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Sample records for noncontrast-enhanced pulse sequence

  1. A noncontrast-enhanced pulse sequence optimized to visualize human peripheral vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjesdal, Kjell-Inge [Sunnmoere MR-Klinikk, Aalesund (Norway); Storaas, Tryggve [Ullevaal University Hospital, Section for Diagnostic Physics, Department of Radiology, Oslo (Norway); Geitung, Jonn-Terje [Haraldsplass University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bergen (Norway)

    2009-01-15

    The purpose of this paper is to present a pulse sequence optimized to visualize human peripheral vessels. The optimized MR technique is a 3D multi-shot balanced non-SSFP gradient echo pulse sequence with fat suppression. Several imaging parameters were adjusted to find the best compromise between the contrast of vascular structures and muscle, fat, and bone. Most of the optimization was performed in the knee and calf regions using multi-channel SENSE coils. To verify potential clinical use, images of both healthy volunteers and volunteers with varicose veins were produced. The balanced non-SSFP sequence can produce high-spatial-resolution images of the human peripheral vessels without the need for an intravenous contrast agent. Both arteries and veins are displayed along with other body fluids. Due to the high spatial resolution of the axial plane source or reconstructed images, the need for procedures to separate arteries from veins is limited. We demonstrate that high signals from synovial joint fluid and cystic structures can be suppressed by applying an inversion prepulse but at the expense of reduced image signal-to-noise and overall image quality. (orig.)

  2. [Evaluation of the right internal iliac artery which is anastomosed to transplant renal artery using non-contrast enhanced MR angiography with electrocardiography-gated and 3D True SSFP time-spatial labeling inversion pulse sequence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ayako; Shiratori, Yoko; Suzuki, Makoto; Ozasa, Masaya; Takeyama, Mamoru; Eshima, Mitsuhiro; Shinohara, Maiko; Yamamoto, Takao; Tajima, Tsuyoshi

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate whether electrocardiography-gated is useful in non-contrast-enhanced MRA with time-spatial labeling inversion pulse (Time-SLIP) in renal transplantation patients compared with respiration-triggered free-breathing. Simulation-based analyses of black blood time interval (BBTI) values for spatial selective inversion-recovery pulse and electrocardiography rates were performed, and confirmed on human subjects using a three-dimensional (3D) coherent steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequence on a 1.5 tesla Toshiba MRI scanner. Signal acquisition interval and BBTI values in which signal of a water tissue becomes the null point showed a strong correlation, and successfully suppressed signals from the background and provided better contrast between the arteries and the background. Because electrocardiography-gated non-contrast MRA does not depend on the respiration interval, providing a contrast stable, it was suggested to be an effective screening tool for evaluation of pelvic arteries.

  3. Age-related change in renal corticomedullary differentiation: evaluation with noncontrast-enhanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) MRI with spatially selective inversion pulse using variable inversion time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Yasufumi; Kanki, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Akira; Higashi, Hiroki; Tanimoto, Daigo; Sato, Tomohiro; Higaki, Atsushi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Ito, Katsuyoshi

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate age-related change in renal corticomedullary differentiation and renal cortical thickness by means of noncontrast-enhanced steady-state free precession (SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with spatially selective inversion recovery (IR) pulse. The Institutional Review Board of our hospital approved this retrospective study and patient informed consent was waived. This study included 48 patients without renal diseases who underwent noncontrast-enhanced SSFP MRI with spatially selective IR pulse using variable inversion times (TIs) (700-1500 msec). The signal intensity of renal cortex and medulla were measured to calculate renal corticomedullary contrast ratio. Additionally, renal cortical thickness was measured. The renal corticomedullary junction was clearly depicted in all patients. The mean cortical thickness was 3.9 ± 0.83 mm. The mean corticomedullary contrast ratio was 4.7 ± 1.4. There was a negative correlation between optimal TI for the best visualization of renal corticomedullary differentiation and age (r = -0.378; P = 0.001). However, there was no significant correlation between renal corticomedullary contrast ratio and age (r = 0.187; P = 0.20). Similarly, no significant correlation was observed between renal cortical thickness and age (r = 0.054; P = 0.712). In the normal kidney, noncontrast-enhanced SSFP MRI with spatially selective IR pulse can be used to assess renal corticomedullary differentiation and cortical thickness without the influence of aging, although optimal TI values for the best visualization of renal corticomedullary junction were shortened with aging. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David O; Grunewald, Elliot D

    2013-11-12

    Technologies applicable to SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling are disclosed, including SNMR acquisition apparatus and methods, SNMR processing apparatus and methods, and combinations thereof. SNMR acquisition may include transmitting two or more SNMR pulse sequences and applying a phase shift to a pulse in at least one of the pulse sequences, according to any of a variety cycling techniques. SNMR processing may include combining SNMR from a plurality of pulse sequences comprising pulses of different phases, so that desired signals are preserved and indesired signals are canceled.

  5. New MR pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Flamig, D.P.; Griffey, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a method for fat suppression for three-dimensional MR imaging. The FATS (fat-suppressed acquisition with echo time shortened) sequence employs a pair of opposing adiabatic half-passage RF pulses tuned on fat resonance. The imaging parameters are as follows: TR, 20 msec; TE, 21.7-3.2 msec; 1,024 x 128 x 128 acquired matrix; imaging time, approximately 11 minutes. A series of 54 examinations were performed. Excellent fat suppression with water excitation is achieved in all cases. The orbital images demonstrate superior resolution of small orbital lesions. The high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in cranial studies demonstrates excellent petrous bone and internal auditory canal anatomy

  6. Ultra-high field upper extremity peripheral nerve and non-contrast enhanced vascular imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh B Raval

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy of Ultra-high field [UHF] 7 Tesla [T] MRI as compared to 3T MRI in non-contrast enhanced [nCE] imaging of structural anatomy in the elbow, forearm, and hand [upper extremity].A wide range of sequences including T1 weighted [T1] volumetric interpolate breath-hold exam [VIBE], T2 weighted [T2] double-echo steady state [DESS], susceptibility weighted imaging [SWI], time-of-flight [TOF], diffusion tensor imaging [DTI], and diffusion spectrum imaging [DSI] were optimized and incorporated with a radiofrequency [RF] coil system composed of a transverse electromagnetic [TEM] transmit coil combined with an 8-channel receive-only array for 7T upper extremity [UE] imaging. In addition, Siemens optimized protocol/sequences were used on a 3T scanner and the resulting images from T1 VIBE and T2 DESS were compared to that obtained at 7T qualitatively and quantitatively [SWI was only qualitatively compared]. DSI studio was utilized to identify nerves based on analysis of diffusion weighted derived fractional anisotropy images. Images of forearm vasculature were extracted using a paint grow manual segmentation method based on MIPAV [Medical Image Processing, Analysis, and Visualization].High resolution and high quality signal-to-noise ratio [SNR] and contrast-to-noise ratio [CNR]-images of the hand, forearm, and elbow were acquired with nearly homogeneous 7T excitation. Measured [performed on the T1 VIBE and T2 DESS sequences] SNR and CNR values were almost doubled at 7T vs. 3T. Cartilage, synovial fluid and tendon structures could be seen with higher clarity in the 7T T1 and T2 weighted images. SWI allowed high resolution and better quality imaging of large and medium sized arteries and veins, capillary networks and arteriovenous anastomoses at 7T when compared to 3T. 7T diffusion weighted sequence [not performed at 3T] demonstrates that the forearm nerves are clearly delineated by fiber tractography. The

  7. Accelerated noncontrast-enhanced pulmonary vein MRA with distributed compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçakaya, Mehmet; Hu, Peng; Chuang, Michael L; Hauser, Thomas H; Ngo, Long H; Manning, Warren J; Tarokh, Vahid; Nezafat, Reza

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the efficacy of distributed compressed sensing (CS) to accelerate free-breathing, electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered noncontrast pulmonary vein (PV) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Fully sampled ECG-triggered noncontrast PV MRA, using a spatially selective slab inversion preparation sequence, was acquired on seven healthy adult subjects (27 ± 17 years, range: 19-65 years, 4 women). The k-space data were retrospectively randomly undersampled by factors of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 and then reconstructed using distributed CS and coil-by-coil CS methods. The reconstructed images were evaluated by two blinded readers in consensus for assessment of major PV branches as well as the presence of artifacts in left atrium (LA) and elsewhere. Diameters of right inferior and right superior PV branches were measured. Additionally, mean square errors (MSE) of the reconstructions were calculated. Both CS methods resulted in image quality scores similar to the fully sampled reference images at undersampling factors up to 6-fold for distributed CS and 4-fold for coil-by-coil CS reconstructions. There was no difference in the presence of artifacts in LA and freedom from important artifacts elsewhere between the two techniques up to undersampling factors of 10 compared to the fully sampled reconstruction. For the PV diameters, no systematic variation between the reference and the reconstructions were observed for either technique. There were no significant differences in MSE between the two methods when compared at a given rate, but the difference was significant when compared across all rates. The sparsity of noncontrast PV MRA and the joint sparsity of different coil images allow imaging at high undersampling factors (up to 6-fold) when distributed CS is used. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Accelerated Non-Contrast Enhanced Pulmonary Vein MRA with Distributed Compressed Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçakaya, Mehmet; Hu, Peng; Chuang, Michael L.; Hauser, Thomas H.; Ngo, Long H.; Manning, Warren J.; Tarokh, Vahid; Nezafat, Reza

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy of distributed compressed sensing (CS) to accelerate free-breathing, ECG-triggered non-contrast pulmonary vein (PV) MR angiography (MRA). Materials and Methods Fully sampled ECG-triggered non-contrast PV MRA, using a spatially-selective slab inversion preparation sequence, was acquired on 7 healthy adult subjects (27±17 years, range: 19–65 years, 4 women). The k-space data were retrospectively randomly under-sampled by factors of 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 and then reconstructed using distributed CS and coil-by-coil CS methods. The reconstructed images were evaluated by two blinded readers in consensus for assessment of major PV branches as well as presence of artifacts in left atrium (LA) and elsewhere. Diameters of right inferior and right superior PV branches were measured. Additionally, mean square errors (MSE) of the reconstructions were calculated. Results Both CS methods resulted in image quality score similar to the fully-sampled reference images at undersampling factors up to 6-fold for distributed CS and 4-fold for coil-by-coil CS reconstructions. There was no difference in the presence of artifacts in LA and freedom from important artifacts elsewhere between the two techniques up to undersampling factors of 10 compared to the fully sampled reconstruction. For the PV diameters, no systematic variation between the reference and the reconstructions were observed for either technique. There were no significant differences in MSE between the two methods when compared at a given rate, but the difference was significant when compared across all rates. Conclusions The sparsity of non-contrast PV MRA and the joint sparsity of different coil images allow imaging at high undersampling factors (up to 6-fold) when distributed CS is used. PMID:21509886

  9. Pulse sequences for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences following the administration of an exogenous contrast agent are discussed. Pulse sequences are categorised according to the contrast agent mechanism: changes in proton density, relaxivity, magnetic susceptibility and resonant frequency shift. Applications in morphological imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, dynamic imaging and cell labelling are described. The importance of optimising the pulse sequence for each application is emphasised

  10. Analysis on Response of Dynamic Systems to Pulse Sequences Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Lili

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Near-fault ground motions with long-period pulses can place severe demands on structures near an active fault. These pulse-type ground motions can be represented by pulse sequences with simple shapes. Half-sinusoidal pulse sequences are used to approximate recorded ground motions and dynamic responses of SDOF system under the excitation of these pulse sequences are studied. Four cases are considered: (1 variation in duration of successor sub-pulse; (2 variation in duration of predecessor sub-pulse; (3 variation in amplitude of successor sub-pulse; and (4 variation in amplitude of predecessor sub-pulse. The corresponding acceleration, velocity and displacement response spectra of these pulse sequences are studied. The analysis on SDOF system shows that in some cases the responses are strongly affected by the changes of duration and/or amplitude of the sub-pulse. The study can be useful to understand the influences of sub-pulse in the near-fault pulse-type ground motions.

  11. Broadband CPMG sequence with short composite refocusing pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, Van D. M.; Mandal, Soumyajit; Song, Yi-Qiao; Hürlimann, Martin D.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate that CPMG sequences with phase-modulated refocusing pulses of the same duration as the standard 180° pulses can generate echo trains with significantly increased amplitudes compared to the standard CPMG sequence in the case when there is a large range of Larmor frequencies across the sample. The best performance is achieved with symmetric phase-alternating (SPA) composite refocusing pulses of the form α-yβ+yα-y. In comparison to standard 180° pulses, we show that with SPA refocusing pulses with α ≈ 27° and β ≈ 126°, it is possible to double the signal-to-noise ratio without increasing the total pulse duration or power consumption of the refocusing pulses. The increased bandwidth of these pulses more than compensates for the decrease in performance in the vicinity of resonance. To achieve the full benefit of the broadband nature of the SPA pulses in a CPMG sequence, it is necessary to combine these refocusing pulses with a broadband excitation pulse. When it is not possible to use a short, high amplitude excitation pulse, we show that phase-alternating (PA) excitation pulses are suitable for this purpose. We present a detailed analysis of the underlying spin dynamics of these new pulse sequences and confirm the simulations with experiments. We show that for samples with T1/T2 > 1, the new sequences in grossly inhomogeneous fields do not only generate echoes with an increased amplitude, but also with an increased decay time. Finally, we analyze the diffusion properties and show quantitatively that the broadband sequences have a substantially higher diffusion sensitivity compared with the standard CPMG sequence.

  12. Use of the Frank sequence in pulsed EPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tseitlin, Mark; Quine, Richard W.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    The Frank polyphase sequence has been applied to pulsed EPR of triarylmethyl radicals at 256MHz (9.1mT magnetic field), using 256 phase pulses. In EPR, as in NMR, use of a Frank sequence of phase steps permits pulsed FID signal acquisition with very low power microwave/RF pulses (ca. 1.5m......W in the application reported here) relative to standard pulsed EPR. A 0.2mM aqueous solution of a triarylmethyl radical was studied using a 16mm diameter cross-loop resonator to isolate the EPR signal detection system from the incident pulses. Keyword: Correlation spectroscopy,Multi-pulse EPR,Low power pulses...

  13. Fat suppression in MR imaging with binomial pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudovin, C.J.; Bryant, D.J.; Bydder, G.M.; Young, I.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to develop pulse sequences allowing suppression of fat signal on MR images without eliminating signal from other tissues with short T1. They have developed such a technique involving selective excitation of protons in water, based on a binomial pulse sequence. Imaging is performed at 0.15 T. Careful shimming is performed to maximize separation of fat and water peaks. A spin-echo 1,500/80 sequence is used, employing 90 degrees pulse with transit frequency optimized for water with null excitation of 20 H offset, followed by a section-selective 180 degrees pulse. With use of the binomial sequence for imagining, reduction in fat signal is seen on images of the pelvis and legs of volunteers. Patient studies show dramatic improvement in visualization of prostatic carcinoma compared with standard sequences

  14. TOPPE: A framework for rapid prototyping of MR pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Noll, Douglas C

    2017-11-02

    To introduce a framework for rapid prototyping of MR pulse sequences. We propose a simple file format, called "TOPPE", for specifying all details of an MR imaging experiment, such as gradient and radiofrequency waveforms and the complete scan loop. In addition, we provide a TOPPE file "interpreter" for GE scanners, which is a binary executable that loads TOPPE files and executes the sequence on the scanner. We also provide MATLAB scripts for reading and writing TOPPE files and previewing the sequence prior to hardware execution. With this setup, the task of the pulse sequence programmer is reduced to creating TOPPE files, eliminating the need for hardware-specific programming. No sequence-specific compilation is necessary; the interpreter only needs to be compiled once (for every scanner software upgrade). We demonstrate TOPPE in three different applications: k-space mapping, non-Cartesian PRESTO whole-brain dynamic imaging, and myelin mapping in the brain using inhomogeneous magnetization transfer. We successfully implemented and executed the three example sequences. By simply changing the various TOPPE sequence files, a single binary executable (interpreter) was used to execute several different sequences. The TOPPE file format is a complete specification of an MR imaging experiment, based on arbitrary sequences of a (typically small) number of unique modules. Along with the GE interpreter, TOPPE comprises a modular and flexible platform for rapid prototyping of new pulse sequences. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. Pulse sequence generator for nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartusek, K.

    1990-01-01

    The hardware and the properties are described of a pulsed sequence generator for a 200 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer designed by the Institute for Research of Instrumentation of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences in Brno. The universal design of the generator meets the requirements of both NMR tomography and NMR microscopy. (author). 3 figs., 6 refs

  16. Preliminary study of pseudorandom binary sequence pulsing of ORELA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, N.M.; Olsen, D.K.

    1980-03-01

    It has been suggested that pseudorandom binary sequence (PRBS) pulsing might enhance the performance of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) for neutron-induced, time-of-flight (TOF) cross-section measurements. In this technical memorandum, equations are developed for expected count rates, statistical variances, and backgrounds for a pulsing scheme in which a PRBS is superimposed on the periodic equalintensity ORELA bursts. Introduction of the PRBS modification permits neutrons of different energies originating from different bursts to reach the detector simultaneously, and the signal corresponding to a unique flight time to be extracted mathematically. Relative advantages and disadvantages of measurements from conventional and PRBS pulsing modes are discussed in terms of counting statistics and backgrounds. Computer models of TOF spectra are generated for both pulsing modes, using as examples a 20-meter 233 U fission-chamber measurement and a 155-meter 238 U sample-in transmission measurement. Detailed comparisons of PRBS vs conventional results are presented. This study indicates that although PRBS pulsing could enhance ORELA performance for selected measurements, for general ORELA operation the disadvantages from PRBS pulsing probably outweigh the advantages

  17. Randomized prospective comparison of non-contrast enhanced helical computed tomography and intravenous urography in the diagnosis of acute ureteric colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, J A; Davies-Payne, D L; Peddinti, B S

    2001-08-01

    Non-contrast enhanced helical CT has become an accepted technique for evaluating acute ureteric colic. The results of a randomized prospective comparison of the accuracy, cost and radiation dose of CT and intravenous urography (IVU) are presented. All patients presenting to the Emergency Department with symptoms and signs suggestive of ureteric colic over a 16-month period (n = 242) were randomized to CT or IVU. Follow up was obtained for 228 patients (94%), with 14 patients (6%) lost to follow up. One hundred and twenty-three patients (54%) underwent CT and 105 (46%) had an IVU. At follow up the sensitivity and specificity of CT were each 100%, while those of IVU were 99% and 100%, respectively. Computed tomography demonstrated seven of 26 (27%) potential alternative diagnoses, whereas IVU suggested one of 23 (4%). Estimates of the average effective dose were calculated for CT (4.95 mSv) and IVU (1.48 mSv, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7-2.27). Radiation dose and intravenous contrast material safety are discussed and the relative costs are considered. Computed tomography is as accurate as IVU in the diagnosis of acute ureteric colic. It confers certain major diagnostic benefits, and is a fast, well-tolerated technique. Its accompanying higher effective radiation dose is recognized.

  18. Programmable pulse sequence generator with multiple output lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabczyk, Hubert

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents a novel concept of pulse sequence generator and its prototype as an electronic circuit testing laboratory tool. The generator has multiple output lines and is capable of using control data defining different pulse sequences to be given to the outputs. It is also possible to use different voltage levels in output signal and switch output lines for reading data from driven system. The pulse sequence generator can be used for runtime environment simulation, as hardware tester or auxiliary tool in new designs. Important design factors were to keep cost of the tool low and allow integration with other projects by using flexible architecture. The prototype was based on universal programmer with adjustable power supply, '51 microcontroller and Altera Cyclone chip. The generator communicates witch PC computer via RS232 port. Dedicated software was developed in the course of this project, to control the tool and data transmission. The prototype confirmed the possibility to create an inexpensive multipurpose laboratory tool for programming, testing and simulation of digital devices.

  19. Quantum Logic with Composite Pulse Sequences on Sr^+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmon, Ruth; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Ge, Yufei; Wang, Shannon; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2008-03-01

    The optical 5S1/2->4D1/2 transition in Sr^+ is an attractive qubit because it can be addressed by diode lasers, which are relatively inexpensive and easy to operate. We characterize single-qubit rotations as well as a CNOT gate on a Sr^+ ion in a surface electrode Paul trap. To improve these operations, the frequency of the clock laser is stabilized to a high-finesse optical cavity. The resulting linewidth of the laser is approximately 300Hz. Composite pulse sequences, a technique adapted from NMR, have been shown to reduce the effects of systematic errors in a variety of quantum systems. We demonstrate several composite sequences that improve the fidelity of quantum logic operations on Sr^+.

  20. Long lifetime air plasma channel generated by femtosecond laser pulse sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Lu, Xin; Ma, Jing-Long; Feng, Liu-Bin; Ge, Xu-Lei; Zheng, Yi; Li, Yu-Tong; Chen, Li-Ming; Dong, Quan-Li; Wang, Wei-Min; Wang, Zhao-Hua; Teng, Hao; Wei, Zhi-Yi; Zhang, Jie

    2012-03-12

    Lifetime of laser plasma channel is significantly prolonged using femtosecond laser pulse sequence, which is generated from a chirped pulse amplification laser system with pure multi-pass amplification chain. Time-resolved fluorescence images and electrical conductivity measurement are used to characterize the lifetime of the plasma channel. Prolongation of plasma channel lifetime up to microsecond level is observed using the pulse sequence.

  1. Investigation of the effect of finite pulse errors on the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene S.; Reid, Alicia E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study of finite pulse widths for the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) approach. In the FME scheme, the first order ? is identical to its counterparts in average Hamiltonian theory (AHT) and Floquet theory (FT). However, the timing part in the FME approach is introduced via the ? function not present in other schemes. This function provides an easy way for evaluating the spin evolution during the time in between' through the Magnus expansion of the operator connected to the timing part of the evolution. The evaluation of ? is particularly useful for the analysis of the non-stroboscopic evolution. Here, the importance of the boundary conditions, which provide a natural choice of ? , is ignored. This work uses the ? function to compare the efficiency of the BABA pulse sequence with ? and the BABA pulse sequence with finite pulses. Calculations of ? and ? are presented.

  2. Vein of Galen aneurysm: MRI with a fast gradient refocusing pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taccone, A.; Oddone, M.; Cariati, M.; Marzoli, A.

    1993-01-01

    A case of vein of Galen aneurysm, studied with a fast gradient refocusing pulse MRI sequence, is presented. Fast MRI sequences allowed the acquisition of additional hemodynamic information that was not available with either routine MRI or angiography. (orig.)

  3. MR pulse sequences for selective relaxation time measurements: a phantom study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Jensen, M

    1990-01-01

    The accuracy of relaxation time measurements of spectroscopic inversion recovery and CPMG multi-echo pulse sequences together with ISIS and stimulated echo-pulse methods have been tested on a reference phantom (test object no. 5, of the EEC Concerted Research Project). For the measurements...... a Siemens Magnetom wholebody magnetic resonance scanner operating at 1.5 Tesla was used. For comparison six imaging pulse sequences for relaxation time measurements were tested on the same phantom. The spectroscopic pulse sequences all had an accuracy better than 10% of the reference values....

  4. A dispersion-balanced Discrete Fourier Transform of repetitive pulse sequences using temporal Talbot effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Pousa, Carlos R.

    2017-11-01

    We propose a processor based on the concatenation of two fractional temporal Talbot dispersive lines with balanced dispersion to perform the DFT of a repetitive electrical sequence, for its use as a controlled source of optical pulse sequences. The electrical sequence is used to impart the amplitude and phase of a coherent train of optical pulses by use of a modulator placed between the two Talbot lines. The proposal has been built on a representation of the action of fractional Talbot effect on repetitive pulse sequences and a comparison with related results and proposals. It is shown that the proposed system is reconfigurable within a few repetition periods, has the same processing rate as the input optical pulse train, and requires the same technical complexity in terms of dispersion and pulse width as the standard, passive pulse-repetition rate multipliers based on fractional Talbot effect.

  5. Investigation of the Effect of Finite Pulse Errors on BABA Pulse Sequence Using Floquet-Magnus Expansion Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene S; Reid, Alicia E

    This paper presents the study of finite pulse widths for the BABA pulse sequence using the Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) approach. In the FME scheme, the first order F 1 is identical to its counterparts in average Hamiltonian theory (AHT) and Floquet theory (FT). However, the timing part in the FME approach is introduced via the Λ 1 ( t ) function not present in other schemes. This function provides an easy way for evaluating the spin evolution during "the time in between" through the Magnus expansion of the operator connected to the timing part of the evolution. The evaluation of Λ 1 ( t ) is useful especially for the analysis of the non-stroboscopic evolution. Here, the importance of the boundary conditions, which provides a natural choice of Λ 1 (0) is ignored. This work uses the Λ 1 ( t ) function to compare the efficiency of the BABA pulse sequence with δ - pulses and the BABA pulse sequence with finite pulses. Calculations of Λ 1 ( t ) and F 1 are presented.

  6. Chirped pulse digital holography for measuring the sequence of ultrafast optical wavefronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Naoki

    2018-04-01

    Optical setups for measuring the sequence of ultrafast optical wavefronts using a chirped pulse as a reference wave in digital holography are proposed and analyzed. In this method, multiple ultrafast object pulses are used to probe the temporal evolution of ultrafast phenomena and they are interfered with a chirped reference wave to record a digital hologram. Wavefronts at different times can be reconstructed separately from the recorded hologram when the reference pulse can be treated as a quasi-monochromatic wave during the pulse width of each object pulse. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by numerical simulation.

  7. Improved WATERGATE Pulse Sequences for Solvent Suppression in NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maili; Mao, Xi-an; Ye, Chaohui; Huang, He; Nicholson, Jeremy K.; Lindon, John C.

    1998-05-01

    Modifications to the WATERGATE method for removing the solvent resonance from1H NMR spectra are presented. In the conventional WATERGATE, a pulse train with three pairs of symmetric pulses in the form 3α-τ-9α-τ-19α-τ-19α-τ-9α-τ-3α (designated here W3), where 26α = 180°, is used, while the improved versions use four and five pairs of symmetric pulses (designated here W4 and W5), respectively. The modified methods provide narrower noninversion regions and hence enhance the sensitivities of the peaks close to the water resonance. The inversion and suppression profiles of the pulse trains W3, W4, and W5 are compared theoretically and experimentally and good agreement is obtained.

  8. Pulse sequences for dynamical decoupling in an optical lattice broadened by temporal frequency drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Christopher R.; Zhuang, Chao; Cruz, Luciano S.; Maneshi, Samansa; Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    2009-05-01

    Despite the very long internal coherence time, transverse drift through an inhomogeneously broadened lattice leads to a rapid decay of a pulse-echo signal. We use higher-order echoes, or dynamical decoupling, to probe and subsequently eliminate the effects of this drift. We study the optimal structure of these pulse sequences for simultaneously canceling out different orders of the effect.

  9. Estimate of pulse-sequence data acquisition system for multi-dimensional measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Yasunori; Sakae, Takeji; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Matoba, Masaru [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Matsumoto, Yuzuru

    1996-07-01

    A pulse-sequence data acquisition system has been newly designed and estimated for the measurement of one- or multi-dimensional pulse train coming from radiation detectors. In this system, in order to realize the pulse-sequence data acquisition, the arrival time of each pulse is recorded to a memory of a personal computer (PC). For the multi-dimensional data acquisition with several input channels, each arrival-time data is tagged with a `flag` which indicates the input channel of arriving pulse. Counting losses due to the existence of processing time of the PC are expected to be reduced by using a First-In-First-Out (FIFO) memory unit. In order to verify this system, a computer simulation was performed, Various sets of random pulse trains with different mean pulse rate (1-600 kcps) were generated by using Monte Carlo simulation technique. Those pulse trains were dealt with another code which simulates the newly-designed data acquisition system including a FIFO memory unit; the memory size was assumed to be 0-100 words. And the recorded pulse trains on the PC with the various FIFO memory sizes have been observed. From the result of the simulation, it appears that the system with 3 words FIFO memory unit works successfully up to the pulse rate of 10 kcps without any severe counting losses. (author)

  10. Estimate of pulse-sequence data acquisition system for multi-dimensional measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Yasunori; Sakae, Takeji; Nohtomi, Akihiro; Matoba, Masaru; Matsumoto, Yuzuru.

    1996-01-01

    A pulse-sequence data acquisition system has been newly designed and estimated for the measurement of one- or multi-dimensional pulse train coming from radiation detectors. In this system, in order to realize the pulse-sequence data acquisition, the arrival time of each pulse is recorded to a memory of a personal computer (PC). For the multi-dimensional data acquisition with several input channels, each arrival-time data is tagged with a 'flag' which indicates the input channel of arriving pulse. Counting losses due to the existence of processing time of the PC are expected to be reduced by using a First-In-First-Out (FIFO) memory unit. In order to verify this system, a computer simulation was performed, Various sets of random pulse trains with different mean pulse rate (1-600 kcps) were generated by using Monte Carlo simulation technique. Those pulse trains were dealt with another code which simulates the newly-designed data acquisition system including a FIFO memory unit; the memory size was assumed to be 0-100 words. And the recorded pulse trains on the PC with the various FIFO memory sizes have been observed. From the result of the simulation, it appears that the system with 3 words FIFO memory unit works successfully up to the pulse rate of 10 kcps without any severe counting losses. (author)

  11. Comparison of ompP5 sequence-based typing and pulsed-filed gel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, comparison of the outer membrane protein P5 gene (ompP5) sequence-based typing with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for the genotyping of Haemophilus parasuis, the 15 serovar reference strains and 43 isolates were investigated. When comparing the two methods, 31 ompP5 sequence types ...

  12. PuLSE: Quality control and quantification of peptide sequences explored by phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shave, Steven; Mann, Stefan; Koszela, Joanna; Kerr, Alastair; Auer, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    The design of highly diverse phage display libraries is based on assumption that DNA bases are incorporated at similar rates within the randomized sequence. As library complexity increases and expected copy numbers of unique sequences decrease, the exploration of library space becomes sparser and the presence of truly random sequences becomes critical. We present the program PuLSE (Phage Library Sequence Evaluation) as a tool for assessing randomness and therefore diversity of phage display libraries. PuLSE runs on a collection of sequence reads in the fastq file format and generates tables profiling the library in terms of unique DNA sequence counts and positions, translated peptide sequences, and normalized 'expected' occurrences from base to residue codon frequencies. The output allows at-a-glance quantitative quality control of a phage library in terms of sequence coverage both at the DNA base and translated protein residue level, which has been missing from toolsets and literature. The open source program PuLSE is available in two formats, a C++ source code package for compilation and integration into existing bioinformatics pipelines and precompiled binaries for ease of use.

  13. Short pulse acquisition by low sampling rate with phase-coded sequence in lidar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Long; Xu, Jiajia; Lv, Wentao; Yang, Xiaocheng

    2016-11-01

    The requirement of high range resolution results in impractical collection of every returned laser pulse due to the limited response speed of imaging detectors. This paper proposes a phase coded sequence acquisition method for signal preprocessing. The system employs an m-sequence with N bits for demonstration with the detector controlled to accumulate N+1 bits of the echo signals to deduce one single returned laser pulse. An indoor experiment achieved 2 μs resolution with the sampling period of 28 μs by employing a 15-bit m-sequence. This method shows the potential to improve the detection capabilities of narrow laser pulses with the detectors at a low frame rate, especially for the imaging lidar systems. Meanwhile, the lidar system is able to improve the range resolution with available detectors of restricted performance.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the Achilles tendon using ultrashort TE (UTE) pulse sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, M.D.; Benjamin, M.; Gishen, P.; Bydder, G.M. E-mail: gbydder@ucsd.edu

    2004-08-01

    AIM: To assess the potential value of imaging the Achilles tendon with ultrashort echo time (UTE) pulse sequences. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four normal controls and four patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were examined in the sagittal and transverse planes. Three of the patients were examined before and after intravenous gadodiamide. RESULTS: The fascicular pattern was clearly demonstrated within the tendon and detail of the three distinct fibrocartilaginous components of an 'enthesis organ' was well seen. T2* measurements showed two short T2* components. Increase in long T2 components with reduction in short T2 components was seen in tendinopathy. Contrast enhancement was much more extensive than with conventional sequences in two cases of tendinopathy but in a third case, there was a region of reduced enhancement. CONCLUSION: UTE pulse sequences provide anatomical detail not apparent with conventional sequences, demonstrate differences in T2* and show patterns of both increased and decreased enhancement in tendinopathy.

  15. Correction of echo shift in reconstruction processing for ultra-short TE pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Masahiro; Ootsuka, Takehiro; Abe, Takayuki; Takahashi, Tetsuhiko

    2010-01-01

    An ultra-short echo time (TE) pulse sequence is composed of a radial sampling that acquires echo signals radially in the K-space and a half-echo acquisition that acquires only half of the echo signal. The shift in the position of the echo signal (echo shift) caused by the timing errors in the gradient magnetic field pulses affects the image quality in the radial sampling with the half-echo acquisition. To improve image quality, we have developed a signal correction algorithm that detects and eliminates this echo shift during reconstruction by performing a pre-scan within 10 seconds. The results showed that image quality is improved under oblique and/or off-centering conditions that frequently cause image distortion due to hardware error. In conclusion, we have developed a robust ultra-short TE pulse sequence that allows wide latitude in the scan parameters, including oblique and off-centering conditions. (author)

  16. Comparison of ompP5 sequence-based typing and pulsed-filed gel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-15

    Mar 15, 2012 ... In this study, comparison of the outer membrane protein P5 gene (ompP5) sequence-based typing with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for the genotyping of Haemophilus parasuis, the 15 serovar reference strains and 43 isolates were investigated. When comparing the two methods, 31 ompP5.

  17. MRI of the brain with ultra-short echo-time pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, A; Rees, J H; Brock, C S; Robson, M D; Gatehouse, P D; Bydder, G M

    2003-12-01

    As well as the long-T2 relaxation components normally detected with conventional imaging techniques, the brain has short-T2 components. We wished to use ultra-short (0.08 ms) echo time (UTE) pulse sequences to assess the feasibility of imaging these in normal subjects and patients. UTE sequences were employed, with or without fat suppression, 90 degree long-T2 suppression pulses, and selective nulling of long-T2 components using an inversion pulse. Subtraction of later echoes from the first was also used to reduce the signal from long-T2 components. We studied dive normal subjects and 15 patients with various diseases. Short-T2 components were demonstrated in grey and white matter. Increased signal from these components was seen in meningeal disease, probable calcification, presumed cavernomas, melanoma metastases and probable gliosis. Reduced signal was seen in some tumours, infarcts, mild multifocal vascular disease and vasogenic oedema. Further development and evaluation of these pulse sequences is warranted.

  18. MRI of the brain with ultra-short echo-time pulse sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, A. [Department of Imaging, Charing Cross Hospital, Fulham Palace Road, W6 8RF, London (United Kingdom); Rees, J.H. [Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, W1N 3BG, London (United Kingdom); Brock, C.S. [Department of Oncology, Charing Cross Hospital, Fulham Palace Road, W6 8RF, London (United Kingdom); Robson, M.D. [Oxford University Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research, MRS Unit, John Radcliffe Hospital, OX3 9DU, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gatehouse, P.D. [The Cardiac MR Unit, Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney Street, SW3 6NP, London (United Kingdom); Bydder, G.M. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, 200 West Arbor Drive, CA 92103-8756, San Diego (United States)

    2003-12-01

    As well as the long-T2 relaxation components normally detected with conventional imaging techniques, the brain has short-T2 components. We wished to use ultra-short (0.08 ms) echo time (UTE) pulse sequences to assess the feasibility of imaging these in normal subjects and patients. UTE sequences were employed, with or without fat suppression, 90 degree long-T2 suppression pulses, and selective nulling of long-T2 components using an inversion pulse. Subtraction of later echoes from the first was also used to reduce the signal from long-T2 components. We studied dive normal subjects and 15 patients with various diseases. Short-T2 components were demonstrated in grey and white matter. Increased signal from these components was seen in meningeal disease, probable calcification, presumed cavernomas, melanoma metastases and probable gliosis. Reduced signal was seen in some tumours, infarcts, mild multifocal vascular disease and vasogenic oedema. Further development and evaluation of these pulse sequences is warranted. (orig.)

  19. Pulseq: A rapid and hardware-independent pulse sequence prototyping framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Kelvin J; Kroboth, Stefan; Jia, Feng; Littin, Sebastian; Yu, Huijun; Leupold, Jochen; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Stöcker, Tony; Zaitsev, Maxim

    2017-04-01

    Implementing new magnetic resonance experiments, or sequences, often involves extensive programming on vendor-specific platforms, which can be time consuming and costly. This situation is exacerbated when research sequences need to be implemented on several platforms simultaneously, for example, at different field strengths. This work presents an alternative programming environment that is hardware-independent, open-source, and promotes rapid sequence prototyping. A novel file format is described to efficiently store the hardware events and timing information required for an MR pulse sequence. Platform-dependent interpreter modules convert the file to appropriate instructions to run the sequence on MR hardware. Sequences can be designed in high-level languages, such as MATLAB, or with a graphical interface. Spin physics simulation tools are incorporated into the framework, allowing for comparison between real and virtual experiments. Minimal effort is required to implement relatively advanced sequences using the tools provided. Sequences are executed on three different MR platforms, demonstrating the flexibility of the approach. A high-level, flexible and hardware-independent approach to sequence programming is ideal for the rapid development of new sequences. The framework is currently not suitable for large patient studies or routine scanning although this would be possible with deeper integration into existing workflows. Magn Reson Med 77:1544-1552, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Single shot three-dimensional pulse sequence for hyperpolarized13C MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiazheng; Wright, Alan J; Hu, De-En; Hesketh, Richard; Brindle, Kevin M

    2017-02-01

    Metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized 13 C-labeled cell substrates is a promising technique for imaging tissue metabolism in vivo. However, the transient nature of the hyperpolarization, and its depletion following excitation, limits the imaging time and the number of excitation pulses that can be used. We describe here a single-shot three-dimensional (3D) imaging sequence and demonstrate its capability to generate 13 C MR images in tumor-bearing mice injected with hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]pyruvate. The pulse sequence acquires a stack-of-spirals at two spin echoes after a single excitation pulse and encodes the kz-dimension in an interleaved manner to enhance robustness to B 0 inhomogeneity. Spectral-spatial pulses are used to acquire dynamic 3D images from selected hyperpolarized 13 C-labeled metabolites. A nominal spatial/temporal resolution of 1.25 × 1.25 × 2.5 mm 3  × 2 s was achieved in tumor images of hyperpolarized [1- 13 C]pyruvate and [1- 13 C]lactate acquired in vivo. Higher resolution in the z-direction, with a different k-space trajectory, was demonstrated in measurements on a thermally polarized [1- 13 C]lactate phantom. The pulse sequence is capable of imaging hyperpolarized 13 C-labeled substrates at relatively high spatial and temporal resolutions and is robust to moderate system imperfections. Magn Reson Med 77:740-752, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. Application of Optimal Control Theory in Solid-State NMR. Time-Suspension Multiple-Pulse Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamiya, J. H.; Callahan, J.; Sinton, S. W.; Drobny, G. P.

    Optimal control theory (computer-aided design and optimization) is applied in a search for new time-suspension pulse sequences which scale both linear and bilinear spin interactions to zero. This computer-aided approach allows one to rapidly examine and assess the characteristics of different time-suspension pulse sequences. The objective of our search is to find a sequence which operates effectively at modest RF field strengths. The initial result of this search is a simple semiwindowless, four-pulse sequence. The basic structure of this sequence is similar to that of a semiwindowless WAHUHA sequence, but with different pulse tip angles and delays resulting from the requirements for maximum overall scaling of the homonuclear dipole-dipole and chemical-shift Hamiltonians. Theoretical results are presented on how this sequence behaves with regard to resonance offsets and spin system parameters (couplings and chemical shifts). The experimental line-narrowing performance of this sequence as a function of RF field strength and resonance offset is examined and its performance is compared to those of two other time-suspension pulse sequences as well as the theoretical predictions. At moderate RF field strengths and small resonance offsets, this new sequence is found to perform reasonably well, but line-narrowing performance improves at higher RF field strengths or large resonance offsets. The experimental results corroborate the theoretical expectations. Possible applications for the use of this sequence, in particular solid-state imaging, are discussed.

  2. Steady state effects in a two-pulse diffusion-weighted sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, Mikhail; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Price, William S; Stilbs, Peter

    2015-04-21

    In conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion measurements a significant amount of experimental time is used up by magnetization recovery, serving to prevent the formation of the steady state, as in the latter case the manifestation of diffusion is modulated by multiple applications of the pulse sequence and conventional diffusion coefficient inference procedures are generally not applicable. Here, an analytical expression for diffusion-related effects in a two-pulse NMR experiment (e.g., pulsed-gradient spin echo) in the steady state mode (with repetition times less than the longitudinal relaxation time of the sample) is derived by employing a Fourier series expansion within the solution of the Bloch-Torrey equations. Considerations are given for the transition conditions between the full relaxation and the steady state experiment description. The diffusion coefficient of a polymer solution (polyethylene glycol) is measured by a two-pulse sequence in the full relaxation mode and for a range of repetition times, approaching the rapid steady state experiment. The precision of the fitting employing the presented steady state solution by far exceeds that of the conventional fitting. Additionally, numerical simulations are performed yielding results strongly supporting the proposed description of the NMR diffusion measurements in the steady state.

  3. Steady state effects in a two-pulse diffusion-weighted sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubkov, Mikhail; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Price, William S.; Stilbs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In conventional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) diffusion measurements a significant amount of experimental time is used up by magnetization recovery, serving to prevent the formation of the steady state, as in the latter case the manifestation of diffusion is modulated by multiple applications of the pulse sequence and conventional diffusion coefficient inference procedures are generally not applicable. Here, an analytical expression for diffusion-related effects in a two-pulse NMR experiment (e.g., pulsed-gradient spin echo) in the steady state mode (with repetition times less than the longitudinal relaxation time of the sample) is derived by employing a Fourier series expansion within the solution of the Bloch-Torrey equations. Considerations are given for the transition conditions between the full relaxation and the steady state experiment description. The diffusion coefficient of a polymer solution (polyethylene glycol) is measured by a two-pulse sequence in the full relaxation mode and for a range of repetition times, approaching the rapid steady state experiment. The precision of the fitting employing the presented steady state solution by far exceeds that of the conventional fitting. Additionally, numerical simulations are performed yielding results strongly supporting the proposed description of the NMR diffusion measurements in the steady state

  4. MRI of the brain stem using fluid attenuated inversion recivery pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Coene, B.; Hajnal, J.V.; Pennock, J.M.; Bydder, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    Heavily T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences with inversion times of 2000-2500 ms and echo times of 130-200 ms were used to image the brain stem of a normal adult and five patients. These sequences produce high signal from many white matter tracts and display high lesion contrast. The corticospinal and parietopontine tracts, lateral and medial lemnisci, superior and inferior cerebellar peduncles, medial longitudinal fasciculi, thalamo-olivary tracts the cuneate and gracile fasiculi gave high signal and were directly visualised. The oculomotor and trigeminal nerves were demonstrated within the brain stem. Lesions not seen with conventional T2-weighted spin echo sequences were seen with high contrast in patients with infarction, multiple sclerosis, sarcoidosis, chunt obstruction and metastatic tumour. The anatomical detail and high lesion contrast given by the FLAIR pulse sequence appear likely to be of value in diagnosis of disease in the brain stem. (orig.)

  5. Normal Evoked Response to Rapid Sequences of Tactile Pulses in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Ganesan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a developmental disorder diagnosed behaviorally, with many documented neurophysiological abnormalities in cortical response properties. While abnormal sensory processing is not considered core to the disorder, most ASD individuals report sensory processing abnormalities. Yet, the neurophysiological correlates of these abnormalities have not been fully mapped. In the auditory domain, studies have shown that cortical responses in the early auditory cortex in ASD are abnormal in multiple ways. In particular, it has been shown that individuals with ASD who were also language impaired, have abnormal cortical auditory evoked responses to rapid, but not slow, sequences of tones. Here, we tested the somatosensory domain in ASD for abnormalities in rapid processing of tactile pulses, to determine whether abnormalities there parallel those observed in the auditory domain. Specifically, we tested the somatosensory cortex response to a sequence of two tactile pulses with different (short and long temporal separation. We analyzed the responses in cortical space, in primary somatosensory cortex. As expected, we found no group difference in the evoked response to pulses with long temporal separation. Contrary to findings in the auditory domain and to our hypothesis, we also found no group differences in the evoked responses to the sequence with a short temporal separation. These results suggest that rapid temporal processing deficits in ASD are not generalized across multiple sensory domains, and are unlikely to underlie the behavioral somatosensory abnormalities observed in ASD.

  6. Evaluation of knee meniscus lesions using MRI - a comparative study of pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Artur da Rocha C.; Vilela, Sonia de Aguiar; Turrini, Elisabeth; Lederman, Henrique M.

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of knee disability after injuries has become higher, in this context meniscal lesions keep an important role. This study evaluated 34 MR exams using 1.5-T system (Signa; GE). In this group 26 had 4 sequences (5 acquisitions); 2 coronal (T1, MPGR), 3 sagittal (T1, T2, proton density). The aim of this study was to evaluate the MR pulse sequence's reproducibility and observer variability. Two readers (A and B) reviewed the exams using the same criteria. The reader A reviewed all sequences for each patient; the reader B reviewed the individual sequences at random on two separate occasions, 6 months apart. The signal expression of meniscal lesion is more evident with T1 (short TR/short TE) sagittal; however, in this sequence the results were less consistent. The sagittal proton density (long TR/short TE) was very close to be the idea sequence: had good concordance among the readings of readers A and B. Kappa concordance test showed best result for sagittal proton density images (Kw = 0.84). (author)

  7. Influence of potential pulses amplitude sequence in a voltammetric electronic tongue (VET) applied to assess antioxidant capacity in aliso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Esteban; Alcañiz, Miguel; Contat, Laura; Baldeón, Edwin O; Barat, José M; Grau, Raúl

    2017-06-01

    Four signals configurations were studied, two of them built by small increases of potential and two with bigger increments. The highest current values were obtained when pulses with bigger change of potential were used although the best results were shown by the pulse sequence which included an intermediate pulse before the relevant pulse. A mathematical model based on trolox pattern was developed to predict antioxidant capacity of aliso, employing information obtained from all the electrodes, although model validation could be done only employing the information from gold electrode. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of different pulse sequences for in vivo determination of T1 relaxation times in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    ). T1 measurements were performed on the human brain using a whole body MR scanner operating at 1.5 tesla. Three different pulse sequences were compared including two 6-points inversion recovery (IR) sequences with TR = 2.0 s and 4.0, respectively, and a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery...

  9. Comparison of different pulse sequences for in vivo determination of T1 relaxation times in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative in vivo determination of T1 relaxation times by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is hampered by several potential sources of error. This study focused on the influence of the radiofrequency pulse sequences applied with special attention to the significance of the repetition time (TR......). T1 measurements were performed on the human brain using a whole body MR scanner operating at 1.5 tesla. Three different pulse sequences were compared including two 6-points inversion recovery (IR) sequences with TR = 2.0 s and 4.0, respectively, and a 12-points partial saturation inversion recovery...

  10. Comparison of MRI pulse sequences for investigation of lesions of the cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campi, A.; Pontesilli, S.; Gerevini, S.; Scotti, G. [San Raffaele Hospital, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2000-09-01

    Small spinal cord lesions, even if clinically significant, can be due to the low sensitivity of some pulse sequences. We compared T2-weighted fast (FSE), and conventional (CSE) spin-echo and short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR)-FSE overlooked on MRI sequences to evaluate their sensitivity to and specificity for lesions of different types. We compared the three sequences in MRI of 57 patients with cervical spinal symptoms. The image sets were assessed by two of us individually for final diagnosis, lesion detectability and image quality. Both readers arrived at the same final diagnoses with all sequences, differentiating four groups of patients. Group 1 (30 patients, 53 %), with a final diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Demyelinating lesions were better seen on STIR-FSE images, on which the number of lesions was significantly higher than on FSE, while the FSE and CSE images showed approximately equal numbers of lesions; additional lesions were found in 9 patients. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of 17 demyelinating lesions was significantly higher on STIR-FSE images than with the other sequences. Group 2, 19 patients (33 %) with cervical pain, 15 of whom had disc protrusion or herniation: herniated discs were equally well delineated with all sequences, with better myelographic effect on FSE. In five patients with intrinsic spinal cord abnormalities, the conspicuity and demarcation of the lesions were similar with STIR-FSE and FSE. Group 3, 4 patients (7 %) with acute myelopathy of unknown aetiology. In two patients, STIR-FSE gave better demarcation of lesions and in one a questionable additional lesions. Group 4, 4 patients (7 %) with miscellaneous final diagnoses. STIR-FSE had high sensitivity to demyelinating lesions, can be considered quite specific and should be included in spinal MRI for assessment of suspected demyelinating disease. (orig.)

  11. Generalized min-max bound-based MRI pulse sequence design framework for wide-range T1 relaxometry: A case study on the tissue specific imaging sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new design strategy for optimizing MRI pulse sequences for T1 relaxometry. The design strategy optimizes the pulse sequence parameters to minimize the maximum variance of unbiased T1 estimates over a range of T1 values using the Cramér-Rao bound. In contrast to prior sequences optimized for a single nominal T1 value, the optimized sequence using our bound-based strategy achieves improved precision and accuracy for a broad range of T1 estimates within a clinically feasible scan time. The optimization combines the downhill simplex method with a simulated annealing process. To show the effectiveness of the proposed strategy, we optimize the tissue specific imaging (TSI sequence. Preliminary Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the optimized TSI sequence yields improved precision and accuracy over the popular driven-equilibrium single-pulse observation of T1 (DESPOT1 approach for normal brain tissues (estimated T1 700-2000 ms at 3.0T. The relative mean estimation error (MSE for T1 estimation is less than 1.7% using the optimized TSI sequence, as opposed to less than 7.0% using DESPOT1 for normal brain tissues. The optimized TSI sequence achieves good stability by keeping the MSE under 7.0% over larger T1 values corresponding to different lesion tissues and the cerebrospinal fluid (up to 5000 ms. The T1 estimation accuracy using the new pulse sequence also shows improvement, which is more pronounced in low SNR scenarios.

  12. Investigation of timing effects in modified composite quadrupolar echo pulse sequences by mean of average Hamiltonian theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene Stephane

    2018-01-01

    The utility of the average Hamiltonian theory and its antecedent the Magnus expansion is presented. We assessed the concept of convergence of the Magnus expansion in quadrupolar spectroscopy of spin-1 via the square of the magnitude of the average Hamiltonian. We investigated this approach for two specific modified composite pulse sequences: COM-Im and COM-IVm. It is demonstrated that the size of the square of the magnitude of zero order average Hamiltonian obtained on the appropriated basis is a viable approach to study the convergence of the Magnus expansion. The approach turns to be efficient in studying pulse sequences in general and can be very useful to investigate coherent averaging in the development of high resolution NMR technique in solids. This approach allows comparing theoretically the two modified composite pulse sequences COM-Im and COM-IVm. We also compare theoretically the current modified composite sequences (COM-Im and COM-IVm) to the recently published modified composite pulse sequences (MCOM-I, MCOM-IV, MCOM-I_d, MCOM-IV_d).

  13. Pulse sequences and visualization of instruments; Pulssequenzen und Visualisierung von Instrumenten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, E.M. [University Hospitals of Cleveland and Case Western Reserve University, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology]|[Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie; Wendt, M.; Chung, Y.C.; Duerk, J.L. [University Hospitals of Cleveland and Case Western Reserve University, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology]|[University Hospitals of Cleveland and Case Western Reserve University, OH (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering; Lewin, J.S. [University Hospitals of Cleveland and Case Western Reserve University, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-03-01

    While initially advocated primarily for intrasurgical visualization (e.g., craniotomy), interventional MRI rapidly evolved into roles in image-guided localization for needle-based procedures, minimally invasive neurosurgical procedures, and thermal ablation of cancer. In this contest, MRI pulse sequences and scanning methods serve one of four primary roles: (1) speed improvement, (2) device localization, (3) anatomy/lesion differentiation and (4) temperature sensitivity. The first part of this manuscript deals with passive visualization of MR-compatible needles and the effects of field strength, sequence design, and orientation of the needle relative to the static magnetic field of the scanner. Issues and recommendations are given for low-field as well as high-field scanners. The second part contains methods reported to achieve improved acquisition efficiency over conventional phase encoding (wavelets, locally focused imaging, singular value decomposition and keyhole imaging). Finally, the last part of the manuscrpt reports the current status of thermosensitive sequences and their dependence on spinlattice relaxation time (T1), water diffusion coefficient (D) and proton chemical shift ({delta}). (orig.) [Deutsch] Nachdem die interventionelle MRT zunaechst nur bei neurochirurgischen Eingriffen Anwendung fand, umfasst das Indikationsspektrum mittlerweile Biopsien, minimalinvasive neurochirurgische Therapieverfahren sowie Thermoblationen von Tumoren. Hierbei werden besondere Anforderungen an das Sequenzdesign gestellt: 1. Verkuerzte Messzeit, 2. Visualisierung von Instrumenten, 3. klare Abgrenzbarkeit von Laesionen und 4. Thermosensitivitaet. Der erste Abschnitt der Arbeit behinhaltet die passive Visualisierung MR-kompatibler Nadeln und den Einfluss von Feldstaerke, Sequenzdesign sowie der Ausrichtung der Nadel im Bezug auf das statische Magnetfeld des Tomographen. Sowohl fuer Niederfeld- als auch fuer Hochfeldtomographen werden diesbezueglich praktische Empfehlungen

  14. Simulations of NMR pulse sequences during equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemical exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helgstrand, Magnus; Haerd, Torleif; Allard, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The McConnell equations combine the differential equations for a simple two-state chemical exchange process with the Bloch differential equations for a classical description of the behavior of nuclear spins in a magnetic field. This equation system provides a useful starting point for the analysis of slow, intermediate and fast chemical exchange studied using a variety of NMR experiments. The McConnell equations are in the mathematical form of an inhomogeneous system of first-order differential equations. Here we rewrite the McConnell equations in a homogeneous form in order to facilitate fast and simple numerical calculation of the solution to the equation system. The McConnell equations can only treat equilibrium chemical exchange. We therefore also present a homogeneous equation system that can handle both equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemical processes correctly, as long as the kinetics is of first-order. Finally, the same method of rewriting the inhomogeneous form of the McConnell equations into a homogeneous form is applied to a quantum mechanical treatment of a spin system in chemical exchange. In order to illustrate the homogeneous McConnell equations, we have simulated pulse sequences useful for measuring exchange rates in slow, intermediate and fast chemical exchange processes. A stopped-flow NMR experiment was simulated using the equations for non-equilibrium chemical exchange. The quantum mechanical treatment was tested by the simulation of a sensitivity enhanced 15 N-HSQC with pulsed field gradients during slow chemical exchange and by the simulation of the transfer efficiency of a two-dimensional heteronuclear cross-polarization based experiment as a function of both chemical shift difference and exchange rate constants

  15. Multishot versus single-shot pulse sequences in very high field fMRI: a comparison using retinotopic mapping.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jascha D Swisher

    Full Text Available High-resolution functional MRI is a leading application for very high field (7 Tesla human MR imaging. Though higher field strengths promise improvements in signal-to-noise ratios (SNR and BOLD contrast relative to fMRI at 3 Tesla, these benefits may be partially offset by accompanying increases in geometric distortion and other off-resonance effects. Such effects may be especially pronounced with the single-shot EPI pulse sequences typically used for fMRI at standard field strengths. As an alternative, one might consider multishot pulse sequences, which may lead to somewhat lower temporal SNR than standard EPI, but which are also often substantially less susceptible to off-resonance effects. Here we consider retinotopic mapping of human visual cortex as a practical test case by which to compare examples of these sequence types for high-resolution fMRI at 7 Tesla. We performed polar angle retinotopic mapping at each of 3 isotropic resolutions (2.0, 1.7, and 1.1 mm using both accelerated single-shot 2D EPI and accelerated multishot 3D gradient-echo pulse sequences. We found that single-shot EPI indeed led to greater temporal SNR and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR than the multishot sequences. However, additional distortion correction in postprocessing was required in order to fully realize these advantages, particularly at higher resolutions. The retinotopic maps produced by both sequence types were qualitatively comparable, and showed equivalent test/retest reliability. Thus, when surface-based analyses are planned, or in other circumstances where geometric distortion is of particular concern, multishot pulse sequences could provide a viable alternative to single-shot EPI.

  16. Detection of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage at Acute and Subacute/Chronic Stages: Comparison of Four Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences and Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Kang Yuan

    2005-03-01

    Conclusion: FLAIR and GE T2* MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are all statistically significant indicators of acute SAH. GE T2*-weighted images are statistically significant indicators of subacute-to-chronic SAH, whereas other MRI pulse sequences, and CT scans, are not.

  17. Incidental liver lesions: diagnostic value of cadence contrast pulse sequencing (CPS) and SonoVue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuzen, A; Tranquart, F

    2004-10-01

    The widespread use of modern imaging modalities has led to an increase in the frequency of detecting coincidental focal liver lesions (cysts, haemangiomas, focal nodular hyperplasia, adenoma, focal fatty sparing and infiltration) in patients with no symptoms of liver disease. A positive diagnosis is needed to avoid overinvestigation or protracted follow-up. The limitations of conventional sonography have led to the use of other imaging modalities and invasive or costly procedures such as CT, MRI or biopsy. The availability of real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging (CEUS) has changed the strategy in the characterization of such lesions without inconvenience for the patient. Cadence contrast pulse sequencing (CPS) gives strong contrast signals as well as simultaneous acquisition of conventional scans for a perfect match of these two images. In our personal experience, in comparison with reference imaging, CPS with SonoVue has differentiated benign from malignant lesions in all cases and has accurately characterized 96% of lesions. These results are slightly better than those reported in the literature, probably because of the higher sensitivity of CPS in detecting bubbles, whether flowing or stationary, and also because of the possibility of matching simultaneously recorded contrast and conventional images which reinforces confidence in lesion assessment. The high diagnostic value of CEUS makes this method a candidate to be considered a reference imaging modality for incidental lesions.

  18. Pulseq-Graphical Programming Interface: Open source visual environment for prototyping pulse sequences and integrated magnetic resonance imaging algorithm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthi Sravan, R; Potdar, Sneha; Poojar, Pavan; Reddy, Ashok Kumar; Kroboth, Stefan; Nielsen, Jon-Fredrik; Zaitsev, Maxim; Venkatesan, Ramesh; Geethanath, Sairam

    2018-03-11

    To provide a single open-source platform for comprehensive MR algorithm development inclusive of simulations, pulse sequence design and deployment, reconstruction, and image analysis. We integrated the "Pulseq" platform for vendor-independent pulse programming with Graphical Programming Interface (GPI), a scientific development environment based on Python. Our integrated platform, Pulseq-GPI, permits sequences to be defined visually and exported to the Pulseq file format for execution on an MR scanner. For comparison, Pulseq files using either MATLAB only ("MATLAB-Pulseq") or Python only ("Python-Pulseq") were generated. We demonstrated three fundamental sequences on a 1.5 T scanner. Execution times of the three variants of implementation were compared on two operating systems. In vitro phantom images indicate equivalence with the vendor supplied implementations and MATLAB-Pulseq. The examples demonstrated in this work illustrate the unifying capability of Pulseq-GPI. The execution times of all the three implementations were fast (a few seconds). The software is capable of user-interface based development and/or command line programming. The tool demonstrated here, Pulseq-GPI, integrates the open-source simulation, reconstruction and analysis capabilities of GPI Lab with the pulse sequence design and deployment features of Pulseq. Current and future work includes providing an ISMRMRD interface and incorporating Specific Absorption Ratio and Peripheral Nerve Stimulation computations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Optimization of multi-pulse sequences for nonlinear contrast agent imaging using a cMUT array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novell, Anthony; Arena, Christopher B.; Kasoji, Sandeep; Dayton, Paul A.

    2015-04-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology provides advantages such as wide frequency bandwidth, which can be exploited for contrast agent imaging. Nevertheless, the efficiency of traditional multi-pulse imaging schemes, such as pulse inversion (PI), remains limited because of the intrinsic nonlinear character of cMUTs. Recently, a new contrast imaging sequence, called bias voltage modulation sequence (BVM), has been specifically developed for cMUTs to suppress their unwanted nonlinear behavior. In this study, we propose to optimize contrast agent detection by combining the BVM sequence with PI and/or chirp reversal (CR). An aqueous dispersion of lipid encapsulated microbubbles was exposed to several combinations of multi-pulse imaging sequences. Approaches were evaluated in vitro using 9 inter-connected elements of a cMUT linear array (excitation frequency of 4 MHz peak negative pressure of 100 kPa). For sequences using chirp excitations, a specific compression filter was designed to compress and extract several nonlinear components from the received microbubble responses. A satisfactory cancellation of the nonlinear signal from the source is achieved when BVM is combined with PI and CR. In comparison with PI and CR imaging modes alone, using sequences incorporating BVM increases the contrast-to-tissue ratio by 10.0 dB and 4.6 dB, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of BVM with CR and PI results in a significant increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio (+29 dB). This enhancement is attributed to the use of chirps as excitation signals and the improved preservation of several nonlinear components contained within the contrast agent response.

  20. Optimization of multi-pulse sequences for nonlinear contrast agent imaging using a cMUT array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novell, Anthony; Arena, Christopher B; Kasoji, Sandeep; Dayton, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (cMUT) technology provides advantages such as wide frequency bandwidth, which can be exploited for contrast agent imaging. Nevertheless, the efficiency of traditional multi-pulse imaging schemes, such as pulse inversion (PI), remains limited because of the intrinsic nonlinear character of cMUTs. Recently, a new contrast imaging sequence, called bias voltage modulation sequence (BVM), has been specifically developed for cMUTs to suppress their unwanted nonlinear behavior. In this study, we propose to optimize contrast agent detection by combining the BVM sequence with PI and/or chirp reversal (CR). An aqueous dispersion of lipid encapsulated microbubbles was exposed to several combinations of multi-pulse imaging sequences. Approaches were evaluated in vitro using 9 inter-connected elements of a cMUT linear array (excitation frequency of 4 MHz; peak negative pressure of 100 kPa). For sequences using chirp excitations, a specific compression filter was designed to compress and extract several nonlinear components from the received microbubble responses. A satisfactory cancellation of the nonlinear signal from the source is achieved when BVM is combined with PI and CR. In comparison with PI and CR imaging modes alone, using sequences incorporating BVM increases the contrast-to-tissue ratio by 10.0 dB and 4.6 dB, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of BVM with CR and PI results in a significant increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio (+29 dB). This enhancement is attributed to the use of chirps as excitation signals and the improved preservation of several nonlinear components contained within the contrast agent response. (paper)

  1. 1H HR-MAS NMR and S180 cells: metabolite assignment and evaluation of pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Aline L. de; Martinelli, Bruno César B.; Lião, Luciano M.; Pereira, Flávia C.; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisangela P.; Alcantara, Glaucia B.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution magic angle spinning 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS NMR) is a useful technique for evaluation of intact cells and tissues. However, optimal NMR parameters are crucial in obtaining reliable results. To identify the key steps for the optimization of HR-MAS NMR parameters, we assessed different pulse sequences and NMR parameters using sarcoma 180 (S180) cells. A complete assignment of the metabolites of S180 is given to assist future studies. (author)

  2. {sup 1}H HR-MAS NMR and S180 cells: metabolite assignment and evaluation of pulse sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Aline L. de; Martinelli, Bruno César B.; Lião, Luciano M. [Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO (Brazil). Instituto de Química. Lab. de RMN; Pereira, Flávia C.; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisangela P. [Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO (Brazil). Instituto de Ciências Biológicas. Laboratório Genética Molecular e Citogenética; Alcantara, Glaucia B., E-mail: glaucia.alcantara@ufms.br [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Inst. de Química

    2014-07-01

    High resolution magic angle spinning {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS NMR) is a useful technique for evaluation of intact cells and tissues. However, optimal NMR parameters are crucial in obtaining reliable results. To identify the key steps for the optimization of HR-MAS NMR parameters, we assessed different pulse sequences and NMR parameters using sarcoma 180 (S180) cells. A complete assignment of the metabolites of S180 is given to assist future studies. (author)

  3. The Optimization of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences in Order to Better Detection of Multiple Sclerosis Plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshidfar Z.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the most sensitive technique to detect multiple sclerosis (MS plaques in central nervous system. In some cases, the patients who were suspected to MS, Whereas MRI images are normal, but whether patients don’t have MS plaques or MRI images are not enough optimized enough in order to show MS plaques? The aim of the current study is evaluating the efficiency of different MRI sequences in order to better detection of MS plaques. Materials and methods: In this cross-sectional study which was performed at Shohada-E Tajrish in Tehran - Iran hospital between October, 2011 to April, 2012, included 20 patients who suspected to MS disease were selected by the method of random sampling and underwent routine brain Pulse sequences (Axial T2w, Axial T1w, Coronal T2w, Sagittal T1w, Axial FLAIR by Siemens, Avanto, 1.5 Tesla system. If any lesion which is suspected to the MS disease was observed, additional sequences such as: Sagittal FLAIR Fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-water sat was also performed. Results: This study was performed in about 52 lesions and the results in more than 19 lesions showed that, for the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDWw sequence with fat suppression is the best choice, And in nearly 33 plaques located in Periventricular area, FLAIR Fat Sat was the most effective sequence than both PDw fat and water suppression pulse sequences. Conclusion: Although large plaques may visible in all images, but important problem in patients with suspected MS is screening the tiny MS plaques. This study showed that for revealing the MS plaques located in the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDw-fat sat is the most effective sequence, and for MS plaques in the periventricular area, FLAIR fat Sat is the best choice.

  4. The Optimization of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pulse Sequences in Order to Better Detection of Multiple Sclerosis Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshidfar, Z; Faeghi, F; Haghighatkhah, H R; Abdolmohammadi, J

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most sensitive technique to detect multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques in central nervous system. In some cases, the patients who were suspected to MS, Whereas MRI images are normal, but whether patients don't have MS plaques or MRI images are not enough optimized enough in order to show MS plaques? The aim of the current study is evaluating the efficiency of different MRI sequences in order to better detection of MS plaques. In this cross-sectional study which was performed at Shohada-E Tajrish in Tehran - Iran hospital between October, 2011 to April, 2012, included 20 patients who suspected to MS disease were selected by the method of random sampling and underwent routine brain Pulse sequences (Axial T2w, Axial T1w, Coronal T2w, Sagittal T1w, Axial FLAIR) by Siemens, Avanto, 1.5 Tesla system. If any lesion which is suspected to the MS disease was observed, additional sequences such as: Sagittal FLAIR Fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-fat Sat, Sagittal PDw-water sat was also performed. This study was performed in about 52 lesions and the results in more than 19 lesions showed that, for the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDWw sequence with fat suppression is the best choice, And in nearly 33 plaques located in Periventricular area, FLAIR Fat Sat was the most effective sequence than both PDw fat and water suppression pulse sequences. Although large plaques may visible in all images, but important problem in patients with suspected MS is screening the tiny MS plaques. This study showed that for revealing the MS plaques located in the Subcortical and Infratentorial areas, PDw-fat sat is the most effective sequence, and for MS plaques in the periventricular area, FLAIR fat Sat is the best choice.

  5. MR imaging of the knee: Improvement of signal and contrast efficiency of T1-weighted turbo spin echo sequences by applying a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radlbauer, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.radlbauer@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Lomoschitz, Friedrich, E-mail: friedrich.lomoschitz@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Salomonowitz, Erich, E-mail: erich.salomonowitz@stpoelten.lknoe.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Eberhardt, Knut E., E-mail: info@mrt-kompetenzzentrum.d [MRT Competence Center Schloss Werneck, Balthasar-Neumann-Platz 2, 97440 Werneck (Germany); Stadlbauer, Andreas, E-mail: andi@nmr.a [MR Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Landesklinikum St. Poelten, Propst Fuehrer Strasse 4, 3100 St. Poelten (Austria); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse incorporated in a standard T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence as used in our routine MRI protocol for examination of pathologies of the knee. Sixteen consecutive patients with knee disorders were examined using the routine MRI protocol, including T1-weighted TSE-sequences with and without a DRIVE pulse. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of anatomical structures and pathologies were calculated and compared for both sequences. The differences in diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images with and without DRIVE pulse were assessed. SNR was significantly higher on images acquired with DRIVE pulse for fluid, effusion, cartilage and bone. Differences in the SNR of meniscus and muscle between the two sequences were not statistically significant. CNR was significantly increased between muscle and effusion, fluid and cartilage, fluid and meniscus, cartilage and meniscus, bone and cartilage on images acquired using the DRIVE pulse. Diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images was found to be improved for delineation of anatomic structures and for diagnosing a variety of pathologies when a DRIVE pulse is incorporated in the sequence. Incorporation of a DRIVE pulse into a standard T1-weighted TSE-sequence leads to significant increase of SNR and CNR of both, anatomical structures and pathologies, and consequently to an increase in diagnostic value within the same acquisition time.

  6. MR imaging of the knee: Improvement of signal and contrast efficiency of T1-weighted turbo spin echo sequences by applying a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radlbauer, Rudolf; Lomoschitz, Friedrich; Salomonowitz, Erich; Eberhardt, Knut E.; Stadlbauer, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of a driven equilibrium (DRIVE) pulse incorporated in a standard T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence as used in our routine MRI protocol for examination of pathologies of the knee. Sixteen consecutive patients with knee disorders were examined using the routine MRI protocol, including T1-weighted TSE-sequences with and without a DRIVE pulse. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of anatomical structures and pathologies were calculated and compared for both sequences. The differences in diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images with and without DRIVE pulse were assessed. SNR was significantly higher on images acquired with DRIVE pulse for fluid, effusion, cartilage and bone. Differences in the SNR of meniscus and muscle between the two sequences were not statistically significant. CNR was significantly increased between muscle and effusion, fluid and cartilage, fluid and meniscus, cartilage and meniscus, bone and cartilage on images acquired using the DRIVE pulse. Diagnostic value of the T1-weighted images was found to be improved for delineation of anatomic structures and for diagnosing a variety of pathologies when a DRIVE pulse is incorporated in the sequence. Incorporation of a DRIVE pulse into a standard T1-weighted TSE-sequence leads to significant increase of SNR and CNR of both, anatomical structures and pathologies, and consequently to an increase in diagnostic value within the same acquisition time.

  7. A novel DNA restriction technology based on laser pulse energy conversion on sequence-specific bound metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaki, Andrea; Maubach, Gunter; Garwe, Frank; Steinbrueck, Andrea; Koenig, Karsten; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2005-03-01

    DNA restriction is a basic method in today"s molecular biology. Besides application for DNA manipulation, this method is used in DNA analytics for 'restriction analysis'. Thereby DNA is digested by sequence specific restriction enzymes, and the length distribution of the resulting fragments is detected by gel electrophoresis. Differences in the sequence lead to different restriction patterns. A disadvantage of this standard method is the limitation to a small set of fixed sequences, so that the assay can not be adapted to any sequence of interest (e.g. SNP). We designed a scheme for DNA restriction in order to provide access to any desired sequence, based on laser light conversion on sequence-specific positioned metal nanoparticles. Especially gold nanoparticles are known for their interesting optical properties caused by plasmon resonance. The resulting absorption can be used to convert laser light pulses into heat, resulting in nanoparticle destruction. We work on the combination of this principle with DNA-modification of nanoparticles and the sequence-specific binding (hybridization) of these DNA-nanoparticle complexes along DNA molecules. Different mechanisms of light-conversion were studied, and the destructive effect of laser light on the nanoparticles and DNA is demonstrated.

  8. Myocardial tagging by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance: evolution of techniques--pulse sequences, analysis algorithms, and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim El-Sayed H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR tagging has been established as an essential technique for measuring regional myocardial function. It allows quantification of local intramyocardial motion measures, e.g. strain and strain rate. The invention of CMR tagging came in the late eighties, where the technique allowed for the first time for visualizing transmural myocardial movement without having to implant physical markers. This new idea opened the door for a series of developments and improvements that continue up to the present time. Different tagging techniques are currently available that are more extensive, improved, and sophisticated than they were twenty years ago. Each of these techniques has different versions for improved resolution, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, scan time, anatomical coverage, three-dimensional capability, and image quality. The tagging techniques covered in this article can be broadly divided into two main categories: 1 Basic techniques, which include magnetization saturation, spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM, delay alternating with nutations for tailored excitation (DANTE, and complementary SPAMM (CSPAMM; and 2 Advanced techniques, which include harmonic phase (HARP, displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE, and strain encoding (SENC. Although most of these techniques were developed by separate groups and evolved from different backgrounds, they are in fact closely related to each other, and they can be interpreted from more than one perspective. Some of these techniques even followed parallel paths of developments, as illustrated in the article. As each technique has its own advantages, some efforts have been made to combine different techniques together for improved image quality or composite information acquisition. In this review, different developments in pulse sequences and related image processing techniques are described along with the necessities that led to their invention

  9. PET Imaging Stability Measurements During Simultaneous Pulsing of Aggressive MR Sequences on the SIGNA PET/MR System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Timothy W; Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jansen, Floris P; Glover, Gary H

    2018-01-01

    The recent introduction of simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanners has enabled new research taking advantage of the complementary information obtainable with PET and MRI. One such application is kinetic modeling, which requires high levels of PET quantitative stability. To accomplish the required PET stability levels, the PET subsystem must be sufficiently isolated from the effects of MR activity. Performance measurements have previously been published, demonstrating sufficient PET stability in the presence of MR pulsing for typical clinical use; however, PET stability during radiofrequency (RF)-intensive and gradient-intensive sequences has not previously been evaluated for a clinical whole-body scanner. In this work, PET stability of the GE SIGNA PET/MR was examined during simultaneous scanning of aggressive MR pulse sequences. Methods: PET performance tests were acquired with MR idle and during simultaneous MR pulsing. Recent system improvements mitigating RF interference and gain variation were used. A fast recovery fast spin echo MR sequence was selected for high RF power, and an echo planar imaging sequence was selected for its high heat-inducing gradients. Measurements were performed to determine PET stability under varying MR conditions using the following metrics: sensitivity, scatter fraction, contrast recovery, uniformity, count rate performance, and image quantitation. A final PET quantitative stability assessment for simultaneous PET scanning during functional MRI studies was performed with a spiral in-and-out gradient echo sequence. Results: Quantitation stability of a 68 Ge flood phantom was demonstrated within 0.34%. Normalized sensitivity was stable during simultaneous scanning within 0.3%. Scatter fraction measured with a 68 Ge line source in the scatter phantom was stable within the range of 40.4%-40.6%. Contrast recovery and uniformity were comparable for PET images acquired simultaneously with multiple MR conditions. Peak noise equivalent count

  10. Comparison of MRI pulse sequences in defining prostate volume after permanent implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, P.W.; Narayana, V.; Drake, D.G.; Miller, B.M.; Marsh, L.; Chan, J.; Gonda, R.; Winfield, R.J.; Roberson, P.L.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relative value of three MRI pulse sequences in defining the prostate volume after permanent implantation. Methods and Materials: A total of 45 patients who received a permanent 125 I implant were studied. Two weeks after implantation, an axial CT scan (2 mm thickness) and T 1 -weighted, T 1 -weighted fat saturation, and T 2 -weighted axial MRI (3-mm) studies were obtained. The prostate volumes were compared with the initial ultrasound planning volumes, and subsequently the CT, T 1 -weighted, and T 1 -weighted fat saturation MRI volumes were compared with the T 2 -weighted volumes. Discrepancies in volume were evaluated by visual inspection of the registered axial images and the registration of axial volumes on the sagittal T 2 -weighted volumes. In a limited set of patients, pre- and postimplant CT and T 2 -weighted MRI studies were available for comparison to determine whether prostate volume changes after implant were dependent on the imaging modality. Results: T 1 -weighted and T 1 -weighted fat saturation MRI and CT prostate volumes were consistently larger than the T 2 -weighted MRI prostate volumes, with a volume on average 1.33 (SD 0.24) times the T 2 -weighted volume. This discrepancy was due to the superiority of T 2 -weighted MRI for prostate definition at the following critical interfaces: membranous urethra, apex, and anterior base-bladder and posterior base-seminal vesicle interfaces. The differences in prostate definition in the anterior base region suggest that the commonly reported underdose may be due to overestimation of the prostate in this region by CT. The consistent difference in volumes suggests that the degree of swelling observed after implantation is in part a function of the imaging modality. In patients with pre- and postimplant CT and T 2 -weighted MRI images, swelling on the T 2 -weighted images was 1.1 times baseline and on CT was 1.3 times baseline, confirming the imaging modality dependence of prostate

  11. Manipulating femtosecond spin-orbit torques with laser pulse sequences to control magnetic memory states and ringing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingos, P. C.; Wang, J.; Perakis, I. E.

    2015-05-01

    Femtosecond (fs) coherent control of collective order parameters is important for nonequilibrium phase dynamics in correlated materials. Here, we propose such control of ferromagnetic order based on using nonadiabatic optical manipulation of electron-hole (e -h ) photoexcitations to create fs carrier-spin pulses with controllable direction and time profile. These spin pulses are generated due to the time-reversal symmetry breaking arising from nonperturbative spin-orbit and magnetic exchange couplings of coherent photocarriers. By tuning the nonthermal populations of exchange-split, spin-orbit-coupled semiconductor band states, we can excite fs spin-orbit torques that control complex magnetization pathways between multiple magnetic memory states. We calculate the laser-induced fs magnetic anisotropy in the time domain by using density matrix equations of motion rather than the quasiequilibrium free energy. By comparing to pump-probe experiments, we identify a "sudden" out-of-plane magnetization canting displaying fs magnetic hysteresis, which agrees with switchings measured by the static Hall magnetoresistivity. This fs transverse spin-canting switches direction with magnetic state and laser frequency, which distinguishes it from the longitudinal nonlinear optical and demagnetization effects. We propose that sequences of clockwise or counterclockwise fs spin-orbit torques, photoexcited by shaping two-color laser-pulse sequences analogous to multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, can be used to timely suppress or enhance magnetic ringing and switching rotation in magnetic memories.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal pituitary gland using ultrashort TE (UTE) pulse sequences (REV 1.0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portman, Olivia; Flemming, Stephen; Cox, Jeremy P.D.; Johnston, Desmond G. [Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, St Mary' s Hospital, Endocrinology and Metabolic Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Bydder, Graeme M. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the normal pituitary gland in male subjects with ultrashort echo time (TE) pulse sequences, describe its appearance and measure its signal intensity before and after contrast enhancement. Eleven male volunteers (mean age 57.1 years; range 36-81 years) were examined with a fat-suppressed ultrashort TE (= 0.08 ms) pulse sequence. The studies were repeated after the administration of intravenous gadodiamide. The MR scans were examined for gland morphology and signal intensity before and after enhancement. Endocrinological evaluation included baseline pituitary function tests and a glucagon stimulatory test to assess pituitary cortisol and growth hormone reserve. High signal intensity was observed in the anterior pituitary relative to the brain in nine of the 11 subjects. These regions involved the whole of the anterior pituitary in three subjects, were localised to one side in two examples and were seen inferiorly in three subjects. Signal intensities relative to the brain increased with age, with a peak around the sixth or seventh decade and decreasing thereafter. Overall, the pituitary function tests were considered to be within normal limits and did not correlate with pituitary gland signal intensity. The anterior pituitary shows increased signal intensity in normal subjects when examined with T{sub 1}-weighted ultrashort TE pulse sequences. The cause of this increased intensity is unknown, but fibrosis and iron deposition are possible candidates. The variation in signal intensity with age followed the temporal pattern of iron content observed at post mortem. No relationship with endocrine status was observed. (orig.)

  13. Generation of customized ultrahigh repetition rate pulse sequences using superimposed fiber Bragg grattings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Azana, J.; Slavík, Radan; Kockaert, P.; Chen, L. R.; LaRochelle, S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6 (2003), s. 1490-1498 ISSN 0733-8724 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : optical pulse generation * optical fibre filters * optical fibre communication * Bragg gratings Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.983, year: 2003

  14. Genotypic characterization of Salmonella by multilocus sequence typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and amplified fragment length polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torpdahl, Mia; Skov, Marianne N.; Sandvang, Dorthe

    2005-01-01

    subspecies enterica isolates. A total of 25 serotypes were investigated that had been isolated from humans or veterinary sources in Denmark between 1995 and 2001. All isolates were genotyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and amplified fragment length...... polymorphism (AFLP). When making genetic trees, all three methods resulted in similar clustering that often corresponded with serotype, although some serotypes displayed more diversity than others. Of the three techniques, MLST was the easiest to interpret and compare between laboratories. Unfortunately...

  15. Intestinal lesions in pediatric Crohn disease: comparative detectability among pulse sequences at MR enterography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Beomseok; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung [Severance Children' s Hospital, Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hong [Severance Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyung Hwa [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Variable sequences can be used in MR enterography, and no consensus exists for the best protocol in children with Crohn disease. To compare the lesion detectability of various MR enterography sequences and to correlate the findings of these sequences with the Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) in children with Crohn disease. Children with clinically or pathologically confirmed Crohn disease underwent MR enterography, including a single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence, motility imaging (coronal 2-D balanced fast field echo), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast enhancement imaging (including arterial, portal and delayed phases). The lesion detectability of each sequence was graded 0-2 for each involved bowel segment. The lesion detectability and PCDAI result on different sequences were compared using the weighted least squares method and Student's t-test, respectively. Fifteen children (11 boys, 4 girls, mean age 13.7 ± 1.4 years) with a total of 41 lesions were included in this study. All lesions detected in more than two sequences were visible on the single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence. The relative lesion detection rate was 78.1% on motility imaging, 90.2% on DWI, and 92.7% on arterial, 95.1% on portal and 95.1% on delayed phase imaging. Compared to the SSFSE sequence, motility imaging (P < 0.001) and DWI (P = 0.039) demonstrated lower detectability. The mean PCDAI result in the detected lesions was statistically higher only on dynamic enhancement imaging (P < 0.001). All MR enterography sequences were found to have relatively high lesion detectability in children with Crohn disease, while motility imaging showed the lowest lesion detectability. Lesions detected on dynamic enhancement imaging showed a higher PCDAI result, which suggests that this sequence is specific for active inflammation. (orig.)

  16. Intestinal lesions in pediatric Crohn disease: comparative detectability among pulse sequences at MR enterography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Beomseok; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung; Koh, Hong; Han, Kyung Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Variable sequences can be used in MR enterography, and no consensus exists for the best protocol in children with Crohn disease. To compare the lesion detectability of various MR enterography sequences and to correlate the findings of these sequences with the Pediatric Crohn's Disease Activity Index (PCDAI) in children with Crohn disease. Children with clinically or pathologically confirmed Crohn disease underwent MR enterography, including a single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence, motility imaging (coronal 2-D balanced fast field echo), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and dynamic contrast enhancement imaging (including arterial, portal and delayed phases). The lesion detectability of each sequence was graded 0-2 for each involved bowel segment. The lesion detectability and PCDAI result on different sequences were compared using the weighted least squares method and Student's t-test, respectively. Fifteen children (11 boys, 4 girls, mean age 13.7 ± 1.4 years) with a total of 41 lesions were included in this study. All lesions detected in more than two sequences were visible on the single-shot fast spin-echo (SSFSE) sequence. The relative lesion detection rate was 78.1% on motility imaging, 90.2% on DWI, and 92.7% on arterial, 95.1% on portal and 95.1% on delayed phase imaging. Compared to the SSFSE sequence, motility imaging (P < 0.001) and DWI (P = 0.039) demonstrated lower detectability. The mean PCDAI result in the detected lesions was statistically higher only on dynamic enhancement imaging (P < 0.001). All MR enterography sequences were found to have relatively high lesion detectability in children with Crohn disease, while motility imaging showed the lowest lesion detectability. Lesions detected on dynamic enhancement imaging showed a higher PCDAI result, which suggests that this sequence is specific for active inflammation. (orig.)

  17. HV discharge acceleration by sequences of UV laser filaments with visible and near-infrared pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Elise; Rastegari, Ali; Feng, Chengyong; Mongin, Denis; Kamer, Brian; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Arissian, Ladan; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2017-12-01

    We investigate the triggering and guiding of DC high-voltage discharges over a distance of 37 cm by filaments produced by ultraviolet (266 nm) laser pulses of 200 ps duration. The latter reduce the breakdown electric field by half and allow up to 80% discharge probability in an electric field of 920 kV m–1. This high efficiency is not further increased by adding nanosecond pulses in the Joule range at 532 and at 1064 nm. However, the latter statistically increases the guiding length, thereby accelerating the discharge by a factor of 2. This effect is due both to photodetachment and to the heating of the plasma channel, that increases the efficiency of avalanche ionization and reduces electron attachment and recombination.

  18. WE-DE-206-04: MRI Pulse Sequences - Spin Echo, Gradient Echo, EPI, Non-Cartesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooley, R. [Mayo Clinic (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an essential part of clinical imaging due to its ability to render high soft tissue contrast. Instead of ionizing radiation, MRI use strong magnetic field, radio frequency waves and field gradients to create diagnostic useful images. It can be used to image the anatomy and also functional and physiological activities within the human body. Knowledge of the basic physical principles underlying MRI acquisition is vitally important to successful image production and proper image interpretation. This lecture will give an overview of the spin physics, imaging principle of MRI, the hardware of the MRI scanner, and various pulse sequences and their applications. It aims to provide a conceptual foundation to understand the image formation process of a clinical MRI scanner. Learning Objectives: Understand the origin of the MR signal and contrast from the spin physics level. Understand the main hardware components of a MRI scanner and their purposes Understand steps for MR image formation including spatial encoding and image reconstruction Understand the main kinds of MR pulse sequences and their characteristics.

  19. A spin echo sequence with a single-sided bipolar diffusion gradient pulse to obtain snapshot diffusion weighted images in moving media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidlin, R. Z.; Kakareka, J. W.; Pohida, T. J.; Komlosh, M. E.; Basser, P. J.

    2012-08-01

    In vivo MRI data can be corrupted by motion. Motion artifacts are particularly troublesome in Diffusion Weighted MRI (DWI), since the MR signal attenuation due to Brownian motion can be much less than the signal loss due to dephasing from other types of complex tissue motion, which can significantly degrade the estimation of self-diffusion coefficients, diffusion tensors, etc. This paper describes a snapshot DWI sequence, which utilizes a novel single-sided bipolar diffusion sensitizing gradient pulse within a spin echo sequence. The proposed method shortens the diffusion time by applying a single refocused bipolar diffusion gradient on one side of a refocusing RF pulse, instead of a set of diffusion sensitizing gradients, separated by a refocusing RF pulse, while reducing the impact of magnetic field inhomogeneity by using a spin echo sequence. A novel MRI phantom that can exhibit a range of complex motions was designed to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed DWI sequence.

  20. The effect of ablation sequence and duration on lesion shape using rapidly pulsed radiofrequency energy through multiple electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRury, I D; Diamond, S; Falwell, G; Schlichting, A; Wilson, C

    2000-04-01

    Sequences of energy application to multiple electrodes and a study of ablation duration with distal tip and multi-electrode ablations were explored with a radiofrequency controller that distributes energy from a generator to up to 4 electrodes with various duty cycles. In vitro ablations were performed on bovine left ventricle in circulating blood and lesions in goats were performed to verify the in vitro results. All of the ablation sequences with simultaneous electrode activation of contiguous electrodes resulted in deeper lesions than those created in sequence. There was also no scalloping of the lesion if contiguous electrodes were activated simultaneously. During all distal tip ablations, lesion volume and depth was greater after 3 minutes of energy delivery than after 1 minute, but did not increase from 3 minutes to 5 minutes. There was a significant increase in multi-electrode ablation lesion depth with each additional minute in the ablation cycle. The in vivo ablations verified these results at 120 and 300 second ablations. Pulsed energy distal tip ablations resulted in deeper lesions than continuous only if power amplitudes over 50 W were employed. In conclusion, contiguous electrodes in simultaneous use create lesions that resemble one large lesion rather than two lesions positioned next to each other. Multi-electrode ablation lesions continue to grow at ablation durations of up to 5 minutes compared to distal tip lesions which reach steady-state between 1 and 3 minutes. Pulsed energy delivery to distal tips may result in deeper lesions than conventional if high powers are employed.

  1. Zero sequence blocking transformers for multi-pulse rectifier in aerospace applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Wenli; Blaabjerg, Frede; Zhang, Xiaobin

    2014-01-01

    The power electronics technology plays an even more important role in the aerospace applications of More Electric Aircrafts (MEA). AutoTransformer Rectifier Units (ATRU) have been widely adopted in aircrafts due to its simplicity and reliability. In this paper, Zero Sequence Blocking Transformers...

  2. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Optimizing pulse sequence protocols for the evaluation of cartilage and labrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guermazi, Ali, E-mail: Ali.Guermazi@aspetar.com [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Jomaah, Nabil [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Hayashi, Daichi [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Department of Radiology, Bridgeport Hospital, Yale University School of Medicine, 267 Grant Street, Bridgeport, CT 06610 (United States); Jarraya, Mohamed [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Silva, Jose Roberto [Department of Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, FGH Building, 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Niu, Jingbo [Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, 650 Albany Street, Suite 200, Boston, MA 02118 (United States); Almusa, Emad; Landreau, Philippe [ASPETAR – Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Sport City Street, Near Khalifa Stadium, P.O. Box 29222 (Qatar); and others

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: To compare axial T1weighted fat-saturated (T1w fs) and T1w non-fs sequences, and coronal T1w-fs and T2w-fs sequences, for evaluation of cartilage and labrum using CT arthrography (CTA) as the reference. Methods: Patients had MR arthrography (MRA) and CTA of the shoulder on the same day. Cartilage was assessed for superficial and full thickness focal and diffuse damage. Labral lesions were graded for Bankart variants and SLAP lesions. CTA images were read for the same features. The diagnostic performance of MRA including area under the curve (AUC) was evaluated against CTA. Results: When comparing axial sequences, the diagnostic performance for cartilage lesion detection on T1w non-fs was 61.9% (sensitivity) 93.6% (specificity) and 89.5% (accuracy) with AUC 0.782, while that for T1w fs was 61.9%, 94.0%, 89.8% and 0.783. For labral assessment, it was 89.1%, 93.0%, 91.4% and 0.919 for T1w non-fs, and 89.9%, 94.0%, 92.6% and 0.922 for T1w fs. Comparing coronal sequences, diagnostic performance for cartilage was 42.5%, 97.5%, 89.8% and 0.702 for T1w fs, and 38.4%, 98.7%, 90.2%, and 0.686 for T2w fs. For the labrum it was 85.1%, 87.5%, 86.2%, and 0.868 for T1w fs, and 75.7%, 97.5%, 80.8% and 0.816 for T2w fs. Conclusions: Axial T1w fs and T1w non-fs sequences are comparable in their ability to diagnose cartilage and labral lesions. Coronal T1w fs sequence offers slightly higher sensitivity but slightly lower specificity than T2w fs sequence for diagnosis of cartilage and labral lesions.

  3. MR arthrography of the shoulder: Optimizing pulse sequence protocols for the evaluation of cartilage and labrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guermazi, Ali; Jomaah, Nabil; Hayashi, Daichi; Jarraya, Mohamed; Silva, Jose Roberto; Niu, Jingbo; Almusa, Emad; Landreau, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To compare axial T1weighted fat-saturated (T1w fs) and T1w non-fs sequences, and coronal T1w-fs and T2w-fs sequences, for evaluation of cartilage and labrum using CT arthrography (CTA) as the reference. Methods: Patients had MR arthrography (MRA) and CTA of the shoulder on the same day. Cartilage was assessed for superficial and full thickness focal and diffuse damage. Labral lesions were graded for Bankart variants and SLAP lesions. CTA images were read for the same features. The diagnostic performance of MRA including area under the curve (AUC) was evaluated against CTA. Results: When comparing axial sequences, the diagnostic performance for cartilage lesion detection on T1w non-fs was 61.9% (sensitivity) 93.6% (specificity) and 89.5% (accuracy) with AUC 0.782, while that for T1w fs was 61.9%, 94.0%, 89.8% and 0.783. For labral assessment, it was 89.1%, 93.0%, 91.4% and 0.919 for T1w non-fs, and 89.9%, 94.0%, 92.6% and 0.922 for T1w fs. Comparing coronal sequences, diagnostic performance for cartilage was 42.5%, 97.5%, 89.8% and 0.702 for T1w fs, and 38.4%, 98.7%, 90.2%, and 0.686 for T2w fs. For the labrum it was 85.1%, 87.5%, 86.2%, and 0.868 for T1w fs, and 75.7%, 97.5%, 80.8% and 0.816 for T2w fs. Conclusions: Axial T1w fs and T1w non-fs sequences are comparable in their ability to diagnose cartilage and labral lesions. Coronal T1w fs sequence offers slightly higher sensitivity but slightly lower specificity than T2w fs sequence for diagnosis of cartilage and labral lesions

  4. A Numerical Simulation Of The Pulse Sequence Reconstruction in AC Biased TESs With a β Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Lorenza; Vaccarone, Renzo

    2009-01-01

    We study the response of micro-calorimeters based on Ir/Au TESs biased by an AC voltage in the MHz range to the power input generated by beta emission in a Re source thermally connected to the calorimeter itself. The micro-calorimeter is assumed to work at -80 mK, and the energy pulses corresponding to the beta emission have an energy distributed between zero and 2.58 KeV. In this numerical simulation the TES is inserted in a RLC resonating circuit, with a low quality factor. The thermal conductivities between the source and the calorimeter and that from the calorimeter to the heat sink are non-linear. The superconducting to normal transition of the TES is described by a realistic non-linear model. The AC current at the carrier frequency, modulated by the changing resistance of the TES, is demodulated and the output is filtered. The resulting signal is analyzed to deduce the attainable time resolution and the linearity of the response.

  5. No pulsar left behind - I. Timing, pulse-sequence polarimetry and emission morphology for 12 pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Casey; Freire, Paulo C. C.; Rankin, Joanna; Stovall, Kevin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we study a set of 12 pulsars that previously had not been characterized. Our timing shows that eleven of them are `normal' isolated pulsars, with rotation periods between 0.22 and 2.65 s, characteristic ages between 0.25 Myr and 0.63 Gyr, and estimated magnetic fields ranging from 0.05 to 3.8 × 1012 G. The youngest pulsar in our sample, PSR J0627+0706, is located near the Monoceros supernova remnant (SNR G205.5+0.5), but it is not the pulsar most likely to be associated with it. We also confirmed the existence of a candidate from an early Arecibo survey, PSR J2053+1718, its subsequent timing and polarimetry are also presented here. It is an isolated pulsar with a spin period of 119 ms, a relatively small magnetic field of 5.8 × 109 G and a characteristic age of 6.7 Gyr; this suggests the pulsar was mildly recycled by accretion from a companion star, which became unbound when that companion became a supernova. We report the results of single-pulse and average Arecibo polarimetry at both 327 and 1400 MHz aimed at understanding the basic emission properties and beaming geometry of these pulsars. Three of them (PSRs J0943+2253, J1935+1159 and J2050+1259) have strong nulls and sporadic radio emission, several others exhibit interpulses (PSRs J0627+0706 and J0927+2345) and one shows regular drifting subpulses (J1404+1159).

  6. Comparison of multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for Salmonella spp. identification in surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chun Wei; Hao Huang, Kuan; Hsu, Bing Mu; Tsai, Hsien Lung; Tseng, Shao Feng; Kao, Po Min; Shen, Shu Min; Chou Chiu, Yi; Chen, Jung Sheng

    2013-04-01

    Salmonella is one of the most important pathogens of waterborne diseases with outbreaks from contaminated water reported worldwide. In addition, Salmonella spp. can survive for long periods in aquatic environments. To realize genotypes and serovars of Salmonella in aquatic environments, we isolated the Salmonella strains by selective culture plates to identify the serovars of Salmonella by serological assay, and identify the genotypes by Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) based on the sequence data from University College Cork (UCC), respectively. The results show that 36 stream water samples (30.1%) and 18 drinking water samples (23.3%) were confirmed the existence of Salmonella using culture method combined PCR specific invA gene amplification. In this study, 24 cultured isolates of Salmonella from water samples were classified to fifteen Salmonella enterica serovars. In addition, we construct phylogenetic analysis using phylogenetic tree and Minimum spanning tree (MST) method to analyze the relationship of clinical, environmental, and geographical data. Phylogenetic tree showed that four main clusters and our strains can be distributed in all. The genotypes of isolates from stream water are more biodiversity while comparing the Salmonella strains genotypes from drinking water sources. According to MST data, we can found the positive correlation between serovars and genotypes of Salmonella. Previous studies revealed that the result of Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) method can predict the serovars of Salmonella strain. Hence, we used the MLST data combined phylogenetic analysis to identify the serovars of Salmonella strain and achieved effectiveness. While using the geographical data combined phylogenetic analysis, the result showed that the dominant strains were existed in whole stream area in rainy season. Keywords: Salmonella spp., MLST, phylogenetic analysis, PFGE

  7. Increased signal intensity on fat-suppressed three-dimensional T1-weighted pulse sequences in patellar tendon: magic angle effect?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karantanas, A.H.; Zibis, A.H. [CT-MRI Dept., Larissa General Hospital, Larissa (Greece); Papanikolaou, N. [Radiology Dept., University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

    2001-02-01

    Objective. To assess the frequency of increased signal intensity in the patellar tendon using three-dimensional T1-weighted MRI pulse sequences. Design and patients. Sixty patients were examined with a 1.0 T scanner (15mT/m gradient strength) using a quadrature coil. Three pulse sequences were applied in the sagittal plane: PD turbo spin echo (PD-TSE), 3D T1-weighted gradient echo with fat suppression (3D-T1-FFE-FS) and 3D T1-weighted echo planar imaging with fat suppression (3D-T1-EPI-FS). The high signal intensity areas were measured in their maximum length. The angle of the patellar tendon relative to the main field position was measured in the same slice. In eight patients with anterior knee pain, and in 11 with no anterior knee pain, a fourth T2-weighted TSE pulse sequence (T2-TSE) was obtained to rule out patellar tendinitis. Results. The correlation of the high signal intensity areas with the relative position of the tendon was found to be significant with the 3D sequences (P=0.03 for 3D-T1-FFE-FS and P=0.003 for 3D-T1-EPI-FS). The length of the high signal intensity area in the tendon was 5.4 mm with 3D-T1-FFE-FS, 4.9 mm with 3D-T1-EPI-FS and 3.1 mm with PD-TSE images. No patellar tendinitis was demonstrated on the T2-TSE images. Conclusion. The magic angle effect is commonly observed in the 3D based T1-weighted pulse sequences with fat suppression. The presence of the above sign must be recognized by radiologists, so that misdiagnosis of patellar tendinitis is avoided. (orig.)

  8. Population Genetic Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Strains as Determined by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Multilocus Sequence Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri, Clémentine; Félix, Benjamin; Guillier, Laurent; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Michelon, Damien; Mariet, Jean-François; Aarestrup, Frank M.; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Hendriksen, René S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium that may cause the foodborne illness listeriosis. Only a small amount of data about the population genetic structure of strains isolated from food is available. This study aimed to provide an accurate view of the L. monocytogenes food strain population in France. From 1999 to 2014, 1,894 L. monocytogenes strains were isolated from food at the French National Reference Laboratory for L. monocytogenes and classified according to the five risk food matrices defined by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). A total of 396 strains were selected on the basis of different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) clusters, serotypes, and strain origins and typed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and the MLST results were supplemented with MLST data available from Institut Pasteur, representing human and additional food strains from France. The distribution of sequence types (STs) was compared between food and clinical strains on a panel of 675 strains. High congruence between PFGE and MLST was found. Out of 73 PFGE clusters, the two most prevalent corresponded to ST9 and ST121. Using original statistical analysis, we demonstrated that (i) there was not a clear association between ST9 and ST121 and the food matrices, (ii) serotype IIc, ST8, and ST4 were associated with meat products, and (iii) ST13 was associated with dairy products. Of the two major STs, ST121 was the ST that included the fewest clinical strains, which might indicate lower virulence. This observation may be directly relevant for refining risk analysis models for the better management of food safety. IMPORTANCE This study showed a very useful backward compatibility between PFGE and MLST for surveillance. The results enabled better understanding of the population structure of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from food and management of the health risks associated with L. monocytogenes food strains. Moreover, this work provided an accurate view

  9. Emergence of a mutL Mutation Causing Multilocus Sequence Typing-Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis Discrepancy among Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from a Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Castillo, M.; Maiz, L.; Morosini, M.-I.; Rodriguez-Banos, M.; Suarez, L.; Fernandez-Olmos, A.; Baquero, F.; Canton, R.; del Campo, R.

    2012-01-01

    A multilocus sequence type (MLST) shift (from ST242 to ST996) was detected in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a uniform pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern obtained from a chronically colonized patient. MLST mutational change involved the mutL gene with the consequent emergence of a hypermutable phenotype. This observation challenges the required neutrality of mutL as an appropriate marker in MLST and alerts researchers to the limitations of MLST-only-based population studies...

  10. The influence of wavelength, temporal sequencing, and pulse duration on resonant infrared matrix-assisted laser processing of polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, S. M.; Schoeffling, Jonathan; Jimenez, Richard; Zinderman, Brian; Yi, SunYong; Bubb, D. M.

    2014-06-01

    We have carried out a systematic investigation of laser ablation plume interactions in resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation. The laser source utilized in this study was a mid-infrared OPO capable of dual sequential ns pulses with adjustable delay ranging from 1 to 100 μs. This unique capability enabled us both to probe the ablation plume with a second laser pulse, and to effectively double the laser fluence. The primary ablation target used for this study consisted of poly(methyl methacrylate) dissolved in a binary mixture of methanol and toluene. Both the critical thermodynamic and optical properties of the binary mixture were determined and used to interpret our results. We found that deposition rates associated with single pulse irradiation tracks with the optical absorption coefficient in the spectral range from 2,700 to 3,800 nm. In the case of dual sequential pulses, discrepancies in this trend have been linked to the rate of change in the optical absorption coefficient with temperature. The influence of fluence on deposition rate was found to follow a sigmoidal dependence. Surface roughness was observed to have a diametrically opposed trend with pulse delay depending on whether the OH or CH vibrational mode was excited. In the case of CH excitation, we suggest that the rougher films are due to the absorbance of the second pulse by droplets within the plume containing residual solvent which leads to the formation of molecular balloons and hence irregularly shaped features on the substrate.

  11. Evaluation of knee meniscus lesions using MRI - a comparative study of pulse sequences; Avaliacao da lesao meniscal por meio de ressonancia magnetica do joelho - estudo comparativo das sequencias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Artur da Rocha C.; Vilela, Sonia de Aguiar; Turrini, Elisabeth; Lederman, Henrique M. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem

    1997-05-01

    The frequency of knee disability after injuries has become higher, in this context meniscal lesions keep an important role. This study evaluated 34 MR exams using 1.5-T system (Signa; GE). In this group 26 had 4 sequences (5 acquisitions); 2 coronal (T1, MPGR), 3 sagittal (T1, T2, proton density). The aim of this study was to evaluate the MR pulse sequence`s reproducibility and observer variability. Two readers (A and B) reviewed the exams using the same criteria. The reader A reviewed all sequences for each patient; the reader B reviewed the individual sequences at random on two separate occasions, 6 months apart. The signal expression of meniscal lesion is more evident with T1 (short TR/short TE) sagittal; however, in this sequence the results were less consistent. The sagittal proton density (long TR/short TE) was very close to be the idea sequence: had good concordance among the readings of readers A and B. Kappa concordance test showed best result for sagittal proton density images (Kw = 0.84). (author) 47 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. B1 mapping for bias-correction in quantitative T1 imaging of the brain at 3T using standard pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreau, Mathieu; Tardif, Christine L; Stikov, Nikola; Sled, John G; Lee, Wayne; Pike, G Bruce

    2017-12-01

    B 1 mapping is important for many quantitative imaging protocols, particularly those that include whole-brain T 1 mapping using the variable flip angle (VFA) technique. However, B 1 mapping sequences are not typically available on many magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners. The aim of this work was to demonstrate that B 1 mapping implemented using standard scanner product pulse sequences can produce B 1 (and VFA T 1 ) maps comparable in quality and acquisition time to advanced techniques. Six healthy subjects were scanned at 3.0T. An interleaved multislice spin-echo echo planar imaging double-angle (EPI-DA) B 1 mapping protocol, using a standard product pulse sequence, was compared to two alternative methods (actual flip angle imaging, AFI, and Bloch-Siegert shift, BS). Single-slice spin-echo DA B 1 maps were used as a reference for comparison (Ref. DA). VFA flip angles were scaled using each B 1 map prior to fitting T 1 ; the nominal flip angle case was also compared. The pooled-subject voxelwise correlation (ρ) for B 1 maps (BS/AFI/EPI-DA) relative to the reference B 1 scan (Ref. DA) were ρ = 0.92/0.95/0.98. VFA T 1 correlations using these maps were ρ = 0.86/0.88/0.96, much better than without B 1 correction (ρ = 0.53). The relative error for each B 1 map (BS/AFI/EPI-DA/Nominal) had 95 th percentiles of 5/4/3/13%. Our findings show that B 1 mapping implemented using product pulse sequences can provide excellent quality B 1 (and VFA T 1 ) maps, comparable to other custom techniques. This fast whole-brain measurement (∼2 min) can serve as an excellent alternative for researchers without access to advanced B 1 pulse sequences. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1673-1682. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. PulseNet International: Vision for the implementation of whole genome sequencing (WGS) for global food-borne disease surveillance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadon, Celine; Van Walle, Ivo; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Campos, Josefina; Chinen, Isabel; Concepcion-Acevedo, Jeniffer; Gilpin, Brent; Smith, Anthony M; Man Kam, Kai; Perez, Enrique; Trees, Eija; Kubota, Kristy; Takkinen, Johanna; Nielsen, Eva Møller; Carleton, Heather

    2017-01-01

    PulseNet International is a global network dedicated to laboratory-based surveillance for food-borne diseases. The network comprises the national and regional laboratory networks of Africa, Asia Pacific, Canada, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, the Middle East, and the United States. The

  14. Molecular characterisation of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from pigs using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguti, Maur?cio; Oliveira, Ros?ngela C; Marques, Lucas M; Buzinhani, Melissa; Buim, Marcos R; Neto, Renata L; Guimar?es, Ana M?rcia S; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Economic loss in pig breeding is common due to respiratory disorders, and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma hyorhinis, namely, are the most common infectious agents. The aim of this study is to recover these mollicutes and detect their genotypic variations by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequencing the 16?s rRNA gene. One hundred and twenty-six swabs from tonsil and nasal mucus of pigs with respiratory disorders were analysed. A total of 78 lungs were sampled, as well as ...

  15. Tracing outbreaks of Streptococcus equi infection (strangles) in horses using sequence variation in the seM gene and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Susanne; Söderlund, Robert; Frosth, Sara; Pringle, John; Båverud, Viveca; Aspán, Anna

    2011-11-21

    Strangles is a serious respiratory disease in horses caused by Streptococcus equi subspecies equi (S. equi). Transmission of the disease occurs by direct contact with an infected horse or contaminated equipment. Genetically, S. equi strains are highly homogenous and differentiation of strains has proven difficult. However, the S. equi M-protein SeM contains a variable N-terminal region and has been proposed as a target gene to distinguish between different strains of S. equi and determine the source of an outbreak. In this study, strains of S. equi (n=60) from 32 strangles outbreaks in Sweden during 1998-2003 and 2008-2009 were genetically characterized by sequencing the SeM protein gene (seM), and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Swedish strains belonged to 10 different seM types, of which five have not previously been described. Most were identical or highly similar to allele types from strangles outbreaks in the UK. Outbreaks in 2008/2009 sharing the same seM type were associated by geographic location and/or type of usage of the horses (racing stables). Sequencing of the seM gene generally agreed with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. Our data suggest that seM sequencing as a epidemiological tool is supported by the agreement between seM and PFGE and that sequencing of the SeM protein gene is more sensitive than PFGE in discriminating strains of S. equi. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Improvements, extensions, and practical aspects of rapid ASAP-HSQC and ALSOFAST-HSQC pulse sequences for studying small molecules at natural abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Sünninghausen, David; Becker, Johanna; Koos, Martin R. M.; Luy, Burkhard

    2017-08-01

    Previously we introduced two novel NMR experiments for small molecules, the so-called ASAP-HSQC and ALSOFAST-HSQC (Schulze-Sünninghausen et al., 2014), which allow the detection of heteronuclear one-bond correlations in less than 30 s at natural abundance. We propose an improved symmetrized pulse scheme of the basic experiment to minimize artifact intensities and the combination with non-uniform sampling to enable the acquisition of conventional HSQC spectra in as short as a couple of seconds and extremely 13C-resolved spectra in less than ten minutes. Based on steady state investigations, a first estimate to relative achievable signal intensities with respect to conventional, ASAP-, and ALSOFAST-HSQC experiments is given. In addition, we describe several extensions to the basic pulse schemes, like a multiplicity-edited version, a revised symmetrized CLIP-ASAP-HSQC, an ASAP-/ALSOFAST-HSQC sequence with broadband BIRD-based 1H,1H decoupling, and a symmetrized sequence optimized for water suppression. Finally, RF-power considerations with respect to the high duty cycle of the experiments are given.

  17. Statistical approach of measurement of signal to noise ratio in according to change pulse sequence on brain MRI meningioma and cyst images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eul Kyu [Inje Paik University Hospital Jeo-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwan Woo [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [The Baekseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seo Goo [The Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Won [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gang-dong, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Soon Yong [The Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Min, Jung Whan; Son, Jin Hyun [The Shingu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to needed basis of measure MRI CAD development for signal to noise ratio (SNR) by pulse sequence analysis from region of interest (ROI) in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. We examined images of brain MRI contrast enhancement of 117 patients, from January 2005 to December 2015 in a University-affiliated hospital, Seoul, Korea. Diagnosed as one of two brain diseases such as meningioma and cysts SNR for each patient's image of brain MRI were calculated by using Image J. Differences of SNR among two brain diseases were tested by SPSS Statistics21 ANOVA test for there was statistical significance (p < 0.05). We have analysis socio-demographical variables, SNR according to sequence disease, 95% confidence according to SNR of sequence and difference in a mean of SNR. Meningioma results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T1CE, T2 and T1, FLAIR. Cysts results, with the quality of distributions in the order of T2 and T1, T1CE and FLAIR. SNR of MRI sequences of the brain would be useful to classify disease. Therefore, this study will contribute to evaluate brain diseases, and be a fundamental to enhancing the accuracy of CAD development.

  18. An analysis of the uncertainty and bias in DCE-MRI measurements using the spoiled gradient-recalled echo pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subashi, Ergys; Choudhury, Kingshuk R.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI have been used in more than 100 phase I trials and investigator led studies. A comparison of the absolute values of these quantities requires an estimation of their respective probability distribution function (PDF). The statistical variation of the DCE-MRI measurement is analyzed by considering the fundamental sources of error in the MR signal intensity acquired with the spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) pulse sequence. Methods: The variance in the SPGR signal intensity arises from quadrature detection and excitation flip angle inconsistency. The noise power was measured in 11 phantoms of contrast agent concentration in the range [0–1] mM (in steps of 0.1 mM) and in onein vivo acquisition of a tumor-bearing mouse. The distribution of the flip angle was determined in a uniform 10 mM CuSO 4 phantom using the spin echo double angle method. The PDF of a wide range of T1 values measured with the varying flip angle (VFA) technique was estimated through numerical simulations of the SPGR equation. The resultant uncertainty in contrast agent concentration was incorporated in the most common model of tracer exchange kinetics and the PDF of the derived pharmacokinetic parameters was studied numerically. Results: The VFA method is an unbiased technique for measuringT1 only in the absence of bias in excitation flip angle. The time-dependent concentration of the contrast agent measured in vivo is within the theoretically predicted uncertainty. The uncertainty in measuring K trans with SPGR pulse sequences is of the same order, but always higher than, the uncertainty in measuring the pre-injection longitudinal relaxation time (T1 0 ). The lowest achievable bias/uncertainty in estimating this parameter is approximately 20%–70% higher than the bias/uncertainty in the measurement of the pre-injection T1 map. The fractional volume parameters derived from the extended Tofts model were found to be

  19. SU-E-T-558: An Exploratory RF Pulse Sequence Technique Used to Induce Differential Heating in Tissues Containing Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for a Possible Hyperthermic Adjuvant Effect to Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, S; Ionascu, D; Wilson, G [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Thapa, R [Oakland University, Rochester, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In pre-clinical trials of cancer thermotherapy, hyperthermia can be induced by exposing localized super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) to external alternating magnetic fields generated by a solenoid electrical circuit (Zhao et al., Theranostics 2012). Alternatively, an RF pulse technique implemented in a regular MRI system is explored as a possible hyperthermia induction technique . Methods: A new thermal RF pulse sequence was developed using the Philips pulse programming tool for the 3T Ingenia MRI system to provide a sinusoidal magnetic field alternating at the frequency of 1.43 kHz (multiples of sine waves of 0.7 ms period) before each excitation RF pulse for imaging. The duration of each thermal RF pulse routine was approximately 3 min, and the thermal pulse was applied multiple times to a phantom that contains different concentrations (high, medium and low) of SPION samples. After applying the thermal pulse each time, the temperature change was estimated by measuring the phase changes in the T1-weighted inversion-prepared multi-shot turbo field echo (TFE) sequence (TR=5.5 ms, TE=2.7 ms, inversion time=200 ms). Results: The phase values and relative differences among them changed as the number of applied thermal RF pulses increased. After the 5th application of the thermal RF pulse, the relative phase differences increased significantly, suggesting the thermal activation of the SPION. The increase of the phase difference was approximately linear with the SPION concentration. Conclusion: A sinusoidal RF pulse from the MRI system may be utilized to selectively thermally activate tissues containing super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

  20. SU-E-T-558: An Exploratory RF Pulse Sequence Technique Used to Induce Differential Heating in Tissues Containing Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for a Possible Hyperthermic Adjuvant Effect to Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, S; Ionascu, D; Wilson, G; Thapa, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In pre-clinical trials of cancer thermotherapy, hyperthermia can be induced by exposing localized super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) to external alternating magnetic fields generated by a solenoid electrical circuit (Zhao et al., Theranostics 2012). Alternatively, an RF pulse technique implemented in a regular MRI system is explored as a possible hyperthermia induction technique . Methods: A new thermal RF pulse sequence was developed using the Philips pulse programming tool for the 3T Ingenia MRI system to provide a sinusoidal magnetic field alternating at the frequency of 1.43 kHz (multiples of sine waves of 0.7 ms period) before each excitation RF pulse for imaging. The duration of each thermal RF pulse routine was approximately 3 min, and the thermal pulse was applied multiple times to a phantom that contains different concentrations (high, medium and low) of SPION samples. After applying the thermal pulse each time, the temperature change was estimated by measuring the phase changes in the T1-weighted inversion-prepared multi-shot turbo field echo (TFE) sequence (TR=5.5 ms, TE=2.7 ms, inversion time=200 ms). Results: The phase values and relative differences among them changed as the number of applied thermal RF pulses increased. After the 5th application of the thermal RF pulse, the relative phase differences increased significantly, suggesting the thermal activation of the SPION. The increase of the phase difference was approximately linear with the SPION concentration. Conclusion: A sinusoidal RF pulse from the MRI system may be utilized to selectively thermally activate tissues containing super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

  1. Gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MR of VX2 carcinoma in rabbit liver: usefulness of the delayed phase imaging and optimal pulse sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seung Il; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Chong Soo [College of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of delayed imaging using gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) and to determine the optimal pulse sequence for the detection of VX2 carcinoma lesions in the rabbit. Twelve VX2 carcinomas implanted in the livers of eleven New Zealand rabbits were studied. All patients underwent an MR protocal consisting of precontrast T2-and T1-weighted sequences, followed by repetition of the T1-weighted sequence at 0 to 30 (arterial phase). 31-60 (portal phase), and 40 minutes (delayed phase) after the intravenous administration of 0.1 mmol/kg of gadobenate dimeglumine. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the liver and VX2 tumor, and the lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of precontrast and postcontrast MR images were quantitatively analyzed, and two experienced radiologists evaluated image quality in terms of lesion conspicuity, artifact, mass delineation, and vascular anatomy. Liver SNR was significantly higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast, arterial, and portal imaging (p<0.05), while lesion SNR was significantly higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast imaging (p<0.05). Lesion CNR was higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast and portal phase imaging (p<0.05), but there was no difference between arterial and delayed imaging. The latter provided better mass delineation than precontrast, arterial and portal phase imaging (p<0.05). While in terms of lesion conspicuity and vascular anatomy, the delayed phase was better than the arterial phase (p<0.05) but similar to the precontrast and portal phase. During the delayed phase, the gradient-echo sequence showed better results than the spin-echo in terms of liver SNR, and lesion SNR and CNR (p<0.05). Because it provides better lesion conspicuity and mass delineation by improving liver SNR and lesion-to-liver CNR, the addition of the delayed phase to a dynamic MRI sequence after gadobenate dimeglumine adminstration facilitates lesion detection. For delayed-phase imaging, the

  2. Gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MR of VX2 carcinoma in rabbit liver: usefulness of the delayed phase imaging and optimal pulse sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seung Il; Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Chong Soo

    2002-01-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of delayed imaging using gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance) and to determine the optimal pulse sequence for the detection of VX2 carcinoma lesions in the rabbit. Twelve VX2 carcinomas implanted in the livers of eleven New Zealand rabbits were studied. All patients underwent an MR protocal consisting of precontrast T2-and T1-weighted sequences, followed by repetition of the T1-weighted sequence at 0 to 30 (arterial phase). 31-60 (portal phase), and 40 minutes (delayed phase) after the intravenous administration of 0.1 mmol/kg of gadobenate dimeglumine. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the liver and VX2 tumor, and the lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of precontrast and postcontrast MR images were quantitatively analyzed, and two experienced radiologists evaluated image quality in terms of lesion conspicuity, artifact, mass delineation, and vascular anatomy. Liver SNR was significantly higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast, arterial, and portal imaging (p<0.05), while lesion SNR was significantly higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast imaging (p<0.05). Lesion CNR was higher at delayed imaging than at precontrast and portal phase imaging (p<0.05), but there was no difference between arterial and delayed imaging. The latter provided better mass delineation than precontrast, arterial and portal phase imaging (p<0.05). While in terms of lesion conspicuity and vascular anatomy, the delayed phase was better than the arterial phase (p<0.05) but similar to the precontrast and portal phase. During the delayed phase, the gradient-echo sequence showed better results than the spin-echo in terms of liver SNR, and lesion SNR and CNR (p<0.05). Because it provides better lesion conspicuity and mass delineation by improving liver SNR and lesion-to-liver CNR, the addition of the delayed phase to a dynamic MRI sequence after gadobenate dimeglumine adminstration facilitates lesion detection. For delayed-phase imaging, the

  3. Noninvasive investigation of exocrine pancreatic function: Feasibility of cine dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective inversion-recovery pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasokawa, Kazuya; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Tamada, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Akira; Hayashida, Minoru; Tanimoto, Daigo; Higaki, Atsushi; Noda, Yasufumi; Kido, Ayumu

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced cine dynamic magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) with a spatially selective inversion-recovery (IR) pulse for evaluating exocrine pancreatic function in comparison with the N-benzoyl-L-tyrosyl-p-aminobenzoic acid (BT-PABA) test as a pancreatic exocrine function test. Twenty subjects with or without chronic pancreatitis were included. MRCP with a spatially selective IR pulse was repeated every 15 seconds for 5 minutes to acquire a total of 20 images (cine-dynamic MRCP). The median and mean frequency of the observation (the number of times) and the moving distance (mean secretion grading scores) of pancreatic juice inflow on cine-dynamic MRCP were compared with a BT-PABA test. The urinary PABA excretion rate (%) had significant positive correlations with both the mean secretion grade (r = 0.66, P = 0.002) and frequency of secretory inflow (r = 0.62, P = 0.004) in cine dynamic MRCP. Both the mean frequency of observations of pancreatic secretory inflow (1.4 ± 1.6 times vs. 14.3 ± 4.2 times, P Cine dynamic MRCP with a spatially selective IR pulse may have potential for estimating the pancreatic exocrine function noninvasively as a substitute for the BT-PABA test. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Assessment of myocardial infarction in mice by Late Gadolinium Enhancement MR imaging using an inversion recovery pulse sequence at 9.4T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlihy Amy H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using an inversion recovery pulse sequence and to define the optimal inversion time (TI to assess myocardial infarction in mice by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE MRI at 9.4T, and to obtain the maximal contrast between the infarcted and the viable myocardium. Methods MRI was performed at 9.4T in mice, two days after induction of myocardial infarction (n = 4. For cardiovascular MR imaging, a segmented magnetization-prepared fast low angle shot (MP-FLASH sequence was used with varied TIs ranging from 40 to 420 ms following administration of gadolinium-DTPA at 0.6 mmol/kg. Contrast-to-noise (CNR and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR were measured and compared for each myocardial region of interest (ROI. Results The optimal TI, which corresponded to a minimum SNR in the normal myocardium, was 268 ms ± 27.3. The SNR in the viable myocardium was significantly different from that found in the infarcted myocardium (17.2 ± 2.4 vs 82.1 ± 10.8; p = 0.006 leading to a maximal relative SI (Signal Intensity between those two areas (344.9 ± 60.4. Conclusion Despite the rapid heart rate in mice, our study demonstrates that LGE MRI can be performed at 9.4T using a protocol similar to the one used for clinical MR diagnosis of myocardial infarction.

  5. Population Genetic Structure of Listeria monocytogenes Strains as Determined by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Multilocus Sequence Typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henri, Clémentine; Félix, Benjamin; Guillier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous bacterium that may cause the foodborne illness listeriosis. Only a small amount of data about the population genetic structure of strains isolated from food is available. This study aimed to provide an accurate view of the L. monocytogenes food strain....... The distribution of sequence types (STs) was compared between food and clinical strains on a panel of 675 strains. High congruence between PFGE and MLST was found. Out of 73 PFGE clusters, the two most prevalent corresponded to ST9 and ST121. Using original statistical analysis, we demonstrated that (i....... This observation may be directly relevant for refining risk analysis models for the better management of food safety. This study showed a very useful backward compatibility between PFGE and MLST for surveillance. The results enabled better understanding of the population structure of L. monocytogenes strains...

  6. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium intracellulare Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis, Mycobacteria Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Typing, and Multilocus Sequence Typing: Molecular Characterization and Comparison of Each Typing Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Semi; Lim, Nara; Kwon, Seungjik; Shim, Taesun; Park, Misun; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Seonghan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Mycobacterium intracellulare is the major causative agent of nontuberculous mycobacteria-related pulmonary infections. The strain typing of M. intracellulare is important for the treatment and control of its infections. We compared the discrimination capacity and effective value of four different molecular typing methods. Methods Antibiotic susceptibility testing, hsp65 and rpoB sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mycobacteria int...

  7. Molecular typing of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium with an automated repetitive sequence-based PCR microbial typing system compared with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardén-Lilja, Minna; Vuopio, Jaana; Koskela, Markku; Tissari, Päivi; Salmenlinna, Saara

    2013-05-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is the main typing method used for the molecular typing of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm). However, more rapid and unambiguous typing methods are needed. DiversiLab, a repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR), offers an alternative method for strain typing. Thirty-nine VREfm isolates with known epidemiological relationships were characterized by semi-automated rep-PCR (DiversiLab), PFGE, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The DiversiLab results were analysed in 2 ways: first relying solely on the DiversiLab software, and second by DiversiLab analysis combined with manual interpretation. The analysis with interpretation yielded more DiversiLab profiles, correlated better with PFGE and MLST, and grouped the isolates better according to their relatedness in time and space. However, most of the DiversiLab groups also included isolates with different PFGE and MLST types. DiversiLab provides rapid information when investigating a potential hospital outbreak. However, the interpretation of E. faecium DiversiLab results cannot be fully automated and is not always straightforward. Other typing methods may be necessary to confirm the analysis.

  8. Investigation of Classical Pulse Sequences for Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging With a cMUT Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouan, Damien; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2016-10-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (cMUTs) provide promising ultrasonic technology that could become an alternative to piezoelectric probes for medical applications. cMUTs could be very valuable for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging based on higher harmonics detection. However, their use is restricted by the intrinsic nonlinearity of the cMUT transmitters themselves, because it is difficult to distinguish between the nonlinearity of the microbubbles and the nonlinearity arising from the emitting transducer. A number of approaches have been proposed in recent years to cancel the nonlinearity of cMUTs. However, these techniques have limitations in terms of implementation with current ultrasound scanner electronics. The solution to be comparable with classical methods should not need precharacterization of the probe or changing the bias voltage (amplitude or polarity) but does need good sensitivity and a high frame rate to avoid motion artifacts. We propose here proof of a concept of an adapted amplitude modulation sequence with cMUT where transmit elements operate alternately. We show that this method, which is currently used with piezoelectric probes, is fully applicable to cMUT probes and the intrinsic nonlinearity of the transmitter is no longer an issue.

  9. Efficient theory of dipolar recoupling in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance of rotating solids using Floquet-Magnus expansion: application on BABA and C7 radiofrequency pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mananga, Eugene S; Reid, Alicia E; Charpentier, Thibault

    2012-02-01

    This article describes the use of an alternative expansion scheme called Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) to study the dynamics of spin system in solid-state NMR. The main tool used to describe the effect of time-dependent interactions in NMR is the average Hamiltonian theory (AHT). However, some NMR experiments, such as sample rotation and pulse crafting, seem to be more conveniently described using the Floquet theory (FT). Here, we present the first report highlighting the basics of the Floquet-Magnus expansion (FME) scheme and hint at its application on recoupling sequences that excite more efficiently double-quantum coherences, namely BABA and C7 radiofrequency pulse sequences. The use of Λ(n)(t) functions available only in the FME scheme, allows the comparison of the efficiency of BABA and C7 sequences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic Diversity of Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 Isolates Obtained from Different Sources as Resolved by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and High-Throughput Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, Kristin M; Wang, Yun; Butler, Robert R; Pombert, Jean-François; Reddy, N Rukma; Skinner, Guy E; Larkin, John W

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium sporogenes PA 3679 is a nonpathogenic, nontoxic model organism for proteolytic Clostridium botulinum used in the validation of conventional thermal food processes due to its ability to produce highly heat-resistant endospores. Because of its public safety importance, the uncertain taxonomic classification and genetic diversity of PA 3679 are concerns. Therefore, isolates of C. sporogenes PA 3679 were obtained from various sources and characterized using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole-genome sequencing. The phylogenetic relatedness and genetic variability were assessed based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing and whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. All C. sporogenes PA 3679 isolates were categorized into two clades (clade I containing ATCC 7955 NCA3679 isolates 1961-2, 1990, and 2007 and clade II containing PA 3679 isolates NFL, UW, FDA, and Campbell and ATCC 7955 NCA3679 isolate 1961-4). The 16S maximum likelihood (ML) tree clustered both clades within proteolytic C. botulinum strains, with clade I forming a distinct cluster with other C. sporogenes non-PA 3679 strains. SNP analysis revealed that clade I isolates were more similar to the genomic reference PA 3679 (NCTC8594) genome (GenBank accession number AGAH00000000.1) than clade II isolates were. The genomic reference C. sporogenes PA 3679 (NCTC8594) genome and clade I C. sporogenes isolates were genetically distinct from those obtained from other sources (University of Wisconsin, National Food Laboratory, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and Campbell's Soup Company). Thermal destruction studies revealed that clade I isolates were more sensitive to high temperature than clade II isolates were. Considering the widespread use of C. sporogenes PA 3679 and its genetic information in numerous studies, the accurate identification and genetic characterization of C. sporogenes PA 3679 are of critical importance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All

  11. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multi locus sequence typing for characterizing genotype variability of Yersinia ruckeri isolated from farmed fish in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvez, Ségolène; Fournel, Catherine; Douet, Diane-Gaëlle; Daniel, Patrick

    2015-06-23

    Yersinia ruckeri is a pathogen that has an impact on aquaculture worldwide. The disease caused by this bacterial species, yersiniosis or redmouth disease, generates substantial economic losses due to the associated mortality and veterinary costs. For predicting outbreaks and improving control strategies, it is important to characterize the population structure of the bacteria. The phenotypic and genetic homogeneities described previously indicate a clonal population structure as observed in other fish bacteria. In this study, the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi locus sequence typing (MLST) methods were used to describe a population of isolates from outbreaks on French fish farms. For the PFGE analysis, two enzymes (NotI and AscI) were used separately and together. Results from combining the enzymes showed the great homogeneity of the outbreak population with a similarity > 80.0% but a high variability within the cluster (cut-off value = 80.0%) with a total of 43 pulsotypes described and an index of diversity = 0.93. The dominant pulsotypes described with NotI (PtN4 and PtN7) have already been described in other European countries (Finland, Germany, Denmark, Spain and Italy). The MLST approach showed two dominant sequence types (ST31 and ST36), an epidemic structure of the French Y. ruckeri population and a preferentially clonal evolution for rainbow trout isolates. Our results point to multiple types of selection pressure on the Y. ruckeri population attributable to geographical origin, ecological niche specialization and movements of farmed fish.

  12. Comparison of automated repetitive-sequence-based polymerase chain reaction and spa typing versus pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for molecular typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Deirdre L; Chow, Barbara L; Lloyd, Tracie; Gregson, Daniel B

    2011-01-01

    Automated repetitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (DiversiLab, bioMérieux, St. Laurent, Quebec, Canada) and single locus sequence typing of the Staphylococcus protein A (spa) gene with spa-type assignment by StaphType RIDOM software were compared to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) as the "gold standard" method for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) typing. Fifty-four MRSA isolates were typed by all methods: 10 of known PFGE CMRSA type and 44 clinical isolates. Correct assignment of CMRSA type or cluster occurred for 47 of 54 (87%) of the isolates when using a rep-PCR similarity index (SI) of ≥95%. Rep-PCR gave 7 discordant results [CMRSA1 (3), CMRSA2 (1), CMRSA4 (1), and CMRSA10 (2)], and some CMRSA clusters were not distinguished (CMRSA10/5/9, CMRSA 7/8, and CMRSA3/6). Several spa types occurred within a single PFGE or repetitive PCR types among the 19 different spa types found. spa type t037 was shared by CMRSA3 and CMRSA6 strains, and CMRSA9 and most CMRSA10 strains shared spa type t008. Time to results for PFGE, repetitive PCR, and spa typing was 3-4 days, 24 h, and 48 h, respectively. The annual costs of using spa or repetitive PCR were 2.4× and 1.9× higher, respectively, than PFGE but routine use of spa typing would lower annual labor costs by 0.10 full-time equivalents compared to PFGE. Repetitive PCR is a good method for rapid outbreak screening, but MRSA isolates that share the same repetitive PCR or PFGE patterns can be distinguished by spa typing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Generation of brain pseudo-CTs using an undersampled, single-acquisition UTE-mDixon pulse sequence and unsupervised clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Kuan-Hao; Hu, Lingzhi; Traughber, Melanie; Stehning, Christian; Helle, Michael; Qian, Pengjiang; Thompson, Cheryl L.; Pereira, Gisele C.; Traughber, Bryan J.; Jordan, David W.; Herrmann, Karin A.; Muzic, Raymond F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: MR-based pseudo-CT has an important role in MR-based radiation therapy planning and PET attenuation correction. The purpose of this study is to establish a clinically feasible approach, including image acquisition, correction, and CT formation, for pseudo-CT generation of the brain using a single-acquisition, undersampled ultrashort echo time (UTE)-mDixon pulse sequence. Methods: Nine patients were recruited for this study. For each patient, a 190-s, undersampled, single acquisition UTE-mDixon sequence of the brain was acquired (TE = 0.1, 1.5, and 2.8 ms). A novel method of retrospective trajectory correction of the free induction decay (FID) signal was performed based on point-spread functions of three external MR markers. Two-point Dixon images were reconstructed using the first and second echo data (TE = 1.5 and 2.8 ms). R2 ∗ images (1/T2 ∗ ) were then estimated and were used to provide bone information. Three image features, i.e., Dixon-fat, Dixon-water, and R2 ∗ , were used for unsupervised clustering. Five tissue clusters, i.e., air, brain, fat, fluid, and bone, were estimated using the fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm. A two-step, automatic tissue-assignment approach was proposed and designed according to the prior information of the given feature space. Pseudo-CTs were generated by a voxelwise linear combination of the membership functions of the FCM. A low-dose CT was acquired for each patient and was used as the gold standard for comparison. Results: The contrast and sharpness of the FID images were improved after trajectory correction was applied. The mean of the estimated trajectory delay was 0.774 μs (max: 1.350 μs; min: 0.180 μs). The FCM-estimated centroids of different tissue types showed a distinguishable pattern for different tissues, and significant differences were found between the centroid locations of different tissue types. Pseudo-CT can provide additional skull detail and has low bias and absolute error of estimated CT

  14. Combination of multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis reveals an association of molecular clonality with the emergence of extensive-drug resistance (XDR) in Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yongzhong; Shen, Yongxiu; Cheng, Lingling; Zhang, Xiaorong; Wang, Chao; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Xiaohui; Chao, Guoxiang; Wu, Yantao

    2018-03-01

    Salmonellae is one of the most important foodborne pathogens and becomes resistant to multiple antibiotics, which represents a significant challenge to food industry and public health. However, a molecular signature that can be used to distinguish antimicrobial resistance profile, particularly multi-drug resistance or extensive-drug resistance (XDR). In the current study, 168 isolates from the chicken and pork production chains and ill chickens were characterized by serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility test, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The results showed that these isolates belonged to 13 serotypes, 14 multilocus sequence types (STs), 94 PFGE genotypes, and 70 antimicrobial resistant profiles. S. Enteritidis, S. Indiana, and S. Derby were the predominant serotypes, corresponding to the ST11, ST17, and ST40 clones, respectively and the PFGE Cluster A, Cluster E, and Cluster D, respectively. Among the ST11-S. Enteritidis (Cluster A) and the ST40-S. Derby (Cluster D) clones, the majority of isolates were resistant to 4-8 antimicrobial agents, whereas in the ST17S. Indiana (Cluster E) clone, isolates showed extensive-drug resistance (XDR) to 9-16 antimicrobial agents. The bla TEM-1-like gene was prevalent in the ST11 and ST17 clones corresponding to high ampicillin resistance. The bla TEM-1-like , bla CTX-M , bla OXA-1-like , sul1, aaC4, aac(6')-1b, dfrA17, and floR gene complex was highly prevalent among isolates of ST17, corresponding to an XDR phenotype. These results demonstrated the association of the resistant phenotypes and genotypes with ST clone and PFGE cluster. Our results also indicated that the newly identified gene complex comprising bla TEM-1-like , bla CTX-M , bla OXA-1-like , sul1, aaC4, aac(6')-1b, dfrA17, and floR, was responsible for the emergence of the ST17S. Indiana XDR clone. ST17 could be potentially used as a molecular signature to distinguish S. Indiana XDR clone. Copyright © 2017

  15. Generation of brain pseudo-CTs using an undersampled, single-acquisition UTE-mDixon pulse sequence and unsupervised clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Kuan-Hao [Case Center for Imaging Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Hu, Lingzhi; Traughber, Melanie [Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, Ohio 44143 (United States); Stehning, Christian; Helle, Michael [Philips Research, Hamburg 22335 (Germany); Qian, Pengjiang [School of Digital Media, Jiangnan University, Jiangsu 214122 (China); Thompson, Cheryl L. [Departments of Family Medicine and Community Health and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Pereira, Gisele C.; Traughber, Bryan J., E-mail: bryan.traughber@case.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Jordan, David W. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Herrmann, Karin A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Muzic, Raymond F. [Case Center for Imaging Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: MR-based pseudo-CT has an important role in MR-based radiation therapy planning and PET attenuation correction. The purpose of this study is to establish a clinically feasible approach, including image acquisition, correction, and CT formation, for pseudo-CT generation of the brain using a single-acquisition, undersampled ultrashort echo time (UTE)-mDixon pulse sequence. Methods: Nine patients were recruited for this study. For each patient, a 190-s, undersampled, single acquisition UTE-mDixon sequence of the brain was acquired (TE = 0.1, 1.5, and 2.8 ms). A novel method of retrospective trajectory correction of the free induction decay (FID) signal was performed based on point-spread functions of three external MR markers. Two-point Dixon images were reconstructed using the first and second echo data (TE = 1.5 and 2.8 ms). R2{sup ∗} images (1/T2{sup ∗}) were then estimated and were used to provide bone information. Three image features, i.e., Dixon-fat, Dixon-water, and R2{sup ∗}, were used for unsupervised clustering. Five tissue clusters, i.e., air, brain, fat, fluid, and bone, were estimated using the fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm. A two-step, automatic tissue-assignment approach was proposed and designed according to the prior information of the given feature space. Pseudo-CTs were generated by a voxelwise linear combination of the membership functions of the FCM. A low-dose CT was acquired for each patient and was used as the gold standard for comparison. Results: The contrast and sharpness of the FID images were improved after trajectory correction was applied. The mean of the estimated trajectory delay was 0.774 μs (max: 1.350 μs; min: 0.180 μs). The FCM-estimated centroids of different tissue types showed a distinguishable pattern for different tissues, and significant differences were found between the centroid locations of different tissue types. Pseudo-CT can provide additional skull detail and has low bias and absolute error of

  16. Optimal MR pulse sequences for hepatic hemangiomas : comparison of T2-weighted turbo-spin-echo, T2-weighted breath-hold turbo-spin-echo, and T1-weighted FLASH dynamic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wen Chao; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Cho, Soon Gu

    1997-01-01

    To optimize MR imaging pulse sequences in the imaging of hepatic hemangioma and to evaluate on dynamic MR imaging the enhancing characteristics of the lesions. Twenty patients with 35 hemangiomas were studied by using Turbo-spin-echo (TSE) sequence (T2-weighted, T2- and heavily T2-weighted breath-hold) and T1-weighted FLASH imaging acquired before, immediately on, and 1, 3 and 5 minutes after injection of a bolus of Gd-DTPA (0.1mmol/kg). Phased-array multicoil was employed. Images were quantitatively analyzed for lesion-to-liver signal difference to noise ratios (SD/Ns), and lesion-to-liver signal ratios (H/Ls), and qualitatively analyzed for lesion conspicuity. The enhancing characteristics of the hemangiomas were described by measuring the change of signal intensity as a curve in T1-weighted FLASH dynamic imaging. For T2-weighted images, breath-hold T2-weighted TSE had a slightly higher SD/N than other pulse sequences, but there was no statistical difference in three fast pulse sequences (p=0.211). For lesion conspicuity, heavily T2-weighted breath-hold TSE images was superior to T2-weighted breath-hold or non-breath-hold TSE (H/L, 5.75, 3.81, 2.87, respectively, p<0.05). T2-weighted breath-hold TSE imaging was more effective than T2-weighted TSE imaging in removing lesion blurring or lack of sharpness, and there was a 12-fold decrease in acquisition time (20sec versus 245 sec). T1-weighted FLASH dynamic images of normal liver showed peak enhancement at less than 1 minute, and of hemangioma at more than 3 minutes;the degree of enhancement for hemangioma decreased after a 3 minute delay. T2-weighed breath-hold TSE imaging and Gd-DTPA enhanced FLASH dynamic imaging with 5 minutes delay are sufficient for imaging hepatic hemangiomas

  17. Pulse Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Lawrence (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An apparatus and a computer-implemented method for generating pulses synchronized to a rising edge of a tachometer signal from rotating machinery are disclosed. For example, in one embodiment, a pulse state machine may be configured to generate a plurality of pulses, and a period state machine may be configured to determine a period for each of the plurality of pulses.

  18. Use of new turbo spin-echo pulse sequences with and without fat suppression in diagnosis and staging of prostate carcinoma; Anwendung neuer Turbo-Spin-Echo-Pulssequenzen mit und ohne Fettunterdrueckung bei der Diagnostik und Stadieneinteilung des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhard, K. [Krankenhaus Martha-Maria, Nuernberg (Germany). Roentgenabteilung; Hollenbach, H.P. [Siemens Erlangen (Germany). Unternehmungsbereich Medizinische Technik; Rieger, J. [Medizinische Klinik Waldkrankenhaus St. Marien, Erlangen (Germany); Kiefer, B. [Siemens Erlangen (Germany). Unternehmungsbereich Medizinische Technik; Riedl, C. [Erlangen-Nuenberg Univ. (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Kreckel, M. [Erlangen-Nuenberg Univ. (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Schrott, K.M. [Erlangen-Nuenberg Univ. (Germany). Urologische Klinik

    1994-01-01

    MR studies using turbo-spin-echo pulse sequences (TSE) were performed on 27 patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer. A prospective study was conducted in 15 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy. Turbo SE pulse sequences generate strongly T{sub 2}-weighted images of excellent quality with reduction of measurement time by a factor of 4-6. A comparison with standard T{sub 2}-weighted spin-echo pulse sequences indicated on objective improvement in the contrast of pathological structures (p<0.001). With respect to differentiation of stages T{sub 2} and T{sub 3} (TNM) during pathohistological correlation, sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 40% and an accuracy rate of 67% were obtained. Sensitivity of 71% and specificity of 75% were obtained when decuding cases of infiltration into the seminal vesicles, with an accuracy rate of 73%. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei 27 Patienten mit histologisch gesichertem Prostatakarzinom wurden MRT-Untersuchungen mit Turbo-Spin-Echo-Pulssequencen (TSE) durchgefuehrt. In 15 Faellen erfolgte eine radikale Prostatektomie. TurboSE-Pulssequenzen erzeugen stark T{sub 2}-gewichtete Bilder mit ausgezeichneter Bildqualitaet bei einer Messzeitverkuerzung in einem Bereich von 4-6. Der Vergleich mit einer Standard-T{sub 2}-gewichteten Spin-Echo-Pulssequenz erbrachte eine objektive Kontrastverbesserung (p<0,001). Bei der pathohistologischen Korrelation konnten bei der Differenzierung zwischen Stadium T{sub 2} und T{sub 3} (TNM) eine Sensitivitaet von 80%, eine Spezifitaet von 40% und eine Treffsicherheit von 67% erreicht werden. Eine Sensitivitaet von 71% und eine Spezifitaet von 75% wurden bei der Beurteilung eines Samenblasenbefalls ermittelt, bei einer Treffsicherheit von 73%. (orig.)

  19. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium intracellulare Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis, Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis, Mycobacteria Interspersed Repetitive-Unit-Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Typing, and Multilocus Sequence Typing: Molecular Characterization and Comparison of Each Typing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Semi; Lim, Nara; Kwon, Seungjik; Shim, Taesun; Park, Misun; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Seonghan

    2014-06-01

    Mycobacterium intracellulare is the major causative agent of nontuberculous mycobacteria-related pulmonary infections. The strain typing of M. intracellulare is important for the treatment and control of its infections. We compared the discrimination capacity and effective value of four different molecular typing methods. Antibiotic susceptibility testing, hsp65 and rpoB sequencing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), mycobacteria interspersed repetitive-unit-variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MIRU-VNTR), and VNTR assay targeting 44 M. intracellulare isolates obtained from patients with pulmonary infections were performed. All the antibiotic susceptibility patterns had no association with the molecular and sequence types tested in this study; however, the molecular and sequence types were related with each other. PFGE gave best results for discriminatory capacity, followed by VNTR, MLST, and MIRU-VNTR. The high discriminatory power of PFGE, VNTR, and MLST is enough for differentiating between reinfection and relapse, as well as for other molecular epidemiological usages. The MLST could be regarded as a representative classification method, because it showed the clearest relation with the sequence types.

  20. Versatile pulse programmer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adduci, D.J.

    1979-05-01

    A description of the sequence of events and the decisions leading to the design of a versatile pulse programmer for pulsed NMR are presented. Background and application information is discussed in order that the reader might better understand the role of the pulse programmer in a NMR spectrometer. Various other design approaches are presented as a basis for comparison. Specifications for this design are proposed, the hardware implementation of the specifications is discussed, and the software operating system is presented.

  1. Versatile pulse programmer for pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adduci, D.J.

    1979-05-01

    A description of the sequence of events and the decisions leading to the design of a versatile pulse programmer for pulsed NMR are presented. Background and application information is discussed in order that the reader might better understand the role of the pulse programmer in a NMR spectrometer. Various other design approaches are presented as a basis for comparison. Specifications for this design are proposed, the hardware implementation of the specifications is discussed, and the software operating system is presented

  2. Diagnosis of adhesive capsulitis: comparison of contrast-enhanced MRI with noncontrast-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyung-Sik; Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Yura; Jeong, Woong-Kyo

    2015-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic performance of contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and non-CE MRI for adhesive capsulitis (AC). CE MRI of 50 AC and 53 non-AC patients were reviewed by two radiologists independently. Axillary capsular thickening and T2 hyperintensity (sensitivity=92-94%; specificity=53-64%) and enhancement of the axillary capsule and rotator interval (sensitivity=92-98%; specificity=38-64%) were helpful in diagnosing AC. Interobserver reliability was highest with axillary joint capsule enhancement (κ=0.92). Non-CE and CE MRI are helpful in confirming the clinical diagnosis of AC. CE-MRI may improve assessment of the rotator interval and diagnostic confidence in patients with AC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Non-contrast enhanced MR venography using 3D fresh blood imaging (FBI). Initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Kenichi; Nitatori, Toshiaki; Inaoka, Sayuki; Takahara, Taro; Hachiya, Junichi [Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-10-01

    This study examined the efficacy of 3D-fresh blood imaging (FBI) in patients with venous disease in the iliac region to lower extremity. Fourteen patients with venous disease were examined [8 deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and 6 varix] by 3D-FBI and 2D-TOF MRA. ALL FBI images and 2D-TOF images were evaluated in terms of visualization of the disease and compared with conventional X-ray venography (CV). The total scan time of 3D-FBI ranged from 3 min 24 sec to 4 min 52 sec. 3D-FBI was positive in all 23 anatomical levels in which DVT was diagnosed by CV (100% sensitivity) as well as 2D-TOF. The delineation of collateral veins was superior or equal to that of 2D-TOF. 3D-FBI allowed depiction of varices in five of six cases; however, in one case, the evaluation was limited because the separation of arteries from veins was difficult. The 3D-FBI technique, which allows iliac to peripheral MR venography without contrast medium within a short acquisition time, is considered clinically useful. (author)

  4. Transient gyriform brightness on non-contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) brain scan of seven infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Close, P.J.; Carty, H.M. (Royal Liverpool Childrens Hospital (UK))

    1991-04-01

    Spontaneous gyriform brightness seen on CT scan is an unusual finding unless associated with arteriovenous malformations (AVM). There are sporadic case reports in the literature of its occurrence in association with herpex simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE), purulent meningitis, following chemotherapy for leukaemia, in a child with chronic renal failure, and in a child with folic acid deficiency. We present a series of seven cases exhibiting this phenomenon, none of whom have AVMs, who have been scanned at this hospital in the first 2 1/2 years following the installation of a CT scanner. Four of the cases had congenital heart disease requiring corrective surgery or cardiac catheterisation. The other three had probable meningo-encephalitis. In all cases the gyriform brightness followed an ischaemic insult to the child's brain. We hypothesise that this phenomenon is an ischaemic response in the immature brain and that its occurrence is not so rare as the literature may suggest. (orig.).

  5. Properties of the unusually short pulse sequences occurring prior to the first strokes of negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolmašová, Ivana; Santolík, O.; Farges, T.; Rison, W.; Lán, Radek; Uhlíř, Luděk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 14 (2014), s. 5316-5324 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31899S Grant - others:Rada Programu interní podpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR M100421206 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : lightning initiation * preliminary breakdown pulses * duration of breakdown process Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.456, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014GL060913/abstract

  6. Characterization of Mycoplasma hyosynoviae strains by amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokotovic, Branko; Friis, N.F.; Ahrens, Peter

    2002-01-01

    , were investigated by analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphisms of the Bgl II and Mfe I restriction sites and by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of a Bss HII digest of chromosomal DNA. Both methods allowed unambiguous differentiation of the analysed strains and showed similar discriminatory...... potential for the differentiation of M. hyosynoviae isolates. Concordant results obtained with the two whole-genome fingerprinting techniques evidence the considerable intraspecies genetic heterogeneity of M. hyosynoviae . Sixteen field strains of M. hyosynoviae and the type strain S16(T) were further...

  7. PULSE GENERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeschke, C.W.

    1957-09-24

    An improvement in pulse generators is described by which there are produced pulses of a duration from about 1 to 10 microseconds with a truly flat top and extremely rapid rise and fall. The pulses are produced by triggering from a separate input or by modifying the current to operate as a free-running pulse generator. In its broad aspect, the disclosed pulse generator comprises a first tube with an anode capacitor and grid circuit which controls the firing; a second tube series connected in the cathode circuit of the first tube such that discharge of the first tube places a voltage across it as the leading edge of the desired pulse; and an integrator circuit from the plate across the grid of the second tube to control the discharge time of the second tube, determining the pulse length.

  8. Detection of small pulmonary nodules in high-field MR at 3 T: evaluation of different pulse sequences using porcine lung explants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regier, M.; Kaul, M.G.; Ittrich, H.; Bansmann, P.M.; Kemper, J.; Nolte-Ernsting, C.; Adam, G. [University Hospital of Hamburg, Center for Diagnostic Imaging and Image Guided Therapy, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Kandel, S.; Hoffmann, B.; Heller, M.; Biederer, J. [University Hospital of Kiel, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kiel (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    To evaluate two MR imaging sequences for the detection of artificial pulmonary nodules inside porcine lung explants. 67 agarose nodules ranging 3-20 mm were injected into ten porcine lungs within a dedicated chest phantom. The signal on T1-weighted images and radiopacity were adjusted by adding 0.125 mmol/l Gd-DTPA and 1.5 g/l of iodine. A T1-weighted three-dimensional gradient-echo (T1-3D-GRE; TR/TE:3.3/1.1 ms, slice:8 mm, flip-angle:10 ) and a T2-weighted half-Fourier fast-spin echo sequence (T2-HF-FSE; TR/TE:2000/66 ms, slice:7 mm, flip-angle:90 ) were applied in axial orientation using a 3-T system (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands), followed by CT (16 x 0.5 mm) as reference. Nodule sizes and locations were assessed by three blinded observers. In nodules of >10 mm, sensitivity was 100% using 3D-GRE-MRI and 94% using the HF-FSE sequence. For nodules 6-10 mm, the sensitivity of MRI was lower than with CT (3D-GRE:92%; T2-HF-FSE:83%). In lesions smaller than 5 mm, the sensitivity declined to 80% (3D-GRE) and 53% (HF-FSE). Small lesion diameters were overestimated with both sequences, particularly with HF-FSE. This study confirms the feasibility of 3 T-MRI for lung nodule detection. In lesions greater than 5 mm, the sensitivity of the 3D-GRE sequence approximated CT (>90%), while sensitivity and PPV with the HF-FSE sequence were slightly inferior. (orig.)

  9. Cartilage destruction in small joints by rheumatoid arthritis: assessment of fat-suppressed three-dimensional gradient-echo MR pulse sequences in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, M.; Allmann, K.H.; Hauer, M.P.; Langer, M.; Ihling, C.; Conca, W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the accuracy of different MR sequences for the detection of articular cartilage abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis. Design and patients. Ten metacarpophalangeal joints and 10 metatarsophalangeal joints (specimens from arthritis patients undergoing ablative joint surgery) were examined with a fat-suppressed (FS) 3D FLASH, a FS 3D FISP, a FS 2D fast spin-echo T2-weighted, and a 2D FS spin-echo T1-weighted sequence. Each cartilage lesion and each cortical lesion was graded from 0 to 4 (modified Outerbridge staging system). Subsequently, the results of each sequence were compared with the macroscopic findings and statistically tested against each other. Results. The study shows that 3D gradient-echo sequences with fat suppression were best for imaging and grading of cartilage lesions in arthritis of the small joints of the hands and feet. Using 3D techniques, all grade 2, grade 3, and grade 4 lesions of cartilage or cortical bone were detected. Conclusion. FS 3D gradient-echo techniques were best for the detection and grading of hyaline cartilage and subchondral bone lesions in rheumatoid arthritis. MRI has a great potential as an objective method of evaluating cartilage damage and bone erosions in rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  10. SU-E-J-231: Comparison of Delineation Variability of Soft Tissue Volume and Position in Head-And-Neck Between Two T1-Weighted Pulse Sequences Using An MR-Simulator with Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, O; Lo, G; Yuan, J; Law, M; Ding, A; Cheng, K; Chan, K; Cheung, K; Yu, S [Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There is growing interests in applying MR-simulator(MR-sim) in radiotherapy but MR images subject to hardware, patient and pulse sequence dependent geometric distortion that may potentially influence target definition. This study aimed to evaluate the influence on head-and-neck tissue delineation, in terms of positional and volumetric variability, of two T1-weighted(T1w) MR sequences on a 1.5T MR-sim Methods: Four healthy volunteers were scanned (4 scans for each on different days) using both spin-echo (3DCUBE, TR/TE=500/14ms, TA=183s) and gradient-echo sequences (3DFSPGR, TE/TR=7/4ms, TA=173s) with identical coverage, voxel-size(0.8×0.8×1.0mm3), receiver-bandwidth(62.5kHz/pix) and geometric correction on a 1.5T MR-sim immobilized with personalized thermoplastic cast and head-rest. Under this setting, similar T1w contrast and signal-to-noise ratio were obtained, and factors other than sequence that might bias image distortion and tissue delineation were minimized. VOIs of parotid gland(PGR, PGL), pituitary gland(PIT) and eyeballs(EyeL, EyeR) were carefully drawn, and inter-scan coefficient-of-variation(CV) of VOI centroid position and volume were calculated for each subject. Mean and standard deviation(SD) of the CVs for four subjects were compared between sequences using Wilcoxon ranksum test. Results: The mean positional(<4%) and volumetric(<7%) CVs varied between tissues, majorly dependent on tissue inherent properties like volume, location, mobility and deformability. Smaller mean volumetric CV was found in 3DCUBE, probably due to its less proneness to tissue susceptibility, but only PGL showed significant difference(P<0.05). Positional CVs had no significant differences for all VOIs(P>0.05) between sequences, suggesting volumetric variation might be more sensitive to sequence-dependent delineation difference. Conclusion: Although 3DCUBE is considered less prone to tissue susceptibility-induced artifact and distortion, our preliminary data showed

  11. Genomic relationships of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 strains evaluated by ribotyping, sequence analysis of ribosomal intergenic regions, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fussing, V.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the genomic relationship among 112 Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 strains obtained throughout Europe and North America. HindIII ribotyping of the strains resulted in five ribotypes of high similarity (87-98%). Sequence analysis of the riboso......The aim of the present study was to examine the genomic relationship among 112 Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 strains obtained throughout Europe and North America. HindIII ribotyping of the strains resulted in five ribotypes of high similarity (87-98%). Sequence analysis...... of the ribosomal intergenic region of strains representing each ribotype and each country showed no differences. A common ribotype was further characterized by PFGE of 12 strains representing all countries. The resultant five PFGE patterns of European strains showed a similarity of more than 91%, to which the two...

  12. Pulse Oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Thoracic Society www. thoracic. org American Thoracic Society PATIENT EDUCATION | INFORMATION SERIES How accurate is the pulse oximeter? The ... patient. co. uk/ doctor/ Pulse- Oximetry. htm This ... service of the American Thoracic Society. The content is for educational purposes only. It ...

  13. Intracranial cerebrospinal fluid spaces imaging using a pulse-triggered three-dimensional turbo spin echo MR sequence with variable flip-angle distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodel, Jerome [Unite Analyse et Restauration du Mouvement, UMR-CNRS, 8005 LBM ParisTech Ensam, Paris (France); University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Creteil (France); Silvera, Jonathan [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neuroradiology, Creteil (France); Bekaert, Olivier; Decq, Philippe [Unite Analyse et Restauration du Mouvement, UMR-CNRS, 8005 LBM ParisTech Ensam, Paris (France); University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Neurosurgery, Creteil (France); Rahmouni, Alain [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Radiology, Creteil (France); Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie [University Paris Est Creteil (UPEC), Creteil (France); Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Paris (France); Hopital Henri Mondor, Department of Public Health, Creteil (France); Vignaud, Alexandre [Siemens Healthcare, Saint Denis (France); Petit, Eric; Durning, Bruno [Laboratoire Images Signaux et Systemes Intelligents, UPEC, Creteil (France)

    2011-02-15

    To assess the three-dimensional turbo spin echo with variable flip-angle distribution magnetic resonance sequence (SPACE: Sampling Perfection with Application optimised Contrast using different flip-angle Evolution) for the imaging of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces. We prospectively investigated 18 healthy volunteers and 25 patients, 20 with communicating hydrocephalus (CH), five with non-communicating hydrocephalus (NCH), using the SPACE sequence at 1.5T. Volume rendering views of both intracranial and ventricular CSF were obtained for all patients and volunteers. The subarachnoid CSF distribution was qualitatively evaluated on volume rendering views using a four-point scale. The CSF volumes within total, ventricular and subarachnoid spaces were calculated as well as the ratio between ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volumes. Three different patterns of subarachnoid CSF distribution were observed. In healthy volunteers we found narrowed CSF spaces within the occipital aera. A diffuse narrowing of the subarachnoid CSF spaces was observed in patients with NCH whereas patients with CH exhibited narrowed CSF spaces within the high midline convexity. The ratios between ventricular and subarachnoid CSF volumes were significantly different among the volunteers, patients with CH and patients with NCH. The assessment of CSF spaces volume and distribution may help to characterise hydrocephalus. (orig.)

  14. Transformed composite sequences for improved qubit addressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, J. True; Doret, S. Charles; Vittorini, Grahame; Addison, J. P.; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2014-10-01

    Selective laser addressing of a single atom or atomic ion qubit can be improved using narrow-band composite pulse sequences. We describe a Lie-algebraic technique to generalize known narrow-band sequences and introduce sequences related by dilation and rotation of sequence generators. Our method improves known narrow-band sequences by decreasing both the pulse time and the residual error. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate these composite sequences using 40Ca+ ions trapped in a surface-electrode ion trap.

  15. Treatment Pulse Application for Magnetic Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Seob Choi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment and diagnosis can be made in difficult areas simply by changing the output pulse form of the magnetic stimulation device. However, there is a limitation in the range of treatments and diagnoses of a conventional sinusoidal stimulation treatment pulse because the intensity, width, and form of the pulse must be changed according to the lesion type. This paper reports a multidischarge method, where the stimulation coils were driven in sequence via multiple switching control. The limitation of the existing simple sinusoidal pulse form could be overcome by changing the intensity, width, and form of the pulse. In this study, a new sequential discharge method was proposed to freely alter the pulse width. The output characteristics of the stimulation treatment pulse were examined according to the trigger signal delay applied to the switch at each stage by applying a range of superposition pulses to the magnetic simulation device, which is widely used in industry and medicine.

  16. Comparison of PCR binary typing (P-BIT), a new approach to epidemiological subtyping of Campylobacter jejuni, with serotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and multilocus sequence typing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Angela J; Gilpin, Brent; Carter, Philip; Nicol, Carolyn; On, Stephen L W

    2010-03-01

    To overcome some of the deficiencies with current molecular typing schema for Campylobacter spp., we developed a prototype PCR binary typing (P-BIT) approach. We investigated the distribution of 68 gene targets in 58 Campylobacter jejuni strains, one Campylobacter lari strain, and two Campylobacter coli strains for this purpose. Gene targets were selected on the basis of distribution in multiple genomes or plasmids, and known or putative status as an epidemicity factor. Strains were examined with Penner serotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE; using SmaI and KpnI enzymes), and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) approaches for comparison. P-BIT provided 100% typeability for strains and gave a diversity index of 98.5%, compared with 97.0% for SmaI PFGE, 99.4% for KpnI PFGE, 96.1% for MLST, and 92.8% for serotyping. Numerical analysis of the P-BIT data clearly distinguished strains of the three Campylobacter species examined and correlated somewhat with MLST clonal complex assignations and with previous classifications of "high" and "low" risk. We identified 18 gene targets that conferred the same level of discrimination as the 68 initially examined. We conclude that P-BIT is a useful approach for subtyping, offering advantages of speed, cost, and potential for strain risk ranking unavailable from current molecular typing schema for Campylobacter spp.

  17. Pulse plating

    CERN Document Server

    Hansal, Wolfgang E G; Green, Todd; Leisner, Peter; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The electrodeposition of metals using pulsed current has achieved practical importance in recent years. Although it has long been known that changes in potential, with or without polarity reversal, can significantly affect the deposition process, the practical application of this has been slow to be adopted. This can largely be explained in terms of the complex relationship between the current regime and its effect on the electrodeposition process. In order to harness these effects, an understanding of the anodic and cathodic electrochemical processes is necessary, together with the effects of polarity reversal and the rate of such reversals. In this new monograph, the basics of metal electrodeposition from solution are laid out in great detail in seven distinct chapters. With this knowledge, the reader is able to predict how a given pulse train profile can be adopted to achieve a desired outcome. Equally important is the choice of a suitable rectifier and the ancillary control circuits to enable pulse platin...

  18. Nonparametric estimation of ultrasound pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Leeman, Sidney

    1994-01-01

    An algorithm for nonparametric estimation of 1D ultrasound pulses in echo sequences from human tissues is derived. The technique is a variation of the homomorphic filtering technique using the real cepstrum, and the underlying basis of the method is explained. The algorithm exploits a priori...

  19. Pulsed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The key element of our pulsed power program is concentration of power in time and space by suppression of breakdown in dielectrics and in vacuum. Magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines and magnetic suppression of insulator flashover have continued as the main reserch directions. Vacuum insulated line studies at Physics International have been expanded and a test bed at Sandia, called MITE (Magnetically Insulated Transmission Experiment), is under development. The choice for the baseline EBFA design will depend on the outcome of these studies and should be made in July 1977. The slow and intermediate speed pulsed power approaches to EBFA will be based on Proto I and Proto II results and several of the projected EBFA subsystems are presently being tested in Proto II. A further stage of power concentration, within the vacuum diode itself, would considerably ease the burden on dielectrics; methods of power multiplication involving magnetically imploded plasmas are being considered and tests have begun using the Ripple III apparatus

  20. MR-guided sclerotherapy of low-flow vascular malformations using T2 -weighted interrupted bSSFP (T2 W-iSSFP): comparison of pulse sequences for visualization and needle guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Di; Herzka, Daniel A; Gilson, Wesley D; McVeigh, Elliot R; Lewin, Jonathan S; Weiss, Clifford R

    2015-02-01

    Image-guided treatment of low-flow vascular (venous or lymphatic) malformations presents a challenging visualization problem, regardless of the imaging modality being used for guidance. The purpose of this study was to employ a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence, T2 -weighted interrupted balanced steady-state free precession (T2 W-iSSFP), for real-time image guidance of needle insertion. T2 W-iSSFP uses variable flip angle balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP, a.k.a. SSFP) to establish T2 -weighting and fat suppression. Swine (n = 3) and patients (n = 4, three female, all with venous malformations) were enrolled in the assessment. T2 -weighted turbo spin echo (T2 -TSE) with spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR), SPAIR-T2 -TSE or T2 -TSE for short, was used as the reference. T2 -weighted half Fourier acquired single shot turbo spin echo (T2 -HASTE) with SPAIR (SPAIR-T2 -HASTE, T2 -HASTE for short), fat saturated bSSFP (FS-SSFP), and T2 W-iSSFP were imaged. Numeric metrics, namely, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) efficiency (CNR divided by the square root of acquisition time) and local sharpness (the reciprocal of edge width), were used to assess image quality. MR-guided sclerotherapy was performed on the same patients using real-time T2 W-iSSFP to guide needle insertion. Comparing the visualization of needles in the images of swine, the local sharpness (mm(-1) ) was: 0.21 ± 0.06 (T2 -HASTE), 0.48 ± 0.02 (FS-SSFP), and 0.49 ± 0.03 (T2 W-iSSFP). T2 W-iSSFP is higher than T2 -HASTE (P W-iSSFP). T2 W-iSSFP is higher than FS-SSFP (P W-iSSFP was 2.5-3.5 frames per second. All MR-guided sclerotherapy procedures were successful, with all needles (six punctures) placed in the targets. T2 W-iSSFP provides effective lesion identification and needle visualization. This new pulse sequence can be used for MR-guided sclerotherapy of low-flow vascular malformations. It may have potential use in other MR-guided procedures where heavily T2 -weighted real

  1. Pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenshields, H.; Seddon, W.A.

    1982-03-01

    This supplement to two bibliographies published in 1970 and 1972 lists 734 references to the literature of pulse radiolysis, arranged under eight broad subject headings. The references were compiled by searching Biological Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts, Nuclear Science Abstracts and the Weekly List of Papers in Radiation Chemistry issued by the Radiation Chemistry Data Center of Notre Dame University. Full bibliographic data is given for papers published in the period 1971 to 1974. A personal author index listing more than 600 authors and a similar number of co-authors is included

  2. PULSE COLUMN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  3. Method for pulse to pulse dose reproducibility applied to electron linear accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ighigeanu, D.; Martin, D.; Oproiu, C.; Cirstea, E.; Craciun, G.

    2002-01-01

    An original method for obtaining programmed beam single shots and pulse trains with programmed pulse number, pulse repetition frequency, pulse duration and pulse dose is presented. It is particularly useful for automatic control of absorbed dose rate level, irradiation process control as well as in pulse radiolysis studies, single pulse dose measurement or for research experiments where pulse-to-pulse dose reproducibility is required. This method is applied to the electron linear accelerators, ALIN-10 of 6.23 MeV and 82 W and ALID-7, of 5.5 MeV and 670 W, built in NILPRP. In order to implement this method, the accelerator triggering system (ATS) consists of two branches: the gun branch and the magnetron branch. ATS, which synchronizes all the system units, delivers trigger pulses at a programmed repetition rate (up to 250 pulses/s) to the gun (80 kV, 10 A and 4 ms) and magnetron (45 kV, 100 A, and 4 ms).The accelerated electron beam existence is determined by the electron gun and magnetron pulses overlapping. The method consists in controlling the overlapping of pulses in order to deliver the beam in the desired sequence. This control is implemented by a discrete pulse position modulation of gun and/or magnetron pulses. The instabilities of the gun and magnetron transient regimes are avoided by operating the accelerator with no accelerated beam for a certain time. At the operator 'beam start' command, the ATS controls electron gun and magnetron pulses overlapping and the linac beam is generated. The pulse-to-pulse absorbed dose variation is thus considerably reduced. Programmed absorbed dose, irradiation time, beam pulse number or other external events may interrupt the coincidence between the gun and magnetron pulses. Slow absorbed dose variation is compensated by the control of the pulse duration and repetition frequency. Two methods are reported in the electron linear accelerators' development for obtaining the pulse to pulse dose reproducibility: the method

  4. Soft-pulse dynamical decoupling with Markovian decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryadko, Leonid P.; Quiroz, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    We consider the effect of broadband decoherence on the performance of refocusing sequences, having in mind applications of dynamical decoupling in concatenation with quantum error correcting codes as the first stage of coherence protection. Specifically, we construct cumulant expansions of effective decoherence operators for a qubit driven by a pulse of a generic symmetric shape and for several sequences of π and π/2 pulses. While, in general, the performance of soft pulses in decoupling sequences in the presence of Markovian decoherence is worse than that of the ideal δ pulses, it can be substantially improved by shaping.

  5. Non-contrast enhanced MRI for evaluation of breast lesions: comparison of non-contrast enhanced high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) images vs. contrast enhanced fat-suppressed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medved, Milica; Fan, Xiaobing; Abe, Hiroyuki; Newstead, Gillian M.; Wood, Abbie M.; Shimauchi, Akiko; Kulkarni, Kirti; Ivancevic, Marko K.; Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Karczmar, Gregory S.

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES To evaluate high spectral and spatial resolution (HiSS) MRI for diagnosis of breast cancer without injection of contrast media: to compare the performance of pre-contrast HiSS images to conventional contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images, based on image quality and in the task of classifying benign and malignant breast lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ten benign and 44 malignant lesions were imaged at 1.5T with HiSS (pre-contrast administration) and conventional fat-suppressed imaging (3–10 min post-contrast). This set of 108 images, after randomization, was evaluated by three experienced radiologists blinded to the imaging technique. BIRADS morphologic criteria (lesion shape; lesion margin; internal signal intensity pattern) and final assessment were used to measure reader performance. Image quality was evaluated based on boundary delineation and quality of fat suppression. An overall probability of malignancy was assigned to each lesion for HiSS and conventional images separately. RESULTS On boundary delineation and quality of fat-suppression, pre-contrast HiSS scored similarly to conventional post-contrast MRI. On benign vs. malignant lesion separation, there was no statistically significant difference in ROC performance between HiSS and conventional MRI, and HiSS met a reasonable non-inferiority condition. CONCLUSION Pre-contrast HiSS imaging is a promising approach for showing lesion morphology without blooming and other artifacts caused by contrast agents. HiSS images could be used to guide subsequent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI scans, to maximize spatial and temporal resolution in suspicious regions. HiSS MRI without contrast agent injection may be particularly important for patients at risk for contrast-induced nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, or allergic reactions. PMID:21962476

  6. Noncontrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Versus Computed Tomography Angiography in Preoperative Evaluation of Potential Living Renal Donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blankholm, Anne Dorte; Pedersen, Bodil G; Østrat, Ernst Ø

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Living renal donors undergo an extensive examination program. These examinations should be as safe, gentle, and patient friendly as possible. To compare computed tomography angiography (CTA) and an extensive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol without contrast agen...... for preoperative assessment of the renal vessels before living donor nephrectomy....

  7. Pulse pile-up. II: Tailed pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, D.H.

    1990-07-01

    The considerations of the preceding paper are extended to the case of pulses having infinite (exponential) tails. Exact solutions are presented for pure exponential pulses all of the same height; ruin theory is applied for pulses of more realistic form. (Author) (2 refs., 9 figs.)

  8. Microscopic Displacement Imaging with Pulsed Field Gradient Turbo Spin-Echo NMR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, T.W.J.; Dusschoten, van D.; Jager, de P.A.; As, van H.

    2000-01-01

    We present a pulse sequence that enables the accurate and spatially resolved measurements of the displacements of spins in a variety of (biological) systems. The pulse sequence combines pulsed field gradient (PFG) NMR with turbo spin–echo (TSE) imaging. It is shown here that by ensuring that the

  9. Random pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ya'nan; Jin Dapeng; Zhao Dixin; Liu Zhen'an; Qiao Qiao; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing

    2007-01-01

    Due to the randomness of radioactive decay and nuclear reaction, the signals from detectors are random in time. But normal pulse generator generates periodical pulses. To measure the performances of nuclear electronic devices under random inputs, a random generator is necessary. Types of random pulse generator are reviewed, 2 digital random pulse generators are introduced. (authors)

  10. Programmable pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Zhihua; Lou Binqiao; Duan Xiaohui

    2002-01-01

    The author introduces the design of programmable pulse generator that is based on a micro-controller and controlled by RS232 interface of personal computer. The whole system has good stability. The pulse generator can produce TTL pulse and analog pulse. The pulse frequency can be selected by EPLD. The voltage amplitude and pulse width of analog pulse can be adjusted by analog switches and digitally-controlled potentiometers. The software development tools of computer is National Instruments LabView5.1. The front panel of this virtual instrumentation is intuitive and easy-to-use. Parameters can be selected and changed conveniently by knob and slide

  11. Pulsed water jet generated by pulse multiplication

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvorský, R.; Sitek, Libor; Sochor, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2016), s. 959-967 ISSN 1330-3651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1406; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0082 Institutional support: RVO:68145535 Keywords : high-pressure pulses * pulse intensifier * pulsed water jet * water hammer effect Subject RIV: JQ - Machines ; Tools Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2016 http://hrcak.srce.hr/163752?lang=en

  12. Laser pulse stacking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  13. Controllable pulse parameter transcranial magnetic stimulator with enhanced circuit topology and pulse shaping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; DʼOstilio, Kevin; Rothwell, John C.; Murphy, David L.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. This work aims at flexible and practical pulse parameter control in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is currently very limited in commercial devices. Approach. We present a third generation controllable pulse parameter device (cTMS3) that uses a novel circuit topology with two energy-storage capacitors. It incorporates several implementation and functionality advantages over conventional TMS devices and other devices with advanced pulse shape control. cTMS3 generates lower internal voltage differences and is implemented with transistors with a lower voltage rating than prior cTMS devices. Main results. cTMS3 provides more flexible pulse shaping since the circuit topology allows four coil-voltage levels during a pulse, including approximately zero voltage. The near-zero coil voltage enables snubbing of the ringing at the end of the pulse without the need for a separate active snubber circuit. cTMS3 can generate powerful rapid pulse sequences (\\lt 10 ms inter pulse interval) by increasing the width of each subsequent pulse and utilizing the large capacitor energy storage, allowing the implementation of paradigms such as paired-pulse and quadripulse TMS with a single pulse generation circuit. cTMS3 can also generate theta (50 Hz) burst stimulation with predominantly unidirectional electric field pulses. The cTMS3 device functionality and output strength are illustrated with electrical output measurements as well as a study of the effect of pulse width and polarity on the active motor threshold in ten healthy volunteers. Significance. The cTMS3 features could extend the utility of TMS as a research, diagnostic, and therapeutic tool.

  14. Comparison of two fat-suppressed magnetic resonance imaging pulse sequences to standard t2-weighted images for brain parenchymal contrast and lesion detection in dogs with inflammatory intracranial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Benjamin D; Mankin, Joseph M; Griffin, John F; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Fowler, Jennifer L; Levine, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    T2-weighted (T2w) sequences are commonly relied upon in magnetic resonance imaging protocols for the detection of brain lesions in dogs. Previously, the effect of fluid suppression via fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) has been compared to T2-weighting with mixed results. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) has been reported to increase the detection of some CNS lesions in people. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effect of fat suppression on brain parenchymal contrast resolution and lesion detection in dogs. We compared three sequences: T2w images, STIR, and T2w FLAIR with chemical fat suppression (T2-FLAIR-FS) in dogs with meningoencephalitis. Dogs with meningoencephalitis and dogs with idiopathic epilepsy were retrospectively identified and anonymized. Evaluators recorded the presence or absence of lesions within 12 predetermined brain regions on randomized sequences, viewing and scoring each sequence individually. Additionally, signal-to-noise ratios, contrast-to-noise ratios, and relative contrast (RC) were measured in a reference population. Short tau inversion recovery sequences had the highest RC between gray and white matter. While descriptively more lesions were identified by evaluators on T2-FLAIR-FS images, there was no statistical difference in the relative sensitivity of lesion detection between the sequences. Nor was there a statistical difference in false lesion detection within our reference population. Short tau inversion recovery may be favored for enhanced anatomic contrast depiction in brain imaging. No benefit of the inclusion of a fat-suppressed T2-FLAIR sequence was found. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  15. Pulse to pulse klystron diagnosis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, J.; Davidson, V.; Genova, L.; Johnson, R.; Reagan, D.

    1981-03-01

    This report describes a system used to study the behavior of SLAC high powered klystrons operating with a twice normal pulse width of 5 μs. At present, up to eight of the klystrons installed along the accelerator can be operated with long pulses and monitored by this system. The report will also discuss some of the recent findings and investigations

  16. Automatic sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Haeseler, Friedrich

    2003-01-01

    Automatic sequences are sequences which are produced by a finite automaton. Although they are not random they may look as being random. They are complicated, in the sense of not being not ultimately periodic, they may look rather complicated, in the sense that it may not be easy to name the rule by which the sequence is generated, however there exists a rule which generates the sequence. The concept automatic sequences has special applications in algebra, number theory, finite automata and formal languages, combinatorics on words. The text deals with different aspects of automatic sequences, in particular:· a general introduction to automatic sequences· the basic (combinatorial) properties of automatic sequences· the algebraic approach to automatic sequences· geometric objects related to automatic sequences.

  17. Temporal gating methods for the generation of isolated attosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calegari, F; Lucchini, M; Negro, M; Vozzi, C; Svelto, O; De Silvestri, S; Sansone, G; Stagira, S; Nisoli, M; Poletto, L

    2012-01-01

    High-order harmonics of ultrashort laser pulses appear in the time domain as a sequence of attosecond bursts of coherent extreme ultraviolet radiation separated by half the optical cycle of the laser field. In order to confine this emission to an isolated attosecond pulse, suitable gating techniques have been proposed and investigated. In this work, we review a few gating techniques used in our laboratories, along with the basic tools for the generation and application of attosecond pulses. (invited review)

  18. Left Gastric Vein Visualization with Hepatopetal Flow Information in Healthy Subjects Using Non-Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Balanced Steady-State Free-Precession Sequence and Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Akihiro; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Ohno, Tsuyoshi; Ono, Ayako; Yamashita, Rikiya; Arizono, Shigeki; Kido, Aki; Sakashita, Naotaka; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-01-01

    To selectively visualize the left gastric vein (LGV) with hepatopetal flow information by non-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography under a hypothesis that change in the LGV flow direction can predict the development of esophageal varices; and to optimize the acquisition protocol in healthy subjects. Respiratory-gated three-dimensional balanced steady-state free-precession scans were conducted on 31 healthy subjects using two methods (A and B) for visualizing the LGV with hepatopetal flow. In method A, two time-spatial labeling inversion pulses (Time-SLIP) were placed on the whole abdomen and the area from the gastric fornix to the upper body, excluding the LGV area. In method B, nonselective inversion recovery pulse was used and one Time-SLIP was placed on the esophagogastric junction. The detectability and consistency of LGV were evaluated using the two methods and ultrasonography (US). Left gastric veins by method A, B, and US were detected in 30 (97%), 24 (77%), and 23 (74%) subjects, respectively. LGV flow by US was hepatopetal in 22 subjects and stagnant in one subject. All hepatopetal LGVs by US coincided with the visualized vessels in both methods. One subject with non-visualized LGV in method A showed stagnant LGV by US. Hepatopetal LGV could be selectively visualized by method A in healthy subjects.

  19. ELECTRICAL PULSE COUNTER APPARATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, W.M.; Jeeves, T.A.

    1962-09-01

    A progressive electrical pulse counter circuit rs designed for the counting of a chain of input pulses. The circuit employs a series of direct connected bistable counting stages simultaneously pulsed by each input pulse and a delay means connected between each of the stages. Each bistable stage has two d-c operative states, which stage, when in its initial state, prevents the next succeeding stage from changing its condition when the latter stage is pulsed. Since the delay circuits between the stages prevents the immediate decay of the d-c state of each stage when the stages are pulsed, only one stage will change its state for each input pulse, thereby providing progressive stage-by-stage counting. (AEC)

  20. Optimal Blood Suppression inversion time based on breathing rates and heart rates to improve renal artery visibility in spatial labeling with multiple inversion pulses: A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Yi Gang; Li, Fang; Long, Xue Ying; Liu, Hui; Wang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Jin Kang; Li, Wen Zheng [Dept. of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha (China); Shen, Hao [GE Healthcare, Waukesha (United States)

    2016-02-15

    To determine whether an optimal blood suppression inversion time (BSP TI) can boost arterial visibility and whether the optimal BSP TI is related to breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR) for hypertension subjects in spatial labeling with multiple inversion pulses (SLEEK). This prospective study included 10 volunteers and 93 consecutive hypertension patients who had undergone SLEEK at 1.5T MRI system. Firstly, suitable BSP TIs for displaying clearly renal artery were determined in 10 volunteers. Secondly, non-contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography with the suitable BSP TIs were performed on those hypertension patients. Then, renal artery was evaluated and an optimal BSP TI to increase arterial visibility was determined for each patient. Patients' BRs and HRs were recorded and their relationships with the optimal BSP TI were analyzed. The optimal BSP TI was negatively correlated with BR (r1 = -0.536, P1 < 0.001; and r2 = -0.535, P2 < 0.001) and HR (r1 = -0.432, P1 = 0.001; and r2 = -0.419, P2 = 0.001) for 2 readers (κ = 0.93). For improving renal arterial visibility, BSP TI = 800 ms could be applied as the optimal BSP TI when the 95% confidence interval were 17-19/min (BR1) and 74-82 bpm (HR1) for reader#1 and 17-19/min (BR2) and 74-83 bpm (HR2) for reader#2; BSP TI = 1100 ms while 14-15/min (BR1, 2) and 71-76 bpm (HR1, 2) for both readers; and BSP TI = 1400 ms when 13-16/min (BR1) and 63-68 bpm (HR1) for reader#1 and 14-15/min (BR2) and 64-70 bpm (HR2) for reader#2. In SLEEK, BSP TI is affected by patients' BRs and HRs. Adopting the optimal BSP TI based on BR and HR can improve the renal arterial visibility and consequently the working efficiency.

  1. Alignment enhancement of a symmetric top molecule by two short laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Christer Z; Viftrup, Simon; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    equation. It is shown that the strongest degree of one-dimensional (single axis) field-free alignment obtainable with a single pulse can be enhanced using the two-pulse sequence in a parallel polarization geometry. The conditions for alignment enhancement are: (1) The second pulse must be sent near...

  2. Second-order shaped pulsed for solid-state quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Pinaki [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We present the construction and detailed analysis of highly optimized self-refocusing pulse shapes for several rotation angles. We characterize the constructed pulses by the coefficients appearing in the Magnus expansion up to second order. This allows a semianalytical analysis of the performance of the constructed shapes in sequences and composite pulses by computing the corresponding leading-order error operators. Higher orders can be analyzed with the numerical technique suggested by us previously. We illustrate the technique by analyzing several composite pulses designed to protect against pulse amplitude errors, and on decoupling sequences for potentially long chains of qubits with on-site and nearest-neighbor couplings.

  3. Comparison of conventional spin-echo, turbo spin-echo and respiratory-triggering turbo spin-echo pulse sequences for T2-weighted MR imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, Shuji; Kimura, Fumiko; Ito, Katsuhide.

    1996-01-01

    T 2 -weighted conventional spin-echo (CSE), turbo spin-echo (TSE) and respiratory-triggering turbo spin-echo (RT-TSE) images were compared to determine there efficacy in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A total of 32 patients with 40 HCCs was examined in this study. Both CSE and RT-TSE images were obtained in all the patients, and in addition conventional TSE images were obtained in 10 patients with 17 HCCs. Quantitative analysis demonstrated that RT-TSE had the highest lesion-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (7.8) and that CSE had the lowest ratio (5.6) (p<0.001). Since qualitative analysis (tissue contrast and conspicuousness of lesions) showed that TSE was inferior to the other sequences, TSE might be less suitable for the depiction of HCC. RT-TSE, however, had the highest assessment in qualitative analysis probably due to reduced respiratory motion artifacts especially at the subphrenic region and at the area adjacent to the gall bladder. It is concluded from the results of the present study that RT-TSE has a potential value as a routine sequence for the detection of HCC. (author)

  4. High voltage pulse conditioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Springfield, R.M.; Wheat, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close

  5. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Diels, Jean-Claude

    2006-01-01

    Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena, 2e serves as an introduction to the phenomena of ultra short laser pulses and describes how this technology can be used to examine problems in areas such as electromagnetism, optics, and quantum mechanics. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Phenomena combines theoretical backgrounds and experimental techniques and will serve as a manual on designing and constructing femtosecond (""faster than electronics"") systems or experiments from scratch. Beyond the simple optical system, the various sources of ultrashort pulses are presented, again with emphasis on the basic

  6. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...... on transcriptional evidence. Analysis of repetitive sequences suggests that they are underrepresented in the reference assembly, reflecting an enrichment of gene-rich regions in the current assembly. Characterization of Lotus natural variation by resequencing of L. japonicus accessions and diploid Lotus species...... is currently ongoing, facilitated by the MG20 reference sequence...

  7. Opportunities in pulse combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenchley, D. L.; Bomelburg, H. J.

    1985-10-01

    In most pulse combustors, the combustion occurs near the closed end of a tube where inlet valves operate in phase with the pressure amplitude variations. Thus, within the combustion zone, both the temperature and the pressure oscillate around a mean value. However, the development of practical applications of pulse combustion has been hampered because effective design requires the right combination of the combustor's dimensions, valve characteristics, fuel/oxidizer combination, and flow pattern. Pulse combustion has several additional advantages for energy conversion efficiency, including high combustion and thermal efficiency, high combustion intensity, and high convective heat transfer rates. Also, pulse combustion can be self-aspirating, generating a pressure boost without using a blower. This allows the use of a compact heat exchanger that may include a condensing section and may obviate the need for a chimney. In the last decade, these features have revived interest in pulse combustion research and development, which has resulted in the development of a pulse combustion air heater by Lennox, and a pulse combustion hydronic unit by Hydrotherm, Inc. To appraise this potential for energy savings, a systematic study was conducted of the many past and present attempts to use pulse combustion for practical purposes. The authors recommended areas where pulse combustion technology could possibly be applied in the future and identified areas in which additional R and D would be necessary. Many of the results of the study project derived from a special workshop on pulse combustion. This document highlights the main points of the study report, with particular emphasis on pulse combustion application in chemical engineering.

  8. Pulse duration discriminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosakovskij, L.F.

    1980-01-01

    Basic circuits of a discriminator for discrimination of pulses with the duration greater than the preset one, and of a multifunctional discriminator allowing to discriminate pulses with the duration greater (tsub(p)>tsub(s)) and lesser (tsub(p) tsub(s) and with the duration tsub(p) [ru

  9. PULSE HEIGHT ANALYZER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, C.W.

    1958-01-21

    An anticoincidence device is described for a pair of adjacent channels of a multi-channel pulse height analyzer for preventing the lower channel from generating a count pulse in response to an input pulse when the input pulse has sufficient magnitude to reach the upper level channel. The anticoincidence circuit comprises a window amplifier, upper and lower level discriminators, and a biased-off amplifier. The output of the window amplifier is coupled to the inputs of the discriminators, the output of the upper level discriminator is connected to the resistance end of a series R-C network, the output of the lower level discriminator is coupled to the capacitance end of the R-C network, and the grid of the biased-off amplifier is coupled to the junction of the R-C network. In operation each discriminator produces a negative pulse output when the input pulse traverses its voltage setting. As a result of the connections to the R-C network, a trigger pulse will be sent to the biased-off amplifier when the incoming pulse level is sufficient to trigger only the lower level discriminator.

  10. Sources of pulsed radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, M.C. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of various sources of pulsed radiation are examined from the viewpoint of their importance to the radiation chemist, and some examples of uses of such sources are mentioned. A summary is given of the application of methods of physical dosimetry to pulsed sources, and the calibration of convenient chemical dosimeters by physical dosimetry is outlined. 7 figures, 1 table

  11. Pulsed neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bespalov, D.F.; Bykovskii, Yu.A.; Vergun, I.I.; Kozlovskii, K.I.; Kozyrev, Yu.P.; Leonov, R.K.; Simagin, B.I.; Tsybin, A.S.; Shikanov, A.Ie.

    1986-03-01

    The paper describes a new device for generating pulsed neutron fields, utilized in nuclear geophysics for carrying out pulsed neutron logging and activation analysis under field conditions. The invention employs a sealed-off neutron tube with a laser ion source which increases neutron yield to the level of 10 neutrons per second or higher. 2 refs., 1 fig

  12. Gas phase pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonah, C.D.; Andong Liu; Mulac, W.A.

    1987-01-01

    Gas phase pulse radiolysis, a technique which can be used to study many different phenomena in chemistry and physics, is discussed. As a source of small radicals, pulse radiolysis is important to the field of chemistry, particularly to combustion and atmospheric kinetics. The reactions of 1,3-butadiene, allene, ethylene and acetylene with OH are presented. 52 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Pulse Distortion in Saturated Fiber Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Da Ros, Francesco; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification is experimentally compared for different chirped pulses in the picosecond regime. The amplified chirped pulses show distortion appearing as pedestals after recompression when the amplifier is operated in saturation.......Fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification is experimentally compared for different chirped pulses in the picosecond regime. The amplified chirped pulses show distortion appearing as pedestals after recompression when the amplifier is operated in saturation....

  14. Solvent suppression using phase-modulated binomial-like sequences and applications to diffusion measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Torres, Allan M.; Price, William S.

    2008-09-01

    Two phase-modulated binomial-like π pulses have been developed by simultaneously optimizing pulse durations and phases. In combination with excitation sculpting, both of the new binomial-like sequences outperform the well-known 3-9-19 sequence in selectivity and inversion width. The new sequences provide similar selectivity and inversion width to the W5 sequence but with significantly shorter sequence durations. When used in PGSTE-WATERGATE, they afford highly selective solvent suppression in diffusion experiments.

  15. Pulse doubling in zigzag-connected autotransformer-based 12-pulse ac-dc converter for power quality improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Rohollah

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a pulse doubling technique in a 12-pulse ac-dc converter which supplies direct torque controlled motor drives (DTCIMDs) in order to have better power quality conditions at the point of common coupling. The proposed technique increases the number of rectification pulses without significant changes in the installations and yields in harmonic reduction in both ac and dc sides. The 12-pulse rectified output voltage is accomplished via two paralleled six-pulse acdc converters each of them consisting of three-phase diode bridge rectifiers. An autotransformer is designed to supply the rectifiers. The design procedure of magnetics is in a way such that makes it suitable for retrofit applications where a six-pulse diode bridge rectifier is being utilized. Independent operation of paralleled diode-bridge rectifiers, i.e. dc-ripple re-injection methodology, requires a Zero Sequence Blocking Transformer (ZSBT). Finally, a tapped interphase reactor is connected at the output of ZSBT to double the pulse numbers of output voltage up to 24 pulses. The aforementioned structure improves power quality criteria at ac mains and makes them consistent with the IEEE-519 standard requirements for varying loads. Furthermore, near unity power factor is obtained for a wide range of DTCIMD operation. A comparison is made between 6-pulse, 12-pulse, and proposed converters from view point of power quality indices. Results show that input current total harmonic distortion (THD) is less than 5% for the proposed topology at various loads.

  16. Dna Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  17. Optical pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The interest in using large lasers to achieve a very short and intense pulse for generating fusion plasma has provided a strong impetus to reexamine the possibilities of optical pulse compression at high energy. Pulse compression allows one to generate pulses of long duration (minimizing damage problems) and subsequently compress optical pulses to achieve the short pulse duration required for specific applications. The ideal device for carrying out this program has not been developed. Of the two approaches considered, the Gires--Tournois approach is limited by the fact that the bandwidth and compression are intimately related, so that the group delay dispersion times the square of the bandwidth is about unity for all simple Gires--Tournois interferometers. The Treacy grating pair does not suffer from this limitation, but is inefficient because diffraction generally occurs in several orders and is limited by the problem of optical damage to the grating surfaces themselves. Nonlinear and parametric processes were explored. Some pulse compression was achieved by these techniques; however, they are generally difficult to control and are not very efficient. (U.S.)

  18. RF Pulsed Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pritzkau, David P.

    2002-01-03

    RF pulsed heating is a process by which a metal is heated from magnetic fields on its surface due to high-power pulsed RF. When the thermal stresses induced are larger than the elastic limit, microcracks and surface roughening will occur due to cyclic fatigue. Pulsed heating limits the maximum magnetic field on the surface and through it the maximum achievable accelerating gradient in a normal conducting accelerator structure. An experiment using circularly cylindrical cavities operating in the TE{sub 011} mode at a resonant frequency of 11.424 GHz is designed to study pulsed heating on OFE copper, a material commonly used in normal conducting accelerator structures. The high-power pulsed RF is supplied by an X-band klystron capable of outputting 50 MW, 1.5 {micro}s pulses. The test pieces of the cavity are designed to be removable to allow testing of different materials with different surface preparations. A diagnostic tool is developed to measure the temperature rise in the cavity utilizing the dynamic Q change of the resonant mode due to heating. The diagnostic consists of simultaneously exciting a TE{sub 012} mode to steady-state in the cavity at 18 GHz and measuring the change in reflected power as the cavity is heated from high-power pulsed RF. Two experimental runs were completed. One run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 120 K for 56 x 10{sup 6} pulses. The second run was executed at a calculated temperature rise of 82 K for 86 x 10{sup 6} pulses. Scanning electron microscope pictures show extensive damage occurring in the region of maximum temperature rise on the surface of the test pieces.

  19. Pulse-width discriminators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budyashov, Yu.G.; Grebenyuk, V.M.; Zinov, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    A pulse duration discriminator is described which is intended for processing signals from multilayer scintillators. The basic elements of the scintillator are: an input gate, a current generator, an integrating capacitor, a Schmidt trigger and an anticoincidence circuit. The basic circuit of the discriminator and its time diagrams explaining its operating are given. The discriminator is based on microcircuits. Pulse duration discrimination threshold changes continuously from 20 to 100 ns, while its amplitude threshold changes within 20 to 100 mV. The temperature instability of discrimination thresholds (both in pulse width and in amplitude) is better than 0.1 per cent/deg C

  20. Radio frequency pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1988-12-01

    High gradients require peak powers. One possible way to generate high peak powers is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a shorter pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before dc to rf conversion as is done for the relativistic klystron or after dc to rf conversion as is done with SLED. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered. Three methods of RFPC will be discussed: SLED, BEC, and REC. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  1. High performance pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothaus, Michael G.; Moran, Stuart L.; Hardesty, Leonard W.

    1992-06-01

    The device is a compact Marx-type generator capable of producing a high-voltage burst of pulses having risetimes less than 10 nanoseconds at repetition rates up to 10 kHz. High-pressure hydrogen switches are used as the switching elements to achieve high rep-rate. A small coaxial design provides low inductance and a fast risetime. The device may be used as a high-rep-rate high-voltage trigger generator, or as a high-voltage pulse source capable of producing up to 1 MV pulses at high repetition rates.

  2. DogPulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Christoffer; Thomsen, Josephine Raun; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents DogPulse, an ambient awareness system to support the coordination of dog walking among family members at home. DogPulse augments a dog collar and leash set to activate an ambient shape-changing lamp and visualize the last time the dog was taken for a walk. The lamp gradually...... changes its form and pulsates its lights in order to keep the family members aware of the dog walking activity. We report the iterative prototyping of DogPulse, its implementation and its preliminary evaluation. Based on our initial findings, we present the limitations and lessons learned as well...

  3. Pulse joining cartridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovashchenko, Sergey Fedorovich; Bonnen, John Joseph Francis

    2017-09-26

    A pulsed joining tool includes a tool body that defines a cavity that receives an inner tubular member and an outer tubular member and a pulse joining cartridge. The tubular members are nested together with the cartridge being disposed around the outer tubular member. The cartridge includes a conductor, such as a wire or foil, that extends around the outer tubular member and is insulated to separate a supply segment from a return segment. A source of stored electrical energy is discharged through the conductor to join the tubular members with an electromagnetic force pulse.

  4. Pulse holographic measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Baik, Seong Hoon; Hong, Seok Kyung; Kim, Jeong Moog; Kim, Duk Hyun

    1992-01-01

    With the development of laser, remote inspection techniques using laser have been growing on. The inspection and measurement techniques by pulse holography are well-established technique for precise measurement, and widely used in various fields of industry now. In nuclear industry, this technology is practically used because holographic inspection is remote, noncontact, and precise measurement technique. In relation to remote inspection technology in nuclear industry, state-of-the art of pulse HNDT (Holographic non-destructive testing) and holographic measurement techniques are examined. First of all, the fundamental principles as well as practical problems for applications are briefly described. The fields of pulse holography have been divided into the HNDT, flow visualization and distribution study, and other application techniques. Additionally holographic particle study, bubble chamber holography, and applications to other visualization techniques are described. Lastly, the current status for the researches and applications of pulse holography to nuclear industry which are carried out actively in Europe and USA, is described. (Author)

  5. IAE pulsed electrostatic accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, V.P.; Ganzhelyuk, M.L.; Kozlov, L.D.; Koltypin, E.A.; Molchanov, Yu.D.; Otroshchenko, G.A.; Yan'kov, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    The modernized pulse electrostatic accelerator using the klystron ion grouping and the beam interruption system prior to acceleration is described. The accelerator is modernized in order to improve parameters of a current pulse and to decrease the background in the measurement room. The ion beam of needed dimensions is obtained with the help of a high-frequency source and a beam grouping and deflection system. The general view of the beam grouping and deflection system is shown. The ion beam forming process is considered in detail. The modernized electrostatic accelerator permits to obtain a pulse current with a pulse length of 1.5 ns and an amplitude of 1.5 - 2 μA. With the repetition frequency of 2 MHz, the average target current is about 6 μA

  6. Pulsed Lorentz Accelerator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Pulsed Lorentz Accelerator (PLA) is proposed to fill the propulsion gap for 6U and smaller satellites. The primary objective is to demonstrate the basic...

  7. Online measurement method for pulse amplitude in pulsed extraction columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xinghai; Li Shichang; Chen Jing

    2009-01-01

    Online measurement of pulse amplitude by air purge was studied. The pulse amplitude in a pulsed extraction column was calculated online by measurement of characteristic parameters of the signal's curve. The method can be used for calculation of different pulsed extraction columns. (authors)

  8. Realtime aspects of pulse-to-pulse modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.; Riedel, C.; Roesch, W.

    1992-01-01

    The pulse-to-pulse modulation of the SIS-ESR control system is described. Fast response to operator interaction and to changes in process conditions is emphasized as well as the essential part played by the timing system in pulse-to-pulse modulation. (author)

  9. Pulsed spallation neutron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development ar Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provide a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology

  10. Pulsed spallation Neutron Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the early history of pulsed spallation neutron source development at Argonne and provides an overview of existing sources world wide. A number of proposals for machines more powerful than currently exist are under development, which are briefly described. The author reviews the status of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source, its instrumentation, and its user program, and provides a few examples of applications in fundamental condensed matter physics, materials science and technology

  11. Ultrashort pulse induced nanogratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolte Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available When intense femtosecond laser pulses are focused into a glass substrate, self-organized periodic nanostructures, so-called nanogratings, are generated in a certain parameter regime. To clarify the ultimate structure of the nanogratings we employed focused ion beam (FIB milling and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS. The results considerably show that voids are the primary constituents and their number increases with ongoing exposure to laser pulses. Potential applications will be highlighted.

  12. Particle acceleration by electromagnetic pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, H.M.

    1982-01-01

    Particle interaction with plane electromagnetic pulses is studied. It is shown that particle acceleration by a wavy pulse, depending on the shape of the pulse, may not be small. Further, a diffusive-type particle acceleration by multiple weak pulses is described and discussed. (author)

  13. Dynamics of traveling reaction pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovzhenko, A. Yu.; Rumanov, E. N.

    2007-01-01

    The growth of activator losses is accompanied by the decay of a traveling reaction pulse. In a ring reactor, this propagation threshold is present simultaneously with a threshold related to the ring diameter. The results of numerical experiments with pulses of an exothermal reaction reveal the transition from pulse propagation to a homogeneous hot regime, established regimes with periodic variations of the pulse velocity, and oscillatory decay of the pulse. When the medium becomes 'bistable' as a result of the variation in parameters, this factor does not prevent the propagation of pulses, but leads to changes in the pulse structure

  14. Enhanced diffusion weighting generated by selective adiabatic pulse trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ziqi; Bartha, Robert

    2007-09-01

    A theoretical description and experimental validation of the enhanced diffusion weighting generated by selective adiabatic full passage (AFP) pulse trains is provided. Six phantoms (Ph-1-Ph-6) were studied on a 4 T Varian/Siemens whole body MRI system. Phantoms consisted of 2.8 cm diameter plastic tubes containing a mixture of 10 μm ORGASOL polymer beads and 2 mM Gd-DTPA dissolved in 5% agar (Ph-1) or nickel(II) ammonium sulphate hexahydrate doped (56.3-0.8 mM) water solutions (Ph-2-Ph-6). A customized localization by adiabatic selective refocusing (LASER) sequence containing slice selective AFP pulse trains and pulsed diffusion gradients applied in the phase encoding direction was used to measure 1H 2O diffusion. The b-value associated with the LASER sequence was derived using the Bloch-Torrey equation. The apparent diffusion coefficients measured by LASER were comparable to those measured by a conventional pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) sequence for all phantoms. Image signal intensity increased in Ph-1 and decreased in Ph-2-Ph-6 as AFP pulse train length increased while maintaining a constant echo-time. These experimental results suggest that such AFP pulse trains can enhance contrast between regions containing microscopic magnetic susceptibility variations and homogeneous regions in which dynamic dephasing relaxation mechanisms are dominant.

  15. Robust efficient estimation of heart rate pulse from video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuchang; Sun, Lingyun; Rohde, Gustavo Kunde

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple but robust algorithm for estimating the heart rate pulse from video sequences containing human skin in real time. Based on a model of light interaction with human skin, we define the change of blood concentration due to arterial pulsation as a pixel quotient in log space, and successfully use the derived signal for computing the pulse heart rate. Various experiments with different cameras, different illumination condition, and different skin locations were conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed algorithm. Examples computed with normal illumination show the algorithm is comparable with pulse oximeter devices both in accuracy and sensitivity. PMID:24761294

  16. High voltage pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasching, George E.

    1977-03-08

    An improved high-voltage pulse generator has been provided which is especially useful in ultrasonic testing of rock core samples. An N number of capacitors are charged in parallel to V volts and at the proper instance are coupled in series to produce a high-voltage pulse of N times V volts. Rapid switching of the capacitors from the paralleled charging configuration to the series discharging configuration is accomplished by using silicon-controlled rectifiers which are chain self-triggered following the initial triggering of a first one of the rectifiers connected between the first and second of the plurality of charging capacitors. A timing and triggering circuit is provided to properly synchronize triggering pulses to the first SCR at a time when the charging voltage is not being applied to the parallel-connected charging capacitors. Alternate circuits are provided for controlling the application of the charging voltage from a charging circuit to be applied to the parallel capacitors which provides a selection of at least two different intervals in which the charging voltage is turned "off" to allow the SCR's connecting the capacitors in series to turn "off" before recharging begins. The high-voltage pulse-generating circuit including the N capacitors and corresponding SCR's which connect the capacitors in series when triggered "on" further includes diodes and series-connected inductors between the parallel-connected charging capacitors which allow sufficiently fast charging of the capacitors for a high pulse repetition rate and yet allow considerable control of the decay time of the high-voltage pulses from the pulse-generating circuit.

  17. HydroPulse Drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.J. Kolle

    2004-04-01

    Tempress HydroPulse{trademark} tool increases overbalanced drilling rates by generating intense suction pulses at the drill bit. This report describes the operation of the tool; results of pressure drilling tests, wear tests and downhole drilling tests; and the business case for field applications. The HydroPulse{trademark} tool is designed to operate on weighted drilling mud at conventional flow rates and pressures. Pressure drilling tests confirm that the HydroPulse{trademark} tool provides 33% to 200% increased rate of penetration. Field tests demonstrated conventional rotary and mud motor drilling operations. The tool has been operated continuous for 50 hours on weighted mud in a wear test stand. This level of reliability is the threshold for commercial application. A seismic-while-drilling version of the tool was also developed and tested. This tool was used to demonstrate reverse vertical seismic profiling while drilling an inclined test well with a PDC bit. The primary applications for the HydroPulse{trademark} tool are deep onshore and offshore drilling where rate of penetration drives costs. The application of the seismic tool is vertical seismic profiling-while-drilling and look-ahead seismic imaging while drilling.

  18. The design of nuclear magnetic resonance programmable pulsed source based SOPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingshun; Zhang Yakun; Wang Wenli

    2012-01-01

    The design of pulse source in the equipment of pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance is studied based on SOPC. The strong processing power of Nios Ⅱ embedded processor and the design flexibility of FPGA are fully used. The SOPC system is built. The overall design plan for the pulse source is described. The design of programmable multi-pulse generation logic user-defined components in the FPGA is introduced mainly. Part of the implementation program and the task logic simulation waveforms are presented. The pulse source has better application value because a clear, stable and good quality multi-pulse output waveform can be shown on the oscilloscope finally. The system software and hardware are easy to be modified and upgraded, meeting different application of pulsed NMR pulse sequence in variety of requirements. (authors)

  19. Current Extensions on PULSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanda Dragos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Using a learning management system (LMS is a common practise nowadays. Such instruments are used in educational institutions to enhance and support the teaching act as well as in industry for training purposes. In a computer science department of an university such instrument tends to be a basic requirement. That is because not only it allows a better management of courses and a better communication between students and professors, but can also serve as a perfect instrument for presenting teaching related materials for computer science subjects. During the years I have created and used several such instruments: a System with Interactive ackNowledgement and Evaluation of students work during laboratory sessions (SINE, a Php Utility used in Laboratories for Student Evaluation (PULSE, and PULSE Extended. The aim of this paper is to present the current enhancements of PULSE.

  20. Discharge pulse phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, A. R.

    1985-01-01

    A model was developed which places radiation induced discharge pulse results into a unified conceptual framework. Only two phenomena are required to interpret all space and laboratory results: (1) radiation produces large electrostatic fields inside insulators via the trapping of a net space charge density; and (2) the electrostatic fields initiate discharge streamer plasmas similar to those investigated in high voltage electrical insulation materials; these streamer plasmas generate the pulsing phenomena. The apparent variability and diversity of results seen is an inherent feature of the plasma streamer mechanism acting in the electric fields which is created by irradiation of the dielectrics. The implications of the model are extensive and lead to constraints over what can be done about spacecraft pulsing.

  1. Pulse Doppler radar

    CERN Document Server

    Alabaster, Clive

    2012-01-01

    This book is a practitioner's guide to all aspects of pulse Doppler radar. It concentrates on airborne military radar systems since they are the most used, most complex, and most interesting of the pulse Doppler radars; however, ground-based and non-military systems are also included. It covers the fundamental science, signal processing, hardware issues, systems design and case studies of typical systems. It will be a useful resource for engineers of all types (hardware, software and systems), academics, post-graduate students, scientists in radar and radar electronic warfare sectors and milit

  2. Millimicrosecond pulse techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Ian A D

    1959-01-01

    Millimicrosecond Pulse Techniques, Second Edition focuses on millimicrosecond pulse techniques and the development of devices of large bandwidth, extending down to comparatively low frequencies (1 Mc/s). Emphasis is on basic circuit elements and pieces of equipment of universal application. Specific applications, mostly in the field of nuclear physics instrumentation, are considered. This book consists of eight chapters and opens with an introduction to some of the terminology employed by circuit engineers as well as theoretical concepts, including the laws of circuit analysis, Fourier analysi

  3. Long Pulse Technology Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jernigan, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    The LPTT tokamak is a non-circular tokamak (R = 1.5 m, a = .45 m) proposed by ORNL for extended pulse operation at high β (5%) and reactor level wall power loading (40 w/cm 2 ). The toroidal field coils are superconducting and a super-conducting bundle divertor is proposed for active impurity control. All systems are designed for continuous operation which will provide pulse lengths > 20 seconds with a 6 to 10 weber flux swing. Experimental access and flexibility in operation are primary design goals

  4. Measuring protein self-diffusion in protein-protein mixtures using a pulsed gradient spin-echo technique with WATERGATE and isotope filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesmelova, Irina V.; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Mayo, Kevin H.

    2004-01-01

    Here we report a modified pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSTE) pulse sequence to measure diffusion coefficients. This approach incorporates WATERGATE combined with isotopic filtering into a standard PGSTE experiment. Doing this eliminates much of the disadvantages from the combination of diffusion encoding and heteronuclear selection intervals and allows for facile modification of the diffusion pulse sequence with flexibility of the time period between RF pulses. The new diffusion pulse sequence is demonstrated using an 15N-labeled peptide and an 15N-labeled protein in a mixture with a protein of similar size.

  5. Pulse power modulators - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatramani, N.

    2006-01-01

    Pulse power modulators are electronic devices to provide, high voltage, high current, power bursts. Ideally, a modulator, with the means to shape and control the pulses, acts as a switch between a high voltage power supply and its load. This article gives an overview of the pulse power modulators: starting with the basics of pulse and modulation, it covers modulation topologies, different types of modulators, major subsystems and pulse measurement techniques. The various applications of pulse power modulators and the recent trends have been included at the end. (author)

  6. A novel selective-excitation RF pulse for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Liu; Jianqi, Li; Gengying, Li

    2008-05-01

    A selective-excitation radiofrequency (RF) pulse that uses hard pulses composed of a sequence of composite pulses with positive and negative phases (P/N pulse) is proposed herein. Because the amplitude of the RF signal is unchanged during the excitation, RF amplification can be accomplished using a nonlinear RF power amplifier (i.e., class C or D type). In this article, Fourier series have been first used to analyze the equivalence between the proposed P/N pulse and the conventional soft pulse on selective excitation. Subsequently, computer simulations based on density-matrix theory are used to compare the excitation profiles of both the soft and the P/N pulses. The excitation profiles of the P/N pulses have been measured experimentally through a home-built 0.3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. In addition, several slices of images have been obtained as proofs by using the multislice two-dimensional spin echo sequence through replacement of the conventional soft pulse by the proposed P/N pulse. Because the perfect selectivity of the proposed P/N pulse, it can be used for imaging studies to improve the efficiency of amplification at the lowest cost.

  7. Pulsed electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    The concept of pulsed electric fields (PEF) was first proposed in 1967 to change the behavior or microorganisms. The electric field phenomenon was identified as membrane rupture theory in the 1980s. Increasing the membrane permeability led to the application of PEF assisted extraction of cellular co...

  8. Differential pulse code modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, C. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A differential pulse code modulation (DPCM) encoding and decoding method is described along with an apparatus which is capable of transmission with minimum bandwidth. The apparatus is not affected by data transition density, requires no direct current (DC) response of the transmission link, and suffers from minimal ambiguity in resolution of the digital data.

  9. Pulsed Power Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The patent describes a step-up power supply which is provided by a plurality of transistors arranged to drive respective, equal turn primary windings...winding, thus maximizing the total voltage applied to the transformer. The power supply amplifies pulses from a blocking oscillator to drive a tuned-plate, tuned-grid transmitter.

  10. Analog pulse processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessendorf, Kurt O.; Kemper, Dale A.

    2003-06-03

    A very low power analog pulse processing system implemented as an ASIC useful for processing signals from radiation detectors, among other things. The system incorporates the functions of a charge sensitive amplifier, a shaping amplifier, a peak sample and hold circuit, and, optionally, an analog to digital converter and associated drivers.

  11. Sleep EEG alterations: effects of pulsed magnetic fields versus pulse-modulated radio frequency electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Marc R; Murbach, Manuel; Lustenberger, Caroline; Maire, Micheline; Kuster, Niels; Achermann, Peter; Loughran, Sarah P

    2012-12-01

    Studies have repeatedly shown that electroencephalographic power during sleep is enhanced in the spindle frequency range following radio frequency electromagnetic field exposures pulse-modulated with fundamental frequency components of 2, 8, 14 or 217 Hz and combinations of these. However, signals used in previous studies also had significant harmonic components above 20 Hz. The current study aimed: (i) to determine if modulation components above 20 Hz, in combination with radio frequency, are necessary to alter the electroencephalogram; and (ii) to test the demodulation hypothesis, if the same effects occur after magnetic field exposure with the same pulse sequence used in the pulse-modulated radio frequency exposure. In a randomized double-blind crossover design, 25 young healthy men were exposed at weekly intervals to three different conditions for 30 min before sleep. Cognitive tasks were also performed during exposure. The conditions were a 2-Hz pulse-modulated radio frequency field, a 2-Hz pulsed magnetic field, and sham. Radio frequency exposure increased electroencephalogram power in the spindle frequency range. Furthermore, delta and theta activity (non-rapid eye movement sleep), and alpha and delta activity (rapid eye movement sleep) were affected following both exposure conditions. No effect on sleep architecture and no clear impact of exposure on cognition was observed. These results demonstrate that both pulse-modulated radio frequency and pulsed magnetic fields affect brain physiology, and the presence of significant frequency components above 20 Hz are not fundamental for these effects to occur. Because responses were not identical for all exposures, the study does not support the hypothesis that effects of radio frequency exposure are based on demodulation of the signal only. © 2012 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Design of the pulse rod drive mechanism for pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Keyi

    1988-07-01

    The pulse rod drive mechanism is a critical movable device for a pulsed reactor. It is an executor under pulse operations, and it may be used in a shim rod under steady-state operations. The pneumatic-electromechanical driving method is taken in the designing. The structure, operating, calculation of parameters and designing methods of the pulse rod drive mechanism are briefly described in this paper. The testing results of the prototypical mechanism are also presented

  13. Moebius sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Kjeldgaard; Maimburg, Rikke Damkjær; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2017-01-01

    and photographical evaluation. Five patients maintained the diagnosis of MS according to the diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: All five patients had bilateral facial and abducens paralysis confirmed by ophthalmological examination. Three of five had normal brain MR imaging. Two had missing facial nerves and one had......BACKGROUND: Moebius Sequence (MS) is a rare disorder defined by bilateral congenital paralysis of the abducens and facial nerves in combination with various odontological, craniofacial, ophthalmological and orthopaedic conditions. The aetiology is still unknown; but both genetic (de novo mutations...

  14. A compact nanosecond pulse modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jizhang; Xue, Jianchao; Qiang, Bohan

    Two circuits of nanosecond pulse modulator which generate two different width rectangular pulses respectively are described. The basic configuration of the modulator is the Marx circuit, in which avalanche transistors are used as switching devices. In order to obtain the rectangular pulses a pulse-forming network (PFN) is introduced and fitted into the Marx. A multi-parallel arrangement of the Marx is used to satisfy the broad pulse requirement. Experiments have shown that the two different width rectangular pulses which have 130 V amplitudes and 30 and 200 ns widths respectively can be obtained at a 50 ohms load. The two pulses have steep front edges (3.6 ns and 10 ns respectively) and flat tops with less than + or - 5 percent ripples. Therefore, the modulator can meet the requirements of the nanosecond pulse radar.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of virtual non-contrast enhanced dual-energy CT for diagnosis of adrenal adenoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, Michael J.; McInnes, Matthew D.F.; Schieda, Nicola [University of Ottawa Department of Radiology, Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON (United States); El-Khodary, Mohamed [McMaster University Department of Radiology, Hamilton, ON (Canada); McGrath, Trevor A. [University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-10-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of dual-energy (DE) virtual non-contrast computed tomography (vNCT) to non-contrast CT (NCT) for the diagnosis of adrenal adenomas. Search of multiple databases and grey literature was performed. Two reviewers independently applied inclusion criteria and extracted data. Risk of bias was assessed using QUADAS-2. Summary estimates of diagnostic accuracy were generated and sources of heterogeneity were assessed. Five studies (170 patients; 192 adrenal masses) were included for diagnostic accuracy assessment; all used dual-source dual-energy CT. Pooled sensitivity for adrenal adenoma on vNCT was 54% (95% CI: 47-62%). Pooled sensitivity for NCT was 57% (95% CI: 45-69%). Pooling of specificity was not performed since no false positives were reported. There was a trend for overestimation of HU density on vNCT as compared to NCT which appeared related to contrast timing. Potential sources of bias were seen regarding the index test and reference standard for the included studies. Potential sources of heterogeneity between studies were seen in adenoma prevalence and intravenous contrast timing. vNCT images generated from dual-energy CT demonstrated comparable sensitivity to NCT for the diagnosis of adenomas; however the included studies are heterogeneous and at high risk for some types of bias. (orig.)

  16. Accelerated noncontrast-enhanced 4-dimensional intracranial MR angiography using golden-angle stack-of-stars trajectory and compressed sensing with magnitude subtraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ziwu; Han, Fei; Yu, Songlin; Yu, Dandan; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Song, Hee Kwon; Wang, Danny J J; Hu, Peng; Yan, Lirong

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and performance of compressed sensing (CS) with magnitude subtraction regularization in accelerating non-contrast-enhanced dynamic intracranial MR angiography (NCE-dMRA). A CS algorithm was introduced in NCE-dMRA by exploiting the sparsity of the magnitude difference of the control and label images. The NCE-dMRA data were acquired using golden-angle stack-of-stars trajectory on six healthy volunteers and one patient with arteriovenous fistula. Images were reconstructed using (i) the proposed magnitude-subtraction CS (MS-CS); (ii) complex-subtraction CS; (iii) independent CS; and (iv) view-sharing with k-space weighted image contrast (KWIC). The dMRA image quality was compared across the four reconstruction strategies. The proposed MS-CS method was further compared with KWIC for temporal fidelity of depicting dynamic flow. The proposed MS-CS method was able to reconstruct NCE-dMRA images with detailed vascular structures and clean background. It provided better subjective image quality than the other two CS strategies (P < 0.05). Compared with KWIC, MS-CS showed similar image quality, but reduced temporal blurring in delineating the fine distal arteries. The MS-CS method is a promising CS technique for accelerating NCE-dMRA acquisition without compromising image quality and temporal fidelity. Magn Reson Med 79:867-878, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Tailored spiral in-out spectral-spatial water suppression pulses for magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Jun; Wismans, Carrie; Cao, Zhipeng; Klomp, DWJ; Wijnen, Jannie P; Grissom, William A

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop short water suppression sequences for 7 T magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, with mitigation of subject-specific transmit RF field ( B1+) inhomogeneity. METHODS: Patient-tailored spiral in-out spectral-spatial saturation pulses were designed for a three-pulse WET water

  18. Pulse mode operation of Love wave devices for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, M I; McHale, G; Martin, F; Gizeli, E; Melzak, K A

    2001-12-01

    In this work we present a novel pulse mode Love wave biosensor that monitors both changes in amplitude and phase. A series of concentrations of 3350 molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) solutions are used as a calibration sequence for the pulse mode system using a network analyzer and high frequency oscilloscope. The operation of the pulse mode system is then compared to the continuous wave network analyzer by showing a sequence of deposition and removal of a model mass layer of palmitoyl-oleoyl-sn-glycerophosphocholine (POPC) vesicles. This experimental apparatus has the potential for making many hundreds of measurements a minute and so allowing the dynamics of fast interactions to be observed.

  19. Hand-held pulse-train-analysis instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, K.V.; Garcia, C.

    1983-01-01

    A portable hand-held pulse-train-analysis instrument uses a number-oriented microprocessor sequenced by a single component microprocessor. The incorporation of new CMOS integrated circuits makes possible complex analysis in a small, easily operated, battery-powered unit. The instrument solves an immediate problem with threshold setting of plastic scintillators and promises numerous other applications

  20. Hand-held pulse-train-analysis instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, K.V.; Garcia, C.

    1982-01-01

    A portable hand-held pulse-train-analysis instrument uses a number-oriented microprocessor sequenced by a single component microprocessor. The incorporation of new CMOS integrated circuits makes possible complex analysis in a small, easily operated, battery-powered unit. The instrument solves an immediate problem with threshold setting of plastic scintillators and promises numerous other applications

  1. Dynamics of a pulsed continuous-variable quantum memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Cviklinski, Jean; Pinard, Michel

    2006-01-01

    We study the transfer dynamics of nonclassical fluctuations of light to the ground-state collective spin components of an atomic ensemble during a pulsed quantum memory sequence, and evaluate the relevant physical quantities to be measured in order to characterize such a quantum memory. We show...... transmission—that accounts for the behavior of the atomic quantum memory....

  2. General solution to inhomogeneous dephasing and smooth pulse dynamical decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Junkai; Deng, Xiu-Hao; Russo, Antonio; Barnes, Edwin

    2018-03-01

    In order to achieve the high-fidelity quantum control needed for a broad range of quantum information technologies, reducing the effects of noise and system inhomogeneities is an essential task. It is well known that a system can be decoupled from noise or made insensitive to inhomogeneous dephasing dynamically by using carefully designed pulse sequences based on square or delta-function waveforms such as Hahn spin echo or CPMG. However, such ideal pulses are often challenging to implement experimentally with high fidelity. Here, we uncover a new geometrical framework for visualizing all possible driving fields, which enables one to generate an unlimited number of smooth, experimentally feasible pulses that perform dynamical decoupling or dynamically corrected gates to arbitrarily high order. We demonstrate that this scheme can significantly enhance the fidelity of single-qubit operations in the presence of noise and when realistic limitations on pulse rise times and amplitudes are taken into account.

  3. Fast pulse amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepetit, J.; Poussier, E.

    1984-01-01

    This amplifier comprises an inverter transformer, the primary circuit of which receives a pulse and the secondary circuit of which is connected to several amplifying elements in parallel. The inverter transformer is made of coaxial cable segments winded around a magnetic torus; the cable cores connected in series constitute the primary circuit and the braiding of cables, connected in parallel, are the secondary circuit. The transformer comprises, besides, delay lines in series with each braiding of the secondary circuit, these ones are such that pulses issued from each braiding arrive together to the secondary circuit connectors. This invention applies, noticeably in the case of a high voltage amplifier, to the control of deflection blocks of particles used in medicine or in particle accelerators [fr

  4. Short pulse neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2016-08-02

    Short pulse neutron generators are described herein. In a general embodiment, the short pulse neutron generator includes a Blumlein structure. The Blumlein structure includes a first conductive plate, a second conductive plate, a third conductive plate, at least one of an inductor or a resistor, a switch, and a dielectric material. The first conductive plate is positioned relative to the second conductive plate such that a gap separates these plates. A vacuum chamber is positioned in the gap, and an ion source is positioned to emit ions in the vacuum chamber. The third conductive plate is electrically grounded, and the switch is operable to electrically connect and disconnect the second conductive plate and the third conductive plate. The at least one of the resistor or the inductor is coupled to the first conductive plate and the second conductive plate.

  5. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  6. STUCTURE OF PULSED BED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Bokun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of pulsed layer is proposed which can be suggested as a state of particulates that is blown by intermittent gas flow with speed which has the force to start material moving. Layer during one cycle is in a suspension, falling down and immobile state resulting in changes of particles arrangement as well as ways of gas flowing through layer. Moreover, it allows carrying out effective interphase heat exchange even adamant real granulation.The process of formation of impact flows is considered aw well as their influence on formation of air bubbles in pulsed layer. At startup of air blast the balance between the force of hydro-dynamic resistance is broken, on one side, and forces of gravity, particles inertia and their links with walls on the other side. The layer is transferred in the state of pulsed pseudo-fluidization, and presents gas-disperse mixture, inside of which impulse of pressure increasing is spreading to all sides as pressure waves (compression. These waves are the sources of impact flows’ formation, the force of which is two times more than during the stationary flow.The waves of pressure are divided into weak and strong ones depending on movement velocity within gas-disperse system. Weak waves are moving with a sound speed and strong ones in active phase of pulsed layer are moving over the speed of sound limit within gas-disperse system. The peculiarity of strong wave is that parameters of system (pressure, density and others are changing in discrete steps.The article describes the regime of layer’s falling down in the passive stage of cycle, which begins after finishing of gas impulse action. And suspension layer of moving up granular material is transferred in the state of falling resulting in change of the layer structure.

  7. Pulsed rf operation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, M.; Cornacchia, M.

    1981-01-01

    The need for a very low final amplifier output impedance, always associated with class A operation, requires a very large power waste in the final tube. The recently suggested pulsed rf operation, while saving a large amount of power, increases the inherent final amplifier non linearity. A method is presented for avoiding the large signal non linear analysis and it is shown how each component of the beam induced voltage depends upon all the beam harmonics via some coupling coefficients which are evaluated

  8. Pulse radiolysis of gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, O.J.

    1984-04-01

    The pulse radiolysis equipment and technique are described and its relevance to atmospheric chemistry is discussed. Pulse radiolysis of a number of different chemical systems have been used to check the validity of the proposed mechanisms: 1) The hydrogen atom yield in the pulse radiolysis of H 2 was measured by four independent calibration techniques, using reactions of H with O 2 , C1NO, and HI. The H atom yield was compared with O 2 yields in pure O 2 and in O 2 /SF 6 mixtures which lead to a value G(H) = 17.6. The rate constants at room temperature of several reactions were determined. 2) OH radical reactions with tetraalkyllead at room temperature and with ethane, methane, and a series of C1- and F-substituted methanes at 300-400 K were studied. Arrhenius parameters, A and Esub(a), were determined for several reactions. The lifetime of Pb(CH 3 ) 4 and Pb(C 2 H 5 ) 4 in ambient air is estimated. CF 2 C1 2 was found to be a very efficient third body, M, in the reaction OH + OH + M arrow H 2 O 2 + M. 3) In the H 2 S systems the HS extinction coefficient at 3242 AA was determined to 9.5 x 10 2 cm -1 mol -1 . Four rate constants at room temperature were determined. (author)

  9. Foundations of pulsed power technology

    CERN Document Server

    Lehr, Janet

    2018-01-01

    Pulsed power technologies could be an answer to many cutting-edge applications. The challenge is in how to develop this high-power/high-energy technology to fit current market demands of low-energy consuming applications. This book provides a comprehensive look at pulsed power technology and shows how it can be improved upon for the world of today and tomorrow. Foundations of Pulsed Power Technology focuses on the design and construction of the building blocks as well as their optimum assembly for synergetic high performance of the overall pulsed power system. Filled with numerous design examples throughout, the book offers chapter coverage on various subjects such as: Marx generators and Marx-like circuits; pulse transformers; pulse-forming lines; closing switches; opening switches; multi-gigawatt to multi-terawatt systems; energy storage in capacitor banks; electrical breakdown in gases; electrical breakdown in solids, liquids and vacuum; pulsed voltage and current measurements; electromagnetic interferen...

  10. Terahertz pulse driven Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camerlingo, Carlo, E-mail: c.camerlingo@cib.na.cnr.it [CNR - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Cibernetica ' E. Caianiello' , Via Campi Flegrei 34, I-80078 Pozzuoli (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    Theoretical model of the ac Josephson effect in pulsed current driven junctions. Evaluation of the voltage response of a THz pulsed radiation driven Josephson junction. The pulsed current bias induces steps in the junction I/V characteristics for voltages depending on the pulse rate. Working principles of a fast response detector for THz pulsed radiation. The voltage response of a Josephson junction to a pulsed terahertz current is evaluated in the limit of a negligible junction capacitance (overdamped limit). The time-dependent superconductor phase difference across the junction is calculated in the framework of the standard resistive shunted junction model by using a perturbative method. The pulsed current bias affects the time average value of the voltage across the junction and current steps are induced in the current-voltage characteristics for voltage values depending on the pulse repetition rate. The current step height is proportional to the square of the pulse time width ({tau}) to the period (T) ratio. A fast response detector for pulsed Terahertz radiation is proposed, with an expected responsivity of the order of 0.1 V/W and an equivalent noise power of about 3 x 10{sup -10} W/Hz{sup 1/2}.

  11. High current transistor pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1991-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current trapezoidally shaped pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in the capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of Darlington transistors. A combination of diodes and Darlington transistors is used to obtain trapezoidal or triangular shaped current pulses into an inductive load and to recover the remaining energy in the same capacitor bank without reversing capacitor voltage. The transistors work in the switch mode, and the power losses are low. The rack mounted pulse generators presently used at SLAC contain a 660 microfarad storage capacitor bank and can deliver 400 amps at 800 volts into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The pulse generators are used in several different power systems, including pulse to pulse bipolar power supplies and in application with current pulses distributed into different inductive loads. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled by the central computer system through a specially developed multichannel controller. Several years of operation with the pulse generators have proven their consistent performance and reliability.

  12. High current transistor pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterov, V.; Cassel, R.

    1991-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current trapezoidally shaped pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in the capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of Darlington transistors. A combination of diodes and Darlington transistors is used to obtain trapezoidal or triangular shaped current pulses into an inductive load and to recover the remaining energy in the same capacitor bank without reversing capacitor voltage. The transistors work in the switch mode, and the power losses are low. The rack mounted pulse generators presently used at SLAC contain a 660 microfarad storage capacitor bank and can deliver 400 amps at 800 volts into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The pulse generators are used in several different power systems, including pulse to pulse bipolar power supplies and in application with current pulses distributed into different inductive loads. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled by the central computer system through a specially developed multichannel controller. Several years of operation with the pulse generators have proven their consistent performance and reliability. 8 figs

  13. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox

    2010-11-09

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  14. Microwave and Pulsed Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freytag, E.K.

    1993-03-01

    The goals of the Microwave and Pulsed Power thrust area are to identify realizable research and development efforts and to conduct high-quality research in those pulse power and microwave technologies that support existing and emerging programmatic requirements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Our main objective is to work on nationally important problems while enhancing our basic understanding of enabling technologies such as component design and testing, compact systems packaging, exploratory physics experiments, and advanced systems integration and performance. During FY-92, we concentrated our research efforts on the six project areas described in this report. (1) We are investigating the superior electronic and thermal properties of diamond that may make it an ideal material for a high-power, solid-state switch. (2) We are studying the feasibility of using advanced Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar technology for reliable non-destructive evaluation of bridges and other high-value concrete structures. These studies include conceptual designs, modeling, experimental verifications, and image reconstruction of simulated radar data. (3) We are exploring the efficiency of pulsed plasma processing techniques used for the removal of NO{sub x} from various effluent sources. (4) We have finished the investigation of the properties of a magnetically delayed low-pressure gas switch, which was designed here at LLNL. (5) We are applying statistical electromagnetic theory techniques to help assess microwave effects on electronic subsystems, by using a mode stirred chamber as our measurement tool. (6) We are investigating the generation of perfluoroisobutylene (PFIB) in proposed CFC replacement fluids when they are subjected to high electrical stresses and breakdown environments.

  15. A Pulsed Sphere Tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cullen, Dermott E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Here I attempt to explain what physically happens when we pulse an object with neutrons, specifically what we expect the time dependent behavior of the neutron population to look like. Emphasis is on the time dependent emission of both prompt and delayed neutrons. I also describe how the TART Monte Carlo transport code models this situation; see the appendix for a complete description of the model used by TART. I will also show that, as we expect, MCNP and MERCURY, produce similar results using the same delayed neutron model (again, see the appendix).

  16. Vocalization of echolocation-like pulses for interindividual interaction in horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayasi, Kohta I; Hiryu, Shizuko; Shimozawa, Ryota; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Although much is known about the echolocation of horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus spp.), little is known about the characteristics and function of their communication calls. This study focused on a stereotyped behavior of a bat approaching a companion animal in the colony, and examined their interaction and vocalization during this behavior. The bats emit echolocation-like vocalizations when approaching each other and these vocalizations contain a "buildup" pulse sequence, in which the frequency of the pulse increases gradually to normal echolocation pulse frequencies. The results suggest that the echolocation-like pulses serve an important role in communication within the colony.

  17. Increasing flexibility in two-dimensional liquid chromatography by pulsed elution of the first dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Simon S.; Christensen, Jan H.; Verdier, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    This work demonstrates the development of an online two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) method where the first dimension column is eluted by a sequence of pulses of increasing eluotropic strength generated by the LC pumps (pulsed-elution 2D-LC). Between the pulses, the first dimension...... online comprehensive 2D-LC: undersampling, difficulties in refocusing, and lack of flexibility in the selection of column dimensions and flow rates because the two dimensions constrain each other. The pulsed-elution 2D-LC was applied for the analysis of a basic fraction of vacuum gas oil. Peak capacity...

  18. Study and realisation of a femtosecond dye laser operating at different wavelengths. Ultrashort pulses compression and amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    We present the study and the realization of a passively mode-locked dye laser producing pulses shorter than 100 femto-seconds (10 -13 s). In a ring cavity with an amplifier medium (Rhodamine 60) and a saturable absorber (DODCI), a sequence of four prisms controls the group velocity dispersion and allows the generation of very short pulses. Then we have studied the production of femtosecond pulses at other wavelengths directly from the femtosecond dye laser. For the first rime, 60 fs pulses at 685 nm and pulses shorter than 50 fs between 775 nm and 800 nm have been produced by passive mode locking. These near infrared pulses have been used to study the absorption saturation kinetics in semiconductors multiple quantum wells GaAs/GaAlAs. We have observed a singular behavior of the laser operating at 685 nm and analyzed the produced pulses in terms of optical solitons. To perform time resolved spectroscopy with shortest pulses, we have studied a pulse compressor and a multipass amplifier to increase the pulses energy. Pulses of 20 fs and 10 micro-joules (peak power: 0.5 GW) have been obtained at low repetition rate (10 Hz) and pulses of 16 fs and 0.6 micro-joules pulses have been generated at high repetition rate (11 kHz) using a copper vapor laser. These pulses have been used to study the absorption saturation kinetics of an organic dye (the Malachite Green). (author) [fr

  19. Supercoherent phenomena in pulsed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Rourke, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter proposes the formulation of programs of basic physics research to transform Pulsed Power Technology (PPT) to Pulsed Power Science and Technology (PPS and T) by formulating the laws of the quantized microscopic electromagnetic field; applying the microscopic electromagnetic field theory to the generation, propagation and deposition of pulses in nonlinear networks; learning more about the basic super coherent ''micro-structure'' in space and time of the many-photon states of pulsed laser beams; learning more about the basic super coherent ''micro-structure'' in space and time of the many-electronstates of pulsed electron and ion laser beams; and learning everything about the ''micro-picture'' of so-called ''dielectric breakdown'' and the associated absolute time delays. Promotes the idea that laser, electron and ion beams are similar kinds of pulses in the microscopic electromagnetic field. Presents expression for the microscopic electromagnetic field in order to show the role of supercoherence in PPS and T

  20. Pulsed power accelerator for material physics experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Reisman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed the design of Thor: a pulsed power accelerator that delivers a precisely shaped current pulse with a peak value as high as 7 MA to a strip-line load. The peak magnetic pressure achieved within a 1-cm-wide load is as high as 100 GPa. Thor is powered by as many as 288 decoupled and transit-time isolated bricks. Each brick consists of a single switch and two capacitors connected electrically in series. The bricks can be individually triggered to achieve a high degree of current pulse tailoring. Because the accelerator is impedance matched throughout, capacitor energy is delivered to the strip-line load with an efficiency as high as 50%. We used an iterative finite element method (FEM, circuit, and magnetohydrodynamic simulations to develop an optimized accelerator design. When powered by 96 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 4.1 MA to a load, and achieves peak magnetic pressures as high as 65 GPa. When powered by 288 bricks, Thor delivers as much as 6.9 MA to a load, and achieves magnetic pressures as high as 170 GPa. We have developed an algebraic calculational procedure that uses the single brick basis function to determine the brick-triggering sequence necessary to generate a highly tailored current pulse time history for shockless loading of samples. Thor will drive a wide variety of magnetically driven shockless ramp compression, shockless flyer plate, shock-ramp, equation of state, material strength, phase transition, and other advanced material physics experiments.

  1. Bipolar pulse forming line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Mark A.

    2008-10-21

    A bipolar pulse forming transmission line module for linear induction accelerators having first, second, third, fourth, and fifth planar conductors which form an interleaved stack with dielectric layers between the conductors. Each conductor has a first end, and a second end adjacent an acceleration axis. The first and second planar conductors are connected to each other at the second ends, the fourth and fifth planar conductors are connected to each other at the second ends, and the first and fifth planar conductors are connected to each other at the first ends via a shorting plate adjacent the first ends. The third planar conductor is electrically connectable to a high voltage source, and an internal switch functions to short a high voltage from the first end of the third planar conductor to the first end of the fourth planar conductor to produce a bipolar pulse at the acceleration axis with a zero net time integral. Improved access to the switch is enabled by an aperture through the shorting plate and the proximity of the aperture to the switch.

  2. Assembly delay line pulse generators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    Assembly of six of the ten delay line pulse generators that will power the ten kicker magnet modules. One modulator part contains two pulse generators. Capacitors, inductances, and voltage dividers are in the oil tank on the left. Triggered high-pressure spark gap switches are on the platforms on the right. High voltage pulse cables to the kicker magnet emerge under the spark gaps. In the centre background are the assembled master gaps.

  3. Pulsed neutron sources at KAON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, I.M.; Egelstaff, P.A.; Craddock, M.K.

    1991-01-01

    The proposed KAON Factory facility at TRIUMF consists of a number of synchrotrons and storage rings which offer proton beams of energies between 0.45 and 30 GeV with varying pulse amplitudes, widths and repetition rates. Various possibilities for feeding these beams to a pulsed neutron facility and their potential for future development are examined. The incremental cost of such a pulsed neutron facility is estimated approximately. (author)

  4. Design of auto-control high-voltage control system of pulsed neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Juntao

    2008-01-01

    It is difficult to produce multiple anode controlling time sequences under different logging mode for the high-voltage control system of the conventional pulsed neutron generator. It is also difficult realize sequential control among anode high-voltage, filament power supply and target voltage to make neutron yield stable. To these problems, an auto-control high-voltage system of neutron pulsed generator was designed. It not only can achieve anode high-voltage double blast time sequences, which can measure multiple neutron blast time sequences such as Σ, activated spectrum, etc. under inelastic scattering mode, but also can realize neutron generator real-time measurement of multi-state parameters and auto-control such as target voltage pulse width modulation (PWM), filament current, anode current, etc., there by it can produce stable neutron yield and realize stable and accurate measurement of the pulsed neutron full spectral loging tool. (authors)

  5. Ultra-short pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, T.E.

    1993-12-28

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shock wave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more. 5 figures.

  6. Ultra-short pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1993-01-01

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shockwave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more.

  7. Double pulse laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Changbum [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: chbkim@postech.ac.kr; Kim, Jin-Cheol B. [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kukhee [National Fusion Reserch Center, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, In Soo [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Suk, Hyyong [Center for Advanced Accelerators, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 641-120 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-22

    Two-dimensional simulation studies are performed for modified laser wakefield acceleration. After one laser pulse, another identical laser pulse is sent to the plasma to amplify the wake wave resonantly. The simulation results show that the number of injected electrons is bigger than that of the single pulse case and the beam energy is higher as well. In addition, increase of the transverse amplitude is noticed in the wake wave after the second laser pulse. This shows that the transverse motion of the wake wave enhances the wave breaking for strong injection and acceleration of electron beams.

  8. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  9. Magnetically pulsed crystal monochromators on a pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cywinski, R.

    1985-01-01

    For some crystal neutron monochromators a Bragg reflection can be found for which the structure factor for nuclear scattering is negligible, while that for magnetic scattering is large. Manipulation of the direction of the magnetisation within the crystal with respect to the scattering vector thus enables the reflectivity of the crystal to be switched on or off. On a pulsed neutron source such switching can be phased to the neutron pulse from the moderator, the duration of the magnetic ''on'' pulse defining the resolution of the monochromating device, and its exact phasing defining, within limits, the monochromated energy. This paper examines the principles of magnetically pulsed monochromation on a pulsed neutron source, and considers the performance of certain magnetic ferrites as pulsed monochromators. Comparisons are made between an inelastic scattering spectrometer based on ferrite monochromation and spectrometers using conventional (copper) crystal monochromators and choppers. It is shown that ferrite monochromation provides a comparible neutron flux at a given energy and resolution, with the additional flexibility that electronic control of the resolution permits an instantaneous balance to be made between resolution and neutron flux. It is also shown that magnetically pulsed monochromator techniques are well suited to crosscorrelation spectroscopy on pulsed neutron sources. (orig.)

  10. Pulsed Drift Tube Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.

    2004-01-01

    The pulsed drift-tube accelerator (DTA) concept was revived by Joe Kwan and John Staples and is being considered for the HEDP/WDM application. It could be used to reach the full energy or as an intermediate accelerator between the diode and a high gradient accelerator such as multi-beam r.f. In the earliest LBNL HIF proposals and conceptual drivers it was used as an extended injector to reach energies where an induction linac with magnetic quadrupoles is the best choice. For HEDP, because of the very short pulse duration, the DTA could provide an acceleration rate of about 1MV/m. This note is divided into two parts: the first, a design based on existing experience; the second, an optimistic extrapolation. The first accelerates 16 parallel K + beams at a constant line charge density of 0.25(micro) C/m per beam to 10 MeV; the second uses a stripper and charge selector at around 4MeV followed by further acceleration to reach 40 MeV. Both benefit from more compact sources than the present 2MV injector source, although that beam is the basis of the first design and is a viable option. A pulsed drift-tube accelerator was the first major HIF experiment at LBNL. It was designed to produce a 2(micro)s rectangular 1 Ampere C s + beam at 2MeV. It ran comfortably at 1.6MeV for several years, then at lower voltages and currents for other experiments, and remnants of that experiment are in use in present experiments, still running 25 years later. The 1A current, completely equivalent to 1.8A K + , was chosen to be intermediate between the beamlets appropriate for a multi-beam accelerator, and a single beam of, say, 10A, at injection energies. The original driver scenarios using one large beam on each side of the reactor rapidly fell out of favor because of the very high transverse and longitudinal fields from the beam space charge, circa 1MV/cm and 250 kV/cm respectively, near the chamber and because of aberrations in focusing a large diameter beam down to a 1mm radius spot at a

  11. An efficient use of the WATERGATE W5 sequence for observing a ligand binding with a protein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furihata, Kazuo; Shimotakahara, Sakurako; Tashiro, Mitsuru

    2008-09-01

    An efficient pulse sequence for observing a ligand binding with a receptor has been developed by incorporating the WATERGATE W5 sequence. In the conventional water ligand observed via gradient spectroscopy (WaterLOGSY) techniques, the water resonance is selectively excited using, e.g. the double-pulsed field gradient spin-echo (DPFGSE) sequence at the initial portion of pulse sequence. In the current version, the modified WATERGATE W5 sequence is incorporated at the initial portion of the pulse sequence, and the resonance at the water frequency can be selectively reserved by the modified WATERGATE W5 sequence. The efficiency of ligand-observed NMR screening techniques has been demonstrated using the human serum albumin (HSA)-tryptophan complex. 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. High repetition rate tunable femtosecond pulses and broadband amplification from fiber laser pumped parametric amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, T V; Schmidt, O; Bruchmann, C; Limpert, J; Aguergaray, C; Cormier, E; Tünnermann, A

    2006-05-29

    We report on the generation of high energy femtosecond pulses at 1 MHz repetition rate from a fiber laser pumped optical parametric amplifier (OPA). Nonlinear bandwidth enhancement in fibers provides the intrinsically synchronized signal for the parametric amplifier. We demonstrate large tunability extending from 700 nm to 1500 nm of femtosecond pulses with pulse energies as high as 1.2 muJ when the OPA is seeded by a supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Broadband amplification over more than 85 nm is achieved at a fixed wavelength. Subsequent compression in a prism sequence resulted in 46 fs pulses. With an average power of 0.5 W these pulses have a peak-power above 10 MW. In particular, the average power and pulse energy scalability of both involved concepts, the fiber laser and the parametric amplifier, will enable easy up-scaling to higher powers.

  13. Pulse-shaping strategies in short-pulse fiber amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimpf, Damian Nikolaus

    2010-02-09

    Ultrashort pulse lasers are an important tool in scientific and industrial applications. However, many applications are demanding higher average powers from these ultrashort pulse sources. This can be achieved by combining direct diode pumping with novel gain media designs. In particular, ultrashort pulse fiber lasers are now delivering average powers in the kW range. However, the design of fiber lasers, producing pulses with high peak-powers, is challenging due to the impact of nonlinear effects. To significantly reduce these detrimental effects in ultrashort pulse fiber amplifers, the combination of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) and large mode area fibers is employed. Using these methods, the pulse energy of fiber lasers has been steadily increasing for the past few years. Recently, a fiber-based CPA-system has been demonstrated which produces pulse energies of around 1 mJ. However, both the stretching and the enlargement of the mode area are limited, and therefore, the impact of nonlinearity is still noticed in systems employing such devices. The aim of this thesis is the analysis of CPA-systems operated beyond the conventional nonlinear limit, which corresponds to accumulated nonlinear phase-shifts around 1 rad. This includes a detailed discussion of the influence of the nonlinear effect self-phase modulation on the output pulse of CPA-systems. An analytical model is presented. Emphasis is placed on the design of novel concepts to control the impact of self-phase modulation. Pulse-shaping is regarded as a powerful tool to accomplish this goal. Novel methods to control the impact of SPM are experimentally demonstrated. The design of these concepts is based on the theoretical findings. Both amplitude- and phase-shaping are studied. Model-based phase-shaping is implemented in a state-of-the-art fiber CPA-system. The influence of the polarization state is also highlighted. Additionally, existing techniques and recent advances are put into context. (orig.)

  14. Pulse-shaping strategies in short-pulse fiber amplifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimpf, Damian Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    Ultrashort pulse lasers are an important tool in scientific and industrial applications. However, many applications are demanding higher average powers from these ultrashort pulse sources. This can be achieved by combining direct diode pumping with novel gain media designs. In particular, ultrashort pulse fiber lasers are now delivering average powers in the kW range. However, the design of fiber lasers, producing pulses with high peak-powers, is challenging due to the impact of nonlinear effects. To significantly reduce these detrimental effects in ultrashort pulse fiber amplifers, the combination of chirped pulse amplification (CPA) and large mode area fibers is employed. Using these methods, the pulse energy of fiber lasers has been steadily increasing for the past few years. Recently, a fiber-based CPA-system has been demonstrated which produces pulse energies of around 1 mJ. However, both the stretching and the enlargement of the mode area are limited, and therefore, the impact of nonlinearity is still noticed in systems employing such devices. The aim of this thesis is the analysis of CPA-systems operated beyond the conventional nonlinear limit, which corresponds to accumulated nonlinear phase-shifts around 1 rad. This includes a detailed discussion of the influence of the nonlinear effect self-phase modulation on the output pulse of CPA-systems. An analytical model is presented. Emphasis is placed on the design of novel concepts to control the impact of self-phase modulation. Pulse-shaping is regarded as a powerful tool to accomplish this goal. Novel methods to control the impact of SPM are experimentally demonstrated. The design of these concepts is based on the theoretical findings. Both amplitude- and phase-shaping are studied. Model-based phase-shaping is implemented in a state-of-the-art fiber CPA-system. The influence of the polarization state is also highlighted. Additionally, existing techniques and recent advances are put into context. (orig.)

  15. Pulsed depressed collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Mark A

    2015-11-03

    A high power RF device has an electron beam cavity, a modulator, and a circuit for feed-forward energy recovery from a multi-stage depressed collector to the modulator. The electron beam cavity include a cathode, an anode, and the multi-stage depressed collector, and the modulator is configured to provide pulses to the cathode. Voltages of the electrode stages of the multi-stage depressed collector are allowed to float as determined by fixed impedances seen by the electrode stages. The energy recovery circuit includes a storage capacitor that dynamically biases potentials of the electrode stages of the multi-stage depressed collector and provides recovered energy from the electrode stages of the multi-stage depressed collector to the modulator. The circuit may also include a step-down transformer, where the electrode stages of the multi-stage depressed collector are electrically connected to separate taps on the step-down transformer.

  16. Digital pulse shape discrimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L. F.; Preston, J.; Pozzi, S.; Flaska, M.; Neal, J.

    2007-01-01

    Pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) has been utilised for about 40 years as a method to obtain estimates for dose in mixed neutron and photon fields. Digitizers that operate close to GHz are currently available at a reasonable cost, and they can be used to directly sample signals from photomultiplier tubes. This permits one to perform digital PSD rather than the traditional, and well-established, analogous techniques. One issue that complicates PSD for neutrons in mixed fields is that the light output characteristics of typical scintillators available for PSD, such as BC501A, vary as a function of energy deposited in the detector. This behaviour is more easily accommodated with digital processing of signals than with analogous signal processing. Results illustrate the effectiveness of digital PSD. (authors)

  17. Progress in pulsed power fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintenz, J.P.; Adams, R.G.; Bailey, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed power offers an efficient, high energy, economical source of x-rays for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. Two main approaches to ICF driven with pulsed power accelerators are pursued: intense light ion beams and z-pinches. Recent progress in each approach and plans for future development is described. (author). 2 figs., 10 refs

  18. NMR in pulsed magnetic field

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, Edy

    2011-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in pulsed magnetic fields up to 30.4 T focused on 1H and 93Nb nuclei are reported. Here we discuss the advantage and limitation of pulsed field NMR and why this technique is able to become a promising research tool. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.

  19. A Single-Pulse Integrator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1974-01-01

    A single-pulse integrator is described. It gives a relative measure of the integral of the output signal from a coil monitor on the Risø 10 MeV linear accelerator, and displays the value on a digital voltmeter. The reproduccibility is found to be better than ±1% for an accelerated pulse charge...

  20. Exact results on dynamical decoupling by π pulses in quantum information processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhrig, Goetz S

    2008-01-01

    The aim of dynamical decoupling consists in the suppression of decoherence by appropriate coherent control of a quantum register. Effectively, the interaction with the environment is reduced. In particular, a sequence of π pulses is considered. Here we present exact results on the suppression of the coupling of a quantum bit to its environment by optimized sequences of π pulses. The effect of various cut-offs of the spectral density of the environment is investigated. As a result we show that the harder the cut-off is, the better an optimized pulse sequence can deal with it. For cut-offs which are neither completely hard nor very soft we advocate iterated optimized sequences

  1. A digital long pulse integrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broesch, J.D.; Strait, E.J.; Snider, R.T.

    1996-10-01

    A prototype digital integrator with very long integration capabilities has been developed and field tested on an inductive magnetic sensor on the DIII-D Tokamak. The integrator is being developed for use on ITER with a pulse length of 1000 s, and has direct applications for other long pulse Tokamaks. Inductive magnetic sensors are routinely used on existing Tokamaks, are well understood, and are extremely robust, however, they require integration of the signal to determine the magnetic field strength. The next generation of Tokamaks, will have pulse lengths of 1000 s or longer, require integrators with drift and noise characteristics compatible with the very long pulse lengths. This paper will discuss the architecture, algorithms, and programming of the Long Pulse Integrator (LPI). Of particular interest are the noise control and the built-in offset correction techniques used in this application

  2. Electromagnetic pulses, localized and causal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2018-01-01

    We show that pulse solutions of the wave equation can be expressed as time Fourier superpositions of scalar monochromatic beam wave functions (solutions of the Helmholtz equation). This formulation is shown to be equivalent to Bateman's integral expression for solutions of the wave equation, for axially symmetric solutions. A closed-form one-parameter solution of the wave equation, containing no backward-propagating parts, is constructed from a beam which is the tight-focus limit of two families of beams. Application is made to transverse electric and transverse magnetic pulses, with evaluation of the energy, momentum and angular momentum for a pulse based on the general localized and causal form. Such pulses can be represented as superpositions of photons. Explicit total energy and total momentum values are given for the one-parameter closed-form pulse.

  3. Square pulse linear transformer driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, A. A.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Sinebryukhov, V. A.; Volkov, S. N.; Kondratiev, S. S.; Alexeenko, V. M.; Bayol, F.; Demol, G.; Stygar, W. A.

    2012-04-01

    The linear transformer driver (LTD) technological approach can result in relatively compact devices that can deliver fast, high current, and high-voltage pulses straight out of the LTD cavity without any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The usual LTD architecture [A. A. Kim, M. G. Mazarakis, V. A. Sinebryukhov, B. M. Kovalchuk, V. A. Vizir, S. N Volkov, F. Bayol, A. N. Bastrikov, V. G. Durakov, S. V. Frolov, V. M. Alexeenko, D. H. McDaniel, W. E. Fowler, K. LeCheen, C. Olson, W. A. Stygar, K. W. Struve, J. Porter, and R. M. Gilgenbach, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050402 (2009)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050402; M. G. Mazarakis, W. E. Fowler, A. A. Kim, V. A. Sinebryukhov, S. T. Rogowski, R. A. Sharpe, D. H. McDaniel, C. L. Olson, J. L. Porter, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, and J. R. Woodworth, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050401 (2009)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050401] provides sine shaped output pulses that may not be well suited for some applications like z-pinch drivers, flash radiography, high power microwaves, etc. A more suitable power pulse would have a flat or trapezoidal (rising or falling) top. In this paper, we present the design and first test results of an LTD cavity that generates such a type of output pulse by including within its circular array a number of third harmonic bricks in addition to the main bricks. A voltage adder made out of a square pulse cavity linear array will produce the same shape output pulses provided that the timing of each cavity is synchronized with the propagation of the electromagnetic pulse.

  4. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  5. A geometrical approach to dynamical decoupling with smooth pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Junkai; Deng, Xiuhao; Barnes, Edwin

    In order to perform high-fidelity quantum information processing, reducing the effects of noise is an essential task. It is well known that a system can be decoupled from noise dynamically by using carefully designed pulse sequences based on delta-function or square waveforms such as spin echo or CPMG. However, such ideal pulses are often challenging to implement experimentally with high fidelity. We present an analytical approach that enables one to generate an unlimited number of smooth, experimentally feasible pulses that perform dynamical decoupling or dynamically corrected gates. Our method is based on a simple geometric picture that facilitates the identification of driving fields that cancel errors in the single-qubit evolution operator to second order or beyond. We demonstrate that this scheme can significantly enhance the fidelity of single-qubit gates in the case of noise with a 1/f power spectrum.

  6. The sequence of sequencers: The history of sequencing DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, James M.; Chain, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Determining the order of nucleic acid residues in biological samples is an integral component of a wide variety of research applications. Over the last fifty years large numbers of researchers have applied themselves to the production of techniques and technologies to facilitate this feat, sequencing DNA and RNA molecules. This time-scale has witnessed tremendous changes, moving from sequencing short oligonucleotides to millions of bases, from struggling towards the deduction of the coding sequence of a single gene to rapid and widely available whole genome sequencing. This article traverses those years, iterating through the different generations of sequencing technology, highlighting some of the key discoveries, researchers, and sequences along the way. PMID:26554401

  7. Laser ablation comparison by picosecond pulses train and nanosecond pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Filippov, M. N.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    A comparison of laser ablation by a train of picosecond pulses and nanosecond pulses revealed a difference in laser craters, ablation thresholds, plasma sizes and spectral line intensities. Laser ablation with a train of picosecond pulses resulted in improved crater quality while ablated mass decreased up to 30%. A reduction in laser plasma dimensions for picosecond train ablation was observed while the intensity of atomic/ionic lines in the plasma spectra was greater by a factor of 2-4 indicating an improved excitation and atomization in the plasma.

  8. Pulsed neutron generator for use with pulsed neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochau, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    A high-output, transportable, pulsed neutron generator has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories for use with Pulsed Neutron Activation (PNA) techniques. The PNA neutron generator generates > 10 10 14 MeV D-T neutrons in a 1.2 millisecond pulse. Each operation of the unit will produce a nominal total neutron output of 1.2 x 10 10 neutrons. The generator has been designed to be easily repaired and modified. The unit requires no additional equipment for operation or measurement of output

  9. Pulse on pulse: modulation and signification in Rafael Lozano-Hemmer's Pulse Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merete Carlson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the relation between signifying processes and non-signifying material dynamism in the installation Pulse Room (2006 by Mexican Canadian artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer. In Pulse Room the sense of pulse is ambiguous. Biorhythms are transmitted from the pulsing energy of the visitor's beating heart to the flashing of a fragile light bulb, thereby transforming each light bulb into a register of individual life. But at the same time the flashing light bulbs together produce a chaotically flickering light environment composed by various layers of repetitive rhythms, a vibrant and pulsating “room”. Hence, the visitor in Pulse Room is invited into a complex scenario that continuously oscillates between various aspects of signification (the light bulbs representing individual lives; the pulse itself as the symbolic “rhythm of life” and instants of pure material processuality (flickering light bulbs; polyrhythmic layers. Taking our point of departure in a discussion of Gilles Deleuze's concepts of modulation and signaletic material in relation to electronic media, we examine how the complex orchestration of pulsation between signification and material modulation produces a multilayered sense of time and space that is central to the sensory experience of Pulse Room as a whole. Pulse Room is, at the very same time, a relational subject–object intimacy and an all-encompassing immersive environment modulating continuously in real space-time.

  10. Pulse shaping using a spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, N

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond pulse shaping can be done by different kinds of pulse shapers, such as liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LC SLM), acousto optic modulators (AOM) and deformable and movable mirrors. A few applications where pulse shaping...

  11. Pulse source requirements for OTDM systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Poulsen, Henrik Nørskov; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2003-01-01

    A simulation model for investigating the impact of incoherent crosstalk due to pulse tail overlapping is proposed. Requirements to pulse width and pulse tail extinction ratio introducing a maximum of 1 dB penalty is extracted....

  12. Sequence Read Archive (SRA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Sequence Read Archive (SRA) stores raw sequencing data from the next generation of sequencing platforms including Roche 454 GS System®, Illumina Genome...

  13. Design of Optical Pulse Position Modulation (PPM) Translating Receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, A J; Hernandez, V J; Gagliardi, R M; Bennett, C V

    2009-06-19

    M-ary pulse position modulation (M-ary PPM) signaling is a means of transmitting multiple bits per symbol in an intensity modulated/direct detection (IM/DD) system. PPM is used in applications with average power limitations. In optical communication systems, PPM becomes challenging to implement at gigabit rates and/or large M, since pulsed signaling requires higher electronic processing bandwidths than the fundamental transmission rate. they have thus been exploring techniques for PPM communications using optical processing. Previous work described a transmitter algorithm that directly translates a bit sequence of N digital bits to the optical pulse position m for any M = 2{sup N}. It has been considerably more difficult to define a similar receiver algorithm that translates the received optical pulse position directly back to a bit sequence with minimal electronic processing. Designs for specific Ms (e.g., 4-ary) have been shown and implemented, but are difficult to scale to larger M. In this work, they present for the first time a generalized PPM translating receiver that is applicable to all M and data rates.

  14. Bomb pulse biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falso, Miranda J. Sarachine [Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Mail Stop L-397, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Buchholz, Bruce A., E-mail: buchholz2@llnl.gov [Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Mail Stop L-397, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The past decade has seen an explosion in use of the {sup 14}C bomb pulse to do fundamental cell biology. Studies in the 1960s used decay counting to measure tissue turnover when the atmospheric {sup 14}C/C concentration was changing rapidly. Today bulk tissue measurements are of marginal interest since most of the carbon in the tissue resides in proteins, lipids and carbohydrates that turn over rapidly. Specific cell types with specialized functions are the focus of cell turnover investigations. Tissue samples need to be fresh or frozen. Fixed or preserved samples contain petroleum-derived carbon that has not been successfully removed. Cell or nuclear surface markers are used to sort specific cell types, typically by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Specific biomolecules need to be isolated with high purity and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements must accommodate samples that generally contain less than 40 {mu}g of carbon. Furthermore, all separations must not add carbon to the sample. Independent means such as UV absorbance must be used to confirm molecule purity. Approaches for separating specific proteins and DNA and combating contamination of undesired molecules are described.

  15. A pulsed magnetic stress applied to Drosophila melanogaster flies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delle Side, D; Giuffreda, E; Nassisi, V; Velardi, L; Bozzetti, M P; Friscini, A; Specchia, V

    2014-01-01

    We report the development of a system to feed pulsed magnetic stress to biological samples. The device is based on a RLC circuit that transforms the energy stored in a high voltage capacitor into a magnetic field inside a coil. The field has been characterized and we found that charging the capacitor with 24 kV results in a peak field of 0.4 T. In order to test its effect, we applied such a stress to the Drosophila melanogaster model and we examined its bio-effects. We analysed, in the germ cells, the effects on the control of specific DNA repetitive sequences that are activated after different environmental stresses. The deregulation of these sequences causes genomic instability and chromosomes breaks leading to sterility. The magnetic field treatment did not produce effects on repetitive sequences in the germ cells of Drosophila. Hence, this field doesn't produce deleterious effects linked to repetitive sequences derepression.

  16. A pulsed magnetic stress applied to Drosophila melanogaster flies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Side, D.; Bozzetti, M. P.; Friscini, A.; Giuffreda, E.; Nassisi, V.; Specchia, V.; Velardi, L.

    2014-04-01

    We report the development of a system to feed pulsed magnetic stress to biological samples. The device is based on a RLC circuit that transforms the energy stored in a high voltage capacitor into a magnetic field inside a coil. The field has been characterized and we found that charging the capacitor with 24 kV results in a peak field of 0.4 T. In order to test its effect, we applied such a stress to the Drosophila melanogaster model and we examined its bio-effects. We analysed, in the germ cells, the effects on the control of specific DNA repetitive sequences that are activated after different environmental stresses. The deregulation of these sequences causes genomic instability and chromosomes breaks leading to sterility. The magnetic field treatment did not produce effects on repetitive sequences in the germ cells of Drosophila. Hence, this field doesn't produce deleterious effects linked to repetitive sequences derepression.

  17. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  18. Double pulse laser ablation and plasma: Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babushok, V.I.; DeLucia, F.C.; Gottfried, J.L.; Munson, C.A.; Miziolek, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    A review of recent results of the studies of double laser pulse plasma and ablation for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy applications is presented. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy configuration was suggested with the aim of overcoming the sensitivity shortcomings of the conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. Several configurations have been suggested for the realization of the double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique: collinear, orthogonal pre-spark, orthogonal pre-heating and dual pulse crossed beam modes. In addition, combinations of laser pulses with different wavelengths, different energies and durations were studied, thus providing flexibility in the choice of wavelength, pulse width, energy and pulse sequence. The double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy approach provides a significant enhancement in the intensity of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy emission lines up to two orders of magnitude greater than a conventional single pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. The double pulse technique leads to a better coupling of the laser beam with the plasma plume and target material, thus providing a more temporally effective energy delivery to the plasma and target. The experimental results demonstrate that the maximum effect is obtained at some optimum separation delay time between pulses. The optimum value of the interpulse delay depends on several factors, such as the target material, the energy level of excited states responsible for the emission, and the type of enhancement process considered. Depending on the specified parameter, the enhancement effects were observed on different time scales ranging from the picosecond time level (e.g., ion yield, ablation mass) up to the hundred microsecond level (e.g., increased emission intensity for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of submerged metal target in water). Several suggestions have been proposed to explain

  19. Hyper dispersion pulse compressor for chirped pulse amplification systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2011-11-29

    A grating pulse compressor configuration is introduced for increasing the optical dispersion for a given footprint and to make practical the application for chirped pulse amplification (CPA) to quasi-narrow bandwidth materials, such as Nd:YAG. The grating configurations often use cascaded pairs of gratings to increase angular dispersion an order of magnitude or more. Increased angular dispersion allows for decreased grating separation and a smaller compressor footprint.

  20. Dynamical suppression of nuclear-spin decoherence time in Si and GaAs using inversion pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, S.; Harada, J.; Sasaki, S.; Hirayama, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We found that nuclear-spin decoherence is suppressed by applying inversion pulses such as alternating phase Carr-Purcell (APCP) and Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequences in silicon and GaAs. The decoherence time reaches ∼1.3s by applying inversion pulses, which is ∼200 times as long as the characteristic decay time obtained from the Hahn echo sequence (∼6ms) in silicon

  1. The generation of near millimeter radiation by picosecond pulse demodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucia, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Near Millimeter Waves can be generated by the demodulation of a picosecond optical pulse train by a photocathodes. Power is produced by the interaction of a microwave structure and the beam of prebunched electrons produced by the demodulation. These bunched electrons are produced at a photocathode by a picosecond optical pulse train. The separation of the bunching process from the energy extraction interaction introduces substantial flexibility into the design of devices based upon this concept. Perhaps the most important manifestation of this flexibility is the capability of these devices to provide virtually any waveform and pulse sequence desired with complete pulse to pulse phase coherence and rapid, controlled frequency agility. Furthermore, techniques are discussed that can change this coding at speeds governed only by electrooptic time scales. It is also important to note that these devices are not quantum down convertors (which would be limited by Manley-Rowe considerations to a maximum efficiency of approximately 0.1%) but rather 'classical' devices in which gain phenomena can convert DC power to microwave energy, thus providing orders of magnitude more efficiency. In this report and its appendixes, we discuss the basic physics of picosecond demodulation devices, experimental results and systems based upon these concepts.

  2. Vibration measurements by pulsed digital holographic endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schedin, Staffan; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Perez-Lopez, Carlos; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando

    2005-02-01

    Digital holographic interferometry in combination with a flexible fiber endoscope allows high precision measurements of deformations on hidden objects surfaces, inside cavities and objects with small access apertures. A digital holographic endoscopy system is described with a frequency-doubled, twin oscillator Q-switched pulsed Nd:YAG laser as light source. A sequence of digital hologram pairs are recorded with a maximum repetition rate of 260 ms. Each digital hologram is captured at separate video frames of a CCD-camera. The time separation between the laser pulses from each cavity can be set in the range from 50 to 500 μs. The digital holograms are transferred to a PC via a frame grabber and evaluated quantitatively by the Fourier transform method. The resulting phase fringe pattern has the information needed to evaluate quantitatively the amount of the deformation. Experimental results of vibration measurements of hidden mechanical and biological object surfaces are presented. The quality of the results obtained by mechanical object surfaces is usually higher than for biological surfaces. This can be explained easily by the fact that a biological surface is much more complex than a mechanical surface in the sense that some parts of the surface may reflect the light well whereas other parts may absorb the light. Also, biological surfaces are translucent, which means that part of the light may enter inside the sample where it may be absorbed or reflected.

  3. Fast and Sequence-Adaptive Whole-Brain Segmentation Using Parametric Bayesian Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puonti, Oula; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2016-01-01

    the performance of a segmentation algorithm designed to meet these requirements, building upon generative parametric models previously used in tissue classification. The method is tested on four different datasets acquired with different scanners, field strengths and pulse sequences, demonstrating comparable...

  4. Quantitative pulsed eddy current analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    The potential of pulsed eddy current testing for furnishing more information than conventional single-frequency eddy current methods has been known for some time. However, a fundamental problem has been analyzing the pulse shape with sufficient precision to produce accurate quantitative results. Accordingly, the primary goal of this investigation was to: demonstrate ways of digitizing the short pulses encountered in PEC testing, and to develop empirical analysis techniques that would predict some of the parameters (e.g., depth) of simple types of defect. This report describes a digitizing technique using a computer and either a conventional nuclear ADC or a fast transient analyzer; the computer software used to collect and analyze pulses; and some of the results obtained. (U.S.)

  5. Next generation Chirped Pulse Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nees, J.; Biswal, S.; Mourou, G. [Univ. Michigan, Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nishimura, Akihiko; Takuma, Hiroshi

    1998-03-01

    The limiting factors of Chirped Pulse Amplification (CPA) are discussed and experimental results of CPA in Yb:glass regenerative amplifier are given. Scaling of Yb:glass to the petawatt level is briefly discussed. (author)

  6. Pulse oximetry for perioperative monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tom; Nicholson, Amanda; Hovhannisyan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    . Results indicated that hypoxaemia was reduced in the pulse oximetry group, both in the operating theatre and in the recovery room. During observation in the recovery room, the incidence of hypoxaemia in the pulse oximetry group was 1.5 to three times less. Postoperative cognitive function was independent...... postoperative complications or even death. Only a few randomized clinical trials of pulse oximetry during anaesthesia and in the recovery room have been performed that describe perioperative hypoxaemic events, postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and cognitive dysfunction. OBJECTIVES: To study the use...... the perioperative period. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed data in relation to events detectable by pulse oximetry, any serious complications that occurred during anaesthesia or in the postoperative period and intraoperative or postoperative mortality. MAIN RESULTS: The last...

  7. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  8. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  9. Artistic Representation with Pulsed Holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, S

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes artistic representation through pulsed holography. One of the prevalent practical problems in making holograms is object movement. Any movement of the object or film, including movement caused by acoustic vibration, has the same fatal results. One way of reducing the chance of movement is by ensuring that the exposure is very quick; using a pulsed laser can fulfill this objective. The attractiveness of using pulsed laser is based on the variety of materials or objects that can be recorded (e.g., liquid material or instantaneous scene of a moving object). One of the most interesting points about pulsed holograms is that some reconstructed images present us with completely different views of the real world. For example, the holographic image of liquid material does not appear fluid; it looks like a piece of hard glass that would produce a sharp sound upon tapping. In everyday life, we are unfamiliar with such an instantaneous scene. On the other hand, soft-textured materials such as a feather or wool differ from liquids when observed through holography. Using a pulsed hologram, we can sense the soft touch of the object or material with the help of realistic three-dimensional (3-D) images. The images allow us to realize the sense of touch in a way that resembles touching real objects. I had the opportunity to use a pulsed ruby laser soon after I started to work in the field of holography in 1979. Since then, I have made pulsed holograms of activities, including pouring water, breaking eggs, blowing soap bubbles, and scattering feathers and popcorn. I have also created holographic art with materials and objects, such as silk fiber, fabric, balloons, glass, flowers, and even the human body. Whenever I create art, I like to present the spectator with a new experience in perception. Therefore, I would like to introduce my experimental artwork through those pulsed holograms.

  10. Artistic Representation with Pulsed Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, S.

    2013-02-01

    This thesis describes artistic representation through pulsed holography. One of the prevalent practical problems in making holograms is object movement. Any movement of the object or film, including movement caused by acoustic vibration, has the same fatal results. One way of reducing the chance of movement is by ensuring that the exposure is very quick; using a pulsed laser can fulfill this objective. The attractiveness of using pulsed laser is based on the variety of materials or objects that can be recorded (e.g., liquid material or instantaneous scene of a moving object). One of the most interesting points about pulsed holograms is that some reconstructed images present us with completely different views of the real world. For example, the holographic image of liquid material does not appear fluid; it looks like a piece of hard glass that would produce a sharp sound upon tapping. In everyday life, we are unfamiliar with such an instantaneous scene. On the other hand, soft-textured materials such as a feather or wool differ from liquids when observed through holography. Using a pulsed hologram, we can sense the soft touch of the object or material with the help of realistic three-dimensional (3-D) images. The images allow us to realize the sense of touch in a way that resembles touching real objects. I had the opportunity to use a pulsed ruby laser soon after I started to work in the field of holography in 1979. Since then, I have made pulsed holograms of activities, including pouring water, breaking eggs, blowing soap bubbles, and scattering feathers and popcorn. I have also created holographic art with materials and objects, such as silk fiber, fabric, balloons, glass, flowers, and even the human body. Whenever I create art, I like to present the spectator with a new experience in perception. Therefore, I would like to introduce my experimental artwork through those pulsed holograms.

  11. Optical pulses, lasers, measuring techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Früngel, Frank B A

    1965-01-01

    High Speed Pulse Technology: Volume II: Optical Pulses - Lasers - Measuring Techniques focuses on the theoretical and engineering problems that result from the capacitor discharge technique.This book is organized into three main topics: light flash production from a capacitive energy storage; signal transmission and ranging systems by capacitor discharges and lasers; and impulse measuring technique. This text specifically discusses the air spark under atmospheric conditions, industrial equipment for laser flashing, and claims for light transmitting system. The application of light impulse sign

  12. Pulse plating of nickel deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimetz, C.J.; Stevenson, M.F.

    1980-02-01

    Pulse plated and conventional nickel deposits have been compared for differences in morphology, mechanical properties, and microstructure. The deposits were obtained from nickel sulfamate, nickel chloride, and Watts nickel plating solutions. No significant differences were found in the direct and pulse current deposits from the sulfamate and chloride solutions; however, significant differences in microstructure, yield strength, and microhardness were observed in deposits from the Watts nickel solution.

  13. Microstructural musical linguistics: composers' pulses are liked most by the best musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, M

    1995-06-01

    Western music is a combination of notated structure plus microstructure. Composers' pulses, as precise microstructural functions, were tested with five groups of subjects of graded musical proficiency: (1) 10 famous artists including Vladimir Ashkenazy, Yehudi Menuhin, Paul Badura-Skoda and others; (2) 14 Julliard School of Music graduate students; (3) 19 Manhattan School of Music graduate students; (4) 51 Australian conservatory students; and (5) 41 non-music students (total, 135 subjects). Composers' pulses consist of combined amplitude and timing warps specific to each composer--the composer's pulse matrix. Each subject listened to and scored 40 versions of 10 short music examples (not selected by the author) of eight bars each, composed by Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn and Schubert, performed by computer, in which composers' pulses, as developed by Clynes (1983, 1985a,b, 1986, 1987), were incorporated in a two-level hierarchic pulse configuration, and interchanged. Each example was heard with the pulses of those four composers in turn, in quasi-random sequence, one performance thus incorporating the "right" pulse and three the "wrong" ones. Results show dramatically that the greater the musical proficiency, the more marked the preference for the "right" pulse (p music as a double stream is introduced. The results suggest that the composers' pulse matrices posited by Clynes as a first approximation are in fact appropriately meaningful. Brain function aspects of the meaningful discrimination of such tiny time differences are discussed.

  14. The Toulouse pulsed magnet facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The 'Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Pulses' (LNCMP) is an international user facility providing access to pulsed magnetic fields up to and beyond 60 T. The laboratory disposes of 10 magnet stations equipped with long-pulse magnets operating in the 35-60 T range and a short-pulse system reaching magnetic fields in excess of 70 T. The experimental infrastructure includes various high and low-temperature systems ranging from ordinary flow-type cryostats to dilution refrigerators reaching 50 mK, as well as different types of high-pressure cells. Experimental techniques include magnetization, transport, luminescence, IR-spectroscopy and polarimetry. The LNCMP pursues an extensive in-house research program focussing on all technological and scientific aspects of pulsed magnetic fields. Recent technical developments include the implementation of 60 T rapid-cooling coils, an 80 T prototype, a pulsed dipole magnet for optical investigations of dilute matter and a transportable horizontal access magnet for small angle x-ray scattering experiments. Scientific activities cover a variety of domains, including correlated electron systems, magnetism, semiconductors and nanoscience

  15. PGSTE-WATERGATE: An STE-based PGSE NMR sequence with excellent solvent suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Stait-Gardner, Timothy; Anil Kumar, P. G.; Torres, Allan M.; Price, William S.

    2008-03-01

    A new stimulated-echo based pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR diffusion sequence incorporating WATERGATE solvent suppression, PGSTE-WATERGATE, is presented. The sequence provides superb solvent suppression without any phase distortions. The sequence is simple to set up and particularly suited to measuring diffusion coefficients in aqueous solution such as is commonly required in pharmaceutical and combinatorial applications. The utility of the sequence is demonstrated on samples containing lysozyme and sucrose. Importantly, the high degree of phase-distortion suppression allows more complicated selective π pulses to be used to enhance the selectivity of solvent suppression.

  16. Massively parallel signature sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daixing; Rao, Mahendra S; Walker, Roger; Khrebtukova, Irina; Haudenschild, Christian D; Miura, Takumi; Decola, Shannon; Vermaas, Eric; Moon, Keith; Vasicek, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    Massively parallel signature sequencing is an ultra-high throughput sequencing technology. It can simultaneously sequence millions of sequence tags, and, therefore, is ideal for whole genome analysis. When applied to expression profiling, it reveals almost every transcript in the sample and provides its accurate expression level. This chapter describes the technology and its application in establishing stem cell transcriptome databases.

  17. Goldbach Partitions and Sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    as a sum of two primes (for even numbers) and three primes (for odd numbers). We call this the Goldbach sequence g(n), which may be converted into a binary sequence b(n) by mapping each even number to 0 and each odd number to 1. The resulting binary sequences may be used as pseudorandom sequences in ...

  18. Tailored spiral in-out spectral-spatial water suppression pulses for magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Wismans, Carrie; Cao, Zhipeng; Klomp, Dennis W J; Wijnen, Jannie P; Grissom, William A

    2018-01-01

    To develop short water suppression sequences for 7 T magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, with mitigation of subject-specific transmit RF field ( B1+) inhomogeneity. Patient-tailored spiral in-out spectral-spatial saturation pulses were designed for a three-pulse WET water suppression sequence. The pulses' identical spatial subpulses were designed using patient-specific B1+ maps and a spiral in-out excitation k-space trajectory. The subpulse train was weighted by a spectral envelope that was root-flipped to minimize peak RF demand. The pulses were validated in in vivo experiments that acquired high resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging data, using a crusher coil for fast lipid suppression. Residual water signals and MR spectra were compared between the proposed tailored sequence and a conventional WET sequence. Replacing conventional spectrally-selective pulses with tailored spiral in-out spectral-spatial pulses reduced mean water residual from 5.88 to 2.52% (57% improvement). Pulse design time was less then 0.4 s. The pulses' specific absorption rate were compatible with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging TRs under 300 ms, which enabled spectra of fine in plane spatial resolution (5 mm) with good quality to be measured in 7.5 min. Tailored spiral in-out spectral-spatial water suppression enables efficient high resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging in the brain. Magn Reson Med 79:31-40, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Some characteristics of the digitization pulses from high pressure neon-helium flash tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, D.S.K.; Leung, S.K.; Ng, L.K.

    1979-01-01

    Characteristics of the digitization output pulses from high pressure neon-helium flash tubes were studied under various operation conditions using square ultra-high voltage pulses. Properties reported by previous workers were compared. Two discharge mechanisms, the Townsend avalanche discharge and the streamer discharge, were observed to occur in sequence in some events. The output waveforms for both discharge mechanisms were studied in detail. The charge induced on a detecting probe was also estimated from the measured data. (Auth.)

  20. Suppression of tissue harmonics for pulse-inversion contrast imaging using time reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couture, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-François; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2008-10-07

    Pulse-inversion (PI) sequences are sensitive to the nonlinear echoes from microbubbles allowing an improvement in the blood-to-tissue contrast. However, at larger mechanical indices, this contrast is reduced by harmonics produced during nonlinear propagation. A method for tissue harmonics cancellation exploiting time reversal is experimentally implemented using a 128-channel 12-bit emitter receiver. The probe calibration is performed by acquiring the nonlinear echo of a wire in water. These distorted pulses are time-reversed, optimized and used for the PI imaging of a tissue phantom. Compared to normal (straight) pulses, the time-reversed distorted pulses reduced the tissue signal in PI by 11 dB. The second harmonic signals from microbubbles flowing in a wall-less vessel were unaffected by the correction. This technique can thus increase the blood-to-tissue contrast ratio while keeping the pressure and the number of pulses constant.

  1. Suppression of tissue harmonics for pulse-inversion contrast imaging using time reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Montaldo, Gabriel; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris (France)], E-mail: olicou@gmail.com

    2008-10-07

    Pulse-inversion (PI) sequences are sensitive to the nonlinear echoes from microbubbles allowing an improvement in the blood-to-tissue contrast. However, at larger mechanical indices, this contrast is reduced by harmonics produced during nonlinear propagation. A method for tissue harmonics cancellation exploiting time reversal is experimentally implemented using a 128-channel 12-bit emitter receiver. The probe calibration is performed by acquiring the nonlinear echo of a wire in water. These distorted pulses are time-reversed, optimized and used for the PI imaging of a tissue phantom. Compared to normal (straight) pulses, the time-reversed distorted pulses reduced the tissue signal in PI by 11 dB. The second harmonic signals from microbubbles flowing in a wall-less vessel were unaffected by the correction. This technique can thus increase the blood-to-tissue contrast ratio while keeping the pressure and the number of pulses constant.

  2. Square pulse linear transformer driver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The linear transformer driver (LTD technological approach can result in relatively compact devices that can deliver fast, high current, and high-voltage pulses straight out of the LTD cavity without any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The usual LTD architecture [A. A. Kim, M. G. Mazarakis, V. A. Sinebryukhov, B. M. Kovalchuk, V. A. Vizir, S. N Volkov, F. Bayol, A. N. Bastrikov, V. G. Durakov, S. V. Frolov, V. M. Alexeenko, D. H. McDaniel, W. E. Fowler, K. LeCheen, C. Olson, W. A. Stygar, K. W. Struve, J. Porter, and R. M. Gilgenbach, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050402 (2009PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050402; M. G. Mazarakis, W. E. Fowler, A. A. Kim, V. A. Sinebryukhov, S. T. Rogowski, R. A. Sharpe, D. H. McDaniel, C. L. Olson, J. L. Porter, K. W. Struve, W. A. Stygar, and J. R. Woodworth, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 050401 (2009PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.12.050401] provides sine shaped output pulses that may not be well suited for some applications like z-pinch drivers, flash radiography, high power microwaves, etc. A more suitable power pulse would have a flat or trapezoidal (rising or falling top. In this paper, we present the design and first test results of an LTD cavity that generates such a type of output pulse by including within its circular array a number of third harmonic bricks in addition to the main bricks. A voltage adder made out of a square pulse cavity linear array will produce the same shape output pulses provided that the timing of each cavity is synchronized with the propagation of the electromagnetic pulse.

  3. Long Silver Nanowires Synthesis by Pulsed Electrodeposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Batevandi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanowires were pulse electrodeposited into nanopore anodic alumina oxide templates. The effects of continuous and pulse electrodeposition waveform on the microstructure properties of the nanowire arrays were studied. It is seen that the microstructure of nanowire is depend to pulse condition. The off time duration of pulse waveform enables to control the growth direction of Ag nanowires.

  4. The impact of pulse duration on composite WATERGATE pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Zhang, Xu; Sun, Peng; Jiang, Xianwang; Jiang, Bin; Cao, Chunyang; Liu, Maili

    2010-10-01

    As an effective method for solvent suppression, WATERGATE is widely used in high resolution NMR spectroscopy. It is usually composed of a number of pulses separated by constant intervals. However, theoretical and experimental analyses indicate that narrower bandwidth and lower intensities around the secondary suppression points occur in the excitation profile of the composite WATERGATE. The excitation profile distortion is caused by the chemical shift evolution during the RF pulses. The higher the ratio of pulse duration to the inter-pulse delay is, the severer the profile distorts. Therefore, in high magnetic fields, the effect will be serious when WATERGATE is applied to some biological samples whose resonances distribute over a wide range. As can be seen obviously by applying WATERGATE to detect a RNA-protein mixture sample in an 800 MHz spectrometer, the resonances of the imino protons were partially suppressed by showing decreased intensities, though the intended secondary suppression points were set far away from them. In this article, we proposed an optimized WATERGATE that could effectively compensate the chemical shift evolution during the RF pulses, and relieve the excitation profile distortion. The optimized experiment will be a good way to retain the imino signal intensities when WATERGATE is applied to detect the RNA samples in high magnetic field.

  5. A Quantitative Analysis of Pulsed Signals Emitted by Wild Bottlenose Dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luís, Ana Rita; Couchinho, Miguel N; Dos Santos, Manuel E

    2016-01-01

    Common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), produce a wide variety of vocal emissions for communication and echolocation, of which the pulsed repertoire has been the most difficult to categorize. Packets of high repetition, broadband pulses are still largely reported under a general designation of burst-pulses, and traditional attempts to classify these emissions rely mainly in their aural characteristics and in graphical aspects of spectrograms. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of pulsed signals emitted by wild bottlenose dolphins, in the Sado estuary, Portugal (2011-2014), and test the reliability of a traditional classification approach. Acoustic parameters (minimum frequency, maximum frequency, peak frequency, duration, repetition rate and inter-click-interval) were extracted from 930 pulsed signals, previously categorized using a traditional approach. Discriminant function analysis revealed a high reliability of the traditional classification approach (93.5% of pulsed signals were consistently assigned to their aurally based categories). According to the discriminant function analysis (Wilk's Λ = 0.11, F3, 2.41 = 282.75, P < 0.001), repetition rate is the feature that best enables the discrimination of different pulsed signals (structure coefficient = 0.98). Classification using hierarchical cluster analysis led to a similar categorization pattern: two main signal types with distinct magnitudes of repetition rate were clustered into five groups. The pulsed signals, here described, present significant differences in their time-frequency features, especially repetition rate (P < 0.001), inter-click-interval (P < 0.001) and duration (P < 0.001). We document the occurrence of a distinct signal type-short burst-pulses, and highlight the existence of a diverse repertoire of pulsed vocalizations emitted in graded sequences. The use of quantitative analysis of pulsed signals is essential to improve classifications and to better assess the contexts of

  6. A Quantitative Analysis of Pulsed Signals Emitted by Wild Bottlenose Dolphins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Luís

    Full Text Available Common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus, produce a wide variety of vocal emissions for communication and echolocation, of which the pulsed repertoire has been the most difficult to categorize. Packets of high repetition, broadband pulses are still largely reported under a general designation of burst-pulses, and traditional attempts to classify these emissions rely mainly in their aural characteristics and in graphical aspects of spectrograms. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of pulsed signals emitted by wild bottlenose dolphins, in the Sado estuary, Portugal (2011-2014, and test the reliability of a traditional classification approach. Acoustic parameters (minimum frequency, maximum frequency, peak frequency, duration, repetition rate and inter-click-interval were extracted from 930 pulsed signals, previously categorized using a traditional approach. Discriminant function analysis revealed a high reliability of the traditional classification approach (93.5% of pulsed signals were consistently assigned to their aurally based categories. According to the discriminant function analysis (Wilk's Λ = 0.11, F3, 2.41 = 282.75, P < 0.001, repetition rate is the feature that best enables the discrimination of different pulsed signals (structure coefficient = 0.98. Classification using hierarchical cluster analysis led to a similar categorization pattern: two main signal types with distinct magnitudes of repetition rate were clustered into five groups. The pulsed signals, here described, present significant differences in their time-frequency features, especially repetition rate (P < 0.001, inter-click-interval (P < 0.001 and duration (P < 0.001. We document the occurrence of a distinct signal type-short burst-pulses, and highlight the existence of a diverse repertoire of pulsed vocalizations emitted in graded sequences. The use of quantitative analysis of pulsed signals is essential to improve classifications and to better assess the

  7. Evaluation of non-selective refocusing pulses for 7 T MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jay; Jankiewicz, Marcin; Anderson, Adam W.; Gore, John C.

    2012-01-01

    There is a continuing need for improved RF pulses that achieve proper refocusing in the context of ultra-high field (⩾7 T) human MRI. Simple block or sinc pulses are highly susceptible to RF field inhomogeneities, and adiabatic pulses are generally considered too SAR intensive for practical use at 7 T. The performance of the array of pulses falling between these extremes, however, has not been systematically evaluated. The aim of this work was to compare the performances of 21 non-selective refocusing pulses spanning a range of durations and SAR levels. The evaluation was based upon simulations and both phantom and in vivo human brain experiments conducted at 7 T. Tested refocusing designs included block, composite block, BIR-4, hyperbolic secant, and numerically optimized composite waveforms. These pulses were divided into three SAR classes and two duration categories, and, based on signal gain in a 3-D spin echo sequence, practical recommendations on usage are made within each category. All evaluated pulses were found to produce greater volume-averaged signals relative to a 180° block pulse. Although signal gains often come with the price of increased SAR or duration, some pulses were found to result in significant signal enhancement while also adhering to practical constraints. This work demonstrates the signal gains and losses realizable with single-channel refocusing pulse designs and should assist in the selection of suitable refocusing pulses for practical 3-D spin-echo imaging at 7 T. It further establishes a reference against which future pulses and multi-channel designs can be compared.

  8. Industrial Applications of Pulsed Power Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaki, Koichi; Katsuki, Sunao

    Recent progress of the industrial applications of pulsed power is reviewed in this paper. Repetitively operated pulsed power generators with a moderate peak power have been developed for industrial applications. These generators are reliable and low maintenance. Development of the pulsed power generators helps promote industrial applications of pulsed power for such things as food processing, medical treatment, water treatment, exhaust gas treatment, ozone generation, engine ignition, ion implantation and others. Here, industrial applications of pulsed power are classified by application for biological effects, for pulsed streamer discharges in gases, for pulsed discharges in liquid or liquid-mixture, and for bright radiation sources.

  9. DIRECT COUPLED PROGRESSIVE STAGE PULSE COUNTER APPARATUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, W.M.

    1962-08-14

    A progressive electrical pulse counter circuit was designed for the counting of a chain of input pulses of random width and/or frequency. The circuit employs an odd and even pulse input line alternately connected to a series of directly connected bistable counting stages. Each bistable stage has two d-c operative states which stage, when in its rnrtial state, prevents the next succeeding stage from changing its condition when the latter stage is pulsed. Since only altennate stages are pulsed for each incoming pulse, only one stage will change its state for each input pulse thereby providing prog essive stage by stage counting. (AEC)

  10. Single and Multiple-Selective Excitation Combined with Pulsed Field Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvit, Claudio; Ko, Soo Young; Böhlen, Jean Marc

    1996-02-01

    Applications of selective, multiselective, and semiselective pulses with pulsed field gradients are described. The use of multiple-selective excitation and PFGs for coherence selection in the selective one-dimensional experiments results in spectra devoid of artifacts and with remarkable solvent suppression. Multiple-selective excitation is also employed in an experiment called Multigate, a variant of the well-known WATERGATE experiment, in order to achieve multiple solvent signal suppression. Finally, new pulse sequences are shown for recording pure absorption ω1semiselective PFG NOESY, ROESY, and TOCSY experiments. The merits and limitations of these experiments are discussed.

  11. Incubation behaviour in triazenepolymer thin films upon near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, J; Wiggins, S M; Solis, J; Sturm, H; Urech, L; Wokaun, A; Lippert, T

    2007-01-01

    The effects of laser radiation induced by a sequence of ultrashort (130 fs), near-infrared (800 nm) Ti:sapphire laser pulses in ∼1 μm thick triazenepolymer films on glass substrates have been investigated by means of in-situ real-time reflectivity measurements featuring a ps-resolution streak camera and a ns-resolution photodiode set-up. The polymer films show incubation effects when each laser pulse in the sequence has a fluence below the single-pulse damage threshold. Non-damage conditions are maintained for several incubation pulses such that the reflectivity of the film shows a rapid decrease of up to 30% within 1 ns but subsequently recovers to its initial value on a ms timescale. Additional pulses lead to a permanent film damage. The critical number of laser pulses needed to generate a permanent damage of the film has been studied as a function of the laser fluence. Once damage is created, further laser pulses cause a partial removal of the film material from the glass substrate. Scanning force microscopy has been used to characterise ex-situ the irradiated surface areas. Based on these complementary measurements possible incubation mechanisms are discussed

  12. Pulsed Corona Discharge Generated By Marx Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sretenovic, G. B.; Obradovic, B. M.; Kovacevic, V. V.; Kuraica, M. M.; Puric J.

    2010-07-01

    The pulsed plasma has a significant role in new environmental protection technologies. As a part of a pulsed corona system for pollution control applications, Marx type repetitive pulse generator was constructed and tested in arrangement with wire-plate corona reactor. We performed electrical measurements, and obtained voltage and current signals, and also power and energy delivered per pulse. Ozone formation by streamer plasma in air was chosen to monitor chemical activity of the pulsed corona discharge.

  13. A high-voltage, short-risetime pulse generator based on a ferrite pulse sharpener

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, N.; Thornton, E.

    1988-11-01

    A high-voltage, short-risetime pulse generator is described. The generator consists of a Marx bank, which produces an initial high-voltage pulse, and a ferrite pulse sharpener that reduces the risetime of the pulse. The generator delivers 70-kV, 350-ps risetime pulses into a 50-Ω load.

  14. Design, characterization and experimental validation of a compact, flexible pulsed power architecture for ex vivo platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Allen L; Caiafa, Antonio; Jiang, Yan; Klopman, Steve; Morton, Christine; Torres, Andrew S; Loveless, Amanda M; Neculaes, V Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Electric pulses can induce various changes in cell dynamics and properties depending upon pulse parameters; however, pulsed power generators for in vitro and ex vivo applications may have little to no flexibility in changing the pulse duration, rise- and fall-times, or pulse shape. We outline a compact pulsed power architecture that operates from hundreds of nanoseconds (with the potential for modification to tens of nanoseconds) to tens of microseconds by modifying a Marx topology via controlling switch sequences and voltages into each capacitor stage. We demonstrate that this device can deliver pulses to both low conductivity buffers, like standard pulsed power supplies used for electroporation, and higher conductivity solutions, such as blood and platelet rich plasma. We further test the effectiveness of this pulse generator for biomedical applications by successfully activating platelets ex vivo with 400 ns and 600 ns electric pulses. This novel bioelectrics platform may provide researchers with unprecedented flexibility to explore a wide range of pulse parameters that may induce phenomena ranging from intracellular to plasma membrane manipulation.

  15. Design, characterization and experimental validation of a compact, flexible pulsed power architecture for ex vivo platelet activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen L Garner

    Full Text Available Electric pulses can induce various changes in cell dynamics and properties depending upon pulse parameters; however, pulsed power generators for in vitro and ex vivo applications may have little to no flexibility in changing the pulse duration, rise- and fall-times, or pulse shape. We outline a compact pulsed power architecture that operates from hundreds of nanoseconds (with the potential for modification to tens of nanoseconds to tens of microseconds by modifying a Marx topology via controlling switch sequences and voltages into each capacitor stage. We demonstrate that this device can deliver pulses to both low conductivity buffers, like standard pulsed power supplies used for electroporation, and higher conductivity solutions, such as blood and platelet rich plasma. We further test the effectiveness of this pulse generator for biomedical applications by successfully activating platelets ex vivo with 400 ns and 600 ns electric pulses. This novel bioelectrics platform may provide researchers with unprecedented flexibility to explore a wide range of pulse parameters that may induce phenomena ranging from intracellular to plasma membrane manipulation.

  16. Nonparametric combinatorial sequence models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauthier, Fabian L; Jordan, Michael I; Jojic, Nebojsa

    2011-11-01

    This work considers biological sequences that exhibit combinatorial structures in their composition: groups of positions of the aligned sequences are "linked" and covary as one unit across sequences. If multiple such groups exist, complex interactions can emerge between them. Sequences of this kind arise frequently in biology but methodologies for analyzing them are still being developed. This article presents a nonparametric prior on sequences which allows combinatorial structures to emerge and which induces a posterior distribution over factorized sequence representations. We carry out experiments on three biological sequence families which indicate that combinatorial structures are indeed present and that combinatorial sequence models can more succinctly describe them than simpler mixture models. We conclude with an application to MHC binding prediction which highlights the utility of the posterior distribution over sequence representations induced by the prior. By integrating out the posterior, our method compares favorably to leading binding predictors.

  17. Fast, Sequence Adaptive Parcellation of Brain MR Using Parametric Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puonti, Oula; Iglesias, Juan Eugenio; Van Leemput, Koen

    2013-01-01

    -of-the-art segmentation performance in both cortical and subcortical structures, while retaining all the benefits of generative parametric models, including high computational speed, automatic adaptiveness to changes in image contrast when different scanner platforms and pulse sequences are used, and the ability...

  18. Root-flipped multiband refocusing pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anuj; Lustig, Michael; Grissom, William A

    2016-01-01

    To design low peak power multiband refocusing radiofrequency pulses, with application to simultaneous multislice spin echo MRI. Multiband Shinnar-Le Roux β polynomials were designed using convex optimization. A Monte Carlo algorithm was used to determine patterns of β polynomial root flips that minimized the peak power of the resulting refocusing pulses. Phase-matched multiband excitation pulses were also designed to obtain linear-phase spin echoes. Simulations compared the performance of the root-flipped pulses with time-shifted and phase-optimized pulses. Phantom and in vivo experiments at 7T validated the function of the root-flipped pulses and compared them to time-shifted spin echo signal profiles. Averaged across number of slices, time-bandwidth product, and slice separation, the root-flipped pulses have 46% shorter durations than time-shifted pulses with the same peak radiofrequency amplitude. Unlike time-shifted and phase-optimized pulses, the root-flipped pulses' excitation errors do not increase with decreasing band separation. Experiments showed that the root-flipped pulses excited the desired slices at the target locations, and that for equivalent slice characteristics, the shorter root-flipped pulses allowed shorter echo times, resulting in higher signal than time-shifted pulses. The proposed root-flipped multiband radiofrequency pulse design method produces low peak power pulses for simultaneous multislice spin echo MRI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Diagnostics of Pulsed Hydrogen Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Jerome; Cunge, Gilles; Joubert, Olivier; Darnon, Maxime; Vallier, Laurent; Posseme, Nicolas; Etching Group Team

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen plasmas present a great potential interest for new materials such as graphene or C-nanotubes. To modify or clean such ultrathin layers without damaging the material, low ion energy bombardment is required (conditions such as those obtained in pulsed ICP reactor). By contrast, for other applications the ion energy must be high, to get a significant etch rate for example. To assist the development of innovative processes in H2 plasmas, we have thus analyzed systematically CW and pulsed H2 plasmas both with and without RF bias power. In particular, we carry out time-resolved ion flux, and time-averaged ion energy measurements in different pulsing configurations. A large variety of ion energies and shapes of IVDF are reported depending on pulsing parameters. The IVDF are typically very broad (due to the low ion transit time of low mass ion through the sheath) and either bi or tri-modal (H +, H2 + and H3 + contributions). The time variations of the ion flux in pulsed plasmas also presents peculiar features that will be discussed. Finally, we show that a specific issue is associated to H2 plasmas: they reduce the chamber walls material therefore releasing impurities (O atoms...) in the plasma with important consequences on processes.

  20. Pre-earthquake Magnetic Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, J.; Heraud, J. A.; Freund, F. T.

    2015-12-01

    A semiconductor model of rocks is shown to describe unipolar magnetic pulses, a phenomenon that has been observed prior to earthquakes. These pulses are suspected to be generated deep in the Earth's crust, in and around the hypocentral volume, days or even weeks before earth quakes. Their extremely long wavelength allows them to pass through kilometers of rock. Interestingly, when the sources of these pulses are triangulated, the locations coincide with the epicenters of future earthquakes. We couple a drift-diffusion semiconductor model to a magnetic field in order to describe the electromagnetic effects associated with electrical currents flowing within rocks. The resulting system of equations is solved numerically and it is seen that a volume of rock may act as a diode that produces transient currents when it switches bias. These unidirectional currents are expected to produce transient unipolar magnetic pulses similar in form, amplitude, and duration to those observed before earthquakes, and this suggests that the pulses could be the result of geophysical semiconductor processes.

  1. Analysis and Suppression of Zero Sequence Circulating Current in Open Winding PMSM Drives With Common DC Bus

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, H.; Zhu, Z.Q.; Odavic, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the zero sequence circulating current in open winding permanent magnet synchronous machine (OW-PMSM) drives with common dc bus is systematically analyzed for the first time. It is revealed that the zero sequence circulating current is affected by zero sequence back-electromotive force, cross coupling voltages in zero sequence from the machine side, pulse-width modulation induced zero sequence voltage, and inverter nonlinearity from the inverter side. Particularly, the influence...

  2. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  3. Status of long pulse experiments in magnetic fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saoutic, B

    2002-01-01

    Achieving long-duration, high-performance discharges in magnetic fusion devices is one of the most important challenges en route to a fusion reactor. At this stage, we need to bring together many physical concepts and technological achievements that hitherto have been considered as separate issues. In the course of a long duration pulse, one encounters a sequence of progressively increasing characteristic timescales, ranging from milliseconds for MHD events, seconds for energy and particle transport times, tens of seconds for current diffusion times and up to hundreds of seconds for wall processes, such as saturation and erosion, to reach equilibrium. Although many present-day experiments have pulse lengths long enough to allow studies of the MHD and transport issues in conditions that are effectively quasi steady state, most have pulse lengths that are marginal for studying current diffusion phenomena and, generally, all are too short to study wall saturation and erosion. Very few present-day experiments bring together the necessary hardware (magnets, power supplies, heating and current drive systems, cooling loops, etc) to properly address issues on timescales greater than 10 s. This paper reviews the status of present-day long pulse experiments in tokamaks and stellarators in terms of the technology and physics. We start by defining the requirements of long pulse experiments and discussing the technology that is needed. Then, we consider the relevant physics including the important interactions between physics and technology. Finally, we consider the issues that must be addressed to go beyond long pulses in order to reach full steady-state operation

  4. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  5. Dynamic parabolic pulse generation using temporal shaping of wavelength to time mapped pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dat; Piracha, Mohammad Umar; Mandridis, Dimitrios; Delfyett, Peter J

    2011-06-20

    Self-phase modulation in fiber amplifiers can significantly degrade the quality of compressed pulses in chirped pulse amplification systems. Parabolic pulses with linear frequency chirp are suitable for suppressing nonlinearities, and to achieve high peak power pulses after compression. In this paper, we present an active time domain technique to generate parabolic pulses for chirped pulse amplification applications. Pulses from a mode-locked laser are temporally stretched and launched into an amplitude modulator, where the drive voltage is designed using the spectral shape of the input pulse and the transfer function of the modulator, resulting in the generation of parabolic pulses. Experimental results of pulse shaping with a pulse train from a mode-locked laser are presented, with a residual error of less than 5%. Moreover, an extinction ratio of 27 dB is achieved, which is ideal for chirped pulse amplification applications.

  6. 35 Volt, 180 Ampere Pulse Generator with Droop Control for Pulsing Xenon Arcs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T.; Nielsen, S. O.

    1972-01-01

    The pulse generator described works as a combined switch and series current regulator and allows the shape of the current pulse to be adjusted at each optical wavelength to produce a flat pulse of monochromatic light....

  7. Anomaly Detection in Sequences

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We present a set of novel algorithms which we call sequenceMiner, that detect and characterize anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences that...

  8. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  9. sequenceMiner algorithm

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Detecting and describing anomalies in large repositories of discrete symbol sequences. sequenceMiner has been open-sourced! Download the file below to try it out....

  10. Saturation and pulsed FEL dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannessi, L.; Mezi, L.

    1995-01-01

    The behavior of a FEL operating in the saturated pulsed regime, may be reproduced by the linear FEL integral equation, suitably modified to include saturation effects through a gain depression coefficient depending on the laser intensity. This simple method allows to evaluate several FEL parameters like gain, efficiency, band-width and optical pulse duration as functions of the optical cavity length, only with a numerical integration. The predictions have been compared with available experimental and numerical data, and the method has been applied to estimate the operating characteristics of some planned FEL experiments

  11. Pulsed neutron porosity logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D. Jr.; Smith, M.P.; Schultz, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved pulsed neutron porosity logging system is provided in the present invention. A logging tool provided with a 14 MeV pulsed neutron source, an epithermal neutron detector, and a fast neutron detector is moved through a borehole. Repetitive bursts of neutrons irradiate the earth formations and, during the bursts, the fast neutron population is sampled. During the interval between bursts the epithermal neutron population is sampled along with background gamma radiation due to lingering thermal neutrons. The fast and epithermal neutron population measurements are combined to provide a measurement of formation porosity

  12. High-speed pulse techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Coekin, J A

    1975-01-01

    High-Speed Pulse Techniques covers the many aspects of technique in digital electronics and encompass some of the more fundamental factors that apply to all digital systems. The book describes the nature of pulse signals and their deliberate or inadvertent processing in networks, transmission lines and transformers, and then examines the characteristics and transient performance of semiconductor devices and integrated circuits. Some of the problems associated with the assembly of these into viable systems operating at ultra high speed are also looked at. The book examines the transients and w

  13. High power ultrashort pulse lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    Small scale terawatt and soon even petawatt (1000 terawatt) class laser systems are made possible by application of the chirped-pulse amplification technique to solid-state lasers combined with the availability of broad bandwidth materials. These lasers make possible a new class of high gradient accelerators based on the large electric fields associated with intense laser-plasma interactions or from the intense laser field directly. Here, we concentrate on the laser technology to produce these intense pulses. Application of the smallest of these systems to the production of high brightness electron sources is also introduced

  14. Pulse-voltage fast generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeev, R.I.; Nikiforov, M.G.; Kharchenko, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    The design is described and the test results of a four-channel pulse-voltage generator with maximum output voltage 200 kV are presented. The measurement results of generator triggering time depending on the value and polarity of the triggering voltage pulse for different triggering circuits are presented. The tests have shown stable triggering of all four channels of the generator in the range up to 40 % from selfbreakdown voltage. The generator triggering delay in the given range is <25 ns, asynchronism in channel triggering is <±1 ns

  15. Pulse compressor with aberration correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankos, Marian [Electron Optica, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    In this SBIR project, Electron Optica, Inc. (EOI) is developing an electron mirror-based pulse compressor attachment to new and retrofitted dynamic transmission electron microscopes (DTEMs) and ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) cameras for improving the temporal resolution of these instruments from the characteristic range of a few picoseconds to a few nanoseconds and beyond, into the sub-100 femtosecond range. The improvement will enable electron microscopes and diffraction cameras to better resolve the dynamics of reactions in the areas of solid state physics, chemistry, and biology. EOI’s pulse compressor technology utilizes the combination of electron mirror optics and a magnetic beam separator to compress the electron pulse. The design exploits the symmetry inherent in reversing the electron trajectory in the mirror in order to compress the temporally broadened beam. This system also simultaneously corrects the chromatic and spherical aberration of the objective lens for improved spatial resolution. This correction will be found valuable as the source size is reduced with laser-triggered point source emitters. With such emitters, it might be possible to significantly reduce the illuminated area and carry out ultrafast diffraction experiments from small regions of the sample, e.g. from individual grains or nanoparticles. During phase I, EOI drafted a set of candidate pulse compressor architectures and evaluated the trade-offs between temporal resolution and electron bunch size to achieve the optimum design for two particular applications with market potential: increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of UEDs, and increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of DTEMs. Specialized software packages that have been developed by MEBS, Ltd. were used to calculate the electron optical properties of the key pulse compressor components: namely, the magnetic prism, the electron mirror, and the electron lenses. In the final step, these results were folded

  16. Neutron guides on pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlile, C.J.; Johnson, M.W.; Williams, W.G.

    1979-11-01

    A survey of the physics of neutron guides has been applied to their installation on pulsed neutron sources, particularly the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Rutherford Laboratory. Guides on pulsed sources generally view smaller source areas than those on continuous sources, and furthermore their lengths are fixed primarily by time-of-flight resolution requirements. These differences have been accounted for in the design of guides for two SNS instruments A Monte Carlo computer code has been used in the optimisation and simulation of the guide geometries. (author)

  17. Induction linacs and pulsed power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caporaso, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    Progress in electronic power conversion technology is making possible a new class of induction linacs that can operate at extremely high repetition rates. Advances in insulator technology, pulse forming line design and switching may also lead to a new type of high current accelerator with accelerating gradients at least an order of magnitude greater than those attainable today. The evolution of the induction accelerator pulsed power system will be discussed along with some details of these emerging technologies which are at the frontiers of accelerator technology

  18. High current pulsed positron microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.H.; Stoeffl, W.; Kumar, A.; Sterne, P.A.; Cowan, T.E.; Hartley, J.

    1997-01-01

    We are developing a low energy, microscopically focused, pulsed positron beam for defect analysis by positron lifetime spectroscopy to provide a new defect analysis capability at the 10 10 e + s -l beam at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory electron linac. When completed, the pulsed positron microprobe will enable defect specific, 3-dimensional maps of defect concentrations with sub-micron resolution of defect location. By coupling these data with first principles calculations of defect specific positron lifetimes and positron implantation profiles we will both map the identity and concentration of defect distributions

  19. Analysis on the arcelin expression in bruchid pest resistant wild pulses using real time RT-qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivelkumar, Shanmugavel; Veeramani, Velayutham; Hilda, Karuppiah; Arumugam, Munusamy; Janarthanan, Sundaram

    2014-12-01

    Arcelin, the antimetabolic protein from wild pulses is a known natural insecticidal molecule. Wild pulses with high arcelin content could serve as potential source to. increase the levels of insect resistance in cultivated pulse crops. In this study, arcelin (Arl) gene expression was screened in seven stored product insect pest resistant wild pulse varieties using real time RT-qPCR. Arcelin gene specific real time PCR primers were synthesized from arcelin mRNA sequence of the wild pulse variety, Lablab purpureus. The results revealed different levels of arcelin gene expression in the tested varieties. Canavalia virosa registered significantly high content indicating its suitability for utilization of arcelin gene in developing stored product insect pest resistance with other cultivated pulses.

  20. Dynamic Characterization of Fiber Optical Chirped Pulse Amplification for Sub-ps Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard

    2013-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the propagation of sub-picosecond pulses in fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers, showing a significant broadening of the pulses from 450 fs up to 720 fs due to dispersion and self-phase modulation.......We investigate experimentally the propagation of sub-picosecond pulses in fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers, showing a significant broadening of the pulses from 450 fs up to 720 fs due to dispersion and self-phase modulation....

  1. Pulse oximetry for perioperative monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Tom; Nicholson, Amanda; Hovhannisyan, Karen; Møller, Ann Merete; Smith, Andrew F; Lewis, Sharon R

    2014-03-17

    This is an update of a review last published in Issue 9, 2009, of The Cochrane Library. Pulse oximetry is used extensively in the perioperative period and might improve patient outcomes by enabling early diagnosis and, consequently, correction of perioperative events that might cause postoperative complications or even death. Only a few randomized clinical trials of pulse oximetry during anaesthesia and in the recovery room have been performed that describe perioperative hypoxaemic events, postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and cognitive dysfunction. To study the use of perioperative monitoring with pulse oximetry to clearly identify adverse outcomes that might be prevented or improved by its use.The following hypotheses were tested.1. Use of pulse oximetry is associated with improvement in the detection and treatment of hypoxaemia.2. Early detection and treatment of hypoxaemia reduce morbidity and mortality in the perioperative period.3. Use of pulse oximetry per se reduces morbidity and mortality in the perioperative period.4. Use of pulse oximetry reduces unplanned respiratory admissions to the intensive care unit (ICU), decreases the length of ICU readmission or both. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2013), EMBASE (1980 to June 2013), CINAHL (1982 to June 2013), ISI Web of Science (1956 to June 2013), LILACS (1982 to June 2013) and databases of ongoing trials; we also checked the reference lists of trials and review articles. The original search was performed in January 2005, and a previous update was performed in May 2009. We included all controlled trials that randomly assigned participants to pulse oximetry or no pulse oximetry during the perioperative period. Two review authors independently assessed data in relation to events detectable by pulse oximetry, any serious complications that occurred during anaesthesia or in the postoperative period and intraoperative or

  2. Formation of nanograting in fused silica by temporally delayed femtosecond double-pulse irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haodong; Song, Juan; Li, Qin; Zeng, Xianglong; Dai, Ye

    2018-04-01

    A 1 kHz femtosecond double-pulse sequence irradiation is used to study the temporal evolution of nanograting in fused silica by controlling the delay times and polarization combinations of two independent beams from a Mach–Zehnder interferometer. A lateral laser-scan experiment with speed at 5 µm s‑1 and each pulse energy of 1 µJ is firstly performed with the delay time from sub-picosecond to 10 ps, and then the written nanostructures are systematically studied under a cross-polarized microscope because the intensity of birefringence signal nearly corresponds to optical retardance and development level of the induced nanograting. The trend shows that the induced nanogratings can continue developing with a decrease of delay time in the case of the linear polarization pulse arriving before. In another vertical laser-scan experiment at the same speed and pulse energy, the morphologies of nanogratings embedded in the lines are characterized by scanning electron microscope after mechanical polishing and chemical etching. The self-organized patterns have a commonly spatial period of 200–300 nm and the orientation is always perpendicular to the polarization of the first laser pulse, and the second pulse in each sequence seems to promote the as-formed nanograting developing further even if the polarized direction is different from the previous pulse. These new findings verify again that a localized memory effect can make positive feedback to reinforce the patterned nanostripes. In that process, the impact ionization from the seed electrons left by the first pulse excitation and the photoionization of self-trapped excitons with lower ionization threshold results in an increase of the re-excited carriers during the second pulse irradiation and the subsequent development of the as-formed nanograting. Our result provides further proofs for understanding the physical mechanism of nanograting strongly connection with the interplay on multiple ionization channels.

  3. Protein sequence databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Wu, Cathy H

    2004-02-01

    A variety of protein sequence databases exist, ranging from simple sequence repositories, which store data with little or no manual intervention in the creation of the records, to expertly curated universal databases that cover all species and in which the original sequence data are enhanced by the manual addition of further information in each sequence record. As the focus of researchers moves from the genome to the proteins encoded by it, these databases will play an even more important role as central comprehensive resources of protein information. Several the leading protein sequence databases are discussed here, with special emphasis on the databases now provided by the Universal Protein Knowledgebase (UniProt) consortium.

  4. A computerized pulse radiolysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, T.E.; Lind, J.; Reitberger, T.

    1976-01-01

    A computer based pulse radiolysis system for gathering and handling of transient optical absorption and electric conductivity data is presented. The system has been developed around a Biomation 8100 transient recorder and a PDP 11/40 (Digital Equipment Corp) computer. (author)

  5. Pulsed neutron generator for logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibideau, F.D.

    1977-01-01

    A pulsed neutron generator for uranium logging is described. This generator is one component of a prototype uranium logging probe which is being developed by SLA to detect, and assay, uranium by borehole logging. The logging method is based on the measurement of epithermal neutrons resulting from the prompt fissioning of uranium from a pulsed source of 17.6 MeV neutrons. An objective of the prototype probe was that its diameter not exceed 2.75 inches, which would allow its use in conventional rotary drill holes of 4.75-inch diameter. This restriction limited the generator to a maximum 2.375-inch diameter. The performance requirements for the neutron generator specified that it operate with a nominal output of 5 x 10 6 neutrons/pulse at up to 100 pulses/second for a one-hour period. The development of a neutron generator meeting the preliminary design goals was completed and two prototype models were delivered to SLA. These two generators have been used by SLA to log a number of boreholes in field evaluation of the probe. The results of the field evaluations have led to the recommendation of several changes to improve the probe's operation. Some of these changes will require additional development effort on the neutron generator. It is expected that this work will be performed during 1977. The design and operation of the first prototype neutron generators is described

  6. Duplex scanning using sparse data sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møllenbach, S. K.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2008-01-01

    The velocity distribution in vessels can be displayed using duplex scanning where B-mode acquisitions are interspaced with the velocity data. This gives an image for orientation, but lowers the maximum detectable velocity by a factor of two. Other pulse sequences either omits the B-mode image...... is scaled by the factor A/T. The approach has been investigated using in vivo RF data from the Hepatic vein, Carotid artery and Aorta from a 33 year old healthy male. A B-K Medical 3535 ultrasound scanner has been used in Duplex mode with a BK 8556, 3.2 MHz linear array probe. The sampling frequency...

  7. Optimal pulse spacing for dynamical decoupling in the presence of a purely dephasing spin bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajoy, Ashok; Alvarez, Gonzalo A.; Suter, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining quantum coherence is a crucial requirement for quantum computation; hence protecting quantum systems against their irreversible corruption due to environmental noise is an important open problem. Dynamical decoupling (DD) is an effective method for reducing decoherence with a low control overhead. It also plays an important role in quantum metrology, where, for instance, it is employed in multiparameter estimation. While a sequence of equidistant control pulses [the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence] has been ubiquitously used for decoupling, Uhrig recently proposed that a nonequidistant pulse sequence [the Uhrig dynamic decoupling (UDD) sequence] may enhance DD performance, especially for systems where the spectral density of the environment has a sharp frequency cutoff. On the other hand, equidistant sequences outperform UDD for soft cutoffs. The relative advantage provided by UDD for intermediate regimes is not clear. In this paper, we analyze the relative DD performance in this regime experimentally, using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. Our system qubits are 13 C nuclear spins and the environment consists of a 1 H nuclear spin bath whose spectral density is close to a normal (Gaussian) distribution. We find that in the presence of such a bath, the CPMG sequence outperforms the UDD sequence. An analogy between dynamical decoupling and interference effects in optics provides an intuitive explanation as to why the CPMG sequence performs better than any nonequidistant DD sequence in the presence of this kind of environmental noise.

  8. Cryosurgery with Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Charlotte S.; Rubinsky, Boris

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the hypothesis that combining the minimally invasive surgical techniques of cryosurgery and pulsed electric fields will eliminate some of the major disadvantages of these techniques while retaining their advantages. Cryosurgery, tissue ablation by freezing, is a well-established minimally invasive surgical technique. One disadvantage of cryosurgery concerns the mechanism of cell death; cells at high subzero temperature on the outer rim of the frozen lesion can survive. Pulsed electric fields (PEF) are another minimally invasive surgical technique in which high strength and very rapid electric pulses are delivered across cells to permeabilize the cell membrane for applications such as gene delivery, electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. The very short time scale of the electric pulses is disadvantageous because it does not facilitate real time control over the procedure. We hypothesize that applying the electric pulses during the cryosurgical procedure in such a way that the electric field vector is parallel to the heat flux vector will have the effect of confining the electric fields to the frozen/cold region of tissue, thereby ablating the cells that survive freezing while facilitating controlled use of the PEF in the cold confined region. A finite element analysis of the electric field and heat conduction equations during simultaneous tissue treatment with cryosurgery and PEF (cryosurgery/PEF) was used to study the effect of tissue freezing on electric fields. The study yielded motivating results. Because of decreased electrical conductivity in the frozen/cooled tissue, it experienced temperature induced magnified electric fields in comparison to PEF delivered to the unfrozen tissue control. This suggests that freezing/cooling confines and magnifies the electric fields to those regions; a targeting capability unattainable in traditional PEF. This analysis shows how temperature induced magnified and focused PEFs could be used to

  9. Cryosurgery with pulsed electric fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte S Daniels

    Full Text Available This study explores the hypothesis that combining the minimally invasive surgical techniques of cryosurgery and pulsed electric fields will eliminate some of the major disadvantages of these techniques while retaining their advantages. Cryosurgery, tissue ablation by freezing, is a well-established minimally invasive surgical technique. One disadvantage of cryosurgery concerns the mechanism of cell death; cells at high subzero temperature on the outer rim of the frozen lesion can survive. Pulsed electric fields (PEF are another minimally invasive surgical technique in which high strength and very rapid electric pulses are delivered across cells to permeabilize the cell membrane for applications such as gene delivery, electrochemotherapy and irreversible electroporation. The very short time scale of the electric pulses is disadvantageous because it does not facilitate real time control over the procedure. We hypothesize that applying the electric pulses during the cryosurgical procedure in such a way that the electric field vector is parallel to the heat flux vector will have the effect of confining the electric fields to the frozen/cold region of tissue, thereby ablating the cells that survive freezing while facilitating controlled use of the PEF in the cold confined region. A finite element analysis of the electric field and heat conduction equations during simultaneous tissue treatment with cryosurgery and PEF (cryosurgery/PEF was used to study the effect of tissue freezing on electric fields. The study yielded motivating results. Because of decreased electrical conductivity in the frozen/cooled tissue, it experienced temperature induced magnified electric fields in comparison to PEF delivered to the unfrozen tissue control. This suggests that freezing/cooling confines and magnifies the electric fields to those regions; a targeting capability unattainable in traditional PEF. This analysis shows how temperature induced magnified and focused

  10. Wave equations for pulse propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, B.W.

    1987-06-24

    Theoretical discussions of the propagation of pulses of laser radiation through atomic or molecular vapor rely on a number of traditional approximations for idealizing the radiation and the molecules, and for quantifying their mutual interaction by various equations of propagation (for the radiation) and excitation (for the molecules). In treating short-pulse phenomena it is essential to consider coherent excitation phenomena of the sort that is manifest in Rabi oscillations of atomic or molecular populations. Such processes are not adequately treated by rate equations for excitation nor by rate equations for radiation. As part of a more comprehensive treatment of the coupled equations that describe propagation of short pulses, this memo presents background discussion of the equations that describe the field. This memo discusses the origin, in Maxwell's equations, of the wave equation used in the description of pulse propagation. It notes the separation into lamellar and solenoidal (or longitudinal and transverse) and positive and negative frequency parts. It mentions the possibility of separating the polarization field into linear and nonlinear parts, in order to define a susceptibility or index of refraction and, from these, a phase and group velocity. The memo discusses various ways of characterizing the polarization characteristics of plane waves, that is, of parameterizing a transverse unit vector, such as the Jones vector, the Stokes vector, and the Poincare sphere. It discusses the connection between macroscopically defined quantities, such as the intensity or, more generally, the Stokes parameters, and microscopic field amplitudes. The material presented here is a portion of a more extensive treatment of propagation to be presented separately. The equations presented here have been described in various books and articles. They are collected here as a summary and review of theory needed when treating pulse propagation.

  11. Flash X-ray sources powered by Blumlein pulse generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davanloo, F.; Coogan, J. J.; Krause, R. K.; Bhawalkar, J. D.; Collins, C. B.

    1991-05-01

    Described here is the progress in construction and characterization of pulse-power generators capable of discharging at high repetition rates. These devices consist of several triaxial Blumleins stacked in series at one end. The lines are charged in parallel and synchronously commuted with a single thyratron at the other end. In this way relatively low charging voltages are multiplied to give the desired discharge voltage without the need for complex Marx bank circuitry. Scaling of these stacked Blumlein generators to obtain open circuit voltages in excess of 0.5 MV is reported. Peak power generated by discharging into an X-ray diode exceeds 10 7 R/s and high repetition rates allow for an average emitted X-ray exposure rate of 25 R/s from a sequence of 40 ns pulses.

  12. Controlled generation of a single Trichel pulse and a series of single Trichel pulses in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Berendt, Artur; Akishev, Yuri

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a simple method for the controlled generation of a single Trichel pulse or a series of single Trichel pulses of a regulated repetition frequency in air is proposed. The concept of triggering a single Trichel pulse or a series of such pulses is based on the precise controlling the voltage inception of the negative corona, which can be accomplished through the use of a ramp voltage pulse or a series of such pulses with properly chosen ramp voltage pulse parameters (rise and fall times, and ramp voltage pulse repetition frequency). The proposal has been tested in experiments using a needle-to-plate electrode arrangement in air, and reproducible Trichel pulses (single or in a series) were obtained by triggering them with an appropriately designed voltage waveform. The proposed method and results obtained have been qualitatively analysed. The analysis provides guidance for designing the voltage ramp pulse in respect of the generation of a single Trichel pulse or a series of single Trichel pulses. The controlled generation of a single Trichel pulse or a series of such pulses would be a helpful research tool for the refined studies of the fundamental processes in a negative corona discharge in a single- (air is an example) and multi-phase gaseous fluids. The controlled generation of a single Trichel pulse or a series of Trichel pulses can also be attractive for those corona treatments which need manipulation of the electric charge and heat portions delivered by the Trichel pulses to the object.

  13. Coherent combining pulse bursts in time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvanauskas, Almantas

    2018-01-09

    A beam combining and pulse stacking technique is provided that enhances laser pulse energy by coherent stacking pulse bursts (i.e. non-periodic pulsed signals) in time domain. This energy enhancement is achieved by using various configurations of Fabry-Perot, Gires-Tournois and other types of resonant cavities, so that a multiple-pulse burst incident at either a single input or multiple inputs of the system produces an output with a solitary pulse, which contains the summed energy of the incident multiple pulses from all beams. This disclosure provides a substantial improvement over conventional coherent-combining methods in that it achieves very high pulse energies using a relatively small number of combined laser systems, thus providing with orders of magnitude reduction in system size, complexity, and cost compared to current combining approaches.

  14. Linear transformer driver for pulse generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Alexander A; Mazarakis, Michael G; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A; Volkov, Sergey N; Kondratiev, Sergey S; Alexeenko, Vitaly M; Bayol, Frederic; Demol, Gauthier; Stygar, William A

    2015-04-07

    A linear transformer driver includes at least one ferrite ring positioned to accept a load. The linear transformer driver also includes a first power delivery module that includes a first charge storage devices and a first switch. The first power delivery module sends a first energy in the form of a first pulse to the load. The linear transformer driver also includes a second power delivery module including a second charge storage device and a second switch. The second power delivery module sends a second energy in the form of a second pulse to the load. The second pulse has a frequency that is approximately three times the frequency of the first pulse. The at least one ferrite ring is positioned to force the first pulse and the second pulse to the load by temporarily isolating the first pulse and the second pulse from an electrical ground.

  15. Pulse amplitude and frequency effects in a pulsed packed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, S.H.

    1954-04-01

    A study has been made of the effect on the efficiency and capacity of applying pulses of varying amplitude and frequency to a packed column. In the efficiency studies, the maximum efficiency was obtained with a pulse having an amplitude of 3/8'' and a frequency of 140 cycles per minute. Under these conditions, the column was about five times as efficient as a simple packed column. Two general types of results were obtained in the capacity studies. Under certain conditions, the capacity increased over that of a simple packed column, but under others, it decreased. Some of the factors causing this were investigated but the fundamental reasons were not determined due to a lack of personnel for the necessary experiments. (author)

  16. Complementarity of long pulse and short pulse spallation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, F.

    1995-01-01

    The complementarity of short pulse spallation sources (SPSS) and steady state (CW) reactors is a widely accepted concept. SPSS and long pulse spallation sources (LPSS) are complementary in two ways: a) in their performance in neutron scattering experiments LPSS closely emulate CW reactors. In this respect two facets of the time-of-flight (TOF) monochromator method adequate for LPSS will be discussed: the superiority of the TOF approach to the crystal monochromator method in high resolution powder diffraction, and the novel technique of repetition rate multiplication in TOF spectroscopy, b) LPSS combined with adequate chopper systems can also emulate SPSS in a number of applications. It will be shown that the LPSS method of producing short neutron pulses is more efficient for cold and thermal neutrons (below an energy of about 100 MeV), while SPSS is the more favourable approach for hot, epithermal neutrons, i.e. in the slowing down regime in contrast to the moderated regime. These two aspects of complementarity of LPSS and SPSS lead to the conclusions that for about 75% of the spectrum of neutron scattering experiments as known of today the LPSS approach is the most advantageous one with a feasible neutron intensity exceeding that available at ILL by a factor of about 30, while for the remaining 25% of applications the SPSS technique is superior with a well-known potential of a similar gain over present day performances. (author) 7 figs., 6 refs

  17. Third Harmonic Imaging using a Pulse Inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Joachim; Du, Yigang; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    The pulse inversion (PI) technique can be utilized to separate and enhance harmonic components of a waveform for tissue harmonic imaging. While most ultrasound systems can perform pulse inversion, only few image the 3rd harmonic component. PI pulse subtraction can isolate and enhance the 3rd...

  18. Perceptions of European stakeholders of pulse fishing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, M.L.; Trapman, B.K.; Rasenberg, M.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    This research project examines the concerns and questions of European stakeholders about pulse fishing, in order to assess to what extent the knowledge agenda on pulse fishing covers these issues. To get a first impression of the concerns about pulse fishing, and to get an idea of the stakeholders

  19. <3> OMEGA pulse-forming network

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Adjustement of the 3 W pulse-forming network of the SPS beam dumping system. When charged at 60 kV, this PFN gives 10 kA, 25 ms current pulses, with oscillations, superimposed on the pulse flat top, of an amplitude of +/- 1 Ka.

  20. Experiments on sediment pulses in mountain rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y. Cui; T. E. Lisle; J. E. Pizzuto; G. Parker

    1998-01-01

    Pulses of sediment can be introduced into mountain rivers from such mechanisms as debris flows, landslides and fans at tributary confluences. These processes can be natural or associated with the activities of humans, as in the case of a pulse created by sediment derived from timber harvest or the removal of a dam. How does the river digest these pulses?

  1. A Study of New Pulse Auscultation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Yun Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new type of pulse auscultation system, which uses a condenser microphone to measure pulse sound waves on the wrist, captures the microphone signal for filtering, amplifies the useful signal and outputs it to an oscilloscope in analog form for waveform display and storage and delivers it to a computer to perform a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT and convert the pulse sound waveform into a heartbeat frequency. Furthermore, it also uses an audio signal amplifier to deliver the pulse sound by speaker. The study observed the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine’s pulsing techniques, where pulse signals at places called “cun”, “guan” and “chi” of the left hand were measured during lifting (100 g, searching (125 g and pressing (150 g actions. Because the system collects the vibration sound caused by the pulse, the sensor itself is not affected by the applied pressure, unlike current pulse piezoelectric sensing instruments, therefore, under any kind of pulsing pressure, it displays pulse changes and waveforms with the same accuracy. We provide an acquired pulse and waveform signal suitable for Chinese Medicine practitioners’ objective pulse diagnosis, thus providing a scientific basis for this Traditional Chinese Medicine practice. This study also presents a novel circuit design using an active filtering method. An operational amplifier with its differential features eliminates the interference from external signals, including the instant high-frequency noise. In addition, the system has the advantages of simple circuitry, cheap cost and high precision.

  2. A study of new pulse auscultation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Yun; Chang, Rong-Seng

    2015-04-14

    This study presents a new type of pulse auscultation system, which uses a condenser microphone to measure pulse sound waves on the wrist, captures the microphone signal for filtering, amplifies the useful signal and outputs it to an oscilloscope in analog form for waveform display and storage and delivers it to a computer to perform a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and convert the pulse sound waveform into a heartbeat frequency. Furthermore, it also uses an audio signal amplifier to deliver the pulse sound by speaker. The study observed the principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine's pulsing techniques, where pulse signals at places called "cun", "guan" and "chi" of the left hand were measured during lifting (100 g), searching (125 g) and pressing (150 g) actions. Because the system collects the vibration sound caused by the pulse, the sensor itself is not affected by the applied pressure, unlike current pulse piezoelectric sensing instruments, therefore, under any kind of pulsing pressure, it displays pulse changes and waveforms with the same accuracy. We provide an acquired pulse and waveform signal suitable for Chinese Medicine practitioners' objective pulse diagnosis, thus providing a scientific basis for this Traditional Chinese Medicine practice. This study also presents a novel circuit design using an active filtering method. An operational amplifier with its differential features eliminates the interference from external signals, including the instant high-frequency noise. In addition, the system has the advantages of simple circuitry, cheap cost and high precision.

  3. Electromagnetic Pulse Coupling Analysis of Electronic Equipment

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Lei; Qingying LI

    2017-01-01

    High-intensity nuclear explosion caused by high-altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse through the antenna, metal cables, holes and other channels, coupled with very high energy into the electronic device, and cause serious threats. In this paper, the mechanism, waveform, coupling path and damage effect of nuclear electromagnetic pulse is analyzed, and the coupling mechanism of nuclear electromagnetic pulse is studied.

  4. Patterns of digital volume pulse waveform and pulse transit time in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Arterial wall changes underlie many disorders of aging and the complications of diseases like hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Analyzing the pulse wave is an easy, noninvasive method used to assess vessel wall stiffness and pulse changes. In this study the digital volume pulse wave and the pulse transit ...

  5. Numerical and experimental study of an annular pulse tube used in the pulse tube cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaomin; Chen, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaotao; Dai, Wei; Luo, Ercang

    2017-12-01

    Multi-stage pulse tube coolers normally use a U-type configuration. For compactness, it is attractive to build a completely co-axial multi-stage pulse tube cooler. In this way, an annular shape pulse tube is inevitable. Although there are a few reports about previous annular pulse tubes, a detailed study and comparison with a circular pulse tube is lacking. In this paper, a numeric model based on CFD software is carried out to compare the annular pulse tube and circular pulse tube used in a single stage in-line type pulse tube cooler with about 10 W of cooling power at 77 K. The length and cross sectional area of the two pulse tubes are kept the same. Simulation results show that the enthalpy flow in the annular pulse tube is lower by 1.6 W (about 11% of the enthalpy flow) compared to that in circular pulse tube. Flow and temperature distribution characteristics are also analyzed in detail. Experiments are then conducted for comparison with an in-line type pulse tube cooler. With the same acoustic power input, the pulse tube cooler with a circular pulse tube obtains 7.88 W of cooling power at 77 K, while using an annular pulse tube leads to a cooling power of 7.01 W, a decrease of 0.9 W (11.4%) on the cooling performance. The study sets the basis for building a completely co-axial two-stage pulse tube cooler.

  6. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of the abdomen with pulse triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muertz, P.; Pauleit, D.; Traeber, F.; Kreft, B.P.; Schild, H.H.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to reduce the influence of motion on diffusion-weighted MR images of the abdomen by pulse triggering of single-shot sequences. Methods: Five healthy volunteers were examined both without and with finger pulse-triggering of a diffusion-weighted single-shot echo planar MR imaging sequence at 1.5 T. Series of diffusion-weighted images were acquired at different phases of the cardiac cycle by varying the time delay between finger pulse and sequence acquisition. The measurements were repeated three times. The diffusion weighted images were analysed by measuring the signal intensities and by determining the ADC values within the spleen, kidney and liver. Results: The magnitude of motion artifacts on diffusion weighted images shows a strong dependence on the trigger delay. The optimum trigger delay is found to be between 500 and 600 ms. For these values the abdominal organs appear homogeneous on all diffusion weighted images and the strongest signal intensities are detected. At optimum triggering the accuracy of the apparent diffusion coefficients is up to 10 times better than without triggering. Moreover, the standard deviation of the repeated measurements is smaller than 12% for all volunteers and for all organs. Without triggering the standard deviation is larger by a factor of 4 on average. Conclusion: Pulse triggering of single-shot sequences leads to significant reduction of motion related artifacts on diffusion weighted images of the abdomen and provides more accurate and reproducible ADC values. (orig.) [de

  7. Pure and Sn-doped ZnO films produced by pulsed laser deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmelund, E.; Schou, Jørgen; Tougaard, S.

    2002-01-01

    A new technique, metronome doping, has been used for doping of films during pulsed laser deposition (PLD). This technique makes it possible to dope continuously during film growth with different concentrations of a dopant in one deposition sequence. Films of pure and doped ZnO have been produced...

  8. Interference Mitigation Technique for Coexistence of Pulse-Based UWB and OFDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohno Kohei

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultra-wideband (UWB is a useful radio technique for sharing frequency bands between radio systems. It uses very short pulses to spread spectrum. However, there is a potential for interference between systems using the same frequency bands at close range. In some regulatory systems, interference detection and avoidance (DAA techniques are required to prevent interference with existing radio systems. In this paper, the effect of interference on orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM signals from pulse-based UWB is discussed, and an interference mitigation technique is proposed. This technique focuses on the pulse repetition cycle of UWB. The pulse repetition interval is set the same or half the period of the OFDM symbol excluding the guard interval to mitigate interference. These proposals are also made for direct sequence (DS-UWB. Bit error rate (BER performance is illustrated through both simulation and theoretical approximations.

  9. Preliminary experimental investigation on induction voltage adder based on rolled strip pulse forming line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Zhipeng; Qian Baoliang; Yang Hanwu; Yang Shi; Li Song

    2011-01-01

    A technical solution for high power pulse generator which is based on both induction voltage adder (IVA) and rolled strip line is introduced. The induction cell is designed for a 10-stage IVA, its equivalent circuit is obtained and corresponding simulation research is carried out. To study the response characteristics of the induction cell, a rolled strip pulse forming line with an impedance of 3 Ω and pulse duration of 230 ns is fabricated as the voltage drive source. Experimental investigations on both the single induction cell and 4-stage IVA are carried out. The results show that the cell has good response characteristics. The current efficiency of the 4-stage IVA can reach about 80%, and the output voltage is about 4 times the magnitude of the input. In the repetitive condition, the sequence of 87 pulses at the frequency of about 5 Hz is obtained, which are well repeatable. (authors)

  10. Particle-in-cell simulation of Trichel pulses in pure oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria-Hoyo, C [Dpto. Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, Sevilla 41012 (Spain); Pontiga, F [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, Sevilla 41012 (Spain); Castellanos, A [Dpto. Electronica y Electromagnetismo, Universidad de Sevilla, Avda. Reina Mercedes s/n, Sevilla 41012 (Spain)

    2007-08-07

    The development and propagation of Trichel pulses in oxygen have been numerically simulated using an improved fluid particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The numerical method has been optimized to accurately reproduce sequences of about 100 Trichel pulses ({approx}1 ms). A classical one-dimensional model of negative corona in sphere-to-plane geometry has been used to formulate the continuity equations for electrons and ions. The effects of ionization, attachment and secondary-electron emission from the cathode have all been considered. The electric field has been obtained from the solution of Poisson's equation in two dimensions. Using this model, the temporal and electrical characteristics of Trichel pulses have been investigated, in particular, the relation between applied voltage, pulse frequency and time-averaged current intensity and charge.

  11. Nine-channel mid-power bipolar pulse generator based on a field programmable gate array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haylock, Ben, E-mail: benjamin.haylock2@griffithuni.edu.au; Lenzini, Francesco; Kasture, Sachin; Fisher, Paul; Lobino, Mirko [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia); Queensland Micro and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia); Streed, Erik W. [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia); Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University, Gold Coast (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Many channel arbitrary pulse sequence generation is required for the electro-optic reconfiguration of optical waveguide networks in Lithium Niobate. Here we describe a scalable solution to the requirement for mid-power bipolar parallel outputs, based on pulse patterns generated by an externally clocked field programmable gate array. Positive and negative pulses can be generated at repetition rates up to 80 MHz with pulse width adjustable in increments of 1.6 ns across nine independent outputs. Each channel can provide 1.5 W of RF power and can be synchronised with the operation of other components in an optical network such as light sources and detectors through an external clock with adjustable delay.

  12. Pulsed ultrasound modulated optical tomography with harmonic lock-in holography detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Haowen; Mather, Melissa L; Morgan, Stephen P

    2013-07-01

    A method that uses digital heterodyne holography reconstruction to extract scattered light modulated by a single-cycle ultrasound (US) burst is demonstrated and analyzed. An US burst is used to shift the pulsed laser frequency by a series of discrete harmonic frequencies which are then locked on a CCD. The analysis demonstrates that the unmodulated light's contribution to the detected signal can be canceled by appropriate selection of the pulse repetition frequency. It is also shown that the modulated signal can be maximized by selecting a pulse sequence which consists of a pulse followed by its inverted counterpart. The system is used to image a 12 mm thick chicken breast with 2 mm wide optically absorbing objects embedded at the midplane. Furthermore, the method can be revised to detect the nonlinear US modulated signal by locking at the second harmonic US frequency.

  13. CW seeded optical parametric amplifier providing wavelength and pulse duration tunable nearly transform limited pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädrich, S; Gottschall, T; Rothhardt, J; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2010-02-01

    An optical parametric amplifier that delivers nearly transform limited pulses is presented. The center wavelength of these pulses can be tuned between 993 nm and 1070 nm and, at the same time, the pulse duration is varied between 206 fs and 650 fs. At the shortest pulse duration the pulse energy was increased up to 7.2 microJ at 50 kHz repetition rate. Variation of the wavelength is achieved by applying a tunable cw seed while the pulse duration can be varied via altering the pump pulse duration. This scheme offers superior flexibility and scaling possibilities.

  14. Development of high-voltage pulse-slicer unit with variable pulse duration for pulse radiolysis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, J.; Sharma, M. L.; Navathe, C. P. [Laser Electronic Support Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Toley, M. A.; Shinde, S. J.; Nadkarni, S. A.; Sarkar, S. K. [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2012-02-15

    A high-voltage pulse-slicer unit with variable pulse duration has been developed and integrated with a 7 MeV linear electron accelerator (LINAC) for pulse radiolysis investigation. The pulse-slicer unit provides switching voltage from 1 kV to 10 kV with rise time better than 5 ns. Two MOSFET based 10 kV switches were configured in differential mode to get variable duration pulses. The high-voltage pulse has been applied to the deflecting plates of the LINAC for slicing of electron beam of 2 {mu}s duration. The duration of the electron beam has been varied from 30 ns to 2 {mu}s with the optimized pulse amplitude of 7 kV to get corresponding radiation doses from 6 Gy to 167 Gy.

  15. Pre-pulse phenomena in pulse forming line charging-up by long pulse energy sources through a transformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianhua; Yang Hanwu; Li Zhiqiang; Shu Ting; Zhang Jiande; Feng Jiahuai; Xu Liurong

    2004-01-01

    The pre-pulse phenomena are studied by the simple theoretical analysis and the method of electro-circuit simulation in a PFL charging-up by MFCG or capacitors. It is show that what affect the amplitude of pre-pulse voltage are the grounding inductance and the frequency of the charging loop circuit, which is determined by the secondary coil inductance of transformer and the capacitance of PFL. The parasitical oscillation with high frequency introduced by the grounding inductance does not change the peak value of pre-pulse voltage. The frequency of the charging loop circuit is low enough that the peak pre-pulse voltage is only on kV level as PFL is charged through a transformer. The experiments are carried out when the PFL is charged by capacitors through a pulse transformer in two cases that the pulse power modulator is with or without pre-pulse switch. (author)

  16. Partially coherent isodiffracting pulsed beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivurova, Matias; Ding, Chaoliang; Turunen, Jari; Pan, Liuzhan

    2018-02-01

    We investigate a class of isodiffracting pulsed beams, which are superpositions of transverse modes supported by spherical-mirror laser resonators. By employing modal weights that, for stationary light, produce a Gaussian Schell-model beam, we extend this standard model to pulsed beams. We first construct the two-frequency cross-spectral density function that characterizes the spatial coherence in the space-frequency domain. By assuming a power-exponential spectral profile, we then employ the generalized Wiener-Khintchine theorem for nonstationary light to derive the two-time mutual coherence function that describes the space-time coherence of the ensuing beams. The isodiffracting nature of the laser resonator modes permits all (paraxial-domain) calculations at any propagation distance to be performed analytically. Significant spatiotemporal coupling is revealed in subcycle, single-cycle, and few-cycle domains, where the partial spatial coherence also leads to reduced temporal coherence even though full spectral coherence is assumed.

  17. Unsplit bipolar pulse forming line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Mark A [Pleasanton, CA

    2011-05-24

    A bipolar pulse forming transmission line module and system for linear induction accelerators having first, second, third, and fourth planar conductors which form a sequentially arranged interleaved stack having opposing first and second ends, with dielectric layers between the conductors. The first and second planar conductors are connected to each other at the first end, and the first and fourth planar conductors are connected to each other at the second end via a shorting plate. The third planar conductor is electrically connectable to a high voltage source, and an internal switch functions to short at the first end a high voltage from the third planar conductor to the fourth planar conductor to produce a bipolar pulse at the acceleration axis with a zero net time integral. Improved access to the switch is enabled by an aperture through the shorting plate and the proximity of the aperture to the switch.

  18. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the emission linear pulse holography which produces a chronological linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. A thirty two point sampling array is used to construct phase-only linear holograms of simulated acoustic emission sources on large metal plates. The concept behind the AE linear pulse holography is illustrated, and a block diagram of a data acquisition system to implement the concept is given. Array element spacing, synthetic frequency criteria, and lateral depth resolution are specified. A reference timing transducer positioned between the array and the inspection zone and which inititates the time-of-flight measurements is described. The results graphically illustrate the technique using a one-dimensional FFT computer algorithm (ie. linear backward wave) for an AE image reconstruction

  19. Acoustic emission linear pulse holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, H.D.; Busse, L.J.; Lemon, D.K.

    1983-10-25

    This device relates to the concept of and means for performing Acoustic Emission Linear Pulse Holography, which combines the advantages of linear holographic imaging and Acoustic Emission into a single non-destructive inspection system. This unique system produces a chronological, linear holographic image of a flaw by utilizing the acoustic energy emitted during crack growth. The innovation is the concept of utilizing the crack-generated acoustic emission energy to generate a chronological series of images of a growing crack by applying linear, pulse holographic processing to the acoustic emission data. The process is implemented by placing on a structure an array of piezoelectric sensors (typically 16 or 32 of them) near the defect location. A reference sensor is placed between the defect and the array.

  20. Ultrarelativistic electromagnetic pulses in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Leboeuf, J. N.; Tajima, T.; Dawson, J. M.; Kennel, C. F.

    1981-01-01

    The physical processes of a linearly polarized electromagnetic pulse of highly relativistic amplitude in an underdense plasma accelerating particles to very high energies are studied through computer simulation. An electron-positron plasma is considered first. The maximum momenta achieved scale as the square of the wave amplitude. This acceleration stops when the bulk of the wave energy is converted to particle energy. The pulse leaves behind as a wake a vacuum region whose length scales as the amplitude of the wave. The results can be explained in terms of a snow plow or piston-like action of the radiation on the plasma. When a mass ratio other than unity is chosen and electrostatic effects begin to play a role, first the ion energy increases faster than the electron energy and then the electron energy catches up later, eventually reaching the same value.

  1. A new phase modulated binomial-like selective-inversion sequence for solvent signal suppression in NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Johnny; Zheng, Gang; Price, William S

    2017-02-01

    A new 8-pulse Phase Modulated binomial-like selective inversion pulse sequence, dubbed '8PM', was developed by optimizing the nutation and phase angles of the constituent radio-frequency pulses so that the inversion profile resembled a target profile. Suppression profiles were obtained for both the 8PM and W5 based excitation sculpting sequences with equal inter-pulse delays. Significant distortions were observed in both profiles because of the offset effect of the radio frequency pulses. These distortions were successfully reduced by adjusting the inter-pulse delays. With adjusted inter-pulse delays, the 8PM and W5 based excitation sculpting sequences were tested on an aqueous lysozyme solution. The 8 PM based sequence provided higher suppression selectivity than the W5 based sequence. Two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy experiments were also performed on the lysozyme sample with 8PM and W5 based water signal suppression. The 8PM based suppression provided a spectrum with significantly increased (~ doubled) cross-peak intensity around the suppressed water resonance compared to the W5 based suppression. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Epigenomics: sequencing the methylome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Martin

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns are increasingly surveyed through methods that utilize massively parallel sequencing. Sequence-based assays developed to detect DNA methylation can be broadly divided into those that depend on affinity enrichment, chemical conversion, or enzymatic restriction. The DNA fragments resulting from these methods are uniformly subjected to library construction and massively parallel sequencing. The sequence reads are subsequently aligned to a reference genome and subjected to specialized analytical tools to extract the underlying methylation signature. This chapter will outline these emerging techniques.

  3. Next-generation sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieneck, Klaus; Bak, Mads; Jønson, Lars

    2013-01-01

    the feasibility of predicting the fetal KEL1 phenotype using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The KEL1/2 single-nucleotide polymorphism was polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified with one adjoining base, and the PCR product was sequenced using a genome analyzer (GAIIx......, Illumina); several millions of PCR sequences were analyzed. RESULTS: The results demonstrated the feasibility of diagnosing the fetal KEL1 or KEL2 blood group from cell-free DNA purified from maternal plasma. CONCLUSION: This method requires only one primer pair, and the large amount of sequence...

  4. Optimal filter bandwidth for pulse oximetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuban, Norbert; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2012-10-01

    Pulse oximeters contain one or more signal filtering stages between the photodiode and microcontroller. These filters are responsible for removing the noise while retaining the useful frequency components of the signal, thus improving the signal-to-noise ratio. The corner frequencies of these filters affect not only the noise level, but also the shape of the pulse signal. Narrow filter bandwidth effectively suppresses the noise; however, at the same time, it distorts the useful signal components by decreasing the harmonic content. In this paper, we investigated the influence of the filter bandwidth on the accuracy of pulse oximeters. We used a pulse oximeter tester device to produce stable, repetitive pulse waves with digitally adjustable R ratio and heart rate. We built a pulse oximeter and attached it to the tester device. The pulse oximeter digitized the current of its photodiode directly, without any analog signal conditioning. We varied the corner frequency of the low-pass filter in the pulse oximeter in the range of 0.66-15 Hz by software. For the tester device, the R ratio was set to R = 1.00, and the R ratio deviation measured by the pulse oximeter was monitored as a function of the corner frequency of the low-pass filter. The results revealed that lowering the corner frequency of the low-pass filter did not decrease the accuracy of the oxygen level measurements. The lowest possible value of the corner frequency of the low-pass filter is the fundamental frequency of the pulse signal. We concluded that the harmonics of the pulse signal do not contribute to the accuracy of pulse oximetry. The results achieved by the pulse oximeter tester were verified by human experiments, performed on five healthy subjects. The results of the human measurements confirmed that filtering out the harmonics of the pulse signal does not degrade the accuracy of pulse oximetry.

  5. Laser induced fluorescence in a pulsed argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scime, Earl; Biloiu, Costel; Compton, Christopher; Doss, Forrest; Venture, Daniel; Heard, John; Choueiri, Edgar; Spektor, Rostislav

    2005-01-01

    A time-resolved laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for pulsed argon plasmas is described. A low power, tunable diode laser pumps a three level Ar II transition sequence at a wavelength of 668.6138 nm. With a standard LIF system designed for steady-state plasmas (e.g., 4 kHz optical chopper, 20 kHz band-width detector, and a lock-in amplifier), we demonstrate that the evolution of the ion velocity distribution can be resolved with a time resolution of 1 ms through a combination of time-series averaging and post-acquisition digital signal processing

  6. Mechanically driven millimeter source of nanosecond X-ray pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, C. G.; Escobar, J. V.; Hird, J. R.; Putterman, S. J.

    2010-06-01

    The emission of nanosecond pulses of ≈20 keV photons having a total energy of GeVs which are generated by peeling millimeter wide strips of pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) tape in a partial pressure of air (≈10-3 Torr) is demonstrated. The X-ray spectrum is similar to that obtained by peeling much wider bands of PSA, implying that the characteristic length for the sequence of processes that govern this phenomenon is less than 1 mm. These experiments demonstrate that MEMS-type X-ray generators are technologically feasible.

  7. Rapid testing of pulse transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillo, J.

    1980-01-01

    Quality-control testing of pulse transformers is speeded up by method for determining rise time and droop. Instead of using oscilloscope and square-wave generator to measure these characteristics directly, method uses voltmeter and sine-wave generator to measure them indirectly in about one-tenth time. Droop and rise time are determined by measuring input/output voltage ratio at just four frequencies.

  8. Solid state pulsed power generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Fengfeng; Saddoughi, Seyed Gholamali; Herbon, John Thomas

    2014-02-11

    A power generator includes one or more full bridge inverter modules coupled to a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) through an inductive resonant branch. Each module includes a plurality of switches that are switched in a fashion causing the one or more full bridge inverter modules to drive the semiconductor opening switch SOS through the resonant circuit to generate pulses to a load connected in parallel with the SOS.

  9. A generalized slab-wise framework for parallel transmit multiband RF pulse design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Schmitter, Sebastian; Auerbach, Edward J; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new slab-wise framework to design parallel transmit multiband pulses for volumetric simultaneous multislice imaging with a large field of view along the slice direction (FOVs). The slab-wise framework divides FOVs into a few contiguous slabs and optimizes pulses for each slab. Effects of relevant design parameters including slab number and transmit B1 (B1+) mapping slice placement were investigated for human brain imaging by designing pulses with global or local SAR control based on electromagnetic simulations of a 7T head RF array. Pulse design using in vivo B1+ maps was demonstrated and evaluated with Bloch simulations. RF performance with respect to SAR reduction or B1+ homogenization across the entire human brain improved with increasing slabs; however, this improvement was nonlinear and leveled off at ∼12 slabs when the slab thickness reduced to ∼12 mm. The impact of using different slice placements for B1+ mapping was small. Compared with slice-wise approaches where each of the many imaging slices requires both B1+ mapping and pulse optimization, the proposed slab-wise design framework attained comparable RF performance while drastically reducing the number of required pulses; therefore, it can be used to increase time efficiency for B1+ mapping, pulse calculation, and sequence preparation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Coherent control of atoms and diatomic molecules with shaped ultrashort pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degert, J.

    2002-12-01

    This thesis deals with the theoretical and experimental study of coherent control of atomic and molecular systems with shaped pulses. At first, we present several experiments of control of coherent transients in rubidium. These transients appear when a two-level system is excited by a perturbative chirped pulse, and are characterized by oscillations in the excited state population. For a strong chirp, we show that a phase step in the spectrum modifies the phase of the oscillations. Then, by direct analogy with Fresnel zone lens, we conceive a chirped pulse with a highly modulated amplitude, allowing to suppress destructive contributions to the population transfer. In a second set of experiments, we focus on quantum path interferences in two-photon transitions excited by linearly chirped pulses. Owing to the broad bandwidth of ultrashort pulses, sequential and direct excitation paths contribute to the excited state population. Oscillations resulting from interferences between these two paths are observed in atomic sodium. Moreover, we show that they are observable whatever the sign of chirp. Theoretically, we study the control of the predissociation of a benchmark diatomic molecule: NaI. Predissociation leads to matter wave interferences in the fragments distribution. First, we show that a suitably chosen probe pulse allows the observation of theses interferences. Next, using a sequence of control pulse inducing electronic transition, we demonstrate the possibility to manipulate fragment energy distribution. (author)

  11. Frequency-locked, injection-seeded, pulsed narrowband optical parametric generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, Thomas A; Bambha, Ray P; Kulp, Thomas J; Schmitt, Randal L

    2003-06-20

    A frequency-locked, injection-seeded, pulsed optical parametric generator (OPG) has been developed for short-range infrared differential absorption lidar (DIAL) applications. The periodically poled lithium niobate OPG is pumped by a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG microlaser and is seeded by a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser. The OPG is designed for DIAL measurement of a narrow R-branch transition of methane at 3.2704 microm. The output of the OPG is a two-pulse sequence with a 100-micros temporal separation between the pulses, where the first pulse is absorbed by methane and the second pulse is not absorbed. The first pulse is actively locked to the methane absorption feature by use of the derivative of the transmission spectrum through a reference cell. Although the device was not optimized for output power, the 3.27-microm OPG output energies of the first and second pulses are 5.5 and 5.9 microJ, respectively, producing 21 mW when operated at 1818 Hz.

  12. Annular pulse column development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    The capacity of critically safe cylindrical pulse columns limits the size of nuclear fuel solvent extraction plants because of the limited cross-sectional area of plutonium, U-235, or U-233 processing columns. Thus, there is a need to increase the cross-sectional area of these columns. This can be accomplished through the use of a column having an annular cross section. The preliminary testing of a pilot-plant-scale annular column has been completed and is reported herein. The column is made from 152.4-mm (6-in.) glass pipe sections with an 89-mm (3.5-in.) o.d. internal tube, giving an annular width of 32-mm (1.25-in.). Louver plates are used to swirl the column contents to prevent channeling of the phases. The data from this testing indicate that this approach can successfully provide larger-cross-section critically safe pulse columns. While the capacity is only 70% of that of a cylindrical column of similar cross section, the efficiency is almost identical to that of a cylindrical column. No evidence was seen of any non-uniform pulsing action from one side of the column to the other

  13. Slow light pulse propagation in dispersive media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical analysis of pulse propagation in a semiconductor photonic crystal waveguide with embedded quantum dots in a regime where the pulse is subjected to both waveguide and material dispersion. The group index and the transmission are investigated by finite...... broadening or break-up of the pulse may be observed. The transition from linear to nonlinear pulse propagation is quantified in terms of the spectral width of the pulse. To cite this article: T.R. Nielsen et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009). (C) 2009 Academie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All...

  14. Intrinsic chirp of single-cycle pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Qiang; Zheng Jian; Dai Jianming; Ho, I-Chen; Zhang, X.-C.

    2010-01-01

    The Fourier transform-limited electromagnetic pulse has been regarded to be free of chirps for a long time. This is no longer true if the pulse duration goes down to or less than one optical cycle. We report the experimental observation of intrinsic chirps in such pulses with the sub-single-cycle terahertz (THz) waveforms obtained with a standard THz time-domain spectroscopy system. The results confirm the break down of the carrier-envelope (CE) expression for single-cycle optical pulses, and may influence the experimental measurements and theoretical modeling with single-cycle pulses.

  15. S100 lathe bed pulse generator applied to pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernicchiaro, G.R.C.; Rudge, M.G.; Albuquerque, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The project and construction of four channel pulse generator in the S100 standard plate and its control software for microcomputer are described. The microcomputer has total control on the pulse generator, which has seven programable parameters, defining the position of four pulses and the width for the three first ones. This pulse generator is controlled by a software developed in c language, and is used in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance experiences. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. The pulsed amplitude unit for the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolfe, J.; Browne, M.J.; Jobe, R.K.

    1987-02-01

    There is a recurring requirement in the SLC for the control of devices such as magnets, phase shifters, and attenuators on a beam-by-beam basis. The Pulsed Amplitude Unit (PAU) is a single width CAMAC module developed for this purpose. It provides digitally programmed analog output voltages on a beam-by-beam basis. Up to 32 preprogrammed values of output voltage are available from the single analog output of the module, and any of these values can be associated with any of the 256 possible SLC beam definitions. A 12-bit Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) digitizes an analog input signal at the appropriate beam time and stores it in a buffer memory. This feature is normally used to monitor the response of the device being controlled by the PAU at each beam time. Initial application of the PAU is a part of the system that controls the output of Klystrons in the SLC. The PAU combines several different functions in a single module. In order to accommodate these functions in a single width CAMAC module, field programmed logic is used extensively. Field Programmable Logic Arrays, Programmed Array Logic, and a Field Programmable Logic Sequencer are employed

  17. High current high accuracy IGBT pulse generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterov, V.V.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current triangular or trapezoidal pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in a capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The circuit can then recover the remaining energy and transfer it back to the capacitor bank without reversing the capacitor voltage. A third IGBT device is employed to control the initial charge to the capacitor bank, a command charging technique, and to compensate for pulse to pulse power losses. The rack mounted pulse generator contains a 525 μF capacitor bank. It can deliver 500 A at 900V into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled to 0.02% accuracy by a precision controller through the SLAC central computer system. This pulse generator drives a series pair of extraction dipoles

  18. Delayed Sequence Intubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weingart, Scott D; Trueger, N Seth; Wong, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    assessed. RESULTS: A total of 62 patients were enrolled: 19 patients required delayed sequence intubation to allow nonrebreather mask, 39 patients required it to allow NIPPV, and 4 patients required it for nasogastric tube placement. Saturations increased from a mean of 89.9% before delayed sequence...

  19. Cosmetology: Scope and Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    This scope and sequence guide, developed for a cosmetology vocational education program, represents an initial step in the development of a systemwide articulated curriculum sequence for all vocational programs within the Metropolitan Nashville Public School System. It was developed as a result of needs expressed by teachers, parents, and the…

  20. Sequences for Student Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Jeffrey; Feil, David; Lartigue, David; Mullins, Bernadette

    2004-01-01

    We describe two classes of sequences that give rise to accessible problems for undergraduate research. These problems may be understood with virtually no prerequisites and are well suited for computer-aided investigation. The first sequence is a variation of one introduced by Stephen Wolfram in connection with his study of cellular automata. The…

  1. Sequence History Update Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanampompan, Teerapat; Gladden, Roy; Fisher, Forest; DelGuercio, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Sequence History Update Tool performs Web-based sequence statistics archiving for Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Using a single UNIX command, the software takes advantage of sequencing conventions to automatically extract the needed statistics from multiple files. This information is then used to populate a PHP database, which is then seamlessly formatted into a dynamic Web page. This tool replaces a previous tedious and error-prone process of manually editing HTML code to construct a Web-based table. Because the tool manages all of the statistics gathering and file delivery to and from multiple data sources spread across multiple servers, there is also a considerable time and effort savings. With the use of The Sequence History Update Tool what previously took minutes is now done in less than 30 seconds, and now provides a more accurate archival record of the sequence commanding for MRO.

  2. Spectral self-imaging effect by time-domain multilevel phase modulation of a periodic pulse train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraquitena, José; Beltrán, Marta; Llorente, Roberto; Martí, Javier; Muriel, Miguel A

    2011-03-15

    We propose and analyze a novel (to our knowledge) approach to implement the spectral self-imaging effect of optical frequency combs. The technique is based on time-domain multilevel phase-only modulation of a periodic optical pulse train. The method admits both infinite- and finite-duration periodic pulse sequences. We show that the fractional spectral self-imaging effect allows one to reduce by an integer factor the comb frequency spacing. Numerical simulation results support our theoretical analysis.

  3. Spectral self-imaging effect by time-domain multilevel phase modulation of a periodic pulse train

    OpenAIRE

    Caraquitena Sales, José; Beltrán, Marta; Llorente, Roberto; Martí Sendra, Javier; Muriel, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    We propose and analyze a novel (to our knowledge) approach to implement the spectral self-imaging effect of optical frequency combs. The technique is based on time-domain multilevel phase-only modulation of a periodic optical pulse train. The method admits both infinite- and finite-duration periodic pulse sequences. We show that the fractional spectral self-imaging effect allows one to reduce by an integer factor the comb frequency spacing. Numerical simulation results support our theoretical...

  4. Quantum entanglement and teleportation in pulsed cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, Sebastian G. [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Gravitational Physics, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Wieczorek, Witlef; Aspelmeyer, Markus [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Hammerer, Klemens [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Gravitational Physics, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Entangling a mechanical oscillator with an optical mode is an enticing and yet a very challenging goal in cavity optomechanics. Here we consider a pulsed scheme to create Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-type entanglement between a traveling-wave light pulse and a mechanical oscillator. The entanglement can be verified unambiguously by a pump-probe sequence of pulses. In contrast to schemes that work in a steady-state regime under a continuous-wave drive, this protocol is not subject to stability requirements that normally limit the strength of achievable entanglement. We investigate the protocol's performance under realistic conditions, including mechanical decoherence, in full detail. We discuss the relevance of a high mechanical Qf product for entanglement creation and provide a quantitative statement on which magnitude of the Qf product is necessary for a successful realization of the scheme. We determine the optimal parameter regime for its operation and show it to work in current state-of-the-art systems.

  5. Hybrid Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sawyer; Trujillo, Skyler; Fort Lewis College Laser Group Team

    This work concerns the novel design of an inexpensive pulsed Nd:YAG laser, consisting of a hybrid Kerr Mode Lock (KLM) and Q-switch pulse. The two pulse generation systems work independently, non simultaneously of each other, thus generating the ability for the user to easily switch between ultra-short pulse widths or large energy density pulses. Traditionally, SF57 glass has been used as the Kerr medium. In this work, novel Kerr mode-locking mediums are being investigated including: tellurite compound glass (TeO2), carbon disulfide (CS2), and chalcogenide glass. These materials have a nonlinear index of refraction orders of magnitude,(n2), larger than SF57 glass. The Q-switched pulse will utilize a Pockels cell. As the two pulse generation systems cannot be operated simultaneously, the Pockels cell and Kerr medium are attached to kinematic mounts, allowing for quick interchange between systems. Pulse widths and repetition rates will vary between the two systems. A goal of 100 picosecond pulse widths are desired for the mode-locked system. A goal of 10 nanosecond pulse widths are desired for the Q-switch system, with a desired repetition rate of 50 Hz. As designed, the laser will be useful in imaging applications.

  6. HIV Sequence Compendium 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Brian Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leitner, Thomas Kenneth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Apetrei, Cristian [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hahn, Beatrice [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mizrachi, Ilene [National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mullins, James [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rambaut, Andrew [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Wolinsky, Steven [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Korber, Bette Tina Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-05

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. We try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2015. Hence, though it is published in 2015 and called the 2015 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2014 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing. In total, at the end of 2014, there were 624,121 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 7% since the previous year. This is the first year that the number of new sequences added to the database has decreased compared to the previous year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 5834 by end of 2014. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a fraction of these. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/ content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  7. Evolution of DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipu, Hamid Nawaz; Shabbir, Ambreen

    2015-03-01

    Sanger and coworkers introduced DNA sequencing in 1970s for the first time. It principally relied on termination of growing nucleotide chain when a dideoxythymidine triphosphate (ddTTP) was inserted in it. Detection of terminated sequences was done radiographically on Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (PAGE). Improvements that have evolved over time in original Sanger sequencing include replacement of radiography with fluorescence, use of separate fluorescent markers for each nucleotide, use of capillary electrophoresis instead of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then introduction of capillary array electrophoresis. However, this technique suffered from few inherent limitations like decreased sensitivity for low level mutant alleles, complexities in analyzing highly polymorphic regions like Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) and high DNA concentrations required. Several Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies have been introduced by Roche, Illumina and other commercial manufacturers that tend to overcome Sanger sequencing limitations and have been reviewed. Introduction of NGS in clinical research and medical diagnostics is expected to change entire diagnostic approach. These include study of cancer variants, detection of minimal residual disease, exome sequencing, detection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) and their disease association, epigenetic regulation of gene expression and sequencing of microorganisms genome.

  8. High-Precision Pulse Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a pulse generator with subnanosecond resolution implemented with a low-cost field-programmable gate array (FPGA) at low power levels. The method used exploits the fast carry chains of certain FPGAs. Prototypes have been built and tested in both Actel AX and Xilinx Virtex 4 technologies. In-flight calibration or control can be performed by using a similar and related technique as a time interval measurement circuit by measuring a period of the stable oscillator, as the delays through the fast carry chains will vary as a result of manufacturing variances as well as the result of environmental conditions (voltage, aging, temperature, and radiation).

  9. Ultrashort-pulse reflectometry (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domier, C.W.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr. (Department of Applied Science, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)); Chou, A.E.; Zhang, W. (Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)); Romanowsky, A.J. (Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States))

    1995-01-01

    Time-of-flight radar diagnostics are envisaged as having great potential for determining electron density profiles in next generation tokamaks such as TPX and ITER. Ultrashort-pulse radar reflectometry is a promising new time-of-flight diagnostic capable of making instantaneous density profile determination utilizing a single source and a single set of measurements. A proof-of-principle eight channel system has been constructed for use on the CCT tokamak at UCLA, and has undergone extensive testing in the laboratory.

  10. Pulse Sharpening Effects in Ferrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    the magnetic field h is obtained by solving the experimental results with the theory . In the case of zero (1 )-(3). Over the voltage range shown the...transmission line theory with steady-state fre- The results have shown that the ferrite pulse sharpener is quency w,, the extent of mismatch at the...dielectric sleeves (farads/meter). E2 ++ + Z2 h Peak magnetic field in spin reversal region ( Oersteds ). 1m Mean magnetic length: ir(d + a)(meters). 2 1 [rL

  11. Neutron diffraction on pulsed sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, V. L.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    The current capabilities of and major scientific problems solved by time-of-flight neutron diffraction are reviewed. The reasons for the rapid development of the method over the last two decades have been mainly the emergence of third-generation pulsed sources with a megawatt time-averaged power and advances in neutron optical devices and detector systems. The paper discusses some historical aspects of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and examines the contribution to this method from F L Shapiro, the centennial of whose birth was celebrated in 2015. The state of the art with respect to neutron sources for studies on extracted beams is reviewed in a special section.

  12. Repetitively pulsed material testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Gullickson, R.; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1975-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. Moderate scaling from existing results is sufficient to provide 2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 . s to a suitable target. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis, is analyzed with respect to other plasma devices and is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed

  13. Repetitively pulsed material testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Gullickson, R; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1975-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. Moderate scaling from existing results is sufficient to provide 2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 .s to a suitable target. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis, is analyzed with respect to other plasma devices and is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed. (U.S.)

  14. Pulse-Flow Microencapsulation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    2006-01-01

    The pulse-flow microencapsulation system (PFMS) is an automated system that continuously produces a stream of liquid-filled microcapsules for delivery of therapeutic agents to target tissues. Prior microencapsulation systems have relied on batch processes that involve transfer of batches between different apparatuses for different stages of production followed by sampling for acquisition of quality-control data, including measurements of size. In contrast, the PFMS is a single, microprocessor-controlled system that performs all processing steps, including acquisition of quality-control data. The quality-control data can be used as real-time feedback to ensure the production of large quantities of uniform microcapsules.

  15. The Colliding Beams Sequencer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.E.; Johnson, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The Colliding Beam Sequencer (CBS) is a computer program used to operate the pbar-p Collider by synchronizing the applications programs and simulating the activities of the accelerator operators during filling and storage. The Sequencer acts as a meta-program, running otherwise stand alone applications programs, to do the set-up, beam transfers, acceleration, low beta turn on, and diagnostics for the transfers and storage. The Sequencer and its operational performance will be described along with its special features which include a periodic scheduler and command logger. 14 refs., 3 figs

  16. Phylogenetic Trees From Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvkin, Paul; Wang, Li-San

    In this chapter, we review important concepts and approaches for phylogeny reconstruction from sequence data.We first cover some basic definitions and properties of phylogenetics, and briefly explain how scientists model sequence evolution and measure sequence divergence. We then discuss three major approaches for phylogenetic reconstruction: distance-based phylogenetic reconstruction, maximum parsimony, and maximum likelihood. In the third part of the chapter, we review how multiple phylogenies are compared by consensus methods and how to assess confidence using bootstrapping. At the end of the chapter are two sections that list popular software packages and additional reading.

  17. Expected performance of time-gradient magnetic field SESANS diffractometer at pulsed reactor IBR-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarchuk, V.; Sadilov, V.; Manoshin, S.; Erhan, R. V.; Ioffe, A.

    2017-06-01

    The application of the time-gradient magnetic field neutron spin-echo technique (TGF-NSE) aiming to extend the possibilities of the REFLEX reflectometer at the pulsed reactor IBR-2 (Dubna, Russia) towards a high and medium resolution small-angle scattering is considered. This technique requires the use of a linearly increasing magnetic field in the form of the sequence of saw-teeth pulses. Such a technique is well-suited to the pulsed structure of the neutron beam at the IBR-2 reactor. The wide range of neutron wavelengths employed in the time-of-flight (TOF) operation mode allows for the simultaneous coverage of a wide range of spin-echo lengths (corresponding to a wide Q-range in conventional SANS). Virtual experiments carried out using the VITESS simulation package demonstrate that such a setup at IBR-2 will allow for the coverage of the length scales from 100 Å to 6000 Å in a single instrument setting. The use of the TGF-NSE technique in the TOF mode leads to gaps in the measured SANS curves due to the jumps of magnetic field at the end of saw-teeth pulses. However, crucially, these do not harm the quality of the data. Moreover, the lost data can be retrieved by an additional measurement with a delayed start of the magnetic pulse sequence.

  18. Multi-pulse scheme for laser-guided electrical breakdown of air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polynkin, Pavel

    2017-10-01

    Channeling an extended electrical breakdown of air by a laser beam is a long-standing challenge in applied laser science. Virtually all previously reported experiments on discharge channeling by femtosecond laser beams relied on the application of a single laser pulse and have been conducted with discharge gaps of less than one meter, in which case the direct ohmic heating of the laser-generated plasma by the applied DC electric field is the dominant channeling mechanism. We report a laboratory-scale demonstration of a channeling approach that makes use of concatenated plasma filaments produced by a sequence of multiple ultrashort laser pulses. Direct ohmic heating of the guiding channel is eliminated through the introduction of large temporal delays between the individual laser pulses in the pulse sequence. We propose an extension of this scheme to channeling kilometer-scale discharges, including natural lightning. Our proposed approach alleviates the fundamental range limitations inherent to the single-pulse schemes reported previously. It can channel discharges propagating in either direction and along curved paths.

  19. Effects of pulse-to-pulse residual species on discharges in repetitively pulsed discharges through packed bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for conversion of toxic and waste gases, and CO2 removal. These discharges are repetitively pulsed having varying flow rates and internal geometries, which results in species from the prior pulse still being in the discharge zone at the time the following discharge pulse occurs. A non-negligible residual plasma density remains, which effectively acts as preionization. This residual charge changes the discharge properties of subsequent pulses, and may impact important PBR properties such as chemical selectivity. Similarly, the residual neutral reactive species produced during earlier pulses will impact the reaction rates on subsequent pulses. We report on results of a computational investigation of a 2D PBR using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM. Results will be discussed for air flowing though an array of dielectric rods at atmospheric pressure. The effects of inter-pulse residual species on PBR discharges will be quantified. Means of controlling the presence of residual species in the reactor through gas flow rate, pulse repetition, pulse width and geometry will be described. Comparisons will be made to experiments. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  20. 1H homonuclear editing of rat brain using semiselective pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetherington, H.P.; Avison, M.J.; Shulman, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have used a semiselective Hahn spin-echo sequence of the form (1331)-tau-(2662)-tau-AQ, delivered by a surface coil to obtain high-resolution 1H NMR spectra from the brains of intact dead rats. This sequence gave suppression of the tissue water resonance by a factor of 80,000 when tau = 68 ms. Delivery of a frequency-selective Dante pulse train to the alpha-CH resonance of lactate at 4.11 ppm, simultaneously with the 2662 refocusing pulse, altered the j-modulation in the spin-coupled beta-CH3 protons. Subtraction of this spectrum from one in which the Dante was ineffective gave an edited spectrum containing only the beta-CH3 resonance of lactate at 1.31 ppm. When the position of the Dante was shifted to 3.78 ppm to selectively invert the alpha-CH protons of alanine, an edited spectrum of alanine was obtained

  1. Jump-and-return sandwiches: A new family of binomial-like selective inversion sequences with improved performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Tom; Chen, Johnny; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Zheng, Gang; Matsukawa, Shingo; Price, William S.

    2018-03-01

    A new family of binomial-like inversion sequences, named jump-and-return sandwiches (JRS), has been developed by inserting a binomial-like sequence into a standard jump-and-return sequence, discovered through use of a stochastic Genetic Algorithm optimisation. Compared to currently used binomial-like inversion sequences (e.g., 3-9-19 and W5), the new sequences afford wider inversion bands and narrower non-inversion bands with an equal number of pulses. As an example, two jump-and-return sandwich 10-pulse sequences achieved 95% inversion at offsets corresponding to 9.4% and 10.3% of the non-inversion band spacing, compared to 14.7% for the binomial-like W5 inversion sequence, i.e., they afforded non-inversion bands about two thirds the width of the W5 non-inversion band.

  2. Noise Pulses in Large Area Optical Modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiello, Sebastiano; Leonora, Emanuele; Giordano, Valentina

    2013-06-01

    A great number of large area photomultipliers are widely used in neutrino and astro-particle detector to measure Cherenkov light in medium like water or ice. The key element of these detectors are the so-called 'optical module', which consist in photodetectors closed in a transparent pressure-resistant container to protect it and ensure good light transmission. The noise pulses present on the anode of each photomultiplier affect strongly the performance of the detector. A large study was conducted on noise pulses of large area photomultipliers, considering time and charge distributions of dark pulses, prepulses, delayed pulses, and after pulses. The contribution to noise pulses due to the presence of the external glass spheres was also studied, even comparing two vessels of different brands. (authors)

  3. Pulse triggering mechanism of air proportional counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, T.; Mori, T.; Watanabe, T.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the pulse triggering mechanism of a cylindrical proportional counter filled with air at atmospheric pressure for the incidence of β-rays. Experimental results indicate that primary electrons created distantly from the anode wire by a β-ray are transformed into negative ions, which then detach electrons close to the anode wire and generate electron avalanches thus triggering pulses, while electrons created near the anode wire by a β-ray directly trigger a pulse. Since a negative ion pulse is triggered by a single electron detached from a negative ion, multiple pulses are generated by a large number of ions produced by the incidence of a single β-ray. It is therefore necessary not to count pulses triggered by negative ions but to count those by primary electrons alone when use is made of air proportional counters for the detection of β-rays. (orig.)

  4. CAMAC differential pulse discriminator-counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tselikov, N.V.

    1987-01-01

    Differential pulse discriminator-counter for Moessbauer spectrometer is described. Input pulse setting into the channel is performed according to the following algorithm: the pulse is transmitted to the channel depending on the fact whether the preceding pulse has got to the discrimination window or not. The circuit does not contain delay lines, taking into account the delay of a signal from the upper level discriminator in relation to the lower level discriminator signal, which is connected with input pulse rise finite time, which in turn allows one to reduce the discriminator dead time up to the operation time of threshold circuits. The pulse counting rate is 150 MHz, input signal amplitude is ±3 V, dead time is 6 ns, delay time from input to output is 14 ns. The unit is made in CAMAC system

  5. Conditions for effects of radiation pulsing

    CERN Document Server

    Trinkaus, H

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of pulsing effects on radiation damage is due to differences in the delay times of relevant defect reactions and/or to the non-linear dependence of such reactions on defect production rates. Thus, significant pulsing effects require (1) proper relationships of the internal time scales of defect production and reaction to the time scales of pulsing and (2) sufficiently large pulsing induced fluctuations in relevant microstructural variables. We show that the first condition, which we quantify by a 'relative dynamic bias', is indeed fulfilled in wide ranges of the main irradiation parameters. The second condition, quantified by an 'absolute dynamic bias', is, however, found to restrict the parameter ranges of possible pulsing effects substantially. For planned spallation neutron sources and similar accelerator driven systems facilities we find, for instance, that, in the temperature range of interest, the defect yield of one pulse (controlling the absolute dynamic bias) is much too small to allo...

  6. Device for flattening statistically distributed pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Il'kanaev, G.I.; Iskenderov, V.G.; Rudnev, O.V.; Teller, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    The description is given of a device that converts the series of statistically distributed pulses into a pseudo-uniform one. The inlet pulses switch over the first counter, and the second one is switched over by the clock pulses each time the uniformity of the counters' states is violated. This violation is recorded by the logic circuit which passes to the output the clock pulses in the amount equal to that of the pulses that reached the device inlet. Losses at the correlation between the light velocity and the sampling rate up to 0.3 do not exceed 0.7 per cent for the memory of pulse counters 3, and 0.035 per cent for memory 7

  7. Anomalous pulse interaction in dissipative media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordyugov, Grigory; Engel, Harald

    2008-06-01

    We review a number of phenomena occurring in one-dimensional excitable media due to modified decay behind propagating pulses. Those phenomena can be grouped in two categories depending on whether the wake of a solitary pulse is oscillatory or not. Oscillatory decay leads to nonannihilative head-on collision of pulses and oscillatory dispersion relation of periodic pulse trains. Stronger wake oscillations can even result in a bistable dispersion relation. Those effects are illustrated with the help of the Oregonator and FitzHugh-Nagumo models for excitable media. For a monotonic wake, we show that it is possible to induce bound states of solitary pulses and anomalous dispersion of periodic pulse trains by introducing nonlocal spatial coupling to the excitable medium.

  8. Gomphid DNA sequence data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — DNA sequence data for several genetic loci. This dataset is not publicly accessible because: It's already publicly available on GenBank. It can be accessed through...

  9. Photonic textiles for pulse oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothmaier, Markus; Selm, Bärbel; Spichtig, Sonja; Haensse, Daniel; Wolf, Martin

    2008-08-18

    Biomedical sensors, integrated into textiles would enable monitoring of many vitally important physiological parameters during our daily life. In this paper we demonstrate the design and performance of a textile based pulse oximeter, operating on the forefinger tip in transmission mode. The sensors consisted of plastic optical fibers integrated into common fabrics. To emit light to the human tissue and to collect transmitted light the fibers were either integrated into a textile substrate by embroidery (producing microbends with a nominal diameter of 0.5 to 2 mm) or the fibers inside woven patterns have been altered mechanically after fabric production. In our experiments we used a two-wavelength approach (690 and 830 nm) for pulse wave acquisition and arterial oxygen saturation calculation. We have fabricated different specimens to study signal yield and quality, and a cotton glove, equipped with textile based light emitter and detector, has been used to examine movement artifacts. Our results show that textile-based oximetry is feasible with sufficient data quality and its potential as a wearable health monitoring device is promising.

  10. A short TE gradient-echo sequence using asymmetric sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Norihiko; Harada, Kohshi; Sakurai, Kosuke; Nakanishi, Katsuyuki; Kim, Shyogen; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a gradient-echo pulse sequence with a short TE less than 4 msec using a data set of asymmetric off-center sampling with a broad bandwidth. The use of such a short TE significantly reduces T 2 * dephasing effect even in a two-dimensional mode, and by collecting an off-center echo, motion-induced phase dispersion is also considerably decreased. High immunity of this sequence to these dephasing effects permits clear visualization of anatomical details near the skull base where large local field inhomogeneities and rapid blood flow such as in the internal carotid artery are present. (author)

  11. General LTE Sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Billal, Masum

    2015-01-01

    In this paper,we have characterized sequences which maintain the same property described in Lifting the Exponent Lemma. Lifting the Exponent Lemma is a very powerful tool in olympiad number theory and recently it has become very popular. We generalize it to all sequences that maintain a property like it i.e. if p^{\\alpha}||a_k and p^\\b{eta}||n, then p^{{\\alpha}+\\b{eta}}||a_{nk}.

  12. Biological sequence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durbin, Richard; Eddy, Sean; Krogh, Anders Stærmose

    This book provides an up-to-date and tutorial-level overview of sequence analysis methods, with particular emphasis on probabilistic modelling. Discussed methods include pairwise alignment, hidden Markov models, multiple alignment, profile searches, RNA secondary structure analysis, and phylogene......This book provides an up-to-date and tutorial-level overview of sequence analysis methods, with particular emphasis on probabilistic modelling. Discussed methods include pairwise alignment, hidden Markov models, multiple alignment, profile searches, RNA secondary structure analysis...

  13. HIV Sequence Compendium 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuiken, Carla [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Foley, Brian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leitner, Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Apetrei, Christian [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hahn, Beatrice [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Mizrachi, Ilene [National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, MD (United States); Mullins, James [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rambaut, Andrew [Univ. of Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Wolinsky, Steven [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-12-31

    This compendium is an annual printed summary of the data contained in the HIV sequence database. In these compendia we try to present a judicious selection of the data in such a way that it is of maximum utility to HIV researchers. Each of the alignments attempts to display the genetic variability within the different species, groups and subtypes of the virus. This compendium contains sequences published before January 1, 2010. Hence, though it is called the 2010 Compendium, its contents correspond to the 2009 curated alignments on our website. The number of sequences in the HIV database is still increasing exponentially. In total, at the time of printing, there were 339,306 sequences in the HIV Sequence Database, an increase of 45% since last year. The number of near complete genomes (>7000 nucleotides) increased to 2576 by end of 2009, reflecting a smaller increase than in previous years. However, as in previous years, the compendium alignments contain only a small fraction of these. Included in the alignments are a small number of sequences representing each of the subtypes and the more prevalent circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) such as 01 and 02, as well as a few outgroup sequences (group O and N and SIV-CPZ). Of the rarer CRFs we included one representative each. A more complete version of all alignments is available on our website, http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/sequence/NEWALIGN/align.html. Reprints are available from our website in the form of both HTML and PDF files. As always, we are open to complaints and suggestions for improvement. Inquiries and comments regarding the compendium should be addressed to seq-info@lanl.gov.

  14. Fast differential pulse discriminator-counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelevoj, K.D.

    1985-01-01

    The flowsheet of a differential pulse discriminator counter is described; the result of discrimination here is independent from the shape of the input pulse. Rate of the analysis of input pulses with minimum amplitude up to 0.3 mV coming out from the photomultiplier makes up 220 MHz. The flowsheet of the discriminator used in the system of photon counting for atmosphere probing is presented

  15. Overload protection device for pulsed electric systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushchenko, V.G.; Kurskov, I.A.; Semina, R.S.

    1976-01-01

    Results of pulsed electric system protection development from effective pulse current overload depending on pulse duration are described. An integrating circuit, charge resistance of which is connected in parallel with a stabilitron, is used in a protection diagram. Given were time responses of overload protection of an output lens of slow root particle extraction channel from synchrophasotron; the responses have been obtained by the experimental and calculation methods

  16. PULSE DRYING EXPERIMENT AND BURNER CONSTRUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert States

    2006-07-15

    Non steady impingement heat transfer is measured. Impingement heating consumes 130 T-BTU/Yr in paper drying, but is only 25% thermally efficient. Pulse impingement is experimentally shown to enhance heat transfer by 2.8, and may deliver thermal efficiencies near 85%. Experimental results uncovered heat transfer deviations from steady theory and from previous investigators, indicating the need for further study and a better theoretical framework. The pulse burner is described, and its roll in pulse impingement is analyzed.

  17. Measurement and Control of Attosecond Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-25

    To use the quantum path interference, present in any attosecond pulse, to resolve the strongly-driven attosecond time-scale electron dynamics in...color pulse is then incident on a gas target placed some distance away where it creates an isolated attosecond pulse in Xenon , Krypton and probably...scale electron dynamics in selected ions. Figure 5: Beamlets as measured in the far field plotted with their angle of propagation shown for

  18. Chirped pulse Raman amplification in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieux, G; Lyachev, A; Yang, X; Ersfeld, B; Farmer, J P; Brunetti, E; Issac, R C; Raj, G; Welsh, G H; Wiggins, S M; Jaroszynski, D A, E-mail: d.a.jaroszynski@strath.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    Raman amplification in plasma has been proposed to be a promising method of amplifying short radiation pulses. Here, we investigate chirped pulse Raman amplification (CPRA) where the pump pulse is chirped and leads to spatiotemporal distributed gain, which exhibits superradiant scaling in the linear regime, usually associated with the nonlinear pump depletion and Compton amplification regimes. CPRA has the potential to serve as a high-efficiency high-fidelity amplifier/compressor stage.

  19. New pulse modulator with low switching frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golub V. S.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The author presents an integrating pulse modulator (analog signal converter with the pulse frequency and duration modulation similar to sigma-delta modulation (with low switching frequency, without quantization. The modulator is characterized by the absence of the quantization noise inherent in sigma-delta modulator, and a low switching frequency, unlike the pulse-frequency modulator. The modulator is recommended, in particular, to convert signals at the input of the class D power amplifier.

  20. Short-pulse optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification for the generation of high-power few-cycle pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major, Zs.; Osterhoff, J.; Hoerlein, R.; Karsch, S.; Fuoloep, J.A.; Krausz, F.; Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet, Muenchen

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. In the quest for a way to generate ultrashort, high-power, few-cycle laser pulses the discovery of optical parametric amplification (OPA) has opened up to the path towards a completely new regime, well beyond that of conventional laser amplification technology. The main advantage of this parametric amplification process is that it allows for an extremely broad amplification bandwidth compared to any known laser amplifier medium. When combined with the chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) principle (i.e. OPCPA), on one hand pulses of just 10 fs duration and 8 mJ pulse energy have been demonstrated. On the other hand, pulse energies of up to 30 J were also achieved on a different OPCPA system; the pulse duration in this case, however, was 100 fs. In order to combine ultrashort pulse durations (i.e. pulses in the few-cycle regime) with high pulse energies (i.e. in the Joule range) we propose tu pump on OPCPA chain with TW-scale short pulses (100 fs - 1 ps instead of > 100 ps of previous OPCPA systems) delivered by a conventional CPA system. This approach inherently improves the conditions for generating high-power ultrashort pulses using OPCPA in the following ways. Firstly, the short pump pulse duration reduces the necessary stretching factor for the seed pulse, thereby increasing stretching and compression fidelity. Secondly, also due to the shortened pump pulse duration, a much higher contrast is achieved. Finally, the significantly increased pump power makes the use of thinner OPCPA crystals possible, which implies an even broader amplification bandwidth, thereby allowing for even shorter pulses. We carried out theoretical investigations to show the feasibility of such a set-up. Alongside these studies we will also present preliminary experimental results of an OPCPA system pumped by the output of our Ti:Sapphire ATLAS laser, currently delivering 350 mJ in 43 fs. An insight into the planned scaling of this technique to petawatt

  1. Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Biology and Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, Markus; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Sources of ultrashort laser pulses are nowadays commercially available and have entered many areas of research and development. This book gives an overview of biological and medical applications of these laser pulses. The briefness of these laser pulses permits the tracing of the fastest processes in photo-active bio-systems, which is one focus of the book. The other focus is applications that rely on the high peak intensity of ultrashort laser pulses. Examples covered span non-linear imaging techniques, optical tomography, and laser surgery.

  2. Pulsed Single Frequency MOPA Laser, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Latest advances in semiconductor optoelectronics makes it possible to develop compact light weight robust sources of coherent optical pulses, demanded for numerous...

  3. Fast solid state high voltage pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Jens; Frank, Klaus; Hartmann, Werner

    1987-05-01

    A fast solid state pulse generator is described which is used to trigger high voltage, high current switches. It consists of a 7-stage marx generator bank switched by avalanche transistors and delivers a negative pulse with a rise time of less than 2 ns and an amplitude of 2.4 kV into a load of 200 ω. The delay between the trigger pulse of TTL level and the output pulse is 16 ns. The jitter is well below 100 ps.

  4. The detection and estimation of spurious pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Spurious pulses which may interfere with the counting of particles can sometimes easily be detected by integral counting as a function of amplification or by pulse-height analysis. However, in order to estimate their count rate, more elaborate methods based on their time relationship are needed. Direct techniques (delayed coincidences, use of a multichannel analyser in time mode, time-to-amplitude conversion) and gating techniques (simple subtraction, correlation counting, pulsed sources, modulo counting) are discussed. These techniques are compared to each other and their application to various detectors is studied as well as the influence of a dead time on spurious pulses

  5. Pulse reversal plating of nickel alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben

    2007-01-01

    Pulse plating has previously been reported to improve the properties of nickel and nickel alloy deposits. Typically, focus has been on properties such as grain size, hardness and smoothness. When pulse plating is to be utilised for microtechnologies such as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS......), internal stress and material distribution are even more important. With baths based upon nickel chloride, and nickel and cobalt chlorides, pulse reversal plating of both pure nickel and nickel-cobalt alloys has been used to fabricate tools for microinjection moulding. Pulse reversal plating of ternary soft...... magnetic alloys, comprising 45-65%Co, 15-35%Fe and 15-35%Ni, is also reported....

  6. Functional polyethylene glycol derivatives nanostructured thin films synthesized by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, R.; Popescu, C.; Popescu, A.; Grigorescu, S.; Mihailescu, I.N.; Mihaiescu, D.; Gittard, S.D.; Narayan, R.J.; Buruiana, T.; Stamatin, I.; Chrisey, D.B.

    2009-01-01

    We report the thin film deposition by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of a polymer conjugate with an hydrophilic sequence between metronidazole molecules that was covalently attached to both oligomer ends of carboxylate poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG 1.5-metronidazole). A pulsed KrF* excimer laser was used to deposit the drug-polymer composite films. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that MAPLE-transferred materials exhibited chemical properties similar to the starting materials. The dependence of the surface morphology on incident laser fluence is given.

  7. Pulse Splitting for Harmonic Beamforming in Time-Modulated Linear Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Poli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel strategy for harmonic beamforming in time-modulated linear arrays is proposed. The pulse splitting technique is exploited to simultaneously generate two harmonic patterns, one at the central frequency and another at a preselected harmonic of arbitrary order, while controlling the maximum level of the remaining sideband radiations. An optimization strategy based on the particle swarm optimizer is developed in order to determine the optimal parameters describing the pulse sequence used to modulate the excitation weights of the array elements. Representative numerical results are reported and discussed to point out potentialities and limitations of the proposed approach.

  8. Contributions of an adiabatic initial inversion pulse and K-space Re-ordered by inversion-time at each slice position (KRISP) to control of CSF artifacts and visualization of the brain in FLAIR magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curati, Walter L.; Oatridge, Angela; Herlihy, Amy H.; Hajnal, Joseph V.; Puri, Basant K.; Bydder, Graeme M

    2001-05-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the performance of three fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences for control of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood flow artifacts in imaging of the brain. The first of these sequences had an initial sinc inversion pulse which was followed by conventional k-space mapping. The second had an initial sinc inversion pulse followed by k-space re-ordered by inversion time at each slice position (KRISP) and the third had an adiabatic initial inversion pulse followed by KRISP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients with established disease were studied with all three pulse sequences. Seven were also studied with the adiabatic KRISP sequence after contrast enhancement. Their images were evaluated for patient motion artifact, CSF and blood flow artifact as well as conspicuity of the cortex, meninges, ventricular system, brainstem and cerebellum. The conspicuity of lesions and the degree of enhancement were also evaluated. RESULTS: Both the sinc and adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequences showed better control of CSF and blood flow artifacts than the conventional FLAIR sequence. In addition the adiabatic KRISP FLAIR sequence showed better control of CSF artifact at the inferior aspect of the posterior fossa. The lesion conspicuity was similar for each of the FLAIR sequences as was the degree of contrast enhancement to that shown with a T{sub 1}weighted spin echo sequence. CONCLUSION: The KRISP FLAIR sequence controls high signal artifacts from CSF flow and blood flow and the adiabatic pulse controls high signal artifacts due to inadequate inversion of the CSF magnetization at the periphery of the head transmitter coil. The KRISP FLAIR sequence also improves cortical and meningeal definition as a result of an edge enhancement effect. The effects are synergistic and can be usefully combined in a single pulse sequence. Curati, W.L. et al. (2001)

  9. Random Sequence for Optimal Low-Power Laser Generated Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangi, D.; Virga, A.; Gulino, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    Low-power laser generated ultrasounds are lately gaining importance in the research world, thanks to the possibility of investigating a mechanical component structural integrity through a non-contact and Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) procedure. The ultrasounds are, however, very low in amplitude, making it necessary to use pre-processing and post-processing operations on the signals to detect them. The cross-correlation technique is used in this work, meaning that a random signal must be used as laser input. For this purpose, a highly random and simple-to-create code called T sequence, capable of enhancing the ultrasound detectability, is introduced (not previously available at the state of the art). Several important parameters which characterize the T sequence can influence the process: the number of pulses Npulses , the pulse duration δ and the distance between pulses dpulses . A Finite Element FE model of a 3 mm steel disk has been initially developed to analytically study the longitudinal ultrasound generation mechanism and the obtainable outputs. Later, experimental tests have shown that the T sequence is highly flexible for ultrasound detection purposes, making it optimal to use high Npulses and δ but low dpulses . In the end, apart from describing all phenomena that arise in the low-power laser generation process, the results of this study are also important for setting up an effective NDT procedure using this technology.

  10. Frequency-Selective Fat Suppression Radiofrequency Pulse Train to Remove Olefinic Fats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    CHESS pulse can suppress the signal originating from aliphatic fat protons but cannot suppress the signal from olefinic fat protons, which is near the resonance frequency of water protons. Adipose tissue contains various fat species; aliphatic fat comprises about 90 % and olefinic fat about 10 % of adipose tissue. Thus, CHESS pulse cannot be used to suppress the signal from adipose tissue completely. The purpose of this study was to find a method to suppress the signal from adipose tissue completely. The Fatsat train pulse, created with an arbitrary flip angle and insensitive to B1 inhomogeneity, was used. Because B1 inhomogeneity is larger on higher field magnetic resonance imaging, the fat suppression radiofrequency pulse needs to be B1-insensitive. To investigate a percentage of olefinic fat in adipose tissues, the excitation frequency of the Fatsat train pulse was varied from -240 to +400 Hz and the images and fat-suppressed images were obtained. The presence of olefinic fat comprising about 10 % of abdominal adipose tissue was identified. The result agreed with some previous papers. Complete fat suppression could be achieved by partial (10 %) inversion of longitudinal aliphatic fat magnetization and by canceling out the two fat magnetizations. The flip angle was identified to about 95°. In conclusion, the cause that the signal from adipose tissues cannot be suppressed completely has been found. Improved images that signals from adipose tissues were suppressed completely have been demonstrated. This technique can also be applied to several pulse sequences.

  11. Interaction with the lower ionosphere of electromagnetic pulses from lightning: Heating, attachment, and ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taranenko, Y.N.; Inan, U.S.; Bell, T.F.

    1993-01-01

    The authors model the interaction of lightning flashes with the lower ionosphere. They use a Boltzmann formulation of the electron distribution function, and use Maxwells equations for the electromagnetic fields. Electromagnetic pulses from lightning have pulse lengths of 50 to 150 μs and produce peak fields of 50 V/m at distances of 100 km from the discharges. Fields greater than 16 V/m can cause avalanche ionization of neutrals at elevations of 100 km, where typical mean free paths for electrons are at least a meter. Modeling the lightning flash as a 100 μs pulse of 10 kHz radiation emitted at 70km altitude, they find that in nighttime skies the pulse can affect the electron density in the range of 1 to 30%. A sequence of pulses can lead to substantial impact on the electron density. The propagation characteristics of the pulses are such as to result in a steepening of the boundary of the lower ionosphere

  12. Interaction with the lower ionosphere of electromagnetic pulses from lightning - Heating, attachment, and ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranenko, Y. N.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    A Boltzmann formulation of the electron distribution function and Maxwell's equations for the EM fields are used to simulate the interaction of lightning radiated EM pulses with the lower ionosphere. Ionization and dissociative attachment induced by the heated electrons cause significant changes in the local electron density, N(e). Due to 'slow' field changes of typical lightning EM pulses over time scales of tens of microsec, the distribution function follows the quasi-equilibrium solution of the Boltzmann equation in the altitude range of interest (70 to 100 km). The EM pulse is simulated as a planar 100 microsec long single period oscillation of a 10 kHz wave injected at 70 km. Under nighttime conditions, individual pulses of intensity 10-20 V/m (normalized to 100 km horizontal distance) produce changes in N(e) of 1-30 percent while a sequence of pulses leads to strong modification of N(e) at altitudes less than 95 km. The N(e) changes produce a 'sharpening' of the lower ionospheric boundary by causing a reduction in electron density at 75-85 km (due to attachment) and a substantial increase at 85-95 km (due to ionization) (e.g., the scale height decreases by a factor of about 2 at about 85 km for a single 20 V/m EM pulse). No substantial N(e) changes occur during daytime.

  13. Rotating crystal pulse shaper for use on a pulsed neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.M.; Carlile, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    A pulse shortening device is described for use on pulsed thermal neutron sources. The device employs rotating single crystals and has applications in the design of high resolution cold neutron spectrometers

  14. Effect of laser pulse energies in laser induced breakdown spectroscopy in double-pulse configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetti, P.A.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Pardini, L.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of laser pulse energy on double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal is studied. In particular, the energy of the first pulse has been changed, while the second pulse energy is held fixed. A systematic study of the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal dependence on the interpulse delay is performed, and the results are compared with the ones obtained with a single laser pulse of energy corresponding to the sum of the two pulses. At the same time, the crater formed at the target surface is studied by video-confocal microscopy, and the variation in crater dimensions is correlated to the enhancement of the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal. The results obtained are consistent with the interpretation of the double-pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy signal enhancement in terms of the changes in ambient gas pressure produced by the shock wave induced by the first laser pulse

  15. Neural mechanisms of sequence generation in songbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Bruce

    Animal models in research are useful for studying more complex behavior. For example, motor sequence generation of actions requiring good muscle coordination such as writing with a pen, playing an instrument, or speaking, may involve the interaction of many areas in the brain, each a complex system in itself; thus it can be difficult to determine causal relationships between neural behavior and the behavior being studied. Birdsong, however, provides an excellent model behavior for motor sequence learning, memory, and generation. The song consists of learned sequences of notes that are spectrographically stereotyped over multiple renditions of the song, similar to syllables in human speech. The main areas of the songbird brain involve in singing are known, however, the mechanisms by which these systems store and produce song are not well understood. We used a custom built, head-mounted, miniature motorized microdrive to chronically record the neural firing patterns of identified neurons in HVC, a pre-motor cortical nucleus which has been shown to be important in song timing. These were done in Bengalese finch which generate a song made up of stereotyped notes but variable note sequences. We observed song related bursting in neurons projecting to Area X, a homologue to basal ganglia, and tonic firing in HVC interneurons. Interneuron had firing rate patterns that were consistent over multiple renditions of the same note sequence. We also designed and built a light-weight, low-powered wireless programmable neural stimulator using Bluetooth Low Energy Protocol. It was able to generate perturbations in the song when current pulses were administered to RA, which projects to the brainstem nucleus responsible for syringeal muscle control.

  16. Efficient chirped-pulse amplification of sub-20 fs laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Shinichi; Yamakawa, Koichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    We have developed a model for ultrabroadband and ultrashort pulse amplification including the effects of a pulse shaper for regenerative pulse shaping, gain narrowing and gain saturation in the amplifiers. Thin solid etalons are used to control both gain narrowing and gain saturation during amplification. This model has been used to design an optimized Ti:sapphire amplifier system for producing efficiently pulses of < 20-fs duration with approaching peak and average powers of 100 TW and 20 W. (author)

  17. Pulse synchronization system for picosecond pulse-pumped OPCPA with femtosecond-level relative timing jitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batysta, František; Antipenkov, Roman; Green, Jonathan T; Naylon, Jack A; Novák, Jakub; Mazanec, Tomáš; Hříbek, Petr; Zervos, Charalampos; Bakule, Pavel; Rus, Bedřich

    2014-12-01

    A simple and compact scheme for synchronization of the pump and signal pulses for short-pulse OPCPA is demonstrated. Relative timing jitter of 17 fs RMS is achieved (1% of the pump pulse duration) and the system remains locked for hours. The scheme uses a balanced optical cross correlator to detect relative delays between the pump and signal pulses and can be operated with just 10's of μJ of pump energy and pJ-level signal energies.

  18. Fiber Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification of Sub-Picosecond Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Da Ros, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification of 400-fs pulses. The 400-fs signal is stretched, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs.......We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification of 400-fs pulses. The 400-fs signal is stretched, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs....

  19. Few-cycle isolated attosecond pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansone, G.; Benedetti, E.; Calegari, F.; Stagira, S.; Vozzi, C.; Silvestri De, S.; Nisoli, M.

    2006-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. In the last few years the field of attosecond science has shown impressive and rapid progress, mainly due to the introduction of novel experimental methods for the characterization of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses and attosecond electron wave packets. This development has been also triggered by significant improvements in the control of the electric field of the driving infrared pulses. Particularly interesting for the applications is the generation of isolated attosecond XUV pulses using few-cycle driving pulses. In this case significant progresses have been achieved thanks to the stabilization of the carrier-envelope phase (CEP) of amplified light pulses. In this work we demonstrate that the polarization gating (PG) method with few-cycle phase-stabilized driving pulses allows one to generate few-cycle isolated attosecond pulses tunable on a very broad spectral region. The PG method is based on temporal modulation of the ellipticity of a light pulse, which confines the XUV emission in the temporal gate where the polarization is close to linear. The time-dependent polarization of phase-stabilized sub-6-fs pulses, generated by the hollow fiber technique, has been obtained using two birefringent plates. It is possible to create a linear polarization gate, whose position is imposed by the intensity profile of the pulse whilst the emission time is linked to the CEP of the electric field. The pulses have been analyzed by using a flat-field spectrometer. Continuous XUV spectra, corresponding to the production of isolated attosecond pulses, have been generated for particular CEP values. Upon changing the rotation of the first plate it was possible to tune the XUV emission in a broad spectra range. We have then achieved a complete temporal characterization of the generated isolated attosecond pulses using frequency-resolved optical gating for complete reconstruction of attosecond bursts (FROG CRAB). The measured parabolic phase

  20. Pulsed irradiation of enriched UO2 in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.R.; Lucoff, D.M.; Reil, K.O.; Croucher, D.W.

    1974-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) to determine the energy deposition and behavior of enriched UO 2 under pulse conditions. In the experiment single unirradiated pellets with enrichments up to 25 percent were pulse heated to melt temperatures. Temperature and fission product inventory measurements were made and compared with neutron transport calculations. (author)

  1. Characterization and modulation of femtosecond laser pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorrer, Christophe

    1999-01-01

    This work brings some solutions to the characterization and control of femtosecond laser pulses. Spectral interferometry has been extensively studied; whereas this is a rather old technique, it has found new specific applications to short pulses. Several important points concerning the experimental implementation of this technique are treated. Sources of errors have been tracked and simple solutions have been found to enhance its reliability. A recently demonstrated technique for the complete characterization of short pulses has been used to characterize short pulses from Chirped Pulse Amplification Systems. This transposition of shearing interferometry to the optical frequency domain, known as Spectral Phase Interferometry for Direct Electric-field Reconstruction (SPlDER), is conceptually very interesting: for example, the inversion from the experimental data to the electric field to be characterized is completely algebraic. A reliable tool for the characterization and optimization of Chirped pulse amplification systems has been built on this principle. This is the first single-shot real-time characterization implementation of this technique. An improvement of the method has also allowed the first single-shot real-time characterization of a short pulse using a single mono-dimensional integrative detector and an algebraic inversion of the experimental data. The control of these pulses is also of prior interest. Through a collaboration with Thomson CSF-LCR, the demonstration of the use of an optically addressed light valve at the Fourier plane of a zero-dispersion line for spectral phase modulation has been made. This device allows a high-resolution control of the spectral phase of a short pulse. It is a well-adapted tool for the correction of the residual spectral phase, at the output of Chirped Pulse Amplification systems and the temporal synthesis of shaped pulses for specific experiments. (author) [fr

  2. Adaptive Processing for Sequence Alignment

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2012-01-26

    Disclosed are various embodiments for adaptive processing for sequence alignment. In one embodiment, among others, a method includes obtaining a query sequence and a plurality of database sequences. A first portion of the plurality of database sequences is distributed to a central processing unit (CPU) and a second portion of the plurality of database sequences is distributed to a graphical processing unit (GPU) based upon a predetermined splitting ratio associated with the plurality of database sequences, where the database sequences of the first portion are shorter than the database sequences of the second portion. A first alignment score for the query sequence is determined with the CPU based upon the first portion of the plurality of database sequences and a second alignment score for the query sequence is determined with the GPU based upon the second portion of the plurality of database sequences.

  3. Neutron diffraction on pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksenov, V.L.; Balagurov, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The possibilities currently offered and major scientific problems solved by time-of-flight neutron diffraction are reviewed. The reasons for the rapid development of the method over the last two decades has been mainly the emergence of third generation pulsed sources with a MW time-averaged power and advances in neutron-optical devices and detector systems. The paper discusses some historical aspects of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and examines the contribution to this method by F.L.Shapiro whose 100th birth anniversary was celebrated in 2015. The state of the art with respect to neutron sources for studies on output beams is reviewed in a special section. [ru

  4. Ultrasonic thermometry using pulse techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnworth, L. C.; Carnevale, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Ultrasonic pulse techniques have been developed which, when applied to inert gases, provide temperature measurements up to 8000 K. The response time can be less than 1 msec. This is a significant feature in studying shock-heated or combusting gases. Using a momentary contact coupling technique, temperature has been measured inside steel from 300 to 1500 K. Thin-wire sensors have been used above 2000 K in nuclear and industrial applications where conditions preclude the use of thermocouples, resistance devices, or optical pyrometers. At 2500 K, temperature sensitivity of 0.1% is obtained in Re wire sensors 5 cm long by timing five round trips with an electronic instrument that resolves the time interval between selected echoes to 0.1 microsec. Sensors have been operated at rotational speeds over 2000 rpm and in noisy environments. Temperature profiling of up to ten regions using only a single guided path or beam has also been accomplished.

  5. TRAPMELT/PULSE users' manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagrman, D.L.

    1990-02-01

    This report is the users's manual for the TRAPMELT/PULSE computer code. The code is designed to calculate fission product transport and disposition when slug flow is a more appropriate approximation than a collection of well-mixed volumes connected by junctions. The name of the code was selected to acknowledge that the original version was based upon models used in the TRAPMELT 2.0 code. However, the coding was been completely redesigned for slug flow and for improved efficiency. Like TRAPMELT, the calculations assume five states. These states are vapor, aerosol, particles, condensed on surfaces, chemisorbed on surfaces, and aerosol particles deposited on surfaces. Mass transport of up to ten chemical species between the various states as an effluent slug proceeds down system piping is calculated. 29 refs

  6. Academic Training - Pulsed SC Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 2, 3, June 29, 30, 31 May, 1, 2 June 11:00-12:00 - Auditorium, bldg 500 Pulsed SC Magnets by M. Wilson Lecture 1. Introduction to Superconducting Materials Type 1,2 and high temperature superconductors; their critical temperature, field & current density. Persistent screening currents and the critical state model. Lecture 2. Magnetization and AC Loss How screening currents cause irreversible magnetization and hysteresis loops. Field errors caused by screening currents. Flux jumping. The general formulation of ac loss in terms of magnetization. AC losses caused by screening currents. Lecture 3. Twisted Wires and Cables Filamentary composite wires and the losses caused by coupling currents between filaments, the need for twisting. Why we need cables and how the coupling currents in cables contribute more ac loss. Field errors caused by coupling currents. Lecture 4. AC Losses in Magnets, Cooling and Measurement Summary of all loss mech...

  7. The Body as a Pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Liberman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The body is the focus of many studies and interventions. Some paradigms conceptualize the body only in relation to its motor-sensory characteristics, while others prioritize its psychological dimensions. With the aim of contributing towards formulating other perspectives within this field, some aspects of Stanley Keleman and Regina Favre's conceptualization of the body are presented here. Starting from clinical situations during seminar groups, we can take the body to be a multifaceted multimedia pulse that is continually [de]constructed through encounters. Together with the author's clinical experiences as an occupational therapist and teacher or undergraduates, these conceptualizations serve as a guide to clinical practice that is thought out, constructed and balanced by the body, using body approaches to promote encounters molded by affections and events, in an attempt to create bodies capable of sustaining the lived intensity of experiences, and which enable self-observation, closeness to other people and production of singularities.

  8. RANCHERO explosive pulsed power experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Goforth, J H; Armijo, E V; Atchison, W L; Bartos, Yu; Clark, D A; Day, R D; Deninger, W J; Faehl, R J; Fowler, C M; García, F P; García, O F; Herrera, D H; Herrera, T J; Keinigs, R K; King, J C; Lindemuth, I R; López, E; Martínez, E C; Martínez, D; McGuire, J A; Morgan, D; Oona, H; Oro, D M; Parker, J V; Randolph, R B; Reinovsky, R E; Rodríguez, G; Stokes, J L; Sena, F C; Tabaka, L J; Tasker, D G; Taylor, A J; Torres, D T; Anderson, H D; Broste, W B; Johnson, J B; Kirbie, H C

    1999-01-01

    The authors are developing the RANCHERO high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) system to power cylindrically imploding solid-density liners for hydrodynamics experiments. Their near-term goal is to conduct experiments in the regime pertinent to the Atlas capacitor bank. That is, they will attempt to implode liners of ~50 g mass at velocities approaching 15 km/sec. The basic building block of the HEPP system is a coaxial generator with a 304.8 mm diameter stator, and an initial armature diameter of 152 mm. The armature is expanded by a high explosive (HE) charge detonated simultaneously along its axis. The authors have reported a variety of experiments conducted with generator modules 43 cm long and have presented an initial design for hydrodynamic liner experiments. In this paper, they give a synopsis of their first system test, and a status report on the development of a generator module that is 1.4 m long. (6 refs).

  9. Maximum likelihood estimation of the attenuated ultrasound pulse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Klaus Bolding

    1994-01-01

    The attenuated ultrasound pulse is divided into two parts: a stationary basic pulse and a nonstationary attenuation pulse. A standard ARMA model is used for the basic pulse, and a nonstandard ARMA model is derived for the attenuation pulse. The maximum likelihood estimator of the attenuated...

  10. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantus, Marcos [Okemos, MI; Lozovoy, Vadim V [Okemos, MI; Comstock, Matthew [Milford, MI

    2009-10-27

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  11. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... that the minimum number of genes from each species that need to be compared to produce a reliable phylogeny is about 20. Yeast has also become an attractive model to study speciation in eukaryotes, especially to understand molecular mechanisms behind the establishment of reproductive isolation. Comparison...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  12. Pulsed power liner for PLT energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armellino, C.A.; Bronner, G.; Murray, J.G.

    1975-01-01

    PLT is Princeton University's latest Tokamak machine in the controlled thermonuclear fusion research effort. The OH (ohmic heating) and SF (shaping field) systems for the machine place a very high energy pulsed current load on the AC line feeding them. This paper describes the two systems and the steps taken to insure minimum effect on line regulation during the pulsed operation

  13. Pulsed electric field inactivation in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a novel, non-thermal pasteurization method which uses short, high electric field pulses to inactivate microorganisms. The advantage of a pasteurization method like PEF compared to regular heat pasteurization is that the taste, flavour, texture and nutritional value

  14. Low power arcjet thruster pulse ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Charles J.; Gruber, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation of the pulse ignition characteristics of a 1 kW class arcjet using an inductive energy storage pulse generator with a pulse width modulated power converter identified several thruster and pulse generator parameters that influence breakdown voltage including pulse generator rate of voltage rise. This work was conducted with an arcjet tested on hydrogen-nitrogen gas mixtures to simulate fully decomposed hydrazine. Over all ranges of thruster and pulser parameters investigated, the mean breakdown voltages varied from 1.4 to 2.7 kV. Ignition tests at elevated thruster temperatures under certain conditions revealed occasional breakdowns to thruster voltages higher than the power converter output voltage. These post breakdown discharges sometimes failed to transition to the lower voltage arc discharge mode and the thruster would not ignite. Under the same conditions, a transition to the arc mode would occur for a subsequent pulse and the thruster would ignite. An automated 11 600 cycle starting and transition to steady state test demonstrated ignition on the first pulse and required application of a second pulse only two times to initiate breakdown.

  15. Pulsed power supply for injection bump magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praeg, W.F.

    1977-01-01

    A very precise and relatively inexpensive charging circuit for an energy storage capacitor bank feeds an efficient thyristor-controlled pulse-forming discharge circuit. These circuits, which generate magnet pulses of 300 joules at a rate of 30 per second, are analyzed

  16. Nasal pulse oximetry overestimates oxygen saturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, M H

    1990-01-01

    Ten surgical patients were monitored with nasal and finger pulse oximetry (Nellcor N-200) for five study periods with alternating mouth and nasal breathing and switching of cables and sensors. Nasal pulse oximetry was found to overestimate arterial oxygen saturation by 4.7 (SD 1.4%) (bias...

  17. The communicative potential of bat echolocation pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gareth; Siemers, Björn M

    2011-05-01

    Ecological constraints often shape the echolocation pulses emitted by bat species. Consequently some (but not all) bats emit species-specific echolocation pulses. Because echolocation pulses are often intense and emitted at high rates, they are potential targets for eavesdropping by other bats. Echolocation pulses can also vary within species according to sex, body size, age, social group and geographic location. Whether these features can be recognised by other bats can only be determined reliably by playback experiments, which have shown that echolocation pulses do provide sufficient information for the identification of sex and individual in one species. Playbacks also show that bats can locate conspecifics and heterospecifics at foraging and roost sites by eavesdropping on echolocation pulses. Guilds of echolocating bat species often partition their use of pulse frequencies. Ecology, allometric scaling and phylogeny play roles here, but are not sufficient to explain this partitioning. Evidence is accumulating to support the hypothesis that frequency partitioning evolved to facilitate intraspecific communication. Acoustic character displacement occurs in at least one instance. Future research can relate genetic population structure to regional variation in echolocation pulse features and elucidate those acoustic features that most contribute to discrimination of individuals.

  18. Pulsed laser deposition: metal versus oxide ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doeswijk, L.M.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.; Blank, David H.A.

    2004-01-01

    We present experimental results of pulsed laser interaction with metal (Ni, Fe, Nb) and oxide (TiO2, SrTiO3, BaTiO3) targets. The influence of the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses on the resulting target morphology are discussed. Although different responses for metal and oxide targets

  19. Selective brain stimulation using conditioning pulses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holsheimer, J.

    2005-01-01

    A system and method is described for preferentially stimulating dorsal column fibers while avoiding stimulation of dorsal root fibers. The invention applies hyperpolarizing (anodic) pre-pulses (HPP) and depolarizing (cathodic) pre-pulses (DPP) to neural tissue, such as spinal cord tissue, through a

  20. Plasma response to transient high voltage pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The solitary electron holes are reviewed for positive pulsed bias to the electrode. Also the excitation of waves (solitary electron and ion holes) is reviewed for a metallic electrode covered by a dielectric material. The wave excitation during and after the pulse withdrawal, excitation and propagation characteristics of various ...

  1. Nova pulse power system description and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, R.W.; Whitham, K.; Merritt, B.T.; Gritton, D.G.; Oicles, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    The Nova laser system is designed to produce critical data in the nation's inertial confinement fusion effort. It is the world's largest peak power laser and presents various unique pulse power problems. In this paper, pulse power systems for this laser are described, the evolutionary points from prior systems are pointed out, and the current status of the hardware is given

  2. Field mapping of ballistic pressure pulse sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rad Abtin Jamshidi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ballistic pressure pulse sources are used since late 1990s for the extracorporeal treatment of chronic Enthesitis. Newly indications are found in trigger-point-therapy for the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. In both applications excellent results without relevant side effects were found in clinical trials. The technical principle of pressure pulse source is based on the same techniques used in air guns. A projectile is accelerated by pressurized air and hits the applicator with high kinetic energy. By this a compression wave travels through the material and induces a fast (4..5μs, almost singular pressure pulse of 2..10 MPa, which is followed by an equally short rarefaction phase of about the same amplitude. It is assumed that the pressure pulse accounts for the biomedical effects of the device. The slower inertial motion of the waveguide is damped by elastic stoppers, but still can be measured several micro seconds after the initial pressure pulse. In order to characterize the pressure pulse devices, field mapping is performed on several radial pressure pulse sources using the fiber optic hydrophone and a polyvinylidenfluorid (PVDF piezoelectric hydrophone. It could be shown that the current standard (IEC 61846 is not appropriate for characterization of ballistic pressure pulse sources.

  3. Influence of pulse electrodeposition parameters on microhardness ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and fine globular. Also, effect of electrodeposition parameters such as average current density, pulse frequency and duty cycle on the microhardness and grain size of nanocomposite coatings that produced through the pulse current electrodeposition method have been investigated. By amplifying both duty cycles up to 50% ...

  4. Pulse X-radiation in flaw detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavilov, S.P.; Gorbunov, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Principles of physical and engineering application of pulse X-radiation (PXR) of micro- and nanosecond duration for nondestructive testing of processes, materials and devices are given. Methods and devices, aimed at generating X-ray pulses, as well as their radiation and flow detection characteristics, and testing methods by means of PXR are considered

  5. Fast Heat Pulse Propagation by Turbulence Spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Mantica, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of a cold pulse initiated by edge cooling in JET is compared to propagation of the heat wave originating from a modulation of the heating source roughly at mid radius. It is found that the propagation of the cold pulse is by far faster than what could be predicted on the basis of ...

  6. Thermodynamic analysis of a pulse tube engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldenhauer, Stefan; Thess, André; Holtmann, Christoph; Fernández-Aballí, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Numerical model of the pulse tube engine process. ► Proof that the heat transfer in the pulse tube is out of phase with the gas velocity. ► Proof that a free piston operation is possible. ► Clarifying the thermodynamic working principle of the pulse tube engine. ► Studying the influence of design parameters on the engine performance. - Abstract: The pulse tube engine is an innovative simple heat engine based on the pulse tube process used in cryogenic cooling applications. The working principle involves the conversion of applied heat energy into mechanical power, thereby enabling it to be used for electrical power generation. Furthermore, this device offers an opportunity for its wide use in energy harvesting and waste heat recovery. A numerical model has been developed to study the thermodynamic cycle and thereby help to design an experimental engine. Using the object-oriented modeling language Modelica, the engine was divided into components on which the conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy were applied. These components were linked via exchanged mass and enthalpy. The resulting differential equations for the thermodynamic properties were integrated numerically. The model was validated using the measured performance of a pulse tube engine. The transient behavior of the pulse tube engine’s underlying thermodynamic properties could be evaluated and studied under different operating conditions. The model was used to explore the pulse tube engine process and investigate the influence of design parameters.

  7. Plastic scintillator with small pulse duration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeshchev, E.A.; Kilin, S.F.; Kovyrzina, K.A.; Kushakevich, Yu.P.; Rozman, I.M.; Shoniya, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    Characteristics of plastic scintillators with small pulse duration are analysed. For manufacturing the latter two methods of quencher introduction are applied: into the scintillator composition and the molecule of luminescent addition. The second method turned to be more effective. The pulse duration < 0.5 nc is attained

  8. An improved rolled strip pulse forming line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Qian, Bao-Liang; Yang, Han-Wu; Gao, Jing-Ming; Liu, Zhao-Xi

    2013-06-01

    The rolled strip pulse forming line (RSPFL) has advantages of compactness, portability, and long pulse achievability which could well meet the requirements of industrial application of the pulse power technology. In this paper, an improved RSPFL with an additional insulator between the grounded conductors is investigated numerically and experimentally. Results demonstrate that the jitter on the flat-top of the output voltage waveform is reduced to 3.8% due to the improved structure. Theoretical analysis shows that the electromagnetic coupling between the conductors of the RSPFL strongly influences the output voltage waveform. Therefore, the new structure was designed to minimize the detrimental effect of the electromagnetic coupling. Simulation results show that the electromagnetic coupling can be efficiently reduced in the improved RSPFL. Experimental results illustrate that the improved RSPFL, with dimensions and weight of Φ 290 × 250 mm and 16 kg, when used as a simple pulse forming line, could generate a well shaped quasi-square pulse with output power of hundreds of MW and pulse duration of 250 ns. Importantly, the improved RSPFL was successfully used as a Blumlein pulse forming line, and a 10.8 kV, 260 ns quasi-square pulse was obtained on a 2 Ω dummy load. Experiments show reasonable agreement with numerical analysis.

  9. Extruded dry bean and other pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrusion is used commercially to produce high value breakfast and snack foods based on cereals such as wheat or corn. However, this processing method is not being commercially used for legume pulses seeds due to the perception that they do not expand well in extrusion. Extrusion cooking of pulses (...

  10. Accuracy of pulse oximetry in pigmented patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for stabilisation of pulse oximeter readings. Once adequate signals were recorded, an arterial blood sample was taken for immediate co-oximetry. At the same time the four pulse oximeter readings were recorded. Bias (mean of differences) and limits of agreement. (accuracy), defined as mean of differences ± 2 SO, between.

  11. Spectral Lag Evolution among -Ray Burst Pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We analyse the spectral lag evolution of -ray burst (GRB) pulses with observations by CGRO/BATSE. No universal spectral lag evolution feature and pulse luminosity-lag relation within a GRB is observed.Our results suggest that the spectral lag would be due to radiation physics and dynamics of a given ...

  12. Observation of pulsed neutron Ramsey resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)]. E-mail: yasuhiro.masuda@kek.jp; Skoy, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Reasearch, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ino, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Jeong, S.C. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Watanabe, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    A Ramsey resonance for pulsed neutrons was observed. The separated oscillatory fields for nuclear magnetic resonance were synchronized with a neutron pulse, and then the Ramsey resonance was observed as a function of the neutron velocity. The phase of one of the oscillatory fields was modulated as a function of the neutron time of flight for a neutron velocity measurement.

  13. Quantum Computation with Ultrafast Laser Pulse Shaping

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum Computation with Ultrafast. Laser Pulse Shaping. Debabrata Goswami is at the Department of. Chemistry, Indian. Institute of Technology,. Kanpur, where he explores the applications of ultrafast shaped pulses to bio-imaging, coherent control, high-speed communication and quantum computing. Keywords. Qubit ...

  14. High reliability low jitter pulse generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Mark E.; Stoltzfus, Brian S.

    2013-01-01

    A method and concomitant apparatus for generating pulses comprising providing a laser light source, disposing a voltage electrode between ground electrodes, generating laser sparks using the laser light source via laser spark gaps between the voltage electrode and the ground electrodes, and outputting pulses via one or more insulated ground connectors connected to the voltage electrode.

  15. Short-pulse chemical beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Suian; Cui, Jie; Aoyagi, Yoshinobu (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan)); Tanaka, Akihiko (Bentec Co., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-03-10

    Short-pulse chemical beam epitaxy has been proposed and studied. The short pulses with supersonic characteristics and a width of milliseconds were generated by high speed valves and the related pumping lines on a purpose-built CBE system. Using a time-of-fight technique, we verified the dependence of pulse properties on the source pressures and the valve on-time. The results indicate that modulation of molecular kinetic energy and accurate control of molecule supply were obtained. GaAs epitaxial growth with use of trimethylgallium pulses was carried out and investigated by means of RHEED (reflection high-energy electron diffraction) observation. It was demonstrated that the newly developed short-pulse chemical beam epitaxy has the advantage of high controllability

  16. Argonne National Laboratory superconducting pulsed coil program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kim, S.H.

    1979-01-01

    The main objectives are to develop high current (approx. 100 kA) cryostable cable configurations with reasonably low ac losses, to build a demonstration pulsed coil, and to develop a rather inexpensive large fiberglass reinforced helium cryostat. A 1.5-MJ cryostable pulsed superconducting coil has been developed and constructed at ANL. The coil has a peak field of 4.5 T at an operating current of 11.0 kA. A large inexpensive plastic cryostat has been developed for testing the pulsed coil. The coil has been pulsed with a maximum dB/dt of 11 T/s. The coil was pulsed more than 4000 cycles. Detailed results of the ac loss measurements and the current sharing of the cryostability will be described

  17. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  18. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm/sup -1/ and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm/sup -1/, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  19. Analysis of picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M.S.; Huang, C.Y.; Malvezzi, A.M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-01-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm -1 and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm -1 , the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nonosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence

  20. Generation of Femtosecond Electron and Photon Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Thongbai, Chitrlada; Kangrang, Nopadol; Kusoljariyakul, Keerati; Rhodes, Michael W; Rimjaem, Sakhorn; Saisut, Jatuporn; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Wichaisirimongkol, Pathom; Wiedemann, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Femtosecond electron and photon pulses become a tool of interesting important to study dynamics at molecular or atomic levels. Such short pulses can be generated from a system consisting of an RF-gun with a thermionic cathode, an alpha magnet as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator. The femtosecond electron pulses can be used directly or used as sources to produce electromagnetic radiation of equally short pulses by choosing certain kind of radiation pruduction processes. At the Fast Neutron Research Facility (Thailand), we are especially interested in production of radiation in Far-infrared and X-ray regime. In the far-infrared wavelengths which are longer than the femtosecond pulse length, the radiation is emitted coherently producing intense radiation. In the X-ray regime, development of femtosecond X-ray source is crucial for application in ultrafast science.