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Sample records for noncommunicable disease mortality

  1. Reducing premature mortality from non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Christi

    2017-04-19

    Cardiovascular disease and other non-communicable diseases, such as diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory disease, are a leading cause of premature death and disability worldwide. This article emphasises the importance of prevention in reducing death and disability from preventable non-communicable diseases, especially for individuals with established risk factors for these diseases. It reviews global initiatives to reduce morality rates from these diseases, identifies opportunities for nurses and other healthcare professionals to discuss risk factors with patients, and provides practical suggestions on how to provide advice on healthy lifestyles and enable behaviour change.

  2. Inequalities in noncommunicable disease mortality in the ten largest Japanese cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Megumi; Hotta, Miyuki; Prasad, Amit

    2013-12-01

    The burden of noncommunicable diseases and social inequalities in health among urban populations is becoming a common problem around the world. This phenomenon is further compounded by population aging. Japan faces the task of maintaining its high level of population health while dealing with these challenges. This study focused on the ten largest cities in Japan and, using publicly available administrative data, analyzed standardized mortality ratios to examine inequalities in relative mortality levels due to major noncommunicable disease at both city and subcity levels. On average, the ten major cities had excess mortality due to cancer and lower mortality due to heart disease and cerebrovascular disease compared to the country as a whole. Substantial inequalities in relative mortality were observed both between and within cities, especially for heart disease and cerebrovascular disease among men. Inequalities in relative mortality levels within cities appear to be increasing over time even while relative mortality levels are decreasing overall. The widely observed health inequalities signal the need for actions to ensure health equity while addressing the burden of noncommunicable diseases. Increasingly, more countries will have to deal with these challenges of inequity, urbanization, aging, and noncommunicable diseases. Local health governance informed by locally specific data on health determinants and outcomes is essential for developing contextualized interventions to improve health and health equity in major urban areas.

  3. Income Inequality in Non-communicable Diseases Mortality among the Regions of the Slovak Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavurová, Beáta; Kováč, Viliam; Šoltés, Michal; Kot, Sebastian; Majerník, Jaroslav

    2017-12-01

    A great amount of non-communicable disease deaths poses a threat for all people and therefore represents the challenge for health policy makers, health providers and other health or social policy actors. The aim of this study is to analyse regional differences in non-communicable disease mortality in the Slovak Republic, and to quantify the relationship between mortality and economic indicators of the Slovak regions. Standardised mortality rates adjusted for age, sex, region, and period were calculated applying direct standardisation methods with the European standard population covering the time span from 2005 to 2013. The impact of income indicators on standardised mortality rates was calculated using the panel regression models. The Bratislava region reaches the lowest values of standardised mortality rate for non-communicable diseases for both sexes. On the other side, the Nitra region has the highest standardised mortality rate for non-communicable diseases. Income quintile ratio has the highest effect on mortality, however, the expected positive impact is not confirmed. Gini coefficient at the 0.001 significance level and social benefits at the 0.01 significance level look like the most influencing variables on the standardised mortality rate. By addition of one percentage point of Gini coefficient, mortality rate increases by 148.19 units. When a share of population receiving social benefits increases by one percentage point, the standardised mortality rate will increase by 22.36 units. Non-communicable disease mortality together with income inequalities among the regions of the Slovak Republic highlight the importance of economic impact on population health. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2017.

  4. Emerging trends in non-communicable disease mortality in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stroke was the leading NCD cause of death, accounting for 17.5% of total NCD deaths. Compared with those for whites, NCD mortality rates for other population groups were higher at 1.3 for black Africans, 1.4 for Indians and 1.4 for coloureds, but varied by condition. Conclusions. NCDs contribute to premature mortality in ...

  5. Socioeconomic inequalities in premature mortality in Colombia, 1998-2007: The double burden of non-communicable diseases and injuries

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    I. Arroyave (Ivan); A. Burdorf (Alex); D. Cardona (Doris); M. Avendano Pabon (Mauricio)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: Non-communicable diseases have become the leading cause of death in middle-income countries, but mortality from injuries and infections remains high. We examined the contribution of specific causes to disparities in adult premature mortality (ages 25-64) by educational level

  6. [Trend of premature mortality from chronic and non-communicable diseases in Tianjin, 1999-2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D Z; Zhang, H; Xu, Z L; Song, G D; Zhang, Y; Shen, C F; Zhang, S; Xue, X D; Wang, C; Jiang, G H

    2017-12-10

    Objective: To explore the trends and distribution of premature mortality caused by four main non-communicable diseases (NCDs) including cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory disease and diabetes in different sex and residential areas in Tianjin so as to provide basis for setting up prevention and control programs on premature mortality. Methods: Population data on premature mortality in 1999-2015 were from the 'Tianjin population based mortality surveillance system' maintained by Tianjin Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data related to permanent residents was from the Tianjin Municipal Public Security Bureau. Standardized premature mortality rates were calculated and adjusted for age and gender according to the '2000 world standard population'. Premature mortality probabilities were analyzed according to the methods recommended by WHO. Joinpoint regression and Cochran-Armitage trend methods were used to determine the significance of differences on the trends of mortality. Results: From 1999 to 2015, the premature mortality appeared consistent ( P diseases with the APC of probabilities as-2.92%, -1.13%, -9.51% and -3.39%, respectively. The probabilities of premature mortality were all declining consistently in both men and women and in both urban and rural areas in Tianjin. From 1999 to 2015, the probabilities of the four main NCDs were between 19.67% and 12.85% (APC=-2.49%, P <0.001), higher in women (from 17.02% to 9.17%, APC=-3.84%, P <0.001) than that in men (from 22.27% to 16.47%, APC=-1.59%, P <0.001), in urban (from 21.04% to 12.34%, APC=-3.26%, P <0.001) than that in rural areas (from 17.80% to 13.54%, APC=-1.54%, P <0.001). Conclusion: Our findings suggested that premature mortality in Tianjin was decreasing during 1999-2015 but attention should still be called for on males and people living in the rural areas to further reducing the premature mortality.

  7. Trends in major risk factors and mortality from main non-communicable diseases in Lithuania, 1985-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Klumbiene, Jurate; Petkeviciene, Janina; Radisauskas, Ricardas; Vikhireva, Olga; Luksiene, Dalia; Virviciute, Dalia

    2016-08-04

    This study aimed to assess the trends in the prevalence and levels of risk factors and mortality from main non-communicable diseases in the Lithuanian population aged 45-64 years during 1985 to 2013. Data from four general population surveys conducted between 1985 and 2008 were used. All these surveys were carried out in Kaunas city and five randomly selected municipalities of Lithuania. Risk factors measured at each survey included regular smoking, overweight, obesity, arterial hypertension, and high levels of blood lipids. In total, data of 10,719 subjects (4,965 men and 5,754 women) aged 45-64 were analysed. Trends in standardized all-cause mortality and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD), coronary heart disease (CHD), and malignant neoplasms were estimated for both sexes by joinpoint regression analysis. In 1985-2013, some favourable trends were observed in the age-standardized mean levels and prevalence of risk factors and mortality from main non-communicable diseases in the Lithuanian middle-aged population. The mean values of blood lipids (with the exception of triglycerides) and the prevalence of dyslipidemias declined. In women, mean levels of systolic blood pressure and body mass index decreased, while in men, the levels of these factors increased. The prevalence of arterial hypertension and obesity increased in men. The proportion of obese women decreased. Smoking prevalence increased in both men and women. From 2007 to 2008, significant downward trends, which were steeper in women than in men, were observed in all-cause, CVD, and CHD mortality. Despite the favourable changes in some risk factors and mortality rates, the prevalence of risk factors and mortality from main non-communicable diseases in Lithuania are still high. This indicates the importance of the ongoing primary and secondary prevention and optimal treatment of these diseases.

  8. Urbanization and non-communicable disease mortality in Thailand: an ecological correlation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angkurawaranon, Chaisiri; Wattanatchariya, Nisit; Doyle, Pat; Nitsch, Dorothea

    2013-02-01

    This study provides strong evidence from an LMIC that urbanization is associated with mortality from three lifestyle-associated diseases at an ecological level. Furthermore, our data suggest that both average household income and number of doctors per population are important factors to consider in ecological analyses of mortality. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Non-communicable diseases in emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demaio, Alessandro; Jamieson, Jennifer; Horn, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have demonstrated the devastating health consequences of complex emergencies and natural disasters and thereby highlighted the importance of comprehensive and collaborative approaches to humanitarian responses and risk reduction. Simultaneously, noncommunicable diseases are now...... recognised as a real and growing threat to population health and development; a threat that is magnified by and during emergencies. Noncommunicable diseases, however, continue to receive little attention from humanitarian organisations in the acute phase of disaster and emergency response. This paper calls...... on all sectors to recognise and address the specific health challenges posed by noncommunicable diseases in emergencies and disaster situations. This publication aims to highlight the need for: • Increased research on morbidity and mortality patterns due to noncommunicable diseases during and following...

  10. National mortality burden due to communicable, non-communicable, and other diseases in Ethiopia, 1990-2015: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misganaw, Awoke; Haregu, Tilahun N; Deribe, Kebede; Tessema, Gizachew Assefa; Deribew, Amare; Melaku, Yohannes Adama; Amare, Azmeraw T; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Gedefaw, Molla; Dessalegn, Muluken; Lakew, Yihunie; Bekele, Tolesa; Mohammed, Mesoud; Yirsaw, Biruck Desalegn; Damtew, Solomon Abrha; Krohn, Kristopher J; Achoki, Tom; Blore, Jed; Assefa, Yibeltal; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Ethiopia lacks a complete vital registration system that would assist in measuring disease burden and risk factors. We used the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015) estimates to describe the mortality burden from communicable, non-communicable, and other diseases in Ethiopia over the last 25 years. GBD 2015 mainly used cause of death ensemble modeling to measure causes of death by age, sex, and year for 195 countries. We report numbers of deaths and rates of years of life lost (YLL) for communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional (CMNN) disorders, non-communicable diseases (NCDs), and injuries with 95% uncertainty intervals (UI) for Ethiopia from 1990 to 2015. CMNN causes of death have declined by 65% in the last two-and-a-half decades. Injury-related causes of death have also decreased by 70%. Deaths due to NCDs declined by 37% during the same period. Ethiopia showed a faster decline in the burden of four out of the five leading causes of age-standardized premature mortality rates when compared to the overall sub-Saharan African region and the Eastern sub-Saharan African region: lower respiratory infections, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, and diarrheal diseases; however, the same could not be said for ischemic heart disease and other NCDs. Non-communicable diseases, together, were the leading causes of age-standardized mortality rates, whereas CMNN diseases were leading causes of premature mortality in 2015. Although lower respiratory infections, tuberculosis, and diarrheal disease were the leading causes of age-standardized death rates, they showed major declines from 1990 to 2015. Neonatal encephalopathy, iron-deficiency anemia, protein-energy malnutrition, and preterm birth complications also showed more than a 50% reduction in burden. HIV/AIDS-related deaths have also decreased by 70% since 2005. Ischemic heart disease, hemorrhagic stroke, and ischemic stroke were among the top causes of premature mortality and age

  11. National mortality burden due to communicable, non-communicable, and other diseases in Ethiopia, 1990-2015: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misganaw, Awoke; Haregu, Tilahun N; Deribe, Kebede; Tessema, Gizachew Assefa; Deribew, Amare; Melaku, Yohannes Adama; Amare, Azmeraw T; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Gedefaw, Molla; Dessalegn, Muluken; Lakew, Yihunie; Bekele, Tolesa; Mohammed, Mesoud; Yirsaw, Biruck Desalegn; Damtew, Solomon Abrha; Krohn, Kristopher J; Achoki, Tom; Blore, Jed; Assefa, Yibeltal; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2017-07-21

    Ethiopia lacks a complete vital registration system that would assist in measuring disease burden and risk factors. We used the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015) estimates to describe the mortality burden from communicable, non-communicable, and other diseases in Ethiopia over the last 25 years. GBD 2015 mainly used cause of death ensemble modeling to measure causes of death by age, sex, and year for 195 countries. We report numbers of deaths and rates of years of life lost (YLL) for communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional (CMNN) disorders, non-communicable diseases (NCDs), and injuries with 95% uncertainty intervals (UI) for Ethiopia from 1990 to 2015. CMNN causes of death have declined by 65% in the last two-and-a-half decades. Injury-related causes of death have also decreased by 70%. Deaths due to NCDs declined by 37% during the same period. Ethiopia showed a faster decline in the burden of four out of the five leading causes of age-standardized premature mortality rates when compared to the overall sub-Saharan African region and the Eastern sub-Saharan African region: lower respiratory infections, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, and diarrheal diseases; however, the same could not be said for ischemic heart disease and other NCDs. Non-communicable diseases, together, were the leading causes of age-standardized mortality rates, whereas CMNN diseases were leading causes of premature mortality in 2015. Although lower respiratory infections, tuberculosis, and diarrheal disease were the leading causes of age-standardized death rates, they showed major declines from 1990 to 2015. Neonatal encephalopathy, iron-deficiency anemia, protein-energy malnutrition, and preterm birth complications also showed more than a 50% reduction in burden. HIV/AIDS-related deaths have also decreased by 70% since 2005. Ischemic heart disease, hemorrhagic stroke, and ischemic stroke were among the top causes of premature mortality and age

  12. Adult mortality attributable to preventable risk factors for non-communicable diseases and injuries in Japan: a comparative risk assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayu Ikeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The population of Japan has achieved the longest life expectancy in the world. To further improve population health, consistent and comparative evidence on mortality attributable to preventable risk factors is necessary for setting priorities for health policies and programs. Although several past studies have quantified the impact of individual risk factors in Japan, to our knowledge no study has assessed and compared the effects of multiple modifiable risk factors for non-communicable diseases and injuries using a standard framework. We estimated the effects of 16 risk factors on cause-specific deaths and life expectancy in Japan. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We obtained data on risk factor exposures from the National Health and Nutrition Survey and epidemiological studies, data on the number of cause-specific deaths from vital records adjusted for ill-defined codes, and data on relative risks from epidemiological studies and meta-analyses. We applied a comparative risk assessment framework to estimate effects of excess risks on deaths and life expectancy at age 40 y. In 2007, tobacco smoking and high blood pressure accounted for 129,000 deaths (95% CI: 115,000-154,000 and 104,000 deaths (95% CI: 86,000-119,000, respectively, followed by physical inactivity (52,000 deaths, 95% CI: 47,000-58,000, high blood glucose (34,000 deaths, 95% CI: 26,000-43,000, high dietary salt intake (34,000 deaths, 95% CI: 27,000-39,000, and alcohol use (31,000 deaths, 95% CI: 28,000-35,000. In recent decades, cancer mortality attributable to tobacco smoking has increased in the elderly, while stroke mortality attributable to high blood pressure has declined. Life expectancy at age 40 y in 2007 would have been extended by 1.4 y for both sexes (men, 95% CI: 1.3-1.6; women, 95% CI: 1.2-1.7 if exposures to multiple cardiovascular risk factors had been reduced to their optimal levels as determined by a theoretical-minimum-risk exposure distribution. CONCLUSIONS

  13. Chronic non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, N; Alberti, K G M M

    2006-01-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCD) account for almost 60% of global mortality, and 80% of deaths from NCD occur in low- and middle-income countries. One quarter of these deaths--almost 9 million in 2005--are in men and women aged globalisation of the food, tobacco and alcohol industries. Because NCD have a major impact on men and women of working age and their elderly dependents, they result in lost income, lost opportunities for investment, and overall lower levels of economic development. Reductions in the incidences of many NCD and their complications are, however, already possible. Up to 80% of all cases of cardiovascular disease or type-2 diabetes and 40% of all cases of cancer, for example, are probably preventable based on current knowledge. In addition, highly cost-effective measures exist for the prevention of some of the complications of established cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Achieving these gains will require a broad range of integrated, population-based interventions as well as measures focused on the individuals at high risk. At present, the international-assistance community provides scant resources for the control of NCD in poor countries, partly, at least, because NCD continue to be wrongly perceived as predominantly diseases of the better off. As urbanization continues apace and populations age, investment in the prevention and control of NCD in low-and middle-income countries can no longer be ignored.

  14. Trend of non-communicable disease mortality for three common conditions in the elderly population from 2002 to 2010: A population-based study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Guo, Jin; Cao, Xiao-Qing; Yuan, Xin; Rao, Ke-Qin; Zheng, Zhe; Liu, Zhi-Dong; Hu, Sheng-Shou

    2015-09-01

    There is a lack of data focusing on non-communicable disease (NCD) mortality in the Chinese elderly population over the past decade. Using mortality data from the Chinese Health Statistics, we explored the crude and age-standardized mortality trend of three major NCDs in the Chinese population ≥65 years of age from 2002 to 2010, namely, malignant neoplasms, heart diseases, and cerebrovascular diseases. Subpopulations characterized as rural and urban residence, and by gender and age were examined separately. Mortality increased with age and was higher among males than among females across the three NCDs, with the gender difference being most remarkable for malignant neoplasms and least for heart diseases mortality. Condition-specific crude mortalities increased between 2002 and 2010, overall and in all the pre-specified subpopulations. After age-standardization, rising trends were observed for people ≥65 years old, and condition-specific mortalities generally increased in rural regions and decreased in urban regions, especially for cerebrovascular diseases. There were increasing trends for mortality due to malignant neoplasms, heart diseases, and cerebrovascular diseases in China between 2002 and 2010, which were largely driven by the population aging. Disparities existed by rural and urban residence, gender, and age.

  15. Scaling up Non-Communicable Disease Control: Lessons to be ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are emerging as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality globally, with the greatest rise in incidence of cardiovascular disease cases observed in Sub-Saharan Africa. This is in addition to the heavy burden of infectious diseases already present in this setting. Describing the ...

  16. Are we facing a noncommunicable disease pandemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Luke

    2017-03-01

    The global boom in premature mortality and morbidity from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) shares many similarities with pandemics of infectious diseases, yet public health professionals have resisted the adoption of this label. It is increasingly apparent that NCDs are actually communicable conditions, and although the vectors of disease are nontraditional, the pandemic label is apt. Arguing for a change in terminology extends beyond pedantry as the move carries serious implications for the public health community and the general public. Additional resources are unlocked once a disease reaches pandemic proportions and, as a long-neglected and underfunded group of conditions, NCDs desperately require a renewed sense of focus and political attention. This paper provides objections, definitions, and advantages to approaching the leading cause of global death through an alternative lens. A novel framework for managing NCDs is presented with reference to the traditional influenza pandemic response. Copyright © 2016 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Social determinants of adult mortality from non-communicable diseases in northern Ethiopia, 2009-2015: Evidence from health and demographic surveillance site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semaw Ferede Abera

    Full Text Available In developing countries, mortality and disability from non-communicable diseases (NCDs is rising considerably. The effect of social determinants of NCDs-attributed mortality, from the context of developing countries, is poorly understood. This study examines the burden and socio-economic determinants of adult mortality attributed to NCDs in eastern Tigray, Ethiopia.We followed 45,982 adults implementing a community based dynamic cohort design recording mortality events from September 2009 to April 2015. A physician review based Verbal autopsy was used to identify the most probable causes of death. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to identify social determinants of NCD mortality.Across the 193,758.7 person-years, we recorded 1,091 adult deaths. Compared to communicable diseases, NCDs accounted for a slightly higher proportion of adult deaths; 33% vs 34.5% respectively. The incidence density rate (IDR of NCD attributed mortality was 194.1 deaths (IDR = 194.1; 95% CI = 175.4, 214.7 per 100,000 person-years. One hundred fifty-seven (41.8%, 68 (18.1% and 34 (9% of the 376 NCD deaths were due to cardiovascular disease, cancer and renal failure, respectively. In the multivariable analysis, age per 5-year increase (HR = 1.35; 95% CI: 1.30, 1.41, and extended family and non-family household members (HR = 2.86; 95% CI: 2.05, 3.98 compared to household heads were associated with a significantly increased hazard of NCD mortality. Although the difference was not statistically significant, compared to poor adults, those who were wealthy had a 15% (HR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.65, 1.11 lower hazard of mortality from NCDs. On the other hand, literate adults (HR = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.13, 0.9 had a significantly decreased hazard of NCD attributed mortality compared to those adults who were unable to read and write. The effect of literacy was modified by age and its effect reduced by 18% for every 5-year increase of age among literate adults

  18. Social determinants of adult mortality from non-communicable diseases in northern Ethiopia, 2009-2015: Evidence from health and demographic surveillance site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abera, Semaw Ferede; Gebru, Alemseged Aregay; Biesalski, Hans Konrad; Ejeta, Gebisa; Wienke, Andreas; Scherbaum, Veronika; Kantelhardt, Eva Johanna

    2017-01-01

    In developing countries, mortality and disability from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is rising considerably. The effect of social determinants of NCDs-attributed mortality, from the context of developing countries, is poorly understood. This study examines the burden and socio-economic determinants of adult mortality attributed to NCDs in eastern Tigray, Ethiopia. We followed 45,982 adults implementing a community based dynamic cohort design recording mortality events from September 2009 to April 2015. A physician review based Verbal autopsy was used to identify the most probable causes of death. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to identify social determinants of NCD mortality. Across the 193,758.7 person-years, we recorded 1,091 adult deaths. Compared to communicable diseases, NCDs accounted for a slightly higher proportion of adult deaths; 33% vs 34.5% respectively. The incidence density rate (IDR) of NCD attributed mortality was 194.1 deaths (IDR = 194.1; 95% CI = 175.4, 214.7) per 100,000 person-years. One hundred fifty-seven (41.8%), 68 (18.1%) and 34 (9%) of the 376 NCD deaths were due to cardiovascular disease, cancer and renal failure, respectively. In the multivariable analysis, age per 5-year increase (HR = 1.35; 95% CI: 1.30, 1.41), and extended family and non-family household members (HR = 2.86; 95% CI: 2.05, 3.98) compared to household heads were associated with a significantly increased hazard of NCD mortality. Although the difference was not statistically significant, compared to poor adults, those who were wealthy had a 15% (HR = 0.85; 95% CI: 0.65, 1.11) lower hazard of mortality from NCDs. On the other hand, literate adults (HR = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.13, 0.9) had a significantly decreased hazard of NCD attributed mortality compared to those adults who were unable to read and write. The effect of literacy was modified by age and its effect reduced by 18% for every 5-year increase of age among literate adults. In summary

  19. NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES: A CHALLENGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After completion of 65 years of independence, our country has witnessed remarkable progress in the health status of its population. However, over the past few decades, there has been major transitions in the country that have serious impact on health. Changes have been seen in economic development, nutritional status, fertility and mortality rates and consequently, the disease profile has changed considerabely. Though there have been substantial acievements in controlling communicable diseases, still they contribute significantly to disease burden of the country. Decline in morbidity and mortality from communicable diseases have been accompanied by a gradual shift to, and accelerated rise in the prevalence of, chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs such as cardiovascular disease (CVD, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, cancers, mental health disorders and injuries1. Researchers and policy makers around the world have been increasingly recognizing NCDs (Non communicable diseases as a health and developmental emergency. NCDs are the leading cause of death in the South-East Asia Region, killing 7.9 million annually (55% of the total deaths in the Region. NCD deaths in region are expected to increase by 21% over the next decade.

  20. Tackling Noncommunicable Diseases in Africa: Caveat Lector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Noncommunicable disease (NCD), principally cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic lung disease, and diabetes, constitutes the major cause of death worldwide. Evidence of a continuing increase in the global burden of these diseases has generated recent urgent calls for global action to tackle and reduce related death and disability. Because the…

  1. Novel approaches to screening for noncommunicable diseases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: As Malawi continues to suffer from a large burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), models for NCD screening need to be developed that do not overload a health system that is already heavily burdened by communicable diseases. Methods: This descriptive study examined 3 screening programmes for ...

  2. [Estimation of the impact of risk factors control on non-communicable diseases mortality, life expectancy and the labor force lost in China in 2030].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, X Y; Li, Y C; Liu, J M; Liu, Y N; Liu, S W; Qi, J L; Zhou, M G

    2017-12-06

    Objective: To estimate the impact of risk factors control on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) mortality, life expectancy and the numbers of labor force lost in China in 2030. Methods: We used the results of China from Global Burden of Disease Study 2013, according to the correlation between death of NCDs and exposure of risk factors and the comparative risk assessment theory, to calculate population attributable fraction (PAF) and disaggregate deaths of NCDs into parts attributable and un-attributable. We used proportional change model to project risk factors exposure and un-attributable deaths of NCDs in 2030, then to get deaths of NCDs in 2030. Simulated scenarios according to the goals of global main NCDs risk factors control proposed by WHO were constructed to calculate the impact of risk factors control on NCDs death, life expectancy and the numbers of labor force lost. Results: If the risk factors exposure changed according to the trend of 1990 to 2013, compared to the numbers (8.499 million) and mortality rate (613.5/100 000) of NCDs in 2013, the death number (12.161 million) and mortality rate (859.2/100 000) would increase by 43.1% and 40.0% respectively in 2030, among which, ischemic stroke (increasing by 103.3% for death number and 98.8% for mortality rate) and ischemic heart disease (increasing by 85.0% for death number and 81.0% for mortality rate) would increase most quickly. If the risk factors get the goals in 2030, the NCDs deaths would reduce 2 631 thousands. If only one risk factor gets the goal, blood pressure (1 484 thousands NCDs deaths reduction), smoking (717 thousands reduction) and BMI (274 thousands reduction) would be the most important factors affecting NCDs death. Blood pressure control would have greater impact on ischemic heart disease (662 thousands reduction) and hemorrhagic stroke (449 thousands reduction). Smoking control would have the greatest effect on lung cancer (251 thousands reduction) and chronic obstructive pulmonary

  3. Adherence to the 2015 Dutch dietary guidelines and risk of non-communicable diseases and mortality in the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G. Voortman (Trudy); J.C. Kiefte-de Jong (Jessica); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); L. Lahousse (Lies); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); G.G. Brusselle (Guy); O.H. Franco (Oscar); J.D. Schoufour (Josje)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractWe aimed to evaluate the criterion validity of the 2015 food-based Dutch dietary guidelines, which were formulated based on evidence on the relation between diet and major chronic diseases. We studied 9701 participants of the Rotterdam Study, a population-based prospective cohort in

  4. Medico-social aspects of the prevention of noncommunicable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Peresypkina

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The noncommunicable disease (NCDs are very common among population around the world. They are the main cause of preventable mortality, cause temporary and permanent disability. NCDs are the major reason for attending for medical care and lead to economic losses. The implementations of preventive strategy, increasing the role of preventive measures are general tasks for all health care system. The analysis of trends of preventive measure for NCD nowadays is the aim of this research. Materials and methods. The study included the result of analysis of science publication and WHO database about NCD and preventive measure used as well as the results of the analysis of data of the Center for Statistics in Medicine of MoH of Ukraine. Results. Diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases are the major NCDs. The base factors which lead to NCD are behavioral risk factors, namely tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, and alcohol abuse. The WHO prepared a lot of documents, among which the most significant are the strategies on noncommunicable diseases prevention, convention against smoking, strategy on diet and physical activity, global strategy on reducing alcohol abusing and so on. Nowadays the world population follows Global Action Plan for Prevention of Noncommunicable Diseases for 2013–2020. The documents emphasize the importance of state support, the use of scientific potential and intersectoral interaction to effectively combat noncommunicable diseases. The major of scientific direction are NCD monitoring, detection of the determinant of NCD development and making strategy for usage it in conditions of limited resources. The role of Digital marketing today increases that leads to the acquisition and consolidation of the habits and behavior of modern youth. Internet marketing is very effective to form unhealthy food behavior in children and adolescents that requires adequate and urgent actions. The

  5. Reframing noncommunicable diseases and injuries for the poorest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Noncommunicable diseases and injuries (NCDIs) account for nearly 70% of deaths worldwide, with an estimated 75% of these deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. Globally, the burden of disease from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is most often caused by the “big 4,” namely: diabetes, ...

  6. Burden and Management of Noncommunicable Diseases After Earthquakes and Tsunamis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneja, Amit; Gakh, Maxim; Rutkow, Lainie

    This integrative review examines extant literature assessing the burden and management of noncommunicable diseases 6 months or more after earthquakes and tsunamis. We conducted an integrative review to identify and characterize the strength of published studies about noncommunicable disease-specific outcomes and interventions at least 6 months after an earthquake and/or tsunami. We included disasters that occurred from 2004 to 2016. We focused primarily on the World Health Organization noncommunicable disease designations to define chronic disease, but we also included chronic renal disease, risk factors for noncommunicable diseases, and other chronic diseases or symptoms. After removing duplicates, our search yielded 6,188 articles. Twenty-five articles met our inclusion criteria, some discussing multiple noncommunicable diseases. Results demonstrate that existing medical conditions may worsen and subsequently improve, new diseases may develop, and risk factors, such as weight and cholesterol levels, may increase for several years after an earthquake and/or tsunami. We make 3 recommendations for practitioners and researchers: (1) plan for noncommunicable disease management further into the recovery period of disaster; (2) increase research on the burden of noncommunicable diseases, the treatment modalities employed, resulting population-level outcomes in the postdisaster setting, and existing models to improve stakeholder coordination and action regarding noncommunicable diseases after disasters; and (3) coordinate with preexisting provision networks, especially primary care.

  7. Pattern of non-communicable diseases among medical admissions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical admissions due to non-communicable diseases were carefully selected and analyzed. There were 1853 cases of various non-communicable diseases out of a total medical admission of 3294 constituting 56.2% of total medical admissions. Diseases of the cardiovascular, endocrine and renal systems were the most ...

  8. Understanding The Relationships Between Noncommunicable Diseases, Unhealthy Lifestyles, And Country Wealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollyky, Thomas J; Templin, Tara; Andridge, Caroline; Dieleman, Joseph L

    2015-09-01

    The amount of international aid given to address noncommunicable diseases is minimal. Most of it is directed to wealthier countries and focuses on the prevention of unhealthy lifestyles. Explanations for the current direction of noncommunicable disease aid include that these are diseases of affluence that benefit from substantial research and development into their treatment in high-income countries and are better addressed through domestic tax and policy measures to reduce risk-factor prevalence than through aid programs. This study assessed these justifications. First, we examined the relationships among premature adult mortality, defined as the probability that a person who has lived to the age of fifteen will die before the age of sixty from noncommunicable diseases; the major risk factors for these diseases; and country wealth. Second, we compared noncommunicable and communicable diseases prevalent in poor and wealthy countries alike, and their respective links to economic development. Last, we examined the respective roles that wealth and risk prevention have played in countries that achieved substantial reductions in premature mortality from noncommunicable diseases. Our results support greater investment in cost-effective noncommunicable disease preventive care and treatment in poorer countries and a higher priority for reducing key risk factors, particularly tobacco use. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  9. Non-communicable diseases and adherence to Mediterranean diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretto, Antonio; Lagattolla, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) also known as chronic diseases last for a long time and progress generally slow. Major non-communicable diseases are cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes. Unhealthy lifestyles and food behaviours play an important role for determining such diseases. The change in unhealthy behaviours or the maintenance of healthy lifestyles has enormous value in the reduction of diseases and longer life expectancy not only on an individual level but for the community as a whole. Recent meta-analyses reported Mediterranean diet to be an optimal diet when adopted as a whole, in order to preserve and maintain a good health status. A greater adherence score to the Mediterranean diet (2-point increase) was related to induce an 8% reduction in overall mortality, a 10% reduced risk of CVD and a 4% reduction in neoplastic diseases. However, there is no direct method in quantifying and evaluating adherence, therefore a large number of indirect indices in several studies have been proposed, with a last unifying score. Recently more and more e-health techniques such as web communication or desktop publishing (DVDs and so on) are being used, obtaining good results in the Mediterranean diet adherence. For successfully changing the unhealthy lifestyles and food behaviours of the population, interventions at all levels are needed with the cooperation of Institutions, mass media, agricultural and food industry and healthcare professionals guided by expert scientific societies.

  10. Effect of the vegetarian diet on non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo

    2014-01-30

    A vegetarian diet generally includes plenty of vegetables and fruits, which are rich in phytochemicals, antioxidants, fiber, magnesium, vitamins C and E, Fe³⁺, folic acid and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), and is low in cholesterol, total fat and saturated fatty acid, sodium, Fe²⁺, zinc, vitamin A, B₁₂ and D, and especially n-3 PUFA. Mortality from all-cause, ischemic heart disease, and circulatory and cerebrovascular diseases was significantly lower in vegetarians than in omnivorous populations. Compared with omnivores, the incidence of cancer and type 2 diabetes was also significantly lower in vegetarians. However, vegetarians have a number of increased risk factors for non-communicable diseases such as increased plasma homocysteine, mean platelet volume and platelet aggregability compared with omnivores, which are associated with low intake of vitamin B₁₂ and n-3 PUFA. Based on the present data, it would seem appropriate for vegetarians to carefully design their diet, specifically focusing on increasing their intake of vitamin B₁₂ and n-3 PUFA to further reduce already low mortality and morbidity from non-communicable diseases. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Non-Communicable Disease Mortality and Risk Factors in Formal and Informal Neighborhoods, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso: Evidence from a Health and Demographic Surveillance System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Rossier

    Full Text Available The expected growth in NCDs in cities is one of the most important health challenges of the coming decades in Sub-Saharan countries. This paper aims to fill the gap in our understanding of socio-economic differentials in NCD mortality and risk in low and middle income neighborhoods in urban Africa. We use data collected in the Ouagadougou Health and Demographic Surveillance System. 409 deaths were recorded between 2009-2011 among 20,836 individuals aged 35 years and older; verbal autopsies and the InterVA program were used to determine the probable cause of death. A random survey asked in 2011 1,039 adults aged 35 and over about tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, lack of physical activity and measured their weight, height, and blood pressure. These data reveal a high level of premature mortality due to NCDs in all neighborhoods: NCD mortality increases substantially by age 50. NCD mortality is greater in formal neighborhoods, while adult communicable disease mortality remains high, especially in informal neighborhoods. There is a high prevalence of risk factors for NCDs in the studied neighborhoods, with over one-fourth of the adults being overweight and over one-fourth having hypertension. Better-off residents are more prone to physical inactivity and excessive weight, while vulnerable populations such as widows/divorced individuals and migrants suffer more from higher blood pressure. Females have a significantly lower risk of being smokers or heavy drinkers, while they are more likely to be physically inactive or overweight, especially when married. Muslim individuals are less likely to be smokers or heavy drinkers, but have a higher blood pressure. Everything else being constant, individuals living in formal neighborhoods are more often overweight. The data presented make clear the pressing need to develop effective programs to reduce NCD risk across all types of neighborhoods in African cities, and suggest several entry points for

  12. Public policy & the challenge of chronic noncommunicable diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    World Bank; Smith, Owen; Adeyi, Olusoji; Robles, Sylvia

    2007-01-01

    ... for Noncommunicable Diseases Evidence on the Economic Burden of NCDs Extent to Which NCDs Matter to the Poor NCDs and Health Financing Notes 59 59 60 64 70 72 Appendix 2 The Evidence Base for t...

  13. Cardiovascular risk factors and non-communicable diseases in Abia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiovascular risk factors and non-communicable diseases in Abia state, Nigeria: report of a community-based survey. OS Ogah, OO Madukwe, UU Onyeonoro, II Chukwuonye, AU Ukegbu, MO Akhimien, IG Okpechi ...

  14. Epidemiology of non-communicable diseases in India - across the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Epidemiology of non-communicable diseases in India - across the life course. Professor Nikhil Tandon, FRCP, FAMS, FNASc. FASc. Dept. of Endocrinology and Metabolism. All India Institute of Medical Sciences. New Delhi, INDIA.

  15. Preventing the Epidemic of Non-Communicable Diseases: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Robson , Anthony ,

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Diet, lifestyle and environment do not just affect a person's health, they also determine the health of their children and possibly the health of their grandchildren. Non-communicable disease is a global epidemic because of the combined effect of the modern diet (including drug abuse) and a sedentary lifestyle. A low energy dense, drug-free diet rich in bioavailable nutrients-plus-exercise is most effective for preventing non-communicable disease throughout life. Nanoc...

  16. Country actions to meet UN commitments on non-communicable diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonita, Ruth; Magnusson, Roger; Bovet, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Strong leadership from heads of state is needed to meet national commitments to the UN political declaration on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and to achieve the goal of a 25% reduction in premature NCD mortality by 2025 (the 25 by 25 goal). A simple, phased, national response to the political...

  17. Prevention and Management of Non-Communicable Disease: The IOC Consensus Statement, Lausanne 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matheson, G.O.; Klugl, M.; Engebretsen, L.; Bendiksen, F.; Blair, S.N.; Borjesson, M.; Budgett, R.; Derman, W.; Erdener, U.; Ioannidis, J.P.A.; Khan, K.M.; Martinez, R.; van Mechelen, W.; Mountjoy, M.; Sallis, R.E.; Schwellnus, M.; Shultz, R.; Soligard, T.; Steffen, K.; Sundberg, C.J.; Weiler, R.; Ljungqvist, A.

    2013-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from preventable, non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) threatens the health of our populations and our economies. The accumulation of vast amounts of scientific knowledge has done little to change this. New and innovative thinking is essential to foster new creative

  18. Mobile Health Approaches to Non-Communicable Diseases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Rwanda is affected by a substantial dual burden of a rapid epidemiological rise in non-communicable diseases. (NCDs) against the backdrop of high infectious disease rates. The Global Burden of Disease study showed that premature deaths due to NCDs such as diabetes and hypertension are increasing, ...

  19. Targeting non-communicable diseases: Beyond tobacco | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    Nov 1, 2013 ... The burden of disease is shifting, with an increasing portion of illness caused by non-communicable diseases (NCD) such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. These are the leading causes of death and disability around the world and will be responsible for more than 75% of all deaths in ...

  20. Non-communicable diseases--finally on the global agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielgosz, A T

    2011-06-01

    After the UN Millennium Development Goals were declared in September 2000 (see Table 1), one of the major short-comings recognized world-wide was the lack of mention of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). While AIDS and malaria were included, none of the leading and universal non-communicable causes of death made the list. There was no mention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer or diabetes, even though these place a far greater burden on global health and economic development than the infectious diseases, and are predicted to continue to increase in epidemic proportions. After much public discussion and intense lobbying, a significant-and uncommon-achievement occurred: on May 13th, 2010, the United Nations General Assembly voted in favour of convening a summit on non-communicable diseases, to take place in September 2011.

  1. Egg consumption, serum cholesterol, and cause-specific and all-cause mortality: the National Integrated Project for Prospective Observation of Non-communicable Disease and Its Trends in the Aged, 1980 (NIPPON DATA80).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Okamura, Tomonori; Tamaki, Shinji; Kadowaki, Takashi; Hayakawa, Takehito; Kita, Yoshikuni; Okayama, Akira; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2004-07-01

    Because egg yolk has a high cholesterol concentration, limited egg consumption is often suggested to help prevent ischemic heart disease (IHD). We epidemiologically examined the validity of this recommendation. We analyzed the relations of egg consumption to serum cholesterol and cause-specific and all-cause mortality by using the NIPPON DATA80 (National Integrated Project for Prospective Observation of Non-communicable Disease And its Trends in the Aged, 1980) database. At the baseline examination in 1980, a nutritional survey was performed by using the food-frequency method in Japanese subjects aged > or =30 y. We followed 5186 women and 4077 men for 14 y. The subjects were categorized into 5 egg consumption groups on the basis of their responses to a questionnaire (> or =2/d, 1/d, 1/2 d, 1-2/wk, and seldom). There were 69, 1396, 1667, 1742, and 315 women in each of the 5 groups, respectively. Age-adjusted total cholesterol (5.21, 5.04, 4.95, 4.91, and 4.92 mmol/L in the 5 egg consumption categories, respectively) was related to egg consumption (P egg consumption was not related to age-adjusted total cholesterol. Cox analysis found that, in women, all-cause mortality in the 1-2-eggs/wk group was significantly lower than that in the 1-egg/d group, whereas no such relations were noted in men. Limiting egg consumption may have some health benefits, at least in women in geographic areas where egg consumption makes a relatively large contribution to total dietary cholesterol intake.

  2. Double burden of noncommunicable and infectious diseases in developing countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, I C

    2012-01-01

    On top of the unfinished agenda of infectious diseases in low- and middle-income countries, development, industrialization, urbanization, investment, and aging are drivers of an epidemic of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Malnutrition and infection in early life increase the risk of chronic NCDs...... in later life, and in adult life, combinations of major NCDs and infections, such as diabetes and tuberculosis, can interact adversely. Because intervention against either health problem will affect the other, intervening jointly against noncommunicable and infectious diseases, rather than competing...

  3. Non-communicable diseases – harnessing the current opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jane Brandt; Demaio, Alessandro Rhyll; Østergaard, Lise Rosendal

    2012-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) receive growing attention, which brings a unique opportunity to utilise solutions available to address them. These diseases are largely preventable; proven, cost-effective interventions are available; and when NCDs have emerged, means exist to treat them, prevent...

  4. Ghana's burden of chronic non-communicable diseases: Future ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of major chronic non-communicable diseases and their risk factors has increased over time and contributes significantly to the Ghana's disease burden. Conditions like hypertension, stroke and diabetes affect young and old, urban and rural, and wealthy and poor communities. The high cost of care

  5. Systems medicine and integrated care to combat chronic noncommunicable diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousquet, Jean; Anto, Josep M.; Sterk, Peter J.; Adcock, Ian M.; Chung, Kian Fan; Roca, Josep; Agusti, Alvar; Brightling, Chris; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Cesario, Alfredo; Abdelhak, Sonia; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Avignon, Antoine; Ballabio, Andrea; Baraldi, Eugenio; Baranov, Alexander; Bieber, Thomas; Bockaert, Joël; Brahmachari, Samir; Brambilla, Christian; Bringer, Jacques; Dauzat, Michel; Ernberg, Ingemar; Fabbri, Leonardo; Froguel, Philippe; Galas, David; Gojobori, Takashi; Hunter, Peter; Jorgensen, Christian; Kauffmann, Francine; Kourilsky, Philippe; Kowalski, Marek L.; Lancet, Doron; Pen, Claude Le; Mallet, Jacques; Mayosi, Bongani; Mercier, Jacques; Metspalu, Andres; Nadeau, Joseph H.; Ninot, Grégory; Noble, Denis; Oztürk, Mehmet; Palkonen, Susanna; Préfaut, Christian; Rabe, Klaus; Renard, Eric; Roberts, Richard G.; Samolinski, Boleslav; Schünemann, Holger J.; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Soares, Marcelo Bento; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Tegner, Jesper; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Wellstead, Peter; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Wouters, Emiel; Balling, Rudi; Brookes, Anthony J.; Charron, Dominique; Pison, Christophe; Chen, Zhu; Hood, Leroy; Auffray, Charles

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: We propose an innovative, integrated, cost-effective health system to combat major non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular, chronic respiratory, metabolic, rheumatologic and neurologic disorders and cancers, which together are the predominant health problem of the 21st

  6. Risk Factors for Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases at Gilgel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Moreover, the distributions of the specific risk factors are not systematically identified in those countries hampering the designing of appropriate preventive and control strategies. The objective of this component of the study was to describe the distribution of risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases. METHODS: ...

  7. The visibility of non-communicable diseases in Northern Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: WHO and Uganda's Ministry of Health emphasize the need to address the growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Treatment for these conditions is urgent in northern Uganda where war has negatively affected both health and the public health care system. Objectives: We aimed to explore the ...

  8. Prevalence of Non-communicable Diseases and its Awareness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of Non-communicable Diseases and its Awareness among Inhabitants of Sokoto Metropolis: Outcome of a Screening Program for Hypertension, Obesity, Diabetes Mellitus and Overt proteinuria. ... Regular health education and screening programs are necessary in order to reduce the menace. Key words: Non- ...

  9. Cardiovascular risk factors and non-communicable diseases in Abia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Oyo state, Nigeria.3Department of ... burden of non-communicable diseases as well as associated cardiovascular risk factors in the state using the World ...... related IEC/BCC materials, training of health care providers, provision of ...

  10. Prevalence of Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The risk factors of Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are not routinely monitored, especially among populace reporting to hospitals to detect and also advise on preventive measures, a key strategy to reducing the impact of NCDs on the Health Care System and population. Methods: A cross-sectional survey ...

  11. A snapshot of noncommunicable disease profiles and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A snapshot of noncommunicable disease profiles and their prescription costs at ten primary healthcare facilities in the in the western half of the Cape Town Metropole. AA Isaacs, N Manga, N Manga, C Le Grange, C Le Grange, DA Hellenberg, DA Hellenberg, V Titus, V Titus, R Sayed, R Sayed ...

  12. The germ-organ theory of non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byndloss, Mariana X; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2018-02-01

    Gut dysbiosis is associated with many non-communicable human diseases, but the mechanisms maintaining homeostasis remain incompletely understood. Recent insights suggest that during homeostasis, epithelial hypoxia limits oxygen availability in the colon, thereby maintaining a balanced microbiota that functions as a microbial organ, producing metabolites contributing to host nutrition, immune education and niche protection. Dysbiosis is characterized by a shift in the microbial community structure from obligate to facultative anaerobes, suggesting oxygen as an important ecological driver of microbial organ dysfunction. The ensuing disruption of gut homeostasis can lead to non- communicable disease because microbiota-derived metabolites are either depleted or generated at harmful concentrations. This Opinion article describes the concept that host control over the microbial ecosystem in the colon is critical for the composition and function of our microbial organ, which provides a theoretical framework for linking microorganisms to non-communicable diseases.

  13. Association between periodontal disease and non-communicable diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hong; Oh, Jin-Young; Youk, Tae-Mi; Jeong, Seong-Nyum; Kim, Young-Taek; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The National Health Insurance Service–Health Examinee Cohort during 2002 to 2013 was used to investigate the associations between periodontal disease (PD) and the following non-communicable diseases (NCDs): hypertension, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, cerebral infarction, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, and obesity. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusting for potential confounders during the follow-up period—including age, sex, household income, insurance status, residence area, health status, and comorbidities—were used to estimated odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in order to assess the associations between PD and NCDs. We enrolled 200,026 patients with PD and 154,824 subjects with a healthy oral status. Statistically, significant associations were found between PD and the investigated NCDs except for cerebral and myocardial infarction after adjusting for sociodemographic and comorbidity factors (P osteoporosis (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.18–1.27, P periodontitis pathogenesis as a triggering and mediating mechanism. PMID:28658175

  14. Transforming South-South technical support to fight noncommunicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakow, Aaron D A; Bukhman, Gene; Adebona, Olumuyiwa; Greene, Jeremy; de Dieu Ngirabega, Jean; Binagwaho, Agnès

    2012-03-01

    At the UN High-Level Meeting on non-communicable diseases (NCD) in September 2011, each member state was challenged to create a multisectoral national policy and plan for the prevention and control of non-communicable disease by 2013. Few low-income countries, however, currently have such plans. Their governments are likely to turn for assistance in drafting and implementation to multilateral agencies and Contract Technical Support Organizations recommended by development partners. Yet because many NCD seen in the lowest-income countries differ significantly from those prevalent elsewhere, existing providers of external technical support may lack the necessary experience to support strategic planning for NCD interventions in these settings. This article reviews currently available mechanisms of technical support for health sector planning. It places them in the broader historical context of post- World War II international development assistance and the more recent campaigns for horizontal "South-South" cooperation and aid effectiveness. It proposes bilateral technical assistance by low income-countries themselves as the natural evolution of development assistance in health. Such programs, it argues, may be able to improve the quality of technical support to low-income countries for strategic planning in the NCD area while directing resources to the regions where they are most needed. Copyright © 2012 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-communicable diseases among prison inmates in North-West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is paucity of data on prevalence of non-communicable diseases in prison inmates. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and pattern of non-communicable diseases in inmates of Sokoto Central Prison, North-West Nigeria. Methodology: Cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out.

  16. Non-communicable diseases control in China and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Li, Xiaoqiang; Nakamura, Sho; Sho, Ri; Zhao, Genming; Nakata, Yoshinori; Xu, Wanghong

    2017-12-20

    China and Japan share numerous similarities other than their geographical proximity. Facing the great challenges of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), China and Japan have developed different preventive strategies and systems. While Japan has made great progress in primary prevention of NCDs through strong legislation, the 'Specific Health Check and Guidance System' and a unique licensed health professional system, China is attempting to catch up by changing its strategies in NCDs control. In this manuscript, we compared disease burden of NCDs, health care systems and preventive strategies against NCDs between China and Japan. In this light, we summarized the points that the two countries can learn from each other, and proposed recommendations for the two countries in NCDs control.

  17. Available data sources for monitoring non-communicable diseases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    communicable diseases (NCDs) in South Africa (SA) are relatively less advanced than those for infectious diseases (particularly tuberculosis and HIV) and for maternal and child health. NCDs are now the largest cause of premature mortality owing to ...

  18. Epidemiology of Major Non-communicable Diseases in Ethiopia: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariam, Damen Haile; Ali, Ahmed; Araya, Tekebash

    2014-01-01

    Impact of non-communicable diseases is not well-documented in Ethiopia. We aimed to document the prevalence and mortality associated with four major non-communicable diseases in Ethiopia: cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Associated risk factors: hypertension, tobacco-use, harmful use of alcohol, overweight/obesity, and khat-chewing were also studied. Systematic review of peer-reviewed and grey literature between 1960 and 2011 was done using PubMed search engines and local libraries to identify prevalence studies on the four diseases. In total, 32 studies were found, and half of these studies were from Addis Ababa. Two hospital-based studies reviewed the prevalence of cardiovascular disease and found a prevalence of 7.2% and 24%; a hospital-based study reviewed cancer prevalence and found a prevalence of 0.3%; two hospital-based studies reviewed diabetes prevalence and found a prevalence of 0.5% and 1.2%; and two hospital-based studies reviewed prevalence of asthma and found a prevalence of 1% and 3.5%. Few community-based studies were done on the prevalence of diabetes and chronic pulmonary obstructive disease among the population. Several studies reviewed the impact of these diseases on mortality: cardiovascular disease accounts for 24% of deaths in Addis Ababa, cancer causes 10% of deaths in the urban settings and 2% deaths in rural setting, and diabetes causes 5% and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease causes 3% of deaths. Several studies reviewed the impact of these diseases on hospital admissions: cardiovascular disease accounts for 3%-12.6% and found to have increased between 1970s and 2000s; cancer accounts for 1.1%-2.8%, diabetes accounts for 0.5%-1.2%, and chronic obstructive diseases account for 2.7%-4.3% of morbidity. Overall, the major non-communicable diseases and related risk factors are highly prevalent, and evidence-based interventions should be designed. PMID:24847587

  19. Prevalence and correlates of self-reported chronic non-communicable diseases in Botswana: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letamo, Gobopamang; Keetile, Mpho; Navaneetham, Kannan; Phatsimo, Mpho

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of self-reported chronic non-communicable diseases and their correlates in Botswana. This is a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey. This is a cross-sectional study of respondents aged 10-64 years using data from the Botswana AIDS Impact Survey IV conducted in 2013. Three self-reported non-communicable diseases, namely, hypertension, diabetes and asthma were used. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify their correlates. Out of the 2153 participants, the prevalence rates of hypertension, diabetes and asthma were 14.2%, 3.3% and 5.3%, respectively. The study found that among other factors, older populations are at a much higher risk of having more than one non-communicable disease. After controlling for other covariates, the ORs of self-reported non-communicable disease was highest among older respondents aged 50 years and over (AOR=12.01, pnon-communicable diseases are likely to increase in the future due to the rise in the old age population resulting from fertility transition and improvement in life expectancy in Botswana. Therefore urgent and holistic intervention programmes are required to halt the problem. Failure to act now is likely to result in high morbidity and mortality. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The visibility of non-communicable diseases in northern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whyte, Susan Reynolds; Park, Sung-Joon; Odong, George

    2015-01-01

    , diabetes, depression, and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We checked the availability of diagnostic instruments and medicines, and interviewed health workers. Results : The four conditions were rarely diagnosed in the outpatient population. Hypertension was the most common, but still constituted......Background : WHO and Uganda’s Ministry of Health emphasize the need to address the growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Treatment for these conditions is urgent in northern Uganda where war has negatively affected both health and the public health care system. Objectives : We aimed...... to explore the recognized presence of selected chronic conditions in the out-patient population and to relate this ‘visibility’ to the ability of health units to diagnose and treat them. Methods : At six health facilities we reviewed patient registers for one month to determine the frequency of hypertension...

  1. Targeting mitochondrial phenotypes for non-communicable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengtang Qi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept that “Exercise is Medicine” has been challenged by the rising prevalence of non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs. This is partly due to the fact that the underlying mechanisms of how exercise influences energy homeostasis and counteracts high-fat diets and physical inactivity is complex and remains relatively poorly understood on a molecular level. In addition to genetic polymorphisms in humans that lead to gross variations in responsiveness to exercise, adaptation in mitochondrial networks is central to physical activity, inactivity, and diet. To harness the benefits of exercise for NCDs, much work still needs to be done to improve health effectively on a societal level such as developing personalized exercise interventions aided by advances in high-throughput genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. We propose that understanding the mitochondrial phenotype according to the molecular information of genotypes, lifestyles, and exercise responsiveness in individuals will optimize exercise effects for prevention of NCDs.

  2. Noncommunicable diseases and human rights: a promising synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruskin, Sofia; Ferguson, Laura; Tarantola, Daniel; Beaglehole, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have finally emerged onto the global health and development agenda. Despite the increasingly important role human rights play in other areas of global health, their contribution to NCD prevention and control remains nascent. The recently adopted Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs 2013-2020 is an important step forward, but the lack of concrete attention to human rights is a missed opportunity. With practical implications for policy development, priority setting, and strategic design, human rights offer a logical, robust set of norms and standards; define the legal obligations of governments; and provide accountability mechanisms that can be used to enhance current approaches to NCD prevention and control. Harnessing the power of human rights can strengthen action for NCDs at the local, national, and global levels.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors associated with nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases in the Eastern Mediterranean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musaiger AO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abdulrahman O Musaiger1, Hazzaa M Al-Hazzaa21Nutrition and Health Studies Unit, Deanship of Scientific Research, University of Bahrain, Bahrain, and Arab Center for Nutrition, Bahrain; 2Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Department of Physical Education and Movement Science, College of Education, and Scientific Board, Obesity Research Chair, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: This paper reviews the current situation concerning nutrition-related noncommunicable diseases (N-NCDs and the risk factors associated with these diseases in the Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR. A systematic literature review of studies and reports published between January 1, 1990 and September 15, 2011 was conducted using the PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, obesity, cancer, and osteoporosis have become the main causes of morbidity and mortality, especially with progressive aging of the population. The estimated mortality rate due to cardiovascular disease and diabetes ranged from 179.8 to 765.2 per 100,000 population, with the highest rates in poor countries. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was very high, ranging from 19% to 45%. The prevalence of overweight and obesity (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 has reached an alarming level in most countries of the region, ranging from 25% to 82%, with a higher prevalence among women. The estimated mortality rate for cancer ranged from 61.9 to 151 per 100,000 population. Osteoporosis has become a critical problem, particularly among women. Several risk factors may be contributing to the high prevalence of N-NCDs in EMR, including nutrition transition, low intake of fruit and vegetables, demographic transition, urbanization, physical inactivity, hypertension, tobacco smoking, stunting of growth of preschool children, and lack of nutrition and health awareness. Intervention programs to prevent and control N-NCDs are urgently needed, with special focus

  4. Paraoxonases, mitochondrial dysfunction and non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Jordi; García-Heredia, Anabel; Hernández-Aguilera, Anna; Joven, Jorge

    2016-11-25

    The most common non-communicable diseases (NCD) are obesity, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, and neurological diseases. Together, they constitute the commonest cause of death and disability worldwide. Mitochondrial alterations, oxidative stress and inflammation underpin NCD and are molecular mechanisms playing major roles in the disease onset and natural history. Interrelations between the mechanisms of oxidative stress, inflammation and metabolism are, in the broadest sense of energy transformations, being increasingly recognized as part of the problem in NCD. Whether or not oxidative stress and inflammation are the causes or the consequences of cellular disturbances, they do significantly contribute to NCD. Paraoxonases are associated with mitochondria and mitochondria-associated membranes. They modulate mitochondria-dependent superoxide production, and prevent apoptosis. Their overexpression protects mitochondria from endoplasmic reticulum stress and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction; highlighting that the anti-inflammatory effects of paraoxonases may be mediated, at least in part, by their protective role in mitochondria and associated organelle function. Since oxidative stress is implicated in the development of NCD (as a result of mitochondrial dysfunction), these data suggest that understanding the role and the molecular targets of paraoxonases may provide novel strategies of intervention in the treatment of these important diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Cost of Treating Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases: Does it Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Conrad, Daren A.; Webb, Marquitta C.

    2012-01-01

    Heart disease and Type 2 diabetes mellitus are among the two leading causes of death in the CARICOM member states with HIV/AIDS a distant sixth. Attention is now being paid to non-communicable diseases which have outpaced communicable diseases as the major cause of death. This paper investigated the link between the public medical cost of treating chronic non-communicable diseases, namely heart disease and diabetes, on national output in Barbados, Guyana, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago. ...

  6. Prevalence of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %) and non- communicable diseases (49%) according to WHO NCD Country Profiles 2014. About 50% of all deaths are attributed to NCD's. The objective of this study was to determine the burden of noncommunicable diseases in semi urban ...

  7. Non-communicable diseases and implications for medical practice in Australia: a framework for analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, Justin; Huckel Schneider, Carmen; Leeder, Stephen

    2014-07-07

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have become leading causes of mortality and morbidity as part of historical epidemiological, demographic and nutritional transitions. There has been considerable historical analysis of the immediate and underlying causes of this change in the impacts of communicable diseases and NCDs, but far less historical analysis of how this transition has shaped medical practice. We lay out a framework for future historical analysis by proposing four domains of inquiry into key areas of change: changes in the concept of disease; evolution of medical technology; changes in workforce, including variation in roles and emerging areas of specialisation; and changes in health care structures including models of care, government responses and transitioning health systems. Our aim is to encourage analysis that takes into account key features in each of the four domains, thus enabling a more complete understanding of why, how and under what circumstances NCDs have had an effect on medical practice.

  8. NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASE PROGRAM IN AMPANGAN HEALTH CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MASTURA I

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-communicable diseases (NCDs represent among the most common and debilitating conditions seen in primary care. Patients’ care will often involves multiple providers and follow-up requires persistence by patients and clinicians alike, therefore ideal outcomes are often difficult to achieve. The need for better disease management policies and practice is growing. This is due to the changing demographic profile of the population, the increasing cost of managing people in acute care hospitals and the availability of new technologies and services. All these changes enable a different care paradigm which is more cost effective and provides people with chronic conditions an improved quality of life. Management of the NCDs therefore offers an excellent opportunity to practice chronic disease management - a systems approach designed to ensure excellent care. The NCD team has developed a comprehensive approach to chronic disease care. We would like to describe the NCD Program in Ampangan Health Clinic which represents many typical government health clinics in Malaysia and the processes by which it was developed. Included are specific examples of the tools and how they can be used by individual clinicians incaring for patients. The integration of Chronic Disease Management Services into health care systems is the direction being undertaken to tackle the burden of chronic disease. Disease management supports the shift in healthcare from an emphasis on managing the acute episode to managing the entire disease course, highlighting both prevention and maintenance of wellbeing for patients with chronic diseases. Disease management promotes better integration and coordination of care across all aspects of the health sector.

  9. Presymptomatic risk assessment for chronic non-communicable diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badri Padhukasahasram

    Full Text Available The prevalence of common chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCDs far overshadows the prevalence of both monogenic and infectious diseases combined. All CNCDs, also called complex genetic diseases, have a heritable genetic component that can be used for pre-symptomatic risk assessment. Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that tag risk haplotypes across the genome currently account for a non-trivial portion of the germ-line genetic risk and we will likely continue to identify the remaining missing heritability in the form of rare variants, copy number variants and epigenetic modifications. Here, we describe a novel measure for calculating the lifetime risk of a disease, called the genetic composite index (GCI, and demonstrate its predictive value as a clinical classifier. The GCI only considers summary statistics of the effects of genetic variation and hence does not require the results of large-scale studies simultaneously assessing multiple risk factors. Combining GCI scores with environmental risk information provides an additional tool for clinical decision-making. The GCI can be populated with heritable risk information of any type, and thus represents a framework for CNCD pre-symptomatic risk assessment that can be populated as additional risk information is identified through next-generation technologies.

  10. Assessment of the role of ageing and non-ageing factors in death from non-communicable diseases based on a cumulative frequency model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Liu

    2017-08-15

    To quantify the effects of ageing and non-ageing factors, a characterization of the effects of ageing, genetic, and exogenous variables on 12 major non-communicable diseases was evaluated using a model assessing cumulative frequency of death and survival by age group from dead and surviving populations based on mortality statistics. Indices (0-1) of the roles of ageing (ARD), genetics (GRD) and exogenous (ERD) variables in deaths due to disease were established, and the sum of ARD, GRD and ERD was 1 (value of each indices was <1). Results showed that ageing plays an important role in death from chronic disease; exogenous factors may contribute more to the pattern of chronic disease than genetic factors (ARD, GRC and ERD were 0.818, 0.058 and 0.124 respectively for all non-communicable diseases). In descending order, ERD for non-communicable diseases were breast cancer, leukaemia, cancer of the cervix uteri and uterus, liver cancer, nephritis and nephropathy, stomach cancer, lung cancer, diabetes, cerebrovascular disease, coronary heart disease, COPD, and Alzheimer's disease, while a smaller ERD indicated a tendency of natural death. An understanding of the aforementioned complex relationships of specific non-communicable diseases will be beneficial in designing primary prevention measures for non-communicable diseases in China.

  11. Non-communicable diseases in South Asia: contemporary perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Karen R; Patel, Shivani A; Ali, Mohammed K

    2014-09-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as metabolic, cardiovascular, cancers, injuries and mental health disorders are increasingly contributing to the disease burden in South Asia, in light of demographic and epidemiologic transitions in the region. Home to one-quarter of the world's population, the region is also an important priority area for meeting global health targets. In this review, we describe the current burden of and trends in four common NCDs (cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) in South Asia. The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study supplemented with the peer-reviewed literature and reports by international agencies and national governments. The burden of NCDs in South Asia is rising at a rate that exceeds global increases in these conditions. Shifts in leading risk factors-particularly dietary habits, tobacco use and high blood pressure-are thought to underlie the mounting burden of death and disability due to NCDs. Improvements in life expectancy, increasing socioeconomic development and urbanization in South Asia are expected to lead to further escalation of NCDs. Although NCD burdens are currently largest among affluent groups in South Asia, many adverse risk factors are concentrated among the poor, portending a future increase in disease burden among lower income individuals. There continues to be a notable lack of national surveillance data to document the distribution and trends in NCDs in the region. Similarly, economic studies and policy initiatives addressing NCD burdens are still in their infancy. Opportunities for innovative structural and behavioral interventions that promote maintenance of healthy lifestyles-such as moderate caloric intake, adequate physical activity and avoidance of tobacco-in the context of socioeconomic development are abundant. Testing of health care infrastructure and systems that best provide low-cost and effective detection and treatment of NCDs is a priority for

  12. Noncommunicable Diseases Risk Factor Surveillance: Experience and Challenge from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Deepa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs are reaching epidemic proportions worldwide and in India. Surveillance of NCD risk factors are therefore needed as they could help in policy planning and implementation of preventive measures. This article will focus on the experiences gained, and challenges faced, in conducting NCD risk factor surveillance studies in India. Two major surveillance studies on NCDs were conducted in India - the World Health Organization (WHO - Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR NCD risk factor surveillance study and the Integrated Disease Surveillance Project (IDSP. The WHO-ICMR study was a six-site pilot study representing six different geographical locations in India with a sample size of 44,537 including rural, peri-urban/slum and urban. Phase 1 of the IDSP was completed and included seven states in India with a sample size of 5000 per state. The NCD risk factor surveillance showed that high prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and obesity in urban areas with slightly lower prevalence rates in semi-urban and rural areas. There are several challenges in obtaining data on NCD risk factors, which include challenges in obtaining anthropometric and blood pressure measures and in assessing tobacco consumption, diet and physical activity. The challenges in field operations include contacting and convincing subjects, creating rapport, tracking subjects, climatic conditions, recall ability and interviewer skills. Success in surveillance studies depends on anticipating and managing these challenges. Conclusion: Improving country-level surveillance and monitoring is a valuable step in prevention and control of NCDs in India.

  13. Noncommunicable diseases risk factor surveillance: experience and challenge from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, M; Pradeepa, R; Anjana, Rm; Mohan, V

    2011-12-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are reaching epidemic proportions worldwide and in India. Surveillance of NCD risk factors are therefore needed as they could help in policy planning and implementation of preventive measures. This article will focus on the experiences gained, and challenges faced, in conducting NCD risk factor surveillance studies in India. Two major surveillance studies on NCDs were conducted in India - the World Health Organization (WHO) - Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) NCD risk factor surveillance study and the Integrated Disease Surveillance Project (IDSP). The WHO-ICMR study was a six-site pilot study representing six different geographical locations in India with a sample size of 44,537 including rural, peri-urban/slum and urban. Phase 1 of the IDSP was completed and included seven states in India with a sample size of 5000 per state. The NCD risk factor surveillance showed that high prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and obesity in urban areas with slightly lower prevalence rates in semi-urban and rural areas. There are several challenges in obtaining data on NCD risk factors, which include challenges in obtaining anthropometric and blood pressure measures and in assessing tobacco consumption, diet and physical activity. The challenges in field operations include contacting and convincing subjects, creating rapport, tracking subjects, climatic conditions, recall ability and interviewer skills. Success in surveillance studies depends on anticipating and managing these challenges Improving country-level surveillance and monitoring is a valuable step in prevention and control of NCDs in India.

  14. Effect of physical inactivity on major noncommunicable diseases and life expectancy in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rezende, Leandro Fornias Machado; Rabacow, Fabiana Maluf; Viscondi, Juliana Yukari Kodaira; Luiz, Olinda do Carmo; Matsudo, Victor Keihan Rodrigues; Lee, I-Min

    2015-03-01

    In Brazil, one-fifth of the population reports not doing any physical activity. This study aimed to assess the impact of physical inactivity on major noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), all-cause mortality and life expectancy in Brazil, by region and sociodemographic profile. We estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) for physical inactivity associated with coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, breast cancer, colon cancer, and all-cause mortality. To calculate the PAF, we used the physical inactivity prevalence from the 2008 Brazilian Household Survey and relative risk data in the literature. In Brazil, physical inactivity is attributable to 3% to 5% of all major NCDs and 5.31% of all-cause mortality, ranging from 5.82% in the southeastern region to 2.83% in the southern region. Eliminating physical inactivity would increase the life expectancy by an average of 0.31 years. This reduction would affect mainly individuals with ≥ 15 years of schooling, male, Asian, elderly, residing in an urban area and earning ≥ 2 times the national minimum wage. In Brazil, physical inactivity has a major impact on NCDs and mortality, principally in the southeastern and central-west regions. Public policies and interventions promoting physical activity will significantly improve the health of the population.

  15. Toothbrushing: A Link Between Noncommunicable and Communicable Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Ayse Basak; Oktay, Inci; Schou, Lone

    2015-01-01

    To assess the correlation between toothbrushing (TB) and the common biological (HDL) and quality-of-life-related risk factors for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and communicable diseases among patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). The present study is part of a prospective intervention study among DM2 patients (n=200), randomly selected from the outpatient clinics, Istanbul, Turkey. The assessed variables were: TB, self-reported gingival bleeding (SRGB), HDL, BMI, body-fat proportion, modified quality of life scale (WHOQOL-BrefPhPs). Descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, Spearman rank correlation, the chi-square test and factor analysis were applied. A minority of the patients brushed their teeth twice a day or more (27%) and reported no gingival bleeding (37%). Favourable HDL and high WHOQOL-BrefPhPs were 77% and 57%, respectively. A majority of patients had unhealthy BMI (83%) and body-fat proportions (63%). SRGB was negatively correlated with WHOQOL-BrefPhPs (rs=-0.24, p<0.05) and TB (rs=-0.25, p<0.01). The patients who reported less than daily TB were more likely to have unfavourable HDL and low WHOQOL-BrefPhPs (32% vs 54%) than those brushing their teeth daily (17% vs 35%, p<0.05). Principal component analysis revealed two clusters: 'healthy weight' (WHOQOL-BrefPhPs, TB, BMI) and 'oral health' (SRGB, HDL). The present results demonstrate a correlation between TB and biological and quality-of-life-related risk markers of NCDs and communicable diseases. There seems to be a need to increase the awareness of the significance TB's potential intermediatory role between NCDs and communicable diseases.

  16. Inoculation message treatments for curbing noncommunicable disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Alicia M; Miller, Claude H

    2013-07-01

    To study the effect of various types of inoculation message treatments on resistance to persuasive and potentially deceptive health- and nutrition-related (HNR) content claims of commercial food advertisers. A three-phase experiment was conducted among 145 students from a Midwestern U.S. university. Quantitative statistical analyses were used to interpret the results. RESULTS provide clear evidence that integrating regulatory focus/fit considerations enhances the treatment effectiveness of inoculation messages. Inoculation messages that employed a preventative, outcome focus with concrete language were most effective at countering HNR advertising claims. The findings indicate that inoculation fosters resistance equally across the most common types of commercially advertised HNR product claims (e.g., absolute, general, and structure/function claims). As the drive to refine the inoculation process model continues, further testing and application of this strategy in a public health context is needed to counter ongoing efforts by commercial food advertisers to avoid government regulations against deceptive practices such as dubious health/nutrition claims. This research advances inoculation theory by providing evidence that 1) good regulatory fit strengthens the effect of refutational preemption and 2) an inoculation approach is highly effective at fostering resistance to commercial advertisers' HNR content claims. This macro approach appears far superior to education or information-based promotional health campaigns targeted solely at specific populations demonstrating rising rates of noncommunicable disease.

  17. Inoculation message treatments for curbing noncommunicable disease development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M. Mason

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of various types of inoculation message treatments on resistance to persuasive and potentially deceptive health- and nutrition-related (HNR content claims of commercial food advertisers. METHODS: A three-phase experiment was conducted among 145 students from a Midwestern U.S. university. Quantitative statistical analyses were used to interpret the results. Results: Results provide clear evidence that integrating regulatory focus/fit considerations enhances the treatment effectiveness of inoculation messages. Inoculation messages that employed a preventative, outcome focus with concrete language were most effective at countering HNR advertising claims. The findings indicate that inoculation fosters resistance equally across the most common types of commercially advertised HNR product claims (e.g., absolute, general, and structure/function claims. CONCLUSIONS: As the drive to refine the inoculation process model continues, further testing and application of this strategy in a public health context is needed to counter ongoing efforts by commercial food advertisers to avoid government regulations against deceptive practices such as dubious health/nutrition claims. This research advances inoculation theory by providing evidence that 1 good regulatory fit strengthens the effect of refutational preemption and 2 an inoculation approach is highly effective at fostering resistance to commercial advertisers' HNR content claims. This macro approach appears far superior to education or information-based promotional health campaigns targeted solely at specific populations demonstrating rising rates of noncommunicable disease.

  18. Prevention and management of noncommunicable disease: the IOC Consensus Statement, Lausanne 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Gordon O; Klügl, Martin; Engebretsen, Lars; Bendiksen, Fredrik; Blair, Steven N; Börjesson, Mats; Budgett, Richard; Derman, Wayne; Erdener, Uğur; Ioannidis, John P A; Khan, Karim M; Martinez, Rodrigo; van Mechelen, Willem; Mountjoy, Margo; Sallis, Robert E; Schwellnus, Martin; Shultz, Rebecca; Soligard, Torbjørn; Steffen, Kathrin; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Weiler, Richard; Ljungqvist, Arne

    2013-11-01

    Morbidity and mortality from preventable, noncommunicable chronic disease (NCD) threatens the health of our populations and our economies. The accumulation of vast amounts of scientific knowledge has done little to change this. New and innovative thinking is essential to foster new creative approaches that leverage and integrate evidence through the support of big data, technology, and design thinking. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of a consensus meeting on NCD prevention sponsored by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in April 2013. Within the context of advocacy for multifaceted systems change, the IOC's focus is to create solutions that gain traction within health care systems. The group of participants attending the meeting achieved consensus on a strategy for the prevention and management of chronic disease that includes the following: 1. Focus on behavioral change as the core component of all clinical programs for the prevention and management of chronic disease. 2. Establish actual centers to design, implement, study, and improve preventive programs for chronic disease. 3. Use human-centered design (HCD) in the creation of prevention programs with an inclination to action, rapid prototyping and multiple iterations. 4. Extend the knowledge and skills of Sports and Exercise Medicine (SEM) professionals to build new programs for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease focused on physical activity, diet, and lifestyle. 5. Mobilize resources and leverage networks to scale and distribute programs of prevention. True innovation lies in the ability to align thinking around these core strategies to ensure successful implementation of NCD prevention and management programs within health care. The IOC and SEM community are in an ideal position to lead this disruptive change. The outcome of the consensus meeting was the creation of the IOC Non-Communicable Diseases ad hoc Working Group charged with the responsibility of moving this

  19. Prevention and management of non-communicable disease: the IOC consensus statement, Lausanne 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Gordon O; Klügl, Martin; Engebretsen, Lars; Bendiksen, Fredrik; Blair, Steven N; Börjesson, Mats; Budgett, Richard; Derman, Wayne; Erdener, Uğur; Ioannidis, John P A; Khan, Karim M; Martinez, Rodrigo; van Mechelen, Willem; Mountjoy, Margo; Sallis, Robert E; Schwellnus, Martin; Shultz, Rebecca; Soligard, Torbjørn; Steffen, Kathrin; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Weiler, Richard; Ljungqvist, Arne

    2013-11-01

    Morbidity and mortality from preventable, non-communicable chronic disease (NCD) threatens the health of our populations and our economies. The accumulation of vast amounts of scientific knowledge has done little to change this. New and innovative thinking is essential to foster new creative approaches that leverage and integrate evidence through the support of big data, technology, and design thinking. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of a consensus meeting on NCD prevention sponsored by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in April, 2013. Within the context of advocacy for multifaceted systems change, the IOC's focus is to create solutions that gain traction within health care systems. The group of participants attending the meeting achieved consensus on a strategy for the prevention and management of chronic disease that includes the following: 1. Focus on behavioural change as the core component of all clinical programs for the prevention and management of chronic disease. 2. Establish actual centres to design, implement, study, and improve preventive programs for chronic disease. 3. Use human-centered design in the creation of prevention programs with an inclination to action, rapid prototyping and multiple iterations. 4. Extend the knowledge and skills of Sports and Exercise Medicine (SEM) professionals to build new programs for the prevention and treatment of chronic disease focused on physical activity, diet and lifestyle. 5. Mobilize resources and leverage networks to scale and distribute programs of prevention. True innovation lies in the ability to align thinking around these core strategies to ensure successful implementation of NCD prevention and management programs within health care. The IOC and SEM community are in an ideal position to lead this disruptive change. The outcome of the consensus meeting was the creation of the IOC Non-Communicable Diseases ad-hoc Working Group charged with the responsibility of moving this

  20. Quantifying urbanization as a risk factor for noncommunicable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allender, Steven; Wickramasinghe, Kremlin; Goldacre, Michael; Matthews, David; Katulanda, Prasad

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the poorly understood relationship between the process of urbanization and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in Sri Lanka using a multicomponent, quantitative measure of urbanicity. NCD prevalence data were taken from the Sri Lankan Diabetes and Cardiovascular Study, comprising a representative sample of people from seven of the nine provinces in Sri Lanka (n = 4,485/5,000; response rate = 89.7%). We constructed a measure of the urban environment for seven areas using a 7-item scale based on data from study clusters to develop an "urbanicity" scale. The items were population size, population density, and access to markets, transportation, communications/media, economic factors, environment/sanitation, health, education, and housing quality. Linear and logistic regression models were constructed to examine the relationship between urbanicity and chronic disease risk factors. Among men, urbanicity was positively associated with physical inactivity (odds ratio [OR] = 3.22; 2.27-4.57), high body mass index (OR = 2.45; 95% CI, 1.88-3.20) and diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.44; 95% CI, 1.66-3.57). Among women, too, urbanicity was positively associated with physical inactivity (OR = 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64-3.21), high body mass index (OR = 2.92; 95% CI, 2.41-3.55), and diabetes mellitus (OR = 2.10; 95% CI, 1.58 - 2.80). There is a clear relationship between urbanicity and common modifiable risk factors for chronic disease in a representative sample of Sri Lankan adults.

  1. [Chronic non-communicable diseases in Mexico: epidemiologic synopsis and integral prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Villalobos, José Angel; Barriguete-Meléndez, Jorge Armando; Lara-Esqueda, Agustín; Barquera, Simón; Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio; de León-May, María Eugenia; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    The federal government has implemented several strategies to reduce mortality caused by chronic non-communicable diseases (CNTD). One example is the development of medical units specialized in the care of CNTD (i.e. overweight, obesity, cardiovascular risk and diabetes), named UNEMES (from its Spanish initials). These units--consisting of an ad-hoc, trained, multi-disciplinary team--will provide patient education, help in the resolution of obstacles limiting treatment adherence, and involve the family in patient care. Treatment will be provided using standardized protocols. The efficacy of the intervention will be regularly measured using pre-specified outcomes. We expect that these UNEMES will result in significant savings. In summary, our health care system is developing better treatment strategies for CNTD. Evaluating the performance of the UNEMES will generate valuable information for the design of future preventive actions.

  2. Role of Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) in Resource-Limited Settings (RLS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosepele, Mosepele; Botsile, Elizabeth

    2018-04-01

    As access to effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) expands globally, a decline in AIDS-related morbidity and mortality has been complicated by rising rates of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). This review provides a brief description of NCDs and existing gaps on knowledge about NCDs among HIV-infected adults mostly in Africa. Recent reports show that one in every five persons living with HIV has a chronic illness, predominantly diabetes and/or hypertension, depression, and most of these conditions are either not diagnosed or not being managed. Human papilloma virus-associated anal dysplasia occurs among 70% of HIV-infected women in RLS. Recognizing risk factors for NCDs and providing effective screening and optimal care remains challenging. Research is urgently needed to carefully characterize HIV-associated NCDs in RLS. Such studies should provide a framework for high-priority NCDs that the limited resources can be focused on in these settings.

  3. Investing in non-communicable disease prevention and management to advance the Sustainable Development Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Rachel; Bertram, Melanie Y; Jan, Stephen; Niessen, Louis W; Sassi, Franco; Jamison, Dean T; Pier, Eduardo González; Beaglehole, Robert

    2018-04-05

    Reduction of the non-communicable disease (NCD) burden is a global development imperative. Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3 includes target 3·4 to reduce premature NCD mortality by a third by 2030. Progress on SDG target 3·4 will have a central role in determining the success of at least nine SDGs. A strengthened effort across multiple sectors with effective economic tools, such as price policies and insurance, is necessary. NCDs are heavily clustered in people with low socioeconomic status and are an important cause of medical impoverishment. They thereby exacerbate economic inequities within societies. As such, NCDs are a barrier to achieving SDG 1, SDG 2, SDG 4, SDG 5, and SDG 10. Productivity gains from preventing and managing NCDs will contribute to SDG 8. SDG 11 and SDG 12 offer clear opportunities to reduce the NCD burden and to create sustainable and healthy cities. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. ANALYSIS OF NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASE BURDEN IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Nehru

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Non-communicable diseases(NCD, also known as chronic diseases are not detected early since they remain asymptomatic in the initial stage. On communicable disease screening, OP services are started in government healthcare setup. Objective of this study is to find out the magnitude of NCDs in the outpatient screening programme. MATERIALS AND METHODS The secondary data was collected from records available in NCD screening OP for a period of 4 years in Thanjavur Medical College Hospital. The data of nearly 55,207 patients screened in the NCD OP was analysed. The burden of the diseases to the healthcare setup and the risk these patients are likely to get in future were discussed in this study. RESULTS Out of 55,207 outpatients attending the NCD OP male patient’s outnumbered female patients. 6,642 new patients with hypertension were detected in 4 years. 1608 new diabetics were detected and referred to medicine department for imitating treatment. 10,796 patients had both diabetes and hypertension. During this study period, 788 FNAC has been done for cancer breast detection, 82 patients were referred for biopsy. 14 cases of new cancer breast were detected during the study period. Doubtful cases were subjected to mammogram and ultrasound breast. 107 cases were referred for mammogram and ultrasound breast. Among them, four new cases of cancer breast has been detected. CONCLUSION Most of the non-communicable diseases are not detected early, which leads to catastrophic complications like strokes, renal failure, cardiac failure, etc. Early detection by NCD screening programme can definitely pickup these cases and proper treatment can be started in time to avoid morbidity and mortality.

  5. Gallstone disease and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Sørensen, Lars Tue; Jørgensen, Torben

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this cohort study was to determine whether subjects with gallstone disease identified by screening of a general population had increased overall mortality when compared to gallstone-free participants and to explore causes of death. METHODS: The study population (N...... built. RESULTS: Gallstone disease was present in 10%. Mortality was 46% during median 24.7 years of follow-up with 1% lost. Overall mortality and death from cardiovascular diseases were significantly associated to gallstone disease. Death from unknown causes was significantly associated to gallstone...... disease and death from cancer and gastrointestinal disease was not associated. No differences in mortality for ultrasound-proven gallstones or cholecystectomy were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Gallstone disease is associated with increased overall mortality and to death from cardiovascular disease. Gallstones...

  6. Social and Economic Implications of Noncommunicable diseases in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J S Thakur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs have become a major public health problem in India accounting for 62% of the total burden of foregone DALYs and 53% of total deaths. In this paper, we review the social and economic impact of NCDs in India. We outline this impact at household, health system and the macroeconomic level. Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs figure at the top among the leading ten causes of adult (25-69 years deaths in India. The effects of NCDs are inequitable with evidence of reversal in social gradient of risk factors and greater financial implications for the poorer households in India. Out-of-pocket expenditure associated with the acute and long-term effects of NCDs is high resulting in catastrophic health expenditure for the households. Study in India showed that about 25% of families with a member with CVD and 50% with cancer experience catastrophic expenditure and 10% and 25%, respectively, are driven to poverty. The odds of incurring catastrophic hospitalization expenditure were nearly 160% higher with cancer than the odds of incurring catastrophic spending when hospitalization was due to a communicable disease. These high numbers also pose significant challenge for the health system for providing treatment, care and support. The proportion of hospitalizations and outpatient consultations as a result of NCDs rose from 32% to 40% and 22% to 35%, respectively, within a decade from 1995 to 2004. In macroeconomic term, most of the estimates suggest that the NCDs in India account for an economic burden in the range of 5-10% of GDP, which is significant and slowing down GDP thus hampering development. While India is simultaneously experiencing several disease burdens due to old and new infections, nutritional deficiencies, chronic diseases, and injuries, individual interventions for clinical care are unlikely to be affordable on a large scale. While it is clear that "treating our way out" of the NCDs may not be the efficient way, it has

  7. Noncommunicable disease risk profile of factory workers in Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Jugal; Kohli, Charu; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Ekta

    2012-09-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are becoming more prevalent in India. The data for presence of NCDs and its risk factors among factory workers is deficient in India. A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out among 37 factory workers and equal number of comparable subjects from general population. Screening for presence of diabetes along with its risk factors was made in both the groups using pretested predesigned World Health Organization STEPwise approach to surveillance (WHO STEPS) questionnaire in rural area of Delhi. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 software. The estimation of risk in two groups was done with calculation of odds ratio (OR). P values less than 0.05 were considered significant. A total of 74 participants were included in the present study. Hypertension and diabetes was present in 13.5 and 5.4% of factory workers and four (10.8%) and three (8.8%) subjects in comparative group, respectively. Seven (18.9%) factory and eight (21.6%) non-factory subjects fell in the category of current smoker or smokeless tobacco users. High density lipoprotein levels were found abnormal among one (2.7%) factory worker and nine (24.3%) subjects in comparative group (P-value = 0.01). Behavioral risk factors, alcohol consumption, and fruits and vegetable intake were significantly different among two groups. Factory workers were having better profile than non-factory subjects except for risk factors such as alcohol intake and inadequate fruits and vegetable intake. However, healthy worker effect phenomenon cannot be ruled out.

  8. PREVALENCE OF MAJOR NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASES AND ITS SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS IN ADULT POPULATION OF BLOCK HAJIN, BANDIPOORA J & K

    OpenAIRE

    Showkat Ahmad; Rafiq; Anjum; Rohul; Syed Shuja; Rifat

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-communicable disease is a medical condition or disease which non-infectious, of long duration and generally of slow progression. Major NCDs include cardiovascular diseases, strokes, diabetes mellitus, cancers and chronic respiratory diseases. They account for a significant part of overall mortality, morbidity & disability, result in huge economic losses to nations, are a cause of psychosocial suffering and are therefore recognized as major public health problem. OBJECTIVE: To ...

  9. Research Award: Non-Communicable Disease Prevention (NCDP ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... developing research questions and protocols, to planning and conducting fieldwork, analysis, and presentation of results. IDRC's Non-Communicable ... reduce demand for and supply of tobacco and alcohol products, and foods high in fat, salt, and sugar;. • increase the affordability and availability of ...

  10. Choosing an epidemiological model structure for the economic evaluation of non-communicable disease public health interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Adam D M; Wolstenholme, Jane; Blakely, Tony; Scarborough, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases are the leading global causes of mortality and morbidity. Growing pressures on health services and on social care have led to increasing calls for a greater emphasis to be placed on prevention. In order for decisionmakers to make informed judgements about how to best spend finite public health resources, they must be able to quantify the anticipated costs, benefits, and opportunity costs of each prevention option available. This review presents a taxonomy of epidemiological model structures and applies it to the economic evaluation of public health interventions for non-communicable diseases. Through a novel discussion of the pros and cons of model structures and examples of their application to public health interventions, it suggests that individual-level models may be better than population-level models for estimating the effects of population heterogeneity. Furthermore, model structures allowing for interactions between populations, their environment, and time are often better suited to complex multifaceted interventions. Other influences on the choice of model structure include time and available resources, and the availability and relevance of previously developed models. This review will help guide modelers in the emerging field of public health economic modeling of non-communicable diseases.

  11. Men's health: non-communicable chronic diseases and social vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidinotto, Daniele Natália Pacharone Bertolini; Simonetti, Janete Pessuto; Bocchi, Silvia Cristina Mangini

    2016-08-15

    to evaluate the relationship between absences in scheduled appointments and the number of non-communicable chronic diseases and to investigate the relationship between spatial distribution of these diseases and social vulnerability, using geoprocessing. a quantitative study of sequential mixed approach by analyzing 158 medical records of male users to relate the absences and 1250 medical records for geoprocessing. the higher the number of absences in the scheduled medical appointments, the less were the number of non-communicable chronic diseases and the ones listed in the International Classification of Diseases in single men. There were 21 significant geostatistically cases of glucose intolerance in the urban area. Of these, 62% lived in a region with a social vulnerability rating of Very Low, Medium 19%, 14% Low and 5% High. it was observed that the older the men, the greater is the number of chronic diseases and the less they miss scheduled appointments. Regarding the use of geoprocessing, we obtained a significant number of cases of glucose intolerance in urban areas, the majority classified as Very Low social vulnerability. It was possible to relate the spatial distribution of these diseases with the social vulnerability classification; however, it was not possible to perceive a relationship of them with the higher rates of social vulnerability. avaliar a relação entre as faltas em consultas agendadas e o número de doenças crônicas não transmissíveis e averiguar a relação entre distribuição espacial dessas doenças e vulnerabilidade social, utilizando-se o geoprocessamento. estudo quantitativo, de abordagem mista sequencial, sendo analisados 158 prontuários de usuários do sexo masculino para se relacionar as faltas e 1250 prontuários para o geoprocessamento. quanto maior o número de faltas nas consultas médicas agendadas, menores foram a quantidade de doenças crônicas não transmissíveis e as listadas na Classificação Internacional de

  12. The profile of non-communicable disease in patients admitted into ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCD) is increasing in recent years in low income countries in sub-Saharan Africa because of changing disease patterns following socioeconomic development. Nevertheless, communicable diseases (CD) still remain the predominant health problem. At present ...

  13. Rising Health Expenditure Due to Non-Communicable Diseases in India: An Outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Debasis; Arokiasamy, Perianayagam

    2016-01-01

    With ongoing demographic transition, epidemiological transition has been emerged as a growing concern in India. The share of non-communicable disease in total disease burden has increased from 31% in 1990 to 45% in 2010. This paper seeks to explore the health scenario of India in the wake of the growing pace of non-communicable diseases such as diabetes and hypertension among Indian population using data from health and morbidity survey of the National Sample Survey Organisation (2004) and notifies about the resource needed to tackle this growing health risk. Given the share of private players (70%) in Indian health system, results indicate a higher private expenditure, mostly out-of-pocket expense, on account of non-communicable diseases. A timely look into the matter may tackle a more dreadful situation in near future.

  14. Looking Beyond the Terrestrial: The Potential of Seaweed Derived Bioactives to Treat Non-Communicable Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kenneth G; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2016-03-18

    Seaweeds are a large and diverse group of marine organisms that are commonly found in the maritime regions of the world. They are an excellent source of biologically active secondary metabolites and have been shown to exhibit a wide range of therapeutic properties, including anti-cancer, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic activities. Several Asian cultures have a strong tradition of using different varieties of seaweed extensively in cooking as well as in herbal medicines preparations. As such, seaweeds have been used to treat a wide variety of health conditions such as cancer, digestive problems, and renal disorders. Today, increasing numbers of people are adopting a "westernised lifestyle" characterised by low levels of physical exercise and excessive calorific and saturated fat intake. This has led to an increase in numbers of chronic Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes mellitus, being reported. Recently, NCDs have replaced communicable infectious diseases as the number one cause of human mortality. Current medical treatments for NCDs rely mainly on drugs that have been obtained from the terrestrial regions of the world, with the oceans and seas remaining largely an untapped reservoir for exploration. This review focuses on the potential of using seaweed derived bioactives including polysaccharides, antioxidants and fatty acids, amongst others, to treat chronic NCDs such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus.

  15. Synergies between Communicable and Noncommunicable Disease Programs to Enhance Global Health Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostova, Deliana; Husain, Muhammad J; Sugerman, David; Hong, Yuling; Saraiya, Mona; Keltz, Jennifer; Asma, Samira

    2017-12-01

    Noncommunicable diseases are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Initiatives that advance the prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases support the goals of global health security in several ways. First, in addressing health needs that typically require long-term care, these programs can strengthen health delivery and health monitoring systems, which can serve as necessary platforms for emergency preparedness in low-resource environments. Second, by improving population health, the programs might help to reduce susceptibility to infectious outbreaks. Finally, in aiming to reduce the economic burden associated with premature illness and death from noncommunicable diseases, these initiatives contribute to the objectives of international development, thereby helping to improve overall country capacity for emergency response.

  16. The Non-Communicable Disease Burden in Korea: Findings from the 2012 Korean Burden of Disease Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jihyun; Seo, Hyeyoung; Oh, In Hwan; Yoon, Seok Jun

    2016-11-01

    In recognition of Korea's rising burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), we investigated the nation's NCD status and extracted detailed information from the 2012 Korean Burden of Disease study. Consistent with that study, we used disability-adjusted life year (DALY) as a metric. Using national data sources and disability weights specific to the Korean population, we analyzed 116 disaggregated NCDs from the study's four-level disease and injury hierarchy for both sexes and nine age groups. Per 100,000 population, 21,019 DALYs were lost to 116 NCDs. Of those, 13.97% were due to premature death (death prior to the standard life expectancy for a subject's age) and 86.03% to non-fatal health outcomes. Based on traditional statistics, the main causes of health loss were mortality of neoplasms; cardiovascular and circulatory diseases; diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases; and chronic respiratory diseases. When combined with analyses of premature death and non-fatal outcomes, however, a substantially different view emerged: the main causes of health loss were diabetes mellitus, low back pain, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, cirrhosis of the liver, osteoarthritis, asthma, gastritis and duodenitis, and periodontal disease (in that order), collectively causing 49.20% of DALYs. Thus, burden of disease data using DALYs rather than traditional statistics brings a new perspective to characterization of the population's health that provides practical information useful for developing and targeting national NCD control programs to better meet national needs.

  17. Tuberculosis comorbidity with communicable and non-communicable diseases: integrating health services and control efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Ben J; Lönnroth, Knut; Lawn, Stephen D; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mwaba, Peter; Glaziou, Philippe; Bates, Matthew; Colagiuri, Ruth; Zijenah, Lynn; Swaminathan, Soumya; Memish, Ziad A; Pletschette, Michel; Hoelscher, Michael; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Hasan, Rumina; Zafar, Afia; Pantaleo, Guiseppe; Craig, Gill; Kim, Peter; Maeurer, Markus; Schito, Marco; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2013-05-01

    Recent data for the global burden of disease reflect major demographic and lifestyle changes, leading to a rise in non-communicable diseases. Most countries with high levels of tuberculosis face a large comorbidity burden from both non-communicable and communicable diseases. Traditional disease-specific approaches typically fail to recognise common features and potential synergies in integration of care, management, and control of non-communicable and communicable diseases. In resource-limited countries, the need to tackle a broader range of overlapping comorbid diseases is growing. Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS persist as global emergencies. The lethal interaction between tuberculosis and HIV coinfection in adults, children, and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa exemplifies the need for well integrated approaches to disease management and control. Furthermore, links between diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcoholism, chronic lung diseases, cancer, immunosuppressive treatment, malnutrition, and tuberculosis are well recognised. Here, we focus on interactions, synergies, and challenges of integration of tuberculosis care with management strategies for non-communicable and communicable diseases without eroding the functionality of existing national programmes for tuberculosis. The need for sustained and increased funding for these initiatives is greater than ever and requires increased political and funder commitment. Copyright © 2013 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd/Inc/BV. All rights reserved. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ghana's Burden of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases: Future Directions in Research, Practice and Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de-Graft Aikins, A.; Addo, J.; Ofei, F.; Bosu, Wk; Agyemang, C.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of major chronic non-communicable diseases and their risk factors has increased over time and contributes significantly to the Ghana's disease burden. Conditions like hypertension, stroke and diabetes affect young and old, urban and rural, and wealthy and poor communities. The high

  19. Effect of physical inactivity on major non-communicable diseases worldwide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, I-Min; Shiroma, Eric J; Lobelo, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Strong evidence shows that physical inactivity increases the risk of many adverse health conditions, including major non-communicable diseases such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and breast and colon cancers, and shortens life expectancy. Because much of the world's population is ina...

  20. Implementation of Policies and Strategies for Control of Noncommunicable Diseases in Malawi: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupafya, Phindile Chitsulo; Mwagomba, Beatrice L. Matanje; Hosig, Kathy; Maseko, Lucy M.; Chimbali, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Malawi is a Sub-Saharan African country experiencing the epidemiological transition from predominantly infectious to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) with dramatically increasing prevalence of lifestyle-related diseases such as obesity, hypertension, and diabetes. Malawi's 2011-2016 Health Sector Strategic Plan included NCDs, and an NCD Control…

  1. Available data sources for monitoring non-communicable diseases and their risk factors in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandai, M.; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens; Day, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Health information systems for monitoring chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in South Africa (SA) are relatively less advanced than those for infectious diseases (particularly tuberculosis and HIV) and for maternal and child health. NCDs are now the largest cause of premature...

  2. Some Aspects of Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases in Pacific Island Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Azmat

    2009-01-01

    This study provides an overview of the incidence of the communicable and non-communicable diseases in Pacific Island countries. Available health statistics confirms that children continue to die annually due to neonatal causes, diarrhoeal diseases, pneumonia and measles. The adult population in several countries reveals presence and emergence of…

  3. Inequalities in non-communicable diseases between the major population groups in Israel: achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhsen, Khitam; Green, Manfred S; Soskolne, Varda; Neumark, Yehuda

    2017-06-24

    Israel is a high-income country with an advanced health system and universal health-care insurance. Overall, the health status has improved steadily over recent decades. We examined differences in morbidity, mortality, and risk factors for selected non-communicable diseases (NCDs) between subpopulation groups. Between 1975 and 2014, life expectancy in Israel steadily increased and is currently above the average life expectancy for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development countries. Nevertheless, life expectancy has remained lower among Israeli Arabs than Israeli Jews, and this gap has recently widened. Age-adjusted mortality as a result of heart disease, stroke, or diabetes remains higher in Arabs, whereas age-adjusted incidence and mortality of cancer were higher among Jews. The prevalence of obesity and low physical activity in Israel is considerably higher among Arabs than Jews. Smoking prevalence is highest for Arab men and lowest for Arab women. Health inequalities are also evident by the indicators of socioeconomic position and in subpopulations, such as immigrants from the former Soviet Union, ultra-Orthodox Jews, and Bedouin Arabs. Despite universal health coverage and substantial improvements in the overall health of the Israeli population, substantial inequalities in NCDs persist. These differences might be explained, at least in part, by gaps in social determinants of health. The Ministry of Health has developed comprehensive programmes to reduce these inequalities between the major population groups. Sustained coordinated multisectoral efforts are needed to achieve a greater impact and to address other social inequalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the impact on non-communicable chronic diseases of a major integrated primary health care program in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja-Aburto, Victor H; González-Anaya, José A; Dávila-Torres, Javier; Rascón-Pacheco, Ramón A; González-León, Margot

    2016-06-01

    Primary health care is the best framework for implementing actions for the prevention and control of non-communicable diseases at an appropriate scale. In 2002, the Mexican Institute for Social Security (IMSS), which provides health care to half of the Mexican population, implemented a primary care-based integrated program that included the improvement of the family health care practice and a preventive strategy called PREVENIMSS, to reduce the burden of disease. To asess the impact of this program on selected non-communicable chronic diseases. Morbidity and mortality were compared before and after implementation of the program and time trends in IMSS affiliates and non-affiliates using the difference-in-differences (DD) method. Incidence rates of diabetes and hypertension increased whereas those of cervical cancer, breast cancer and other cerebrovascular diseases decreased from 2000 to 2013. The DD in mortality rates, expressed per 100000 persons, showed a decrease of 49.4 for diabetes mellitus, 9.1 for hypertensive disease, 42.9 for ischemic heart disease, 17.4 for cerebrovascular disease, 7.5 for cervical cancer and 5.8 for breast cancer. The reductions in mortality rates could be explained by both changes in incidence rates and changes in case fatality rates associated with early detection and treatment. These initial findings can be interpreted as the potential impact of integrated programs based on primary health care in a developing country. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The global epidemic of noncommunicable disease: the role of early-life factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Atul

    2014-01-01

    The rapid increase in prevalence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is probably the most important global health problem of the 21st century. Already in every region except Africa, NCDs account for greater mortality than communicable, maternal, perinatal and nutritional conditions combined. Although modifiable lifestyle behaviors in adult life are the main risk factors, substantial evidence now suggests that factors in early life also have a major role in the development of NCDs. For instance, breastfeeding and a slower pattern of infant weight gain have been shown to reduce the risk of obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes in both low-income and high-income countries. The mechanisms involved are poorly understood, but include epigenetic changes and resetting of endocrine systems that affect energy metabolism and appetite. These early life factors may interact with and exacerbate the detrimental effects of a sedentary lifestyle and energy-dense diets later in life. As a consequence, the impact of early-life factors on long-term health may be particularly important in low- and middle-income countries, which face the fastest increases in urbanization and greatest changes to lifestyle. Strategies to optimize infant nutrition could therefore make a major contribution to stemming the current global epidemic of NCD. © 2014 Nestec Ltd., Vevey/S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Cervical cancer in sub-Saharan Africa: a preventable noncommunicable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mboumba Bouassa, Ralph-Sydney; Prazuck, Thierry; Lethu, Thérèse; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Meye, Jean-François; Bélec, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    Infections caused by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) are responsible for 7.7% of cancers in developing countries, mainly cervical cancer. This disease is steadily increasing in sub-Saharan Africa, with more than 75,000 new cases and 50,000 deaths yearly, further increased by HIV infection. Areas covered: The current status of cervical cancer associated with HPV in sub-Saharan Africa has been systematically revised. The main issues discussed here are related to the public health burden of cervical cancer in sub-Saharan Africa and predictions for the coming decades, including molecular epidemiology and determinants of HPV infection in Africa, and promising prevention measures currently being evaluated in Africa. Expert commentary: By the year 2030, cervical cancer will kill more than 443,000 women yearly worldwide, most of them in sub-Saharan Africa. The increase in the incidence of cervical cancer in Africa could counteract the progress made by African women in reducing maternal mortality and longevity. Nevertheless, cervical cancer is a potentially preventable noncommunicable disease, and intervention strategies to eliminate cervical cancer as a public health concern should be urgently implemented.

  7. Noncommunicable Diseases in Ghana: Does the Theory of Social Gradient in Health Hold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenkorang, Eric Y.; Kuuire, Vincent Z.

    2016-01-01

    The theory of social gradient in health posits that individuals with lower socioeconomic status (SES) have poorer health outcomes, compared with those in higher socioeconomic brackets. Applied to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), this theory has largely been corroborated by studies from the West. However, evidence from sub-Saharan Africa are mixed,…

  8. Non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries: context, determinants and health policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J. J.; Kinra, S.; Casas, J. P.; Smith, G. Davey; Ebrahim, S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The rise of non-communicable diseases and their impact in low- and middle-income countries has gained increased attention in recent years. However, the explanation for this rise is mostly an extrapolation from the history of high-income countries whose experience differed from the development processes affecting today’s low- and middle-income countries. This review appraises these differences in context to gain a better understanding of the epidemic of non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries. Theories of developmental and degenerative determinants of non-communicable diseases are discussed to provide strong evidence for a causally informed approach to prevention. Health policies for non-communicable diseases are considered in terms of interventions to reduce population risk and individual susceptibility and the research needs for low- and middle-income countries are discussed. Finally, the need for health system reform to strengthen primary care is highlighted as a major policy to reduce the toll of this rising epidemic. PMID:18937743

  9. The burden of non-communicable diseases in Nigeria; in the context ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It assesses the growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Nigeria and its relationship with globalization. It further describes the conceptual framework on which to view the impact of globalization on NCDs in Nigeria. It assesses the Nigerian dimension of the relationship between the risk factors of NCDs and ...

  10. Overcoming Obstacles To Enable Access To Medicines For Noncommunicable Diseases In Poor Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Sandeep P; Kolappa, Kavitha; Jarvis, Jordan D; Park, Paul H; Belt, Rachel; Balasubramaniam, Thirukumaran; Kiddell-Monroe, Rachel

    2015-09-01

    The modern access-to-medicines movement grew largely out of the civil-society reaction to the HIV/AIDS pandemic three decades ago. While the movement was successful with regard to HIV/AIDS medications, the increasingly urgent challenge to address access to medicines for noncommunicable diseases has lagged behind-and, in some cases, has been forgotten. In this article we first ask what causes the access gap with respect to lifesaving essential noncommunicable disease medicines and then what can be done to close the gap. Using the example of the push for access to antiretrovirals for HIV/AIDS patients for comparison, we highlight the problems of inadequate global financing and procurement for noncommunicable disease medications, intellectual property barriers and concerns raised by the pharmaceutical industry, and challenges to building stronger civil-society organizations and a patient and humanitarian response from the bottom up to demand treatment. We provide targeted policy recommendations, specific to the public sector, the private sector, and civil society, with the goal of improving access to noncommunicable disease medications globally. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  11. Towards reframing health service delivery in Uganda: the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of Non-Communicable Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeremy I; Dunkle, Ashley; Akiteng, Ann R; Birabwa-Male, Doreen; Kagimu, Richard; Mondo, Charles K; Mutungi, Gerald; Rabin, Tracy L; Skonieczny, Michael; Sykes, Jamila; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is accelerating. Given that the capacity of health systems in LMICs is already strained by the weight of communicable diseases, these countries find themselves facing a double burden of disease. NCDs contribute significantly to morbidity and mortality, thereby playing a major role in the cycle of poverty, and impeding development. Integrated approaches to health service delivery and healthcare worker (HCW) training will be necessary in order to successfully combat the great challenge posed by NCDs. In 2013, we formed the Uganda Initiative for Integrated Management of NCDs (UINCD), a multidisciplinary research collaboration that aims to present a systems approach to integrated management of chronic disease prevention, care, and the training of HCWs. Through broad-based stakeholder engagement, catalytic partnerships, and a collective vision, UINCD is working to reframe integrated health service delivery in Uganda.

  12. An Analysis of the Policy Environment Surrounding Noncommunicable Diseases Risk Factor Surveillance in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary Mamka Anyona

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kenya is a developing country in sub-Saharan Africa, facing a triple disease burden, with an increase in non-communicable diseases (NCDs; uncontained infectious diseases; coupled with significant morbidity and mortality from environmental causes such as droughts and flooding. The limelight has been on infectious diseases, leaving few resources for NCDs. As NCDs start to gain attention, it is becoming apparent that essential information on their epidemiology and risk factor trends—key in evidence-based decision-making—is lacking. As a consequence, policies have long relied on information derived from unreliable data sources such as vital registries and facility-level data, and unrepresentative data from small-scale clinical and academic research. This study analyzed the health policy aspects of NCD risk factor surveillance in Kenya, describing barriers to the successful design and implementation of an NCD risk factor surveillance system, and suggests a strategy best suited for the Kenyan situation. A review of policy documents and publications was augmented by a field-study consisting of interviews of key informants identified as stakeholders. Findings were analyzed using the Walt and Gilson policy analysis triangle. Findings attest that no population baseline NCD burden or risk factor data was available, with a failed WHO STEPs survey in 2005, to be undertaken in 2013. Despite the continued mention of NCD surveillance and the highlighting of its importance in various policy documents, a related strategy is yet to be established. Hurdles ranged from a lack of political attention for NCDs and competing public interests, to the lack of an evidence-based decision making culture and the impact of aid dependency of health programs. Progress in recognition of NCDs was noted and the international community and civil society's contribution to these achievements documented. While a positive outlook on the future of NCD surveillance were encountered

  13. National action plan for non-communicable diseases prevention and control in Iran; a response to emerging epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peykari, Niloofar; Hashemi, Hassan; Dinarvand, Rasoul; Haji-Aghajani, Mohammad; Malekzadeh, Reza; Sadrolsadat, Ali; Sayyari, Ali Akbar; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen; Delavari, Alireza; Farzadfar, Farshad; Haghdoost, Aliakbar; Heshmat, Ramin; Jamshidi, Hamidreza; Kalantari, Naser; Koosha, Ahmad; Takian, Amirhossein; Larijani, Bagher

    2017-01-01

    Emerging Non-communicable diseases burden move United Nation to call for 25% reduction by 2025 in premature mortality from non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The World Health Organization (WHO) developed global action plan for prevention and control NCDs, but the countries' contexts, priorities, and health care system might be different. Therefore, WHO expects from countries to meet national commitments to achieve the 25 by 25 goal through adapted targets and action plan. In this regards, sustainable high-level political statement plays a key role in rules and regulation support, and multi-sectoral collaborations to NCDs' prevention and control by considering the sustainable development goals and universal health coverage factors. Therefore, Iran established the national authority's structure as Iranian Non Communicable Diseases Committee (INCDC) and developed NCDs' national action plan through multi-sectoral approach and collaboration researchers and policy makers. Translation Iran's expertise could be benefit to mobilizing leadership in other countries for practical action to save the millions of peoples.

  14. [Provincial representativeness assessment of China Non-communicable and Chronic Disease Risk Factor Surveillance System in 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z P; Wang, L M; Li, Y C; Jiang, Y; Zhang, M; Huang, Z J; Zhang, X; Li, C; Zhou, M G

    2018-02-06

    Objective: To evaluate the provincial representativeness of China Non-communicable and Chronic Disease Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2013. Methods: The Sixth National Population Census data which was collected by National Bureau of Statistics of People's Republic of China was used to calculate proportion of population who aged 65 and above, mortality rate, the proportion of non-agriculture population, the illiteracy rate and urbanization rate in order to evaluate the surveillance system in each province. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine the statistically differences between the surveillance system and corresponding general population. Results: Among the 298 disease surveillance points (DSPs) in China Non-communicable and Chronic Disease Risk Factor Surveillance System, there were 111, 85, and 102 DSPs located in the east, middle, and west area of China, which covering 13.90%, 11.48%, and 12.28% of the total population, respectively. The surveillance system covered 169 million of the population of China, accounting for 12.70% of Chinese population. The number of DSPs by provinces ranges from 6 (Hainan, Qinghai, and Ningxia) to 14 (Shandong, Guangdong and Henan). It indicated that mortality rate (DSP: 0.238%; Province: 0.482%) and the illiteracy rate (DSP: 15.54%; Province: 26.22%) among DSPs in Tibet were significantly lower than the provincial level, on the other hand, the proportion of non-agriculture population among DSPs (40.6%) was significantly higher than the provincial level (18.8%). The urbanization rate among Jiangxi DSPs (43.4%) was significantly lower than the provincial level (59.9%). The proportion of non-agriculture population among Shandong DSPs (32.8%) was significantly higher than the provincial level (24.2%), however, the illiteracy rate among Shandong DSPs (3.86%) was significantly lower than the provincial level (5.25%). Other than the provinces mentioned above, there was no statistical differences ( P> 0.05) among proportions of

  15. Can internet access growth help reduce the global burden of noncommunicable diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes, are currently the leading causes of death in several regions of the world. The continuing fast increase in the global burden of noncommunicable diseases is accompanied by a speedy worldwide internet access growth. The worldwide number of internet users has doubled over the past five years. As the internet can make the access to information on a healthy lifestyle and disease prevention activities easier, internet access growth may help to promote good health. Against this background, I discuss the roles the internet and access to information can play in health promotion. I also present an open access web portal on local prevention and health promotion activities. It was initiated by two German states to link health information from disparate sources and to organize this information in a user-friendly way. The web portal focuses on reducing preventable lifestyle-related risk factors associated with noncommunicable diseases, including physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, tobacco use, and the harmful use of alcohol. This local initiative has the potential for scaling up and can serve as a blueprint for other areas that have or will acquire internet access.

  16. The Global Epidemiologic Transition: Noncommunicable Diseases and Emerging Health Risk of Allergic Disease in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiim, George A.; Elliott, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Globally, there has been a shift in the causes of illness and death from infectious diseases to noncommunicable diseases. This changing pattern has been attributed to the effects of an (ongoing) epidemiologic transition. Although researchers have applied epidemiologic transition theory to questions of global health, there have been relatively few…

  17. Progress with the Strategic Action Plan for Tackling Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in Brazil, 2011-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Oliveira, Taís Porto; Santos, Maria Aline Siqueira; Andrade, Silvânia Suely Caribé de Araújo; Silva, Marta Maria Alves da

    2016-01-01

    to describe the actions undertaken by the Strategic Action Plan for Tackling Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) in Brazil, from 2011 to 2015. the actions were identified through sectorial and interministerial meetings, annual forums, as well as document reviews of publications and laws on government websites. the actions found were: national surveys and monitoring of mortality and risk factor reduction targets; encouragement of physical activity, adequate nutrition and health promotion through the creation of the Health Gym Program (Programa Academia da Saúde); the publication of legislation on tobacco-free environments; free of charge drugs for hypertension, diabetes, and asthma; organization of the emergency service network for cardiovascular diseases; and expanding access to diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients. we found progress regarding surveillance, health promotion and comprehensive care; in general, the goals of the Plan are being met.

  18. Below the poverty line and non-communicable diseases in Kerala: The Epidemiology of Non-communicable Diseases in Rural Areas (ENDIRA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Jaideep; Vijayakumar, N; Joseph, Joseph K; David, P C; Menon, M N; Mukundan, Shyam; Dorphy, P D; Banerjee, Amitava

    2015-01-01

    India carries the greatest burden of global non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Poverty is strongly associated with NCDs but there are few prevalence studies which have measured poverty in India, particularly in rural settings. In Kerala, India, a population of 113,462 individuals was identified. The "Epidemiology of Non-communicable Diseases in Rural Areas" (ENDIRA) study was conducted via ASHAs (Accredited Social Health Activists). Standardised questionnaires were used in household interviews of individuals ≥18years during 2012 to gather sociodemographic, lifestyle and medical data for this population. The Government of Kerala definition of "the poverty line" was used. The association between below poverty line (BPL) status, NCDs and risk factors was analysed in multivariable regression models. 84,456 adults were included in the analyses (25.4% below the poverty line). The prevalence of NCDs was relatively common: myocardial infarction (MI) 1.4%, stroke 0.3%, respiratory diseases 5.0%, and cancer 1.1%. BPL status was not associated with age (p=0.96) or gender (p=0.26). Compared with those above the poverty line (APL), the BPL group was less likely to have diabetes, hypertension or dyslipidaemia (ppoverty line status. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Integration of mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases in Peru: challenges and opportunities for primary care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Diez-Canseco, Francisco; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú. Psicólogo, magíster en Salud Pública.; Ipince, Alessandra; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú. antropóloga.; Toyama, Mauricio; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú. Facultad de Letras y Ciencias Humanas, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Lima, Perú. estudiante de Psicología.; Benate-Galvez, Ysabel; Gerencia de Prestaciones Primarias de Salud, Gerencia Central de Prestaciones de Salud, Seguro Social del Perú. médico geriatra.; Galán-Rodas, Edén; Gerencia de Prestaciones Primarias de Salud, Gerencia Central de Prestaciones de Salud, Seguro Social del Perú, EsSalud. Lima, Perú. médico cirujano.; Medina-Verástegui, Julio César; Gerencia de Prestaciones Primarias de Salud, Gerencia Central de Prestaciones de Salud, Seguro Social del Perú, EsSalud. Lima, Perú. médico pediatra.; Sánchez-Moreno, David; Centro de Salud “El Progreso”, Microrred de Salud Carabayllo, Red de Salud Túpac Amaru, DISA V Lima Ciudad, Ministerio de Salud, Lima, Perú. psicólogo.; Araya, Ricardo; Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Londres, Reino Unido. médico psiquiatra, doctor en Epidemiología Psiquiátrica.; Miranda, J. Jaime; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. médico, magíster y doctor en Epidemiología.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases is discussed as well as the possibility to address them in a comprehensive manner in the Peruvian health system. First, the prevalence estimates and the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases and mental disorders worldwide and in Peru are reviewed. Then, the detrimental impact of depression in the early stages as well as the progress of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases is described. Addition...

  20. Medicine Availability and Prescribing Policy for Non-Communicable Diseases in the Western Balkan Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekez-Pavlisko, Tanja; Racic, Maja; Kusmuk, Srebrenka

    2017-01-01

    During the transition processes, the Western Balkan countries were affected by conflicts and transition-related changes. Life expectancy in these countries is lower, while the mortality from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is higher in comparison with western and northern parts of Europe. The primary aim of this study was to analyze the treatment possibilities for the most common NCDs in the Western Balkan countries. The secondary aim was to understand and compare the policies regarding prescribing-related competencies of family physicians. In June and July 2017, a document analysis was performed of national positive medicines lists, strategic documents, and clinical guidelines for the treatment of the most frequent NCDs; arterial hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). All text phrases that referred to medicines prescribing were extracted and sorted into following domains: medicine availability, prescribing policy, and medication prescribing-related competencies. Possibilities for treatment of arterial hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, asthma, and COPD vary across the Western Balkan countries. This variance is reflected in the number of registered medicines, number of parallels, and number of different combinations, as well as restrictions placed on family physicians in prescribing insulin, inhaled corticosteroids, statins and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), without consultant's recommendation. Western Balkan countries are capable of providing essential medicines for the treatment of NCDs, with full or partial reimbursement. There are some exceptions, related to statins, newer generation of oral antidiabetic agents and some of the antihypertensive combinations. Prescribing-related competences of family physicians are limited. However, this practice is not compliant to the practices of family medicine, its principles and primary care structures, and may potentially result in increased health

  1. The prevalence and risk factor control associated with noncommunicable diseases in China, Japan, and Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Defu; Sakai, Hiromichi; Wakabayashi, Chihiro; Kwon, Jong-Sook; Lee, Yoonna; Liu, Shuo; Wan, Qiaoqin; Sasao, Kumiko; Ito, Kanade; Nishihara, Ken; Wang, Peiyu

    2017-12-01

    Noncommunicable disease (NCD) has become the leading cause of mortality and disease burden worldwide. A cross-sectional survey was carried out to investigate the prevalence of NCDs and risk factor control on dietary behaviors and dietary intake in China, Japan, and Korea. There were significant differences among the three countries on the prevalence of hypertension (24.5% in China, 17.6% in Korea, and 15.2% in Japan), diabetes (8.9% in China, 5.7% in Korea, and 4.8% in Japan), hyperlipidemia (13.1% in China, 9.2% in Korea, and 6.9% in Japan), and angina pectoris (3.6% in China, 1.7% in Korea, and 1.5% in Japan). The prevalence rate of hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and angina pectoris was highest in China and lowest in Japan. However, 82.2%, 48.4%, and 64.4% of Chinese, Koreans, and Japanese presented good dietary behavior, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression analysis found that sex, age, and marital status were predictors of good dietary behavior. In addition, in comparison with subjects without hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia, subjects with hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia significantly improved their dietary behaviors and controlled their intake of salt, sugar, and oil. The prevalence of NCDs and trends in major modifiable risk factor control in China, Korea, and Japan remain troubling. Public efforts to introduce healthy lifestyle changes and systematic NCDs prevention programs are necessary to reduce the epidemic of NCDs in these three Asian countries. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The environmental roots of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and the epigenetic impacts of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vineis, Paolo; Stringhini, Silvia; Porta, Miquel

    2014-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are increasing worldwide. We hypothesize that environmental factors (including social adversity, diet, lack of physical activity and pollution) can become "embedded" in the biology of humans. We also hypothesize that the "embedding" partly occurs because of epigenetic changes, i.e., durable changes in gene expression patterns. Our concern is that once such factors have a foundation in human biology, they can affect human health (including NCDs) over a long period of time and across generations. To analyze how worldwide changes in movements of goods, persons and lifestyles (globalization) may affect the "epigenetic landscape" of populations and through this have an impact on NCDs. We provide examples of such changes and effects by discussing the potential epigenetic impact of socio-economic status, migration, and diet, as well as the impact of environmental factors influencing trends in age at puberty. The study of durable changes in epigenetic patterns has the potential to influence policy and practice; for example, by enabling stratification of populations into those who could particularly benefit from early interventions to prevent NCDs, or by demonstrating mechanisms through which environmental factors influence disease risk, thus providing compelling evidence for policy makers, companies and the civil society at large. The current debate on the '25 × 25 strategy', a goal of 25% reduction in relative mortality from NCDs by 2025, makes the proposed approach even more timely. Epigenetic modifications related to globalization may crucially contribute to explain current and future patterns of NCDs, and thus deserve attention from environmental researchers, public health experts, policy makers, and concerned citizens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The prevalence and risk factor control associated with noncommunicable diseases in China, Japan, and Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defu Ma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Noncommunicable disease (NCD has become the leading cause of mortality and disease burden worldwide. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out to investigate the prevalence of NCDs and risk factor control on dietary behaviors and dietary intake in China, Japan, and Korea. Results: There were significant differences among the three countries on the prevalence of hypertension (24.5% in China, 17.6% in Korea, and 15.2% in Japan, diabetes (8.9% in China, 5.7% in Korea, and 4.8% in Japan, hyperlipidemia (13.1% in China, 9.2% in Korea, and 6.9% in Japan, and angina pectoris (3.6% in China, 1.7% in Korea, and 1.5% in Japan. The prevalence rate of hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and angina pectoris was highest in China and lowest in Japan. However, 82.2%, 48.4%, and 64.4% of Chinese, Koreans, and Japanese presented good dietary behavior, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression analysis found that sex, age, and marital status were predictors of good dietary behavior. In addition, in comparison with subjects without hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia, subjects with hypertension, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia significantly improved their dietary behaviors and controlled their intake of salt, sugar, and oil. Conclusions: The prevalence of NCDs and trends in major modifiable risk factor control in China, Korea, and Japan remain troubling. Public efforts to introduce healthy lifestyle changes and systematic NCDs prevention programs are necessary to reduce the epidemic of NCDs in these three Asian countries.

  4. Infections interplay with non-communicable diseases. African Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    on the 'histologic chemotherapy for colorectal cancer'14. Our interest lies in the fact that colorectal adenocarcinoma is be- coming extremely common in Africa, possibly due to change in dietary habits of our people. Sickle cell anaemia seems ... characteristics, outcome pattern and predictors of mortality in a cohort of diabetic ...

  5. Addressing non-communicable diseases in Malaysia: an integrative process of systems and community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Feisul; Omar, Zainal; Mihat, Omar; Md Noh, Kamaliah; Hassan, Noraryana; Abu Bakar, Rotina; Abd Manan, Azizah; Ismail, Fatanah; Jabbar, Norli; Muhamad, Yusmah; Rahman, Latifah A; Majid, Fatimah A; Shahrir, Siti; Ahmad, Eliana; Davey, Tamzyn; Allotey, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and NCD risk factors in Malaysia have risen substantially in the last two decades. The Malaysian Ministry of Health responded by implementing, "The National Strategic Plan for Non-Communicable Diseases (NSP-NCD) 2010-2014", and the "NCD Prevention 1Malaysia" (NCDP-1M) programme. This paper outlines the primary health system context in which the NCDP-1M is framed. We also discuss the role of community in facilitating the integration of this programme, and outline some of the key challenges in addressing the sustainability of the plan over the next few years. The paper thus provides an analysis of an integration of a programme that involved a multi-sectoral approach with the view to contributing to a broader discourse on the development of responsive health systems.

  6. Prevention of Non-communicable Diseases by Balanced Nutrition: Population- specific Effective Public Health Approaches in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passi, Santosh J

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the developing countries are afflicted with the dual burden of disease - non-communicable diseases (NCDs) becoming a major public health challenge. It is projected that in near future, NCDs will account for nearly 70% of the mortality in developing world. Caused due to lifestyle related factors, there is an upsurge in the incidence of overweight/obesity, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancers, respiratory diseases and mental illnesses. Appropriate dietary practices, increased physical activity, weight management, abstinence from tobacco/substance use and alcohol abuse play an important role in their prevention and management. This narrative review highlights the role of various dietary components - both nutrient and non-nutrient, in the prevention and risk reduction of NCDs. It is a comprehensive overview of various experimental researches, observational studies, clinical trials, epidemiological studies, pooled/meta-analyses and reviews carried out globally, particularly the developing nations. Studies were retrieved by an extensive search of the online PubMed/Medline, SciVerse Scopus databases using individual/combination of several keywords like non-communicable diseases, energy, various nutrients, sugar sweetened beverages, functional foods, tea, coffee, spices/condiments/herbs, animal foods, nuts and oil seeds, physical activity, dietary practices, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, T2DM, respiratory diseases, lifestyle modifications, tobacco, smoking, alcohol and public health approaches. The review also highlights several preventive approaches for curbing NCDs in the developing world with special emphasis on dietary factors. Since the occurrence of NCDs is marked by a cumulative effect of various risk factors, urgent collective actions are needed to avert/prevent the same effectively. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Prevention of non-communicable diseases in Pakistan: an integrated partnership-based model

    OpenAIRE

    Nishtar, Sania

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Development and implementation of non-communicable disease (NCD) prevention polices in the developing countries is a multidimensional challenge. This article highlights the evolution of a strategic approach in Pakistan. The model is evidence-based and encompasses a concerted and integrated approach to NCDs. It has been modelled to impact a set of indicators through the combination of a range of actions capitalizing on the strengths of a public-private partnership. The paper highlight...

  8. Hunger and Behavioral Risk Factors for Noncommunicable Diseases in School-Going Adolescents in Bolivia, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Matthew L

    2016-04-21

    Hunger may play a role in noncommunicable disease (NCD) risk. This study used the 2012 Global School-based Student Health Survey from Bolivia to determine the association between hunger and risk factors for NCDs among adolescents. Hunger was associated with increased odds of nondaily fruit and vegetable consumption (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.21; P hunger sometimes [AOR = 1.83; P hunger, in addition to traditional behavioral risk factors.

  9. Impact of school policies on non-communicable disease risk factors - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ankur; Bassi, Shalini; Nazar, Gaurang P; Saluja, Kiran; Park, MinHae; Kinra, Sanjay; Arora, Monika

    2017-04-04

    Globally, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are identified as one of the leading causes of mortality. NCDs have several modifiable risk factors including unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, tobacco use and alcohol abuse. Schools provide ideal settings for health promotion, but the effectiveness of school policies in the reduction of risk factors for NCD is not clear. This study reviewed the literature on the impact of school policies on major NCD risk factors. A systematic review was conducted to identify, collate and synthesize evidence on the effectiveness of school policies on reduction of NCD risk factors. A search strategy was developed to identify the relevant studies on effectiveness of NCD policies in schools for children between the age of 6 to 18 years in Ovid Medline, EMBASE, and Web of Science. Data extraction was conducted using pre-piloted forms. Studies included in the review were assessed for methodological quality using the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) quality assessment tool. A narrative synthesis according to the types of outcomes was conducted to present the evidence on the effectiveness of school policies. Overall, 27 out of 2633 identified studies were included in the review. School policies were comparatively more effective in reducing unhealthy diet, tobacco use, physical inactivity and inflammatory biomarkers as opposed to anthropometric measures, overweight/obesity, and alcohol use. In total, for 103 outcomes independently evaluated within these studies, 48 outcomes (46%) had significant desirable changes when exposed to the school policies. Based on the quality assessment, 18 studies were categorized as weak, six as moderate and three as having strong methodological quality. Mixed findings were observed concerning effectiveness of school policies in reducing NCD risk factors. The findings demonstrate that schools can be a good setting for initiating positive changes in reducing NCD risk factors, but more research is

  10. The dynamic of non-communicable disease control policy in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiani, Yodi; Dugdale, Paul; Tavener, Meredith; Byles, Julie E

    2017-05-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to examine non-communicable disease (NCD) policy formation and implementation in Indonesia. Methods Interviews were conducted with 13 Indonesian health policy workers. The processes and issues relating to NCD policy formation were mapped, exploring the interactions between policy makers, technical/implementation bodies, alliances across various levels and the mobilisation of non-policy actors. Results Problems in NCD policy formation include insufficient political interest in NCD control, disconnected policies and difficulty in multisectoral coordination. These problems are well illustrated in relation to tobacco control, but also apply to other control efforts. Nevertheless, participants were optimistic that there are plentiful opportunities for improving NCD control policies given growing global attention to NCD, increases in the national health budget and the growing body of Indonesia-relevant NCD-related research. Conclusion Indonesia's success in the creation and implementation of NCD policy will be dependent on high-level governmental leadership, including support from the President, the Health Minister and coordinating ministries. What is known about the topic? The burden of NCD in Indonesia has increased gradually. Nationally, NCD-related mortality accounted for 65% of deaths in 2010. Indonesia is also a country with the highest burden of tobacco smoking in the world. However, the government has not instituted sufficient policy action to tackle NCDs, including tobacco control. What does this paper add? This paper deepens our understanding of current NCD control policy formation in Indonesia, including the possible underlying reason why Indonesia has weak tobacco control policies. It describes the gaps in the current policies, the actors involved in policy formation, the challenges in policy formation and implementation and potential opportunities for improving NCD control. What are the implications for

  11. Improving non-communicable disease remediation outcomes in Tonga: the importance of domestic fruit production systems: an analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. R. Underhill

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-communicable diseases (NCD are the leading cause of mortality in the Pacific Island nation of Tonga. Current remedial strategies have focused on promoting healthy food choices based on increased intake of fruits and vegetables. While researchers seek to overcome complex social, gender and cultural practices that impede dietary transition, discontinuous domestic fruit supply chains undermine this effort. With the view to supporting a more holistic approach to NCD remediation in Tonga, this paper provides a preliminary assessment of domestic horticultural supply chains constraints, in support of diversification and expansion of local fruit production. Current impediments and constraints to enhanced local fruit production are presented and possible strategies to increased domestic fruit supply discussed. We present a case for a more consumer-centric approach to industry development, with an emphasis on production systems that are compatible with existing social structures, customary land ownership constraints, and local nutritional needs.

  12. The Changing Pattern of Hospital Admission to Medical Wards; Burden of non-communicable diseases at a hospital in a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sufian K. Noor

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to determine the pattern of hospital admissions and patient outcomes in medical wards at Atbara Teaching Hospital in River Nile State, Sudan. Methods: This retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2013 to July 2014 and included all patients admitted to medical wards at the Atbara Teaching Hospital during the study period. Morbidity and mortality data was obtained from medical records. Diseases were categorised using the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases (ICD coding system. Results: A total of 2,614 patient records were analysed. The age group with the highest admissions was the 56‒65-year-old age group (19.4% and the majority of patients were admitted for one week or less (86.4%. Non-communicable diseases constituted 71.8% of all cases. According to ICD classifications, patients were admitted most frequently due to infectious or parasitic diseases (19.7%, followed by diseases of the circulatory (16.4%, digestive (16.4% and genito-urinary (13.8% systems. The most common diseases were cardiovascular disease (16.4%, malaria (11.3%, gastritis/peptic ulcer disease (9.8%, urinary tract infections (7.2% and diabetes mellitus (6.9%. The mortality rate was 4.7%. Conclusion: The burden of non-communicable diseases was found to exceed that of communicable diseases among patients admitted to medical wards at the Atbara Teaching Hospital.

  13. The Changing Pattern of Hospital Admission to Medical Wards: Burden of non-communicable diseases at a hospital in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Sufian K; Elmadhoun, Wadie M; Bushara, Sarra O; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to determine the pattern of hospital admissions and patient outcomes in medical wards at Atbara Teaching Hospital in River Nile State, Sudan. This retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted from August 2013 to July 2014 and included all patients admitted to medical wards at the Atbara Teaching Hospital during the study period. Morbidity and mortality data was obtained from medical records. Diseases were categorised using the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding system. A total of 2,614 patient records were analysed. The age group with the highest admissions was the 56-65-year-old age group (19.4%) and the majority of patients were admitted for one week or less (86.4%). Non-communicable diseases constituted 71.8% of all cases. According to ICD classifications, patients were admitted most frequently due to infectious or parasitic diseases (19.7%), followed by diseases of the circulatory (16.4%), digestive (16.4%) and genito-urinary (13.8%) systems. The most common diseases were cardiovascular disease (16.4%), malaria (11.3%), gastritis/peptic ulcer disease (9.8%), urinary tract infections (7.2%) and diabetes mellitus (6.9%). The mortality rate was 4.7%. The burden of non-communicable diseases was found to exceed that of communicable diseases among patients admitted to medical wards at the Atbara Teaching Hospital.

  14. Cost of care of chronic non-communicable diseases in Jamaican patients: the role of obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M. Fray-Aiken

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the economic cost of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases (CNCDs and the portion attributable to obesity among patients in Jamaica. METHODS: The cost-of-illness approach was used to estimate the cost of care in a hospital setting in Jamaica for type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, gallbladder disease, breast cancer, colon cancer, osteoarthritis, and high cholesterol. Cost and service utilization data were collected from the hospital records of all patients with these diseases who visited the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI during 2006. Patients were included in the study if they were between15 and 74 years of age and if female, were not pregnant during that year. Costs were categorized as direct or indirect. Direct costs included costs for prescription drugs, consultation visits (emergency and clinic visits, hospitalizations, allied health services, diagnostic and treatment procedures. Indirect costs included costs attributed to premature mortality, disability (permanent and temporary, and absenteeism. Indirect costs were discounted at 3% rate. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 554 patients (40% males (60% females. The economic burden of the nine diseases was estimated at US$ 5,672,618 (males 37%; females 63% and the portion attributable to obesity amounted to US$ 1,157,173 (males 23%; females 77%. Total direct cost was estimated at US$ 3,740,377 with female patients accounting for 69.9% of this cost. Total indirect cost was estimated at US$ 1,932,241 with female patients accounting for 50.6% of this cost. The greater cost among women was not found to be statistically significant. Overall, on a per capita basis, males and females accrued similar costs-of-illness (US$ 9,451.75 vs. US$ 10,758.18. CONCLUSIONS: In a country with per capita GDP of less than US$ 5,300, a per capita annual cost of illness of US$ 10,239 for CNCDs is excessive and has detrimental implications for the

  15. Non-communicable diseases among children in Ghana: health and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    communicable diseases (NCDs). This paper examined the health and social concerns of parents/caregivers on in-patient care for children with NCDs in Ghana. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in three large health facilities in Ghana (the largest ...

  16. The visibility of non-communicable diseases in Northern Uganda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diabetes, depression, and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We checked the ... The development of a separate national mental health .... for outpatients age 5 and above for one month. Table 3. Selected chronic disease diagnoses for outpatients age 5+ October 2011. Health unit HT. DM. Depression PTSD. Total pts*.

  17. Multimorbidity in non-communicable diseases in South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension was the commonest NCD diagnosis encountered (13.1%), followed by type 2 diabetes (3.9%), osteoarthritis (2.2%), asthma (2.0%), epilepsy (1.9%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (0.6%). The majority of patients (66.9%) consulted a nurse and 33.1% a doctor. Overall 48.4% of patients had ...

  18. State of non-communicable diseases in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Gajananda Prakash; Angdembe, Mirak Raj; Dhimal, Meghnath; Neupane, Sushma; Bhusal, Choplal

    2014-01-10

    The prevalence of Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs) is still unknown in Nepal. The Ministry of Health and Population, Government of Nepal has not yet formulated policy regarding NCDs in the absence of evidence based finding. The study aims to find out the hospital based prevalence of NCDs in Nepal, thus directing the concerned authorities at policy level. A cross sectional study was conducted to identify the hospital based prevalence of 4 NCDs (cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), wherein 400 indoor patients admitted during 2009 were randomly selected from each of the 31 selected health institutions which included all non-specialist tertiary level hospitals outside the Kathmandu valley (n = 25), all specialist tertiary level hospitals in the country (n = 3) and 3 non-specialist tertiary level hospitals inside the Kathmandu valley. In case of Kathmandu valley, 3 non-specialist health institutions- one central hospital, one medical college and one private hospital were randomly selected. The main analyses are based on the 28 non-specialist hospitals. Univariate (frequency and percentage) and bivariate (cross-tabulation) analysis were used. In non-specialist institutions, the hospital based NCD prevalence was 31%. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (43%) was the most common NCD followed by cardiovascular disease (40%), diabetes mellitus (12%) and cancer (5%). Ovarian (14%), stomach (14%) and lung cancer (10%) were the main cancers accounting for 38% of distribution. Majority of CVD cases were hypertension (47%) followed by cerebrovascular accident (16%), congestive cardiac failure (11%), ischemic heart disease (7%), rheumatic heart disease (5%) and myocardial infarction (2%). CVD was common in younger age groups while COPD in older age groups. Majority among males (42%) and females (45%) were suffering from COPD. The study was able to reveal that Nepal is also facing the surging burden of NCDs similar

  19. Fetal programming and the risk of noncommunicable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Caroline H D

    2013-03-01

    The "developmental origins of health and disease" (DOHaD) hypothesis proposes that environmental conditions during fetal and early post-natal development influence lifelong health and capacity through permanent effects on growth, structure and metabolism. This has been called 'programming'. The hypothesis is supported by epidemiological evidence in humans linking newborn size, and infant growth and nutrition, to adult health outcomes, and by experiments in animals showing that maternal under- and over-nutrition and other interventions (e.g., glucocorticoid exposure) during pregnancy lead to abnormal metabolism and body composition in the adult offspring. Early life programming is now thought to be important in the etiology of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, opening up the possibility that these common diseases could be prevented by achieving optimal fetal and infant development. This is likely to have additional benefits for infant survival and human capital (e.g., improved cognitive performance and physical work capacity). Fetal nutrition is influenced by the mother's diet and body size and composition, but hard evidence that the nutrition of the human mother programmes chronic disease risk in her offspring is currently limited. Recent findings from follow-up of children born after randomised nutritional interventions in pregnancy are mixed, but show some evidence of beneficial effects on vascular function, lipid concentrations, glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. Work in experimental animals suggests that epigenetic phenomena, whereby gene expression is modified by DNA methylation, and which are sensitive to the nutritional environment in early life, may be one mechanism underlying programming.

  20. Gender and leadership for health literacy to combat the epidemic rise of noncommunicable diseases.

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    Manhanzva, Rufaro; Marara, Praise; Duxbury, Theodore; Bobbins, Amy Claire; Pearse, Noel; Hoel, Erik; Mzizi, Thandi; Srinivas, Sunitha C

    2017-08-01

    Until recently, the noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) epidemic has been considered only a significant burden to men in high-income countries. However, latest figures indicate that half of all NCD-related deaths affect women, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), with global responses to the NCD epidemic overlooking the significance of women and girls in their approaches and programs. This case study highlights the burden of disease challenging South Africa that disproportionately affects women in the country and suggests that the country, along with other LMICs internationally, requires a shift in the gender-based leadership of health literacy and self-empowerment.

  1. [Behavioral risk factors of chronic non-communicable diseases in medical doctors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Исаева, Анна С; Резник, Лариса А; Вовченко, Марина Н; Буряковская, Алена А; Довганюк, Инна Э

    2017-01-01

    Introdukcion: Group of chronic communicable disease is the main cause of mobility and mortality in industrially and development countries. The same behavioral risk factors are in the basis of these diseases. On the one side medical doctors are completely aware about risk factors management, from the other side, they are mainly unable to maintain healthy life style. The aim of the present study was to assess behavioral risk factors in medical doctors and awareness of need to maintain healthy life style. Fifty one medical doctors of different specialties were included in the study. Anthropometric parameters (high, weight, waist circumference, body mass index, body composition, smoking status, nutrition habits, sleep quality and physical activity were studied. The body composition was assessed with Omron Body Composition Monitor BF511. Physical activity was measurement by pedometer Omron Walking style III step counter HJ-203-EK. The status of smoking, nutrition habits and sleep quality were analyzed with standardized questionnaires. Materials and Methods:Fifty one medical doctors of different specialties were included in the study. Anthropometric parameters (high, weight, waist circumference, body mass index, body composition, smoking status, nutrition habits, sleep quality and physical activity were studied. The body composition was assessed with Omron Body Composition Monitor BF511. Physical activity was measurement by pedometer Omron Walking style III step counter HJ-203-EK. The status of smoking, nutrition habits and sleep quality were analyzed with standardized questionnaires. Results: very low level of physical activity was found in medical doctors. Median of steps per day in male subjects was8462 [5742÷10430] and 7479 [5574÷10999] in female. Such physical activity was associated with overweight; low muscular and high fat tissue as well as with increased level of visceral fat. Different sleep disorders and associated day symptoms were detected in investigated

  2. Obesity-related non-communicable diseases: South Asians vs White Caucasians.

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    Misra, A; Khurana, L

    2011-02-01

    South Asians are at higher risk than White Caucasians for the development of obesity and obesity-related non-communicable diseases (OR-NCDs), including insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and coronary heart disease (CHD). Rapid nutrition and lifestyle transitions have contributed to acceleration of OR-NCDs in South Asians. Differences in determinants and associated factors for OR-NCDs between South Asians and White Caucasians include body phenotype (high body fat, high truncal, subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat, and low muscle mass), biochemical parameters (hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, hyperleptinemia, low levels of adiponectin and high levels of C-reactive protein), procoagulant state and endothelial dysfunction. Higher prevalence, earlier onset and increased complications of T2DM and CHD are often seen at lower levels of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) in South Asians than White Caucasians. In view of these data, lower cut-offs for obesity and abdominal obesity have been advocated for Asian Indians (BMI; overweight >23 to 24.9 kg m(-2) and obesity ≥ 25 kg m(-2); and WC; men ≥ 90 cm and women ≥ 80 cm, respectively). Imbalanced nutrition, physical inactivity, perinatal adverse events and genetic differences are also important contributory factors. Other differences between South Asians and White Caucasians include lower disease awareness and health-seeking behavior, delayed diagnosis due to atypical presentation and language barriers, and religious and sociocultural factors. All these factors result in poorer prevention, less aggressive therapy, poorer response to medical and surgical interventions, and higher morbidity and mortality in the former. Finally, differences in response to pharmacological agents may exist between South Asians and White Caucasians, although these have been inadequately studied. In view of these data, prevention and management strategies should be more

  3. Reframing noncommunicable diseases and injuries for the poorest Malawians: the Malawi National NCDI Poverty Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundale, Katie; Wroe, Emily; Matanje-Mwagomba, Beatrice L; Muula, Adamson S; Gupta, Neil; Berman, Josh; Kasomekera, Noel; Masiye, Jones

    2017-06-01

    Noncommunicable diseases and injuries (NCDIs) account for nearly 70% of deaths worldwide, with an estimated 75% of these deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries. Globally, the burden of disease from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is most often caused by the "big 4," namely: diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and chronic lung diseases. However, in Malawi, these 4 conditions account for only 29% of the NCDI disease burden. The Malawi National NCDI Poverty Commission was launched in November 2016 and will describe and evaluate the current NCDI situation in Malawi, with a focus on the poorest populations. The National Commission will investigate which NCDIs cause the biggest burden, which are more present in the young, and which interventions are available to avert death and disability from NCDIs in Malawi, particularly among the poorest segments of the population. The evidence gained through the work of this Commission will help inform research, policy, and programme interventions, all through an advocacy lens, as we strive to address the impact of NCDIs among all populations in Malawi.

  4. GPER blockers as Nox downregulators: A new drug class to target chronic non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Matthias R; Barton, Matthias

    2018-02-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of chronic non-communicable diseases such as arterial hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes, and chronic renal disease. Cardiovascular diseases are characterized by increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NAPDH oxidase 1 (Nox1) and additional Nox isoforms among other sources. Activation of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) can mediate multiple salutary effects on the cardiovascular system. However, GPER also has constitutive activity, e.g. in the absence of specific agonists, that was recently shown to promote hypertension and aging-induced tissue damage by promoting Nox1-derived production of ROS. Furthermore, the small molecule GPER blocker (GRB) G36 reduces blood pressure and vascular ROS production by selectively down-regulating Nox1 expression. These unexpected findings revealed GRBs as first in class Nox downregulators capable to selectively reduce the increased expression and activity of Nox1 in disease conditions. Here, we will discuss the paradigm shift from selective GPER activation to ligand-independent, constitutive GPER signaling as a key regulator of Nox-derived oxidative stress, and the surprising identification of GRBs as the first Nox downregulators for the treatment of chronic non-communicable diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fermented Food and Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases: A Review

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    Doreen Gille

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Fermented foods represent a significant fraction of human diets. Although their impact on health is positively perceived, an objective evaluation is still missing. We have, therefore, reviewed meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials (RCT investigating the relationship between fermented foods and non-transmissible chronic diseases. Overall, after summarizing 25 prospective studies on dairy products, the association of fermented dairy with cancer was found to be neutral, whereas it was weakly beneficial, though inconsistent, for specific aspects of cardio-metabolic health, in particular stroke and cheese intake. The strongest evidence for a beneficial effect was for yoghurt on risk factors of type 2 diabetes. Although mechanisms explaining this association have not been validated, an increased bioavailability of insulinotropic amino acids and peptides as well as the bacterial biosynthesis of vitamins, in particular vitamin K2, might contribute to this beneficial effect. However, the heterogeneity in the design of the studies and the investigated foods impedes a definitive assessment of these associations. The literature on fermented plants is characterized by a wealth of in vitro data, whose positive results are not corroborated in humans due to the absence of RCTs. Finally, none of the RCTs were specifically designed to address the impact of food fermentation on health. This question should be addressed in future human studies.

  6. [Quality and compliance with Clinical Practice Guidelines of Chronic Noncommunicable Diseases in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblano-Verástegui, Ofelia; Vieyra-Romero, Waldo I; Galván-García, Ángel F; Fernández-Elorriaga, María; Rodríguez-Martínez, Antonia I; Saturno-Hernández, Pedro J

    2017-01-01

    To assess the quality and compliance of clinical practice guidelines (CPG) applicable to chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCD) in primary healthcare (CS), and views of staff on the barriers, facilitators and their use. 18 valued CPG with AGREEII, 3 are selected to develop indicators and assess compliance using lot quality acceptance sample (LQAS, standard 75 / 95% threshold 40 / 75% respectively, α:0. 05, β:0. 10) on 5 CS. 70 professionals surveyed about knowledge and use of CPG. Average quality of the CPG was 57.2%; low rating in domains: "Applicability" (health services.

  7. The economic burden of chronic non-communicable diseases in rural Malawi: an observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qun; Brenner, Stephan; Kalmus, Olivier; Banda, Hastings Thomas; De Allegri, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence from population-based studies on the economic burden imposed by chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCDs) is still sparse in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our study aimed to fill this existing gap in knowledge by estimating both the household direct, indirect, and total costs incurred due to CNCDs and the economic burden households bear as a result of these costs in Malawi. Methods The study used data from the first round of a longitudinal household health survey conducted in 2012 i...

  8. The burden of non-communicable diseases in Nigeria; in the context of globalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiyaki, Musa Baba; Garbati, Musa Abubakar

    2014-01-01

    This paper highlights the tenets of globalization and how its elements have spread to sub-Saharan Africa, and Nigeria in particular. It assesses the growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Nigeria and its relationship with globalization. It further describes the conceptual framework on which to view the impact of globalization on NCDs in Nigeria. It assesses the Nigerian dimension of the relationship between the risk factors of NCDs and globalization. Appropriate recommendations on tackling the burden of NCDs in Nigeria based on cost-effective, culturally sensitive, and evidence-based interventions are highlighted.

  9. The Impact of Selected Groups of Non-communicable Disease Deaths on Life Expectancy in the Slovak Republic.

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    Gavurová, Beáta; Vagašová, Tatiana; Dražilová, Sylvia; Jarčuška, Peter

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compute the potential gains in life expectancy (PGLEs) if the five main groups of non-communicable disease deaths were eliminated in the Slovak population during 1996-2014, and to decompose PGLEs by five-year age groups. PGLEs were computed from mortality reports for deaths from ischaemic heart disease (I20-25), cerebrovascular diseases (I60-I69), cancer (C00-C97), diabetes mellitus (E10-E14), and chronic respiratory diseases (J30-J98) using the life table decomposition technique. In 2014, life expectancy at birth was 76.87 years compared to 72.87 in 1996. The highest impact on life expectancy was recorded for ischaemic heart disease and PGLEs have changed from 3.9 years to 4.6 over 1996-2014. However, the trends for other diseases did not fluctuate. The PGLEs of cancer, as the second most influential disease, increased from 3.3 years to 3.6. Conversely, a slight decline was observed in cerebrovascular diseases from 1.13 years to 1.12, and diabetes mellitus from 0.14 years to 0.13. The proportion of diabetes mellitus and chronic respiratory diseases in PGLEs was low, approaching zero. As far as PGLEs among age groups in 2014 are concerened: whereas PGLEs for ischaemic heart disease mortality reduction are very similar among all age groups they are mostly on the decrease from other causes of death. However, PGLEs reached a value of 0.13 years in the 0-54 years age-group for diabetes mellitus; this means that the number of years of life lost are the same for 54 year old people and younger, with the impact of diabetes mellitus declining at age 55 and over. The same scenario is apparent for cerebrovascular diseases. The impact of mortality from other causes of death is decreasing with age. Our findings suggest that optimum benefit would be gained from prevention programs for reduction of ischaemic heart disease mortality in all age groups. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2017.

  10. Life course health care and preemptive approach to non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, Hiroo

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease, are chronic, non-infectious diseases of long duration. NCDs are increasingly widespread worldwide and are becoming a serious health and economic burden. NCDs arise from complex interactions between the genetic make-up of an individual and environmental factors. Several epidemiological studies have revealed that the perinatal environment influences health later in life, and have proposed the concept of developmental programming or developmental origin of health and disease (DOHaD). These studies suggest the importance of life course health care from fetal life, early childhood, adulthood, and through to old age. Recent progress in genomics, proteomics and diagnostic modalities holds promise for identifying high risk groups, predicting latent diseases, and allowing early intervention. Preemptive medicine is the ultimate goal of medicine, but to achieve it, the full participation of the public and all sectors of society is imperative.

  11. Food Exchange List and Dietary Management of Non-Communicable Diseases in Cultural Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mahnaz Nasir; Kalsoom, Samia; Khan, Ayyaz Ali

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses at highlighting the importance of Food Exchange List in cultural perspective, as an effective dietary tool to help individuals' manage their dietary modifications in relation to non communicable diseases whilst specifying measures that can help improve the quality of Food Exchange Lists for combating various non communicable diseases and addressing adherence related issues to specialized diets. A search was done using PubMed & Google Scholar till June 2016. Search terms used were food exchange list AND disease, diet AND non-communicable diseases. We included only studies that discussed Food Exchange List (FEL) in relation to non-communicable diseases; in addition to factors like cultural relevance and adherence. Out of the 837 papers accessed 57 were identified as relevant to the Food Exchange List, out of which 39 papers were focused to the concept and development of the Food Exchange List. Only 18 discussed FEL in relation to non communicable diseases and were thus included in the review. Food exchange list is a user friendly tool for dietary modification due to disease. This tool may help to customize meals for people as it provides information regarding various food items in different groups. This tool is helpful in reducing blood & plasma glucose levels, maintaining lipid profile & effectively combating other diet related diseases & those ailments in which diet plays a significant role in maintenance & prevention from reoccurrences. However, better management and adherence to modified diets for non communicable diseases can be ensured by keeping cultural relevance under consideration before using Food Exchange Lists for such diseases.

  12. Globalisation and the prevention and control of non-communicable disease: the neglected chronic diseases of adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaglehole, R; Yach, D

    2003-09-13

    The growing global burden of non-communicable diseases in poor countries and poor populations has been neglected by policy makers, major multilateral and bilateral aid donors, and academics. Despite strong evidence for the magnitude of this burden, the preventability of its causes, and the threat it poses to already strained health care systems, national and global actions have been inadequate. Globalisation is an important determinant of non-communicable disease epidemics since it has direct effects on risks to populations and indirect effects on national economies and health systems. The globalisation of the production and marketing campaigns of the tobacco and alcohol industries exemplify the challenges to policy makers and public health practitioners. A full range of policy responses is required from government and non-governmental agencies; unfortunately the capacity and resources for this response are insufficient, and governments need to respond appropriately. The progress made in controlling the tobacco industry is a modest cause for optimism.

  13. Establishing national noncommunicable disease surveillance in a developing country: a model for small island nations

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    Angela M. Rose

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To describe the surveillance model used to develop the first national, population-based, multiple noncommunicable disease (NCD registry in the Caribbean (one of the first of its kind worldwide; registry implementation; lessons learned; and incidence and mortality rates from the first years of operation. Methods Driven by limited national resources, this initiative of the Barbados Ministry of Health (MoH, in collaboration with The University of the West Indies, was designed to collect prospective data on incident stroke and acute myocardial infarction (MI (heart attack cases from all health care facilities in this small island developing state (SIDS in the Eastern Caribbean. Emphasis is on tertiary and emergency health care data sources. Incident cancer cases are obtained retrospectively, primarily from laboratories. Deaths are collected from the national death register. Results Phased introduction of the Barbados National Registry for Chronic NCDs (“the BNR” began with the stroke component (“BNR–Stroke,” 2008, followed by the acute MI component (“BNR–Heart,” 2009 and the cancer component (“BNR–Cancer,” 2010. Expected case numbers projected from prior studies estimated an average of 378 first-ever stroke, 900 stroke, and 372 acute MI patients annually, and registry data showed an annual average of about 238, 593, and 349 patients respectively. There were 1 204 tumors registered in 2008, versus the expected 1 395. Registry data were used to identify public health training themes. Success required building support from local health care professionals and creating island-wide registry awareness. With spending of approximately US$ 148 per event for 2 200 events per year, the program costs the MoH about US$ 1 per capita annually. Conclusions Given the limited absolute health resources available to SIDS, combined surveillance should be considered for building a national NCD evidence base. With prevalence

  14. Monitoring and accountability for the Pacific response to the non-communicable diseases crisis

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    Hilary Tolley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-communicable diseases (NCD are the leading cause of premature death and disability in the Pacific. In 2011, Pacific Forum Leaders declared “a human, social and economic crisis” due to the significant and growing burden of NCDs in the region. In 2013, Pacific Health Ministers’ commitment to ‘whole of government’ strategy prompted calls for the development of a robust, sustainable, collaborative NCD monitoring and accountability system to track, review and propose remedial action to ensure progress towards the NCD goals and targets. The purpose of this paper is to describe a regional, collaborative framework for coordination, innovation and application of NCD monitoring activities at scale, and to show how they can strengthen accountability for action on NCDs in the Pacific. A key component is the Dashboard for NCD Action which aims to strengthen mutual accountability by demonstrating national and regional progress towards agreed NCD policies and actions. Discussion The framework for the Pacific Monitoring Alliance for NCD Action (MANA draws together core country-level components of NCD monitoring data (mortality, morbidity, risk factors, health system responses, environments, and policies and identifies key cross-cutting issues for strengthening national and regional monitoring systems. These include: capacity building; a regional knowledge exchange hub; innovations (monitoring childhood obesity and food environments; and a robust regional accountability system. The MANA framework is governed by the Heads of Health and operationalised by a multi-agency technical Coordination Team. Alliance membership is voluntary and non-conditional, and aims to support the 22 Pacific Island countries and territories to improve the quality of NCD monitoring data across the region. In establishing a common vision for NCD monitoring, the framework combines data collected under the WHO Global Framework for NCDs with a set of action

  15. Managing and monitoring chronic non-communicable diseases in a primary health care clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjomo, R C; Mwagomba, B; Ade, S; Ali, E; Ben-Smith, A; Khomani, P; Bondwe, P; Nkhoma, D; Douglas, G P; Tayler-Smith, K; Chikosi, L; Harries, A D; Gadabu, O J

    2016-06-21

    Patients with chronic non-communicable diseases attending a primary health care centre, Lilongwe, Malawi. Using an electronic medical record monitoring system, to describe the quarterly and cumulative disease burden, management and outcomes of patients registered between March 2014 and June 2015. A cross-sectional study. Of 1135 patients, with new registrations increasing each quarter, 66% were female, 21% were aged ⩾65 years, 20% were obese, 53% had hypertension alone, 18% had diabetes alone, 12% had asthma, 10% had epilepsy and 7% had both hypertension and diabetes. In every quarter, about 30% of patients did not attend the clinic and 19% were registered as lost to follow-up (not seen for ⩾1 year) in the last quarter. Of those attending, over 90% were prescribed medication, and 80-90% with hypertension and/or diabetes had blood pressure/blood glucose measured. Over 85% of those with epilepsy had no seizures and 60-75% with asthma had no severe attacks. Control of blood pressure (41-51%) and diabetes (15-38%) was poor. It is feasible to manage patients with non-communicable diseases in a primary health care setting in Malawi, although more attention is needed to improve clinic attendance and the control of hypertension and diabetes.

  16. Pars cohort study of non-communicable diseases in Iran: protocol and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandomkar, Abdullah; Poustchi, Hossein; Moini, Maryam; Moghadami, Mohsen; Imanieh, Hadi; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Ayatollahi, Seyyed Mohammad Taghi; Sagheb, Mohammad Mahdi; Anushiravani, Amir; Mortazavi, Roozbeh; Sepanlou, Sadaf Ghajarieh; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2017-04-01

    The pars cohort study (PCS) is a 10-year cohort study aiming to investigate the burden and the major risk factors of non-communicable diseases, and to establish a setting to launch interventions for prevention of these diseases and controlling their risk factors. All inhabitants of Valashahr district in South of Iran, aged 40-75 years, were invited to undergo interviews and physical examination, and to provide biological samples. A total of 9264 invitees accepted to participate in the study (95 % participation rate) and were recruited from 2012 to 2014. Active follow-up was also carried out after 12 months. About 46 % of participants were male and 54 % were female. About 14.0 % of the participants were current smokers and 8.4 % were ever opium users. The prevalence of overweight and obesity were 37.3 and 18.2 %, respectively. The prevalence of hypertension was 26.9 %. A total of 49 participants died during a median follow-up of one year. PCS with its large scale and wealth of socio-economic and medical data can be a unique platform for studying the etiology of non-communicable diseases and effective interventions in Iran.

  17. Screening for Non-Communicable Diseases among transport employees of a University: A Descriptive Analysis

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    Chythra R Rao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In most parts of the world today, non-communicable diseases (NCDs are on the rise. Worldwide they are currently responsible for almost half (42% of the premature deaths which occurs before the age of 70. Due to sedentary lifestyle, workers of transportation department may be at a higher risk for development of obesity, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and hyperglycaemia.Objective: To screen all the transport employees of a university for non-communicable diseases.Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out among all transport employees to screen for hypertension, Type II diabetes, obesity and visual impairment. Data was collected by personal interviews using a pre designed questionnaire. Anthropometry, blood pressure recording, fasting blood glucose testing, vision assessment followed by electrocardiogram recording was done for all subjects.Results: Out of 90 participants, 10(11.1% had diabetes, 26(28.9% were hypertensive, 36(40.0% were overweight and obese, three individuals had myopia and abnormal colour vision, whereas 17(18.9% had impaired near vision. The screen positives were referred to tertiary care hospital for further management. Over half of the subjects reported alcohol use while 21(23.4% were using tobacco. Only 43(47.8% used seat belts while driving.Conclusion: Proportion of obesity, hypertension, and diabetes was found to be more among the transport employees. This demands an urgent need for appropriate preventive and health promotive interventions to address these chronic diseases.

  18. Non-communicable diseases in the Asia-Pacific region: Prevalence, risk factors and community-based prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Wah-Yun; Lee, Yew-Kong; Samy, Alexander Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) lead to substantial mortality and morbidity worldwide. The most common NCDs are cardiovascular diseases (CVD), diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases. With the rapid increase in NCD-related deaths in Asia Pacific countries, NCDs are now the major cause of deaths and disease burden in the region. NCDs hamper achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG). People in the low socio-economic group are most affected by NCDs as they have poor access to policies, legislations, regulations and healthcare services meant to combat NCDs. This results in loss of productivity by a decreasing labor force with implications at the macroeconomic level. The 3 major NCDs in the Asia Pacific region are CVDs, cancer and diabetes due to the increasing loss of disability adjusted life years (DALYs). The 4 major behavioral risk factors for NCDs are: tobacco use, alcohol consumption, inadequate physical activity and unhealthy diet. The underlying risk factors are urbanization, globalization, sedentary lifestyle, obesity and hypertension. Strategies to combat NCDs in the Asia Pacific region are as follows: population-based dietary salt reduction, health education, psychological interventions, i.e., cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational-interviewing, taxation and bans on tobacco-related advertisements, implementing smoke-free zones and surveillance by the World Health Organization. Control measures must focus on prevention and strengthening inter-sectorial collaboration. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  19. Non-communicable diseases in the Asia-Pacific region: Prevalence, risk factors and community-based prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wah-Yun Low

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-communicable diseases (NCDs lead to substantial mortality and morbidity worldwide. The most common NCDs are cardiovascular diseases (CVD, diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases. With the rapid increase in NCD-related deaths in Asia Pacific countries, NCDs are now the major cause of deaths and disease burden in the region. NCDs hamper achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG. People in the low socio-economic group are most affected by NCDs as they have poor access to policies, legislations, regulations and healthcare services meant to combat NCDs. This results in loss of productivity by a decreasing labor force with implications at the macroeconomic level. The 3 major NCDs in the Asia Pacific region are CVDs, cancer and diabetes due to the increasing loss of disability adjusted life years (DALYs. The 4 major behavioral risk factors for NCDs are: tobacco use, alcohol consumption, inadequate physical activity and unhealthy diet. The underlying risk factors are urbanization, globalization, sedentary lifestyle, obesity and hypertension. Strategies to combat NCDs in the Asia Pacific region are as follows: population-based dietary salt reduction, health education, psychological interventions, i.e., cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational-interviewing, taxation and bans on tobacco-related advertisements, implementing smoke-free zones and surveillance by the World Health Organization. Control measures must focus on prevention and strengthening inter-sectorial collaboration.

  20. The epidemiology of noncommunicable respiratory disease in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rana; Robinson, Ryan; Mortimer, Kevin

    2017-06-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are a major and increasing global health issue. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that NCDs represent 63% of all global deaths of which 3.9 million are due to chronic respiratory diseases (CRDs) and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) in particular. COPD is now the third most common cause of death globally; 90% of these deaths occur in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). COPD affects 329 million people, almost 5% of the world's population. In addition, asthma affects 334 million people, again representing almost 5% of the world's population. There is limited literature published on the epidemiology of COPD and Asthma from Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Both diseases are under-diagnosed and underestimated in both SSA and MENA regions. The burden of COPD in sub-Saharan Africa is disputed and reports offer variable prevalence estimates, ranging from 4.1% to almost 22.2%. SSA and MENA countries report similar mortality rates from COPD of 18 per 100,000 population (2001 data). Asthma is a less common cause of death than COPD but is a major cause of morbidity; WHO estimates that there are 250,000 deaths per year from asthma, mainly in LMICs and it remains in the top twenty causes of disability in children globally. Risk factors for CRD are genetic and environmental; the latter dominated by air pollution exposures including tobacco smoke, household air pollution, outdoor air pollution and occupational exposures.

  1. Non-communicable disease prevention in Nepal: systemic challenges and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sudesh Raj; Page, Rachel; Matheson, Anna; Lambrick, Danielle; Faulkner, James; Mishra, Shiva Raj

    2017-08-01

    Developing countries such as Nepal are experiencing a double burden of communicable and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) resulting in social and economic losses. In Nepal, more than half of the disease burden is due to NCDs. The major NCDs in Nepal are cardiovascular diseases, cancers, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes. Behavioural factors such as tobacco use, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and unhealthy diet are driving the epidemic of NCDs, which are further influenced by social, economic and environmental determinants. The health system of Nepal has not been able to address the ever-increasing burden of NCDs. With the formulation of the Multisectoral Action Plan for Prevention and Control of NCDs 2014-2020, there has been some hope for tackling the NCDs and their social determinants in Nepal through a primary prevention approach. This paper discusses the systemic challenges and recommends two key actions for the prevention and control of NCDs in Nepal.

  2. Are the urban poor vulnerable to non-communicable diseases? A survey of risk factors for non-communicable diseases in urban slums of Faridabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, K; Shah, Bela; Yadav, Kapil; Singh, Ritesh; Mathur, Prashant; Paul, Eldho; Kapoor, S K

    2007-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases have modifiable risk factors, which are easy to measure and can help in planning effective interventions. We established a community-based sentinel surveillance to estimate the prevalence and level of common risk factors for major non-communicable diseases as part of a joint Indian Council of Medical Research/WHO initiative. This survey was done from February 2003 to June 2004 and included 1260 men and 1 304 women 15-64 years of age living in urban slum areas of Ballabgarh block, Faridabad district, Haryana. A list of all slums in Ballabgarh block was obtained from the Municipal Corporation of Faridabad. Slums were selected by stratified cluster sampling. All households in the selected slums were visited and men and women interviewed in alternate households. The study instrument was based on the STEPS approach of WHO. It included questions related to tobacco use, alcohol intake, diet, physical activity, and history of treatment for hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Height, weight, waist circumference and blood pressure were measured. To estimate prevalence at the population level, age adjustment was done using the urban Faridabad population structure from the 2001 Census of India. The age-adjusted prevalence of smoking among men was 36.5% compared with 7% in women. Bidi was the predominant form of smoked tobacco used. The use of smokeless tobacco was reported by 10.2% of men and 2.9% of women. While 26% of men reported consuming alcohol in the past 1 year, none of the women did. The mean number of servings per day of fruits and vegetables was 2.7 for men compared with 2.2 for women. Overall, only 7.9% and 5.4% of men and women, respectively took > or = 5 servings per day of fruits and vegetables. Women were more likely to be physically inactive compared with men (14.8% v. 55%); 67% of men and 22.8% of women reported mean physical activity > 150 minutes per week. The mean body mass index (BMI) was lower in men than in women (20.9 v. 21

  3. The role of family in non-communicable disease prevention in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BeLue, Rhonda

    2017-09-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular disease risk factors such as diabetes (DM) and hypertension (HTN), are becoming an increasing burden in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA); by 2030, NCDs are expected to eclipse communicable diseases as the leading causes of death. DM and HTN require daily management to prevent stroke, myocardial infarction, or other complications including kidney failure. In SSA, the concept of family is critical for DM and HTN management behaviors such as adhering to medications and possessing the ability to purchase related goods. Many management behaviors also serve as primary prevention for DM and HTN. For example, including family in primary and secondary prevention strategies for NCDs in SSA may enhance existing interventions by exposing the whole family to positive NCD management methods and reinforcing better NCD outcomes for family members with NCDs. Furthermore, family inclusion may encourage preventive behaviors and, as a result, increase primary prevention of NCDs among other family members.

  4. Evolution of non-communicable disease prevention and control in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mengge; Shi, Xiao Ming; Cai, Chun; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Wang Hong

    2017-12-01

    The 70-year experience of China in fighting against non-communicable diseases (NCDs) can be classified into three distinct periods: 1) the disease-oriented strategy period (from 1950 to 1994); 2) the risk factor-focused strategy period (from 1995 to 2008); and 3) the social and policy priority strategy period (since 2009). A number of projects were successful and valuable experience and lessons were accumulated during the three periods. Due to the underestimation of the 'explosive' epidemic of NCDs, however, it took China quite a long time to find the right path to curb the upward trend in these diseases. In this commentary, the authors review the evolution of strategies and the healthcare service system, examine advances and challenges, and summarize experience and lessons in NCD control in China. In view of development, China's experience may have valuable implications for other low- and middle-income countries.

  5. Bioactive Peptide of Marine Origin for the Prevention and Treatment of Non-Communicable Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangestuti, Ratih; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2017-03-09

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. The four main leading causes of NCD are cardiovascular diseases, cancers, respiratory diseases and diabetes. Recognizing the devastating impact of NCD, novel prevention and treatment strategies are extensively sought. Marine organisms are considered as an important source of bioactive peptides that can exert biological functions to prevent and treatment of NCD. Recent pharmacological investigations reported cardio protective, anticancer, antioxidative, anti-diabetic, and anti-obesity effects of marine-derived bioactive peptides. Moreover, there is available evidence supporting the utilization of marine organisms and its bioactive peptides to alleviate NCD. Marine-derived bioactive peptides are alternative sources for synthetic ingredients that can contribute to a consumer's well-being, as a part of nutraceuticals and functional foods. This contribution focus on the bioactive peptides derived from marine organisms and elaborates its possible prevention and therapeutic roles in NCD.

  6. Learning lessons from operational research in infectious diseases: can the same model be used for noncommunicable diseases in developing countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosu WK

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available William K Bosu Department of Epidemics and Disease Control, West African Health Organisation, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso Abstract: About three-quarters of global deaths from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs occur in developing countries. Nearly a third of these deaths occur before the age of 60 years. These deaths are projected to increase, fueled by such factors as urbanization, nutrition transition, lifestyle changes, and aging. Despite this burden, there is a paucity of research on NCDs, due to the higher priority given to infectious disease research. Less than 10% of research on cardiovascular diseases comes from developing countries. This paper assesses what lessons from operational research on infectious diseases could be applied to NCDs. The lessons are drawn from the priority setting for research, integration of research into programs and routine service delivery, the use of routine data, rapid-assessment survey methods, modeling, chemoprophylaxis, and the translational process of findings into policy and practice. With the lines between infectious diseases and NCDs becoming blurred, it is justifiable to integrate the programs for the two disease groups wherever possible, eg, screening for diabetes in tuberculosis. Applying these lessons will require increased political will, research capacity, ownership, use of local expertise, and research funding. Keywords: infectious diseases, noncommunicable diseases, operational research, developing countries, integration

  7. Can the rural poor in India afford to treat non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnendijk, Erika; Koren, Ruth; Dror, David M

    2012-11-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are on the increase in low-income countries, where healthcare costs are paid mostly out-of-pocket. We investigate the financial burden of NCD vs. communicable diseases (CD) among rural poor in India and assess whether they can afford to treat NCD. We used data from two household surveys undertaken in 2009-2010 among 7389 rural poor households (39 205 individuals) in Odisha and Bihar. All persons from the sampled households, irrespective of age and gender, were included in the analysis. We classify self-reported illnesses as NCD, CD or 'other morbidities' following the WHO classification. Non-communicable diseases accounted for around 20% of the diseases in the month preceding the survey in Odisha and 30% in Bihar. The most prevalent NCD, representing the highest share in outpatient costs, were musculoskeletal, digestive and cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular and digestive problems also generated the highest inpatient costs. Women, older persons and less-poor households reported higher prevalence of NCD. Outpatient costs (consultations, medicines, laboratory tests and imaging) represented a bigger share of income for NCD than for CD. Patients with NCD were more likely to report a hospitalisation. Patients with NCD in rural poor settings in India pay considerably more than patients with CD. For NCD cases that are chronic, with recurring costs, this would be aggravated. The cost of NCD care consumes a big part of the per person share of household income, obliging patients with NCD to rely on informal intra-family cross-subsidisation. An alternative solution to finance NCD care for rural poor patients is needed. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Ethnic and Gender Differentials in Non-Communicable Diseases and Self-Rated Health in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Jane K. L.; Tey, Nai Peng; Ng, Sor Tho

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This paper examines the ethnic and gender differentials in high blood pressure (HBP), diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD), arthritis and asthma among older people in Malaysia, and how these diseases along with other factors affect self-rated health. Differentials in the prevalence of non-communicable diseases among older people are examined in the context of socio-cultural perspectives in multi-ethnic Malaysia. Methods Data for this paper are obtained from the 2004 Malaysian Population and Family Survey. The survey covered a nationally representative sample of 3,406 persons aged 50 and over, comprising three main ethnic groups (Malays, Chinese and Indians) and all other indigenous groups. Bivariate analyses and hierarchical logistic regression were used in the analyses. Results Arthritis was the most common non-communicable disease (NCD), followed by HBP, diabetes, asthma and CHD. Older females were more likely than males to have arthritis and HBP, but males were more likely to have asthma. Diabetes and CHD were most prevalent among Indians, while arthritis and HBP were most prevalent among the Indigenous groups. Older people were more likely to report poor health if they suffered from NCD, especially CHD. Controlling for socio-economic, health and lifestyle factors, Chinese were least likely to report poor health, whereas Indians and Indigenous people were more likely to do so. Chinese that had HBP were more likely to report poor health compared to other ethnic groups with the same disease. Among those with arthritis, Indians were more likely to report poor health. Conclusion Perceived health status and prevalence of arthritis, HBP, diabetes, asthma and CHD varied widely across ethnic groups. Promotion of healthy lifestyle, early detection and timely intervention of NCDs affecting different ethnic groups and gender with socio-cultural orientations would go a long way in alleviating the debilitating effects of the common NCDs among older people. PMID

  9. Ethnic and gender differentials in non-communicable diseases and self-rated health in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Jane K L; Tey, Nai Peng; Ng, Sor Tho

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the ethnic and gender differentials in high blood pressure (HBP), diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD), arthritis and asthma among older people in Malaysia, and how these diseases along with other factors affect self-rated health. Differentials in the prevalence of non-communicable diseases among older people are examined in the context of socio-cultural perspectives in multi-ethnic Malaysia. Data for this paper are obtained from the 2004 Malaysian Population and Family Survey. The survey covered a nationally representative sample of 3,406 persons aged 50 and over, comprising three main ethnic groups (Malays, Chinese and Indians) and all other indigenous groups. Bivariate analyses and hierarchical logistic regression were used in the analyses. Arthritis was the most common non-communicable disease (NCD), followed by HBP, diabetes, asthma and CHD. Older females were more likely than males to have arthritis and HBP, but males were more likely to have asthma. Diabetes and CHD were most prevalent among Indians, while arthritis and HBP were most prevalent among the Indigenous groups. Older people were more likely to report poor health if they suffered from NCD, especially CHD. Controlling for socio-economic, health and lifestyle factors, Chinese were least likely to report poor health, whereas Indians and Indigenous people were more likely to do so. Chinese that had HBP were more likely to report poor health compared to other ethnic groups with the same disease. Among those with arthritis, Indians were more likely to report poor health. Perceived health status and prevalence of arthritis, HBP, diabetes, asthma and CHD varied widely across ethnic groups. Promotion of healthy lifestyle, early detection and timely intervention of NCDs affecting different ethnic groups and gender with socio-cultural orientations would go a long way in alleviating the debilitating effects of the common NCDs among older people.

  10. Ethnic and gender differentials in non-communicable diseases and self-rated health in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane K L Teh

    Full Text Available This paper examines the ethnic and gender differentials in high blood pressure (HBP, diabetes, coronary heart disease (CHD, arthritis and asthma among older people in Malaysia, and how these diseases along with other factors affect self-rated health. Differentials in the prevalence of non-communicable diseases among older people are examined in the context of socio-cultural perspectives in multi-ethnic Malaysia.Data for this paper are obtained from the 2004 Malaysian Population and Family Survey. The survey covered a nationally representative sample of 3,406 persons aged 50 and over, comprising three main ethnic groups (Malays, Chinese and Indians and all other indigenous groups. Bivariate analyses and hierarchical logistic regression were used in the analyses.Arthritis was the most common non-communicable disease (NCD, followed by HBP, diabetes, asthma and CHD. Older females were more likely than males to have arthritis and HBP, but males were more likely to have asthma. Diabetes and CHD were most prevalent among Indians, while arthritis and HBP were most prevalent among the Indigenous groups. Older people were more likely to report poor health if they suffered from NCD, especially CHD. Controlling for socio-economic, health and lifestyle factors, Chinese were least likely to report poor health, whereas Indians and Indigenous people were more likely to do so. Chinese that had HBP were more likely to report poor health compared to other ethnic groups with the same disease. Among those with arthritis, Indians were more likely to report poor health.Perceived health status and prevalence of arthritis, HBP, diabetes, asthma and CHD varied widely across ethnic groups. Promotion of healthy lifestyle, early detection and timely intervention of NCDs affecting different ethnic groups and gender with socio-cultural orientations would go a long way in alleviating the debilitating effects of the common NCDs among older people.

  11. Socioeconomic inequality in the prevalence of noncommunicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries: Results from the World Health Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosseinpoor, Ahmad Reza; Bergen, Nicole; Mendis, Shanthi; Harper, Sam; Verdes, Emese; Kunst, Anton; Chatterji, Somnath

    2012-01-01

    Background: Noncommunicable diseases are an increasing health concern worldwide, but particularly in low-and middle-income countries. This study quantified and compared education-and wealth-based inequalities in the prevalence of five noncommunicable diseases (angina, arthritis, asthma, depression

  12. An Emerging Epidemic of Noncommunicable Diseases in Developing Populations Due to a Triple Evolutionary Mismatch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, Jacob J E; van Bodegom, David; Ziem, Juventus B

    2016-01-01

    , because their genetic, cultural, and epigenetic characteristics do not match with the eagerly awaited affluent environments. In regard to this, there is an urgent need for public health organizations to reorganize current environments in developing populations so as to fit their inherited characteristics......With their transition from adverse to affluent environments, developing populations experience a rapid increase in the number of individuals with noncommunicable diseases. Here, we emphasize that developing populations are more susceptible than western populations to acquire these chronic diseases....... Unfortunately, this need is neglected as an essential part of the Sustainable Development Goals that form the core of the United Nations' Post-2015 Development Agenda. Only through global collaborative efforts can the environments in developing populations be reorganized and, thereby, the emerging epidemic...

  13. Malnutrition and non-communicable diseases among Bangladeshi women: an urban–rural comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahangir, M S; Hasan, M M; Richardson, A; Tabassum, S

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives: This study aims at examining the urban–rural differentials in the effects of socioeconomic predictors on underweight and obesity of ever-married women in Bangladesh. The effect of malnutrition and other risk factors on non-communicable diseases is also examined. Subjects/Methods: The information regarding nutritional status, socioeconomic and demographic background, and non-communicable diseases of ever-married women was extracted from the nationally representative, cross-sectional Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey (BDHS 2011) data set. Both bivariate (χ2 test) and multivariate (multinomial logistic regression model) analyses were performed in determining the risk factors of malnutrition. The effect of malnutrition and associated risk factors on non-communicable diseases was determined using binary logistic regression models. Results: The overall prevalence as well as the effects of individual risk factors of malnutrition differ in urban and rural settings. Regional differentials in the prevalence of underweight were statistically significant only for rural areas. In rural and urban settings, women from households with poor economic status were 67% (odds ratio (OR) 0.33, 95% CI 0.26–0.43) and 81% (OR=0.19, 95% CI 0.13–0.29) less likely to be overweight, respectively, with respect to those from affluent households. Women from the Rangpur division were significantly more likely to suffer from anemia (OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.13–1.77) and hypertension (OR=1.67, 95% CI 1.19–2.34) than those from the Sylhet division (reference division). With respect to those considered as underweight, women who were categorized as overweight were 0.47 (OR=0.53, 95% CI 0.43–0.65) times less likely to suffer from anemia, and 1.83 (OR=2.83, 95% CI 1.99–4.02) and 1.70 (OR=2.70, 95% CI 2.09–3.50) times more likely to suffer from diabetes and hypertension, respectively. Conclusions: Rural–urban differentials in the effects of individual risk factors

  14. Nurse-led care interventions for high blood pressure control: Implications for non-communicable disease programs in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Katende

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Nurses play a significant role in the control of high blood pressure when they employ effective evidence based strategies in identification, prevention and management of hypertension. Adapting effective evidence based strategies in identification, prevention and management of non-communicable diseases could improve patient outcomes in Uganda.

  15. Reducing the Role of the Food, Tobacco, and Alcohol Industries in Noncommunicable Disease Risk in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delobelle, Peter; Sanders, David; Puoane, Thandi; Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) impose a growing burden on the health, economy, and development of South Africa. According to the World Health Organization, four risk factors, tobacco use, alcohol consumption, unhealthy diets, and physical inactivity, account for a significant proportion of major NCDs. We analyze the role of tobacco, alcohol, and…

  16. Promotion of access to essential medicines for non-communicable diseases : practical implications of the UN political declaration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogerzeil, Hans V.; Liberman, Jonathan; Wirtz, Veronika J.; Kishore, Sandeep P.; Selvaraj, Sakthi; Kiddell-Monroe, Rachel; Mwangi-Powell, Faith N.; von Schoen-Angerer, Tido

    2013-01-01

    Access to medicines and vaccines to prevent and treat non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is unacceptably low worldwide. In the 2011 UN political declaration on the prevention and control of NCDs, heads of government made several commitments related to access to essential medicines, technologies, and

  17. Role of occupational health in managing non-communicable diseases in Brunei Darussalam

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    Pg Khalifah Pg Ismail

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Like most ASEAN countries, Brunei faces an epidemic of non-communicable diseases. To deal with the complexity of NCDs prevention, all perspectives - be it social, familial or occupational – need to be considered. In Brunei Darussalam, occupational health services (OHS offered by its Ministry of Health, among others, provide screening and management of NCDs at various points of service. The OHS does not only issue fitness to work certificates, but is a significant partner in co-managing patients’ health conditions, with the advantage of further management at the workplace. Holistic approach of NCD management in the occupational setting is strengthened with both employer and employee education and participation, targeting several approaches including risk management and advocating healthy lifestyles as part of a healthy workplace programme.

  18. Transforming cardiac rehabilitation into broad-based healthy lifestyle programs to combat noncommunicable disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J; Cahalin, Lawrence P; Briggs, Paige D; Guizilini, Solange; Daugherty, John; Chan, Wai-Man; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The current incidence and prevalence of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is currently a cause for great concern on a global scale; future projections are no less disconcerting. Unhealthy lifestyle patterns are at the core of the NCD crisis; physical inactivity, excess body mass, poor nutrition and tobacco use are the primary lifestyle factors that substantially increase the risk of developing one or more NCDs. We have now come to recognize that healthy lifestyle interventions are a medical necessity that should be prescribed to all individuals. Perhaps the most well-established model for healthy lifestyle interventions in the current healthcare model is cardiac rehabilitation. To have any hope of improving the outlook for NCDs on a global scale, what is currently known as cardiac rehabilitation must transform into broad-based healthy lifestyle programing, with a shifted focus on primordial and primary prevention.

  19. Countermarketing Alcohol and Unhealthy Food: An Effective Strategy for Preventing Noncommunicable Diseases? Lessons from Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmedo, P Christopher; Dorfman, Lori; Garza, Sarah; Murphy, Eleni; Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2017-03-20

    Countermarketing campaigns use health communications to reduce the demand for unhealthy products by exposing motives and undermining marketing practices of producers. These campaigns can contribute to the prevention of noncommunicable diseases by denormalizing the marketing of tobacco, alcohol, and unhealthy food. By portraying these activities as outside the boundaries of civilized corporate behavior, countermarketing can reduce the demand for unhealthy products and lead to changes in industry marketing practices. Countermarketing blends consumer protection, media advocacy, and health education with the demand for corporate accountability. Countermarketing campaigns have been demonstrated to be an effective component of comprehensive tobacco control. This review describes common elements of tobacco countermarketing such as describing adverse health consequences, appealing to negative emotions, highlighting industry manipulation of consumers, and engaging users in the design or implementation of campaigns. It then assesses the potential for using these elements to reduce consumption of alcohol and unhealthy foods.

  20. Nature Cure and Non-Communicable Diseases: Ecological Therapy as Health Care in India

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    Joseph S. Alter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With rapidly increasing rates of non-communicable diseases, India is experiencing a dramatic public health crisis that is closely linked to changing lifestyles and the growth of the middle-class. In this essay we discuss how the practice of Nature Cure provides a way of understanding the scale and scope of the crisis, as it is embodied, and a way to understand key elements of a solution to problems that the crisis presents for institutionalized health care. As institutionalized in contemporary India, Nature Cure involves treatment and managed care using earth, air, sunlight, and water as well as a strict dietary regimen. In this regard, the essay shows how Nature Cure’s bio-ecological orientation toward public health, which is grounded in the history of its modern incorporation into India, provides an expansionist, ecological model for holistic care that counters the reductionist logic of bio-medical pharmaceuticalization.

  1. Bangladesh policy on prevention and control of non-communicable diseases: a policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Tuhin; Pervin, Sonia; Tanim, Md Imtiaz Alam; Niessen, Louis; Islam, Anwar

    2017-06-19

    This paper is aimed at critically assessing the extent to which Non-Communicable Disease NCD-related policies introduced in Bangladesh align with the World Health Organization's (WHO) 2013-2020 Action Plan for the Global Strategy for the Prevention and Control of NCDs. The authors reviewed all relevant policy documents introduced by the Government of Bangladesh since its independence in 1971. The literature review targeted scientific and grey literature documents involving internet-based search, and expert consultation and snowballing to identify relevant policy documents. Information was extracted from the documents using a specific matrix, mapping each document against the six objectives of the WHO 2013-2020 Action Plan for the Global Strategy for the Prevention and Control of NCDs. A total of 51 documents were identified. Seven (14%) were research and/or surveys, nine were on established policies (17%), while seventeen (33%) were on action programmes. Five (10%) were related to guidelines and thirteen (25%) were strategic planning documents from government and non-government agencies/institutes. The study covered documents produced by the Government of Bangladesh as well as those by quasi-government and non-government organizations irrespective of the extent to which the intended policies were implemented. The policy analysis findings suggest that although the government has initiated many NCD-related policies or programs, they lacked proper planning, implementation and monitoring. Consequently, Bangladesh over the years had little success in effectively addressing the growing burden of non-communicable diseases. It is imperative that future research critically assess the effectiveness of national NCD policies by monitoring their implementation and level of population coverage.

  2. Children's adherence to health behavior recommendations associated with reducing risk of non-communicable disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise L. Hardy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to report the proportions of Australian children age 5–16 years meeting six health behavior recommendations associated with reducing risk of non-communicable disease. Data comes from a representative cross-sectional population survey conducted in 2015. Parents completed a health behavior questionnaire for children age  10 years self-reported. Adherence rates were calculated separately for children and adolescents on meeting recommendations for fruit (2-serves/day, vegetables (5-serves/day, physical activity (≥60 min/day, screen-time (<2 h/day, oral health (brush-teeth twice daily and sleep (children 9–11 h/night; adolescents: 8–10 h/night. Participants were 3884 children and 3671 adolescents. Adherence to recommendations was low, with children adhering to an average of 2.5 and adolescents to 2.3 of six recommendations. Overall, recommendation adherence rates were 7% for vegetables, 18% for screen-time, 20% for physical activity, 56% for sleep, 67% for dental (teeth brushing 79% for fruit; 3.3% reported zero adherence with recommendations and <0.5% adhered to all six recommendations. There was evidence of social disparity in adherence rates; children and adolescents from low socioeconomic neighborhoods met fewer recommendations and were less likely to meet screen-time and dental recommendations, compared with high socioeconomic peers. Children and adolescents from rural areas met more recommendations, compared with urban peers. Children's and adolescents' adherence to health behavior recommendations is sub-optimal, exposing them to risk of developing non-communicable diseases during adulthood. Better communication and health promotion strategies are required to improve parents' and children's awareness of and adherence to health behavior recommendations.

  3. Challenges in the management of chronic noncommunicable diseases by Indonesian community pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitasari, Hanni P; Aslani, Parisa; Krass, Ines

    2015-01-01

    We explored factors influencing Indonesian primary care pharmacists' practice in chronic noncommunicable disease management and proposed a model illustrating relationships among factors. We conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with pharmacists working in community health centers (Puskesmas, n=5) and community pharmacies (apotek, n=15) in East Java Province. We interviewed participating pharmacists using Bahasa Indonesia to explore facilitators and barriers to their practice in chronic disease management. We audiorecorded all interviews, transcribed ad verbatim, translated into English and analyzed the data using an approach informed by "grounded-theory". We extracted five emergent themes/factors: pharmacists' attitudes, Puskesmas/apotek environment, pharmacy education, pharmacy professional associations, and the government. Respondents believed that primary care pharmacists have limited roles in chronic disease management. An unfavourable working environment and perceptions of pharmacists' inadequate knowledge and skills were reported by many as barriers to pharmacy practice. Limited professional standards, guidelines, leadership and government regulations coupled with low expectations of pharmacists among patients and doctors also contributed to their lack of involvement in chronic disease management. We present the interplay of these factors in our model. Pharmacists' attitudes, knowledge, skills and their working environment appeared to influence pharmacists' contribution in chronic disease management. To develop pharmacists' involvement in chronic disease management, support from pharmacy educators, pharmacy owners, professional associations, the government and other stakeholders is required. Our findings highlight a need for systematic coordination between pharmacists and stakeholders to improve primary care pharmacists' practice in Indonesia to achieve continuity of care.

  4. The implantation of the Surveillance System for Non-communicable Diseases in Brazil, 2003 to 2015: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Silva, Marta Maria Alves da; Moura, Lenildo de; Morais, Otaliba Libânio de

    2017-01-01

    To describe the implantation of the Surveillance System for Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) in the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde) and the challenges in maintaining it. A literature review was carried out the information contained in federal government directives between 2003 and 2015 was consulted. A comprehensive risk and protection factor surveillance system was implemented. It is capable of producing information and providing evidence to monitor changes in the health behavior of the population. Among the advances cited are the organization of epidemiological surveys, such as the Surveillance System for Risk Factors and Protection for NCD (Sistema de Vigilância de Fatores de Risco e Proteção para DCNT - Vigitel), the National School Health Survey (Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde do Escolar - PeNSE), and the National Health Survey (Pesquisa Nacional de Saude) from 2013, which enabled the most extensive health diagnosis of the Brazilian population. In 2011, the NCD National Plan 2011-2022 established targets for reducing risk factors and NCD mortality. The information gathered from the NCD surveillance system can support the implementation of sectoral and intersectorial strategies, which will result in the implementation of the Brazilian Strategic Action Plan for the prevention and control of NCDs, as well as the monitoring and evaluation of their results periodically. Finally, it can be a very important tool to help Brazil achieve the goals proposed by the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Global Plan to Tackling NCDs.

  5. [Analysis on probability of premature death and cause eliminated life expectancy of major non-communicable diseases in Chongqing Municipality, 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, X B; Tang, W W; Mao, D Q; Jiao, Y; Shen, Z Z

    2017-11-06

    Objective: To analyze the premature death probability and cause-eliminated life expectancy of cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic respiratory disease and diabetes in Chongqing residents in 2016 so as to provide recommendation for non-communicable diseases (NCDs) prevention and control in Chongqing. Methods: Death cases of Chongqing Municipality between January 1(st) and December 31(st), 2016 were reported through death case registry system of national center for disease prevention and control. Death cases were sorted by international classification of disease (ICD-10). Mortality rate, standardized mortality rate, constituent ratio, premature death probability, life expectancy, and cause-eliminated life expectancy of four major NCDs were analyzed. Results: A total of 218 004 death cases were reported in Chongqing, 2016, and the mortality rate was 731.73/100 000. Of them, a total of 179 637 death cases of the four major NCDs including cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic respiratory disease and diabetes were reported, accounting for 82.40% of all death cases. The mortality rate and standardized mortality rate of four major NCDs was 602.95/100 000 and 455.82/100 000, respectively. The premature death probability of four major NCDs was 15.96%, and males (25.39%) had a higher premature death probability than females (10.78%). The premature death probability of cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic respiratory disease, and diabetes were 6.01%, 8.32%, 2.05%, and 0.43%, respectively. Life expectancy would increase by 6.02, 3.19, 1.89, and 0.19 years, after eliminating cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic respiratory disease and diabetes respectively. Conclusion: The premature death probability of major NCDs was high in Chongqing, and males had a higher premature death probability than females did. Intervention and health management of the population should be conducted according to different gender-based risk factors to reduce the premature death probability.

  6. DNA damage in non-communicable diseases: A clinical and epidemiological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milic, Mirta; Frustaci, Alessandra; Del Bufalo, Alessandra; Sánchez-Alarcón, Juana; Valencia-Quintana, Rafael; Russo, Patrizia; Bonassi, Stefano

    2015-06-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a leading cause of death and disability, representing 63% of the total death number worldwide. A characteristic phenotype of these diseases is the accelerated aging, which is the result of phenomena such as accumulated DNA damage, telomere capping loss and subcellular irreversible/nonrepaired oxidative damage. DNA damage, mostly oxidative, plays a key role in the development of most common NCDs. The present review will gather some of the most relevant knowledge concerning the presence of DNA damage in NCDs focusing on cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and neurodegenerative disorders, and discussing a selection of papers from the most informative literature. The challenge of comorbidity and the potential offered by new systems approaches for introducing these biomarkers into the clinical decision process will be discussed. Systems Medicine platforms represent the most suitable approach to personalized medicine, enabling to identify new patterns in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and prognosis of chronic diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Urbanization and non-communicable disease in Southeast Asia: a review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angkurawaranon, C; Jiraporncharoen, W; Chenthanakij, B; Doyle, P; Nitsch, D

    2014-10-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have been highlighted as a major public health issue in the Southeast (SE) Asian region. One of the major socio-environmental factors that are considered to be associated with such a rise in NCDs is urbanization. Urbanization is associated with behavioural changes such as eating an unhealthy diet, and a decrease in physical activities, which may result in associated obesity. The SE Asian region also has a substantive burden of infectious disease such as HIV and malaria, which may modify associations between urbanization and development of NCDs. A systematic review was conducted until April 2013. Using four databases: EMBASE, PubMed, GlobalHealth and DigitalJournal, the systematic review pools existing evidence on urban-rural gradients in NCD prevalence/incidence. The study found that in SE Asia, urban exposure was positively associated with coronary heart disease, diabetes and respiratory diseases in children. Urban exposure was negatively associated with rheumatic heart diseases. The stages of economic development may also modify the association between urbanization and NCDs such as diabetes. There was pronounced heterogeneity between associations. It is recommended that future studies examine the major constituents of NCDs separately and also focus on the interplay between lifestyle and infectious risk factors for NCDs. Prospective studies are needed to understand the diverse causal pathways between urbanization and NCDs in SE Asia.

  8. Shining a Light on Task-Shifting Policy; Exploring opportunities for adaptability in non-communicable disease management programmes in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey Katende

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In terms of disease burden, many low- and middle-income countries are currently experiencing a transition from infectious to chronic diseases. In Uganda, non-communicable diseases (NCDs have increased significantly in recent years; this challenge is compounded by the healthcare worker shortage and the underfunded health system administration. Addressing the growing prevalence of NCDs requires evidence-based policies and strategies to reduce morbidity and mortality rates; however, the integration and evaluation of new policies and processes pose many challenges. Task-shifting is the process whereby specific tasks are transferred to health workers with less training and fewer qualifications. Successful implementation of a task-shifting policy requires appropriate skill training, clearly defined roles, adequate evaluation, an enhanced training capacity and sufficient health worker incentives. This article focuses on task-shifting policy as a potentially effective strategy to address the growing burden of NCDs on the Ugandan healthcare system.

  9. Investing in non-communicable diseases: an estimation of the return on investment for prevention and treatment services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Melanie Y; Sweeny, Kim; Lauer, Jeremy A; Chisholm, Daniel; Sheehan, Peter; Rasmussen, Bruce; Upreti, Senendra Raj; Dixit, Lonim Prasai; George, Kenneth; Deane, Samuel

    2018-04-05

    The global burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is growing, and there is an urgent need to estimate the costs and benefits of an investment strategy to prevent and control NCDs. Results from an investment-case analysis can provide important new evidence to inform decision making by governments and donors. We propose a methodology for calculating the economic benefits of investing in NCDs during the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) era, and we applied this methodology to cardiovascular disease prevention in 20 countries with the highest NCD burden. For a limited set of prevention interventions, we estimated that US$120 billion must be invested in these countries between 2015 and 2030. This investment represents an additional $1·50 per capita per year and would avert 15 million deaths, 8 million incidents of ischaemic heart disease, and 13 million incidents of stroke in the 20 countries. Benefit-cost ratios varied between interventions and country-income levels, with an average ratio of 5·6 for economic returns but a ratio of 10·9 if social returns are included. Investing in cardiovascular disease prevention is integral to achieving SDG target 3.4 (reducing premature mortality from NCDs by a third) and to progress towards SDG target 3.8 (the realisation of universal health coverage). Many countries have implemented cost-effective interventions at low levels, so the potential to achieve these targets and strengthen national income by scaling up these interventions is enormous. Copyright © 2018 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd/Inc/BV. All rights reserved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Income Gradient in Renal Disease Mortality in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Lankarani, Maryam Moghani

    2017-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases and associated mortality follow a social gradient and chronic kidney disease is not an exception to this rule. Intermediate behavioral and medical factors that may explain such social gradients are, however, still unknown. Using nationally representative data in the United States, this study was conducted to investigate the mediating effect of medical and behavioral risk factors on the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and renal disease mortality. Americans' Changing Lives Study (ACL), 1986-2011, is a 25-year nationally representative prospective cohort study. ACL followed 3,361 adults for up to 25 years. Income, education, and unemployment were the main predictors of interest. Death due to renal disease was the main outcome. Health behaviors (smoking, drinking, and exercise) and medical risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, and obesity) were the mediators. Cox proportional hazards models were used for data analysis. Higher income (HR = 0.75; 95% CI = 0.62-0.89) was associated with lower risk of death due to renal disease over the 25-year follow-up period. Although health behaviors and medical risk factors at baseline were also predictors of the outcome, they failed to explain the effect of income on death due to renal disease. That is, income was associated with death due to renal disease above and beyond all potential mediators including behavioral and medical risk factors. Socioeconomic inequalities in the United States cause disparities in renal disease mortality; however, such differences are not due to health behaviors (smoking and drinking) and medical risk factors (hypertension and diabetes). To reduce disparities in renal disease mortality in the United States, policies should go beyond health behaviors and medical risk factors. While programs should help low-income individuals maintain exercise and avoid smoking, reduction of income disparities should be regarded as a strategy for reduction of disparities

  11. The gut microbiota and inflammatory noncommunicable diseases: associations and potentials for gut microbiota therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Christina E; Renz, Harald; Jenmalm, Maria C; Kozyrskyj, Anita L; Allen, Katrina J; Vuillermin, Peter; Prescott, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    Rapid environmental transition and modern lifestyles are likely driving changes in the biodiversity of the human gut microbiota. With clear effects on physiologic, immunologic, and metabolic processes in human health, aberrations in the gut microbiome and intestinal homeostasis have the capacity for multisystem effects. Changes in microbial composition are implicated in the increasing propensity for a broad range of inflammatory diseases, such as allergic disease, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), obesity, and associated noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). There are also suggestive implications for neurodevelopment and mental health. These diverse multisystem influences have sparked interest in strategies that might favorably modulate the gut microbiota to reduce the risk of many NCDs. For example, specific prebiotics promote favorable intestinal colonization, and their fermented products have anti-inflammatory properties. Specific probiotics also have immunomodulatory and metabolic effects. However, when evaluated in clinical trials, the effects are variable, preliminary, or limited in magnitude. Fecal microbiota transplantation is another emerging therapy that regulates inflammation in experimental models. In human subjects it has been successfully used in cases of Clostridium difficile infection and IBD, although controlled trials are lacking for IBD. Here we discuss relationships between gut colonization and inflammatory NCDs and gut microbiota modulation strategies for their treatment and prevention. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mitochondrial Dysfunction: A Basic Mechanism in Inflammation-Related Non-Communicable Diseases and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hernández-Aguilera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is not necessarily a predisposing factor for disease. It is the handling of fat and/or excessive energy intake that encompasses the linkage of inflammation, oxidation, and metabolism to the deleterious effects associated with the continuous excess of food ingestion. The roles of cytokines and insulin resistance in excessive energy intake have been studied extensively. Tobacco use and obesity accompanied by an unhealthy diet and physical inactivity are the main factors that underlie noncommunicable diseases. The implication is that the management of energy or food intake, which is the main role of mitochondria, is involved in the most common diseases. In this study, we highlight the importance of mitochondrial dysfunction in the mutual relationships between causative conditions. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that fuse and divide in response to environmental stimuli, developmental status, and energy requirements. These organelles act to supply the cell with ATP and to synthesise key molecules in the processes of inflammation, oxidation, and metabolism. Therefore, energy sensors and management effectors are determinants in the course and development of diseases. Regulating mitochondrial function may require a multifaceted approach that includes drugs and plant-derived phenolic compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities that improve mitochondrial biogenesis and act to modulate the AMPK/mTOR pathway.

  13. Developmental Immunotoxicity, Perinatal Programming, and Noncommunicable Diseases: Focus on Human Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietert, Rodney R.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental immunotoxicity (DIT) is a term given to encompass the environmentally induced disruption of normal immune development resulting in adverse outcomes. A myriad of chemical, physical, and psychological factors can all contribute to DIT. As a core component of the developmental origins of adult disease, DIT is interlinked with three important concepts surrounding health risks across a lifetime: (1) the Barker Hypothesis, which connects prenatal development to later-life diseases, (2) the hygiene hypothesis, which connects newborns and infants to risk of later-life diseases and, (3) fetal programming and epigenetic alterations, which may exert effects both in later life and across future generations. This review of DIT considers: (1) the history and context of DIT research, (2) the fundamental features of DIT, (3) the emerging role of DIT in risk of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and (4) the range of risk factors that have been investigated through human research. The emphasis on the human DIT-related literature is significant since most prior reviews of DIT have largely focused on animal research and considerations of specific categories of risk factors (e.g., heavy metals). Risk factors considered in this review include air pollution, aluminum, antibiotics, arsenic, bisphenol A, ethanol, lead (Pb), maternal smoking and environmental tobacco smoke, paracetamol (acetaminophen), pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polyfluorinated compounds. PMID:26556429

  14. Reducing Disaster Exacerbated Non-Communicable Diseases Through Public Health Infrastructure Resilience: Perspectives of Australian Disaster Service Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Benjamin J; Franklin, Richard C; Burkle, Frederick M; Aitken, Peter; Smith, Erin; Watt, Kerrianne; Leggat, Peter

    2016-12-21

    The exposure of people and infrastructure to flood and storm related disasters across the world is increasing faster than vulnerability is decreasing. For people with non-communicable diseases this presents a significant risk as traditionally the focus of disaster management systems has been on immediate trauma and communicable diseases. This focus must now be expanded to include the management of non-communicable diseases because these conditions are generating the bulk of ill health, disability and premature death around the globe. When public health service infrastructure is destroyed or damaged access to treatment and care is severely jeopardised, resulting in an increased risk of non-communicable disease exacerbation or even death. This research proposes disaster responders, coordinators and government officials are vital assets to mitigate and eventually prevent these problems from being exacerbated during a disaster. This is due to their role in supporting the public health service infrastructure required to maximise treatment and care for people with non-communicable diseases. By focusing on the disaster cycle as a template, and on mitigation and prevention phases in particular, these actions and activities performed by disaster service responders will lead to overall improved preparedness, response, recovery and rehabilitation phases. Data were collected via 32 interviews and one focus group (eight participants) between March 2014 and August 2015 (total of 40 participants). The research was conducted in the State of Queensland, Australia, with disaster service providers. The analysis included the phases of: organizing data; data description; data classification; and interpretation. The research found a relationship between the impact of a disaster on public health service infrastructure, and increased health risks for people with non-communicable diseases. Mitigation strategies were described for all phases of the disaster cycle impacting public health

  15. Care-seeking patterns for fatal non-communicable diseases among women of reproductive age in rural northwest Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikder Shegufta S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though non-communicable diseases contribute to an increasing share of the disease burden in South Asia, health systems in most rural communities are ill-equipped to deal with chronic illness. This analysis seeks to describe care-seeking behavior among women of reproductive age who died from fatal non-communicable diseases as recorded in northwest rural Bangladesh between 2001 and 2007. Methods This analysis utilized data from a large population-based cohort trial in northwest rural Bangladesh. To conduct verbal autopsies of women who died while under study surveillance, physicians interviewed family members to elicit the biomedical symptoms that the women experienced as well as a narrative of the events leading to deaths. We performed qualitative textual analysis of verbal autopsy narratives for 250 women of reproductive age who died from non-communicable diseases between 2001 and 2007. Results The majority of women (94% sought at least one provider for their illnesses. Approximately 71% of women first visited non-certified providers such as village doctors and traditional healers, while 23% first sought care from medically certified providers. After the first point of care, women appeared to switch to medically certified practitioners when treatment from non-certified providers failed to resolve their illness. Conclusions This study suggests that treatment seeking patterns for non-communicable diseases are affected by many of the sociocultural factors that influence care seeking for pregnancy-related illnesses. Families in northwest rural Bangladesh typically delayed seeking treatment from medically certified providers for NCDs due to the cost of services, distance to facilities, established relationships with non-certified providers, and lack of recognition of the severity of illnesses. Most women did not realize initially that they were suffering from a chronic illness. Since women typically reached medically certified

  16. Protocol for a national, mixed-methods knowledge, attitudes and practices survey on non-communicable diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demaio, Alessandro R; Dugee, Otgontuya; Amgalan, Gombodorj

    2011-01-01

    Surveillance) that described a growing burden of Non-Communicable Diseases and injuries (NCDs).This study aimed to assess, describe and explore the knowledge, attitudes and practices of the Mongolian adult population around NCDs in order to better understand the drivers and therefore develop more appropriate...... solutions to this growing disease burden. In addition, it aimed to provide data for the evaluation of current public health programs and to assist in building effective, evidence-based health policy....

  17. Trade and investment liberalization and Asia’s noncommunicable disease epidemic: a synthesis of data and existing literature

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Phillip; Kay, Adrian; Walls, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Background Trade and investment liberalization (trade liberalization) can promote or harm health. Undoubtedly it has contributed, although unevenly, to Asia’s social and economic development over recent decades with resultant gains in life expectancy and living standards. In the absence of public health protections, however, it is also a significant upstream driver of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) including cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes through facilitating increased consumpt...

  18. Community-Based Noncommunicable Disease Care for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Stephen; Jonsson, Rebecka; Skaff, Rony; Tyler, Frank

    2017-09-27

    In the sixth year of the Syrian conflict, 11 million people have been displaced, including more than 1.1 million seeking refuge in Lebanon. Prior to the crisis, noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) accounted for 80% of all deaths in Syria, and the underlying health behaviors such as tobacco use, obesity, and physical inactivity are still prevalent among Syrian refugees in Lebanon. Humanitarian agencies initially responded to the acute health care needs of refugees by delivering services to informal settlements via mobile medical clinics. As the crisis has become more protracted, humanitarian response plans have shifted their focus to strengthening local health systems in order to better address the needs of both the host and refugee populations. To that end, we identified gaps in care for NCDs and launched a program to deliver chronic disease care for refugees. Based on a participatory needs assessment and community surveys, and building on the success of community health programs in other contexts, we developed a network of 500 refugee outreach volunteers who are supported with training, supervision, and materials to facilitate health promotion and disease control for community members, target NCDs and other priority conditions, and make referrals to a primary health care center for subsidized care. This model demonstrates that volunteer refugee health workers can implement community-based primary health activities in a complex humanitarian emergency. © Sethi et al.

  19. Medicalization of global health 3: the medicalization of the non-communicable diseases agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jocalyn

    2014-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the massive global burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) due to their prevalence, projected social and economic costs, and traditional neglect compared to infectious disease. The 2011 UN Summit, WHO 25×25 targets, and support of major medical and advocacy organisations have propelled prominence of NCDs on the global health agenda. NCDs are by definition 'diseases' so already medicalized. But their social drivers and impacts are acknowledged, which demand a broad, whole-of-society approach. However, while both individual- and population-level targets are identified in the current NCD action plans, most recommended strategies tend towards the individualistic approach and do not address root causes of the NCD problem. These so-called population strategies risk being reduced to expectations of individual and behavioural change, which may have limited success and impact and deflect attention away from government policies or regulation of industry. Industry involvement in NCD agenda-setting props up a medicalized approach to NCDs: food and drink companies favour focus on individual choice and responsibility, and pharmaceutical and device companies favour calls for expanded access to medicines and treatment coverage. Current NCD framing creates expanded roles for physicians, healthcare workers, medicines and medical monitoring. The professional rather than the patient view dominates the NCD agenda and there is a lack of a broad, engaged, and independent NGO community. The challenge and opportunity lie in defining priorities and developing strategies that go beyond a narrow medicalized framing of the NCD problem and its solutions.

  20. Community-Based Noncommunicable Disease Care for Syrian Refugees in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Stephen; Jonsson, Rebecka; Skaff, Rony; Tyler, Frank

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the sixth year of the Syrian conflict, 11 million people have been displaced, including more than 1.1 million seeking refuge in Lebanon. Prior to the crisis, noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) accounted for 80% of all deaths in Syria, and the underlying health behaviors such as tobacco use, obesity, and physical inactivity are still prevalent among Syrian refugees in Lebanon. Humanitarian agencies initially responded to the acute health care needs of refugees by delivering services to informal settlements via mobile medical clinics. As the crisis has become more protracted, humanitarian response plans have shifted their focus to strengthening local health systems in order to better address the needs of both the host and refugee populations. To that end, we identified gaps in care for NCDs and launched a program to deliver chronic disease care for refugees. Based on a participatory needs assessment and community surveys, and building on the success of community health programs in other contexts, we developed a network of 500 refugee outreach volunteers who are supported with training, supervision, and materials to facilitate health promotion and disease control for community members, target NCDs and other priority conditions, and make referrals to a primary health care center for subsidized care. This model demonstrates that volunteer refugee health workers can implement community-based primary health activities in a complex humanitarian emergency. PMID:28928227

  1. Research on chronic noncommunicable diseases in Brazil: meeting the challenges of epidemiologic transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Erly C; Pacheco-Santos, Leonor M; Peters, Lilian R; Serruya, Suzanne J; Guimarães, Reinaldo

    2012-03-01

    In Brazil, chronic noncommunicable diseases (CNCDs) are the leading cause of death and a major contributor to the national disease burden. This article describes CNCD research funded by the Ministry of Health Department of Science and Technology (DECIT) to support the production and dissemination of scientific evidence for the national health system, in accordance with the National Agenda of Priorities in Health Research, and within the context of Brazil's epidemiologic transition. Data were obtained from Ministry of Health database management systems. CNCD-related projects financed by DECIT from 2002 to 2009 were analyzed by research theme (cancer, obesity, hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, CNCDs in general, and CNCD risk factors) and geographic region. In terms of funding and number of projects, the most-supported research theme was cancer, and the most-supported region was the Southeast. Project type varied widely, ranging from basic scientific studies to highly technological research and development. Results obtained included epidemiologic profiles and surveillance, cost, and quality-of-life data.

  2. APOE Genotype in the Ethnic Majority and Minority Groups of Laos and the Implications for Non-Communicable Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Kaoru; Soukaloun, Douangdao; Akkhavong, Kongsap; Southivong, Bouavanh; Rattanavong, Oudayvone; Sengkhygnavong, Vikham; Pyaluanglath, Amphay; Sayasithsena, Saymongkhonh; Nakamura, Satoshi; Midorikawa, Yutaka; Murata, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    Increasing age is associated with elevated risk of non-communicable diseases, including dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele is a risk factor not only for AD, but also for cognitive decline, depressive symptoms, stroke, hypertension, coronary heart disease, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. The Lao People's Democratic Republic (Laos) is undergoing development; consequently, life expectancy has risen. To evaluate the future risk of non-communicable diseases, we investigated APOE genotypes and anthropometric characteristics in the Laotian population. Subjects were 455 members of the Lao Loum majority and 354 members of ethnic minorities. APOE genotypes, anthropometric characteristics, blood pressure, and blood glucose were recorded. To compare individual changes, health examination data collected 5 years apart were obtained from a subset of Lao Loum subjects. APOE ε4 allele frequencies were higher among minorities (31.3%) than among Lao Loum (12.6%). In Lao Loum, but not in minorities, mean waist circumference and blood pressure increased significantly across age groups. Comparisons of health conditions between the beginning and end of the 5-year period revealed significant increases in obesity and blood glucose levels in Lao Loum. APOE ε4 carriers exhibited significant increases in resting heart rate in both ethnic groups. A higher ε4 allele frequency was observed in Laotian minorities than in the Laotian majority. Furthermore, higher obesity, blood pressure and blood glucose were observed in the middle-aged ethnic majority. Therefore, given these genetic and non-communicable disease risk factors, it seems likely that as the Laotian population ages, elevated rates of non-communicable aging-related diseases, such as dementia, will also become more prevalent.

  3. [Transitions in context: findings related to rural-to-urban migration and chronic non-communicable diseases in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J Jaime; Wells, Jonathan C K; Smeeth, Liam

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the emergence of chronic non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries this article seeks to present, in context, different transitional processes which societies and populations are currently undergoing. Relevant factors for specific contexts such as Peru are described, including internal migration, urbanization and profiles of adversity in early life, all of them linked to chronic non-communicable diseases, including obesity and overweight. The capacity-load model, which considers chronic disease risk in adulthood as a function of two generic traits, metabolic capacity and metabolic load, is described. The contribution of rural-to-urban migration to this problem is also presented. Finally, these topics are framed within pending challenges for public health in Peru.

  4. The social nature of chronic noncommunicable diseases and how to tackle them through communication technology, training, and outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Moreno, Jose M; Apfel, Franklin; Sanchez, Jose Luis Alfonso; Galea, Gauden; Jakab, Zsuzsanna

    2011-08-01

    As world leaders prepare for the United Nations High Level Meeting on Noncommunicable Diseases, to take place in September 2011, international organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and economic and business fora have created new alliances and initiatives to accelerate research, advocacy, and political commitment. This article argues that the time is propitious to reflect on the social nature of the most common behavioral noncommunicable disease determinants, including tobacco and alcohol use, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet. Evidence is presented related to the fact that these diseases are profoundly rooted in social and community ties and points to the need for a modern communication strategy to serve as a linchpin of any successful action to address these public health threats. Several proposals, aimed at promoting health literacy, strengthening health workforce skills, capturing the power of new media and technologies, and targeting vulnerable groups, are discussed.

  5. Ethics Considerations in Global Mobile Phone-Based Surveys of Noncommunicable Diseases: A Conceptual Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Joseph; Labrique, Alain B; Gionfriddo, Kara; Pariyo, George; Gibson, Dustin G; Pratt, Bridget; Deutsch-Feldman, Molly; Hyder, Adnan A

    2017-05-05

    Mobile phone coverage has grown, particularly within low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), presenting an opportunity to augment routine health surveillance programs. Several LMICs and global health partners are seeking opportunities to launch basic mobile phone-based surveys of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). The increasing use of such technology in LMICs brings forth a cluster of ethical challenges; however, much of the existing literature regarding the ethics of mobile or digital health focuses on the use of technologies in high-income countries and does not consider directly the specific ethical issues associated with the conduct of mobile phone surveys (MPS) for NCD risk factor surveillance in LMICs. In this paper, we explore conceptually several of the central ethics issues in this domain, which mainly track the three phases of the MPS process: predata collection, during data collection, and postdata collection. These include identifying the nature of the activity; stakeholder engagement; appropriate design; anticipating and managing potential harms and benefits; consent; reaching intended respondents; data ownership, access and use; and ensuring LMIC sustainability. We call for future work to develop an ethics framework and guidance for the use of mobile phones for disease surveillance globally. ©Joseph Ali, Alain B Labrique, Kara Gionfriddo, George Pariyo, Dustin G Gibson, Bridget Pratt, Molly Deutsch-Feldman, Adnan A Hyder. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 05.05.2017.

  6. Taking on the challenge of noncommunicable diseases: we all hold a piece of the puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Nicolai; Ersbøll, Charlotte; Kingo, Lise

    2011-11-01

    Two out of 3 deaths globally are attributable to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), with 80% occurring in low-resource countries. The "cost of inaction" is estimated to be US$35 trillion between 2005 and 2030. We need to get behind the societal root causes of this global health challenge; we need a life-course approach to respond to the increasing evidence of intergenerational transmission of NCDs; and we need to focus on strengthening of health systems and integration of services for prevention, screening, and management across disease groups. There is a growing understanding that all actors, private or public, for-profit or not-for-profit, can make substantial and positive contributions as long as they maintain transparency in their agenda, motivation, and actions. Effective and sustainable global public-private partnerships require trust between partners, a safe space for talks and negotiations, and a framework for governance and accountability. We need a neutral global convener to unite us all behind shared visions for a healthier future, where each player is encouraged to commit and contribute to the common cause and be recognized or held accountable for their respective commitments. Creation of such a platform could be a direct outcome of the United Nations High Level Meeting on NCDs to be held in September 2011. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Socioeconomic inequalities in self-reported chronic non-communicable diseases in urban Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kien, Vu Duy; Van Minh, Hoang; Giang, Kim Bao; Dao, Amy; Weinehall, Lars; Eriksson, Malin; Ng, Nawi

    2017-12-01

    This study measures and decomposes socioeconomic inequalities in the prevalence of self-reported chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in urban Hanoi, Vietnam. A cross-sectional survey of 1211 selected households was carried out in four urban districts in both slum and non-slum areas of Hanoi city in 2013. The respondents were asked if a doctor or health worker had diagnosed any household members with an NCD, such as cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory, diabetes or cancer, during last 12 months. Information from 3736 individuals, aged 15 years and over, was used for the analysis. The concentration index (CI) was used to measure inequalities in self-reported NCD prevalence, and it was also decomposed into contributing factors. The prevalence of chronic NCDs in the slum and non-slum areas was 7.9% and 11.6%, respectively. The CIs show gradients disadvantageous to both the slum (CI = -0.103) and non-slum (CI = -0.165) areas. Lower socioeconomic status and aging significantly contributed to inequalities in the self-reported NCDs, particularly for those living in the slum areas. The findings confirm the existence of substantial socioeconomic inequalities linked to NCDs in urban Vietnam. Future policies should target these vulnerable areas.

  8. Level of urbanization and noncommunicable disease risk factors in Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allender, Steven; Lacey, Ben; Webster, Premila; Rayner, Mike; Deepa, Mohan; Scarborough, Peter; Arambepola, Carukshi; Datta, Manjula; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the poorly understood relationship between the process of urbanization and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) through the application of a quantitative measure of urbanicity. We constructed a measure of the urban environment for seven areas using a seven-item scale based on data from the Census of India 2001 to develop an "urbanicity" scale. The scale was used in conjunction with data collected from 3705 participants in the World Health Organization's 2003 STEPwise risk factor surveillance survey in Tamil Nadu, India, to analyse the relationship between the urban environment and major NCD risk factors. Linear and logistic regression models were constructed examining the relationship between urbanicity and chronic disease risk. Among men, urbanicity was positively associated with smoking (odds ratio: 3.54; 95% confidence interval, CI: 2.4-5.1), body mass index (OR: 7.32; 95% CI: 4.0-13.6), blood pressure (OR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.4-2.7) and low physical activity (OR: 3.26; 95% CI: 2.5-4.3). Among women, urbanicity was positively associated with low physical activity (OR: 4.13; 95% CI: 3.0-5.7) and high body mass index (OR: 6.48; 95% CI: 4.6-9.2). In both sexes urbanicity was positively associated with the mean number of servings of fruit and vegetables consumed per day (P Urbanicity is associated with the prevalence of several NCD risk factors in Tamil Nadu, India.

  9. Climate change, noncommunicable diseases, and development: the relationships and common policy opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, S; Bowen, K; Campbell-Lendrum, D; Frumkin, H; McMichael, A J; Rasanathan, K

    2011-01-01

    The rapid growth in noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), including injury and poor mental health, in low- and middle-income countries and the widening social gradients in NCDs within most countries worldwide pose major challenges to health and social systems and to development more generally. As Earth's surface temperature rises, a consequence of human-induced climate change, incidences of severe heat waves, droughts, storms, and floods will increase and become more severe. These changes will bring heightened risks to human survival and will likely exacerbate the incidence of some NCDs, including cardiovascular disease, some cancers, respiratory health, mental disorders, injuries, and malnutrition. These two great and urgent contemporary human challenges-to improve global health, especially the control of NCDs, and to protect people from the effects of climate change-would benefit from alignment of their policy agendas, offering synergistic opportunities to improve population and planetary health. Well-designed climate change policy can reduce the incidence of major NCDs in local populations.

  10. Exercise physiologists: essential players in interdisciplinary teams for noncommunicable chronic disease management

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    Soan EJ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Esme J Soan,1–3 Steven J Street,1,2 Sharon M Brownie,3,4 Andrew P Hills1–31Mater Mothers' Hospital, South Brisbane, 2Mater Research Institute – University of Queensland, South Brisbane, 3Griffith Health Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 4Green Templeton College, Oxford University, Oxford, UKAbstract: Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus, are a growing public health challenge in Australia, accounting for a significant and increasing cost to the health care system. Management of these chronic conditions is aided by interprofessional practice, but models of care require updating to incorporate the latest evidence-based practice. Increasing research evidence reports the benefits of physical activity and exercise on health status and the risk of inactivity to chronic disease development, yet physical activity advice is often the least comprehensive component of care. An essential but as yet underutilized player in NCD prevention and management is the "accredited exercise physiologist," a specialist in the delivery of clinical exercise prescriptions for the prevention or management of chronic and complex conditions. In this article, the existing role of accredited exercise physiologists in interprofessional practice is examined, and an extension of their role proposed in primary health care settings.Keywords: interdisciplinary team, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, exercise physiology, accredited exercise physiologist

  11. Differentials in risk factors for chronic non-communicable diseases from the race/color standpoint

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    Deborah Carvalho Malta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the differences between the prevalence of risk factors of non-communicable chronic disease by race/color. It is a cross-sectional study using data from a telephone survey of 45,448 adults. Prevalence ratios for chronic disease risk factors by race/color were calculated. After adjustments were made for education and income, race/color differences persisted. Among afro-descendant and mulatto women and mulatto men a higher prevalence ratio was identified of physical activity at work and physical activity at home. Afro-descendant women and mulatto men indulged in less physical inactivity. Mulatto men and women showed a lower prevalence of smoking and consumption of 20 cigarettes daily and lower consumption of fruit and vegetables. A higher consumption of full-fat milk with and beans was observed among afro-descendant and mulatto men. Afro-descendant women had a lower prevalence of drinking and driving. Afro-descendant women and men ate more meat with fat and afro-descendant men suffered more from hypertension. Differences in risk factors by race/color can be explained by cultural aspects, by not fully adjustable socioeconomic differences that determine less access to goods and less opportunities for the afro-descendant population.

  12. Non-communicable disease risk factors and treatment preference of obese patients in Cape Town

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    Kathryn Manning

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insights into the characteristics of treatment seekers for lifestyle changes and treatment preferences are necessary for intervention planning.Aim: To compile a profile of treatment-seeking obese patients with non-communicable diseases (NCDs or NCD risk factors and to compare patients who choose group-based (facility-based therapeutic group [FBTG] versus usual care (individual consultations treatment.Setting: A primary healthcare facility in Cape Town, South Africa.Methods: One hundred and ninety-three patients were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Ninety six chose FBTG while 97 chose usual care. A questionnaire, the hospital database and patients’ folders were used to collect data. Weight, height and waist circumference were measured. STATA 11.0 was used for descriptive statistics and to compare the two groups.Results: The subjects’ mean age was 50.4 years, 78% were women and of low education levels and income, and 41.5% had type 2 diabetes, 83.4% hypertension and 69.5% high cholesterol. Mean (s.d. HbA1c was 9.1 (2.0%, systolic BP 145.6 (21.0 mmHg, diastolic BP 84.5 (12.0 mmHg, cholesterol 5.4 (1.2 mmol/L, body mass indicator (BMI 39.3 (7.3 kg/m2 and waist circumference 117 (12.6 cm. These figures were undesirable although pharmacological treatment for diabetes and hypertension was in place. Only 14% were physically active, while TV viewing was > 2h/day. Mean daily intake of fruit and vegetables (2.2 portions/day was low while added sugar (5 teaspoons and sugar-sweetened beverages (1.3 glasses were high. Usual care patients had a higher smoking prevalence, HbA1c, number of NCD risk factors and refined carbohydrate intake, and a lower fruit and vegetable intake.Conclusion: Treatment seekers were typically middle-aged, low income women with various modifiable and intermediate risk factors for NCDs. Patients choosing usual care could have more NCD risks.Keywords: Non-communicable diseases; primary health care; family

  13. Clustering of Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases among Adolescents from Southern Brazil.

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    Heloyse Elaine Gimenes Nunes

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the simultaneous presence of risk factors for non-communicable diseases and the association of these risk factors with demographic and economic factors among adolescents from southern Brazil.The study included 916 students (14-19 years old enrolled in the 2014 school year at state schools in São José, Santa Catarina, Brazil. Risk factors related to lifestyle (i.e., physical inactivity, excessive alcohol consumption, smoking, sedentary behaviour and unhealthy diet, demographic variables (sex, age and skin colour and economic variables (school shift and economic level were assessed through a questionnaire. Simultaneous behaviours were assessed by the ratio between observed and expected prevalences of risk factors for non-communicable diseases. The clustering of risk factors was analysed by multinomial logistic regression. The clusters of risk factors that showed a higher prevalence were analysed by binary logistic regression.The clustering of two, three, four, and five risk factors were found in 22.2%, 49.3%, 21.7% and 3.1% of adolescents, respectively. Subgroups that were more likely to have both behaviours of physical inactivity and unhealthy diet simultaneously were mostly composed of girls (OR = 3.03, 95% CI = 1.57-5.85 and those with lower socioeconomic status (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.05-3.21; simultaneous physical inactivity, excessive alcohol consumption, sedentary behaviour and unhealthy diet were mainly observed among older adolescents (OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.05-2.12. Subgroups less likely to have both behaviours of sedentary behaviour and unhealthy diet were mostly composed of girls (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.38-0.89; simultaneous physical inactivity, sedentary behaviour and unhealthy diet were mainly observed among older individuals (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.49-0.87 and those of the night shift (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.43-0.82.Adolescents had a high prevalence of simultaneous risk factors for NCDs

  14. Policy initiatives, culture and the prevention and control of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the Caribbean.

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    Samuels, T Alafia; Guell, Cornelia; Legetic, Branka; Unwin, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    To explore interactions between disease burden, culture and the policy response to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) within the Caribbean, a region with some of the highest prevalence rates, morbidity and mortality from NCDs in the Americas. We undertook a wide ranging narrative review, drawing on a variety of peer reviewed, government and intergovernmental literature. Although the Caribbean is highly diverse, linguistically and ethnically, it is possible to show how 'culture' at the macro-level has been shaped by shared historic, economic and political experiences and ties. We suggest four broad groupings of countries: the English-speaking Caribbean Community (CARICOM); the small island states that are still colonies or departments of colonial powers; three large-Spanish speaking countries; and Haiti, which although part of CARICOM is culturally distinct. We explore how NCD health policies in the region stem from and are influenced by the broad characteristics of these groupings, albeit played out in varied ways in individual countries. For example, the Port of Spain declaration (2007) on NCDs can be understood as the product of the co-operative and collaborative relationships with CARICOM, which are based on a shared broad culture. We note, however, that studies investigating the relationships between the formation of NCD policy and culture (at any level) are scarce. Within the Caribbean region it is possible to discern relationships between culture at the macro-level and the formation of NCD policy. However, there is little work that directly assesses the interactions between culture and NCD policy formation. The Caribbean with its cultural diversity and high burden of NCDs provides an ideal environment within which to undertake further studies to better understand the interactions between culture and health policy formation.

  15. The burden of selected chronic non-communicable diseases and their risk factors in Malawi: nationwide STEPS survey.

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    Kelias P Msyamboza

    Full Text Available Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs are becoming significant causes of morbidity and mortality, particularly in sub-Saharan African countries, although local, high-quality data to inform evidence-based policies are lacking.To determine the magnitude of NCDs and their risk factors in Malawi.Using the WHO STEPwise approach to chronic disease risk factor surveillance, a population-based, nationwide cross-sectional survey was conducted between July and September 2009 on participants aged 25-64 years. Socio-demographic and behaviour risk factors were collected in Step 1. Physical anthropometric measurements and blood pressure were documented in Step 2. Blood cholesterol and fasting blood glucose were measured in Step 3.A total of 5,206 adults (67% females were surveyed. Tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking and raised blood pressure (BP were more frequent in males than females, 25% vs 3%, 30% vs 4% and 37% vs 29%. Overweight, physical inactivity and raised cholesterol were more common in females than males, 28% vs 16%, 13% vs 6% and 11% vs 6%. Tobacco smoking was more common in rural than urban areas 11% vs 7%, and overweight and physical inactivity more common in urban than rural areas 39% vs 22% and 24% vs 9%, all with p<0.05. Overall (both sexes prevalence of tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption, overweight and physical inactivity was 14%, 17%, 22%, 10% and prevalence of raised BP, fasting blood sugar and cholesterol was 33%, 6% and 9% respectively. These data could be useful in the formulation and advocacy of NCD policy and action plan in Malawi.

  16. Prevalence of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors at a semi-urban community, Pakistan.

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    Naseem, Sajida; Khattak, Umme Kulsoom; Ghazanfar, Haider; Irfan, Awais

    2016-01-01

    Pakistan is currently facing the double burden of communicable (38%) and non- communicable diseases (49%) according to WHO NCD Country Profiles 2014. About 50% of all deaths are attributed to NCD's. The objective of this study was to determine the burden of non-communicable diseases in semi urban community of Islamabad. We carried a cross sectional study to estimate the burden of non-communicable diseases in an urban setting, a community based cross sectional survey covering 1210 households was carried out over a period of three months. Households were selected through consecutive non-probability sampling, among which adult females and males who were permanent resident of the community were interviewed through a structured questionnaire in urdu language. SPSS version 21 was used to analyze the data. Descriptive statistics were calculated. About 38.7% individuals had High BP / IHD, 34.4% had oro-dental health problems, 24.3% were physically disabled and 14.6% had diabetes. Among the risk factors, 48.2% were tobacco user, 13.60% were drug abuser and 1.8% alcoholics. We conclude that the prevalence of non-communicable diseases is quite high in the above setting as compared to the National indicators, which demands timely intervention to curtail the existing burden of NCD.

  17. A 3-Year Workplace-Based Intervention Program to Control Noncommunicable Disease Risk Factors in Sousse, Tunisia.

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    Bhiri, Sana; Maatoug, Jihene; Zammit, Nawel; Msakni, Zineb; Harrabi, Imed; Amimi, Souad; Mrizek, Nejib; Ghannem, Hassen

    2015-07-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a 3-year workplace-based intervention program on the control of the main noncommunicable disease risk factors (poor nutrition, physical inactivity, and tobacco use) among the employees of Sousse, Tunisia. We conducted a quasi-experimental study (pre- and postassessments with intervention and control groups) in six companies of the governorate of Sousse in Tunisia.The intervention program consisted of health education programs (eg, workshops, films and open sensitization days). We also scheduled free physical activity sessions and free smoking cessation consultations. Our intervention program showed meaningful improvement among the employees toward dietary and physical activity behaviors but not for tobacco use. Workplace is a crucial setting for health promotion, and future programs should consider a multisectoral approach to control the main noncommunicable disease risk factors.

  18. Who will deliver comprehensive healthy lifestyle interventions to combat non-communicable disease? Introducing the healthy lifestyle practitioner discipline.

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    Arena, Ross; Lavie, Carl J; Hivert, Marie-France; Williams, Mark A; Briggs, Paige D; Guazzi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Unhealthy lifestyle characteristics (i.e., physical inactivity, excess body mass, poor diet, and smoking) as well as associated poor health metrics (i.e., dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension) are the primary reasons for the current non-communicable disease crisis. Compared to those with the poorest of lifestyles and associated health metrics, any movement toward improving lifestyle and associated health metrics improves health outcomes. To address the non-communicable disease crisis we must: 1) acknowledge that healthy lifestyle (HL) interventions are a potent medicine; and 2) move toward a healthcare system that embraces primordial as much as, if not more than, secondary prevention with a heavy focus on HL medicine. This article introduces the Healthy Lifestyle Practitioner, focused on training health professionals to deliver HL medicine.

  19. Public health service options for affordable and accessible noncommunicable disease and related chronic disease prevention and management

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    Brownie S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sharon Brownie,1,2 Andrew P Hills,3,4 Rachel Rossiter51Workforce and Health Services, Griffith Health, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 2Oxford PRAXIS Forum, Green Templeton College, Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom; 3Allied Health Research, Mater Research Institute – The University of Queensland and Mater Mothers' Hospital, South Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 4Griffith Health Institute, Griffith Health, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia; 5MMHN and Nurse Practitioner Programs, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, AustraliaAbstract: Globally, nations are confronted with the challenge of providing affordable health services to populations with increasing levels of noncommunicable and chronic disease. Paradoxically, many nations can both celebrate increases in life expectancy and bemoan parallel increases in chronic disease prevalence. Simply put, despite living longer, not all of that time is spent in good health. Combined with factors such as rising levels of obesity and related noncommunicable disease, the demand for health services is requiring nations to consider new models of affordable health care. Given the level of disease burden, all staff, not just doctors, need to be part of the solution and encouraged to innovate and deliver better and more affordable health care, particularly preventative primary health care services. This paper draws attention to a range of exemplars to encourage and stimulate readers to think beyond traditional models of primary health service delivery. Examples include nurse-led, allied health-led, and student-led clinics; student-assisted services; and community empowerment models. These are reported for the interest of policy makers and health service managers involved in preventative and primary health service redesign initiatives.Keywords: primary health care planning, community health care, nurse-led clinics, allied health personnel

  20. The Effectiveness of Interventions for Non-Communicable Diseases in Humanitarian Crises: A Systematic Review.

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    Alexander Ruby

    Full Text Available Non-communicable diseases (NCDs are of increasing concern in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs affected humanitarian crises. Humanitarian agencies and governments are increasingly challenged with how to effectively tackle NCDs. Reviewing the evidence of interventions for NCDs in humanitarian crises can help guide future policies and research by identifying effective interventions and evidence gaps. The aim of this paper is to systematically review evidence on the effectiveness of interventions targeting NCDs during humanitarian crises in LMICs.A systematic review methodology was followed using PRISMA standards. Studies were selected on NCD interventions with civilian populations affected by humanitarian crises in low- and middle-income countries. Five bibliographic databases and a range of grey literature sources were searched. Descriptive analysis was applied and a quality assessment conducted using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale for observational studies and the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool for experimental studies.The search yielded 4919 references of which 8 studies met inclusion criteria. Seven of the 8 studies were observational, and one study was a non-blinded randomised-controlled trial. Diseases examined included hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, thalassaemia, and arthritis. Study settings included locations in the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and South Asia. Interventions featuring disease-management protocols and/or cohort monitoring demonstrated the strongest evidence of effectiveness. No studies examined intervention costs. The quality of studies was limited, with a reliance on observational study designs, limited use of control groups, biases associated with missing data and inadequate patient-follow-up, and confounding was poorly addressed.The review highlights the extremely limited quantity and quality of evidence on this topic. Interventions that incorporate

  1. The Effectiveness of Interventions for Non-Communicable Diseases in Humanitarian Crises: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Alexander; Knight, Abigail; Perel, Pablo; Blanchet, Karl; Roberts, Bayard

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are of increasing concern in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) affected humanitarian crises. Humanitarian agencies and governments are increasingly challenged with how to effectively tackle NCDs. Reviewing the evidence of interventions for NCDs in humanitarian crises can help guide future policies and research by identifying effective interventions and evidence gaps. The aim of this paper is to systematically review evidence on the effectiveness of interventions targeting NCDs during humanitarian crises in LMICs. Methods A systematic review methodology was followed using PRISMA standards. Studies were selected on NCD interventions with civilian populations affected by humanitarian crises in low- and middle-income countries. Five bibliographic databases and a range of grey literature sources were searched. Descriptive analysis was applied and a quality assessment conducted using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale for observational studies and the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool for experimental studies. Results The search yielded 4919 references of which 8 studies met inclusion criteria. Seven of the 8 studies were observational, and one study was a non-blinded randomised-controlled trial. Diseases examined included hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, thalassaemia, and arthritis. Study settings included locations in the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and South Asia. Interventions featuring disease-management protocols and/or cohort monitoring demonstrated the strongest evidence of effectiveness. No studies examined intervention costs. The quality of studies was limited, with a reliance on observational study designs, limited use of control groups, biases associated with missing data and inadequate patient-follow-up, and confounding was poorly addressed. Conclusions The review highlights the extremely limited quantity and quality of evidence on this topic. Interventions that

  2. Non-communicable diseases and global health governance: enhancing global processes to improve health development

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    Magnusson Roger S

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper assesses progress in the development of a global framework for responding to non-communicable diseases, as reflected in the policies and initiatives of the World Health Organization (WHO, World Bank and the UN: the institutions most capable of shaping a coherent global policy. Responding to the global burden of chronic disease requires a strategic assessment of the global processes that are likely to be most effective in generating commitment to policy change at country level, and in influencing industry behaviour. WHO has adopted a legal process with tobacco (the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, but a non-legal, advocacy-based approach with diet and physical activity (the Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health. The paper assesses the merits of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs and the FCTC as distinct global processes for advancing health development, before considering what lessons might be learned for enhancing the implementation of the Global Strategy on Diet. While global partnerships, economic incentives, and international legal instruments could each contribute to a more effective global response to chronic diseases, the paper makes a special case for the development of international legal standards in select areas of diet and nutrition, as a strategy for ensuring that the health of future generations does not become dependent on corporate charity and voluntary commitments. A broader frame of reference for lifestyle-related chronic diseases is needed: one that draws together WHO's work in tobacco, nutrition and physical activity, and that envisages selective use of international legal obligations, non-binding recommendations, advocacy and policy advice as tools of choice for promoting different elements of the strategy.

  3. Alcohol consumption patterns in Thailand and their relationship with non-communicable disease.

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    Wakabayashi, Mami; McKetin, Rebecca; Banwell, Cathy; Yiengprugsawan, Vasoontara; Kelly, Matthew; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Iso, Hiroyasu; Sleigh, Adrian

    2015-12-24

    Heavy alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for non-communicable diseases (NCDs) but few studies have investigated drinking and disease risk in middle income, non-western countries. We report on the relationship between alcohol consumption and NCDs in Thailand. A nationwide cross sectional survey was conducted of 87,151 Thai adult open university students aged 15 to 87 years (mean age 30.5 years) who were recruited into the Thai Cohort Study. Participants were categorized as never having drunk alcohol (n = 22,527), as being occasional drinkers who drank infrequently but heavily (4+ glasses/occasion - occasional heavy drinkers, n = 24,152) or drank infrequently and less heavily (migration and other recognized risks for NCDs (sedentary lifestyle and poor diet). After adjustment for these factors the odds ratios (ORs) for several NCDs outcomes - high cholesterol, hypertension, and liver disease - were significantly elevated among both occasional heavy drinkers (1.2 to 1.5) and regular heavy drinkers (1.5 to 2.0) relative to never drinkers. Heavy alcohol consumption of 4 or more glasses per occasion, even if the occasions were infrequent, was associated with elevated risk of NCDs in Thailand. These results highlight the need for strategies in Thailand to reduce the quantity of alcohol consumed to prevent alcohol-related disease. Thailand is fortunate that most of the female population is culturally protected from drinking and this national public good should be endorsed and supported.

  4. National survey of risk factors for non-communicable disease in Vietnam: prevalence estimates and an assessment of their validity

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    Bui, Tan Van; Blizzard, Christopher Leigh; Luong, Khue Ngoc; Truong, Ngoc Le Van; Tran, Bao Quoc; Otahal, Petr; Gall, Seana; Nelson, Mark R.; Au, Thuy Bich; Ha, Son Thai; Phung, Hai Ngoc; Tran, Mai Hoang; Callisaya, Michele; Srikanth, Velandai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background To estimate the prevalence of non-communicable disease (NCD) risk factors at a provincial level in Vietnam, and to assess whether the summary estimates allow reliable inferences to be drawn regarding regional differences in risk factors and associations between them. Methods Participants (n = 14706, 53.5 % females) aged 25–64 years were selected by multi-stage stratified cluster sampling from eight provinces each representing one of the eight geographical regions of Vietna...

  5. Designing a food tax to impact food-related non-communicable diseases: the case of Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Caro, Juan Carlos; Smith-Taillie, Lindsey; Ng, Shu Wen; Popkin, Barry

    2017-01-01

    The global shift towards diets high in sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and energy dense ultra-processed foods is linked to higher prevalence of obesity, diabetes and most other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), causing significant health costs. Chile has the highest SSB consumption in the world, very high junk food intake and very rapid increases in these poor components of the diet plus obesity prevalence. This study’s purpose is to compare the effect of different tax schemes for SSBs and ul...

  6. Potential use of telephone-based survey for non-communicable disease surveillance in Sri Lanka.

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    Herath, H M M; Weerasinghe, N P; Weerarathna, T P; Hemantha, A; Amarathunga, A

    2017-12-29

    Telephone survey (TS) has been a popular tool for conducting health surveys, particularly in developed countries. However, the feasibility, and reliability of TS are not adequately explored in Sri Lanka. The main aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of telephone-based survey in estimating the prevalence of common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Sri Lanka. We carried out an observational cross-sectional study using telephone interview method in Galle district, Sri Lanka. The study participants were selected randomly from the residents living in the households with fixed land telephone lines. The prevalence of the main NCDs was estimated using descriptive statistics. Overall, 975 telephone numbers belonging to six main areas of Galle district were called, and 48% agreed to participate in the study. Of the non-respondents, 22% actively declined to participate. Data on NCDs were gathered from 1470 individuals. The most common self-reported NCD was hypertension (17.%), followed by diabetes (16.3%) and dyslipidaemia (15.6%). Smoking was exclusively seen in males (7.4%), and regular alcohol use was significantly more common in males (19.2%) than females (0.4%, P Sri Lankan setting. Overall prevalence of main NCDs in this study showed a comparable prevalence to studies used face to face interview method. This study supports the potential use of telephone-based survey to assess heath related information in Sri Lanka.

  7. Non-communicable diseases and human rights: Global synergies, gaps and opportunities.

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    Ferguson, Laura; Tarantola, Daniel; Hoffmann, Michael; Gruskin, Sofia

    2017-10-01

    The incorporation of human rights in health policy and programmes is known to strengthen responses to health problems and help address disparities created or exacerbated by illness yet this remains underexplored in relation to non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Aiming to understand existing synergies and how they might be further strengthened, we assessed the extent to which human rights are considered in global NCD policies and strategies and the degree of attention given to NCDs by select United Nations human rights mechanisms. Across global NCD policies and strategies, rhetorical assertions regarding human rights appear more often than actionable statements, thus limiting their implementation and impact. Although no human rights treaty explicitly mentions NCDs, some human rights monitoring mechanisms have been paying increasing attention to NCDs. This provides important avenues for promoting the incorporation of human rights norms and standards into NCD responses as well as for accountability. Linking NCDs and human rights at the global level is critical for encouraging national-level action to promote better outcomes relating to both health and human rights. The post-2015 development agenda constitutes a key entry point for highlighting these synergies and strengthening opportunities for health and rights action at global, national and local levels.

  8. Framework legislation for non-communicable diseases: and for the Sustainable Development Goals?

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    Magnusson, Roger S

    2017-01-01

    'Framework legislation' refers to legislation that sets out structures for governance and accountability or other processes for guiding the decisions and actions taken by government or the executive. Framework legislation for non-communicable diseases (NCDs) provides the opportunity for countries to focus their political commitment, to set national targets, and a time-frame for achieving them, and to create cross-sectoral governance structures for the development and implementation of innovative policies. Although they extend well beyond NCDs, the health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) create similar demands for effective national governance. A similar case might, therefore, be made for framework legislation for the health-related SDGs or for legislation to govern particular aspects, such as managing commercial relationships with the private sector or managing conflicts of interest. This article considers the possible benefits of framework legislation, including what issues might be appropriate for inclusion in a framework law. The absence of framework legislation should neither be seen as an excuse for inaction, nor is framework legislation a substitute for detailed regulation of areas such as sanitation and water quality, tobacco and alcohol control, food safety, essential medicines or poisons. The ultimate test for framework legislation will be its capacity to provide a catalyst for action and to accelerate progress towards national and global health goals.

  9. Non-communicable diseases and HIV care and treatment: models of integrated service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Malia; Ojikutu, Bisola; Andrian, Soa; Sohng, Elaine; Minior, Thomas; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2017-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are a growing cause of morbidity in low-income countries including in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Integration of NCD and HIV services can build upon experience with chronic care models from HIV programmes. We describe models of NCD and HIV integration, challenges and lessons learned. A literature review of published articles on integrated NCD and HIV programs in low-income countries and key informant interviews were conducted with leaders of identified integrated NCD and HIV programs. Information was synthesised to identify models of NCD and HIV service delivery integration. Three models of integration were identified as follows: NCD services integrated into centres originally providing HIV care; HIV care integrated into primary health care (PHC) already offering NCD services; and simultaneous introduction of integrated HIV and NCD services. Major challenges identified included NCD supply chain, human resources, referral systems, patient education, stigma, patient records and monitoring and evaluation. The range of HIV and NCD services varied widely within and across models. Regardless of model of integration, leveraging experience from HIV care models and adapting existing systems and tools is a feasible method to provide efficient care and treatment for the growing numbers of patients with NCDs. Operational research should be conducted to further study how successful models of HIV and NCD integration can be expanded in scope and scaled-up by managers and policymakers seeking to address all the chronic care needs of their patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Socioeconomic status, health inequalities and non-communicable diseases: a systematic review.

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    Lago, Santiago; Cantarero, David; Rivera, Berta; Pascual, Marta; Blázquez-Fernández, Carla; Casal, Bruno; Reyes, Francisco

    2018-01-01

    A comprehensive approach to health highlights its close relationship with the social and economic conditions, physical environment and individual lifestyles. However, this relationship is not exempt from methodological problems that may bias the establishment of direct effects between the variables studied. Thus, further research is necessary to investigate the role of socioeconomic variables, their composition and distribution according to health status, particularly on non-communicable diseases. To shed light on this field, here a systematic review is performed using PubMed, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science. A 7-year retrospective horizon was considered until 21 July 2017. Twenty-six papers were obtained from the database search. Additionally, results from "hand searching" were also included, where a wider horizon was considered. Five of the 26 studies analyzed used aggregated data compared to 21 using individual data. Eleven considered income as a study variable, while 17 analyzed the effect of income inequality on health status (2 of the studies considered both the absolute level and distribution of income). The most used indicator of inequality in the literature was the Gini index. Although different types of analysis produce very different results concerning the role of health determinants, the general conclusion is that income distribution is related to health where it represents a measure of the differences in social class in the society. The effect of income inequality is to increase the gap between social classes or to widen differences in status.

  11. [Chronic non-communicable diseases: a global epidemic of the 21st century].

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    Andersen, Karl; Gudnason, Vilmundur

    2012-11-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the cause of 86% of all deaths in the EU and 65% of deaths worldwide. A third of these deaths occur before the age of sixty years. The NCDs affect 40% of the adult population of the EU and two thirds of the population reaching retirement age suffers from two or more NCDs. The NCDs are a global epidemic challenging economic growth in most countries. According to the WHO, NCDs are one of the major threats to worldwide social and economic development in the 21st century. The problem is of great concern to the international community and was discussed at a High level meeting at the UN General Assembly in September 2011. In this paper we review the epidemic of NCDs both from a national and international perspective. We discuss the causes and consequences. In a second review paper we reflect on the political health policy issues raised by the international community in order to respond to the problem. These issues will become a major challenge for social and economic development in most countries of the world in the coming decades.

  12. Prevention of non-communicable diseases in Pakistan: an integrated partnership-based model.

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    Nishtar, Sania

    2004-09-13

    Development and implementation of non-communicable disease (NCD) prevention polices in the developing countries is a multidimensional challenge. This article highlights the evolution of a strategic approach in Pakistan. The model is evidence-based and encompasses a concerted and integrated approach to NCDs. It has been modelled to impact a set of indicators through the combination of a range of actions capitalizing on the strengths of a public-private partnership. The paper highlights the merits and limitations of this approach. The experience outlines a number of clear imperatives for fostering an enabling environment for integrated NCD prevention public health models, which involve roles played by a range of stakeholders. It also highlights the value that such partnership arrangements bring in facilitating the mission and mandates of ministries of health, international agencies with global health mandates, and the non-profit private sector. The experience is of relevance to developing countries that have NCD programs running and those that need to develop them. It provides an empirical basis for enhancing the performance of the health system by fostering partnerships within integrated evidence-based models and permits an analysis of health systems models built on shared responsibility for the purpose of providing sustainable health outcomes.

  13. Prevention of non-communicable diseases in Pakistan: an integrated partnership-based model

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    Nishtar Sania

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Development and implementation of non-communicable disease (NCD prevention polices in the developing countries is a multidimensional challenge. This article highlights the evolution of a strategic approach in Pakistan. The model is evidence-based and encompasses a concerted and integrated approach to NCDs. It has been modelled to impact a set of indicators through the combination of a range of actions capitalizing on the strengths of a public-private partnership. The paper highlights the merits and limitations of this approach. The experience outlines a number of clear imperatives for fostering an enabling environment for integrated NCD prevention public health models, which involve roles played by a range of stakeholders. It also highlights the value that such partnership arrangements bring in facilitating the mission and mandates of ministries of health, international agencies with global health mandates, and the non-profit private sector. The experience is of relevance to developing countries that have NCD programs running and those that need to develop them. It provides an empirical basis for enhancing the performance of the health system by fostering partnerships within integrated evidence-based models and permits an analysis of health systems models built on shared responsibility for the purpose of providing sustainable health outcomes.

  14. Urbanization and noncommunicable disease (NCD) risk factors: WHO STEPwise Iranian NCD risk factors surveillance in 2011.

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    Khorrami, Zahra; Etemad, Koorosh; Yarahmadi, Shahin; Khodakarim, Soheila; Kameli, Mohammadesmail; Hezaveh, Alireza Mahdavi; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2017-08-27

    This study was conducted to examine the relationship between urbanization and risk factors of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) according to the World Health Organization stepwise approach to surveillance of NCDs. This study is part of a NCD risk factor surveillance of 10 069 individuals in all provinces of the Islamic Republic of Iran, aged over 20 years, during 2011. By utilizing 2011 census data, urbanization levels were determined in all provinces and logistics regression was used to examine the relationship between urbanization and risk factors. Among males, urbanization had a positive correlation with low physical activity (OR=1.7; 95% CI: 1.42-2.09), low fruit and vegetable consumption (OR=1.8; 95% CI: 1.09-2.96), and high BMI (OR=1.4; 95% CI: 1.20-1.70). Among females there was a positive and significant correlation with low physical activity (OR=1.2; 95% CI: 1.08-1.49), low fruit and vegetable consumption (OR=1.22; 95% CI: 0.78-1.91) and high BMI (OR=1.3; 95% CI: 1.14-1.53). Thus, urbanization has a significant correlation with increases in NCD factors in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

  15. Noncommunicable Diseases in Ghana: Does the Theory of Social Gradient in Health Hold?

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    Tenkorang, Eric Y; Kuuire, Vincent Z

    2016-04-01

    The theory of social gradient in health posits that individuals with lower socioeconomic status (SES) have poorer health outcomes, compared with those in higher socioeconomic brackets. Applied to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), this theory has largely been corroborated by studies from the West. However, evidence from sub-Saharan Africa are mixed, with those from Ghana conspicuously missing in the literature. Using data from the Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health, and applying random-effects C log-log models, this study examined the relationship between SES and the risks of living with NCDs in Ghana. Results confirmed a negative social gradient, as Ghanaians with higher SES were more likely to live with NCDs compared with those with low SES. The addition of lifestyle factors attenuated the risks of living with NCDs among Ghanaian men and women with higher SES. This study underscores the need for policies targeted at specific socioeconomic and demographic groups, such as the emerging middle and upper class Ghanaians. It is similarly important for interventions to move beyond biomedical solutions that put more emphasis on epidemiological risk factors to strategies that embrace psychosocial factors as important correlates of cardiovascular health. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  16. A New Wave of Vaccines for Non-Communicable Diseases: What Are the Regulatory Challenges?

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    Darrow, Jonathan J; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines represent one of the greatest achievements of medicine, dramatically reducing the incidence of serious or life-threatening infectious diseases and allowing people to live longer, healthier lives. As life expectancy has increased, however, the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cancer, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and diabetes has increased. This shifting burden of disease has heightened the already urgent need for therapies that treat or prevent NCDs, a need that is now being met with increased efforts to develop NCD vaccines. Like traditional vaccines, NCD vaccines work by modulating the human immune system, but target cells, proteins or other molecules that are associated with the NCD in question rather than pathogens or pathogen-infected cells. Efforts are underway to develop NCD vaccines to address not only cancer and hypertension, but also addiction, obesity, asthma, arthritis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and Crohn's disease, among others. NCD vaccines present an interesting challenge for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which is tasked with approving new treatments on the basis of efficacy and safety. Should NCD vaccines be evaluated under the same analytic frame as traditional vaccines, or that of biologic drugs? Despite the borrowed nomenclature, NCD vaccines differ in important ways from infectious disease vaccines. Because infectious disease vaccines are generally administered to healthy individuals, often children, tolerance for adverse events is low and willingness to pay is limited. It is important to have infectious disease vaccines even for rare or eradicated disease (e.g., smallpox), in the event of an outbreak. The efficacy of infectious disease vaccines is generally high, and the vaccines convey population level benefits associated with herd immunity and potential eradication. The combination of substantial population-level benefits, low willingness to pay, and low tolerance for adverse events explains the

  17. The global impact of non-communicable diseases on healthcare spending and national income: a systematic review.

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    Muka, Taulant; Imo, David; Jaspers, Loes; Colpani, Veronica; Chaker, Layal; van der Lee, Sven J; Mendis, Shanthi; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Bramer, Wichor M; Falla, Abby; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar H

    2015-04-01

    The impact of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in populations extends beyond ill-health and mortality with large financial consequences. To systematically review and meta-analyze studies evaluating the impact of NCDs (including coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer (lung, colon, cervical and breast), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic kidney disease) at the macro-economic level: healthcare spending and national income. Medical databases (Medline, Embase and Google Scholar) up to November 6th 2014. For further identification of suitable studies, we searched reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. We included randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, cohorts, case-control, cross-sectional, modeling and ecological studies carried out in adults assessing the economic consequences of NCDs on healthcare spending and national income without language restrictions. All abstracts and full text selection was done by two independent reviewers. Any disagreements were resolved through consensus or consultation of a third reviewer. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers using a pre-designed data collection form. Studies evaluating the impact of at least one of the selected NCDs on at least one of the following outcome measures: healthcare expenditure, national income, hospital spending, gross domestic product (GDP), gross national product, net national income, adjusted national income, total costs, direct costs, indirect costs, inpatient costs, outpatient costs, per capita healthcare spending, aggregate economic outcome, capital loss in production levels in a country, economic growth, GDP per capita (per capita income), percentage change in GDP, intensive growth, extensive growth, employment, direct governmental expenditure and non-governmental expenditure. From 4,364 references, 153 studies met our inclusion criteria. Most of the studies were focused on healthcare related costs of NCDs

  18. Patent and exclusivity status of essential medicines for non-communicable disease.

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    Mackey, Tim K; Liang, Bryan A

    2012-01-01

    The threat of non-communicable diseases ("NCDs") is increasingly becoming a global health crisis and are pervasive in high, middle, and low-income populations resulting in an estimated 36 million deaths per year. There is a need to assess intellectual property rights ("IPRs") that may impede generic production and availability and affordability to essential NCD medicines. Using the data sources listed below, the study design systematically eliminated NCD drugs that had no patent/exclusivity provisions on API, dosage, or administration route. The first step identified essential medicines that treat certain high disease burden NCDs. A second step examined the patent and exclusivity status of active ingredient, dosage and listed route of administration using exclusion criteria outlined in this study. We examined the patent and exclusivity status of medicines listed in the World Health Organization's ("WHO") Model List of Essential Drugs (Medicines) ("MLEM") and other WHO sources for drugs treating certain NCDs. i.e., cardiovascular and respiratory disease, cancers, and diabetes. We utilized the USA Food and Drug Administration Orange Book and the USA Patent and Trademark Office databases as references given the predominant number of medicines registered in the USA. Of the 359 MLEM medicines identified, 22% (79/359) address targeted NCDs. Of these 79, only eight required in-depth patent or exclusivity assessment. Upon further review, no NCD MLEM medicines had study patent or exclusivity protection for reviewed criteria. We find that ensuring availability and affordability of potential generic formulations of NCD MLEM medicines appears to be more complex than the presence of IPRs with API, dosage, or administration patent or exclusivity protection. Hence, more sophisticated analysis of NCD barriers to generic availability and affordability should be conducted in order to ensure equitable access to global populations for these essential medicines.

  19. Patent and exclusivity status of essential medicines for non-communicable disease.

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    Tim K Mackey

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The threat of non-communicable diseases ("NCDs" is increasingly becoming a global health crisis and are pervasive in high, middle, and low-income populations resulting in an estimated 36 million deaths per year. There is a need to assess intellectual property rights ("IPRs" that may impede generic production and availability and affordability to essential NCD medicines. METHODS: Using the data sources listed below, the study design systematically eliminated NCD drugs that had no patent/exclusivity provisions on API, dosage, or administration route. The first step identified essential medicines that treat certain high disease burden NCDs. A second step examined the patent and exclusivity status of active ingredient, dosage and listed route of administration using exclusion criteria outlined in this study. MATERIALS: We examined the patent and exclusivity status of medicines listed in the World Health Organization's ("WHO" Model List of Essential Drugs (Medicines ("MLEM" and other WHO sources for drugs treating certain NCDs. i.e., cardiovascular and respiratory disease, cancers, and diabetes. We utilized the USA Food and Drug Administration Orange Book and the USA Patent and Trademark Office databases as references given the predominant number of medicines registered in the USA. RESULTS: Of the 359 MLEM medicines identified, 22% (79/359 address targeted NCDs. Of these 79, only eight required in-depth patent or exclusivity assessment. Upon further review, no NCD MLEM medicines had study patent or exclusivity protection for reviewed criteria. CONCLUSIONS: We find that ensuring availability and affordability of potential generic formulations of NCD MLEM medicines appears to be more complex than the presence of IPRs with API, dosage, or administration patent or exclusivity protection. Hence, more sophisticated analysis of NCD barriers to generic availability and affordability should be conducted in order to ensure equitable access to global

  20. Chronic non-communicable diseases in Cameroon - burden, determinants and current policies

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    Echouffo-Tcheugui Justin B

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cameroon is experiencing an increase in the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs, which accounted for 43% of all deaths in 2002. This article reviews the published literature to critically evaluate the evidence on the frequency, determinants and consequences of NCDs in Cameroon, and to identify research, intervention and policy gaps. The rising trends in NCDs have been documented for hypertension and diabetes, with a 2-5 and a 10-fold increase in their respective prevalence between 1994 and 2003. Magnitudes are much higher in urban settings, where increasing prevalence of overweight/obesity (by 54-82% was observed over the same period. These changes largely result from the adoption of unfavorable eating habits, physical inactivity, and a probable increasing tobacco use. These behavioral changes are driven by the economic development and social mobility, which are part of the epidemiologic transition. There is still a dearth of information on chronic respiratory diseases and cancers, as well as on all NDCs and related risk factors in children and adolescents. More nationally representative data is needed to tract risk factors and consequences of NCDs. These conditions are increasingly been recognized as a priority, mainly through locally generated evidence. Thus, national-level prevention and control programs for chronic diseases (mainly diabetes and hypertension have been established. However, the monitoring and evaluation of these programs is necessary. Budgetary allocations data by the ministry of health would be helpful, to evaluate the investment in NCDs prevention and control. Establishing more effective national-level tobacco control measures and food policies, as well as campaigns to promote healthy diets, physical activity and tobacco cessation would probably contribute to reducing the burden of NCDs.

  1. Economic evaluations of non-communicable disease interventions in developing countries: a critical review of the evidence base

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    Walker Damian

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Demographic projections suggest a major increase in non-communicable disease (NCD mortality over the next two decades in developing countries. In a climate of scarce resources, policy-makers need to know which interventions represent value for money. The prohibitive cost of performing multiple economic evaluations has generated interest in transferring the results of studies from one setting to another. This paper aims to bridge the gap in the current literature by critically evaluating the available published data on economic evaluations of NCD interventions in developing countries. Methods We identified and reviewed the methodological quality of 32 economic evaluations of NCD interventions in developing countries. Developing countries were defined according to the World Bank classification for low- and lower middle-income countries. We defined NCDs as the 12 categories listed in the 1993 World Bank report Investing in Health. English language literature was searched for the period January 1984 and January 2003 inclusive in Medline, Science Citation Index, HealthStar, NHS Economic Evaluation Database and Embase using medical subheading terms and free text searches. We then assessed the quality of studies according to a set of pre-defined technical criteria. Results We found that the quality of studies was poor and resource allocation decisions made by local and global policy-makers on the basis of this evidence could be misleading. Furthermore we have identified some clear gaps in the literature, particularly around injuries and strategies for tackling the consequences of the emerging tobacco epidemic. Conclusion In the face of poor evidence the role of so-called generalised cost-effectiveness analyses has an important role to play in aiding public health decision-making at the global level. Further research is needed to investigates the causes of variation among cost, effects and cost-effectiveness data within and between

  2. The extra cost of comorbidity: multiple illnesses and the economic burden of non-communicable diseases.

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    Cortaredona, Sébastien; Ventelou, Bruno

    2017-12-08

    The literature offers competing estimates of disease costs, with each study having its own data and methods. In 2007, the Dutch Center for Public Health Forecasting of the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment provided guidelines that can be used to set up cost-of-illness (COI) studies, emphasising that most COI analyses have trouble accounting for comorbidity in their cost estimations. When a patient has more than one chronic condition, the conditions may interact such that the patient's healthcare costs are greater than the sum of the costs for the individual diseases. The main objective of this work was to estimate the costs of 10 non-communicable diseases when their co-occurrence is acknowledged and properly assessed. The French Echantillon Généraliste de Bénéficiaires (EGB) database was used to assign all healthcare expenses for a representative sample of the population covered by the National Health Insurance. COIs were estimated in a bottom-up approach, through regressions on individuals' healthcare expenditure. Two-way interactions between the 10 chronic disease variables were included in the expenditure model to account for possible effect modification in the presence of comorbidity(ies). The costs of the 10 selected chronic diseases were substantially higher for individuals with comorbidity, demonstrating the pattern of super-additive costs in cases of diseases interaction. For instance, the cost associated with diabetes for people without comorbidity was estimated at 1776 €, whereas this was 2634 € for people with heart disease as a comorbidity. Overall, we detected 41 cases of super-additivity over 45 possible comorbidities. When simulating a preventive action on diabetes, our results showed that significant monetary savings could be achieved not only for diabetes itself, but also for the chronic diseases frequently associated with diabetes. When comorbidity exists and where super-additivity is involved, a given preventive

  3. Risk Factors for Non-communicable Diseases in Vietnam: A Focus on Pesticides

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    Hoang V. Dang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Agent Orange, which was used in southern Vietnam, is confirmed the main source of dioxin exposure in Vietnam. Since early 1990s, agriculture of Vietnam has attained advances under intensive cultivation. Both production and yields per crop have increased significantly at the farm level, but the quantity of pesticides used in agriculture also increased in the absence of regulations and good practices. Illegal business of pesticides with false labels, as well as marketing of expired or poor quality products in stores without license are popular in Vietnam. Misuse and improper use in agriculture in Vietnam has led to a variety of problems, such as environmental pollution (including food producing animals and adverse health impact on animals and humans. Open dumpsites worsen the general scenario. Similar to the environmental exposure, human exposure to DDT in Vietnam was ranked among the highest worldwide, with recognized effects. Exposed communities have to face birth defects, health disorders and non-communicable diseases (NCDs, from metabolic syndrome, asthma, infertility and other reproductive disorders through to diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. A common feature of many chronic disorders and NCDs is metabolic disruption: environmental chemical factors disturb cellular homeostasis, thus affecting the ability of the body to restore a functional internal environment. Among these, endocrine disrupting pesticides can interfere with the action of hormones including metabolic hormones, and are likely to represent the main concern for developmentally-induced NCDs. Since pesticides are often persistent and bio-accumulate in the food chain through the living environment of food-producing organisms, this paper discusses relevant aspects of risk assessment, risk communication and risk management.

  4. Stigma-related experiences in non-communicable respiratory diseases: A systematic review.

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    Rose, Shiho; Paul, Christine; Boyes, Allison; Kelly, Brian; Roach, Della

    2017-08-01

    The stigma of non-communicable respiratory diseases (NCRDs), whether perceived or otherwise, can be an important element of a patient's experience of his/her illness and a contributing factor to poor psychosocial, treatment and clinical outcomes. This systematic review examines the evidence regarding the associations between stigma-related experiences and patient outcomes, comparing findings across a range of common NCRDs. Electronic databases and manual searches were conducted to identify original quantitative research published to December 2015. Articles focussing on adult patient samples diagnosed with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis, lung cancer or mesothelioma, and included a measurement of stigma-related experience (i.e. perceived stigma, shame, blame or guilt), were eligible for inclusion. Included articles were described for study characteristics, outcome scores, correlates between stigma-related experiences and patient outcomes and methodological rigor. Twenty-five articles were eligible for this review, with most ( n = 20) related to lung cancer. No articles for cystic fibrosis were identified. Twenty unique scales were used, with low to moderate stigma-related experiences reported overall. The stigma-related experiences significantly correlated with all six patient-related domains explored (psychosocial, quality of life, behavioral, physical, treatment and work), which were investigated more widely in COPD and lung cancer samples. No studies adequately met all criteria for methodological rigor. The inter-connectedness of stigma-related experiences to other aspects of patient experiences highlight that an integrated approach is needed to address this important issue. Future studies should adopt more rigorous methodology, including streamlining measures, to provide robust evidence.

  5. Medicalization of global health 3: the medicalization of the non-communicable diseases agenda

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    Jocalyn Clark

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available There is growing recognition of the massive global burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs due to their prevalence, projected social and economic costs, and traditional neglect compared to infectious disease. The 2011 UN Summit, WHO 25×25 targets, and support of major medical and advocacy organisations have propelled prominence of NCDs on the global health agenda. NCDs are by definition ‘diseases’ so already medicalized. But their social drivers and impacts are acknowledged, which demand a broad, whole-of-society approach. However, while both individual- and population-level targets are identified in the current NCD action plans, most recommended strategies tend towards the individualistic approach and do not address root causes of the NCD problem. These so-called population strategies risk being reduced to expectations of individual and behavioural change, which may have limited success and impact and deflect attention away from government policies or regulation of industry. Industry involvement in NCD agenda-setting props up a medicalized approach to NCDs: food and drink companies favour focus on individual choice and responsibility, and pharmaceutical and device companies favour calls for expanded access to medicines and treatment coverage. Current NCD framing creates expanded roles for physicians, healthcare workers, medicines and medical monitoring. The professional rather than the patient view dominates the NCD agenda and there is a lack of a broad, engaged, and independent NGO community. The challenge and opportunity lie in defining priorities and developing strategies that go beyond a narrow medicalized framing of the NCD problem and its solutions.

  6. Perception of non-communicable diseases predicts consumption of fruits and vegetables

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    Charles Surjadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Nutrition has come to the fore as one of the major modifiable determinants of chronic disease. Establishing healthy eating habits during adolescence is important given that fruit and vegetable consumption has long-term health-protective benefits. The objective of this study was to investigate the determinant factors of fruit and vegetable consumption habits among Padang inhabitants Methods We conducted a questionnaire-based rapid assessment of 150 respondents who came from different settings: The questionnaire consisted of items on personal characteristics such as age, working status, gender, and personal knowledge of the subjects about the cause of non-communicable diseases (NCDs and their activities to prevent NCDs. Bivariate analysis was applied to look for variables significantly related to healthy eating (vegetable and fruit consumption. We applied multiple logistic regression to look for the best model to explain factors related to regular fruit and vegetable consumption. Results The age range of the subjects was 14 to 76 years, 60% of subjects were women, and 40% were men. The study indicated that 64.7% of the respondents perceived that eating habits relate to NCD, while 67.3% consumed fruits and vegetables regularly. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that gender (O.R.=2.74; 95% C.I. 1.54-5.27 and perception of NCD as being related to healthy eating (O.R.=5.62;95% C.I. 2.93-10.76 were significantly related to regular fruit and vegetable consumption. Conclusion This study demonstrated that perception of NCD was the most determinant factor of regular fruit and vegetable consumption. Activities to improve practice of regular fruit and vegetable consumption are part of control of NCD risk factors.

  7. Supermarket purchase contributes to nutrition-related non-communicable diseases in urban Kenya.

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    Demmler, Kathrin M; Klasen, Stephan; Nzuma, Jonathan M; Qaim, Matin

    2017-01-01

    While undernutrition and related infectious diseases are still pervasive in many developing countries, the prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCD), typically associated with high body mass index (BMI), is rapidly rising. The fast spread of supermarkets and related shifts in diets were identified as possible factors contributing to overweight and obesity in developing countries. Potential effects of supermarkets on people's health have not been analyzed up till now. This study investigates the effects of purchasing food in supermarkets on people's BMI, as well as on health indicators such as fasting blood glucose (FBG), blood pressure (BP), and the metabolic syndrome. This study uses cross-section observational data from urban Kenya. Demographic, anthropometric, and bio-medical data were collected from 550 randomly selected adults. Purchasing food in supermarkets is defined as a binary variable that takes a value of one if any food was purchased in supermarkets during the last 30 days. In a robustness check, the share of food purchased in supermarkets is defined as a continuous variable. Instrumental variable regressions are applied to control for confounding factors and establish causality. Purchasing food in supermarkets contributes to higher BMI (+ 1.8 kg/m2) (Pfood in supermarkets also contributes to higher levels of FBG (+ 0.3 mmol/L) (Pdiabetes (Pfood sales strategies seem to have direct effects on people's health. In addition to increasing overweight and obesity, supermarkets contribute to nutrition-related NCDs. Effects of supermarkets on nutrition and health can mainly be ascribed to changes in the composition of people's food choices.

  8. Supermarket purchase contributes to nutrition-related non-communicable diseases in urban Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin M Demmler

    Full Text Available While undernutrition and related infectious diseases are still pervasive in many developing countries, the prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCD, typically associated with high body mass index (BMI, is rapidly rising. The fast spread of supermarkets and related shifts in diets were identified as possible factors contributing to overweight and obesity in developing countries. Potential effects of supermarkets on people's health have not been analyzed up till now.This study investigates the effects of purchasing food in supermarkets on people's BMI, as well as on health indicators such as fasting blood glucose (FBG, blood pressure (BP, and the metabolic syndrome.This study uses cross-section observational data from urban Kenya. Demographic, anthropometric, and bio-medical data were collected from 550 randomly selected adults. Purchasing food in supermarkets is defined as a binary variable that takes a value of one if any food was purchased in supermarkets during the last 30 days. In a robustness check, the share of food purchased in supermarkets is defined as a continuous variable. Instrumental variable regressions are applied to control for confounding factors and establish causality.Purchasing food in supermarkets contributes to higher BMI (+ 1.8 kg/m2 (P<0.01 and an increased probability (+ 20 percentage points of being overweight or obese (P<0.01. Purchasing food in supermarkets also contributes to higher levels of FBG (+ 0.3 mmol/L (P<0.01 and a higher likelihood (+ 16 percentage points of suffering from pre-diabetes (P<0.01 and the metabolic syndrome (+ 7 percentage points (P<0.01. Effects on BP could not be observed.Supermarkets and their food sales strategies seem to have direct effects on people's health. In addition to increasing overweight and obesity, supermarkets contribute to nutrition-related NCDs. Effects of supermarkets on nutrition and health can mainly be ascribed to changes in the composition of people's food choices.

  9. The prevalence of multiple non-communicable diseases among middle-aged and elderly people: the Shanghai Changfeng Study.

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    Lin, Huandong; Li, Qian; Hu, Yu; Zhu, Chouwen; Ma, Hui; Gao, Jian; Wu, Jiong; Shen, Hong; Jiang, Wenhai; Zhao, Naiqing; Yin, Yiqing; Pan, Baishen; Jeekel, Johannes; Hofman, Albert; Gao, Xin

    2017-02-01

    We set out to study the prevalence and combination of multiple non-communicable diseases among middle-aged and elderly people in the Shanghai Changfeng community, China. A cross-sectional survey through questionnaire, physical, and laboratory examinations, color ultrasound and DXA was performed on a typical sample of 6038 residents (ages greater than 45-years-old) from the Shanghai Changfeng community between June 2009 and December 2012. The prevalence of chronic diseases (rating from high to low) was as follows: hypertension (55.3%), dyslipidemia (33.5%), diabetes (21.9%), obesity (12.4%), and osteoporosis (9.3%). There were sex-specific and age-specific differences in these diseases. Just less than half (40.5%) the study population suffered from two or more chronic diseases. Hypertension patients were more likely to suffer from obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, but not osteoporosis. The most common combination of multiple diseases was hypertension with dyslipidemia (9.95%) or diabetes (6.61%). In the Chinese middle-aged and elderly population, the most common multiple non-communicable diseases, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and obesity should be controlled to prevent cardiovascular disease.

  10. Chronic Non-Communicable Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Disease in sub-Saharan Africa: An Academic Model for Countering the Epidemic

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    Bloomfield, Gerald S.; Kimaiyo, Sylvester; Carter, E. Jane; Binanay, Cynthia; Corey, G. Ralph; Einterz, Robert M.; Tierney, William M.; Velazquez, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Non-communicable diseases are rapidly overtaking infectious, perinatal, nutritional and maternal diseases as the major causes of worldwide death and disability. It is estimated that within the next 10-15 years, the increasing burden of chronic diseases and the ageing of the population will expose the world to an unprecedented burden of chronic diseases. Preventing the potential ramifications of a worldwide epidemic of chronic non-communicable diseases in a sustainable manner requires coordinated, collaborative efforts. Herein we present our collaboration's strategic plan to understand, treat and prevent chronic cardiovascular and pulmonary disease in Western Kenya which builds on a two decade partnership between academic universities in North America and Kenya; the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH). We emphasize the importance of training Kenyan clinician-investigators who will ultimately lead efforts in cardiovascular and pulmonary disease care, education and research. This penultimate aim will be achieved by our five main goals. Our goals include creating an administrative core capable of managing operations, develop clinical and clinical research training curricula, enhancing existing technology infrastructure and implementing relevant research programs. Leveraging a strong international academic partnership with respective expertise in cardiovascular medicine, pulmonary medicine and medical informatics we have undertaken to understand and counter cardiovascular and pulmonary disease in Kenya by addressing patient care, teaching and clinical research. PMID:21570512

  11. SM = SM: The Interface of Systems Medicine and Sexual Medicine for Facing Non-Communicable Diseases in a Gender-Dependent Manner.

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    Jannini, Emmanuele A

    2017-07-01

    Complex non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, and chronic respiratory disorders, are major causes of morbidity and mortality globally. The complexity of NCDs requires innovative, integrated, and interdisciplinary approaches for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention by adopting the new paradigm called systems medicine. A growing body of evidence suggests that sexual dysfunction in general and erectile and lubrication dysfunctions in particular are, in a sex-dependent manner, efficient predictors of overall systemic well-being. However, the relation between systems medicine and sexual medicine is not well defined. To demonstrate that in combating the major NCDs, sexual health can be used as a surrogate marker of systemic health and can facilitate the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of NCDs. A comprehensive review of peer-reviewed publications on the topic was performed through a PubMed search. Because there is a strong biological basis for the developmental origins of health and disease not only in the early phases of development but also later in life, the identification of appropriate biomarkers is essential for monitoring these timelines and trajectories for better understanding NCD processes, risk stratification for NCD intervention, and prevention. In this review, I propose a novel approach in which sexual medicine can be used as a new tool to understand and manage NCDs and as a marker of systemic health. Moreover, the multipronged application of systems medicine to pathophysiologic changes leading to sexual dysfunction might sustain the growth of a young science such as sexual medicine. This multilevel approach has the potential to suggest novel avenues for the comprehensive management of NCDs and sexual dysfunction in a sex-dependent manner. Jannini EA. SM = SM: The Interface of Systems Medicine and Sexual Medicine for Facing Non-Communicable Diseases in a Gender-Dependent Manner. Sex Med Rev 2017

  12. Noncommunicable diseases and the use of health services: analysis of the National Health Survey in Brazil.

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    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; Bernal, Regina Tomie Ivata; Lima, Margareth Guimarães; Araújo, Silvânia Suely Caribé de; Silva, Marta Maria Alves da; Freitas, Maria Imaculada de Fátima; Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo

    2017-06-01

    To assess whether sex, education level, and health insurance affect the use of health services among the adult Brazilian population with chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCD). Data from a cross-sectional survey were analyzed, the National Health Survey (PNS). Frequency of use of services in the population that referred at least one NCD were compared with the frequency from a population that did not report NCD, according to sex, education level, health insurance, and NCD number (1, 2, 3, 4, or more). The prevalence and prevalence ratios were calculated crude and adjusted for sex, age, region, and 95% confidence intervals. The presence of a noncommunicable disease was associated with increase in hospitalizations in the last 12 months, in 1.7 times (95%CI 1.53-1.9). Failing to perform usual activities in the last two weeks for health reasons was 3.1 times higher in NCD carriers (95%CI 2.78-3.46); while the prevalence of medical consultation in the last 12 months was 1.26 times higher (95%CI 1.24-1.28). NCD carriers make more use of health services, as well as women, people with higher number of comorbidities, with health insurance, and higher education level. NCD carriers make more use of health services, as well as women, people with higher number of comorbidities, with health insurance, and higher education level. Analisar se sexo, escolaridade e posse de plano de saúde influenciam a utilização de serviços de saúde entre a população adulta brasileira portadora de doenças crônicas não transmissíveis (DCNT). Foram analisados dados de inquérito transversal, a Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde (PNS). Foram comparadas as frequências de uso de serviços na população que referiu pelo menos uma DCNT, com aquelas que não relatam DCNT, segundo sexo, escolaridade, posse de plano de saúde e número de DCNT (1, 2, 3, 4 ou mais). Foram calculadas as prevalências e razões de prevalência (RP) brutas e ajustadas por sexo, idade e região e respectivos intervalos de

  13. Innovations in non-communicable diseases management in ASEAN: a case series

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    Jeremy Lim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs are reaching epidemic proportions worldwide and present an unprecedented challenge to economic and social development globally. In Southeast Asia, the challenges are exacerbated by vastly differing levels of health systems development and funding availability. In addressing the burden of NCDs, ASEAN nations need to fundamentally re-examine how health care services are structured and delivered and discover new models as undiscerning application of models from other geographies with different cultures and resources will be problematic. Objective: We sought to examine cases of innovation and identify critical success factors in NCD management in ASEAN. Design: A qualitative design, focusing on in-depth interviews and site visits to explore the meanings and perceptions of participants regarding innovations in NCD against the backdrop of the overall context of delivering health care within the country's context was adopted. Results: In total 12 case studies in six ASEAN countries were analysed. Primary interventions accounted for five of the total cases, whereas secondary interventions comprised four, and tertiary interventions three. Five core themes contributing to successful innovation for NCD management were identified. They include: 1 encourage better outcomes through leadership and support, 2 strengthen inter-disciplinary partnership, 3 community ownership is key, 4 recognise the needs of the people and what appeals to them, and 5 raise awareness through capacity building and increasing health literacy. Conclusions: Innovation is vital in enabling ASEAN nations to successfully address the growing crisis of NCDs. More of the same or wholesale transfers of developed world models will be ineffective and lead to financially unsustainable programmes or programmes lacking appropriate human capital. The case studies have demonstrated the transformative impact of innovation and identified key factors in

  14. Perspectives on healthcare, chronic non-communicable disease, and healthworlds in an urban and rural setting.

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    Lopes Ibanez-Gonzalez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Amidst diverging discourses describing chronic non-communicable disease (NCD) and healthcare access, the hermeneutical tradition within sociology, particularly as exemplified in the work of Jurgen Habermas, provides a starting point for exploring and interpreting the experiences of chronic illness and healthcare access. In this study, we aimed to understand how women living with NCDs experience their illness and access healthcare in an urban and rural context. This study was a mixed-methods comparative case study of the healthcare access experiences of women with NCDs in an urban and rural area in South Africa. The core of the study methodology was a comparative qualitative case study, with quantitative methods serving to contextualise the findings. The cross-sectional survey describes a low resource population with a high prevalence of NCDs. Slightly over half the respondents in urban Soweto (50.7%) reported having at least one NCD. Only around a third (33.3%) of these participants reported accessing formal healthcare services in the past 6 months. Similar trends were found in the review of research carried out in rural Agincourt. The qualitative case study in Soweto is characterised by a preoccupation with how medicine from the clinic interacts with the body. The Agincourt qualitative case study highlights the importance of church membership, particularly of African Christian Churches, as the strongest factor motivating against the open use of traditional medicine. A consideration of the findings suggests five broad themes for further research: 1) processes of constructing body narratives; 2) encounters with purposive-rational systems; 3) encounters with traditional medicine; 4) encounters with contemporary informal medicine; and 5) religion and healthcare. These five themes constitute the beginning of a comprehensive schema of the lifeworld/healthworld.

  15. Educational status and beliefs regarding non-communicable diseases among children in Ghana.

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    Badasu, Delali M; Abuosi, Aaron A; Adzei, Francis A; Anarfi, John K; Yawson, Alfred E; Atobrah, Deborah A

    2018-03-05

    Increasing prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has been observed in Ghana as in other developing countries. Past research focused on NCDs among adults. Recent researches, however, provide evidence on NCDs among children in many countries, including Ghana. Beliefs about the cause of NCDs among children may be determined by the socioeconomic status of parents and care givers. This paper examines the relationship between educational status of parents and/or care givers of children with NCDs on admission and their beliefs regarding NCDs among children. A total of 225 parents and/or care givers of children with NCDS hospitalized in seven hospitals in three regions (Greater Accra, Ashanti and Volta) were selected for the study. Statistical techniques, including the chi-square and multinomial logistic regression, were used for the data analysis. Educational status is a predictor of care giver's belief about whether enemies can cause NCDs among children or not. This is the only belief with which all the educational categories have significant relationship. Also, post-secondary/polytechnic (p-value =0.029) and university (p-value = 0.009) levels of education are both predictors of care givers being undecided about the belief that NCDs among children can be caused by enemies, when background characteristics are controlled for. Significant relationship is found between only some educational categories regarding the other types of beliefs and NCDs among children. For example, those with Middle/Juniour Secondary School (JSS)/Juniour High School (JHS) education are significantly undecided about the belief that the sin of parents can cause NCDs among children. Education is more of a predictor of the belief that enemies can cause NCDs among children than the other types of beliefs. Some categories of ethnicity, residential status and age have significant relationship with the beliefs when background characteristics of the parents and/or care givers were controlled

  16. Legal priorities for prevention of non-communicable diseases: innovations from WHO's Eastern Mediterranean region.

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    Gostin, L O; Abou-Taleb, H; Roache, S A; Alwan, A

    2017-03-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading cause of death globally and in the World Health Organization's (WHO) Eastern Mediterranean region (EMR). This paper reports on a research collaboration between the WHO's Eastern Mediterranean Office (EMRO) and the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University that aims to identify (1) regionally relevant, cost-effective and affordable legal interventions to prevent NCDs, and (2) methods to strengthen implementation and enforcement. Comparative analysis of >200 international, regional and domestic interventions addressing key NCD risk factors, including tobacco, alcohol, diet and physical inactivity. Researchers searched legal and policy databases including the WHO Nutrition, Obesity and Physical Activity Database and drew upon academic commentary and 'grey' literature. Measures included evidence of impact; evidence of cost-effectiveness; and monitoring and enforcement mechanisms. Researchers identified many examples of legal interventions effectively reducing NCD risk factors. Key enabling factors for effective NCD-related laws include regulatory capacity; governance mechanisms promoting multisectoral collaboration and accountability; and tailoring interventions to local legal, economic and social contexts. In the EMR, and globally, law can be a cost-effective and affordable means of curbing underlying drivers of the NCD pandemic, such as rampant junk food marketing. Building upon this research, together with international and regional experts, EMRO has identified 10 priority interventions in the areas of tobacco control, unhealthy diets and NCD governance. The EMRO/O'Neill Institute partnership will develop guidance tools and capacity building initiatives to support Member States to harness the power of law to achieve population health improvements. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Innovations in non-communicable diseases management in ASEAN: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeremy; Chan, Melissa M H; Alsagoff, Fatimah Z; Ha, Duc

    2014-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are reaching epidemic proportions worldwide and present an unprecedented challenge to economic and social development globally. In Southeast Asia, the challenges are exacerbated by vastly differing levels of health systems development and funding availability. In addressing the burden of NCDs, ASEAN nations need to fundamentally re-examine how health care services are structured and delivered and discover new models as undiscerning application of models from other geographies with different cultures and resources will be problematic. We sought to examine cases of innovation and identify critical success factors in NCD management in ASEAN. A qualitative design, focusing on in-depth interviews and site visits to explore the meanings and perceptions of participants regarding innovations in NCD against the backdrop of the overall context of delivering health care within the country's context was adopted. In total 12 case studies in six ASEAN countries were analysed. Primary interventions accounted for five of the total cases, whereas secondary interventions comprised four, and tertiary interventions three. Five core themes contributing to successful innovation for NCD management were identified. They include: 1) encourage better outcomes through leadership and support, 2) strengthen inter-disciplinary partnership, 3) community ownership is key, 4) recognise the needs of the people and what appeals to them, and 5) raise awareness through capacity building and increasing health literacy. Innovation is vital in enabling ASEAN nations to successfully address the growing crisis of NCDs. More of the same or wholesale transfers of developed world models will be ineffective and lead to financially unsustainable programmes or programmes lacking appropriate human capital. The case studies have demonstrated the transformative impact of innovation and identified key factors in successful implementation. Beyond pilot success, the bigger challenge is

  18. Horizontal inequity in public health care service utilization for non-communicable diseases in urban Vietnam

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    Vu Duy Kien

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: A health system that provides equitable health care is a principal goal in many countries. Measuring horizontal inequity (HI in health care utilization is important to develop appropriate and equitable public policies, especially policies related to non-communicable diseases (NCDs. Design: A cross-sectional survey of 1,211 randomly selected households in slum and non-slum areas was carried out in four urban districts of Hanoi city in 2013. This study utilized data from 3,736 individuals aged 15 years and older. Respondents were asked about health care use during the previous 12 months; information included sex, age, and self-reported NCDs. We assessed the extent of inequity in utilization of public health care services. Concentration indexes for health care utilization and health care needs were constructed via probit regression of individual utilization of public health care services, controlling for age, sex, and NCDs. In addition, concentration indexes were decomposed to identify factors contributing to inequalities in health care utilization. Results: The proportion of healthcare utilization in the slum and non-slum areas was 21.4 and 26.9%, respectively. HI in health care utilization in favor of the rich was observed in the slum areas, whereas horizontal equity was achieved among the non-slum areas. In the slum areas, we identified some key factors that affect the utilization of public health care services. Conclusion: Our results suggest that to achieve horizontal equity in utilization of public health care services, policy should target preventive interventions for NCDs, focusing more on the poor in slum areas.

  19. Impact of economic sanctions on access to noncommunicable diseases medicines in the Islamic Republic of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirandish, Mehrnaz; Varahrami, Vida; Kebriaeezade, Abbas; Cheraghali, Abdol Majid

    2018-04-05

    It has been argued that economic sanctions and the economic crisis have adversely affected access to drugs. To assess the impact of economic sanctions on the Iranian banking system in 2011 and Central Bank in 2012 on access to and use of drugs for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). An interrupted time series study assessed the effects of sanctions on drugs for diabetes (5 drug groups), asthma (5 drug groups), cancer (14 drugs) and multiple sclerosis (2 drugs). We extracted data from national reference databases on the list of drugs on the Iranian pharmaceutical market before 2011 for each selected NCD and their monthly sales. For cancer drugs, we used stratified random sampling by volume and value of sales, and source of supply (domestic or imported). Data were analysed monthly from 2008 to 2013. Market availability of 13 of 26 drugs was significantly reduced. Ten other drugs showed nonsignificant reductions in their market availability. Interferon α2b usage reduced from 0.014 defined daily doses per 1000 inhabitants per day (DID) in 2010 to 0.008 in 2013; and cytarabine from 1.40 mg per 1000 population per day in 2010 to 0.96 in 2013. Selective β2-adrenoreceptor agonists usage reduced from 8.4 to 6.8 DID in the same time period. There is strong evidence that sanctions have had a negative effect on access to drugs, particularly those that depended on the import of their raw material or finished products. Copyright © World Health Organization (WHO) 2018. Some rights reserved. This work is available under the CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/igo).

  20. The global impact of non-communicable diseases on macro-economic productivity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaker, Layal; Falla, Abby; van der Lee, Sven J; Muka, Taulant; Imo, David; Jaspers, Loes; Colpani, Veronica; Mendis, Shanthi; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Bramer, Wichor M; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar H

    2015-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have large economic impact at multiple levels. To systematically review the literature investigating the economic impact of NCDs [including coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer (lung, colon, cervical and breast), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD)] on macro-economic productivity. Systematic search, up to November 6th 2014, of medical databases (Medline, Embase and Google Scholar) without language restrictions. To identify additional publications, we searched the reference lists of retrieved studies and contacted authors in the field. Randomized controlled trials, cohort, case-control, cross-sectional, ecological studies and modelling studies carried out in adults (>18 years old) were included. Two independent reviewers performed all abstract and full text selection. Disagreements were resolved through consensus or consulting a third reviewer. Two independent reviewers extracted data using a predesigned data collection form. Main outcome measure was the impact of the selected NCDs on productivity, measured in DALYs, productivity costs, and labor market participation, including unemployment, return to work and sick leave. From 4542 references, 126 studies met the inclusion criteria, many of which focused on the impact of more than one NCD on productivity. Breast cancer was the most common (n = 45), followed by stroke (n = 31), COPD (n = 24), colon cancer (n = 24), DM (n = 22), lung cancer (n = 16), CVD (n = 15), cervical cancer (n = 7) and CKD (n = 2). Four studies were from the WHO African Region, 52 from the European Region, 53 from the Region of the Americas and 16 from the Western Pacific Region, one from the Eastern Mediterranean Region and none from South East Asia. We found large regional differences in DALYs attributable to NCDs but especially for cervical and lung cancer. Productivity losses in the USA ranged from 88 million

  1. Leveraging rapid community-based HIV testing campaigns for non-communicable diseases in rural Uganda.

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    Gabriel Chamie

    Full Text Available The high burden of undiagnosed HIV in sub-Saharan Africa limits treatment and prevention efforts. Community-based HIV testing campaigns can address this challenge and provide an untapped opportunity to identify non-communicable diseases (NCDs. We tested the feasibility and diagnostic yield of integrating NCD and communicable diseases into a rapid HIV testing and referral campaign for all residents of a rural Ugandan parish.A five-day, multi-disease campaign, offering diagnostic, preventive, treatment and referral services, was performed in May 2011. Services included point-of-care screening for HIV, malaria, TB, hypertension and diabetes. Finger-prick diagnostics eliminated the need for phlebotomy. HIV-infected adults met clinic staff and peer counselors on-site; those with CD4 ≤ 100/µL underwent intensive counseling and rapid referral for antiretroviral therapy (ART. Community participation, case-finding yield, and linkage to care three months post-campaign were analyzed.Of 6,300 residents, 2,323/3,150 (74% adults and 2,020/3,150 (69% children participated. An estimated 95% and 52% of adult female and male residents participated respectively. Adult HIV prevalence was 7.8%, with 46% of HIV-infected adults newly diagnosed. Thirty-nine percent of new HIV diagnoses linked to care. In a pilot subgroup with CD4 ≤ 100, 83% linked and started ART within 10 days. Malaria was identified in 10% of children, and hypertension and diabetes in 28% and 3.5% of adults screened, respectively. Sixty-five percent of hypertensives and 23% of diabetics were new diagnoses, of which 43% and 61% linked to care, respectively. Screening identified suspected TB in 87% of HIV-infected and 19% of HIV-uninfected adults; 52% percent of HIV-uninfected TB suspects linked to care.In an integrated campaign engaging 74% of adult residents, we identified a high burden of undiagnosed HIV, hypertension and diabetes. Improving male attendance and optimizing linkage to care

  2. A cross-sectional, facility based study of comorbid non-communicable diseases among adults living with HIV infection in Zimbabwe.

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    Magodoro, Itai M; Esterhuizen, Tonya M; Chivese, Tawanda

    2016-08-02

    Increased antiretroviral therapy uptake in sub-Saharan Africa has resulted in improved survival of the infected. Opportunistic infections are declining as leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Though comprehensive data are lacking, concern has been raised about the rapid emergence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the African HIV care setting. We therefore set out to characterise the NCD/HIV burden among adults living and ageing with HIV infection in Zimbabwe. We conducted a cross-sectional study among patients receiving care in a public sector facility. We reviewed patient records and determined the prevalence of comorbid and multi-morbid NCDs. Associations with patient characteristics were evaluated using univariate and multi-variate logistic regression modelling. Significance testing was done using 2-sided p values and 95 % confidence intervals calculated. We recruited 1033 participants. 31 % were men. Significant gender differences included: older median age, more advanced disease at baseline, and greater use of stavudine and protease inhibitor containing regimens in men compared to women. The prevalence of comorbidity and multi-morbidity were, respectively, 15.3 % (95 % CI 13.3-17.7 %) and 4.5 % (95 % CI 3.4-6.0 %). Women had higher rates than men of both co-morbidity and multi-morbid ity: 21.8 vs. 14.9 %; p = 0.010 and 5.3 vs. 2.9 %; p = 0.025 respectively. The commonly observed individual NCDs were hypertension [10.2 %; (95 % CI 8.4-12.2 %)], asthma [4.3 % (95 % CI 3.1-5.8 %)], type 2 diabetes mellitus [2.1 % (95 % CI 1.3-3.2 %)], cancer [1.8 % (95 % CI 1.1-2.8 %)], and congestive cardiac failure [1.5 % (95 % CI 0.9-2.5 %)]. After adjusting for confounding, only age categories 45-≤55 years (AOR 2.25; 95 % CI 1.37-3.69) and >55 years (AOR 5.42; 95 % CI 3.17-9.26), and female gender (AOR 2.12; 95 % CI 1.45-3.11) remained significantly and strongly associated with comorbidity risk. We found a substantial burden of

  3. Responding to non-communicable diseases in Zambia: a policy analysis.

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    Mukanu, Mulenga M; Zulu, Joseph Mumba; Mweemba, Chrispin; Mutale, Wilbroad

    2017-04-24

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are an emerging global health concern. Reports have shown that, in Zambia, NCDs are also an emerging problem and the government has begun initiating a policy response. The present study explores the policy response to NCDs by the Ministry of Health in Zambia using the policy triangle framework of Walt and Gilson. A qualitative approach was used for the study. Data collected through key informant interviews with stakeholders who were involved in the NCD health policy development process as well as review of key planning and policy documents were analysed using thematic analysis. The government's policy response was as a result of international strategies from WHO, evidence of increasing disease burden from NCDs and pressure from interest groups. The government developed the NCD strategic plan based on the WHO Global Action Plan for NCDs 2013-2030. Development of the NCD strategic plan was driven by the government through the Ministry of Health, who set the agenda and adopted the final document. Stakeholders participated in the fine tuning of the draft document from the Ministry of Health. The policy development process was lengthy and this affected consistency in composition of the stakeholders and policy development momentum. Lack of representative research evidence for some prioritised NCDs and use of generic targets and indicators resulted in the NCD strategic plan being inadequate for the Zambian context. The interventions in the strategic plan also underutilised the potential of preventing NCDs through health education. Recent government pronouncements were also seen to be conflicting the risk factor reduction strategies outlined in the NCD strategic plan. The content of the NCD strategic plan inadequately covered all the major NCDs in Zambia. Although contextual factors like international strategies and commitments are crucial catalysts to policy development, there is need for domestication of international guidelines and

  4. Noncommunicable diseases: global health priority or market opportunity? An illustration of the World Health Organization at its worst and at its best.

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    Katz, Alison Rosamund

    2013-01-01

    The promotion of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) as a global health priority started a decade ago and culminated in a 2011 United Nations high-level meeting. The focus is on four diseases (cardiovascular and chronic respiratory diseases, cancers, and diabetes) and four risk factors (tobacco use, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity, and harmful alcohol use). The message is that disease and death are now globalized, risk factors are overwhelmingly behavioral, and premature NCD deaths, especially in low- and middle-income countries, are the concern. The NCD agenda is promoted by United Nations agencies, foundations, institutes, and organizations in a style that suggests a market opportunity. This "hard sell" of NCDs contrasts with the sober style of the World Health Organization's Global Burden of Disease report, which presents a more nuanced picture of mortality and morbidity and different implications for global health priorities. This report indicates continuing high levels of premature death from infectious disease and from maternal, perinatal, and nutritional conditions in low-income countries and large health inequalities. Comparison of the reports offers an illustration of the World Health Organization at its worst, operating under the influence of the private sector, and at its best, operating according to its constitutional mandate.

  5. Trade and investment liberalization and Asia's noncommunicable disease epidemic: a synthesis of data and existing literature.

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    Baker, Phillip; Kay, Adrian; Walls, Helen

    2014-09-12

    Trade and investment liberalization (trade liberalization) can promote or harm health. Undoubtedly it has contributed, although unevenly, to Asia's social and economic development over recent decades with resultant gains in life expectancy and living standards. In the absence of public health protections, however, it is also a significant upstream driver of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) including cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes through facilitating increased consumption of the 'risk commodities' tobacco, alcohol and ultra-processed foods, and by constraining access to NCD medicines. In this paper we describe the NCD burden in Asian countries, trends in risk commodity consumption and the processes by which trade liberalization has occurred in the region and contributed to these trends. We further establish pressing questions for future research on strengthening regulatory capacity to address trade liberalization impacts on risk commodity consumption and health. A semi-structured search of scholarly databases, institutional websites and internet sources for academic and grey literature. Data for descriptive statistics were sourced from Euromonitor International, the World Bank, the World Health Organization, and the World Trade Organization. Consumption of tobacco, alcohol and ultra-processed foods was prevalent in the region and increasing in many countries. We find that trade liberalization can facilitate increased trade in goods, services and investments in ways that can promote risk commodity consumption, as well as constrain the available resources and capacities of governments to enact policies and programmes to mitigate such consumption. Intellectual property provisions of trade agreements may also constrain access to NCD medicines. Successive layers of the evolving global and regional trade regimes including structural adjustment, multilateral trade agreements, and preferential trade agreements have enabled transnational corporations that

  6. Socio-Economic Inequality of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Tuhin; Islam, Md. Saimul; Linton, Natalie; Rawal, Lal B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a major public health challenge, and undermine social and economic development in much of the developing world, including Bangladesh. Epidemiologic evidence on the socioeconomic status (SES)-related pattern of NCDs remains limited in Bangladesh. This study assessed the relationship between three chronic NCDs and SES among the Bangladeshi population, paying particular attention to the differences between urban and rural areas. Materials and Method Data from the 2011 Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey were used for this study. Using a concentration index (CI), we measured relative inequality across pre-diabetes, diabetes, pre-hypertension, hypertension, and BMI (underweight, normal weight, and overweight/obese) in urban and rural areas in Bangladesh. A CI and its associated curve can be used to identify whether socioeconomic inequality exists for a given health variable. In addition, we estimated the health achievement index, integrating mean coverage and the distribution of coverage by rural and urban populations. Results Socioeconomic inequalities were observed across diseases and risk factors. Using CI, significant inequalities observed for pre-hypertension (CI = 0.09, p = 0.001), hypertension (CI = 0.10, p = 0.001), pre-diabetes (CI = -0.01, p = 0.005), diabetes (CI = 0.19, p<0.001), and overweight/obesity (CI = 0.45, p<0.001). In contrast to the high prevalence of the chronic health conditions among the urban richest, a significant difference in CI was observed for pre-hypertension (CI = -0.20, p = 0.001), hypertension (CI = -0.20, p = 0.005), pre-diabetes (CI = -0.15, p = 0.005), diabetes (CI = -0.26, p = 0.004) and overweight/obesity (CI = 0.25, p = 0.004) were observed more among the low wealth quintiles of rural population. In the same vein, the poorest rural households had more co-morbidities compared to the richest rural households (p = 0.003), and prevalence of co-morbidities was much higher

  7. Food pricing strategies, population diets, and non-communicable disease: a systematic review of simulation studies.

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    Helen Eyles

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Food pricing strategies have been proposed to encourage healthy eating habits, which may in turn help stem global increases in non-communicable diseases. This systematic review of simulation studies investigates the estimated association between food pricing strategies and changes in food purchases or intakes (consumption (objective 1; Health and disease outcomes (objective 2, and whether there are any differences in these outcomes by socio-economic group (objective 3. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Electronic databases, Internet search engines, and bibliographies of included studies were searched for articles published in English between 1 January 1990 and 24 October 2011 for countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Where ≥ 3 studies examined the same pricing strategy and consumption (purchases or intake or health outcome, results were pooled, and a mean own-price elasticity (own-PE estimated (the own-PE represents the change in demand with a 1% change in price of that good. Objective 1: pooled estimates were possible for the following: (1 taxes on carbonated soft drinks: own-PE (n  =  4 studies, -0.93 (range, -0.06, -2.43, and a modelled -0.02% (-0.01%, -0.04% reduction in energy (calorie intake for each 1% price increase (n  =  3 studies; (2 taxes on saturated fat: -0.02% (-0.01%, -0.04% reduction in energy intake from saturated fat per 1% price increase (n  =  5 studies; and (3 subsidies on fruits and vegetables: own-PE (n = 3 studies, -0.35 (-0.21, -0.77. Objectives 2 and 3: variability of food pricing strategies and outcomes prevented pooled analyses, although higher quality studies suggested unintended compensatory purchasing that could result in overall effects being counter to health. Eleven of 14 studies evaluating lower socio-economic groups estimated that food pricing strategies would be associated with pro-health outcomes. Food pricing strategies also have the potential to reduce

  8. Impact of fetal and neonatal malnutrition on the onset of puberty and associated noncommunicable disease risks

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    Nicholas E Connor

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Nicholas E ConnorChild Health Research Foundation Dhaka Shishu Hospital, Dhaka, BangladeshBackground: Fetal and neonatal malnutrition impacts the timing of the onset of puberty. The timing of puberty onset has been shown to be a rough indicator of noncommunicable disease (NCD risk. Recent advances in understanding the various inter-related neurochemical and genetic controls underpinning puberty onset have shed new light on these interesting and important phenomena. These studies have suggested that developmental trajectory is set very early by epigenetic mechanisms that serve to adjust phenotype to environment.Objective: The aims of this article are to review the most recent research into the proximate mechanisms that initiate puberty; to explore how the activation of those mechanisms could be affected by nutritional cues received during fetal and neonatal life; and, finally, to briefly explore the ramifications for public health.Methods: An extensive literature review was performed using PubMed (1950 to September 2010 and Google Scholar (1980 to September 2010 using the search terms “puberty onset”, “perinatal”, and “neonatal malnutrition”. English language, original research, and review articles were examined; pertinent citations from these articles were also assessed.Results: Literature detailing biochemical pathways and evolutionary explanations of human puberty itself led quickly to a noteworthy connection between neonatal malnutrition, puberty onset, and NCD risk. A strong connection was found between maternal malnutrition during critical windows (followed by catch-up growth in childhood and an accelerated onset of puberty. Children subject to early nutritional insult not only are likely to undergo puberty earlier but also show an increase in their risk of developing NCDs in later life. Several authors have suggested that this relationship may show potential as an early proxy indicator of susceptibility to these types of

  9. Developmental Origins of Health and Disease: A Lifecourse Approach to the Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases.

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    Baird, Janis; Jacob, Chandni; Barker, Mary; Fall, Caroline H D; Hanson, Mark; Harvey, Nicholas C; Inskip, Hazel M; Kumaran, Kalyanaraman; Cooper, Cyrus

    2017-03-08

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs), such as cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis, affect individuals in all countries worldwide. Given the very high worldwide prevalence of NCDs across a range of human pathology, it is clear that traditional approaches targeting those at most risk in older adulthood will not efficiently ameliorate this growing burden. It will thus be essential to robustly identify determinants of NCDs across the entire lifecourse and, subsequently, appropriate interventions at every stage to reduce an individual's risk of developing these conditions. A lifecourse approach has the potential to prevent NCDs, from before conception through fetal life, infancy, childhood, adolescence, adulthood and into older age. In this paper, we describe the origins of the lifecourse concept, the importance of early life influences, for example during pregnancy, examine potential underlying mechanisms in both cell biology and behavior change, and finally describe current efforts to develop interventions that take a lifecourse approach to NCD prevention. Two principal approaches to improving women's nutritional status are outlined: nutritional supplementation and behavior change.

  10. Causal narratives in public health: the difference between mechanisms of aetiology and mechanisms of prevention in non-communicable diseases.

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    Kelly, Michael P; Russo, Federica

    2018-01-01

    Research in the health sciences has been highly successful in revealing the aetiologies of many morbidities, particularly those involving the microbiology of communicable disease. This success has helped form a narrative to be found in numerous public health documents, about interventions to reduce the burden of non-communicable diseases (e.g., obesity or alcohol related pathologies). These focus on tackling the purported pathogenic factors causing the diseases as a means of prevention. In this paper, we argue that this approach has been sub-optimal. The mechanisms of aetiology and of prevention are sometimes significantly different and failure to make this distinction has hindered efforts at preventing non-communicable diseases linked to diet, exercise and alcohol consumption. We propose a sociological approach as an alternative based on social practice theory. (A virtual abstract for this paper can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_979cmCmR9rLrKuD7z0ycA). © 2017 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation for SHIL.

  11. [Access to health care in Dakar (Senegal): frequency, type of provider, and non-communicable chronic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboz, P; Gueye, L; Boetsch, G; Macia, E

    2015-01-01

    (1) To describe access to health care in the population of Dakar; (2) to analyze the influence of socioeconomic and demographic characteristics on access to health care; (3) and to describe the fraction of consultations accounted for by chronic non-communicable diseases. These data come from a 2009 survey of 600 individuals aged 20 years and over. Socioeconomic and demographic characteristics and information about access to health care were collected. Chi-square tests and binary logistic regressions were used for the statistical analyses. Men, people with no schooling, and poor people were underrepresented among users of health care services. Moreover, the majority of Dakar residents who sought health care during the year preceding the survey went to see a doctor (as opposed to a traditional healer, pharmacist, nurse, midwife, or dentist). Finally, chronic diseases accounted for the smallest fraction of reasons for medical consultations; they were mentioned most often by those aged 50 years or older who consult more than 5 times a year. Dakar residents have an access to health care similar to that of people in other African countries, but this conclusion hides major inequalities. Moreover, at the same time that Senegal is undergoing an epidemiological transition, chronic non-communicable diseases are not a major reason for consultations. The epidemiological projections made for Africa for the next 15 years indicate that the development of strategies to avert the development of these diseases in Senegal must be a priority objective.

  12. Chronic non-communicable diseases and the challenge of universal health coverage: insights from community-based cardiovascular disease research in urban poor communities in Accra, Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Kushitor, Mawuli; Koram, Kwadwo; Gyamfi, Stella; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    Background The rising burden of chronic non-communicable diseases in low and middle income countries has major implications on the ability of these countries to achieve universal health coverage. In this paper we discuss the impact of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) on primary healthcare services in urban poor communities in Accra, Ghana. Methods We review the evidence on the evolution of universal health coverage in Ghana and the central role of the community-based health planning services (CH...

  13. The economic burden of chronic non-communicable diseases in rural Malawi: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun; Brenner, Stephan; Kalmus, Olivier; Banda, Hastings Thomas; De Allegri, Manuela

    2016-09-01

    Evidence from population-based studies on the economic burden imposed by chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCDs) is still sparse in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our study aimed to fill this existing gap in knowledge by estimating both the household direct, indirect, and total costs incurred due to CNCDs and the economic burden households bear as a result of these costs in Malawi. The study used data from the first round of a longitudinal household health survey conducted in 2012 in three rural districts in Malawi. A cost-of-illness method was applied to estimate the economic burden of CNCDs. Indicators of catastrophic spending and impoverishment were used to estimate the economic burden imposed by CNCDs on households. A total 475 out of 5643 interviewed individuals reported suffering from CNCDs. Mean total costs of all reported CNCDs were 1,040.82 MWK, of which 56.8 % was contributed by direct costs. Individuals affected by chronic cardiovascular conditions and chronic neuropsychiatric conditions bore the highest levels of direct, indirect, and total costs. Using a threshold of 10 % of household non-food expenditure, 21.3 % of all households with at least one household member reporting a CNCD and seeking care for such a condition incurred catastrophic spending due to CNCDs. The poorest households were more likely to incur catastrophic spending due to CNCDs. An additional 1.7 % of households reporting a CNCD fell under the international poverty line once considering direct costs due to CNCDs. Our study showed that the economic burden of CNCDs is high, causes catastrophic spending, and aggravates poverty in rural Malawi, a country where in principle basic care for CNCDs should be offered free of charge at point of use through the provision of an Essential Health Package (EHP). Our findings further indicated that particularly high direct, indirect, and total costs were linked to specific diagnoses, although costs were high even for conditions targeted by the EHP. Our

  14. [Association analysis between urbanization and non-communicable diseases and health-related behavior].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G F; Sun, M P; Wang, Z Y; Jian, W Y

    2016-06-18

    To explore the association between different urbanization levels and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in China and provide suggestions on designing relevant health policies in the urbanization process. We obtained health-related data from China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) 2011. This study used multistage sampling in design stage and covered 150 districts/counties, representative at the levels of the country. Geo-information system (GIS) method was used to get district areas data, and in combination with the Sixth National Census population data, we computed the population density which was regarded as the proxy variable of urbanization level in every city. The Logistic model was used to explore the effect of urbanization level on hypertension, diabetes, smoking, drinking, overweight and obesity. Compared with other cities in China, Shanghai and Shenzhen, with the population density of more than 3 000 people per km(2), were the cities with highest urbanization level. From the map of urbanization distribution across China, it was found that the urbanization levels of the northwestern districts were lower than those of the southeastern and coastal districts. The hypertension rate increased with the development of urbanization but there was no statistical significance. The proportion of patients with diabetes went up first and then saw a decrease trend in the process of urbanization. Drinking rate, overweight rate and obesity rate had similar trends, falling to their lowest point when urbanization level equaled 737,1 186 and 1 353 people per km(2) respectively and then experienced upward trends. By contrast, smoking rate declined first and then went up (the turning point was 1 029 people per km(2)). Different urbanization levels have different effects on NCDs, health-related behavior, overweight and obesity. Low urbanization level may create negative impact on health while high level can pose positive effect and increase people's health condition

  15. Non-communicable diseases at a regional hospital in Nepal: Findings of a high burden of alcohol-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, M S; Kirkeby, T M G; Giri, S; Koju, R; Krishna, S S; Ystgaard, B; Solligård, E; Risnes, K

    2016-12-01

    Recent global burden of disease reports find that a major proportion of global deaths and disability worldwide can be attributed to alcohol use. Thus, it may be surprising that very few studies have reported on the burden of alcohol-related disease in low income settings. The evidence of non-communicable disease (NCD) burden in Nepal was recently reviewed and concluded that data is still lacking, particularly to describe the burden of alcohol-related diseases (ARDs). Therefore, here we report on NCD burden and specifically ARDs, in hospitalized patients at a regional hospital in Nepal. We conducted a retrospective chart-review that included detailed information on all discharged patients during a four month period. A local database that included sociodemographic information and diagnoses at discharge was established. All doctor-assigned discharge diagnoses were retrospectively assigned ICD-10 codes. A total of 1,139 hospitalized adult patients were included in the study and one third of these were NCDs (n = 332). The main NCDs were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 148, 45%) and ARDs (n = 57, 17%). Patients with ARD often presented with signs of liver cirrhosis and were typically younger men, with a median age at 43 years, from specific ethnic groups. These data demonstrate that severe alcohol-related organ failure in relatively young men contributed to a high proportion of NCDs in a regional hospital in Nepal. These findings are novel and alarming and warrant further studies that can establish the burden of ARDs and alcohol use in Nepal and other similar low-income countries. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The role and importance of economic evaluation of traditional herbal medicine use for chronic non-communicable diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes GD

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gail D Hughes,1 Oluwaseyi M Aboyade,1 John D Hill,2 Rafia S Rasu3 1South African Herbal Science and Medicine Institute, University of the Western Cape, Western Cape, South Africa; 2Department of Pharmacy, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 3School of Pharmacy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, USA Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCD constitute major public health problems globally, with an impact on morbidity and mortality ranking high and second to HIV/AIDS. Existing studies conducted in South Africa have demonstrated that people living with NCD rely on traditional herbal medicine (THM primarily or in combination with conventional drugs. The primary research focus has been on the clinical and experimental aspects of THM use for NCD, with limited data on the economic impact of health care delivery. Therefore, the purpose of this study will be to determine the cost and utilization of resources on THM in South Africa for NCD. Materials and methods: Study describes the methods toward incorporating cost estimations and economic evaluation illustrated with the Prospective Urban and rural Epidemiological (PURE study in South Africa. The South African PURE cohort is investigating the geographic and socioeconomic influence of THM spending and utilization, variations in spending based on perceived health status, marital status, and whether spending patterns have any impact on hospitalizations and disability. Data collection and evaluation plan: Since the individual costs of THM are not regulated nor do they have a standardized price value, information obtained through this study can be utilized to assess differences and determine underlying factors contributing to spending. This insight into THM spending patterns can aid in the development and implementation of guidelines or standardized legislation governing THM use and distribution. An economic evaluation and cost estimation model has been proposed, while the data collection is still ongoing

  17. High prevalence of non-communicable diseases and associated risk factors amongst adults living with HIV in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhoun, Pheak; Tuot, Sovannary; Harries, Anthony D; Kyaw, Nang Thu Thu; Pal, Khuondyla; Mun, Phalkun; Brody, Carrine; Mburu, Gitau; Yi, Siyan

    2017-01-01

    With rapid expansion of antiretroviral therapy for HIV, there are rising life expectancies among people living with HIV. As a result, co-morbidity from non-communicable diseases in those living and aging with HIV is increasingly being reported. Published data on this issue have been limited in Cambodia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia and associated risk factors in adults living with HIV in Cambodia. This cross-sectional study was conducted in five provinces of Cambodia from May-June 2015. Information was obtained on socio-demographic and clinical characteristics through face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire, and anthropometric and biochemical measurements were performed. Diabetes mellitus was diagnosed with fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg/dl, hypertension with systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg and hypercholesterolemia with fasting blood cholesterol ≥190 mg/dl. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to explore risk factors. The study sample included 510 adults living with HIV; 67% were female, with a mean age of 45 (standard deviation = 8) years. Of these, 8.8% had diabetes mellitus, 15.1% had hypertension and 34.7% had hypercholesterolemia. Of the total participants with non-communicable diseases (n = 244), 47.8% had one or more diseases, and 75% were not aware of their diseases prior to the study: new disease was diagnosed in 90% of diabetes mellitus, 44% of hypertension and 90% of hypercholesterolemia. Single disease occurred in 81%, dual disease in 17% and triple disease in 2%. In adjusted analyses, those consuming 1 serving of fruit compare to 2 servings as significantly with diabetes mellitus, those eating 1 serving of fruit compare to 2 servings and using lard for cooking were significantly associated with hypertension, and those being unemployed, having monthly income less than 100 USD and being

  18. Tobacco and alcohol usage as risk factors of non-communicable diseases among students of Zenica University (Bosnia and Herzegovina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujezinović, Adnan; Čalkić, Lejla; Hasanica, Nino; Tandir, Salih

    2018-02-01

    Aim To establish the presence of two risk factors, smoking and alcohol use, for non-communicable diseases among students at the University of Zenica. Methods The research was conducted at eight schools of the University of Zenica in the academic year 2016/2017 during the period from 1 December 2016 to 15 February 2017. The study involved 600 students 19-29 years of age (all years of study). The research was carried out with a standardized and validated questionnaire, the STEPS non-communicable Disease Risk Factors survey, developed by the World Health Organization. Results Tobacco was used by 145 (24.2%) students, 68 (46.9%) of them being males and 77 (53.1%) females (pnon-communicable diseases. Two levels of the prevention measures should be applied in order to reduce the prevalence of such risk factors: strategic level with a definition of the population, actors, activities, target population and anticipated results, and tactic level which will show contingency activities at the University. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  19. The global impact of non-communicable diseases on households and impoverishment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Loes; Colpani, Veronica; Chaker, Layal; van der Lee, Sven J; Muka, Taulant; Imo, David; Mendis, Shanthi; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Bramer, Wichor M; Falla, Abby; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar H

    2015-03-01

    The global economic impact of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) on household expenditures and poverty indicators remains less well understood. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature evaluating the global economic impact of six NCDs [including coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer (lung, colon, cervical and breast), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD)] on households and impoverishment. Medline, Embase and Google Scholar databases were searched from inception to November 6th 2014. To identify additional publications, reference lists of retrieved studies were searched. Randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, cohorts, case-control, cross-sectional, modeling and ecological studies carried out in adults and assessing the economic consequences of NCDs on households and impoverishment. No language restrictions. All abstract and full text selection was done by two independent reviewers. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers and checked by a third independent reviewer. Studies were included evaluating the impact of at least one of the selected NCDs and on at least one of the following measures: expenditure on medication, transport, co-morbidities, out-of-pocket (OOP) payments or other indirect costs; impoverishment, poverty line and catastrophic spending; household or individual financial cost. From 3,241 references, 64 studies met the inclusion criteria, 75% of which originated from the Americas and Western Pacific WHO region. Breast cancer and DM were the most studied NCDs (42 in total); CKD and COPD were the least represented (five and three studies respectively). OOP payments and financial catastrophe, mostly defined as OOP exceeding a certain proportion of household income, were the most studied outcomes. OOP expenditure as a proportion of family income, ranged between 2 and 158% across the different NCDs and countries. Financial catastrophe due to

  20. The Built Environment—A Missing “Cause of the Causes” of Non-Communicable Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin L. Walls

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations “25 × 25 Strategy” of decreasing non-communicable diseases (NCDs, including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases, by 25% by 2025 does not appear to take into account all causes of NCDs. Its focus is on a few diseases, which are often linked with life-style factors with “voluntary” “modifiable behavioral risk factors” causes tending towards an over-simplification of the issues. We propose to add some aspects of our built environment related to hazardous building materials, and detailed form of the construction of infrastructure and buildings, which we think are some of the missing causes of NCDs. Some of these could be termed “involuntary causes”, as they relate to factors that are beyond the control of the general public.

  1. Cardiovascular health in the Americas: facts, priorities and the UN high-level meeting on non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordúñez, Pedro

    2011-10-01

    Population aging, smoking, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity, in the context of globalization and unregulated urbanization, explain the high prevalences of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and diabetes in the Americas, making cardiovascular diseases the main cause of death. Moreover, cardiovascular diseases and their risk factors disproportionately affect the poorest people, obstructing antipoverty efforts and further deepening health and other inequities. The global crisis of chronic non-communicable diseases has reached such proportions that the UN General Assembly called a high-level meeting in September 2011 to address the issue as one of human development, aiming to stimulate political commitment to a concerted global effort to stem the pandemic. In reference to the Americas, this article reviews the burden of cardiovascular diseases and describes priorities for strategies and action in the region and their relation to the results of the UN meeting.

  2. Socioeconomic status and non-communicable disease behavioural risk factors in low-income and lower-middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Luke; Williams, Julianne; Townsend, Nick; Mikkelsen, Bente; Roberts, Nia; Foster, Charlie; Wickramasinghe, Kremlin

    2017-03-01

    socioeconomic status. High socioeconomic groups were found to be less physically active and consume more fats, salt, and processed food than individuals of low socioeconomic status. While the included studies presented clear patterns for tobacco use and physical activity, heterogeneity between dietary outcome measures and a paucity of evidence around harmful alcohol use limit the certainty of these findings. Despite significant heterogeneity in exposure and outcome measures, clear evidence shows that the burden of behavioural risk factors is affected by socioeconomic position within LLMICs. Governments seeking to meet Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3.4-reducing premature non-communicable disease mortality by a third by 2030-should leverage their development budgets to address the poverty-health nexus in these settings. Our findings also have significance for health workers serving these populations and policy makers tasked with preventing and controlling the rise of non-communicable diseases. WHO. Copyright © 2017 World Health Organization; licensee Elsevier. This is an Open Access article published under the CC BY 3.0 IGO license which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. In any use of this article, there should be no suggestion that WHO endorses any specific organisation, products or services. The use of the WHO logo is not permitted. This notice should be preserved along with the article's original URL.

  3. Cardiovascular disease mortality and its association with socioeconomic status: findings from a population-based cohort study in rural Vietnam, 1999-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van Minh; Dao, Lan Huong; Wall, Stig; Nguyen, Thi Kim Chuc; Byass, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an emerging epidemic in Vietnam, but because cause of death and other routine data are not widely available, it is difficult to characterize community-based disease patterns. Using 5-year data from an ongoing cause-specific mortality study conducted within a demographic surveillance system in Vietnam's Bavi district, this article estimates the rates of adult cardiovascular disease mortality in relation to the mortality rates of other noncommunicable diseases in rural northern Vietnam and examines the association of cardiovascular disease with certain demographic and socioeconomic factors. All causes of death of adults aged 20 and older occurring from 1999 through 2003 (n = 1067) were determined by using an established demographic surveillance system and data collected by trained interviewers who asked caretakers or relatives of the deceased individuals about signs and symptoms of disease during quarterly household visits. Deaths were classified as cardiovascular disease, cancer, or other noncommunicable diseases. These records were linked to demographic and socioeconomic data. Of the 1067 adult deaths that were recorded, there was an overall noncommunicable disease mortality rate of 7.8 per 1000 person-years. Cardiovascular disease accounted for 33% of male and 31% of female deaths. Compared with cancer and other noncommunicable causes of death in a Cox proportional hazards model, higher cardiovascular disease mortality rates were observed among men, older age groups, and those without formal education. To date, cohort studies and population-based mortality data in Vietnam have been scarce; this study provides insights into the public health aspects of cardiovascular disease in transitional Vietnam. The rates of cardiovascular disease mortality in this rural Vietnamese community were high, suggesting the need for both primary prevention and secondary treatment initiatives. The demographic surveillance system is an important tool for

  4. Deaths Ascribed to Non-Communicable Diseases among Rural Kenyan Adults Are Proportionately Increasing: Evidence from a Health and Demographic Surveillance System, 2003–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips-Howard, Penelope A.; Laserson, Kayla F.; Amek, Nyaguara; Beynon, Caryl M.; Angell, Sonia Y.; Khagayi, Sammy; Byass, Peter; Hamel, Mary J.; van Eijk, Anne M.; Zielinski-Gutierrez, Emily; Slutsker, Laurence; De Cock, Kevin M.; Vulule, John; Odhiambo, Frank O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) result in more deaths globally than other causes. Monitoring systems require strengthening to attribute the NCD burden and deaths in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). Data from health and demographic surveillance systems (HDSS) can contribute towards this goal. Methods and Findings Between 2003 and 2010, 15,228 deaths in adults aged 15 years (y) and older were identified retrospectively using the HDSS census and verbal autopsy in rural western Kenya, attributed into broad categories using InterVA-4 computer algorithms; 37% were ascribed to NCDs, 60% to communicable diseases (CDs), 3% to injuries, and diseases (CVDs; 29%). The proportionate mortality from NCDs rose from 35% in 2003 to 45% in 2010 (χ2 linear trend 93.4; p<0.001). While overall annual mortality rates (MRs) for NCDs fell, cancer-specific MRs rose from 200 to 262 per 100,000 population, mainly due to increasing deaths in adults aged 65y and older, and to respiratory neoplasms in all age groups. The substantial fall in CD MRs resulted in similar MRs for CDs and NCDs among all adult females by 2010. NCD MRs for adults aged 15y to <65y fell from 409 to 183 per 100,000 among females and from 517 to 283 per 100,000 population among males. NCD MRs were higher among males than females aged both below, and at or above, 65y. Conclusions NCDs constitute a significant proportion of deaths in rural western Kenya. Evidence of the increasing contribution of NCDs to overall mortality supports international recommendations to introduce or enhance prevention, screening, diagnosis and treatment programmes in LMICs. PMID:25426945

  5. Non-communicable diseases in sub-Saharan Africa: understanding the drivers of the epidemic to inform intervention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirenda, Moffat J

    2016-05-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is experiencing a rapidly increasing epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), while it continues to face longstanding challenges from infectious diseases. This double burden of disease could have a devastating impact on a continent that already has significant resource constraints, emphasizing the urgent need for appropriate interventions in the region. However, it is crucial to have a careful understanding of the local drivers of NCDs. This should not only include study of the traditional lifestyle risk factors, but also an examination of emerging risk factors (such as the influence of insults early in life or interactions with infection), which may be of particular importance in Africa. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Evaluation of care access and hypertension control in a community health worker driven non-communicable disease programme in rural Uganda: the chronic disease in the community project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Daniel S; Lam, Wanda C; Nyirangirimana, Patience; Burton, William B; Baganizi, Michael; Musominali, Sam; Bareke, Deus; Paccione, Gerald A

    2016-03-08

    The burden of non-communicable diseases continues to grow throughout the developing world. Health systems in low- and middle-income regions face significant human resource shortages, which limit the ability to meet the growing need for non-communicable disease care. Specially trained community health workers may be useful in filling that provider gap. This study aimed to evaluate consistency of access to care and quality of hypertension control in a community health worker led, decentralized non-communicable disease programme operating in rural Uganda. Days between clinical evaluations and average systolic blood pressure were described for programme patients; these markers were also compared with patients seen in a central, hospital-based clinic. In 2013, community health worker programme patients were seen every 35.6 days and significantly more often than clinic patients (50.8 days, P health worker programme had a mean systolic blood pressure of 147.8 mmHg. This was lower than the average systolic pressure of clinic patients (156.7 mmHg, P health workers improved consistency of access to care and did not come with a demonstrable cost in quality of hypertension control. Community health workers may have the potential to bridge the provider gap in low-income nations, providing expanded non-communicable disease care. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Patients' satisfaction with the non-communicable diseases services provided at UNRWA health centres in Gaza governorates: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkahtib, Zoheir

    2018-02-21

    Most health-care organisations are increasingly interested in assessing the quality of their services. Patient satisfaction has a central role in the quality assessment in health care because it reflects the appropriateness of services from the clients' perspectives. The aim of this study was to assess the level of satisfaction in patients with non-communicable diseases (mainly diabetes and hypertension) who receive services from UNRWA health centres in Gaza governorates. In this cross-sectional study we chose a random sample of participants who presented to the randomly selected six health centres for treatment of non-communicable diseases. Through an exit interviewing technique, participants were chosen according to the study eligibility criteria and were requested to complete a questionnaire. The total instrument reliability (Cronbach's Alpha) was very high (0·936). To examine construct validity, we used Factor Analysis Principal Component Extraction with Varimax Rotation and Kaiser Normalisation with a cutoff point of 0·4. The reported variance was 42·28%, indicating high validity. Ethical approval from the Palestinian Ministry of Health (the Helsinki committee) was obtained, and verbal consent was obtained from the participants. 327 (82%) of 400 eligible patients completed the questionnaire. The reported overall satisfaction level with services for non-communicable diseases was moderately high (72%). The study extracted six domains that could constitute a framework for patient satisfaction with services at UNRWA clinics for non-communicable diseases. Elicited satisfaction scores about these domains varied and ranged from 57% to 84%. Although high satisfaction levels were found with general impressions, accessibility, communication, and interpersonal relationships, patients had a low level of satisfaction with the technical quality of services, clinic environment, and convenience of the services. People who were unmarried, working, living in the southern

  8. Is criminal violence a non-communicable disease? Exploring the epidemiology of violence in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDavid, H A; Cowell, N; McDonald, A

    2011-07-01

    There is a high level of criminal violence that afflicts the Jamaican society. While it is certainly noncommunicable in the context of medicine and public health, the concepts of social contagion and the well-established fact of the intergenerational transfer of effects of trauma raise questions as to whether or not it is non-communicable in a social sense. Historically, scholars have linked Jamaican criminal violence to three main roots: poverty and urban decay, political patronage, garrisonisation and more recently to a fourth, the growth in transnational organized crime (TOC). Traditionally as well, policymakers have brought the three discrete perspectives of criminology, criminal justice and public health to bear on the problem. This paper applies a conceptual framework derived from a combination of epidemiology and the behavioural sciences to argue that a sustainable resolution to this looming and intractable social problem must take the form of a cocktail of policies that encompasses all three approaches at levels ranging from the community to the international.

  9. An integrated approach to telemonitoring noncommunicable diseases: best practice from the European innovation partnership on active and healthy ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret, Rodolphe; Bousquet, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) has prioritized noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). An innovative integrated health system built around medical systems and strategic partnerships is proposed to combat NCDs. Information and communication technology (ICT) is needed for the implementation of integrated care in a medical systems approach. The Teaching Hospital of Montpellier has set up the clinic and uses IP-Soins as an ICT tool. Patients with NCDs will be referred to the chronic disease clinic of the hospital by a primary care physician. This paper reviews the complexity of NCDs intertwined with ageing. It gives an overview of the problem. It presents an innovative approach in the implementation of a clinical information system in a "SaaS" (Software as a Service) mode.

  10. Community health workers for non-communicable diseases prevention and control in developing countries: Evidence and implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gursimer Jeet

    Full Text Available National programs for non-communicable diseases (NCD prevention and control in different low middle income countries have a strong community component. A community health worker (CHW delivers NCD preventive services using informational as well as behavioural approaches. Community education and interpersonal communication on lifestyle modifications is imparted with focus on primordial prevention of NCDs and screening is conducted as part of early diagnosis and management. However, the effectiveness of health promotion and screening interventions delivered through community health workers needs to be established.This review synthesised evidence on effectiveness of CHW delivered NCD primary prevention interventions in low and middle-income countries (LMICs.A systematic review of trials that utilised community health workers for primary prevention/ early detection strategy in the management of NCDs (Diabetes, cardiovascular diseases (CVD, cancers, stroke, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD in LMICs was conducted. Digital databases like PubMed, EMBASE, OVID, Cochrane library, dissertation abstracts, clinical trials registry web sites of different LMIC were searched for such publications between years 2000 and 2015. We focussed on community based randomised controlled trial and cluster randomised trials without any publication language limitation. The primary outcome of review was percentage change in population with different behavioural risk factors. Additionally, mean overall changes in levels of several physical or biochemical parameters were studied as secondary outcomes. Subgroup analyses was performed by the age and sex of participants, and sensitivity analyses was conducted to assess the robustness of the findings.Sixteen trials meeting the inclusion criteria were included in the review. Duration, study populations and content of interventions varied across trials. The duration of the studies ranged from mean follow up of 4 months

  11. Heavy burden of non-communicable diseases at early age and gender disparities in an adult population of Burkina Faso: world health survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miszkurka Malgorzata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WHO estimates suggest that age-specific death rates from non-communicable diseases are higher in sub-Saharan Africa than in high-income countries. The objectives of this study were to examine, in Burkina Faso, the prevalence of non-communicable disease symptoms by age, gender, socioeconomic group and setting (rural/urban, and to assess gender and socioeconomic inequalities in the prevalence of these symptoms. Methods We obtained data from the Burkina Faso World Health Survey, which was conducted in an adult population (18 years and over with a high response rate (4822/4880 selected individuals. The survey used a multi-stage stratified random cluster sampling strategy to identify participants. The survey collected information on socio-demographic and economic characteristics, as well as data on symptoms of a variety of health conditions. Our study focused on joint disease, back pain, angina pectoris, and asthma. We estimated prevalence correcting for the sampling design. We used multiple Poisson regression to estimate associations between non-communicable disease symptoms, gender, socioeconomic status and setting. Results The overall crude prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CI were: 16.2% [13.5; 19.2] for joint disease, 24% [21.5; 26.6] for back pain, 17.9% [15.8; 20.2] for angina pectoris, and 11.6% [9.5; 14.2] for asthma. Consistent relationships between age and the prevalence of non-communicable disease symptoms were observed in both men and women from rural and urban settings. There was markedly high prevalence in all conditions studied, starting with young adults. Women presented higher prevalence rates of symptoms than men for all conditions: prevalence ratios and 95% CIs were 1.20 [1.01; 1.43] for joint disease, 1.42 [1.21; 1.66] for back pain, 1.68 [1.39; 2.04] for angina pectoris, and 1.28 [0.99; 1.65] for asthma. Housewives and unemployed women had the highest prevalence rates of non-communicable disease

  12. Heavy burden of non-communicable diseases at early age and gender disparities in an adult population of Burkina Faso: World Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszkurka, Malgorzata; Haddad, Slim; Langlois, Étienne V; Freeman, Ellen E; Kouanda, Seni; Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria

    2012-01-10

    WHO estimates suggest that age-specific death rates from non-communicable diseases are higher in sub-Saharan Africa than in high-income countries. The objectives of this study were to examine, in Burkina Faso, the prevalence of non-communicable disease symptoms by age, gender, socioeconomic group and setting (rural/urban), and to assess gender and socioeconomic inequalities in the prevalence of these symptoms. We obtained data from the Burkina Faso World Health Survey, which was conducted in an adult population (18 years and over) with a high response rate (4822/4880 selected individuals). The survey used a multi-stage stratified random cluster sampling strategy to identify participants. The survey collected information on socio-demographic and economic characteristics, as well as data on symptoms of a variety of health conditions. Our study focused on joint disease, back pain, angina pectoris, and asthma. We estimated prevalence correcting for the sampling design. We used multiple Poisson regression to estimate associations between non-communicable disease symptoms, gender, socioeconomic status and setting. The overall crude prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were: 16.2% [13.5; 19.2] for joint disease, 24% [21.5; 26.6] for back pain, 17.9% [15.8; 20.2] for angina pectoris, and 11.6% [9.5; 14.2] for asthma. Consistent relationships between age and the prevalence of non-communicable disease symptoms were observed in both men and women from rural and urban settings. There was markedly high prevalence in all conditions studied, starting with young adults. Women presented higher prevalence rates of symptoms than men for all conditions: prevalence ratios and 95% CIs were 1.20 [1.01; 1.43] for joint disease, 1.42 [1.21; 1.66] for back pain, 1.68 [1.39; 2.04] for angina pectoris, and 1.28 [0.99; 1.65] for asthma. Housewives and unemployed women had the highest prevalence rates of non-communicable disease symptoms. Our work suggests that social inequality extends

  13. Socioeconomic inequality in the prevalence of noncommunicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries: results from the World Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinpoor, Ahmad Reza; Bergen, Nicole; Mendis, Shanthi; Harper, Sam; Verdes, Emese; Kunst, Anton; Chatterji, Somnath

    2012-06-22

    Noncommunicable diseases are an increasing health concern worldwide, but particularly in low- and middle-income countries. This study quantified and compared education- and wealth-based inequalities in the prevalence of five noncommunicable diseases (angina, arthritis, asthma, depression and diabetes) and comorbidity in low- and middle-income country groups. Using 2002-04 World Health Survey data from 41 low- and middle-income countries, the prevalence estimates of angina, arthritis, asthma, depression, diabetes and comorbidity in adults aged 18 years or above are presented for wealth quintiles and five education levels, by sex and country income group. Symptom-based classification was used to determine angina, arthritis, asthma and depression rates, and diabetes diagnoses were self-reported. Socioeconomic inequalities according to wealth and education were measured absolutely, using the slope index of inequality, and relatively, using the relative index of inequality. Wealth and education inequalities were more pronounced in the low-income country group than the middle-income country group. Both wealth and education were inversely associated with angina, arthritis, asthma, depression and comorbidity prevalence, with strongest inequalities reported for angina, asthma and comorbidity. Diabetes prevalence was positively associated with wealth and, to a lesser extent, education. Adjustments for confounding variables tended to decrease the magnitude of the inequality. Noncommunicable diseases are not necessarily diseases of the wealthy, and showed unequal distribution across socioeconomic groups in low- and middle-income country groups. Disaggregated research is warranted to assess the impact of individual noncommunicable diseases according to socioeconomic indicators.

  14. The Epidemiology of Hypertension in Uganda: Findings from the National Non-Communicable Diseases Risk Factor Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guwatudde, David; Mutungi, Gerald; Wesonga, Ronald; Kajjura, Richard; Kasule, Hafisa; Muwonge, James; Ssenono, Vincent; Bahendeka, Silver K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension is an important contributor to global burden of disease and mortality, and is a growing public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. However, most sub-Saharan African countries lack detailed countrywide data on hypertension and other non-communicable diseases (NCD) risk factors that would provide benchmark information for design of appropriate interventions. We analyzed blood pressure data from Uganda’s nationwide NCD risk factor survey conducted in 2014, to describe the prevalence and distribution of hypertension in the Ugandan population, and to identify the associated factors. Methods The NCD risk factor survey drew a countrywide sample stratified by the four regions of the country, and with separate estimates for rural and urban areas. The World Health Organization’s STEPs tool was used to collect data on demographic and behavioral characteristics, and physical and biochemical measurements. Prevalence rate ratios (PRR) using modified Poison regression modelling was used to identify factors associated with hypertension. Results Of the 3906 participants, 1033 were classified as hypertensive, giving an overall prevalence of 26.4%. Prevalence was highest in the central region at 28.5%, followed by the eastern region at 26.4%, western region at 26.3%, and northern region at 23.3%. Prevalence in urban areas was 28.9%, and 25.8% in rural areas. The differences between regions, and between rural-urban areas were not statistically significant. Only 7.7% of participants with hypertension were aware of their high blood pressure. The prevalence of pre-hypertension was also high at 36.9%. The only modifiable factor found to be associated with hypertension was higher body mass index (BMI). Compared to participants with BMI less than 25 kg/m2, prevalence was significantly higher among participants with BMI between 25 to 29.9 kg/m2 with an adjusted PRR = 1.46 [95% CI = 1.25–1.71], and even higher among obese participants (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) with an

  15. U.S. Associated Pacific Islands Health Care Teams Chart a Course for Improved Health Systems: Implementation and Evaluation of a Non-communicable Disease Collaborative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosey, Gwendolyn M.; Rengiil, Augusta; Maddison, Robert; Agapito, Angelica U.; Lippwe, Kipier; Wally, Omengkar Damien; Agapito, Dennis D.; Seremai, Johannes; Primo, Selma; Luther, X-ner; Ikerdeu, Edolem; Satterfield, Dawn

    2017-01-01

    Summary The burden of non-communicable disease (NCD) is increasing in the U.S. Associated Pacific Islands (USAPI). We describe the implementation and evaluation of a NCD Collaborative pilot, using local trainers, as an evidence-based strategy to systematically strengthen NCD health care quality and outcomes, focusing on diabetes preventive care across five health systems in the region. PMID:27818410

  16. Promotion of Standard Treatment Guidelines and Building Referral System for Management of Common Noncommunicable Diseases in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Jindal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment services constitute one of the five priority actions to face the global crisis due to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs. It is important to formulate standard treatment guidelines (STGs for an effective management, particularly at the primary and secondary levels of health care. Dissemination and implementation of STGs for NCDs on a country-wide scale involves difficult and complex issues. The management of NCDs and the associated costs are highly variable and huge. Besides the educational strategies for promotion of STGs, the scientific and administrative sanctions and sanctity are important for purposes of reimbursements, insurance, availability of facilities, and legal protection. An effective and functional referral- system needs to be built to ensure availability of appropriate care at all levels of health- services. The patient-friendly "to and fro" referral system will help to distribute the burden, lower the costs, and maintain the sustainability of services.

  17. Promotion of standard treatment guidelines and building referral system for management of common noncommunicable diseases in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Sk

    2011-12-01

    Treatment services constitute one of the five priority actions to face the global crisis due to noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). It is important to formulate standard treatment guidelines (STGs) for an effective management, particularly at the primary and secondary levels of health care. Dissemination and implementation of STGs for NCDs on a country-wide scale involves difficult and complex issues. The management of NCDs and the associated costs are highly variable and huge. Besides the educational strategies for promotion of STGs, the scientific and administrative sanctions and sanctity are important for purposes of reimbursements, insurance, availability of facilities, and legal protection. An effective and functional referral- system needs to be built to ensure availability of appropriate care at all levels of health- services. The patient-friendly "to and fro" referral system will help to distribute the burden, lower the costs, and maintain the sustainability of services.

  18. Urbanization and international trade and investment policies as determinants of noncommunicable diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, Ashley; Labonté, Ronald; Sanders, David

    2013-01-01

    There are three dominant globalization pathways affecting noncommunicable diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA): urbanization, trade liberalization, and investment liberalization. Urbanization carries potential health benefits due to improved access to an increased variety of food imports, although for the growing number of urban poor, this has often meant increased reliance on cheap, highly processed food commodities. Reduced barriers to trade have eased the importation of such commodities, while investment liberalization has increased corporate consolidation over global and domestic food chains. Higher profit margins on processed foods have promoted the creation of 'obesogenic' environments, which through progressively integrated global food systems have been increasingly 'exported' to developing nations. This article explores globalization processes, the food environment, and dietary health outcomes in SSA through the use of trend analyses and structural equation modelling. The findings are considered in the context of global barriers and facilitators for healthy public policy. © 2013.

  19. Prevalence of Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases in the Adult Population of Urban Areas in Kabul City, Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khwaja Mir Islam Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-Communicable diseases (NCDs are a major global problem. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of common risk factors for NCDs among the adult population in urban areas of Kabul city, Afghanistan. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted from December 2011 through March 2012 and involved a survey of 1169 respondents, aged 40 years and above. Multistage cluster sampling was used for participant selection, followed by random sampling of the participants. The World Health Organization STEPwise approachfor Surveillance (STEPS was modified and used for this study. Results: The overall prevalence of smoking was 5.1% (14.7% men versus 0.3% women and using mouth snuff was 24.4% in men and 1.3% in women. The prevalence of obesity and hypertension were 19.1% and 45.2 % in men and 37.3% and 46.5% in women. Prevalence of diabetes was 16.1% in men and 12% in women. The overall prevalence of obesity, hypertension and diabetes mellitus was 31.2%, 46% and 13.3%, respectively. On average, subjects consumed 3.37 servings of fruit and 2.96 servings of leafy vegetables per week. Mean walking and sitting hours per week (as proxies for physical activity were 19.4 and 20.5, respectively. A multivariate model demonstrated that age was a significant risk factor for obesity (OR=1.86, diabetes (OR=2/09 and hypertension (OR=4.1. Obesity was significantly associated with sex (OR=1.65. Conclusion: These results highlight the need for interventions to reduce and prevent risk factors of non-communicable diseases in urban areas of Kabul City, Afghanistan.

  20. Prevention and control of non-communicable diseases in Singapore: a review of national health promotion programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, C M; Chew, S K; Tan, C C

    2002-07-01

    The epidemiological transition in Singapore from infectious to chronic, non-communicable diseases created different challenges for our public health system. The population-based strategy is adopted in primary prevention, through the promotion of a healthy lifestyle--smoking cessation, physical activity, eating right and managing stress. Complementing this are measures to detect chronic conditions early through screening and optimal treatment of the disease. While improvements were seen in the common risk factors of smoking and physical inactivity, prevalence of measurable risk factors like hypertension increased between 1992 and 1998. In 2000, the Ministry of Health initiated a series of national disease management plans for major disease conditions affecting Singaporeans. This approach uses a comprehensive and systematic approach to integrate the various components, with identification of responsible parties to ensure successful implementation of initiatives. Chronic diseases will remain prevalent as our society rapidly ages. Close monitoring of our initiatives in disease management will provide information on the long-term efficacy of such strategies.

  1. Public health impact of global heating due to climate change: potential effects on chronic non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Butler, Ainslie J; Lucas, Robyn M; Bonita, Ruth

    2010-04-01

    Several categories of ill health important at the global level are likely to be affected by climate change. To date the focus of this association has been on communicable diseases and injuries. This paper briefly analyzes potential impacts of global climate change on chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs). We reviewed the limited available evidence of the relationships between climate exposure and chronic and NCDs. We further reviewed likely mechanisms and pathways for climatic influences on chronic disease occurrence and impacts on pre-existing chronic diseases. There are negative impacts of climatic factors and climate change on some physiological functions and on cardio-vascular and kidney diseases. Chronic disease risks are likely to increase with climate change and related increase in air pollution, malnutrition, and extreme weather events. There are substantial research gaps in this arena. The health sector has a major role in facilitating further research and monitoring the health impacts of global climate change. Such work will also contribute to global efforts for the prevention and control of chronic NCDs in our ageing and urbanizing global population.

  2. Trends and educational differences in non-communicable disease risk factors in Pitkäranta, Russia, from 1992 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasoff, Tiina; Laatikainen, Tiina; Korpelainen, Vesa; Uhanov, Mihail; Pokusajeva, Svetlana; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Vartiainen, Erkki; Puska, Pekka

    2015-02-01

    Mortality and morbidity from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is a major public health problem in Russia. The aim of the study was to examine trends and educational differences from 1992 to 2007 in NCD risk factors in Pitkäranta in the Republic of Karelia, Russia. Four cross-sectional population health surveys were carried out in the Pitkäranta region, Republic of Karelia, Russia, in 1992, 1997, 2002, and 2007. An independent random sample of 1000 persons from the general population aged 25-64 years was studied in each survey round. The total number of respondents in the four surveys was 2672. The surveys included a questionnaire, physical measurements, and blood sampling, and they were carried out following standard protocols. The NCD risk factor trends generally increased in Pitkäranta during the study period with the exception of systolic blood pressure and smoking among men. Especially significant increases were observed in alcohol consumption among both sexes and in smoking among women. Educational differences and differences in trends were relatively small with the exception of a significant increase in smoking in the lowest female educational category. Trends showing an increase in some major NCD risk factors and signs of emerging socio-economic differences call for stronger attention to effective health promotion and preventive policies in Russia. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  3. WHO’s global strategy on diet, physical activity and health. Response to a worldwide epidemic of non-communicable diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Waxman, Amalia

    2004-01-01

    World health is in transition. Epidemiologically, many low- and middle-income countries are now experiencing a double burden of disease, whereby in addition to infectious diseases, they are facing a growing toll of death and disability from non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The world population is aging, while increased development has been accompanied by rising disposable incomes, urbanization, mechanization and the globalization of food markets, leading to lifestyle and behaviour changes th...

  4. Coffee intake, cardiovascular disease and allcause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Ask Tybjærg; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    Background: Coffee has been associated with modestly lower risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in meta-analyses; however, it is unclear whether these are causal associations. We tested first whether coffee intake is associated with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality...... observationally; second, whether genetic variations previously associated with caffeine intake are associated with coffee intake; and third, whether the genetic variations are associated with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Methods: First, we used multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazard......- and age adjusted Cox proportional hazard regression models to examine genetic associations with cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in 112 509 Danes. Finally, we used sex and age-adjusted logistic regression models to examine genetic associations with ischaemic heart disease including...

  5. Noncommunicable diseases among urban refugees and asylum-seekers in developing countries: a neglected health care need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Ahmed Hassan; Aljunid, Syed Mohamed

    2014-04-03

    With the increasing trend in refugee urbanisation, growing numbers of refugees are diagnosed with chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). However, with few exceptions, the local and international communities prioritise communicable diseases. The aim of this study is to review the literature to determine the prevalence and distribution of chronic NCDs among urban refugees living in developing countries, to report refugee access to health care for NCDs and to compare the prevalence of NCDs among urban refugees with the prevalence in their home countries. Major search engines and refugee agency websites were systematically searched between June and July 2012 for articles and reports on NCD prevalence among urban refugees. Most studies were conducted in the Middle East and indicated a high prevalence of NCDs among urban refugees in this region, but in general, the prevalence varied by refugees' region or country of origin. Hypertension, musculoskeletal disease, diabetes and chronic respiratory disease were the major diseases observed. In general, most urban refugees in developing countries have adequate access to primary health care services. Further investigations are needed to document the burden of NCDs among urban refugees and to identify their need for health care in developing countries.

  6. Noncommunicable diseases among urban refugees and asylum-seekers in developing countries: a neglected health care need

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing trend in refugee urbanisation, growing numbers of refugees are diagnosed with chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). However, with few exceptions, the local and international communities prioritise communicable diseases. The aim of this study is to review the literature to determine the prevalence and distribution of chronic NCDs among urban refugees living in developing countries, to report refugee access to health care for NCDs and to compare the prevalence of NCDs among urban refugees with the prevalence in their home countries. Major search engines and refugee agency websites were systematically searched between June and July 2012 for articles and reports on NCD prevalence among urban refugees. Most studies were conducted in the Middle East and indicated a high prevalence of NCDs among urban refugees in this region, but in general, the prevalence varied by refugees’ region or country of origin. Hypertension, musculoskeletal disease, diabetes and chronic respiratory disease were the major diseases observed. In general, most urban refugees in developing countries have adequate access to primary health care services. Further investigations are needed to document the burden of NCDs among urban refugees and to identify their need for health care in developing countries. PMID:24708876

  7. Mortality by sickle cell disease in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, Giovanna Abadia Oliveira; Rodrigues, Letícia Pinto; Trovó de Marqui, Alessandra Bernadete

    This work aimed to characterize mortality by sickle cell disease in Brazil. The MEDLINE electronic database was searched using the terms 'mortality' and 'sickle cell disease' and 'Brazil' for articles published in the last five years aiming to provide a current analysis of the subject in question. Eight studies on mortality by sickle cell disease were carried out in the Brazilian states of Maranhão, Bahia, Minas Gerais, Rio de Janeiro and Mato Grosso do Sul. The majority of the deaths occurred in patients with sickle cell anemia, which is the most common genotype and causes the most severe clinical manifestation of the disease. In summary, there are few published studies on mortality related to sickle cell disease in Brazil, and most are from the state of Minas Gerais. This study emphasizes the importance of developing more studies on sickle cell disease mortality, so that it may be possible to profile gene carriers and give health professionals more data to strategize the delivery of more effective assistance to these individuals. Despite the early diagnosis of sickle cell disease by the Neonatal Screening Program and the use of preventive and therapeutic measures (penicillin, immunization and hydroxyurea), mortality by sickle cell disease on the world stage is still significant. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  8. Mortality in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, L; Stenager, E; Stenager, E

    1995-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: After the introduction of L-dopa the mortality rate in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients has changed, but is still higher than in the background population. MATERIAL & METHODS: Mortality, age at death and cause of death in a group of PD patients compared with the background population...

  9. Estimation of years lived with disability due to noncommunicable diseases and injuries using a population-representative survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji In Park

    Full Text Available The Global Burden of Disease 2010 and the WHO Global Health Estimates of years lived with disability (YLDs uses disability-weights obtained from lay health-state descriptions, which cannot fully reflect different disease manifestations, according to severity, treatment, and environment. The aim of this study was to provide population-representative YLDs of noncommunicable diseases and injuries using a prevalence-based approach, with the disability weight measured in subjects with specific diseases or injuries. We included a total of 44969 adults, who completed the EQ-5D questionnaire as participation in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2007-2014. We estimated the prevalence of each of 40 conditions identified from the noncommunicable diseases and injuries in the WHO list. Modified condition-specific disability-weight was determined from the adjusted mean difference of the EQ-5D index between the condition and reference groups. Condition-specific YLDs were calculated as the condition's prevalence multiplied by the condition's disability-weight. All-cause YLDs, estimated as "number of population × (1 - mean score of EQ-5D" were 2165 thousands in 39044 thousand adults aged ≥20. The combined YLDs for all 40 conditions accounted for 67.6% of all-cause YLDs, and were 1604, 2126, 8749, and 12847 per 100000 young (age 20-59 males, young females, old (age ≥60 males, and old females, respectively. Back pain/osteoarthritis YLDs were exceptionally large (442/40, 864/146, 2037/836, and 4644/3039 per 100000 young males, young females, old males, and old females, respectively. Back pain, osteoarthritis, depression, diabetes, periodontitis, and stroke accounted for 22.3%, 9.1%, 4.6%, 3.3%, 3.2%, and 2.9% of all-cause YLDs, respectively. In conclusion, this estimation of YLDs using prevalence rates and disability-weights measured in a population-representative survey may form the basis for population-level strategies to prevent age

  10. Use of Healthcare Services by Patients with Non-Communicable Diseases in Nepal: A Qualitative Study with Healthcare Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Saval; Veerman, Lennert; Nissen, Lisa; Hollingworth, Samantha

    2017-06-01

    The healthcare systems in many Low-and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs) like Nepal have long focused on preventing and treating infectious diseases. Little is known about their preparedness to address the increasing prevalence of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs). This study aimed to investigate the use of healthcare services by patients with NCDs in Nepal. Nine healthcare providers (including health assistants, pharmacy assistants, nurse, specialised nurse, practicing pharmacists, chief hospital pharmacist, doctors and specialised doctor) from Pokhara, Nepal, were recruited using purposive sampling. In depth interviews about the magnitude of NCDs, first point of care, screening and diagnosis, prevention and management, follow-up, and healthcare system responses to NCD burden were conducted. Data were thematically analysed with a deductive approach. Although the healthcare system in Nepal is still primarily focused on communicable infectious diseases, healthcare providers are aware of the increasing burden of NCDs and NCD risk factors. The first points of care for patients with NCDs are government primary healthcare facilities and private pharmacies. NCDs are often diagnosed late and opportunistically. NCD prevention and treatment is unaffordable for many people. There are no government sponsored NCD screening programs. There are problems associated with screening, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients with NCDs in Nepal. Healthcare providers believe that the current healthcare system in Nepal is inadequate to address the growing problem of NCDs. The health system of Nepal will face challenges to incorporate programs to prevent and treat NCDs in addition to the pre-existing communicable diseases.

  11. A systematic review of primary care models for non-communicable disease interventions in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Jennifer; Landes, Megan; Carroll, Christopher; Nolen, Amy; Sodhi, Sumeet

    2017-03-23

    Chronic diseases, primarily cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, diabetes and cancer, are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where communicable disease prevalence still outweighs that of non-communicable disease (NCDs), rates of NCDs are rapidly rising and evidence for primary healthcare approaches for these emerging NCDs is needed. A systematic review and evidence synthesis of primary care approaches for chronic disease in SSA. Quantitative and qualitative primary research studies were included that focused on priority NCDs interventions. The method used was best-fit framework synthesis. Three conceptual models of care for NCDs in low- and middle-income countries were identified and used to develop an a priori framework for the synthesis. The literature search for relevant primary research studies generated 3759 unique citations of which 12 satisfied the inclusion criteria. Eleven studies were quantitative and one used mixed methods. Three higher-level themes of screening, prevention and management of disease were derived. This synthesis permitted the development of a new evidence-based conceptual model of care for priority NCDs in SSA. For this review there was a near-consensus that passive rather than active case-finding approaches are suitable in resource-poor settings. Modifying risk factors among existing patients through advice on diet and lifestyle was a common element of healthcare approaches. The priorities for disease management in primary care were identified as: availability of essential diagnostic tools and medications at local primary healthcare clinics and the use of standardized protocols for diagnosis, treatment, monitoring and referral to specialist care.

  12. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Kwajelein Atoll, Ebeye Island: a systems perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiho, Henry M; Seremai, Johannes; Trinidad, Richard; Paul, Irene; Langidrik, Justina; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been declared a health emergency in the US-affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI). This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted on Ebeye Island of Kwajelein Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) to describe the burdens due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); assess the system of service capacity and activities for service delivery, data collection, and reporting; and identify the key issues that need to be addressed. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and lifestyle behaviors lead to overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that impact the morbidity and mortality of the population. Population survey of the RMI show that 62.5% of the total population is overweight or obese with a dramatic increase from the 15-24 year old (10.6%) and the 25-64 year old (41.9%) age groups. The leading causes of death were septicemia, renal failure, pneumonia, cancer, and myocardial infarction. Other findings show gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, and support services to address these NCD. All health care in Ebeye is provided in one setting and there is collaboration, coordination, and communication among medical and health care providers. The Book of Protocols for the Kwajalein Atoll Health Care Bureau provides the guidelines, standards, and policy and procedures for the screening, diagnosis, and management of diabetes and other NCDs. Based on these findings, priority issues and problems to be addressed for the administrative, clinical, and data systems were identified.

  13. An assessment of non-communicable diseases, diabetes, and related risk factors in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Majuro Atoll: a systems perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiho, Henry M; deBrum, Ione; Kedi, Shra; Langidrik, Justina; Aitaoto, Nia

    2013-05-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) have been identified as a health emergency in the US-associated Pacific Islands (USAPI).1 This assessment, funded by the National Institutes of Health, was conducted in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, Majuro Atoll and describes the burdens due to selected NCD (diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, chronic kidney disease); and assesses the system of service capacity and current activities for service delivery, data collection and reporting as well as identifying the issues that need to be addressed. Findings reveal that the risk factors of poor diet, lack of physical activity, and risky lifestyle behaviors are associated with overweight and obesity and subsequent NCD that are significant factors in the morbidity and mortality of the population. The leading causes of death include sepsis, cancer, diabetes-related deaths, pneumonia, and hypertension. Population-based survey for the RMI show that 62.5% of the adults are overweight or obese and the prevalence of diabetes stands at 19.6%. Other findings show significant gaps in the system of administrative, clinical, data, and support services to address these NCD. There is no policy and procedure manual for the hospital or public health diabetes clinics and there is little communication, coordination, or collaboration between the medical and public health staff. There is no functional data system that allows for the identification, registry, or tracking of patients with diabetes or other NCDs. Based on these findings, priority issues and problems to be addressed for the administrative, clinical, and data systems were identified.

  14. Impacts of chronic non-communicable diseases on households' out-of-pocket healthcare expenditures in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallegedara, Asankha

    2018-01-10

    This article examines the effects of chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) on households' out-of-pocket health expenditures in Sri Lanka. We explore the disease specific impacts on out-of-pocket health care expenses from chronic NCDs such as heart diseases, hypertension, cancer, diabetics and asthma. We use nationwide cross-sectional household income and expenditure survey 2012/2013 data compiled by the department of census and statistics of Sri Lanka. Employing propensity score matching method to account for selectivity bias, we find that chronic NCD affected households appear to spend significantly higher out-of-pocket health care expenditures and encounter grater economic burden than matched control group despite having universal public health care policy in Sri Lanka. The results also suggest that out-of-pocket expenses on medicines and other pharmaceutical products as well as expenses on medical laboratory tests and other ancillary services are particularly higher for households with chronic NCD patients. The findings underline the importance of protecting households against the financial burden due to NCDs.

  15. The lack of a non-communicable disease curriculum threatens the relevance of global public health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Henry; Leeder, Stephen R; Shiau, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), cancer, lung disease and diabetes are major public health challenges for emerging economies. However, Masters of Public Health (MPH) curricula in the USA do not provide germane coursework. To assess the availability of global NCD courses in MPH curricula, we searched the websites of the 50 schools accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health as of 1 July 2013. Our questionnaire queried availability of a global or international health department or track, availability of an NCD track, and the presence of courses on NCD, NCD risk factors, CVD or global NCDs as well as global health infrastructure. All schools had online course coursework available. Thirty-one schools (62%) offered a global/international health track or certificate; 38 (76%) offered an NCD course but only 4 (8%) offered a global NCD course. Of the schools with a global health program, none required an NCD course but all offered courses on global health economics or infrastructure. For public health schools to be aligned with global realities and to retain a leadership role, curricular initiatives that highlight the NCD epidemic and its societal complexities will need new emphasis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Modifying the Interagency Emergency Health Kit to include treatment for non-communicable diseases in natural disasters and complex emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Marcello; Wiebe, Natasha; Nadler, Brian; Darzi, Ara; Rasheed, Shahnawaz

    2016-01-01

    The Interagency Emergency Health Kit (IEHK) provides a standard package of medicines and simple medical devices for aid agencies to use in emergencies such as disasters and armed conflicts. Despite the increasing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in such settings, the IEHK includes few drugs and devices for management of NCDs. Using published data to model the population burden of acute and chronic presentations of NCDs in emergency-prone regions, we estimated the quantity of medications and devices that should be included in the IEHK. NCDs considered were cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, hypertension and chronic respiratory disease. In scenario 1 (the primary scenario), we assumed that resources in the IEHK would only include those needed to manage acute life-threatening conditions. In scenario 2, we included resources required to manage both acute and chronic presentations of NCDs. Drugs and devices that might be required included amlodipine, aspirin, atenolol, beclomethasone, dextrose 50%, enalapril, furosemide, glibenclamide, glyceryl trinitrate, heparin, hydralazine, hydrochlorothiazide, insulin, metformin, prednisone, salbutamol and simvastatin. For scenario 1, the number of units required ranged from 12 (phials of hydralazine) to ∼15 000 (tablets of enalapril). Space and weight requirements were modest and total cost for all drugs and devices was approximately US$2078. As expected, resources required for scenario 2 were much greater. Space and cost requirements increased proportionately: estimated total cost of scenario 2 was $22 208. The resources required to treat acute NCD presentations appear modest, and their inclusion in the IEHK seems feasible.

  17. [Difficulties in the interpretation of the results of biomedical research related to chronic non-communicable disease patient management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyatt, Gordon H; Málaga, Germán

    2014-01-01

    The progressive increase in the prevalence of chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCD) has generated a need to change the paradigms in interpreting research about therapeutic and disease control strategies. One aspect to keep in mind is the incorporation of risk awareness that CNCD treatment implies, which creates uncertainty in the treatment result, compared to the curative paradigm that occurs in communicable diseases where a cure is expected. Another aspect is related to clinical trials result reports, where substitute results are used frequently. For example, the therapeutic goal of reducing glycosylated hemoglobin in a diabetic patient instead of showing the results based on treatment benefit (such as prevention of myocardial infarction). Problems arise when looking for a substitute that can replace the result that really matters. That is why we must be alert to the widespread use of results grouping (composite outcomes) which while they allow studies with fewer patients with shorter follow-up times and less expense, they can generate misleading results and show presumed untrue benefits due to improper selection of components of the "composite outcomes". In this article we draw attention to new challenges in the interpretation of scientific studies related to CNCDs.

  18. Mortality in patients with pituitary disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sherlock, Mark

    2010-06-01

    Pituitary disease is associated with increased mortality predominantly due to vascular disease. Control of cortisol secretion and GH hypersecretion (and cardiovascular risk factor reduction) is key in the reduction of mortality in patients with Cushing\\'s disease and acromegaly, retrospectively. For patients with acromegaly, the role of IGF-I is less clear-cut. Confounding pituitary hormone deficiencies such as gonadotropins and particularly ACTH deficiency (with higher doses of hydrocortisone replacement) may have a detrimental effect on outcome in patients with pituitary disease. Pituitary radiotherapy is a further factor that has been associated with increased mortality (particularly cerebrovascular). Although standardized mortality ratios in pituitary disease are falling due to improved treatment, mortality for many conditions are still elevated above that of the general population, and therefore further measures are needed. Craniopharyngioma patients have a particularly increased risk of mortality as a result of the tumor itself and treatment to control tumor growth; this is a key area for future research in order to optimize the outcome for these patients.

  19. Online continuing medical education as a key link for successful noncommunicable disease self-management: the CASALUD™ Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Rincón, Héctor; Saucedo-Martínez, Rodrigo; Mujica-Rosales, Ricardo; Lee, Evan M; Israel, Amy; Torres-Beltran, Braulio; Quijano-González, Úrsula; Atkinson, Elena Rose; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate how the benefits of online continuing medical education (CME) provided to health care professionals traveled along a patient "educational chain". In this study, the educational chain begins with the influence that CME can have on the quality of health care, with subsequent influence on patient knowledge, disease self-management, and disease biomarkers. A total of 422 patients with at least one noncommunicable disease (NCD) treated in eight different Mexican public health clinics were followed over 3 years. All clinics were participants in the CASALUD Model, an NCD care model for primary care, where all clinic staff were offered CME. Data were collected through a questionnaire on health care, patient disease knowledge, and self-management behaviors; blood samples and anthropometric measurements were collected to measure patient disease biomarkers. Between 2013 and 2015, the indexes measuring quality of health care, patient health knowledge, and diabetes self-management activities rose moderately but significantly (from 0.54 to 0.64, 0.80 to 0.84, and 0.62 to 0.67, respectively). Performing self-care activities - including owning and using a glucometer and belonging to a disease support group - saw the highest increase (from 0.65 to 0.75). A1C levels increased between 2013 and 2015 from 7.95 to 8.41% (63-68 mmol/mol) ( P Online CME can effect certain changes in the educational chain linking quality of health care, patient knowledge, and self-management behaviors. However, in order to assure adequate NCD control, the entire health care system must be improved in tandem. Online CME programs, such as CASALUD's, are feasible strategies for impacting changes in disease self-management at a clinic level throughout a country.

  20. National Responses to HIV/AIDS and Non-Communicable Diseases in Developing Countries: Analysis of Strategic Parallels and Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haregu, Tilahun Nigatu; Setswe, Geoffrey; Elliott, Julian; Oldenburg, Brian

    2014-03-26

    HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) epidemics may have many important similarities in their aetiology, pathogenesis and management. Evidence about the similarities and differences between the national responses HIV/AIDS and NCDs is essential for an integrated response. The objective of this study was to examine the parallels and differences between national responses to HIV/AIDS and NCDs in selected developing countries. This study applied a strategic level comparative case study approach as its study design. The main construct was national response to HIV/AIDS and NCDs. The 4 overarching themes were policy response, institutional mechanism, programmatic response and strategic information. Four countries were purposively selected as cases. Data were collected and triangulated from a multiple sources. The focus of analysis included identifying items for comparison, characteristics to be compared, degrees of similarity, and strategic importance of similarities. Analysis of data was qualitative content analysis with within-case, between-case, and across-case comparisons. While the nature of the disease and the contents of national HIV/AIDS and NCD policies are different, the policy processes involved are largely similar. Functional characteristics of programmatic response to HIV/AIDS and NCDs are similar. But the internal constituents are different. Though both HIV and NCDs require both a multi-sectorial response and a national coordination mechanism, the model and the complexity of the coordination are different. Strategic information frameworks for HIV/AIDS and NCDs use similar models. However, the indicators, targets and priorities are different. In conclusion, the national responses between HIV/AIDS and NCDs are largely similar in approaches and functions but different in content. Significance for public healthThis study explores the parallels and differences between national responses to HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The identified

  1. Advanced glycation end products and their receptor in age-related, non-communicable chronic inflammatory diseases; Overview of clinical evidence and potential contributions to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaert, Niki L; Gopal, Poornima; Rutten, Erica P A; Wouters, Emiel F M; Schalkwijk, Casper G

    2016-12-01

    Age-related, non-communicable chronic inflammatory diseases represent the major 21st century health problem. Especially in Western countries, the prevalence of non-communicable diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis are exponentially rising as the population ages. These diseases are determined by common risk factors and share an age-related onset. The affected organs display evidence of accelerated ageing, and are hallmarked by chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases and plays a central role in amplifying inflammatory responses. Advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation and accumulation is accelerated under these conditions. Advanced glycation end products are not only linked to RAGE signaling and inflammation, but to various hallmarks of the ageing process. In addition to these biological functions, circulating levels of the soluble form of RAGE and of advanced glycation end products are candidate biomarkers for many age-related inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the mechanistic connections between RAGE and advanced glycation end products and the processes of inflammation and ageing. Furthermore, through the presented overview of AGE-RAGE alterations that have been described in clinical studies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis, and insight obtained from mechanistic in vitro and animal studies, it can be concluded that these AGE-RAGE disturbances are a common contributing factor to the inflammatory state and pathogenesis of these various conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Socioeconomic status, non-communicable disease risk factors, and walking speed in older adults: multi-cohort population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringhini, Silvia; Carmeli, Cristian; Jokela, Markus; Avendaño, Mauricio; McCrory, Cathal; d'Errico, Angelo; Bochud, Murielle; Barros, Henrique; Costa, Giuseppe; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Delpierre, Cyrille; Gandini, Martina; Fraga, Silvia; Goldberg, Marcel; Giles, Graham G; Lassale, Camille; Kenny, Rose Anne; Kelly-Irving, Michelle; Paccaud, Fred; Layte, Richard; Muennig, Peter; Marmot, Michael G; Ribeiro, Ana Isabel; Severi, Gianluca; Steptoe, Andrew; Shipley, Martin J; Zins, Marie; Mackenbach, Johan P; Vineis, Paolo; Kivimäki, Mika

    2018-03-23

    To assess the association of low socioeconomic status and risk factors for non-communicable diseases (diabetes, high alcohol intake, high blood pressure, obesity, physical inactivity, smoking) with loss of physical functioning at older ages. Multi-cohort population based study. 37 cohort studies from 24 countries in Europe, the United States, Latin America, Africa, and Asia, 1990-2017. 109 107 men and women aged 45-90 years. Physical functioning assessed using the walking speed test, a valid index of overall functional capacity. Years of functioning lost was computed as a metric to quantify the difference in walking speed between those exposed and unexposed to low socioeconomic status and risk factors. According to mixed model estimations, men aged 60 and of low socioeconomic status had the same walking speed as men aged 66.6 of high socioeconomic status (years of functioning lost 6.6 years, 95% confidence interval 5.0 to 9.4). The years of functioning lost for women were 4.6 (3.6 to 6.2). In men and women, respectively, 5.7 (4.4 to 8.1) and 5.4 (4.3 to 7.3) years of functioning were lost by age 60 due to insufficient physical activity, 5.1 (3.9 to 7.0) and 7.5 (6.1 to 9.5) due to obesity, 2.3 (1.6 to 3.4) and 3.0 (2.3 to 4.0) due to hypertension, 5.6 (4.2 to 8.0) and 6.3 (4.9 to 8.4) due to diabetes, and 3.0 (2.2 to 4.3) and 0.7 (0.1 to 1.5) due to tobacco use. In analyses restricted to high income countries, the number of years of functioning lost attributable to low socioeconomic status by age 60 was 8.0 (5.7 to 13.1) for men and 5.4 (4.0 to 8.0) for women, whereas in low and middle income countries it was 2.6 (0.2 to 6.8) for men and 2.7 (1.0 to 5.5) for women. Within high income countries, the number of years of functioning lost attributable to low socioeconomic status by age 60 was greater in the United States than in Europe. Physical functioning continued to decline as a function of unfavourable risk factors between ages 60 and 85. Years of functioning

  3. editorial the war against non-communicable disease: how ready is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    communicable diseases (NCDs) includes hypertension, stroke ... diseases. This group of diseases results from a mixture of genetic, physiological, environmental and behavioral factors with pronounced dangers because of its chronic nature. Annually ...

  4. Non-communicable diseases in the Western Area District, Sierra Leone, before and during the Ebola outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samba, T; Bhat, P; Owiti, P; Samuels, L; Kanneh, P J; Paul, R; Kargbo, B; Harries, A D

    2017-06-21

    Setting: Twenty-seven peripheral health units, five secondary hospitals and one tertiary hospital, Western Area District, Sierra Leone. Objectives: To describe reporting systems, monthly attendances and facility-based patterns of six non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in the pre-Ebola and Ebola virus disease outbreak periods. Design: A cross-sectional study using programme data. Results: Reporting was 89% complete on the six selected NCDs pre-Ebola and 86% during the Ebola outbreak ( P < 0.01). Overall, marked declining trends in NCDs were reported during the Ebola period, with a monthly mean of 342 cases pre-Ebola and 164 during the Ebola outbreak. The monthly mean number of cases per disease in the pre-Ebola and Ebola outbreak periods was respectively 228 vs. 85 for hypertension, 43 vs. 27 for cardiovascular diseases, 36 vs. 18 for diabetes and 25 vs. 29 for peptic ulcer disease; this last condition increased during the outbreak. There were higher proportions of NCDs among females during the Ebola outbreak compared with the pre-Ebola period. Except for peptic ulcer disease, the number of patients with NCDs declined by 25% in peripheral health units, 91% in the secondary hospitals and 70% in the tertiary hospital between the pre-Ebola and the Ebola outbreak periods. Conclusion: Comprehensive reporting of NCDs was suboptimal, and declined during the Ebola epidemic. There were decreases in reported attendances for NCDs between the pre-Ebola and the Ebola outbreak periods, which were even more marked in the hospitals. This study has important policy implications.

  5. Non-communicable diseases in decontamination workers in areas affected by the Fukushima nuclear disaster: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawano, Toyoaki; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Ozaki, Akihiko; Leppold, Claire; Nomura, Shuhei; Shimada, Yuki; Ochi, Sae; Tsukada, Manabu; Nemoto, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Shigeaki; Kanazawa, Yukio; Ohira, Hiromichi

    2016-12-14

    To assess the prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), and whether NCDs were treated or not, among hospitalised decontamination workers who moved to radio-contaminated areas after Japan's 2011 Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster. We retrospectively extracted records of decontamination workers admitted to Minamisoma Municipal General Hospital between 1 June 2012 and 31 August 2015, from hospital records. We investigated the incidence of underlying NCDs such as hypertension, dyslipidaemia and diabetes among the decontamination workers, and their treatment status, in addition to the reasons for their hospital admission. A total of 113 decontamination workers were admitted to the hospital (112 male patients, median age of 54 years (age range: 18-69 years)). In terms of the demographics of underlying NCDs in this population, 57 of 72 hypertensive patients (79.2%), 37 of 45 dyslipidaemic patients (82.2%) and 18 of 27 hyperglycaemic patients (66.7%) had not been treated for their NCDs before admission to the hospital. A high burden of underlying NCDs was found in hospitalised decontamination workers in Fukushima. Managing underlying diseases such as hypertension, hyperlipidaemia and diabetes mellitus is essential among this population. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Co-morbid Non-communicable Diseases and Associated Health Service Use in African and Caribbean Immigrants with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masindi, Khatundi-Irene; Jembere, Nathaniel; Kendall, Claire E; Burchell, Ann N; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Loutfy, Mona; Raboud, Janet; Rourke, Sean B; Luyombya, Henry; Antoniou, Tony

    2017-12-05

    We sought to characterize non-communicable disease (NCD)-related and overall health service use among African and Caribbean immigrants living with HIV between April 1, 2010 and March 31, 2013. We conducted two population-based analyses using Ontario's linked administrative health databases. We studied 1525 persons with HIV originally from Africa and the Caribbean. Compared with non-immigrants with HIV (n = 11,931), African and Caribbean immigrants had lower rates of hospital admissions, emergency department visits and non-HIV specific ambulatory care visits, and higher rates of health service use for hypertension and diabetes. Compared with HIV-negative individuals from these regions (n = 228,925), African and Caribbean immigrants with HIV had higher rates of health service use for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [rate ratio (RR) 1.78; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36-2.34] and malignancy (RR 1.20; 95% CI 1.19-1.43), and greater frequency of hospitalizations for mental health illness (RR 3.33; 95% CI 2.44-4.56), diabetes (RR 1.37; 95% CI 1.09-1.71) and hypertension (RR 1.85; 95% CI 1.46-2.34). African and Caribbean immigrants with HIV have higher rates of health service use for certain NCDs than non-immigrants with HIV. The evaluation of health services for African and Caribbean immigrants with HIV should include indicators of NCD care that disproportionately affect this population.

  7. Realizing the Potential of Adolescence to Prevent Transgenerational Conditioning of Noncommunicable Disease Risk: Multi-Sectoral Design Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquie L. Bay

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from the field of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD demonstrates that early life environmental exposures impact later-life risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs. This has revealed the transgenerational nature of NCD risk, thus demonstrating that interventions to improve environmental exposures during early life offer important potential for primary prevention of DOHaD-related NCDs. Based on this evidence, the prospect of multi-sectoral approaches to enable primary NCD risk reduction has been highlighted in major international reports. It is agreed that pregnancy, lactation and early childhood offer significant intervention opportunities. However, the importance of interventions that establish positive behaviors impacting nutritional and non-nutritional environmental exposures in the pre-conceptual period in both males and females, thus capturing the full potential of DOHaD, must not be overlooked. Adolescence, a period where life-long health-related behaviors are established, is therefore an important life-stage for DOHaD-informed intervention. DOHaD evidence underpinning this potential is well documented. However, there is a gap in the literature with respect to combined application of theoretical evidence from science, education and public health to inform intervention design. This paper addresses this gap, presenting a review of evidence informing theoretical frameworks for adolescent DOHaD interventions that is accessible collectively to all relevant sectors.

  8. Age, chronic non-communicable disease and choice of traditional Chinese and western medicine outpatient services in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeoh Eng

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 1997 Hong Kong reunified with China and the development of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM started with this change in national identity. However, the two latest discussion papers on Hong Kong's healthcare reform have failed to mention the role of TCM in primary healthcare, despite TCM's public popularity and its potential in tackling the chronic non-communicable disease (NCD challenge in the ageing population. This study aims to describe the interrelationship between age, non-communicable disease (NCD status, and the choice of TCM and western medicine (WM services in the Hong Kong population. Methods This study is a secondary analysis of the Thematic Household Survey (THS 2005 dataset. The THS is a Hong Kong population representative face to face survey was conducted by the Hong Kong Administrative Region Government of China. A random sample of respondents aged >15 years were invited to report their use of TCM and WM in the past year, together with other health and demographic information. A total of 33,263 persons were interviewed (response rate 79.2%. Results Amongst those who received outpatient services in the past year (n = 18,087, 80.23% only visited WM doctors, 3.17% consulted TCM practitioners solely, and 16.60% used both type of services (double consulters. Compared to those who only consulted WM doctor, multinomial logistic regression showed that double consulters were more likely to be older, female, NCD patients, and have higher socioeconomic backgrounds. Further analysis showed that the association between age and double consulting was curvilinear (inverted U shaped regardless of NCD status. Middle aged (45-60 years NCD patients, and the NCD free "young old" group (60-75 years were most likely to double consult. On the other hand, the relationship between age and use of TCM as an alternative to WM was linear regardless of NCD status. The NCD free segment of the population was more inclined to use TCM alone

  9. The population impact of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases in relation to other non-communicable disorders: comparing two estimation approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Daniela; Araújo, Fábio Azevedo; Monjardino, Teresa; Severo, Milton; Cruz, Ivo; Carmona, Loreto; Lucas, Raquel

    2018-02-08

    The aim of this study was to quantify the population impact of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs) with other non-communicable diseases (NCDs), using two complementary strategies: standard multivariate models based on global burden of disease (GBD)-defined groups vs. empirical mutually exclusive patterns of NCDs. We used cross-sectional data from the Portuguese Fourth National Health Survey (n = 23,752). Six GBD-defined groups were included: RMDs, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma, cancer, depression, diabetes or renal failure, and stroke or myocardial infarction. The empirical approach comprised the patterns "low disease probability", "cardiometabolic conditions", "respiratory conditions" and "RMDs and depression". As recommended by the outcome measures in rheumatology (OMERACT) initiative, health outcomes included life impact, pathophysiological manifestations, and resource use indicators. Population attributable fractions (PAF) were computed for each outcome and bootstrap confidence intervals (95% CI) were estimated. Among GBD-defined groups, RMDs had the highest impact across all the adverse health outcomes, from frequent healthcare utilization (PAF 7.8%, 95% CI 6.2-9.3) to negative self-rated health (PAF 18.1%, 95% CI 15.4-20.6). In the empirical approach, patterns "cardiometabolic conditions" and "RMDs and depression" had similar PAF estimates across all adverse health outcomes, but "RMDs and depression" showed significantly higher impact on chronic pain (PAF 8.9%, 95% CI 7.6-10.3) than the remaining multimorbidity patterns. RMDs revealed the greatest population impact across all adverse health outcomes tested, using both approaches. Empirical patterns are particularly interesting to evaluate the impact of RMDs in the context of their co-occurrence with other NCDs.

  10. A global framework for action to improve the primary care response to chronic non-communicable diseases: a solution to a neglected problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachariah Rony

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although in developing countries the burden of morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases has often overshadowed that due to chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs, there is evidence now of a shift of attention to NCDs. Discussion Decreasing the chronic NCD burden requires a two-pronged approach: implementation of the multisectoral policies aimed at decreasing population-level risks for NCDs, and effective and affordable delivery of primary care interventions for patients with chronic NCDs. The primary care response to common NCDs is often unstructured and inadequate. We therefore propose a programmatic, standardized approach to the delivery of primary care interventions for patients with NCDs, with a focus on hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic airflow obstruction, and obesity. The benefits of this approach will extend to patients with related conditions, e.g. those with chronic kidney disease caused by hypertension or diabetes. This framework for a "public health approach" is informed by experience of scaling up interventions for chronic infectious diseases (tuberculosis and HIV. The lessons learned from progress in rolling out these interventions include the importance of gaining political commitment, developing a robust strategy, delivering standardised interventions, and ensuring rigorous monitoring and evaluation of progress towards defined targets. The goal of the framework is to reduce the burden of morbidity, disability and premature mortality related to NCDs through a primary care strategy which has three elements: 1 identify and address modifiable risk factors, 2 screen for common NCDs and 3 and diagnose, treat and follow-up patients with common NCDs using standard protocols. The proposed framework for NCDs borrows the same elements as those developed for tuberculosis control, comprising a goal, strategy and targets for NCD control, a package of interventions for quality care, key operations for

  11. CASALUD: an innovative health-care system to control and prevent non-communicable diseases in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Gallardo-Rincón, Héctor; Saucedo-Martinez, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    Mexico and other Latin American countries are currently facing a dramatic increase in the number of adults suffering from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), which require prolonged, continuous care. This epidemiological shift has created new challenges for health-care systems. Both the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations (UN) have recognised the growing human and economic costs of NCDs and outlined an action plan, recognising that NCDs are preventable, often with common preventable risk factors linked to risky health behaviours. In line with international best practices, Mexico has applied a number of approaches to tackle these diseases. However, challenges remain for the Mexican health-care system, and in planning a strategy for combating and preventing NCDs, it must consider how best to integrate these strategies with existing health-care infrastructure. Shifting the paradigm of care in Mexico from a curative, passive approach to a preventive, proactive model will require an innovative and replicable system that guarantees availability of medicines and services, strengthens human capital through ongoing professional education, expands early and continuous access to care through proactive prevention strategies and incorporates technological innovations in order to do so. Here, we describe CASALUD: an innovative model in health-care that leverages international best practices and uses innovative technology to deliver NCD care, control and prevention. In addition, we describe the lessons learned from the initial implementation of the model for its effective use in Mexico, as well as the plans for wider implementation throughout the country, in partnership with the Mexican Ministry of Health. © Royal Society for Public Health 2013.

  12. Mapping genetic research in non-communicable disease publications in selected Arab countries: first step towards a guided research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaluddine, Zeina; Sibai, Abla Mehio; Othman, Shahd; Yazbek, Soha

    2016-11-10

    In the Arab world, intervention and policy response to non-communicable diseases (NCD) has been weak despite extensive epidemiological evidence highlighting the alarmingly increased prevalence of chronic diseases. Generating genetic information is one key component to promote efficient disease management strategies. This study undertook a scoping review to generate the profile of the undertaken research on genetics of NCD publications in selected Arab countries. An analysis of the research produced examined the extent, range, nature, topic and methods of published research. The study aimed at identifying the gaps in genetic NCD research to inform policy action for NCD prevention and control. The scoping review was conducted based on the five-stage methodological framework and included countries in Arab region selected to represent various economies and epidemiological transitions. The search identified 555 articles that focus on genetics-NCD research in the selected Arab countries over the duration of this study (January 2000 to December 2013). The most commonly conducted research was descriptive and clinically focused, rather than etiologically focused. Country-specific carrier and risk screening studies were not among the top research designs. The genetic component of certain highly heritable diseases, as well as diabetes, obesity, hypertension, chronic lung dysfunction and metabolic syndrome were all under investigated. This scoping review identified gaps for further research in the context of bioinformatics and genome-wide association studies. Genetic research in the Arab region has to be redirected towards NCDs with the highest morbidity, heritability and health burden within each country. A focused research plan to include community genetics is required for its proper integration in the Arab community.

  13. Non-Communicable Disease Clinical Practice Guidelines in Brazil: A Systematic Assessment of Methodological Quality and Transparency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline de Godoi Rezende Costa Molino

    Full Text Available Annually, non-communicable diseases (NCDs kill 38 million people worldwide, with low and middle-income countries accounting for three-quarters of these deaths. High-quality clinical practice guidelines (CPGs are fundamental to improving NCD management. The present study evaluated the methodological rigor and transparency of Brazilian CPGs that recommend pharmacological treatment for the most prevalent NCDs.We conducted a systematic search for CPGs of the following NCDs: asthma, atrial fibrillation, benign prostatic hyperplasia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease and/or stable angina, dementia, depression, diabetes, gastroesophageal reflux disease, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis. CPGs comprising pharmacological treatment recommendations were included. No language or year restrictions were applied. CPGs were excluded if they were merely for local use and referred to NCDs not listed above. CPG quality was independently assessed by two reviewers using the Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation instrument, version II (AGREE II."Scope and purpose" and "clarity and presentation" domains received the highest scores. Sixteen of 26 CPGs were classified as low quality, and none were classified as high overall quality. No CPG was recommended without modification (77% were not recommended at all. After 2009, 2 domain scores ("rigor of development" and "clarity and presentation" increased (61% and 73%, respectively. However, "rigor of development" was still rated < 30%.Brazilian healthcare professionals should be concerned with CPG quality for the treatment of selected NCDs. Features that undermined AGREE II scores included the lack of a multidisciplinary team for the development group, no consideration of patients' preferences, insufficient information regarding literature searches, lack of selection criteria, formulating recommendations, authors' conflict of

  14. The Harbin Cohort Study on Diet, Nutrition and Chronic Non-communicable Diseases: study design and baseline characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Na

    Full Text Available Diet and nutrition have been reported to be associated with many common chronic diseases and blood-based assessment would be vital to investigate the association and mechanism, however, blood-based prospective studies are limited. The Harbin Cohort Study on Diet, Nutrition and Chronic Non-communicable Diseases was set up in 2010. From 2010 to 2012, 9,734 participants completed the baseline survey, including demographic characteristics, dietary intake, lifestyles and physical condition, and anthropometrics. A re-survey on 490 randomly selected participants was done by using the same methods which were employed in the baseline survey. For all participants, the mean age was 50 years and 36% of them were men. Approximately 99.4 % of cohort members donated blood samples. The mean total energy intake was 2671.7 kcal/day in men and 2245.9 kcal/day in women, the mean body mass index was 25.7 kg/m2 in men and 24.6 kg/m2 in women, with 18.4% being obese (≥ 28 kg/m2, 12.7% being diabetic, and 29.5% being hypertensive. A good agreement was obtained for the physical measurements between the baseline survey and re-survey. The resources from the cohort and its fasting and postprandial blood samples collected both at baseline and in each follow-up will be valuable and powerful in investigating relationship between diet, nutrition and chronic diseases and discovering novel blood biomarkers and the metabolism of these biomarkers related to chronic diseases.

  15. The effect of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure in individuals with insulin resistance, prediabetes, or noncommunicable chronic diseases: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibaba, Daniel T; Xun, Pengcheng; Song, Yiqing; Rosanoff, Andrea; Shechter, Michael; He, Ka

    2017-09-01

    Background: To our knowledge, the effect of magnesium supplementation on blood pressure (BP) in individuals with preclinical or noncommunicable diseases has not been previously investigated in a meta-analysis, and the findings from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been inconsistent. Objective: We sought to determine the pooled effect of magnesium supplementation on BP in participants with preclinical or noncommunicable diseases. Design: We identified RCTs that were published in English before May 2017 that examined the effect of magnesium supplementation on BP in individuals with preclinical or noncommunicable diseases through PubMed, ScienceDirect, Cochrane, clinicaltrials.gov, SpringerLink, and Google Scholar databases as well as the reference lists from identified relevant articles. Random- and fixed-effects models were used to estimate the pooled standardized mean differences (SMDs) with 95% CIs in changes in BP from baseline to the end of the trial in both systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) between the magnesium-supplementation group and the control group. Results: Eleven RCTs that included 543 participants with follow-up periods that ranged from 1 to 6 mo (mean: 3.6 mo) were included in this meta-analysis. The dose of elemental magnesium that was used in the trials ranged from 365 to 450 mg/d. All studies reported BP at baseline and the end of the trial. The weighted overall effects indicated that the magnesium-supplementation group had a significantly greater reduction in both SBP (SMD: -0.20; 95% CI: -0.37, -0.03) and DBP (SMD: -0.27; 95% CI: -0.52, -0.03) than did the control group. Magnesium supplementation resulted in a mean reduction of 4.18 mm Hg in SBP and 2.27 mm Hg in DBP. Conclusion: The pooled results suggest that magnesium supplementation significantly lowers BP in individuals with insulin resistance, prediabetes, or other noncommunicable chronic diseases. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  16. Preparedness of HIV care and treatment clinics for the management of concomitant non?communicable diseases: a cross?sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Claudia; Aris, Eric; Mhalu, Aisa; Siril, Hellen; Christian, Beatrice; Koda, Happiness; Samatta, Talumba; Maghimbi, Martha Tsere; Hirschhorn, Lisa R.; Chalamilla, Guerino; Hawkins, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background In Sub-Saharan Africa, epidemiological studies have reported an increasing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCD) among people living with HIV. NCD management can be feasibly integrated into HIV care; however, clinic readiness to provide NCD services in these settings should first be assessed and gaps in care identified. Methods A cross-sectional survey conducted in July 2013 assessed the resources available for NCD care at 14 HIV clinics in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Sur...

  17. Can epidemics be non-communicable?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seeberg, Jens; Meinert, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that the concept of communicability that is central to the distinction between communicable diseases (CDs) and noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is poorly conceptualized. The epidemic spread of NCDs such as diabetes, depression, and eating disorders demonstrates...

  18. Mortality in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wermuth, L; Stenager, E; Stenager, E

    1995-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: After the introduction of L-dopa the mortality rate in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients has changed, but is still higher than in the background population. MATERIAL & METHODS: Mortality, age at death and cause of death in a group of PD patients compared with the background population....... In the background population the median age at death was 80.69 years for men and 84.37 years for women. The SMR for men was 1.92 and for women 2.47. Infections, in particular lung infections, and heart diseases were the most common causes of death. Seventy percent of the death certificates had PD as a diagnosis....... CONCLUSION: It is likely that several factors can influence the changed mortality of PD: more effective treatment, changing diagnostic practice, and inter-disease competition....

  19. Leveraging existing virtual platform for training medical officers on Non-Communicable Diseases; an experience from Bihar, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Gautam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The state of Bihar in India has high prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs. A NCDs training program using virtual platform was implemented for medical officers posted at public health facilities from two districts of Bihar.   Aims & Objectives: The aim of this analysis was to evaluate the effectiveness of a pilot NCDs training program in improving the knowledge of Medical officers using virtual platform.   Material & Methods: A secondary analysis of pre-post NCDs training data was undertaken. A structured knowledge assessment tool (KAT was used to assess the knowledge of participants before and after completion of training. Also, post-training participant’s feedback was collected using a “Likert scale”. Statistical analysis: Median pre-post KAT scores were calculated and compared for statistical significance using “Wilcoxon Signed Rank test”. The proportions of participants satisfied with training were also calculated. Results: The pre-post KAT scores for diabetes, hypertension and CAD were ranked, analysed and found to be statistically significant (p < .001. Overall 94% of the participants were satisfied with the virtual training on NCDs. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the NCDs training using virtual platform significantly improved the knowledge of medical officers and was found to be highly acceptable by them.

  20. Task Shifting the Management of Non-Communicable Diseases to Nurses in Kibera, Kenya: Does It Work?

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    David Some

    Full Text Available In sub-Saharan Africa there is an increasing need to leverage available health care workers to provide care for non-communicable diseases (NCDs. This study was conducted to evaluate adherence to Médecins Sans Frontières clinical protocols when the care of five stable NCDs (hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, epilepsy, asthma, and sickle cell was shifted from clinical officers to nurses.Descriptive, retrospective review of routinely collected clinic data from two integrated primary health care facilities within an urban informal settlement, Kibera, Nairobi, Kenya (May to August 2014.There were 3,554 consultations (2025 patients; 733 (21% were by nurses out of which 725 met the inclusion criteria among 616 patients. Hypertension (64%, 397/616 was the most frequent NCD followed by asthma (17%, 106/616 and diabetes mellitus (15%, 95/616. Adherence to screening questions ranged from 65% to 86%, with an average of 69%. Weight and blood pressure measurements were completed in 89% and 96% of those required. Laboratory results were reviewed in 91% of indicated visits. Laboratory testing per NCD protocols was higher in those with hypertension (88% than diabetes mellitus (67% upon review. Only 17 (2% consultations were referred back to clinical officers.Nurses are able to adhere to protocols for managing stable NCD patients based on clear and standardized protocols and guidelines, thus paving the way towards task shifting of NCD care to nurses to help relieve the significant healthcare gap in developing countries.

  1. Structural responses to the obesity and non-communicable diseases epidemic: the Chilean Law of Food Labeling and Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvalán, C; Reyes, M; Garmendia, M L; Uauy, R

    2013-11-01

    In 12 July 2012, the Chilean Senate approved the Law of Food Labeling and Advertising, resulting from the joint efforts of a group of health professionals, researchers and legislators who proposed a regulatory framework in support of healthy diets and active living. Its goal was to curb the ongoing epidemic increase of obesity and non-communicable diseases. Two actions included: (i) improving point of food purchase consumer information by incorporating easy-to-understand front-of-packages labeling and specific messages addressing critical nutrients, and (ii) decreasing children's exposure to unhealthy foods by restricting marketing, advertising and sales. We summarize the work related to the law's release and discuss the conclusions reached by the various expert committees that were convened by the Ministry of Health to guide the development of the regulatory norms. Throughout the process, the food industry has overtly expressed its disagreement with the regulatory effort. The final content of the regulatory norms is still pending; however there are suggestions that its implementation will be delayed and might be modified based on the industry lobbying actions. These lessons should contribute to show the need of anticipating and addressing potential barriers to obesity-prevention policy implementation, particularly with respect to the role of the private sector. © 2013 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  2. Task Shifting the Management of Non-Communicable Diseases to Nurses in Kibera, Kenya: Does It Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some, David; Edwards, Jeffrey K.; Reid, Tony; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Kosgei, Rose J.; Wilkinson, Ewan; Baruani, Bienvenu; Kizito, Walter; Khabala, Kelly; Shah, Safieh; Kibachio, Joseph; Musembi, Phylles

    2016-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa there is an increasing need to leverage available health care workers to provide care for non-communicable diseases (NCDs). This study was conducted to evaluate adherence to Médecins Sans Frontières clinical protocols when the care of five stable NCDs (hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, epilepsy, asthma, and sickle cell) was shifted from clinical officers to nurses. Methods Descriptive, retrospective review of routinely collected clinic data from two integrated primary health care facilities within an urban informal settlement, Kibera, Nairobi, Kenya (May to August 2014). Results There were 3,554 consultations (2025 patients); 733 (21%) were by nurses out of which 725 met the inclusion criteria among 616 patients. Hypertension (64%, 397/616) was the most frequent NCD followed by asthma (17%, 106/616) and diabetes mellitus (15%, 95/616). Adherence to screening questions ranged from 65% to 86%, with an average of 69%. Weight and blood pressure measurements were completed in 89% and 96% of those required. Laboratory results were reviewed in 91% of indicated visits. Laboratory testing per NCD protocols was higher in those with hypertension (88%) than diabetes mellitus (67%) upon review. Only 17 (2%) consultations were referred back to clinical officers. Conclusion Nurses are able to adhere to protocols for managing stable NCD patients based on clear and standardized protocols and guidelines, thus paving the way towards task shifting of NCD care to nurses to help relieve the significant healthcare gap in developing countries. PMID:26812079

  3. Engagement of adolescents in a health communications program to prevent noncommunicable diseases: Multiplicadores Jóvenes, Lima, Peru, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Boeren, Yulissa; Quispe, Renato; Chiang, Mey Lin; Miranda, J Jaime

    2015-03-05

    Several risk factors for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), including obesity, are associated with behaviors established in infancy that persist throughout adolescence and adulthood. As such, adolescents should be engaged in the design and implementation of NCD prevention strategies. In Lima, Peru's capital, the proportion of adolescents aged 15 to 19 is 9.3% of the city's population, and school enrollment rates are high. The prevalence of excess weight in Peruvian adolescents is 14.2%, and prevalence has not declined in recent years. Also recently, NCDs and their risk factors have gained more attention in public health and policy areas, with regulatory action focusing on healthful nutrition to address obesity and related NCDs. The Multiplicadores Jóvenes (Young Multipliers) project was conducted among adolescents aged 15 to 17 from 9 public secondary schools in peri-urban areas of Lima, Peru. The project provided basic communication tools and knowledge of NCD prevention and public health research to adolescents during 16 weekly participatory sessions to enable them to design and disseminate healthful lifestyle promotion messages to their school peers. Thirty of 45 participants finished the program. Seven communications campaigns were designed and implemented in schools, reaching 1,200 students. The participants gained motivation, increased knowledge, and developed communication skills that were combined to implement healthful lifestyle promotion campaigns. Engaging young people in public health promotion activities was feasible and advantageous for the design of tailored prevention-related content and its dissemination among peers.

  4. Applications of systems science in biomedical research regarding obesity and noncommunicable chronic diseases: opportunities, promise, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youfa; Xue, Hong; Liu, Shiyong

    2015-01-01

    Interest in the application of systems science (SS) in biomedical research, particularly regarding obesity and noncommunicable chronic disease (NCD) research, has been growing rapidly over the past decade. SS is a broad term referring to a family of research approaches that include modeling. As an emerging approach being adopted in public health, SS focuses on the complex dynamic interaction between agents (e.g., people) and subsystems defined at different levels. SS provides a conceptual framework for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches that address complex problems. SS has unique advantages for studying obesity and NCD problems in comparison to the traditional analytic approaches. The application of SS in biomedical research dates back to the 1960s with the development of computing capacity and simulation software. In recent decades, SS has been applied to addressing the growing global obesity epidemic. There is growing appreciation and support for using SS in the public health field, with many promising opportunities. There are also many challenges and uncertainties, including methodologic, funding, and institutional barriers. Integrated efforts by stakeholders that address these challenges are critical for the successful application of SS in the future. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. The World Health Organization STEPwise Approach to Noncommunicable Disease Risk-Factor Surveillance: Methods, Challenges, and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Leanne; Guthold, Regina; Cowan, Melanie; Savin, Stefan; Bhatti, Lubna; Armstrong, Timothy; Bonita, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    We sought to outline the framework and methods used by the World Health Organization (WHO) STEPwise approach to noncommunicable disease (NCD) surveillance (STEPS), describe the development and current status, and discuss strengths, limitations, and future directions of STEPS surveillance. STEPS is a WHO-developed, standardized but flexible framework for countries to monitor the main NCD risk factors through questionnaire assessment and physical and biochemical measurements. It is coordinated by national authorities of the implementing country. The STEPS surveys are generally household-based and interviewer-administered, with scientifically selected samples of around 5000 participants. To date, 122 countries across all 6 WHO regions have completed data collection for STEPS or STEPS-aligned surveys. STEPS data are being used to inform NCD policies and track risk-factor trends. Future priorities include strengthening these linkages from data to action on NCDs at the country level, and continuing to develop STEPS' capacities to enable a regular and continuous cycle of risk-factor surveillance worldwide.

  6. Break in Sedentary Behavior Reduces the Risk of Noncommunicable Diseases and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors among Workers in a Petroleum Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chutima Jalayondeja

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Although prolonged sitting appears as a novel risk factor related to health outcomes for all ages, its association needs to be replicated in occupational conditions. This study explored the associations between sedentary behavior and four noncommunicable diseases (NCDs as well as two cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRFs among workers in a petroleum company, Thailand. All workers were invited to complete the online self-report questionnaire. Sedentary behavior was measured as the amount of time sitting at work, during recreation, and while commuting. Out of 3365 workers contacted, 1133 (34% participated. Prevalence of NCDs and CMRFs was 36% and was positively associated with sedentary behavior. After adjusting for age, BMI, and exercise, the risk of NCDs and CMRFs for sedentary office work was 40% greater compared with more active field work. Those who took a break without sitting more than twice a day and commuted by walking or cycling had less risk of NCDs and CMRFs. The total duration of sedentary behavior was 10 h/day, and two-thirds of that total was workplace sitting. This was significantly associated with NCDs and CMRFs (p < 0.001. Day-and-night rotating shiftwork was negatively associated with NCDs and CMRFs (p < 0.001. Sedentary behavior should be considered a health risk among workers. Hence, to promote a healthy lifestyle and safe workplace, organizations should encourage standing activities during break and physically active commutes, and have workers avoid prolonged sitting.

  7. Traditional local medicines in the republic of Palau and non-communicable diseases (NCD), signs of effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graz, Bertrand; Kitalong, Christopher; Yano, Victor

    2015-02-23

    The aim of this survey was to describe which traditional medicines (TM) are most commonly used for non-communicable diseases (NCD - diabetes, hypertension related to excess weight and obesity) in Pacific islands and with what perceived effectiveness. NCD, especially prevalent in the Pacific, have been subject to many public health interventions, often with rather disappointing results. Innovative interventions are required; one hypothesis is that some local, traditional approaches may have been overlooked. The method used was a retrospective treatment-outcome study in a nation-wide representative sample of the adult population (about 15,000 individuals) of the Republic of Palau, an archipelago of Micronesia. From 188 respondents (61% female, age 16-87, median 48,), 30 different plants were used, mostly self-prepared (69%), or from a traditional healer (18%). For excess weight, when comparing the two most frequent plants, Morinda citrifolia L. was associated with more adequate outcome than Phaleria nishidae Kaneh. (P=0.05). In case of diabetes, when comparing Phaleria nishidae (=Phaleria nisidai) and Morinda citrifolia, the former was statistically more often associated with the reported outcome "lower blood sugar" (P=0.01). Statistical association between a plant used and reported outcome is not a proof of effectiveness or safety, but it can help select plants of interest for further studies, e.g. through a reverse pharmacology process, in search of local products which may have a positive impact on population health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dietary patterns and non-communicable disease risk in Indian adults: secondary analysis of Indian Migration Study data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Edward Jm; Green, Rosemary; Agrawal, Sutapa; Aleksandrowicz, Lukasz; Bowen, Liza; Kinra, Sanjay; Macdiarmid, Jennie I; Haines, Andy; Dangour, Alan D

    2017-08-01

    Undernutrition and non-communicable disease (NCD) are important public health issues in India, yet their relationship with dietary patterns is poorly understood. The current study identified distinct dietary patterns and their association with micronutrient undernutrition (Ca, Fe, Zn) and NCD risk factors (underweight, obesity, waist:hip ratio, hypertension, total:HDL cholesterol, diabetes). Data were from the cross-sectional Indian Migration Study, including semi-quantitative FFQ. Distinct dietary patterns were identified using finite mixture modelling; associations with NCD risk factors were assessed using mixed-effects logistic regression models. India. Migrant factory workers, their rural-dwelling siblings and urban non-migrants. Participants (7067 adults) resided mainly in Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra and Uttar Pradesh. Five distinct, regionally distributed, dietary patterns were identified, with rice-based patterns in the south and wheat-based patterns in the north-west. A rice-based pattern characterised by low energy consumption and dietary diversity ('Rice & low diversity') was consumed predominantly by adults with little formal education in rural settings, while a rice-based pattern with high fruit consumption ('Rice & fruit') was consumed by more educated adults in urban settings. Dietary patterns met WHO macronutrient recommendations, but some had low micronutrient contents. Dietary pattern membership was associated with several NCD risk factors. Five distinct dietary patterns were identified, supporting sub-national assessments of the implications of dietary patterns for various health, food system or environment outcomes.

  9. Knowledge of communicable and noncommunicable diseases among Karen ethnic high school students in rural Thasongyang, the far northwest of Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorga T

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Thaworn Lorga,1 Myo Nyein Aung,1,2 Prissana Naunboonruang,1 Piyatida Junlapeeya,1 Apiradee Payaprom31Boromarajonani College of Nursing Nakhon Lampang (BCNLP, Lampang, Thailand; 2Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan; 3Thasongyang Hospital, Thasongyang, Tak, ThailandBackground: The double burden of communicable and noncommunicable diseases (NCD is an increasing trend in low- and-middle income developing countries. Rural and minority populations are underserved and likely to be affected severely by these burdens. Knowledge among young people could provide immunity to such diseases within a community in the long term. In this study we aimed to assess the knowledge of several highly prevalent NCDs (diabetes, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] and several highly incident communicable diseases (malaria and diarrheal diseases among Karen high school students in a rural district in far northwest of Thailand. The aim of the study is to explore information for devising life-course health education that will be strategically based in schools.Method: A cross-sectional survey approved by the ethics committee of Boromarajonani College of Nursing Nakhon Lampang (BCNLP, Lampang, Thailand was conducted in Thasongyang, Tak province, from September 2011 to January 2012. Questionnaires for assessing knowledge regarding diabetes, hypertension, COPD, malaria, and diarrheal diseases were delivered to all 457 Karen high school students attending Thasongyang high school. A total of 371 students returned the questionnaires. Experts' validation and split-half reliability assessment was applied to the instrument.Results: Students' main sources of health information were their teachers (62%, health care workers (60%, television (59%, and parents (54%. Familial risk factors of diabetes and hypertension were not known to more than two thirds of the students. Except obesity and physical

  10. Non-communicable diseases: mapping research funding organisations, funding mechanisms and research practices in Italy and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephani, Victor; Sommariva, Silvia; Spranger, Anne; Ciani, Oriana

    2017-10-02

    Evidence shows that territorial borders continue to have an impact on research collaboration in Europe. Knowledge of national research structural contexts is therefore crucial to the promotion of Europe-wide policies for research funding. Nevertheless, studies assessing and comparing research systems remain scarce. This paper aims to further the knowledge on national research landscapes in Europe, focusing on non-communicable disease (NCD) research in Italy and Germany. To capture the architecture of country-specific research funding systems, a three-fold strategy was adopted. First, a literature review was conducted to determine a list of key public, voluntary/private non-profit and commercial research funding organisations (RFOs). Second, an electronic survey was administered qualifying RFOs. Finally, survey results were integrated with semi-structured interviews with key opinion leaders in NCD research. Three major dimensions of interest were investigated - funding mechanisms, funding patterns and expectations regarding outputs. The number of RFOs in Italy is four times larger than that in Germany and the Italian research system has more project funding instruments than the German system. Regarding the funding patterns towards NCD areas, in both countries, respiratory disease research resulted as the lowest funded, whereas cancer research was the target of most funding streams. The most reported expected outputs of funded research activity were scholarly publication of articles and reports. This cross-country comparison on the Italian and German research funding structures revealed substantial differences between the two systems. The current system is prone to duplicated research efforts, popular funding for some diseases and intransparency of research results. Future research will require addressing the need for better coordination of research funding efforts, even more so if European research efforts are to play a greater role.

  11. Moving the Agenda on Noncommunicable Diseases: Policy Implications of Mobile Phone Surveys in Low and Middle-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariyo, George W; Wosu, Adaeze C; Gibson, Dustin G; Labrique, Alain B; Ali, Joseph; Hyder, Adnan A

    2017-05-05

    The growing burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), for example, cardiovascular diseases and chronic respiratory diseases, in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) presents special challenges for policy makers, due to resource constraints and lack of timely data for decision-making. Concurrently, the increasing ubiquity of mobile phones in LMICs presents possibilities for rapid collection of population-based data to inform the policy process. The objective of this paper is to highlight potential benefits of mobile phone surveys (MPS) for developing, implementing, and evaluating NCD prevention and control policies. To achieve this aim, we first provide a brief overview of major global commitments to NCD prevention and control, and subsequently explore how countries can translate these commitments into policy action at the national level. Using the policy cycle as our frame of reference, we highlight potential benefits of MPS which include (1) potential cost-effectiveness of using MPS to inform NCD policy actions compared with using traditional household surveys; (2) timeliness of assessments to feed into policy and planning cycles; (3) tracking progress of interventions, hence assessment of reach, coverage, and distribution; (4) better targeting of interventions, for example, to high-risk groups; (5) timely course correction for suboptimal or non-effective interventions; (6) assessing fairness in financial contribution and financial risk protection for those affected by NCDs in the spirit of universal health coverage (UHC); and (7) monitoring progress in reducing catastrophic medical expenditure due to chronic health conditions in general, and NCDs in particular. We conclude that MPS have potential to become a powerful data collection tool to inform policies that address public health challenges such as NCDs. Additional forthcoming assessments of MPS in LMICs will inform opportunities to maximize this technology. ©George W Pariyo, Adaeze C Wosu, Dustin G

  12. A cohort study protocol to analyze the predisposing factors to common chronic non-communicable diseases in rural areas: Fasa Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjam, Mojtaba; Bahrami, Hossein; Bahramali, Ehsan; Jamshidi, Javad; Askari, Alireza; Zakeri, Habibollah; Homayounfar, Reza; Poustchi, Hossein; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2016-10-18

    Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have become the main causes of morbidity and mortality even in rural areas of many developing countries, including Iran. In view of this increased risk, Fasa Cohort Study (FACS) has been established to assess the risk factors for NCDs with the ultimate goal of providing optimal risk calculators for Iranian population and finding grounds for interventions at the population level. In a population-based cohort, at least 10,000 people within the age range of 35 to 70 years old from Sheshdeh, the suburb of Fasa city and its 24 satellite villages are being recruited. A detailed demographic, socioeconomic, anthropometric, nutrition, and medical history is obtained for each individual besides limited physical examinations and determination of physical activity and sleep patterns supplemented by body composition and electrocardiographic records. Routine laboratory assessments are done and a comprehensive biobank is compiled for future biological investigations. All data are stored online using a dedicated software. FACS enrolls the individuals from rural and little township areas to evaluate the health conditions and analyze the risk factors pertinent to major NCDs. This study will provide an evidence-based background for further national and international policies in preventive medicine. Yearly follow ups are designed to assess the health events in the participating population. It is believed that the results would construct a contemporary knowledge of Iranian high risk health characteristics and behaviors as well as the platform for further interventions of risk reduction in a typical Iranian population. Constantly probing for future advances in NCDs prevention and management, the accumulated database and biobank serves as a potential for state of the art research and international collaborations.

  13. A cohort study protocol to analyze the predisposing factors to common chronic non-communicable diseases in rural areas: Fasa Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Farjam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-communicable diseases (NCDs have become the main causes of morbidity and mortality even in rural areas of many developing countries, including Iran. In view of this increased risk, Fasa Cohort Study (FACS has been established to assess the risk factors for NCDs with the ultimate goal of providing optimal risk calculators for Iranian population and finding grounds for interventions at the population level. Methods In a population-based cohort, at least 10,000 people within the age range of 35 to 70 years old from Sheshdeh, the suburb of Fasa city and its 24 satellite villages are being recruited. A detailed demographic, socioeconomic, anthropometric, nutrition, and medical history is obtained for each individual besides limited physical examinations and determination of physical activity and sleep patterns supplemented by body composition and electrocardiographic records. Routine laboratory assessments are done and a comprehensive biobank is compiled for future biological investigations. All data are stored online using a dedicated software. Discussion FACS enrolls the individuals from rural and little township areas to evaluate the health conditions and analyze the risk factors pertinent to major NCDs. This study will provide an evidence-based background for further national and international policies in preventive medicine. Yearly follow ups are designed to assess the health events in the participating population. It is believed that the results would construct a contemporary knowledge of Iranian high risk health characteristics and behaviors as well as the platform for further interventions of risk reduction in a typical Iranian population. Constantly probing for future advances in NCDs prevention and management, the accumulated database and biobank serves as a potential for state of the art research and international collaborations.

  14. The global impact of non-communicable diseases on macro-economic productivity: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Chaker (Layal); A. Falla (Abby); S.J. van der Lee (Sven); T. Muka (Taulant); D. Imo (David); L. Jaspers (Loes); V. Colpani (Veronica); S. Mendis (Shanthi); R. Chowdhury (Rajiv); W.M. Bramer (Wichor); R. Pazoki (Raha); O.H. Franco (Oscar)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractNon-communicable diseases (NCDs) have large economic impact at multiple levels. To systematically review the literature investigating the economic impact of NCDs [including coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer (lung, colon, cervical and breast),

  15. Socioeconomic Inequalities in Non-Communicable Diseases Prevalence in India: Disparities between Self-Reported Diagnoses and Standardized Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellakkal, Sukumar; Subramanian, S. V.; Millett, Christopher; Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; Ebrahim, Shah

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are diseases of poverty or affluence in low-and-middle income countries has been vigorously debated. Most analyses of NCDs have used self-reported data, which is biased by differential access to healthcare services between groups of different socioeconomic status (SES). We sought to compare self-reported diagnoses versus standardised measures of NCD prevalence across SES groups in India. Methods We calculated age-adjusted prevalence rates of common NCDs from the Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey. We compared self-reported diagnoses to standardized measures of disease for five NCDs. We calculated wealth-related and education-related disparities in NCD prevalence by calculating concentration index (C), which ranges from −1 to +1 (concentration of disease among lower and higher SES groups, respectively). Findings NCD prevalence was higher (range 5.2 to 19.1%) for standardised measures than self-reported diagnoses (range 3.1 to 9.4%). Several NCDs were particularly concentrated among higher SES groups according to self-reported diagnoses (Csrd) but were concentrated either among lower SES groups or showed no strong socioeconomic gradient using standardized measures (Csm): age-standardised wealth-related C: angina Csrd 0.02 vs. Csm −0.17; asthma and lung diseases Csrd −0.05 vs. Csm −0.04 (age-standardised education-related Csrd 0.04 vs. Csm −0.05); vision problems Csrd 0.07 vs. Csm −0.05; depression Csrd 0.07 vs. Csm −0.13. Indicating similar trends of standardized measures detecting more cases among low SES, concentration of hypertension declined among higher SES (Csrd 0.19 vs. Csm 0.03). Conclusions The socio-economic patterning of NCD prevalence differs markedly when assessed by standardized criteria versus self-reported diagnoses. NCDs in India are not necessarily diseases of affluence but also of poverty, indicating likely under-diagnosis and

  16. Improving access to medicines for non-communicable diseases in rural India: a mixed methods study protocol using quasi-experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashanth, N S; Elias, Maya Annie; Pati, Manoj Kumar; Aivalli, Praveenkumar; Munegowda, C M; Bhanuprakash, Srinath; Sadhana, S M; Criel, Bart; Bigdeli, Maryam; Devadasan, Narayanan

    2016-08-22

    India has the distinction of financing its healthcare mainly through out-of-pocket expenses by individual families contributing to catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment. Nearly 70 % of the expenditure is on medicines purchased at private pharmacies. Patients with chronic ailments are especially affected, as they often need lifelong medicines. Over the past years in India, there have been several efforts to improve drug availability at government primary health centres. In this study, we aim to understand health system factors that affect utilisation and access to generic medicines for people with non-communicable diseases. This study aims to understand if (and how) a package of interventions targeting primary health centres and community participation platforms affect utilisation and access to generic medicines for people with non-communicable diseases in the current district context in India. This study will employ a quasi-experimental design and a qualitative theory-driven approach. PHCs will be randomly assigned to one of three arms of the intervention. In one arm, PHCs will receive inputs to optimise service delivery for non-communicable diseases, while the second arm will receive an additional package of interventions to strengthen community participation platforms for improving non-communicable disease care. The third arm will be the control. We will conduct household and facility surveys, before and after the intervention and will estimate the effect of the intervention by difference-in-difference analysis. Sample size for measuring effects was calculated based on obtaining at least 30 households for each primary health centre spread across three distance-based clusters. Primary outcomes include availability and utilisation of medicines at primary health centres and out-of-pocket expenditure for medicines by non-communicable disease households. Focus group discussions with patients and in-depth interviews with health workers will also be

  17. Toward core inter-professional health promotion competencies to address the non-communicable diseases and their risk factors through knowledge translation: curriculum content assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Elizabeth; Moffat, Marilyn; Skinner, Margot; Dornelas de Andrade, Armele; Myezwa, Hellen; Söderlund, Anne

    2014-07-14

    To increase the global impact of health promotion related to non-communicable diseases, health professionals need evidence-based core competencies in health assessment and lifestyle behavior change. Assessment of health promotion curricula by health professional programs is a first step. Such program assessment is a means of 1. demonstrating collective commitment across health professionals to prevent non-communicable diseases; 2. addressing the knowledge translation gap between what is known about non-communicable diseases and their risk factors consistent with 'best' practice; and, 3. establishing core health-based competencies in the entry-level curricula of established health professions. Consistent with the World Health Organization's definition of health (i.e., physical, emotional and social wellbeing) and the Ottawa Charter, health promotion competencies are those that support health rather than reduce signs and symptoms primarily. A process algorithm to guide the implementation of health promotion competencies by health professionals is described. The algorithm outlines steps from the initial assessment of a patient's/client's health and the indications for health behavior change, to the determination of whether that health professional assumes primary responsibility for implementing health behavior change interventions or refers the patient/client to others.An evidence-based template for assessment of the health promotion curriculum content of health professional education programs is outlined. It includes clinically-relevant behavior change theory; health assessment/examination tools; and health behavior change strategies/interventions that can be readily integrated into health professionals' practices. Assessment of the curricula in health professional education programs with respect to health promotion competencies is a compelling and potentially cost-effective initial means of preventing and reversing non-communicable diseases. Learning evidence

  18. Psychiatric Co-morbidities among Patients with Select Non-communicable Diseases in a Coastal City of South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaman Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psychiatric illnesses are an important group of co-morbidities that can occur among patients with non-communicable diseases (NCDs. Both these chronic conditions have an important implication in terms of quality of life, general well-being and cost of treatment and general longevity of the patient. The objectives of our study were to assess the burden of psychiatric co-morbidities among patients with select NCDs and to identify the determinants associated with them. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the outpatient departments (OPDs of Government District Hospital, Mangalore. The study was conducted among patients with select NCDs viz. diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ischemic heart diseases and their combinations attending OPDs of Government District Hospital, Mangalore. Participants were interviewed using Patient Health Questionnaire-Somatic, Anxiety and Depressive Symptoms. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 11.0 (SPSS Inc., 233 South Wacker Drive, 11 th floor, Chicago, IL 60606-6412. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were performed to test the association between different variables. Results: Among the 282 study participants, psychiatric illnesses observed were somatization (n = 99, 35.1%, anxiety (n = 54, 19.1% and depression (n = 82, 29.1%. Bivariate analysis showed significant negative association (P <0.05 between psychiatric illness and factors such as education, marital status, age <60 years, duration of illness of <10 years. However, on multivariate analysis only marital status (odds ratio [OR]: 0.500, confidence interval [CI]: 0.321-0.777, P = 0.002 and duration of illness (OR: 0.651, CI: 0.439-0.967, P = 0.032 were found to be significantly associated negatively with depression and anxiety.

  19. Nutrition transition in South Asia: the emergence of non-communicable chronic diseases [version 2; referees: 2 approved

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    Ghose Bishwajit

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Overview: South Asian countries have experienced a remarkable economic growth during last two decades along with subsequent transformation in social, economic and food systems. Rising disposable income levels continue to drive the nutrition transition characterized by a shift from a traditional high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets towards diets with a lower carbohydrate and higher proportion of saturated fat, sugar and salt. Steered by various transitions in demographic, economic and nutritional terms, South Asian population are experiencing a rapidly changing disease profile. While the healthcare systems have long been striving to disentangle from the vicious cycle of poverty and undernutrition, South Asian countries are now confronted with an emerging epidemic of obesity and a constellation of other non-communicable diseases (NCDs. This dual burden is bringing about a serious health and economic conundrum and is generating enormous pressure on the already overstretched healthcare system of South Asian countries.   Objectives: The Nutrition transition has been a very popular topic in the field of human nutrition during last few decades and many countries and broad geographic regions have been studied. However there is no review on this topic in the context of South Asia  as yet. The main purpose of this review is to highlight the factors accounting for the onset of nutrition transition and its subsequent impact on epidemiological transition in five major South Asian countries including Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. Special emphasis was given on India and Bangladesh as they together account for 94% of the regional population and about half world’s malnourished population. Methods: This study is literature based. Main data sources were published research articles obtained through an electronic medical databases search.

  20. Association of Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Risk Factors of Non-Communicable Diseases in Children and Adolescents

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    Parinaz Poursafa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Risk factors of non-communicable disease (NCD origin from early life, and exposure to environmental pollutant may be a predisposing factor. This study aimed to investigate the association of air quality index (AQI and fine particulate matter (PM2.5 with some NCD risk factors in a sample of Iranian children and adolescents. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 to 2016 among children and adolescents, aged 6-18 years, in Isfahan, Iran. Physical examination, including weight, height, and blood pressure, was conducted by standard methods. Fasting blood sample was obtained for fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein- cholesterol, and triglycerides. The mean AQI and PM2.5 values from the study time till one year prior to the survey were used. Multiple linear regression analysis was conducted for the association of AQI and PM2.5 with other variables. Results: Participants consisted of 186 children and adolescents with mean (SD age of 10.52(2.38 years. Exposure to higher level of PM2.5 had significant associations with higher levels of systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides. It also had positive relationship with other risk factors and inverse association with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, but these associations were not statistically significant. The corresponding figures were not significant for AQI. Conclusion: At current study results showed that exposure to higher levels of fine particulates was associated with some NCD risk factors in children and adolescents. Early life prevention of NCDs can lead to large reductions in disease risk; adverse effects of ambient pollutants should be considered in this regard.

  1. Prevalence and risk factors for self-reported non-communicable diseases among older Ugandans: a cross-sectional study

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    Stephen Ojiambo Wandera

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is limited evidence about the prevalence and risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCDs among older Ugandans. Therefore, this article is aimed at investigating the prevalence of self-reported NCDs and their associated risk factors using a nationally representative sample. Design: We conducted a secondary analysis of the 2010 Uganda National Household Survey (UNHS using a weighted sample of 2,382 older people. Frequency distributions for descriptive statistics and Pearson chi-square tests to identify the association between self-reported NCDs and selected explanatory variables were done. Finally, multivariable complementary log–log regressions to estimate the risk factors for self-reported NCDs among older people in Uganda were done. Results: About 2 in 10 (23% older persons reported at least one NCD [including hypertension (16%, diabetes (3%, and heart disease (9%]. Among all older people, reporting NCDs was higher among those aged 60–69 and 70–79; Muslims; and Pentecostals and Seventh Day Adventists (SDAs. In addition, the likelihood of reporting NCDs was higher among older persons who depended on remittances and earned wages; owned a bicycle; were sick in the last 30 days; were disabled; and were women. Conversely, the odds of reporting NCDs were lower for those who were relatives of household heads and were poor. Conclusions: In Uganda, self-reported NCDs were associated with advanced age, being a woman, having a disability, ill health in the past 30 days, being rich, depended on remittances and earning wages, being Muslim, Pentecostal and SDAs, and household headship. The Ministry of Health should prevent and manage NCDs by creating awareness in the public and improving the supply of essential drugs for these health conditions. Finally, there is a need for specialised surveillance studies of older people to monitor the trends and patterns of NCDs over time.

  2. The relationship between non-communicable disease occurrence and poverty-evidence from demographic surveillance in Matlab, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirelman, Andrew J; Rose, Sherri; Khan, Jahangir Am; Ahmed, Sayem; Peters, David H; Niessen, Louis W; Trujillo, Antonio J

    2016-07-01

    In low-income countries, a growing proportion of the disease burden is attributable to non-communicable diseases (NCDs). There is little knowledge, however, of their impact on wealth, human capital, economic growth or household poverty. This article estimates the risk of being poor after an NCD death in the rural, low-income area of Matlab, Bangladesh. In a matched cohort study, we estimated the 2-year relative risk (RR) of being poor in Matlab households with an NCD death in 2010. Three separate measures of household economic status were used as outcomes: an asset-based index, self-rated household economic condition and total household landholding. Several estimation methods were used including contingency tables, log-binomial regression and regression standardization and machine learning. Households with an NCD death had a large and significant risk of being poor. The unadjusted RR of being poor after death was 1.19, 1.14 and 1.10 for the asset quintile, self-rated condition and landholding outcomes. Adjusting for household and individual level independent variables with log-binomial regression gave RRs of 1.19 [standard error (SE) 0.09], 1.16 (SE 0.07) and 1.14 (SE 0.06), which were found to be exactly the same using regression standardization (SE: 0.09, 0.05, 0.03). Machine learning-based standardization produced slightly smaller RRs though still in the same order of magnitude. The findings show that efforts to address the burden of NCD may also combat household poverty and provide a return beyond improved health. Future work should attempt to disentangle the mechanisms through which economic impacts from an NCD death occur. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Effect of genetic and environmental factors on protein biomarkers for common non-communicable disease and use of personally normalized plasma protein profiles (PNPPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enroth, Stefan; Bosdotter Enroth, Sofia; Johansson, Åsa; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    To study the impact of genetic and lifestyle factors on protein biomarkers and develop personally normalized plasma protein profiles (PNPPP) controlling for non-disease-related variance. Proximity extension assays were used to measure 145 proteins in 632 controls and 344 cases with non-communicable diseases. Genetic and lifestyle factors explained 20-88% of the variation in healthy controls. Adjusting for these factors reduced the number of candidate biomarkers by 63%. PNPPP efficiently controls for non-disease-related variance, allowing both for efficient discovery of novel biomarkers and for covariate-independent linear cut-offs suitable for clinical use.

  4. Prevalence of smoking and high blood pressure, two major risk factors for non-communicable diseases: the SuRF NCD (surveillance of risk factors of non-communicable disease) report 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalizadeh, Ahmad; Kamiab, Zahra; Esmaeili Nadimi, Ali; Nejadghaderi, Mohsen; Saeidi, Ala; Porkarami, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years non-communicable diseases (NCDs) risk factors such as tobacco consumption and high blood pressure (BP) have been increased. This study aimed to determine the frequency of risk factors of the main NCDs among inhabitants of Rafsanjan city. Methods: Our study is a part of NCD surveillance in Iran (SuRF NCD). A total of 640 people enrolled and divided in four age groups in urban and rural areas in Rafsanjan (a city in Kerman province). Data were collected using the standardized stepwise protocol for NCD risk factor surveillance of the World Health Organization (WHO). This study focused on hypertension (HTN) and smoking. Results: A total of 640 people (46.9% male and 53.1% female) participated in this cross-sectional study. The prevalence of HTN was 198 per 1000 population. 4.8% of those were below the age of 44, and 15% between 45 and 70 years old. Mean systolic BP was 127 ± 15.6 in male and 118 ± 19.65 in female and the statistical difference was significant (t = 5.55, P < 0.001). 79 (14.1%) of hypertensive live in urban and 32 (5.7%) live in rural areas (χ2 = 8.004, P = 0.005). The prevalence of current smokers was 112 per 1000 population; among them 56 (88.9%) were daily smokers. The mean age for starting smoking was 21.11 ± 7.16 years. Conclusion: Modifying risk factors such as HTN and smoking behavior through primary and secondary prevention programs by enhancing awareness and knowledge of lay people, improvement screening and treatment interventions, particularly for the youth is highly recommended.

  5. Multi-sectoral Action for Non-communicable Disease Prevention in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This is especially true among the poor, given their lack of access to proper care and medicine. Often, communicable diseases and NCDs co-exist in the same individual; one can increase the risk or impact of the other. Current projections indicate that by 2020, the largest increase in NCD deaths will occur in Africa.

  6. Overweight, obesity and related non-communicable diseases in Asian Indian girls and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, S M; Misra, A; Gulati, S; Gupta, R

    2013-07-01

    The prevalence of obesity is rising globally and in India. Overweight, obesity and related diseases need to be delineated in Asian Indian women. A literature search was done using key words like 'obesity', 'Asian Indian women', 'body fat distribution', 'type 2 diabetes', 'fertility', 'polycystic ovarian disease', metabolic syndrome', 'cardiovascular disease', 'non-alcoholic fatty liver disease', 'gender', 'sex' and 'prevalence' up to September 2012 in Pubmed and Google Scholar search engines. This review highlights the Asian Indian body composition with regards to obesity and provides a collated perspective of gender-specific prevalence of the co-morbidities. Recent data show that women (range of prevalence of overweight and obesity from different studies 15-61%) have higher prevalence of overweight and obesity as compared with men (range of prevalence of overweight and obesity from different studies 12-54%) in India and that obesity is increasing in the youth. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in both men and women steeply rose in a Punjabi community from Jaipur. Importantly, prevalence of abdominal obesity has been consistently higher in women than in men. The lowest prevalence (6.0%) of type 2 diabetes mellitus in women is reported from South India (rural Andhra Pradesh; 2006) and the highest (14.0%) by the National Urban Diabetes Survey (2001). Although the clustering of cardiovascular disease risk factors was generally high, it increased further in post-menopausal women. There are a number of factors that predispose Indian women to obesity; sedentary behaviour, imbalanced diets, sequential and additive postpartum weight gain and further decrease in physical activity during this period and cultural issues. In view of these data, preventive measures should be specifically targeted to Indian women.

  7. Sociodemographic and socioeconomic patterns of chronic non-communicable disease among the older adult population in Ghana

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    Nadia Minicuci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Ghana, the older adult population is projected to increase from 5.3% of the total population in 2015 to 8.9% by 2050. National and local governments will need information about non-communicable diseases (NCDs in this population in order to allocate health system resources and respond to the health needs of older adults. Design: The 2007/08 Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE Wave 1 in Ghana used face-to-face interviews in a nationally representative sample of persons aged 50-plus years. Individual respondents were asked about their overall health, diagnosis of 10 chronic non-communicable conditions, and common health risk factors. A number of anthropometric and health measurements were also taken in all respondents, including height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, and blood pressure (BP. Results: This paper includes 4,724 adults aged 50-plus years. The highest prevalence of self-reported chronic conditions was for hypertension [14.2% (95% CI 12.8–15.6] and osteoarthritis [13.8%, (95% CI 11.7–15.9]. The figure for hypertension reached 51.1% (95% CI 48.9–53.4 when based on BP measurement. The prevalence of current smokers was 8.1% (95% CI 7.0–9.2, while 2.0 (95% CI 1.5–2.5 were infrequent/frequent heavy drinkers, 67.9% (95% CI 65.2–70.5 consume insufficient fruits and vegetables, and 25.7% (95% CI 23.1–28.3 had a low level of physical activity. Almost 10% (95% CI 8.3–11.1 of adults were obese and 77.6% (95% CI 76.0–79.2 had a high-risk waist-to-hip ratio (WHR. Risks from tobacco and alcohol consumption continued into older age, while insufficient fruit and vegetable intake, low physical activity and obesity increased with increasing age. The patterns of risk factors varied by income quintile, with higher prevalence of obesity and low physical activity in wealthier respondents, and higher prevalence of insufficient fruit and vegetable intake and smoking in lower-income respondents. The multivariate

  8. Engaging One Health for Non-Communicable Diseases in Africa: Perspective for Mycotoxins

    OpenAIRE

    Carina Ladeira; Carina Ladeira; Carina Ladeira; Chiara Frazzoli; Orish Ebere Orisakwe

    2017-01-01

    The role of mycotoxins—e.g., aflatoxins, ochratoxins, trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, tremorgenic toxins, and ergot alkaloids—has been recognized in the etiology of a number of diseases. In many African countries, the public health impact of chronic (indoor) and/or repeated (dietary) mycotoxin exposure is largely ignored hitherto, with impact on human health, food security, and export of African agricultural food products. Notwithstanding, African scientific research reached mileston...

  9. Prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases through evidence-based public health: implementing the NCD 2020 action plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diem, Günter; Brownson, Ross C; Grabauskas, Vilius; Shatchkute, Aushra; Stachenko, Sylvie

    2016-09-01

    The control of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) was addressed by the declaration of the 66th United Nations (UN) General Assembly followed by the World Health Organization's (WHO) NCD 2020 action plan. There is a clear need to better apply evidence in public health settings to tackle both behaviour-related factors and the underlying social and economic conditions. This article describes concepts of evidence-based public health (EBPH) and outlines a set of actions that are essential for successful global NCD prevention. The authors describe the importance of knowledge translation with the goal of increasing the effectiveness of public health services, relying on both quantitative and qualitative evidence. In particular, the role of capacity building is highlighted because it is fundamental to progress in controlling NCDs. Important challenges for capacity building include the need to bridge diverse disciplines, build the evidence base across countries and the lack of formal training in public health sciences. As brief case examples, several successful capacity-building efforts are highlighted to address challenges and further evidence-based decision making. The need for a more comprehensive public health approach, addressing social, environmental and cultural conditions, has led to government-wide and society-wide strategies that are now on the agenda due to efforts such as the WHO's NCD 2020 action plan and Health 2020: the European Policy for Health and Wellbeing. These efforts need research to generate evidence in new areas (e.g. equity and sustainability), training to build public health capacity and a continuous process of improvement and knowledge generation and translation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Pilot Testing and Implementation of a mHealth tool for Non-communicable Diseases in a Humanitarian Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doocy, Shannon; Paik, Kenneth; Lyles, Emily; Tam, Hok Hei; Fahed, Zeina; Winkler, Eric; Kontunen, Kaisa; Mkanna, Abdalla; Burnham, Gilbert

    2017-06-05

    Given the protracted nature of the crisis in Syria, national and international assistance agencies face immense challenges in providing for the needs of refugees and the host Lebanese due to the high burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) among both populations. These are complex conditions to manage, and the resources for refugee care limited, having dramatic implications for Lebanon's health system. A longitudinal cohort study was implemented from January 2015 through August 2016 to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment guidelines and an mHealth application on quality of care and health outcomes for patients in primary health care facilities in Lebanon serving Syrian refugees and host communities. Overall, reporting in clinic medical records remained low, however, during the mHealth phase recording of BMI and blood pressure were significantly greater in the mHealth application as compared to clinic medical records. Patient exit interviews reported a much more frequent measurement of weight, height, blood pressure, and blood glucose, suggesting these may be assessed more often than they are recorded. Satisfaction with the clinic visit improved significantly during implementation of the mHealth application as compared to both baseline and guidelines implementation in all measures. Despite positive changes, provider uptake of the application was low; patients indicated that the mHealth application was used in a minority (21.7%) of consultations. Provider perspectives on how the application changed patient interactions were mixed. Similar to previous evidence, this study further demonstrates the need to incorporate new interventions with existing practices and reporting requirements to minimize duplication of efforts and, consequently, strengthen provider usage. Additional research is needed to identify organizational and provider-side factors associated with uptake of similar applications, particularly in complex settings, to optimize the benefit of such tools.

  11. National survey of risk factors for non-communicable disease in Vietnam: prevalence estimates and an assessment of their validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Van Bui

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To estimate the prevalence of non-communicable disease (NCD risk factors at a provincial level in Vietnam, and to assess whether the summary estimates allow reliable inferences to be drawn regarding regional differences in risk factors and associations between them. Methods Participants (n = 14706, 53.5 % females aged 25–64 years were selected by multi-stage stratified cluster sampling from eight provinces each representing one of the eight geographical regions of Vietnam. Measurements were made using the World Health Organization STEPS protocols. Data were analysed using complex survey methods. Results Differences by sex in mean years of schooling (males 8.26 ± 0.20, females 7.00 ± 0.18, proportions of current smokers (males 57.70 %, females 1.73 %, and binge-drinkers (males 25.11 %, females 0.63 %, and regional differences in diet, reflected the geographical and socio-cultural characteristics of the country. Provinces with a higher proportion of urban population had greater mean levels of BMI (r = 0.82, and lesser proportions of active people (r = −0.89. The associations between the summary estimates were generally plausible (e.g. physical activity and BMI, r = −0.80 but overstated, and with some anomalous findings due to characterisation of smoking and hypertension by STEPS protocols. Conclusions This report provides an extensive description of the sex-specific and regional distribution of NCD risk factors in Vietnam and an account of some health-related consequences of industrialisation in its early stages. The STEPS protocols can be utilized to provide aggregate data for valid between-population comparisons, but with important caveats identified.

  12. The contribution of urbanization to non-communicable diseases: Evidence from 173 countries from 1980 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryakin, Yevgeniy; Rocco, Lorenzo; Suhrcke, Marc

    2017-08-01

    It is widely believed that the expanding burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is in no small part the result of major macro-level determinants. We use a large amount of new data, to explore in particular the role played by urbanization - the process of the population shifting from rural to urban areas within countries - in affecting four important drivers of NCDs world-wide: diabetes prevalence, as well as average body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol level and systolic blood pressure. Urbanization is seen by many as a double-edged sword: while its beneficial economic effects are widely acknowledged, it is commonly alleged to produce adverse side effects for NCD-related health outcomes. In this paper we submit this hypothesis to extensive empirical scrutiny, covering a global set of countries from 1980-2008, and applying a range of estimation procedures. Our results indicate that urbanization appears to have contributed to an increase in average BMI and cholesterol levels: the implied difference in average total cholesterol between the most and the least urbanized countries is 0.40mmol/L, while people living in the least urbanized countries are also expected to have an up to 2.3kg/m 2 lower BMI than in the most urbanized ones. Moreover, the least urbanized countries are expected to have an up to 3.2p.p. lower prevalence of diabetes among women. This association is also much stronger in the low and middle-income countries, and is likely to be mediated by energy intake-related variables, such as calorie and fat supply per capita. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Establishment of health clinics as mass screening and referral systems for chronic non-communicable diseases in primary health care

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    Kamal Heidari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to establish a comprehensive screening and referral system for chronic non-communicable diseases (CNCD in the routine primary health care, and to determine the prevalence of diabetes, pre-diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemia in adult population invited by public announcement to the Health clinics in Isfahan, Iran. Methods: This survey was conducted from March 2010, and the current paper presents data obtained until November 2011. To provide health services for prevention and control of CNCDs, with priority of type2 diabetes mellitus, Health clinics were established in different parts of Isfahan city with a population of approximately 2,100,000 in Iran. The general populations aged 30 years and above were invited to the Health clinics by public announcement. Results: A total of 198972 participants were screened. The mean age of participants was 47.8 years (48.5 men, 47.3 women, with a range of 1 to 95 years old and standard deviation of 12.3 years (12.7 men, 12.1 women. Overall, 22% of participants had impaired fasting glucose, 25% had hypercholesterolemia, 31% had hypertriglyceridemia, and 20% had metabolic syndrome. Conclusion: The high prevalence of dysglycemia and diabetes in our survey may serve as confirmatory evidence about the importance of mass screening and early diagnosis of CNCDs′ risk factors. Our model of establishing Health clinics, as a comprehensive referral system in the routine primary health care can be adopted by Middle Eastern countries, where CNCDs notably diabetes are an emerging health problem.

  14. National survey of risk factors for non-communicable disease in Vietnam: prevalence estimates and an assessment of their validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Tan Van; Blizzard, Christopher Leigh; Luong, Khue Ngoc; Truong, Ngoc Le Van; Tran, Bao Quoc; Otahal, Petr; Gall, Seana; Nelson, Mark R; Au, Thuy Bich; Ha, Son Thai; Phung, Hai Ngoc; Tran, Mai Hoang; Callisaya, Michele; Srikanth, Velandai

    2016-06-10

    To estimate the prevalence of non-communicable disease (NCD) risk factors at a provincial level in Vietnam, and to assess whether the summary estimates allow reliable inferences to be drawn regarding regional differences in risk factors and associations between them. Participants (n = 14706, 53.5 % females) aged 25-64 years were selected by multi-stage stratified cluster sampling from eight provinces each representing one of the eight geographical regions of Vietnam. Measurements were made using the World Health Organization STEPS protocols. Data were analysed using complex survey methods. Differences by sex in mean years of schooling (males 8.26 ± 0.20, females 7.00 ± 0.18), proportions of current smokers (males 57.70 %, females 1.73 %), and binge-drinkers (males 25.11 %, females 0.63 %), and regional differences in diet, reflected the geographical and socio-cultural characteristics of the country. Provinces with a higher proportion of urban population had greater mean levels of BMI (r = 0.82), and lesser proportions of active people (r = -0.89). The associations between the summary estimates were generally plausible (e.g. physical activity and BMI, r = -0.80) but overstated, and with some anomalous findings due to characterisation of smoking and hypertension by STEPS protocols. This report provides an extensive description of the sex-specific and regional distribution of NCD risk factors in Vietnam and an account of some health-related consequences of industrialisation in its early stages. The STEPS protocols can be utilized to provide aggregate data for valid between-population comparisons, but with important caveats identified.

  15. Linkage to HIV, TB and non-communicable disease care from a mobile testing unit in Cape Town, South Africa.

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    Darshini Govindasamy

    Full Text Available HIV counseling and testing may serve as an entry point for non-communicable disease screening.To determine the yield of newly-diagnosed HIV, tuberculosis (TB symptoms, diabetes and hypertension, and to assess CD4 count testing, linkage to care as well as correlates of linkage and barriers to care from a mobile testing unit.A mobile unit provided screening for HIV, TB symptoms, diabetes and hypertension in Cape Town, South Africa between March 2010 and September 2011. The yield of newly-diagnosed cases of these conditions was measured and clients were followed-up between January and November 2011 to assess linkage. Linkage to care was defined as accessing care within one, three or six months post-HIV diagnosis (dependent on CD4 count and one month post-diagnosis for other conditions. Clinical and socio-demographic correlates of linkage to care were evaluated using Poisson regression and barriers to care were determined.Of 9,806 clients screened, the yield of new diagnoses was: HIV (5.5%, TB suspects (10.1%, diabetes (0.8% and hypertension (58.1%. Linkage to care for HIV-infected clients, TB suspects, diabetics and hypertensives was: 51.3%, 56.7%, 74.1% and 50.0%. Only disclosure of HIV-positive status to family members or partners (RR=2.6, 95% CI: 1.04-6.3, p=0.04 was independently associated with linkage to HIV care. The main barrier to care reported by all groups was lack of time to access a clinic.Screening for HIV, TB symptoms and hypertension at mobile units in South Africa has a high yield but inadequate linkage. After-hours and weekend clinics may overcome a major barrier to accessing care.

  16. Socioeconomic inequalities in catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment associated with non-communicable diseases in urban Hanoi, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kien, Vu Duy; Van Minh, Hoang; Giang, Kim Bao; Dao, Amy; Tuan, Le Thanh; Ng, Nawi

    2016-10-13

    The catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment indices offer guidance for developing appropriate health policies and intervention programs to decrease financial inequity. This study assesses socioeconomic inequalities in catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment in relation to self-reported non-communicable diseases (NCD) in urban Hanoi, Vietnam. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from February to March 2013 in Hanoi, the capital city of Vietnam. We estimated catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment using information from 492 slum household and 528 non-slum households. We calculated concentration indexes to assess socioeconomic inequalities in catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment. Factors associated with catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment were modelled using logistic regression analysis. The poor households in both slum and non-slum areas were at higher risk of experiencing catastrophic health expenditure, while only the poor households in slum areas were at higher risk of impoverishment because of healthcare spending. Households with at least one member reporting an NCD were significantly more likely to face catastrophic health expenditure (odds ratio [OR] = 2.4; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.8-4.0) and impoverishment (OR = 2.3; 95 % CI, 1.1-6.3) compared to households without NCDs. In addition, households in slum areas, with people age 60 years and above, and belonging to the poorest socioeconomic group were significantly associated with increased catastrophic health expenditure, while only households that lived in slum areas, and belonging to the poor or poorest socioeconomic groups were significantly associated with increased impoverishment because of healthcare spending. Financial interventions to prevent catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment should target poor households, especially those with family members suffering from NCDs, with older members and those located in slum

  17. Analyzing the impact of severe tropical cyclone Yasi on public health infrastructure and the management of noncommunicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Benjamin J; Franklin, Richard C; Burkle, Frederick M; Watt, Kerrianne; Aitken, Peter; Smith, Erin C; Leggat, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Traditionally, post disaster response activities have focused on immediate trauma and communicable diseases. In developed countries such as Australia, the post disaster risk for communicable disease is low. However, a "disease transition" is now recognized at the population level where noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are increasingly documented as a post disaster issue. This potentially places an extra burden on health care resources and may have implications for disaster-management systems. With increasing likelihood of major disasters for all sectors of global society, there is a need to ensure that health systems, including public health infrastructure (PHI), can respond properly. Problem There is limited peer-reviewed literature on the impact of disasters on NCDs. Research is required to better determine both the impact of NCDs post disaster and their impact on PHI and disaster-management systems. A literature review was used to collect and analyze data on the impact of the index case event, Australia's Severe Tropical Cyclone Yasi (STC Yasi), on PHI and the management of NCDs. The findings were compared with data from other world cyclone events. The databases searched were MEDLINE, CINAHL, Google Scholar, and Google. The date range for the STC Yasi search was January 26, 2011 through May 2, 2013. No time limits were applied to the search from other cyclone events. The variables compared were tropical cyclones and their impacts on PHI and NCDs. The outcome of interest was to identify if there were trends across similar world events and to determine if this could be extrapolated for future crises. This research showed a tropical cyclone (including a hurricane and typhoon) can impact PHI, for instance, equipment (oxygen, syringes, and medications), services (treatment and care), and clean water availability/access that would impact both the treatment and management of NCDs. The comparison between STC Yasi and worldwide tropical cyclones found the challenges faced

  18. Lacunae in noncommunicable disease control program: Need to focus on adherence issues!

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    Tarundeep Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic non communicable diseases in India have increased in magnitude with earlier onset and more likelihood of complications. Much emphasis is given to early diagnosis and timely treatment. Additionally, tertiary prevention through medication adherence is needed to limit disability and prevent early onset of complications. This study was aimed to assess the magnitude of medication and lifestyle adherence among elderly patients suffering from diabetes and hypertension in rural areas of Punjab. Methodology: This was a clinic based study in district Fatehgarh Sahib, Punjab. Patients were subjected to regular blood pressure and blood glucose monitoring. Thereafter they were offered free medications through weekly clinic held at Community Health Center, Bassi Pathana. Along with treatment, Public Health Nurse conducted counselling on diet and lifestyle. Frequency and process of taking medications was explained in local language and records duly maintained during visits. Results: Nearly 70% of study subjects were more than 50 years old. Males constituted 26% of the sample and 60% of subjects were illiterate. Large majority of study subjects did not consumed tobacco (98.08% or alcohol (89.42% in past thirty days. In-sufficient physical activity and poor compliance to diet was reported by 10.5% (Males: 7.4%, Females: 11.7% and 23.5% (Males: 31.5%, Females: 20.8% subjects. Nearly 46.15% of study subjects reported missing prescribed medications. Nearly 61.54% of study subjects were very sure that they will be able to take medicines as directed by physician. Conclusion: National Program for Control of Diabetes, Cardio-vascular Disease and Stroke relies on early diagnosis and treatment non- communicable diseases. However, with reported levels of adherence to medication and lifestyle interventions, there is an urgent need of exploring innovative ways to ensure compliance and improve treatment outcomes.

  19. Women Health in Saudi Arabia: A review of non-communicable diseases and their risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Alquaiz, Aljoharah; R Siddiqui, Amna; H Qureshi, Riaz; A Fouda, Mona; A Almuneef, Maha; A Habib, Fawzia; M Turkistani, Iqbal

    2014-03-01

    This is a review of the changing pattern of chronic diseases among women in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Data from national surveys conducted in KSA, whose results were published between 1996 and 2011 were used. The results showed that over a period of ten years the prevalence of obesity increased in Saudi women from 23.6% to 44.0% and in men from 14.2% to 26.2%; self-reported physical inactivity worsened in both women (from 84.7% to 98.1%) and men (from 43.3% to 93.9%); prevalence of smoking in women increased (from 0.9% to 7.6%), while it declined in men (from 21.0% to 18.7%). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was significantly greater in women than men (42.0% versus 37.2%; p Saudi women are potentially at a greater risk than a decade ago to develop cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus, with a notable increase in obesity compared to men.

  20. Chronic non-communicable diseases, risk and health promotion: social construction of Vigitel participants

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    Erika de Azevedo Leitão Mássimo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The dimension of choice and adherence to healthy lifestyles is in the area of social constructions made in representations of individuals and had not yet been included in the Surveillance of Risk and Protective Factors for Chronic Diseases by Telephone Survey (VIGITEL analysis systems. This article aims to understand, in individual narratives, representations contained in the trajectories of people's lives selected from the 2010 VIGITEL sample, in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. It is a qualitative study based on Social Representation Theory. Thirty in-depth and open interviews with subjects selected from the 2010 VIGITEL sample were conducted in Belo Horizonte in the State of Minas Gerais. The Structural Analysis of Narrative technique was used to reveal the content of speeches. Age and heredity representations related to NCDs are part of the spectrum of current scientific information. Learning from childhood onwards is the basis of care. The lack of comprehension of the pathophysiology of NCDs, and the depth of representations of illness and death related to communicable diseases, is partly responsible for the difficulty of preventing NCDs.

  1. Global nutrition dynamics: the world is shifting rapidly toward a diet linked with noncommunicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkin, Barry M

    2006-08-01

    Global energy imbalances and related obesity levels are rapidly increasing. The world is rapidly shifting from a dietary period in which the higher-income countries are dominated by patterns of degenerative diseases (whereas the lower- and middle-income countries are dominated by receding famine) to one in which the world is increasingly being dominated by degenerative diseases. This article documents the high levels of overweight and obesity found across higher- and lower-income countries and the global shift of this burden toward the poor and toward urban and rural populations. Dietary changes appear to be shifting universally toward a diet dominated by higher intakes of animal and partially hydrogenated fats and lower intakes of fiber. Activity patterns at work, at leisure, during travel, and in the home are equally shifting rapidly toward reduced energy expenditure. Large-scale decreases in food prices (eg, beef prices) have increased access to supermarkets, and the urbanization of both urban and rural areas is a key underlying factor. Limited documentation of the extent of the increased effects of the fast food and bottled soft drink industries on this nutrition shift is available, but some examples of the heterogeneity of the underlying changes are presented. The challenge to global health is clear.

  2. Non-communicable diseases, mental ill-health: Is it a failure of the food system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Michel A

    2013-01-01

    The rise in brain disorders and mental ill-health is the most serious crisis facing the survival of humanity. Starting from an understanding of the origins of the nervous system and the brain, together with its nutritional requirements, the present direction of the food system since World War II (WWII) can be seen as departing from the biological essence of brain chemistry and its nutritional needs. Such advances in the food system would lead to epigenetic changes. Improper maternal/foetal nutrition is considered in this manner to lead to heart disease, stroke and diabetes in later life. Is there any reason why the brain would not be similarly susceptible to a nutritional background departing from its specific needs? The changing food system likely bears responsibility for the rise in mental ill health that has now overtaken all other burdens of ill health. Its globalisation is threatening civil society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Public health concern and initiatives on the priority action towards non-communicable diseases in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mfinangai, Sayoki G M; Kivuyo, Sokoine L; Ezekiel, Linda; Ngadaya, Esther; Mghamba, Janneth; Ramaiya, Kaushik

    2011-12-01

    Tanzania is already facing challenges caused by existing burden of communicable diseases, and the growing trend of nonconununicable diseases (NCDs), which raises a lot of concerns and challenges. The objective of this review is to provide broad insight of the "silent epidemic" of NCDs, existing policies, strategies and interventions, and recommendations on prioritized actions. A review of existing literature including published articles, technical reports, and proceedings from national and international NCDs meetings was carried out. The burden, existing interventions, socio-economic impact, lessons learnt, and potential for expanding cost effective interventions in Tanzania were explored. Challenges to catch up with global momentum on NCD agenda were identified and discussed. The review has indicated that the burden of NCDs and its underlying risk factors in Tanzania is alarming, and affects people of all socio-economic status. The costs of health care for managing NCDs are high, and thus impoverishing the already poor people. The country leadership has a high political commitment; there are policies and strategies, which need to be implemented to address the growing NCD burden. In conclusion, NCDs in Tanzania are a silent rising health burden and has enormous impact on an individual and country's social-economical status. From the experience of other countries, interventions for NCDs are affordable, feasible and some are income generating. Multisectoral approach, involving national and international partners has a unique role in intensifying action on NCDs. Tanzania should strategize on implementation research on how to adapt the interventions and apply multi-sectoral approach to control and prevent NCDs in the country.

  4. Construction of the Chinese Veteran Clinical Research (CVCR) platform for the assessment of non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiping; Li, Nan; Gao, Jing; Guo, Yuhe; Hu, Wei; Yang, Jinsheng; Yu, Baocheng; Yu, Jianmin; Du, Wei; Zhang, Wenjun; Cui, Lianqi; Wang, Qingsong; Xia, Xiangnan; Li, Jianjun; Zhou, Peiyi; Zhang, Baohe; Liu, Zhiying; Zhang, Shaogang; Sun, Lanying; Liu, Nan; Deng, Ruixiang; Dai, Wenguang; Yi, Fang; Chen, Wenjun; Zhang, Yongqing; Xue, Shenwu; Cui, Bo; Zhao, Yiming; Wang, Luning

    2014-01-01

    Based on the excellent medical care and management system for Chinese veterans, as well as the detailed medical documentation available, we aim to construct a Chinese Veteran Clinical Research (CVCR) platform on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and carry out studies of the primary disabling NCDs. The Geriatric Neurology Department of Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital and veterans' hospitals serve as the leading and participating units in the platform construction. The fundamental constituents of the platform are veteran communities. Stratified typical cluster sampling is adopted to recruit veteran communities. A cross-sectional study of mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders are performed in two stages using screening scale such as the Mini-Mental State Examination and Montreal cognitive assessment, followed by systematic neuropsychological assessments to make clinical diagnoses, evaluated disease awareness and care situation. A total of 9 676 among 277 veteran communities from 18 cities are recruited into this platform, yielding a response rate of 83.86%. 8 812 subjects complete the MNS subproject screening and total response rate is 91.70%. The average participant age is (82.01±4.61) years, 69.47% of veterans are 80 years or older. Most participants are male (94.01%), 83.36% of subjects have at least a junior high school degree. The overall health status of veterans is good and stable. The most common NCD are cardiovascular disorders (86.44%), urinary and genital diseases (73.14%), eye and ear problems (66.25%), endocrine (56.56%) and neuro-psychiatric disturbances (50.78%). We first construct a veterans' comprehensive clinical research platform for the study of NCDs that is primarily composed of highly educated Chinese males of advanced age and utilize this platform to complete a cross-sectional national investigation of MNS disorders among veterans. The good and stable health condition of the veterans could facilitate the long

  5. Describing the primary care system capacity for the prevention and management of non-communicable diseases in rural Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Minh, Hoang; Do, Young Kyung; Bautista, Mary Ann Cruz; Tuan Anh, Tran

    2014-01-01

    The primary care system in Vietnam has been shown to play a crucial role in disease prevention and health promotion. This study described the primary care system in a selected rural area in Vietnam in terms of its capacity for prevention and control of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). The study was conducted in 2011 in Dong Hy district, Thai Nguyen province-a rural community located in northern Vietnam. Mixed methods were used, including quantitative and qualitative and literature review approaches, to collect data on the current status of the six building blocks of the primary care system in Dong Hy district. Selected health workers and stakeholders in the selected healthcare facilities were surveyed. A description of Dong Hy district's primary care capacity for NCD prevention and control is reported. (i) Service delivery: The current practice in NCD prevention and treatment is mainly based on a single risk factor rather than a combination of cardiovascular disease risks. (ii) Governance: At the primary care level, multi-sectoral collaborations are limited, and there is insufficient integration of NCD preventive activities. (iii) Financing: A national budget for NCD prevention and control is lacking. The cost of treatment and medicines is high, whereas the health insurance scheme limits the list of available medicines and the reimbursement ceiling level. Health workers have low remuneration despite their important roles in NCD prevention. (iv) Human resources: The quantity and quality of health staff working at the primary care level, especially those in preventive medicine, are insufficient. (v) Information and research: The health information system in the district is weak, and there is no specific information system for collecting population-based NCD data. (vi) Medical products and technology: Not all essential equipment and medicines recommended by the WHO are always available at the commune health centre. The capacity of the primary care system in Vietnam

  6. Online continuing medical education as a key link for successful noncommunicable disease self-management: the CASALUD™ Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallardo-Rincón H

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Héctor Gallardo-Rincón,1 Rodrigo Saucedo-Martínez,1 Ricardo Mujica-Rosales,1 Evan M Lee,2 Amy Israel,2 Braulio Torres-Beltran,3 Úrsula Quijano-González,3 Elena Rose Atkinson,3 Pablo Kuri-Morales,4 Roberto Tapia-Conyer1 1Fundación Carlos Slim, Mexico City, Mexico; 2Lilly Global Health, Eli Lilly and Company, Vernier, Switzerland; 3C230 Consultores, Mexico City, Mexico; 4Mexican Ministry of Health, Mexico City, Mexico Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate how the benefits of online continuing medical education (CME provided to health care professionals traveled along a patient “educational chain”. In this study, the educational chain begins with the influence that CME can have on the quality of health care, with subsequent influence on patient knowledge, disease self-management, and disease biomarkers. Methods: A total of 422 patients with at least one noncommunicable disease (NCD treated in eight different Mexican public health clinics were followed over 3 years. All clinics were participants in the CASALUD Model, an NCD care model for primary care, where all clinic staff were offered CME. Data were collected through a questionnaire on health care, patient disease knowledge, and self-management behaviors; blood samples and anthropometric measurements were collected to measure patient disease biomarkers. Results: Between 2013 and 2015, the indexes measuring quality of health care, patient health knowledge, and diabetes self-management activities rose moderately but significantly (from 0.54 to 0.64, 0.80 to 0.84, and 0.62 to 0.67, respectively. Performing self-care activities – including owning and using a glucometer and belonging to a disease support group – saw the highest increase (from 0.65 to 0.75. A1C levels increased between 2013 and 2015 from 7.95 to 8.41% (63–68 mmol/mol (P<0.001, and blood pressure decreased between 2014 and 2015 from 143.7/76.8 to 137.5/74.4 (systolic/diastolic reported in mmHg (P<0

  7. Engaging One Health for Non-Communicable Diseases in Africa: Perspective for Mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeira, Carina; Frazzoli, Chiara; Orisakwe, Orish Ebere

    2017-01-01

    The role of mycotoxins-e.g., aflatoxins, ochratoxins, trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, tremorgenic toxins, and ergot alkaloids-has been recognized in the etiology of a number of diseases. In many African countries, the public health impact of chronic (indoor) and/or repeated (dietary) mycotoxin exposure is largely ignored hitherto, with impact on human health, food security, and export of African agricultural food products. Notwithstanding, African scientific research reached milestones that, when linked to findings gained by the international scientific community, make the design and implementation of science-driven governance schemes feasible. Starting from Nigeria as leading African Country, this article (i) overviews available data on mycotoxins exposure in Africa; (ii) discusses new food safety issues, such as the environment-feed-food chain and toxic exposures of food producing animals in risk assessment and management; (iii) identifies milestones for mycotoxins risk management already reached in West Africa; and (iv) points out preliminary operationalization aspects for shielding communities from direct (on health) and indirect (on trade, economies, and livelihoods) effects of mycotoxins. An African science-driven engaging of scientific knowledge by development actors is expected therefore. In particular, One health/One prevention is suggested, as it proved to be a strategic and sustainable development framework.

  8. Engaging One Health for Non-Communicable Diseases in Africa: Perspective for Mycotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of mycotoxins—e.g., aflatoxins, ochratoxins, trichothecenes, zearalenone, fumonisins, tremorgenic toxins, and ergot alkaloids—has been recognized in the etiology of a number of diseases. In many African countries, the public health impact of chronic (indoor and/or repeated (dietary mycotoxin exposure is largely ignored hitherto, with impact on human health, food security, and export of African agricultural food products. Notwithstanding, African scientific research reached milestones that, when linked to findings gained by the international scientific community, make the design and implementation of science-driven governance schemes feasible. Starting from Nigeria as leading African Country, this article (i overviews available data on mycotoxins exposure in Africa; (ii discusses new food safety issues, such as the environment–feed–food chain and toxic exposures of food producing animals in risk assessment and management; (iii identifies milestones for mycotoxins risk management already reached in West Africa; and (iv points out preliminary operationalization aspects for shielding communities from direct (on health and indirect (on trade, economies, and livelihoods effects of mycotoxins. An African science-driven engaging of scientific knowledge by development actors is expected therefore. In particular, One health/One prevention is suggested, as it proved to be a strategic and sustainable development framework.

  9. PREVALENT DISEASES AND OVERALL MORTALITY IN BROILERS

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    M. Farooq, Zahir-ud-Din, F .R. Durrani, M.A. Mian, N. Chand and J. Ahmed1

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Records from 62-broiler farms located in Swat, North West Frontier Province (NWFP, Pakistan were, collected during the year 1998 to investigate prevalent diseases and overall mortality in broilers. Losses due Hydro-pericardium syndrome (HPS were the highest (17.05 ± 2.08% and the lowest due to coccidiosis 9.39 ± 3.82%. Non-significant differences existed in mortality caused by Newcastle, IBD and yolk sac infection. Differences in losses caused by infectious coryza, enteritis and coccidiosis were also non- significant. Average overall mortality was 13.05 ± 1.16%, representing 7.59 ± 0.46% losses from day-1 to day 14 and 18.52 ± 0.95% from day-15 till marketing of broilers (42-50 days. Lower (p<0.05 overall mortality was observed in broilers reared on well-finished concrete floors (12.43 ± 1.45 % than in those on brick+mud made floors (14.36 ± 1.55. Higher (p<0.05 overall mortality was found in overcrowded houses 5.60 ± 5.62% than in optimally utilized houses (10.69 ± 1.51%. Overall mortality was higher (p<0.05 in flocks under substandard vaccination schedule (15.92 ± 1.55% than in those maintained under standard lancination schedule (10.20 ± 1.21%. Overall mortality was higher (21.11 ± 3.39% when the interval between two batches was ≤ 7 days than 16-20 days (5.72 ± 3.01%. Lower (p<0.05 overall mortality was und in broilers maintained under good hygienic ( 11.59 ±1.93% and sanitary conditions ( 10.82 ± 1.16% compared to those under poor hygienic and sanitary conditions (14.12 ± 2.81% and 15.15 ± 1.68 %respectively. Maintenance of broilers under good hygienic conditions on well finished concrete floor, providing the required space/broiler, following recommended vaccination schedule without HPS vaccine and keeping 8.20 days interval between two batches were suggested as key factors in reducing mortality among broilers in Swat

  10. Influence of distance between residence and health facilities on non-communicable diseases: An assessment over hypertension and diabetes in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Raaj Kishore; Kabir, Enamul

    2017-01-01

    This paper reflected on the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes in Bangladesh, which is spreading rapidly in low-income countries. The rationale of constructing more health centers for addressing NCDs was assessed in this paper by determining the relationship between prevalence of NCDs, particularly hypertension and diabetes, and distance to health facilities. From BDHS (Bangladesh Health and Demographic Survey) 2011 data set, 7544 samples were analyzed to demonstrate association between Non-communicable diseases (NCD) and distance from respondents' home to health facilities like hospitals, community clinics, pharmacies or doctors' chambers, and community facilities like market, post office or cinema hall. Bivariate analysis was conducted between accessibility to health facilities and prevalence of the diseases. The causal relationship between the spatial effects and the prevalence of the diseases were analyzed by applying Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM) was fitted. Fitting linear mixed effect models, we found that hypertension and diabetes react differently with various spatial effects. Distance from home to hospital had significant effect (P non-communicable disease should be dealt to its own merit for policy making instead considering as a group of diseases.

  11. A Survey of Earthquake-Affected Region and Controlling Actions to Communicable and Non-Communicable Diseases in Azerbaijan Earthquake, 2012

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    Ahmad koosha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and Objectives : There are always changes in our planet that can threat human life and earthquake is one of them and has an increasing importance. This study aims to survey earthquake-affected region and controlling actions to communicable and non-communicable diseases in Azerbaijan Earthquake, 2012. Material and Methods : This is a cross-sectional study that its data were collected by East Azerbaijan province health center personnel and were analyzed and reported by current research team on the disease categories and relevant, controlling activities. In addition, the researchers assessed strengths and weaknesses of the teams’ performance from their members’ perspectives by interview. Results : The findings indicate that status of environmental health and psychological disorders is suitable and status of communicable and non-communicable diseases is acceptable. The strengths points of health teams included rapid assessment and on-time response to earthquake and constant monitoring of diseases and weaknesses were lack of coordination and organizing in disaster management Conclusion : This study showed that implemented activities for disease control and preventing epidemics had enough effectiveness and this experience can be used as a suitable model for disaster management in similar situations.

  12. Neighborhood clustering of non-communicable diseases: results from a community-based study in Northern Tanzania

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    John W. Stanifer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to begin to address the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs in sub-Saharan Africa, high quality community-based epidemiological studies from the region are urgently needed. Cluster-designed sampling methods may be most efficient, but designing such studies requires assumptions about the clustering of the outcomes of interest. Currently, few studies from Sub-Saharan Africa have been published that describe the clustering of NCDs. Therefore, we report the neighborhood clustering of several NCDs from a community-based study in Northern Tanzania. Methods We conducted a cluster-designed cross-sectional household survey between January and June 2014. We used a three-stage cluster probability sampling method to select thirty-seven sampling areas from twenty-nine neighborhood clusters, stratified by urban and rural. Households were then randomly selected from each of the sampling areas, and eligible participants were tested for chronic kidney disease (CKD, glucose impairment including diabetes, hypertension, and obesity as part of the CKD-AFRiKA study. We used linear mixed models to explore clustering across each of the samplings units, and we estimated absolute-agreement intra-cluster correlation (ICC coefficients (ρ for the neighborhood clusters. Results We enrolled 481 participants from 346 urban and rural households. Neighborhood cluster sizes ranged from 6 to 49 participants (median: 13.0; 25th–75th percentiles: 9–21. Clustering varied across neighborhoods and differed by urban or rural setting. Among NCDs, hypertension (ρ = 0.075 exhibited the strongest clustering within neighborhoods followed by CKD (ρ = 0.440, obesity (ρ = 0.040, and glucose impairment (ρ = 0.039. Conclusion The neighborhood clustering was substantial enough to contribute to a design effect for NCD outcomes including hypertension, CKD, obesity, and glucose impairment, and it may also highlight NCD risk factors that vary

  13. Prevalence and Knowledge Assessment of HIV and Non-Communicable Disease Risk Factors among Formal Sector Employees in Namibia.

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    Leonor Guariguata

    Full Text Available The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs is growing in sub-Saharan Africa combined with an already high prevalence of infectious disease, like HIV. Engaging the formal employment sector may present a viable strategy for addressing both HIV and NCDs in people of working age. This study assesses the presence of three of the most significant threats to health in Namibia among employees in the formal sector: elevated blood pressure, elevated blood glucose, and HIV and assesses the knowledge and self-perceived risk of employees for these conditions.A health and wellness screening survey of employees working in 13 industries in the formal sector of Namibia was conducted including 11,192 participants in the Bophelo! Project in Namibia, from January 2009 to October 2010. The survey combined a medical screening for HIV, blood glucose and blood pressure with an employee-completed survey on knowledge and risk behaviors for those conditions. We estimated the prevalence of the three conditions and compared to self-reported employee knowledge and risk behaviors and possible determinants.25.8% of participants had elevated blood pressure, 8.3% of participants had an elevated random blood glucose measurement, and 8.9% of participants tested positive for HIV. Most participants were not smokers (80%, reported not drinking alcohol regularly (81.2%, and had regular condom use (66%. Most participants could not correctly identify risk factors for hypertension (57.2%, diabetes (57.3%, or high-risk behaviors for HIV infection (59.5%. In multivariate analysis, having insurance (OR:1.15, 95%CI: 1.03 - 1.28 and a managerial position (OR: 1.29, 95%CI: 1.13 - 1.47 were associated with better odds of knowledge of diabetes.The prevalence of elevated blood pressure, elevated blood glucose, and HIV among employees of the Namibian formal sector is high, while risk awareness is low. Attention must be paid to improving the knowledge of health-related risk factors as well as

  14. Family aggregation of cardiovascular disease mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Möller, Sören

    2017-01-01

    Background: Familial factors play an important role in the variation of risk factors of cardiovascular diseases (CVD), but less is known about how they affect the risk of death from CVD. We estimated familial aggregation of CVD mortality for twins offering the maximum level of risk due to genetic...... and other familial factors. Methods: Altogether, 132 771 twin individuals, including 65 196 complete pairs from Denmark, Finland and Sweden born in 1958 or earlier, participated in this study. During the register-based follow-up, 11 641 deaths occurred from coronary heart disease (CHD), including 6280...

  15. Respiratory disease mortality among uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, V.E.; Gillam, J.D.; Wagoner, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    A mortality analysis of a group of white and Indian uranium miners was done by a life-table method. A significant excess of respiratory cancer among both whites and Indians was found. Nonmalignant respiratory disease deaths among the whites are approaching cancer in importance as a cause of death, probably as a result of diffuse parenchymal radiation damage. Exposure-response curves for nonsmokers are linear for both respiratory cancer and ''other respiratory disease''. Cigaret smoking elevates and distorts that curve. Light cigaret smokers appear to be most vulnerable to lung parenchymal damage. The predominant histologic cancer among nonsmokers is small-cell undifferentiated, just as it is among cigaret smokers

  16. Predictors of health related quality of life in older people with non-communicable diseases attending three primary care clinics in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazlina, S G; Zaiton, A; Nor Afiah, M Z; Hayati, K S

    2012-05-01

    To determine the health related quality of life and its predictive factors among older people with non-communicable diseases attending primary care clinics. Cross-sectional study. Three public primary care clinics in a district in Selangor, Malaysia. Registered patients aged 55 years and above. A face-to-face interview was conducted using a validated questionnaire of Medical Outcome Study 36-item short form health survey (SF-36). The outcome measure was the health related quality of life (HRQoL) and other factors measured were socio demography, physical activity, social support (Duke-UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire), and presence of non-communicable diseases. A total of 347 participants had non-communicable diseases which included hypertension (41.8%), type 2 diabetes (33.7%), asthma (4.8%), hyperlipidaemia (1.7%), coronary heart disease (1.2%), and osteoarthritis (0.2%). Age ≥ 65 years old (OR =2.23; 95%CI=1.42, 3.50), single (OR=1.75; 95%CI=1.06,2.90), presence of co-morbid condition (OR=1.66; 95%CI=1.06, 2.61), and poorer social support (OR=2.11; 95%CI=1.27, 3.51; p=0.002) were significant predictors of poorer physical component of HRQoL . In predicting lower mental health component of HRQoL, the significant predictors were women (OR=2.28; 95%CI=1.44, 3.62), Indian ethnicity (OR=1.86; 95%CI=1.08, 3.21) and poorer social support (OR=2.71; 95%CI=1.63, 4.51). No interactions existed between these predictors. Older people with non-communicable diseases were susceptible to lower health related quality of life. Increasing age, single, presence of co-morbid conditions, and poorer social support were predictors of lower physical health component of HRQoL. While the older women, Indian ethnicity and poorer social support reported lower mental health component of HRQoL.

  17. Physical inactivity associated with the risk of non-communicable diseases in Japanese working mothers with young children: A cross-sectional study in Nagano city, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Shinjo, Tokiko; Maruyama-Nagao, Asako; Nakaniida, Atsuko; Kadoya, Haruka; Shibata, Marika; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Itoh, Hiroaki; Yokoyama, Kazuhito

    2017-06-01

    Physical activity helps to prevent the development of chronic non-communicable diseases. However, childbearing generally reduces parents' level of physical activity, particularly in mothers. Therefore, mothers with young children generally have lower levels of physical activity and have a higher risk of developing non-communicable diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine this risk in Japanese working mothers with young children. A cross-sectional study was conducted in four nursery schools in Nagano city, Japan. All mothers were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding abnormal findings at their proximate annual medical examination, and were asked to record their normal physical activity. A total of 182 mothers completed the questionnaires, and 36 reported having abnormal findings (ABN group). Mothers in the ABN group were significantly older than those without abnormal findings (NOR; P=0.043). No significant differences in physical activity were observed between the two groups; however, mothers in the ABN group spent a significantly longer time sitting than those in the NOR group (P=0.028). Regarding socioeconomic characteristics, mothers in the ABN group had a significantly higher educational background (P=0.040) and a higher annual family income (Pmothers held full-time jobs (55.9 vs. 36.0%; P=0.005). Full-time working mothers typically had a significantly higher family income (Pmothers in part-time and other work. Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that sedentary lifestyles, namely the amount of time spent sitting, may increase the risk of Japanese working mothers with young children developing non-communicable diseases.

  18. Effectiveness of social media in reducing risk factors for noncommunicable diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, George; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Jull, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to synthesize evidence of the effect of social media use compared with no social media use as part of interventions to reduce risk factors for noncommunicable diseases. Databases were searched up to June 10, 2014, using medical subject headings. A secondary aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of social media use compared with no social media use in reducing the risk factors for noncommunicable diseases, stratifying the results by the extent of bias on outcomes, by social media use alone, and by the levels of social presence and media richness. Sixteen trials (n=10,711 participants) met the inclusion criteria, but interventions mostly used social media with low levels of media richness and presence (e.g., discussion boards, bulletin boards). Meta-analysis of all trials showed no significant differences (standardized mean difference [SMD] -0.14; 95%CI -0.28 to 0.01), with similar findings for physical activity (SMD 0.07; 95%CI -0.25 to 0.38), body weight (SMD 0.07; 95%CI -0.17 to 0.20), and fruit and vegetable intake (SMD 0.39; 95%CI -0.11 to 0.89). Trials assessing social media interventions aimed at modifying risk factors for noncommunicable diseases showed that social media use improved the primary outcomes, but the overall quality of the included studies limits the generalizability of these findings. Further trials are warranted, especially to isolate the effect of social media use and to fully evaluate the effect of the social presence and media richness of social media platforms. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Mediterranean diet and Alzheimer disease mortality

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    Scarmeas, Nikolaos; Luchsinger, Jose A.; Mayeux, Richard; Stern, Yaakov

    2009-01-01

    Background We previously reported that the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) is related to lower risk for Alzheimer disease (AD). Whether MeDi is associated with subsequent AD course and outcomes has not been investigated. Objectives To examine the association between MeDi and mortality in patients with AD. Methods A total of 192 community-based individuals in New York who were diagnosed with AD were prospectively followed every 1.5 years. Adherence to the MeDi (0- to 9-point scale with higher scores indicating higher adherence) was the main predictor of mortality in Cox models that were adjusted for period of recruitment, age, gender, ethnicity, education, APOE genotype, caloric intake, smoking, and body mass index. Results Eighty-five patients with AD (44%) died during the course of 4.4 (±3.6, 0.2 to 13.6) years of follow-up. In unadjusted models, higher adherence to MeDi was associated with lower mortality risk (for each additional MeDi point hazard ratio 0.79; 95% CI 0.69 to 0.91; p = 0.001). This result remained significant after controlling for all covariates (0.76; 0.65 to 0.89; p = 0.001). In adjusted models, as compared with AD patients at the lowest MeDi adherence fertile, those at the middle fertile had lower mortality risk (0.65; 0.38 to 1.09; 1.33 years’ longer survival), whereas subjects at the highest fertile had an even lower risk (0.27; 0.10 to 0.69; 3.91 years’ longer survival; p for trend = 0.003). Conclusion Adherence to the Mediterranean diet (MeDi) may affect not only risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) but also subsequent disease course: Higher adherence to the MeDi is associated with lower mortality in AD. The gradual reduction in mortality risk for higher MeDi adherence tertiles suggests a possible dose–response effect. PMID:17846408

  20. A conceptual framework for investigating the impacts of international trade and investment agreements on noncommunicable disease risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, Ashley; Ruckert, Arne; VanDuzer, J Anthony; Friel, Sharon; Gleeson, Deborah; Thow, Anne-Marie; Stuckler, David; Labonte, Ronald

    2018-01-01

    We developed a conceptual framework exploring pathways between trade and investment and noncommunicable disease (NCD) outcomes. Despite increased knowledge of the relevance of social and structural determinants of health, the discourse on NCD prevention has been dominated by individualizing paradigms targeted at lifestyle interventions. We situate individual risk factors, alongside key social determinants of health, as being conditioned and constrained by trade and investment policy, with the aim of creating a more comprehensive approach to investigations of the health impacts of trade and investment agreements, and to encourage upstream approaches to combating rising rates of NCDs. To develop the framework we employed causal chain analysis, a technique which sequences the immediate causes, underlying causes, and root causes of an outcome; and realist review, a type of literature review focussed on explaining the underlying mechanisms connecting two events. The results explore how facilitating trade in goods can increase flows of affordable unhealthy imports; while potentially altering revenues for public service provision and reshaping domestic economies and labour markets-both of which distribute and redistribute resources for healthy lifestyles. The facilitation of cross-border trade in services and investment can drive foreign investment in unhealthy commodities, which in turn, influences consumption of these products; while altering accessibility to pharmaceuticals that may mediate NCDs outcomes that result from increased consumption. Furthermore, trade and investment provisions that influence the policy-making process, set international standards, and restrict policy-space, may alter a state's propensity for regulating unhealthy commodities and the efficacy of those regulations. It is the hope that the development of this conceptual framework will encourage capacity and inclination among a greater number of researchers to investigate a more comprehensive

  1. Determinants of initial utilization of community healthcare services among patients with major non-communicable chronic diseases in South China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajie Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although expected to act as gate-keeping primary care providers, as community health service (CHS facilities are severely under-utilized; Chinese people in both rural and urban areas used predominantly higher-tier facilities for primary care purpose, with significant financial and outcome consequences. This study intends to explore the determinants of initial utilization of CHS among patients with major non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs in order to understand the care-seeking behavior among urban and rural residents in South China. METHODS: A multi-stage cluster random sampling methodology was adopted to create a sample of 19,466 adults with NCDs from 7,970 urban households and 32,035 adults with NCDs from 3,860 rural households in Guangdong, China. Interviews and physical examinations were conducted in 2010 to collect data on patient characteristics, medical conditions, and awareness and utilization of healthcare. Descriptive analysis and logistic regression analysis were performed to study utilization patterns and the factors associated with the patterns. RESULTS: Prevalence of major NCDs in urban areas was significantly higher than that in rural areas (12.55% vs. 8.70%; p<0.001. Second-tier district hospitals were most preferred for initial consultation (46.05% in rural areas vs. 45.32% in urban areas; p<0.001, followed by tertiary general or specialized hospitals (28.39% in rural areas vs. 33.89% in urban areas; p<0.001. The proportion of patients who had initial use of CHS was relatively low (25.56% in rural areas vs. 20.79% in urban areas; p<0.001. Awareness of self-care and the presence of medical insurance were leading factors associated with first contact of CHS facilities in both urban and rural areas. CONCLUSION: The study suggests that CHS facilities are not often used as the first contact for patients in both rural and urban areas in south China. Much effect must be made to enhance the gatekeeper system and improve

  2. Identifying determinants of socioeconomic inequality in health service utilization among patients with chronic non-communicable diseases in China.

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    Xin Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People with chronic non-communicable diseases (NCD are particularly vulnerable to socioeconomic inequality due to their long-term expensive health needs. This study aimed to assess socioeconomic-related inequality in health service utilization among NCD patients in China and to analyze factors associated with this disparity. METHODS: Data were taken from the 2008 Chinese National Health Survey, in which a multiple stage stratified random sampling method was employed to survey 56,456 households. We analyzed the distribution of actual use, need-expected use, and need-standardized usage of outpatient services (over a two-week period and inpatient services (over one-year across different income groups in 27,233 adult respondents who reported as having a NCD. We used a concentration index to measure inequality in the distribution of health services, which was expressed as HI (Horizontal Inequity Index for need-standardized use of services. A non-linear probit regression model was employed to detect inequality across socio-economic groups. RESULTS: Pro-rich inequity in health services among NCD patients was more substantial than the average population. A higher degree of pro-rich inequity (HI = 0.253 was found in inpatient services compared to outpatient services (HI = 0.089. Despite a greater need for health services amongst those of lower socio-economic status, their actual use is much less than their more affluent counterparts. Health service underuse by the poor and overuse by the affluent are evident. Household income disparity was the greatest inequality factor in NCD service use for both outpatients (71.3% and inpatients (108%, more so than health insurance policies. Some medical insurance schemes, such as the MIUE, actually made a pro-rich contribution to health service inequality (16.1% for outpatient and 12.1% for inpatient. CONCLUSIONS: Inequality in health services amongst NCD patients in China remains largely

  3. Designing a food tax to impact food-related non-communicable diseases: the case of Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Juan Carlos; Smith-Taillie, Lindsey; Ng, Shu Wen; Popkin, Barry

    2017-08-01

    The global shift towards diets high in sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and energy dense ultra-processed foods is linked to higher prevalence of obesity, diabetes and most other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), causing significant health costs. Chile has the highest SSB consumption in the world, very high junk food intake and very rapid increases in these poor components of the diet plus obesity prevalence. This study's purpose is to compare the effect of different tax schemes for SSBs and ultra-processed foods on nutrient availability, utilizing price-elasticities, which are estimated from a Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System model, using the 2011-2012 Income and Expenditure survey. We take into account the high proportion of households not purchasing various food and beverage groups (censored nature of data). The food groups considered were: sweets and desserts; salty snacks and chips; meat products and fats; fruits, vegetables and seafood; cereals and cereal products; SSB ready-to-drink; SSB from concentrate; plain water, coffee and tea; and milk, which together represent 90% of food expenditures. The simulated taxes were: (1) 40% price tax on SSBs(22% above the current tax level); (2) a 5 cents per gram of sugar tax on products with added sugar; and (3) 30% price tax on all foods(27% above current tax levels) and beverages (12% above the current tax level) exceeding thresholds on sodium, saturated fat, and added sugar and for which marketing is restricted (based on a Chilean law, effective June 16 2016). Unhealthy foods are price-elastic (-1.99 for salty snacks and chips, -1.06 for SSBs ready-to-drink, and -1.27 for SSBs from concentrate), meaning that the change in consumption is proportionally larger with respect to a change in price. Results are robust to different model specification, and consistent among different socioeconomic sub-populations. Overall, the tax on marketing controlled foods and beverages is associated with the largest reduction in

  4. Alcohol use among adults in Uganda: findings from the countrywide non-communicable diseases risk factor cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabwama, Steven Ndugwa; Ndyanabangi, Sheila; Mutungi, Gerald; Wesonga, Ronald; Bahendeka, Silver K.; Guwatudde, David

    2016-01-01

    Background There are limited data on levels of alcohol use in most sub-Saharan African countries. Objective We analyzed data from Uganda's non-communicable diseases risk factor survey conducted in 2014, to identify alcohol use prevalence and associated factors. Design The survey used the World Health Organization STEPS tool to collect data, including the history of alcohol use. Alcohol users were categorized into low-, medium-, and high-end users. Participants were also classified as having an alcohol-use-related disorder if, over the past 12 months, they were unable to stop drinking alcohol once they had started drinking, and/or failed to do what was normally expected of them because of drinking alcohol, and/or needed an alcoholic drink first in the morning to get going after a heavy drinking session the night before. Weighted logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with medium- to high-end alcohol use. Results Of the 3,956 participants, 1,062 (26.8%) were current alcohol users, including 314 (7.9%) low-end, 246 (6.2%) medium-end, and 502 (12.7%) high-end users. A total of 386 (9.8%) were classified as having an alcohol-use-related disorder. Male participants were more likely to be medium- to high-end alcohol users compared to females; adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=2.34 [95% confidence interval (CI)=1.88–2.91]. Compared to residents in eastern Uganda, participants in central and western Uganda were more likely to be medium- to high-end users; AOR=1.47 (95% CI=1.01–2.12) and AOR=1.89 (95% CI=1.31–2.72), respectively. Participants aged 30–49 years and those aged 50–69 years were more likely to be medium- to high-end alcohol users, compared to those aged 18–29 years, AOR=1.49 (95% CI=1.16–1.91) and AOR=2.08 (95% CI=1.52–2.84), respectively. Conclusions The level of alcohol use among adults in Uganda is high, and 9.8% of the adult population has an alcohol-use-related disorder. PMID:27491961

  5. Alcohol use among adults in Uganda: findings from the countrywide non-communicable diseases risk factor cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Ndugwa Kabwama

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are limited data on levels of alcohol use in most sub-Saharan African countries. Objective: We analyzed data from Uganda's non-communicable diseases risk factor survey conducted in 2014, to identify alcohol use prevalence and associated factors. Design: The survey used the World Health Organization STEPS tool to collect data, including the history of alcohol use. Alcohol users were categorized into low-, medium-, and high-end users. Participants were also classified as having an alcohol-use-related disorder if, over the past 12 months, they were unable to stop drinking alcohol once they had started drinking, and/or failed to do what was normally expected of them because of drinking alcohol, and/or needed an alcoholic drink first in the morning to get going after a heavy drinking session the night before. Weighted logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with medium- to high-end alcohol use. Results: Of the 3,956 participants, 1,062 (26.8% were current alcohol users, including 314 (7.9% low-end, 246 (6.2% medium-end, and 502 (12.7% high-end users. A total of 386 (9.8% were classified as having an alcohol-use-related disorder. Male participants were more likely to be medium- to high-end alcohol users compared to females; adjusted odds ratio (AOR=2.34 [95% confidence interval (CI=1.88–2.91]. Compared to residents in eastern Uganda, participants in central and western Uganda were more likely to be medium- to high-end users; AOR=1.47 (95% CI=1.01–2.12 and AOR=1.89 (95% CI=1.31–2.72, respectively. Participants aged 30–49 years and those aged 50–69 years were more likely to be medium- to high-end alcohol users, compared to those aged 18–29 years, AOR=1.49 (95% CI=1.16–1.91 and AOR=2.08 (95% CI=1.52–2.84, respectively. Conclusions: The level of alcohol use among adults in Uganda is high, and 9.8% of the adult population has an alcohol-use-related disorder.

  6. Identifying determinants of socioeconomic inequality in health service utilization among patients with chronic non-communicable diseases in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xin; Wu, Qunhong; Hao, Yanhua; Yin, Hui; Fu, Wenqi; Ning, Ning; Xu, Ling; Liu, Chaojie; Li, Ye; Kang, Zheng; He, Changzhi; Liu, Guoxiang

    2014-01-01

    People with chronic non-communicable diseases (NCD) are particularly vulnerable to socioeconomic inequality due to their long-term expensive health needs. This study aimed to assess socioeconomic-related inequality in health service utilization among NCD patients in China and to analyze factors associated with this disparity. Data were taken from the 2008 Chinese National Health Survey, in which a multiple stage stratified random sampling method was employed to survey 56,456 households. We analyzed the distribution of actual use, need-expected use, and need-standardized usage of outpatient services (over a two-week period) and inpatient services (over one-year) across different income groups in 27,233 adult respondents who reported as having a NCD. We used a concentration index to measure inequality in the distribution of health services, which was expressed as HI (Horizontal Inequity Index) for need-standardized use of services. A non-linear probit regression model was employed to detect inequality across socio-economic groups. Pro-rich inequity in health services among NCD patients was more substantial than the average population. A higher degree of pro-rich inequity (HI = 0.253) was found in inpatient services compared to outpatient services (HI = 0.089). Despite a greater need for health services amongst those of lower socio-economic status, their actual use is much less than their more affluent counterparts. Health service underuse by the poor and overuse by the affluent are evident. Household income disparity was the greatest inequality factor in NCD service use for both outpatients (71.3%) and inpatients (108%), more so than health insurance policies. Some medical insurance schemes, such as the MIUE, actually made a pro-rich contribution to health service inequality (16.1% for outpatient and 12.1% for inpatient). Inequality in health services amongst NCD patients in China remains largely determined by patient financial capability. The current

  7. Designing a food tax to impact food-related non-communicable diseases: the case of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Juan Carlos; Smith-Taillie, Lindsey; Ng, Shu Wen; Popkin, Barry

    2018-01-01

    The global shift towards diets high in sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and energy dense ultra-processed foods is linked to higher prevalence of obesity, diabetes and most other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), causing significant health costs. Chile has the highest SSB consumption in the world, very high junk food intake and very rapid increases in these poor components of the diet plus obesity prevalence. This study’s purpose is to compare the effect of different tax schemes for SSBs and ultra-processed foods on nutrient availability, utilizing price-elasticities, which are estimated from a Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System model, using the 2011–2012 Income and Expenditure survey. We take into account the high proportion of households not purchasing various food and beverage groups (censored nature of data). The food groups considered were: sweets and desserts; salty snacks and chips; meat products and fats; fruits, vegetables and seafood; cereals and cereal products; SSB ready-to-drink; SSB from concentrate; plain water, coffee and tea; and milk, which together represent 90% of food expenditures. The simulated taxes were: (1) 40% price tax on SSBs(22% above the current tax level); (2) a 5 cents per gram of sugar tax on products with added sugar; and (3) 30% price tax on all foods(27% above current tax levels) and beverages (12% above the current tax level) exceeding thresholds on sodium, saturated fat, and added sugar and for which marketing is restricted (based on a Chilean law, effective June 16 2016). Unhealthy foods are price-elastic (−1.99 for salty snacks and chips, −1.06 for SSBs ready-to-drink, and −1.27 for SSBs from concentrate), meaning that the change in consumption is proportionally larger with respect to a change in price. Results are robust to different model specification, and consistent among different socioeconomic sub-populations. Overall, the tax on marketing controlled foods and beverages is associated with the largest reduction

  8. Seasonal mortality variations of cardiovascular, respiratory and malignant diseases in the City of Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanišić-Stojić Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    cardiovascular diseases increased twice, namely at the end of June and October, which is assumed to be the result of sudden temperature changes. Nonetheless, no such seasonal variations were observed in mortality caused by cancer. Seasonal variations in mortality resulting from cardiovascular diseases also indicate gender differences, which is why sudden temperature changes in interim periods affect more women than men. As regards deseasonalized trend, mortality caused by cardiovascular diseases stagnates, while mortality caused by cancer and mortality caused by respiratory diseases records moderate to severe increase. This is a uniform trend in almost all municipalities in Belgrade, with average mortality rates being higher in central zones than in suburbs over the last 15 years, particularly mortality caused by cancer. A slight increase in the overall mortality can also be attributed to aging of the population, which cannot be verified due to lack of available accurate data on the average age structure of Belgrade population for the observed period. A better understanding of seasonal variations in mortality caused by chronic non-communicable diseases can contribute to improving the population health care and rising awareness of the population concerning greater health care in changeable weather conditions due to global warming and climate change. These findings can also enhance preventive action on environmental risk factors that are not limited exclusively to weather conditions, such as air pollution.

  9. [Assessment on the capacity for programs regarding chronic non-communicable diseases prevention and control, in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Xiang; Zhai, Yi; Shi, Xiaoming

    2014-06-01

    To assess the policies and programs on the capacity of prevention and control regarding non-communicable diseases (NCDs) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCs) at all levels and grass roots health care institutions, in China. On-line questionnaire survey was adopted by 3 352 CDCs at provincial, city and county levels and 1 200 grass roots health care institutions. 1) On policies: 75.0% of the provincial governments provided special funding for chronic disease prevention and control, whereas 19.7% city government and 11.3% county government did so. 2) Infrastructure:only 7.1% county level CDCs reported having a department taking care of NCD prevention and control. 8 263 staff members worked on NCDs prevention and control, accounting for 4.2% of all the CDCs' personnel. 40.2% CDCs had special funding used for NCDs prevention and control. 3)Capacity on training and guidance:among all the CDCs, 96.9% at provincial level, 50.3% at city level and 42.1% at county level had organized training on NCDs prevention and control. Only 48.3% of the CDCs at county level provided technical guidance for grass-roots health care institutions. 4) Capacities regarding cooperation and participation: 20.2% of the CDCs had experience in collaborating with mass media. 5) Surveillance capacity: 64.6% of the CDCs at county level implemented death registration, compare to less than 30.0% of CDCs at county level implemented surveillance programs on major NCDs and related risk factors. In the grass roots health care institutions, 18.6% implemented new stroke case reporting system but only 3.0% implemented program on myocardial infarction case reporting. 6) Intervention and management capacity: 36.1% and 32.2% of the CDCs conducted individualized intervention on hypertension and diabetes, while less than another 20% intervened into other NCDs and risk factors. More than 50% of the grass roots health care institutions carried follow-up survey on hypertension and diabetes. Rates

  10. Chronic non-communicable diseases and the challenge of universal health coverage: insights from community-based cardiovascular disease research in urban poor communities in Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Kushitor, Mawuli; Koram, Kwadwo; Gyamfi, Stella; Ogedegbe, Gbenga

    2014-01-01

    The rising burden of chronic non-communicable diseases in low and middle income countries has major implications on the ability of these countries to achieve universal health coverage. In this paper we discuss the impact of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) on primary healthcare services in urban poor communities in Accra, Ghana. We review the evidence on the evolution of universal health coverage in Ghana and the central role of the community-based health planning services (CHPS) programme and the National Health Insurance Scheme in primary health care. We present preliminary findings from a study on community CVD knowledge, experiences, responses and access to services. The rising burden of NCDs in Ghana will affect the achievement of universal health coverage, particularly in urban areas. There is a significant unmet need for CVD care in the study communities. The provision of primary healthcare services for CVD is not accessible, equitable or responsive to the needs of target communities. We consider these findings in the context of the primary healthcare system and discuss the challenges and opportunities for strengthening health systems in low and middle-income countries.

  11. POlish-Norwegian Study (PONS): research on chronic non-communicable diseases in European high risk countries - study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatoński, Witold A; Mańczuk, Marta

    2011-01-01

    A large-scale population study of health and disease would represent the most powerful tool to address these important issues in Poland. The aim is to extensively survey the study population with respect to important factors related to health and wellbeing, and subsequently, the intention is to follow-up the population for important health outcomes, including the incidence and mortality of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other major causes of morbidity and mortality. The infrastructure for establishing a large cohort of people in Poland is needed; therefore, the PONS (Polish-Norwegian Study) project represents an eff ort to establish such infrastructure. The PONS Study is enrolling individuals aged 45-64 years. Structured lifestyle and food frequency questionnaires are administered. Study participants undergo medical check-up, anthropometric measurements and provide blood and urine sample for long-term storage. Fasting glucose and lipids profile are checked in the laboratory. This report describes the design, justification and methodology of the presented prospective cohort study. Recruitment of participants began in September 2010, and by the end of 2011 it is planned to achieve a total of between 10,000 – 15,000 participants. The PONS study is the fi rst prospective cohort study with blood and urine collection ever conducted in Central and Eastern Europe. It will provide reliable new data on both established and emerging risk factors for several major chronic diseases in a range of different circumstances.

  12. Healthy fats for healthy nutrition. An educational approach in the workplace to regulate food choices and improve prevention of non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Roberto; Stefano, Predieri; Massimiliano, Magli; Francesca, Martelli; Gianluca, Sotis; Federica, Rossi

    2015-12-01

    An educational activity, aimed at highlighting the benefits of Mediterranean Diet, compared to less healthy eating patterns, can encourage the adoption and maintenance of a mindful approach to food choice. This is especially important when a progressive shift towards a non-Mediterranean dietary pattern can be observed, even in Mediterranean countries. To test a protocol aimed at increasing knowledge and motivation to embrace healthy eating habits and, engendering conscientious food choices, improve the prevention of non-communicable diseases. Employees were involved in educational activities focusing on a healthy Mediterranean diet and on the role played by extra-virgin olive oil, one of its key components. Food questionnaires were completed both before and after the educational and information activities, in order to assess changes in personal knowledge of and attitudes towards fat consumption. Answers on dietary guidelines and fat properties were more accurate after the seminars. The results showed increased understanding of the properties of extra-virgin olive oil versus seed oil and a stronger tendency towards healthy food choices. Implementing preventive information and training strategies and tools in the workplace, can motivate a more mindful approach to food choice with the long-term goal of contribute to reducing non-communicable diseases.

  13. End User and Implementer Experiences of mHealth Technologies for Noncommunicable Chronic Disease Management in Young Adults: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Helen; Campbell, Jared M; Stinson, Jennifer N; Burley, Megan M; Briggs, Andrew M

    2017-12-12

    Chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as asthma, diabetes, cancer, and persistent musculoskeletal pain impose an escalating and unsustainable burden on young people, their families, and society. Exploring how mobile health (mHealth) technologies can support management for young people with NCDs is imperative. The aim of this study was to identify, appraise, and synthesize available qualitative evidence on users' experiences of mHealth technologies for NCD management in young people. We explored the perspectives of both end users (young people) and implementers (health policy makers, clinicians, and researchers). A systematic review and meta-synthesis of qualitative studies. Eligibility criteria included full reports published in peer-reviewed journals from January 2007 to December 2016, searched across databases including EMBASE, MEDLINE (PubMed), Scopus, and PsycINFO. All qualitative studies that evaluated the use of mHealth technologies to support young people (in the age range of 15-24 years) in managing their chronic NCDs were considered. Two independent reviewers identified eligible reports and conducted critical appraisal (based on the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument: JBI-QARI). Three reviewers independently, then collaboratively, synthesized and interpreted data through an inductive and iterative process to derive emergent themes across the included data. External validity checking was undertaken by an expert clinical researcher and for relevant content, a health policy expert. Themes were subsequently subjected to a meta-synthesis, with findings compared and contrasted between user groups and policy and practice recommendations derived. Twelve studies met our inclusion criteria. Among studies of end users (N=7), mHealth technologies supported the management of young people with diabetes, cancer, and asthma. Implementer studies (N=5) covered the management of cognitive and communicative disabilities, asthma

  14. Burden and trend of diet-related non-communicable diseases in Australia and comparison with 34 OECD countries, 1990-2015: findings from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaku, Yohannes Adama; Renzaho, Andre; Gill, Tiffany K; Taylor, Anne W; Dal Grande, Eleonora; de Courten, Barbora; Baye, Estifanos; Gonzalez-Chica, David; Hyppӧnen, Elina; Shi, Zumin; Riley, Malcolm; Adams, Robert; Kinfu, Yohannes

    2018-03-07

    Diet is a major determining factor for many non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs). However, evidence on diet-related NCD burden remains limited. We assessed the trends in diet-related NCDs in Australia from 1990 to 2015 and compared the results with other countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). We used data and methods from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2015 study to estimate the NCD mortality and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) attributable to 14 dietary risk factors in Australia and 34 OECD nations. Countries were further ranked from the lowest (first) to highest (35th) burden using an age-standardized population attributable fraction (PAF). In 2015, the estimated number of deaths attributable to dietary risks was 29,414 deaths [95% uncertainty interval (UI) 24,697 - 34,058 or 19.7% of NCD deaths] and 443,385 DALYs (95% UI 377,680-511,388 or 9.5% of NCD DALYs) in Australia. Young (25-49 years) and middle-age (50-69 years) male adults had a higher PAF of diet-related NCD deaths and DALYs than their female counterparts. Diets low in fruits, vegetables, nuts and seeds and whole grains, but high in sodium, were the major contributors to both NCD deaths and DALYs. Overall, 42.3% of cardiovascular deaths were attributable to dietary risk factors. The age-standardized PAF of diet-related NCD mortality and DALYs decreased over the study period by 28.2% (from 27.0% in 1990 to 19.4% in 2015) and 41.0% (from 14.3% in 1990 to 8.4% in 2015), respectively. In 2015, Australia ranked 12th of 35 examined countries in diet-related mortality. A small improvement of rank was recorded compared to the previous 25 years. Despite a reduction in diet-related NCD burden over 25 years, dietary risks are still the major contributors to a high burden of NCDs in Australia. Interventions targeting NCDs should focus on dietary behaviours of individuals and population groups.

  15. What is the role of lifestyle behaviour change associated with non-communicable disease risk in managing musculoskeletal health conditions with special reference to chronic pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Elizabeth; Söderlund, Anne

    2015-04-13

    Other than activity and exercise, lifestyle practices such as not smoking and healthy nutrition, well established for preventing and managing lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases (i.e., heart disease, cancer, hypertension, stroke, obstructive lung disease, diabetes, and obesity), are less emphasized in the physical therapy guidelines for addressing chronic pain, e.g., back pain. This state-of-the-art review examines the relationships between lifestyle behaviours and musculoskeletal health, with special reference to chronic pain, and their clinical and research implications. A state-of-the-art review was conducted to synthesize evidence related to lifestyle factors (not smoking, healthy diet, healthy weight, optimal sleep and manageable stress, as well as physical activity) and musculoskeletal health, with special reference to chronic pain. The findings support that health behaviour change competencies (examination/assessment and intervention/treatment) may warrant being included in first-line management of chronic pain, either independently or in conjunction with conventional physical therapy interventions. To address knowledge gaps in the literature however three lines of clinical trial research are indicated: 1) to establish the degree to which traditional physical therapy interventions prescribed for chronic pain augment the benefits of lifestyle behaviour change; 2) to establish the degree to which adopting healthier lifestyle practices, avoids or reduces the need for conventional physical therapy; and 3) to establish whether patients/clients with healthier lifestyles and who have chronic pain, respond more favourably to conventional physical therapy interventions than those who have less healthy lifestyles. Lifestyle behaviour change is well accepted in addressing lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases. Compelling evidence exists however supporting the need for elucidation of the role of negative lifestyle behaviours on the incidence of chronic

  16. Nutrimetabolomics: An Update on Analytical Approaches to Investigate the Role of Plant-Based Foods and Their Bioactive Compounds in Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Huerta, Oscar Daniel; Gil, Angel

    2016-12-09

    Metabolomics is the study of low-weight molecules present in biological samples such as biofluids, tissue/cellular extracts, and culture media. Metabolomics research is increasing, and at the moment, it has several applications in the food science and nutrition fields. In the present review, we provide an update about the most frequently used methodologies and metabolomic platforms in these areas. Also, we discuss different metabolomic strategies regarding the discovery of new bioactive compounds (BACs) in plant-based foods. Furthermore, we review the existing literature related to the use of metabolomics to investigate the potential protective role of BACs in the prevention and treatment of non-communicable chronic diseases, namely cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer.

  17. Nutrimetabolomics: An Update on Analytical Approaches to Investigate the Role of Plant-Based Foods and Their Bioactive Compounds in Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Daniel Rangel-Huerta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomics is the study of low-weight molecules present in biological samples such as biofluids, tissue/cellular extracts, and culture media. Metabolomics research is increasing, and at the moment, it has several applications in the food science and nutrition fields. In the present review, we provide an update about the most frequently used methodologies and metabolomic platforms in these areas. Also, we discuss different metabolomic strategies regarding the discovery of new bioactive compounds (BACs in plant-based foods. Furthermore, we review the existing literature related to the use of metabolomics to investigate the potential protective role of BACs in the prevention and treatment of non-communicable chronic diseases, namely cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer.

  18. Integration of non-communicable diseases in health care: tackling the double burden of disease in African settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temu, Florence; Leonhardt, Marcus; Carter, Jane; Thiam, Sylla

    2014-01-01

    Sub-Saharan African countries now face the double burden of Non Communicable and Communicable Diseases. This situation represents a major threat to fragile health systems and emphasises the need for innovative integrative approaches to health care delivery. Health services need to be reorganised to address populations' needs holistically and effectively leverage resources in already resource-limited settings. Access and delivery of quality health care should be reinforced and implemented at primary health care level within the framework of health system strengthening. Competencies need to be developed around services provided rather than specific diseases. New models of integration within the health sector and other sectors should be explored and further evidence generated to inform policy and practice to combat the double burden.

  19. Prevalence of Selected Intermediate Risk Factors for Non-communicable Diseases in an Apparently Healthy Indian Community in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naicker, Ashika; Venter, Christine S; MacIntyre, Una E; Ellis, Suria

    2017-02-01

    South Africa, burdened with the emerging chronic diseases, is home to one of the largest migrant Indian population, however, little data exists on the risk factors for non-communicable diseases in this population. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of yet undiagnosed selected intermediate risk factors for non-communicable diseases among the Indian population in KwaZulu-Natal. We randomly selected 250 apparently healthy Indians, aged 35-55 years, living in KwaDukuza to participate in this study. Clinical and anthropometric measurements were taken under prescribed clinical conditions using Asian cut-off points. Pearson correlations was used to detect associations between anthropometric and clinical risk markers. A large percentage of participants' systolic blood pressure fell within the normal range. Diastolic blood pressure was >85 mmHg for 61 % of the participants and triglyceride levels were >1.69 mmol/L for 89 % of the participants'; 94 % of the women and 87 % of the men were classified as centrally obese. Raised fasting blood glucose was seen in 39 % of participants'. Waist circumference and body mass index showed statistically significant associations with all clinical risk markers except for diastolic blood pressure. Our findings suggest that the use of ethno specific strategies in the management of the disease profile of South African Indians, will enable the South African health system to respond more positively towards the current trend of increased metabolic and physiological risk factors in this community. Moreover, key modifiable behaviours such as increased physical activity and weight reduction may improve most of these metabolic abnormalities.

  20. Association between periodontal disease and non-communicable diseases: A 12-year longitudinal health-examinee cohort study in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hong; Oh, Jin-Young; Youk, Tae-Mi; Jeong, Seong-Nyum; Kim, Young-Taek; Choi, Seong-Ho

    2017-06-01

    The National Health Insurance Service-Health Examinee Cohort during 2002 to 2013 was used to investigate the associations between periodontal disease (PD) and the following non-communicable diseases (NCDs): hypertension, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, cerebral infarction, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, and obesity.Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusting for potential confounders during the follow-up period-including age, sex, household income, insurance status, residence area, health status, and comorbidities-were used to estimated odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in order to assess the associations between PD and NCDs.We enrolled 200,026 patients with PD and 154,824 subjects with a healthy oral status. Statistically, significant associations were found between PD and the investigated NCDs except for cerebral and myocardial infarction after adjusting for sociodemographic and comorbidity factors (P < .05). In particular, obesity (OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.04-1.63, P = .022), osteoporosis (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.18-1.27, P < .001), and angina pectoris (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.17-1.27, P < .001) were significantly and positively associated with PD.This longitudinal cohort study has provided evidence that patients with PD are at increased risk of NCDs. Further studies are required to confirm the reliability of this association and elucidate the role of the inflammatory pathway in periodontitis pathogenesis as a triggering and mediating mechanism.

  1. The impact of dietary risk factors on the burden of non-communicable diseases in Ethiopia: findings from the Global Burden of Disease study 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaku, Yohannes Adama; Temesgen, Awoke Misganaw; Deribew, Amare; Tessema, Gizachew Assefa; Deribe, Kebede; Sahle, Berhe W; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Bekele, Tolesa; Lemma, Ferew; Amare, Azmeraw T; Seid, Oumer; Endris, Kedir; Hiruye, Abiy; Worku, Amare; Adams, Robert; Taylor, Anne W; Gill, Tiffany K; Shi, Zumin; Afshin, Ashkan; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H

    2016-12-16

    The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has increased in sub-Saharan countries, including Ethiopia. The contribution of dietary behaviours to the NCD burden in Ethiopia has not been evaluated. This study, therefore, aimed to assess diet-related burden of disease in Ethiopia between 1990 and 2013. We used the 2013 Global Burden of Disease (GBD) data to estimate deaths, years of life lost (YLLs) and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) related to eight food types, five nutrients and fibre intake. Dietary exposure was estimated using a Bayesian hierarchical meta-regression. The effect size of each diet-disease pair was obtained based on meta-analyses of prospective observational studies and randomized controlled trials. A comparative risk assessment approach was used to quantify the proportion of NCD burden associated with dietary risk factors. In 2013, dietary factors were responsible for 60,402 deaths (95% Uncertainty Interval [UI]: 44,943-74,898) in Ethiopia-almost a quarter (23.0%) of all NCD deaths. Nearly nine in every ten diet-related deaths (88.0%) were from cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and 44.0% of all CVD deaths were related to poor diet. Suboptimal diet accounted for 1,353,407 DALYs (95% UI: 1,010,433-1,672,828) and 1,291,703 YLLs (95% UI: 961,915-1,599,985). Low intake of fruits and vegetables and high intake of sodium were the most important dietary factors. The proportion of NCD deaths associated with low fruit consumption slightly increased (11.3% in 1990 and 11.9% in 2013). In these years, the rate of burden of disease related to poor diet slightly decreased; however, their contribution to NCDs remained stable. Dietary behaviour contributes significantly to the NCD burden in Ethiopia. Intakes of diet low in fruits and vegetables and high in sodium are the leading dietary risks. To effectively mitigate the oncoming NCD burden in Ethiopia, multisectoral interventions are required; and nutrition policies and dietary guidelines should be

  2. Diagnosis, monitoring and prevention of exposure-related non-communicable diseases in the living and working environment: DiMoPEx-project is designed to determine the impacts of environmental exposure on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Lygia Therese; Adam, Balazs; Albin, Maria; Banelli, Barbara; Baur, Xaver; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Bolognesi, Claudia; Broberg, Karin; Gustavsson, Per; Göen, Thomas; Fischer, Axel; Jarosinska, Dorota; Manservisi, Fabiana; O'Kennedy, Richard; Øvrevik, Johan; Paunovic, Elizabet; Ritz, Beate; Scheepers, Paul T J; Schlünssen, Vivi; Schwarzenbach, Heidi; Schwarze, Per E; Sheils, Orla; Sigsgaard, Torben; Van Damme, Karel; Casteleyn, Ludwine

    2018-01-01

    The WHO has ranked environmental hazardous exposures in the living and working environment among the top risk factors for chronic disease mortality. Worldwide, about 40 million people die each year from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) including cancer, diabetes, and chronic cardiovascular, neurological and lung diseases. The exposure to ambient pollution in the living and working environment is exacerbated by individual susceptibilities and lifestyle-driven factors to produce complex and complicated NCD etiologies. Research addressing the links between environmental exposure and disease prevalence is key for prevention of the pandemic increase in NCD morbidity and mortality. However, the long latency, the chronic course of some diseases and the necessity to address cumulative exposures over very long periods does mean that it is often difficult to identify causal environmental exposures. EU-funded COST Action DiMoPEx is developing new concepts for a better understanding of health-environment (including gene-environment) interactions in the etiology of NCDs. The overarching idea is to teach and train scientists and physicians to learn how to include efficient and valid exposure assessments in their research and in their clinical practice in current and future cooperative projects. DiMoPEx partners have identified some of the emerging research needs, which include the lack of evidence-based exposure data and the need for human-equivalent animal models mirroring human lifespan and low-dose cumulative exposures. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach incorporating seven working groups, DiMoPEx will focus on aspects of air pollution with particulate matter including dust and fibers and on exposure to low doses of solvents and sensitizing agents. Biomarkers of early exposure and their associated effects as indicators of disease-derived information will be tested and standardized within individual projects. Risks arising from some NCDs, like pneumoconioses, cancers and

  3. The Fertility Management Experiences of Australian Women with a Non-communicable Chronic Disease: Findings from the Understanding Fertility Management in Contemporary Australia Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Sara; Thananjeyan, Aberaami; Rowe, Heather; Kirkman, Maggie; Jordan, Lynne; McNamee, Kathleen; Bayly, Christine; McBain, John; Sinnott, Vikki; Fisher, Jane

    2018-02-06

    Introduction Despite the considerable and increasing proportion of women of reproductive age with a chronic non-communicable disease (NCD) and the potential adverse implications of many NCDs for childbearing, little is known about the fertility management experiences of women with an NCD, including their contraceptive use, pregnancy experiences and outcomes, and reproductive health care utilisation. The aim of this study was to investigate the fertility management experiences of women with an NCD and draw comparisons with women without an NCD. Method A sample of 18-50 year-old women (n = 1543) was randomly recruited from the Australian electoral roll in 2013. Of these women, 172 women reported a physical, chronic non-communicable disease: diabetes, arthritis, asthma, hypertension, heart disease, thyroid disorders, and cystic fibrosis. Respondents completed an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. Factors associated with fertility management were identified in multivariable analyses. Results Women who reported having an NCD were significantly more likely than women who did not report an NCD to have ever been pregnant (75.9 vs. 67.5%, p = 0.034), have had an unintended pregnancy (33.47 vs. 25.5%, p = 0.026), and have had an abortion (20.3 vs. 14.2%, p = 0.044); they were less likely to consult a healthcare provider about fertility management (45.0 vs. 54.4%, p = 0.024). Similar proportions were using contraception (48.8 vs. 54.5%, p = 0.138). Conclusion The findings have implications for healthcare providers and women with an NCD and highlight the importance of addressing possible assumptions about the inability of women with an NCD to become pregnant, and ensuring women receive information about suitable methods of contraception and pre-pregnancy care.

  4. Mobile health for non-communicable diseases in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of the literature and strategic framework for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Gerald S; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Vasudevan, Lavanya; Kithei, Anne; Were, Martin; Velazquez, Eric J

    2014-06-13

    Mobile health (mHealth) approaches for non-communicable disease (NCD) care seem particularly applicable to sub-Saharan Africa given the penetration of mobile phones in the region. The evidence to support its implementation has not been critically reviewed. We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Central Register of Clinical Trials, a number of other databases, and grey literature for studies reported between 1992 and 2012 published in English or with an English abstract available. We extracted data using a standard form in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Our search yielded 475 citations of which eleven were reviewed in full after applying exclusion criteria. Five of those studies met the inclusion criteria of using a mobile phone for non-communicable disease care in sub-Saharan Africa. Most studies lacked comparator arms, clinical endpoints, or were of short duration. mHealth for NCDs in sub-Saharan Africa appears feasible for follow-up and retention of patients, can support peer support networks, and uses a variety of mHealth modalities. Whether mHealth is associated with any adverse effect has not been systematically studied. Only a small number of mHealth strategies for NCDs have been studied in sub-Saharan Africa. There is insufficient evidence to support the effectiveness of mHealth for NCD care in sub-Saharan Africa. We present a framework for cataloging evidence on mHealth strategies that incorporates health system challenges and stages of NCD care. This framework can guide approaches to fill evidence gaps in this area. Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42014007527.

  5. Reconnecting urban planning with health: a protocol for the development and validation of national liveability indicators associated with noncommunicable disease risk behaviours and health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles-Corti, Billie; Badland, Hannah; Mavoa, Suzanne; Turrell, Gavin; Bull, Fiona; Boruff, Bryan; Pettit, Chris; Bauman, Adrian; Hooper, Paula; Villanueva, Karen; Astell-Burt, Thomas; Feng, Xiaoqi; Learnihan, Vincent; Davey, Rachel; Grenfell, Rob; Thackway, Sarah

    2014-11-28

    Liveable communities create the conditions to optimise health and wellbeing outcomes in residents by influencing various social determinants of health - for example, neighbourhood walkability and access to public transport, public open space, local amenities, and social and community facilities. This study will develop national liveability indicators that are (a) aligned with state and federal urban policy, (b) developed using national data (where available), (c) standard and consistent over time, (d) suitable for monitoring progress towards creating more liveable, equitable and sustainable communities, (e) validated against selected noncommunicable disease risk behaviours and/or health outcomes, and (f) practical for measuring local, national and federal built environment interventions. Protocol. Over two years, the National Liveability Study, funded through The Australian Prevention Partnership Centre (TAPPC), will develop and validate a national set of spatially derived built environment liveability indicators related to noncommunicable disease risk behaviours and/or health outcomes, informed by a review of relevant policies in selected Australian state and territory governments. To create national indicators, we will compare measures developed using national data with finer-grained state-level data, which have been validated against a range of outcomes. Finally, we will explore the creation of a national database of built environment spatial indicators. A national advisory group comprising stakeholders in state and federal government, federal nongovernment organisations and state-based technical working groups located in the ACT, Victoria, NSW, Queensland and WA has been established; a policy analysis is under way and work programs are being prepared. This project seeks to build the capacity for built environment and health systems research by developing national indicators to monitor progress towards creating healthy and liveable communities. This ambition

  6. Survey on the availability, price and affordability of selected essential medicines for non-communicable diseases in community pharmacies of Kathmandu valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Rajeev; Ghale, Anish; Chapagain, Bijay Raj; Gyawali, Mahasagar; Acharya, Trishna

    2017-01-01

    The access to essential medicines for non-communicable disease treatment is unacceptably low worldwide. The fundamental right to health cannot be fulfilled without equitable access to essential medicines. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 94 community pharmacies of Kathmandu valley. Non-probability quota sampling method was adopted for the purpose. Village Development Committees with more than 5000 populations were included in the study. The availability of the selected essential medicines, their price and producer identity were observed. Data entry and analysis were carried out in Microsoft Excel and Statistical package for social science. The availability of the essential medicines was not 100% in Kathmandu valley. High competition and high price variation were seen in metformin 500 mg (254.6%) and atorvastatin 10 mg (327.6%). The study showed that maximum (54.7%) brands were manufactured in Nepal. Furthermore, atorvastatin 10 mg (0.6 day wage) was found to be quite expensive, and glibenclamide 5 mg (0.1 day wage) was the cheapest one for diabetes mellitus treatment for 1 month of treatment period compared to daily wages of other essential medicines. The availability of the selected essential medicines was found to be ununiform and insufficient in the entire region. High competition was observed in the products with high price variation, and the access to cost-effective brand was poor. Furthermore, it was found that government salary is affordable to treat non-communicable disease with the help of the essential medicines.

  7. The role of urban food policy in preventing diet-related non-communicable diseases in Cape Town and New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libman, K; Freudenberg, N; Sanders, D; Puoane, T; Tsolekile, L

    2015-04-01

    Cities are important settings for production and prevention of non-communicable diseases. This article proposes a conceptual framework for identification of opportunities to prevent diet-related non-communicable diseases in cities. It compares two cities, Cape Town in South Africa and New York City in the United States, to illustrate municipal, regional, national and global influences in three policy domains that influence NCDs: product formulation, shaping retail environments and institutional food practices, domains in which each city has taken action. Comparative case study. Critical analysis of selected published studies and government and non-governmental reports on food policies and systems in Cape Town and New York City. While Cape Town and New York City differ in governance, history and culture, both have food systems that make unhealthy food more available in low-income than higher income neighborhoods; cope with food environments in which unhealthy food is increasingly ubiquitous; and have political economies dominated by business and financial sectors. New York City has more authority and resources to take on local influences on food environments but neither city has made progress in addressing deeper social determinants of diet-related NCDs including income inequality, child poverty and the disproportionate political influence of wealthy elites. Through their intimate connections with the daily lives of their residents, municipal governments have the potential to shape environments that promote health. Identifying the specific opportunities to prevent diet-related NCDs in a particular city requires intersectoral and multilevel analyses of the full range of influences on food environments. Copyright © 2014 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Projections of global mortality and burden of disease from 2002 to 2030.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin D Mathers

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Global and regional projections of mortality and burden of disease by cause for the years 2000, 2010, and 2030 were published by Murray and Lopez in 1996 as part of the Global Burden of Disease project. These projections, which are based on 1990 data, continue to be widely quoted, although they are substantially outdated; in particular, they substantially underestimated the spread of HIV/AIDS. To address the widespread demand for information on likely future trends in global health, and thereby to support international health policy and priority setting, we have prepared new projections of mortality and burden of disease to 2030 starting from World Health Organization estimates of mortality and burden of disease for 2002. This paper describes the methods, assumptions, input data, and results. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Relatively simple models were used to project future health trends under three scenarios-baseline, optimistic, and pessimistic-based largely on projections of economic and social development, and using the historically observed relationships of these with cause-specific mortality rates. Data inputs have been updated to take account of the greater availability of death registration data and the latest available projections for HIV/AIDS, income, human capital, tobacco smoking, body mass index, and other inputs. In all three scenarios there is a dramatic shift in the distribution of deaths from younger to older ages and from communicable, maternal, perinatal, and nutritional causes to noncommunicable disease causes. The risk of death for children younger than 5 y is projected to fall by nearly 50% in the baseline scenario between 2002 and 2030. The proportion of deaths due to noncommunicable disease is projected to rise from 59% in 2002 to 69% in 2030. Global HIV/AIDS deaths are projected to rise from 2.8 million in 2002 to 6.5 million in 2030 under the baseline scenario, which assumes coverage with antiretroviral drugs

  9. Basic Risk Factors Awareness in Non-Communicable Diseases (BRAND) Study Among People Visiting Tertiary Care Centre in Mysuru, Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thippeswamy, Thippeswamy; Chikkegowda, Prathima

    2016-04-01

    Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs) are the major causes of mortality and morbidity globally. Awareness about NCDs and their risk factors has an important role in prevention and management strategies of these NCDs. 1) To assess the awareness of risk factors contributing to NCDs among the patients visiting tertiary care hospital in Mysuru district; 2) To compare the difference in awareness of risk factors for NCDs among the urban and rural patients with/ without NCD visiting the tertiary care hospital. A cross- sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care centre- JSS Hospital, Mysuru, Karnataka from March 2013 - August 2013. The patients visiting Medicine OPD during the period were the study subjects. The subjects were allocated into 4 groups: Urban without any NCD, Urban with atleast one NCD, rural without NCD, rural with atleast one NCD. A pretested questionnaire regarding awareness of risk factors for NCDs was used in the study and frequency and proportions were used to analyse the data. A total of 400 subjects, 100 subjects in each group were included in the study. Out of these subjects about 65% of the urban group and 42% of the rural group subjects were aware of the NCDs and their risk factors. Least awareness was observed among the rural subjects without any NCDs (35%). The awareness of risk factors of NCDs and knowledge regarding prevention of NCDs was not satisfactory. The results highlighted the need and scope for health education and interventions to improve the awareness about NCDs and their risk factors.

  10. Social determinants of common metabolic risk factors (high blood pressure, high blood sugar, high body mass index and high waist-hip ratio) of major non-communicable diseases in South Asia region: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sudesh Raj; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Wagle, Kusum; Page, Rachel; Matheson, Anna; Lambrick, Danielle; Faulkner, James; Lounsbury, David; Vaidya, Abhinav

    2017-09-07

    Prevalence of non-communicable diseases has been increasing at a greater pace in developing countries and, in particular, the South Asia region. Various behavioral, social and environmental factors present in this region perpetuate common metabolic risk factors of non-communicable diseases. This study will identify social determinants of common metabolic risk factors of major non-communicable diseases in the context of the South Asian region and map their causal pathway. A systematic review of selected articles will be carried out following Cochrane guidelines. Review will be guided by Social Determinants of Health Framework developed by the World Health Organization to extract social determinants of metabolic risk factors of non-communicable diseases from studies. A distinct search strategy will be applied using key words to screen relevant studies from online databases. Primary and grey literature published from the year 2000 to 2016 and studies with discussion on proximal and distal determinants of non-communicable risk factors among adults of the South Asia region will be selected. They will be further checked for quality, and a matrix illustrating contents of selected articles will be developed. Thematic content analysis will be done to trace social determinants and their interaction with metabolic risk factors. Findings will be illustrated in causal loop diagrams with social determinants of risk factors along with their interaction (feedback mechanism). The review will describe the interplay of social determinants of common NCD metabolic risk factors in the form of causal loop diagram. Findings will be structured in two parts: the first part will explain the linkage between proximal determinants with the metabolic risk factors and the second part will describe the linkage among the risk factors, proximal determinants and distal determinants. Evidences across different regions will be discussed to compare and validate and/or contrast the findings. Possible

  11. Mortality in inherited cardiac diseases: directing care in affected families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nannenberg, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with an inherited cardiac disease face a substantial mortality risk, due to arrhythmias (sudden cardiac death), heart failure or embolic stroke. Knowledge about the mortality of diseases can help doctors and patients to make decisions on (timing of) treatment, screening strategies,

  12. Prevalence of major sheep diseases and analysis of mortality in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross sectional and retrospective case study design were carried out from May 2008 to April 2012 in model sheep villages of Farta and Lay Gaint districts with the objective of identifying major sheep diseases, to assess the magnitude of sheep mortality and recommend disease and mortality control options in the study ...

  13. Comportamiento de las enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles en adultos mayores Behavior of non-communicable chronic diseases in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Llibre Guerra

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Con el incremento de la expectativa de vida y el consecuente aumento de la proporción de personas de 60 años y más, también se eleva el porcentaje de la población que padece de enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles, las que representan las primeras causas de muerte en los países desarrollados y en Cuba. Se presenta un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal, realizado en el período comprendido entre marzo de 2007 y marzo de 2008 en pacientes de 65 años y más en el Policlínico "27 de Noviembre" del municipio Marianao, con el objetivo de identificar el comportamiento de estas enfermedades. Se estudiaron 300 ancianos, la información se obtuvo de las bases de datos del estudio de investigación en demencias 10/66, con las tasas de prevalencia de las principales enfermedades no transmisibles que afectan a este grupo poblacional. La hipertensión arterial constituyó la enfermedad de mayor frecuencia con un 55 %, seguida de las enfermedades del corazón (32,3 % y la diabetes mellitus (18,3 %. La primera fue más frecuente en el sexo masculino, mientras que las otras predominaron en el femenino. El síndrome demencial presentó una frecuencia del 12 %, y la depresión estuvo presente en el 6,7 % de los pacientes estudiados.With the increase of life expectancy and the consequent rise of the number of persons aged 60 and over, the percentage of the population suffering from non-communicable chronic diseases, which are the first causes of death in the developed countries and in Cuba, also grows. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among patients aged 65 and over at "27 de Noviembre" Polyclinic from March 2007 to March 2008 aimed at identifying the behavior of these diseases. 300 elderly were studied. The information was obtained from the databases of the research on dementias 10/66, with the rates of prevalence of the main non-communicable diseases affecting this population group. Arterial hypertension was the most common

  14. Prevention--a cost-effective way to fight the non-communicable disease epidemic: an academic perspective of the United Nations High-level NCD Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Tanner, Marcel; Kessler, Claudia; Burri, Christian; Künzli, Nino

    2011-09-07

    The United Nations General Assembly has convened a Summit on non-communicable diseases (NCDs), an historic moment in the global combat of these disorders. Lifestyles in increasingly urban and globalised environments have led to a steep surge in NCD incidence in low and middle income countries, where two thirds of all NCD deaths occur (most importantly from cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory disease as well as diabetes). Treatment of NCDs is usually long term and expensive, thus threatening patients' and nations' budgets and putting them at high risk for poverty. The NCD Summit offers an opportunity for strengthening and shaping primary prevention, the most cost-effective instrument to fight major risk factors such as tobacco smoking, alcohol abuse, physical inactivity and unhealthy diet. From a Swiss perspective, we also emphasised the efforts for new laws on prevention and diagnosis registration, in accordance with the recommendations of the NCD summit in order to strengthen primary prevention and disease monitoring. In addition, the need for structural prevention across all policy sectors with leadership in environmental policy making to prevent NCDs as well as the need to adapt and strengthen primary health care are equally relevant for Switzerland. To compliment efforts in primary prevention, the field of NCDs requires special R&D platforms for affordable NCD drugs and diagnostics for neglected population segments in both Switzerland and low and middle income countries. Switzerland has a track record in research and development against diseases of poverty on a global scale that now needs to be applied to NCDs.

  15. Mortality from nonneoplastic skin disease in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Jason P; Gross, Cary P

    2014-01-01

    The mortality burden from nonneoplastic skin disease in the United States is unknown. We sought to estimate mortality from nonneoplastic skin disease as underlying and contributing causes of death. Population-based death certificate data detailing mortality from nonneoplastic skin disease for years 1999 to 2009 were used to calculate absolute numbers of death and age-adjusted mortality by year, patient demographics, and 10 most commonly reported diagnoses. Nonneoplastic skin diseases were reported as underlying and contributing causes of mortality for approximately 3948 and 19,542 patients per year, respectively. Age-adjusted underlying cause mortality (per 100,000 persons) were significantly greater (P deaths occurred in patients ages 65 years and older (34,248 total deaths). Common underlying causes of death included chronic ulcers (1789 deaths/y) and cellulitis (1348 deaths/y). Errors in death certificate data and inability to adjust for patient-level confounders may limit the accuracy and generalizability of our results. Mortality from nonneoplastic skin disease is uncommon yet potentially preventable. The elderly bear the greatest burden of mortality from nonneoplastic skin disease. Chronic ulcers and cellulitis constitute frequent causes of death. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cross-Sectional Association between Length of Incarceration and Selected Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases in Two Male Prisons of Mexico City.

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    Omar Silverman-Retana

    Full Text Available Mexico City prisons are characterized by overcrowded facilities and poor living conditions for housed prisoners. Chronic disease profile is characterized by low prevalence of self reported hypertension (2.5% and diabetes (1.8% compared to general population; 9.5% of male inmates were obese. There is limited evidence regarding on the exposure to prison environment over prisoner's health status; particularly, on cardiovascular disease risk factors. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between length of incarceration and selected risk factors for non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs.We performed a cross-sectional analysis using data from two large male prisons in Mexico City (n = 14,086. Using quantile regression models we assessed the relationship between length of incarceration and selected risk factors for NCDs; stratified analysis by age at admission to prison was performed. We found a significant negative trend in BMI and WC across incarceration length quintiles. BP had a significant positive trend with a percentage change increase around 5% mmHg. The greatest increase in systolic blood pressure was observed in the older age at admission group.This analysis provides insight into the relationship between length of incarceration and four selected risk factors for NCDs; screening for high blood pressure should be guarantee in order to identify at risk individuals and linked to the prison's health facility. It is important to assess prison environment features to approach potential risk for developing NCDs in this context.

  17. Polypharmacy, medication adherence and medication management at home in elderly patients with multiple non-communicable diseases in Thai primary care

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    Pasitpon Vatcharavongvan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background . Polypharmacy among elderly patients in primary care settings is a global phenomenon that has not been well examined in Thailand. Objectives . To determine (i the prevalence rate of polypharmacy (using ≥ 5 medications among elderly Thai patients ≥ 60 years of age who were diagnosed with multiple non-communicable diseases (NCDs in primary care, (ii medication adherence and (iii quality of home medication management. Material and methods . The electronic medical records of eligible patients were reviewed to obtain demographic data, current medications, medical diagnoses and medical outcomes such as blood pressure. Those with polypharmacy were interviewed at their homes using structured questionnaires to examine medication adherence and medication management at home. Data was collected between September 2014 and April 2015. Results . Of the 397 participants, 146 (36.8% had polypharmacy. Those with polypharmacy were more likely to have type 2 diabetes mellitus, poor disease control and more NCDs. High rates of poor medication adherence (61% and poor medication management (60.2% at home were found in the polypharmacy group, but these factors were not associated with poor disease control (p = 0.169 and p = 0.683, respectively. Conclusions . More than one-third of the sample of Thai elderly with multiple NCDs in primary care were recipients of polypharmacy. Of those with polypharmacy, almost two-thirds reported poor medication adherence and poor medication management at home. Strategies to decrease unnecessary polypharmacy and improve both medication adherence and home management are essential in this patient group.

  18. Effect of mHealth on modifying behavioural risk-factors of non-communicable diseases in an adult, rural population in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Malvika; Banerjee, Bratati; Ingle, G K; Garg, Suneela

    2017-01-01

    The rising trend of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) has led to a "dual burden" in low and middle-income (LAMI) countries like India which are still battling with high prevalence of communicable diseases. The incorporation of a target specially dedicated to NCDs within the goal 3 of the newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals indicates the importance the world now accords to prevention and control of these diseases. Mobile phone technology is increasingly viewed as a promising communication channel that can be utilized for primary prevention of NCDs by promoting behaviour change and risk factor modification. A "Before and After" Intervention study was conducted on 400 subjects, over a period of one year, in Barwala village, Delhi, India. An mHealth intervention package consisting of weekly text messages and monthly telephone calls addressing lifestyle modification for risk factors of NCDs was given to the intervention group, compared to no intervention package in control group. After Intervention Phase, significant reduction was seen in behavioural risk factors (unhealthy diet and insufficient physical activity) in the intervention group compared to control group. Body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure and fasting blood sugar level also showed significant difference in the intervention group as compared to controls. Our study has demonstrated the usefulness of mHealth for health promotion and lifestyle modification at community level in a LAMI country. With the growing burden of NCDs in the community, such cost effective and innovative measures will be needed that can easily reach the masses.

  19. Cross-Sectional Association between Length of Incarceration and Selected Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Chronic Diseases in Two Male Prisons of Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman-Retana, Omar; Lopez-Ridaura, Ruy; Servan-Mori, Edson; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; Bertozzi, Stefano M

    2015-01-01

    Mexico City prisons are characterized by overcrowded facilities and poor living conditions for housed prisoners. Chronic disease profile is characterized by low prevalence of self reported hypertension (2.5%) and diabetes (1.8%) compared to general population; 9.5% of male inmates were obese. There is limited evidence regarding on the exposure to prison environment over prisoner's health status; particularly, on cardiovascular disease risk factors. The objective of this study is to assess the relationship between length of incarceration and selected risk factors for non-communicable chronic diseases (NCDs). We performed a cross-sectional analysis using data from two large male prisons in Mexico City (n = 14,086). Using quantile regression models we assessed the relationship between length of incarceration and selected risk factors for NCDs; stratified analysis by age at admission to prison was performed. We found a significant negative trend in BMI and WC across incarceration length quintiles. BP had a significant positive trend with a percentage change increase around 5% mmHg. The greatest increase in systolic blood pressure was observed in the older age at admission group. This analysis provides insight into the relationship between length of incarceration and four selected risk factors for NCDs; screening for high blood pressure should be guarantee in order to identify at risk individuals and linked to the prison's health facility. It is important to assess prison environment features to approach potential risk for developing NCDs in this context.

  20. The burden of non-communicable disease in transition communities in an Asian megacity: baseline findings from a cohort study in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Faisal S; Lotia-Farrukh, Ismat; Khan, Aamir J; Siddiqui, Saad Tariq; Sajun, Sana Zehra; Malik, Amyn Abdul; Burfat, Aziza; Arshad, Mohammad Hussham; Codlin, Andrew J; Reininger, Belinda M; McCormick, Joseph B; Afridi, Nadeem; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P

    2013-01-01

    The demographic transition in South Asia coupled with unplanned urbanization and lifestyle changes are increasing the burden of non-communicable disease (NCD) where infectious diseases are still highly prevalent. The true magnitude and impact of this double burden of disease, although predicted to be immense, is largely unknown due to the absence of recent, population-based longitudinal data. The present study was designed as a unique 'Framingham-like' Pakistan cohort with the objective of measuring the prevalence and risk factors for hypertension, obesity, diabetes, coronary artery disease and hepatitis B and C infection in a multi-ethnic, middle to low income population of Karachi, Pakistan. We selected two administrative areas from a private charitable hospital's catchment population for enrolment of a random selection of cohort households in Karachi, Pakistan. A baseline survey measured the prevalence and risk factors for hypertension, obesity, diabetes, coronary artery disease and hepatitis B and C infection. Six hundred and sixty-seven households were enrolled between March 2010 and August 2011. A majority of households lived in permanent structures (85%) with access to basic utilities (77%) and sanitation facilities (98%) but limited access to clean drinking water (68%). Households had high ownership of communication technologies in the form of cable television (69%) and mobile phones (83%). Risk factors for NCD, such as tobacco use (45%), overweight (20%), abdominal obesity (53%), hypertension (18%), diabetes (8%) and pre-diabetes (40%) were high. At the same time, infectious diseases such as hepatitis B (24%) and hepatitis C (8%) were prevalent in this population. Our findings highlight the need to monitor risk factors and disease trends through longitudinal research in high-burden transition communities in the context of rapid urbanization and changing lifestyles. They also demonstrate the urgency of public health intervention programs tailored for these

  1. The burden of non-communicable disease in transition communities in an Asian megacity: baseline findings from a cohort study in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal S Khan

    Full Text Available The demographic transition in South Asia coupled with unplanned urbanization and lifestyle changes are increasing the burden of non-communicable disease (NCD where infectious diseases are still highly prevalent. The true magnitude and impact of this double burden of disease, although predicted to be immense, is largely unknown due to the absence of recent, population-based longitudinal data. The present study was designed as a unique 'Framingham-like' Pakistan cohort with the objective of measuring the prevalence and risk factors for hypertension, obesity, diabetes, coronary artery disease and hepatitis B and C infection in a multi-ethnic, middle to low income population of Karachi, Pakistan.We selected two administrative areas from a private charitable hospital's catchment population for enrolment of a random selection of cohort households in Karachi, Pakistan. A baseline survey measured the prevalence and risk factors for hypertension, obesity, diabetes, coronary artery disease and hepatitis B and C infection.Six hundred and sixty-seven households were enrolled between March 2010 and August 2011. A majority of households lived in permanent structures (85% with access to basic utilities (77% and sanitation facilities (98% but limited access to clean drinking water (68%. Households had high ownership of communication technologies in the form of cable television (69% and mobile phones (83%. Risk factors for NCD, such as tobacco use (45%, overweight (20%, abdominal obesity (53%, hypertension (18%, diabetes (8% and pre-diabetes (40% were high. At the same time, infectious diseases such as hepatitis B (24% and hepatitis C (8% were prevalent in this population.Our findings highlight the need to monitor risk factors and disease trends through longitudinal research in high-burden transition communities in the context of rapid urbanization and changing lifestyles. They also demonstrate the urgency of public health intervention programs tailored for

  2. Factors affecting adherence to appointment system in the clinic for non-communicable diseases in UNRWA's Khan Younis Health Centre and the role of mobile phone text messages to improve adherence: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Najjar, Sanaa; Al Shaer, Tamer

    2018-02-21

    To meet the emerging needs of the increasing numbers of patients with non-communicable diseases and to provide optimum care with optimum contact time and minimum waiting time, as stated in UNRWA guidelines, the mobile phone text messaging system was implemented in UNRWA centres to remind patients of upcoming appointments and to thereby improve the quality of care for vulnerable patients and regulate the work load in the clinics for non-communicable diseases. The aim of this study was to assess the causes for lack of adherence to the appointment system at UNRWA centres. This descriptive cross-sectional study was done in the UNRWA's Khan Younis Health Centre (KYHC), which serves the same refugee population as other UNRWA health centres and follows the same guidelines with minimal variation. Data were collected through interviewer-administered questionnaires, with ten medical staff members involved in the appointment process and 50 patients with non-communicable diseases selected randomly from patients attending the KYHC. The text-message reminder intervention targeted 1000 patients with non-communicable diseases and consisted of an electronic message technique that was developed to remind patients about the day and time of upcoming appointments. Administrative approval was obtained from the chief of UNRWA health programme. Verbal consent was obtained from participants. We followed the Modified International Code of Ethics Principles (1975), known as the Declaration of Helsinki. The main barrier to adherence to appointments in the clinic for non-communicable diseases was forgetting the appointment. Other factors were lack of awareness, clinic overcrowding, appointments that do not match the patient's preference, availability of other service providers, and financial issues. In March, 2016, after the completion of the intervention, the proportion of patients that adhered to their appointment by date and time was 76%, compared with about 45% in January and February

  3. Implementing prevention interventions for non-communicable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implementing prevention interventions for non-communicable diseases within the Primary Health Care system in the Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria. ... Conclusion: The capacity of the PHC system to implement NCDs interventions is weak, necessitating a need to strengthen coordination, partnership and funding for better ...

  4. Chiang Mai University Health Worker Study aiming toward a better understanding of noncommunicable disease development in Thailand: methods and description of study population

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    Angkurawaranon C

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chaisiri Angkurawaranon,1,2 Anawat Wisetborisut,2 Wichuda Jiraporncharoen,2 Surinporn Likhitsathian,3 Ronnaphob Uaphanthasath,2 Patama Gomutbutra,2 Surin Jiraniramai,2 Chawin Lerssrimonkol,2 Apinun Aramrattanna,2 Pat Doyle,1 Dorothea Nitsch1 1Department of Non-Communicable Disease Epidemiology, Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; 2Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand; 3Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand Background: Urbanization is considered to be one of the key drivers of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs in Thailand and other developing countries. These influences, in turn, may affect an individual's behavior and risk of developing NCDs. The Chiang Mai University (CMU Health Worker Study aims to provide evidence for a better understanding of the development of NCDs and ultimately to apply the evidence toward better prevention, risk modification, and improvement of clinical care for patients with NCDs and NCD-related conditions. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of health care workers from CMU Hospital was conducted between January 2013 and June 2013. Questionnaires, interviews, and physical and laboratory examinations were used to assess urban exposure, occupational shift work, risk factors for NCDs, self-reported NCDs, and other NCD-related health conditions. Results: From 5,364 eligible workers, 3,204 participated (59.7%. About 11.1% of the participants had high blood pressure (systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg and almost 30% were considered to be obese (body mass index ≥25 kg/m2. A total of 2.3% had a high fasting blood glucose level (≥126 mg/dL, and the most common abnormal lipid profile was high low-density lipoprotein (≥160 mg/dL, which was found in 19.2% of participants. Discussion: The study of health