence of NEIL1 and DNA, while small-angle X-ray scattering analysis confirmed the NEIL1 mediated PCNA trimer dissociation and formation of a 1:1:1 NEIL1-DNA-PCNA(monomer) complex. Furthermore, ab initio shape reconstruction provides insights into the solution structure of this previously unreported complex. Together, these data point to a potential mechanistic switch between replication and BER.

  7. GFP-like Fluorophores as DNA Labels for Studying DNA-Protein Interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Riedl, Jan; Ménová, Petra; Pohl, Radek; Orság, Petr; Fojta, Miroslav; Hocek, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 18 (2012), s. 8287-8293 ISSN 0022-3263 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0317; GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : DNA * oligonucleotides * polymerase * nucleotides * fluorescent labeling Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.564, year: 2012

  8. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy of Spermine-DNA Interactions - Nanostructure and Physical Supramolecular Chemistry of DNA Condensation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kral, Teresa; Langner, M.; Hof, Martin; Adjimatera, N.; Blagbrough, I. S.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 98, Supplement (2004), s22-s23 ISSN 0009-2770 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : fluorescence * nanostructure * DNA condensation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.348, year: 2004

  9. Identifying key interactions stabilizing DOF zinc finger-DNA complexes using in silico approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeh-Mivehroud, Maryam; Moghaddas-Sani, Hakimeh; Rahbar-Shahrouziasl, Mahdieh; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-10-07

    DOF (DNA-binding with one finger) proteins, a family of DNA-binding transcription factors, are members of zinc fingers unique to plants. They are associated with different plant specific phenomena including germination, dormancy, light and defense responses. Until now, there is no report of experimentally solved structure for DOF proteins, making empirical investigation of DOF-DNA interaction more challenging. It has been shown that comparative modeling can be used to reliably predict the three-dimensional (3D) model of structurally unknown proteins whenever a suitable template is available. Furthermore, current molecular mechanics force fields allow prediction of interaction energies for macromolecular complexes. Therefore, the approaches considered in this work were to model the 3D structures of DOF zinc fingers (ZFs) from Arabidopsis thaliana complexed with DNA molecule, to calculate their binding energies, to identify key interactions established between ZFs and DNA, and to determine the impact of the different interactions on the binding energies. The results were used to predict the binding affinities for the novel designed ZFs and may be used in engineering DNA binding proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis and non-covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes rings: new nanomaterials with lectin affinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assali, Mohyeddin; Leal, Manuel Pernía; Khiar, Noureddine; Fernández, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    We present a mild and practical carbon nanotubes rings (CNRs) synthesis from non-covalent functionalized and water-soluble linear single-wall carbon nanotubes. The hemi-micellar–supramolecular self-organization of lactose-based glycolipid 1 on the ring surface, followed by photo-polymerization of the diacetylenic function triggered by UV light afforded the first water-soluble and biocompatible CNRs. The obtained donut-like nanoconstructs expose a high density of lactose moieties on their surface, and are able to engage specific interactions with Arachis hypogea lectin similar to glycoconjugates on the cell membrane. (paper)

  11. Identification of β Clamp-DNA Interaction Regions That Impair the Ability of E. coli to Tolerate Specific Classes of DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanfara, Michael T; Babu, Vignesh M P; Ghazy, Mohamed A; Sutton, Mark D

    The E. coli dnaN-encoded β sliding clamp protein plays a pivotal role in managing the actions on DNA of the 5 bacterial DNA polymerases, proteins involved in mismatch repair, as well as several additional proteins involved in DNA replication. Results of in vitro experiments indicate that the loading of β clamp onto DNA relies on both the DnaX clamp loader complex as well as several discrete sliding clamp-DNA interactions. However, the importance of these DNA interactions to E. coli viability, as well as the ability of the β clamp to support the actions of its numerous partner proteins, have not yet been examined. To determine the contribution of β clamp-DNA interactions to the ability of E. coli to cope with different classes of DNA damage, we used alanine scanning to mutate 22 separate residues mapping to 3 distinct β clamp surfaces known or nearby those known to contact the DNA template, including residues P20-L27 (referred to here as loop I), H148-Y154 (loop II) and 7 different residues lining the central pore of the β clamp through which the DNA template threads. Twenty of these 22 dnaN mutants supported bacterial growth. While none of these 20 conferred sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide or ultra violet light, 12 were sensitized to NFZ, 5 were sensitized to MMS, 8 displayed modestly altered frequencies of DNA damage-induced mutagenesis, and 2 may be impaired for supporting hda function. Taken together, these results demonstrate that discrete β clamp-DNA interaction regions contribute to the ability of E. coli to tolerate specific classes of DNA damage.

  12. M. tuberculosis Sliding β-Clamp Does Not Interact Directly with the NAD+ -Dependent DNA Ligase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Khanam, Taran; Chopra, Deepti; Singh, Nidhi; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2012-01-01

    The sliding β-clamp, an important component of the DNA replication and repair machinery, is drawing increasing attention as a therapeutic target. We report the crystal structure of the M. tuberculosis β-clamp (Mtbβ-clamp) to 3.0 Å resolution. The protein crystallized in the space group C2221 with cell-dimensions a = 72.7, b = 234.9 & c = 125.1 Å respectively. Mtbβ-clamp is a dimer, and exhibits head-to-tail association similar to other bacterial clamps. Each monomer folds into three domains with similar structures respectively and associates with its dimeric partner through 6 salt-bridges and about 21 polar interactions. Affinity experiments involving a blunt DNA duplex, primed-DNA and nicked DNA respectively show that Mtbβ-clamp binds specifically to primed DNA about 1.8 times stronger compared to the other two substrates and with an apparent Kd of 300 nM. In bacteria like E. coli, the β-clamp is known to interact with subunits of the clamp loader, NAD+ -dependent DNA ligase (LigA) and other partners. We tested the interactions of the Mtbβ-clamp with MtbLigA and the γ-clamp loader subunit through radioactive gel shift assays, size exclusion chromatography, yeast-two hybrid experiments and also functionally. Intriguingly while Mtbβ-clamp interacts in vitro with the γ-clamp loader, it does not interact with MtbLigA unlike in bacteria like E. coli where it does. Modeling studies involving earlier peptide complexes reveal that the peptide-binding site is largely conserved despite lower sequence identity between bacterial clamps. Overall the results suggest that other as-yet-unidentified factors may mediate interactions between the clamp, LigA and DNA in mycobacteria. PMID:22545130

  13. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H; Miller, Katherine H; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L

    2015-06-05

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H.; Miller, Katherine H.; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome. PMID:25903123

  15. Enzymatic Activity Enhancement of Non-Covalent Modified Superoxide Dismutase and Molecular Docking Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Jun Song

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase was improved in the pyrogallol autoxidation system by about 27%, after interaction between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclo- dextrin and superoxide dismutase. Fluorescence spectrometry was used to study the interaction between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and superoxide dismutase at different temperatures. By doing this, it can be found that these interactions increase fluorescence sensitivity. In the meantime, the synchronous fluorescence intensity revealed the interaction sites to be close to the tryptophan (Trp and tyrosine (Tyr residues of superoxide dismutase. Furthermore, molecular docking was applied to explore the binding mode between the ligands and the receptor. This suggested that HP-β-CD interacted with the B ring, G ring and the O ring and revealed that the lysine (Lys residues enter the nanocavity. It was concluded that the HP-β-CD caused specific conformational changes in SOD by non-covalent modification.

  16. Interaction of DNA/nuclear protein/polycation and the terplexes for gene delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yuan; Pan Shirong; Feng Min; Wen Yuting; Deng Jingjing; Luo Xin; Wu Chuanbin [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan II Road 74, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Peng Hui, E-mail: fengmin@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Zhongshan Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2010-01-29

    Nuclear transport of exogenous DNA is a major barrier to nonviral gene delivery that needs to be addressed in the design of new vectors. In this study, we prepared pDNA/HMGB1/PEG-PEI terplexes to promote nuclear import. HMGB1 in the terplexes was used to assist the transportation of pDNA into the nucleus of cells, since it contained nuclear localization signal (NLS); PEG chains were introduced to stabilize pDNA/vector terplexes and reduce the cytotoxicity. HMGB1/PEG-PEI combined vectors have been investigated specifically for their structure interaction by atomic force microscopy and circular dichroic spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that the HMGB1 molecule could bind with the pDNA chains, but not condense pDNA well. The PEG-PEI further compacted pDNA/HMGB1 complexes into nanosized spherical terplexes. The pDNA delivered by HMGB1/PEG-PEI combined vectors was significantly accumulated in the nucleus of cells, as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The percentage of GFP-transfected cells and VEGF protein expression level induced by HMGB1/PEG-PEI were 2.6-4.9-fold and 1.4-2.8-fold higher, respectively, than that of a common cationic polymer PEI 25 kDa. Therefore, the HMGB1/PEG-PEI combined vector could be used as a versatile vector for promoting exogenous DNA nuclear localization, thereby enhancing its expression.

  17. DNA builds and strengthens the extracellular matrix in Myxococcus xanthus biofilms by interacting with exopolysaccharides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available One intriguing discovery in modern microbiology is the extensive presence of extracellular DNA (eDNA within biofilms of various bacterial species. Although several biological functions have been suggested for eDNA, including involvement in biofilm formation, the detailed mechanism of eDNA integration into biofilm architecture is still poorly understood. In the biofilms formed by Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative soil bacterium with complex morphogenesis and social behaviors, DNA was found within both extracted and native extracellular matrices (ECM. Further examination revealed that these eDNA molecules formed well organized structures that were similar in appearance to the organization of exopolysaccharides (EPS in ECM. Biochemical and image analyses confirmed that eDNA bound to and colocalized with EPS within the ECM of starvation biofilms and fruiting bodies. In addition, ECM containing eDNA exhibited greater physical strength and biological stress resistance compared to DNase I treated ECM. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that DNA interacts with EPS and strengthens biofilm structures in M. xanthus.

  18. DNA-protein interaction dynamics at the Lamin B2 replication origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzzi, Luca; Marchetti, Laura; Peverali, Fiorenzo A; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Giacca, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    To date, a complete understanding of the molecular events leading to DNA replication origin activation in mammalian cells still remains elusive. In this work, we report the results of a high resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation study to detect proteins interacting with the human Lamin B2 replication origin. In addition to the pre-RC component ORC4 and to the transcription factors USF and HOXC13, we found that 2 components of the AP-1 transcription factor, c-Fos and c-Jun, are also associated with the origin DNA during the late G1 phase of the cell cycle and that these factors interact with ORC4. Both DNA replication and AP-1 factor binding to the origin region were perturbed by cell treatment with merbarone, a topoisomerase II inhibitor, suggesting that DNA topology is essential for determining origin function.

  19. Interaction of DNA with Simple and Mixed Ligand Copper(II) Complexes of 1,10-Phenanthrolines as Studied by DNA-Fiber EPR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikira, Makoto; Ng, Chew Hee; Palaniandavar, Mallayan

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of simple and ternary Cu(II) complexes of 1,10-phenanthrolines with DNA has been studied extensively because of their various interesting and important functions such as DNA cleavage activity, cytotoxicity towards cancer cells, and DNA based asymmetric catalysis. Such functions are closely related to the DNA binding modes of the complexes such as intercalation, groove binding, and electrostatic surface binding. A variety of spectroscopic methods have been used to study the DNA binding mode of the Cu(II) complexes. Of all these methods, DNA-fiber electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy affords unique information on the DNA binding structures of the complexes. In this review we summarize the results of our DNA-fiber EPR studies on the DNA binding structure of the complexes and discuss them together with the data accumulated by using other measurements. PMID:26402668

  20. Effect of hairpin loop structure on reactivity, sequence preference and adduct orientation of a DNA-interactive pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBD) antitumour agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, David E; Vassoler, Higia; Jackson, Paul J M; James, Colin H; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2015-04-07

    The pyrrolobenzodiazepines (PBDs) are a family of covalent-binding DNA-interactive minor-groove binding agents with a thermodynamic preference for binding to 5'-Pu-G-Pu-3' sequences (Pu = Purine) but a kinetic preference for 5'-Py-G-Py-3' (Py = Pyrimidine). Using HPLC/MS methodology and a range of designed hairpin-forming oligonucleotides, the kinetics of reaction of a C8-bis-pyrrole pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) conjugate (GWL-78, 2) with sixteen isomeric oligonucleotides has been evaluated, each containing a single PBD binding site in one of two locations. The PBD-binding base-pair triplets were designed to include every possible combination of A and T bases adjacent to the covalently-reacting guanine, with the set of hairpins consisting of isomeric pairs containing the same sequence in the hairpin stem but with either hexaethylene glycol (HEG) or TTT loops. The PBD 2 reacted most rapidly with TGT and TGA sequences, with the possibility that adducts might form in both the 3'- and 5'-directions with some sequences according to modelling studies. A faster reaction rate was observed for all hairpins containing the HEG loop except one (Seq 10) when the PBD binding triplets were located either near the loop or adjacent to the 5'-end. Modelling studies have suggested that this difference in reactivity could be due to the structural flexibility of the HEG loop allowing both A-ring-3' and A-ring-5' adducts to form, while a TTT loop should favour only A-ring-5' adducts due to steric considerations. These findings contrast with the results reported by Nguyen and Wilson for the interaction of non-covalent DNA-binding molecules with DNA hairpins, where the loop structure was found to have little effect on interaction in the main stem of the hairpin.

  1. Multi-spectroscopic methods investigation on the interaction of tenoxicam with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing-Mi; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Li-Ping; Ma, Ping; Wang, Xin; Liu, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) show chemopreventive and chemosuppressive effects on various cancer cell lines. They exert anticancer activities by inhibiting both at the protein level and/or at the transcription level. Thus, in this paper, the interaction between tenoxicam (TXM) and calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was investigated by UV-visible light, fluorescence, viscosity experiments and DNA melting studies. The results showed that TXM could bind to ct-DNA in the groove binding mode. The binding constants were 7.67 × 10(3) and 5.48 × 10(3) M(-1) at 293 and 300 K, respectively. Furthermore, the calculated thermodynamic parameters suggested that hydrogen bonds or van der Waals force might play an important role in the binding of TXM to ct-DNA. The obtained results should give new insight into the pharmacological activity of TXM. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Energetic studies on DNA-peptide interaction in relation to the enthalpy-entropy compensation paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Robin C K; Huang, Jonathan T B; Chien, Shih-Chuan; Huang, Roy; Jeng, Kee-Ching G; Chen, Yen-Chung; Liao, Mokai; Wu, Jia-Rong; Hung, Wei-Kang; Hung, Chia-Chun; Chen, Yu-Ling; Waring, Michael J; Sheh, Leung

    2013-01-07

    This study aims to interpret the energetic basis of complex DNA-peptide interactions according to a novel allosteric interaction network approach. In common with other designed peptides, five new conjugates incorporating the XPRK or XHypRK motif (Hyp = hydroxyproline) attached to a N-methylpyrrole (Py) tract with a basic tail have been found to display cooperative binding to DNA involving multiple monodentate as well as interstrand bidentate interactions. Using quantitative DNase I footprinting it appears that allosteric communication via cooperative binding to multiple sites on complementary DNA strands corresponds to two different types of DNA-peptide interaction network. Temperature variation experiments using a dodecapeptide RY-12 show that lower temperature (25 °C) favor a circuit type of allosteric interaction network, whereas higher temperatures (31 and 37 °C) afford only a partial-circuit type of network. Circular dichroism studies show that our five peptides induce significant local conformational changes in DNA via the minor groove, with apparently dimeric binding stoichiometry. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that these peptides, together with another seven for comparison, are strongly exothermic upon binding to a model 13-mer DNA duplex, characterized by ΔH ranging from -14.7 to -74.4 kcal mol(-1), and also high TΔS ranging from -6.5 to -65.9 kcal mol(-1). Multiple monodentate and bidentate interactions, as well as ionic forces that mediate positive cooperativity in sequence recognition, are consistent with a dramatic decrease in entropy and a 'tightening' effect of DNA conformation. Distinctive enthalpy-entropy compensation (EEC) relationships are demonstrated for the interaction of all twelve designed peptides with DNA, affording a straight line of slope close to unity when ΔH is plotted versus TΔS, with a y-axis intercept (average ΔG) corresponding to -8.5 kcal mol(-1), while the observed ΔG ranges from -8.2 to -9.1 kcal mol(-1) for

  3. Synthesis and DNA interaction of a Sm(III) complex of a Schiff base ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interaction between the Sm(III) complex of an ionic Schiff base [HL]-, derived from vanillin and L-tryptophan, and herring sperm DNA at physiological pH (7.40) has been studied by UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence and viscosity methods. The binding ratios nSm(III) : nK[HL] = 1:1 and nSm(III)L: nDNA =5:1 were confirmed ...

  4. A Qualitative and Quantitative Assay to Study DNA/Drug Interaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fragment which was run in Tris-acetate EDTA buffer (40 mM Tris base, pH 8.0, 18 mM glacial acetic acid and 1 mM EDTA) at 100 V for 2 h. The gel was exposed to 220 nm near. UV region spectrum and then the DNA bands were visualized and analyzed for drug-DNA interaction studies. RESULTS. Binding of distamycin-A, ...

  5. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  6. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-15

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB)2(2+)) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB)2(2+) complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 x 10(4) L mol(-1). Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB)2(2+) complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB)2(2+) complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 microg mL(-1) for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 microg mL(-1) for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 microg mL(-1) for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL(-1) for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL(-1) for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL(-1) for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  7. Interactions between Cytochrome c and DNA Strands Self-Assembled at Gold Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Ruojun; Wang, Lihua; Wan, Ying; Zhang, Jiong; Song, Shiping; Zhang, Zhizhou; Fan, Chunhai; He, Lin

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we reported the investigation on the interaction between DNA strands self-assembled at gold electrodes and an electron transfer protein, cytochrome c. We observed that cytochrome c exhibited well-defined electrochemistry in both double-stranded and single-stranded DNA films. This suggested that the electron transfer reaction of cytochrome c arose possibly due to the electron hopping along DNA strands rather than wiring along the double helix. We also compared the heterogeneous electron transfer rate of cytochrome c with that of a ruthenium complex, which further confirmed this mechanism.

  8. physico-chemical studies on DNA-drugs interaction and their analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, S.A

    2003-01-01

    The present thesis is devoted to study the interaction of some antibacterial agents i.e. fluoroquinolones . these agents include ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin , ofloxacin , pefloxacin and levofloxacin with DNA. voltammetric and spectrophotometric methods were used to carry out this study. Also the interaction of the suggested drugs with DNA at the surface of carbon electrode by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse techniques is examined. The work comprises three chapters: (1) includes an introduction of voltammetry , differential pulse, drug-DNA interaction and fluoroquinoline- DNA interaction and literature survey on fluoroquinolones.Chapter (II) includes preparation of the solutions and instruments which were used for the measurements using the different techniques.Chapter(III) comprises three parts; (1) deals with the interaction of fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, pefloxacin and levofloxacin) with DNA in solution have been investigated by means of voltammetry and spectroscopy . the results show that the values of binding constant of fluoroquinolne drugs with DNA obtained through the changes of the anodic peak current, and their values are, 30900,31000,32300,32000 and 32500 M -1 respectively. or changes of absorption and values are, 36000,30200.38300,36500 and 34400 M -1 receptively.(II) includes voltammetric behavior of fluoroquinolones on DNA-modified carbon paste electrode. (III)includes analytical application for proposed method for the determination of levofloxacin as a typical example for fluoroquinolones. Concentration in the range 5.0x10 -7 ∼ 5.0x10 -6 mol/L , with a detection limit of 1.0x10 -7 mol/L. direct and simple determination of levofloxacin in urine was established with no manipulation of urine sample other than dilution 1:10

  9. Analysis of damaged DNA / proteins interactions: Methodological optimizations and applications to DNA lesions induced by platinum anticancer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounaix Morand du Puch, Ch

    2010-10-01

    DNA lesions contribute to the alteration of DNA structure, thereby inhibiting essential cellular processes. Such alterations may be beneficial for chemotherapies, for example in the case of platinum anticancer agents. They generate bulky adducts that, if not repaired, ultimately cause apoptosis. A better understanding of the biological response to such molecules can be obtained through the study of proteins that directly interact with the damages. These proteins constitute the DNA lesions interactome. This thesis presents the development of tools aiming at increasing the list of platinum adduct-associated proteins. Firstly, we designed a ligand fishing system made of damaged plasmids immobilized onto magnetic beads. Three platinum drugs were selected for our study: cisplatin, oxali-platin and satra-platin. Following exposure of the trap to nuclear extracts from HeLa cancer cells and identification of retained proteins by proteomics, we obtained already known candidates (HMGB1, hUBF, FACT complex) but also 29 new members of the platinated-DNA interactome. Among them, we noted the presence of PNUTS, TOX4 and WDR82, which associate to form the recently-discovered PTW/PP complex. Their capture was then confirmed with a second model, namely breast cancer cell line MDA MB 231, and the biological consequences of such an interaction now need to be elucidated. Secondly, we adapted a SPRi bio-chip to the study of platinum-damaged DNA/proteins interactions. Affinity of HMGB1 and newly characterized TOX4 for adducts generated by our three platinum drugs could be validated thanks to the bio-chip. Finally, we used our tools, as well as analytical chemistry and biochemistry methods, to evaluate the role of DDB2 (a factor involved in the recognition of UV-induced lesions) in the repair of cisplatin adducts. Our experiments using MDA MB 231 cells differentially expressing DDB2 showed that this protein is not responsible for the repair of platinum damages. Instead, it appears to act

  10. Investigation of Interactions between DNA and Nuclear Receptors: A Review of the Most Used Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Fattori

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors (NRs comprise a superfamily of proteins modulated by ligands that regulate the expression of target genes. These proteins share a multidomain structure harboring an N-terminal domain, a highly conserved DNA binding domain, and a ligand binding domain, which has ligand dependent activation function. They play key roles in development, metabolism, and physiology being closely related to diseases. Most of the knowledge about this superfamily emerges from investigations on new ligands and are mostly centered in the ligand binding domain. However, more investigation focusing on interactions between DNA and DNA binding domain is necessary to shed light on important roles of NRs' participation in transcriptional mechanisms and in specific genes network. Here, our goal is to discuss some nuances of NRs-DNA interaction, describing details of the most used techniques in this sort of study, such as gel shift (EMSA, DNA footprinting, reporter gene assay, ChIP-Seq, 3C, and fluorescence anisotropy. Additionally, we aim to provide tools, presenting advantages and disadvantages of these common methods, when choosing the most suitable one to study NRs-DNA interactions to answer specific questions.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA interaction with metallic nanoparticles and TiO2 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kholmurodov, Kh.T.; Krasavin, E.A.; Dushanov, E.B.; Hassan, H.K.; Galal, A.; ElHabashy, H.A.; Sweilam, N.H.; Yasuoka, K.

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the mechanism of DNA interactions and binding with metallic nanoparticles (NPs) and surfaces represents a great interest in today's medicine applications due to diagnostic and treatment of oncology diseases. Recent experimental and simulation studies involve the DNA interaction with highly localized proton beams or metallic NPs (such as Ag, Au, etc.), aimed at targeted cancer therapy through the injection of metal micro- or nanoparticles into the tumor tissue with consequent local microwave or laser heating. The effects of mutational structure changes in DNA and protein structures could result in destroying of native chemical (hydrogen) bonds or, on the contrary, creating of new bonds that do not normally exist there. The cause of such changes might be the alteration of one or several nucleotides (in DNA) or the substitution of specific amino acid residues (in proteins) that can lead to the essential structural destabilization or unfolding. At the atomic or molecular level, the replacement of one nucleotide by another (in DNA double helices) or replacement of one amino acid residue by another (in proteins) cause essential modifications of the molecular force fields of the environment that break locally important hydrogen bonds underlying the structural stability of the biological molecules. In this work, the molecular dynamics(MD) simulations were performed for four DNA models and the flexibilities of the purine and pyrimidine nucleotides during the interaction process with the metallic NPs and TiO 2 surface were clarified

  12. Interactions between ionic liquid surfactant [C12mim]Br and DNA in dilute brine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunfei; Shang, Yazhuo; Liu, Zhenhai; Shao, Shuang; Liu, Honglai; Hu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between ionic liquid surfactant [C(12)mim]Br and DNA in dilute brine were investigated in terms of various experimental methods and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It was shown that the aggregation of [C(12)mim]Br on DNA chains is motivated not only by electrostatic attractions between DNA phosphate groups and [C(12)mim]Br headgroups but also by hydrophobic interactions among [C(12)mim]Br alkyl chains. Isothermal titration calorimetry analysis indicated that the [C(12)mim]Br aggregation in the presence and absence of DNA are both thermodynamically favored driven by enthalpy and entropy. DNA undergoes size transition and conformational change induced by [C(12)mim]Br, and the charges of DNA are neutralized by the added [C(12)mim]Br. Various microstructures were observed such as DNA with loose coil conformation in nature state, necklace-like structures, and compact spherical aggregates. MD simulation showed that the polyelectrolyte collapses upon the addition of oppositely charged surfactants and the aggregation of surfactants around the polyelectrolyte was reaffirmed. The simulation predicted the gradual neutralization of the negatively charged polyelectrolyte by the surfactant, consistent with the experimental results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Microbial interactions chapter: binding and entry of DNA in bacterial transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    Genetic transformation of bacteria by DNA released from cells of a related strain is discussed. The mechanism by which the giant information-bearing molecules of DNA are transported into the bacterial cell was investigated. It was concluded that the overall process of DNA uptake consists of two main steps, binding of donor DNA to the outside of the cell and entry of the bound DNA into the cell. Each step is discussed in detail. Inasmuch as these phenomena occur at the cell surface, they are related to structures and functions of the cell wall and membrane. In addition, the development of competence, that is the formation of cell surface structures allowing DNA uptake, is examined from both a physiological and evolutionary point of view. Genetic transfer mediated by free DNA is an obvious and important form of cellular interaction. The development of competence involves another, quite distinct system of interaction between bacterial cells. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Bacillus subtilis, and Hemophilus influenzae were used as the test organisms. 259 references.

  14. Effect of citric acid on noncovalent interactions in biopolymer jellies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuanyzhbek Musabekov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of citric acid on the formation of gels based on gelatine, melon pulp and sugar has been studied. It is found that the structuring of gelatin the presence of melon pulp is due to hydrogen bonds between the amino acids of gelatin and pectin melon by hydrogen bonds. It is shown that the structuring of gelatin and gelatin – melon pulp depends on the concentration of sugar. The addition of acid in the pectin-gelatin composition reduces the pH, the solubility of pectin and accelerates the formation of jelly. This is due to the fact that in the presence of citric acid reduced the degree of dissociation of galacturonic acid. The intensity of the effect of citric acid on the structure in the presence of melon pulp could be explained by the formation of hydrogen bonds between pectin and citric acid.

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo Methods Describe Noncovalent Interactions with Subchemical Accuracy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubecký, M.; Jurečka, P.; Derian, R.; Hobza, Pavel; Otyepka, M.; Mitas, L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 10 (2013), s. 4287-4292 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:Operational Program Research and Development for Innovations(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0058; Operational Program Education for Competitiveness(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0004; Operational Program Education for Competitiveness(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0058 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Gaussian-basis sets * wave-functions * electronic-structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.310, year: 2013

  16. Noncovalent Interactions: a Challenge for Experiment and Theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müller-Dethlefs, K.; Hobza, Pavel

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 1 (2000), s. 143-167 ISSN 0009-2665 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/98/1166; GA AV ČR IAA4040903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901; CEZ:A54/98:Z4-040-9-ii Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 21.244, year: 1999

  17. Stimulation of DNA Glycosylase Activities by XPC Protein Complex: Roles of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Shimizu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We showed that XPC complex, which is a DNA damage detector for nucleotide excision repair, stimulates activity of thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG that initiates base excision repair. XPC appeared to facilitate the enzymatic turnover of TDG by promoting displacement from its own product abasic site, although the precise mechanism underlying this stimulation has not been clarified. Here we show that XPC has only marginal effects on the activity of E. coli TDG homolog (EcMUG, which remains bound to the abasic site like human TDG but does not significantly interacts with XPC. On the contrary, XPC significantly stimulates the activities of sumoylated TDG and SMUG1, both of which exhibit quite different enzymatic kinetics from unmodified TDG but interact with XPC. These results point to importance of physical interactions for stimulation of DNA glycosylases by XPC and have implications in the molecular mechanisms underlying mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in XP-C patients.

  18. Spectroscopic studies of DNA interactions with food colorant indigo carmine with the use of ethidium bromide as a fluorescence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yadi; Zhang, Guowen; Pan, Junhui

    2012-10-31

    The interaction of indigo carmine (IC) with calf thymus DNA in physiological buffer (pH 7.4), using ethidium bromide (EB) dye as a fluorescence probe, was investigated by ultraviolet-visible absorption, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, coupled with viscosity measurements and DNA-melting studies. Hypochromicity of the absorption spectra of IC and enhancement in fluorescence polarization of IC were observed with the addition of DNA. Moreover, the binding of IC to DNA was able to decrease iodide and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) quenching effects, increase the melting temperature and relative viscosity of DNA, and induce the changes in CD spectra of DNA. All of the evidence indicated that IC interacted with DNA in the mode of intercalative binding. Furthermore, the three-way synchronous fluorescence spectra data obtained from the interaction between IC and DNA-EB were resolved by parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), and the results provided simultaneously the concentration information and the pure spectra for the three reaction components (IC, EB, and DNA-EB) of the system at equilibrium. This PARAFAC demonstrated that the intercalation of IC molecules into DNA proceeded by substituting for EB in the DNA-EB complex. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, ΔH° and ΔS°, suggested that both hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds played a predominant role in the binding of IC to DNA.

  19. Learning protein-DNA interaction landscapes by integrating experimental data through computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianling; Wasson, Todd; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2014-10-15

    Transcriptional regulation is directly enacted by the interactions between DNA and many proteins, including transcription factors (TFs), nucleosomes and polymerases. A critical step in deciphering transcriptional regulation is to infer, and eventually predict, the precise locations of these interactions, along with their strength and frequency. While recent datasets yield great insight into these interactions, individual data sources often provide only partial information regarding one aspect of the complete interaction landscape. For example, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) reveals the binding positions of a protein, but only for one protein at a time. In contrast, nucleases like MNase and DNase can be used to reveal binding positions for many different proteins at once, but cannot easily determine the identities of those proteins. Currently, few statistical frameworks jointly model these different data sources to reveal an accurate, holistic view of the in vivo protein-DNA interaction landscape. Here, we develop a novel statistical framework that integrates different sources of experimental information within a thermodynamic model of competitive binding to jointly learn a holistic view of the in vivo protein-DNA interaction landscape. We show that our framework learns an interaction landscape with increased accuracy, explaining multiple sets of data in accordance with thermodynamic principles of competitive DNA binding. The resulting model of genomic occupancy provides a precise mechanistic vantage point from which to explore the role of protein-DNA interactions in transcriptional regulation. The C source code for compete and Python source code for MCMC-based inference are available at http://www.cs.duke.edu/∼amink. amink@cs.duke.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Covalent and non-covalent functionalization and solubilization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Non-covalent functionalization of DWNTs has been carried out by using polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyoxyethylene(40)nonylphenyl ether (IGPAL), both of which enable solubilization in aqueous media. These functionalized DWNTs have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, IR and Raman ...

  1. Covalent and non-covalent functionalization and solubilization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Abstract. Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) have been functionalized by both covalent and non-covalent means. Covalent functionalization has been carried out by attaching an aliphatic amide function to DWNTs which enable solubilization in non-polar solvents. Solubilization in non-polar sol- vents has also been ...

  2. Electrochemical study of varenicline adsorptive behaviour and its interaction with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behaviour of novel nicotinic α4β2 subtype receptor partial agonist varenicline (VAR which is used for smoking cessation, was investigated in Britton-Robinson buffers (pH 2.0-12.0 by cyclic, differential pulse and square wave voltammetry at a hanging mercury drop elctrode. The influence of pH, scan rate, concentration, accumulation potential and time on peak current and potential suggested that in alkaline media the redox process was adsorption controlled. Also, the experimental value of surface coverage, G = 1.03´10-10 mol cm-2, was used to determine the conditions when VAR was fully adsorbed at the electrode surface. Having in mind potential high toxicity of VAR due to the presence of quinoxaline structure, its interaction with DNA was postulated, and studied when both compounds were in the adsorbed state at modified HMDE. Using adsorptive transfer technique, the changes in potential and decrease in normalized peak currents were observed. The estimated value of the ratio of surface-binding constants indicated that the reduced form of VAR interacted with dsDNA more strongly than the oxidized form. Subtle DNA damage under conditions of direct DNA-VAR interaction at room temperature was observed. The proposed type of interaction was an intercalation. This study used simple electroanalytical methodology and showed the potential of DNA/HMDE biosensor for investigation of genotoxic effects.

  3. Interaction of a copper (II) complex containing an artificial sweetener (aspartame) with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kashanian, Soheila; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2014-01-01

    A copper (II) complex containing aspartame (APM) as ligand, Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O, was synthesized and characterized. In vitro binding interaction of this complex with native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied at physiological pH. The interaction was studied using different methods: spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, competition experiment, circular dichroism (CD) and viscosimetric techniques. Hyperchromicity was observed in UV absorption band of Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of DNA to Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O was observed and the binding constants (Kf) and corresponding numbers of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be+89.3 kJ mol(-1) and+379.3 J mol(-1) K(-1) according to Van't Hoff equation which indicated that reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Experimental results from spectroscopic methods were comparable and further supported by viscosity measurements. We suggest that Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 8×10+4 M(-1). Binding of this copper complex to DNA was found to be stronger compared to aspartame which was studied recently. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Impedance analysis of DNA and DNA-drug interactions on thin mercury film electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasoň, Stanislav; Dvořák, Jakub; Jelen, František; Vetterl, Vladimír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 2 (2002), s. 167-179 ISSN 1040-8347 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4004901; GA AV ČR IAA4004002; GA AV ČR IBS5004107 Grant - others:GA FRVŠ(XC) G40583; GA FRVŠ(XC) F40564 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : electrochemical impedance spectroscopy * intercalators * DNA at electrode surface Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.074, year: 2002

  5. Structure and decoy-mediated inhibition of the SOX18/Prox1-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Miriam; Prokoph, Nina; Girbig, Mathias; Wang, Xuecong; Huang, Yong-Heng; Srivastava, Yogesh; Hou, Linlin; Narasimhan, Kamesh; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Francois, Mathias; Jauch, Ralf

    2016-05-05

    The transcription factor (TF) SOX18 drives lymphatic vessel development in both embryogenesis and tumour-induced neo-lymphangiogenesis. Genetic disruption of Sox18 in a mouse model protects from tumour metastasis and established the SOX18 protein as a molecular target. Here, we report the crystal structure of the SOX18 DNA binding high-mobility group (HMG) box bound to a DNA element regulating Prox1 transcription. The crystals diffracted to 1.75Å presenting the highest resolution structure of a SOX/DNA complex presently available revealing water structure, structural adjustments at the DNA contact interface and non-canonical conformations of the DNA backbone. To explore alternatives to challenging small molecule approaches for targeting the DNA-binding activity of SOX18, we designed a set of five decoys based on modified Prox1-DNA. Four decoys potently inhibited DNA binding of SOX18 in vitro and did not interact with non-SOX TFs. Serum stability, nuclease resistance and thermal denaturation assays demonstrated that a decoy circularized with a hexaethylene glycol linker and terminal phosphorothioate modifications is most stable. This SOX decoy also interfered with the expression of a luciferase reporter under control of a SOX18-dependent VCAM1 promoter in COS7 cells. Collectively, we propose SOX decoys as potential strategy for inhibiting SOX18 activity to disrupt tumour-induced neo-lymphangiogenesis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Direct measurement of interaction forces between a platinum dichloride complex and DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Shimada, Shogo; Okada, Tomoko

    2017-09-01

    The interaction forces between a platinum dichloride complex and DNA molecules have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The platinum dichloride complex, di-dimethylsulfoxide-dichloroplatinum (II) (Pt(DMSO) 2 Cl 2 ), was immobilized on an AFM probe by coordinating the platinum to two amino groups to form a complex similar to Pt(en)Cl 2 , which is structurally similar to cisplatin. The retraction forces were measured between the platinum complex and DNA molecules immobilized on mica plates using force curve measurements. The histogram of the retraction force for λ-DNA showed several peaks; the unit retraction force was estimated to be 130 pN for a pulling rate of 60 nm/s. The retraction forces were also measured separately for four single-base DNA oligomers (adenine, guanine, thymine, and cytosine). Retraction forces were frequently observed in the force curves for the DNA oligomers of guanine and adenine. For the guanine DNA oligomer, the most frequent retraction force was slightly lower than but very similar to the retraction force for λ-DNA. A higher retraction force was obtained for the adenine DNA oligomer than for the guanine oligomer. This result is consistent with a higher retraction activation energy of adenine with the Pt complex being than that of guanine because the kinetic rate constant for retraction correlates to exp(FΔx - ΔE) where ΔE is an activation energy, F is an applied force, and Δx is a displacement of distance.

  7. Sequence-influenced interactions of oligoacridines with DNA detected by retarded gel electrophorectic migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, P.E.; Zhen, W.; Henriksen, U.; Buchardt, O.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have found that di-, tri-, tetra-, and hexa-9-acridinylamines are so efficiently associated with DNA during electrophoresis in polyacrylamide or agarose gels that they retard its migration. The retardation is roughly proportional to the reagent to base pair ratio, and the magnitude of the retardation indicates that a combined charge neutralization/helix extension mechanism is mainly responsible for the effect. Furthermore, DNA sequence dependent differences are observed. Thus, the pUC 19 restriction fragments (HaeIII or AluI), which in the native state comigrate upon gel electrophoretic analysis, could be separated in the presence of a diacridine, and specific DNA fragments responded differently to different diacridines. These results suggest that the effect also is due to a contribution from the DNA conformation and that the DNA conformation dynamics are influenced differently upon binding of different diacridines. They foresee three applications of this observation: (1) in analytical gel electrophoretic separation of otherwise comigrating DNA molecules, (2) in studies of polyintercalator-DNA interaction, and (3) in measurements of polyintercalator-induced DNA unwinding

  8. The Cold Shock Domain of YB-1 Segregates RNA from DNA by Non-Bonded Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Kljashtorny

    Full Text Available The human YB-1 protein plays multiple cellular roles, of which many are dictated by its binding to RNA and DNA through its Cold Shock Domain (CSD. Using molecular dynamics simulation approaches validated by experimental assays, the YB1 CSD was found to interact with nucleic acids in a sequence-dependent manner and with a higher affinity for RNA than DNA. The binding properties of the YB1 CSD were close to those observed for the related bacterial Cold Shock Proteins (CSP, albeit some differences in sequence specificity. The results provide insights in the molecular mechanisms whereby YB-1 interacts with nucleic acids.

  9. Modes of Escherichia coli Dps Interaction with DNA as Revealed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav V Melekhov

    Full Text Available Multifunctional protein Dps plays an important role in iron assimilation and a crucial role in bacterial genome packaging. Its monomers form dodecameric spherical particles accumulating ~400 molecules of oxidized iron ions within the protein cavity and applying a flexible N-terminal ends of each subunit for interaction with DNA. Deposition of iron is a well-studied process by which cells remove toxic Fe2+ ions from the genetic material and store them in an easily accessible form. However, the mode of interaction with linear DNA remained mysterious and binary complexes with Dps have not been characterized so far. It is widely believed that Dps binds DNA without any sequence or structural preferences but several lines of evidence have demonstrated its ability to differentiate gene expression, which assumes certain specificity. Here we show that Dps has a different affinity for the two DNA fragments taken from the dps gene regulatory region. We found by atomic force microscopy that Dps predominantly occupies thermodynamically unstable ends of linear double-stranded DNA fragments and has high affinity to the central part of the branched DNA molecule self-assembled from three single-stranded oligonucleotides. It was proposed that Dps prefers binding to those regions in DNA that provide more contact pads for the triad of its DNA-binding bundle associated with one vertex of the protein globule. To our knowledge, this is the first study revealed the nucleoid protein with an affinity to branched DNA typical for genomic regions with direct and inverted repeats. As a ubiquitous feature of bacterial and eukaryotic genomes, such structural elements should be of particular care, but the protein system evolutionarily adapted for this function is not yet known, and we suggest Dps as a putative component of this system.

  10. Energetic and binding properties of DNA upon interaction with dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathaie, S Z; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Saboury, A A

    1999-02-15

    The interaction of dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), a cationic surfactant, with calf thymus DNA has been studied by various methods, including potentiometric technique using DTAB-selective plastic membrane electrode at 27 and 37 degreesC, isothermal titration microcalorimetry and UV spectrophotometry at 27 degreesC using 0.05 M Tris buffer and 0.01 M NaCl at pH 7.4. The free energy is calculated from binding isotherms on the basis of Wyman binding potential theory and the enthalpy of binding according to van't Hoff relation. The enthalpy of unfolding has been determined by subtraction of the enthalpy of binding from the microcalorimetric enthalpy. The results show that, after the interaction of first DTAB molecule to DNA (base molarity) through the electrostatic interaction, the second DTAB molecule also binds to DNA through electrostatic interaction. At this stage, the predom-inant DNA conformational change occurs. Afterwards up to 20 DTAB molecules, below the critical micelle concentration of DTAB, bind through hydrophobic interactions.

  11. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  12. FT-Raman and QM/MM study of the interaction between histamine and DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Chica, A.J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Soriano, A. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica/IcMol, Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot Valencia (Spain); Tunon, I. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica/IcMol, Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot Valencia (Spain); Sanchez-Jimenez, F.M. [Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Silla, E. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica/IcMol, Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot Valencia (Spain); Ramirez, F.J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain)], E-mail: ramirez@uma.es

    2006-05-31

    The interaction between histamine and highly polymerized calf-thymus DNA has been investigated using FT-Raman spectroscopy and the hybrid QM/MM (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) methodology. Raman spectra of solutions containing histamine and calf-thymus DNA, at different molar ratios, were recorded. Solutions were prepared at physiological settings of pH and ionic strength, using both natural and heavy water as the solvent. The analysis of the spectral changes on the DNA Raman spectra when adding different concentrations of histamine allowed us to identify the reactive sites of DNA and histamine, which were used to built two minor groove and one intercalated binding models. They were further used as starting points of the QM/MM theoretical study. However, minimal energy points were only reached for the two minor groove models. For each optimized structure, we calculated analytical force constants of histamine molecule in order to perform the vibrational dynamics. Normal mode descriptions allowed us to compare calculated wavenumbers for DNA-interacting histamine to those measured in the Raman spectra of DNA-histamine solutions.

  13. Low-energy-electron interactions with DNA: approaching cellular conditions with atmospheric experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, E.; Sanche, L.

    2014-01-01

    A novel technique has been developed to investigate low energy electron (LEE)-DNA interactions in the presence of small biomolecules (e.g., N 2 , O 2 , H 2 O) found near DNA in the cell nucleus, in order to simulate cellular conditions. In this technique, LEEs are emitted from a metallic surface exposed by soft X-rays and interact with DNA thin films at standard ambient temperature and pressure (SATP). Whereas atmospheric N 2 had little effect on the yields of LEE-induced single and double strand breaks, both O 2 and H 2 O considerably modified and increased such damage. The highest yields were obtained when DNA is embedded in a combined O 2 and H 2 O atmosphere. In this case, the amount of additional double strand breaks was supper-additive. The effect of modifying the chemical and physical stability of DNA by platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents (Pt-drugs) including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin was also investigated with this technique. The results obtained provide information on the role played by subexcitation-energy electrons and dissociative electron attachment in the radiosensitization of DNA by Pt-drugs, which is an important step to unravel the mechanisms of radiosensitization of these agents in chemo-radiation cancer therapy. (authors)

  14. In vitro study on the interaction of 4,4-dimethylcurcumin with calf thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing-Mi, E-mail: liubingmi@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Bai, Chong-Liang [Centre for Molecular Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Zhang, Jun; Liu, Yang; Dong, Bo-Yang; Zhang, Yi-Tong [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Liu, Bin, E-mail: liubinzehao@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of 4,4-dimethylcurcumin (DMCU), a synthesized analog of curcumin, with calf-thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was investigated using fluorescence, absorption, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, coupled with viscosity measurements and molecular docking techniques. DMCU was found to bind to ct-DNA with moderate binding affinity through groove binding as evidenced by a decrease in the absorption intensity in combination with no obvious change in the relative specific viscosity of ct-DNA and the CD spectrum. Thermodynamic analysis of the fluorescence data obtained at different temperatures suggested that the binding process was spontaneous and was primarily driven by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Furthermore, competitive binding experiments with ethidium bromide and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole as probes showed that DMCU could preferentially bind in the minor groove of double-stranded DNA. The results obtained from the molecular docking studies were consistent with these experimental results. This study explored the potential applicability of the spectroscopic properties of DMCU for studying its interactions with relevant biological or biomimicking targets. - Highlights: • 4,4-dimethylcurcumin (DMCU) has strong fluorescence characteristics. • DMCU could bind to DNA through groove binding. • Docking studies revealed that DMCU bound to the A–T region in the minor groove.

  15. Low-energy-electron interactions with DNA: approaching cellular conditions with atmospheric experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Sanche, Léon

    2014-04-01

    A novel technique has been developed to investigate low energy electron (LEE)-DNA interactions in the presence of small biomolecules (e.g., N2, O2, H2O) found near DNA in the cell nucleus, in order to simulate cellular conditions. In this technique, LEEs are emitted from a metallic surface exposed by soft X-rays and interact with DNA thin films at standard ambient temperature and pressure (SATP). Whereas atmospheric N2 had little effect on the yields of LEE-induced single and double strand breaks, both O2 and H2O considerably modified and increased such damage. The highest yields were obtained when DNA is embedded in a combined O2 and H2O atmosphere. In this case, the amount of additional double strand breaks was supper-additive. The effect of modifying the chemical and physical stability of DNA by platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents (Pt-drugs) including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin was also investigated with this technique. The results obtained provide information on the role played by subexcitation-energy electrons and dissociative electron attachment in the radiosensitization of DNA by Pt-drugs, which is an important step to unravel the mechanisms of radiosensitisation of these agents in chemoradiation cancer therapy.

  16. FT-Raman and QM/MM study of the interaction between histamine and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Chica, A.J.; Soriano, A.; Tunon, I.; Sanchez-Jimenez, F.M.; Silla, E.; Ramirez, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between histamine and highly polymerized calf-thymus DNA has been investigated using FT-Raman spectroscopy and the hybrid QM/MM (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) methodology. Raman spectra of solutions containing histamine and calf-thymus DNA, at different molar ratios, were recorded. Solutions were prepared at physiological settings of pH and ionic strength, using both natural and heavy water as the solvent. The analysis of the spectral changes on the DNA Raman spectra when adding different concentrations of histamine allowed us to identify the reactive sites of DNA and histamine, which were used to built two minor groove and one intercalated binding models. They were further used as starting points of the QM/MM theoretical study. However, minimal energy points were only reached for the two minor groove models. For each optimized structure, we calculated analytical force constants of histamine molecule in order to perform the vibrational dynamics. Normal mode descriptions allowed us to compare calculated wavenumbers for DNA-interacting histamine to those measured in the Raman spectra of DNA-histamine solutions

  17. Structure of uracil-DNA glycosylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: insights into interactions with ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Prem Singh; Talawar, Ramappa K.; Varshney, Umesh; Vijayan, M.

    2010-01-01

    The molecule of uracil-DNA glycosylase from M. tuberculosis exhibits domain motion on binding to DNA or a proteinaceous inhibitor. The highly conserved DNA-binding region interacts with a citrate ion in the structure. Uracil N-glycosylase (Ung) is the most thoroughly studied of the group of uracil DNA-glycosylase (UDG) enzymes that catalyse the first step in the uracil excision-repair pathway. The overall structure of the enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essentially the same as that of the enzyme from other sources. However, differences exist in the N- and C-terminal stretches and some catalytic loops. Comparison with appropriate structures indicate that the two-domain enzyme closes slightly when binding to DNA, while it opens slightly when binding to the proteinaceous inhibitor Ugi. The structural changes in the catalytic loops on complexation reflect the special features of their structure in the mycobacterial protein. A comparative analysis of available sequences of the enzyme from different sources indicates high conservation of amino-acid residues in the catalytic loops. The uracil-binding pocket in the structure is occupied by a citrate ion. The interactions of the citrate ion with the protein mimic those of uracil, in addition to providing insights into other possible interactions that inhibitors could be involved in

  18. Deciphering the mechanism of interaction of edifenphos with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ajaz; Ahmad, Masood

    2018-01-01

    Edifenphos is an important organophosphate pesticide with many antifungal and anti-insecticidal properties but it may cause potential hazards to human health. In this work, we have tried to explore the binding mode of action and mechanism of edifenphos to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA). Several experiments such as ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra and emission spectroscopy showed complex formation between edifenphos and CT-DNA and low binding constant values supporting groove binding mode. These results were further confirmed by circular dichroism (CD), CT-DNA melting studies, viscosity measurements, density functional theory and molecular docking. CD study suggests that edifenphos does not alter native structure of CT-DNA. Isothermal calorimetry reveals that binding of edifenphos with CT-DNA is enthalpy driven process. Competitive binding assay and effect of ionic strength showed that edifenphos binds to CT-DNA via groove binding manner. Hence, edifenphos is a minor groove binder preferably interacting with A-T regions with docking score - 6.84 kJ/mol.

  19. Interaction of DNA with Cationic Lipid Mixtures-Investigation at Langmuir Lipid Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janich, Christopher; Hädicke, André; Bakowsky, Udo; Brezesinski, Gerald; Wölk, Christian

    2017-10-03

    Four different binary lipid mixtures composed of a cationic lipid and the zwitterionic colipids DOPE or DPPC, which show different DNA transfer activities in cell culture models, were investigated at the soft air/water interface to identify transfection efficiency determining characteristics. Langmuir films are useful models to investigate the interaction between DNA and lipid mixtures in a two-dimensional model system by using different surface sensitive techniques, namely, epifluorescence microscopy and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy. Especially, the effect of adsorbed DNA on the properties of the lipid mixtures has been examined. Distinct differences between the lipid composites were found which are caused by the different colipids of the mixtures. DOPE containing lipid mixtures form fluid monolayers with a uniform distribution of the fluorescent probe in the presence and absence of DNA at physiologically relevant surface pressures. Only at high nonphysiological pressures, the lipid monolayer collapses and phase separation was observed if DNA was present in the subphase. In contrast, DPPC containing lipid mixtures show domains in the liquid condensed phase state in the presence and absence of DNA in the subphase. The adsorption of DNA at the positively charged mixed lipid monolayer induces phase separation which is expressed in the morphology and the point of appearance of these domains.

  20. GEMC1 is a TopBP1-interacting protein required for chromosomal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Alessia; Cosentino, Claudia; Errico, Alessia; Garner, Elizabeth; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Many of the factors required for chromosomal DNA replication have been identified in unicellular eukaryotes. However, DNA replication is poorly understood in multicellular organisms. Here, we report the identification of GEMC1 (geminin coiled-coil containing protein 1), a novel vertebrate protein required for chromosomal DNA replication. GEMC1 is highly conserved in vertebrates and is preferentially expressed in proliferating cells. Using Xenopus laevis egg extract we show that Xenopus GEMC1 (xGEMC1) binds to the checkpoint and replication factor TopBP1, which promotes binding of xGEMC1 to chromatin during pre-replication complex (pre-RC) formation. We demonstrate that xGEMC1 interacts directly with replication factors such as Cdc45 and the kinase Cdk2-CyclinE, through which it is heavily phosphorylated. Phosphorylated xGEMC1 stimulates initiation of DNA replication, whereas depletion of xGEMC1 prevents the onset of DNA replication owing to the impairment of Cdc45 loading onto chromatin. Similarly, inhibition of GEMC1 expression with morpholino and siRNA oligos prevents DNA replication in embryonic and somatic vertebrate cells. These data suggest that GEMC1 promotes initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in multicellular organisms by mediating TopBP1- and Cdk2-dependent recruitment of Cdc45 onto replication origins.

  1. GEMC1 is a TopBP1 interacting protein required for chromosomal DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Alessia; Cosentino, Claudia; Errico, Alessia; Garner, Elizabeth; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Many factors required for chromosomal DNA replication have been identified in unicellular eukaryotes. However, DNA replication in complex multicellular organisms is poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of GEMC1, a novel vertebrate protein required for chromosomal DNA replication. GEMC1 is highly conserved in vertebrates and is preferentially expressed in proliferating cells. Using Xenopus egg extract we show that Xenopus GEMC1 (xGEMC1) binds to checkpoint and replication factor TopBP1, which promotes xGEMC1 binding to chromatin during pre-replication complex (pre-RC) formation. We demonstrate that xGEMC1 directly interacts with replication factors such as Cdc45 and Cdk2-CyclinE by which it is heavily phosphorylated. Phosphorylated xGEMC1 stimulates initiation of DNA replication whereas depletion of xGEMC1 prevents DNA replication onset due to impairment of Cdc45 loading onto chromatin. Likewise, inhibition of GEMC1 expression by morpholino and siRNA oligos prevents DNA replication in embryonic and somatic vertebrate cells. These data suggest that GEMC1 promotes initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in higher eukaryotes by mediating TopBP1 and Cdk2 dependent recruitment of Cdc45 onto replication origins. PMID:20383140

  2. Palladium polypyridyl complexes: synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and biological activity on Leishmania (L.) mexicana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Maribel; Betancourt, Adelmo; Hernandez, Clara; Marchan, Edgar

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the search for new potential chemotherapeutic agents based on transition metal complexes with planar ligands. In this study, palladium polypyridyl complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopies. The interaction of the complexes with DNA was also investigated by spectroscopic methods. All metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) bands of the palladium polypyridyl complexes exhibited hypochromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant and viscosity data suggested that the complexes [PdCl 2 (phen)] and [PdCl 2 (phendiamine)] interact with DNA by electrostatic forces. Additionally, these complexes induced an important leishmanistatic effect on L. (L.) mexicana promastigotes at the final concentration of 10 μmol L -1 in 48 h. (author)

  3. Palladium polypyridyl complexes: synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and biological activity on Leishmania (L.) mexicana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Maribel [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas (Venezuela). Centro de Quimica; Betancourt, Adelmo [Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia (Venezuela). Facultad Experimental de Ciencia y Tecnologia. Dept. de Quimica; Hernandez, Clara [Universidad de Carabobo Sede Aragua, Maracay (Venezuela). Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud. Dept. de Ciencias Basicas; Marchan, Edgar [Universidad de Oriente, Cumana (Venezuela). Inst. de Investigaciones en Biomedicina y Ciencias Aplicadas. Nucleo de Sucre

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the search for new potential chemotherapeutic agents based on transition metal complexes with planar ligands. In this study, palladium polypyridyl complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopies. The interaction of the complexes with DNA was also investigated by spectroscopic methods. All metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) bands of the palladium polypyridyl complexes exhibited hypochromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant and viscosity data suggested that the complexes [PdCl{sub 2}(phen)] and [PdCl{sub 2}(phendiamine)] interact with DNA by electrostatic forces. Additionally, these complexes induced an important leishmanistatic effect on L. (L.) mexicana promastigotes at the final concentration of 10 {mu}mol L{sup -1} in 48 h. (author)

  4. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  5. Screening a cDNA Library for Protein–Protein Interactions Directly in Planta[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lan-Ying; Wu, Fu-Hui; Hsu, Chen-Tran; Shen, Shu-Chen; Yeh, Hsuan-Yu; Liao, De-Chih; Fang, Mei-Jane; Liu, Nien-Tze; Yen, Yu-Chen; Dokládal, Ladislav; Sýkorová, Eva; Gelvin, Stanton B.; Lin, Choun-Sea

    2012-01-01

    Screening cDNA libraries for genes encoding proteins that interact with a bait protein is usually performed in yeast. However, subcellular compartmentation and protein modification may differ in yeast and plant cells, resulting in misidentification of protein partners. We used bimolecular fluorescence complementation technology to screen a plant cDNA library against a bait protein directly in plants. As proof of concept, we used the N-terminal fragment of yellow fluorescent protein– or nVenus-tagged Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirE2 and VirD2 proteins and the C-terminal extension (CTE) domain of Arabidopsis thaliana telomerase reverse transcriptase as baits to screen an Arabidopsis cDNA library encoding proteins tagged with the C-terminal fragment of yellow fluorescent protein. A library of colonies representing ∼2 × 105 cDNAs was arrayed in 384-well plates. DNA was isolated from pools of 10 plates, individual plates, and individual rows and columns of the plates. Sequential screening of subsets of cDNAs in Arabidopsis leaf or tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 protoplasts identified single cDNA clones encoding proteins that interact with either, or both, of the Agrobacterium bait proteins, or with CTE. T-DNA insertions in the genes represented by some cDNAs revealed five novel Arabidopsis proteins important for Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. We also used this cDNA library to confirm VirE2-interacting proteins in orchid (Phalaenopsis amabilis) flowers. Thus, this technology can be applied to several plant species. PMID:22623495

  6. Interaction of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen With DNA at the Single Molecule Level

    KAUST Repository

    Raducanu, Vlad-Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key factor involved in Eukaryotic DNA replication and repair, as well as other cellular pathways. Its importance comes mainly from two aspects: the large numbers of interacting partners and the mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA. The large numbers of interacting partners makes PCNA a necessary factor to consider when studying DNA replication, either in vitro or in vivo. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA, i.e. sliding along the duplex, reduces the six degrees of freedom of the molecule, three degrees of freedom of translation and three degrees of freedom of rotation, to only two, translation along the duplex and rotational tracking of the helix. Through this mechanism PCNA can recruit its partner proteins and localize them to the right spot on the DNA, maybe in the right spatial orientation, more effectively and in coordination with other proteins. Passive loading of the closed PCNA ring on the DNA without free ends is a topologically forbidden process. Replication factor C (RFC) uses energy of ATP hydrolysis to mechanically open the PCNA ring and load it on the dsDNA. The first half of the introduction gives overview of PCNA and RFC and the loading mechanism of PCNA on dsDNA. The second half is dedicated to a diffusion model and to an algorithm for analyzing PCNA sliding. PCNA and RFC were successfully purified, simulations and a mean squared displacement analysis algorithm were run and showed good stability and experimental PCNA sliding data was analyzed and led to parameters similar to the ones in literature.

  7. A Qualitative and Quantitative Assay to Study DNA/Drug Interaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Article. A Qualitative and Quantitative Assay to Study. DNA/Drug Interaction Based on Sequence Selective. Inhibition of Restriction Endonucleases. Syed A Hassan1*, Lata Chauhan2, Ritu Barthwal2 and Aparna Dixit3. 1 Faculty of Computing and Information Technology, King Abdul Aziz University, Rabigh-21911 ...

  8. Influence of anticancer drugs on interactions of tumor suppressor protein p53 with DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivoňková, Hana; Němcová, Kateřina; Brázdová, Marie; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Fojta, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 272, Suppl. 1 (2005), s. 562 ISSN 1474-3833. [FEBS Congress /30./ and IUBMB Conference /9./. 02.07.2005-07.07.2005, Budapest] R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NC7574 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : tumour suppressor protein p53 * anticancer drugs * interaction with DNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  9. INTERACTION OF IRON(II MIXED-LIGAND COMPLEXES WITH DNA: BASE-PAIR SPECIFICITY AND THERMAL DENATURATION STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudasir Mudasir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A research about base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of [Fe(phen3]2+, [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ and [Fe(phen(dip2]2+ complexes and the effect of calf-thymus DNA (ct-DNA binding of these metal complexes on thermal denaturation of ct-DNA has been carried out. This research is intended to evaluate the preferential binding of the complexes to the sequence of DNA (A-T or G-C sequence and to investigate the binding strength and mode upon their interaction with DNA. Base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of the complexes was determined by comparing the equilibrium binding constant (Kb of each complex to polysynthetic DNA that contain only A-T or G-C sequence. The Kb value of the interaction was determined by spectrophotometric titration and thermal denaturation temperature (Tm was determined by monitoring the absorbance of the mixture solution of each complex and ct-DNA at λ =260 nm as temperature was elevated in the range of 25 - 100 oC. Results of the study show that in general all iron(II complexes studied exhibit a base-pair specificity in their DNA binding to prefer the relatively facile A-T sequence as compared to the G-C one. The thermal denaturation experiments have demonstrated that Fe(phen3]2+ and [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ interact weakly with double helical DNA via electrostatic interaction as indicated by insignificant changes in melting temperature, whereas [Fe(phen2(dip]2+  most probably binds to DNA in mixed modes of interaction, i.e.: intercalation and electrostatic interaction. This conclusion is based on the fact that the binding of [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ to ct-DNA moderately increase the Tm value of ct- DNA   Keywords: DNA Binding, mixed-ligand complexes

  10. Sequence Dependent Interactions Between DNA and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxbury, Daniel

    It is known that single-stranded DNA adopts a helical wrap around a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), forming a water-dispersible hybrid molecule. The ability to sort mixtures of SWCNTs based on chirality (electronic species) has recently been demonstrated using special short DNA sequences that recognize certain matching SWCNTs of specific chirality. This thesis investigates the intricacies of DNA-SWCNT sequence-specific interactions through both experimental and molecular simulation studies. The DNA-SWCNT binding strengths were experimentally quantified by studying the kinetics of DNA replacement by a surfactant on the surface of particular SWCNTs. Recognition ability was found to correlate strongly with measured binding strength, e.g. DNA sequence (TAT)4 was found to bind 20 times stronger to the (6,5)-SWCNT than sequence (TAT)4T. Next, using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations, equilibrium structures formed by (a) single-strands and (b) multiple-strands of 12-mer oligonucleotides adsorbed on various SWCNTs were explored. A number of structural motifs were discovered in which the DNA strand wraps around the SWCNT and 'stitches' to itself via hydrogen bonding. Great variability among equilibrium structures was observed and shown to be directly influenced by DNA sequence and SWCNT type. For example, the (6,5)-SWCNT DNA recognition sequence, (TAT)4, was found to wrap in a tight single-stranded right-handed helical conformation. In contrast, DNA sequence T12 forms a beta-barrel left-handed structure on the same SWCNT. These are the first theoretical indications that DNA-based SWCNT selectivity can arise on a molecular level. In a biomedical collaboration with the Mayo Clinic, pathways for DNA-SWCNT internalization into healthy human endothelial cells were explored. Through absorbance spectroscopy, TEM imaging, and confocal fluorescence microscopy, we showed that intracellular concentrations of SWCNTs far exceeded those of the incubation

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and DNA Interaction Studies of Copper Complex Containing Food Additive Carmoisine Dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Akbari, Alireza; Jamshidbeigi, Mina; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-06-02

    A copper complex of carmoisine dye; [Cu(carmoisine)2(H2O)2]; was synthesized and characterized by using physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding of this complex with calf thymus (ct) DNA was investigated by circular dichroism, absorption studies, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. UV-vis results confirmed that the Cu complex interacted with DNA to form a ground-state complex and the observed binding constant (2× 10(4) M(-1)) is more in keeping with the groove bindings with DNA. Furthermore, the viscosity measurement result showed that the addition of complex causes no significant change on DNA viscosity and it indicated that the intercalation mode is ruled out. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played major roles in the reaction. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that the complex can change the conformation of DNA from B-like form toward A-like conformation. The cytotoxicity studies of the carmoisine dye and its copper complex indicated that both of them had anticancer effects on HT-29 (colon cancer) cell line and they may be new candidates for treatment of the colon cancer.

  12. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Assay for the Identification of Arabidopsis Protein-DNA Interactions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Dorota N; Mouriz, Alfonso; Jarillo, José A; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2016-01-14

    Intricate gene regulatory networks orchestrate biological processes and developmental transitions in plants. Selective transcriptional activation and silencing of genes mediate the response of plants to environmental signals and developmental cues. Therefore, insights into the mechanisms that control plant gene expression are essential to gain a deep understanding of how biological processes are regulated in plants. The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technique described here is a procedure to identify the DNA-binding sites of proteins in genes or genomic regions of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. The interactions with DNA of proteins of interest such as transcription factors, chromatin proteins or posttranslationally modified versions of histones can be efficiently analyzed with the ChIP protocol. This method is based on the fixation of protein-DNA interactions in vivo, random fragmentation of chromatin, immunoprecipitation of protein-DNA complexes with specific antibodies, and quantification of the DNA associated with the protein of interest by PCR techniques. The use of this methodology in Arabidopsis has contributed significantly to unveil transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control a variety of plant biological processes. This approach allowed the identification of the binding sites of the Arabidopsis chromatin protein EBS to regulatory regions of the master gene of flowering FT. The impact of this protein in the accumulation of particular histone marks in the genomic region of FT was also revealed through ChIP analysis.

  13. Preparation, characterization, and DNA interaction studies of cationic europium luminescent copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ziwei; Hu, Xiaoxi; Wang, Yun; Yin, Yanzhen; Peng, Bo; Xu, Zushun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposed a simple synthetic strategy towards a novel cationic europium luminescent copolymer, poly(METAC-co-NIPAm-co-Eu(AA)3Phen) (PMNEu), and investigation about their complexation ability with DNA. In this approach, first, Eu(AA)3Phen complex monomer containing Eu(3+), acrylic acid (AA), and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) was synthesized, and subsequently, free radical copolymerization of Eu(AA)3Phen complex monomer with other two functional monomers, [2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride (METAC) and N-isopropylarylamide (NIPAm), was carried out in methanol using azodiisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator. (1)HNMR, GPC, fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and TEM were used to investigate the chemical structures, molecular weight and molecular weight distribution, fluorescence properties, UV spectra, and morphologies of PMNEu copolymer, respectively. Furthermore, the interaction of PMNEu with DNA was also studied with fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis. These results indicated that PMNEu could interact with DNA via an electrostatic bonding mode and the bonding constant was 2.2 × 10(5) L/mol. Additionally, TEM observation showed that pure PMNEu formed micelles in water solution, while the size-controllable aggregations of PMNEu with DNA were obtained when PMNEu was mixed with DNA at various concentration ratios. A good biocompability of PMNEu was demonstrated through in vitro cytotoxicity assays.

  14. Antibacterial effect of cationic porphyrazines and anionic phthalocyanine and their interaction with plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Leila; Hakimian, Fatemeh; Safaei, Elham; Fazeli, Zahra

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is a public health issue and identification of new antibacterial agents is one of the most important goals of pharmacological research. Among the novel developed antibacterial agents, porphyrin complexes and their derivatives are ideal candidates for use in medical applications. Phthalocyanines differ from porphyrins by having nitrogen atoms link the individual pyrrol units. The aza analogues of the phthalocyanines (azaPcs) such as tetramethylmetalloporphyrazines are heterocyclic Pc analogues. In this investigation, interaction of an anionic phthalocyanine (Cu(PcTs)) and two cationic tetrapyridinoporphyrazines including [Cu(2,3-tmtppa)]4+ and [Cu(3,4-tmtppa)]4+ complexes with plasmid DNA was studied using spectroscopic and gel electrophoresis methods. In addition, antibacterial effect of the complexes against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria was investigated using dilution test method. The results indicated that both porphyrazines have significant antibacterial properties, but Cu(PcTs) has weak antibacterial effect. Compairing the binding of the phthalocyanine and the porphyrazines to DNA demonstrated that the interaction of cationic porphyrazines is stronger than the anionic phthalocyanine remarkably. The extent of hypochromicity and red shift of absorption spectra indicated preferential intercalation of the two porphyrazine into the base pairs of DNA helix. Gel electrophoresis result implied Cu(2,3-tmtppa) and Cu(3,4-tmtppa) are able to perform cleavage of the plasmid DNA. Consequently, DNA binding and cleavage might be one of the antibacterial mechanisms of the complexes.

  15. Electrochemical monitoring of the interaction between anticancer drug and DNA in the presence of antioxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muti, Merve; Muti, Mihrican

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this work is to find out the effect of antioxidant onto the interaction of DNA-anticancer drug, daunorubicin. Daunorubicin (DNR) is an anti-cancer drug which is used for the treatment of certain cancers including the treatment of leukemia. The treatments of patients, who suffer from cancer, become generally complicated if they take some antioxidant-containing supplement during chemotherapy. In this study, the interaction performance between DNR and DNA was investigated both in the presence and absence of antioxidant, caffeic acid, as the first time in the literature. Interaction performances were evaluated by observing both guanine (1.0V) and DNR (0.5V) oxidation signal in the same potential window. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasticity in Repressor-DNA Interactions Neutralizes Loss of Symmetry in Bipartite Operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Deepti; Narayanan, Naveen; Nair, Deepak T

    2016-01-15

    Transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to gene regulation. Many transcription factors regulate multiple target genes and can bind sequences that do not conform strictly to the consensus. To understand the structural mechanism utilized by the transcription regulators to bind diverse target sequences, we have employed the repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis as a model system. AraR is known to bind to eight different operator sites in the bacterial genome. Although there are differences in the sequences of four of these operators, ORE1, ORX1, ORA1, and ORR3, the AraR-DNA binding domain (AraR-DBD) as well as full-length AraR unexpectedly binds to each of these sequences with similar affinities as measured by fluorescence anisotropy experiments. We have determined crystal structures of AraR-DBD in complex with two different natural operators ORE1 and ORX1 up to 2.07 and 1.97 Å resolution, respectively. These structures were compared with the previously reported structures of AraR-DBD bound to two other natural operators (ORA1 and ORR3). Interactions of two molecules of AraR-DBD with the symmetric operator, ORE1, are identical, but their interaction with the non-symmetric operator ORX1 results in breakdown of the symmetry in protein-DNA interactions. The novel interactions observed are accompanied by local conformational change in the DNA. ChIP-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) data on other transcription factors has shown that they can bind to diverse targets, and hence the plasticity exhibited by AraR may be a general phenomenon. The ability of transcription factors to form alternate interactions may be important for employment in new functions and evolution of novel regulatory circuits. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of DNA with the copper complexes of NSAIDs lornoxicam and isoxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Sathi; Ray, Suhita; Sarkar, Munna

    2016-12-01

    Non Steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) form the most common class of anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents. They also show anticancer properties for which they exert their effects by interacting at the protein but not at the genomic level. This is because most NSAIDs are anions at physiological pH, which prohibit their approach to the polyanionic DNA backbone. Complexing NSAIDs with bioactive metal like copper obliterates this disadvantage. Here, copper complexes of two oxicam NSAIDs, Lornoxicam (Lx) and Isoxicam (Isx) have been chosen to study their interaction with calf thymus (ct) DNA and have been synthesized as per reported protocols. UV-vis absorption showed that DNA binding to Cu(II)-Lx complex alters the absorption spectra indicating changes in the electronic environment of the complex, whereas, for Cu(II)-Isx there was only small changes. Hence, UV-vis absorption was used to determine the binding constant, stoichiometry and thermodynamic parameters of Cu(II)-Lx. However, UV-melting studies and CD difference spectra showed that both Cu(II)-Lx and Cu(II)-Isx can interact with the DNA backbone albeit with different binding modes. The probable binding mode was determined by kinetics of EtBr displacement and viscosity measurements. Our results point to an intercalative mode of binding for Cu(II)-Lx and external groove binding for Cu(II)-Isx. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Interaction studies between biosynthesized silver nanoparticle with calf thymus DNA and cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Swarup; Sadhukhan, Ratan; Ghosh, Utpal; Das, Tapan Kumar

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of calf thymus DNA (CTDNA) with silver nanoparticles (SNP) has been investigated following spectroscopic studies, analysis of melting temperature (Tm) curves and hydrodynamic measurement. In spectrophotometric titration and thermal denaturation studies of CTDNA it was found that SNP can form a complex with double-helical DNA and the increasing value of Tm also supported the same. The association constant of SNP with DNA from UV-Vis study was found to be 4.1 × 103 L/mol. The fluorescence emission spectra of intercalated ethidium bromide (EB) with increasing concentration of SNP represented a significant reduction of EB intensity and quenching of EB fluorescence. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that SNP can change the conformation of DNA. From spectroscopic, hydrodynamic, and DNA melting studies, SNP has been found to be a DNA groove binder possessing partial intercalating property. Cell cytotoxicity of SNP was compared with that of normal silver salt solution on HeLa cells. Our results show that SNP has less cytotoxicity compared to its normal salt solution and good cell staining property.

  19. Interfacial design of carbon nanotube polymer composites: a hybrid system of noncovalent and covalent functionalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. Q.; Xiao, T.; Liao, K.; Wu, P.

    2007-04-01

    Homogeneous dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) throughout the polymer matrix and their adequate interfacial bonding are critical for load transfer in CNT-polymer composites. However, both cannot be realized simultaneously by either covalent or noncovalent functionalization. A hybrid system integrating both covalent and noncovalent functionalizations is presented for interfacial design of CNT-polymer composites. To investigate the feasibility of this system, examples of the epoxidized single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) subsequently wrapped by poly(m-phenylenevinylene- co-2,5-dioctyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene) (PmPV) are studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations. It is shown by our results that PmPV molecules are miscible with epoxy resin and tend to wrap around the epoxidized SWNT, which could be used to weaken the interaction between SWNTs and consequently improve the dispersion of SWNTs into the matrix. The interfacial shear strength of CNT-polymer composites can be improved significantly by properly designed functionalizations, especially the hybrid system.

  20. Long-range macromolecule interaction and “speed reading” long nucleotide sequences in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namiot, V.A.; Anashkina, A.A.; Filatov, I.V.; Tumanyan, V.G.; Esipova, N.G.

    2013-01-01

    Methods based on the phenomenon of the specific long-range interaction between long macromolecules proposed for “speed reading” nucleotide sequences in single DNA molecules. One way is to measure the electric field potential along the preliminary stretched double DNA strand. Another way of information “reading” is to measure deformation of strand elements caused by an electric field that is generated by the “straightening” electrode due to an alternating voltage applied to it. On the base of the obtained information the sequence of nucleotides in the strand could be determined in principle.

  1. Interactions of DNA binding proteins with G-Quadruplex structures at the single molecule level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sujay

    Guanine-rich nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) sequences can form non-canonical secondary structures, known as G-quadruplex (GQ). Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have demonstrated formation of these structures in telomeric and non-telomeric regions of the genome. Telomeric GQs protect the chromosome ends whereas non-telomeric GQs either act as road blocks or recognition sites for DNA metabolic machinery. These observations suggest the significance of these structures in regulation of different metabolic processes, such as replication and repair. GQs are typically thermodynamically more stable than the corresponding Watson-Crick base pairing formed by G-rich and C-rich strands, making protein activity a crucial factor for their destabilization. Inside the cell, GQs interact with different proteins and their enzymatic activity is the determining factor for their stability. We studied interactions of several proteins with GQs to understand the underlying principles of protein-GQ interactions using single-molecule FRET and other biophysical techniques. Replication Protein-A (RPA), a single stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is known to posses GQ unfolding activity. First, we compared the thermal stability of three potentially GQ-forming DNA sequences (PQS) to their stability against RPA-mediated unfolding. One of these sequences is the human telomeric repeat and the other two, located in the promoter region of tyrosine hydroxylase gene, are highly heterogeneous sequences that better represent PQS in the genome. The thermal stability of these structures do not necessarily correlate with their stability against protein-mediated unfolding. We conclude that thermal stability is not necessarily an adequate criterion for predicting the physiological viability of GQ structures. To determine the critical structural factors that influence protein-GQ interactions we studied two groups of GQ structures that have systematically varying loop lengths and number of G-tetrad layers. We

  2. Exploring protein-DNA interactions in 3D using in situ construction, manipulation and visualization of individual DNA dumbbells with optical traps, microfluidics and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Anthony L; Dombrowski, Christopher C; Amitani, Ichiro; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2013-03-01

    In this protocol, we describe a procedure to generate 'DNA dumbbells'-single molecules of DNA with a microscopic bead attached at each end-and techniques for manipulating individual DNA dumbbells. We also detail the design and fabrication of a microfluidic device (flow cell) used in conjunction with dual optical trapping to manipulate DNA dumbbells and to visualize individual protein-DNA complexes by single-molecule epifluorescence microscopy. Our design of the flow cell enables the rapid movement of trapped molecules between laminar flow channels and a flow-free reservoir. The reservoir provides the means to examine the formation of protein-DNA complexes in solution in the absence of external flow forces while maintaining a predetermined end-to-end extension of the DNA. These features facilitate the examination of the role of 3D DNA conformation and dynamics in protein-DNA interactions. Preparation of flow cells and reagents requires 2 days each; in situ DNA dumbbell assembly and imaging of single protein-DNA complexes require another day.

  3. Human cytomegalovirus RL13 protein interacts with host NUDT14 protein affecting viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guili; Ren, Gaowei; Cui, Xin; Lu, Zhitao; Ma, Yanping; Qi, Ying; Huang, Yujing; Liu, Zhongyang; Sun, Zhengrong; Ruan, Qiang

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between the host and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is important in determining the outcome of a viral infection. The HCMV RL13 gene product exerts independent, inhibitory effects on viral growth in fibroblasts and epithelial cells. At present, there are few reports on the interactions between the HCMV RL13 protein and human host proteins. The present study provided direct evidence for the specific interaction between HCMV RL13 and host nucleoside diphosphate linked moiety X (nudix)‑type motif 14 (NUDT14), a UDP‑glucose pyrophosphatase, using two‑hybrid screening, an in vitro glutathione S‑transferase pull‑down assay, and co‑immunoprecipitation in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Additionally, the RL13 protein was shown to co‑localize with the NUDT14 protein in the HEK293 cell membrane and cytoplasm, demonstrated using fluorescence confocal microscopy. Decreasing the expression level of NUDT14 via NUDT14‑specific small interfering RNAs increased the number of viral DNA copies in the HCMV‑infected cells. However, the overexpression of NUDT14 in a stably expressing cell line did not affect viral DNA levels significantly in the HCMV infected cells. Based on the known functions of NUDT14, the results of the present study suggested that the interaction between the RL13 protein and NUDT14 protein may be involved in HCMV DNA replication, and that NUDT14 may offer potential in the modulation of viral infection.

  4. Interaction of organophosphorus pesticides with DNA nucleotides on a Boron-doped diamond electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbellini, Gustavo S.; Uliana, Carolina V.; Yamanaka, Hideko

    2013-01-01

    Diamond electrode was used to evaluate the interaction of the nucleotides guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with the pesticides chlorpyrifos, methamidophos and monocrotophos. Changes were observed in the currents and peak potentials of the nucleotide voltammograms in the presence of the pesticides, with dependence on the pesticide concentration (from 5.0 × 10 -7 to 5.0 × 10 -5 mol L -1 ) and the interaction time (from 1 min to 4 h). This is probably due to binding of the pesticides to the nitrogenous bases present in the nucleotides, which could lead to problems in the DNA replication and biological functions of nucleotides. The pesticides showed stronger interaction with AMP than with GMP. Studies of the interaction of 50 µg mL -1 DNA with the pesticides (from 30 min to 4 h and from 1.0 × 10 -6 to 6.0 × 10 -5 mol L -1 ) did not reveal any peaks relating to double helix opening or DNA unwinding. (author)

  5. Interaction of organophosphorus pesticides with DNA nucleotides on a Boron-doped diamond electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbellini, Gustavo S.; Uliana, Carolina V.; Yamanaka, Hideko, E-mail: gustgarb@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica

    2013-12-01

    Diamond electrode was used to evaluate the interaction of the nucleotides guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with the pesticides chlorpyrifos, methamidophos and monocrotophos. Changes were observed in the currents and peak potentials of the nucleotide voltammograms in the presence of the pesticides, with dependence on the pesticide concentration (from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1}) and the interaction time (from 1 min to 4 h). This is probably due to binding of the pesticides to the nitrogenous bases present in the nucleotides, which could lead to problems in the DNA replication and biological functions of nucleotides. The pesticides showed stronger interaction with AMP than with GMP. Studies of the interaction of 50 Micro-Sign g mL{sup -1} DNA with the pesticides (from 30 min to 4 h and from 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1}) did not reveal any peaks relating to double helix opening or DNA unwinding. (author)

  6. Synthesis and characterisation of platinum (II) salphen complex and its interaction with calf thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukri, Shahratul Ain Mohd; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43650 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    A platinum (II) salphen complex was synthesised by condensation reaction of 2,4-dihydroxylbenzaldehyde and o-phenylenediamine with potassium tetrachloroplatinate to obtain N,N′-Bis-4-(hydroxysalicylidene)-phenylenediamine-platinum (II). The structure of the complex was confirmed by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, CHN elemental analyses and ESI-MS spectrometry. The platinum (II) salphen complex with four donor atoms N{sub 2}O{sub 2} from its salphen ligand coordinated to platinum (II) metal centre were determined. The binding mode and interaction of this complex with calf thymus DNA was determined by UV/Vis DNA titration and emission titration. The intercalation between the DNA bases by π-π stacking due to its square planar geometry and aromatic rings structures was proposed.

  7. Biflorin induces cytotoxicity by DNA interaction in genetically different human melanoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Ana Carolina Lima; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; da Silva Souza, Luciana Gregório; de Lemos, Telma Leda Gomes; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; de Vasconcellos, Marne Carvalho

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is a public health problem and the second leading cause of death worldwide. The incidence of cutaneous melanoma has been notably increasing, resulting in high aggressiveness and poor survival rates. Taking into account the antitumor activity of biflorin, a substance isolated from Capraria biflora L. roots that is cytotoxic in vitro and in vivo, this study aimed to demonstrate the action of biflorin against three established human melanoma cell lines that recapitulate the molecular landscape of the disease in terms of genetic alterations and mutations, such as the TP53, NRAS and BRAF genes. The results presented here indicate that biflorin reduces the viability of melanoma cell lines by DNA interactions. Biflorin causes single and double DNA strand breaks, consequently inhibiting cell cycle progression, replication and DNA repair and promoting apoptosis. Our data suggest that biflorin could be considered as a future therapeutic option for managing melanoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA-interactive properties of crotamine, a cell-penetrating polypeptide and a potential drug carrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Crotamine, a 42-residue polypeptide derived from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, has been shown to be a cell-penetrating protein that targets chromosomes, carries plasmid DNA into cells, and shows specificity for actively proliferating cells. Given this potential role as a nucleic acid-delivery vector, we have studied in detail the binding of crotamine to single- and double-stranded DNAs of different lengths and base compositions over a range of ionic conditions. Agarose gel electrophoresis and ultraviolet spectrophotometry analysis indicate that complexes of crotamine with long-chain DNAs readily aggregate and precipitate at low ionic strength. This aggregation, which may be important for cellular uptake of DNA, becomes less likely with shorter chain length. 25-mer oligonucleotides do not show any evidence of such aggregation, permitting the determination of affinities and size via fluorescence quenching experiments. The polypeptide binds non-cooperatively to DNA, covering about 5 nucleotide residues when it binds to single (ss or (ds double stranded molecules. The affinities of the protein for ss- vs. ds-DNA are comparable, and inversely proportional to salt levels. Analysis of the dependence of affinity on [NaCl] indicates that there are a maximum of ∼3 ionic interactions between the protein and DNA, with some of the binding affinity attributable to non-ionic interactions. Inspection of the three-dimensional structure of the protein suggests that residues 31 to 35, Arg-Trp-Arg-Trp-Lys, could serve as a potential DNA-binding site. A hexapeptide containing this sequence displayed a lower DNA binding affinity and salt dependence as compared to the full-length protein, likely indicative of a more suitable 3D structure and the presence of accessory binding sites in the native crotamine. Taken together, the data presented here describing crotamine-DNA interactions may lend support to the design of more

  9. Internal charge transfer based ratiometric interaction of anionic surfactant with calf thymus DNA bound cationic surfactant: Study I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Abhijit; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Moulik, Satya Priya; Banerjee, Manas

    2016-01-01

    Cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) binds calf thymus (ct-) DNA like anionic biopolymers electrostatically and established equilibrium both in the ground as well as in excited state in aqueous medium at pH 7. Anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) does not show even hydrophobic interaction with ct-DNA at low concentration. On contrary, SDS can establish well defined equilibrium with DNA bound CTAB in ground state where the same CTAB-DNA isosbestic point reappears. First report of internal charge transfer (ICT) based binding of CTAB with ct-DNA as well as ICT based interaction of anionic SDS with DNA bound CTAB that shows dynamic quenching contribution also. The reappearance of anodic peak and slight increase in cathodic peak current with increasing concentration (at lower range) of anionic SDS, possibly reflect the release of CTAB from DNA bound CTAB by SDS.

  10. DNA interaction studies of new nano metal based anticancer agent: validation by spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Chandra Sharma, Girish; Arjmand, Farukh [Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Azam, Ameer, E-mail: tsartaj62@yahoo.com [Center of Excellence in Materials Science (Nanomaterials), Department of Applied Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, UP (India)

    2010-05-14

    A new nano dimensional heterobimetallic Cu-Sn containing complex as a potential drug candidate was designed, synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral methods. The electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance parameters of the complex revealed that the Cu(II) ion exhibits a square pyramidal geometry with the two pyrazole nitrogen atoms, the amine nitrogen atom and the carboxylate oxygen of the phenyl glycine chloride ligand located at the equatorial sites and the coordinated chloride ion occupying an apical position. {sup 119}Sn NMR spectral data showed a hexa-coordinated environment around the Sn(IV) metal ion. TEM, AFM and XRD measurements illustrate that the complex could induce the condensation of CT-DNA to a particulate nanostructure. The interaction of the Cu-Sn complex with CT-DNA was investigated by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, as well as cyclic voltammetric measurements. The results indicated that the complex interacts with DNA through an electrostatic mode of binding with an intrinsic binding constant K{sub b} = 8.42 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}. The Cu-Sn complex exhibits effective cleavage of pBR322 plasmid DNA by an oxidative cleavage mechanism, monitored at different concentrations both in the absence and in the presence of reducing agents.

  11. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction between tryptophan-erbium(III) complex and herring sperm DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Wang, Xingming; Pan, Haizhuan; Hu, Yamin; Ding, Lisheng

    2010-05-01

    By means of UV and fluorescence spectra, the binding ratios between Er(III)-Trp and DNA in physiological pH environment (pH 7.40) were determined as nTrp: nEr(III) = 3:1 and n:n=2:1, and the apparent molar absorptivity of ɛEr(III)-Trp-DNA is 4.33 × 10 5 L mol -1 cm -1 which was confirmed by molar ratio method. The binding constants at different temperatures KB25°Cθ=1.93×10 L mol and KB37°Cθ=5.28×10 L mol were obtained by double reciprocal method. Thermodynamic function computation demonstrates that ΔHmθ is the primary driving power of the interaction between Er(III)(Trp) 3 and DNA. By combination analysis of the Scatchard method and CD spectrometry, we suggested that the interaction mode between Er(III)(Trp) 3 complex and herring sperm DNA is groove and intercalation bindings.

  12. Single-molecule observations of RNA-RNA kissing interactions in a DNA nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yosuke; Endo, Masayuki; Suzuki, Yuki; Hidaka, Kumi; Durand, Guillaume; Dausse, Eric; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules uniquely form a complex through specific hairpin loops, called a kissing complex. The kissing complex is widely investigated and used for the construction of RNA nanostructures. Molecular switches have also been created by combining a kissing loop and a ligand-binding aptamer to control the interactions of RNA molecules. In this study, we incorporated two kinds of RNA molecules into a DNA origami structure and used atomic force microscopy to observe their ligand-responsive interactions at the single-molecule level. We used a designed RNA aptamer called GTPswitch, which has a guanosine triphosphate (GTP) responsive domain and can bind to the target RNA hairpin named Aptakiss in the presence of GTP. We observed shape changes of the DNA/RNA strands in the DNA origami, which are induced by the GTPswitch, into two different shapes in the absence and presence of GTP, respectively. We also found that the switching function in the nanospace could be improved by using a cover strand over the kissing loop of the GTPswitch or by deleting one base from this kissing loop. These newly designed ligand-responsive aptamers can be used for the controlled assembly of the various DNA and RNA nanostructures.

  13. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of presentations and discussions which took place at the US Department of Energy/Commission of European Communities (DOE/CEC) workshop on ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection,'' held at San Diego, California, January 21-22, 1987, is provided. The Department has traditionally supported fundamental research on interactions of ionizing radiation with different biological systems and at all levels of biological organization. The aim of this workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection

  14. The interaction of DNA gyrase with the bacterial toxin CcdB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Howells, A J; Maxwell, A

    1999-01-01

    CcdB is a bacterial toxin that targets DNA gyrase. Analysis of the interaction of CcdB with gyrase reveals two distinct complexes. An initial complex (alpha) is formed by direct interaction between GyrA and CcdB; this complex can be detected by affinity column and gel-shift analysis, and has...... of this initial complex with ATP in the presence of GyrB and DNA slowly converts it to a second complex (beta), which has a lower rate of ATP hydrolysis and is unable to catalyse supercoiling. The efficiency of formation of this inactive complex is dependent on the concentrations of ATP and CcdB. We suggest...

  15. Cytogenetic evaluation and DNA interaction studies of the food colorants amaranth, erythrosine and tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpountoukas, Panagiotis; Pantazaki, Anastasia; Kostareli, Efterpi; Christodoulou, Pantelitsa; Kareli, Dimitra; Poliliou, Stamatia; Mourelatos, Costas; Lambropoulou, Vasso; Lialiaris, Theodore

    2010-10-01

    Food coloring agents, amaranth, erythrosine and tartrazine have been tested at 0.02-8mM in human peripheral blood cells in vitro, in order to investigate their genotoxic, cytotoxic and cytostatic potential. Amaranth at the highest concentration (8mM) demonstrates high genotoxicity, cytostaticity and cytotoxicity. The frequency of SCEs/cell was increased 1.7 times over the control level. Additionally, erythrosine at 8, 4 and 2mM shows a high cytotoxicity and cytostaticity. Finally, tartrazine seems to be toxic at 8 and 4mM. No signs of genotoxicity were observed. Reversely, tartrazine showed cytotoxicity at 1 and 2mM. Furthermore, spectroscopic titration studies for the interaction of these food additives with DNA showed that these dyes bind to calf thymus DNA and distinct isosbestic points are observed clearly suggesting binding of the dyes to DNA. Additionally DNA electrophoretic mobility experiments showed that these colorants are obviously capable for strong binding to linear dsDNA causing its degradation. PCR amplification of all DNA fragments (which previously were pre-treated with three different concentrations of the colorants, extracted from agarose gel after separation and then purified), seems to be attenuated with a manner dye concentration-dependent reflecting in a delayed electrophoretic mobility due to the possible binding of some molecules of the dyes. Evaluation of the data and curves were obtained after quantitative and qualitative analysis of the lanes of the gel by an analyzer computer program. Our results indicate that these food colorants had a toxic potential to human lymphocytes in vitro and it seems that they bind directly to DNA. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interatomic Coulombic Decay Effects in Theoretical DNA Recombination Systems Involving Protein Interaction Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, E. L.; Rivas, D. A.; Duot, A. C.; Hovey, R. T.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.

    2015-03-01

    DNA replication is the basis for all biological reproduction. A strand of DNA will ``unzip'' and bind with a complimentary strand, creating two identical strands. In this study, we are considering how this process is affected by Interatomic Coulombic Decay (ICD), specifically how ICD affects the individual coding proteins' ability to hold together. ICD mainly deals with how the electron returns to its original state after excitation and how this affects its immediate atomic environment, sometimes affecting the connectivity between interaction sites on proteins involved in the DNA coding process. Biological heredity is fundamentally controlled by DNA and its replication therefore it affects every living thing. The small nature of the proteins (within the range of nanometers) makes it a good candidate for research of this scale. Understanding how ICD affects DNA molecules can give us invaluable insight into the human genetic code and the processes behind cell mutations that can lead to cancer. Authors wish to give special thanks to Pacific Union College Student Senate in Angwin, California, for their financial support.

  17. Exploring protein-DNA interactions in 3D using in situ construction, manipulation, and visualization of individual DNA-dumbbells with optical traps, microfluidics, and fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forget, Anthony L.; Dombrowski, Christopher C.; Amitani, Ichiro; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    In this Protocol, we describe a procedure to generate ‘DNA-dumbbells’ — single molecules of DNA with a microscopic bead attached at each end — and techniques for manipulating individual DNA-dumbbells. We also detail the design and fabrication of a microfluidic device (flow cell) used in conjunction with dual optical trapping to manipulate DNA-dumbbells and to visualize individual protein–DNA complexes by single-molecule epifluorescence microscopy. Our design of the flow cell enables the rapid movement of trapped molecules between laminar flow channels and a flow-free ‘reservoir’. The reservoir provides the means to examine formation of DNA–protein complexes in solution in the absence of external flow forces, while still maintaining a predetermined end-to-end extension of the DNA. These features facilitate examination of the role of three-dimensional DNA conformation and dynamics in protein–DNA interactions. Preparation of flow cells and reagents requires two days each; in situ DNA-dumbbell assembly and imaging of single protein–DNA complexes requires another day. PMID:23411634

  18. Structural insights into the EthR-DNA interaction using native mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, DSH; Seetoh, WG; McConnell, BN; Matak-Vinković, D; Thomas, SE; Mendes, V; Blaszczyk, M; Coyne, AG; Blundell, TL; Abell, C

    2017-01-01

    EthR is a transcriptional repressor that increases Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to ethionamide. In this study, the EthR-DNA interaction has been investigated by native electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry for the first time. The results show that up to six subunits of EthR are able to bind to its operator. D.S.-H. Chan acknowledges the support of the Croucher Foundation and the Cambridge Commonwealth, European and International Trust for receipt of a Croucher Cambridge Intern...

  19. Interactive measurement and characterization of DNA molecules by analysis of AFM images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marek, J.; Demjénová, E.; Tomori, Z.; Janáček, Jiří; Zolotová, I.; Valle, F.; Favre, M.; Dietler, G.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2005), s. 87-93 ISSN 1552-4922 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 5048; VEGA(SK) 2185; CZ-SK(CZ) KONTAKT 139; Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 2100-063746.00/1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : DNA * atomic force microscopy * interactive image analysis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.115, year: 2005

  20. Highly functionalized piperidines: Free radical scavenging, anticancer activity, DNA interaction and correlation with biological activity

    OpenAIRE

    Suvankar Das; Cristiane J. da Silva; Marina de M. Silva; Maria Dayanne de A. Dantas; Ângelo de Fátima; Ana Lúcia T. Góis Ruiz; Cleiton M. da Silva; João Ernesto de Carvalho; Josué C.C. Santos; Isis M. Figueiredo; Edeildo F. da Silva-Júnior; Thiago M. de Aquino; João X. de Araújo-Júnior; Goutam Brahmachari; Luzia Valentina Modolo

    2018-01-01

    Twenty-five piperidines were studied as potential radical scavengers and antitumor agents. Quantitative interaction of compounds with ctDNA using spectroscopic techniques was also evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the evaluated piperidines possesses different abilities to scavenge the radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and the anion radical superoxide (·O2−). The piperidine 19 was the most potent radical DPPH scavenger, while the most effective to ·O2− scavenger was piperidine...

  1. The influence of β-cyclodextrin on the interaction of hesperetin and its bismuth (III) complex with calf thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sameena, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Karunya University, Coimbatore 641 114 (India); Enoch, Israel V.M.V., E-mail: israelenoch@karunya.edu [Department of Chemistry, Karunya University, Coimbatore 641 114 (India)

    2013-06-15

    The interaction between hesperetin (Hes)/hesperetin–Bi (III) complex (Bhes) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) was analyzed in the solid and the solution phase. The interaction of hesperetin [5,7,3′-trihydroxyl-4′-methoxyl-flavanone] and its bismuth complex with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) in the absence and the presence of β-CD was studied by absorption and fluorescence techniques. Docking of Hes with β-CD/DNA was carried out to study the binding theoretically. Hyperchromic and fluorescence enhancement was observed for the interaction between Hes/Bhes and β-CD. Hes interact with β-CD to form 1:2 complexes whereas Bhes shows 1:1 complexation. The effect of β-CD on the binding strength of Hes/Bhes with ctDNA was observed. Hyperchromic effect and fluorescence quenching were observed for the binding of Hes/Bhes and ctDNA in the absence and the presence of β-CD. Significant enhancement in the fluorescence intensity of Hes–ctDNA and Bhes–ctDNA was noticed in the β-CD solution. The fluorescence study showed that the quenching of Hes–ctDNA interaction was of static type, whereas Bhes–ctDNA is of dynamic type. Low Stern–Volmer quenching constant of β-CD-bound-Hes, in comparison with Hes was observed which might be due to cleavage of Hes from DNA by inclusion complexation between Hes and β-CD. The similar order of magnitude of Stern–Volmer quenching of Bhes in the aqueous and the β-CD solutions might be due to electrostatic interaction between the Bi and DNA predominantly. The study on the interaction of Hes/Bhes with ctDNA in competition with methylene blue (MB) supported the existence of electrostatic interaction. -- Highlights: ► Hesperetin forms a 1:2 complex and hesperetin–Bi (III) forms a 1:1 with β-CD. ► The effect of β-CD on ctDNA interacted hesperetin/hesperetin–Bi (III) is reported. ► Hesperetin and its β-CD complex bind more strongly with ctDNA than Hes–Bi (III) complex. ► 1:1 stoichiometry is observed for Hes/Bhes with ctDNA in

  2. Guidelines to develop interactive tutorials on 3D biomolecules: the case of DNA repair by photolyase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Assis Barony Valadares Fonseca

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This work presents the following guidelines for developing interactive learning objects on the 3D biomolecules: i- identify a relevant educational need; ii-select an appropriate subject; iii- employ interactive 3D molecular structures; iv- simultaneously display animation with related textual information or 2D diagrams; v- integrating different modes of representation of chemical phenomena. Based on these, was constructed the "Photolyase Tutorial". Photolyase is an enzyme that repairs DNA. It recognizes the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesion (CPD caused by exposure to ultraviolet light. Understanding the repair mechanism requires understanding the structure-activity relationships of the molecules involved. Therefore, this topic is a convenient subject for teaching key aspects of the structure of protein and nucleic acids. There are few interactive 3D DNA repair tutorials available and most of these are in english, therefore not acessible for students that do not domain this language. Besides, these tutorials generally focus only on displaying structural features without make foster correlations between the structure and chemical aspects of repair mechanisms. OBJECTIVES: In order to construct a interactive tutorial that fills these gaps, the 3D structures of a DNA molecule, a DNA with CPD lesion and the photolyase enzyme were manipulated focusing on structural and chemical explanation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: These structures were obtained from PDB (http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/home/home.do and manipulated to show biochemical and chemical concepts by using the resources from the LABIQ Platform (http://labiq.is.usp.br. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS: Several concepts are covered, i.e., H-bonding, active site, co-factors etc. The tutorial is organized in small conceptual blocks presenting, in a stepwise fashion, how the enzyme recognizes the DNA lesion and proceeds to repair. Each block comprises a trigger button that controls the interactive

  3. Oncogene Expression Modulation in Cancer Cell Lines by DNA G-Quadruplex-Interactive Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Ana Paula; Paulo, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Nucleic acids are prone to structural polymorphism and a number of structures may be formed in addition to the well-known DNA double helix. Among these is a family of nucleic acid four-stranded structures known as G-quadruplexes (G4). These quadruplex structures can be formed by sequences containing repetitive guanine-rich tracks and the analysis of Non-B-DNA database indicated an enrichment of these sequences in genomic regions controlling cellular proliferation, such as for example in the promoter regions of c- MYC, k-RAS, c-KIT, HSP90 and VEGF among others. The broad concept of G4 targeting with small molecules is now generally accepted as a promising novel approach to anticancer therapy and several small molecules with antiproliferative activity in cancer cell lines have also been shown to stabilize these DNA structures, thus suggesting a potential application of G4-interactive small molecules as new anticancer drugs. Herein we review, by targeted oncogene and main chemical scaffold, those G4-interactive small molecules with reported gene expression modulatory activity in cancer cell lines. The data obtained so far are encouraging but further efforts are needed to validate G4 as drug targets and optimize the structure of G4- interactive small molecules into new anticancer drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Single-Molecule Characterization of DNA-Protein Interactions Using Nanopore Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, A H; Gilboa, T; Torfstein, C; Varongchayakul, N; Meller, A

    2017-01-01

    Detection and characterization of nucleic acid-protein interactions, particularly those involving DNA and proteins such as transcription factors, enzymes, and DNA packaging proteins, remain significant barriers to our understanding of genetic regulation. Nanopores are an extremely sensitive and versatile sensing platform for label-free detection of single biomolecules. Analyte molecules are drawn to and through a nanoscale aperture by an electrophoretic force, which acts upon their native charge while in the sensing region of the pore. When the nanopore's diameter is only slightly larger than the biopolymer's cross section (typically a few nm); the latter must translocate through the pore in a linear fashion due to the constricted geometry in this region. These features allow nanopores to interrogate protein-nucleic acids in multiple sensing modes: first, by scanning and mapping the locations of binding sites along an analyte molecule, and second, by probing the strength of the bond between a protein and nucleic acid, using the native charge of the nucleic acid to apply an electrophoretic force to the complex while the protein is geometrically prevented from passing through the nanopore. In this chapter, we describe progress toward nanopore sensing of protein-nucleic acid complexes in the context of both mapping binding sites and performing force spectroscopy to determine the strength of interactions. We conclude by reviewing the strengths and challenges of the nanopore technique in the context of studying DNA-protein interactions. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Atomic Simulation of Complex DNA DSBs and the Interactions with the Ku70/80 Heterodimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shaowen; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation (IR) usually contain modified bases such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) and thymine glycol, apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, 2-deoxyribonolactone, or single-strand breaks (SSBs). The presence of such lesions in close proximity to the DSB terminus makes the DNA nicks more difficult to repair and rejoin than endogenously induced simple DSBs, and as such a major determinant of the biological effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation as encountered in space travel. In this study we conducted molecular dynamics simulations on a series of DNA duplexes with various complex lesions of 8-oxoG and AP sites, in an effort to investigate the effects of such lesions to the structural integrity and stability of DNA after insulted by IR. We also simulated the interaction of such complex DSBs with the Ku70/80 heterodimer, the first protein in mammalian cells to embark the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair pathway. The results indicate, compared to DNA with simple DSBs, the complex lesions can enhance the hydrogen bonds opening rate at the DNA terminus, and increase the mobility of the whole duplex, thus they present more deleterious effects to the genome integrity if not captured and repaired promptly in cells. Simulations also demonstrate the binding of Ku drastically reduces structural disruption and flexibility caused by the complex lesions, and the interactions of Ku with complex DSBs have a different potential energy landscape from the bound structure with simple DSB. In all complex DSBs systems, the binding of DSB terminus with Ku70 is softened while the binding of the middle duplex with Ku80 is tightened. This energy shift may help the Ku protein to secure at the DSB terminus for a longer time, so that other end processing factors or repair pathways can proceed at the lesions before NHEJ repair process starts. These atomic simulations may provide valuable new insight into the

  6. Interaction of bacteriophage T4 and T7 single-stranded DNA-binding proteins with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokri, Leila; Williams, Mark C; Rouzina, Ioulia

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriophages T4 and T7 are well-studied model replication systems, which have allowed researchers to determine the roles of many proteins central to DNA replication, recombination and repair. Here we summarize and discuss the results from two recently developed single-molecule methods to determine the salt-dependent DNA-binding kinetics and thermodynamics of the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins (SSBs) from these systems. We use these methods to characterize both the equilibrium double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and ssDNA binding of the SSBs T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) and T7 gene 2.5 protein (gp2.5). Despite the overall two-orders-of-magnitude weaker binding of gp2.5 to both forms of DNA, we find that both proteins exhibit four-orders-of-magnitude preferential binding to ssDNA relative to dsDNA. This strong preferential ssDNA binding as well as the weak dsDNA binding is essential for the ability of both proteins to search dsDNA in one dimension to find available ssDNA-binding sites at the replication fork

  7. Multispectroscopic studies on the interaction of a copper(ii) complex of ibuprofen drug with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Shiri, Farshad

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of copper(II)-ibuprofenato complex with calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) has been explored following, UV-visible spectrophotometry, fluorescence measurement, dynamic viscosity measurements, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. In spectrophotometric studies of ct-DNA it was found that [Cu(ibp) 2 ] 2 can form a complex with double-helical DNA. The association constant of [Cu(ibp) 2 ] 2 with DNA from UV-Vis study was found to be 6.19 × 10 4 L mol -1 . The values of K f from fluorescence measurement clearly underscore the high affinity of [Cu(ibp) 2 ] 2 to DNA. The experimental results showed that the conformational changes in DNA helix induced by [Cu(ibp) 2 ] 2 are the reason for the fluorescence quenching of the DNA-Hoechst system. In addition, the fluorescence emission spectra of intercalated methylene blue (MB) with increasing concentrations of [Cu(ibp) 2 ] 2 represented a significant increase of MB intensity as to release MB from MB-DNA system. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that copper(II)-ibuprofenato complex can change the conformation of DNA. In addition, the results of viscosity measurements suggest that copper(II)-ibuprofenato complex may bind with non-classical intercalative mode. From spectroscopic and hydrodynamic studies, it has been found that [Cu(ibp) 2 ] 2 interacts with DNA by partial intercalation mode which contains intercalation and groove properties.

  8. Discovering approximate-associated sequence patterns for protein-DNA interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Tak Ming

    2010-12-30

    Motivation: The bindings between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are fundamental protein-DNA interactions in transcriptional regulation. Extensive efforts have been made to better understand the protein-DNA interactions. Recent mining on exact TF-TFBS-associated sequence patterns (rules) has shown great potentials and achieved very promising results. However, exact rules cannot handle variations in real data, resulting in limited informative rules. In this article, we generalize the exact rules to approximate ones for both TFs and TFBSs, which are essential for biological variations. Results: A progressive approach is proposed to address the approximation to alleviate the computational requirements. Firstly, similar TFBSs are grouped from the available TF-TFBS data (TRANSFAC database). Secondly, approximate and highly conserved binding cores are discovered from TF sequences corresponding to each TFBS group. A customized algorithm is developed for the specific objective. We discover the approximate TF-TFBS rules by associating the grouped TFBS consensuses and TF cores. The rules discovered are evaluated by matching (verifying with) the actual protein-DNA binding pairs from Protein Data Bank (PDB) 3D structures. The approximate results exhibit many more verified rules and up to 300% better verification ratios than the exact ones. The customized algorithm achieves over 73% better verification ratios than traditional methods. Approximate rules (64-79%) are shown statistically significant. Detailed variation analysis and conservation verification on NCBI records demonstrate that the approximate rules reveal both the flexible and specific protein-DNA interactions accurately. The approximate TF-TFBS rules discovered show great generalized capability of exploring more informative binding rules. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  9. Uncovering Trophic Interactions in Arthropod Predators through DNA Shotgun-Sequencing of Gut Contents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora P Paula

    Full Text Available Characterizing trophic networks is fundamental to many questions in ecology, but this typically requires painstaking efforts, especially to identify the diet of small generalist predators. Several attempts have been devoted to develop suitable molecular tools to determine predatory trophic interactions through gut content analysis, and the challenge has been to achieve simultaneously high taxonomic breadth and resolution. General and practical methods are still needed, preferably independent of PCR amplification of barcodes, to recover a broader range of interactions. Here we applied shotgun-sequencing of the DNA from arthropod predator gut contents, extracted from four common coccinellid and dermapteran predators co-occurring in an agroecosystem in Brazil. By matching unassembled reads against six DNA reference databases obtained from public databases and newly assembled mitogenomes, and filtering for high overlap length and identity, we identified prey and other foreign DNA in the predator guts. Good taxonomic breadth and resolution was achieved (93% of prey identified to species or genus, but with low recovery of matching reads. Two to nine trophic interactions were found for these predators, some of which were only inferred by the presence of parasitoids and components of the microbiome known to be associated with aphid prey. Intraguild predation was also found, including among closely related ladybird species. Uncertainty arises from the lack of comprehensive reference databases and reliance on low numbers of matching reads accentuating the risk of false positives. We discuss caveats and some future prospects that could improve the use of direct DNA shotgun-sequencing to characterize arthropod trophic networks.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis class II apurinic/apyrimidinic-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III exhibits DNA regulated modes of interaction with the sliding DNA β-clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, Taran; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-10-01

    The class-II AP-endonuclease (XthA) acts on abasic sites of damaged DNA in bacterial base excision repair. We identified that the sliding DNA β-clamp forms in vivo and in vitro complexes with XthA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel 239 QLRFPKK245 motif in the DNA-binding domain of XthA was found to be important for the interactions. Likewise, the peptide binding-groove (PBG) and the C-terminal of β-clamp located on different domains interact with XthA. The β-clamp-XthA complex can be disrupted by clamp binding peptides and also by a specific bacterial clamp inhibitor that binds at the PBG. We also identified that β-clamp stimulates the activities of XthA primarily by increasing its affinity for the substrate and its processivity. Additionally, loading of the β-clamp onto DNA is required for activity stimulation. A reduction in XthA activity stimulation was observed in the presence of β-clamp binding peptides supporting that direct interactions between the proteins are necessary to cause stimulation. Finally, we found that in the absence of DNA, the PBG located on the second domain of the β-clamp is important for interactions with XthA, while the C-terminal domain predominantly mediates functional interactions in the substrate's presence. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Non-covalent functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes and graphene by a conjugated polymer

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili

    2014-07-07

    We report first-principles calculations on the binding of poly[(9,9-bis-(6-bromohexylfluorene-2,7-diyl)-co-(benzene-1,4-diyl)] to a (8,0) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and to graphene. Considering different relative orientations of the subsystems, we find for the generalized gradient approximation a non-binding state, whereas the local density approximation predicts reasonable binding energies. The results coincide after inclusion of van der Waals corrections, which demonstrates a weak interaction between the polymer and SWCNT/graphene, mostly of van der Waals type. Accordingly, the density of states shows essentially no hybridization. The physisorption mechanism explains recent experimental observations and suggests that the conjugated polymer can be used for non-covalent functionalization.

  12. A new insight into the interaction of ZnO with calf thymus DNA through surface defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sumita; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Pramanik, Srikrishna; Devi, Parukuttyamma Sujatha; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2018-01-01

    Experimental evidences on the binding interaction of ZnO and Calf Thymus (CT) DNA using several biophysical techniques are the centre of interest of the present study. The interaction of ZnO with CT DNA has been investigated in detail by absorption spectral study, fluorescence titration, Raman analysis, zeta potential measurement, viscometric experiment along with thermal melting study and microscopic analysis. Steady-state fluorescence study revealed the quenching (48%) of the surface defect related peak intensity of ZnO on interaction with DNA. The optimized concentration of ZnO and DNA to obtain this level of quenching has been found to be 0.049mM and 1.027μM, respectively. Additional fluorescence study with 8-hydroxy-5-quinoline (HQ) as a fluorescence probe for Zn 2+ ruled out the dissolution effect of ZnO under the experimental conditions. DNA conjugation on the surface of ZnO was also supported by Raman study. The quantitative variation in conductivity as well as electrophoretic mobility indicated significant interaction of ZnO with the DNA molecule. Circular dichroism (CD) and viscometry titrations provided clear evidence in support of the conformational retention of the DNA on interaction with ZnO. The binding interaction was found to be predominantly entropy driven in nature. The bio-physical studies presented in this paper exploring ZnO-CT DNA interaction could add a new horizon to understand the interaction between metal oxide and DNA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Interaction study of some macrocyclic inorganic schiff base complexes with calf thymus DNA using spectroscopic and voltammetric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordbar, Maryam; Tavoosi, Fariba; Yeganeh-Faal, Ali; Zebarjadian, Mohammad Hasan

    2018-01-01

    The interaction of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Mn(II)-L (4,8-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-4,8-diazaundecane-1,11-diamine) transition metal complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated using electronic, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, thermal denaturation and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Based on the UV-Vis study, binding constants of the complexes with CT-DNA were calculated. Changes in the band of the CD spectrum, DNA melting temperature and in the ipa and ipc of the complexes in the presenceCT-DNA, overall, showed that the studied complex exhibited good DNA interaction ability with partial intercalation mode.

  14. [Mechanistic modelling allows to assess pathways of DNA lesion interactions underlying chromosome aberration formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eĭdel'man, Iu A; Slanina, S V; Sal'nikov, I V; Andreev, S G

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of radiation-induced chromosomal aberration (CA) mechanisms is required in many fields of radiation genetics, radiation biology, biodosimetry, etc. However, these mechanisms are yet to be quantitatively characterised. One of the reasons is that the relationships between primary lesions of DNA/chromatin/chromosomes and dose-response curves for CA are unknown because the pathways of lesion interactions in an interphase nucleus are currently inaccessible for direct experimental observation. This article aims for the comparative analysis of two principally different scenarios of formation of simple and complex interchromosomal exchange aberrations: by lesion interactions at chromosome territories' surface vs. in the whole space of the nucleus. The analysis was based on quantitative mechanistic modelling of different levels of structures and processes involved in CA formation: chromosome structure in an interphase nucleus, induction, repair and interactions of DNA lesions. It was shown that the restricted diffusion of chromosomal loci, predicted by computational modelling of chromosome organization, results in lesion interactions in the whole space of the nucleus being impossible. At the same time, predicted features of subchromosomal dynamics agrees well with in vivo observations and does not contradict the mechanism of CA formation at the surface of chromosome territories. On the other hand, the "surface mechanism" of CA formation, despite having certain qualities, proved to be insufficient to explain high frequency of complex exchange aberrations observed by mFISH technique. The alternative mechanism, CA formation on nuclear centres is expected to be sufficient to explain frequent complex exchanges.

  15. Interactions between low energy electrons and DNA: a perspective from first-principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohanoff, Jorge; McAllister, Maeve; Tribello, Gareth A.; Gu, Bin

    2017-09-01

    DNA damage caused by irradiation has been studied for many decades. Such studies allow us to better assess the dangers posed by radiation, and to increase the efficiency of the radiotherapies that are used to combat cancer. A full description of the irradiation process involves multiple size and time scales. It starts with the interaction of radiation—either photons or swift ions—and the biological medium, which causes electronic excitation and ionisation. The two main products of ionising radiation are thus electrons and radicals. Both of these species can cause damage to biological molecules, in particular DNA. In the long run, this molecular level damage can prevent cells from replicating and can hence lead to cell death. For a long time it was assumed that the main actors in the damage process were the radicals. However, experiments in a seminal paper by the group of Leon Sanche in 2000 showed that low-energy electrons (LEE), such as those generated when ionising biological targets, can also cause bond breaks in biomolecules, and strand breaks in plasmid DNA in particular (Boudaiffa et al 2000 Science 287 1658-60). These results prompted a significant amount of experimental and theoretical work aimed at elucidating the role played by LEE in DNA damage. In this Topical Review we provide a general overview of the problem. We discuss experimental findings and theoretical results hand in hand with the aim of describing the physics and chemistry that occurs during the process of radiation damage, from the initial stages of electronic excitation, through the inelastic propagation of electrons in the medium, the interaction of electrons with DNA, and the chemical end-point effects on DNA. A very important aspect of this discussion is the consideration of a realistic, physiological environment. The role played by the aqueous solution and the amino acids from the histones in chromatin must be considered. Moreover, thermal fluctuations must be incorporated when

  16. DNA-Interacting Characteristics of the Archaeal Rudiviral Protein SIRV2_Gp1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Peeters

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the infection cycles of many bacterial and eukaryotic viruses have been characterized in detail, those of archaeal viruses remain largely unexplored. Recently, studies on a few model archaeal viruses such as SIRV2 (Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus have revealed an unusual lysis mechanism that involves the formation of pyramidal egress structures on the host cell surface. To expand understanding of the infection cycle of SIRV2, we aimed to functionally characterize gp1, which is a SIRV2 gene with unknown function. The SIRV2_Gp1 protein is highly expressed during early stages of infection and it is the only protein that is encoded twice on the viral genome. It harbours a helix-turn-helix motif and was therefore hypothesized to bind DNA. The DNA-binding behavior of SIRV2_Gp1 was characterized with electrophoretic mobility shift assays and atomic force microscopy. We provide evidence that the protein interacts with DNA and that it forms large aggregates, thereby causing extreme condensation of the DNA. Furthermore, the N-terminal domain of the protein mediates toxicity to the viral host Sulfolobus. Our findings may lead to biotechnological applications, such as the development of a toxic peptide for the containment of pathogenic bacteria, and add to our understanding of the Rudiviral infection cycle.

  17. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) localizes to mitochondria and interacts with mitochondrial single-stranded binding protein (mtSSB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Barbara; Samson, Leona D

    2013-03-01

    Due to a harsh environment mitochondrial genomes accumulate high levels of DNA damage, in particular oxidation, hydrolytic deamination, and alkylation adducts. While repair of alkylated bases in nuclear DNA has been explored in detail, much less is known about the repair of DNA alkylation damage in mitochondria. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) recognizes and removes numerous alkylated bases, but to date AAG has only been detected in the nucleus, even though mammalian mitochondria are known to repair DNA lesions that are specific substrates of AAG. Here we use immunofluorescence to show that AAG localizes to mitochondria, and we find that native AAG is present in purified human mitochondrial extracts, as well as that exposure to alkylating agent promotes AAG accumulation in the mitochondria. We identify mitochondrial single-stranded binding protein (mtSSB) as a novel interacting partner of AAG; interaction between mtSSB and AAG is direct and increases upon methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) treatment. The consequence of this interaction is specific inhibition of AAG glycosylase activity in the context of a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), but not a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) substrate. By inhibiting AAG-initiated processing of damaged bases, mtSSB potentially prevents formation of DNA breaks in ssDNA, ensuring that base removal primarily occurs in dsDNA. In summary, our findings suggest the existence of AAG-initiated BER in mitochondria and further support a role for mtSSB in DNA repair. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Synthesis, spectral characterization, DNA interaction, radical scavenging and cytotoxicity studies of ruthenium(II) hydrazone complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Maruthachalam; Ayyannan, Ganesan; Raja, Gunasekaran; Jayabalakrishnan, Chinnasamy

    2016-05-01

    Three new ruthenium(II) complexes with hydrazone ligands, furan-2-carboxylic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(1)), furan-2-carboxylic acid [4-(ethyl-propyl-amino)-2-hydroxy-benzylidene]-hydrazide (HL(2)) and furan-2-carboxylic acid (3-ethoxy-2-hydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(3)) were synthesized and characterized by various spectro-analytical techniques. The hydrazone ligands act as a tridendate ligand with ONO as the donor sites and are preferably found in the enol form in all the complexes. The molecular structure of the ligands was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The interaction of the ligands and the complexes with CT-DNA were evaluated by an absorption titration method which revealed that the compounds interact with CT-DNA through intercalation. Gel electrophoresis assay demonstrated the ability of the complexes to cleave the calf thymus DNA hydrolytically. Antioxidant studies showed that the ruthenium(II) complexes have a strong radical-scavenging properties. Further, the cytotoxic effect of the compounds examined on cancerous cell lines showed that the complexes exhibited substantial anticancer activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Applying pollen DNA metabarcoding to the study of plant-pollinator interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Karen L; Fowler, Julie; Burgess, Kevin S; Dobbs, Emily K; Gruenewald, David; Lawley, Brice; Morozumi, Connor; Brosi, Berry J

    2017-06-01

    To study pollination networks in a changing environment, we need accurate, high-throughput methods. Previous studies have shown that more highly resolved networks can be constructed by studying pollen loads taken from bees, relative to field observations. DNA metabarcoding potentially allows for faster and finer-scale taxonomic resolution of pollen compared to traditional approaches (e.g., light microscopy), but has not been applied to pollination networks. We sampled pollen from 38 bee species collected in Florida from sites differing in forest management. We isolated DNA from pollen mixtures and sequenced rbcL and ITS2 gene regions from all mixtures in a single run on the Illumina MiSeq platform. We identified species from sequence data using comprehensive rbcL and ITS2 databases. We successfully built a proof-of-concept quantitative pollination network using pollen metabarcoding. Our work underscores that pollen metabarcoding is not quantitative but that quantitative networks can be constructed based on the number of interacting individuals. Due to the frequency of contamination and false positive reads, isolation and PCR negative controls should be used in every reaction. DNA metabarcoding has advantages in efficiency and resolution over microscopic identification of pollen, and we expect that it will have broad utility for future studies of plant-pollinator interactions.

  20. Interaction of anticancer Ru(III) complexes with single stranded and duplex DNA model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Domenica; Rozza, Lucia; Merlino, Antonello; Paduano, Luigi; Marzo, Tiziano; Massai, Lara; Messori, Luigi; Montesarchio, Daniela

    2015-08-21

    The interaction of the anticancer Ru(iii) complex AziRu - in comparison with its analogue NAMI-A, currently in advanced clinical trials as an antimetastatic agent - with DNA model systems, both single stranded and duplex oligonucleotides, was investigated using a combined approach, including absorption UV-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) and electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) techniques. UV-vis absorption spectra of the Ru complexes were recorded at different times in a pseudo-physiological solution, to monitor the ligand exchange processes in the absence and in the presence of the examined oligonucleotides. CD experiments provided information on the overall conformational changes of the DNA model systems induced by these metal complexes. UV- and CD-monitored thermal denaturation studies were performed to analyse the effects of AziRu and NAMI-A on the stability of the duplex structures. ESI-MS experiments, carried out on the oligonucleotide/metal complex mixtures under investigation, allowed us to detect the formation of stable adducts between the guanine-containing oligomers and the ruthenium complexes. These data unambiguously demonstrate that both AziRu and NAMI-A can interact with the DNA model systems. Although very similar in their structures, the two metal compounds manifest a markedly different reactivity with the examined sequences, respectively, with either a naked Ru(3+) ion or a Ru(Im)(3+) (Im = imidazole) fragment being incorporated into the oligonucleotide structure via stable linkages.

  1. Interactions of theBacillus subtilisDnaE polymerase with replisomal proteins modulate its activity and fidelity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Vasileios; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Green, Matthew; Képès, François; Soultanas, Panos; Janniere, Laurent

    2017-09-01

    During Bacillus subtilis replication two replicative polymerases function at the replisome to collectively carry out genome replication. In a reconstituted in vitro replication assay, PolC is the main polymerase while the lagging strand DnaE polymerase briefly extends RNA primers synthesized by the primase DnaG prior to handing-off DNA synthesis to PolC. Here, we show in vivo that (i) the polymerase activity of DnaE is essential for both the initiation and elongation stages of DNA replication, (ii) its error rate varies inversely with PolC concentration, and (iii) its misincorporations are corrected by the mismatch repair system post-replication. We also found that the error rates in cells encoding mutator forms of both PolC and DnaE are significantly higher (up to 15-fold) than in PolC mutants. In vitro , we showed that (i) the polymerase activity of DnaE is considerably stimulated by DnaN, SSB and PolC, (ii) its error-prone activity is strongly inhibited by DnaN, and (iii) its errors are proofread by the 3' > 5' exonuclease activity of PolC in a stable template-DnaE-PolC complex. Collectively our data show that protein-protein interactions within the replisome modulate the activity and fidelity of DnaE, and confirm the prominent role of DnaE during B. subtilis replication. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Identification of coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human K562 cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-09-27

    Motivation: The protein-DNA interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, also known as DNA motifs) are critical activities in gene transcription. The identification of the DNA motifs is a vital task for downstream analysis. Unfortunately, the long-range coupling information between different DNA motifs is still lacking. To fill the void, as the first-of-its-kind study, we have identified the coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human. Results: The coupling DNA motif pairs exhibit substantially higher DNase accessibility than the background sequences. Half of the DNA motifs involved are matched to the existing motif databases, although nearly all of them are enriched with at least one gene ontology term. Their motif instances are also found statistically enriched on the promoter and enhancer regions. Especially, we introduce a novel measurement called motif pairing multiplicity which is defined as the number of motifs that are paired with a given motif on chromatin interactions. Interestingly, we observe that motif pairing multiplicity is linked to several characteristics such as regulatory region type, motif sequence degeneracy, DNase accessibility and pairing genomic distance. Taken into account together, we believe the coupling DNA motif pairs identified in this study can shed lights on the gene transcription mechanism under long-range chromatin interactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Structural studies of p53 inactivation by DNA-contact mutations and its rescue by suppressor mutations via alternative protein–DNA interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldar, Amir; Rozenberg, Haim; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Rohs, Remo; Shakked, Zippora

    2013-01-01

    A p53 hot-spot mutation found frequently in human cancer is the replacement of R273 by histidine or cysteine residues resulting in p53 loss of function as a tumor suppressor. These mutants can be reactivated by the incorporation of second-site suppressor mutations. Here, we present high-resolution crystal structures of the p53 core domains of the cancer-related proteins, the rescued proteins and their complexes with DNA. The structures show that inactivation of p53 results from the incapacity of the mutated residues to form stabilizing interactions with the DNA backbone, and that reactivation is achieved through alternative interactions formed by the suppressor mutations. Detailed structural and computational analysis demonstrates that the rescued p53 complexes are not fully restored in terms of DNA structure and its interface with p53. Contrary to our previously studied wild-type (wt) p53-DNA complexes showing non-canonical Hoogsteen A/T base pairs of the DNA helix that lead to local minor-groove narrowing and enhanced electrostatic interactions with p53, the current structures display Watson–Crick base pairs associated with direct or water-mediated hydrogen bonds with p53 at the minor groove. These findings highlight the pivotal role played by R273 residues in supporting the unique geometry of the DNA target and its sequence-specific complex with p53. PMID:23863845

  4. Copper(II) complexes of salicylaldehyde hydrazones: synthesis, structure, and DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, La-Mei; Teng, Han-Bing; Ke, Xian-Bing; Xu, Wen-Jin; Su, Jiang-Tao; Liang, Shu-Cai; Hu, Xian-Ming

    2007-09-01

    Three hydrazone ligands, H2L1-H2L3, made from salicylaldehyde and ibuprofen- or naproxen-derived hydrazides, were prepared and transformed into the corresponding copper(II) complexes [Cu(II)L1] x H2O, [Cu(II)L2], and [(Cu(II))2(L3)2] x H2O x DMF (Scheme). The X-ray crystal structure of the last-mentioned complex was solved (Fig. 1), showing a square-planar complexation geometry, and the single units were found to form a one-dimensional chain structure (Fig. 2). The interactions of these complexes with CT-DNA were studied by different techniques, indicating that they all bind to DNA by classical and/or non-classical intercalation modes.

  5. From “Simple” DNA-Protein Interactions to the Macromolecular Machines of Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hippel, Peter H.

    2008-01-01

    The physicochemical concepts that underlie our present ideas on the structure and assembly of the “macromolecular machines of gene expression” are developed, starting with the structure and folding of the individual protein and DNA components, the thermodynamics and kinetics of their conformational rearrangements during complex assembly, and the molecular basis of the sequence specificity and recognition interactions of the final assemblies that include the DNA genome. The role of diffusion in reduced dimensions in the kinetics of the assembly of macromolecular machines from their components is also considered, and diffusion-driven reactions are compared with those fueled by ATP binding and hydrolysis, as well as by the specific covalent chemical modifications involved in rearranging chromatin and modifying signal transduction networks in higher organisms. PMID:17477836

  6. From "simple" DNA-protein interactions to the macromolecular machines of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hippel, Peter H

    2007-01-01

    The physicochemical concepts that underlie our present ideas on the structure and assembly of the "macromolecular machines of gene expression" are developed, starting with the structure and folding of the individual protein and DNA components, the thermodynamics and kinetics of their conformational rearrangements during complex assembly, and the molecular basis of the sequence specificity and recognition interactions of the final assemblies that include the DNA genome. The role of diffusion in reduced dimensions in the kinetics of the assembly of macromolecular machines from their components is also considered, and diffusion-driven reactions are compared with those fueled by ATP binding and hydrolysis, as well as by the specific covalent chemical modifications involved in rearranging chromatin and modifying signal transduction networks in higher organisms.

  7. Electrochemical monitoring of the interaction between mitomycin C and DNA at chitosan--carbon nanotube composite modified electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    CANAVAR, Pembe Ece; EKŞİN, Ece; ERDEM, Arzum

    2015-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) and chitosan composite (chitosan*CNT) based sensors were developed as DNA biosensors, and then they were applied for electrochemical investigation of the interaction between the anticancer drug mitomycin C (MC) and DNA. The oxidation signals of MC and guanine were monitored before and after the interaction process by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The DPV results were in good agreement with those of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)....

  8. Hydrogen scrambling in non-covalent complexes of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modzel, Maciej; Stefanowicz, Piotr; Szewczuk, Zbigniew

    2012-12-15

    Mass spectrometry analysis combined with hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX-MS) is arising as a tool for quick analysis of native protein conformation. However, during collision-induced dissociation (CID) the spatial distribution of deuterium is not always conserved. It is therefore important to find out how hydrogen scrambling occurs--this study concentrates on the possibility of scrambling between amino acid residues spatially close together, but not connected by covalent bonds. Peptides used in this study were synthesized by Fmoc strategy. Deuteration occurred in ammonia formate solution in D(2)O. Non-covalent complexes consisting of a deuterated and a non-deuterated peptide were analyzed by electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR-MS) with quadrupole mass filter. Low-energy CID was used for complex dissociation. The complexes were isolated on a quadrupole and subjected to CID to cause dissociation. The deuterium distribution before and after the dissociation of a non-covalent complex to its components was measured. The study revealed that no significant scrambling occurred between the constituents of the complexes--the degree of scrambling did not exceed 10%. The results obtained for the complexes should be similar to those for protein parts spatially close together--hydrogen scrambling between them should be negligible. The knowledge that almost all the scrambling occurs along peptide chains gives a better insight into the mechanism of HDX inside a protein. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. In and out of the minor groove: interaction of an AT-rich DNA with the drug CD27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta-Reyes, Francisco J.; Dardonville, Christophe; Koning, Harry P. de; Natto, Manal; Subirana, Juan A.; Campos, J. Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    New features of an antiprotozoal DNA minor-groove binding drug, which acts as a cross-linking agent, are presented. It also fills the minor groove of DNA completely and prevents the access of proteins. These features are also expected for other minor-groove binding drugs when associated with suitable DNA targets. The DNA of several pathogens is very rich in AT base pairs. Typical examples include the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and the causative agents of trichomoniasis and trypanosomiases. This fact has prompted studies of drugs which interact with the minor groove of DNA, some of which are used in medical practice. Previous studies have been performed almost exclusively with the AATT sequence. New features should be uncovered through the study of different DNA sequences. In this paper, the crystal structure of the complex of the DNA duplex d(AAAATTTT) 2 with the dicationic drug 4, 4′-bis(imidazolinylamino)diphenylamine (CD27) is presented. The drug binds to the minor groove of DNA as expected, but it shows two new features that have not previously been described: (i) the drugs protrude from the DNA and interact with neighbouring molecules, so that they may act as cross-linking agents, and (ii) the drugs completely cover the whole minor groove of DNA and displace bound water. Thus, they may prevent the access to DNA of proteins such as AT-hook proteins. These features are also expected for other minor-groove binding drugs when associated with all-AT DNA. These findings allow a better understanding of this family of compounds and will help in the development of new, more effective drugs. New data on the biological interaction of CD27 with the causative agent of trichomoniasis, Trichomonas vaginalis, are also reported

  10. In and out of the minor groove: interaction of an AT-rich DNA with the drug CD27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta-Reyes, Francisco J. [Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dardonville, Christophe [Instituto de Química Médica, IQM–CSIC, Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Koning, Harry P. de; Natto, Manal [University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Subirana, Juan A.; Campos, J. Lourdes, E-mail: lourdes.campos@upc.edu [Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    New features of an antiprotozoal DNA minor-groove binding drug, which acts as a cross-linking agent, are presented. It also fills the minor groove of DNA completely and prevents the access of proteins. These features are also expected for other minor-groove binding drugs when associated with suitable DNA targets. The DNA of several pathogens is very rich in AT base pairs. Typical examples include the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and the causative agents of trichomoniasis and trypanosomiases. This fact has prompted studies of drugs which interact with the minor groove of DNA, some of which are used in medical practice. Previous studies have been performed almost exclusively with the AATT sequence. New features should be uncovered through the study of different DNA sequences. In this paper, the crystal structure of the complex of the DNA duplex d(AAAATTTT){sub 2} with the dicationic drug 4, 4′-bis(imidazolinylamino)diphenylamine (CD27) is presented. The drug binds to the minor groove of DNA as expected, but it shows two new features that have not previously been described: (i) the drugs protrude from the DNA and interact with neighbouring molecules, so that they may act as cross-linking agents, and (ii) the drugs completely cover the whole minor groove of DNA and displace bound water. Thus, they may prevent the access to DNA of proteins such as AT-hook proteins. These features are also expected for other minor-groove binding drugs when associated with all-AT DNA. These findings allow a better understanding of this family of compounds and will help in the development of new, more effective drugs. New data on the biological interaction of CD27 with the causative agent of trichomoniasis, Trichomonas vaginalis, are also reported.

  11. In vivo protein-DNA interactions at the β-globin gene locus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohru Ikuta; Yuet Wai Kan

    1991-01-01

    The authors have investigated in vivo protein-DNA interactions in the β-globin gene locus by dimethyl sulfate (DMS) footprinting in K562 cells, which express var-epsilon- and γ-globin but not β-globin. In the locus control region, hypersensitive site 2 (HS-2) exhibited footprints in several putative protein binding motifs. HS-3 was not footprinted. The β promoter was also not footprinted, while extensive footprints were observed in the promoter of the active γ-globin gene. No footprints were seen in the A γ and β3' enhancers. With several motifs, additional protein interactions and alterations in binding patterns occurred with hemin induction. In HeLa cells, some footprints were observed in some of the motifs in HS-2, compatible with the finding that HS-2 has some enhancer function in HeLa cells, albeit much weaker than its activity in K562 cells. No footprint was seen in B lymphocytes. In vivo footprinting is a useful method for studying relevant protein-DNA interactions in erythroid cells

  12. The crystal structure of sulfamethoxazole, interaction with DNA, DFT calculation, and molecular docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipankar; Sahu, Nilima; Roy, Suman; Dutta, Paramita; Mondal, Sudipa; Torres, Elena L; Sinha, Chittaranjan

    2015-02-25

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) [4-amino-N-(5-methyl-1,2-oxazol-3-yl)benzenesulfonamide] is structurally established by single crystal X-ray diffraction measurement. The crystal packing shows H-bonded 2D polymer through N(7)-H(7A)-O(2), N(7)-H(7B)-O(3), N(1)-H(1)-N(2), C(5)-H(5)-O(3)-S(1) and N(7)-(H7A)-O(2)-S(1). Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Time Dependent-DFT (TD-DFT) computations of optimized structure of SMX determine the electronic structure and has explained the electronic spectral transitions. The interaction of SMX with CT-DNA has been studied by absorption spectroscopy and the binding constant (Kb) is 4.37×10(4)M(-1). The in silico test of SMX with DHPS from Escherichia coli and Streptococcus pneumoniae helps to understand drug metabolism and accounts the drug-molecule interactions. The molecular docking of SMX-DNA also helps to predict the interaction feature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural characterization of a noncovalent complex between ubiquitin and the transactivation domain of the erythroid-specific factor EKLF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiola, Luca; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Gagnon, David; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Mascle, Xavier; Arseneault, Genevieve; Legault, Pascale; Archambault, Jacques; Omichinski, James G

    2013-11-05

    Like other acidic transactivation domains (TAD), the minimal TAD from the erythroid-specific transcription factor EKLF (EKLFTAD) has been shown to contribute both to its transcriptional activity as well as to its ubiquitin(UBI)-mediated degradation. In this article, we examine the activation-degradation role of the acidic TAD of EKLF and demonstrate that the first 40 residues (EKLFTAD1) within this region form a noncovalent interaction with UBI. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural studies of an EKLFTAD1-UBI complex show that EKLFTAD1 adopts a 14-residue α helix that forms the recognition interface with UBI in a similar manner as the UBI-interacting helix of Rabex5. We also identify a similar interaction between UBI and the activation-degradation region of SREBP1a, but not with the activation-degradation regions of p53, GAL4, and VP16. These results suggest that select activation-degradation regions like the ones found in EKLF and SREBP1a function in part through their ability to form noncovalent interactions with UBI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mapping a Noncovalent Protein-Peptide Interface by Top-Down FTICR Mass Spectrometry Using Electron Capture Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David J.; Murray, Euan; Hupp, Ted; Mackay, C. Logan; Langridge-Smith, Pat R. R.

    2011-08-01

    Noncovalent protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes are readily detected using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS). Furthermore, recent reports have demonstrated that careful use of electron capture dissociation (ECD) fragmentation allows covalent backbone bonds of protein complexes to be dissociated without disruption of noncovalent protein-ligand interactions. In this way the site of protein-ligand interfaces can be identified. To date, protein-ligand complexes, which have proven tractable to this technique, have been mediated by ionic electrostatic interactions, i.e., ion pair interactions or salt bridging. Here we extend this methodology by applying ECD to study a protein-peptide complex that contains no electrostatics interactions. We analyzed the complex between the 21 kDa p53-inhibitor protein anterior gradient-2 and its hexapeptide binding ligand (PTTIYY). ECD fragmentation of the 1:1 complex occurs with retention of protein-peptide binding and analysis of the resulting fragments allows the binding interface to be localized to a C-terminal region between residues 109 and 175. These finding are supported by a solution-phase competition assay, which implicates the region between residues 108 and 122 within AGR2 as the PTTIYY binding interface. Our study expands previous findings by demonstrating that top-down ECD mass spectrometry can be used to determine directly the sites of peptide-protein interfaces. This highlights the growing potential of using ECD and related top-down fragmentation techniques for interrogation of protein-protein interfaces.

  15. Mapping the Binding Interface in a Noncovalent Size Variant of a Monoclonal Antibody Using Native Mass Spectrometry, Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuetian; Wei, Hui; Jusuf, Sutjano; Krystek, Stanley R; Chen, Jie; Chen, Guodong; Ludwig, Richard T; Tao, Li; Das, Tapan K

    2017-11-01

    Variants of monoclonal antibody containing an extra light chain have been reported in protein products. Due to potential impact on potency and immunogenicity, it is important to understand the formation mechanism of such variants so that appropriate control strategies can be implemented to assure product quality. In a model monoclonal antibody, we observed a size variant with an extra light chain noncovalently associated with the monomer (later named as "1.2mer"). The interaction between monomer and the extra light chain was characterized by native spray and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry techniques. The goal is to understand the nature of the noncovalent interaction, to map out the interaction interface and regions of potential conformational distortions. In addition, computational modeling was used to aid in binding site identification. The combined results identify the interaction interface to be located in the heavy chain region 38-57 and in the extra light chain region 30-50. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize noncovalent interaction of a size variant comprising an antibody monomer and an extra light chain. Structural knowledge generated in this research work is invaluable for process development and construct design of antibody-based biopharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. DNA controlled assembly of soft nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Stefan; Simonsen, Adam Cohen; Jakobsen, Ulla

    2008-01-01

    DNA-encoding of solid nanoparticles requires surfacechemistry, which is often tedious and not generally applicable. In the present study non-covalently attached DNA are used to assemble soft nanoparticles (liposomes) in solution. This process displays remarkably sharp thermal transitions from ass...

  17. Probing the Characterization of the Interaction of Aflatoxins B1 and G1 with Calf Thymus DNA In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang; Wang, Jiaman; Zhang, Yuhao

    2017-07-01

    The binding characterization of aflatoxins with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) under physiological conditions was investigated. Multispectroscopic techniques, ctDNA melting, viscosity measurements, and molecular docking techniques were employed to elucidate the binding mechanism of the aflatoxins with DNA. The fluorescence results indicated that both aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and aflatoxin G1 (AFG1) bound to the ctDNA, forming complexes through hydrogen bonding. The binding constants of AFB1 and AFG1 with ctDNA reached up to 10³ L·mol -1 and 10⁴ L·mol -1 , respectively, and AFG1 exhibited a higher binding propensity than that of AFB1. Furthermore, both AFB1 and AFG1 bound to the ctDNA through groove binding, as evidenced by the results of the spectroscopic, iodide quenching effect, viscosity, and ctDNA melting measurements. Changes in the circular dichroism signal manifested that both AFB1 and AFG1 induced an increase in the right-handed helicity, but only minimally influenced the base stacking of the DNA. A molecular docking study of the aflatoxin's binding with the DNA revealed a groove binding mode, which was driven mainly by hydrogen bonding. This study of aflatoxin-ctDNA interaction may provide novel insights into the toxicological effect of the mycotoxins.

  18. Single-molecule kinetic analysis of HP1-chromatin binding reveals a dynamic network of histone modification and DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Louise C; Weilandt, Daniel R; Bachmann, Andreas L; Kilic, Sinan; Lechner, Carolin C; Odermatt, Pascal D; Fantner, Georg E; Georgeon, Sandrine; Hantschel, Oliver; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Fierz, Beat

    2017-10-13

    Chromatin recruitment of effector proteins involved in gene regulation depends on multivalent interaction with histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) and structural features of the chromatin fiber. Due to the complex interactions involved, it is currently not understood how effectors dynamically sample the chromatin landscape. Here, we dissect the dynamic chromatin interactions of a family of multivalent effectors, heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) proteins, using single-molecule fluorescence imaging and computational modeling. We show that the three human HP1 isoforms are recruited and retained on chromatin by a dynamic exchange between histone PTM and DNA bound states. These interactions depend on local chromatin structure, the HP1 isoforms as well as on PTMs on HP1 itself. Of the HP1 isoforms, HP1α exhibits the longest residence times and fastest binding rates due to DNA interactions in addition to PTM binding. HP1α phosphorylation further increases chromatin retention through strengthening of multivalency while reducing DNA binding. As DNA binding in combination with specific PTM recognition is found in many chromatin effectors, we propose a general dynamic capture mechanism for effector recruitment. Multiple weak protein and DNA interactions result in a multivalent interaction network that targets effectors to a specific chromatin modification state, where their activity is required. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Interaction between insulin and calf thymus DNA, and quantification of insulin and calf thymus DNA by a resonance Rayleigh scattering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, L.; Liu, Z.; Hu, X.; Liu, S.; Li, W.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of insulin with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) leads to a complex that displays remarkably enhanced resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS). The complex and its formation were investigated by atomic force microscopy and by absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopies. We show that the Tyr B16, Tyr B26 and Phe B24 amino acids near the active center (Phe B25) were influenced by the interaction, whereas Tyr A14, Tyr A19 and Phe B1 (which are located far away from the active center) were less influenced. The interaction provide a way in the quantitation of both ctDNA and insulin with high sensitivity. When ctDNA is used as a probe to quantify insulin, the detection limit (3σ) is 6.0 ng mL -1 . If, inversely, insulin is used as a probe to quantify ctDNA, the detection limit (3σ) is 7.2 ng mL -1 . The analysis of synthetic DNA samples and an insulin infection sample provided satisfactory results. (author)

  20. A selective chemosensor for fluoride ion and its interaction with Calf Thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Al Masum, Abdulla; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Islam, Md. Maidul; Alam, Md. Akhtarul; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2017-05-01

    The amido-Schiff base 1 (N1, N3-bis (2-nitrobenzylidene)benzene-1,3-dicabohydrazide) containing a sbnd CONHsbnd group and sbnd CHdbnd Nsbnd linkage has been synthesized by the condensation between isophthalic acid dihydrazide and o-nitrobenzaldehyde. This molecule can act as a fluoride ion sensor with high selectivity and sensitivity. Presence of nitro group in the phenyl ring may be responsible for the detection of fluoride ion visually with a dramatic color change from colorless to deep red in aqueous dimethyl sulphoxide solution. This Schiff base can be used as test kit for sensing of fluoride ion in the solid state. Compound 1 can detect fluoride also in commercially available toothpaste. As the compound has adequate solubility in DMSO-water mixture (7:93, v/v) and having some hydrogen bond donor and acceptor centers, we have investigated its nature of binding with Calf Thymus-DNA (CT-DNA) using theoretical molecular modelling and other experimental methods like UV-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroic and thermal melting studies. Thermodynamic parameters have been obtained using the well known Van't Hoff's equation. From both theoretical and experimental findings it has been observed that it can interact effectively with CT-DNA with binding energy - 7.55 kcal/mol to - 7.50 kcal/mol.

  1. A selective chemosensor for fluoride ion and its interaction with Calf Thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Al Masum, Abdulla; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Islam, Md Maidul; Alam, Md Akhtarul; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2017-05-05

    The amido-Schiff base 1 (N 1 , N 3 -bis (2-nitrobenzylidene)benzene-1,3-dicabohydrazide) containing a CONH group and CHN linkage has been synthesized by the condensation between isophthalic acid dihydrazide and o-nitrobenzaldehyde. This molecule can act as a fluoride ion sensor with high selectivity and sensitivity. Presence of nitro group in the phenyl ring may be responsible for the detection of fluoride ion visually with a dramatic color change from colorless to deep red in aqueous dimethyl sulphoxide solution. This Schiff base can be used as test kit for sensing of fluoride ion in the solid state. Compound 1 can detect fluoride also in commercially available toothpaste. As the compound has adequate solubility in DMSO-water mixture (7:93, v/v) and having some hydrogen bond donor and acceptor centers, we have investigated its nature of binding with Calf Thymus-DNA (CT-DNA) using theoretical molecular modelling and other experimental methods like UV-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroic and thermal melting studies. Thermodynamic parameters have been obtained using the well known Van't Hoff's equation. From both theoretical and experimental findings it has been observed that it can interact effectively with CT-DNA with binding energy -7.55kcal/mol to -7.50kcal/mol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ionizing radiation interactions with DNA: nanodosimetry; Ionisierende Strahlungswechselwirkung mit der DNS. Nanodosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bug, Marion; Nettelbeck, Heidi [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Biologische Wirksamkeit ionisierender Strahlung' ; Hilgers, Gerhard [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Nanodosimetrie' ; Rabus, Hans [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Fachbereich ' Grundlagen der Dosimetrie'

    2011-06-15

    The metrology of ionizing radiation is based on measuring values that are averaged over macroscopic volume elements, for instance the energy dose is defined as ratio of the energy deposited on the absorber and the absorber mass. For biological or medical radiation effects the stochastic nature of radiation interaction is of main importance, esp. the interaction of ionizing radiation with the DNA as the genetic information carrier. For radiotherapy and risk evaluation purposes a comprehensive system of radiation weighing factors and other characteristics, like radiation quality or relative biological efficacy was developed. The nanodosimetry is aimed to develop a metrological basis relying on physical characteristics of the microscopic structure of ionizing radiation tracks. The article includes the development of experimental nanodosimetric methods, the respective calibration techniques, Monte-Carlo simulation of the particle track microstructure and the correlation nanodosimetry and biological efficiency.

  3. Alpha Particles and X Rays Interact in Inducing DNA Damage in U2OS Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollazzo, Alice; Brzozowska, Beata; Cheng, Lei; Lundholm, Lovisa; Haghdoost, Siamak; Scherthan, Harry; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    Survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are monitored for health effects within the Life Span Study (LSS). The LSS results represent the most important source of data about cancer effects from ionizing radiation exposure, which forms the foundation for the radiation protection system. One uncertainty connected to deriving universal risk factors from these results is related to the problem of mixed radiation qualities. The A-bomb explosions generated a mixed beam of the sparsely ionizing gamma radiation and densely ionizing neutrons. However, until now the possible interaction of the two radiation types of inducing biological effects has not been taken into consideration. The existence of such interaction would suggest that the application of risk factors derived from the LSS to predict cancer effects after pure gamma-ray irradiation (such as in the Fukushima prefecture) leads to an overestimation of risk. To analyze the possible interaction of radiation types, a mixed-beam exposure facility was constructed where cells can be exposed to sparsely ionizing X rays and densely ionizing alpha particles. U2OS cells were used, which are stably transfected with a plasmid coding for the DNA repair gene 53BP1 coupled to a gene coding for the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The induction and repair of DNA damage, which are known to be related to cancer induction, were analyzed. The results suggest that alpha particles and X rays interact, leading to cellular and possibly cancer effects, which cannot be accurately predicted based on assuming simple additivity of the individual mixed-beam components.

  4. Introducing a model of pairing based on base pair specific interactions between identical DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    (O’ Lee, Dominic J.

    2018-02-01

    At present, there have been suggested two types of physical mechanism that may facilitate preferential pairing between DNA molecules, with identical or similar base pair texts, without separation of base pairs. One mechanism solely relies on base pair specific patterns of helix distortion being the same on the two molecules, discussed extensively in the past. The other mechanism proposes that there are preferential interactions between base pairs of the same composition. We introduce a model, built on this second mechanism, where both thermal stretching and twisting fluctuations are included, as well as the base pair specific helix distortions. Firstly, we consider an approximation for weak pairing interactions, or short molecules. This yields a dependence of the energy on the square root of the molecular length, which could explain recent experimental data. However, analysis suggests that this approximation is no longer valid at large DNA lengths. In a second approximation, for long molecules, we define two adaptation lengths for twisting and stretching, over which the pairing interaction can limit the accumulation of helix disorder. When the pairing interaction is sufficiently strong, both adaptation lengths are finite; however, as we reduce pairing strength, the stretching adaptation length remains finite but the torsional one becomes infinite. This second state persists to arbitrarily weak values of the pairing strength; suggesting that, if the molecules are long enough, the pairing energy scales as length. To probe differences between the two pairing mechanisms, we also construct a model of similar form. However, now, pairing between identical sequences solely relies on the intrinsic helix distortion patterns. Between the two models, we see interesting qualitative differences. We discuss our findings, and suggest new work to distinguish between the two mechanisms.

  5. Structure and function of DnaA N-terminal domains: specific sites and mechanisms in inter-DnaA interaction and in DnaB helicase loading on oriC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yoshito; Jo, Takaaki; Matsuda, Yusaku; Matsunaga, Chika; Katayama, Tsutomu; Ueda, Tadashi

    2007-06-15

    DnaA forms a homomultimeric complex with the origin of chromosomal replication (oriC) to unwind duplex DNA. The interaction of the DnaA N terminus with the DnaB helicase is crucial for the loading of DnaB onto the unwound region. Here, we determined the DnaA N terminus structure using NMR. This region (residues 1-108) consists of a rigid region (domain I) and a flexible region (domain II). Domain I has an alpha-alpha-beta-beta-alpha-beta motif, similar to that of the K homology (KH) domain, and has weak affinity for oriC single-stranded DNA, consistent with KH domain function. A hydrophobic surface carrying Trp-6 most likely forms the interface for domain I dimerization. Glu-21 is located on the opposite surface of domain I from the Trp-6 site and is crucial for DnaB helicase loading. These findings suggest a model for DnaA homomultimer formation and DnaB helicase loading on oriC.

  6. Differential interaction kinetics of a bipolar structure-specific endonuclease with DNA flaps revealed by single-molecule imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachid Rezgui

    Full Text Available As DNA repair enzymes are essential for preserving genome integrity, understanding their substrate interaction dynamics and the regulation of their catalytic mechanisms is crucial. Using single-molecule imaging, we investigated the association and dissociation kinetics of the bipolar endonuclease NucS from Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab on 5' and 3'-flap structures under various experimental conditions. We show that association of the PabNucS with ssDNA flaps is largely controlled by diffusion in the NucS-DNA energy landscape and does not require a free 5' or 3' extremity. On the other hand, NucS dissociation is independent of the flap length and thus independent of sliding on the single-stranded portion of the flapped DNA substrates. Our kinetic measurements have revealed previously unnoticed asymmetry in dissociation kinetics from these substrates that is markedly modulated by the replication clamp PCNA. We propose that the replication clamp PCNA enhances the cleavage specificity of NucS proteins by accelerating NucS loading at the ssDNA/dsDNA junctions and by minimizing the nuclease interaction time with its DNA substrate. Our data are also consistent with marked reorganization of ssDNA and nuclease domains occurring during NucS catalysis, and indicate that NucS binds its substrate directly at the ssDNA-dsDNA junction and then threads the ssDNA extremity into the catalytic site. The powerful techniques used here for probing the dynamics of DNA-enzyme binding at the single-molecule have provided new insight regarding substrate specificity of NucS nucleases.

  7. Crystal structure of a covalent intermediate in DNA cleavage and rejoining by Escherichia coli DNA topoisomerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongtao; Cheng, Bokun; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2011-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases control DNA topology by breaking and rejoining DNA strands via covalent complexes with cleaved DNA substrate as catalytic intermediates. Here we report the structure of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I catalytic domain (residues 2–695) in covalent complex with a cleaved single-stranded oligonucleotide substrate, refined to 2.3-Å resolution. The enzyme-substrate intermediate formed after strand cleavage was captured due to the presence of the D111N mutation. This structure of the covalent topoisomerase-DNA intermediate, previously elusive for type IA topoisomerases, shows distinct conformational changes from the structure of the enzyme without bound DNA and provides detailed understanding of the covalent catalysis required for strand cleavage to take place. The portion of cleaved DNA 5′ to the site of cleavage is anchored tightly with extensive noncovalent protein–DNA interactions as predicted by the “enzyme-bridged” model. Distortion of the scissile strand at the -4 position 5′ to the cleavage site allows specific selectivity of a cytosine base in the binding pocket. Many antibacterial and anticancer drugs initiate cell killing by trapping the covalent complexes formed by topoisomerases. We have demonstrated in previous mutagenesis studies that accumulation of the covalent complex of bacterial topoisomerase I is bactericidal. This structure of the covalent intermediate provides the basis for the design of novel antibiotics that can trap the enzyme after formation of the covalent complex. PMID:21482796

  8. Characterisation of the interactions between substrate, copper(II) complex and DNA and their role in rate acceleration in DNA-based asymmetric catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Boersma, Arnold J; Browne, Wesley R; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Interactions of the azachalcone derived substrate Aza with copper(II) complexes in the presence and absence of st-DNA were studied in detail by UV/Vis absorption, EPR and Raman and (UV and vis) resonance Raman spectroscopies. The binding of Aza to the Lewis acidic copper(II) complexes, which results

  9. Study on the interaction of the antiviral drug, zidovudine with DNA using neutral red (NR) and methylene blue (MB) dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabadi, Nahid, E-mail: nahidshahabadi@yahoo.com [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghadam, Neda Hossein pour [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The interaction between the drug, zidovudine and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) was investigated using neutral red (NR) and methylene blue (MB) dyes as a spectral probes by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that the conformational changes in DNA helix induced by zidovudine are the reason for the fluorescence quenching of the DNA-NR system. In addition, by increasing zidovudine to DNA-MB solution, the fluorescence has no change. From the experimental results, it was found that zidovudine can cause structural changes on CT-DNA and bind with DNA via groove binding mode. At the same time, the paper proved that conformational changes of DNA can also lead to the fluorescence decrease of DNA-probe systems. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Search for new molecular structures which exhibit effective antitumor activities among popular drugs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The DRUG can bind to DNA via groove binding mode. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Several spectroscopic techniques have been used in this research.

  10. Flexible double-headed cytosine-linked 2'-deoxycytidine nucleotides. Synthesis, polymerase incorporation to DNA and interaction with DNA methyltransferases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kielkowski, Pavel; Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Hocek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2016), s. 1268-1276 ISSN 0968-0896 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : nucleosides * nucleotides * pyrimidines * DNA methyltransferases * DNA polymerases Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.930, year: 2016

  11. Effects of vanadium complexes on cell growth of human leukemia cells and protein-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampronti, Ilaria; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Borgatti, Monica; Fabbri, Enrica; Vizziello, Leonardo; Khan, Mahmud Tareq Hassan; Ather, Arjumand; Brezena, Dan; Tahir, Mohammad Mahroof; Gambari, Roberto

    2005-07-01

    Vanadium complexes are known to possess potent insulin-mimetic effects, high affinity for several enzymes and anticancer activity, which deserve increasing attention for application to biomedical sciences. Different vanadium complexes have been found to be more effective than the simple vanadium-(IV) and -(V) salts in experiments performed both in vitro and in vivo. Application of polyoxometalates as potential drugs against Herpes Simplex Virus and AIDS have also increased the interest to study the association between vanadium containing species and proteins. The aim of our research was to investigate the in vitro antiproliferative activity of a variety of vanadium-containing compounds, and study their ability to interfere with the molecular interactions between GATA-1 and NF-kappaB transcription factors and target DNA elements, employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays. All of the used vanadium compounds were found to exhibit antiproliferative activity, despite with differences in efficacy. Inhibition of K562 cell growth was not associated with differentiation, but with activation of apoptosis. Vanadium complexes with a +5 oxidation state and their discrete anionic units appear essential for the respective effects on K562 cells; a +4 oxidation state appears to be important in inhibiting transcription factors/DNA interactions.

  12. Ni(II) complexes of arginine Schiff-bases and its interaction with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallam, S.A.; Abbas, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ni(II) complexes with Schiff-bases obtained by condensation of arginine with salicylaldehyde; 2,3-; 2,4-; 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde have been synthesized using the template method in ethanol or ammonia media. They were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, magnetic moment, UV, IR and 1 H NMR spectra as well as thermal analysis (TG, DTG and DTA). The Schiff-bases are dibasic tridentate donors and the complexes have diamagnetic square planar and octahedral structures. The complexes decompose in three steps where kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition steps were computed. The interactions of the formed complexes with FM-DNA were monitored by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy. -- Highlights: ► Arginine Schiff-bases and their nickel(II) complexes have been synthesized. ► Magnetic and spectral data show diamagnetic square planar and octahedral complexes. ► The complexes thermally decompose in three stages. Interaction with FM-DNA shows hyperchromism with blue shift

  13. Transcription factor interactions: Selectors of positive or negative regulation from a single DNA element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, M.I.; Miner, J.N.; Yoshinaga, S.K.; Yamamoto, K.R. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1990-09-14

    The mechanism by which a single factor evokes opposite regulatory effects from a specific DNA sequence is not well understood. In this study, a 25-base pair element that resides upstream of the mouse proliferin gene was examined; it conferred on linked promoters either positive or negative glucocorticoid regulation, depending upon physiological context. This sequence, denoted a composite glucocorticoid response element (GRE), was bound selective in vitro both by the glucocorticoid receptor and by c-Jun and c-Fos, components of the phorbol ester-activated AP-1 transcription factor. Indeed, c-Jun and c-Fos served as selectors of hormone responsiveness: the composite GRE was inactive in the absence of c-Jun, whereas it conferred a positive glucocorticoid effect in the presence of c-Jun, and a negative glucocorticoid effect in the presence of c-Jun and relatively high levels of c-Fos. The receptor also interacted selectively with c-Jun in vitro. A general model for composite GRE action is proposed that invokes both DNA binding and protein-protein interactions by receptor and nonreceptor factors.

  14. A feature-based approach to modeling protein-DNA interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilon Sharon

    Full Text Available Transcription factor (TF binding to its DNA target site is a fundamental regulatory interaction. The most common model used to represent TF binding specificities is a position specific scoring matrix (PSSM, which assumes independence between binding positions. However, in many cases, this simplifying assumption does not hold. Here, we present feature motif models (FMMs, a novel probabilistic method for modeling TF-DNA interactions, based on log-linear models. Our approach uses sequence features to represent TF binding specificities, where each feature may span multiple positions. We develop the mathematical formulation of our model and devise an algorithm for learning its structural features from binding site data. We also developed a discriminative motif finder, which discovers de novo FMMs that are enriched in target sets of sequences compared to background sets. We evaluate our approach on synthetic data and on the widely used TF chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP dataset of Harbison et al. We then apply our algorithm to high-throughput TF ChIP data from mouse and human, reveal sequence features that are present in the binding specificities of mouse and human TFs, and show that FMMs explain TF binding significantly better than PSSMs. Our FMM learning and motif finder software are available at http://genie.weizmann.ac.il/.

  15. Electronic structure of an anticancer drug DC81 and its interaction with DNA base pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Gargi, E-mail: gargi.tiwari@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Dipendra, E-mail: d-11sharma@rediffmail.com; Dwivedi, K. K., E-mail: dwivedikarunesh4@gmail.com [Department of Physics, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur (India); Dwivedi, M. K., E-mail: dwivedi-ji@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India)

    2016-05-06

    The drug, 8-Hydroxy-7-methoxy-pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4] benzodiazepine-5-one, commonly christened as DC81 belongs to the pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBDs) family. It is a member of the group of naturally occurring antitumour antibiotics produced by various Streptomyces species. The antitumour activity of DC81 is attributed to its sequence specific interaction with G-C rich DNA region in particular, for Pu-G-Pu motifs. In the present paper, physico-chemical properties DC81 have been carried out using an ab-initio method, HF/6-31G(d,p) with GAMESS program. MEP, HOMO and LUMO surfaces have been scanned. Ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, global hardness and softness of the drug have been calculated. Further, drug-DNA interactions have been examined using modified second order perturbation theory along with multicentred-multipole expansion technique. Results have been discussed in the light of other theoretical and experimental observations. Efforts have been made to elucidate the binding patterns and thereby biological properties of the drug.

  16. Highly functionalized piperidines: Free radical scavenging, anticancer activity, DNA interaction and correlation with biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvankar Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five piperidines were studied as potential radical scavengers and antitumor agents. Quantitative interaction of compounds with ctDNA using spectroscopic techniques was also evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the evaluated piperidines possesses different abilities to scavenge the radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and the anion radical superoxide (·O2−. The piperidine 19 was the most potent radical DPPH scavenger, while the most effective to ·O2− scavenger was piperidine 10. In general, U251, MCF7, NCI/ADR-RES, NCI-H460 and HT29 cells were least sensitive to the tested compounds and all compounds were considerably more toxic to the studied cancer cell lines than to the normal cell line HaCaT. The binding mode of the compounds and ctDNA was preferably via intercalation. In addition, these results were confirmed based on theoretical studies. Finally, a linear and exponential correlation between interaction constant (Kb and GI50 for several human cancer cell was observed.

  17. Binding of PFOS to serum albumin and DNA: insight into the molecular toxicity of perfluorochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yin-Sheng

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health risk from exposure of perfluorochemicals (PFCs to wildlife and human has been a subject of great interest for understanding their molecular mechanism of toxicity. Although much work has been done, the toxigenicity of PFCs remains largely unknown. In this work, the non-covalent interactions between perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS and serum albumin (SA and DNA were investigated under normal physiological conditions, aiming to elucidate the toxigenicity of PFCs. Results In equilibrium dialysis assay, the bindings of PFOS to SA correspond to the Langmuir isothermal model with two-step sequence model. The saturation binding number of PFOS was 45 per molecule of SA and 1 per three base-pairs of DNA, respectively. ITC results showed that all the interactions were spontaneous driven by entropy change. Static quenching of the fluorescence of SA was observed when interacting with PFOS, indicating PFOS bound Trp residue of SA. CD spectra of SA and DNA changed obviously in the presence of PFOS. At normal physiological conditions, 1.2 mmol/l PFOS reduces the binding ratio of Vitamin B2 to SA by more than 30%. Conclusion The ion bond, van der Waals force and hydrophobic interaction contributed to PFOS binding to peptide chain of SA and to the groove bases of DNA duplex. The non-covalent interactions of PFOS with SA and DNA alter their secondary conformations, with the physiological function of SA to transport Vitamin B2 being inhibited consequently. This work provides a useful experimental method for further studying the toxigenicity of PFCs.

  18. Physical interaction of ionising radiations with the intracellular macromolecular target DNA and its biological consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geard, C.R.; Loucas, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA breaks were evaluated in normal human fibroblasts after irradiation of non-cycling G1 phase cells with 90 keV·μm -1 α particles and 250 kV p X rays. Yields were measured using the premature chromosome condensation technique in interphase cells, straight after and 24 h after irradiation, and by mitotic scoring of terminal deletions following cellular release at 24 h and progression through the cell cycle. Yields were related to the frequencies of energy deposition events per cell nucleus estimated microdosimetrically for X rays and by relating fluence to nuclear cross-sectional areas for the α particles. Linear relationships were found for both radiations and at all three times post-irradiation. Initial break yields of 1.3 x 10 o and 1.6 x 10 -2 per energy deposition event for α particles and X rays respectively, changed to residual yields (24 h) of 4.0 x 10 -1 and 1.3 x 10 -3 , and for terminal deletions at mitosis to 6.0 x 10 -3 and 4.0 x 10 -5 per energy deposition event. That is, one 90 keV·μm -1 α particle is about 100 times more biologically effective than an electron track from 250 kV p X rays and greater than 99% of initially induced chromosomal DNA breaks are repaired/misrepaired before the next mitosis. Misrepair will involve illegitimate interactions and combinations of pairs of lesions, entities which pre-dominate at mitosis, while a failure to repair/misrepair resulting in relic DNA double strand breaks is likely to be of minimal consequence. Lesion interaction, proximity dependent, and largely irrespective of LET dependent lesion severity will then be the principal basis for the unwanted biological sequelae from ionising radiations. (Author)

  19. Non-Covalent Organocatalyzed Domino Reactions Involving Oxindoles: Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tecla Gasperi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous presence of spirooxindole architectures with several functionalities and stereogenic centers in bioactive molecules has been appealing for the development of novel methodologies seeking their preparation in high yields and selectivities. Expansion and refinement in the field of asymmetric organocatalysis have made possible the development of straightforward strategies that address these two requisites. In this review, we illustrate the current state-of-the-art in the field of spirooxindole synthesis through the use of non-covalent organocatalysis. We aim to provide a concise overview of very recent methods that allow to the isolation of unique, densely and diversified spirocyclic oxindole derivatives with high structural diversity via the use of cascade, tandem and domino processes.

  20. Programmable display of DNA-protein chimeras for controlling cell-hydrogel interactions via reversible intermolecular hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2013-04-08

    Extensive studies have been recently carried out to achieve dynamic control of cell-material interactions primarily through physicochemical stimulation. The purpose of this study was to apply reversible intermolecular hybridization to program cell-hydrogel interactions in physiological conditions based on DNA-antibody chimeras and complementary oligonucleotides. The results showed that DNA oligonucleotides could be captured to and released from the immobilizing DNA-functionalized hydrogels with high specificity via DNA hybridization. Accordingly, DNA-antibody chimeras were captured to the hydrogels, successfully inducing specific cell attachment. The cell attachment to the hydrogels reached the plateau at approximately half an hour after the functionalized hydrogels and the cells were incubated together. The attached cells were rapidly released from the bound hydrogels when triggering complementary oligonucleotides were introduced to the system. However, the capability of the triggering complementary oligonucleotides in releasing cells was affected by the length of intermolecular hybridization. The length needed to be at least more than 20 base pairs in the current experimental setting. Notably, because the procedure of intermolecular hybridization did not involve any harsh condition, the released cells maintained the same viability as that of the cultured cells. The functionalized hydrogels also exhibited the potential to catch and release cells repeatedly. Therefore, this study demonstrates that it is promising to regulate cell-material interactions dynamically through the DNA-programmed display of DNA-protein chimeras.

  1. A study on interaction of DNA molecules and carbon nanotubes for an effective ejection of the molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, N.; Wang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    The ejection of DNA molecules from carbon nanotubes is reported from interaction energy perspectives by molecular dynamics simulations. The critical ejection energy, which is to be applied to a DNA molecule for a successful ejection from a carbon nanotube, is investigated based on a study on the friction and binding energy between the DNA molecule and the tube. An effective ejection is realized by subjecting a kinetic energy on the DNA molecule that is larger than the solved critical ejection energy. In addition, the relationship between ejection energies and sizes of DNA molecules and carbon nanotubes is investigated. -- Highlights: ► Report the ejection of DNA molecules from CNTs from interaction energy perspectives. ► Develop a methodology for the critical energy of an effective ejection of a DNA molecule from a CNT. ► Present the relationship between critical ejection energies and sizes of DNA molecules and CNTs. ► Provide a general guidance on the ejection of encapsulated molecules from CNTs.

  2. Phosphorylated STAT5 directly facilitates parvovirus B19 DNA replication in human erythroid progenitors through interaction with the MCM complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaie, Safder S; Zou, Wei; Xu, Peng; Deng, Xuefeng; Kleiboeker, Steve; Qiu, Jianming

    2017-05-01

    Productive infection of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) exhibits high tropism for burst forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) and colony forming unit erythroid (CFU-E) progenitor cells in human bone marrow and fetal liver. This exclusive restriction of the virus replication to human erythroid progenitor cells is partly due to the intracellular factors that are essential for viral DNA replication, including erythropoietin signaling. Efficient B19V replication also requires hypoxic conditions, which upregulate the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathway, and phosphorylated STAT5 is essential for virus replication. In this study, our results revealed direct involvement of STAT5 in B19V DNA replication. Consensus STAT5-binding elements were identified adjacent to the NS1-binding element within the minimal origins of viral DNA replication in the B19V genome. Phosphorylated STAT5 specifically interacted with viral DNA replication origins both in vivo and in vitro, and was actively recruited within the viral DNA replication centers. Notably, STAT5 interacted with minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex, suggesting that STAT5 directly facilitates viral DNA replication by recruiting the helicase complex of the cellular DNA replication machinery to viral DNA replication centers. The FDA-approved drug pimozide dephosphorylates STAT5, and it inhibited B19V replication in ex vivo expanded human erythroid progenitors. Our results demonstrated that pimozide could be a promising antiviral drug for treatment of B19V-related diseases.

  3. Intercalative interaction of asymmetric copper(II) complex with DNA: experimental, molecular docking, molecular dynamics and TDDFT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Deng, Suwen; Huang, Jianyin; Lu, Yanmei; Le, Xueyi; Zheng, Wenxu

    2013-10-01

    The intercalative interactions of small molecules with DNA are important in a variety of biological processes including mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and chemotherapy. A comprehensive research protocol including experiments and calculations was employed to investigate the intercalative interaction between metallointercalator copper(II) complex and DNA. The intercalative binding mode has been validated by UV spectra, fluorescence spectra, CD spectra and viscosity measurements. The classical molecular dynamics simulation was carried out to investigate the intercalative interaction between asymmetric copper(II) complex and DNA. An analytical method was proposed to simulate the dynamically changing absorption spectra of intercalator/DNA system. According to the established model, the changing process of the electronic absorption spectra for intercalator/DNA system can be predicted accurately. A rational explanation for the change law of absorption spectra has been proposed. Moreover, the analyses of the frontier orbital reveal that the red shift of the absorption spectra is due to the increase of π orbital energy caused by the coupling of the π orbital of the intercalated ligand with the π orbital of DNA. This cause of red shift of spectra is completely different from the previous inference. All these insights are of crucial importance for correctly analyzing the absorption spectra of intercalative interaction, as well as for explaining the macroscopic phenomena observed in experiments at the molecular level. © 2013.

  4. The structure of selective dinucleotide interactions and periodicities in D melanogaster mtDNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Y Valenzuela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We found a strong selective 3-sites periodicity of deviations from randomness of the dinucleotide (DN distribution, where both bases of DN were separated by 1, 2, K sites in prokaryotes and mtDNA. Three main aspects are studied. I the specific 3 K-sites periodic structure of the 16 DN. II to discard the possibility that the periodicity was produced by the highly nonrandom interactive association of contiguous bases, by studying the interaction of non-contiguous bases, the first one chosen each I sites and the second chosen J sites downstream. III the difference between this selective periodicity of association (distance to randomness of the four bases with the described fixed periodicities of base sequences. RESULTS: I The 16 pairs presented a consistent periodicity in the strength of association of both bases of the pairs; the most deviated pairs are those where G and C are involved and the least deviated ones are those where A and T are involved. II we found significant non-random interactions when the first nucleotide is chosen every I sites and the second J sites downstream until I = J = 76. III we showed conclusive differences between these internucleotide association periodicities and sequence periodicities. CONCLUSIONS: This relational selective periodicity is different from sequence periodicities and indicates that any base strongly interacts with the bases of the residual genome; this interaction and periodicity is highly structured and systematic for every pair of bases. This interaction should be destroyed in few generations by recurrent mutation; it is only compatible with the Synthetic Theory of Evolution and agrees with the Wright's adaptive landscape conception and evolution by shifting balanced adaptive peaks.

  5. Non-covalent pomegranate (Punica granatum) hydrolyzable tannin-protein complexes modulate antigen uptake, processing and presentation by a T-cell hybridoma line co-cultured with murine peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrigal-Carballo, Sergio; Haas, Linda; Vestling, Martha; Krueger, Christian G; Reed, Jess D

    2016-12-01

    In this work we characterize the interaction of pomegranate hydrolyzable tannins (HT) with hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) and determine the effects of non-covalent tannin-protein complexes on macrophage endocytosis, processing and presentation of antigen. We isolated HT from pomegranate and complex to HEL, the resulting non-covalent tannin-protein complex was characterized by gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF MS. Finally, cell culture studies and confocal microscopy imaging were conducted on the non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL protein complexes to evaluate its effect on macrophage antigen uptake, processing and presentation to T-cell hybridomas. Our results indicate that non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL protein complexes modulate uptake, processing and antigen presentation by mouse peritoneal macrophages. After 4 h of pre-incubation, only trace amounts of IL-2 were detected in the co-cultures treated with HEL alone, whereas a non-covalent pomegranate HT-HEL complex had already reached maximum IL-2 expression. Pomegranate HT may increase rate of endocytose of HEL and subsequent expression of IL-2 by the T-cell hybridomas.

  6. Nine supramolecular assemblies from 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine and carboxylic acids by strong classical H-bonds and other noncovalent associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aihua; Jin, Shouwen; Jin, Shide; Guo, Ming; Liu, Hui; Guo, Jianzhong; Wang, Daqi

    2017-12-01

    This article demonstrates 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine based organic salt formation in nine crystalline solids 1-9, in which the carboxylates have been integrated. Addition of equivalents of the COOH to the solution of 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine generates the singly protonated cationic species which direct the carboxylates. The nine compounds crystallize as their organic salts with the COOH proton transferred to the aromatic N of the 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine. All salts have been characterized by IR, mp, EA and XRD technique. The major driving force in 1-9 is the classical H-bonds from 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine and the acids, here the Nsbnd H⋯O H-bonds were found in all salts. Other extensive non-covalent interactions also exhibit great functions in space association of the molecular counterparts in relevant crystals. Except 4, all salts had the CHsbnd O, or CH3sbnd O interactions or both. Except 9, the common R22 (8) graph set has been observed in all salts due to the H-bonds and the non-covalent associations. For the synergistic interactions of the classical H-bonds and the various non-covalent associations, the salts displayed 1D-3D structures.

  7. The aug-cc-pVnZ-F12 basis set family: Correlation consistent basis sets for explicitly correlated benchmark calculations on anions and noncovalent complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvetsky, Nitai; Kesharwani, Manoj K; Martin, Jan M L

    2017-10-07

    We have developed a new basis set family, denoted as aug-cc-pVnZ-F12 (or aVnZ-F12 for short), for explicitly correlated calculations. The sets included in this family were constructed by supplementing the corresponding cc-pVnZ-F12 sets with additional diffuse functions on the higher angular momenta (i.e., additional d-h functions on non-hydrogen atoms and p-g on hydrogen atoms), optimized for the MP2-F12 energy of the relevant atomic anions. The new basis sets have been benchmarked against electron affinities of the first- and second-row atoms, the W4-17 dataset of total atomization energies, the S66 dataset of noncovalent interactions, the Benchmark Energy and Geometry Data Base water cluster subset, and the WATER23 subset of the GMTKN24 and GMTKN30 benchmark suites. The aVnZ-F12 basis sets displayed excellent performance, not just for electron affinities but also for noncovalent interaction energies of neutral and anionic species. Appropriate CABSs (complementary auxiliary basis sets) were explored for the S66 noncovalent interaction benchmark: between similar-sized basis sets, CABSs were found to be more transferable than generally assumed.

  8. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H.; Miller, Katherine H.; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L. (UW-MED); (UCB)

    2015-04-22

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome.

  9. The impact of α-hydrazino acids embedded in short fluorescent peptides on peptide interactions with DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suć, Josipa; Tumir, Lidija-Marija; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica; Jukić, Marijana; Piantanida, Ivo; Jerić, Ivanka

    2016-06-07

    A series of novel hydrazino-based peptidomimetics and analogues comprising N-terminal lysine and C-terminal phenanthridinyl-l-alanine were prepared. The presented results demonstrate the up to now unknown possibility to finely modulate peptide interactions with DNA/RNA by α-hydrazino group insertion and how the different positioning of two α-hydrazino groups in peptides controls binding to various double stranded and single stranded DNA and RNA. All peptidomimetics bind with 1-10 micromolar affinity to ds-DNA/RNA, whereby the binding mode is a combination of electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic interactions within DNA/RNA grooves. Insertion of the α-hydrazino group into the peptide systematically decreased its fluorimetric response to DNA/RNA binding in the order: mono-hydrazino < alternating-hydrazino < sequential-hydrazino group. Binding studies of ss-polynucleotides suggest intercalation of phenanthridine between polynucleotide bases, whereby affinity and fluorimetric response decrease with the number of α-hydrazino groups in the peptide sequence. Particularly interesting was the interaction of two sequential α-hydrazino acids-peptidomimetic with poly rG, characterised by a specific strong increase of CD bands, while all other peptide/ssRNA combinations gave only a CD-band decrease. All mentioned interactions could also be reversibly controlled by adjusting the pH, due to the protonation of the fluorophore.

  10. Multilevel interaction of the DnaK/DnaJ(HSP70/HSP40) stress-responsive chaperone machine with the central metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglès, Fréderic; Castanié-Cornet, Marie-Pierre; Slama, Nawel; Dinclaux, Mickael; Cirinesi, Anne-Marie; Portais, Jean-Charles; Létisse, Fabien; Genevaux, Pierre

    2017-01-27

    Networks of molecular chaperones maintain cellular protein homeostasis by acting at nearly every step in the biogenesis of proteins and protein complexes. Herein, we demonstrate that the major chaperone DnaK/HSP70 of the model bacterium Escherichia coli is critical for the proper functioning of the central metabolism and for the cellular response to carbon nutrition changes, either directly or indirectly via the control of the heat-shock response. We identified carbon sources whose utilization was positively or negatively affected by DnaK and isolated several central metabolism genes (among other genes identified in this work) that compensate for the lack of DnaK and/or DnaK/Trigger Factor chaperone functions in vivo. Using carbon sources with specific entry points coupled to NMR analyses of real-time carbon assimilation, metabolic coproducts production and flux rearrangements, we demonstrate that DnaK significantly impacts the hierarchical order of carbon sources utilization, the excretion of main coproducts and the distribution of metabolic fluxes, thus revealing a multilevel interaction of DnaK with the central metabolism.

  11. Dielectric behavior of irradiated and nonirradiadiated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-crotonic acid interaction in 5% dextrose solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erginun, M.

    1980-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ex. thymus, dissolved in 5% dextrose, was exposed to gamma radiation at doses between 0-5000 Rads. Crotonic acid dissolved in 5% dextrose was added to this irradiated DNA at t=0 and t=24 hrs after irradiation, in concentrations between 0-1.000 mg/ml. The dielectric behavior of the DNA-irradiation-crotonic acid interaction was investigated at T=20 0 C by pH, permittivity (dielectric constant) and conductivity measurements. The pH, permittivity and conductivity measurements exhibit that the effective and critical conditions for the DNA-irradiation-crotonic acid interaction are; low doses of irradiation (350 Rad.), low concentrations of crotonic acid (0.05-0.100 mg/ml) and the addition of crotonic acid 24 hours after the irradiation. These results support and are in good agreement with those results observed with mammalian cells and laboratory animals when the chemical carcinogens are given in conjunction with radiation

  12. Different combinations of atomic interactions predict protein-small molecule and protein-DNA/RNA affinities with similar accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Raquel; Kolazckowski, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between proteins and other molecules play essential roles in all biological processes. Although it is widely held that a protein's ligand specificity is determined primarily by its three-dimensional structure, the general principles by which structure determines ligand binding remain poorly understood. Here we use statistical analyses of a large number of protein-ligand complexes with associated binding-affinity measurements to quantitatively characterize how combinations of atomic interactions contribute to ligand affinity. We find that there are significant differences in how atomic interactions determine ligand affinity for proteins that bind small chemical ligands, those that bind DNA/RNA and those that interact with other proteins. Although protein-small molecule and protein-DNA/RNA binding affinities can be accurately predicted from structural data, models predicting one type of interaction perform poorly on the others. Additionally, the particular combinations of atomic interactions required to predict binding affinity differed between small-molecule and DNA/RNA data sets, consistent with the conclusion that the structural bases determining ligand affinity differ among interaction types. In contrast to what we observed for small-molecule and DNA/RNA interactions, no statistical models were capable of predicting protein-protein affinity with >60% correlation. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of protein-DNA/RNA binding prediction as a possible tool for high-throughput virtual screening to guide laboratory investigations, suggesting that quantitative characterization of diverse molecular interactions may have practical applications as well as fundamentally advancing our understanding of how molecular structure translates into function. © 2015 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Interaction of hnRNP A1 with telomere DNA G-quadruplex structures studied at the single molecule level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Asger Christian; Raarup, Merete Krog; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig

    2010-01-01

    G-rich telomeric DNA sequences can form G-quadruplex structures. The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) and a shortened derivative (UP1) are active in telomere length regulation, and it has been reported that UP1 can unwind G-quadruplex structures. Here, we investigate...... the interaction of hnRNP A1 with G-quadruplex DNA structures containing the human telomere repeat (TTAGGG) by gel retardation assays, ensemble fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy, and single molecule FRET microscopy. Our biochemical experiments show that hnRNP A1 binds well to the G...... to the previously reported crystal structures of UP1-telomere DNA complexes where the DNA oligo within the protein-DNA complex is in a fully open conformation....

  14. Plasticity of BRCA2 function in homologous recombination: genetic interactions of the PALB2 and DNA binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Siaud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells through its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR. Human BRCA2 is 3,418 amino acids and is comprised of multiple domains that interact with the RAD51 recombinase and other proteins as well as with DNA. To gain insight into the cellular function of BRCA2 in HR, we created fusions consisting of various BRCA2 domains and also introduced mutations into these domains to disrupt specific protein and DNA interactions. We find that a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the DNA binding domain and active in HR is completely dependent on interaction with the PALB2 tumor suppressor for activity. Conversely, a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the PALB2 binding domain is dependent on an intact DNA binding domain, providing a role for this conserved domain in vivo; mutagenesis suggests that both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA binding activities in the DNA binding domain are required for its activity. Given that PALB2 itself binds DNA, these results suggest alternative mechanisms to deliver RAD51 to DNA. In addition, the BRCA2 C terminus contains both RAD51-dependent and -independent activities which are essential to HR in some contexts. Finally, binding the small peptide DSS1 is essential for activity when its binding domain is present, but not when it is absent. Our results reveal functional redundancy within the BRCA2 protein and emphasize the plasticity of this large protein built for optimal HR function in mammalian cells. The occurrence of disease-causing mutations throughout BRCA2 suggests sub-optimal HR from a variety of domain modulations.

  15. Cyclic voltammetry of echinomycin and its interaction with double-stranded and single-stranded DNA adsorbed at the electrode

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelen, František; Erdem, A.; Paleček, Emil

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 55, 1/2 (2002), s. 165-167 ISSN 1567-5394 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4004901; GA ČR GV204/97/K084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : electrochemistry of DNA * interaction of DNA with echinomycin * hanging mercury drop electrode Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.463, year: 2002

  16. Identification of coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human K562 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin

    2016-02-01

    The protein-DNA interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, also known as DNA motifs) are critical activities in gene transcription. The identification of the DNA motifs is a vital task for downstream analysis. Unfortunately, the long-range coupling information between different DNA motifs is still lacking. To fill the void, as the first-of-its-kind study, we have identified the coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human. The coupling DNA motif pairs exhibit substantially higher DNase accessibility than the background sequences. Half of the DNA motifs involved are matched to the existing motif databases, although nearly all of them are enriched with at least one gene ontology term. Their motif instances are also found statistically enriched on the promoter and enhancer regions. Especially, we introduce a novel measurement called motif pairing multiplicity which is defined as the number of motifs that are paired with a given motif on chromatin interactions. Interestingly, we observe that motif pairing multiplicity is linked to several characteristics such as regulatory region type, motif sequence degeneracy, DNase accessibility and pairing genomic distance. Taken into account together, we believe the coupling DNA motif pairs identified in this study can shed lights on the gene transcription mechanism under long-range chromatin interactions. The identified motif pair data is compressed and available in the supplementary materials associated with this manuscript. kc.w@cityu.edu.hk Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Dimerization and DNA-binding of ASR1, a small hydrophilic protein abundant in plant tissues suffering from water loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskin, Laura; Frankel, Nicolas; Gudesblat, Gustavo; Demergasso, Maria J.; Pietrasanta, Lia I.; Iusem, Norberto D.

    2007-01-01

    The Asr gene family is present in Spermatophyta. Its members are generally activated under water stress. We present evidence that tomato ASR1, one of the proteins of the family, accumulates in seed during late stages of embryogenesis, a physiological process characterized by water loss. In vitro, electrophoretic assays show a homo-dimeric structure for ASR1 and highlight strong non-covalent interactions between monomers prone to self-assemble. Direct visualization of single molecules by atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirms that ASR1 forms homodimers and that uncovers both monomers and dimers bind double stranded DNA

  18. Interactions between DNA purines and ruthenium ammine complexes within nanostructured sol-gel silica matrixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Luís M F; Garcia, Ana R; Brogueira, Pedro; Ilharco, Laura M

    2010-03-25

    The interactions between DNA purines (guanine and adenine) and three ruthenium ammine complexes (hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride, hexaammineruthenium(II) chloride, and ruthenium-red) were studied in a confined environment, within sol-gel silica matrixes. Two encapsulation methods were rehearsed (differing in temperature and condensation pH), in order to analyze the effects of the sol-gel processes on the purines and on the Ru complexes separately. The extent of decomposition of the Ru complexes, as well as the interactions established with the purine bases, proved to be determined by the coencapsulation method. Combined results by diffuse reflectance UV-vis and infrared spectroscopies showed that, when coencapsulation is carried out at 60 degrees C, specific H bonding interactions are established between the amine group of Ade and the ammine groups of the Ru complex or the hydroxo group of an early decomposition product. These are responsible for the important role of the purine in inhibiting the oxidation reactions of the Ru(II) and Ru(III) complexes. In contrast, Gua establishes preferential H bonds with the matrix (mainly due to the carbonyl group), leading to higher yields in the final oxidation products of the Ru complexes, namely, trimers and dimers. Direct covalent bonding of either purine to the metal was not observed.

  19. Molecular spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies on the interaction of anti-platelet drug ticlopidine with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Shumaila; Rahman, Yusra; Sarwar, Tarique; Husain, Mohammed Amir; Ali, Abad; Shamsuzzaman; Tabish, Mohammad

    2017-11-01

    Ticlopidine is an anti-platelet drug which belongs to the thienopyridine structural family and exerts its effect by functioning as an ADP receptor inhibitor. Ticlopidine inhibits the expression of TarO gene in S. aureus and may provide protection against MRSA. Groove binding agents are known to disrupt the transcription factor DNA complex and consequently inhibit gene expression. Understanding the mechanism of interaction of ticlopidine with DNA can prove useful in the development of a rational drug designing system. At present, there is no such study on the interaction of anti-platelet drugs with nucleic acids. A series of biophysical experiments were performed to ascertain the binding mode between ticlopidine and calf thymus DNA. UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments confirmed the formation of a complex between ticlopidine and calf thymus DNA. Moreover, the values of binding constant were found to be in the range of 103 M- 1, which is indicative of groove binding between ticlopidine and calf thymus DNA. These results were further confirmed by studying the effect of denaturation on double stranded DNA, iodide quenching, viscometric studies, thermal melting profile as well as CD spectral analysis. The thermodynamic profile of the interaction was also determined using isothermal titration calorimetric studies. The reaction was found to be endothermic and the parameters obtained were found to be consistent with those of known groove binders. In silico molecular docking studies further corroborated well with the experimental results.

  20. Multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on the interaction of darunavir, a HIV protease inhibitor with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Zhou, Kai-Li; Lou, Yan-Yue; Pan, Dong-Qi

    2018-03-01

    Molecular interaction of darunavir (DRV), a HIV protease inhibitor with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA) was studied in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) by multi-spectroscopic approaches hand in hand with viscosity measurements and molecular docking technique. The UV absorption and fluorescence results together revealed the formation of a DRV-ct-DNA complex having binding affinities of the order of 103 M- 1, which was more in keeping with the groove binding. The results that DRV bound to ct-DNA via groove binding mode was further evidenced by KI quenching studies, viscosity measurements, competitive binding investigations with EB and Rhodamine B and CD spectral analysis. The effect of ionic strength indicated the negligible involvement of electrostatic interaction between DRV and ct-DNA. The thermodynamic parameters regarding the binding interaction of DRV with ct-DNA in terms of enthalpy change (ΔH0) and entropy change (ΔS0) were - 63.19 kJ mol- 1 and - 141.92 J mol- 1 K- 1, indicating that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played a predominant role in the binding process. Furthermore, molecular simulation studies suggested that DRV molecule was prone to bind in the A-T rich region of the minor groove of DNA.

  1. Experimental and molecular docking studies on DNA binding interaction of adefovir dipivoxil: Advances toward treatment of hepatitis B virus infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh

    The toxic interaction of adefovir dipivoxil with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove binding mode. The binding constant of UV-visible and the number of binding sites were 3.33 ± 0.2 × 104 L mol-1and 0.99, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drug and CT-DNA is exothermic (ΔH = 34.4 kJ mol-1; ΔS = 184.32 J mol-1 K-1). Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was employed to measure the conformational change of CT-DNA in the presence of adefovir dipivoxil, which verified the groove binding mode. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity. The molecular modeling results illustrated that adefovir strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -16.83 kJ mol-1. This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the toxic interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with bio macromolecules, which contributes to clarify the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  2. Resonance light scattering spectroscopy study of interaction between norfloxacin and calf thymus DNA and its analytical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanguang; Zhang, Taiyu; Han, Yali; Zhu, Li

    2006-11-01

    The interaction between norfloxacin and calf thymus double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) has been studied by a resonance light scattering (RLS) technique with a common spectrofluorometer. The characteristics of RLS spectra, the effective factors and optimum conditions of the reaction have been investigated. In Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer (pH 5.87), norfloxacin has a maximum peak 405.5 nm and the RLS intensity is remarkably enhanced by trace amount of calf thymus dsDNA due to the interaction between norfloxacin and dsDNA. The binding of norfloxacin to DNA forms large particles, which were characterized by RLS spectrum, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum, and fluorescence spectrum. Based on the enhanced RLS intensity, a novel method for sensitive determination of calf thymus dsDNA concentration ranging from 0.02 to 2.3 microg ml(-1) was developed. The determination limit (3 sigma) was 1.2 ng ml(-1). The method is simple, rapid, practical and relatively free from interference generated by coexisting substance, as well as much more sensitive than most of the reported methods. Three synthetic samples of ctDNA were determined with satisfactory results.

  3. Spectroscopic studies on the binding interaction of phenothiazinium dyes toluidine blue O, azure A and azure B to DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Puja; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2013-04-01

    In this study a detailed characterization of the binding aspects of three phenothiazinium dyes, toluidine blue O (TBO), azure A and azure B with herring testes DNA is presented employing spectroscopic techniques. The absorbance and fluorescence properties of these dyes have been remarkably modified upon binding with DNA and the interaction is manifested through noncooperative binding as revealed form non-linear Scatchard plots with negative slopes at all binding ratios. The binding clearly revealed the high preference of TBO to DNA followed by the other two dyes azure A and azure B. The affinity of TBO was higher by about two times than that of the azures. From the series of studies using absorption, steady-state emission, the effect of ferrocyanide ion-induced steady-state fluorescence quenching, fluorescence polarization anisotropy, circular dichroism, the mode of binding of these dyes to the DNA double helix has been substantiated to be principally intercalative in nature. The stoichiometry of the association of these dyes to DNA was determined by the continuous variation analysis of Job from fluorescence data. The conformational aspects of the interaction was delineated from circular dichroism studies wherein higher perturbation was observed with TBO. Hydrodynamic study using viscosity measurements of linear rod like DNA confirmed that the binding was intercalative and strongest for TBO and weaker for azure A and azure B. The utility of the present work lies in exploring the potential binding applicability of these dyes to DNA for their development as effective therapeutic agents.

  4. GEC Student Award for Excellence Finalist: Interaction of Non-Thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma with DNA inside Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalghatgi, Sameer; Kelly, Crystal; Fridman, Gregory; Clifford-Azizkhan, Jane; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary

    2008-10-01

    Direct non-thermal plasma is now being widely considered for various medical applications, viz; cancer treatment, coagulation, wound healing. However, the understanding of the interaction between non-thermal plasma and cells is lacking. Here we study the possibility that effects of the plasma treatment can penetrate though cellular membranes without destroying them. One of the most important of such effects to investigate would be DNA double strand breaks (DSB's) since these are some of the important events in a cell's life cycle. We measured DNA DSB's in mammalian cells using immunofluorescence and western blots. Hydrogen peroxide treatment was used as a positive control since it is known to induce massive DNA double strand breaks. The results indicate that short (5 seconds) direct plasma treatment at low power (0.2 W/cm^2) does produce DNA DSB's in mammalian cells. This means that somehow plasma penetrates inside the cells. Several questions arise about what is the mechanism of penetration and do the cells repair the DNA DSB's. We show that the cells do repair the DNA DSB's produced by short exposure of low power plasma. Although the detailed mechanisms are being investigated we confirmed that reactive oxygen species mediate interaction between plasma and DNA.

  5. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  6. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base

  7. Novel fluorescent amphiphilic block copolymers: photophysics behavior and interactions with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, novel amphiphilic fluorescent copolymers poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone-b-poly(N-methacryloyl-N'-(α-naphthylthiourea (PVP-b-PNT were synthesized via ATRP with poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone-Cl as macroinitiator and N-methacryloyl-N'-α-naphthylthiourea (NT as hydrophobic segment. PVP-b-PNT copolymers were characterized by 1H NMR, GPC-MALLS and fluorescence measurements. The aggregation behavior of PVP-b-PNT in water was investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS measurement. The photophysics behavior of PVP-b-PNT showed that block copolymer formed strong excimer. The interaction of DNA with the block copolymer made the excimer of block copolymer quench. The cytotoxicity result of PVP-b-PNT in cell culture in vitro indicated that this copolymer PVP-b-PNT had good biocompatibility.

  8. Interplay of nonlinearity and geometry in a DNA-related, Klein-Gordon model with long-range dipole-dipole interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archilla, J. F.R.; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich

    2002-01-01

    Most of the studies on mathematical models of DNA are limited to next neighbor interaction. However, the coupling between base pairs is thought to be caused by dipole interaction, and, when the DNA strand is bent, the distances between base pairs become shorter, therefore the interactions with di...

  9. Molecular spectroscopy and chemometrics: an analytical study of synergistic effects of drugs--interaction between fluoroquinolones and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Yongnian; Du, Shan; Kokot, Serge

    2009-09-01

    Three commonly used fluoroquinolone antibiotics (norfloxacin (NFX), ofloxacin (OFX) and lomefloxacin (LMFX)) were used as examples of molecules which can interact with a biomacromolecule, such as DNA, separately or in a mixture. Such interactions were investigated with the use of UV and Synchronous Fluorescence Spectroscopy (SFS). Equilibrium binding (K(ap)) and Stern-Volmer equilibrium (K(SV)) constants were extracted from these two types of spectra from interactions of DNA with single fluoroquinolones. The values of these equilibrium constants were relatively low, and this suggested that the DNA groove was the likely binding site. The complex SFS profiles obtained from the interactions of the DNA with the drug analyte mixtures were resolved, with the use of the curve resolution method, parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis, into spectra of individual drugs. From these spectra, the (K(SV)) values for the individual analytes in the mixture were obtained. Also extracted were the concentrations of the individual quinolones as a function of concentration of the DNA. From a comparison of the equilibrium constants for the individual drug-DNA interaction with those obtained from the interaction with the drugs in a mixture, it was found that the binding strength of a single analyte to DNA was LMFX > NFX > OFX, but when the drug mixture was involved, this order was reversed. Importantly, it was also found that the equilibrium uptake of the drugs OFX and NFX was higher than from single drug-DNA experiments; the concentrations of LMFX did not change significantly. These observations collectively suggested that the binding of NFX and OFX to DNA is synergistically affected and that they probably share similar binding sites, while the LMFX was bound to a different site. This new important qualitative and quantitative information, which can now act as a springboard for more complex and deeper studies of the apparent synergistic effects of drug interactions with biomacromolecules

  10. Role of indirect readout mechanism in TATA box binding protein-DNA interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Manas; Choudhury, Devapriya; Chakrabarti, Jaydeb; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2015-03-01

    Gene expression generally initiates from recognition of TATA-box binding protein (TBP) to the minor groove of DNA of TATA box sequence where the DNA structure is significantly different from B-DNA. We have carried out molecular dynamics simulation studies of TBP-DNA system to understand how the DNA structure alters for efficient binding. We observed rigid nature of the protein while the DNA of TATA box sequence has an inherent flexibility in terms of bending and minor groove widening. The bending analysis of the free DNA and the TBP bound DNA systems indicate presence of some similar structures. Principal coordinate ordination analysis also indicates some structural features of the protein bound and free DNA are similar. Thus we suggest that the DNA of TATA box sequence regularly oscillates between several alternate structures and the one suitable for TBP binding is induced further by the protein for proper complex formation.

  11. The Inner Membrane Protein PilG Interacts with DNA and the Secretin PilQ in Transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan A Frye

    Full Text Available Expression of type IV pili (Tfp, filamentous appendages emanating from the bacterial surface, is indispensable for efficient neisserial transformation. Tfp pass through the secretin pore consisting of the membrane protein PilQ. PilG is a polytopic membrane protein, conserved in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, that is required for the biogenesis of neisserial Tfp. PilG null mutants are devoid of pili and non-competent for transformation. Here, recombinant full-length, truncated and mutated variants of meningococcal PilG were overexpressed, purified and characterized. We report that meningococcal PilG directly binds DNA in vitro, detected by both an electromobility shift analysis and a solid phase overlay assay. PilG DNA binding activity was independent of the presence of the consensus DNA uptake sequence. PilG-mediated DNA binding affinity was mapped to the N-terminus and was inactivated by mutation of residues 43 to 45. Notably, reduced meningococcal transformation of DNA in vivo was observed when PilG residues 43 to 45 were substituted by alanine in situ, defining a biologically significant DNA binding domain. N-terminal PilG also interacted with the N-terminal region of PilQ, which previously was shown to bind DNA. Collectively, these data suggest that PilG and PilQ in concert bind DNA during Tfp-mediated transformation.

  12. The Inner Membrane Protein PilG Interacts with DNA and the Secretin PilQ in Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Stephan A; Lång, Emma; Beyene, Getachew Tesfaye; Balasingham, Seetha V; Homberset, Håvard; Rowe, Alexander D; Ambur, Ole Herman; Tønjum, Tone

    2015-01-01

    Expression of type IV pili (Tfp), filamentous appendages emanating from the bacterial surface, is indispensable for efficient neisserial transformation. Tfp pass through the secretin pore consisting of the membrane protein PilQ. PilG is a polytopic membrane protein, conserved in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, that is required for the biogenesis of neisserial Tfp. PilG null mutants are devoid of pili and non-competent for transformation. Here, recombinant full-length, truncated and mutated variants of meningococcal PilG were overexpressed, purified and characterized. We report that meningococcal PilG directly binds DNA in vitro, detected by both an electromobility shift analysis and a solid phase overlay assay. PilG DNA binding activity was independent of the presence of the consensus DNA uptake sequence. PilG-mediated DNA binding affinity was mapped to the N-terminus and was inactivated by mutation of residues 43 to 45. Notably, reduced meningococcal transformation of DNA in vivo was observed when PilG residues 43 to 45 were substituted by alanine in situ, defining a biologically significant DNA binding domain. N-terminal PilG also interacted with the N-terminal region of PilQ, which previously was shown to bind DNA. Collectively, these data suggest that PilG and PilQ in concert bind DNA during Tfp-mediated transformation.

  13. Cytotoxicity, radiosensitization, and DNA interaction of platinum complexes of thiazin and xanthene dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teicher, B.A.; Herman, T.S.; Kaufmann, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    Complexes of the platinum(II) tetrachlorodianion with positively charged nuclear dyes have been prepared in an effort to produce neutral molecules which could gain ready access to the nuclear DNA where the platinum(II) tetrachlorodianion could function as a radiosensitizing and a bifunctional alkylating agent. The thiazin dyes Thionin, Azure B, and Methylene Blue, the aminoxanthene dye Pyronin Y, and the thiazole dye Thioflavin have each been complexed to the platinum(II) tetrachlorodianion(PtCl4) in a ratio of 2:1(dye:PtCl4). Studies of the interaction of these complexes and of the dyes with the pBR322 plasmid superhelical DNA demonstrated that while each complex and dye readily associated with the DNA in a dose-dependent manner, only Pt(Thioflavin)2 and Thioflavin produced irreversible DNA changes (single-strand breaks). In exponentially growing EMT6 cells the cytotoxicity of these drugs was assessed in normally oxygenated and hypoxic cells at both pH 7.4 and 6.45. At concentrations ranging from 1 to 500 microM, Pt(Methylene Blue)2 was significantly more cytotoxic than the other thiazin dye complexes Pt(Thionin)2 and Pt(Azure B)2. The cytotoxicity of Pt(Thionin)2 and Pt(Methylene Blue)2 was increased in normally oxygenated and hypoxic cells at low pH. Both Pt(Pyronin Y)2 and Pt(Thioflavin)2 were more toxic than the thiazin complexes. Pt(Pyronin Y)2 was most cytotoxic to normally oxygenated cells at normal pH and hypoxic cells at low pH, while Pt(Thioflavin)2 was most cytotoxic to cells at low pH under both oxygenation conditions. In vitro studies of the radiosensitizing properties of these agents in EMT6 cells demonstrated that exposure to 100 microM for 1 h before and during irradiation resulted in enhancement rations of 2.5, 1.9, 1.5, and 1.5 for Pt(Azure B)2, Pt(Thionin)2, Pt(Pyronin Y)2, and Pt(Thioflavin)2, respectively, in hypoxic cells

  14. Specificity of interactions among the DNA-packaging machine components of T4-related bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Rao, Venigalla B

    2011-02-04

    Tailed bacteriophages use powerful molecular motors to package the viral genome into a preformed capsid. Packaging at a rate of up to ∼2000 bp/s and generating a power density twice that of an automobile engine, the phage T4 motor is the fastest and most powerful reported to date. Central to DNA packaging are dynamic interactions among the packaging components, capsid (gp23), portal (gp20), motor (gp17, large "terminase"), and regulator (gp16, small terminase), leading to precise orchestration of the packaging process, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we analyzed the interactions between small and large terminases of T4-related phages. Our results show that the gp17 packaging ATPase is maximally stimulated by homologous, but not heterologous, gp16. Multiple interaction sites are identified in both gp16 and gp17. The specificity determinants in gp16 are clustered in the diverged N- and C-terminal domains (regions I-III). Swapping of diverged region(s), such as replacing C-terminal RB49 region III with that of T4, switched ATPase stimulation specificity. Two specificity regions, amino acids 37-52 and 290-315, are identified in or near the gp17-ATPase "transmission" subdomain II. gp16 binding at these sites might cause a conformational change positioning the ATPase-coupling residues into the catalytic pocket, triggering ATP hydrolysis. These results lead to a model in which multiple weak interactions between motor and regulator allow dynamic assembly and disassembly of various packaging complexes, depending on the functional state of the packaging machine. This might be a general mechanism for regulation of the phage packaging machine and other complex molecular machines.

  15. Two modes of interaction of the single-stranded DNA-binding protein of bacteriophage T7 with the DNA polymerase-thioredoxin complex

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sharmistha

    2010-04-06

    The DNA polymerase encoded by bacteriophage T7 has low processivity. Escherichia coli thioredoxin binds to a segment of 76 residues in the thumb subdomain of the polymerase and increases the processivity. The binding of thioredoxin leads to the formation of two basic loops, loops A and B, located within the thioredoxin-binding domain (TBD). Both loops interact with the acidic C terminus of the T7 helicase. A relatively weak electrostatic mode involves the C-terminal tail of the helicase and the TBD, whereas a high affinity interaction that does not involve the C-terminal tail occurs when the polymerase is in a polymerization mode. T7 gene 2.5 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (gp2.5) also has an acidic C-terminal tail. gp2.5 also has two modes of interaction with the polymerase, but both involve the C-terminal tail of gp2.5. An electrostatic interaction requires the basic residues in loops A and B, and gp2.5 binds to both loops with similar affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance. When the polymerase is in a polymerization mode, the C terminus of gene 2.5 protein interacts with the polymerase in regions outside the TBD.gp2.5 increases the processivity of the polymerase-helicase complex during leading strand synthesis. When loop B of the TBD is altered, abortive DNA products are observed during leading strand synthesis. Loop B appears to play an important role in communication with the helicase and gp2.5, whereas loop A plays a stabilizing role in these interactions. © 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Detailed kinetic analysis of the interaction between the FOXO4–DNA-binding domain and DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vácha, P.; Zusková, Iva; Bumba, Ladislav; Večeř, J.; Obšilová, Veronika; Obšil, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 184, DEC 31 (2013), s. 68-78 ISSN 0301-4622 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0717 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : binding kinetics * DNA-binding domain * FOXO4 forkhead transcription factor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; CE - Biochemistry (MBU-M) Impact factor: 2.319, year: 2013

  17. Tighter binding of HIV reverse transcriptase to RNA-DNA vs. DNA-DNA results mostly from interactions in the polymerase domain and requires just a small stretch of RNA-DNA*

    OpenAIRE

    Bohlayer, William P.; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2006-01-01

    Binding of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) to unique substrates that positioned RNA-DNA or DNA-DNA near the polymerase or RNase H domains was measured. The substrates consisted of a 50 nucleotide template and DNA primers ranging from 23–43 nucleotides. Five different types of template strands were used: homogeneous (1) RNA or (2) DNA, (3) first 20 5′ nucleotides DNA and last 30 RNA, (4) first 20 RNA and last 30 DNA, (5) 15 nucleotides DNA followed by 5 RNA then 30 DNA. The different length pri...

  18. DNA homologous recombination factor SFR1 physically and functionally interacts with estrogen receptor alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Feng

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα, a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates the expression of its target genes by interacting with corepressors and coactivators. Since the first cloning of SRC1, more than 280 nuclear receptor cofactors have been identified, which orchestrate target gene transcription. Aberrant activity of ER or its accessory proteins results in a number of diseases including breast cancer. Here we identified SFR1, a protein involved in DNA homologous recombination, as a novel binding partner of ERα. Initially isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen, the interaction of SFR1 and ERα was confirmed in vivo by immunoprecipitation and mammalian one-hybrid assays. SFR1 co-localized with ERα in the nucleus, potentiated ER's ligand-dependent and ligand-independent transcriptional activity, and occupied the ER binding sites of its target gene promoters. Knockdown of SFR1 diminished ER's transcriptional activity. Manipulating SFR1 expression by knockdown and overexpression revealed a role for SFR1 in ER-dependent and -independent cancer cell proliferation. SFR1 differs from SRC1 by the lack of an intrinsic activation function. Taken together, we propose that SFR1 is a novel transcriptional modulator for ERα and a potential target in breast cancer therapy.

  19. Detecting host-parasitoid interactions in an invasive Lepidopteran using nested tagging DNA metabarcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitson, James J N; Hahn, Christoph; Sands, Richard J; Straw, Nigel A; Evans, Darren M; Lunt, David H

    2018-02-27

    Determining the host-parasitoid interactions and parasitism rates for invasive species entering novel environments is an important first step in assessing potential routes for biocontrol and integrated pest management. Conventional insect rearing techniques followed by taxonomic identification are widely used to obtain such data, but this can be time-consuming and prone to biases. Here, we present a next-generation sequencing approach for use in ecological studies which allows for individual-level metadata tracking of large numbers of invertebrate samples through the use of hierarchically organised molecular identification tags. We demonstrate its utility using a sample data set examining both species identity and levels of parasitism in late larval stages of the oak processionary moth (Thaumetopoea processionea-Linn. 1758), an invasive species recently established in the United Kingdom. Overall, we find that there are two main species exploiting the late larval stages of oak processionary moth in the United Kingdom with the main parasitoid (Carcelia iliaca-Ratzeburg, 1840) parasitising 45.7% of caterpillars, while a rare secondary parasitoid (Compsilura concinnata-Meigen, 1824) was also detected in 0.4% of caterpillars. Using this approach on all life stages of the oak processionary moth may demonstrate additional parasitoid diversity. We discuss the wider potential of nested tagging DNA metabarcoding for constructing large, highly resolved species interaction networks. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. High mobility graphene ion-sensitive field-effect transistors by noncovalent functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, W; Nef, C; Tarasov, A; Wipf, M; Stoop, R; Knopfmacher, O; Weiss, M; Calame, M; Schönenberger, C

    2013-12-21

    Noncovalent functionalization is a well-known nondestructive process for property engineering of carbon nanostructures, including carbon nanotubes and graphene. However, it is not clear to what extend the extraordinary electrical properties of these carbon materials can be preserved during the process. Here, we demonstrated that noncovalent functionalization can indeed delivery graphene field-effect transistors (FET) with fully preserved mobility. In addition, these high-mobility graphene transistors can serve as a promising platform for biochemical sensing applications.

  1. Non-covalent modification of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) by coiled-coil technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Christian; Perozzo, Remo; Borchard, Gerrit

    2016-09-10

    We present here an approach to non-covalently combine an engineered model protein with a PEGylated peptide via coiled-coil binding. To this end a fusion protein of G-CSF and the peptide sequence (JunB) was created-one sequence of JunB was expressed at the N-terminal of GCSF. JunB is able to bind to the peptide sequence cFos, which was in turn covalently linked to a chain of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). The selected peptide sequences are leucine zipper motives from transcription factors and are known to bind to each other specifically by formation of a super secondary structure called coiled-coil. The binding between PEGylated peptides of various molecular weights and the modified protein was assessed by isothermal calorimetry (ITC), dynamic light scattering (DLS), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence anisotropy. Our findings show that the attachment of 2 and 5kDa PEG does not interfere with coiled-coil formation and thus binding of peptide to fusion protein. With this work we successfully demonstrate the non-covalent binding of a model moiety (PEG) to a protein through coiled-coil interaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Three-dimensional structure of N-terminal domain of DnaB helicase and helicase-primase interactions in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Kashav

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Replication initiation is a crucial step in genome duplication and homohexameric DnaB helicase plays a central role in the replication initiation process by unwinding the duplex DNA and interacting with several other proteins during the process of replication. N-terminal domain of DnaB is critical for helicase activity and for DnaG primase interactions. We present here the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD of H. pylori DnaB (HpDnaB helicase at 2.2 A resolution and compare the structural differences among helicases and correlate with the functional differences. The structural details of NTD suggest that the linker region between NTD and C-terminal helicase domain plays a vital role in accurate assembly of NTD dimers. The sequence analysis of the linker regions from several helicases reveals that they should form four helix bundles. We also report the characterization of H. pylori DnaG primase and study the helicase-primase interactions, where HpDnaG primase stimulates DNA unwinding activity of HpDnaB suggesting presence of helicase-primase cohort at the replication fork. The protein-protein interaction study of C-terminal domain of primase and different deletion constructs of helicase suggests that linker is essential for proper conformation of NTD to interact strongly with HpDnaG. The surface charge distribution on the primase binding surface of NTDs of various helicases suggests that DnaB-DnaG interaction and stability of the complex is most probably charge dependent. Structure of the linker and helicase-primase interactions indicate that HpDnaB differs greatly from E.coli DnaB despite both belong to gram negative bacteria.

  3. Carcinogen-DNA interaction study by base sequence footprinting. Final report, July 1, 1983-June 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bases, R.

    1986-01-01

    Our previous studies on acetylaminofluorene (AAF) modified DNA demonstrated three kinds of structural changes in DNA of defined base sequence. For example, adduct formation by N-Aco-AAF was found at each guanine. We studied the interaction of IgG specific for AAF guanosine in an in vitro system using AAF modified phi X-174 rf DNA. We had expected to find protection against DNAase I digestion. Instead, when the DNA was immunobound to an inert matrix via the IgG, DNAase I digestion was enhanced 20 fold without changing the base sequence pattern of digestion. DNAase I hypersensitive sites are a necessary but not a sufficient condition for transcription. Moreover, some hypersensitive sites are stably propagated, independent of the continued presence of the inducer. Stability of these hypersensitive sites in the absence of their inducer suggests that they can be propagated. It appeared likely that distortion of DNA by a carcinogen adduct such as AAF, and the interaction of this modified DNA with a specific protein such as IgG or cellular proteins might inappropriately enhance the transcription of specific genes. That hypothesis will be tested; surprisingly, little is known about the early action of carcinogens on expression of specific genes. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  4. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Shuangying; Tang, Song; Mayer, Gregory D.; Cobb, George P.; Maul, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Interactive effects of UVB radiation-pesticide co-exposures were examined in frogs. • Responses included induction of DNA photo-adducts and DNA damage and repair genes. • Elevated DNA adduct levels occurred for co-exposures compared to UVB alone. • One mechanism is that pesticides may alter nuclear excision repair gene expression. - Abstract: Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides

  5. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shuangying, E-mail: shuangying.yu@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Tang, Song, E-mail: song.tang@usask.ca [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Mayer, Gregory D., E-mail: greg.mayer@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States); Cobb, George P., E-mail: george_cobb@baylor.edu [Department of Environmental Science, Baylor University, One Bear Place #97266, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Maul, Jonathan D., E-mail: jonathan.maul@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, 1207 S. Gilbert Dr., Lubbock, TX 79416 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Interactive effects of UVB radiation-pesticide co-exposures were examined in frogs. • Responses included induction of DNA photo-adducts and DNA damage and repair genes. • Elevated DNA adduct levels occurred for co-exposures compared to UVB alone. • One mechanism is that pesticides may alter nuclear excision repair gene expression. - Abstract: Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides

  6. Investigations on the interactions of diclofenac sodium with HSA and ctDNA using molecular modeling and multispectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanrui; Hao, Erjun; Hui, Guangquan; Guo, Wei; Cui, Fengling

    2013-06-01

    A tentative study on interaction of diclofenac sodium (DF-Na) with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was conducted by using multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques under simulative physiological conditions. The results of spectroscopic measurements suggested that the quenching mechanisms were static quenching. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy clearly demonstrated the occurrence of conformational changes of HSA with addition of DF-Na. In addition, competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) have shown that DF-Na can bind to ctDNA relatively strong via groove binding. Based on the values of thermodynamic parameters and the results of molecular modeling, it was confirmed that hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bond were the mainly binding forces in DF-Na-HSA and DF-Na-DNA systems. The binding distance between DF-Na and HSA was also determined using the theory of the Förster energy transference.

  7. IDN2 Interacts with RPA and Facilitates DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Homologous Recombination in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingming; Ba, Zhaoqing; Costa-Nunes, Pedro; Wei, Wei; Li, Lanxia; Kong, Fansi; Li, Yan; Chai, Jijie; Pontes, Olga; Qi, Yijun

    2017-03-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for the maintenance of genome integrity. We previously showed that DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) facilitate homologous recombination-mediated DSB repair in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we show that INVOLVED IN DE NOVO2 (IDN2), a double-stranded RNA binding protein involved in small RNA-directed DNA methylation, is required for DSB repair in Arabidopsis. We find that IDN2 interacts with the heterotrimeric replication protein A (RPA) complex. Depletion of IDN2 or the diRNA binding ARGONAUTE2 leads to increased accumulation of RPA at DSB sites and mislocalization of the recombination factor RAD51. These findings support a model in which IDN2 interacts with RPA and facilitates the release of RPA from single-stranded DNA tails and subsequent recruitment of RAD51 at DSB sites to promote DSB repair. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficient energy transfer between coronene-modified permethyl-β-cyclodextrins and porphyrin for light induced DNA cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Li, Pei-Yu; Liu, Yu

    2017-03-28

    A novel supramolecular assembly was constructed by the noncovalent complexation of hexa-cata-hexabenzocoronene modified permethyl-β-cyclodextrins with tetrasodium tetraphenylporphyrintetrasulfonate in water, exhibiting highly efficient excited energy transfer behaviors and a promising DNA photocleavage ability.

  9. The effect of potential supramolecular-bond promoters on the DNA-interacting abilities of copper-terpyridine compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Jordi; Brissos, Rosa F; Salinas-Uber, Jorge; Caballero, Ana B; Caubet, Amparo; Roubeau, Olivier; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Gamez, Patrick

    2015-09-28

    Three copper(ii) coordination compounds have been prepared from three different 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine-based ligands, which have been selected to investigate the potential role of supramolecular interactions on the DNA-interacting and cytotoxicity properties of the corresponding metal complexes. Hence, the ligands 4'-((naphthalen-2-yl)methoxy)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine () and 4'-((1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)methoxy)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine () have been synthesized from commercially-available 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (), and their copper(ii) complexes have been obtained by reaction with copper(ii) nitrate. The DNA-interacting abilities of the corresponding compounds [Cu()(H2O)(NO3)2] (), [Cu()(NO3)(H2O)](NO3)(MeOH) () and [Cu()(NO3)(H2O)](NO3) () have been investigated using different techniques, and cytotoxicity assays with several cancer cell lines have revealed interesting features, viz. the more efficient complex is , which although it does not act as a DNA cleaver, displays the most effective DNA-interacting and cytotoxic properties, compared to and .

  10. The interaction of linear and ring forms of DNA molecules with nanodiamonds synthesized by detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purtov, K V; Burakova, L P; Puzyr, A P; Bondar, V S

    2008-01-01

    Nanodiamonds synthesized by detonation have been found not to immobilize the ring form of pUC19 plasmid DNA. Linear pUC19 molecules with blunt ends, prepared by restriction of the initial ring form of pUC19 DNA, and linear 0.25-10 kb DNA fragments are adsorbed on nanodiamonds. The amount of adsorbed linear DNA molecules depends on the size of the molecules and the size of the nanodiamond clusters

  11. Interactions between globular proteins and procyanidins of different degrees of polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prigent, S.V.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Koningsveld, van G.A.; Baron, A.; Renard, C.M.; Gruppen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Interactions of proteins with phenolic compounds occur in food products containing vegetable sources, such as cocoa, cereals, or yogurts containing fruit. Such interactions can modify protein digestion and protein industrial properties. Noncovalent interactions between globular proteins (proteins

  12. Photoinduced interactions of supramolecular ruthenium(II) complexes with plasmid DNA: synthesis and spectroscopic, electrochemical, and DNA photocleavage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swavey, Shawn; DeBeer, Madeleine; Li, Kaiyu

    2015-04-06

    Two new bridging ligands have been synthesized by combining substituted benzaldehydes with phenanthrolinopyrrole (php), resulting in new polyazine bridging ligands. The ligands have been characterized by (1)H NMR, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. These new ligands display π-π* transitions above 500 nm with modest molar absorptivities. Upon excitation at the ligand-centered charge-transfer transition, weak emission with a maximum wavelength of 612 nm is observed. When coordinated to two ruthenium(II) bis(bipyridyl) groups, the new bimetallic complexes generated give an overall 4+ charge. The electronic transitions of the bimetallic ruthenium(II) complexes display traditional π-π* transitions at 287 nm and metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions at 452 nm with molar absorptivities greater than 30000 M(-1) cm(-1). Oxidation of the ruthenium(II) metal centers to ruthenium(III) occurs at potentials above 1.4 V versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements indicate that the ruthenium(II) moieties behave independently. Both complexes are water-soluble and show the ability to photonick plasmid DNA when irradiated with low-energy light above 550 nm. In addition, one of the complexes, [Ru(bpy)2php]2Van(4+), shows the ability to linearize plasmid DNA and gives evidence, by gel electrophoresis, of photoinduced binding to plasmid DNA.

  13. Far Western blotting as a rapid and efficient method for detecting interactions between DNA replication and DNA repair proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian W; Lenhart, Justin S; Schroeder, Jeremy W; Simmons, Lyle A

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are required for the proper function of many biological pathways. Numerous biochemical and protein blotting methods are available for probing direct and indirect interactions between two protein-binding partners. Here, we describe the methodology of far Western blotting, or immunodot blotting, as a technique for probing direct interactions between two proteins. We describe the utility of this approach as a rapid, qualitative screen for identifying novel protein-binding partners. We also describe the importance of this technique for measuring differences in interaction between wild-type and mutant forms of a known binding partner. Far Western blotting is a rapid and highly reproducible experimental approach for identifying and understanding the interaction between protein-binding partners leading to new discoveries in the function and regulation of biological pathways.

  14. Drosophila DNA polymerase zeta interacts with recombination repair protein 1, the Drosophila homologue of human abasic endonuclease 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Ryo; Ruike, Tatsushi; Nakamura, Ryo-ichi; Shimanouchi, Kaori; Kanai, Yoshihiro; Abe, Yoko; Ihara, Ayumi; Sakaguchi, Kengo

    2006-04-28

    Abasic (AP) sites are a threat to cellular viability and genomic integrity, since they impede transcription and DNA replication. In mammalian cells, DNA polymerase (pol) beta plays an important role in the repair of AP sites. However, it is known that many organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster, do not have a pol beta homologue, and it is unclear how they repair AP sites. Here, we screened for DNA polymerases that interact with the Drosophila AP endonuclease 1 homologue, Rrp1 (recombination repair protein 1), and found that Drosophila pol zeta (Dmpol zeta), DmREV3 and DmREV7 bound to Rrp1 in a protein affinity column. Rrp1 directly interacted with DmREV7 in vitro and in vivo but not with DmREV3. These findings suggest that the DNA polymerase partner for Rrp1 is Dmpol zeta and that this interaction occurs through DmREV7. Interestingly, DmREV7 bound to the N-terminal region of Rrp1, which has no known protein homologue, suggesting that this binding is a species-specific event. Moreover, DmREV7 could stimulate the AP endonuclease activity of Rrp1, but not the 3'-exonuclease activity, and form a homomultimer. DmREV3 could not incorporate nucleotides at the 5'-incised tetrahydrofran sites but did show strand displacement activity for one-nucleotide-gapped DNA, which was not influenced by either DmREV7 or Rrp1. Methyl methanesulfonate and hydrogen peroxide treatments increased mRNA levels of DmREV3 and DmREV7. On the basis of the direct interaction between DmREV7 and Rrp1, we suggest that Dmpol zeta may be involved in the repair pathway of AP sites in DNA.

  15. Stable non-covalent labeling of layered silicate nanoparticles for biological imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Gysell M; Jack, Kevin S; Musumeci, Anthony W; Martin, Darren J; Minchin, Rodney F

    2016-04-01

    Layered silicate nanoparticles (LSN) are widely used in industrial applications and consumer products. They also have potential benefits in biomedical applications such as implantable devices and for drug delivery. To study how nanomaterials interact with cells and tissues, techniques to track and quantify their movement through different biological compartments are essential. While radiolabels can be very sensitive, particularly for in vivo studies, fluorescent labeling has been preferred in recent years because of the array of methods available to image and quantify fluorescent nanoparticles. However, labeling can be problematic, especially if it alters the physical properties of the nanomaterial. Herein is described a novel non-covalent labeling technique for LSN using readily available fluorescent dimeric cyanine dyes without the need to use excess amounts of dye to achieve labeling, or the need for removal of unbound dye. The approach utilizes the cationic binding properties of layered silicate clays and the multiple quaternary nitrogens associated with the dyes. Preparation of YOYO-1 labeled LSN with optimal dispersion in aqueous media is presented. The utilization of the labeled particles is then demonstrated in cell binding and uptake studies using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. The labeled LSN are highly fluorescent, stable and exhibit identical physical properties with respect to the unlabeled nanoparticles. The general approach described here is applicable to other cyanine dyes and may be utilized more widely for labeling nanoparticles that comprise a crystalline plate structure with a high binding capacity. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reversal of charge selectivity in transmembrane protein pores by using noncovalent molecular adapters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Li-Qun; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Vincent, J. Bryan; Vigh, Gyula; Cheley, Stephen; Braha, Orit; Bayley, Hagan

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the charge selectivity of staphylococcal α-hemolysin (αHL), a bacterial pore-forming toxin, is manipulated by using cyclodextrins as noncovalent molecular adapters. Anion-selective versions of αHL, including the wild-type pore and various mutants, become more anion selective when β-cyclodextrin (βCD) is lodged within the channel lumen. By contrast, the negatively charged adapter, hepta-6-sulfato-β-cyclodextrin (s7βCD), produces cation selectivity. The cyclodextrin adapters have similar effects when placed in cation-selective mutant αHL pores. Most probably, hydrated Cl− ions partition into the central cavity of βCD more readily than K+ ions, whereas s7βCD introduces a charged ring near the midpoint of the channel lumen and confers cation selectivity through electrostatic interactions. The molecular adapters generate permeability ratios (PK+/PCl−) over a 200-fold range and should be useful in the de novo design of membrane channels both for basic studies of ion permeation and for applications in biotechnology. PMID:10760267

  17. DNA binding, DNA cleavage and BSA interaction of a mixed-ligand copper(II) complex with taurine Schiff base and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lianzhi; Guo, Qiong; Dong, Jianfang; Xu, Tao; Li, Jinghong

    2013-08-05

    The DNA-binding properties and DNA-cleavage activities of a Cu(II) complex, [Cu(sal-tau(phen)]·1.5H2O (sal-tau=a Schiff base derived from salicylaldehyde and taurine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline), have been investigated by using UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. Results indicated that this Cu(II) complex can bind to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) via an intercalative mode and shows efficient cleavage activity in the absence and presence of reducer. Its intrinsic binding constant Kb (1.66×10(4)M(-1)) was calculated by absorption spectra and its linear Stern-Volmer quenching constant K(sq) (3.05) was obtained from florescence spectroscopy, as well as the cleaving reaction rate constant k1 (2.0×10(-4)s(-1)) was acquired from agarose gel electrophoresis. Meanwhile, the interactions of the complex with BSA have also been studied by spectroscopy. Results showed that the complex could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of bovine serum albumin (BSA) remarkably through a static quenching process, and induce a conformational change with the loss of helical stability of protein. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterisation of the interactions between substrate, copper(II) complex and DNA and their role in rate acceleration in DNA-based asymmetric catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Boersma, Arnold J; Browne, Wesley R; Roelfes, Gerard

    2015-02-28

    Interactions of the azachalcone derived substrate Aza with copper(II) complexes in the presence and absence of st-DNA were studied in detail by UV/Vis absorption, EPR and Raman and (UV and vis) resonance Raman spectroscopies. The binding of Aza to the Lewis acidic copper(II) complexes, which results in activation of the substrate, was established spectroscopically. It was shown that the binding of Aza differs between Cu(II)dmbpy and Cu(II)terpy, consistent with the observed differences in catalytic asymmetric Diels-Alder reactions with regard to both the rate and enantiomeric preference. Finally, it was shown that DNA has a major beneficial effect on the binding of Aza to the copper(II) complex due to the fact that both bind to the DNA. The result is a high effective molarity of both the copper complexes and the Aza substrate, which leads to a significant increase in binding of Aza to the copper(II) complex. This effect is a key reason for the observed rate acceleration in the catalyzed reactions brought about by the presence of DNA.

  19. RADX interacts with single-stranded DNA to promote replication fork stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Lisa; Ho, Teresa; Hoffmann, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    has an essential genome maintenance role, protecting ssDNA regions from nucleolytic degradation and providing a recruitment platform for proteins involved in responses to replication stress and DNA damage. Here, we identify the uncharacterized protein RADX (CXorf57) as an ssDNA-binding factor in human...... cells. RADX binds ssDNA via an N-terminal OB fold cluster, which mediates its recruitment to sites of replication stress. Deregulation of RADX expression and ssDNA binding leads to enhanced replication fork stalling and degradation, and we provide evidence that a balanced interplay between RADX and RPA...

  20. Sequence-specific nucleic acid mobility using a reversible block copolymer gel matrix and DNA amphiphiles (lipid-DNA) in capillary and microfluidic electrophoretic separations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagler, Patrick; Minero, Gabriel Antonio S.; Tangen, Uwe; de Vries, Jan Willem; Prusty, Deepak; Kwak, Minseok; Herrmann, Andreas; McCaskill, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible noncovalent but sequence-dependent attachment of DNA to gels is shown to allow programmable mobility processing of DNA populations. The covalent attachment of DNA oligomers to polyacrylamide gels using acrydite-modified oligonucleotides has enabled sequence-specific mobility assays for

  1. Role of minor groove width and hydration pattern on amsacrine interaction with DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K Jangir

    Full Text Available Amsacrine is an anilinoacridine derivative anticancer drug, used to treat a wide variety of malignancies. In cells, amsacrine poisons topoisomerase 2 by stabilizing DNA-drug-enzyme ternary complex. Presence of amsacrine increases the steady-state concentration of these ternary complexes which in turn hampers DNA replication and results in subsequent cell death. Due to reversible binding and rapid slip-out of amsacrine from DNA duplex, structural data is not available on amsacrine-DNA complexes. In the present work, we designed five oligonucleotide duplexes, differing in their minor groove widths and hydration pattern, and examined their binding with amsacrine using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Complexes of amsacrine with calf thymus DNA were also evaluated for a comparison. Our results demonstrate for the first time that amsacrine is not a simple intercalator; rather mixed type of DNA binding (intercalation and minor groove takes place between amsacrine and DNA. Further, this binding is highly sensitive towards the geometries and hydration patterns of different minor grooves present in the DNA. This study shows that ligand binding to DNA could be very sensitive to DNA base composition and DNA groove structures. Results demonstrated here could have implication for understanding cytotoxic mechanism of aminoacridine based anticancer drugs and provide directions to modify these drugs for better efficacy and few side-effects.

  2. Residues of E. coli topoisomerase I conserved for interaction with a specific cytosine base to facilitate DNA cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Gagandeep; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial and archaeal topoisomerase I display selectivity for a cytosine base 4 nt upstream from the DNA cleavage site. Recently, the solved crystal structure of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I covalently linked to a single-stranded oligonucleotide revealed that R169 and R173 interact with the cytosine base at the −4 position via hydrogen bonds while the phenol ring of Y177 wedges between the bases at the −4 and the −5 position. Substituting R169 to alanine changed the selectivity of the enzyme for the base at the −4 position from a cytosine to an adenine. The R173A mutant displayed similar sequence selectivity as the wild-type enzyme, but weaker cleavage and relaxation activity. Mutation of Y177 to serine or alanine rendered the enzyme inactive. Although mutation of each of these residues led to different outcomes, R169, R173 and Y177 work together to interact with a cytosine base at the −4 position to facilitate DNA cleavage. These strictly conserved residues might act after initial substrate binding as a Molecular Ruler to form a protein–DNA complex with the scissile phosphate positioned at the active site for optimal DNA cleavage by the tyrosine hydroxyl nucleophile to facilitate DNA cleavage in the reaction pathway. PMID:22833607

  3. Subunit interaction and regulation of activity through terminal domains of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y; Tang, X-F; Matsui, E; Matsui, I

    2004-04-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) has recently been found in the Euryarchaeota subdomain of Archaea. Its genes are adjacent to several other genes related to DNA replication, repair and recombination in the genome, suggesting that this enzyme may be the major DNA replicase in Euryarchaeota. We successfully cloned, expressed, and purified the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii (PolDPho). By site-directed mutagenesis, we identified amino acid residues Asp-1122 and Asp-1124 of a large subunit as the essential residues responsible for DNA-polymerizing activity. We analysed the domain structure using proteins truncated at the N- and C-termini of both small and large subunits (DP1Pho and DP2Pho), and identified putative regions responsible for subunit interaction, oligomerization and regulation of the 3'-5' exonuclease activity in PolDPho. It was also found that the internal region of the putative zinc finger motif (cysteine cluster II) at the C-terminal of DP2Pho is involved in the 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Using gel filtration analysis, we determined the molecular masses of the recombinant PolDPho and the N-terminal putative dimerization domain of the large subunit, and proposed that PolD from P. horikoshii probably forms a heterotetrameric structure in solution. Based on these results, a model regarding the subunit interaction and regulation of activity of PolDPho is proposed.

  4. High-intensity UV laser ChIP-seq for the study of protein-DNA interactions in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steube, Arndt; Schenk, Tino; Tretyakov, Alexander; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2017-11-03

    Genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding is generally performed by chemical protein-DNA crosslinking, followed by chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq). Here we present the ChIP-seq technique based on photochemical crosslinking of protein-DNA interactions by high-intensity ultraviolet (UV) laser irradiation in living mammalian cells (UV-ChIP-seq). UV laser irradiation induces an efficient and instant formation of covalent "zero-length" crosslinks exclusively between nucleic acids and proteins that are in immediate contact, thus resulting in a "snapshot" of direct protein-DNA interactions in their natural environment. Here we show that UV-ChIP-seq, applied for genome-wide profiling of the sequence-specific transcriptional repressor B-cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells, produces sensitive and precise protein-DNA binding profiles, highly enriched with canonical BCL6 DNA sequence motifs. Using this technique, we also found numerous previously undetectable direct BCL6 binding sites, particularly in condensed, inaccessible areas of chromatin.

  5. Distance-dependent interactions between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent molecules with DNA as tunable spacers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chhabra, Rahul; Sharma, Jaswinder; Lin Su; Yan Hao; Lindsay, Stuart; Liu Yan; Wang Haining; Zou Shengli

    2009-01-01

    Using stoichiometrically controlled 1:1 functionalization of gold nanoparticles with fluorescent dye molecules in which the dye molecule is held away from the particle surface by a rigid DNA spacer allows precise determination of the distance-dependent effect of the metal nanoparticles on fluorescence intensity. Two dyes were studied, Cy3 and Cy5, with two sizes of nanoparticles, 5 and 10 nm. The larger the particle, the more quenching of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity, due to increased overlap of the dye's emission spectrum with the Au surface plasmon resonance. Fluorescence is quenched significantly for distances somewhat larger than the particle diameter, in good agreement with the predictions of an electrodynamics model based on interacting dipoles. The distance dependence of surface energy transfer behavior, i.e. quenching efficiency, is proportional to 1/d 4 , which involves no consideration of the size of the particle and the spectral overlap of the dye and AuNp. This surface energy transfer model is found qualitatively and agrees with the electrodynamic model, though the exponent is greater than 4 for the smaller nanoparticles (5 nm), and smaller than 4 for the larger nanoparticles (10 nm).

  6. Distance-dependent interactions between gold nanoparticles and fluorescent molecules with DNA as tunable spacers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, Rahul; Sharma, Jaswinder; Lin Su; Yan Hao; Lindsay, Stuart; Liu Yan [Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Wang Haining; Zou Shengli, E-mail: stuart.lindsay@asu.ed, E-mail: yan_liu@asu.ed [Department of Chemistry, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2009-12-02

    Using stoichiometrically controlled 1:1 functionalization of gold nanoparticles with fluorescent dye molecules in which the dye molecule is held away from the particle surface by a rigid DNA spacer allows precise determination of the distance-dependent effect of the metal nanoparticles on fluorescence intensity. Two dyes were studied, Cy3 and Cy5, with two sizes of nanoparticles, 5 and 10 nm. The larger the particle, the more quenching of the photoluminescence (PL) intensity, due to increased overlap of the dye's emission spectrum with the Au surface plasmon resonance. Fluorescence is quenched significantly for distances somewhat larger than the particle diameter, in good agreement with the predictions of an electrodynamics model based on interacting dipoles. The distance dependence of surface energy transfer behavior, i.e. quenching efficiency, is proportional to 1/d{sup 4}, which involves no consideration of the size of the particle and the spectral overlap of the dye and AuNp. This surface energy transfer model is found qualitatively and agrees with the electrodynamic model, though the exponent is greater than 4 for the smaller nanoparticles (5 nm), and smaller than 4 for the larger nanoparticles (10 nm).

  7. Interactions among Trypanosoma brucei RAD51 paralogues in DNA repair and antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Rachel; Stockdale, Christopher; Lapsley, Craig; Wilkes, Jonathan; McCulloch, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Homologous recombination in Trypanosoma brucei is used for moving variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes into expression sites during immune evasion by antigenic variation. A major route for such VSG switching is gene conversion reactions in which RAD51, a universally conserved recombinase, catalyses homology-directed strand exchange. In any eukaryote, RAD51-directed strand exchange in vivo is mediated by further factors, including RAD51-related proteins termed Rad51 paralogues. These appear to be ubiquitously conserved, although their detailed roles in recombination remain unclear. In T. brucei, four putative RAD51 paralogue genes have been identified by sequence homology. Here we show that all four RAD51 paralogues act in DNA repair, recombination and RAD51 subnuclear dynamics, though not equivalently, while mutation of only one RAD51 paralogue gene significantly impedes VSG switching. We also show that the T. brucei RAD51 paralogues interact, and that the complexes they form may explain the distinct phenotypes of the mutants as well as observed expression interdependency. Finally, we document the Rad51 paralogues that are encoded by a wide range of protists, demonstrating that the Rad51 paralogue repertoire in T. brucei is unusually large among microbial eukaryotes and that one member of the protein family corresponds with a key, conserved eukaryotic Rad51 paralogue. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene ISW2 encodes a microtubule-interacting protein required for premeiotic DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtulcová, P; Janatová, I; Kohlwein, S D; Hasek, J

    2000-01-15

    A molecular genetic characterization of the ORF YOR304W (ISW2), identified in a screen of a yeast lambdagt11 library using a monoclonal antibody that reacts with a 210 kDa mammalian microtubule-interacting protein, is presented in this paper. The protein encoded by the ORF YOR304W is 50% identical to the Drosophila nucleosome remodelling factor ISWI and is therefore a new member of the SNF2 protein family and has been recently entered into SDG as ISW2. Although not essential for vegetative growth, we found that the ISW2 gene is required for early stages in sporulation. The isw2 homozygous deletant diploid strain was blocked in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, unable to execute the premeiotic DNA replication and progress through the nuclear meiotic division cycle. ISW2 expression from a multicopy plasmid had the same effect as deletion, but ISW2 expression from a centromeric plasmid rescued the deletion phenotype. In vegetatively growing diploid cells, the Isw2 protein was preferentially found in the cytoplasm, co-localizing with microtubules. An accumulation of the Isw2 protein within the nucleus was observed in cells entering sporulation. Together with data published very recently by Tsukiyama et al. (1999), we propose a role for the Isw2 protein in facilitating chromatin accessibility for transcriptional factor(s) that positively regulate meiosis/sporulation-specific genes. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA mapping of social-biological interactions in Brazilian Amazonian African-descendant populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Maia Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the Brazilian Amazonian population has historically involved three main ethnic groups, Amerindian, African and European. This has resulted in genetic investigations having been carried out using classical polymorphisms and molecular markers. To better understand the genetic variability and the micro-evolutionary processes acting in human groups in the Brazilian Amazon region we used mitochondrial DNA to investigate 159 maternally unrelated individuals from five Amazonian African-descendant communities. The mitochondrial lineage distribution indicated a contribution of 50.2% from Africans (L0, L1, L2, and L3, 46.6% from Amerindians (haplogroups A, B, C and D and a small European contribution of 1.3%. These results indicated high genetic diversity in the Amerindian and African lineage groups, suggesting that the Brazilian Amazonian African-descendant populations reflect a possible population amalgamation of Amerindian women from different Amazonian indigenous tribes and African women from different geographic regions of Africa who had been brought to Brazil as slaves. The present study partially mapped the historical biological and social interactions that had occurred during the formation and expansion of Amazonian African-descendant communities.

  10. Nucleosome–nucleosome interactions via histone tails and linker DNA regulate nuclear rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Yuta; Tamura, Sachiko; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Cells, as well as the nuclei inside them, experience significant mechanical stress in diverse biological processes, including contraction, migration, and adhesion. The structural stability of nuclei must therefore be maintained in order to protect genome integrity. Despite extensive knowledge on nuclear architecture and components, however, the underlying physical and molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. We address this by subjecting isolated human cell nuclei to microneedle-based quantitative micromanipulation with a series of biochemical perturbations of the chromatin. We find that the mechanical rigidity of nuclei depends on the continuity of the nucleosomal fiber and interactions between nucleosomes. Disrupting these chromatin features by varying cation concentration, acetylating histone tails, or digesting linker DNA results in loss of nuclear rigidity. In contrast, the levels of key chromatin assembly factors, including cohesin, condensin II, and CTCF, and a major nuclear envelope protein, lamin, are unaffected. Together with in situ evidence using living cells and a simple mechanical model, our findings reveal a chromatin-based regulation of the nuclear mechanical response and provide insight into the significance of local and global chromatin structures, such as those associated with interdigitated or melted nucleosomal fibers. PMID:28428255

  11. Phototoxic Activity and DNA Interactions of Water-Soluble Porphyrins and Their Rhenium(I) Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mion, Giuliana; Gianferrara, Teresa; Bergamo, Alberta; Gasser, Gilles; Pierroz, Vanessa; Rubbiani, Riccardo; Vilar, Ramon; Leczkowska, Anna; Alessio, Enzo

    2015-11-01

    In the search for alternative photosensitizers for use in photodynamic therapy (PDT), herein we describe two new water-soluble porphyrins, a neutral fourfold-symmetric compound and a +3-charged tris-methylpyridinium derivative, in which either four or one [1,4,7]-triazacyclononane (TACN) units are connected to the porphyrin macrocycle through a hydrophilic linker; we also report their corresponding tetracationic Re(I) conjugates. The in vitro (photo)toxic effects of the compounds toward the human cell lines HeLa (cervical cancer), H460M2 (non-small-cell lung carcinoma), and HBL-100 (non-tumorigenic epithelial cells) are reported. Three of the compounds are not cytotoxic in the dark up to 100 μm, and the fourfold-symmetric couple revealed very good phototoxic indexes (PIs). The intracellular localization of all derivatives was studied in HeLa cells by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Although low nuclear localization was observed for some of them, it still prompted us to investigate their capacity to bind both quadruplex and duplex DNA; we observed significant selectivity in the tris-methylpyridinium derivatives for G-quadruplex interactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. DMPD: Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14751759 Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withTo...;16(1):17-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of... CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. PubmedID 14751759 Title Signal transduction pathways

  13. Interactions between the R2R3-MYB transcription factor, AtMYB61, and target DNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Prouse

    Full Text Available Despite the prominent roles played by R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the regulation of plant gene expression, little is known about the details of how these proteins interact with their DNA targets. For example, while Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB protein AtMYB61 is known to alter transcript abundance of a specific set of target genes, little is known about the specific DNA sequences to which AtMYB61 binds. To address this gap in knowledge, DNA sequences bound by AtMYB61 were identified using cyclic amplification and selection of targets (CASTing. The DNA targets identified using this approach corresponded to AC elements, sequences enriched in adenosine and cytosine nucleotides. The preferred target sequence that bound with the greatest affinity to AtMYB61 recombinant protein was ACCTAC, the AC-I element. Mutational analyses based on the AC-I element showed that ACC nucleotides in the AC-I element served as the core recognition motif, critical for AtMYB61 binding. Molecular modelling predicted interactions between AtMYB61 amino acid residues and corresponding nucleotides in the DNA targets. The affinity between AtMYB61 and specific target DNA sequences did not correlate with AtMYB61-driven transcriptional activation with each of the target sequences. CASTing-selected motifs were found in the regulatory regions of genes previously shown to be regulated by AtMYB61. Taken together, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AtMYB61 regulates transcription from specific cis-acting AC elements in vivo. The results shed light on the specifics of DNA binding by an important family of plant-specific transcriptional regulators.

  14. Anticancer drug mithramycin interacts with core histones: An additional mode of action of the DNA groove binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mithramycin (MTR is a clinically approved DNA-binding antitumor antibiotic currently in Phase 2 clinical trials at National Institutes of Health for treatment of osteosarcoma. In view of the resurgence in the studies of this generic antibiotic as a human medicine, we have examined the binding properties of MTR with the integral component of chromatin – histone proteins – as a part of our broad objective to classify DNA-binding molecules in terms of their ability to bind chromosomal DNA alone (single binding mode or both histones and chromosomal DNA (dual binding mode. The present report shows that besides DNA, MTR also binds to core histones present in chromatin and thus possesses the property of dual binding in the chromatin context. In contrast to the MTR–DNA interaction, association of MTR with histones does not require obligatory presence of bivalent metal ion like Mg2+. As a consequence of its ability to interact with core histones, MTR inhibits histone H3 acetylation at lysine 18, an important signature of active chromatin, in vitro and ex vivo. Reanalysis of microarray data of Ewing sarcoma cell lines shows that upon MTR treatment there is a significant down regulation of genes, possibly implicating a repression of H3K18Ac-enriched genes apart from DNA-binding transcription factors. Association of MTR with core histones and its ability to alter post-translational modification of histone H3 clearly indicates an additional mode of action of this anticancer drug that could be implicated in novel therapeutic strategies.

  15. MRNIP/C5orf45 Interacts with the MRN Complex and Contributes to the DNA Damage Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Staples

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Through an RNAi-based screen for previously uncharacterized regulators of genome stability, we have identified the human protein C5orf45 as an important factor in preventing the accumulation of DNA damage in human cells. Here, we functionally characterize C5orf45 as a binding partner of the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN damage-sensing complex. Hence, we rename C5orf45 as MRNIP for MRN-interacting protein (MRNIP. We find that MRNIP is rapidly recruited to sites of DNA damage. Cells depleted of MRNIP display impaired chromatin loading of the MRN complex, resulting in reduced DNA end resection and defective ATM-mediated DNA damage signaling, a reduced ability to repair DNA breaks, and radiation sensitivity. Finally, we show that MRNIP phosphorylation on serine 115 leads to its nuclear localization, and this modification is required for MRNIP’s role in promoting genome stability. Collectively, these data reveal that MRNIP is an important component of the human DNA damage response.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of the Interaction Strength and Dynamics of Human IgG4 Half Molecules by Native Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rose, Rebecca J.; Labrijn, Aran F.; van den Bremer, Ewald T. J.; Loverix, Stefan; Lasters, Ignace; van Berkel, Patrick H. C.; van de Winkel, Jan G. J.; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful technique for studying noncovalent protein-protein interactions. Here, native MS was employed to examine the noncovalent interactions involved in homodimerization of antibody half molecules (HL) in hinge-deleted human IgG4 (IgG4 Delta hinge). By analyzing

  17. Study of neutral red interaction with DNA by resolution of rank deficient multi-way fluorescence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghaddam, Fatemeh Ghasemi; Kompany Zare, Mohsen; Gholami, Somayeh

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of neutral red (NR) as an efficient anticancer drug with DNA was studied under physiological pH condition. Three-way data array were recorded by measuring excitation-emission fluorescence during the titration of neutral red with DNA at constant pH. The acid-base equilibrium constant...... were performed in two different conditions (phosphate buffers at pH 7.20 and 7.40). The parameters were determined from the cross point of two minimum lines of R.S.D. This is the first report of the simultaneous determination of the complex formation constants for both protonated and deprotonated forms...

  18. The self-assembly of particles with isotropic interactions: Using DNA coated colloids to create designer nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R. B.; Dion, S.; Konigslow, K. von

    2014-01-01

    Self-consistent field theory equations are presented that are suitable for use as a coarse-grained model for DNA coated colloids, polymer-grafted nanoparticles and other systems with approximately isotropic interactions. The equations are generalized for arbitrary numbers of chemically distinct colloids. The advantages and limitations of such a coarse-grained approach for DNA coated colloids are discussed, as are similarities with block copolymer self-assembly. In particular, preliminary results for three species self-assembly are presented that parallel results from a two dimensional ABC triblock copolymer phase. The possibility of incorporating crystallization, dynamics, inverse statistical mechanics and multiscale modelling techniques are discussed

  19. Performance of DNA metabarcoding, standard barcoding, and morphological approach in the identification of host–parasitoid interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulcr, Jiří; Drozd, Pavel; Hrček, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Understanding interactions between herbivores and parasitoids is essential for successful biodiversity protection and monitoring and for biological pest control. Morphological identifications employ insect rearing and are complicated by insects’ high diversity and crypsis. DNA barcoding has been successfully used in studies of host–parasitoid interactions as it can substantially increase the recovered real host–parasitoid diversity distorted by overlooked species complexes, or by species with slight morphological differences. However, this approach does not allow the simultaneous detection and identification of host(s) and parasitoid(s). Recently, high-throughput sequencing has shown high potential for surveying ecological communities and trophic interactions. Using mock samples comprising insect larvae and their parasitoids, we tested the potential of DNA metabarcoding for identifying individuals involved in host–parasitoid interactions to different taxonomic levels, and compared it to standard DNA barcoding and morphological approaches. For DNA metabarcoding, we targeted the standard barcoding marker cytochrome oxidase subunit I using highly degenerate primers, 2*300 bp sequencing on a MiSeq platform, and RTAX classification using paired-end reads. Additionally, using a large host–parasitoid dataset from a Central European floodplain forest, we assess the completeness and usability of a local reference library by confronting the number of Barcoding Index Numbers obtained by standard barcoding with the number of morphotypes. Overall, metabarcoding recovery was high, identifying 92.8% of the taxa present in mock samples, and ide