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Sample records for nonadiabatic dust charge

  1. Linear and nonlinear excitations in complex plasmas with nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and dust size distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Li-Ping; Xue Ju-Kui; Li Yan-Long

    2011-01-01

    Both linear and nonlinear excitation in dusty plasmas have been investigated including the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation and Gaussian size distribution dust particles.A linear dispersion relation and a Korteweg-de VriesBurgers equation governing the dust acoustic shock waves are obtained.The relevance of the instability of wave and the wave evolution to the dust size distribution and nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation is illustrated both analytically and numerically.The numerical results show that the Gaussian size distribution of dust particles and the nonadiabatic dust charge fluctuation have strong common influence on the propagation of both linear and nonlinear excitations.

  2. Characteristics of nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a Lorentzian dusty plasma with effect of adiabatic and nonadiabatic grain charge fluctuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raicharan Denra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, characteristics of small amplitude nonlinear dust acoustic wave have been investigated in a unmagnetized, collisionless, Lorentzian dusty plasma where electrons and ions are inertialess and modeled by generalized Lorentzian Kappa distribution. Dust grains are inertial and equilibrium dust charge is negative. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic fluctuation of charges on dust grains have been taken under consideration. For adiabatic dust charge variation reductive perturbation analysis gives rise to a KdV equation that governs the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves having soliton solutions. For nonadiabatic dust charge variation nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic wave obeys KdV-Burger equation and gives rise to dust acoustic shock waves. Numerical estimation for adiabatic grain charge variation shows the existence of rarefied soliton whose amplitude and width varies with grain charges. Amplitude and width of the soliton have been plotted for different electron Kappa indices keeping ion velocity distribution Maxwellian. For non adiabatic dust charge variation, ratio of the coefficients of Burger term and dispersion term have been plotted against charge fluctuation for different kappa indices. All these results approach to the results of Maxwellian plasma if both electron and ion kappa tends to infinity.

  3. Characteristics of nonlinear dust acoustic waves in a Lorentzian dusty plasma with effect of adiabatic and nonadiabatic grain charge fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denra, Raicharan; Paul, Samit; Sarkar, Susmita

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, characteristics of small amplitude nonlinear dust acoustic wave have been investigated in a unmagnetized, collisionless, Lorentzian dusty plasma where electrons and ions are inertialess and modeled by generalized Lorentzian Kappa distribution. Dust grains are inertial and equilibrium dust charge is negative. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic fluctuation of charges on dust grains have been taken under consideration. For adiabatic dust charge variation reductive perturbation analysis gives rise to a KdV equation that governs the nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves having soliton solutions. For nonadiabatic dust charge variation nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic wave obeys KdV-Burger equation and gives rise to dust acoustic shock waves. Numerical estimation for adiabatic grain charge variation shows the existence of rarefied soliton whose amplitude and width varies with grain charges. Amplitude and width of the soliton have been plotted for different electron Kappa indices keeping ion velocity distribution Maxwellian. For non adiabatic dust charge variation, ratio of the coefficients of Burger term and dispersion term have been plotted against charge fluctuation for different kappa indices. All these results approach to the results of Maxwellian plasma if both electron and ion kappa tends to infinity.

  4. Charged Dust Aggregate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2015-11-01

    A proper understanding of the behavior of dust particle aggregates immersed in a complex plasma first requires a knowledge of the basic properties of the system. Among the most important of these are the net electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments on the dust aggregate as well as the manner in which the aggregate interacts with the local electrostatic fields. The formation of elongated, fractal-like aggregates levitating in the sheath electric field of a weakly ionized RF generated plasma discharge has recently been observed experimentally. The resulting data has shown that as aggregates approach one another, they can both accelerate and rotate. At equilibrium, aggregates are observed to levitate with regular spacing, rotating about their long axis aligned parallel to the sheath electric field. Since gas drag tends to slow any such rotation, energy must be constantly fed into the system in order to sustain it. A numerical model designed to analyze this motion provides both the electrostatic charge and higher multipole moments of the aggregate while including the forces due to thermophoresis, neutral gas drag, and the ion wakefield. This model will be used to investigate the ambient conditions leading to the observed interactions. This research is funded by NSF Grant 1414523.

  5. Dust acoustic shock wave generation due to dust charge variation in a dusty plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Gupta; S Sarkar; M Khan; Samiran Ghosh

    2003-12-01

    In a dusty plasma, the non-adiabaticity of the charge variation on a dust grain surface results in an anomalous dissipation. Analytical investigation shows that this results in a small but finite amplitude dust acoustic (DA) wave propagation which is described by the Korteweg–de Vries–Burger equation. Results of the numerical investigation of the propagation of large-amplitude dust acoustic stationary shock wave are presented here using the complete set of non-linear dust fluid equations coupled with the dust charging equation and Poisson equation. The DA waves are of compressional type showing considerable increase of dust density, which is of significant importance in astrophysical context as it leads to enhanced gravitational attraction considered as a viable process for star formation. The DA shock transition to its far downstream amplitude is oscillatory in nature due to dust charge fluctuations, the oscillation amplitude and shock width depending on the ratio pd/ch and other plasma parameters.

  6. Effect of secondary electron emission on nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation in a complex plasma with negative equilibrium dust charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Subrata; Ghosh, Uttam; Sarkar, Susmita

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the effect of secondary electron emission on nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves in a complex plasma where equilibrium dust charge is negative. The primary electrons, secondary electrons, and ions are Boltzmann distributed, and only dust grains are inertial. Electron-neutral and ion-neutral collisions have been neglected with the assumption that electron and ion mean free paths are very large compared to the plasma Debye length. Both adiabatic and nonadiabatic dust charge variations have been separately taken into account. In the case of adiabatic dust charge variation, nonlinear propagation of dust acoustic waves is governed by the KdV (Korteweg-de Vries) equation, whereas for nonadiabatic dust charge variation, it is governed by the KdV-Burger equation. The solution of the KdV equation gives a dust acoustic soliton, whose amplitude and width depend on the secondary electron yield. Similarly, the KdV-Burger equation provides a dust acoustic shock wave. This dust acoustic shock wave may be monotonic or oscillatory in nature depending on the fact that whether it is dissipation dominated or dispersion dominated. Our analysis shows that secondary electron emission increases nonadiabaticity induced dissipation and consequently increases the monotonicity of the dust acoustic shock wave. Such a dust acoustic shock wave may accelerate charge particles and cause bremsstrahlung radiation in space plasmas whose physical process may be affected by secondary electron emission from dust grains. The effect of the secondary electron emission on the stability of the equilibrium points of the KdV-Burger equation has also been investigated. This equation has two equilibrium points. The trivial equilibrium point with zero potential is a saddle and hence unstable in nature. The nontrivial equilibrium point with constant nonzero potential is a stable node up to a critical value of the wave velocity and a stable focus above it. This critical

  7. Nonextensive dust acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacha, Mustapha; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2012-01-01

    Our recent analysis on nonlinear nonextensive dust-acoustic waves (DA) [Amour and Tribeche in Phys. Plasmas 17:063702, 2010] is extended to include self-consistent nonadiabatic grain charge fluctuation. The appropriate nonextensive electron charging current is rederived based on the orbit-limited motion theory. Our results reveal that the amplitude, strength and nature of the nonlinear DA waves (solitons and shocks) are extremely sensitive to the degree of ion nonextensivity. Stronger is the electron correlation, more important is the charge variation induced nonlinear wave damping. The anomalous dissipation effects may prevail over that dispersion as the electrons evolve far away from their Maxwellian equilibrium. Our investigation may be of wide relevance to astronomers and space scientists working on interstellar dusty plasmas where nonthermal distributions are turning out to be a very common and characteristic feature.

  8. Photoelectric Charging of Dust in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickafoose, A. A.; Robertson, S.; Colwell, J. E.; Horanyi, M.

    1999-09-01

    Illumination of surfaces in space by solar ultraviolet light produces photoelectrons which form a plasma sheath near the surface. Dust particles on the surface can acquire a charge and be transported horizontally and vertically by electric fields within the sheath. On the moon, suspended dust grains have been observed on multiple occasions, and there is evidence for horizontal lunar dust transport. Photoelectron production and dust particle charging are also expected to be significant near the surface of Mars. Understanding the photoelectric charging properties of dust can help explain the observed dynamics of lunar dust and help predict the behavior of dust on surfaces of planetary satellites, asteroids, planetary ring particles, and planetesimals. In addition, any human or spacecraft activity on planetary bodies is affected by dust dynamics near the surface. We have examined the photoelectric charging of dust dropped through UV illumination and dust dropped past a UV illuminated surface having a photoelectron sheath. Experiments are performed in vacuum with illumination from a 1 kW Hg-Xe arc lamp. The lamp produces a spectrum down to ~ 200 nm ( ~ 6.2 eV), and the photoemitter is a 12 cm diameter zirconium plate. Dust dropped through UV illumination loses electrons due to photoemission, while dust dropped past an illuminated surface gains electrons from the photoelectron sheath. Initial results are consistent with expected charge calculated from the work function of the materials, the energy of incoming photons, and the capacitance of the grains. Photoelectric charging experiments have been done for several different kinds of dust 90-106 mu m in diameter. We will present the results of these experiments and compare the charging properties of zinc, copper, graphite, Martian regolith simulant (JSC Mars-1), lunar regolith simulant (JSC-1), and lunar soil from an Apollo 17 sample. This research is supported by NASA.

  9. Ionization and Dust Charging in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, A V; Caselli, P

    2016-01-01

    Ionization-recombination balance in dense interstellar and circumstellar environments is a key factor for a variety of important physical processes, such as chemical reactions, dust charging and coagulation, coupling of the gas with magnetic field and the development of magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary disks. We present a self-consistent analytical model which allows us to exactly calculate abundances of charged species in dusty gas, in the regime where the dust-phase recombination dominates over the gas-phase recombination. The model is employed to verify applicability of a conventional approximation of low dust charges in protoplanetary disks, and to discuss the implications for the dust coagulation and the development of the "dead zone" in the disk. Furthermore, the importance of mutually consistent models for the ionization and dust evolution is addressed: These processes are coupled via several mechanisms operating in the disk, and therefore their interplay can be crucial for the ultimate ...

  10. Dust Charging in Electronegative SiH4 Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Ping; WANG Zheng-Xiong; LIU Yue; LIU Jin-Yuan; WANG Xiao-Gang

    2005-01-01

    @@ We theoretically investigate the dust charging in electronegative silane (SiH4) plasmas, taking into account the effects of UV photodetachment. It is found that UV photodetachment could significantly lower the dust negative charge and even makes dust grains be positively charged under some special conditions. In addition, the other parameters, involving the negative ion and dust number densities, electron temperature and dust radius, have great effects upon the dust charging.

  11. Analytical Study of Nonlinear Dust Acoustic Waves in Two-Dimensional Dust Plasma with Dust Charge Variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chang; ZHANG Xiu-Lian

    2005-01-01

    The nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation is analytically investigated by using the formally variable separation approach. New analytical solutions for the governing equation of this system have been obtained for dust acoustic waves in a dust plasma for the first time. We derive exact analytical expressions for the general case of the nonlinear dust acoustic waves in two-dimensional dust plasma with dust charge variation.

  12. Charging and Growth of Fractal Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, Lorin S

    2007-01-01

    The structure and evolution of aggregate grains formed within a plasma environment are dependent upon the charge acquired by the micron-sized dust grains during the coagulation process. The manner in which the charge is arranged on developing irregular structures can affect the fractal dimension of aggregates formed during collisions, which in turn influences the coagulation rate and size evolution of the dust within the plasma cloud. This paper presents preliminary models for the charge and size evolution of fractal aggregates immersed in a plasma environment calculated using a modification to the orbital-motion-limited (OML) theory. Primary electron and ion currents incident on points on the aggregate surface are determined using a line-of-sight (LOS) approximation: only those electron or ion trajectories which are not blocked by another grain within the aggregate contribute to the charging current. Using a self-consistent iterative approach, the equilibrium charge and dipole moment are calculated for the d...

  13. Ionization and Dust Charging in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, A. V.; Akimkin, V. V.; Caselli, P.

    2016-12-01

    Ionization-recombination balance in dense interstellar and circumstellar environments is a key factor for a variety of important physical processes, such as chemical reactions, dust charging and coagulation, coupling of the gas with magnetic field, and development of instabilities in protoplanetary disks. We determine a critical gas density above which the recombination of electrons and ions on the grain surface dominates over the gas-phase recombination. For this regime, we present a self-consistent analytical model, which allows us to calculate exactly the abundances of charged species in dusty gas, without making assumptions on the grain charge distribution. To demonstrate the importance of the proposed approach, we check whether the conventional approximation of low grain charges is valid for typical protoplanetary disks, and discuss the implications for dust coagulation and development of the “dead zone” in the disk. The presented model is applicable for arbitrary grain-size distributions and, for given dust properties and conditions of the disk, has only one free parameter—the effective mass of the ions, shown to have a small effect on the results. The model can be easily included in numerical simulations following the dust evolution in dense molecular clouds and protoplanetary disks.

  14. Imaging Charged Dust in Laboratory Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goree, John

    2010-05-01

    Laboratory experiments with dust grains are described in this talk, which will include numerous images and videos from the experiments. In all the experiments, grains are immersed in plasma, and they are electrically charged. In the first experiment, grains are synthesized under conditions that simulate the outflow of carbon stars. These grains are grown in the gas phase with a carbon vapor. They grow by homogeneous nucleation, accretion, and coagulation. After growth, they are collected and imaged by scanning electron microscopy. These images reveal the grain morphology. In the second experiment, the structure and dynamics of the liquid or solid-phase centers of a star is simulated in the laboratory using charged grains (precision micron-size spheres) as proxies for protons. These grains are imaged by video microscopy, revealing how they self-organize, arranging themselves spatially in a crystalline-like lattice due to mutual Coulomb repulsion. Video microscopy allows tracking the motion of the microspheres and calculating their velocities. This measurement allows the experimenter to detect waves corresponding to random thermal motion, and from the properties of these waves one can measure the grain's charge. In the third experiment, sound waves in a cloud of charged dust are observed using high-speed video cameras. The compression and rarefaction of the dust-grain number density are easily observed in the video. Work supported by NSF and NASA.

  15. Propagation of dust-acoustic waves in weakly ionized plasmas with dust-charge fluctuation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Mondal

    2004-11-01

    For an unmagnetized partially ionized dusty plasma containing electrons, singly charged positive ions, micron-sized massive negatively charged dust grains and a fraction of neutral atoms, dispersion relations for both the dust-ion-acoustic and the dust-acoustic waves have been derived, incorporating dust charge fluctuation. The dispersion relations, under various conditions, have been exhaustively analysed. The explicit expressions for the growth rates have also been derived.

  16. Dust Charging in the Sheath of an Electronegative Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王正汹; 王文春; 刘悦; 刘金远; 王晓钢

    2004-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the dust charging in the sheath of an electronegative plasma, by using a single dust grain model based on a previous sheath structure [Chin. Phys. Lett 20 (2003) 1537] in which cold positive ions and hot negative ions have been assumed. It is found that dust grains are first charged negatively at the sheath edge and then begin to be charged positively in the sheath. Moreover, both the temperature ratio of electrons to negative ions and the density ratio of negative ions to positive ions have effects on the neutral point of the dust charge.

  17. Jeans instability of a dusty plasma with dust charge variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimi Pajouh, H., E-mail: hakimi@alzahra.ac.ir; Afshari, N. [Faculty of Physics, Alzahra University, P. O. Box 19938-93973, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    The effect of the dust charge variations on the stability of a self-gravitating dusty plasma has been theoretically investigated. The dispersion relation for the dust-acoustic waves in a self-gravitating dusty plasma is obtained. It is shown that the dust charge variations have significant effects. It increases the growth rate of instability and the instability cutoff wavenumbers. It is found that by increasing the value of the ions temperature and the absolute value of the equilibrium dust charge, the cutoff wavenumber decreases and the stability region is extended.

  18. Dust charging and charge fluctuations in a weakly collisional radio-frequency sheath at low pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piel, Alexander, E-mail: piel@physik.uni-kiel.de; Schmidt, Christian [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Kiel (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Models for the charging of dust particles in the bulk plasma and in the sheath region are discussed. A new model is proposed that describes collision-enhanced ion currents in the sheath. The collisions result in a substantial reduction of the negative charge of the dust. Experimental data for the dust charge in the sheath can be described by this model when a Bi-Maxwellian electron distribution is taken into account. Expressions for the dust charging rate for all considered models are presented and their influence on the rise of the kinetic dust temperature is discussed.

  19. Charging of Fractal Dust Agglomerates in a Plasma Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, L S

    2007-01-01

    The charge on micron-sized dust grains plays a crucial role in the structure and evolution of forming aggregates within the dust population during the coagulation process. The manner in which the charge is arranged on developing irregular structures can affect the fractal dimension of aggregates formed during collisions, which in turn influences the coagulation rate and size evolution of the dust cloud. Preliminary models for the charge evolution on fractal aggregates immersed in a plasma environment calculated using a modification to the orbital-motion-limited (OML) theory are presented in this paper. The model calculates currents to each point on the aggregate surface using a line-of-sight (LOS) approximation: only those electron or ion trajectories which are not blocked by another grain within the aggregate contribute to the charging current. Both the total charge and the dipole moment are calculated for the dust aggregate. While most coagulation theories assume that it is difficult for like-charged grains...

  20. Planetary Magnetosphere Probed by Charged Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Gruen, E.; Srama, R.; Auer, S.; Kempf, S.; Krueger, H.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ and remote sensing observations combined with theoretical and numerical modeling greatly advanced our understanding planetary magnetospheres. Dust is an integral component of the Saturnian and Jovian magnetospheres where it can act as a source/sink of plasma particles (dust particles are an effective source for plasma species like O2, OH, etc. through sputtering of ice particles, for example); its distribution is shaped by electrodynamic forces coupled radiation pressure, plasma, and neutral drag, for example. The complex interaction can lead to unusual dust dynamics, including the transport, capture, and ejection of dust grains. The study of the temporal and spatial evolution of fine dust within or outside the magnetosphere thus provides a unique way to combine data from a large number of observations: plasma, plasma wave, dust, and magnetic field measurements. The dust detectors on board the Galileo and Cassini spacecrafts lead to major discoveries, including the jovian dust stream originating from Io or the in-situ sampling and analysis of the plumes of Enceladus. Recent advancement in dust detector technology enables accurate measurement of the dust trajectory and elemental composition that can greatly enhance the understanding of dust magnetorspheric interaction and indentify the source of the dust with high precision. The capabilities of a modern dust detector thus can provide support for the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission.

  1. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasma with variable dust charge

    CERN Document Server

    Forozani, Gh

    2011-01-01

    In this article we are going to consider dust acoustic wave in dusty plasma whose constituents are inertial negative charged dust particles, Boltzmann distributed electrons and non-thermal distributed ions with variable dust charge. Using reductive perturbation method, we have obtained Korteweg-de Veries (kdv) and modified kdv(mkdv) equations. A Sagdeev potential for the system and stability conditions for solitonic solution are also derived.

  2. Coherent structures in presence of dust charge fluctuations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Kakati; K S Goswami

    2000-05-01

    This paper shows the formation of nonlinear coherent structures in a dusty plasma in presence of dust charge fluctuations. Using the typical plasma parameters the potential of the nonlinear coherent structures is derived.

  3. Abnormal Kinetic Energy of Charged Dust Particles in Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, G.; Stegailov, V.; Timofeev, A.

    A mechanism of the increase of the average kinetic energy of charged dust particles in gas discharge plasmas is suggested. Particle charge fluctuation is the reason for the appearance of forced resonance, which heals vertical oscillations. The energy transfer from vertical oscillations to the

  4. Abnormal Kinetic Energy of Charged Dust Particles in Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, G.; Stegailov, V.; Timofeev, A.

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism of the increase of the average kinetic energy of charged dust particles in gas discharge plasmas is suggested. Particle charge fluctuation is the reason for the appearance of forced resonance, which heals vertical oscillations. The energy transfer from vertical oscillations to the horizo

  5. Role of nonthermal electrons on dust ion acoustic double layer with variable dust charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Prathana; Gogoi, Deepshikha; Das, Nilakshi

    2016-01-01

    The presence of nonthermal electron may play an important role in the formation of nonlinear structures in plasma. On the other hand, fluctuation of dust charge is an important and unique feature of complex plasma and it gives rise to a dissipative effect in the system leading to the formation of nonlinear structures due to the balance between nonlinearity and dissipation. In this paper, the propagation of nonlinear dust ion acoustic (DIA) wave in unmagnetized collisionless dusty plasma consisting of ions, nonthermal electrons and dust grains with variable negative charge has been investigated using the Sagdeev potential method. The existence domain of rarefactive double layer (DL) in the DIA wave has been investigated for the range of plasma parameters. The real potential has been obtained by numerically solving the Poisson equation and dust charging equation. It is observed that the presence of nonthermal electrons strengthens the DIA DL.

  6. Transport of charged dust grains into the galactic halo

    CERN Document Server

    Khoperskov, S A

    2014-01-01

    We develop a 3D dynamical model of dust outflows from galactic discs. The outflows are initiated by multiple SN explosions in a magnetized interstellar medium (ISM) with a gravitationally stratified density distribution. Dust grains are treated as particles in cells interacting collisionally with gas, and forced by stellar radiation of the disc and Lorenz force. We show that magnetic field plays a crucial role in accelerating the charged dust grains and expelling them out of the disc: in 10--20~Myr they can be elevated at distances up to 10~kpc above the galactic plane. The dust-to-gas ratio in the outflowing medium varies in the range $5 \\cdot 10^{-4} - 5 \\cdot 10^{-2}$ along the vertical stream. Overall the dust mass loss rate depends on the parameters of ISM and may reach up to $3\\times 10^{-2}$~\\Msun~yr$^{-1}$

  7. Acceleration of Small Dust Grains due to Charge Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem

    2011-01-01

    We consider the acceleration of very small dust grains including Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) arising from the electrostatic interactions of dust grains that have charge fluctuates in time due to charging events. We simulate the charge fluctuations of very small grains due to their sticking collisions with electrons and ions in plasma and the emission of photoelectrons by UV photons using Monte Carlo method. We identify the acceleration induced by the charge fluctuations as the dominant acceleration mechanism of very small grains in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We show that this acceleration mechanism is more efficient for environments with low ionization, where the charge fluctuations are slow but have a large amplitude. We also discuss the implications of the present mechanism for grain coagulation and shattering in the diffuse ISM, molecular clouds and protoplanetary disks.

  8. Effect of dust charge variation on dust-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized two-ion-temperature dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛具奎; 郎和

    2003-01-01

    The effect of dust charge variation on the dust-acoustic solitary structures is investigated in a warm magnetized two-ion-temperature dusty plasma consisting of a negatively and variably charged extremely massive dust fluid and ions of two different temperatures. It is shown that the dust charge variation as well as the presence of a second component of ions would modify the properties of the dust-acoustic solitary structures and may excite both dust-acoustic solitary holes (soliton waves with a density dip) and positive solitons (soliton waves with a density hump).

  9. Charge of dust particles in a particle chain

    CERN Document Server

    Yousefi, Razieh; Matthews, Lorin Swint; Hyde, Truell W

    2016-01-01

    Charged dust particles form structures which are extended in the vertical direction in the electrode sheath of a rf discharge when confined within a glass box. The charge on each particle as a function of height varies due to the changing plasma conditions and the wakefield of upstream particles. Here an analysis of the equilibrium state of chains of varying number of particles is analyzed to determine the charge on each particle within a vertically extended chain as well as the magnitude of the positive wakefield charge.

  10. Dust particle charge distribution in a stratified glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhinin, Gennady I [Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentyev Ave., 1, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Fedoseev, Alexander V [Institute of Thermophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Lavrentyev Ave., 1, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Ramazanov, Tlekkabul S [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi, 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Dzhumagulova, Karlygash N [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi, 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Amangaliyeva, Rauan Zh [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi, 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)

    2007-12-21

    The influence of a highly pronounced non-equilibrium characteristic of the electron energy distribution function in a stratified dc glow discharge on the process of dust particle charging in a complex plasma is taken into account for the first time. The calculated particle charge spatial distribution is essentially non-homogeneous and it can explain the vortex motion of particles at the periphery of a dusty cloud obtained in experiments.

  11. Effect of adiabatic variation of dust charges on dust acoustic solitary waves in magnetized dusty plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duan Wen-Shan

    2004-01-01

    The effect of dust charging and the influence of its adiabatic variation on dust acoustic waves is investigated. By employing the reductive perturbation technique we derived a Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation for small amplitude dust acoustic waves. We have analytically verified that there are only rarefactive solitary waves for this system. The instability region for one-dimensional solitary wave under transverse perturbations has also been obtained. The obliquely propagating solitary waves to the z-direction for the ZK equation are given in this paper as well.

  12. Dust-Acoustic Waves in Strongly Coupled Dusty Plasmas Containing Variable-Charge Impurities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Bai-Song; HE Kai-Fen; M. Y. Yu

    2000-01-01

    A relatively self-consistent theory of dust-acoustic waves in the strongly coupled dusty plasmas containing variable charge impurities is given. Relevant physical processes such as dust elastic relaxation and dust charge relaxation are taken into account. It is shown that the negative dispersion of dust-acoustic waves due to the strong correlation of dusts is enhanced in the presence of dust-neutral collisions.

  13. Dust acoustic and drift waves in a non-Maxwellian dusty plasma with dust charge fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakir, U.; Haque, Q.; Imtiaz, N.; Qamar, A.

    2015-12-01

    > ) on the wave dispersion and instability are presented. It is found that the presence of the non-thermal electron and ion populations reduce the growth rate of the instability which arises due to the dust charging effect. In addition, the nonlinear vortex solutions are also obtained. For illustration, the results are analysed by using the dusty plasma parameters of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  14. Charge and Levitation of Grains in Plasma Sheath with Dust Thermic Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    By taking into account thermic emission current from hot dust surface, the problem involved in dust charging and levitation of dust grains in plasma sheath has been researched. The results are compared to that without including thermal emission current while the system parameters are same. It is found that the thermal emission current has played a significant role on modifying the dust charging and balance levitations. Both of the charging numbers of dust and the dust radius in balance are dramatically reduced. The stability of dust levitation is also analyzed and discussed.

  15. Complex role of secondary electron emissions in dust grain charging in space environments: measurements on Apollo 11 & 17 dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mian; Tankosic, Dragana; Spann, James; Leclair, Andre C.

    Dust grains in various astrophysical environments are generally charged electrostatically by photoelectric emissions with radiation from nearby sources, by electron/ion collisions, and sec-ondary electron emissions. Knowledge of the dust grain charges and equilibrium potentials is important for understanding of a variety of physical and dynamical processes in the interstel-lar medium (ISM), and heliospheric, interplanetary, planetary, and lunar environments. The high vacuum environment on the lunar surface leads to some unusual physical and dynam-ical phenomena involving dust grains with high adhesive characteristics, and levitation and transportation over long distances. It has been well recognized that the charging properties of individual micron/submicron size dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the corresponding values for bulk materials and theoretical models. In this paper we present experimental results on charging of individual dust grains selected from Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 dust samples by exposing them to mono-energetic electron beams in the 10-400 eV energy range. The charging rates of positively and negatively charged particles of 0.2 to 13 µm diam-eters are discussed in terms of the secondary electron emission (SEE) process, which is found to be a complex charging process at electron energies as low as 10-25 eV, with strong parti-cle size dependence. The measurements indicate substantial differences between dust charging properties of individual small size dust grains and of bulk materials.

  16. Nonadiabatic Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryachko, Eugene S.

    The general features of the nonadiabatic coupling and its relation to molecular properties are surveyed. Some consequences of the [`]equation of motion', formally expressing a [`]smoothness' of a given molecular property within the diabatic basis, are demonstrated. A particular emphasis is made on the relation between a [`]smoothness' of the electronic dipole moment and the generalized Mulliken-Hush formula for the diabatic electronic coupling.

  17. Small amplitude variable charge dust Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal double layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amour, Rabia [Plasma Physics Group, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences - Physics, U.S.T.H.B, Bab-Ezzouar, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Tribeche, Mouloud [Plasma Physics Group, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences - Physics, U.S.T.H.B, Bab-Ezzouar, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)], E-mail: mouloud-tribeche@lycos.com

    2009-05-11

    A first theoretical attempt is made to investigate small amplitude, variable charge dust Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) double layers (DLs). The nature of the dust BGK-DLs (compressive or rarefactive), their strength and thickness depend sensitively on the net negative charge residing on the grain surface, the dust grain dynamics and, more interestingly, on the ion-to-electron temperatures ratio.

  18. Irregularity excitation associated with charged dust cloud boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Scales, W. A.

    2012-02-01

    Irregularity generation associated with dust cloud expansion through a background plasma along a magnetic field is investigated. Because of the dust charging process, a boundary layer is produced, separating the dusty plasma generated and the background plasma. It is observed that under appropriate conditions, localized plasma irregularities may be generated in this boundary layer. Theoretical and computational models are used to study the evolution of relevant plasma instabilities thought to play a dominant role in irregularity production. An electron flow develops along the boundary layer of the dust cloud, and plasma irregularities are generated in response to this flow. Several aspects of the cloud's structure (thickness of the boundary layer, average particle size and density, collisional processes, and cloud expansion speed) and the ambient plasma are varied to determine the effect of these quantities on the resulting irregularities. The relevance of these results to past experimental observations in space and the laboratory for applications to the expansion of naturally or artificially created dust clouds is discussed.

  19. Charged dust and shock phenomena in the Solar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. I. Popel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The results on shock phenomena in dusty plasmas of the Solar System are reviewed. The problems of dust ion acoustic bow shock in interaction of the solar wind with dusty cometary coma and formation of transient atmospheres of atmosphereless cosmic bodies such as Moon, Mercury, asteroids and comets are considered. The latter assumes the evolution of meteoroid impact plumes and production of charged dust grains due to the condensation of both the plume substance and the vapor thrown from the crater and the surrounding regolith layer. Physical phenomena occurring during large meteoroid impacts can be modeled with the aid of active rocket experiments, which involve the release of some gaseous substance in near-Earth space. New vistas in investigation of shock processes in natural dusty plasmas are determined.

  20. Electrostatic Charging of Lunar Dust by UV Photoelectric Emissions and Solar Wind Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mian M.; Tankosic, Dragana; Spann, James f.; LeClair, Andre C.; Dube, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitous presence of dust in the lunar environment with its high adhesive characteristics has been recognized to be a major safety issue that must be addressed in view of its hazardous effects on robotic and human exploration of the Moon. The reported observations of a horizon glow and streamers at the lunar terminator during the Apollo missions are attributed to the sunlight scattered by the levitated lunar dust. The lunar surface and the dust grains are predominantly charged positively by the incident UV solar radiation on the dayside and negatively by the solar wind electrons on the night-side. The charged dust grains are levitated and transported over long distances by the established electric fields. A quantitative understanding of the lunar dust phenomena requires development of global dust distribution models, based on an accurate knowledge of lunar dust charging properties. Currently available data of lunar dust charging is based on bulk materials, although it is well recognized that measurements on individual dust grains are expected to be substantially different from the bulk measurements. In this paper we present laboratory measurements of charging properties of Apollo 11 & 17 dust grains by UV photoelectric emissions and by electron impact. These measurements indicate substantial differences of both qualitative and quantitative nature between dust charging properties of individual micron/submicron sized dust grains and of bulk materials. In addition, there are no viable theoretical models available as yet for calculation of dust charging properties of individual dust grains for both photoelectric emissions and electron impact. It is thus of paramount importance to conduct comprehensive measurements for charging properties of individual dust grains in order to develop realistic models of dust processes in the lunar atmosphere, and address the hazardous issues of dust on lunar robotic and human missions.

  1. Orbital-motion-limited theory of dust charging and plasma response

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The foundational theory for dusty plasmas is the dust charging theory that provides the dust potential and charge arising from the dust interaction with a plasma. The most widely used dust charging theory for negatively charged dust particles is the so-called orbital motion limited (OML) theory, which predicts the dust potential and heat collection accurately for a variety of applications, but was previously found to be incapable of evaluating the dust charge and plasma response in any situation. Here we report a revised OML formulation that is able to predict the plasma response and hence the dust charge. Numerical solutions of the new OML model show that the widely-used Whipple approximation of dust charge-potential relationship agrees with OML theory in the limit of small dust radius compared with plasma Debye length, but incurs large (order-unity) deviation from the OML prediction when the dust size becomes comparable with or larger than plasma Debye length. This latter case is expected for the important ...

  2. Harrison transformation of hyperelliptic solutions and charged dust disks

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, C

    2002-01-01

    We use a Harrison transformation on solutions to the stationary axisymmetric Einstein equations to generate solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations. The case of hyperelliptic solutions to the Ernst equation is studied in detail. Analytic expressions for the metric and the multipole moments are obtained. As an example we consider the transformation of a family of counter-rotating dust disks. The resulting solutions can be interpreted as disks with currents and matter with a purely azimuthal pressure or as two streams of freely moving charged particles. We discuss interesting limiting cases as the extreme limit where the charge becomes identical to the mass, and the ultrarelativistic limit where the central redshift diverges.

  3. Dust ion-acoustic shock waves due to dust charge fluctuation in a superthermal dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alinejad, H., E-mail: alinejad@nit.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Science, Babol University of Technology, Babol 47148-71167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Fundamental Sciences (RIFS), University of Tabriz, 51664, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tribeche, M. [Plasma Physics Group, Faculty of Sciences – Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar (Algeria); Mohammadi, M.A. [Research Institute for Fundamental Sciences (RIFS), University of Tabriz, 51664, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-14

    The nonlinear propagation of dust ion-acoustic (DIA) shock waves is studied in a charge varying dusty plasma with electrons having kappa velocity distribution. We use hot ions with equilibrium streaming speed and a fast superthermal electron charging current derived from orbit limited motion (OLM) theory. It is found that the presence of superthermal electrons does not only significantly modify the basic properties of shock waves, but also causes the existence of shock profile with only positive potential in such plasma with parameter ranges corresponding to Saturn's rings. It is also shown that the strength and steepness of the shock waves decrease with increase of the size of dust grains and ion temperature. -- Highlights: ► The presence of superthermal electrons causes the existence of shock waves with only positive potential. ► The strength and steepness of the shock waves decrease with increase of the size of dust grains and ion temperature. ► As the electrons evolve toward their thermodynamic equilibrium, the shock structures are found with smaller amplitude.

  4. A note on dust grain charging in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Central to the study of dust-plasma interactions in the solar system is the electrostatic charging of dust grains. While previous calculations have generally assumed that the distributions of electrons and ions in the plasma are Maxwellian, most space plasmas are observed to have non-Maxwellian tails and can often be fit by a generalized Lorentzian (kappa) distribution. Here we use such a distribution to reevaluate the grain potential, under the condition that the dominant currents to the grain are due to electron and ion collection, as is the case in certain regions of space. The magnitude of the grain potential is found to be larger than that in a Maxwellian plasma as long as the electrons are described by a kappa distribution: this enhancement increased with ion mass and decreasing electron kappa. The modification of the grain potential in generalized Lorentzian plasmas has implications for both the physics (e.g., grain growth and disruption) and the dynamics of dust in space plasmas. These are also briefly discussed.

  5. Influence of solar wind ions on photoemission charging of dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouzak, Libor; Richterova, Ivana; Pavlu, Jiri; Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek

    2016-04-01

    The lunar surface covered by a layer of dust grains is exposed to solar wind particles and photons coming from the Sun on the sunlit side. Solar wind ions cause sputtering of dust grains or can be implanted into grains. We suppose that as a consequence of ion implantation, an additional energy is transferred to grains, more valence band electrons are excited, and the photoelectron yield is increased. An increase of the photoelectron current causes the enhanced density of electrons that form a sheet above the illuminated lunar surface. Thus, an influence of solar wind ions on the Debye length and photoelectron sheet formation is expected. We present laboratory estimations of work functions and photoelectron yields of a single micron-sized silica grain before and after ion implantation. The silica grain used as a lunar simulant is caught in the electrodynamic trap. Grain's specific charge is evaluated by an analysis of the grain motion within the trap, while its work function is determined from observations of a time evolution of the charge-to-mass ratio when the grain is irradiated by photons of different emission lines. By comparison of the photoelectron current (from grain) with photon flux (from UV source), we establish the photoelectron yield of the trapped object. The influence of ion implantation is thoroughly analyzed and discussed.

  6. Dynamical mechanism of charge separation by photoexcited generation of proton-electron pairs in organic molecular systems. A nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kentaro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2016-08-01

    In this perspective article, we review, along with presenting new results, a series of our theoretical analyses on the excited-state mechanism of charge separation (proton-electron pair creation) relevant to the photoinduced water-splitting reaction (2H2O → 4H+ + 4e- + O2) in organic and biological systems, which quite often includes Mn clusters in various molecular configurations. The present mechanism is conceived to be universal in the triggering process of the photoexcited water splitting dynamics. In other words, any Mn-based catalytic charge separation is quite likely to be initiated according to this mechanism. As computationally tractable yet realistic models, we examine a series of systems generally expressed as X-Mn-OH2⋯A, where X = (OH, Ca(OH)3) and A = (N-methylformamidine, guanidine, imidazole or ammonia cluster) in terms of the theory of nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics. We first find both an electron and a proton are simultaneously transferred to the acceptors through conical intersections upon photoexcitation. In this mechanism, the electron takes different pathways from that of the proton and reaches the densely lying Rydberg-like states of the acceptors in the end, thereby inducing charge separation. Therefore the presence of the Rydberg-like diffused unoccupied states as an electron acceptor is critical for this reaction to proceed. We also have found another crucial nonadiabatic process that deteriorates the efficiency of charge separation by rendering the created pair of proton and electron back to the originally donor site through the states of d-d band originated from Mn atom. Repetition of this process gradually annihilates the created pair of proton and electron in a way different from the usual charge recombination process. We address this dynamics by means of our proposed path-branching representation. The dynamical roles of a doped Ca atom are also uncovered, which are relevant to controlling the pathways of electron

  7. Semi-analytic variable charge solitary waves involving dust phase-space vortices (holes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribeche, Mouloud; Younsi, Smain; Amour, Rabia; Aoutou, Kamel [Plasma Physics Group, Faculty of Sciences-Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB BP 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)], E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz

    2009-09-15

    A semi-analytic model for highly nonlinear solitary waves involving dust phase-space vortices (holes) is outlined. The variable dust charge is expressed in terms of the Lambert function and we take advantage of this transcendental function to investigate the localized structures that may occur in a dusty plasma with variable charge trapped dust particles. Our results which complement the previously published work on this problem (Schamel et al 2001 Phys. Plasmas 8 671) should be of basic interest for experiments that involve the trapping of dust particles in ultra-low-frequency dust acoustic modes.

  8. Attraction of positively charged dust grains in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzanno, Gian Luca; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2006-10-01

    In two recent papers, Delzanno et al. [1-2] have pointed out that an electron emitting dust grain immersed in a plasma can sustain profiles of the shielding potential having an attractive potential well. The existence of attractive potential wells around dust grains in a plasma is of considerable interest as it provides an alternative mechanism for the attraction of the grains. Moreover, this mechanism can play an important role in astrophysical scenarios, for example in star forming regions where a substantial UV field is responsible for grain photoemission. We have therefore developed a three-dimensional PIC code with the aim of studying the collapse of a system of grains undergoing gravitational and electrostatic forces (the latter modeled via the potential well discovered in Refs. [1,2]). We will show how the attractive potential well can indeed lead to the collapse of the system, at rates which can be higher with respect to the pure gravitational analogue. Further on, a pure monotonic Debye-Huckel electrostatic potential can impede the collapse, depending on the charge to mass ratio of the grains. These results are in agreement with the predictions of the linear theory we have recently developed [3]. [1] G. L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, M. Rosenberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 (3), 035002 (2004). [2] G. L. Delzanno, A. Bruno, G. Sorasio, G. Lapenta, Phys. Plasmas 12, 062102 (2005). [3] G. L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 175005 (2005).

  9. Study on plasma parameters and dust charging in an electrostatically plugged multicusp plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of the electrostatic confinement potential on the charging of dust grains and its relationship with the plasma parameters has been studied in an electrostatically plugged multicusp dusty plasma device. Electrostatic plugging is implemented by biasing the electrically isolated magnetic multicusp channel walls. The experimental results show that voltage applied to the channel walls can be a controlling parameter for dust charging.

  10. Effect of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation on dust ion-acoustic shock waves in a multi-ion dusty plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WANG HONGYAN; ZHANG KAIBIAO

    2016-07-01

    The effects of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation of dust grains on the small but finite amplitude nonlinear dust ion-acoustic shock waves, in an unmagnetized multi-ion dusty plasma which contains negative ions, positive ions and electrons, are studied in this paper. A Burgers equation and its stationary solutions are obtained by using the reductive perturbation method. The analytical and numerical results show that the height with polynomial dust size distribution is larger than that of the monosized dusty plasmas with the same dustgrains, but the thickness in the case of different dust grains is smaller than that of the monosized dusty plasmas. Furthermore, the moving speed of the shock waves also depend on different dust size distributions.

  11. Stochastic Theory of Dust-Grain Charging in Low-Pressure Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Abolmasov, S N; Cabarrocas, P Roca i

    2013-01-01

    Charging of dust grains in low-pressure plasmas is reviewed critically. A theory based on the Fokker-Planck equation and orbital motion limited approximation is proposed. The theory predicts that dust grains can acquire a positive charge in low-pressure electropositive plasmas having a sufficiently high plasma potential, in agreement with experimental observations. It is also shown that variations in the plasma potential (electron temperature) can lead to spatial regions in which grains have opposite charges.

  12. Electrostatic shock waves in a nonthermal dusty plasma with oppositely charged dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossen, M. Mobarak; Nahar, L.; Alam, M. S.; Sultana, S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    Theoretical and numerical investigations of dust acoustic shock waves (DASHWs) have been carried out in electron-depleted magnetized dusty plasmas (consisting of mobile positively charged as well as negatively charged dust particles, and nonextensive q-distributed ions). The both positively and negatively charged dust kinematic viscosities are taken into account to derive the Burgers equation. It is observed that the viscous force (acting on both polarity charged dust particles) is the dissipitive source and responsible for the formation of DASHWs. It is seen that the electron-depleted magnetized plasma supports both (positive and negative) polarity shock structures. It is also seen that the basic features (i.e., amplitude, width, polarity, phase speed, etc.) of DASHWs are modified by the effects of ion nonextensivity, coefficient of viscosity, oblique angle, negative-to-positive dust mass ratio, ratio of the number of electrons on a negatively charged dust-to-the number of protons on a positively charged dust, and the ratio of the ion number density-to-the negative dust number density. The results of our present investigation may be useful to study the various space and laboratory plasmas, where dissipation due to kinematic viscosity can not be neglected.

  13. Dust charge fluctuation effects on Langmuir waves with kappa distributed electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, M.; Rouhani, M. R.; Hakimi Pajouh, H.

    2016-03-01

    Using a kinetic description, dust charge fluctuations due to the inelastic collisions between dust particles and plasma particles are studied in unmagnetized dusty plasmas. Most astrophysical and space plasmas are observed to have non-Maxwellian high energy tail. Therefore, a kappa distribution for electrons in the equilibrium is assumed. The dispersion relation and damping rates for Langmuir waves are obtained. Considering the dust charge fluctuations increases the damping rate of Langmuir waves. It is shown that the damping rate of Langmuir waves depends on the spectral index and the dust density parameter.

  14. Stability Dust-Ion-Acoustic Wave in Dusty Plasmas With Stream -Influence of Charge Fluctuation of Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Atamaniuk, B; Atamaniuk, Barbara; Zuchowski, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    There is a quickly increasing wealth of experimental data on so-called dusty plasmas i. e. ionized gases or usual plasmas that contain micron sized charged particles. Interest in these structures is driven both by their importance in many astrophysical as well as commercial situations. Among them are linear and nonlinear wave phenomena. We consider the influence of dust charge fluctuations on stability of the ion-acoustic waves when the stream of particles is present. It is assumed that all grains of dust have equal masses but charges are not constant in time-they may fluctuate in time. The dust charges are not really independent of the variations of the plasma potentials. All modes will influence the charging mechanism, and feedback will lead to several new interesting and unexpected phenomena. The charging of the grains depends on local plasma characteristics. If the waves disturb these characteristic, then charging of the grains is affected and the grain charge is modified, with a resulting feedback on the...

  15. Attraction of likely charged nano-sized grains in dust-electron plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishnyakov, Vladimir I., E-mail: eksvar@ukr.net [Physical-Chemical Institute for Environmental and Human Protection, Odessa 65082 (Ukraine)

    2016-01-15

    Dust-electron plasma, which contains only the dust grains and electrons, emitted by them, is studied. Assumption of almost uniform spatial electrons distribution, which deviates from the uniformity only near the dust grains, leads to the grain charge division into two parts: first part is the individual for each grain “visible” charge and the second part is the common charge of the neutralized background. The visible grain charge can be both negative and positive, while the total grain charge is only positive. The attraction of likely charged grains is possible, because the grain interaction is determined by the visible charges. The equilibrium state between attraction and repulsion of grains is demonstrated.

  16. Charge Fluctuation of Dust Grain and Its Impact on Dusty-Acoustic Wave Damping

    CERN Document Server

    Atamaniuk, B

    2007-01-01

    We consider the influence of dust charge fluctuations on damping of the dust-ion-acoustic waves. It is assumed that all grains have equal masses but charges are not constant in time - they may fluctuate in time. The dust charges are not really independent of the variations in the plasma potentials. All modes will influence the charging mechanism, and feedback will lead to several new interesting and unexpected phenomena. The charging of the grains depends on local plasma characteristics. If the waves disturb these characteristic, then charging of the grains is affected and the grain charge is modified, with a resulting feedback on the wave mode. In the case considered here, when the temperature of electrons is much greater than the temperature of the ions and the temperature of electrons is not great enough for further ionization of the ions, we show that attenuation of the acoustic wave depends only on one phenomenological coefficient

  17. Secondary charging effects due to icy dust particle impacts on rocket payloads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kassa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of dust currents obtained with a small probe and a larger probe during the flight of the ECOMA-4 rocket through the summer polar mesosphere. The payload included two small dust probes behind a larger dust probe located centrally at the front. For certain phases of the payload rotation, the current registered by one of the small dust probes was up to 2 times the current measured with the larger probe, even though the effective collection area of the larger probe was 4 times that of the small one. We analyze the phase dependence of the currents and their difference with a model based on the assumption that the small probe was hit by charged dust fragments produced in collisions of mesospheric dust with the payload body. Our results confirm earlier findings that secondary charge production in the collision of a noctilucent cloud/Polar Summer Mesospheric Echo (NLC/PMSE dust particle with the payload body must be several orders of magnitude larger than might be expected from laboratory studies of collisions of pure ice particles with a variety of clean surfaces. An important consequence is that for some payload configurations, one should not assume that the current measured with a detector used to study mesospheric dust is simply proportional to the number density of ambient dust particles. The higher secondary charge production may be due to the NLC/PMSE particles containing multiple meteoric smoke particles.

  18. Secondary charging effects due to icy dust particle impacts on rocket payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, M.; Rapp, M.; Hartquist, T. W.; Havnes, O.

    2012-03-01

    We report measurements of dust currents obtained with a small probe and a larger probe during the flight of the ECOMA-4 rocket through the summer polar mesosphere. The payload included two small dust probes behind a larger dust probe located centrally at the front. For certain phases of the payload rotation, the current registered by one of the small dust probes was up to 2 times the current measured with the larger probe, even though the effective collection area of the larger probe was 4 times that of the small one. We analyze the phase dependence of the currents and their difference with a model based on the assumption that the small probe was hit by charged dust fragments produced in collisions of mesospheric dust with the payload body. Our results confirm earlier findings that secondary charge production in the collision of a noctilucent cloud/Polar Summer Mesospheric Echo (NLC/PMSE) dust particle with the payload body must be several orders of magnitude larger than might be expected from laboratory studies of collisions of pure ice particles with a variety of clean surfaces. An important consequence is that for some payload configurations, one should not assume that the current measured with a detector used to study mesospheric dust is simply proportional to the number density of ambient dust particles. The higher secondary charge production may be due to the NLC/PMSE particles containing multiple meteoric smoke particles.

  19. Collisionless damping of dust-acoustic waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amour, Rabia; Tribeche, Mouloud [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Plasma Physics Group (PPG), University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria)

    2014-12-15

    The charge variation induced nonlinear dust-acoustic wave damping in a charge varying dusty plasma with nonextensive ions is considered. It is shown that the collisionless damping due to dust charge fluctuation causes the nonlinear dust acoustic wave propagation to be described by a damped Korteweg-de Vries (dK-dV) equation the coefficients of which depend sensitively on the nonextensive parameter q. The damping term, solely due to the dust charge variation, is affected by the ion nonextensivity. For the sake of completeness, the possible effects of nonextensivity and collisionless damping on weakly nonlinear wave packets described by the dK-dV equation are succinctly outlined by deriving a nonlinear Schrödinger-like equation with a complex nonlinear coefficient.

  20. Stimulated Brillouin scattering of an electromagnetic wave in weakly magnetized plasma with variably charged dust particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sourabh Bal; M Bose

    2009-10-01

    We have investigated analytically the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) of an electromagnetic wave in non-dissipative weakly magnetized plasma in the presence of dust particles with variable charge.

  1. The Challenge of Incorporating Charged Dust in the Physics of Flowing Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Ma, Y.; Lai, H.; Jian, L.; Toth, G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of two oppositely charged species with very different mass ratios leads to interesting physical processes and difficult numerical simulations. The reconnection problem is a classic example of this principle with a proton-electron mass ratio of 1836, but it is not the only example. Increasingly we are discovering situations in which heavy, electrically charged dust particles are major players in a plasma interaction. The mass of a 1mm dust particle is about 2000 proton masses and of a 10 mm dust particle about 2 million proton masses. One example comes from planetary magnetospheres. Charged dust pervades Enceladus' southern plume. The saturnian magnetospheric plasma flows through this dusty plume interacting with the charged dust and ionized plume gas. Multiple wakes are seen downstream. The flow is diverted in one direction. The field aligned-current systems are elsewhere. How can these two wake features be understood? Next we have an example from the solar wind. When asteroids collide in a disruptive collision, the solar wind strips the nano-scale charged dust from the debris forming a dusty plasma cloud that may be over 106km in extent and containing over 100 million kg of dust accelerated to the solar wind speed. How does this occur, especially as rapidly as it appears to happen? In this paper we illustrate a start on understanding these phenomena using multifluid MHD simulations but these simulations are only part of the answer to this complex problem that needs attention from a broader range of the community.

  2. Effect of dust charge variation on dust—acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized two—ion—temperature dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XueJu-Kui; LangHe

    2003-01-01

    The effect of dust charge variation on the dust-acoustic solitary structures is investigated in a warm magnetized two-ion-temperature dusty plasma consisting of a negatively and variably charged extremely massive dust fluid and ions of two different temperatures. It is shown that the dust charge variation as well as the presence of a second component of ions would modify the properties of the dust-acoustic solitary structures and may exite both dust-acoustic solitary holes (soliton waves with a density dip) and positive solitons (soliton waves with a density hump).

  3. Dust-lower-hybrid instability with fluctuating charge in quantum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, M.; Ali, M.; Rasheed, A.; Zubia, K.; Salimullah, M.

    2015-03-01

    The instability of Dust-Lower-Hybrid (DLH) wave is examined in detail in the uniform dusty magnetoplasmas. The time dependent charging effects on dust particles around its equilibrium charge Qd0 are taken into account based on Orbit-Limited Probe theory. The quantum characteristics of the system like Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure are dealt using the quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas. The external magnetic field and size of the dust particles have new physical effects over the dissipative instability of DLH wave in the quantum plasma regime.

  4. The dust-acoustic mode in two-temperature electron plasmas with charging effects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhong Xijuan; Chen Hui; Liu Nianhua; Liu Sanqiu

    2016-04-01

    Dust charging in an unmagnetized collisionless dusty plasma with two-temperature electrons was investigated based on the orbital motion limited theory, where the two-temperature electrons and ions are modelled by the Maxwellian distributions. Then by taking into account the effects of two-temperature electron and the associated charging fluctuations, the dispersion peculiarities of dust-acoustic waves are studied based on dust fluid dynamics. The present results show that the effect will introduce a dissipation on the mode, and the dispersion and the dissipation depend on the temperature ratio and number density ratio of hot and cold electrons.

  5. Dust-lower-hybrid instability with fluctuating charge in quantum plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Ali, M. [Department of Physics, School of Natural Sciences, NUST, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Rasheed, A. [Department of Physics, GC University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Zubia, K. [Department of Physics, GC University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2015-03-15

    The instability of Dust-Lower-Hybrid (DLH) wave is examined in detail in the uniform dusty magnetoplasmas. The time dependent charging effects on dust particles around its equilibrium charge Q{sub d0} are taken into account based on Orbit-Limited Probe theory. The quantum characteristics of the system like Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure are dealt using the quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas. The external magnetic field and size of the dust particles have new physical effects over the dissipative instability of DLH wave in the quantum plasma regime.

  6. Interaction of solitary waves in magnetized warm dusty plasmas with dust charging effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Ju-Kui

    2006-01-01

    In consideration of adiabatic dust charge variation, the combined effect of the external magnetized field and the dust temperature on head-on collision of the three-dimensional dust acoustic solitary waves is investigated. By using the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo method, the phase shifts and the trajectories of two solitons after the collision are obtained. The effects of the magnitude and the obliqueness of the external magnetic field and the dust temperature on the solitary wave collisions are discussed in detail.

  7. Measurement of net electric charge and dipole moment of dust aggregates in a complex plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Yousefi, Razieh; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Matthews, Lorin S; Hyde, Truell W

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the agglomeration of dust particles in complex plasmas requires a knowledge of the basic properties such as the net electrostatic charge and dipole moment of the dust. In this study, dust aggregates are formed from gold coated mono-disperse spherical melamine-formaldehyde monomers in a radio-frequency (rf) argon discharge plasma. The behavior of observed dust aggregates is analyzed both by studying the particle trajectories and by employing computer models examining 3D structures of aggregates and their interactions and rotations as induced by torques arising from their dipole moments. These allow the basic characteristics of the dust aggregates, such as the electrostatic charge and dipole moment, to be determined. It is shown that the experimental results support the predicted values from computer models for aggregates in these environments.

  8. Measurement of net electric charge and dipole moment of dust aggregates in a complex plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Razieh; Davis, Allen B; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Matthews, Lorin S; Hyde, Truell W

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the agglomeration of dust particles in complex plasmas requires knowledge of basic properties such as the net electrostatic charge and dipole moment of the dust. In this study, dust aggregates are formed from gold-coated mono-disperse spherical melamine-formaldehyde monomers in a radiofrequency (rf) argon discharge plasma. The behavior of observed dust aggregates is analyzed both by studying the particle trajectories and by employing computer models examining three-dimensional structures of aggregates and their interactions and rotations as induced by torques arising from their dipole moments. These allow the basic characteristics of the dust aggregates, such as the electrostatic charge and dipole moment, as well as the external electric field, to be determined. It is shown that the experimental results support the predicted values from computer models for aggregates in these environments.

  9. Self-organization and oscillation of negatively charged dust particles in a 2-dimensional dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Y.L. [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang, F., E-mail: huangfeng@cau.edu.cn [College of Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen, Z.Y., E-mail: chenzy@mail.buct.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); State Key Laboratory of Laser Propulsion & Application, Beijing 101416 (China); Liu, Y.H. [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Yu, M.Y. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, D-44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2016-02-22

    Negatively charged dust particles immersed in 2-dimensional dusty plasma system are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the confinement potential and attraction interaction potential on dust particle self-organization are studied in detail and two typical dust particle distributions are obtained when the system reaches equilibrium. The average radial velocity (ARV), average radial force (ARF) and radial mean square displacement are employed to analyze the dust particles' dynamics. Both ARVs and ARFs exhibit oscillation behaviors when the simulation system reaches equilibrium state. The relationships between the oscillation and confinement potential and attraction potential are studied in this paper. The simulation results are qualitatively similar to experimental results. - Highlights: • Self-organization and oscillation of a 2-dimensional dusty plasma is investigated. • Effect of the confinement potential on dust self-organization and oscillation is given. • Effect of the attraction potential on dust self-organization and oscillation is studied.

  10. Nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma with arbitrarily charged dust and trapped electrons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O Rahman; A A Mamun

    2013-06-01

    A theoretical investigation of dust-acoustic solitary waves in three-component unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of trapped electrons, Maxwellian ions, and arbitrarily charged cold mobile dust was done. It has been found that, owing to the departure from the Maxwellian electron distribution to a vortex-like one, the dynamics of small but finite amplitude dust-acoustic (DA) waves is governed by a nonlinear equation of modified Korteweg–de Vries (mKdV) type (instead of KdV). The reductive perturbation method was employed to study the basic features (amplitude, width, speed, etc.) of DA solitary waves which are significantly modified by the presence of trapped electrons. The implications of our results in space and laboratory plasmas are briefly discussed.

  11. Effect of trapped ions and nonequilibrium electron-energy distribution function on dust-particle charging in gas discharges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhinin, G I; Fedoseev, A V; Antipov, S N; Petrov, O F; Fortov, V E

    2009-03-01

    Dust-particles charging in a low-pressure glow discharge was investigated theoretically. The dust-particle charge was found on the basis of a developed self-consistent model taking into account the nonequilibrium character of electron distribution function and the formation of an ionic coat composed of bound or trapped ions around the dust particle. The dust-particle charge, the radial distributions of electron density, free and trapped ions densities, and the distribution of electrostatic potential were found. It was shown that the non-Maxwellian electron distribution function and collisional flux of trapped ions both reduce the dust-particle charge in comparison with that received with the help of the conventional orbital motion limited (OML) model. However, in rare collisional regimes in plasma when the collisional flux is negligible, the formation of ionic coat around a particle leads to a shielding of the proper charge of a dust particle. In low-pressure experiments, it is only possible to detect the effective charge of a dust particle that is equal to the difference between the proper charge of the particle and the charge of trapped ions. The calculated effective dust particle charge is in fairly good agreement with the experimental measurements of dust-particle charge dependence on gas pressure.

  12. The Effect of the Charge Fluctuation of Dust Particles on Ion-acoustic Wave Excited Through Ioniza tion Instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华建军; 刘金远; 马腾才

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the charge fluctuation of dust particles on ion acoustic wave (IAW) excited through ionization instability was investigated. The hydrodynamic equations and linear time-dependent perturbation theory served as the starting point of theory, by which the dispersion relation and growth rate of the IAW were given. By comparing the results with the case of constant dust charges, it was found that the charge fluctuation of dust particles reduces the instability of the wave mode.

  13. Influence of dust charge fluctuation and polarization force on radiative condensation instability of magnetized gravitating dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prajapati, R.P., E-mail: prajapati_iter@yahoo.co.in; Bhakta, S.

    2015-10-30

    The influence of dust charge fluctuation, thermal speed and polarization force due to massive charged dust grains is studied on the radiative condensation instability (RCI) of magnetized self-gravitating astrophysical dusty (complex) plasma. The dynamics of the charged dust and inertialess electrons are considered while the Boltzmann distributed ions are assumed to be thermal. The dusty fluid model is formulated and the general dispersion relations are derived analytically using the plane wave solutions under the long wavelength limits in both the presence and the absence of dust charge fluctuations. The combined effects of polarization force, dust thermal speed, dust charge fluctuation and dust cyclotron frequency are observed on the low frequency wave modes and radiative modified Jeans Instability. The classical criterion of RCI is also derived which remains unaffected due to the presence of these parameters. Numerical calculations have been performed to calculate the growth rate of the system and plotted graphically. We find that dust charge fluctuation, radiative cooling and polarization force have destabilizing while dust thermal speed and dust cyclotron frequency have stabilizing influence on the growth rate of Jeans instability. The results have been applied to understand the radiative cooling process in dusty molecular cloud when both the dust charging and polarization force are dominant. - Highlights: • We study combined influence of dust charge fluctuation and polarization force on RCI of dusty plasma. • The modified dispersion characteristics and conditions of Jeans and radiative instabilities are obtained. • In the photo-association region various parameters are numerically estimated. • The dust charge fluctuation, radiative cooling and polarization force have destabilizing influence on the growth rate.

  14. Simulation of Dust Charging and Shielding in the Presence of a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtl, Chris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2006-10-01

    We explore the charging of a dust particle immersed in a plasma in the presence of a magnetic field. The dust particle charges due to the flowing electrons and ions within the plasma and is allowed to emit electrons via thermionic emission and photoemission. Several parameters are obtained and compared with basic simulations without the magnetic field using the 2-D, 3-V DEMOCRITUS code developed at LANL. Next we look at the effect of this dust particle charging in the presence of another dust particle. Delzanno, et al. [1] showed that for a thermionically emitting particle immersed in a plasma, an attractive potential well can form. This leads to the attraction of particles with like charges, such as another dust grain. We explore the attractive forces between two particles as a function of their separation. If the attractive potential well is deep enough, the two particles will combine, thereby creating macro-particles. We study this in an astrophysical sense, looking at this phenomenon as a possible source of galactic formation. [1] G.L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, and M. Rosenberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 (3), 035002 (2004)

  15. Charge Balance in the Mesosphere with Meteoric Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, S. H.; Asmus, H.; Dickson, S.; Friedrich, M.; Megner, L. S.

    2013-12-01

    An aerosol particle charging model developed initially for noctilucent cloud particles has been extended in several steps in order to better explain data for charged meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) returned by the nighttime and daytime CHAMPS rockets launched from the Andøya rocket Range, Norway, in October 2011. Addition of photodetachment to the model shows that this process reduces the number density of positively charged MSPs as well as the number density of negatively charged MSPs as a consequence of the photodetached electrons neutralizing the positively charged MSPs. In addition, the model shows that the ionization rate can be deduced from the electron number density and the electron-ion recombination rate only at the highest altitudes as a consequence of recombination of electrons on the MSPs at lower altitudes. The differences between the daytime and nighttime data place constraints on the photodetachment rate. A further extension of the model to include the formation of negative ions and their destruction by atomic oxygen helps explain the ledge seen in the number density of the lightest negatively charged particles. MSP particle densities from the CARMA/CHEM2D model are in better agreement with rocket data for assumed values of the meteor input flux that are at the low end of the generally accepted range.

  16. Simulation of the electrostatic charging of Philae on 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and of its interaction with the dusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, S. L. G.; Sarrailh, P.; Matéo-Vélez, J.-C.; Forest, J.; Jeanty-Ruard, B.; Cipriani, F.

    2015-12-01

    ROSETTA's probe Philae landed on a dust covered soil. This dust may be ejected from the ground through many mechanisms (other than spacecraft landing) : micro-meteorite impacts, electrostatic charging and soil outgassing. In any cases, the dust grains charge electrostatically in the ambient plasma and this charge impacts the dust interaction with the spacecraft, which is itself differentially charged due to its partial exposure to the solar UV light. Using the DUST addition to the Spacecraft-Plasma Interaction Software (SPIS) routinely used to compute the charge state of the spacecraft surfaces, we simulate the electrostatic charging of Philae as well as its dust environment. SPIS-DUST allows one to compute the electrostatic charging of the dust grains on the ground and in the plasma, and to model their ejection and their recollection by the probe. We simulated one cometary day of the Philae environment at different distances from the sun to observe the variation of the dust collection with Philae's local time.

  17. Charged cosmological dust solutions of the coupled Einstein and Maxwell equations

    CERN Document Server

    Spruck, Joel

    2010-01-01

    It is well known through the work of Majumdar, Papapetrou, Hartle, and Hawking that the coupled Einstein and Maxwell equations admit a static multiple blackhole solution representing a balanced equilibrium state of finitely many point charges. This is a result of the exact cancellation of gravitational attraction and electric repulsion under an explicit condition on the mass and charge ratio. The resulting system of particles, known as an extremely charged dust, gives rise to examples of spacetimes with naked singularities. In this paper, we consider the continuous limit of the Majumdar--Papapetrou--Hartle--Hawking solution modeling a space occupied by an extended distribution of extremely charged dust. We show that for a given smooth distribution of matter of finite ADM mass there is a continuous family of smooth solutions realizing asymptotically flat space metrics.

  18. Charging of dust grains in a nonequilibrium plasma of a stratified glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhinin, G. I.; Fedoseev, A. V.

    2007-12-01

    A theoretical model is presented that describes the charging of dust grains in the positive plasma column of a stratified glow dc discharge in argon. A one-dimensional self-consistent model is used to obtain axial profiles of the electric field, as well as the electron energy distribution function along the axis of the discharge tube. Radial profiles of the electric field are determined in the ambipolar diffusion approximation. It is assumed that, in the radial direction, the electron distribution function depends only on the total electron energy. Two-dimensional distributions of the discharge plasma parameters are calculated and used to determine the potential and charge of a test dust grain at a certain point within the discharge and the electrostatic forces acting on it. It is shown that the grain charge distribution depends strongly on the nonequilibrium electron distribution function and on the nonuniform distribution of the electric field in a stratified glow discharge. A discussion is presented on the suspension of dust grains, the separation of grains by size in the discharge striations, and a possible mechanism for the onset of vortex dust motion at the edge of a dust cloud.

  19. Influence of charging process and size distribution of dust grain on the electric conductivity of dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan Jizheng; Wang Canglong; Zhang Jianrong; Ma Shengqian; Hong Xueren; Sun Jianan [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China) and Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Duan Wenshan [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China) and Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics and Functional Materials of Gansu Province, College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Yang Lei [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering and Joint Laboratory of Atomic and Molecular Physics of NWNU and IMP CAS, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China) and Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Department of Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2012-08-15

    The effects of dust size distribution and charging process of dust grains on the complex electric conductivity of dusty plasmas have been investigated in the present paper. Comparisons are made between real dusty plasma in which there are many different dust grain species and the mono-sized dusty plasma (MDP) in which there is only one kind of dust grain whose size is the average dust size. In some cases the complex electric conductivity of real dusty plasma is larger than that of MDP, while in other cases it is smaller than that of MDP, it depends on the dust size distribution function.

  20. On the signature of positively charged dust particles on plasma irregularities in the mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, A.; Scales, W. A.

    2013-11-01

    Recent rocket payloads have studied the properties of aerosol particles within the ambient plasma environment in the polar mesopause region and measured the signature of the positively charged particles with number densities of (2000 cm-3) for particles of 0.5-1 nm in radius. The measurement of significant numbers of positively charged aerosol particles is unexpected from the standard theory of aerosol charging in plasma. Nucleation on the cluster ions is one of the most probable hypotheses for the positive charge on the smallest particles. This work attempts to study the correlation and anti-correlation of fluctuations in the electron and ion densities in the background plasma by adopting the proposed hypothesis of positive dust particle formation. The utility being that it may provide a test for determining the presence of positive dust particles. The results of the model described show good agreement with observed rocket data. As an application, the model is also applied to investigate the electron irregularity behavior during radiowave heating assuming the presence of positive dust particles. It is shown that the positive dust produces important changes in the behavior during Polar Mesospheric Summer Echo PMSE heating experiments that can be described by the fluctuation correlation and anti-correlation properties.

  1. Charge of interstellar dust in dense molecular clouds: Effect of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, Alexei; Galli, Daniele; Caselli, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The local cosmic-ray (CR) spectra are calculated for typical characteristic regions of a cold dense molecular cloud, to investigate two so far neglected mechanisms of dust charging: collection of suprathermal CR electrons and protons by grains, and photoelectric emission from grains due to the UV radiation generated by CRs. The two mechanisms add to the conventional charging by ambient plasma, produced in the cloud by CRs. We show that the CR-induced photoemission can dramatically modify the charge distribution function for submicron grains. We demonstrate the importance of the obtained results for dust coagulation: While the charging by ambient plasma alone leads to a strong Coulomb repulsion between grains and inhibits their further coagulation, the combination with the photoemission provides optimum conditions for the growth of large dust aggregates in a certain region of the cloud, corresponding to the densities $n(\\mathrm{H_2})$ between $\\sim10^4$ cm$^{-3}$ and $\\sim10^6$ cm$^{-3}$. The charging effect o...

  2. Comparison of dust charging between Orbital-Motion-Limited theory and Particle-In-Cell simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Delzanno, Gian Luca

    2016-01-01

    The Orbital-Motion-Limited (OML) theory has been modified to predict the dust charge and the results were contrasted with the Whipple approximation [Tang and Delzanno, Phys. Plasmas 21, 123708 (2014)]. To further establish its regime of applicability, in this paper the OML predictions (for a non-electron-emitting, spherical dust grain at rest in a collisionless, unmagnetized plasma) are compared with Particle-In-Cell simulations that retain the absorption radius effect. It is found that for large dust grain radius $r_d$ relative to the plasma Debye length $\\lambda_D$, the revised OML theory remains a very good approximation as, for the parameters considered ($r_d/\\lambda_D\\le10$, equal electron and ion temperatures), it yields the dust charge to within $20\\%$ accuracy. This is a substantial improvement over the Whipple approximation. The dust collected currents and energy fluxes, which remain the same in the revised and standard OML theories, are accurate to within $15-30\\%$.

  3. Dust dynamics and evolution in expanding HII regions. I. Radiative drift of neutral and charged grains

    CERN Document Server

    Akimkin, V V; Pavlyuchenkov, Ya N; Wiebe, D S

    2015-01-01

    We consider dust drift under the influence of stellar radiation pressure during the pressure-driven expansion of an HII region using the chemo-dynamical model MARION. Dust size distribution is represented by four dust types: conventional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), very small grains (VSGs), big grains (BGs) and also intermediate-sized grains (ISGs), which are larger than VSGs and smaller than BGs. The dust is assumed to move at terminal velocity determined locally from the balance between the radiation pressure and gas drag. As Coulomb drag is an important contribution to the overall gas drag, we evaluate a grain charge evolution within the HII region for each dust type. BGs are effectively swept out of the HII region. The spatial distribution of ISGs within the HII region has a double peak structure, with a smaller inner peak and a higher outer peak. PAHs and VSGs are mostly coupled to the gas. The mean charge of PAHs is close to zero, so they can become neutral from time to time because of char...

  4. Dust charging processes with a Cairns-Tsallis distribution function with negative ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abid, A. A., E-mail: abidaliabid1@hotmail.com [Applied Physics Department, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Islamabad Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Khan, M. Z., E-mail: mzk-qau@yahoo.com [Applied Physics Department, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Islamabad Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Yap, S. L. [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Terças, H., E-mail: hugo.tercas@tecnico.ul.pt [Physics of Information Group, Instituto de Telecomunicações, Av. Rovisco Pais, Lisbon 1049-001 (Portugal); Mahmood, S. [Science Place, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N5A2 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Dust grain charging processes are presented in a non-Maxwellian dusty plasma following the Cairns-Tsallis (q, α)–distribution, whose constituents are the electrons, as well as the positive/negative ions and negatively charged dust grains. For this purpose, we have solved the current balance equation for a negatively charged dust grain to achieve an equilibrium state value (viz., q{sub d} = constant) in the presence of Cairns-Tsallis (q, α)–distribution. In fact, the current balance equation becomes modified due to the Boltzmannian/streaming distributed negative ions. It is numerically found that the relevant plasma parameters, such as the spectral indexes q and α, the positive ion-to-electron temperature ratio, and the negative ion streaming speed (U{sub 0}) significantly affect the dust grain surface potential. It is also shown that in the limit q → 1 the Cairns-Tsallis reduces to the Cairns distribution; for α = 0 the Cairns-Tsallis distribution reduces to pure Tsallis distribution and the latter reduces to Maxwellian distribution for q → 1 and α = 0.

  5. Effects of nonthermal distribution of electrons and polarity of net dust-charge number density on nonplanar dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun, A A; Shukla, P K

    2009-09-01

    Effects of the nonthermal distribution of electrons as well as the polarity of the net dust-charge number density on nonplanar (viz. cylindrical and spherical) dust-ion-acoustic solitary waves (DIASWs) are investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. It is found that the basic features of the DIASWs are significantly modified by the effects of nonthermal electron distribution, polarity of net dust-charge number density, and nonplanar geometry. The implications of our results in some space and laboratory dusty plasma environments are briefly discussed.

  6. Secondary electron emission from a charged spherical dust particle due to electron incidence according to OML model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Y., E-mail: tomita@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Huang, Z.H.; Pan, Y.D. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Kawamura, G. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Yan, L.W. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China)

    2015-08-15

    Effect of secondary electron emission (SEE) current to dust charging and influence to forces on a dust particle are studied according to the orbital motion limited (OML) model. As higher electron temperature increases the SEE current, the negative dust charge decreases. As a result, the ion friction force on the dust particle decreases. The critical electron temperatures without the dust charge are 75.1, 70.3 and 55.9 eV for graphite and are 31.3, 30.4 and 27.1 eV for tungsten to the temperature ratio T{sub i}/T{sub e} = 0.1, 1.0 and 10.0, respectively. At the critical electron temperature, there is no ion scattering force but the ion absorption force remains finite.

  7. Kinetic Modeling of the Neutral Gas, Ions, and Charged Dust in Europa's Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenishev, V.; Borovikov, D.; Rubin, M.; Jia, X.; Combi, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere with Europa has been a subject of active research during the last few decades both through in-situ and remote sensing observations as well as theoretical considerations. Linking the magnetosphere and the moon's surface and interior, Europa's exosphere has become one of the primary objects of study in the field. Understanding the physical processes occurring in the exosphere and its chemical composition is required for the understanding of the interaction between Europa and Jupiter. Europa's surface-bound exosphere originates mostly from ion sputtering of the water ice surface. Minor neutral species and ions of exospheric origin are produced via photolytic and electron impact reactions. The interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere and Europa affects the exospheric population of both neutrals and ions via source and loss processes. Moreover, the Lorentz force causes the newly created exospheric ions to move preferably aligned with the magnetic field lines. Contrary to the ions, heavier and slow-moving charged dust grains are mostly affected by gravity and the electric field component of the Lorentz force. As a result, escaping dust forms a narrow tail aligned in the direction of the convection electric field. Here we present results of a kinetic model of the neutral species (H2O, OH, O2, O, and H), ions (O+, O2+, H+, H2+, H2O+, and OH+), and neutral and charged dust in Europa's exosphere. In our model H2O and O2 are produced via sputtering and other exospheric neutral and ions species are produced via photolytic and electron impact reactions. For the charged dust we compute the equilibrium grain charge by balancing the electron and ion collecting currents according to the local plasma flow conditions at the grain's location. For the tracking of the ions, charged dust, and the calculation of the grains' charge we use plasma density and velocity, and the magnetic field derived from our multi-fluid MHD model of Europa

  8. Nonlinear pulsational eigenmodes of a planar collisional dust molecular cloud with grain-charge fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, P. K.; Borah, B.

    2013-09-01

    We try to present a theoretical evolutionary model leading to the excitations of nonlinear pulsational eigenmodes in a planar (1D) collisional dust molecular cloud (DMC) on the Jeans scale. The basis of the adopted model is the Jeans assumption of self-gravitating homogeneous uniform medium for simplification. It is a self-gravitating multi-fluid consisting of the Boltzmann distributed warm electrons and ions, and the inertial cold dust grains with partial ionization. Dust-charge fluctuations, convections and all the possible collisions are included. The grain-charge behaves as a dynamical variable owing mainly to the attachment of the electrons and ions to the grain-surfaces randomly. The adopted technique is centered around a mathematical model based on new solitary spectral patterns within the hydrodynamic framework. The collective dynamics of the patterns is governed by driven Korteweg-de Vries ( d-KdV) and Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations obtained by a standard multiscale analysis. Then, simplified analytical and numerical solutions are presented. The grain-charge fluctuation and collision processes play a key role in the DMC stability. The sensitive dependence of the eigenmode amplitudes on diverse relevant plasma parameters is discussed. The significance of the main results in astrophysical, laboratory and space environments are concisely summarized.

  9. Kadomstev–Petviashvili (KP) equation in warm dusty plasma with variable dust charge, two-temperature ion and nonthermal electron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hamid Reza Pakzad

    2010-04-01

    In this work, the propagation of nonlinear waves in warm dusty plasmas with variable dust charge, two-temperature ion and nonthermal electron is studied. By using the reductive perturbation theory, the Kadomstev–Petviashvili (KP) equation is derived. The energy of the soliton and the linear dispersion relation are obtained. The effects of variable dust charge on the energy of soliton and the angular frequency of linear wave are also discussed.

  10. Effects of Adiabatic Dust Charge Fluctuation and Particles Collisions on Dust-Acoustic Solitary Waves in Three-Dimensional Magnetized Dusty Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-Hong; WEI Nan-Xia

    2009-01-01

    Taking into account the combined effects of the external magnetic field, adiabatic dust charge fluctuation and collisions occurring between the charged dust gains and neutral gas particles (dust-neutral collisions), the dust-acoustic solitary waves in three-dimensional uniform dusty plasmas are investigated analytically. By using the reductive perturbation method, the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation governing the dust-acoustic solitary waves is obtained. The present analytical results show that only rarefactive solitary waves exist in this system. It is also found that the effects of the wave vector along the z-direction, dust charge variation, collisional frequency, the plasma density, and temperature ratio can significantly influence the characteristics of low-frequency wave modes. Moreover, for the collisional dusty plasmas, there is a certain critical value μc of the plasma density ratio #, if μ < μc, the width of the waves increases with μ, otherwise the width of waves decreases with μ.

  11. Neutron yield when fast deuterium ions collide with strongly charged tritium-saturated dust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akishev, Yu. S., E-mail: akishev@triniti.ru; Karal’nik, V. B.; Petryakov, A. V.; Starostin, A. N.; Trushkin, N. I.; Filippov, A. V. [State Research Center of Russian Federation, Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Thermonuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The ultrahigh charging of dust particles in a plasma under exposure to an electron beam with an energy up to 25 keV and the formation of a flux of fast ions coming from the plasma and accelerating in the strong field of negatively charged particles are considered. Particles containing tritium or deuterium atoms are considered as targets. The calculated rates of thermonuclear fusion reactions in strongly charged particles under exposure to accelerated plasma ions are presented. The neutron generation rate in reactions with accelerated deuterium and tritium ions has been calculated for these targets. The neutron yield has been calculated when varying the plasma-forming gas pressure, the plasma density, the target diameter, and the beam electron current density. Deuterium and tritium-containing particles are shown to be the most promising plasmaforming gas–target material pair for the creation of a compact gas-discharge neutron source based on the ultrahigh charging of dust particles by beam electrons with an energy up to 25 keV.

  12. Influence of superthermal plasma particles on the Jeans instability in self-gravitating dusty plasmas with dust charge variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimi Pajouh, H., E-mail: hakimi@alzahra.ac.ir; Afshari, N.

    2016-11-25

    Highlights: • The current of superthermal electrons and ions on the dust surface is calculated. • Increase in the superthermal particles number increases growth rate of instability. • Increase in the superthermal particles number decreases DA waves frequency. • By decreasing κ, the ratio of electric to self-gravitational force is decreased. • Dust charge variations decreases the ratio of electric to self-gravitational force. - Abstract: A theoretical analysis of the dust acoustic waves in the self-gravitating dusty plasmas is presented within the consideration of the superthermal electrons, ions and dust charge variations. For this purpose, the current of electrons and ions to the dust surface is calculated, and then the dispersion relation for the dust acoustic waves is obtained. It is shown that by increasing the number of superthermal particles, the growth rate of the instability increases, the dust acoustic waves frequency decreases, and the instability region is extended to the smaller wavelengths. Moreover, it is found that the ratio of the electric force to the self-gravitational force is decreased in the presence of the superthermal particles, and dust charge variations.

  13. Propagation of waves in a multicomponent plasma having charged dust particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sukanya Burman; A Roy Chowdhury; S N Paul

    2001-06-01

    Propagation of both low and high frequency waves in a plasma consisting of electrons, ions, positrons and charged dust particles have been theoretically studied. The characteristics of dust acoustic wave propagating through the plasma has been analysed and the dispersion relation deduced is a generalization of that obtained by previous authors. It is found that nonlinear localization of high frequency electromagnetic field in such a plasma generates magnetic field. This magnetic field is seen to depend on the temperatures of electrons and positrons and also on their equilibrium density ratio. It is suggested that the present model would be applicable to find the magnetic field generation in space plasma.

  14. Solar wind plasma profiles during interplanetary field enhancements (IFEs): Consistent with charged-dust pickup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, H. R.; Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T.

    2013-06-01

    The solar wind contains many magnetic structures, and most of them have identifiable correlated changes in the flowing plasma. However, the very characteristic rise and fall of the magnetic field in an interplanetary field enhancement has no clear solar wind counterpart. It appears to be a pure magnetic ``barrier'' that transfers solar wind momentum to charged dust produced in collisions of interplanetary bodies in the size range of tens to hundreds of meters. This transfer lifts the fine scale dust out of the Sun's gravitational well. We demonstrate the lack of field-plasma correlation with several examples from spacecraft records as well as show an ensemble average velocity profile during IFEs which is consistent with our IFE formation hypothesis.

  15. Nonadiabatic transition path sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, M. C.; Corcelli, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) is combined with transition path sampling (TPS) to produce a new method called nonadiabatic path sampling (NAPS). The NAPS method is validated on a model electron transfer system coupled to a Langevin bath. Numerically exact rate constants are computed using the reactive flux (RF) method over a broad range of solvent frictions that span from the energy diffusion (low friction) regime to the spatial diffusion (high friction) regime. The NAPS method is shown to quantitatively reproduce the RF benchmark rate constants over the full range of solvent friction. Integrating FSSH within the TPS framework expands the applicability of both approaches and creates a new method that will be helpful in determining detailed mechanisms for nonadiabatic reactions in the condensed-phase.

  16. Spherical Kadomtsev–Petviashviliequation for dust acoustic waves with dust size distribution and two-charges-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Annou; S Bahamida; R Annou

    2011-03-01

    The nonlinear dust acoustic waves in dusty plasmas with negative as well as positive ions and the combined effects of bounded spherical geometry and the transverse perturbation and the size distribution of dust grains are studied. Using the perturbation method, a spherical Kadomtsev–Petviashvili (SKP) equation that describes the dust acoustic waves is deduced.

  17. Gyromagnetic factor of rotating disks of electrically charged dust in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu Pynn, Yu-Chun; Macedo, Rodrigo Panosso; Breithaupt, Martin; Palenta, Stefan; Meinel, Reinhard

    2016-11-01

    We calculated the dimensionless gyromagnetic ratio ("g -factor") of self-gravitating, uniformly rotating disks of dust with a constant specific charge ɛ . These disk solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell equations depend on ɛ and a "relativity parameter" γ (0 <γ ≤1 ) up to a scaling parameter. Accordingly, the g -factor is a function g =g (γ ,ɛ ). The Newtonian limit is characterized by γ ≪1 , whereas γ →1 leads to a black-hole limit. The g -factor, for all ɛ , approaches the values g =1 as γ →0 and g =2 as γ →1 .

  18. Gyromagnetic factor of rotating disks of electrically charged dust in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Pynn, Yu-Chun; Breithaupt, Martin; Palenta, Stefan; Meinel, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    We calculated the dimensionless gyromagnetic ratio ("$g$-factor") of self-gravitating, uniformly rotating disks of dust with a constant specific charge $\\epsilon$. These disk solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell equations depend on $\\epsilon$ and a "relativity parameter" $\\gamma$ ($0<\\gamma\\le 1$) up to a scaling parameter. Accordingly, the $g$-factor is a function $g=g(\\gamma,\\epsilon)$. The Newtonian limit is characterized by $\\gamma \\ll 1$, whereas $\\gamma\\to 1$ leads to a black-hole limit. The $g$-factor, for all $\\epsilon$, approaches the values $g=1$ as $\\gamma\\to 0$ and $g=2$ as $\\gamma\\to 1$.

  19. Electromagnetic wave attenuation due to the charged particles in dust&sand (DUSA) storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, X. Q.; Xie, L.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we calculated the attenuation of the electromagnetic waves (EMWs) propagating through the dust&sand (DUSA) storms using the predicting model based on Mie theory, in which the charges carried on the DUSA particles, the ambient relative humidity (RH) and the particle size distribution are considered simultaneously. It can be found that the charges carried on the DUSA particles and the RH can change the value of the absorption and scattering efficiency, but they can't change the domain attenuation mechanism caused by the DUSA storms in the EMWs frequency regions (3 GHz, 4 GHz), (8 GHz, 40 GHz) and (75 GHz, 100 GHz). Whatever the DUSA storms are formed by equal-size particles or the mixed-size particles, the charge carried on the particle surface and the RH have a significant impact on the attenuation caused by the DUSA storms, and the change ratio of the attenuation caused by the charge or RH depends on the particle size. By the comparison of the calculated attenuation with the measured one, we found that the charges carried on the particles and the RH will be important factors to affect the attenuation of the EMWs.

  20. Time evolution of nonplanar dust ion-acoustic solitary waves in a charge varying dusty plasma with superthermal electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayout, Saliha; Tribeche, Mouloud, E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr [Plasma Physics Group (PPG), Theoretical Physics Laboratory (TPL), Faculty of Sciences- Physics, University of Bab-Ezzouar, U.S.T.H.B, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Sahu, Biswajit [Department of Mathematics, West Bengal State University, Barasat, Kolkata-700126 (India)

    2015-12-15

    A theoretical study on the nonlinear propagation of nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) dust ion-acoustic solitary waves (DIASW) is carried out in a dusty plasma, whose constituents are inertial ions, superthermal electrons, and charge fluctuating stationary dust particles. Using the reductive perturbation theory, a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived. It is shown that the propagation characteristics of the cylindrical and spherical DIA solitary waves significantly differ from those of their one-dimensional counterpart.

  1. Influence of Addition of Briquettes with Dust Content into the Charge of Electric Induction Furnace on Cast Iron Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pribulová

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Foundry dust from blasting and grinding of castings contain a high amount of iron, ergo it is possible its recycling in foundry process.Dust was compacted by briquetting, two kinds of briquettes were prepared (A contained 95% magnetic part of dust from casting blasting+5% bentonite and B contained 95% mixture of dust from casting grinding and magnetic part of dust from casting blasting + 5%bentonite and used as a part of charge into the electric induction furnace. It was found that addition of briquettes has had an influence of a chemical composition of cast iron above all on content of sulphur, phosphorus and silicon. It was not reflected in decrease in tensile strength and in microstructure. Yield of metal from briquettes was not lower then 70%.

  2. Collision rate coefficient for charged dust grains in the presence of linear shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2017-09-01

    Like and oppositely charged particles or dust grains in linear shear flows are often driven to collide with one another by fluid and/or electrostatic forces, which can strongly influence particle-size distribution evolution. In gaseous media, collisions in shear are further complicated because particle inertia can influence differential motion. Expressions for the collision rate coefficient have not been developed previously which simultaneously account for the influences of linear shear, particle inertia, and electrostatic interactions. Here, we determine the collision rate coefficient accounting for the aforementioned effects by determining the collision area, i.e., the area of the plane perpendicular to the shear flow defining the relative initial locations of particles which will collide with one another. Integration of the particle flux over this area yields the collision rate. Collision rate calculations are parametrized as an enhancement factor, i.e., the ratio of the collision rate considering potential interactions and inertia to the traditional collision rate considering laminar shear only. For particles of constant surface charge density, the enhancement factor is found dependent only on the Stokes number (quantifying particle inertia), the electrostatic energy to shear energy ratio, and the ratio of colliding particle radii. Enhancement factors are determined for Stokes numbers in the 0-10 range and energy ratios up to 5. Calculations show that the influences of both electrostatic interactions and inertia are significant; for inertialess (St =0 ) equal-sized and oppositely charged particles, we find that even at energy ratios as low as 0.2, enhancement factors are in excess of 2. For the same situation but like-charged particles, enhancement factors fall below 0.5. Increasing the Stokes number acts to mitigate the influence of electrostatic potentials for both like and oppositely charged particles; i.e., inertia reduces the enhancement factor for

  3. Atmospheric dust charging, vertical profiles and optical properties measured in the Arabian Peninsula during the DREAME campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Sabbah, I.; Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K. A.; Hirst, E.; Kaye, P. H.; Al-Abbadi, N.; Rogers, G.

    2010-05-01

    Polarimetric observations of atmospheric Saharan dust over the Canary Islands have provided strong evidence for the presence of vertically aligned particles. The alignment was thought to be due to the electric field present because of dust charging. It was concluded that the charging and consequent partial alignment could be a common feature of atmospheric mineral dust layers, influencing the optical properties of dust layers and possibly also dust transport (Atmos. Chem. Phys. 7, 6161, 2007). We show preliminary results from the DREAME campaign, aimed at investigating these phenomena. DREAME used simultaneous and collocated measurements from specially developed aerosol radiosondes, and ground-based sun photometers and electric field meters. The radiosondes provided vertical profiles of dust size distribution and electric charge density, in addition to standard meteorological parameters (Ulanowski et al. EGU 2010, AS3.16). The electric field was measured in Kuwait between late April and November 2009, and at Solar Village (Riyadh, Saudi Arabia) between May and June 2009. The measurements were supplemented by satellite retrievals of aerosol properties. Similar measurements but without electric field meters were carried out on Cape Verde Islands in August 2009 (Nicoll et al. EGU 2010, AS4.7). The electric field measured on the ground in Kuwait showed strong variability, particularly in the presence of atmospheric dust, when polarity reversals from the normal positive potential gradient (PG) clear-sky pattern were frequently observed. In the absence of clouds the negative PG excursions were often down to -800 V/m and reached -1300 V/m. The PG was strongly correlated with the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from the sun photometer: the correlation coefficient was about -0.51 at visible and near infra-red wavelengths and a few percent less in the UV. Slightly lower correlation was present for satellite AOT: -0.4 for MODIS AOT at 550 nm, and -0.3 for OMI AOT at 483.5 nm

  4. Nonadiabatic Induced Dipole Moment by High Intensity Femtosecond Optical Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Koprinkov, I. G.

    2006-01-01

    Nonadiabtic dressed states and nonadiabatic induced dipole moment in the leading order of nonadiabaticity is proposed. The nonadiabatic induced dipole moment is studied in the femtosecond time domain.

  5. Large amplitude solitary waves in ion-beam plasmas with charged dust impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, A P

    2011-01-01

    The nonlinear propagation of large amplitude dust ion-acoustic (DIA) solitary waves (SWs) in an ion-beam plasma with stationary charged dusts is investigated. For typical plasma parameters relevant for experiments [J. Plasma Phys. \\textbf{60}, 69 (1998)], when the beam speed is larger than the DIA speed ($v_{b0}\\gtrsim1.7c_s$), three stable waves, namely the "fast" and "slow" ion-beam modes and the plasma DIA wave are shown to exist. These modes can propagate as SWs in the beam plasmas. However, in the other regime ($c_s0)$ is found to be limited by a critical value which typically depends on $M$, $v_{b0}$ as well as the ion/beam temperature. The conditions for the existence of DIA solitons are obtained and their properties are analyzed numerically in terms of the system parameters. While the system supports both the compressive and rarefactive large amplitude SWs, the small amplitude solitons exist only of the compressive type. The theoretical results may be useful for observation of soliton excitations in l...

  6. Small-amplitude shock waves and double layers in dusty plasmas with opposite polarity charged dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amina, M.; Ema, S. A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    Theoretical investigation is carried out for understanding the properties of nonlinear dust-acoustic (DA) waves in an unmagnetized dusty plasma whose constituents are massive, micron-sized, positive and negatively charged inertial dust grains along with q (nonextensive) distributed electrons and ions. The reductive perturbation method is employed in order to derive two types of nonlinear dynamical equations, namely, Burgers equation and modified Gardner equation (Gardner equation with dissipative term). They are also numerically analyzed to investigate the basic features (viz., polarity, amplitude, width, etc.) of shock waves and double layers. It has been observed that the effects of nonextensivity, opposite polarity charged dust grains, and different dusty plasma parameters have significantly modified the fundamental properties of shock waves and double layers. The results of this investigation may be used for researches of the nonlinear wave propagation in laboratory and space plasmas.

  7. Effect of self-gravitation and dust-charge fluctuations on the shielding and energy loss of N×M projectiles in a collisional dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, M. Adnan; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2007-03-01

    A simple derivation of the electrostatic potential and energy loss of N×M test charge projectiles traveling through dusty plasma has been presented. The effect of dust-charge fluctuations, dust neutral collisions, and self-gravitation on the shielded potential and energy loss of charge projectiles has been investigated both analytically as well as numerically. An interference contribution of these projectiles to the shielded potential and energy loss has been observed, which depends upon their relative orientation and separation distance. A comparison has been made for correlated and uncorrelated motion of the two projectiles. The amplitude of the shielded potential is enhanced with the increase of dust Jeans frequency for separation less than the effective Debye length. The dust-charge fluctuations produce a potential well for a slow charge relaxation rate and energy is gained, not lost, by the test charge projectiles. However, a fast charge relaxation rate with a fixed value of Jeans frequency enhances the energy loss. The dust neutral collisions are also found to enhance the energy loss for the test charge velocities greater than the dust acoustic speeds. The present investigation might be useful to explain the coagulation of dust particles such as those in molecular clouds, the interstellar medium, comet tails, planetary rings, etc.

  8. Three-dimensional kinetic modeling of the neutral and charged dust in the coma of Rosetta’s target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenishev, Valeriy; Borovikov, Dmitry; Combi, Michael R.; Fougere, Nicolas; Huang, Zhenguang; Bieler, Andre; Hansen, Kenneth; Toth, Gabor; Jia, Xianzhe; Shou, Yinsi; Gombosi, Tamas; Rubin, Martin; Rotundi, Alessandra; Della Corte, Vincenzo

    2015-11-01

    Rosetta is the first mission that escorts a comet along its way through the Solar System for an extended amount of time. As a result, the target of the mission, comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, is an object of great scientific interest.Dust ejected from the nucleus is entrained into the coma by the escaping gas. Interacting with the ambient plasma the dust particles are charged by the electron and ion collection currents. The photo and secondary emission currents can also change the particle charge. The resulting Lorentz force together with the gas drag, gravity, and radiation pressure define the dust particle trajectories.At altitudes comparable to those of the Rosetta trajectory, direction of a dust particle velocity can be significantly different from that in the innermost vicinity of the coma near the nucleus. At such altitudes the angular distribution of the dust grains velocity has a pronounced tail-like structure. This is consistent with Rosetta’s GIADA dust observations showing dust grains moving in the anti-sunward direction.Here, we present results of our model study of the neutral and charged dust in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, combining the University of Michigan AMPS kinetic particle model and the BATSRUS MHD model. Trajectories of dust particles within the observable size range of Rosetta’s GIADA dust instrument have been calculated accounting for the radiation pressure, gas drag, the nucleus gravity, the Lorentz force, and the effect of the nucleus rotation. The dust grain electric charge is calculated by balancing the collection currents at the grain’s location. We present angular velocity distribution maps of these charged dust grains for a few locations representative of Rosetta's trajectory around the comet.This work was supported by US Rosetta project contracts JPL-1266313 and JPL-1266314 and NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX14AG84G

  9. Solitary waves in a dusty plasma with charge fluctuation and dust size distribution and vortex like ion distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy Chowdhury, K. [Department of Physics, J.C.C. College, Kolkata 700 033 (India); Mishra, Amar P. [High Energy Physics Division, Department of Physics Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Roy Chowdhury, A. [High Energy Physics Division, Department of Physics Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2006-07-15

    A modified KdV equation is derived for the propagation of non-linear waves in a dusty plasma, containing N different dust grains with a size distribution and charge fluctuation with electrons in the background. The ions are assumed to obey a vortex like distribution due to their non-isothermal nature. The standard distribution for the dust size is a power law. The variation of the soliton width is studied with respect to normalized size of the dust grains. A numerical solution of the equation is done by considering the soliton solution of the modified KdV as the initial pulse. It shows considerable broadening of the pulse variation of width with {beta} {sub 1} is shown.

  10. Dissipative dust-acoustic shock waves in a varying charge electronegative magnetized dusty plasma with trapped electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacha, Mustapha [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Plasma Physics Group, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Tribeche, Mouloud, E-mail: mouloudtribeche@yahoo.fr, E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz [Faculty of Physics, Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Plasma Physics Group, University of Bab-Ezzouar, USTHB, B.P. 32, El Alia, Algiers 16111 (Algeria); Algerian Academy of Sciences and Technologies, Algiers (Algeria)

    2016-08-15

    The combined effects of an oblique magnetic field and electron trapping on dissipative dust-acoustic waves are examined in varying charge electronegative dusty plasmas with application to the Halley Comet plasma (∼10{sup 4} km from the nucleus). A weakly nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive a modified Korteweg-de Vries-Burger-like equation. Making use of the equilibrium current balance equation, the physically admissible values of the electron trapping parameter are first constrained. We then show that the Burger dissipative term is solely due to the dust charge variation process. It is found that an increase of the magnetic field obliqueness or a decrease of its magnitude renders the shock structure more dispersive.

  11. Nonadiabatic reaction of energetic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Atanu; Guo, Yuanqing; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2010-12-21

    Energetic materials store a large amount of chemical energy that can be readily converted into mechanical energy via decomposition. A number of different ignition processes such as sparks, shocks, heat, or arcs can initiate the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic materials. Experiments have demonstrated the essential role of excited electronic state decomposition in the energy conversion process. A full understanding of the mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials from excited electronic states will require the investigation and analysis of the specific topography of the excited electronic potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these molecules. The crossing of multidimensional electronic PESs creates a funnel-like topography, known as conical intersections (CIs). CIs are well established as a controlling factor in the excited electronic state decomposition of polyatomic molecules. This Account summarizes our current understanding of the nonadiabatic unimolecular chemistry of energetic materials through CIs and presents the essential role of CIs in the determination of decomposition pathways of these energetic systems. Because of the involvement of more than one PES, a decomposition process involving CIs is an electronically nonadiabatic mechanism. Based on our experimental observations and theoretical calculations, we find that a nonadiabatic reaction through CIs dominates the initial decomposition process of energetic materials from excited electronic states. Although the nonadiabatic behavior of some polyatomic molecules has been well studied, the role of nonadiabatic reactions in the excited electronic state decomposition of energetic molecules has not been well investigated. We use both nanosecond energy-resolved and femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to determine the decomposition mechanism and dynamics of energetic species experimentally. Subsequently, we employ multiconfigurational methodologies (such as, CASSCF

  12. Nonadiabatic eigenfunctions can have conical nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Peter W.; Peters, William K.; Jonas, David M.

    2017-09-01

    It has been argued the total vibrational probability amplitude for a molecular nonadiabatic eigenfunction should not have nodes unless required by symmetry. For a model with two nonadiabatically coupled electronic states, exact factorization of nonadiabatic eigenfunctions into a total vibrational probability amplitude and a normalized electronic factor reveals zero-dimensional nodes in nonadiabatic eigenfunctions over a two-dimensional vibrational space. These conical nodes have the shape of a right elliptical cone with the node at the vertex. Low dimensionality nodes are likely when the number of nonadiabatically coupled electronic states is less than or equal to the dimensionality of the vibrational space.

  13. Study of the Effects of the Electric Field on Charging Measurements on Individual Micron-size Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The dust charging by electron impact is an important dust charging process in Astrophysical, Planetary, and the Lunar environments. Low energy electrons are reflected or stick to the grains charging the dust grains negatively. At sufficiently high energies electrons penetrate the grain leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Available theoretical models for the calculation of SEE yield applicable for neutral, planar or bulk surfaces are generally based on Sternglass Equation. However, viable models for charging of individual dust grains do not exist at the present time. Therefore, the SEE yields have to be obtained by some experimental methods at the present time. We have conducted experimental studies on charging of individual micron size dust grains in simulated space environments using an electrodynamic balance (EDB) facility at NASA-MSFC. The results of our extensive laboratory study of charging of individual micron-size dust grains by low energy electron impact indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a very complex process expected to be substantially different from the bulk materials. It was found that the incident electrons may lead to positive or negative charging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration. In this paper we give a more elaborate discussion about the possible effects of the AC field in the EDB on dust charging measurements by comparing the secondary electron emission time-period (tau (sub em) (s/e)) with the time-period (tau (sub ac) (ms)) of the AC field cycle in the EDB that we have briefly addressed in our previous publication.

  14. Readout of relaxation rates by nonadiabatic pumping spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riwar, Roman-Pascal; Roche, Benoît; Jehl, Xavier; Splettstoesser, Janine

    2016-06-01

    We put forward nonadiabatic charge pumping as a method for accessing the different charge relaxation rates as well as the relaxation rates of excited orbital states in double-quantum-dot setups, based on extremely size-limited quantum dots and dopant systems. The rates are obtained in a well-separated manner from plateaus, occurring when comparing the steady-state current for reversed driving cycles. This yields a reliable readout independent of any fitting parameters. Importantly, the nonadiabatic pumping spectroscopy essentially exploits the same driving scheme that the operation of these devices generally employs. We provide a detailed analysis of the working principle of the readout scheme as well as of possible errors, thereby demonstrating its broad applicability. The precise knowledge of relaxation rates is highly relevant for the implementation of time-dependently operated devices, such as electron pumps for metrology or qubits in quantum information.

  15. Effect of ion radiative cooling on Jeans instability of partially ionized dusty plasma with dust charge fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prerana; Patidar, Archana

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of ion radiative cooling on the gravitational instability of dusty plasma is studied, incorporating dust charge fluctuation with dust-neutral, neutral-ion, and ion-neutral collisions. The basic equations are linearized using normal mode analysis to obtain a general dispersion relation. The general dispersion relation is analytically and numerically discussed to explain the role of ion radiative cooling in the structure formation through gravitational instability. The Jeans collapse criteria are found to be modified due to ion and electron radiative cooling, dust charge fluctuations, and collisions effects. It is determined from the analytical and numerical calculations that the support of radiative cooling of ions drives thermal fluctuations and gives instability to the system. The electron cooling effect remains dominating over ion cooling effect, and thus, it enhances the collapse more efficiently than ion cooling effect. Although the radiative cooling is slow, it may precede the collapse in molecular cloud, which further leads to the structure formation. The present work is relevance for the structure formation in the molecular cloud.

  16. Stable motions of charged dust grains subject to solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the mean interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotka, Christoph; Bourdin, Philippe; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the combined effect of solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the frozen-in interplanetary magnetic field on the motion of charged dust grains in our solar system. It is generally accepted that the combined effects of solar wind and photon absorption and re-emmision (Poynting-Robertson drag) lead to a decrease in semi-major axis on secular time scales. On the contrary, we demonstrate that the interplanetary magnetic field may counteract these drag forces under certain circumstances. We derive a simple relation between the parameters of the magnetic field, the physical properties of the dust grain as well as the shape and orientation of the orbital ellipse of the particle, which is a necessary conditions for the stabilization in semi-major axis.

  17. Charged dust grain dynamics subject to solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the interplanetary magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Lhotka, Christoph; Narita, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the combined effect of solar wind, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the frozen-in interplanetary magnetic field on the motion of charged dust grains in our solar system. For this reason we derive a secular theory of motion by the means of averaging method and validate it with numerical simulations of the un-averaged equations of motions. The theory predicts that the secular motion of charged particles is mainly affected by the z-component of the solar magnetic axis, or the normal component of the interplanetary magnetic field. The normal component of the interplanetary magnetic field leads to an increase or decrease of semi-major axis depending on its functional form and sign of charge of the dust grain. It is generally accepted that the combined effects of solar wind and photon absorption and re-emmision (Poynting-Robertson drag) lead to a decrease in semi-major axis on secular time scales. On the contrary, we demonstrate that the interplanetary magnetic field may counteract these drag forces unde...

  18. Spatial non-adiabatic passage using geometric phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benseny, Albert; Busch, Thomas [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Quantum Systems Unit, Okinawa (Japan); Kiely, Anthony; Ruschhaupt, Andreas [University College Cork, Department of Physics, Cork (Ireland); Zhang, Yongping [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Quantum Systems Unit, Okinawa (Japan); Shanghai University, Department of Physics, Shanghai (China)

    2017-12-15

    Quantum technologies based on adiabatic techniques can be highly effective, but often at the cost of being very slow. Here we introduce a set of experimentally realistic, non-adiabatic protocols for spatial state preparation, which yield the same fidelity as their adiabatic counterparts, but on fast timescales. In particular, we consider a charged particle in a system of three tunnel-coupled quantum wells, where the presence of a magnetic field can induce a geometric phase during the tunnelling processes. We show that this leads to the appearance of complex tunnelling amplitudes and allows for the implementation of spatial non-adiabatic passage. We demonstrate the ability of such a system to transport a particle between two different wells and to generate a delocalised superposition between the three traps with high fidelity in short times. (orig.)

  19. Full counting statistics of a nonadiabatic electron pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croy, Alexander; Saalmann, Ulf

    2016-04-01

    Nonadiabatic charge pumping through a single-level quantum dot with periodically modulated parameters is studied theoretically. By means of a quantum-master-equation approach the full counting statistics of the system is obtained. We find a trinomial-probability distribution of the charge transfer, which adequately describes the reversal of the pumping current by sweeping the driving frequency. Further, we derive equations of motion for current and noise and solve those numerically for two different driving schemes. Both show interesting features, which can be fully analyzed due to the simple and generic model studied.

  20. Bistable Intrinsic Charge Fluctuations of a Dust Grain Subject to Secondary Electron Emission in a Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Shotorban, Babak

    2015-01-01

    A master equation was formulated to study intrinsic charge fluctuations of a grain in a plasma as ions and primary electrons are attached to the grain through collisional collection, and secondary electrons are emitted from the grain. Two different plasmas with Maxwellian and non-Maxwellian distributions were considered. The fluctuations could be bistable in either plasma when the secondary electron emission is present, as two stable macrostates, associated with two stable roots of the charge net current, may exist. Metastablity of fluctuations, manifested by the passage of the grain charge between two macrostates, was shown to be possible.

  1. Bistable intrinsic charge fluctuations of a dust grain subject to secondary electron emission in a plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shotorban, B

    2015-10-01

    A master equation was formulated to study intrinsic charge fluctuations of a grain in a plasma as ions and primary electrons are attached to the grain through collisional collection, and secondary electrons are emitted from the grain. Two different plasmas with Maxwellian and non-Maxwellian distributions were considered. The fluctuations could be bistable in either plasma when the secondary electron emission is present, as two stable macrostates, associated with two stable roots of the charge net current, may exist. Metastablity of fluctuations, manifested by the passage of the grain charge between two macrostates, was shown to be possible.

  2. Ultrahigh charging of dust grains by the beam−plasma method for creating a compact neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akishev, Yu. S., E-mail: fav@triniti.ru; Karal’nik, V. B.; Petryakov, A. V.; Starostin, A. N.; Trushkin, N. I.; Filippov, A. V. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Generation of high-voltage high-current electron beams in a low-pressure (P = 0.1–1 Torr) gas discharge is studied experimentally as a function of the discharge voltage and the sort and pressure of the plasma-forming gas. The density of the plasma formed by a high-current electron beam is measured. Experiments on ultrahigh charging of targets exposed to a pulsed electron beam with an energy of up to 25 keV, an electron current density of higher than 1 A/cm{sup 2}, a pulse duration of up to 1 μs, and a repetition rate of up to 1 kHz are described. A numerical model of ultrahigh charging of dust grains exposed to a high-energy electron beam is developed. The formation of high-energy positive ions in the field of negatively charged plane and spherical targets is calculated. The calculations performed for a pulse-periodic mode demonstrate the possibility of achieving neutron yields of higher than 10{sup 6} s{sup –1} cm{sup –2} in the case of a plane target and about 10{sup 9} s{sup –1} in the case of 10{sup 3} spherical targets, each with a radius of 250 μm.

  3. Stability analysis of non-thermal complex astrofluids in the presence of polarized dust-charge fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, P.; Das, P.; Karmakar, P. K.

    2016-10-01

    The panoptic influence of plasma q-nonextensivity and dust-charge fluctuations on the gravito-electro-magnetic stability behaviour of a realistic non-thermal complex astroplasma model configuration with infinite geometrical extension is reconnoitered. It includes active viscoelasticity and dust polarization force-field effects in quasi-neutral hydrostatic equilibrium on the astrophysical fluid scales of space and time. The nontrivial linear model is simplified with the Jeans homogenization assumption (Jeans swindle, no zeroth-order force-field). It analytically and logically enables us to relax from the inclusion of large-scale inhomogeneities and of associated intrinsic complications. The role of boundary effects on the dynamical stability is assumed to be insignificant. We apply a standard technique of the Fourier formulaic plane-wave analysis over the basic cloud-structuring equations in a closed integrated form. It reduces the model Fourier algebraic equations decoupling into a unique form of cubic dispersion relation having mixed variable coefficients, which, indeed, explicitly, evolve on the diverse model plasma parameters. It is interestingly seen that the polarization and nonextensive effects directly play destabilizing roles. In contrast, the viscoelasticity and magnetic field create stabilizing effects on the instability. The pragmatic significance and applicability in the context of astro-cosmo-galactic environments are briefly indicated aboard analytic facts and introspective faults.

  4. Experimental realization of nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guanru; Xu, Guofu; Long, Guilu

    2013-05-10

    Because of its geometric nature, holonomic quantum computation is fault tolerant against certain types of control errors. Although proposed more than a decade ago, the experimental realization of holonomic quantum computation is still an open challenge. In this Letter, we report the first experimental demonstration of nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in a liquid NMR quantum information processor. Two noncommuting one-qubit holonomic gates, rotations about x and z axes, and the two-qubit holonomic CNOT gate are realized by evolving the work qubits and an ancillary qubit nonadiabatically. The successful realizations of these universal elementary gates in nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation demonstrates the experimental feasibility of this quantum computing paradigm.

  5. Lost in Jupiter's Shadow: Can Resonant Charge Variations Explain Dust Grain Sizes in the Main Ring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Hamilton, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    Interplanetary impacts onto the tiny moons Metis and Adrastea replenish Jupiter's main ring with dusty ejecta of all sizes. The equilibrium size distribution present in the rings at a given time is a function of production and loss mechanisms, both of which may be vary with particle size. Loss mechanisms include collisions and dynamical processes. Here we explore some of the latter. Grains tend to pick up negative electric charges due to motion through Jupiter's plasma environment, and positive charges from the photoelectric effect of sunlight. The periodic interruption of sunlight in Jupiter's shadow causes the equilibrium electric charge, and hence the Lorentz force, to resonate with the Kepler orbital frequency. The eccentricity increases for grains moving radially inwards during the shadow transit, and decreases when grains move outward in the shadow, hence the azimuthal location of pericenter is important. For smaller grains, the eccentricity increases monotonically until they collide with Jupiter. For much larger grains, precession due to both the Lorentz force and planetary oblateness causes the eccentricity to oscillate periodically. We explore the shadow instability in the main ring for a variety of uniform plasma density models, comparing numerical data with a semi-analytic approximation. We find that the effect of the shadow dwindles in importance for plasma that is either too sparse or too dense. In sparse plasma, the charging timescale slows, limiting the change in electric potential from sunlight to shadow. In dense plasma, charging currents from the plasma overwhelm the photoelectric effect in sunlight, also resulting in a small change in electric potential. Between these two regimes, the shadow resonance efficiently removes grains up to a particular size threshold in the main ring. This size-dependent loss mechanism may contribute to the observed flattening in the size distribution index for smaller grains.

  6. Nonadiabatic Excited-State Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Photoinduced Dynamics in Conjugated Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Tammie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Center for Nonlinear Studies (CNLS) and Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT), Theoretical Division; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian [Univ. Nacional de Quilmes, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Chernyak, Vladimir [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Roitberg, Adrian E. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Depts. of Physics and Chemistry. Quantum Theory Project; Tretiak, Sergei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Center for Nonlinear Studies (CNLS) and Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT), Theoretical Division

    2011-01-10

    Nonadiabatic dynamics generally defines the entire evolution of electronic excitations in optically active molecular materials. It is commonly associated with a number of fundamental and complex processes such as intraband relaxation, energy transfer, and light harvesting influenced by the spatial evolution of excitations and transformation of photoexcitation energy into electrical energy via charge separation (e.g., charge injection at interfaces). To treat ultrafast excited-state dynamics and exciton/charge transport we have developed a nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics (NA-ESMD) framework incorporating quantum transitions. Our calculations rely on the use of the Collective Electronic Oscillator (CEO) package accounting for many-body effects and actual potential energy surfaces of the excited states combined with Tully’s fewest switches algorithm for surface hopping for probing nonadiabatic processes. This method is applied to model the photoinduced dynamics of distyrylbenzene (a small oligomer of polyphenylene vinylene, PPV). Our analysis shows intricate details of photoinduced vibronic relaxation and identifies specific slow and fast nuclear motions that are strongly coupled to the electronic degrees of freedom, namely, torsion and bond length alternation, respectively. Nonadiabatic relaxation of the highly excited mA{sub g} state is predicted to occur on a femtosecond time scale at room temperature and on a picosecond time scale at low temperature.

  7. Interplanetary Charged Dust Magnetic Clouds Striking the Magnetosphere: Coordinated Space-based and Ground-based Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Chi, Peter; Lai, Hairong

    In general, asteroids, meteoroids and dust do not interact with the plasma structures in the solar system, but after a collision between fast moving bodies the debris cloud contains nanoscale dust particles that are charged and behave like heavy ions. Dusty magnetic clouds are then accelerated to the solar wind speed. While they pose no threat to spacecraft because of the particle size, the coherency imposed by the magnetization of the cloud allows the cloud to interact with the Earth’s magnetosphere as well as the plasma in the immediate vicinity of the cloud. We call these clouds Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs). These IFEs are a unique class of interplanetary field structures that feature cusp-shaped increases and decreases in the interplanetary magnetic field and a thin current sheet. The occurrence of IFEs is attributed to the interaction between the solar wind and dust particles produced in inter-bolide collisions. Previous spacecraft observations have confirmed that IFEs move with the solar wind. When IFEs strike the magnetosphere, they may distort the magnetosphere in several possible ways, such as producing a small indentation, a large scale compression, or a glancing blow. In any event if the IFE is slowed by the magnetosphere, the compression of the Earth’s field should be seen in the ground-based magnetic records that are continuously recorded. Thus it is important to understand the magnetospheric response to IFE arrival. In this study, we investigate the IFE structure observed by spacecraft upstream of the magnetosphere and the induced magnetic field perturbations observed by networks of ground magnetometers, including the THEMIS, CARISMA, McMAC arrays in North America and the IMAGE array in Europe. We find that, in a well-observed IFE event on December 24, 2006, all ground magnetometer stations observed an impulse at approximately 1217 UT when the IFE was expected to arrive at the Earth’s magnetopause. These ground stations spread across

  8. Quantum-classical correspondence in steady states of nonadiabatic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Mikiya; Yamashita, Koichi [Department of Chemical System Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); CREST, JST, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    We first present nonadiabatic path integral which is exact formulation of quantum dynamics in nonadiabatic systems. Then, by applying the stationary phase approximations to the nonadiabatic path integral, a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum-classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems is presented as a nonadiabatic trace formula. The present quantum-classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow degree of freedom, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels.

  9. Phthalate concentrations in house dust in relation to autism spectrum disorder and developmental delay in the CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment (CHARGE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippat, Claire; Bennett, Deborah H; Krakowiak, Paula; Rose, Melissa; Hwang, Hyun-Min; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva

    2015-06-26

    Phthalates are endocrine-disrupting chemicals that influence thyroid hormones and sex steroids, both critical for brain development. We studied phthalate concentrations in house dust in relation to the risks of developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or developmental delay (DD). Participants were a subset of children from the CHARGE (CHildhood Autism Risks from Genetics and the Environment) case-control study. ASD and DD cases were identified through the California Department of Developmental Services system or referrals; general population controls were randomly sampled from state birth files and frequency-matched on age, sex, and broad geographic region to ASD cases. All children (50 ASD, 27 DD, 68 typically developing (TD)) were assessed with Mullen Scales of Early Learning, Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) and Aberrant Behavior Checklist. We measured 5 phthalates in dust collected in the child's home using a high volume small surface sampler. None of the phthalates measured in dust was associated with ASD. After adjustment, we observed greater di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and butylbenzyl phthalate (BBzP) concentrations in indoor dust from homes of DD children: Odds ratios (OR) were 2.10 (95% confidence interval (CI); 1.10; 4.09) and 1.40 (95% CI; 0.97; 2.04) for a one-unit increase in the ln-transformed DEHP and BBzP concentrations, respectively. Among TD children, VABS communication, daily living, and adaptive composite standard scores were lower, in association with increased diethyl phthalate (DEP) concentrations in dust. Participants with higher dibutyl phthalate (DBP) concentrations in house dust also trended toward reduced performance on these subscales. Among ASD and DD boys, higher indoor dust concentrations of DEP and DBP were associated with greater hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention. House dust levels of phthalates were not associated with ASD. The inability to distinguish past from recent exposures in house dust and the fact

  10. Nonadiabatic ionic--covalent transitions. Exponential-linear model for the charge exchange and neutralization reactions Na+H arrow-right-left Na/sup +/+H/sup -/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Mo, O.; Riera, A.

    1986-01-01

    A previous study of charge exchange processes taking place through ionic--covalent transitions is extended to the case of Na+H and Na/sup +/+H/sup -/ collisions. A five-state molecular expansion, with the inclusion of two-electron translation factors, is employed to calculate the charge exchange and neutralization cross sections. Transitions at the first two pseudocrossings between the energy curves, practically determine the cross sections in the energy range 0.16--5 keV amu/sup -1/. We also show that the widely used multichannel Landau--Zener theory is totally inadequate, to treat these transitions.

  11. Non-adiabatic perturbations in multi-component perfect fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshelev, N.A., E-mail: koshna71@inbox.ru [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy str 42, 432970 (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-01

    The evolution of non-adiabatic perturbations in models with multiple coupled perfect fluids with non-adiabatic sound speed is considered. Instead of splitting the entropy perturbation into relative and intrinsic parts, we introduce a set of symmetric quantities, which also govern the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation in models with energy transfer. We write the gauge invariant equations for the variables that determine on a large scale the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation and the rate of changes of the comoving curvature perturbation. The analysis of evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation has been made for several particular models.

  12. Impact of turbocharger non-adiabatic operation on engine volumetric efficiency and turbo lag

    OpenAIRE

    S. Shaaban; Seume, J.

    2012-01-01

    Turbocharger performance significantly affects the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid at engine boundaries and hence engine performance. Heat transfer takes place under all circumstances during turbocharger operation. This heat transfer affects the power produced by the turbine, the power consumed by the compressor, and the engine volumetric efficiency. Therefore, non-adiabatic turbocharger performance can restrict the engine charging process and hence engine performance. The prese...

  13. Impact of Turbocharger Non-Adiabatic Operation on Engine Volumetric Efficiency and Turbo Lag

    OpenAIRE

    S. Shaaban; Seume, J.

    2012-01-01

    Turbocharger performance significantly affects the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid at engine boundaries and hence engine performance. Heat transfer takes place under all circumstances during turbocharger operation. This heat transfer affects the power produced by the turbine, the power consumed by the compressor, and the engine volumetric efficiency. Therefore, non-adiabatic turbocharger performance can restrict the engine charging process and hence engine performance. The prese...

  14. Impact of Turbocharger Non-Adiabatic Operation on Engine Volumetric Efficiency and Turbo Lag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shaaban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbocharger performance significantly affects the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid at engine boundaries and hence engine performance. Heat transfer takes place under all circumstances during turbocharger operation. This heat transfer affects the power produced by the turbine, the power consumed by the compressor, and the engine volumetric efficiency. Therefore, non-adiabatic turbocharger performance can restrict the engine charging process and hence engine performance. The present research work investigates the effect of turbocharger non-adiabatic performance on the engine charging process and turbo lag. Two passenger car turbochargers are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The effect of turbine casing insulation is also explored. The present investigation shows that thermal energy is transferred to the compressor under all circumstances. At high rotational speeds, thermal energy is first transferred to the compressor and latter from the compressor to the ambient. Therefore, the compressor appears to be “adiabatic” at high rotational speeds despite the complex heat transfer processes inside the compressor. A tangible effect of turbocharger non-adiabatic performance on the charging process is identified at turbocharger part load operation. The turbine power is the most affected operating parameter, followed by the engine volumetric efficiency. Insulating the turbine is recommended for reducing the turbine size and the turbo lag.

  15. Multiplicity features of nonadiabatic, autothermal tubular reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovo, M.; Balakotaiah, V. (Houston Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Singularity theory is combined with asymptotic analysis to determine the exact uniqueness-multiplicity boundary and ignition and extinction locus for the non-adiabatic, autothermal tubular reactor model. It is found that the steady-state behavior of the nonadiabatic reactor is described by the two limiting cases of adiabatic and strongly cooled models. The adiabatic case has been examined in a previous study. In this paper, the authors develop limiting models to describe the strongly cooled asymptotes. The authors also classify the different types of bifurcation diagrams of conversion vs. residence time using the results of singularity theory with a distinguished parameter. Analytical criteria are developed for predicting the conditions under which autothermal operation is feasible when heat losses are significant.

  16. Methods for molecular dynamics with nonadiabatic transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Coker, D F

    1994-01-01

    We show how the dynamically nonlocal formulation of classical nuclear motion in the presence of quantal electronic transitions presented many years ago by Pechukas can be localized in time using time dependent perturbation theory to give an impulsive force which acts when trajectories hop between electronic surfaces. The action of this impulsive force is completely equivalent to adjusting the nuclear velocities in the direction of the nonadiabatic coupling vector so as to conserve energy, a procedure which is widely used in surface hopping trajectory methods. This is the first time the precise connection between these two formulations of the nonadiabatic dynamics problem has been considered. We also demonstrate that the stationary phase approximation to the reduced propagator at the heart of Pechukas' theory is not unitary due to its neglect of nonstationary paths. As such mixed quantum-classical evolution schemes based on this approximation are not norm conserving and in general must fail to give the correct...

  17. Semiclassical quantization of nonadiabatic systems with hopping periodic orbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Mikiya, E-mail: mikiya.fujii@gmail.com; Yamashita, Koichi [Department of Chemical System Engineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); JST, CREST, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2015-02-21

    We present a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum–classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems consisting of fast and slow degrees of freedom (DOFs) by extending Gutzwiller’s trace formula to a nonadiabatic form. The quantum–classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow DOF, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels. In addition to the semiclassical quantization condition, we also discuss chaotic dynamics involved in the classical limit of nonadiabatic dynamics.

  18. Semiclassical quantization of nonadiabatic systems with hopping periodic orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Mikiya; Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    We present a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum-classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems consisting of fast and slow degrees of freedom (DOFs) by extending Gutzwiller's trace formula to a nonadiabatic form. The quantum-classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow DOF, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels. In addition to the semiclassical quantization condition, we also discuss chaotic dynamics involved in the classical limit of nonadiabatic dynamics.

  19. Nonadiabatic Dynamics in Atomistic Environments: Harnessing Quantum-Classical Theory with Generalized Quantum Master Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalzgraff, William C; Kelly, Aaron; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-12-03

    The development of methods that can efficiently and accurately treat nonadiabatic dynamics in quantum systems coupled to arbitrary atomistic environments remains a significant challenge in problems ranging from exciton transport in photovoltaic materials to electron and proton transfer in catalysis. Here we show that our recently introduced MF-GQME approach, which combines Ehrenfest mean field theory with the generalized quantum master equation framework, is able to yield quantitative accuracy over a wide range of charge-transfer regimes in fully atomistic environments. This is accompanied by computational speed-ups of up to 3 orders of magnitude over a direct application of Ehrenfest theory. This development offers the opportunity to efficiently investigate the atomistic details of nonadiabatic quantum relaxation processes in regimes where obtaining accurate results has previously been elusive.

  20. Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    To ensure the safety and success of future lunar exploration missions, it is important to measure the toxicity of the lunar dust and its electrostatic properties. The electrostatic properties of lunar dust govern its behavior, from how the dust is deposited in an astronaut s lungs to how it contaminates equipment surfaces. NASA has identified the threat caused by lunar dust as one of the top two problems that need to be solved before returning to the Moon. To understand the electrostatic nature of lunar dust, NASA must answer the following questions: (1) how much charge can accumulate on the dust? (2) how long will the charge remain? and (3) can the dust be removed? These questions can be answered by measuring the electrostatic properties of the dust: its volume resistivity, charge decay, charge-to-mass ratio or chargeability, and dielectric properties.

  1. A Tractable Numerical Model for Exploring Nonadiabatic Quantum Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camrud, Evan; Turner, Daniel B.

    2017-01-01

    Numerous computational and spectroscopic studies have demonstrated the decisive role played by nonadiabatic coupling in photochemical reactions. Nonadiabatic coupling drives photochemistry when potential energy surfaces are nearly degenerate at avoided crossings or truly degenerate at unavoided crossings. The dynamics induced by nonadiabatic…

  2. Robust paths to realize nonadiabatic holonomic gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G. F.; Zhao, P. Z.; Tong, D. M.; Sjöqvist, Erik

    2017-05-01

    To realize one desired nonadiabatic holonomic gate, various equivalent evolution paths can be chosen. However, in the presence of errors, these paths become inequivalent. In this paper we investigate the difference of these evolution paths in the presence of systematic Rabi-frequency errors and aim to find paths with optimal robustness to realize one-qubit nonadiabatic holonomic gates. We focus on three types of evolution paths in the Λ system: paths belonging to the original two-loop scheme [E. Sjöqvist et al., New J. Phys. 14, 103035 (2012), 10.1088/1367-2630/14/10/103035], the single-loop multiple-pulse scheme [E. Herterich and E. Sjöqvist, Phys. Rev. A 94, 052310 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.94.052310], and the off-resonance single-shot scheme [G. F. Xu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 052302 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.92.052302; E. Sjöqvist, Phys. Lett. A 380, 65 (2016), 10.1016/j.physleta.2015.10.006]. Whereas both the single-loop multiple-pulse and single-shot schemes aim to improve the robustness of the original two-loop scheme by shortening the exposure to decoherence, we find here that the two-loop scheme is more robust to systematic errors in the Rabi frequencies. More importantly, we derive conditions under which the resilience to this kind of error can be optimized, thereby strengthening the robustness of nonadiabatic holonomic gates.

  3. Regular and quasi black hole solutions for spherically symmetric charged dust distributions in Einstein-Maxwell theory

    CERN Document Server

    Horvat, D; Narancic, Z; Horvat, Dubravko; Ilijic, Sasa; Narancic, Zoran

    2004-01-01

    Spherically symmetric distributions of electrically counterpoised dust (ECD) are used to construct solutions to Einstein-Maxwell equations in Majumdar-Papapetrou formalism. Unexpected bifurcating behavior of regular and singular solutions with regard to source strength is found for localized, as well as for the delta-function ECD distributions. Unified treatment of general ECD distributions is accomplished and it is shown that for certain source strengths one class of regular solutions approaches Minkowski spacetime, while the other comes arbitrarily close to black hole solutions.

  4. Nonadiabatic quantum chaos in atom optics

    CERN Document Server

    Prants, S V

    2012-01-01

    Coherent dynamics of atomic matter waves in a standing-wave laser field is studied. In the dressed-state picture, wave packets of ballistic two-level atoms propagate simultaneously in two optical potentials. The probability to make a transition from one potential to another one is maximal when centroids of wave packets cross the field nodes and is given by a simple formula with the single exponent, the Landau--Zener parameter $\\kappa$. If $\\kappa \\gg 1$, the motion is essentially adiabatic. If $\\kappa \\ll 1$, it is (almost) resonant and periodic. If $\\kappa \\simeq 1$, atom makes nonadiabatic transitions with a splitting of its wave packet at each node and strong complexification of the wave function as compared to the two other cases. This effect is referred as nonadiabatic quantum chaos. Proliferation of wave packets at $\\kappa \\simeq 1$ is shown to be connected closely with chaotic center-of-mass motion in the semiclassical theory of point-like atoms with positive values of the maximal Lyapunov exponent. Th...

  5. Density matrix treatment of non-adiabatic photoinduced electron transfer at a semiconductor surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micha, David A

    2012-12-14

    Photoinduced electron transfer at a nanostructured surface leads to localized transitions and involves three different types of non-adiabatic couplings: vertical electronic transitions induced by light absorption emission, coupling of electronic states by the momentum of atomic motions, and their coupling due to interactions with electronic density fluctuations and vibrational motions in the substrate. These phenomena are described in a unified way by a reduced density matrix (RDM) satisfying an equation of motion that contains dissipative rates. The RDM treatment is used here to distinguish non-adiabatic phenomena that are localized from those due to interaction with a medium. The fast decay of localized state populations due to electronic density fluctuations in the medium has been treated within the Lindblad formulation of rates. The formulation is developed introducing vibronic states constructed from electron orbitals available from density functional calculations, and from vibrational states describing local atomic displacements. Related ab initio molecular dynamics calculations have provided diabatic momentum couplings between excited electronic states. This has been done in detail for an indirect photoexcitation mechanism of the surface Ag(3)Si(111):H, which leads to long lasting electronic charge separation. The resulting coupled density matrix equations are solved numerically to obtain the population of the final charge-separated state as it changes over time, for several values of the diabatic momentum coupling. New insight and unexpected results are presented here which can be understood in terms of photoinduced non-adiabatic transitions involving many vibronic states. It is found that the population of long lasting charge separation states is larger for smaller momentum coupling, and that their population grows faster for smaller coupling.

  6. Nonadiabatic Phase and Persistent Currents for System of Spin-1/2 Particles in Presence of Electromagnetic Fields and Spin-Orbit Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Nian-Bei; MA Zhong-Shui

    2004-01-01

    We present a comprehensive view and details of calculations on Aharonov-Anandan phase for the charged particles in the external electric and magnetic fields for a nonadiabatic process. We derive, with consideration of a spin-orbit interaction and Zeemann Splitting, the persistent currents as a response to an Aharonov-Casher topological interference effect in one-dimensional mesoscopic ring. We also establish a connection to Berry adiabatic phase with deduced dynamical-nature dependence in the nonadiabatic process. The second quantization representation has also been employed in exhibition of persistent currents in the many-body case.

  7. An exact factorization perspective on quantum interferences in nonadiabatic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curchod, Basile F. E.; Agostini, Federica; Gross, E. K. U.

    2016-07-01

    Nonadiabatic quantum interferences emerge whenever nuclear wavefunctions in different electronic states meet and interact in a nonadiabatic region. In this work, we analyze how nonadiabatic quantum interferences translate in the context of the exact factorization of the molecular wavefunction. In particular, we focus our attention on the shape of the time-dependent potential energy surface—the exact surface on which the nuclear dynamics takes place. We use a one-dimensional exactly solvable model to reproduce different conditions for quantum interferences, whose characteristic features already appear in one-dimension. The time-dependent potential energy surface develops complex features when strong interferences are present, in clear contrast to the observed behavior in simple nonadiabatic crossing cases. Nevertheless, independent classical trajectories propagated on the exact time-dependent potential energy surface reasonably conserve a distribution in configuration space that mimics one of the exact nuclear probability densities.

  8. An Exact Factorization Perspective on Quantum Interferences in Nonadiabatic Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Curchod, Basile F E; Gross, E K U

    2016-01-01

    Nonadiabatic quantum interferences emerge whenever nuclear wavefunctions in different electronic states meet and interact in a nonadiabatic region. In this work, we analyze how nonadiabatic quantum interferences translate in the context of the exact factorization of the molecular wavefunction. In particular, we focus our attention on the shape of the time-dependent potential energy surface - the exact surface on which the nuclear dynamics takes place - using an exactly-solvable model to reproduce different conditions for quantum interferences. The time-dependent potential energy surface develops complex features when strong interferences are present, in clear contrast to the observed behavior in simple nonadiabatic crossing cases. Nevertheless, independent classical trajectories propagated on the exact time-dependent potential energy surface reasonably conserve a distribution in configuration space that mimics the one of the exact nuclear probability density.

  9. Planar dust-acoustic waves in electron-positron-ion-dust plasmas with dust size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Kai-Biao [Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong (China)

    2014-06-15

    Nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves which are described with a Kortweg-de vries (KdV) equation by using the reductive perturbation method, are investigated in a planar unmagnetized dusty plasma consisting of electrons, positrons, ions and negatively-charged dust particles of different sizes and masses. The effects of the power-law distribution of dust and other plasma parameters on the dust-acoustic solitary waves are studied. Numerical results show that the dust size distribution has a significant influence on the propagation properties of dust-acoustic solitons. The amplitudes of solitary waves in the case of a power-law distribution is observed to be smaller, but the soliton velocity and width are observed to be larger, than those of mono-sized dust grains with an average dust size. Our results indicate that only compressed solitary waves exist in dusty plasma with different dust species. The relevance of the present investigation to interstellar clouds is discussed.

  10. Thermoflow multiplicity in nonadiabatic multitube reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pita, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    Steady states with different flow rates and temperature profiles may exist in a multitube packed-bed reactor operating under a prescribed pressure drop due to the coupling among the species, energy and momentum balances, and the dependence of physical properties on temperature, composition, and pressure. This thermoflow multiplicity may lead to a highly undesired operation. A pseudohomogeneous nonadiabatic one-dimensional reactor model is used to predict the conditions under which the multiplicity may exist when a single gaseous exothermic reaction is carried out. Two limiting models,one assuming negligible dispersion of heat (ND) and one assuming infinite dispersion (lumped thermal or LT), as well as a general model accounting for finite thermal dispersion (FD) are analyzed. Each limiting model is analyzed for several limiting cases, each assuming that a different mechanism is the main cause of pressure drop. When the thermal axial dispersion is neglected, thermoflow multiplicity may be observed only for highly exothermic reactions, even if the reaction induces a volume increase. The FD model exhibits multiplicity for larger heats of reaction than those of the LT model but smaller than those of the ND model. These values span the range of interest for industrial reactors.

  11. Study on Ground Simulation Test System of Material Charging under Lunar Dust Environment%月尘环境材料带电地面模拟试验系统研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许滨; 原青云; 孙永卫; 吴勇

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the characteristics of lunar dust and harm of lunar dust electro-statics to spacecraft’s activities,based on the fundamental principles of material charging under the lunar dust environment,and sets up a ground simulation system of charged materials in vacu-um environment.This system can be used to inspect the effects of simulated electrostatic lunar dust on lunar probes,to study the laws of effects of lunar dust on moon crafts as to its electrostat-ic electrification,adsorption,coupling and discharge.It is intended to meet the requirements of e-lectrostatic shielding technology for our country's lunar probe programs.%介绍月尘的特点及月尘静电对航天活动的危害,根据月尘环境下材料带电的原理,构建真空环境材料带电地面模拟试验系统。利用装置进行模拟静电月尘对探月航天器的作用,研究月尘静电对登月探测器的静电起电、吸附、耦合及放电效应影响规律,从而初步解决我国在探月工程上月球探测器对月球表面静电防护技术的需求。

  12. Coriolis coupling and nonadiabaticity in chemical reaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Emilia L

    2010-12-01

    The nonadiabatic quantum dynamics and Coriolis coupling effect in chemical reaction have been reviewed, with emphasis on recent progress in using the time-dependent wave packet approach to study the Coriolis coupling and nonadiabatic effects, which was done by K. L. Han and his group. Several typical chemical reactions, for example, H+D(2), F+H(2)/D(2)/HD, D(+)+H(2), O+H(2), and He+H(2)(+), have been discussed. One can find that there is a significant role of Coriolis coupling in reaction dynamics for the ion-molecule collisions of D(+)+H(2), Ne+H(2)(+), and He+H(2)(+) in both adiabatic and nonadiabatic context.

  13. Nonadiabatic dynamics and coherent control of nonequilibrium superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, Andreas; Manske, Dirk [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Krull, Holger; Uhrig, Goetz [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Physik I, Technische Univeritaet Dortmund, Otto-Hahn Strasse 4, 44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Inspired by recent THz pump-THz probe experiments on NbN films, we theoretically study the pump-probe response of nonequilibrium superconductors coupled to optical phonons. For ultrashort pump pulses a nonadiabatic regime emerges, which is characterized by amplitude oscillations of the superconducting gap and by the generation of coherent phonons. Using density-matrix theory as well as analytical methods, we compute the pump-probe response of the superconductor in the nonadiabatic regime and determine the signatures of the order parameter and of the phonon oscillations in the pump-probe conductivity. We find that the nonadiabatic dynamics of the superconductor reflects itself in oscillations of the pump-probe response as a function of delay time between pump and probe pulses. We also consider two-band superconductors and study the interplay of the two amplitude oscillations of the two gaps.

  14. Group delay and dispersion tailoring in nonadiabatic tapered fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Sara; Palací, Jesús; Martí, Javier

    2016-09-01

    The dispersion profile of a nonadiabatic tapered singlemode fiber is characterized and dynamically tuned. Its group delay and dispersion parameters are measured and compared to those of a standard singlemode fiber. The dispersion profile can be tuned by introducing a phase shift through mechanical stretching. Coarse tuning is also obtained by varying the surrounding medium of the tapered fiber. Dispersion values up to 700 ps/nm·km in nonadiabatic tapered fibers are obtained for the first time. Dynamic tuning exposed here can be very useful in applications such as nonlinearities or soliton generation.

  15. Intrinsic nonadiabatic topological torque in magnetic skyrmions and vortices

    KAUST Repository

    Akosa, Collins Ashu

    2017-03-01

    We propose that topological spin currents flowing in topologically nontrivial magnetic textures, such as magnetic skyrmions and vortices, produce an intrinsic nonadiabatic torque of the form Tt∼[(∂xm×∂ym)·m]∂ym. We show that this torque, which is absent in one-dimensional domain walls and/or nontopological textures, is responsible for the enhanced nonadiabaticity parameter observed in magnetic vortices compared to one-dimensional textures. The impact of this torque on the motion of magnetic skyrmions is expected to be crucial, especially to determine their robustness against defects and pinning centers.

  16. Adiabatic following criterion, estimation of the nonadiabatic excitation fraction and quantum jumps

    CERN Document Server

    Shakhmuratov, R N

    2003-01-01

    An accurate theory describing adiabatic following of the dark, nonabsorbing state in the three-level system is developed. An analytical solution for the wave function of the particle experiencing Raman excitation is found as an expansion in terms of the time varying nonadiabatic perturbation parameter. The solution can be presented as a sum of adiabatic and nonadiabatic parts. Both are estimated quantitatively. It is shown that the limiting value to which the amplitude of the nonadiabatic part tends is equal to the Fourier component of the nonadiabatic perturbation parameter taken at the Rabi frequency of the Raman excitation. The time scale of the variation of both parts is found. While the adiabatic part of the solution varies slowly and follows the change of the nonadiabatic perturbation parameter, the nonadiabatic part appears almost instantly, revealing a jumpwise transition between the dark and bright states. This jump happens when the nonadiabatic perturbation parameter takes its maximum value.

  17. On the continua in two-dimensional nonadiabatic magnetohydrodynamic spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ploey, A.; Van der Linden, R. A. M.; Belien, A. J. C.

    2000-01-01

    The equations for the continuous subspectra of the linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normal modes spectrum of two-dimensional (2D) plasmas are derived in general curvilinear coordinates, taking nonadiabatic effects in the energy equation into account. Previously published derivations of continuous sp

  18. Non-adiabatic geometrical quantum gates in semiconductor quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Solinas, P; Zanghì, N; Rossi, F; Solinas, Paolo; Zanardi, Paolo; Zanghì, Nino; Rossi, Fausto

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we study the implementation of non-adiabatic geometrical quantum gates with in semiconductor quantum dots. Different quantum information enconding/manipulation schemes exploiting excitonic degrees of freedom are discussed. By means of the Aharanov-Anandan geometrical phase one can avoid the limitations of adiabatic schemes relying on adiabatic Berry phase; fast geometrical quantum gates can be in principle implemented

  19. Non-adiabatic collisions in H+ + O2 system: An initio study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Saieswari; Sanjay Kumar

    2007-09-01

    An ab initio study on the low-lying potential energy surfaces of H+ + O2 system for different orientations () of H+ have been undertaken employing the multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) method and Dunning's -VTZ basis set to examine their role in influencing the collision dynamics. Nonadiabatic interactions have been analysed for the 2 × 2 case in two dimensions for = 0°, 45° and 90°, and the corresponding diabatic potential energy surfaces have been obtained using the diabatic wavefunctions and their CI coefficients. The characteristics of the collision dynamics have been analysed in terms of vibrational coupling matrix elements for both inelastic and charge transfer processes in the restricted geometries. The strengths of coupling matrix elements reflect the vibrational excitation patterns observed in the state-to-state beam experiments.

  20. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  1. How Large are Nonadiabatic Effects in Atomic and Diatomic Systems?

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Yubo; Tubman, Norm; Krogel, Jaron; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Ceperley, David

    2015-01-01

    With recent developments in simulating nonadiabatic systems to high accuracy, it has become possible to determine how much energy is attributed to nuclear quantum effects beyond zero-point energy. In this work we calculate the non-relativistic ground-state energies of atomic and molecular systems without the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. For this purpose we utilize the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo method, in which the nodes depend on both the electronic and ionic positions. We report ground-state energies for all systems studied, ionization energies for the first-row atoms and atomization energies for the first-row hydrides. We find the ionization energies of the atoms to be nearly independent of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, within the accuracy of our results. The atomization energies of molecular systems, however, show small effects of the nonadiabatic coupling between electrons and nuclei.

  2. Acoustic vibration sensor based on nonadiabatic tapered fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ben; Li, Yi; Sun, Miao; Zhang, Zhen-Wei; Dong, Xin-Yong; Zhang, Zai-Xuan; Jin, Shang-Zhong

    2012-11-15

    A simple and low-cost vibration sensor based on single-mode nonadiabatic fiber tapers is proposed and demonstrated. The environmental vibrations can be detected by demodulating the transmission loss of the nonadiabatic fiber taper. Theoretical simulations show that the transmission loss is related to the microbending of the fiber taper induced by vibrations. Unlike interferometric sensors, this vibration sensor does not need any feedback loop to control the quadrature point to obtain a stable performance. In addition, it has no requirement for the coherence of the light source and is insensitive to temperature changes. Experimental results show that this sensing system has a wide frequency response range from a few hertz to tens of kilohertz with the maximal signal to noise ratio up to 73 dB.

  3. ENTROPY-VORTEX WAVES IN NON-ADIABATIC FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibáñez S, Miguel H., E-mail: mhibanez@yahoo.com [Departamento de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Caribe, Barranquilla (Colombia)

    2016-02-20

    The Ertel theorem on the vorticity along the flow of adiabatic fluids is generalized for non-adiabatic flows. Several limiting cases are analyzed and the results are applied to flows behind different hydrodynamics fronts, particularly to thermal fronts (heat and cooling fronts). An important conclusion of the present analysis is that vorticity is inherent in the condensation’s (or hot spots) formation by thermal instabilities in plasma flows. Implications for several astrophysical plasmas are outlined.

  4. Nonadiabatic Geometric Phase in Composite Systems and Its Subsystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin

    2008-01-01

    We point out that the time-dependent gauge transformation technique may be effective in investigating the nonadiabatic geometric phase of a subsystem in a composite system. As an example, we consider two uniaxially coupled spin -1/2 particles with one of particles driven by rotating magnetic field. The influences of coupling and precession frequency of the magnetic field on geometric phase are also discussed in detail.

  5. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhov, Dmitry V; Glover, William J; Martinez, Todd J; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V

    2014-08-07

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as "cloning," in analogy to the "spawning" procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, "trains," as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions.

  6. Nonadiabatic electron response in the Hasegawa-Wakatani equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoltzfus-Dueck, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Scott, B. D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Krommes, J. A. [PPPL, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, MS 28, Princeton, New Jersey 08543–0451 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Tokamak edge turbulence is strongly influenced by parallel electron physics, which relaxes density and potential fluctuations towards electron adiabatic response. Beginning with the paradigmatic Hasegawa-Wakatani equations (HWEs) for resistive tokamak edge turbulence, a unique decomposition of the electric potential (φ) into adiabatic (a) and nonadiabatic (b) portions is derived, based on the requirement that a neither drive nor respond to the parallel current j{sub ∥}. The form of the decomposition clarifies that, at perpendicular scales large relative to the sound radius, the electron adiabatic response controls the nonzonal φ, not the fluctuating density n. Simple energy balance arguments allow one to rigorously bound the ratio of rms nonzonal nonadiabatic fluctuations (b(tilde sign)) relative to adiabatic ones (ã). The role of the vorticity nonlinearity in transferring energy between adiabatic and nonadiabatic fluctuations aids intuitive understanding of self-sustained turbulence in the HWEs. When the normalized parallel resistivity is weak, b(tilde sign) becomes effectively slaved, allowing the reduction to an approximate one-field model that remains valid for strong turbulence. In addition to guiding physical intuition, the one-field reduction should greatly ease further analytical manipulations. Direct numerical simulation of the 2D HWEs confirms the convergence of the asymptotic formula for b(tilde sign)

  7. Non-Adiabatic Molecular Dynamics Methods for Materials Discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furche, Filipp [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Parker, Shane M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Muuronen, Mikko J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Roy, Saswata [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-04-04

    The flow of radiative energy in light-driven materials such as photosensitizer dyes or photocatalysts is governed by non-adiabatic transitions between electronic states and cannot be described within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation commonly used in electronic structure theory. The non-adiabatic molecular dynamics (NAMD) methods based on Tully surface hopping and time-dependent density functional theory developed in this project have greatly extended the range of molecular materials that can be tackled by NAMD simulations. New algorithms to compute molecular excited state and response properties efficiently were developed. Fundamental limitations of common non-linear response methods were discovered and characterized. Methods for accurate computations of vibronic spectra of materials such as black absorbers were developed and applied. It was shown that open-shell TDDFT methods capture bond breaking in NAMD simulations, a longstanding challenge for single-reference molecular dynamics simulations. The methods developed in this project were applied to study the photodissociation of acetaldehyde and revealed that non-adiabatic effects are experimentally observable in fragment kinetic energy distributions. Finally, the project enabled the first detailed NAMD simulations of photocatalytic water oxidation by titania nanoclusters, uncovering the mechanism of this fundamentally important reaction for fuel generation and storage.

  8. Ab initio multiple cloning algorithm for quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhov, Dmitry V.; Shalashilin, Dmitrii V. [Department of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Glover, William J.; Martinez, Todd J. [Department of Chemistry and The PULSE Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    We present a new algorithm for ab initio quantum nonadiabatic molecular dynamics that combines the best features of ab initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) and Multiconfigurational Ehrenfest (MCE) methods. In this new method, ab initio multiple cloning (AIMC), the individual trajectory basis functions (TBFs) follow Ehrenfest equations of motion (as in MCE). However, the basis set is expanded (as in AIMS) when these TBFs become sufficiently mixed, preventing prolonged evolution on an averaged potential energy surface. We refer to the expansion of the basis set as “cloning,” in analogy to the “spawning” procedure in AIMS. This synthesis of AIMS and MCE allows us to leverage the benefits of mean-field evolution during periods of strong nonadiabatic coupling while simultaneously avoiding mean-field artifacts in Ehrenfest dynamics. We explore the use of time-displaced basis sets, “trains,” as a means of expanding the basis set for little cost. We also introduce a new bra-ket averaged Taylor expansion (BAT) to approximate the necessary potential energy and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. The BAT approximation avoids the necessity of computing electronic structure information at intermediate points between TBFs, as is usually done in saddle-point approximations used in AIMS. The efficiency of AIMC is demonstrated on the nonradiative decay of the first excited state of ethylene. The AIMC method has been implemented within the AIMS-MOLPRO package, which was extended to include Ehrenfest basis functions.

  9. Nonadiabatic dynamics of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer in a solvated phenol-amine complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Puja; Schwerdtfeger, Christine A; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2015-02-12

    Photoinduced concerted electron-proton transfer (EPT), denoted photo-EPT, is important for a wide range of energy conversion processes. Transient absorption and Raman spectroscopy experiments on the hydrogen-bonded p-nitrophenylphenol-t-butylamine complex, solvated in 1,2-dichloroethane, suggested that this complex may undergo photo-EPT. The experiments probed two excited electronic states that were interpreted as an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state and an EPT state. Herein mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical nonadiabatic surface hopping dynamics is used to investigate the relaxation pathways following photoexcitation. The potential energy surface is generated on the fly with a semiempirical floating occupation molecular orbital complete active space configuration interaction method for the solute molecule and a molecular mechanical force field for the explicit solvent molecules. The free energy curves along the proton transfer coordinate illustrate that proton transfer is thermodynamically and kinetically favorable on the lower-energy excited state but not on the higher-energy excited state, supporting the characterization of these states as EPT and ICT, respectively. The nonadiabatic dynamics simulations indicate that the population decays from the ICT state to the EPT state in ∼100 fs and from the EPT state to the ground state on the slower time scale of ∼1 ps, qualitatively consistent with the experimental measurements. For ∼54% of the trajectories, the proton transfers from the phenol to the amine in ∼400 fs on the EPT state and then transfers back to the phenol rapidly upon decay to the ground state. Thus, these calculations augment the original interpretation of the experimental data by providing evidence of proton transfer on the EPT state prior to decay to the ground state. The fundamental insights obtained from these simulations are also relevant to other photo-EPT processes.

  10. Non-adiabatic Excited State Molecule Dynamics Modeling of Photochemistry and Photophysics of Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Tammie Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tretiak, Sergei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-06

    Understanding and controlling excited state dynamics lies at the heart of all our efforts to design photoactive materials with desired functionality. This tailor-design approach has become the standard for many technological applications (e.g., solar energy harvesting) including the design of organic conjugated electronic materials with applications in photovoltaic and light-emitting devices. Over the years, our team has developed efficient LANL-based codes to model the relevant photophysical processes following photoexcitation (spatial energy transfer, excitation localization/delocalization, and/or charge separation). The developed approach allows the non-radiative relaxation to be followed on up to ~10 ps timescales for large realistic molecules (hundreds of atoms in size) in the realistic solvent dielectric environment. The Collective Electronic Oscillator (CEO) code is used to compute electronic excited states, and the Non-adiabatic Excited State Molecular Dynamics (NA-ESMD) code is used to follow the non-adiabatic dynamics on multiple coupled Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces. Our preliminary NA-ESMD simulations have revealed key photoinduced mechanisms controlling competing interactions and relaxation pathways in complex materials, including organic conjugated polymer materials, and have provided a detailed understanding of photochemical products and intermediates and the internal conversion process during the initiation of energetic materials. This project will be using LANL-based CEO and NA-ESMD codes to model nonradiative relaxation in organic and energetic materials. The NA-ESMD and CEO codes belong to a class of electronic structure/quantum chemistry codes that require large memory, “long-queue-few-core” distribution of resources in order to make useful progress. The NA-ESMD simulations are trivially parallelizable requiring ~300 processors for up to one week runtime to reach a meaningful restart point.

  11. Enhanced Nonadiabaticity in Vortex Cores due to the Emergent Hall Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Bisig, André

    2017-01-04

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study, investigating the origin of the enhanced nonadiabaticity of magnetic vortex cores. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is used to image the vortex core gyration dynamically to measure the nonadiabaticity with high precision, including a high confidence upper bound. We show theoretically, that the large nonadiabaticity parameter observed experimentally can be explained by the presence of local spin currents arising from a texture induced emergent Hall effect. This study demonstrates that the magnetic damping α and nonadiabaticity parameter β are very sensitive to the topology of the magnetic textures, resulting in an enhanced ratio (β/α>1) in magnetic vortex cores or Skyrmions.

  12. Enhanced Nonadiabaticity in Vortex Cores due to the Emergent Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisig, André; Akosa, Collins Ashu; Moon, Jung-Hwan; Rhensius, Jan; Moutafis, Christoforos; von Bieren, Arndt; Heidler, Jakoba; Kiliani, Gillian; Kammerer, Matthias; Curcic, Michael; Weigand, Markus; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Manchon, Aurelien; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-12-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study, investigating the origin of the enhanced nonadiabaticity of magnetic vortex cores. Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy is used to image the vortex core gyration dynamically to measure the nonadiabaticity with high precision, including a high confidence upper bound. We show theoretically, that the large nonadiabaticity parameter observed experimentally can be explained by the presence of local spin currents arising from a texture induced emergent Hall effect. This study demonstrates that the magnetic damping α and nonadiabaticity parameter β are very sensitive to the topology of the magnetic textures, resulting in an enhanced ratio (β /α >1 ) in magnetic vortex cores or Skyrmions.

  13. Effect of nonthermal ion distribution and dust temperature on nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Annou; R Annou

    2012-01-01

    Dust-acoustic solitary waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma whose constituents are inertial charged dust grains, Boltzmannian electrons and nonthermal ions have been investigated by taking into account finite dust temperature. The pseudopotential has been used to study solitary solution. The existence of solitary waves having negative potential is reported.

  14. Astrophysics of Dust in Cold Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Draine, B T

    2003-01-01

    Nine lectures reviewing the astrophysics of dust in interstellar clouds. Topics include: (1) Summary of observational evidence concerning interstellar dust: broadband extinction, scattering of starlight, polarization of starlight, spectroscopy of dust, IR and FIR emission, and depletions of grain-forming elements. (2) Optics of interstellar dust grains: dielectric functions of nonconducting and conducting materials, calculational techniques, formulae valid in the Rayleigh limit, Kramers-Kronig relations, microwave emission mechanisms, and X-ray scattering. (3) IR and FIR emission: heating of interstellar dust, including single-photon heating, and resulting IR emission spectrum. (4) Charging of dust grains: collisional charging, photoelectric emission, and resulting charge distribution functions. (5) Dynamics: gas drag, Lorentz force, forces due to anisotropic radiation, and resulting drift velocities. (6) Rotational dynamics: brownian rotation, suprathermal rotation, and effects of starlight torques. (7) Alig...

  15. Dust devil dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, W.; Miura, H.; Onishchenko, O.; Couedel, L.; Arnas, C.; Escarguel, A.; Benkadda, S.; Fedun, V.

    2016-06-01

    A self-consistent hydrodynamic model for the solar heating-driven onset of a dust devil vortex is derived and analyzed. The toroidal flows and vertical velocity fields are driven by an instability that arises from the inversion of the mass density stratification produced by solar heating of the sandy surface soil. The nonlinear dynamics in the primary temperature gradient-driven vertical airflows drives a secondary toroidal vortex flow through a parametric interaction in the nonlinear structures. While an external tangential shear flow may initiate energy transfer to the toroidal vortex flow, the nonlinear interactions dominate the transfer of vertical-radial flows into a fast toroidal flow. This secondary flow has a vertical vorticity, while the primary thermal gradient-driven flow produces the toroidal vorticity. Simulations for the complex nonlinear structure are carried out with the passive convection of sand as test particles. Triboelectric charging modeling of the dust is used to estimate the charging of the sand particles. Parameters for a Dust Devil laboratory experiment are proposed considering various working gases and dust particle parameters. The nonlinear dynamics of the toroidal flow driven by the temperature gradient is of generic interest for both neutral gases and plasmas.

  16. Discussion about Dust Collector for Coke Pushing Car of Top Charging Coke Oven%顶装焦炉推焦车烟尘捕集装置的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    樊海莲

    2015-01-01

    针对顶装焦炉推焦车烟尘捕集装置存在的问题 ,提出了相应的解决措施 ,以提高环保效果为目标 ,使太重公司的产品成为具有市场竞争力的高可靠性、实用性的设备.%In this article ,to the problems in dust collector for coke pushing car of top charging coke oven ,a relevant solution is giv-en ,which aims at high environmental protection ,to makes our products have high reliability and practicality in market competitive-ness .

  17. LADEE Search for a Dust Exosphere: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenar, D. A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Elphic, R.

    2014-01-01

    The LADEE search for exospheric dust is strongly motivated by putative detections of forward-scattered sunlight from exospheric dust grains which were observed during the Apollo era. This dust population, if it exists, has been associated with charging and transport of dust near the terminators. It is likely that the concentration of these dust grains is governed by a saltation mechanism originated by micrometeoroid impacts, which are the source of the more tenuous ejecta cloud.

  18. Electronically Nonadiabatic Dynamics via Semiclassical Initial Value Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, William H.

    2008-12-11

    In the late 1970's Meyer and Miller (MM) [J. Chem. Phys. 70, 3214 (1979)] presented a classical Hamiltonian corresponding to a finite set of electronic states of a molecular system (i.e., the various potential energy surfaces and their couplings), so that classical trajectory simulations could be carried out treating the nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom (DOF) in an equivalent dynamical framework (i.e., by classical mechanics), thereby describing non-adiabatic dynamics in a more unified manner. Much later Stock and Thoss (ST) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 578 (1997)] showed that the MM model is actually not a 'model', but rather a 'representation' of the nuclear-electronic system; i.e., were the MMST nuclear-electronic Hamiltonian taken as a Hamiltonian operator and used in the Schroedinger equation, the exact (quantum) nuclear-electronic dynamics would be obtained. In recent years various initial value representations (IVRs) of semiclassical (SC) theory have been used with the MMST Hamiltonian to describe electronically non-adiabatic processes. Of special interest is the fact that though the classical trajectories generated by the MMST Hamiltonian (and which are the 'input' for an SC-IVR treatment) are 'Ehrenfest trajectories', when they are used within the SC-IVR framework the nuclear motion emerges from regions of non-adiabaticity on one potential energy surface (PES) or another, and not on an average PES as in the traditional Ehrenfest model. Examples are presented to illustrate and (hopefully) illuminate this behavior.

  19. Nonlinear effects generation in non-adiabatically tapered fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palací, Jesús; Mas, Sara; Monzón-Hernández, David; Martí, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Nonlinear effects are observed in a non-adiabatically tapered optical fibre. The designed structure allows for the introduction of self-phase modulation, which is observed through pulse breaking and spectral broadening, in approximately a centimetre of propagation using a commercial telecom laser. These devices are simple to fabricate and suitable to generate and control a variety of nonlinear effects in practical applications because they do not experience short-term degradation as previously reported approaches. Experimental and theoretical results are obtained, showing a good agreement.

  20. Nonadiabatic effects in odd-odd deformed proton emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patial, M.; Jain, A. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247 667 (India); Arumugam, P. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttarakhand 247 667 (India); Centro de Fisica das Interaccoes Fundamentais, and Departmento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Maglione, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padova (Italy); Ferreira, L. S. [Centro de Fisica das Interaccoes Fundamentais, and Departmento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Avenida Rovisco Pais, P1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2011-11-30

    We present for the first time, the nonadiabatic quasiparticle approach to study proton emission from odd-odd deformed nuclei. Coriolis effects are incorporated in both the parent and daughter wavefunctions and hence our formalism allows us to study their complete role on the decay widths. First results obtained for the nucleus {sup 112}Cs suggest a weak dependance on Coriolis effect. However, we are able to reproduce the experimental half-lives without assuming the exact Nilsson orbital from which the decay proceeds.

  1. Non-adiabatic study of the Kepler subgiant KIC 6442183

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosjean M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the precision of Kepler observations, [3] were able to measure the linewidth and amplitude of individual modes (including mixed modes in several subgiant power spectra. We perform a forward modelling of a Kepler subgiant based on surface properties and observed frequencies. Non-adiabatic computations including a time- dependent treatment of convection give the lifetimes of radial and non-radial modes. Next, combining the lifetimes and inertias with a stochastic excitation model gives the amplitudes of the modes. We can now directly compare theoretical and observed linewidths and amplitudes of mixed-modes to obtain new constraints on our theoretical models.

  2. Memory effects in nonadiabatic molecular dynamics at metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We study the effect of temporal correlation in a Langevin equation describing nonadiabatic dynamics at metal surfaces. For a harmonic oscillator, the Langevin equation preserves the quantum dynamics exactly and it is demonstrated that memory effects are needed in order to conserve the ground state...... energy of the oscillator. We then compare the result of Langevin dynamics in a harmonic potential with a perturbative master equation approach and show that the Langevin equation gives a better description in the nonperturbative range of high temperatures and large friction. Unlike the master equation...... the temporal correlation function and dynamical friction within density functional theory....

  3. Measuring nonadiabaticity of molecular quantum dynamics with quantum fidelity and with its efficient semiclassical approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    We propose to measure nonadiabaticity of molecular quantum dynamics rigorously with the quantum fidelity between the Born-Oppenheimer and fully nonadiabatic dynamics. It is shown that this measure of nonadiabaticity applies in situations where other criteria, such as the energy gap criterion or the extent of population transfer, fail. We further propose to estimate this quantum fidelity efficiently with a generalization of the dephasing representation to multiple surfaces. Two variants of the multiple-surface dephasing representation (MSDR) are introduced, in which the nuclei are propagated either with the fewest-switches surface hopping (FSSH) or with the locally mean field dynamics (LMFD). The LMFD can be interpreted as the Ehrenfest dynamics of an ensemble of nuclear trajectories, and has been used previously in the nonadiabatic semiclassical initial value representation. In addition to propagating an ensemble of classical trajectories, the MSDR requires evaluating nonadiabatic couplings and solving the Sc...

  4. Accurate nonadiabatic quantum dynamics on the cheap: making the most of mean field theory with master equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aaron; Brackbill, Nora; Markland, Thomas E

    2015-03-07

    In this article, we show how Ehrenfest mean field theory can be made both a more accurate and efficient method to treat nonadiabatic quantum dynamics by combining it with the generalized quantum master equation framework. The resulting mean field generalized quantum master equation (MF-GQME) approach is a non-perturbative and non-Markovian theory to treat open quantum systems without any restrictions on the form of the Hamiltonian that it can be applied to. By studying relaxation dynamics in a wide range of dynamical regimes, typical of charge and energy transfer, we show that MF-GQME provides a much higher accuracy than a direct application of mean field theory. In addition, these increases in accuracy are accompanied by computational speed-ups of between one and two orders of magnitude that become larger as the system becomes more nonadiabatic. This combination of quantum-classical theory and master equation techniques thus makes it possible to obtain the accuracy of much more computationally expensive approaches at a cost lower than even mean field dynamics, providing the ability to treat the quantum dynamics of atomistic condensed phase systems for long times.

  5. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reactive airway disease - dust; Bronchial asthma - dust; Triggers - dust ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Dust is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to dust, you are ...

  6. Early Events in the Nonadiabatic Relaxation Dynamics of 4-(N,N-Dimethylamino)benzonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochman, Michał A; Tajti, Attila; Morrison, Carole A; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2015-03-10

    4-(N,N-Dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) is the archetypal system for dual fluorescence. Several past studies, both experimental and theoretical, have examined the mechanism of its relaxation in the gas phase following photoexcitation to the S2 state, without converging to a single description. In this contribution, we report first-principles simulations of the early events involved in this process performed using the nonadiabatic trajectory surface hopping (TSH) approach in combination with the ADC(2) electronic structure method. ADC(2) is verified to reproduce the ground- and excited-state structures of DMABN in reasonably close agreement with previous theoretical benchmarks. The TSH simulations predict that internal conversion from the S2 state to the S1 takes place as early as 8.5 fs, on average, after the initial photoexcitation, and with no significant torsion of the dimethylamino group relative to the aromatic ring. As evidenced by supporting EOM-CCSD calculations, the population transfer from S2 to S1 can be attributed to the skeletal deformation modes of the aromatic ring and the stretching of the ring-dimethylamino nitrogen bond. The non- or slightly twisted locally excited structure is the predominant product of the internal conversion, and the twisted intramolecular charge transfer structure is formed through equilibration with the locally excited structure with no change of adiabatic state. These findings point toward a new interpretation of data from previous time-resolved experiments.

  7. Geometric Phase Effects in Nonadiabatic Dynamics near Conical Intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Joubert-Doriol, Loïc; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2017-07-18

    Dynamical consideration that goes beyond the common Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) becomes necessary when energy differences between electronic potential energy surfaces become small or vanish. One of the typical scenarios of the BOA breakdown in molecules beyond diatomics is a conical intersection (CI) of electronic potential energy surfaces. CIs provide an efficient mechanism for radiationless electronic transitions: acting as "funnels" for the nuclear wave function, they enable rapid conversion of the excessive electronic energy into the nuclear motion. In addition, CIs introduce nontrivial geometric phases (GPs) for both electronic and nuclear wave functions. These phases manifest themselves in change of the wave function signs if one considers an evolution of the system around the CI. This sign change is independent of the shape of the encircling contour and thus has a topological character. How these extra phases affect nonadiabatic dynamics is the main question that is addressed in this Account. We start by considering the simplest model providing the CI topology: two-dimensional two-state linear vibronic coupling model. Selecting this model instead of a real molecule has the advantage that various dynamical regimes can be easily modeled in the model by varying parameters, whereas any fixed molecule provides the system specific behavior that may not be very illustrative. After demonstrating when GP effects are important and how they modify the dynamics for two sets of initial conditions (starting from the ground and excited electronic states), we give examples of molecular systems where the described GP effects are crucial for adequate description of nonadiabatic dynamics. Interestingly, although the GP has a topological character, the extent to which accounting for GPs affect nuclear dynamics profoundly depends on topography of potential energy surfaces. Understanding an extent of changes introduced by the GP in chemical dynamics poses a problem of

  8. Dust in the planetary system: Dust interactions in space plasmas of the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Czechowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Cosmic dust particles are small solid objects observed in the solar planetary system and in many astronomical objects like the surrounding of stars, the interstellar and even the intergalactic medium. In the solar system the dust is best observed and most often found within the region of the orbits of terrestrial planets where the dust interactions and dynamics are observed directly from spacecraft. Dust is observed in space near Earth and also enters the atmosphere of the Earth where it takes part in physical and chemical processes. Hence space offers a laboratory to study dust-plasma interactions and dust dynamics. A recent example is the observation of nanodust of sizes smaller than 10 nm. We outline the theoretical considerations on which our knowledge of dust electric charges in space plasmas are founded. We discuss the dynamics of the dust particles and show how the small charged particles are accelerated by the solar wind that carries a magnetic field. Finally, as examples for the space observation of cosmic dust interactions, we describe the first detection of fast nanodust in the solar wind near Earth orbit and the first bi-static observations of PMSE, the radar echoes that are observed in the Earth ionosphere in the presence of charged dust.

  9. State Space Path Integrals for Electronically Nonadiabatic Reaction Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Duke, Jessica Ryan

    2016-01-01

    We present a state-space-based path integral method to calculate the rate of electron transfer (ET) in multi-state, multi-electron condensed-phase processes. We employ an exact path integral in discrete electronic states and continuous Cartesian nuclear variables to obtain a transition state theory (TST) estimate to the rate. A dynamic recrossing correction to the TST rate is then obtained from real-time dynamics simulations using mean field ring polymer molecular dynamics. We employ two different reaction coordinates in our simulations and show that, despite the use of mean field dynamics, the use of an accurate dividing surface to compute TST rates allows us to achieve remarkable agreement with Fermi's golden rule rates for nonadiabatic ET in the normal regime of Marcus theory. Further, we show that using a reaction coordinate based on electronic state populations allows us to capture the turnover in rates for ET in the Marcus inverted regime.

  10. Relevance of nonadiabatic effects in TiOCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastrogiuseppe, Diego; Dobry, Ariel, E-mail: dobry@ifir-conicet.gov.a [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas IngenierIa y Agrimensura, Universidad Nacional de Rosario and Instituto de Fisica Rosario, Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 bis, 2000 Rosario (Argentina)

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the effect of the phonon dynamics on a recently proposed model for the uniform-incommensurate transition seen in TiOX compounds. The study is based on a recently developed formalism for nonadiabatic spin-Peierls systems based on bosonization and a mean field RPA approximation for the interchain coupling. To reproduce the measured low temperature spin gap, a spin-phonon coupling quite bigger than the one predicted from an adiabatic approach is required. This high value is compatible with the renormalization of the phonons in the high temperature phase seen in inelastic x-ray experiments. Our theory accounts for the temperature of the incommensurate transition and the value of the incommensurate wave vector at the transition point.

  11. Electric nonadiabatic geometric entangling gates on spin qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi Mousolou, Vahid

    2017-07-01

    Producing and maintaining entanglement reside at the heart of the optimal construction of quantum operations and are fundamental issues in the realization of universal quantum computation. We here introduce a setup of spin qubits that allows the geometric implementation of entangling gates between the register qubits with any arbitrary entangling power. We show this by demonstrating a circuit through a spin chain, which performs universal nonadiabatic holonomic two-qubit entanglers. The proposed gates are all electric and geometric, which would help to realize fast and robust entangling gates on spin qubits. This family of entangling gates contains gates that are as efficient as the cnot gate in quantum algorithms. We examine the robustness of the circuit to some extent.

  12. Spectral Shifts of Nonadiabatic High-Order Harmonic Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André D. Bandrauk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available High-order harmonic generation (HHG is a nonlinear nonperturbative process in ultrashort intense laser-matter interaction. It is the main source of coherent attosecond (1 as = 10−18 s laser pulses to investigate ultrafast electron dynamics. HHG has become an important table-top source covering a spectral range from infrared to extreme ultraviolet (XUV. One way to extend the cutoff energy of HHG is to increase the intensity of the laser pulses. A consequence of HHG in such intense short laser fields is the characteristic nonadiabatic red and blue shifts of the spectrum, which are reviewed in the present work. An example of this nonperturbative light-matter interaction is presented for the one-electron nonsymmetric molecular ion HeH2+, as molecular systems allow for the study of the laser-molecule orientation dependence of such new effects including a four-step model of MHOHG (Molecular High-order Harmonic Generation.

  13. Fractional Charge Definitions and Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldhaber, A.S.

    2004-06-04

    Fractional charge is known through theoretical and experimental discoveries of isolable objects carrying fractions of familiar charge units--electric charge Q, spin S, and the difference of baryon and lepton numbers B-L. With a few simple assumptions all these effects may be described using a generalized version of charge renormalization for locally conserved charges, in which medium correlations yield familiar adiabatic, continuous renormalization, or sometimes nonadiabatic, discrete renormalization. Fractional charges may be carried by fundamental particles or fundamental solitons. Either picture works for the simplest fractional-quantum-Hall-effect quasiholes, though the particle description is far more general. The only known fundamental solitons in three or fewer space dimensions d are the kink (d = 1), the vortex (d = 2), and the magnetic monopole (d = 3). Further, for a charge not intrinsically coupled to the topological charge of a soliton, only the kink and the monopole may carry fractional values. The same reasoning enforces fractional values of B-L for electrically charged elementary particles.

  14. Approach to nonadiabatic transitions by density matrix evolution and molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, H.J.C.; Mavri, J.

    1996-01-01

    Many biological processes are characterized by an essentially quantum dynamical event, such as electron or proton transfer, in a complex classical environment. To treat such processes properly by computer simulation, allowing nonadiabatic transitions involving excited states, we recently developed a

  15. Experimental realization of single-shot nonadiabatic holonomic gates in nuclear spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hang; Liu, Yang; Long, GuiLu

    2017-08-01

    Nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation has received increasing attention due to its robustness against control errors. However, all the previous schemes have to use at least two sequentially implemented gates to realize a general one-qubit gate. Based on two recent reports, we construct two Hamiltonians and experimentally realized nonadiabatic holonomic gates by a single-shot implementation in a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) system. Two noncommuting one-qubit holonomic gates, rotating along ˆx and ˆz axes respectively, are implemented by evolving a work qubit and an ancillary qubit nonadiabatically following a quantum circuit designed. Using a sequence compiler developed for NMR quantum information processor, we optimize the whole pulse sequence, minimizing the total error of the implementation. Finally, all the nonadiabatic holonomic gates reach high unattenuated experimental fidelities over 98%.

  16. Nonadiabatic geometric quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces based on unconventional geometric phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P. Z.; Xu, G. F.; Tong, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    Nonadiabatic geometric quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces has received increasing attention due to the merits of its high-speed implementation and robustness against both control errors and decoherence. However, all the previous schemes in this direction have been based on the conventional geometric phases, of which the dynamical phases need to be removed. In this paper, we put forward a scheme of nonadiabatic geometric quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces based on unconventional geometric phases, of which the dynamical phases do not need to be removed. Specifically, by using three physical qubits undergoing collective dephasing to encode one logical qubit, we realize a universal set of geometric gates nonadiabatically and unconventionally. Our scheme not only maintains all the merits of nonadiabatic geometric quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces, but also avoids the additional operations required in the conventional schemes to cancel the dynamical phases.

  17. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of non-adiabatic dynamics in polyatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Stolow, Albert

    2015-01-01

    This review article discusses advances in the use of time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy for the study of non-adiabatic processes in molecules. A theoretical treatment of the experiments is presented together with a number of experimental examples.

  18. Compressive and Rarefactive Waves in Dust Plasma with Non-thermal Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Wen-Shan; WANG Hong-Yan; John Parkes

    2006-01-01

    The governing equation of the dust fluid with non-thermal ions and variable dust charge on dust particles in hot dust plasmas is obtained. Both the compressive and rarefactive waves in this system are investigated. They can be determined by plasma parameters including the temperatures of dust fluid, ions and electrons, as well as the non-thermal parameter of ions, and the number densities of the dust particles, the ions and the electrons, etc.

  19. Dust acoustic waves in strongly coupled dissipative plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, B. S.; Yu, M. Y.

    2000-12-01

    The theory of dust acoustic waves is revisited in the frame of the generalized viscoelastic hydrodynamic theory for highly correlated dusts. Physical processes relevant to many experiments on dusts in plasmas, such as ionization and recombination, dust-charge variation, elastic electron and ion collisions with neutral and charged dust particles, as well as relaxation due to strong dust coupling, are taken into account. These processes can be on similar time scales and are thus important for the conservation of particles and momenta in a self-consistent description of the system. It is shown that the dispersion properties of the dust acoustic waves are determined by a sensitive balance of the effects of strong dust coupling and collisional relaxation. The predictions of the present theory applicable to typical parameters in laboratory strongly coupled dusty plasmas are given and compared with the experiment results. Some possible implications and discrepanies between theory and experiment are also discussed.

  20. Nonadiabatic Effects of Atomic Coherence on Laser Intensity Fluctuations in Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Qing; HU Xiang-Ming

    2011-01-01

    In an electromagnetically induced transparency system,the atoms have long-lived coherence compared to the cavity lifetime and interact nonadiabatically with the laser fields.We show that the high frequency fluctuations of both the intensities and the intensity difference can be squeezed below the shot noise limit due to the nonadiabatic effects.This noise squeezing can be used to enhance the precision in the short time measurements based on the intensities or the intensity difference.

  1. Improved sampling and validation of frozen Gaussian approximation with surface hopping algorithm for nonadiabatic dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    In the spirit of the fewest switches surface hopping, the frozen Gaussian approximation with surface hopping (FGA-SH) method samples a path integral representation of the non-adiabatic dynamics in the semiclassical regime. An improved sampling scheme is developed in this work for FGA-SH based on birth and death branching processes. The algorithm is validated for the standard test examples of non-adiabatic dynamics.

  2. Electric Field Generation in Martian Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Erika L.; Farrell, William M.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial dust devils are known to generate electric fields from the vertical separation of charged dust particles. The particles present within the dust devils on Mars may also be subject to similar charging processes and so likely contribute to electric field generation there as well. However, to date, no Marsin situ instrumentation has been deployed to measure electric field strength. In order to explore the electric environment of dust devils on Mars, the triboelectric dust charging physics from the MacroscopicTriboelectric Simulation (MTS) code has been coupled to the Mars Regional Atmospheric ModelingSystem (MRAMS). Using this model, we examine how macroscopic electric fields are generated within martian dust disturbances and attempt to quantify the time evolution of the electrodynamical system.Electric fields peak for several minutes within the dust devil simulations. The magnitude of the electric field is a strong function of the size of the particles present, the average charge on the particles and the number of particles lifted. Varying these parameters results in peak electric fields between tens of millivolts per meter and tens of kilovolts per meter.

  3. Dust Mite Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dust mite allergy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Dust mite allergy is an allergic reaction to tiny bugs that commonly live in house dust. Signs of dust mite allergy include those common to hay fever, such as ...

  4. Non-monotonic spatial distribution of the interstellar dust in astrospheres: finite gyroradius effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Alexashov, D. B.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Gvaramadze, V. V.

    2017-02-01

    High-resolution mid-infrared observations of astrospheres show that many of them have filamentary (cirrus-like) structure. Using numerical models of dust dynamics in astrospheres, we suggest that their filamentary structure might be related to specific spatial distribution of the interstellar dust around the stars, caused by a gyrorotation of charged dust grains in the interstellar magnetic field. Our numerical model describes the dust dynamics in astrospheres under an influence of the Lorentz force and assumption of a constant dust charge. Calculations are performed for the dust grains with different sizes separately. It is shown that non-monotonic spatial dust distribution (viewed as filaments) appears for dust grains with the period of gyromotion comparable with the characteristic time-scale of the dust motion in the astrosphere. Numerical modelling demonstrates that the number of filaments depends on charge-to-mass ratio of dust.

  5. Non-adiabatic effects in thermochemistry, spectroscopy and kinetics: the general importance of all three Born-Oppenheimer breakdown corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; McKemmish, Laura K; McKenzie, Ross H; Hush, Noel S

    2015-10-14

    Using a simple model Hamiltonian, the three correction terms for Born-Oppenheimer (BO) breakdown, the adiabatic diagonal correction (DC), the first-derivative momentum non-adiabatic correction (FD), and the second-derivative kinetic-energy non-adiabatic correction (SD), are shown to all contribute to thermodynamic and spectroscopic properties as well as to thermal non-diabatic chemical reaction rates. While DC often accounts for >80% of thermodynamic and spectroscopic property changes, the commonly used practice of including only the FD correction in kinetics calculations is rarely found to be adequate. For electron-transfer reactions not in the inverted region, the common physical picture that diabatic processes occur because of surface hopping at the transition state is proven inadequate as the DC acts first to block access, increasing the transition state energy by (ℏω)(2)λ/16J(2) (where λ is the reorganization energy, J the electronic coupling and ω the vibration frequency). However, the rate constant in the weakly-coupled Golden-Rule limit is identified as being only inversely proportional to this change rather than exponentially damped, owing to the effects of tunneling and surface hopping. Such weakly-coupled long-range electron-transfer processes should therefore not be described as "non-adiabatic" processes as they are easily described by Born-Huang ground-state adiabatic surfaces made by adding the DC to the BO surfaces; instead, they should be called just "non-Born-Oppenheimer" processes. The model system studied consists of two diabatic harmonic potential-energy surfaces coupled linearly through a single vibration, the "two-site Holstein model". Analytical expressions are derived for the BO breakdown terms, and the model is solved over a large parameter space focusing on both the lowest-energy spectroscopic transitions and the quantum dynamics of coherent-state wavepackets. BO breakdown is investigated pertinent to: ammonia inversion, aromaticity

  6. Applications of Electrified Dust and Dust Devil Electrodynamics to Martian Atmospheric Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. G.; Barth, E.; Esposito, F.; Merrison, J.; Montmessin, F.; Aplin, K. L.; Borlina, C.; Berthelier, J. J.; Déprez, G.; Farrell, W. M.; Houghton, I. M. P.; Renno, N. O.; Nicoll, K. A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Zimmerman, M.

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric transport and suspension of dust frequently brings electrification, which may be substantial. Electric fields of 10 kV m-1 to 100 kV m-1 have been observed at the surface beneath suspended dust in the terrestrial atmosphere, and some electrification has been observed to persist in dust at levels to 5 km, as well as in volcanic plumes. The interaction between individual particles which causes the electrification is incompletely understood, and multiple processes are thought to be acting. A variation in particle charge with particle size, and the effect of gravitational separation explains to, some extent, the charge structures observed in terrestrial dust storms. More extensive flow-based modelling demonstrates that bulk electric fields in excess of 10 kV m-1 can be obtained rapidly (in less than 10 s) from rotating dust systems (dust devils) and that terrestrial breakdown fields can be obtained. Modelled profiles of electrical conductivity in the Martian atmosphere suggest the possibility of dust electrification, and dust devils have been suggested as a mechanism of charge separation able to maintain current flow between one region of the atmosphere and another, through a global circuit. Fundamental new understanding of Martian atmospheric electricity will result from the ExoMars mission, which carries the DREAMS (Dust characterization, Risk Assessment, and Environment Analyser on the Martian Surface)—MicroARES (Atmospheric Radiation and Electricity Sensor) instrumentation to Mars in 2016 for the first in situ electrical measurements.

  7. Applications of Electrified Dust and Dust Devil Electrodynamics to Martian Atmospheric Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. G.; Barth, E.; Esposito, F.; Merrison, J.; Montmessin, F.; Aplin, K. L.; Borlina, C.; Berthelier, J. J.; Déprez, G.; Farrell, W. M.; Houghton, I. M. P.; Renno, N. O.; Nicoll, K. A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Zimmerman, M.

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric transport and suspension of dust frequently brings electrification, which may be substantial. Electric fields of 10 kV m-1 to 100 kV m-1 have been observed at the surface beneath suspended dust in the terrestrial atmosphere, and some electrification has been observed to persist in dust at levels to 5 km, as well as in volcanic plumes. The interaction between individual particles which causes the electrification is incompletely understood, and multiple processes are thought to be acting. A variation in particle charge with particle size, and the effect of gravitational separation explains to, some extent, the charge structures observed in terrestrial dust storms. More extensive flow-based modelling demonstrates that bulk electric fields in excess of 10 kV m-1 can be obtained rapidly (in less than 10 s) from rotating dust systems (dust devils) and that terrestrial breakdown fields can be obtained. Modelled profiles of electrical conductivity in the Martian atmosphere suggest the possibility of dust electrification, and dust devils have been suggested as a mechanism of charge separation able to maintain current flow between one region of the atmosphere and another, through a global circuit. Fundamental new understanding of Martian atmospheric electricity will result from the ExoMars mission, which carries the DREAMS (Dust characterization, Risk Assessment, and Environment Analyser on the Martian Surface)—MicroARES ( Atmospheric Radiation and Electricity Sensor) instrumentation to Mars in 2016 for the first in situ electrical measurements.

  8. Lunar Dust and Dusty Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    In the plasma and radiation environment of space, small dust grains from the Moon s surface can become charged. This has the consequence that their motion is determined by electromagnetic as well as gravitational forces. The result is a plasma-like condition known as "dusty plasmas" with the consequence that lunar dust can migrate and be transported by magnetic, electric, and gravitational fields into places where heavier, neutral debris cannot. Dust on the Moon can exhibit unusual behavior, being accelerated into orbit by electrostatic surface potentials as blow-off dust, or being swept away by moving magnetic fields like the solar wind as pick-up dust. Hence, lunar dust must necessarily be treated as a dusty plasma subject to the physics of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). A review of this subject has been given before [1], but a synopsis will be presented here to make it more readily available for lunar scientists.

  9. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations: synergies between theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2015-03-17

    Recent developments in nonadiabatic dynamics enabled ab inito simulations of complex ultrafast processes in the condensed phase. These advances have opened new avenues in the study of many photophysical and photochemical reactions triggered by the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, theoretical investigations can be combined with the most sophisticated femtosecond experimental techniques to guide the interpretation of measured time-resolved observables. At the same time, the availability of experimental data at high (spatial and time) resolution offers a unique opportunity for the benchmarking and the improvement of those theoretical models used to describe complex molecular systems in their natural environment. The established synergy between theory and experiments can produce a better understanding of new ultrafast physical and chemical processes at atomistic scale resolution. Furthermore, reliable ab inito molecular dynamics simulations can already be successfully employed as predictive tools to guide new experiments as well as the design of novel and better performing materials. In this paper, I will give a concise account on the state of the art of molecular dynamics simulations of complex molecular systems in their excited states. The principal aim of this approach is the description of a given system of interest under the most realistic ambient conditions including all environmental effects that influence experiments, for instance, the interaction with the solvent and with external time-dependent electric fields, temperature, and pressure. To this end, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is among the most efficient and accurate methods for the representation of the electronic dynamics, while trajectory surface hopping gives a valuable representation of the nuclear quantum dynamics in the excited states (including nonadiabatic effects). Concerning the environment and its effects on the dynamics, the quantum mechanics

  10. Dust in the Interplanetary Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Mann, Ingrid; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Zaslavsky, Arnaud; Lamy, Herve

    2010-01-01

    The mass density of dust particles that form from asteroids and comets in the interplanetary medium of the solar system is, near 1 AU, comparable to the mass density of the solar wind. It is mainly contained in particles of micrometer size and larger. Dust and larger objects are destroyed by collisions and sublimation and hence feed heavy ions into the solar wind and the solar corona. Small dust particles are present in large number and as a result of their large charge to mass ratio deflected by electromagnetic forces in the solar wind. For nano dust particles of sizes 1 - 10 nm, recent calculations show trapping near the Sun and outside from about 0.15 AU ejection with velocities close to solar wind velocity. The fluxes of ejected nano dust are detected near 1AU with the plasma wave instrument onboard the STEREO spacecraft. Though such electric signals have been observed during dust impacts before, the interpretation depends on several different parameters and data analysis is still in progress.

  11. Trapped ions and the shielding of dust particles in low-density non-equilibrium plasma of glow discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhinin, Gennady; Fedoseev, Alexander [Institute of Thermophysics SB RAS, Ave. Lavrentyev, 1, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Antipov, Sergei; Petrov, Oleg; Fortov, Vladimir [Joint Institute for High Temperatures RAS, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 127412 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: sukhinin@itp.nsc.ru

    2009-05-29

    A new model for the formation of trapped ions around a negatively charged dust particle immersed in low-density non-equilibrium plasma of gas discharge is presented. It is shown that the ionic coat leads to a shielding of the proper charge of the dust particle. In experiments it is only possible to detect the effective charge of a dust particle that is equal to the difference between the proper charge of the particle and the charge of trapped ion000.

  12. Single-loop multiple-pulse nonadiabatic holonomic quantum gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herterich, Emmi; Sjöqvist, Erik

    2016-11-01

    Nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation provides the means to perform fast and robust quantum gates by utilizing the resilience of non-Abelian geometric phases to fluctuations of the path in state space. While the original scheme [E. Sjöqvist et al., New J. Phys. 14, 103035 (2012), 10.1088/1367-2630/14/10/103035] needs two loops in the Grassmann manifold (i.e., the space of computational subspaces of the full state space) to generate an arbitrary holonomic one-qubit gate, we propose single-loop one-qubit gates that constitute an efficient universal set of holonomic gates when combined with an entangling holonomic two-qubit gate. Our one-qubit gate is realized by dividing the loop into path segments, each of which is generated by a Λ -type Hamiltonian. We demonstrate that two path segments are sufficient to realize arbitrary single-loop holonomic one-qubit gates. We describe how our scheme can be implemented experimentally in a generic atomic system exhibiting a three-level Λ -coupling structure by utilizing carefully chosen laser pulses.

  13. Non-adiabatic oscillations of compact stars in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Gualtieri, L; Miniutti, G

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a formalism to study non-adiabatic, non-radial oscillations of compact stars in the frequency domain including the effects of thermal diffusion in a general relativistic framework. When a general equation of state depending on temperature is used, the perturbations of the fluid result in heat flux which is coupled with the spacetime geometry through the Einstein field equations. Our results show that the frequency of the first pressure (p) and gravity (g) oscillation modes is significantly affected by thermal diffusion, while that of the fundamental (f) mode is basically unaltered due to the global nature of that oscillation. The damping time of the oscillations is generally much smaller than in the adiabatic case (more than two orders of magnitude for the p- and g-modes) reflecting the effect of thermal dissipation. Both the isothermal and adiabatic limits are recovered in our treatment and we study in more detail the intermediate regime. Our formalism finds its natural astrophysical applic...

  14. Dust en-route to Jupiter and the Galilean satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H; Krueger, Harald; Gruen, Eberhard

    2002-01-01

    Spacecraft investigations during the last ten years have vastly improved our knowledge about dust in the Jovian system. All Galilean satellites, and probably all smaller satellites as well, are sources of dust in the Jovian system. In-situ measurements with the dust detectors on board the Ulysses and Galileo spacecraft have for the first time demonstrated the electromagnetic interaction of charged dust grains with the interplanetary magnetic field and with a planetary magnetosphere. Jupiter's magnetosphere acts as a giant mass-velocity spectrometer for charged 10-nanometer dust grains. These dust grains are released from Jupiter's moon Io with typical rate of 1 kg s^1. The dust streams probe the plasma conditions in the Io plasma torus and can be used as a potential monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity. The other Galilean satellites are surrounded by tenuous impact-generated clouds of mostly sub-micrometer ejecta grains. Galileo measurements have demonstrated that impact-ejecta derived from hypervelocity i...

  15. Revisiting STEREO interplanetary and interstellar dust flux and mass estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David M.; O'Brien, Leela E.; Thayer, Frederick; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Collette, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Two recent events have motivated a second look at estimates for the flux and mass of approximately micron-radius interplanetary and interstellar dust observed by the twin STEREO spacecraft. First, the signals interpreted as nanometer dust impacts on STEREO-A have nearly ceased, even though STEREO-B continues to observe these signals unabated. Second, a recent laboratory dust accelerator experimental campaign has quantified the charge release associated with hypervelocity dust impacts on materials specific to STEREO. The first event enables an investigation of the extent to which nanometer dust signals influence estimates of micron-radius dust flux. The second event allows an evaluation of how impact charge release values specific to STEREO materials influence dust mass estimates. Revised estimates based on these considerations yield higher fluxes and similar masses for micron-radius interplanetary dust compared to prior studies, as well as lower fluxes and higher masses for interstellar micron-radius dust compared to prior studies. The revised flux and mass estimates reported here differ by less than a factor of 4 from those reported in previous work, demonstrating that STEREO-derived estimates for the flux and mass of micron-radius dust are largely robust to spacecraft material charge yields and the disappearance of nanometer dust signals.

  16. A Possible Mechanism for Overcoming the Electrostatic Barrier Against Dust Growth in Protoplanetary disks

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The coagulation of dust particles under the conditions in protoplanetary disks is investigated. The study focuses on the repulsive electrostatic barrier against growth of charged dust grains. Taking into account the photoelectric effect leads to the appearance of a layer at intermediate heights where the dust has a close to zero charge, enabling the dust grains to grow efficiently. An increase in the coagulation rate comes about not only due to the lowering of the Coulomb barrier, but also be...

  17. Classical molecular dynamics simulation of electronically non-adiabatic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William H; Cotton, Stephen J

    2016-12-22

    Both classical and quantum mechanics (as well as hybrids thereof, i.e., semiclassical approaches) find widespread use in simulating dynamical processes in molecular systems. For large chemical systems, however, which involve potential energy surfaces (PES) of general/arbitrary form, it is usually the case that only classical molecular dynamics (MD) approaches are feasible, and their use is thus ubiquitous nowadays, at least for chemical processes involving dynamics on a single PES (i.e., within a single Born-Oppenheimer electronic state). This paper reviews recent developments in an approach which extends standard classical MD methods to the treatment of electronically non-adiabatic processes, i.e., those that involve transitions between different electronic states. The approach treats nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom (DOF) equivalently (i.e., by classical mechanics, thereby retaining the simplicity of standard MD), and provides "quantization" of the electronic states through a symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) windowing model. The approach is seen to be capable of treating extreme regimes of strong and weak coupling between the electronic states, as well as accurately describing coherence effects in the electronic DOF (including the de-coherence of such effects caused by coupling to the nuclear DOF). A survey of recent applications is presented to illustrate the performance of the approach. Also described is a newly developed variation on the original SQC model (found universally superior to the original) and a general extension of the SQC model to obtain the full electronic density matrix (at no additional cost/complexity).

  18. The quantum dynamics of electronically nonadiabatic chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    1993-01-01

    Considerable progress was achieved on the quantum mechanical treatment of electronically nonadiabatic collisions involving energy transfer and chemical reaction in the collision of an electronically excited atom with a molecule. In the first step, a new diabatic representation for the coupled potential energy surfaces was created. A two-state diabatic representation was developed which was designed to realistically reproduce the two lowest adiabatic states of the valence bond model and also to have the following three desirable features: (1) it is more economical to evaluate; (2) it is more portable; and (3) all spline fits are replaced by analytic functions. The new representation consists of a set of two coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces plus a coupling surface. It is suitable for dynamics calculations on both the electronic quenching and reaction processes in collisions of Na(3p2p) with H2. The new two-state representation was obtained by a three-step process from a modified eight-state diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) representation of Blais. The second step required the development of new dynamical methods. A formalism was developed for treating reactions with very general basis functions including electronically excited states. Our formalism is based on the generalized Newton, scattered wave, and outgoing wave variational principles that were used previously for reactive collisions on a single potential energy surface, and it incorporates three new features: (1) the basis functions include electronic degrees of freedom, as required to treat reactions involving electronic excitation and two or more coupled potential energy surfaces; (2) the primitive electronic basis is assumed to be diabatic, and it is not assumed that it diagonalizes the electronic Hamiltonian even asymptotically; and (3) contracted basis functions for vibrational-rotational-orbital degrees of freedom are included in a very general way, similar to previous prescriptions for locally

  19. Interpolated wave functions for nonadiabatic simulations with the fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Tubman, Norm; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Ceperley, David

    2016-01-01

    Simulating nonadiabatic effects with many-body wave function approaches is an open field with many challenges. Recent interest has been driven by new algorithmic developments and improved theoretical understanding of properties unique to electron-ion wave functions. Fixed-node diffusion Monte Caro is one technique that has shown promising results for simulating electron-ion systems. In particular, we focus on the CH molecule for which previous results suggested a relatively significant contribution to the energy from nonadiabatic effects. We propose a new wave function ansatz for diatomic systems which involves interpolating the determinant coefficients calculated from configuration interaction methods. We find this to be an improvement beyond previous wave function forms that have been considered. The calculated nonadiabatic contribution to the energy in the CH molecule is reduced compared to our previous results, but still remains the largest among the molecules under consideration.

  20. Non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation in linear system-bath coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunfang; Wang, Gangcheng; Wu, Chunfeng; Liu, Haodi; Feng, Xun-Li; Chen, Jing-Ling; Xue, Kang

    2016-02-05

    Non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces protects quantum information from control imprecisions and decoherence. For the non-collective decoherence that each qubit has its own bath, we show the implementations of two non-commutable holonomic single-qubit gates and one holonomic nontrivial two-qubit gate that compose a universal set of non-adiabatic holonomic quantum gates in decoherence-free-subspaces of the decoupling group, with an encoding rate of (N - 2)/N. The proposed scheme is robust against control imprecisions and the non-collective decoherence, and its non-adiabatic property ensures less operation time. We demonstrate that our proposed scheme can be realized by utilizing only two-qubit interactions rather than many-qubit interactions. Our results reduce the complexity of practical implementation of holonomic quantum computation in experiments. We also discuss the physical implementation of our scheme in coupled microcavities.

  1. Novel quantum description for nonadiabatic evolution of light wave propagation in time-dependent linear media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakehal, Halim; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2016-02-01

    A simple elegant expression of nonadiabatic light wave evolution is necessary in order to have a deeper insight for complicated optical phenomena in light science as well as in everyday life. Light wave propagation in linear media which have time-dependent electromagnetic parameters is investigated by utilizing a quadratic invariant of the system. The time behavior of the nonadiabatic geometric phase of the waves that yield a cyclic nonadiabatic evolution is analyzed in detail. Various quantum properties of light waves in this situation, such as variances of electric and magnetic fields, uncertainty product, coherent and squeezed states, and their classical limits, are developed. For better understanding of our research, we applied our analysis in a particular case. The variances of the fields D and B are illustrated and their time behaviors are addressed. Equivalent results for the corresponding classical systems are deduced from the study of the time evolution of the appropriate coherent and squeezed states.

  2. Derivation of the electronic nonadiabatic coupling field in molecular systems: an algebraic-vectorial approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vértesi, T; Vibók, A; Halász, G J; Baer, M

    2004-05-08

    In this Communication it is suggested that various elements of the nonadiabatic coupling matrix, tau(jk)(s) are created by the singular nonadiabatic coupling terms of the system. Moreover, given the spatial distribution of these coupling terms in the close vicinity of their singularity points yields, according to this approach, the integrated intensity of the field at every point in the region of interest. To support these statements we consider the conical intersections of the three lower states of the H+H(2) system: From an ab initio treatment we obtain the nonadiabatic coupling terms around each conical intersection separately (at its close vicinity) and having those, create the field at every desired point employing vector-algebra. This approach is also used to calculate the intensity of the Curl of those matrix elements that lack their own sources [tau(13)(s) in the present case]. The final results are compared with relevant ab initio calculations.

  3. Accurate Non-adiabatic Quantum Dynamics from Pseudospectral Sampling of Time-dependent Gaussian Basis Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Heaps, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Quantum molecular dynamics requires an accurate representation of the molecular potential energy surface from a minimal number of electronic structure calculations, particularly for nonadiabatic dynamics where excited states are required. In this paper, we employ pseudospectral sampling of time-dependent Gaussian basis functions for the simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics. Unlike other methods, the pseudospectral Gaussian molecular dynamics tests the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation with $N$ Dirac delta functions located at the centers of the Gaussian functions reducing the scaling of potential energy evaluations from $\\mathcal{O}(N^2)$ to $\\mathcal{O}(N)$. By projecting the Gaussian basis onto discrete points in space, the method is capable of efficiently and quantitatively describing nonadiabatic population transfer and intra-surface quantum coherence. We investigate three model systems; the photodissociation of three coupled Morse oscillators, the bound state dynamics of two coupled Morse oscillators, and a two-d...

  4. Novel quantum description for nonadiabatic evolution of light wave propagation in time-dependent linear media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakehal, Halim; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2016-02-05

    A simple elegant expression of nonadiabatic light wave evolution is necessary in order to have a deeper insight for complicated optical phenomena in light science as well as in everyday life. Light wave propagation in linear media which have time-dependent electromagnetic parameters is investigated by utilizing a quadratic invariant of the system. The time behavior of the nonadiabatic geometric phase of the waves that yield a cyclic nonadiabatic evolution is analyzed in detail. Various quantum properties of light waves in this situation, such as variances of electric and magnetic fields, uncertainty product, coherent and squeezed states, and their classical limits, are developed. For better understanding of our research, we applied our analysis in a particular case. The variances of the fields D and B are illustrated and their time behaviors are addressed. Equivalent results for the corresponding classical systems are deduced from the study of the time evolution of the appropriate coherent and squeezed states.

  5. Nonadiabatic quantum dynamics calculations for the N + NH --> N(2) + H reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Hankel, M; Varandas, Antonio; Han, Keli

    2010-09-01

    Nonadiabatic quantum dynamics calculations on the two coupled potential energy surfaces (PESs) (1(2)A' and 2(2)A') and also adiabatic quantum calculations on the lowest adiabatic PES are reported for the title reaction. Reaction probabilities for total angular momenta, J, varying from 0 to 160, are calculated to obtain the integral cross section (ICS) for collision energies ranging from 0.05 to 1.0 eV. Calculations using both the close coupling and the Centrifugal Sudden (CS) approximation are carried out to evaluate the role of Coriolis coupling effects for this reaction. The results of the nonadiabatic calculations show that the nonadiabatic effects in the title reaction for the initial state of NH (v = 0, j = 0) could be neglected, at least in the collision energy range considered in this study.

  6. A Monte Carlo Simulation for the Ion Transport in Glow Discharges with Dusts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ai-Ping; PU Wei; QIU Xiao-Ming

    2001-01-01

    We use the Monte Carlo method to simulate theion transport in the rf parallel plate glow discharge with a negative-voltage pulse connected to the electrode. It is found that self-consistent field, dust charge, dust concentration,and dust size influence the energy distribution and the density of the ions arriving at the target, and in particular, the latter two make significant influence. As dust concentration or dust size increases, the number of ions arriving at the target reduces greatly.

  7. Mesospheric dust observations during the MAXIDUSTY campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsen, Tarjei; Havnes, Ove; Fredriksen, Åshild; Friedrich, Martin; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Plane, John; Hartquist, Tom; Olsen, Sveinung; Eilertsen, Yngve; Trondsen, Espen; Mann, Ingrid; Hedin, Jonas; Gumbel, Jörg; Moen, Jøran; Latteck, Ralph; Baumgarten, Gerd; Höffner, Josef; Williams, Bifford; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Karlberg, Jan-Ove

    2017-04-01

    The MAXIDUSTY rocket payloads, launched from Andøya June 30 and July 8 2016, were equipped with dust impact detectors aiming to characterize mesospheric dust charge state, mass distribution of impact fragments and NLC/PMSE structure. One of the main scientific objectives for the campaign was to confirm that material of meteoric origin is abundant inside the icy mesospheric dust particles. The rockets were launched simultaneously with PMSE and NLC (MAXIDUSTY-1) and PMSE (MAXIDUSTY-1B) respectively, and radar measurements were made coincident with the rocket flight path. We report here on the initial results from the rocket probes and remote soundings, with emphasis on the dust impact detector results. Results from the Multiple Dust Detector (MUDD) confirm that NLC ice particles probably have a relatively high content of meteoric smoke particles with a filling factor of up to several percent. Comparisons of the DUSTY faraday bucket and PMSE show that there is no simple correlation between the two.

  8. Dust particle spin-up caused by cross-field plasma flow and turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P. K.; Shevchenko, V. I.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2006-10-01

    Spinning of dust particles adds new interesting features to dust particle dynamics and to the dusty plasma physics. Several reasons for dust particle spin-up have been suggested (e.g. Ref. 1): i) sheared flow of plasmas around charge dust particles, ii) dust particle surface irregularities, and iii) sheath effects resulting from the interactions of a charge dipole of a dust particle (caused by plasma flows into the sheath) with the sheath electric field. Here we present a novel mechanism for charged dust particle spin-up. The physics of the present mechanism is simple and robust, and is associated with the interaction of a charge dipole of a dust particle, D, induced by the ExB cross-field flow of a magnetized plasma (D ExB), where E and B are the electric and ambient magnetic fields. Since the resulting torque is proportional to | E |^2, the presented mechanism of charged dust particle spin-up works for both stationary and non-stationary (turbulent in particular) electric fields. In many cases the turbulent electric field stremgth is much larger than the laminar one so that the impact of turbulence can be dominant. We present theoretical analyses for charged dust particle spin-up and estimate the maximum value for the angular velocity charged dust particle can acquire due to our new spin-up mechanism. [1] N. Sato ``Spinning Motion of Fine Particles in Plasmas'', AIP Conference Proceedings No. 799, p. 97; AIP, New York, 2005.

  9. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation: An approach based on quantum measurement picture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Feng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation implies an effective quantum measurement on the electronic states by the classical motion of atoms. Based on this insight, we propose a quantum trajectory mean-field approach for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. The new protocol provides a natural interface between the separate quantum and classical treatments, without invoking artificial surface hopping algorithm. Moreover, it also bridges two widely adopted nonadiabatic dynamics methods, the Ehrenfest mean-field theory and the trajectory surface-hopping method. Excellent agreement with the exact results is illustrated with representative model systems, including the challenging ones for traditional methods.

  10. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation: An approach based on quantum measurement picture

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Wei; Li, Xin-Qi; Fang, Weihai; Yan, YiJing

    2013-01-01

    Mixed-quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation implies an effective measurement on the electronic states owing to continuously tracking the atomic forces.Based on this insight, we propose a quantum trajectory mean-field approach for nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations. The new protocol provides a natural interface between the separate quantum and classical treatments, without invoking artificial surface hopping algorithm. Moreover, it also bridges two widely adopted nonadiabatic dynamics methods, the Ehrenfest mean-field theory and the trajectory surface-hopping method. Excellent agreement with the exact results is illustrated with representative model systems, including the challenging ones for traditional methods.

  11. The Non-Adiabatic Pressure Perturbation and Non-Canonical Kinetic Terms in Multifield Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    van de Bruck, C

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation during inflation driven by two scalar fields is studied numerically for three different types of models. In the first model, the fields have standard kinetic terms. The other two models considered feature non-canonical kinetic terms; the first containing two fields which are coupled via their kinetic terms, and the second where one field has the standard kinetic term with the other field being a DBI field. We find that the evolution and the final amplitude of the non-adiabatic pressure perturbation depends strongly on the kinetic terms.

  12. Non-adiabatic rotational excitation of dipolar molecule under the influence of delayed pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Urvashi Arya; Brijender Dahiya; Vinod Prasad

    2013-09-01

    We suggest a control scheme for choosing populations of molecular rotational states by wave packet interference. The rotational wave packets of LiCl molecule excited non-adiabatically by half cycle pulse (HCP) is controlled using the second ultrashort HCP. By adjusting the time delay between the two laser pulses, constructive or destructive interference among these wave packets enables the population to be enhanced or repressed for the specific rotational state. The role played by the field strength and the pulse duration is also calculated numerically. We have used fourth order Runge-Kutta method to study non-adiabatic rotational excitation (NAREX) dynamics.

  13. Measurement of Nonadiabatic Effects in Ultracold Molecules via Anomalous Linear and Quadratic Zeeman Shifts

    CERN Document Server

    McGuyer, B H; McDonald, M; Reinaudi, G; Skomorowski, W; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2013-01-01

    Anomalously large linear and quadratic Zeeman shifts are measured for weakly bound ultracold $^{88}$Sr$_2$ molecules near the intercombination line asymptote. Nonadiabatic Coriolis coupling and the nature of long-range molecular potentials explain how this effect arises and scales roughly cubically with the size of the molecule. The linear shifts yield nonadiabatic mixing angles of the molecular states. The quadratic shifts are sensitive to fourth-order contributions and to nearby opposite $f$-parity states, and provide a stringent test of a state-of-the-art ab initio model.

  14. Adiabatic and nonadiabatic spin torques induced by a spin-triplet supercurrent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Rina; Fujimoto, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Takehito

    2017-09-01

    We study spin-transfer torques induced by a spin-triplet supercurrent in a magnet with the superconducting proximity effect. By a perturbative approach, we show that spin-triplet correlations realize new types of torques, which are analogous to the adiabatic and nonadiabatic (β ) torques, without extrinsic spin-flip scattering. Remarkable advantages compared to conventional spin-transfer torques are highlighted in domain-wall manipulation. Oscillatory motions of a domain wall do not occur for a small Gilbert damping, and the threshold current density to drive its motion becomes zero in the absence of extrinsic pinning potentials due to the nonadiabatic torque controlled by the triplet correlations.

  15. Radiation and Dynamics of Dust Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Klacka, J

    2002-01-01

    Relativistically covariant form of equation of motion for arbitrarily shaped dust particle (neutral in charge) under the action of electromagnetic radiation is derived -- emission, scattering and absorption of radiation is considered. The result is presented in the form of optical quantities used in optics of dust particles. The obtained equation of motion represents a generalization of the Poynting-Robertson (P-R) effect, which is standardly used in orbital evolution of dust particles in astrophysics. Simultaneous action of electromagnetic radiation and gravitational fields of the central body -- star -- on the motion of the particle is discussed.

  16. Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust Simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; Ritz, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    Lunar dust can jeopardize exploration activities due to its ability to cling to most surfaces. In this paper, we report on our measurements of the electrostatic properties of the lunar soil simulants. Methods have been developed to measure the volume resistivity, dielectric constant, chargeability, and charge decay of lunar soil. While the first two parameters have been measured in the past [Olhoeft 1974], the last two have never been measured directly on the lunar regolith or on any of the Apollo samples. Measurements of the electrical properties of the lunar samples are being performed in an attempt to answer important problems that must be solved for the development of an effective dust mitigation technology, namely, how much charge can accumulate on the dust and how long does the charge remain on surfaces. The measurements will help develop coatings that are compatible with the intrinsic electrostatic properties of the lunar regolith.

  17. Surface Potential of Dust Grains at the Sheath Edge of Electronegative Dusty Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段萍; 王正汹; 王文春; 刘金远; 刘悦; 王晓钢

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the dust surface potential at the sheath edge of electronegative dusty plasmas theoretically, using the standard fluid model for the sheath and treating electrons and negative ions as Boltzmann particles but positive ions and dust grains as cold fluids.The dust charging model is self-consistently coupled with the sheath formation criterion by the dust surface potential and the ion Mach number, moreover the dust density variation is taken into account. The numerical results reveal that the dust number density and negative ion number density as well as its temperature can significantly affect the dust surface potential at the sheath edge.

  18. Dust Measurements in Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudakov, D; Yu, J; Boedo, J; Hollmann, E; Krasheninnikov, S; Moyer, R; Muller, S; Yu, A; Rosenberg, M; Smirnov, R; West, W; Boivin, R; Bray, B; Brooks, N; Hyatt, A; Wong, C; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Lasnier, C; McLean, A; Stangeby, P; Ratynskaia, S; Roquemore, A; Skinner, C; Solomon, W M

    2008-04-23

    Dust production and accumulation impose safety and operational concerns for ITER. Diagnostics to monitor dust levels in the plasma as well as in-vessel dust inventory are currently being tested in a few tokamaks. Dust accumulation in ITER is likely to occur in hidden areas, e.g. between tiles and under divertor baffles. A novel electrostatic dust detector for monitoring dust in these regions has been developed and tested at PPPL. In DIII-D tokamak dust diagnostics include Mie scattering from Nd:YAG lasers, visible imaging, and spectroscopy. Laser scattering resolves size of particles between 0.16-1.6 {micro}m in diameter; the total dust content in the edge plasmas and trends in the dust production rates within this size range have been established. Individual dust particles are observed by visible imaging using fast-framing cameras, detecting dust particles of a few microns in diameter and larger. Dust velocities and trajectories can be determined in 2D with a single camera or 3D using multiple cameras, but determination of particle size is problematic. In order to calibrate diagnostics and benchmark dust dynamics modeling, pre-characterized carbon dust has been injected into the lower divertor of DIII-D. Injected dust is seen by cameras, and spectroscopic diagnostics observe an increase of carbon atomic, C2 dimer, and thermal continuum emissions from the injected dust. The latter observation can be used in the design of novel dust survey diagnostics.

  19. Dynamics of Dust Aggregates in a Complex Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Allen; Carmona Reyes, Jorge; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2012-10-01

    Charged dust aggregates play an important role in many astrophysical phenomena, such as early stages of protostellar and protoplanetary growth, the dynamics of planetary rings and cometary tails, and the formation of noctilucent clouds in earth's upper atmosphere. Dust is also expected to be an unwanted byproduct in the operation of plasma fusion devices, such as ITER. In all of these environments, direct study of the dust aggregates in their in situ environment is extremely difficult, if not impossible. As a model for these complex plasma environments, dust aggregates are formed in a laboratory plasma as monodisperse spheres are accelerated in a self-excited dust density wave. Individual dust particles are perturbed using a diode pumped solid state laser (Coherent VERDI) with their motions recorded by a high-speed camera at 1000 fps. Analysis of the particle motion allows determination of the aggregate characteristics which determine the grain dynamics, such as charge, mass, and gas drag.

  20. Grain charging in protoplanetary discs

    CERN Document Server

    Ilgner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Recent work identified a growth barrier for dust coagulation that originates in the electric repulsion between colliding particles. Depending on its charge state, dust material may have the potential to control key processes towards planet formation such as MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) turbulence and grain growth which are coupled in a two-way process. We quantify the grain charging at different stages of disc evolution and differentiate between two very extreme cases: compact spherical grains and aggregates with fractal dimension D_f = 2. Applying a simple chemical network that accounts for collisional charging of grains, we provide a semi-analytical solution. This allowed us to calculate the equilibrium population of grain charges and the ionisation fraction efficiently. The grain charging was evaluated for different dynamical environments ranging from static to non-stationary disc configurations. The results show that the adsorption/desorption of neutral gas-phase heavy metals, such as magnesium, effects the ...

  1. Spontaneous electrostatic precipitation of dust. Research report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowkes, F.M.; Hielscher, F.H.

    1973-05-15

    The report provides fundamental research information on the electrostatic behavior of coal mine dust. The results will be used to help determine whether a precipitator should be designed that would function by the spontaneous exchange of electric charge between coal mine dust and polymer surfaces. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Electrification occurs upon contact of materials; rubbing is not required; (2) Electrification occurs by electron injection and not by polarization of dipoles; (3) The direction of electron transfer depends on the electron-donor or electron-acceptor character of the outermost surfaces of the materials in contact; (4) Some pairs of materials transferred as many as 4 x 10 to the 12th power electrons/cm; (5) Strong electrification of dusts took place in a fraction of a second, but weaker charge transfer took longer; (6) The transfer of charge between an insulated polymer surface and impinging dust particles diminishes as the surface charge builds up on the polymer; (7) The charge transfer characteristics of polymers were modified by incorporating acidic or basic additives. (GRA)

  2. Ideal quantum gas in an expanding cavity: nature of nonadiabatic force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K; Avazbaev, S K; Sobirov, Z A; Matrasulov, D U; Monnai, T

    2011-04-01

    We consider a quantum gas of noninteracting particles confined in the expanding cavity and investigate the nature of the nonadiabatic force which is generated from the gas and acts on the cavity wall. First, with use of the time-dependent canonical transformation, which transforms the expanding cavity to the nonexpanding one, we can define the force operator. Second, applying the perturbative theory, which works when the cavity wall begins to move at time origin, we find that the nonadiabatic force is quadratic in the wall velocity and thereby does not break the time-reversal symmetry, in contrast with general belief. Finally, using an assembly of the transitionless quantum states, we obtain the nonadiabatic force exactly. The exact result justifies the validity of both the definition of the force operator and the issue of the perturbative theory. The mysterious mechanism of nonadiabatic transition with the use of transitionless quantum states is also explained. The study is done for both cases of the hard- and soft-wall confinement with the time-dependent confining length. ©2011 American Physical Society

  3. TREATMENT OF NONADIABATIC TRANSITIONS BY DENSITY-MATRIX EVOLUTION AND MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MAVRI, J; BERENDSEN, HJC

    1994-01-01

    A density matrix evolution (DME) method (H.J.C. Berendsen and J. Mavri, J. Phys. Chem., 97 (1993) 13469) to simulate the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in a classical environment is presented. The DME method allows treatment of nonadiabatic transitions. As numerical examples the collinear coll

  4. Ideal quantum gas in expanding cavity: nature of non-adiabatic force

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, K; Sobirov, Z A; Matrasulov, D U; Monnai, T

    2011-01-01

    We consider a quantum gas of non-interacting particles confined in the expanding cavity, and investigate the nature of the non-adiabatic force which is generated from the gas and acts on the cavity wall. Firstly, with use of the time-dependent canonical transformation which transforms the expanding cavity to the non-expanding one, we can define the force operator. Secondly, applying the perturbative theory which works when the cavity wall begins to move at time origin, we find that the non-adiabatic force is quadratic in the wall velocity and thereby does not break the time-reversal symmetry, in contrast with the general belief. Finally, using an assembly of the transitionless quantum states, we obtain the nonadiabatic force exactly. The exact result justifies the validity of both the definition of force operator and the issue of the perturbative theory. The mysterious mechanism of nonadiabatic transition with use of transitionless quantum states is also explained. The study is done on both cases of the hard-...

  5. Nonadiabatic semiclassical scattering: Atom-diatom collisions in self-consistent matrix propagator formalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Michael F.; Freed, Karl F.

    1983-05-01

    The self-consistent matrix propagator method of Laing and Freed is extended to treat semiclassical nonadiabatic scattering in the collinear atom-diatom system. Applications are made to a model system in which diabatic surfaces are parallel, so the nonadiabatic transitions are not well localized in space, thereby introducing difficulties in some previous nonadiabatic semiclassical methods. In the self-consistent matrix propagator method nonadiabatic transitions occur at the boundaries of Magnus regions, and the relative phases, associated with trajectories undergoing transitions at different boundaries, must accurately be determined. This necessitates the determination of the absolute phases of the uniformized classical S matrix, a phase which is unnecessary in single potential surface semiclassical scattering. Semiclassical calculations are compared with full close coupled quantum calculations of Schmalz. The agreement is very good even at relatively low energies. The largest errors enter, as anticipated, for highly classically forbidden transitions whose overall probabilities are, however, rather small. The self-consistent matrix propagator method becomes simpler to apply and more accurate as the total energy increases, i.e., as the fully quantum calculations become prohibitively large. The method has the physical appeal that the self-consistent trajectories follow essentially adiabatic surfaces in strongly interacting regions and diabatic surfaces in weakly interacting regions, with a self-consistent interpolation between these regions.

  6. Nonadiabatic dynamics with intersystem crossings: A time-dependent density functional theory implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco de Carvalho, F. [Centre Européen de Calcul Atomique et Moléculaire, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Tavernelli, I. [IBM Research GmbH, Zurich Research Laboratory, 8803 Ruschlikon (Switzerland)

    2015-12-14

    In this work, we derive a method to perform trajectory-based nonadiabatic dynamics that is able to describe both nonadiabatic transitions and intersystem crossing events (transitions between states of different spin-multiplicity) at the same level of theory, namely, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). To this end, we combined our previously developed TDDFT-based trajectory surface hopping scheme with an accurate and efficient algorithm for the calculation of the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) matrix elements. More specifically, we designed two algorithms for the calculation of intersystem crossing transitions, one based on an extended Tully’s surface hopping scheme including SOC and the second based on a Landau-Zener approximation applied to the spin sector of the electronic Hilbert space. This development allows for the design of an efficient on-the-fly nonadiabatic approach that can handle, on an equal footing, nonadiabatic and intersystem crossing transitions. The method is applied to the study of the photophysics of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in gas and liquid phases.

  7. Modeling of Plasma Irregularities in Expanding Ionospheric Dust Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, H.; Scales, W.; Mahmoudian, A.; Bordikar, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    Natural dust layers occur in the earth’s mesosphere (50km-85km). Plasma irregularities are associated with these natural dust layers that produce radar echoes. Recently, an Ionospheric sounding rocket experiment was performed to investigate the plasma irregularities in upper atmospheric dust layers. The Charged Aerosol Release Experiment (CARE) uses a rocket payload injection of particles in the ionosphere to determine the mechanisms for enhanced radar scatter from plasma irregularities embedded in artificial dusty plasma in space. A 2-D hybrid computational model is described that may be used to study a variety of irregularities in dusty space plasmas which may lead to radar echoes. In this model, the dust and ions are both treated with Particle-In-Cell method while the dust charge varies with time based on the standard dust Orbit Motion Limited charging model. A stochastic model is adopted to remove particle ions due to the dust charging process. Electrons are treated with a fluid model including the parallel dynamics of magnetic fields. Fourier spectral methods with a predictor-corrector time advance are used to solve it. This numerical model will be used to investigate the electrodynamics and several possible plasma irregularity generation mechanisms after the creation of an artificial dust layer. The first is the dust ion-acoustic instability due to the drift of dust relative to the plasma. The instability saturates by trapping some ions. The effects of dust radius and dust drift velocity on plasma irregularities will be analyzed further. Also, a shear- driven instability in expanding dusty clouds is investigated.

  8. Instrument concept of a single channel dust trajectory detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwei; Kempf, Sascha; Simolka, Jonas; Strack, Heiko; Grün, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf

    2017-03-01

    Charged dust particles in space can be detected by in situ sensors using charge induction. Such trajectory sensors are normally based on many grid or wire electrodes connected to individual charge sensitive amplifiers. In this article we describe a new approach to measure the trajectory of a charged dust particle by a single charge sensitive amplifier. The signal shape is used to calculate particle speed, mass and trajectory. The detector employs two half-circular grid electrodes, and the electrodes are connected to the differential input stage of an amplifier. Simulations using the Coulomb 9.0 software package were performed in order to determine the expected signal shapes depending on the particle parameters (entry location and incident angles). The simulated charge signals show, that the chosen measurement concept is an efficient method for low-power and low-mass dust trajectory sensors.

  9. The requisite electronic structure theory to describe photoexcited nonadiabatic dynamics: nonadiabatic derivative couplings and diabatic electronic couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotnik, Joseph E; Alguire, Ethan C; Ou, Qi; Landry, Brian R; Fatehi, Shervin

    2015-05-19

    Electronically photoexcited dynamics are complicated because there are so many different relaxation pathways: fluorescence, phosphorescence, radiationless decay, electon transfer, etc. In practice, to model photoexcited systems is a very difficult enterprise, requiring accurate and very efficient tools in both electronic structure theory and nonadiabatic chemical dynamics. Moreover, these theoretical tools are not traditional tools. On the one hand, the electronic structure tools involve couplings between electonic states (rather than typical single state energies and gradients). On the other hand, the dynamics tools involve propagating nuclei on multiple potential energy surfaces (rather than the usual ground state dynamics). In this Account, we review recent developments in electronic structure theory as directly applicable for modeling photoexcited systems. In particular, we focus on how one may evaluate the couplings between two different electronic states. These couplings come in two flavors. If we order states energetically, the resulting adiabatic states are coupled via derivative couplings. Derivative couplings capture how electronic wave functions change as a function of nuclear geometry and can usually be calculated with straightforward tools from analytic gradient theory. One nuance arises, however, in the context of time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT): how do we evaluate derivative couplings between TD-DFT excited states (which are tricky, because no wave function is available)? This conundrum was recently solved, and we review the solution below. We also discuss the solution to a second, pesky problem of origin dependence, whereby the derivative couplings do not (strictly) satisfy translation variance, which can lead to a lack of momentum conservation. Apart from adiabatic states, if we order states according to their electronic character, the resulting diabatic states are coupled via electronic or diabatic couplings. The couplings

  10. Inhaled dust and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following: the respiratory system; respirable dust; the fate of inhaled dust; translocation and some general effects of inhaled dust; silicosis; experimental research on silica-related disease; natural fibrous silicates; asbestos dust levels and dust sources; asbestos-related diseases - asbestosis, lung cancer, mesothelioma and other diseases, cancers at sites other than lung and pleura; experimental research relating to asbestos-related diseases; asbestos hazard - mineral types and hazardous occupations, neighbourhood and domestic hazard; silicates other than asbestos-man-made mineral fibres, mineral silicates and cement; metals; coal mine dust, industrial carbon and arsenic; natural and synthetic organic substances; dusts that provoke allergic alveolitis; tobacco smoke.

  11. Dust in the interplanetary medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Ingrid; Lamy, Herve [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Brussels (Belgium); Czechowski, Andrzej [Space Research Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Zaslavsky, Arnaud, E-mail: ingrid.mann@aeronomie.b [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France)

    2010-12-15

    The mass density of dust particles that form from asteroids and comets in the interplanetary medium of the solar system is, near 1 AU, comparable to the mass density of the solar wind. It is mainly contained in particles of micrometer size and larger. Dust and larger objects are destroyed by collisions and sublimation and hence feed heavy ions into the solar wind and the solar corona. Small dust particles are present in large number and as a result of their large charge to mass ratio deflected by electromagnetic forces in the solar wind. For nanodust particles of sizes {approx_equal}1-10 nm, recent calculations show trapping near the Sun and outside from about 0.15 AU ejection with velocities close to solar wind velocity. The fluxes of ejected nanodust are detected near 1 AU with the plasma wave instrument onboard the STEREO spacecraft. Although such electric signals have been observed during dust impacts before, the interpretation depends on several different parameters and data analysis is still in progress.

  12. Kinetic temperature of dust particle motion in gas-discharge plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, G. E.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    A system of equations describing motion of dust particles in gas discharge plasma is formulated. This system is developed for a monolayer of dust particles with an account of dust particle charge fluctuations and features of the discharge near-electrode layer. Molecular dynamics simulation of the du

  13. Obliquely propagating dust-density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, A.; Arp, O.; Klindworth, M.; Melzer, A.

    2008-02-01

    Self-excited dust-density waves are experimentally studied in a dusty plasma under microgravity. Two types of waves are observed: a mode inside the dust volume propagating in the direction of the ion flow and another mode propagating obliquely at the boundary between the dusty plasma and the space charge sheath. The dominance of oblique modes can be described in the frame of a fluid model. It is shown that the results fom the fluid model agree remarkably well with a kinetic electrostatic model of Rosenberg [J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996)]. In the experiment, the instability is quenched by increasing the gas pressure or decreasing the dust density. The critical pressure and dust density are well described by the models.

  14. Finite dust clusters in dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melzer, A; Buttenschoen, B; Miksch, T; Passvogel, M [Institute of Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 6, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Block, D; Arp, O; Piel, A, E-mail: melzer@physik.uni-greifswald.d [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet Kiel, Olshausenstr. 40-60, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    We review recent experiments on the formation of finite systems of charged microspheres in dusty plasmas. There, finite arrangements of these dust clusters can be studied in different geometries ranging from 1D to 3D. The structure and the mode dynamics in these systems will be discussed.

  15. A simple model of the magnetic emission from a dust devil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurgansky, Michael V.; Baez, Leonardo; Ovalle, Elías M.

    2007-11-01

    A simple Rankine-like vortex model of the dust devil behaving as a magnetic solenoid has been constructed. It is augmented with a one-dimensional model describing steady vertical distribution of the electric charge in the dust devil. For terrestrial dust devils, the model permits uniform vertical distribution of the negatively charged dust within the main vortex flow. For higher electric conductivity of air on Mars, the model hints on a rapid decay with altitude of the dust electrification, with e-folding height order of several tens of meters, which is much less than the total dust column height. It is shown that some characteristic features of recently discovered ULF magnetic emission from the terrestrial dust devil can be interpreted in terms of interaction between negatively charged smaller-scale vortex filaments inside the main vortex. It is conjectured that such ULF magnetic emission should be accompanied by the emission of sound waves of approximately doubled frequency.

  16. The Lunar Environment: Determining the Health Effects of Exposure to Moon Dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan-Mayberry, Noreen

    2007-01-01

    The moon's surface is covered with a thin layer of fine, charged, reactive dust capable of layer of fine, charged, reactive dust capable of capable of entering habitats and vehicle compartments, where it can result in crewmember health problems. NASA formed the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Advisory Group (LADTAG) to study the effects of exposure to Lunar Dust on human health. To date, no scientifically defensible toxicological studies have been performed on lunar dusts, specifically the determination of exposure limits and their affect on human health. The multi-center LADTAG (Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicology center LADTAG (Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicology Advisory Group) was formed in response to the Office of the Chief Health and Medical Office s (OCHMO) request to develop recommendations for defining risk (OCHMO) request to develop recommendations for defining risk defining risk criteria for human lunar dust exposure.

  17. Dust levitation about Itokawa's equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzell, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Electrostatic dust motion has been hypothesized to occur on the asteroids, due to the observations of the Eros dust ponds [1] and the potential presence of such a phenomenon on the Moon [2]. There are two phases of electrostatic dust motion: lofting and the subsequent trajectories. The feasibility of electrostatic dust lofting can be assessed by comparing the strength of the electrostatic force to the gravity and cohesion which hold the grain on to the surface [3--5]. The motion of the dust grains after they detach from the surface can be described as either ballistic, escaping, or levitating. We are interested in dust levitation because it could potentially redistribute grains on the surface of an asteroid (for instance, producing the Eros dust ponds) and it could also be hazardous to spacecraft. Specifically, levitating dust could obscure the observations of surface-based spacecraft or possibly trigger obstacle avoidance routines during landing. Dust Levitation: Dust levitation is defined as the altitude oscillation of grains prior to their redeposition on the surface of an asteroid. Levitation occurs about equilibria where the electrostatic and gravity forces on the grain are equal and opposite. An equilibrium state is defined as a position and charge for a specific grain size. We have previously identified equilibria using a 1D plasma model and a simple gravity model for Itokawa [6]. In this simple model, the largest grain that was capable of stable levitation above Itokawa was 3 microns (in radius) [6]. Additionally, we have shown that levitating dust grains follow the variation in the equilibria for a rotating asteroid (i.e., the grain continues to oscillate about an equilibrium state that approaches the surface) [7]. Due to the nonspherical shape of Itokawa, both the gravity and plasma environments are much more complicated than the 1D approximations made in our previous work. Thus, in order to accurately assess the feasibility of dust

  18. Jeans Collapse of a System of Electron Emitting Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzanno, G. L.; Lapenta, G.

    2004-05-01

    The collapse of a molecular cloud to form a planetary system is a classic process in astrophysics. The length scale of the collapsed system and the rate of its formation is described in the simplest model by the Jeans instability. When the model is complicated by additional processes, the rate and scale of the Jeans instability is modified [1]. We focus on the processes involved with the charging of the dust in the initial cloud. The presence of charge of the same sign on the dust particles inhibits the process of collapse. Yet, the process of charging is expected to be operational. We propose a mechanism that can explain this apparent contradiction. In a recent work [2], we have shown that in presence of electron emission from the dust the interaction potential of a dust particle becomes similar to the Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential. The important consequence of this discovery is that emitting dust particles with LJ like potential can actually attract each other even though they all share the same sign of charge. Here, we present a series of simulations conducted with a new code designed to study a large system of weakly coupled dust particles, interacting with a LJ like potential. [1] P. K. Shukla, Dust plasma interaction in space, Nova Science Publ., 2002. [2] G.L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, M. Rosenberg, Phys. Rev. Lett., to appear.

  19. Beyond Orbital-Motion-Limited theory effects for dust transport in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delzanno, Gian Luca [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tang, Xianzhu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-29

    Dust transport in tokamaks is very important for ITER. Can many kilograms of dust really accumulate in the device? Can the dust survive? The conventional dust transport model is based on Orbital-Motion-Limited theory (OML). But OML can break in the limit where the dust grain becomes positively charged due to electron emission processes because it overestimates the dust collected power. An OML+ approximation of the emitted electrons trapped/passing boundary is shown to be in good agreement with PIC simulations.

  20. High T(c) superconductivity in MgB2 by nonadiabatic pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, E; Ciuchi, S; Grimaldi, C; Pietronero, L; Strässler, S

    2002-03-18

    The evidence for the key role of the sigma bands in the electronic properties of MgB2 points to the possibility of nonadiabatic effects in the superconductivity of these materials. These are governed by the small value of the Fermi energy due to the vicinity of the hole doping level to the top of the sigma bands. We show that the nonadiabatic theory leads to a coherent interpretation of T(c) = 39 K and the boron isotope coefficient alphaB = 0.30 without invoking very large couplings and it naturally explains the role of the disorder on T(c). It also leads to various specific predictions for the properties of MgB2 and for the material optimization of these types of compounds.

  1. An analysis of nonadiabatic ring-polymer molecular dynamics and its application to vibronic spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Jeremy O; Pleinert, Marc-Oliver; Thoss, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nonadiabatic ring-polymer molecular dynamics employs the mapping approach to describe nonadiabatic effects within the ring-polymer ansatz. In this paper, it is generalized to allow for the nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom to be described by different numbers of ring-polymer beads. Analysis of the resulting method shows that as the number of electronic mapping variables increases, certain problems associated with the approach are removed, such as the non-unique choice of the mapping Hamiltonian and negative populations leading to inverted potential-energy surfaces. Explicit integration over cyclic variables reduces the sign problem for the initial distribution in the general case. A new application for the simulation of vibronic spectra is described and promising results are presented for a model system.

  2. An analysis of nonadiabatic ring-polymer molecular dynamics and its application to vibronic spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jeremy O.; Meyer, Philipp; Pleinert, Marc-Oliver; Thoss, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Nonadiabatic ring-polymer molecular dynamics employs the mapping approach to describe nonadiabatic effects within the ring-polymer ansatz. In this paper, it is generalized to allow for the nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom to be described by different numbers of ring-polymer beads. Analysis of the resulting method shows that as the number of electronic mapping variables increases, certain problems associated with the approach are removed, such as the non-unique choice of the mapping Hamiltonian and negative populations leading to inverted potential-energy surfaces. Explicit integration over cyclic variables reduces the sign problem for the initial distribution in the general case. A new application for the simulation of vibronic spectra is described and promising results are presented for a model system.

  3. Non-adiabatic dynamics close to conical intersections and the surface hopping perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Pedro eMalhado

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Conical intersections play a major role in the current understanding of electronic de-excitation in polyatomic molecules, and thus in the description of photochemistry and photo physics of molecular systems. This article reviews aspects of the basic theory underlying the description of non-adiabatic transitions at conical intersections, with particular emphasis on the important case when the dynamics of the nuclei are treated classically. Within this classical nuclear motion framework, the main aspects of the surface hopping methodology in the conical intersection context are presented. The emerging picture from this treatment is that of electronic transitions around conical intersections dominated by the interplay of the nuclear velocity and the derivative non-adiabatic coupling vector field.

  4. Topologically correct quantum nonadiabatic formalism for on-the-fly dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Joubert-Doriol, Loic; Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-01-01

    On-the-fly quantum nonadiabatic dynamics for large systems greatly benefits from the adiabatic representation readily available from the electronic structure programs. However, frequently occurring in this representation conical intersections introduce non-trivial geometric or Berry phases which require a special treatment for adequate modelling of the nuclear dynamics. We analyze two approaches for nonadiabatic dynamics using the time-dependent variational principle and the adiabatic representation. The first approach employs adiabatic electronic functions with global parametric dependence on the nuclear coordinates. The second approach uses adiabatic electronic functions obtained only at the centres of moving localized nuclear basis functions (e.g. frozen-width Gaussians). Unless a gauge transformation is used to enforce single-valued boundary conditions, the first approach fails to capture the geometric phase. In contrast, the second approach accounts for the geometric phase naturally because of the absenc...

  5. Unraveling nonadiabatic ionization and Coulomb potential effects in strong-field photoelectron holography

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Xiaohong; Sheng, Zhihao; Liu, Peng; Chen, Zhangjin; Yang, Weifeng; Hu, Shilin; Lin, C D; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Strong field photoelectron holography has been proposed as a means for interrogating the spatial and temporal information of electrons and ions in a dynamic system. After ionization, part of the electron wave packet may directly go to the detector (the reference wave), while another part may be driven back to the ion where it scatters off (the signal wave). The interference hologram of the two waves may be used to retrieve the target information. However, unlike conventional optical holography, the propagations of electron wave packets are affected by the Coulomb potential as well as by the laser field. In addition, electrons are emitted over the whole laser pulse duration, thus multiple interferences may occur. In this work, we used a generalized quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo method to investigate the effect of Coulomb potential and the nonadiabatic subcycle ionization on the photoelectron hologram. We showed that photoelectron hologram can be well described only when the nonadiabatic effect in ionization i...

  6. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamics with complex quantum trajectories. I. The diabatic representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamstein, Noa; Tannor, David J

    2012-12-14

    We extend a recently developed quantum trajectory method [Y. Goldfarb, I. Degani, and D. J. Tannor, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 231103 (2006)] to treat non-adiabatic transitions. Each trajectory evolves on a single surface according to Newton's laws with complex positions and momenta. The transfer of amplitude between surfaces stems naturally from the equations of motion, without the need for surface hopping. In this paper we derive the equations of motion and show results in the diabatic representation, which is rarely used in trajectory methods for calculating non-adiabatic dynamics. We apply our method to the first two benchmark models introduced by Tully [J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990)]. Besides giving the probability branching ratios between the surfaces, the method also allows the reconstruction of the time-dependent wavepacket. Our results are in quantitative agreement with converged quantum mechanical calculations.

  7. A semiclassical model for the calculation of nonadiabatic transition probabilities for classically forbidden transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Phuong-Thanh; Herman, Michael F

    2009-02-01

    A semiclassical surface hopping model is presented for the calculation of nonadiabatic transition probabilities for the case in which the avoided crossing point is in the classically forbidden regions. The exact potentials and coupling are replaced with simple functional forms that are fitted to the values, evaluated at the turning point in the classical motion, of the Born-Oppenheimer potentials, the nonadiabatic coupling, and their first few derivatives. For the one-dimensional model considered, reasonably accurate results for transition probabilities are obtained down to around 10(-10). The possible extension of this model to many dimensional problems is discussed. The fact that the model requires only information at the turning point, a point that the trajectories encounter would be a significant advantage in many dimensional problems over Landau-Zener type models, which require information at the avoided crossing seam, which is in the forbidden region where the trajectories do not go.

  8. Topologically Correct Quantum Nonadiabatic Formalism for On-the-Fly Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert-Doriol, Loïc; Sivasubramanium, Janakan; Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2017-01-19

    On-the-fly quantum nonadiabatic dynamics for large systems greatly benefits from the adiabatic representation readily available from electronic structure programs. However, conical intersections frequently occurring in this representation introduce nontrivial geometric or Berry phases which require a special treatment for adequate modeling of the nuclear dynamics. We analyze two approaches for nonadiabatic dynamics using the time-dependent variational principle and the adiabatic representation. The first approach employs adiabatic electronic functions with global parametric dependence on the nuclear coordinates. The second approach uses adiabatic electronic functions obtained only at the centers of moving localized nuclear basis functions (e.g., frozen-width Gaussians). Unless a gauge transformation is used to enforce single-valued boundary conditions, the first approach fails to capture the geometric phase. In contrast, the second approach accounts for the geometric phase naturally because of the absence of the global nuclear coordinate dependence in the electronic functions.

  9. Ultrafast hydrogen migration in acetylene cation driven by non-adiabatic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Li, Zheng; Vendrell, Oriol

    2013-03-07

    Non-adiabatic dynamics of the acetylene cation is investigated using mixed quantum-classical dynamics based on trajectory surface hopping. To describe the non-adiabatic effects, two surface hopping methods are used, namely, Tully's fewest switches and Landau-Zener surface hopping. Similarities and differences between the results based on those two methods are discussed. We find that the photoionization of acetylene into the first excited state A(2)Σg(+) drives the molecule from the linear structure to a trans-bent structure. Through a conical intersection the acetylene cation can relax back to either the ground state of acetylene or vinylidene. We conclude that hydrogen migration always takes place after non-radiative electronic relaxation to the ground state of the monocation. Based on the analysis of correlation functions we identify coherent oscillations between acetylene and vinylidene with a period of about 70 fs after the electronic relaxation.

  10. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  11. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  12. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  13. Non-adiabatic molecular Hamiltonian: Canonical transformation coupling electronic and vibrational motions

    OpenAIRE

    Hubac, Ivan; Babinec, Peter; Polasek, Martin; Urban, Jan; Mach, Pavel; Masik, Jozef; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    1998-01-01

    The coupling of electronic and vibrational motion is studied by two canonical transformations namely normal coordinate transformation and momentum transformation on molecular Hamiltonian. It is shown that by these transformations we can pass from crude approximation to adiabatic approximation and then to non-adiabatic (diabatic) Hamiltonian. This leads to renormalized fermions and renormalized diabatic phonons. Simple calculations on $H_{2}$, $HD$, and $D_{2}$ systems are performed and compar...

  14. Inchworm Monte Carlo for exact non-adiabatic dynamics. II. Benchmarks and comparison with established methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Cohen, Guy; Reichman, David R.

    2017-02-01

    In this second paper of a two part series, we present extensive benchmark results for two different inchworm Monte Carlo expansions for the spin-boson model. Our results are compared to previously developed numerically exact approaches for this problem. A detailed discussion of convergence and error propagation is presented. Our results and analysis allow for an understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of inchworm Monte Carlo compared to other approaches for exact real-time non-adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  15. Inchworm Monte Carlo for exact non-adiabatic dynamics. II. Benchmarks and comparison with established methods

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Reichman, David R

    2016-01-01

    In this second paper of a two part series, we present extensive benchmark results for two different inchworm Monte Carlo expansions for the spin-boson model. Our results are compared to previously developed numerically exact approaches for this problem. A detailed discussion of convergence and error propagation is presented. Our results and analysis allow for an understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of inchworm Monte Carlo compared to other approaches for exact real-time non-adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  16. Optical flowmeter using a modal interferometer based on a single nonadiabatic fiber taper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazão, O; Caldas, P; Araújo, F M; Ferreira, L A; Santos, J L

    2007-07-15

    A novel in-fiber modal interferometer is presented that is based on a nonadiabatic biconical fused taper that couples light between the cladding and the core, combined with the Fresnel reflection at the fiber end. It is observed that the returned light from this fiber structure shows a channeled spectrum similar to that of a two-wave Michelson interferometer. The application of this device as a fiber optic flowmeter sensor is demonstrated.

  17. Nonadiabatic analysis of strange-modes in hot massive stars with time-dependent convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonoi Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We carry out nonadiabatic analysis of strange-modes in hot massive stars with time-dependent convection (TDC. We find that the instability of the modes excited at the Fe bump is weaker with TDC than with frozen-in convection (FC. But the instability still remains with TDC, and could be a possible candidate for the trigger of luminous blue variable (LBV phenomena.

  18. Non-oscillatory flux correlation functions for efficient nonadiabatic rate theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jeremy O; Thoss, Michael

    2014-08-21

    There is currently much interest in the development of improved trajectory-based methods for the simulation of nonadiabatic processes in complex systems. An important goal for such methods is the accurate calculation of the rate constant over a wide range of electronic coupling strengths and it is often the nonadiabatic, weak-coupling limit, which being far from the Born-Oppenheimer regime, provides the greatest challenge to current methods. We show that in this limit there is an inherent sign problem impeding further development which originates from the use of the usual quantum flux correlation functions, which can be very oscillatory at short times. From linear response theory, we derive a modified flux correlation function for the calculation of nonadiabatic reaction rates, which still rigorously gives the correct result in the long-time limit regardless of electronic coupling strength, but unlike the usual formalism is not oscillatory in the weak-coupling regime. In particular, a trajectory simulation of the modified correlation function is naturally initialized in a region localized about the crossing of the potential energy surfaces. In the weak-coupling limit, a simple link can be found between the dynamics initialized from this transition-state region and an generalized quantum golden-rule transition-state theory, which is equivalent to Marcus theory in the classical harmonic limit. This new correlation function formalism thus provides a platform on which a wide variety of dynamical simulation methods can be built aiding the development of accurate nonadiabatic rate theories applicable to complex systems.

  19. The Dust Accelerator Facility at CCLDAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, A. J.; Collette, A.; Drake, K.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Leblanc, S.; Munsat, T.; Northway, P.; Robertson, S. H.; Srama, R.; Sternovsky, Z.; Thomas, E.; Wagner, M.; Colorado CenterLunar Dust; Atmospheric Studies

    2010-12-01

    At the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Science (CCLDAS) we are in the process of assembling a 3MV macroscopic (~1um) dust particle accelerator. The acceleration unit is being made by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). The accelerator consists of a pelletron generator and potential rings encased in an enclosure held at 6 atm of SF6. A pulsed dust source is used to inject particles into the accelerator. Here we describe advancements in dust accelerator technology at CCLDAS to allow more functionality and ease of use, focusing primarily on dust source control, and the capability to select a precise range in dust mass and velocity. Previously, the dust source was controlled by long plastic rods turning potentiometers inside the SF6 environment providing little to no feedback and repeatability. We describe a fiber optic control system that allows full control of the pulse characteristics being sent to the dust source using a LabVIEW control program to increase usability. An electrostatic Einzel lens is being designed using the ion-optics code SIMION to determine the properties of the electrodes needed for the optimum focusing of the dust beam. Our simulations studies indicate that the dust beam can be directed into a 0.5mm diameter spot. Our planned experiments require a high degree of control over particles size, speed, charge and other characteristics. In order to ensure that only particles of the desired characteristics are allowed to pass into the target chamber, two deflection plates are used to eliminate unwanted particles from the beam. Further simulations are being done to determine the possibility of bending the beamline to allow active selection of particles. The current design of the selection unit uses nuclear accelerator techniques to determine the velocity and charge of each particle and digital timing and logic to choose particles that will be allowed to pass. This requires a high signal to noise ratio due to the need for a well

  20. Dust in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Armosky, Brad J.

    2004-01-01

    Space is seeming less and less like empty space as new discoveries and reexaminations fill in the gaps. And, ingenuity and technology, like the Spitzer Space Telescope, is allowing examination of the far reaches of the Milky Way and beyond. Even dust is getting its due, but not the dust everyone is familiar with. People seldom consider the dust in…

  1. Nonadiabatic corrections to a quantum dot quantum computer working in adiabatic limit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Ávila

    2014-07-01

    The time of operation of an adiabatic quantum computer must be less than the decoherence time, otherwise the computer would be nonoperative. So far, the nonadiabatic corrections to an adiabatic quantum computer are merely theoretical considerations. By the above reason, we consider the particular case of a quantum-dot-confined electron spin qubit working adiabatically in the nanoscale regime (e.g., in the MeV range of energies) and include nonadiabatic corrections in it. If the decoherence times of a quantum dot computer are ∼100 ns [J M Kikkawa and D D Awschalom, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 4313 (1998)] then the predicted number of one qubit gate (primitive) operations of the Loss–DiVincenzo quantum computer in such an interval of time must be > 1010. However, if the quantum-dot-confined electron spin qubit is very excited (i.e., the semiclassical limit) the number of operations of such a computer would be approximately the same as that of a classical computer. Our results suggest that for an adiabatic quantum computer to operate successfully within the decoherence times, it is necessary to take into account nonadiabatic corrections.

  2. Single-shot realization of nonadiabatic holonomic quantum gates in decoherence-free subspaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P. Z.; Xu, G. F.; Ding, Q. M.; Sjöqvist, Erik; Tong, D. M.

    2017-06-01

    Nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces has attracted increasing attention recently, as it allows for high-speed implementation and combines both the robustness of holonomic gates and the coherence stabilization of decoherence-free subspaces. Since the first protocol of nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces, a number of schemes for its physical implementation have been put forward. However, all previous schemes require two noncommuting gates to realize an arbitrary one-qubit gate, which doubles the exposure time of gates to error sources as well as the resource expenditure. In this paper, we propose an alternative protocol for nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces, in which an arbitrary one-qubit gate in decoherence-free subspaces is realized by a single-shot implementation. The present protocol not only maintains the merits of the original protocol but also avoids the extra work of combining two gates to implement an arbitrary one-qubit gate and thereby reduces the exposure time to various error sources.

  3. Nonadiabatic nonradial p-mode frequencies of the standard solar model, with and without helium diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    The nonadiabatic frequencies of a standard solar model and a solar model that includes helium diffusion are discussed. The nonadiabatic pulsation calculation includes physics that describes the losses and gains due to radiation. Radiative gains and losses are modeled in both the diffusion approximation, which is only valid in optically thick regions, and the Eddington approximation, which is valid in both optically thin and thick regions. The calculated pulsation frequencies for modes with l less than or equal to 1320 are compared to the observed spectrum of the Sun. Compared to a strictly adiabatic calculation, the nonadiabatic calculation of p-mode frequencies improves the agreement between model and observation. When helium diffusion is included in the model the frequencies of the modes that are sensitive to regions near the base of the convection zone are improved (i.e., brought into closer agreement with observation), but the agreement is made worse for other modes. Cyclic variations in the frequency spacings of the Sun as a function of frequency of n are presented as evidence for a discontinuity in the structure of the Sun, possibly located near the base of the convection zone.

  4. Analysis of magnetically immersed electron guns with non-adiabatic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Raparia, Deepak; Ritter, John

    2016-11-01

    Electron diode guns, which have strongly varying magnetic or electric fields in a cathode-anode gap, were investigated in order to generate laminar electron beams with high current density using magnetically immersed guns. By creating a strongly varying radial electric field in a cathode-anode gap of the electron gun, it was demonstrated that the optical properties of the gun can be significantly altered, which allows the generation of a laminar, high-current electron beam with relatively low magnetic field on the cathode. The relatively high magnetic compression of the electron beam achieved by this method is important for producing electron beams with high current density. A similar result can be obtained by inducing a strong variation of the magnetic field in a cathode-anode gap. It was observed that creating a dip in the axial magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap of an adiabatic electron gun has an optical effect similar to guns with strong variation of radial electric field. By analyzing the electron trajectories angles and presenting the results in a gun performance map, different geometries of magnetically immersed electron guns with non-adiabatic fields are compared with each other and with a more traditional adiabatic electron gun. Some advantages and limitations of guns with non-adiabatic fields are outlined. The tests' results of a non-adiabatic electron gun with modified magnetic field are presented.

  5. Specific absorption rate determination of magnetic nanoparticles through hyperthermia measurements in non-adiabatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coïsson, M. [INRIM, strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Barrera, G. [INRIM, strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); University of Torino, Chemistry Department, via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino (Italy); Celegato, F.; Martino, L.; Vinai, F. [INRIM, strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Martino, P. [Politronica srl, via Livorno 60, 10144 Torino (Italy); Ferraro, G. [Center for Space Human Robotics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia - IIT, corso Trento 21, 10129 Torino (Italy); Tiberto, P. [INRIM, strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2016-10-01

    An experimental setup for magnetic hyperthermia operating in non-adiabatic conditions is described. A thermodynamic model that takes into account the heat exchanged by the sample with the surrounding environment is developed. A suitable calibration procedure is proposed that allows the experimental validation of the model. Specific absorption rate can then be accurately determined just from the measurement of the sample temperature at the equilibrium steady state. The setup and the measurement procedure represent a simplification with respect to other systems requiring calorimeters or crucial corrections for heat flow. Two families of magnetic nanoparticles, one superparamagnetic and one characterised by larger sizes and static hysteresis, have been characterised as a function of field intensity, and specific absorption rate and intrinsic loss power have been obtained. - Highlights: • Development and thermodynamic modelling of a hyperthermia setup operating in non-adiabatic conditions. • Calibration of the experimental setup and validation of the model. • Accurate measurement of specific absorption rate and intrinsic loss power in non-adiabatic conditions.

  6. Non-Adiabatic Dynamics around a Conical Intersection with Surface-Hopping Coupled Coherent States

    CERN Document Server

    Humeniuk, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    An extension of the CCS-method [Chem. Phys. 2004, 304, p. 103-120] for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics with quantum effects of the nuclei is put forward. The time-dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger equation for the motion of the nuclei is solved in a moving basis set. The basis set is guided by classical trajectories, which can hop stochastically between different electronic potential energy surfaces. The non-adiabatic transitions are modelled by a modified version of Tully's fewest switches algorithm. The trajectories consist of Gaussians in the phase space of the nuclei (coherent states) combined with amplitudes for an electronic wave function. The time-dependent matrix elements between different coherent states determine the amplitude of each trajectory in the total multistate wave function; the diagonal matrix elements determine the hopping probabilities and gradients. In this way, both intereference effects and non-adiabatic transitions can be described in a very compact fashion, leading to the exact solution i...

  7. Nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics: On-the-fly limiting of essential excited states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Tammie; Naumov, Artem; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Tretiak, Sergei

    2016-12-01

    The simulation of nonadiabatic dynamics in extended molecular systems involving hundreds of atoms and large densities of states is particularly challenging. Nonadiabatic coupling terms (NACTs) represent a significant numerical bottleneck in surface hopping approaches. Rather than using unreliable NACT cutting schemes, here we develop "on-the-fly" state limiting methods to eliminate states that are no longer essential for the non-radiative relaxation dynamics as a trajectory proceeds. We propose a state number criteria and an energy-based state limit. The latter is more physically relevant by requiring a user-imposed energy threshold. For this purpose, we introduce a local kinetic energy gauge by summing contributions from atoms within the spatial localization of the electronic wavefunction to define the energy available for upward hops. The proposed state limiting schemes are implemented within the nonadiabatic excited-state molecular dynamics framework to simulate photoinduced relaxation in poly-phenylene vinylene (PPV) and branched poly-phenylene ethynylene (PPE) oligomers for benchmark evaluation.

  8. A new symmetrical quasi-classical model for electronically non-adiabatic processes: Application to the case of weak non-adiabatic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Stephen J.; Miller, William H.

    2016-10-01

    Previous work has shown how a symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) windowing procedure can be used to quantize the initial and final electronic degrees of freedom in the Meyer-Miller (MM) classical vibronic (i.e, nuclear + electronic) Hamiltonian, and that the approach provides a very good description of electronically non-adiabatic processes within a standard classical molecular dynamics framework for a number of benchmark problems. This paper explores application of the SQC/MM approach to the case of very weak non-adiabatic coupling between the electronic states, showing (as anticipated) how the standard SQC/MM approach used to date fails in this limit, and then devises a new SQC windowing scheme to deal with it. Application of this new SQC model to a variety of realistic benchmark systems shows that the new model not only treats the weak coupling case extremely well, but it is also seen to describe the "normal" regime (of electronic transition probabilities ≳ 0.1) even more accurately than the previous "standard" model.

  9. Bridging a High School Science Fair Experience with First Year Undergraduate Research: Using the E-SPART Analyzer to Determine Electrostatic Charge Properties of Compositionally Varied Rock Dust Particles as Terrestrial Analogues to Mars Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A. G.; Williams, W. J. W.; Mazumder, M. K.; Biris, A.; Srirama, P. K.

    2005-01-01

    NASA missions to Mars confirm presence of surficial particles, as well as dramatic periods of aeolian reworking. Dust deposition on, or infiltration into, exploration equipment such as spacecraft, robotic explorers, solar panel power supplies, and even spacesuits, can pose significant problems such as diminished power collection, short circuits / discharges, and added weight. We report results conducted initially as a science fair project and a study now part of a first year University undergraduate research experience.

  10. Solar wind collimation of the Jupiter high velocity dust streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, A.; Krueger, H.

    2006-12-01

    The dust bursts discovered by the Ulysses dust sensor when approaching Jupiter in 1992 were later confirmed as collimated streams of high velocity (~200 km/s) charged (~5V) dust grains escaping from Jupiter and dominated by the interplanetary Magnetic field (IMF). With Cassini, a similar phenomenon was observed in Saturn. It was demonstrated that the Jovian dust streams are closely related to the solar wind compressed regions, either Corotating interaction regions (CIRs) or Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ¨Cto a minor extent-. Actually the dust streams seem ultimately to be generated by such events. This can be explained considering that dust grains are accelerated as they gain substantial energy while compressed at the forward and reverse shocks that bound or precede these solar wind regions.

  11. Jovian dust streams Probes of the Io plasma torus

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H; Grün, E; Krueger, Harald; Horanyi, Mihaly; Gruen, Eberhard

    2002-01-01

    Jupiter was discovered to be a source of high speed dust particles by the Ulysses spacecraft in 1992. These dust particles originate from the volcanic plumes on Io. They collect electrostatic charges from the plasma environment, gain energy from the co-rotating electric field of the magnetosphere, and leave Jupiter with escape speeds over $\\rm 200 km s^{-1}$. The dust streams were also observed by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft. While Ulysses and Cassini only had a single encounter with Jupiter, Galileo has continuously monitored the dust streams in the Jovian magnetosphere since 1996. The observed dust fluxes exhibit large orbit-to-orbit variability due to both systematic and stochastic changes. By combining the entire data set, the variability due to stochatic processes can be approximately removed and a strong variation with Jovian local time is found. This result is consistent with theoretical expectations and confirms that the majority of the Jovian dust stream particles originate from Io rather than...

  12. Universal instability of dust ion-sound waves and dust-acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsytovich, V.N. [General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science Moscow, Moscow (Russian Federation); Watanabe, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that the dust ion-sound waves (DISW) and the dust-acoustic waves (DAW) are universally unstable for wave numbers less than some critical wave number. The basic dusty plasma state is assumed to be quasi-neutral with balance of the plasma particle absorption on the dust particles and the ionization with the rate proportional to the electron density. An analytical expression for the critical wave numbers, for the frequencies and for the growth rates of DISW and DAW are found using the hydrodynamic description of dusty plasma components with self-consistent treatment of the dust charge variations and by taking into account the change of the ion and electron distributions in the dust charging process. Most of the previous treatment do not take into account the latter process and do not treat the basic state self-consistently. The critical lengths corresponding to these critical wave numbers can be easily achieved in the existing experiments. It is shown that at the wave numbers larger than the critical ones DISW and DAW have a large damping which was not treated previously and which can be also measured. The instabilities found in the present work on their non linear stage can lead to formation of different types of dust self-organized structures. (author)

  13. Interstellar Dust Inside and Outside the Heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Krueger, Harald

    2008-01-01

    In the early 1990s, after its Jupiter flyby, the Ulysses spacecraft identified interstellar dust in the solar system. Since then the in-situ dust detector on board Ulysses continuously monitored interstellar grains with masses up to 10e-13 kg, penetrating deep into the solar system. While Ulysses measured the interstellar dust stream at high ecliptic latitudes between 3 and 5 AU, interstellar impactors were also measured with the in-situ dust detectors on board Cassini, Galileo and Helios, covering a heliocentric distance range between 0.3 and 3 AU in the ecliptic plane. The interstellar dust stream in the inner solar system is altered by the solar radiation pressure force, gravitational focussing and interaction of charged grains with the time varying interplanetary magnetic field. The grains act as tracers of the physical conditions in the local interstellar cloud (LIC). Our in-situ measurements imply the existence of a population of 'big' interstellar grains (up to 10e-13 kg) and a gas-to-dust-mass ratio i...

  14. Toxicity of lunar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Linnarsson, Dag; Fubini, Bice; Gerde, Per; Karlsson, Lars L; Loftus, David J; Prisk, G Kim; Staufer, Urs; Tranfield, Erin M; van Westrenen, Wim

    2012-01-01

    The formation, composition and physical properties of lunar dust are incompletely characterised with regard to human health. While the physical and chemical determinants of dust toxicity for materials such as asbestos, quartz, volcanic ashes and urban particulate matter have been the focus of substantial research efforts, lunar dust properties, and therefore lunar dust toxicity may differ substantially. In this contribution, past and ongoing work on dust toxicity is reviewed, and major knowledge gaps that prevent an accurate assessment of lunar dust toxicity are identified. Finally, a range of studies using ground-based, low-gravity, and in situ measurements is recommended to address the identified knowledge gaps. Because none of the curated lunar samples exist in a pristine state that preserves the surface reactive chemical aspects thought to be present on the lunar surface, studies using this material carry with them considerable uncertainty in terms of fidelity. As a consequence, in situ data on lunar dust...

  15. Isotope effect in charge-transfer collisions of H with He{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loreau, J.; Dalgarno, A. [Institute for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Ryabchenko, S. [Northern (Arctic) Federal University, 17 Severnaya Dvina Emb., 163002 Arkhangelsk (Russian Federation); Laboratoire de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), CP160/09, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Vaeck, N. [Laboratoire de Chimie Quantique et Photophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), CP160/09, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2011-11-15

    We present a theoretical study of the isotope effect arising from the replacement of H by T in the charge-transfer collision H(n=2) + He{sup +}(1s) at low energy. Using a quasimolecular approach and a time-dependent wave-packet method, we compute the cross sections for the reaction including the effects of the nonadiabatic radial and rotational couplings. For H(2s) + He{sup +}(1s) collisions, we find a strong isotope effect at energies below 1 eV/amu for both singlet and triplet states. We find a much smaller isotopic dependence of the cross section for H(2p) + He{sup +}(1s) collisions in triplet states, and no isotope effect in singlet states. We explain the isotope effect on the basis of the potential energy curves and the nonadiabatic couplings, and we evaluate the importance of the isotope effect on the charge-transfer rate coefficients.

  16. On the Mechanism of the Primary Charge Separation in Bacterial Photosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, C H; Egger, Reinhold

    1994-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the mechanism of the primary charge separation process in bacterial photosynthesis using real-time path integrals. Direct computer simulations as well as an approximate analytical theory have been employed to map out the dynamics of the charge separation process in many regions of the parameter space relevant to bacterial photosynthesis. Two distinct parameter regions, one characteristic of sequential transfer and the other characteristic of superexchange, have been found to yield charge separation dynamics in agreement with experiments. Nonadiabatic theory provides accurate rate estimates for low-lying and very high-lying bacteriochlorophyll state energies, but it breaks down in between these two regimes.

  17. Dust-ion acoustic cnoidal waves and associated nonlinear ion flux in a nonthermal dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ur-Rehman, Hafeez; Mahmood, S.

    2016-09-01

    The dust-ion acoustic nonlinear periodic (cnoidal) waves and solitons are investigated in a dusty plasma containing dynamic cold ions, superthermal kappa distributed electrons and static charged dust particles. The massive dust particles can have positive or negative charge depending on the plasma environment. Using reductive perturbation method (RPM) with appropriate periodic boundary conditions, the evolution equations for the first and second order nonlinear potentials are derived. The first order potential is determined through Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation which gives dust-ion acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons structures. The solution of second order nonlinear potential is obtained through an inhomogeneous differential equation derived from collecting higher order terms of dynamic equations, which is linear for second order electrostatic potential. The nonlinear ion flux associated with the cnoidal waves is also found out numerically. The numerical plots of the dust-ion acoustic cnoidal wave and soliton structures for both positively and negatively charged dust particles cases and nonthermal electrons are also presented for illustration. It is found that only compressive nonlinear electrostatic structures are formed in case of positively dust charged particles while both compressive and rarefactive nonlinear structures are obtained in case of negatively charged particles depending on the negatively charged dust density in a nonthermal dusty plasma. The numerical results are obtained using data of the ionospheric region containing dusty plasma exist in the literature.

  18. Self-excited dust-acoustic waves in an electron-depleted nanodusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadsen, Benjamin, E-mail: tadsen@physik.uni-kiel.de; Greiner, Franko; Groth, Sebastian; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    A dust density wave field is observed in a cloud of nanodust particles confined in a radio frequency plasma. Simultaneous measurements of the dust properties, grain size and density, as well as the wave parameters, frequency and wave number, allow for an estimate of the ion density, ion drift velocity, and the dust charge using a hybrid model for the wave dispersion. It appears that the charge on the dust grains in the cloud is drastically reduced to tens of elementary charges compared with isolated dust particles in a plasma. The charge is much higher at the cloud's periphery, i.e., towards the void in the plasma center and also towards the outer edge of the cloud.

  19. A Possible Mechanism for Overcoming the Electrostatic Barrier Against Dust Growth in Protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Akimkin, V

    2015-01-01

    The coagulation of dust particles under the conditions in protoplanetary disks is investigated. The study focuses on the repulsive electrostatic barrier against growth of charged dust grains. Taking into account the photoelectric effect leads to the appearance of a layer at intermediate heights where the dust has a close to zero charge, enabling the dust grains to grow efficiently. An increase in the coagulation rate comes about not only due to the lowering of the Coulomb barrier, but also because of the electrostatic attraction between grains of opposite charge due to the non-zero dispersion of the near-zero charge. Depending on the efficiency of mixing in the disk, the acceleration of the evolution of the dust in this layer could be important, both in the quasi-stationary stage of the disk evolution and during its dispersal.

  20. Nonlinear dust-ion-acoustic waves in a multi-ion plasma with trapped electrons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Duha; B Shikha; A A Mamun

    2011-08-01

    A dusty multi-ion plasma system consisting of non-isothermal (trapped) electrons, Maxwellian (isothermal) light positive ions, warm heavy negative ions and extremely massive charge fluctuating stationary dust have been considered. The dust-ion-acoustic solitary and shock waves associated with negative ion dynamics, Maxwellian (isothermal) positive ions, trapped electrons and charge fluctuating stationary dust have been investigated by employing the reductive perturbation method. The basic features of such dust-ion-acoustic solitary and shock waves have been identified. The implications of our findings in space and laboratory dusty multi-ion plasmas are discussed.

  1. Operational Dust Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Angela; Baldasano, Jose M.; Basart, Sara; Benincasa, Francesco; Boucher, Olivier; Brooks, Malcolm E.; Chen, Jen-Ping; Colarco, Peter R.; Gong, Sunlin; Huneeus, Nicolas; Jones, Luke; Lu, Sarah; Menut, Laurent; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Mulcahy, Jane; Nickovic, Slobodan; Garcia-Pando, Carlos P.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Sekiyama, Thomas T.; Tanaka, Taichu Y.; Terradellas, Enric; Westphal, Douglas L.; Zhang, Xiao-Ye; Zhou, Chun-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, numerical prediction of dust aerosol concentration has become prominent at several research and operational weather centres due to growing interest from diverse stakeholders, such as solar energy plant managers, health professionals, aviation and military authorities and policymakers. Dust prediction in numerical weather prediction-type models faces a number of challenges owing to the complexity of the system. At the centre of the problem is the vast range of scales required to fully account for all of the physical processes related to dust. Another limiting factor is the paucity of suitable dust observations available for model, evaluation and assimilation. This chapter discusses in detail numerical prediction of dust with examples from systems that are currently providing dust forecasts in near real-time or are part of international efforts to establish daily provision of dust forecasts based on multi-model ensembles. The various models are introduced and described along with an overview on the importance of dust prediction activities and a historical perspective. Assimilation and evaluation aspects in dust prediction are also discussed.

  2. Fast Numerical Evaluation of Time-Derivative Nonadiabatic Couplings for Mixed Quantum-Classical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Nagesh, Jayashree; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2015-11-05

    We have developed a numerical differentiation scheme that eliminates evaluation of overlap determinants in calculating the time-derivative nonadiabatic couplings (TDNACs). Evaluation of these determinants was the bottleneck in previous implementations of mixed quantum-classical methods using numerical differentiation of electronic wave functions in the Slater determinant representation. The central idea of our approach is, first, to reduce the analytic time derivatives of Slater determinants to time derivatives of molecular orbitals and then to apply a finite-difference formula. Benchmark calculations prove the efficiency of the proposed scheme showing impressive several-order-of-magnitude speedups of the TDNAC calculation step for midsize molecules.

  3. Monitoring Nonadiabatic Electron-Nuclear Dynamics in Molecules by Attosecond Streaking of Photoelectrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Bennett, Kochise; Rouxel, Jérémy R; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-07-22

    Streaking of photoelectrons has long been used for the temporal characterization of attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. When the time-resolved photoelectrons originate from a coherent superposition of electronic states, they carry additional phase information, which can be retrieved by the streaking technique. In this contribution we extend the streaking formalism to include coupled electron and nuclear dynamics in molecules as well as initial coherences. We demonstrate how streaked photoelectrons offer a novel tool for monitoring nonadiabatic dynamics as it occurs in the vicinity of conical intersections and avoided crossings. Streaking can provide high time resolution direct signatures of electronic coherences, which affect many primary photochemical and biological events.

  4. Optimal control with non-adiabatic Molecular Dynamics: application to the Coulomb explosion of Sodium clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Pueyo, Adrián Gómez; Castro, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We present an implementation of optimal control theory for the first-principles non-adiabatic Ehrenfest Molecular Dynamics model, which describes a condensed matter system by considering classical point-particle nuclei, and quantum electrons, handled in our case with time-dependent density-functional theory. The scheme is demonstrated by optimizing the Coulomb explosion of small Sodium clusters: the algorithm is set to find the optimal femtosecond laser pulses that disintegrate the clusters, for a given total pulse duration, fluence, and cut-off frequency. We describe the numerical details and difficulties of the methodology.

  5. Monitoring Nonadiabatic Electron-Nuclear Dynamics in Molecules by Attosecond Streaking of Photoelectrons

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalewski, Markus; Rouxel, Jérémy R; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-01-01

    Streaking of photoelectrons has long been used for the temporal characterization of attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. When the time-resolved photoelectrons originate from a coherent superposition of electronic states, they carry an additional phase information, which can be retrieved by the streaking technique. In this contribution we extend the streaking formalism to include coupled electron and nuclear dynamics in molecules as well as initial coherences and demonstrate how it offers a novel tool to monitor non-adiabatic dynamics as it occurs in the vicinity of conical intersections and avoided crossings. Streaking can enhance the time resolution and provide direct signatures of electronic coherences, which affect many primary photochemical and biological events.

  6. Monitoring Nonadiabatic Electron-Nuclear Dynamics in Molecules by Attosecond Streaking of Photoelectrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski, Markus; Bennett, Kochise; Rouxel, Jérémy R.; Mukamel, Shaul

    2016-07-01

    Streaking of photoelectrons has long been used for the temporal characterization of attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. When the time-resolved photoelectrons originate from a coherent superposition of electronic states, they carry additional phase information, which can be retrieved by the streaking technique. In this contribution we extend the streaking formalism to include coupled electron and nuclear dynamics in molecules as well as initial coherences. We demonstrate how streaked photoelectrons offer a novel tool for monitoring nonadiabatic dynamics as it occurs in the vicinity of conical intersections and avoided crossings. Streaking can provide high time resolution direct signatures of electronic coherences, which affect many primary photochemical and biological events.

  7. Non-adiabatic description of proton emission from the odd-odd nucleus 130Eu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patial Monika

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the non-adiabatic quasiparticle approach for calculating the rotational spectra and decay width of odd-odd proton emitters. The Coriolis effects are incorporated in both the parent and daughter wave functions. Results for the two probable ground states (1+ and 2+ of the proton emitter 130Eu are discussed. With our calculations, we confirm the proton emitting state to be the Iπ = 1+ state, irrespective of the strength of the Coriolis interaction. This study provides us with an opportunity to look into the details of wave functions of deformed odd-odd nuclei to which the proton emission halflives are quite sensitive.

  8. Quantum grow--a quantum dynamics sampling approach for growing potential energy surfaces and nonadiabatic couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsi, Oded; Collins, Michael A; Peskin, Uri

    2010-03-28

    A quantum sampling algorithm for the interpolation of diabatic potential energy matrices by the Grow method is introduced. The new procedure benefits from penetration of the wave packet into classically forbidden regions, and the accurate quantum mechanical description of nonadiabatic transitions. The increased complexity associated with running quantum dynamics is reduced by using approximate low order expansions of the nuclear wave function within a Multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree scheme during the Grow process. The sampling algorithm is formulated and applied for three representative test cases, demonstrating the recovery of analytic potentials by the interpolated ones, and the convergence of a dynamic observable.

  9. Numerical Model of Capillary Tubes: Enhanced Performance and Study of Non-Adiabatic Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Ablanque, Nicolas; Oliet, Carles; Rigola, Joaquim; Pérez-Segarra, Carlos David

    2014-01-01

    In this work a numerical model to simulate the thermal and fluid-dynamic phenomena inside non-adiabatic capillary tubes is presented. The model presented herein is an improved version of the distributed model detailed in [1]. It is based on a pseudo-homogeneous two-phase flow model where the governing equations (continuity, momentum, energy and entropy) are integrated over the discretized fluid domain and solved by means of a step-by-step scheme. The main novelty of the improved algorithm is ...

  10. Multichannel Scattering Problem with Non-trivial Asymptotic Non-adiabatic Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, S L; Elander, N; Belyaev, A K

    2016-01-01

    The multichannel scattering problem in an adiabatic representation is considered. The non-adiabatic coupling matrix is assumed to have a non-trivial constant asymptotic behavior at large internuclear separations. The asymptotic solutions at large internuclear distances are constructed. It is shown that these solutions up to the first order of perturbation theory are identical to the asymptotic solutions of the re-projection approach, which was proposed earlier as a remedy for the electron translation problem in the context of the Born-Oppenheimer treatment.

  11. Confinement and structure of electrostatically coupled dust clouds in a direct current plasma-sheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunomura, S.; Ohno, N.; Takamura, S.

    1998-10-01

    Mechanisms for the confinement and the internal structure of an electrostatically coupled dust cloud formed in a dc glow discharge have been investigated from a comparative viewpoint between experimental observations and a simple model. Two kinds of dust clouds with different internal structures are clearly observed, depending on the dispersion of the size distribution of dust particles. The dust cloud can be trapped only in the plasma-sheath boundary area, corresponding to the potential minimum region determined by gravitational and electrostatic forces in the cathode sheath. No dust particles were found deep inside of the sheath, which is consistent with the analysis because the dust particles may be charged positively due to an extreme reduction of the electron density. The internal structure of the electrostatically coupled dust cloud was found to be arranged so that the total potential energy, including the repulsive Coulomb interaction among negative dust particles, may become minimal.

  12. Theoretical study of charge exchange dynamics in He$^+$ + NO collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bene, E

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the charge transfer mechanism in the collisions of helium ions on nitric oxide using a molecular description framework with consideration of the orientation of the projectile toward the target. The anisotropy of the collision process has been analysed in detail in connection with the non-adiabatic interactions around avoided crossings. Potential energy curves, radial and rotational coupling matrix elements have been determined by means of ab initio quantum chemical methods. The collision dynamics is performed in the [1.-25.] keV collision energy range using a semiclassical approach, and the total electron transfer cross sections are analysed with regard to available experimental data.

  13. Particulate Matter Emissions Factors for Dust from Unique Military Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    good assumption for desert dust in the absence of iron oxides, especially hematite (Fe2O3)). In the SI-1400 method, particle size distribution is...shear stress imparted to the surface. The PI-SWERL is being used increasingly as a primary tool to evaluate windblown dust emissions from natural and...surface, so the amount of charge should be the primary control on emission strength for a given surface. 26 Table 3. Minimum, maximum, mean and

  14. Alignment of atmospheric mineral dust due to electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanowski, Z.; Bailey, J.; Lucas, P. W.; Hough, J. H.; Hirst, E.

    2007-12-01

    Optical polarimetry observations on La Palma, Canary Islands, during a Saharan dust episode show dichroic extinction indicating the presence of vertically aligned particles in the atmosphere. Modelling of the extinction together with particle orientation indicates that the alignment could have been due to an electric field of the order of 2 kV/m. Two alternative mechanisms for the origin of the field are examined: the effect of reduced atmospheric conductivity and charging of the dust layer, the latter effect being a more likely candidate. It is concluded that partial alignment may be a common feature of Saharan dust layers. The modelling indicates that the alignment can significantly alter dust optical depth. This "Venetian blind effect" may have decreased optical thickness in the vertical direction by as much as 10% for the case reported here. It is also possible that the alignment and the electric field modify dust transport.

  15. Carbon dust particles in a beam-plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, O. A.; Vizgalov, V.; Shalpegin, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on dynamics of micro-sized carbon dust grains in beam-plasma discharge (BPD) plasmas. It was demonstrated that injected dust particles can be captured and transported along the discharge. Longitudinal average velocity of the particles in the central area of the plasma column was 17 m/sec, and 2 m/sec in the periphery. Dust injection caused a decrease of emission intensity of metastable nitrogen molecular ion. This effect is suggested for a spectroscopy method for particles’ potential measurements. Five-micron radius carbon dust grains obtained potential above 500 V in the experiments on PR-2 installation, proving the feasibility of BPDs for the charging of fine dust particles up to high potential values, unattainable in similar plasma conditions.

  16. Stone dusting process advance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Ryan; David Humphreys [Mining Attachments (Qld.) Pty Ltd. (Australia)

    2009-01-15

    The coal mining industry has, for many years, used dry stone dust or calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) in the prevention of the propagation of coal dust explosions throughout their underground mines in Australia. In the last decade wet stone dusting has been introduced. This is where stone dust and water are mixed together to form a paste like slurry. This mixture is pumped and sprayed on to the underground roadway surfaces. This method solved the contamination of the intake airways but brought with it a new problem known as 'caking'. Caking is the hardened layer that is formed as the stone dust slurry dries. It was proven that this hardened layer compromises the dispersal characteristics of the stone dust and therefore its ability to suppress a coal dust explosion. This project set out to prove a specially formulated, non toxic slurry additive and process that could overcome the caking effect. The slurry additive process combines dry stone dust with water to form a slurry. The slurry is then treated with the additive and compressed air to create a highly vesicular foam like stone dusted surface. The initial testing on a range of additives and the effectiveness in minimising the caking effect of wet dusting were performed at Applied Chemical's research laboratory in Melbourne, Victoria and independently tested at the SGS laboratory in Paget, Queensland. The results from these tests provided the platform to conduct full scale spraying trials at the Queensland Mines Rescue Station and Caledon Coal's Cook Colliery, Blackwater. The project moved into the final stage of completion with the collection of data. The intent was to compare the slurry additive process to dry stone dusting in full-scale methane explosions at the CSIR Kloppersbos explosion facility in Kloppersbos, South Africa.

  17. Interstellar Dust in the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Krueger, Harald; Altobelli, Nicolas; Gruen, Eberhard

    2007-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft has been orbiting the Sun on a highly inclined ellipse almost perpendicular to the ecliptic plane (inclination 79 deg, perihelion distance 1.3 AU, aphelion distance 5.4 AU) since it encountered Jupiter in 1992. The in-situ dust detector on board continuously measured interstellar dust grains with masses up to 10^-13 kg, penetrating deep into the solar system. The flow direction is close to the mean apex of the Sun's motion through the solar system and the grains act as tracers of the physical conditions in the local interstellar cloud (LIC). While Ulysses monitored the interstellar dust stream at high ecliptic latitudes between 3 and 5 AU, interstellar impactors were also measured with the in-situ dust detectors on board Cassini, Galileo and Helios, covering a heliocentric distance range between 0.3 and 3 AU in the ecliptic plane. The interstellar dust stream in the inner solar system is altered by the solar radiation pressure force, gravitational focussing and interaction of charged gr...

  18. Discrimination of 1,1-difluoroethylene nuclear spin isomers in the presence of non-adiabatic coupling terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Sandra; Oppel, Markus; González, Leticia

    2017-09-01

    The possibility to discriminate the ortho and para nuclear spin isomers of 1,1-difluoroethylene via their excited state dynamics is studied using wavepacket propagations including non-adiabatic couplings. The two nuclear spin isomers are connected via a torsional motion around the double bond. Photo-excitation induces a different interference pattern, with different torsional periods - a fact that can be exploited to distinguish, and eventually separate the nuclear spin isomers using femtosecond pump-probe experiments. The inclusion of non-adiabatic couplings results in a slowdown of the wavepacket, increasing the torsional periods of the nuclear spin isomers.

  19. Dust Particle Dynamics in The Presence of Highly Magnetized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Brian; Konopka, Uwe; Thomas, Edward; Merlino, Robert; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2016-10-01

    Complex plasmas are four component plasmas that contain, in addition to the usual electrons, ions, and neutral atoms, macroscopic electrically charged (nanometer to micrometer) sized ``dust'' particles. These macroscopic particles typically obtain a net negative charge due to the higher mobility of electrons compared to that of ions. Because the electrons, ions, and dust particles are charged, their dynamics may be significantly modified by the presence of electric and magnetic fields. Possible consequences of this modification may be the charging rate and the equilibrium charge. For example, in the presence of a strong horizontal magnetic field (B >1 Tesla), it may be possible to observe dust particle gx B deflection and, from that deflection, determine the dust grain charge. In this poster, we present recent data from performing multiple particle dropping experiments to characterize the g x B deflection in the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX). This work is supported by funding from the U. S. Department of Energy Grant Number DE - SC0010485 and the NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory, JPL-1543114.

  20. Dust in magnetised plasmas - Basic theory and some applications. [to planetary rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrop, T. G.; Morfill, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the theory of charged test particle motion in magnetic fields is reviewed. This theory is then extended to charged dust particles, for which gravity and charge fluctuations play an important role. It is shown that systematic drifts perpendicular to the magnetic field and stochastic transport effects may then have to be considered none of which occur in the case of atomic particles (with the exception of charge exchange reactions). Some applications of charged dust particle transport theory to planetary rings are then briefly discussed.

  1. Escape mechanisms of dust in Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, A.

    The injection of material into the jovian magnetosphere through Io's volcanic activity makes possible the formation of structures such as the plasma torus and the dust ballerina skirt. Io's high temperature volcanism produces spectacular plumes, but even the tallest plumes, as those of Pelen Patera, will not produce enough energy to defeat the gravitational attraction of Io. The fact is that dust escapes from Io, which implies that a second mechanism is acting on the grains. Grains brought to the top of the highest plumes by the volcanic forces are still under Io's gravitational pull, but need only a minimum charge (~10-1 4 C) so that the Lorentz force due to the Jovian magnetic field equilibrates this attraction. In the volcanic vents, the escape velocity of the ejected material and its own density produces enough collisions to create charges. On top of the highest plumes (~500km) charged grains are exposed to the plasma torus that co-rotates rigidly with Jupiter and, due to the relative velocity among Io and the torus, the grains will be dragged away from Io. As it is well known, these dust grains will also be dragged away from Jupiter.

  2. Prototype detector development for measurement of high altitude Martian dust using a future orbiter platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Patel, Darshil; Chokhawala, Vimmi; Bogavelly, Anvesh

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils mostly occur during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer on Mars and play a key role in the background dust opacity. Due to continuous bombardment of micrometeorites, secondary ejecta come out from the Moons of the Mars and can easily escape. This phenomenon can contribute dust around the Moons and therefore, also around the Mars. Similar to the Moons of the Earth, the surfaces of the Martian Moons get charged and cause the dust levitation to occur, adding to the possible dust source. Also, interplanetary dust particles may be able to reach the Mars and contribute further. It is hypothesized that the high altitude Martian dust could be in the form of a ring or tori around the Mars. However, no such rings have been detected to the present day. Typically, width and height of the dust torus is ~5 Mars radii wide (~16950 km) in both the planes as reported in the literature. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, a langmuir probe cannot explain the source of such dust particles. It is a puzzling question to the space scientist how dust has reached to such high altitudes. A dedicated dust instrument on future Mars orbiter may be helpful to address such issues. To study origin, abundance, distribution and seasonal variation of Martian dust, a Mars Orbit Dust Experiment (MODEX) is proposed. In order to measure the Martian dust from a future orbiter, design of a prototype of an impact ionization dust detector has been initiated at PRL. This paper presents developmental aspects of the prototype dust detector and initial results. The further work is underway.

  3. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  4. Dust escape from Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandes, Alberto

    2004-08-01

    The Dust ballerina skirt is a set of well defined streams composed of nanometric sized dust particles that escape from the Jovian system and may be accelerated up to >=200 km/s. The source of this dust is Jupiter's moon Io, the most volcanically active body in the Solar system. The escape of dust grains from Jupiter requires first the escape of these grains from Io. This work is basically devoted to explain this escape given that the driving of dust particles to great heights and later injection into the ionosphere of Io may give the particles an equilibrium potential that allow the magnetic field to accelerate them away from Io. The grain sizes obtained through this study match very well to the values required for the particles to escape from the Jovian system.

  5. Galactic dust properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies have shown evidence for variations in the dust emissivity law with temperature and wavelength. A recent dust emission model, called TLS model (for two-level systems), based on the description of the disordered internal structure of the amorphous dust grains has been developped to interpret observations in the far-infrared/submillimeter (FIR/submm) domain. A recent work focusing on the comparison between data of the diffuse interstellar medium seen by FIRAS-WMAP, as well as Archeops compact sources, with the TLS model allowed us to constrain the model parameters characterizing the general Galactic dust properties. Using the newly available Herschel/Hi-GAL data of the inner Galactic plane, we report a 500 μm emissivity excess in the peripheral parts of the Galactic plane, that can reach up to 20% of the emissivity. Results of the TLS modeling indicate significant changes in the dust properties from the central to peripheral parts of the Galactic plane.

  6. A non-adiabatic approach to entanglement distribution over long distances

    CERN Document Server

    Razavi, M; Razavi, Mohsen; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2006-01-01

    Entanglement distribution between trapped-atom quantum memories, viz. single atoms in optical cavities, is addressed. In most scenarios, the rate of entanglement distribution depends on the efficiency with which the state of traveling single photons can be transferred to trapped atoms. This loading efficiency is analytically studied for two-level, $V$-level, $\\Lambda$-level, and double-$\\Lambda$-level atomic configurations by means of a system-reservoir approach. An off-resonant non-adiabatic approach to loading $\\Lambda$-level trapped-atom memories is proposed, and the ensuing trade-offs between the atom-light coupling rate and input photon bandwidth for achieving a high loading probability are identified. The non-adiabatic approach allows a broad class of optical sources to be used, and in some cases it provides a higher system throughput than what can be achieved by adiabatic loading mechanisms. The analysis is extended to the case of two double-$\\Lambda$ trapped-atom memories illuminated by a polarization...

  7. (Non-adiabatic) string creation on nice slices in Schwarzschild black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Puhm, Andrea; Ugajin, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Nice slices have played a pivotal role in the discussion of the black hole information paradox as they avoid regions of strong spacetime curvature and yet smoothly cut through the infalling matter and the outgoing Hawking radiation, thus, justifying the use of low energy field theory. To avoid information loss it has been argued recently, however, that local effective field theory has to break down at the horizon. To assess the extent of this breakdown in a UV complete framework we study string-theoretic effects on nice slices in Schwarzschild black holes. Our purpose is two-fold. First, we use nice slices to address various open questions and caveats of arXiv:1402.1486 where it was argued that boost-enhanced non-adiabatic string-theoretic effects at the horizon could provide a dynamical mechanism for the firewall. Second, we identify two non-adiabatic effects on nice slices in Schwarzschild black holes: pair production of open strings near the horizon enhanced by the presence of the infinite tower of highly ...

  8. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation studied by surface hopping classical trajectory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Domcke, Wolfgang; Lasser, Caroline; Trigila, Giulio

    2015-03-01

    The Landau-Zener (LZ) type classical-trajectory surface-hopping algorithm is applied to the nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation after photoionization of the ground-state neutral molecule to the excited states of the cation. The algorithm employs a recently proposed formula for nonadiabatic LZ transition probabilities derived from the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The evolution of the populations of the ground state and the two lowest excited adiabatic states is calculated up to 200 fs. The results agree well with quantum simulations available for the first 100 fs based on the same potential energy surfaces. Three different time scales are detected for the nuclear dynamics: Ultrafast Jahn-Teller dynamics between the excited states on a 5 fs time scale; fast transitions between the excited state and the ground state within a time scale of 20 fs; and relatively slow partial conversion of a first-excited-state population to the ground state within a time scale of 100 fs. Beyond 100 fs, the adiabatic electronic populations are nearly constant due to a dynamic equilibrium between the three states. The ultrafast nonradiative decay of the excited-state populations provides a qualitative explanation of the experimental evidence that the ammonia cation is nonfluorescent.

  9. Use of non-adiabatic geometric phase for quantum computing by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ranabir; Kumar, S K Karthick; Kumar, Anil

    2005-12-01

    Geometric phases have stimulated researchers for its potential applications in many areas of science. One of them is fault-tolerant quantum computation. A preliminary requisite of quantum computation is the implementation of controlled dynamics of qubits. In controlled dynamics, one qubit undergoes coherent evolution and acquires appropriate phase, depending on the state of other qubits. If the evolution is geometric, then the phase acquired depend only on the geometry of the path executed, and is robust against certain types of error. This phenomenon leads to an inherently fault-tolerant quantum computation. Here we suggest a technique of using non-adiabatic geometric phase for quantum computation, using selective excitation. In a two-qubit system, we selectively evolve a suitable subsystem where the control qubit is in state |1, through a closed circuit. By this evolution, the target qubit gains a phase controlled by the state of the control qubit. Using the non-adiabatic geometric phase we demonstrate implementation of Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm and Grover's search algorithm in a two-qubit system.

  10. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation studied by surface hopping classical trajectory calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Andrey K; Lasser, Caroline; Trigila, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    The Landau--Zener (LZ) type classical-trajectory surface-hopping algorithm is applied to the nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation after photoionization of the ground-state neutral molecule to the excited states of the cation. The algorithm employs the recently proposed formula for nonadiabatic LZ transition probabilities derived from the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The evolution of the populations of the ground state and the two lowest excited adiabatic states is calculated up to 200 fs. The results agree well with quantum simulations available for the first 100 fs based on the same potential energy surfaces. Four different time scales are detected for the nuclear dynamics: Ultrafast Jahn--Teller dynamics between the excited states on a 5 fs time scale; fast transitions between the excited state and the ground state within a time scale of 20 fs; relatively slow partial conversion of a first-excited-state population to the ground state within a time scale of 100 fs; and nearly constant ...

  11. Pulsating low-mass white dwarfs in the frame of new evolutionary sequences: II. Nonadiabatic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Córsico, Alejandro H

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass ($M_{\\star}/M_{\\sun} \\lesssim 0.45$) white dwarfs, including the so called extremely low-mass white dwarfs (ELM, $M_{\\star}/M_{\\sun } \\lesssim 0.18-0.20$), are being currently discovered in the field of our Galaxy through dedicated photometric surveys. The fact that some of them pulsate opens the unparalleled chance for sounding their interiors. We present a detailed nonadiabatic pulsational analysis of such stars based on a new set of He-core white-dwarf models with masses ranging from $0.1554$ to $0.4352 M_{\\sun}$ derived by computing the non-conservative evolution of a binary system consisting of an initially $1 M_{\\sun}$ ZAMS star and a $1.4 M_{\\sun}$ neutron star. We have computed nonadiabatic radial modes and nonradial g and p modes to assess the dependence of the pulsational stability properties of these objects with stellar parameters such as the stellar mass, the effective temperature, and the convective efficiency. We found that a dense spectrum of unstable radial modes and nonradial g and ...

  12. Coefficient of performance for a low-dissipation Carnot-like refrigerator with nonadiabatic dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Wu, Feifei; Ma, Yongli; He, Jizhou; Wang, Jianhui; Hernández, A Calvo; Roco, J M M

    2013-12-01

    We study the coefficient of performance (COP) and its bounds for a Carnot-like refrigerator working between two heat reservoirs at constant temperatures T(h) and T(c), under two optimization criteria χ and Ω. In view of the fact that an "adiabatic" process usually takes finite time and is nonisentropic, the nonadiabatic dissipation and the finite time required for the adiabatic processes are taken into account by assuming low dissipation. For given optimization criteria, we find that the lower and upper bounds of the COP are the same as the corresponding ones obtained from the previous idealized models where any adiabatic process is undergone instantaneously with constant entropy. To describe some particular models with very fast adiabatic transitions, we also consider the influence of the nonadiabatic dissipation on the bounds of the COP, under the assumption that the irreversible entropy production in the adiabatic process is constant and independent of time. Our theoretical predictions match the observed COPs of real refrigerators more closely than the ones derived in the previous models, providing a strong argument in favor of our approach.

  13. Flapping current sheet motions in magnetotail excited by non-adiabatic ions: case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, X., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The current sheet is a crucial region of the magnetotail, where energy reserve and release take place. The origin of the up-down motions of the current sheet, referred to as flapping motions, is among the most fundamental issues of magnetotail dynamics. Observational evidences suggest that the flapping motion is a kind of internal excited kink-like waves, but its particular propagating features such as the low phase speeds and the propagating direction from the tail center toward flanks do not match any local generation mechanisms previously established so far. Here we report observations of the current sheet flapping motions induced by non-adiabatic ions in the magnetic field configurations with a finite guiding component, whose population present periodic hemispherical asymmetries. Three type of current sheet flapping event in this paper will be discussed. This current sheet flapping phenomenon implies that the excitation mechanism of the current sheet flapping motions is a self-circulation process between the non-adiabatic ion population and the current sheet equilibrium itself.

  14. The current sheet tiled and non-adiabatic ions effect on the flapping motion in magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, XinHua

    2016-04-01

    The current sheet is a crucial region of the magnetotail, where energy reserve and release take place. The origin of the up-down motions of the current sheet, referred to as flapping motions, is among the most fundamental issues of magnetotail dynamics. Observational evidences suggest that the flapping motion is a kind of internal excited kink-like waves, but its particular propagating features such as the low phase speeds and the propagating direction from the tail center toward flanks do not match any local generation mechanisms previously established so far. Here we report observations of the current sheet flapping motions induced by non-adiabatic ions in the magnetic field configurations with a finite guiding component, whose population present periodic hemispherical asymmetries. These flapping motion current sheet cases often observed tiled. The current sheet flapping phenomenon implies that the excitation mechanism of the current sheet flapping motions is a self-circulation process between the non-adiabatic ion population and the current sheet equilibrium itself.

  15. Unraveling nonadiabatic ionization and Coulomb potential effect in strong-field photoelectron holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaohong; Lin, Cheng; Sheng, Zhihao; Liu, Peng; Chen, Zhangjin; Yang, Weifeng; Hu, Shilin; Lin, C. D.; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Strong field photoelectron holography has been proposed as a means for interrogating the spatial and temporal information of electrons and ions in a dynamic system. After ionization, part of the electron wave packet may directly go to the detector (the reference wave), while another part may be driven back and scatters off the ion(the signal wave). The interference hologram of the two waves may be used to extract target information embedded in the collision process. Unlike conventional optical holography, however, propagation of the electron wave packet is affected by the Coulomb potential as well as by the laser field. In addition, electrons are emitted over the whole laser pulse duration, thus multiple interferences may occur. In this work, we used a generalized quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo method to investigate the effect of Coulomb potential and the nonadiabatic subcycle ionization on the photoelectron hologram. We showed that photoelectron hologram can be well described only when the effect of nonadiabatic ionization is accounted for, and Coulomb potential can be neglected only in the tunnel ionization regime. Our results help paving the way for establishing photoelectron holography for probing spatial and dynamic properties of atoms and molecules.

  16. Generalization of classical mechanics for nuclear motions on nonadiabatically coupled potential energy surfaces in chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2007-10-18

    Classical trajectory study of nuclear motion on the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces is now one of the standard methods of chemical dynamics. In particular, this approach is inevitable in the studies of large molecular systems. However, as soon as more than a single potential energy surface is involved due to nonadiabatic coupling, such a naive application of classical mechanics loses its theoretical foundation. This is a classic and fundamental issue in the foundation of chemistry. To cope with this problem, we propose a generalization of classical mechanics that provides a path even in cases where multiple potential energy surfaces are involved in a single event and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation breaks down. This generalization is made by diagonalization of the matrix representation of nuclear forces in nonadiabatic dynamics, which is derived from a mixed quantum-classical representation of the electron-nucleus entangled Hamiltonian [Takatsuka, K. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 064111]. A manifestation of quantum fluctuation on a classical subsystem that directly contacts with a quantum subsystem is discussed. We also show that the Hamiltonian thus represented gives a theoretical foundation to examine the validity of the so-called semiclassical Ehrenfest theory (or mean-field theory) for electron quantum wavepacket dynamics, and indeed, it is pointed out that the electronic Hamiltonian to be used in this theory should be slightly modified.

  17. Charge transfer in the cold Yb$^+$ + Rb collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Sayfutyarova, Elvira R; Yakovleva, Svetlana A; Belyaev, Andrey K

    2013-01-01

    Charge-transfer cold Yb$^+$ + Rb collision dynamics is investigated theoretically using high-level {\\it ab initio} potential energy curves, dipole moment functions and nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements. Within the scalar-relativistic approximation, the radiative transitions from the entrance $A^1\\Sigma^+$ to the ground $X^1\\Sigma^+$ state are found to be the only efficient charge-transfer pathway. The spin-orbit coupling does not open other efficient pathways, but alters the potential energy curves and the transition dipole moment for the $A-X$ pair of states. The radiative, as well as the nonradiative, charge-transfer cross sections calculated within the $10^{-3}-10$ cm$^{-1}$ collision energy range exhibit all features of the Langevin ion-atom collision regime, including a rich structure associated with centrifugal barrier tunneling (orbiting) resonances. Theoretical rate coefficients for two Yb isotopes agree well with those measured by immersing Yb$^+$ ion in an ultracold Rb ensemble in a hybrid trap....

  18. Nonadiabatic Renner-Teller quantum dynamics of OH(X(2)Π) + H(+) reactive collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamallo, Pablo; Akpinar, Sinan; Defazio, Paolo; Petrongolo, Carlo

    2017-02-08

    Following previous studies on the O((3)P) + H2(+)(X(2)Σg(+)) collisions, we present the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics of the reactions OH(X(2)Π) + H'(+) → OH'(X(2)Π) + H(+), exchange (e), → OH(+)(X(3)Σ(-)) + H'((2)S), quenching (q), and → OH'(+) (X(3)Σ(-)) + H((2)S), exchange-quenching (eq). The reactants and products correlate via the ground X[combining tilde](2)A'' and first excited Ã(2)A' electronic states of OH2(+), which are the degenerate components of linear (2)Π species. Therefore, they are strongly perturbed by nonadiabatic Renner-Teller (RT) effects, opening the (q) and (eq) channels that are closed in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Using accurate potential energy surfaces (PESs) and RT matrix elements, initial-state-resolved reaction probabilities, real-time dynamics, cross sections, and rate constants of the product channels are obtained through the time-dependent real wavepacket (WP) method and full coupled-channel calculations. Owing to the nonadiabatic couplings, the WP jumps from the excited Ã(2)A' surface to the X[combining tilde](2)A'' ground PES, avoiding any barrier, opening the quenching channels, and giving many collision complexes into the deep minima of both PESs, as it is clearly shown by the oscillations of the reaction probabilities and by the time-dependent WP dynamics. All the results show that the nonadiabatic-RT channels (q) and (eq) are highly reactive, much more than the adiabatic one (e), pointing out large RT effects. The reactivity of the quenching channels is similar, accounting for 97% of the overall reactivity. In fact, the maximum values of the (q) and (eq) cross sections σq and σeq are equal to 31.6 Å(2), whereas the maximum σe value equals 1.34 Å(2), and the maximum values of the rate constants kq, keq, and ke are 2.07 × 10(-10), 2.45 × 10(-10), and 0.23 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1). Some calculations show that the centrifugal-sudden and the truncated coupled-channel approximations cannot be employed for

  19. Collision and recombination driven instabilities in variable charged dusty plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bal; M Bose

    2013-04-01

    The dust-acoustic instability driven by recombination of electrons and ions on the surface of charged and variably-charged dust grains as well as by collisions in dusty plasmas with significant pressure of background neutrals have been theoretically investigated. The recombination driven instability is shown to be dominant in the long wavelength regime even in the presence of dust-neutral and ion-neutral collisions, while in the shorter wavelength regime, the dust-neutral collision is found to play a major role. In an earlier research work, the dust-neutral collision was neglected in comparison to the effect due to the recombination for estimating the dust-acoustic instability; later the other report shows that the recombination effect is negligible in the presence of dust-neutral collisions. In line of this present situation our investigation revealed that the recombination is more important than dust-neutral collisions in laboratory plasma and fusion plasma, while the dust-neutral collision frequency is dominant in the interstellar plasmas. The effects of ion and dust densities and ion streaming on the recombination and collision driven mode in parameter regimes relevant for many experimental studies on dusty plasmas have also been calculated.

  20. Charge density fluctuation of low frequency in a dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳; 吕保维; O.Havnes

    1997-01-01

    The charge density fluctuation of low frequency in a dusty plasma, which is derived from the longitudinal dielectric permittivity of the dusty plasma, has been studied by kinetic theory. The results show that the P value, which describes the relative charge density on the dust in the plasma, and the charging frequency of a dust particle Ωc, which describes the ratio of charge changing of the dust particles, determine the character of the charge density fluctuation of low frequency. For a dusty plasma of P<<1, when the charging frequency Ωc is much smaller than the dusty plasma frequency wd, there is a strong charge density fluctuation which is of character of dust acoustic eigen wave. For a dusty plasma of P>>1, when the frequency Ωc, is much larger than wd there are weaker fluctuations with a wide spectrum. The results have been applied to the ionosphere and the range of radius and density of dust particles is found, where a strong charge density fluctuation of low frequency should exist.

  1. SPARCLE: Electrostatic Dust Control Tool Proof of Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Minetto, F.; Marshall, J.; Nuth, J.; Calle, C.

    2010-01-01

    Successful exploration of most planetary surfaces, with their impact-generated dusty regoliths, will depend on the capabilities to keep surfaces free of the performance-compromising dust. Once in contact with surfaces, whether set in motion by natural or mechanical means, regolith fines, or dust, behave like abrasive Velcro, coating surfaces, clogging mechanisms, making movement progressively more difticult, and being almost impossible to remove by mechanical mcans (brushing). The successful dust removal strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between Van der Waals and Coulombic forces. Here, proof of concept for an electrostatically-based concept for dust control tool is described and demonstrated. A low power focused electron beam is used in the presence of a small electrical field to increase the negative charge to mass ratio of a dusty surface until dust repulsion and attraction to a lower potential surface, acting as a dust collector, occurred. Our goal is a compact device of less than 5 kg mass and using less than 5 watts of power to be operational in less than 5 years with heritage from ionic sweepers for active spacecraft potential control (e.g ., on POLAR). Rovers could be fitted with devices that could hamess the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  2. SPARCLE: Electrostatic Dust Control Tool Proof of Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Minetto, F.; Marshall, J.; Nuth, J.; Calle, C.

    2010-01-01

    Successful exploration of most planetary surfaces, with their impact-generated dusty regoliths, will depend on the capabilities to keep surfaces free of the performance-compromising dust. Once in contact with surfaces, whether set in motion by natural or mechanical means, regolith fines, or dust, behave like abrasive Velcro, coating surfaces, clogging mechanisms, making movement progressively more difticult, and being almost impossible to remove by mechanical mcans (brushing). The successful dust removal strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between Van der Waals and Coulombic forces. Here, proof of concept for an electrostatically-based concept for dust control tool is described and demonstrated. A low power focused electron beam is used in the presence of a small electrical field to increase the negative charge to mass ratio of a dusty surface until dust repulsion and attraction to a lower potential surface, acting as a dust collector, occurred. Our goal is a compact device of less than 5 kg mass and using less than 5 watts of power to be operational in less than 5 years with heritage from ionic sweepers for active spacecraft potential control (e.g ., on POLAR). Rovers could be fitted with devices that could hamess the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  3. Hypervelocity Dust Impacts in Space and the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, Mihaly; Colorado CenterLunar Dust; Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) Team

    2013-10-01

    Interplanetary dust particles continually bombard all objects in the solar system, leading to the excavation of material from the target surfaces, the production of secondary ejecta particles, plasma, neutral gas, and electromagnetic radiation. These processes are of interest to basic plasma science, planetary and space physics, and engineering to protect humans and instruments against impact damages. The Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Studies (CCLDAS) has recently completed a 3 MV dust accelerator, and this talk will summarize our initial science results. The 3 MV Pelletron contains a dust source, feeding positively charged micron and sub-micron sized particles into the accelerator. We will present the technical details of the facility and its capabilities, as well as the results of our initial experiments for damage assessment of optical devices, and penetration studies of thin films. We will also report on the completion of our dust impact detector, the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX), is expected to be flying onboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) mission by the time of this presentation. LDEX was tested, and calibrated at our dust accelerator. We will close by offering the opportunity to use this facility by the planetary, space and plasma physics communities.

  4. Broken space-time symmetries and mechanisms of rectification of ac fields by nonlinear (non)adiabatic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denisov, S.; Flach, S.; Ovchinnikov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    We consider low-dimensional dynamical systems exposed to a heat bath and to additional ac fields. The presence of these ac fields may lead to a breaking of certain spatial or temporal symmetries, which in turn cause nonzero averages of relevant observables. Nonlinear (non)adiabatic response is em...

  5. Mesospheric dust and its secondary effects as observed by the ESPRIT payload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Havnes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The dust detector on the ESPRIT rocket detected two extended dust/aerosol layers during the launch on 1 July 2006. The lower layer at height ~81.5–83 km coincided with a strong NLC and PMSE layer. The maximum dust charge density was ~−3.5×109 e m−3 and the dust layer was characterized by a few strong dust layers where the dust charge density at the upper edges changed by factors 2–3 over a distance of ≲10 m, while the same change at their lower edges were much more gradual. The upper edge of this layer is also sharp, with a change in the probe current from zero to IDC=−10−11 A over ~10 m, while the same change at the low edge occurs over ~500 m. The second dust layer at ~85–92 km was in the height range of a comparatively weak PMSE layer and the maximum dust charge density was ~−108 e m−3. This demonstrates that PMSE can be formed even if the ratio of the dust charge density to the electron density P=NdZd /n_e≲0.01.

    In spite of the dust detector being constructed to reduce possible secondary charging effects from dust impacts, it was found that they were clearly present during the passage through both layers. The measured secondary charging effects confirm recent results that dust in the NLC and PMSE layers can be very effective in producing secondary charges with up to ~50 to 100 electron charges being rubbed off by one impacting large dust particle, if the impact angle is θi≳20–35°. This again lends support to the suggested model for NLC and PMSE dust particles (Havnes and Næsheim, 2007 as a loosely bound water-ice clump interspersed with a considerable number of sub-nanometer-sized meteoric smoke particles, possibly also contaminated with meteoric atomic species.

  6. Mesospheric dust and its secondary effects as observed by the ESPRIT payload

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havnes, O. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Tromsoe, Tromsoe (Norway); Surdal, L.H. [Narvik University College, Norvik, and Andoeya Rocket Range, Andenes (Norway); Philbrick, C.R. [Pennsylvania State University, Electrical Engineering Department (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The dust detector on the ESPRIT rocket detected two extended dust/aerosol layers during the launch on 1 July 2006. The lower layer at height {proportional_to}81.5-83 km coincided with a strong NLC and PMSE layer. The maximum dust charge density was {proportional_to}-3.5 x 10{sup 9} e m{sup -3} and the dust layer was characterized by a few strong dust layers where the dust charge density at the upper edges changed by factors 2-3 over a distance of dust layer at {proportional_to}85-92 km was in the height range of a comparatively weak PMSE layer and the maximum dust charge density was {proportional_to}-10{sup 8} e m{sup -3}. This demonstrates that PMSE can be formed even if the ratio of the dust charge density to the electron density P=N{sub d}Z{sub d}/n{sub e}dust detector being constructed to reduce possible secondary charging effects from dust impacts, it was found that they were clearly present during the passage through both layers. The measured secondary charging effects confirm recent results that dust in the NLC and PMSE layers can be very effective in producing secondary charges with up to {proportional_to}50 to 100 electron charges being rubbed off by one impacting large dust particle, if the impact angle is {theta}{sub i}>or similar 20-35 . This again lends support to the suggested model for NLC and PMSE dust particles (Havnes and Naesheim, 2007) as a loosely bound water-ice clump interspersed with a considerable number of sub-nanometer-sized meteoric smoke particles, possibly also contaminated with meteoric atomic species.

  7. Planar dust-acoustic waves in electron–positron–ion–dust plasmas with dust-size distribution under higher-order transverse perturbations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hong-Yan Wang; Kai-Biao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of small but finite nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves are investigated in a planar unmagnetized dusty plasma, which consists of electrons, positrons, ions and negatively charged dust particles with different sizes and masses. A Kadomtsev–Petviashvili (KP) equation is obtained by using reductive perturbation method. The effect of positron density and positron–electron temperature ratio on dust-acoustic solitary structures are studied. Numerical results show that the increase in positron number density increases the amplitude of hump-like solitons but decreases the dip-like solitary waves. Furthermore, increase in the positron–electron temperature ratio results in the decrease of the amplitude of dip-like solitary waves. It seems that both the dipand hump-like solitary waves can exist in this system. Our results also suggest that the dust-size distribution has a significant role on the amplitude of the solitary waves.

  8. The description of charge transfer in fast negative ions scattering on water covered Si(100) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Qiu, Shunli; Liu, Pinyang; Xiong, Feifei; Lu, Jianjie; Liu, Yuefeng; Li, Guopeng; Liu, Yiran; Ren, Fei; Xiao, Yunqing; Gao, Lei; Zhao, Qiushuang; Ding, Bin; Li, Yuan; Guo, Yanling; Chen, Ximeng

    2016-11-01

    Doping has significantly affected the characteristics and performance of semiconductor electronic devices. In this work, we study the charge transfer processes for 8.5-22.5 keV C- and F- ions scattering on H2O-terminated p-type Si(100) surfaces with two different doping concentrations. We find that doping has no influence on negative-ion formation for fast collisions in this relatively high energy range. Moreover, we build a model to calculate negative ion fractions including the contribution from positive ions. The calculations support the nonadiabatic feature of charge transfer.

  9. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... influence of oxygen and carbon on the metal dusting corrosion is explored. The results indicate that exposure to metal dusting conditions have a detrimental effect on the resistance against oxidation and, conversely, that exposure to oxidation has a detrimental effect on the resistance towards metal dusting....... Consequently, a combination of carburizing and oxidizing conditions has a strong mutual catalyzing effect on the metal dusting corrosion....

  10. Composite circumstellar dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ranjan; Vaidya, Dipak B.; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-10-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5-25 μm. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18 μm. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-type and asymptotic giant branch stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes, shape, composition and dust temperature.

  11. Composite Circumstellar Dust Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Ranjan; Dutta, Rajeshwari

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the absorption efficiencies of composite silicate grains with inclusions of graphite and silicon carbide in the spectral range 5--25$\\rm \\mu m$. We study the variation in absorption profiles with volume fractions of inclusions. In particular we study the variation in the wavelength of peak absorption at 10 and 18$\\rm \\mu m$. We also study the variation of the absorption of porous silicate grains. We use the absorption efficiencies to calculate the infrared flux at various dust temperatures and compare with the observed infrared emission flux from the circumstellar dust around some M-Type \\& AGB stars obtained from IRAS and a few stars from Spitzer satellite. We interpret the observed data in terms of the circumstellar dust grain sizes; shape; composition and dust temperature.

  12. Nano Dust Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new highly sensitive instrument to confirm the existence of the so-called nano-dust particles, characterize their impact parameters, and...

  13. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-01-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current (DC) glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self excited dust acoustic waves and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust par...

  14. Spinning Dust Emission from Wobbling Grains: Important Physical Effects and Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Hoang, Thiem

    2012-01-01

    We review major progress on the modeling of electric dipole emission from rapidly spinning tiny dust grains, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We begin by summarizing the original model of spinning dust proposed by Draine and Lazarian and recent theoretical results improving the Draine and Lazarian model. The review is focused on important physical effects that were disregarded in earlier studies for the sake of simplicity and recently accounted for by us, including grain wobbling due to internal relaxation, impulsive excitation by single-ion collisions, the triaxiality of grain shape, charge fluctuations, and the turbulent nature of astrophysical environments. Implications of the spinning dust emission for constraining physical properties of tiny dust grains and environment conditions are discussed. We discuss the alignment of tiny dust grains and possibility of polarized spinning dust emission. Suggestions for constraining the alignment of tiny grains and polarization of spinning dust emiss...

  15. Dust emission from comets at large heliocentric distances. I - The case of comet Bowell /1980b/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpis, H. L. F.; Mendis, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Alternative processes of dust emission from comets at large heliocentric distances are considered, in order to explain the dust coma observed in comet Bowell (1980b) at a heliocentric distance as large as 7.17 AU. It is shown that the electrostatic blow-off of dust from a charged, H2O-dominated nucleus having a layer of loose, fine dust may be the formation process of the dust coma, with the coma size expected from the process being comparable to the observed value and the dust grain size being equal to or less than 0.4 microns in size. The upper limit for the total mass in the coma is 3.9 x 10 to the 8th g, and the spatial extension less than 10,000 km. The observed activity may alternatively be due to dust entrainment by the sublimating gas from a CO2-dominated nucleus.

  16. Evaluation of the electrical properties of dust storms by multi-parameter observations and theoretical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Bo, Tian-Li; Zheng, Xiaojing

    2017-03-01

    Dusty phenomena, such as wind-blown sand, dust devils, and dust storms, play key roles in Earth's climate and geological processes. Dust electrification considerably affects the lifting and transport of dust particles. However, the electrical properties of dust storms remain poorly understood. Here, we conducted multi-parameter measurements and theoretical calculations to investigate the electrical properties of dust storms and their application to dust storm prediction. The results show that the vertical electric field (E-field) decreases first, then increases, and finally decreases with the height above the ground, reversing its direction at two heights, ∼ 8- 12 and ∼ 24 m. This suggests that the charge polarity of dust particles changes from negative to positive and back to negative again as the height increases. By carefully analyzing the E-field and dust concentration data, we further found that there is a significant positive linear relationship between the measured E-field intensity and dust concentration at the given ambient conditions. In addition, measurements and calculations demonstrate that a substantial enhancement in the vertical E-field can be observed several hours before the arrival of the external-source dust storms, indicating that the E-field can be used to provide an early warning of external-source dust storms.

  17. An In Vitro Investigation of Pulmonary Alveolar Macrophage Cytotoxicity Introduced by Fibrous and Grainy Mineral Dusts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Faqin; DENG Jianjun; WU Fengchun; PU Xiaoyong; John HUANG; FENG Qiming; HE Xiaochun

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the damage mechanism of mineral dusts on the pulmonary alveolar macrophage (AM), the changes in their death ratio, malandialdthyde (MDA) content and activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured, and the technique of cell culture in vitro was used to investigate the cytotoxicity of six mineral dusts (twelve crystal habits)from twelve mineral deposits. The results show that wollastonite and clinoptilolite have no AM cytotoxicity, while other fibrous and grainy mineral dusts damage pulmonary AM in various degrees.The cytotoxicity of fibrous mineral dusts was greater than that of the grainy ones, and the cytotoxicity of dusts was positively correlated with the active OH- content in dusts, but not necessarily so with its SiO2 content. The high pH values produced by dust was unfavorable for the survival of cells and the dusts with low bio-resistance were safe for cells. The content of variable valence elements in dusts might influence their cytotoxicity and the surface charge of dusts was not a stable factor for their toxicity. It is demonstrated that the shape of mineral dusts was one of the factors affecting cytotoxicity, and that the cytotoxicity of mineral dusts depends mainly on their properties.

  18. Measurements of Finite Dust Temperature Effects in the Dispersion Relation of the Dust Acoustic Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipes, Erica; Williams, Jeremiah

    2009-04-01

    A dusty plasma is a four-component system composed of ions, electrons, neutral particles and charged microparticles. The presence of these charged microparticles gives rise to new plasma wave modes, including the dust acoustic wave. Recent measurements [1, 2] of the dispersion relationship for the dust acoustic wave in a glow discharge have shown that finite temperature effects are observed at higher values of neutral pressure. Other work [3] has shown that these effects are not observed at lower values of neutral pressure. We present the results of ongoing work examining finite temperature effects in the dispersion relation as a function of neutral pressure. [4pt] [1] E. Thomas, Jr., R. Fisher, and R. L. Merlino, Phys. Plasmas 14, 123701 (2007). [0pt] [2] J. D. Williams, E. Thomas Jr., and L. Marcus, Phys. Plasmas 15, 043704 (2008). [0pt] [3] T. Trottenberg, D. Block, and A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 13, 042105 (2006).

  19. Dust acoustic solitary structures in a multi-fluid dusty plasma in the presence of kappa distributed particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manpreet; Singh Saini, Nareshpal; Ghai, Yashika; Kaur, Nimardeep

    2016-07-01

    Dusty plasma is a fully or partially ionized gas which contain micron or sub-micron sized dust particles. These dust particles can be positively or negatively charged, depending upon the mechanism of charging . Dusty plasma is often observed in most of the space and astrophysical plasma environments. Presence of these dust particles can modify the dispersion properties of waves in the plasma and can introduce several new wave modes, e.g., dust acoustic (DA) waves, dust-ion acoustic (DIA) waves, dust-acoustic shock waves etc. In this investigation we have studied the small amplitude dust acoustic waves in an unmagnetized plasma comprising of electrons, positively charged ions, negatively charged hot as well as cold dust. Electrons and ions are described by superthermal distribution which is more appropriate for modeling space and astrophysical plasmas. Kadomtsev- Petviashvili (KP) equation has been derived using reductive perturbation technique. Positive as well as negative potential structures are observed, depending upon some critical values of parameters. Amplitude and width of dust acoustic solitary waves are modified by varying these parameters such as superthermality of electrons and ions, direction of propagation of the wave, relative concentration of hot and cold dust particles etc. This study may be helpful in understanding the formation and dynamics of nonlinear structures in various space and astrophysical plasma environments such Saturn's F-rings.

  20. Dust Versus Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirre, A N

    1999-01-01

    Two groups have recently discovered a statistically significant deviation in the fluxes of high-redshift type Ia supernovae from the predictions of a Friedmann model with zero cosmological constant. This letter argues that bright, dusty, starburst galaxies would preferentially eject a dust component with a shallower opacity curve (hence less reddening) and a higher opacity/mass than the observed galactic dust which is left behind. Such dust could cause the falloff in flux at high-z without violating constraints on reddening or metallicity. The specific model presented is of needle-like dust, which is expected from the theory of crystal growth and has been detected in samples of interstellar dust. Carbon needles with conservative properties can supply the necessary opacity, and would very likely be ejected from galaxies as required. The model is not subject to the arguments given in the literature against grey dust, but may be constrained by future data from supernova searches done at higher redshift, in clust...

  1. Electrovacuum Static Counterrotating Relativistic Dust Disks

    CERN Document Server

    García-Reyes, Gonzalo

    2004-01-01

    A detailed study is presented of the counterrotating model (CRM) for generic electrovacuum static axially symmetric relativistic thin disks without radial pressure. We find a general constraint over the counterrotating tangential velocities needed to cast the surface energy-momentum tensor of the disk as the superposition of two counterrotating charged dust fluids. We also find explicit expressions for the energy densities, charge densities and velocities of the counterrotating fluids. We then show that this constraint can be satisfied if we take the two counterrotating streams as circulating along electro-geodesics. However, we show that, in general, it is not possible to take the two counterrotating fluids as circulating along electro-geodesics nor take the two counterrotating tangential velocities as equal and opposite. Four simple families of models of counterrotating charged disks based on Chazy-Curzon-like, Zipoy-Voorhees-like, Bonnor-Sackfield-like and Kerr-like electrovacuum solutions are considered w...

  2. Coagulation of dust particles in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, M.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The electrostatic charge of small dust grains in a plasma in which the temperature varies in time is discussed, pointing out that secondary electron emission might introduce charge separation. If the sign of the charge on small grains is opposite to that on big ones, enhanced coagulation can occur which will affect the size distribution of grains in a plasma. Two scenarios where this process might be relevant are considered: a hot plasma environment with temperature fluctuations and a cold plasma environment with transient heating events. The importance of the enhanced coagulation is uncertain, because the plasma parameters in grain-producing environments such as a molecular cloud or a protoplanetary disk are not known. It is possible, however, that this process is the most efficient mechanism for the growth of grains in the size range of 0.1-500 microns.

  3. Newton to Einstein — dust to dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Michael; Uhlemann, Cora; Haugg, Thomas, E-mail: michael.kopp@physik.lmu.de, E-mail: cora.uhlemann@physik.lmu.de, E-mail: thomas.haugg@physik.lmu.de [Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics, Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich, Theresienstr. 37, Munich, 80333 (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equations. Brustein and Riotto (2011) conjectured the equivalence of these systems in the special case where vector perturbations were neglected. We show that this approach does not lead to the Euler equation but to a physically different one with large deviations already in the 1-loop power spectrum. We show that it is also possible to consistently set to zero the vector perturbations which strongly constrains the allowed initial conditions, in particular excluding Gaussian ones such that inclusion of vector perturbations is inevitable in the cosmological context. In addition we derive nonlinear equations for the gravitational slip and tensor perturbations, thereby extending Newtonian gravity of a dust fluid to account for nonlinear light propagation effects and dust-induced gravitational waves.

  4. Floating potential of large dust grains with electron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacharis, M., E-mail: minas.bacharis03@imperial.ac.uk [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-15

    Electron emission from the surface of solid particles plays an important role in many dusty plasma phenomena and applications. Examples of such cases include fusion plasmas and dusty plasma systems in our solar system. Electron emission complicates the physics of the plasma-dust interaction. One of the most important aspects of the physics of the dust plasma interaction is the calculation of the particle's floating potential. This is the potential a dust particle acquires when it is in contact with a plasma and it plays a very important role for determining its dynamical behaviour. The orbital motion limited (OML) approach is used in most cases in the literature to model the dust charging physics. However, this approach has severe limitations when the size of the particles is larger than the electron Debye length λ{sub De}. Addressing this shortcoming for cases without electron emission, a modified version of OML (MOML) was developed for modelling the charging physics of dust grains larger than the electron Debye length. In this work, we will focus on extending MOML in cases where the particles emit electrons. Furthermore, a general method for calculating the floating potential of dust particles with electron emission will be presented for a range of grain sizes.

  5. Critical appraisal of excited state nonadiabatic dynamics simulations of 9H-adeninea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbatti, Mario; Lan, Zhenggang; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Szymczak, Jaroslaw J.; Lischka, Hans; Thiel, Walter

    2012-12-01

    In spite of the importance of nonadiabatic dynamics simulations for the understanding of ultrafast photo-induced phenomena, simulations based on different methodologies have often led to contradictory results. In this work, we proceed through a comprehensive investigation of on-the-fly surface-hopping simulations of 9H-adenine in the gas phase using different electronic structure theories (ab initio, semi-empirical, and density functional methods). Simulations that employ ab initio and semi-empirical multireference configuration interaction methods predict the experimentally observed ultrafast deactivation of 9H-adenine with similar time scales, however, through different internal conversion channels. Simulations based on time-dependent density functional theory with six different hybrid and range-corrected functionals fail to predict the ultrafast deactivation. The origin of these differences is analyzed by systematic calculations of the relevant reaction pathways, which show that these discrepancies can always be traced back to topographical features of the underlying potential energy surfaces.

  6. Ab-initio tensorial electronic friction for molecules on metal surfaces: nonadiabatic vibrational relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Maurer, Reinhard J; Batista, Victor S; Tully, John C

    2016-01-01

    Molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces exchange energy with substrate phonons and low-lying electron-hole pair excitations. In the limit of weak coupling, electron-hole pair excitations can be seen as exerting frictional forces on adsorbates that enhance energy transfer and facilitate vibrational relaxation or hot-electron mediated chemistry. We have recently reported on the relevance of tensorial properties of electronic friction [Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 217601 (2016)] in dynamics at surfaces. Here we present the underlying implementation of tensorial electronic friction based on Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory for condensed phase and cluster systems. Using local atomic-orbital basis sets, we calculate nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements and evaluate the full electronic friction tensor in the classical limit. Our approach is numerically stable and robust as shown by a detailed convergence analysis. We furthermore benchmark the accuracy of our approach by calculation of vibrational relaxation rates and li...

  7. Inchworm Monte Carlo for exact non-adiabatic dynamics. I. Theory and algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Cohen, Guy; Reichman, David R.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we provide a detailed description of the inchworm Monte Carlo formalism for the exact study of real-time non-adiabatic dynamics. This method optimally recycles Monte Carlo information from earlier times to greatly suppress the dynamical sign problem. Using the example of the spin-boson model, we formulate the inchworm expansion in two distinct ways: The first with respect to an expansion in the system-bath coupling and the second as an expansion in the diabatic coupling. The latter approach motivates the development of a cumulant version of the inchworm Monte Carlo method, which has the benefit of improved scaling. This paper deals completely with methodology, while Paper II provides a comprehensive comparison of the performance of the inchworm Monte Carlo algorithms to other exact methodologies as well as a discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of each.

  8. Fully quantum non-adiabatic dynamics in electronic-nuclear coherent state basis

    CERN Document Server

    Humeniuk, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Direct dynamics methods using Gaussian wavepackets have to rely only on local properties, such as gradients and hessians at the center of the wavepacket, so as to be compatible with the usual quantum chemistry methods. Matrix elements of the potential energy surfaces between wavepackets therefore usually have to be approximated. It is shown, that if a modified form of valence bond theory is used instead of the usual MO-based theories, the matrix elements can be obtained exactly. This is so because the molecular Hamiltonian only contains the Coulomb potential, for which matrix elements between different basis functions (consisting of Gaussian nuclear and electronic orbitals) are all well-known. In valence bond theory the self-consistent field calculation can be avoided so that the matrix elements are analytical functions of the nuclear coordinates. A method for simulating non-adiabatic quantum dynamics is sketched, where coherent state trajectories are propagated "on the fly" on adiabatic potential energy surf...

  9. Semiclassical Green's functions and an instanton formulation of electron-transfer rates in the nonadiabatic limit

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Jeremy O; Thoss, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present semiclassical approximations to Green's functions of multidimensional systems, extending Gutzwiller's work to the classically forbidden region. Based on steepest-descent integrals over these functions, we derive an instanton method for computing the rate of nonadiabatic reactions, such as electron transfer, in the weak-coupling limit, where Fermi's golden-rule can be employed. This generalizes Marcus theory to systems for which the environment free-energy curves are not harmonic and where nuclear tunnelling plays a role. The derivation avoids using the Im F method or short-time approximations to real-time correlation functions. A clear physical interpretation of the nuclear tunnelling processes involved in an electron-transfer reaction is thus provided. In the following paper, we discuss numerical evaluation of the formulae.

  10. The measurement of shear stress and total heat flux in a nonadiabatic turbulent hypersonic boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulla, V.; Horstman, C. C.

    1975-01-01

    Turbulent shear stress and direct turbulent total heat-flux measurements have been made across a nonadiabatic, zero pressure gradient, hypersonic boundary layer by using specially designed hot-wire probes free of strain-gauging and wire oscillation. Heat-flux measurements were in reasonably good agreement with values obtained by integrating the energy equation using measured profiles of velocity and temperature. The shear-stress values deduced from the measurements, by assuming zero correlation of velocity and pressure fluctuations, were lower than the values obtained by integrating the momentum equation. Statistical properties of the cross-correlations are similar to corresponding incompressible measurements at approximately the same momentum-thickness Reynolds number.

  11. Semiclassical analysis of the electron-nuclear coupling in electronic non-adiabatic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Agostini, Federica; Gross, E K U

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function, the coupling between electrons and nuclei beyond the adiabatic regime is encoded (i) in the time-dependent vector and scalar potentials and (ii) in the electron-nuclear coupling operator. The former appear in the Schroedinger-like equation that drives the evolution of the nuclear degrees of freedom, whereas the latter is responsible for inducing non-adiabatic effects in the electronic evolution equation. As we have devoted previous studies to the analysis of the vector and scalar potentials, in this paper we focus on the properties of the electron-nuclear coupling operator, with the aim of describing a numerical procedure to approximate it within a semiclassical treatment of the nuclear dynamics.

  12. Non-adiabatic elimination of auxiliary modes in continuous quantum measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Huan; Chen, Yanbei

    2011-01-01

    When measuring a complex quantum system, we are often interested in only a few degrees of freedom-the plant, while the rest of them are collected as auxiliary modes-the bath. The bath can have finite memory (non-Markovian), and simply ignoring its dynamics, i.e., adiabatically eliminating it, is inadequate to predict the true quantum behavior of the plant. We generalize the technique introduced by Strunz et. al. [Phys. Rev. Lett 82, 1801 (1999)], and develop a formalism that allows us to eliminate the bath non-adiabatically in continuous quantum measurements, and derive a non-Markovian stochastic master equation for the plant alone. We apply this formalism to two interesting examples in cavity QED: (i) a two-level atom (a qubit) coupled to a cavity and (ii) linear optomechanical interaction, both of which can be exactly solved.

  13. Adiabatic vs. non-adiabatic determination of specific absorption rate of ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natividad, Eva [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza), Sede Campus Rio Ebro, Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Castro, Miguel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza), Sede Campus Rio Ebro, Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)], E-mail: mcastro@unizar.es; Mediano, Arturo [Grupo de Electronica de Potencia y Microelectronica (GEPM), Instituto de Investigacion en Ingenieria de Aragon (Universidad de Zaragoza), Maria de Luna, 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The measurement of temperature variations in adiabatic conditions allows the determination of the specific absorption rate of magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids from the correct incremental expression, SAR=(1/m{sub MNP})C({delta}T/{delta}t). However, when measurements take place in non-adiabatic conditions, one must approximate this expression by SAR{approx}C{beta}/m{sub MNP}, where {beta} is the initial slope of the temperature vs. time curve during alternating field application. The errors arising from the use of this approximation were estimated through several experiments with different isolating conditions, temperature sensors and sample-sensor contacts. It is concluded that small to appreciable errors can appear, which are difficult to infer or control.

  14. A model for reactive nonadiabatic transitions: Comparison between exact numerical and approximate analytical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, M. S.; Baer, M.

    1981-03-01

    Exact diabatic/adiabatic branching ratios and final state distributions are presented for a reactive model for nonadiabatic transitions, applicable to situations where the coupling term is approximately constant over the region where the interpotential seam crosses the two valleys. Comparison is made with the Bauer-Fischer-Gilmore (BFG) and Franck-Condon (FC) models for a variety of situations. A new index γ=(vRΔGR/vrΔGR), where subscripts R and r denote translational and vibrational variables, respectively, is introduced as a measure of the validity of the two approximations. The FC approximation is shown to become exact for γ≳≳1, while the BFG approximation is preferred for γ<<1.

  15. Nonadiabatic dynamics and multiphoton resonances in strong field molecular ionization with few cycle laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Tagliamonti, Vincent; Zhao, Arthur; Rozgonyi, Tamás; Marquetand, Philipp; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We study strong field molecular ionization using few- (four to ten) cycle laser pulses. Employing a supercontinuum light source, we are able to tune the optical laser wavelength (photon energy) over a range of about $\\sim$200 nm (500 meV). We measure the photoelectron spectrum for a series of different molecules as a function of laser intensity, frequency, and bandwidth and illustrate how the ionization dynamics vary with these parameters. We find that multiphoton resonances and nonadiabatic dynamics (internal conversion) play an important role and result in ionization to different ionic continua. Interestingly, while nuclear dynamics can be "frozen" for sufficiently short laser pulses, we find that resonances strongly influence the photoelectron spectrum and final cationic state of the molecule regardless of pulse duration -- even for pulses that are less than four cycles in duration.

  16. Semiclassical Green's functions and an instanton formulation of electron-transfer rates in the nonadiabatic limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jeremy O.; Bauer, Rainer; Thoss, Michael

    2015-10-01

    We present semiclassical approximations to Green's functions of multidimensional systems, extending Gutzwiller's work to the classically forbidden region. Based on steepest-descent integrals over these functions, we derive an instanton method for computing the rate of nonadiabatic reactions, such as electron transfer, in the weak-coupling limit, where Fermi's golden-rule can be employed. This generalizes Marcus theory to systems for which the environment free-energy curves are not harmonic and where nuclear tunnelling plays a role. The derivation avoids using the Im F method or short-time approximations to real-time correlation functions. A clear physical interpretation of the nuclear tunnelling processes involved in an electron-transfer reaction is thus provided. In Paper II [J. O. Richardson, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 134116 (2015)], we discuss numerical evaluation of the formulae.

  17. Numerical solution of non-isothermal non-adiabatic flow of real gases in pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez, Alfredo; López, Xián; Vázquez-Cendón, M. Elena

    2016-10-01

    A finite volume scheme for the numerical solution of a mathematical model for non-isothermal non-adiabatic compressible flow of a real gas in a pipeline is introduced. In order to make an upwind discretization of the flux, the Q-scheme of van Leer is used. Unlike standard Euler equations, the model takes into account wall friction, variable height and heat transfer between the pipe and the environment. Since all these terms are sources, in order to get a well-balanced scheme they are discretized by making a similar upwinding to the one in the flux term. The performance of the overall method has been shown for some usual numerical tests. The final goal, which is beyond the scope of this paper, is to consider a network including several pipelines connected at junctions, as those employed for natural gas transport.

  18. Inchworm Monte Carlo for exact non-adiabatic dynamics I. Theory and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Reichman, David R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we provide a detailed description of the inchworm Monte Carlo formalism for the exact study of real-time non-adiabatic dynamics. This method optimally recycles Monte Carlo information from earlier times to greatly suppress the dynamical sign problem. Using the example of the spin-boson model, we formulate the inchworm expansion in two distinct ways: The first with respect to an expansion in the system-bath coupling and the second as an expansion in the diabatic coupling. The latter approach motivates the development of a cumulant version of the inchworm Monte Carlo method, which has the benefit of improved scaling. This paper deals completely with methodology, while the companion paper provides a comprehensive comparison of the performance of the inchworm Monte Carlo algorithms to other exact methodologies as well as a discussion of the relative advantages and disadvantages of each.

  19. Damping of Linear Nonadiabatic MHD Waves in a Flowing Prominence Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of shear flow on the time damping of linear nonadiabatic magnetoacoustic waves in a solar prominence. We consider a homogeneous, isothermal, and unbounded medium permeated by a uniform magnetic field. The adiabaticity is removed by including the optically thin radiative losses, thermal conduction, and heating term in energy equation. We present a local theory of MHD waves to obtain a dispersion relation. The dispersion relation is solved numerically to study the time damping of these waves. It is found that flow influences the damping time and damping per period of both the slow and fast waves significantly. Damping time and damping per period of slow waves are very much higher than the damping time and damping per period of fast waves.

  20. Nonadiabatic tunneling via conical intersections and the role of the geometric phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changjian; Yarkony, David R.; Guo, Hua

    2017-02-01

    As a ubiquitous quantum effect, tunneling has attracted attention ever since the dawn of quantum mechanics. However, recent evidence suggests that nonadiabatic atomic tunneling near a conical intersection (CI) behaves differently from its adiabatic counterpart, producing lifetime differences of up to two orders of magnitude. Using two-dimensional models, we demonstrate here that the failure of the adiabatic model in describing tunneling near a CI can be attributed largely to the neglect of the geometric phase, which is associated with the adiabatic electronic wave function transported around a CI. The geometric phase-induced destructive interference among wave functions following different paths around the CI, manifested as a node in the adiabatic wave function, retards tunneling.

  1. Nonadiabatic theory of strong-field atomic effects under elliptical polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Eberly, J H

    2012-12-14

    Elliptically polarized laser fields provide a new channel for access to strong-field processes that are either suppressed or not present under linear polarization. Quantum theory is mostly unavailable for their analysis, and we report here results of a systematic study based on a classical ensemble theory with solution of the relevant ab inito time-dependent Newton equations for selected model atoms. The study's approach is necessarily nonadiabatic, as it follows individual electron trajectories leading to single, double, and triple ionizations. Of particular interest are new results bearing on open questions concerning experimental reports of unexplained species dependences as well as double-electron release times that are badly matched by a conventional adiabatic quantum tunneling theory. We also report the first analysis of electron trajectories for sequential and non-sequential triple ionization.

  2. Non-adiabatic radiative collapse of a relativistic star under different initial conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjan Sharma; Ramesh Tikekar

    2012-09-01

    We examine the role of space-time geometry in the non-adiabatic collapse of a star dissipating energy in the form of radial heat flow, studying its evolution under different initial conditions. The collapse of a star filled with a homogeneous perfect fluid is compared with that of a star filled with inhomogeneous imperfect fluid under anisotropic pressure. Both the configurations are spherically symmetric. However, in the latter case, the physical space = constant of the configurations endowed with spheroidal or pseudospheroidal geometry is assumed to be inhomogeneous. It is observed that as long as the collapse is shear-free, its evolution depends only on the mass and size of the star at the onset of collapse.

  3. Non-adiabatic spin transfer torque investigated using thermally activated magnetic domain walls in permalloy wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eltschka, Matthias; Krzyk, Stephen; Nowak, Ulrich; Klaeui, Mathias [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Woetzel, Mathias [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Kasama, Takeshi; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Rhensius, Jan [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Heyderman, Laura [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    The understanding of the interplay between spin-polarized currents and magnetization as well as the determination of the spin torque terms are of scientific interest and essential for many proposed applications. Using transmission electron microscopy we investigate thermally activated domain walls (DWs) jumping back and forth between two pinning sites in permalloy wires at room temperature. The motion is of pure thermal origin without the influence of external magnetic fields or electron currents. Considering the DW as a quasi particle in a local potential with two metastable states we show that this DW movement can be described by an Arrhenius law. Subsequently, we investigate the change of the local potential by constant currents which are far below the threshold values needed for DW propagation and do not induce significant heating. Based on a 1D description of the spin transfer torque effect and the Arrhenius law we derive the non-adiabatic coefficient {beta} for a transverse and a vortex DW.

  4. Adiabatic & non-adiabatic perturbation theory for coherence vector description of neutrino oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Hollenberg, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    The standard wave function approach for the treatment of neutrino oscillations fails in situations where quantum ensembles at a finite temperature with or without an interacting background plasma are encountered. As a first step to treat such phenomena in a novel way, we propose a unified approach to both adiabatic and non-adiabatic two-flavor oscillations in neutrino ensembles with finite temperature and generic (e.g. matter) potentials. Neglecting effects of ensemble decoherence for now we study the evolution of a neutrino ensemble governed by the associated Quantum Kinetic Equations, which apply to systems with finite temperature. The Quantum Kinetic Equations are solved formally using the Magnus expansion and it is shown that a convenient choice of the quantum mechanical picture (e.g. the interaction picture) reveals suitable parameters to characterize the physics of the underlying system (e.g. an effective oscillation length). It is understood that this method also provides a promising starting point for...

  5. Non-adiabatic effects in near-adiabatic mixed-field orientation and alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Anjali; Ahlawat, Dharamvir Singh; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical study of the impact of a pair of moderate electric fields tilted an angle with respect to one another on a molecule. As a prototype, we consider a molecule with large rotational constant (with corresponding small rotational period) and moderate dipole moment. Within rigid-rotor approximation, the time-dependent Schrodinger equation is solved using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. We have analysed that lower rotational states are significantly influenced by variation in pulse durations, the tilt angle between the fields and also on the electric field strengths. We also suggest a control scheme of how the rotational dynamics, orientation and alignment of a molecule can be enhanced by a combination of near-adiabatic pulses in comparision to non-adiabatic or adiabatic pulses.

  6. Non-adiabatic molecular dynamic simulations of opening reaction of molecular junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobač, Vladmír; Lewis, James P.; Jelínek, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    We report non-adiabatic molecular dynamic simulations of the ring opening reaction of diarylethene (DAE) derivative molecules, both free standing and embedded between gold electrodes. Simulations are performed by the surface hopping method employing density functional theory. Typically, the free-standing molecules exhibit large quantum yields to open and close; however the process is quenched for the molecules embedded between electrodes. Our simulations reveal the importance of the DAE side chemical groups, which explain the efficiency of the quenching process. Namely, delocalization of the LUMO state contributes to electronic coupling between the molecule and electrodes, suppressing or enhancing the reaction process. The simulations indicate that a proper choice of the chemical side group, which provides the strong localization of the LUMO state, can substantially diminish the quenching mechanism. Additionally, we analyze a strong dependency of the quantum yield of the opening reaction coming from the mechanical strength of the molecules.

  7. Specific absorption rate determination of magnetic nanoparticles through hyperthermia measurements in non-adiabatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coïsson, M.; Barrera, G.; Celegato, F.; Martino, L.; Vinai, F.; Martino, P.; Ferraro, G.; Tiberto, P.

    2016-10-01

    An experimental setup for magnetic hyperthermia operating in non-adiabatic conditions is described. A thermodynamic model that takes into account the heat exchanged by the sample with the surrounding environment is developed. A suitable calibration procedure is proposed that allows the experimental validation of the model. Specific absorption rate can then be accurately determined just from the measurement of the sample temperature at the equilibrium steady state. The setup and the measurement procedure represent a simplification with respect to other systems requiring calorimeters or crucial corrections for heat flow. Two families of magnetic nanoparticles, one superparamagnetic and one characterised by larger sizes and static hysteresis, have been characterised as a function of field intensity, and specific absorption rate and intrinsic loss power have been obtained.

  8. Adiabatic and Non-adiabatic quenches in a Spin-1 Bose Einstein Condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguslawski, Matthew; Hebbe Madhusudhana, Bharath; Anquez, Martin; Robbins, Bryce; Barrios, Maryrose; Hoang, Thai; Chapman, Michael

    2016-05-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is observed in a wide range of phenomena. We have studied the dynamics of a spin-1 ferromagnetic Bose-Einstein condensate for both adiabatic and non-adiabatic quenches through a QPT. At the quantum critical point (QCP), finite size effects lead to a non-zero gap, which makes an adiabatic quench possible through the QPT. We experimentally demonstrate such a quench, which is forbidden at the mean field level. For faster quenches through the QCP, the vanishing energy gap causes the reaction timescale of the system to diverge, preventing the system from adiabatically following the ground state. We measure the temporal evolution of the spin populations for different quench speeds and determine the exponents characterizing the scaling of the onset of excitations, which are in good agreement with the predictions of Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  9. Deriving the exact nonadiabatic quantum propagator in the mapping variable representation

    CERN Document Server

    Hele, Timothy J H

    2016-01-01

    We derive an exact quantum propagator for nonadiabatic dynamics in multi-state systems using the mapping variable representation, where classical-like Cartesian variables are used to represent both continuous nuclear degrees of freedom and discrete electronic states. The resulting expression is a Moyal series that, when suitably approximated, can allow for the use of classical dynamics to efficiently model large systems. We demonstrate that different truncations of the exact propagator lead to existing approximate semiclassical and mixed quantum-classical methods and we derive an associated error term for each method. Furthermore, by combining the imaginary-time path-integral representation of the Boltzmann operator with the exact propagator, we obtain an analytic expression for thermal quantum real-time correlation functions. These results provide a rigorous theoretical foundation for the development of accurate and efficient classical-like dynamics to compute observables such as electron transfer reaction r...

  10. Ring-polymer instanton theory of electron transfer in the nonadiabatic limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Jeremy O., E-mail: jeremy.richardson@fau.de [Institut für Theoretische Physik und Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Molekulare Materialien, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Staudtstraße 7/B2, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-10-07

    We take the golden-rule instanton method derived in the previous paper [J. O. Richardson, R. Bauer, and M. Thoss, J. Chem. Phys. 143, 134115 (2015)] and reformulate it using a ring-polymer instanton approach. This gives equations which can be used to compute the rates of electron-transfer reactions in the nonadiabatic (golden-rule) limit numerically within a semiclassical approximation. The multidimensional ring-polymer instanton trajectories are obtained efficiently by minimization of the action. In this form, comparison with Wolynes’ quantum instanton method [P. G. Wolynes, J. Chem. Phys. 87, 6559 (1987)] is possible and we show that our semiclassical approach is the steepest-descent limit of this method. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of both methods and give examples of where the new approach is more accurate.

  11. Nonadiabaticity in a Jahn-Teller system probed by absorption and resonance Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pae, K; Hizhnyakov, V

    2013-03-14

    A theory of absorption and resonance Raman scattering of impurity centers in crystals with E⊗e-type Jahn-Teller effect in the excited state is presented. The vibronic interaction with non-totally symmetric local or pseudolocal modes and with a continuum of bath modes (phonons) is considered. A number of specific quantum effects, such as the nonadiabaticity-induced enhancement of the Raman scattering at high-energy excitation, the size effect of the final state, the interference of different channels of scattering, the Fermi resonances in the conical intersection, and others, were shown to become apparent in the calculated spectra. The vibronic interaction with phonons essentially determines the structure of the spectra.

  12. Shielding of emitting dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca Delzanno, Gian; Lapenta, Giovanni; Rosenberg, Marlene

    2003-10-01

    In the present work we focus on the role of electron emission (either thermionic or photoelectric) in charging an object immersed in a plasma. In fact, it is well known that the higher mobility of the plasma electrons (that would lead to negatively charged objects) can be overcome by electron emission, thus reversing the object polarity. Moreover, recent work [1] has shown how electron emission can fundamentally affect the shielding potential around the dust. In particular, depending on the physical parameters of the system (that were chosen such to correspond to common experimental conditions), the shielding potential can develop an attractive potential well. The aim of the present work is two-fold. First, we will present a parametric study in order to enlight the conditions for the formation, as well as the stability of the well. Furthermore, simulations will be presented with physical parameters corresponding to the ionosphere, thus extending our study to the case of meteroids. [1] G.L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, M. Rosenberg, "Attractive Potential among Thermionically Emitting Microparticles", submitted.

  13. Nonadiabatic quantum wave packet dynamics of the H + H2 reaction including the coriolis coupling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Jayachander Rao; S Mahapatra

    2009-09-01

    The effect of coriolis coupling on the dynamics of H + H2 reaction is examined by calculating the initial state-selected and energy resolved reaction probabilities on the coupled manifold of its degenerate 2 (') ground electronic state. H3 in this state is prone to the Jahn-Teller (JT) instability and consequently the degeneracy is split upon distortion from its 3ℎ equilibrium geometry. The orbital degeneracy is, however, restored along the 3ℎ symmetry configuration and it results into conical intersections of the two JT split component states. The energetically lower adiabatic component of latter is repulsive, and mainly (`rather solely’) drive the H + H2 reaction dynamics. On the otherhand, the upper adiabatic component is of bound type and can only impart non-adiabaticity on the dynamics of lower state. Comparison calculations are therefore also carried out on the uncoupled lower adiabatic sheet to assess the nonadiabatic effect. Exact quantum scattering calculations are performed by a chebyshev polynomial propagator and employing the double many body expansion potential energy surface of the electronic ground state of H3. Reaction probabilities are reported up to a total energy of ∼ 3.0 eV, slightly above the energetic minimum of the seam of conical intersections at ∼ 2.74 eV. Reaction probabilities are calculated up to the total angular momentum, = 20 and for each value of , the projection quantum number is varied from 0 to min (, max), with max = 4. Probability results are compared and discussed with those obtained without the coriolis coupling.

  14. Non-Adiabatic Dynamics of ICN-(Ar)n and BrCN-(Ar)n

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku-Agyeman, Bernice; McCoy, Anne B.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the photodissociation of ICN-(Ar)n and BrCN-(Ar)n following electronic excitation to states that dissociate into X- + CN and X* + CN- (X = I or Br) using classical dynamics approaches. Observations made from previous experiments and calculations of these anions demonstrated that non-adiabatic effects are important in the photodissociation process and are reflected in the branching ratios of the photoproducts. The addition of an argon atom is expected to shift the relative energies of these excited states, thereby altering the product branching. Interestingly, experimental studies show that electronically exciting ICN- solvated with even a single argon atom leads to a small fraction of the products recombine to form ICN-.a In this study, the dynamics are carried out using classical mechanics, treating the non-adiabatic effect with a surface hopping algorithm. We assess the accuracy of this approach by first calculating the branching ratios for the bare anions and comparing the results to those from quantum dynamics calculations.a,b Once the results from both the quantum and classical dynamics are shown to be consistent, the classical dynamics simulations are extended to the argon solvated anions. S. Case, E. M. Miller, J. P. Martin, Y. J. Lu, L. Sheps, A. B. McCoy, and W. C. Lineberger, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 51, 2651 (2012). B. Opoku-Agyeman, A. S. Case, J. H. Lehman, W. Carl Lineberger and A. B. McCoy, J. Chem Phys. 141, 084305 (2014). J. C. Tully, J. Chem Phys. 93, 1061 (1990).

  15. Consistent schemes for non-adiabatic dynamics derived from partial linearized density matrix propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F

    2012-12-14

    Powerful approximate methods for propagating the density matrix of complex systems that are conveniently described in terms of electronic subsystem states and nuclear degrees of freedom have recently been developed that involve linearizing the density matrix propagator in the difference between the forward and backward paths of the nuclear degrees of freedom while keeping the interference effects between the different forward and backward paths of the electronic subsystem described in terms of the mapping Hamiltonian formalism and semi-classical mechanics. Here we demonstrate that different approaches to developing the linearized approximation to the density matrix propagator can yield a mean-field like approximate propagator in which the nuclear variables evolve classically subject to Ehrenfest-like forces that involve an average over quantum subsystem states, and by adopting an alternative approach to linearizing we obtain an algorithm that involves classical like nuclear dynamics influenced by a quantum subsystem state dependent force reminiscent of trajectory surface hopping methods. We show how these different short time approximations can be implemented iteratively to achieve accurate, stable long time propagation and explore their implementation in different representations. The merits of the different approximate quantum dynamics methods that are thus consistently derived from the density matrix propagator starting point and different partial linearization approximations are explored in various model system studies of multi-state scattering problems and dissipative non-adiabatic relaxation in condensed phase environments that demonstrate the capabilities of these different types of approximations for treating non-adiabatic electronic relaxation, bifurcation of nuclear distributions, and the passage from nonequilibrium coherent dynamics at short times to long time thermal equilibration in the presence of a model dissipative environment.

  16. Characteristic study of head-on collision of dust-ion acoustic solitons of opposite polarity with kappa distributed electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Shahida; Mahmood, Shahzad; Adnan, Muhammad; Qamar, Anisa

    2016-09-01

    The head on collision between two dust ion acoustic (DIA) solitary waves, propagating in opposite directions, is studied in an unmagnetized plasma constituting adiabatic ions, static dust charged (positively/negatively) grains, and non-inertial kappa distributed electrons. In the linear limit, the dispersion relation of the dust ion acoustic (DIA) solitary wave is obtained using the Fourier analysis. For studying characteristic head-on collision of DIA solitons, the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo method is employed to obtain Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations with quadratic nonlinearities and investigated the phase shifts in their trajectories after the interaction. It is revealed that only compressive solitary waves can exist for the positive dust charged concentrations while for negative dust charge concentrations both the compressive and rarefactive solitons can propagate in such dusty plasma. It is found that for specific sets of plasma parameters, the coefficient of nonlinearity disappears in the KdV equation for the negative dust charged grains. Therefore, the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equations with cubic nonlinearity coefficient, and their corresponding phase shift and trajectories, are also derived for negative dust charged grains plasma at critical composition. The effects of different plasma parameters such as superthermality, concentration of positively/negatively static dust charged grains, and ion to electron temperature ratio on the colliding soliton profiles and their corresponding phase shifts are parametrically examined.

  17. Observations of dust trapping phenomena in the TRISTAN accumulation ring and a study of dust removal in a beam chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Hiroshi; Momose, Takashi; Ishimaru, Hajime

    1991-04-01

    Using a gamma-ray detector and a television camera system for synchrotron light, high-energy bremsstrahlung and horizontal growth of the synchrotron light source were observed when sudden decrease in the electron-beam lifetime occurred due to dust trapping in the electron beam. Two types of beam current losses were found; one was a continuous beam current loss, and the other was a short-term beam current loss. High-energy bremsstrahlung at a location was observed in a short time and after that, the bremsstrahlung was not detected in spite of the occurrence of dust trapping phenomena. The fact suggests motions of the trapped dust particles in the longitudinal directions. Materials collected in the beam chamber are dust particles from ion pumps and dust particles made during the beam chamber processing for welding. Most of the collected dust particles were less than 2 mm in size and surfaces of some dust particles were melted with the electron beam. Simple analysis was carried out for the conditions necessary for a dust particle to be trapped, for motions of the trapped dust particle, and for interactions between the trapped dust particle and the electron beam. The analysis showed that a dust particle less than 3 mm in size, made of Al, can be trapped and that the trapped dust particle can move in the vertical and longitudinal directions. The analysis also suggested that a dust particle in size of about 2 mm can be continuously trapped around the electron beam without being destroyed by the electron beam. Furthermore, the analysis explained the difference between the two types of beam current losses observed in the ring. Experiments which simulate the electron beam using a Cu wire in an evacuated beam chamber show that a dust particle (less than 70 μm) is trapped sufficiently. The experiments also coincide with theory for an attractive force acting to a conducting small particle. The calculated electric field of the electron beam and the calculated electric charge

  18. Thermodynamics and Charging of Interstellar Iron Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Brandon S.; Draine, B. T.

    2017-01-01

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of ≃4.5 Å, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar environments, finding that iron nanoparticles can acquire negative charges, particularly in regions with high gas temperatures and ionization fractions. If ≳10% of the interstellar iron is in the form of ultrasmall iron clusters, the photoelectric heating rate from dust may be increased by up to tens of percent relative to dust models with only carbonaceous and silicate grains.

  19. Thermodynamics and Charging of Interstellar Iron Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Hensley, Brandon S

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of $\\simeq 4.5\\,$\\AA, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar environments, finding that iron nanoparticles can acquire negative charges particularly in regions with high gas temperatures and ionization fractions. If $\\gtrsim 10\\%$ of the interstellar iron is in the form of ultrasmall iron clusters, the photoelectric heating rate from dust may be increased by up to tens of percent relative to dust models with only carbonaceous and silicate grains.

  20. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of Charged Magnetic Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Perry, Jonathan; Hyde, Truell

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between dust grains is an important process in fields as diverse as planetesimal formation or the plasma processing of silicon wafers into computer chips. This interaction depends in large part on the material properties of the grains, for example whether the grains are conducting, non-conducting, ferrous or non-ferrous. This work considers the effects that electrostatic and magnetic forces, alone or in combination, can have on the coagulation of dust in various environments. A numerical model is used to simulate the coagulation of charged, charged-magnetic and magnetic dust aggregates formed from ferrous material and the results are compared to each other as well as to those from uncharged, non-magnetic material. The interactions between extended dust aggregates are also examined, specifically looking at how the arrangement of charge over the aggregate surface or the inclusion of magnetic material produces dipole-dipole interactions. It will be shown that these dipole-dipole interactions can ...

  1. Alignment of atmospheric mineral dust due to electric field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ulanowski

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Optical polarimetry observations on La Palma, Canary Islands, during a Saharan dust episode show dichroic extinction consistent with the presence of vertically aligned particles in the atmosphere. Modelling of the extinction together with particle orientation indicates that the alignment could have been due to an electric field of the order of 2 kV/m. Two alternative mechanisms for the origin of the field are examined: the effect of reduced atmospheric conductivity and charging of the dust layer, the latter effect being a more likely candidate. It is concluded that partial alignment may be a common feature of Saharan dust layers. The modelling also indicates that the alignment can significantly alter dust optical depth. This "Venetian blind effect" may have decreased optical thickness in the vertical direction by as much as 10% for the case reported here.

  2. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Solar Panels on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; Mantovani, J. G.; Clements S.; Chen, A.; Mazumder, M. K.; Biris, A. S.; Nowicki, A. W.

    2004-01-01

    The Materials Adherence Experiment on the Mars Pathfinder mission measured an obscuration of the solar arrays due to dust deposition at a rate of about 0.2 8% per day. It was estimated that settling dust may cause degradation in performance of a solar panel of between 22% and 89% over the course of two years [1, 2]. These results were obtained without the presence of a global dust storm. Several types of adherence forces keep dust particles attached to surfaces. The most widely discussed adherence force is the electrostatic force. Laboratory experiments [3] as well as indirect evidence from the Wheel Abrasion Experiment on Pathfinder [4] indicate that it is very likely that the particles suspended in the Martian atmosphere are electrostatically charged.

  3. Nonlinear Electrostatic Properties of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Stacy A.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was designed to study the induction charging and charge decay characteristics of small dielectric particles, or glass beads. Initially, the goal of the experiment was further understanding of induction charging of lunar dust particles. However, the mechanism of charging became a point of greater interest as the project continued. Within an environmentally-controlled acrylic glove box was placed a large parallel plate capacitor at high-voltage (HV) power supply with reversible polarity. Spherical 1-mm and 0.5-mm glass beads, singly, were placed between the plates, and their behaviors recorded on video and quantified. Nearly a hundred trials at various humidities were performed. The analysis of the results indicated a non-linear relationship between humidity and particle charge exchange time (CET), for both sizes of beads. Further, a difference in CET for top-resting beads and bottom-resting beads hinted at a different charging mechanism than that of simple induction. Results from the I-mm bead trials were presented at several space science and physics conferences in 2008 and 2009, and were published as a Master's thesis in August 2009. Tangential work stemming from this project resulted in presentations at other international conferences in 2010, and selection to attend workshop on granular matter flow 2011.

  4. Interactions of a Projectile Charge with Two-Dimensional Dusty Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ke; HOU Lu-Jing; WANG You-Nian

    2005-01-01

    @@ The interactions of a moving charge (namely, one additional dust particle) with a two-dimensional dusty plasma in gas discharge experiment are studied by means of the linearized hydrodynamic theory for the dusty plasma.Expressions are derived for the induced potential and the stopping power of the moving charge, when the charge flights parallel to and over the dust layer. The numerical results are obtained for different discharge pressures and different distances from the moving charge to the dust layer. The results show that the moving charge excites a V-shaped disturbance of induced potential or the so-called Mach cone in the dust layer, while the charge itself loses its energy.

  5. Measurements of Martian dust devil winds with HiRISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D.S.; Dundas, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    We report wind measurements within Martian dust devils observed in plan view from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) orbiting Mars. The central color swath of the HiRISE instrument has three separate charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and color filters that observe the surface in rapid cadence. Active features, such as dust devils, appear in motion when observed by this region of the instrument. Our image animations reveal clear circulatory motion within dust devils that is separate from their translational motion across the Martian surface. Both manual and automated tracking of dust devil clouds reveal tangential winds that approach 20-30 m s -1 in some cases. These winds are sufficient to induce a ???1% decrease in atmospheric pressure within the dust devil core relative to ambient, facilitating dust lifting by reducing the threshold wind speed for particle elevation. Finally, radial velocity profiles constructed from our automated measurements test the Rankine vortex model for dust devil structure. Our profiles successfully reveal the solid body rotation component in the interior, but fail to conclusively illuminate the profile in the outer regions of the vortex. One profile provides evidence for a velocity decrease as a function of r -1/2, instead of r -1, suggestive of surface friction effects. However, other profiles do not support this observation, or do not contain enough measurements to produce meaningful insights. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Oblique dust density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Arp, Oliver; Menzel, Kristoffer; Klindworth, Markus

    2007-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of dust density waves in a complex (dusty) plasma under microgravity. The plasma is produced in a radio-frequency parallel-plate discharge (argon, p=15Pa, U=65Vpp). Different sizes of dust particles were used (3.4 μm and 6.4μm diameter). The low-frequency (f 11Hz) dust density waves are naturally unstable modes, which are driven by the ion flow in the plasma. Surprisingly, the wave propagation direction is aligned with the ion flow direction in the bulk plasma but becomes oblique at the boundary of the dust cloud with an inclination of 60^o with respect to the plasma boundary. The experimental results are compared with a kinetic model in the electrostatic approximation [1] and a fluid model [2]. Moreover, the role of dust surface waves is discussed. [1] M. Rosenberg, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996) [2] A. Piel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205009 (2006)

  7. CHARGE syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Chitra

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CHARGE syndrome was initially defined as a non-random association of anomalies (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear anomalies/deafness. In 1998, an expert group defined the major (the classical 4C's: Choanal atresia, Coloboma, Characteristic ears and Cranial nerve anomalies and minor criteria of CHARGE syndrome. Individuals with all four major characteristics or three major and three minor characteristics are highly likely to have CHARGE syndrome. However, there have been individuals genetically identified with CHARGE syndrome without the classical choanal atresia and coloboma. The reported incidence of CHARGE syndrome ranges from 0.1–1.2/10,000 and depends on professional recognition. Coloboma mainly affects the retina. Major and minor congenital heart defects (the commonest cyanotic heart defect is tetralogy of Fallot occur in 75–80% of patients. Choanal atresia may be membranous or bony; bilateral or unilateral. Mental retardation is variable with intelligence quotients (IQ ranging from normal to profound retardation. Under-development of the external genitalia is a common finding in males but it is less apparent in females. Ear abnormalities include a classical finding of unusually shaped ears and hearing loss (conductive and/or nerve deafness that ranges from mild to severe deafness. Multiple cranial nerve dysfunctions are common. A behavioral phenotype for CHARGE syndrome is emerging. Mutations in the CHD7 gene (member of the chromodomain helicase DNA protein family are detected in over 75% of patients with CHARGE syndrome. Children with CHARGE syndrome require intensive medical management as well as numerous surgical interventions. They also need multidisciplinary follow up. Some of the hidden issues of CHARGE syndrome are often forgotten, one being the feeding adaptation of these children, which needs an early aggressive approach from a feeding team. As the child

  8. Dust-acoustic solitary waves in a dusty plasma with two-temperature nonthermal ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhi-Jian Zhou; Hong-Yan Wang; Kai-Biao Zhang

    2012-01-01

    By using reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear propagation of dust-acoustic waves in a dusty plasma (containing a negatively charged dust fluid, Boltzmann distributed electrons and two-temperature nonthermal ions) is investigated. The effects of two-temperature nonthermal ions on the basic properties of small but finite amplitude nonlinear dust-acoustic waves are examined. It is found that two-temperature nonthermal ions affect the basic properties of the dust-acoustic solitary waves. It is also observed that only compressive solitary waves exist in this system.

  9. Influence of grain charge gradients on the dynamics of macroparticles in an electrostatic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaulina, O. S., E-mail: olga.vaulina@bk.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    An analytical model of anomalous heating of charged dust grains (macroparticles) caused by their stochastic motion in a bounded plasma volume is proposed. Analytical expressions allowing one to describe the pumping (heating) of interacting grains with additional stochastic energy due to grain charge gradients are derived. The analytical results are verified by numerical simulation of the problem. It is shown that spatial variations in the charges of dust grains can lead to their anomalous heating in laboratory plasma.

  10. Dust acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahim, Z.; Qamar, A. [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics (NCP) at QAU Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, S. [National Center for Physics (NCP) at QAU Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-07-15

    The linear and nonlinear properties of dust-acoustic waves are investigated in a collisionless Thomas-Fermi magnetoplasma, whose constituents are electrons, ions, and negatively charged dust particles. At dust time scale, the electron and ion number densities follow the Thomas-Fermi distribution, whereas the dust component is described by the classical fluid equations. A linear dispersion relation is analyzed to show that the wave frequencies associated with the upper and lower modes are enhanced with the variation of dust concentration. The effect of the latter is seen more strongly on the upper mode as compared to the lower mode. For nonlinear analysis, we obtain magnetized Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equations involving the dust-acoustic solitary waves in the framework of reductive perturbation technique. Furthermore, the shock wave excitations are also studied by allowing dissipation effects in the model, leading to the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) and ZKB equations. The analysis reveals that the dust-acoustic solitary and shock excitations in a Thomas-Fermi plasma are strongly influenced by the plasma parameters, e.g., dust concentration, dust temperature, obliqueness, magnetic field strength, and dust fluid viscosity. The present results should be important for understanding the solitary and shock excitations in the environments of white dwarfs or supernova, where dust particles can exist.

  11. Dust exposure in Finnish foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltanen, E; Koponen, M; Kokko, A; Engström, B; Reponen, J

    1976-01-01

    Dust measurements were made in 51 iron, 9 steel, and 8 nonferrous foundries, at which 4,316 foundrymen were working. The sampling lasted at least two entire shifts or work days continuously during various operations in each foundry. The dust samples were collected at fixed sites or in the breathing zones of the workers. The mass concentration was determined by weighing and the respirable dust fraction was separated by liquid sedimentation. The free silica content was determined by X-ray diffraction. In the study a total of 3,188 samples were collected in the foundries and 6,505 determinations were made in the laboratory. The results indicated a definite difference in the dust exposure during various operations. The highest dust exposures were found during furnace, cupola, and pouring ladle repair. During cleaning work, sand mixing, and shake-out operations excessive silica dust concentrations were also measured. The lowest dust concentrations were measured during melting and pouring operations. Moderate dust concentrations were measured during coremaking and molding operations. The results obtained during the same operations of iron and steel foundries were similar. The distribution of the workers into various exposure categories, the content of respirable dust and quartz, the correlation between respirable dust and total dust, and the correlation between respirable silica and total dust concentrations are discussed. Observations concerning dust suppression and control methods are briefly considered.

  12. Photoinduced Charge Separation Catalyzed by Manganese Oxides onto a Y-Shaped Branching Acceptor Efficiently Preventing Charge Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kentaro; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2017-03-03

    A full-dimensional nonadiabatic electron wavepacket study is performed on Mn oxide catalytic charge separation to be created on an accepting molecular system, which is of Y-shaped structure and has a track-branching function for protons and electrons. This branching is necessary in cases in which the transferred electrons and protons are to be eventually carried to mutually different destinations without quick annihilation of the created pair (charge separation). However, as a result of the larger size of such a branched acceptor, the distance between the Mn oxide and the acceptor is so great that it is far from obvious whether an electron is successfully delivered through conical intersections. It is shown here that this can actually occur.

  13. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Free Energy Maps and Nonadiabatic Simulations for a Photochemical Reaction in DNA: Cyclobutane Thymine Dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendieta-Moreno, Jesús I; Trabada, Daniel G; Mendieta, Jesús; Lewis, James P; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Ortega, José

    2016-11-03

    The absorption of ultraviolet radiation by DNA may result in harmful genetic lesions that affect DNA replication and transcription, ultimately causing mutations, cancer, and/or cell death. We analyze the most abundant photochemical reaction in DNA, the cyclobutane thymine dimer, using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) techniques and QM/MM nonadiabatic molecular dynamics. We find that, due to its double helix structure, DNA presents a free energy barrier between nonreactive and reactive conformations leading to the photolesion. Moreover, our nonadiabatic simulations show that most of the photoexcited reactive conformations return to standard B-DNA conformations after an ultrafast nonradiative decay to the ground state. This work highlights the importance of dynamical effects (free energy, excited-state dynamics) for the study of photochemical reactions in biological systems.

  14. Dust Devil Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 6 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. Dust devils, small cyclonic wind storms, are common in the American Southwest and on Mars. As the dust devil moves across the surface it picks up the loose dust, leaving behind a dark track to mark its passage. These dust devil tracks are in the Argyre Basin. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -46.6, Longitude 317.5 East (42.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the

  15. Dust Devil Tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Dennis; Fenton, Lori; Neakrase, Lynn; Zimmerman, Michael; Statella, Thiago; Whelley, Patrick; Rossi, Angelo Pio; Balme, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    Dust devils that leave dark- or light-toned tracks are common on Mars and they can also be found on the Earth's surface. Dust devil tracks (hereinafter DDTs) are ephemeral surface features with mostly sub-annual lifetimes. Regarding their size, DDT widths can range between ˜1 m and ˜1 km, depending on the diameter of dust devil that created the track, and DDT lengths range from a few tens of meters to several kilometers, limited by the duration and horizontal ground speed of dust devils. DDTs can be classified into three main types based on their morphology and albedo in contrast to their surroundings; all are found on both planets: (a) dark continuous DDTs, (b) dark cycloidal DDTs, and (c) bright DDTs. Dark continuous DDTs are the most common type on Mars. They are characterized by their relatively homogenous and continuous low albedo surface tracks. Based on terrestrial and martian in situ studies, these DDTs most likely form when surficial dust layers are removed to expose larger-grained substrate material (coarse sands of ≥500 μm in diameter). The exposure of larger-grained materials changes the photometric properties of the surface; hence leading to lower albedo tracks because grain size is photometrically inversely proportional to the surface reflectance. However, although not observed so far, compositional differences (i.e., color differences) might also lead to albedo contrasts when dust is removed to expose substrate materials with mineralogical differences. For dark continuous DDTs, albedo drop measurements are around 2.5 % in the wavelength range of 550-850 nm on Mars and around 0.5 % in the wavelength range from 300-1100 nm on Earth. The removal of an equivalent layer thickness around 1 μm is sufficient for the formation of visible dark continuous DDTs on Mars and Earth. The next type of DDTs, dark cycloidal DDTs, are characterized by their low albedo pattern of overlapping scallops. Terrestrial in situ studies imply that they are formed when sand

  16. Dust during the Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Elfgren, E; Elfgren, Erik

    2003-01-01

    The possibility that population III stars have reionized the Universe at redshifts greater than 6 has recently gained momentum with WMAP polarization results. Here we analyse the role of early dust produced by these stars and ejected into the intergalactic medium. We show that this dust, heated by the radiation from the same population III stars, produces a submillimetre excess. The electromagnetic spectrum of this excess is compatible with the FIRAS (Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer) cosmic far infrared background. This spectrum, a Doppler spectrum times the $\

  17. Charged Leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Albrecht, J; Babu, K; Bernstein, R H; Blum, T; Brown, D N; Casey, B C K; Cheng, C -h; Cirigliano, V; Cohen, A; Deshpande, A; Dukes, E C; Echenard, B; Gaponenko, A; Glenzinski, D; Gonzalez-Alonso, M; Grancagnolo, F; Grossman, Y; Harnik, R; Hitlin, D G; Kiburg, B; Knoepfe, K; Kumar, K; Lim, G; Lu, Z -T; McKeen, D; Miller, J P; Ramsey-Musolf, M; Ray, R; Roberts, B L; Rominsky, M; Semertzidis, Y; Stoeckinger, D; Talman, R; Van De Water, R; Winter, P

    2013-01-01

    This is the report of the Intensity Frontier Charged Lepton Working Group of the 2013 Community Summer Study "Snowmass on the Mississippi", summarizing the current status and future experimental opportunities in muon and tau lepton studies and their sensitivity to new physics. These include searches for charged lepton flavor violation, measurements of magnetic and electric dipole moments, and precision measurements of the decay spectrum and parity-violating asymmetries.

  18. Dust particles investigation for future Russian lunar missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnikov, Gennady; Horanyi, Mihaly; Esposito, Francesca; Zakharov, Alexander; Popel, Sergey; Afonin, Valeri; Borisov, Nikolay; Seran, Elena; Godefroy, Michel; Shashkova, Inna; Kuznetsov, Ilya; Lyash, Andrey; Vorobyova, Elena; Petrov, Oleg; Lisin, Evgeny

    One of the complicating factors of the future robotic and human lunar landing missions is the influence of the dust. Meteorites bombardment has accompanied by shock-explosive phenomena, disintegration and mix of the lunar soil in depth and on area simultaneously. As a consequence, the lunar soil has undergone melting, physical and chemical transformations. Recently we have the some reemergence for interest of Moon investigation. The prospects in current century declare USA, China, India, and European Union. In Russia also prepare two missions: Luna-Glob and Luna-Resource. Not last part of investigation of Moon surface is reviewing the dust condition near the ground of landers. Studying the properties of lunar dust is important both for scientific purposes to investigation the lunar exosphere component and for the technical safety of lunar robotic and manned missions. The absence of an atmosphere on the Moon's surface is leading to greater compaction and sintering. Properties of regolith and dust particles (density, temperature, composition, etc.) as well as near-surface lunar exosphere depend on solar activity, lunar local time and position of the Moon relative to the Earth's magneto tail. Upper layers of regolith are an insulator, which is charging as a result of solar UV radiation and the constant bombardment of charged particles, creates a charge distribution on the surface of the moon: positive on the illuminated side and negative on the night side. Charge distribution depends on the local lunar time, latitude and the electrical properties of the regolith (the presence of water in the regolith can influence the local distribution of charge). On light side of Moon near surface layer there exists possibility formation dusty plasma system. Altitude of levitation is depending from size of dust particle and Moon latitude. The distribution dust particle by size and altitude has estimated with taking into account photoelectrons, electrons and ions of solar wind, solar

  19. A non-adiabatic dynamics study of octatetraene: the radiationless conversion from S2 to S1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zexing; Liu, Chungen

    2013-12-28

    Simulation of the excited state dynamics of all-trans-1,3,5,7-octatetraene has been performed to investigate the ultrafast radiationless S2 → S1 internal conversion process. Multireference configuration interaction with single excitation method has been employed to optimize the equilibrium structure of the excited states, as well as the S2/S1 conical intersection, and to investigate the non-adiabatic molecular dynamics of the S2/S1 state transition. At the conical intersection, the molecule is found to be distorted from the original planar trans structure to a nearly perpendicular conformation around C3-C4 bond, with the torsion angle being about 107°. Such structural change can result in mutual approaching of states S2 and S1 in energy, and drastically increase the nonadiabatic coupling between the two states by destroying the inter-state symmetry prohibition in the electronic wavefunctions. Surface-hopping molecular dynamics simulations are performed to describe the non-adiabatic process. Upon the Franck-Condon excitation to the S2 state, the molecule quickly twists its C3-C4 bond and approaches the conical intersection region, where it can undergo efficient internal conversion to S1. The decay time constant (τ) of S2 state is estimated to be around 251 fs by fitting the occupation number of average fraction of trajectories using an exponential damping function. This value is reasonably consistent with previous experimental measurements of around 300-400 fs.

  20. Dynamics of photoionization from molecular electronic wavepacket states in intense pulse laser fields: A nonadiabatic electron wavepacket study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    A theory for dynamics of molecular photoionization from nonadiabatic electron wavepackets driven by intense pulse lasers is proposed. Time evolution of photoelectron distribution is evaluated in terms of out-going electron flux (current of the probability density of electrons) that has kinetic energy high enough to recede from the molecular system. The relevant electron flux is in turn evaluated with the complex-valued electronic wavefunctions that are time evolved in nonadiabatic electron wavepacket dynamics in laser fields. To uniquely rebuild such wavefunctions with its electronic population being lost by ionization, we adopt the complex-valued natural orbitals emerging from the electron density as building blocks of the total wavefunction. The method has been implemented into a quantum chemistry code, which is based on configuration state mixing for polyatomic molecules. Some of the practical aspects needed for its application will be presented. As a first illustrative example, we show the results of hydrogen molecule and its isotope substitutes (HD and DD), which are photoionized by a two-cycle pulse laser. Photon emission spectrum associated with above threshold ionization is also shown. Another example is taken from photoionization dynamics from an excited state of a water molecule. Qualitatively significant effects of nonadiabatic interaction on the photoelectron spectrum are demonstrated.

  1. Quantifying Waddington landscapes and paths of non-adiabatic cell fate decisions for differentiation, reprogramming and transdifferentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhe; Wang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Cellular differentiation, reprogramming and transdifferentiation are determined by underlying gene regulatory networks. Non-adiabatic regulation via slow binding/unbinding to the gene can be important in these cell fate decision-making processes. Based on a stem cell core gene network, we uncovered the stem cell developmental landscape. As the binding/unbinding speed decreases, the landscape topography changes from bistable attractors of stem and differentiated states to more attractors of stem and other different cell states as well as substates. Non-adiabaticity leads to more differentiated cell types and provides a natural explanation for the heterogeneity observed in the experiments. We quantified Waddington landscapes with two possible cell fate decision mechanisms by changing the regulation strength or regulation timescale (non-adiabaticity). Transition rates correlate with landscape topography through barrier heights between different states and quantitatively determine global stability. We found the optimal speeds of these cell fate decision-making processes. We quantified biological paths and predict that differentiation and reprogramming go through an intermediate state (IM1), whereas transdifferentiation goes through another intermediate state (IM2). Some predictions are confirmed by recent experimental studies. PMID:24132204

  2. Electrostatic Power Generation from Negatively Charged, Simulated Lunar Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang H.; King, Glen C.; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yeonjoon

    2010-01-01

    Research was conducted to develop an electrostatic power generator for future lunar missions that facilitate the utilization of lunar resources. The lunar surface is known to be negatively charged from the constant bombardment of electrons and protons from the solar wind. The resulting negative electrostatic charge on the dust particles, in the lunar vacuum, causes them to repel each other minimizing the potential. The result is a layer of suspended dust about one meter above the lunar surface. This phenomenon was observed by both Clementine and Surveyor spacecrafts. During the Apollo 17 lunar landing, the charged dust was a major hindrance, as it was attracted to the astronauts' spacesuits, equipment, and the lunar buggies. The dust accumulated on the spacesuits caused reduced visibility for the astronauts, and was unavoidably transported inside the spacecraft where it caused breathing irritation [1]. In the lunar vacuum, the maximum charge on the particles can be extremely high. An article in the journal "Nature", titled "Moon too static for astronauts?" (Feb 2, 2007) estimates that the lunar surface is charged with up to several thousand volts [2]. The electrostatic power generator was devised to alleviate the hazardous effects of negatively charged lunar soil by neutralizing the charged particles through capacitive coupling and thereby simultaneously harnessing power through electric charging [3]. The amount of power generated or collected is dependent on the areal coverage of the device and hovering speed over the lunar soil surface. A thin-film array of capacitors can be continuously charged and sequentially discharged using a time-differentiated trigger discharge process to produce a pulse train of discharge for DC mode output. By controlling the pulse interval, the DC mode power can be modulated for powering devices and equipment. In conjunction with a power storage system, the electrostatic power generator can be a power source for a lunar rover or other

  3. Identification of the exploatation dust in road dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication is to determine models of explore dust from vehicle brake systems and the presentationof measurement results of the exploitation dust, which is separate from road dust. The following methods and measuring devices were used: T-01M device, screen analysis, analysis of chemical composition with the use of a scanning microscope with Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (EDS analyser. The measurements for identifying this type of dust were conducted on marked sections of roads: motorway, city road and mountain road. The explored dust was distinguished in the following car systems: brakes, clutch plates, tyres and catalytic converters.

  4. Temperature measurement of a dust particle in a RF plasma GEC reference cell

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin S; Hyde, Truell W

    2016-01-01

    The thermal motion of a dust particle levitated in a plasma chamber is similar to that described by Brownian motion in many ways. The primary differences between a dust particle in a plasma system and a free Brownian particle is that in addition to the random collisions between the dust particle and the neutral gas atoms, there are electric field fluctuations, dust charge fluctuations, and correlated motions from the unwanted continuous signals originating within the plasma system itself. This last contribution does not include random motion and is therefore separable from the random motion in a normal temperature measurement. In this paper, we discuss how to separate random and coherent motion of a dust particle confined in a glass box in a Gaseous Electronic Conference radio frequency reference cell employing experimentally determined dust particle fluctuation data analyzed using the mean square displacement technique.

  5. Cylindrically symmetric dust spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Senovilla, J M M; Senovilla, Jose M. M.; Vera, Raul

    2000-01-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of Einstein's equations for an inhomogeneous dust universe with cylindrical symmetry. The spacetime is extremely simple but nonetheless it has new surprising features. The universe is ``closed'' in the sense that the dust expands from a big-bang singularity but recollapses to a big-crunch singularity. In fact, both singularities are connected so that the whole spacetime is ``enclosed'' within a single singularity of general character. The big-bang is not simultaneous for the dust, and in fact the age of the universe as measured by the dust particles depends on the spatial position, an effect due to the inhomogeneity, and their total lifetime has no non-zero lower limit. Part of the big-crunch singularity is naked. The metric depends on a parameter and contains flat spacetime as a non-singular particular case. For appropriate values of the parameter the spacetime is a small perturbation of Minkowski spacetime. This seems to indicate that flat spacetime may be unstable agai...

  6. Cylindrically symmetric dust spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senovilla, José M. M.

    2000-07-01

    We present an explicit exact solution of Einstein's equations for an inhomogeneous dust universe with cylindrical symmetry. The spacetime is extremely simple but nonetheless it has surprising new features. The universe is `closed' in the sense that the dust expands from a big-bang singularity but recollapses to a big-crunch singularity. In fact, both singularities are connected so that the whole spacetime is `enclosed' within a single singularity of general character. The big-bang is not simultaneous for the dust, and in fact the age of the universe as measured by the dust particles depends on the spatial position, an effect due to the inhomogeneity, and their total lifetime has no non-zero lower limit. Part of the big-crunch singularity is naked. The metric depends on a parameter and contains flat spacetime as a non-singular particular case. For appropriate values of the parameter the spacetime is a small perturbation of Minkowski spacetime. This seems to indicate that flat spacetime may be unstable against some global non-vacuum perturbations.

  7. Left in the Dust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Stardust spacecraft ended its seven-year voyage January 15 after a safe landing on earth, bringing back a capsule of comet particles and samples of interstellar dust that exceeded the loftiest of expectations of mission scientists. The ensuing studies of the cosmic treasure are expected to shed light on the origins of the solar system and earth itself.

  8. Charge Exchange in Low-Energy H, D + C4+ Collisions with Full Account of Electron Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vaeck

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the application of the quantum approach, which takes full account of electron translation at low collisional energies, to the charge exchange process H, D + C4+ → H+, D+ + C3+(3s; 3p; 3d. The partial and the total integral cross sections of the process are calculated in the energy range from 1 till 60 eV/amu. It is shown that the present results are independent from the upper integration limit for numerical solution of the coupled channel equations although nonadiabatic couplings remain nonzero up to infinity. The calculated partial and total cross sections are in agreement with the previous low-energy calculations and the available experimental data. It is shown that for low collisional energies the isotopic effect takes place. The observed effect is explained in terms of the nonadiabatic dynamics.

  9. Dust Acoustic Solitary Waves in Saturn F-ring's Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.K. El-Shewy; M.I. Abo el Maaty; H.G. Abdelwahed; M.A.Elmessary

    2011-01-01

    Effect of hot and cold dust charge on the propagation of dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) in unmagnetized plasma having electrons, singly charged ions, hot and cold dust grains has been investigated.The reductive perturbation method is employed to reduce the basic set of fluid equations to the Kortewege-de Vries (KdV) equation.At the critical hot dusty plasma density NhO, the KdV equation is not appropriate for describing the system.Hence, a set of stretched coordinates is considered to derive the modified KdV equation.It is found that the presence of hot and cold dust charge grains not only significantly modifies the basic properties of solitary structure, but also changes the polarity of the solitary profiles.In the vicinity of the critical hot dusty plasma density NhO, neither KdV nor mKdV equation is appropriate for describing the DAWs.Therefore, a further modified KdV (fmKdV) equation is derived, which admits both soliton and double layer solutions.

  10. Reuyl Crater Dust Avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 13 May 2002) The Science The rugged, arcuate rim of the 90 km crater Reuyl dominates this THEMIS image. Reuyl crater is at the southern edge of a region known to be blanketed in thick dust based on its high albedo (brightness) and low thermal inertia values. This thick mantle of dust creates the appearance of snow covered mountains in the image. Like snow accumulation on Earth, Martian dust can become so thick that it eventually slides down the face of steep slopes, creating runaway avalanches of dust. In the center of this image about 1/3 of the way down is evidence of this phenomenon. A few dozen dark streaks can be seen on the bright, sunlit slopes of the crater rim. The narrow streaks extend downslope following the local topography in a manner very similar to snow avalanches on Earth. But unlike their terrestrial counterparts, no accumulation occurs at the bottom. The dust particles are so small that they are easily launched into the thin atmosphere where they remain suspended and ultimately blow away. The apparent darkness of the avalanche scars is due to the presence of relatively dark underlying material that becomes exposed following the passage of the avalanche. Over time, new dust deposition occurs, brightening the scars until they fade into the background. Although dark slope streaks had been observed in Viking mission images, a clear understanding of this dynamic phenomenon wasn't possible until the much higher resolution images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed the details. MOC images also showed that new avalanches have occurred during the time MGS has been in orbit. THEMIS images will allow additional mapping of their distribution and frequency, contributing new insights about Martian dust avalanches. The Story The stiff peaks in this image might remind you of the Alps here on Earth, but they really outline the choppy edge of a large Martian crater over 50 miles wide (seen in the context image at right). While these aren

  11. Possibilities of Diagnosing Mesospheric Dust Layers During Ionospheric Heating Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Wayne; Mahmoudian, Alireza

    2012-07-01

    Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in understanding physical processes associated with heating mesospheric dust layers with high power radiowaves. The principal signature associated with this heating, which increases the electron temperature, is the modulation of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes PMSEs which are strong radar echoes from electron irregularities due to the presence of the charged dust layer. Particularly important is the modulation of PMSE strength during the periods after the turn-on and turn-off of the radiowave heating. Such periods have been proposed to provide significant diagnostic information about the dust layer and have lead to this being a vigorous field of investigation. At this time, several computational models have been developed that can reproduce important aspects of the temporal behavior during the experiments, however, a key objective to furthering experimental progress is to continue to develop strategies to obtain critical diagnostic information on the dust layer. The focus of this talk is to present simplified analytical models that 1) elucidate the fundamental dusty plasma physics of the processes during the turn-on and turn-off of radiowave heating and 2) are much more amenable to directly providing diagnostic information on the dust layer than the complicated computational models of the past. During the first part of the presentation, the formulation and application of the simplified models are discussed. It is then shown that using a multi-frequency experimental measurement is expected to provide enough observables to determine critical diagnostic information on the dust layer such as the dust density altitude profile, average charge state, and electron temperature in the heated volume.

  12. Head-on collision of dust-ion-acoustic solitons in electron-dust-ion quantum plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prasanta Chatterjee; Malay Kumar Ghorui; Rajkumar Roychoudhury

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we study the head-on collision between two dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) solitons in quantum electron-dust-ion plasma. Using the extended Poincaré–Lighthill–Kuo (PLK) method, we obtain the Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equations, the phase shifts and the trajectories after the head-on collision of the two DIA solitons. We investigate the effect of quantum diffraction parameters for electrons and ions $(H_{e}, H_{i})$, the Fermi temperature ratio () and the dust charged number density (d0) on the phase shifts. Different values of = d0(d0/i0) and d = d0(i/d) are taken to discuss the effects on phase shifts, where d0 denotes the dust charge number, j0 represents the equilibrium number density and is the mass of the jth species ( = , , for electrons, ions and dust particles, respectively). It is observed that the phase shifts are significantly affected by the plasma parameters.

  13. Dust impact signals on the wind spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Monson, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze waveforms recorded by the Time Domain Sampler of the WAVES experiment on Wind which are similar to impulsive waveforms observed by the S/WAVES experiment on STEREO. These have been interpreted as dust impacts by Meyer-Vernet et al. and M. L. Kaiser and K. Goetz and extensively analyzed by Zaslavsky et al. The mechanism for coupling the emission to the antennas to produce an electrical signal is still not well understood, however. One suggested mechanism for coupling of the impact to the antenna is that the spacecraft body changes potential with respect to the surrounding plasma but the antennas do not (the body mechanism). Another class of mechanisms, with several forms, is that the charge of the emitted cloud interacts with the antennas. The Wind data show that both are operating. The time domain shapes of the dust pulses are highly variable but we have little understanding of what provides these shapes. One feature of the STEREO data has been interpreted as impacts from high velocity nanoparticles entrained by the solar wind. We have not found evidence for fast nanodust in the Wind data. An appreciable fraction of the impacts observed on Wind is consistent with interstellar dust. The impact rates do not follow a Poisson distribution, expected for random independent events, and this is interpreted as bunching. We have not succeeded in relating this bunching to known meteor showers, and they do not repeat from 1 year to the next. The data suggest bunching by fields in the heliosphere.

  14. Dust occultation at Titan measured by CDA onboard Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srama, Ralf; CDA science Team

    2016-10-01

    The Cosmic Dust Analyzer (CDA) onboard Cassini characterized successfully the dust environment at Saturn since 2004. The instrument measures the primary charge, speed, mass and composition of individual submicron and micron sized dust grains. The detection threshold scales with speed^3.5 such that the detection of fast nanograins (~100 km/s) is possible. Saturn's nanodust environment (streams) is studied many years. However, a special geometric condition of Saturn, Cassini and Titan during a Titan flyby in 2014 (DOY 65) provided a special dust occultation opportunity. Titan and its atmosphere blocked the stream of fast nanoparticles such that CDA registered a clear drop in impact rate around closest approach. An analysis of the data allows to constrain the source region of the nanograins, which is compatible with a source region in the ring plane at distances from Saturn between 4 and 8 Saturn radii. Backward and forward modeling was performed leading to dust grain sizes between 3 and 9 nm and speeds between 80 and 150 km/s. The new modeling results also show that Enceladus acts a direct source for nanodust streams leading to the observation of periodic impact rates in the outer Saturn system. Such periodicities were observed recently by CDA and showed a clear signature of the Enceladus orbital period. A second dust occultation opportunity using Titan is planned august 2016.

  15. Laboratory investigation of antenna signals from dust impacts on spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Collette, Andrew; Malaspina, David M.; Thayer, Frederick

    2016-04-01

    Electric field and plasma wave instruments act as dust detectors picking up voltage pulses induced by impacts of particulates on the spacecraft body. These signals enable the characterization of cosmic dust environments even with missions without dedicated dust instruments. For example, the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft performed the first detection of dust particles near Uranus, Neptune, and in the outer solar system [Gurnett et al., 1987, 1991, 1997]. The two STEREO spacecraft observed distinct signals at high rate that were interpreted as nano-sized particles originating from near the Sun and accelerated to high velocities by the solar wind [MeyerVernet et al, 2009a, Zaslavsky et al., 2012]. The MAVEN spacecraft is using the antennas onboard to characterize the dust environment of Mars [Andersson et al., 2014] and Solar Probe Plus will do the same in the inner heliosphere. The challenge, however, is the correct interpretation of the impact signals and calculating the mass of the dust particles. The uncertainties result from the incomplete understanding of the signal pickup mechanisms, and the variation of the signal amplitude with impact location, the ambient plasma environment, and impact speed. A comprehensive laboratory study of impact generated antenna signals has been performed recently using the IMPACT dust accelerator facility operated at the University of Colorado. Dust particles of micron and submicron sizes with velocities of tens of km/s are generated using a 3 MV electrostatic analyzer. A scaled down model spacecraft is exposed to the dust impacts and one or more antennas, connected to sensitive electronics, are used to detect the impact signals. The measurements showed that there are three clearly distinct signal pickup mechanisms due to spacecraft charging, antenna charging and antenna pickup sensing space charge from the expanding plasma cloud. All mechanisms vary with the spacecraft and antenna bias voltages and, furthermore, the latter two

  16. Dust processing in elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Villaume, Alexa; Srinivasan, Sundar

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the origin and processing of dust in elliptical galaxies. We theoretically formulate the evolution of grain size distribution, taking into account dust supply from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and dust destruction by sputtering in the hot interstellar medium (ISM), whose temperature evolution is treated by including two cooling paths: gas emission and dust emission (i.e. gas cooling and dust cooling). With our new full treatment of grain size distribution, we confirm that dust destruction by sputtering is too efficient to explain the observed dust abundance even if AGB stars continue to supply dust grains, and that, except for the case where the initial dust-to-gas ratio in the hot gas is as high as $\\sim 0.01$, dust cooling is negligible compared with gas cooling. However, we show that, contrary to previous expectations, cooling does not help to protect the dust; rather, the sputtering efficiency is raised by the gas compression as a result of cooling. We additionally consider grain grow...

  17. Multistate vibronic interactions and nonadiabatic wave packet dynamics in the second photoelectron band of chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahapatra, Susanta; Ritschel, Thomas

    2003-04-15

    We report theoretical investigations on the second photoelectron band of chlorine dioxide molecule by ab initio quantum dynamical methods. This band exhibits a highly complex structure and represents a composite portrait of five excited energetically close-lying electronic states of ClO{sub 2}{sup +}. Much of this complexity is likely to be arising due to strong vibronic interactions among these electronic states - which we address and examine herein. The near equilibrium MRCI potential energy surfaces (PESs) of these five cationic states reported by Peterson and Werner [J. Chem. Phys. 99 (1993) 302] for the C{sub 2v} configuration, are extended for the C{sub s} geometry assuming a harmonic vibration along the asymmetric stretching mode. The strength of the vibronic coupling parameters of the Hamiltonian are calculated by ab initio CASSCF-MRCI method and conical intersections of the PESs are established. The diabatic Hamiltonian matrix is constructed within a linear vibronic coupling scheme and the resulting PESs are employed in the nuclear dynamical simulations, carried out with the aid of a time-dependent wave packet approach. Companion calculations are performed for transitions to the uncoupled electronic states in order to reveal explicitly the impact of the nonadiabatic coupling on the photoelectron dynamics. The theoretical findings are in good accord with the experimental observations. The femtosecond nonradiative decay dynamics of ClO{sub 2}{sup +} excited electronic states mediated by conical intersections is also examined and discussed.

  18. Photochromic Mechanism of a Bridged Diarylethene: Combined Electronic Structure Calculations and Nonadiabatic Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Ting; Gao, Yuan-Jun; Wang, Qian; Cui, Ganglong

    2017-02-02

    Intramolecularly bridged diarylethenes exhibit improved photocyclization quantum yields because the anti-syn isomerization that originally suppresses photocyclization in classical diarylethenes is blocked. Experimentally, three possible channels have been proposed to interpret experimental observation, but many details of photochromic mechanism remain ambiguous. In this work we have employed a series of electronic structure methods (OM2/MRCI, DFT, TDDFT, RI-CC2, DFT/MRCI, and CASPT2) to comprehensively study excited state properties, photocyclization, and photoreversion dynamics of 1,2-dicyano[2,2]metacyclophan-1-ene. On the basis of optimized stationary points and minimum-energy conical intersections, we have refined experimentally proposed photochromic mechanism. Only an S1/S0 minimum-energy conical intersection is located; thus, we can exclude the third channel experimentally proposed. In addition, we find that both photocyclization and photoreversion processes use the same S1/S0 conical intersection to decay the S1 system to the S0 state, so we can unify the remaining two channels into one. These new insights are verified by our OM2/MRCI nonadiabatic dynamics simulations. The S1 excited-state lifetimes of photocyclization and photoreversion are estimated to be 349 and 453 fs, respectively, which are close to experimentally measured values: 240 ± 60 and 250 fs in acetonitrile solution. The present study not only interprets experimental observations and refines previously proposed mechanism but also provides new physical insights that are valuable for future experiments.

  19. The effect of nonadiabaticity on the efficiency of quantum memory based on an optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselkova, N. G.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2017-07-01

    Quantum efficiency is an important characteristic of quantum memory devices that are aimed at recording the quantum state of light signals and its storing and reading. In the case of memory based on an ensemble of cold atoms placed in an optical cavity, the efficiency is restricted, in particular, by relaxation processes in the system of active atomic levels. We show how the effect of the relaxation on the quantum efficiency can be determined in a regime of the memory usage in which the evolution of signals in time is not arbitrarily slow on the scale of the field lifetime in the cavity and when the frequently used approximation of the adiabatic elimination of the quantized cavity mode field cannot be applied. Taking into account the effect of the nonadiabaticity on the memory quality is of interest in view of the fact that, in order to increase the field-medium coupling parameter, a higher cavity quality factor is required, whereas storing and processing of sequences of many signals in the memory implies that their duration is reduced. We consider the applicability of the well-known efficiency estimates via the system cooperativity parameter and estimate a more general form. In connection with the theoretical description of the memory of the given type, we also discuss qualitative differences in the behavior of a random source introduced into the Heisenberg-Langevin equations for atomic variables in the cases of a large and a small number of atoms.

  20. Two-level system in spin baths: non-adiabatic dynamics and heat transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Dvira

    2014-04-28

    We study the non-adiabatic dynamics of a two-state subsystem in a bath of independent spins using the non-interacting blip approximation, and derive an exact analytic expression for the relevant memory kernel. We show that in the thermodynamic limit, when the subsystem-bath coupling is diluted (uniformly) over many (infinite) degrees of freedom, our expression reduces to known results, corresponding to the harmonic bath with an effective, temperature-dependent, spectral density function. We then proceed and study the heat current characteristics in the out-of-equilibrium spin-spin-bath model, with a two-state subsystem bridging two thermal spin-baths of different temperatures. We compare the behavior of this model to the case of a spin connecting boson baths, and demonstrate pronounced qualitative differences between the two models. Specifically, we focus on the development of the thermal diode effect, and show that the spin-spin-bath model cannot support it at weak (subsystem-bath) coupling, while in the intermediate-strong coupling regime its rectifying performance outplays the spin-boson model.

  1. Nonadiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics study of photoisomerization in N-salicilydenemethylfurylamine (SMFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ai-Hua; Wang, Mei-Shan

    2017-03-01

    The photoisomerization mechanisms of N-salicilydenemethylfurylamine upon excitation to the first singlet state are investigated by means of surface-hopping dynamics simulations based on the Zhu-Nakamura theory. Due to different orientations of the methyl-furyl part with respect to the salicylaldimine part and different orientations of hydroxy group with respect to the benzene ring, various stable structures are obtained in the optimization. The enol isomer, S0-ENOL-5a, is the most stable conformer. An ultrafast excited-state intramolecular proton transfer is observed after photoexcitation of the most stable enol conformer and then the molecule reaches the excited-state minimum. After the internal conversion around a conical intersection, the system relaxes to either the cis-keto or trans-keto region in the ground state. The potential energy profiles of the ground and the first excited singlet state are also calculated. According to full-dimensional nonadiabatic dynamics simulations and potential energy profiles, the trans-keto and cis-keto photoproducts can be responsible for the photochromic effect of N-salicilydenemethylfurylamine.

  2. Non-adiabatic quantum evolution: The S matrix as a geometrical phase factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saadi, Y., E-mail: S_yahiadz@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systèmes Dynamiques, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ferhat Abbas de Sétif, Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Maamache, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et Systèmes Dynamiques, Faculté des Sciences, Université Ferhat Abbas de Sétif, Sétif 19000 (Algeria)

    2012-03-19

    We present a complete derivation of the exact evolution of quantum mechanics for the case when the underlying spectrum is continuous. We base our discussion on the use of the Weyl eigendifferentials. We show that a quantum system being in an eigenstate of an invariant will remain in the subspace generated by the eigenstates of the invariant, thereby acquiring a generalized non-adiabatic or Aharonov–Anandan geometric phase linked to the diagonal element of the S matrix. The modified Pöschl–Teller potential and the time-dependent linear potential are worked out as illustrations. -- Highlights: ► In this Letter we study the exact quantum evolution for continuous spectra problems. ► We base our discussion on the use of the Weyl eigendifferentials. ► We give a generalized Lewis and Riesenfeld phase for continuous spectra. ► This generalized phase or Aharonov–Anandan geometric phase is linked to the S matrix. ► The modified Pöschl–Teller and the linear potential are worked out as illustrations.

  3. Selective excitation in a three-state system using a hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yunheung; Jo, Hanlae; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-01-01

    The chirped-pulse interaction in the adiabatic coupling regime induces cyclic permutations of the energy states of a three-level system in the $V$-type configuration, which process is known as the three-level chirped rapid adiabatic passage. Here we show that a spectral hole in a chirped pulse can turn on and off one of the two adiabatic crossing points of this process, reducing the system to an effective two-level system. The given hybrid adiabatic-nonadiabatic transition results in selective excitation of the three-level system, controlled by the laser intensity and spectral position of the hole as well as the sign of the chirp parameter. Experiments are performed with shaped femtosecond laser pulses and the three lowest energy-levels (5S$_{1/2}$, 5P$_{1/2}$, and 5P$_{3/2}$) of atomic rubidium ($^{85}$Rb), of which the result shows good agreement with the theoretically analyzed dynamics. The result indicates that our method, being combined with the ordinary chirped-RAP, implements an adiabatic transitions b...

  4. Ab initio tensorial electronic friction for molecules on metal surfaces: Nonadiabatic vibrational relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Reinhard J.; Askerka, Mikhail; Batista, Victor S.; Tully, John C.

    2016-09-01

    Molecular adsorbates on metal surfaces exchange energy with substrate phonons and low-lying electron-hole pair excitations. In the limit of weak coupling, electron-hole pair excitations can be seen as exerting frictional forces on adsorbates that enhance energy transfer and facilitate vibrational relaxation or hot-electron-mediated chemistry. We have recently reported on the relevance of tensorial properties of electronic friction [M. Askerka et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 217601 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.217601] in dynamics at surfaces. Here we present the underlying implementation of tensorial electronic friction based on Kohn-Sham density functional theory for condensed phase and cluster systems. Using local atomic-orbital basis sets, we calculate nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements and evaluate the full electronic friction tensor in the Markov limit. Our approach is numerically stable and robust, as shown by a detailed convergence analysis. We furthermore benchmark the accuracy of our approach by calculation of vibrational relaxation rates and lifetimes for a number of diatomic molecules at metal surfaces. We find friction-induced mode-coupling between neighboring CO adsorbates on Cu(100) in a c (2 ×2 ) overlayer to be important for understanding experimental findings.

  5. Nonadiabatic dissociation dynamics in H2O: Competition between rotationally and nonrotationally mediated pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kaijun; Cheng, Yuan; Cheng, Lina; Guo, Qing; Dai, Dongxu; Wang, Xiuyan; Yang, Xueming; Dixon, Richard N.

    2008-01-01

    The photochemistry of H2O in the VUV region is important in interstellar chemistry. Whereas previous studies of the photodissociation used excitation via unbound states, we have used a tunable VUV photolysis source to excite individual levels of the rotationally structured C̃ state near 124 nm. The ensuing OH product state distributions were recorded by using the H-atom Rydberg tagging technique. Experimental results indicate a dramatic variation in the OH product state distributions and its stereodynamics for different resonant states. Photodissociation of H2O(C̃) in rotational states with k′a = 0 occurs exclusively through a newly discovered homogeneous coupling to the à state, leading to OH products that are vibrationally hot (up to v = 13), but rotationally cold. In contrast, for H2O in rotationally excited states with k′a > 0, an additional pathway opens through Coriolis-type coupling to the B̃ state surface. This yields extremely rotationally hot and vibrationally cold ground state OH(X) and electronically excited OH(A) products, through 2 different mechanisms. In the case of excitation via the 110 ← 000 transition the H atoms for these 2 product channels are ejected in completely different directions. Quantum dynamical models for the C̃-state photodissociation clearly support this remarkable dynamical picture, providing a uniquely detailed illustration of nonadiabatic dynamics involving at least 4 electronic surfaces. PMID:19047628

  6. Tensor-Train Split-Operator Fourier Transform (TT-SOFT) Method: Multidimensional Nonadiabatic Quantum Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M; Batista, Victor S

    2017-09-12

    We introduce the "tensor-train split-operator Fourier transform" (TT-SOFT) method for simulations of multidimensional nonadiabatic quantum dynamics. TT-SOFT is essentially the grid-based SOFT method implemented in dynamically adaptive tensor-train representations. In the same spirit of all matrix product states, the tensor-train format enables the representation, propagation, and computation of observables of multidimensional wave functions in terms of the grid-based wavepacket tensor components, bypassing the need of actually computing the wave function in its full-rank tensor product grid space. We demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the TT-SOFT method as applied to propagation of 24-dimensional wave packets, describing the S1/S2 interconversion dynamics of pyrazine after UV photoexcitation to the S2 state. Our results show that the TT-SOFT method is a powerful computational approach for simulations of quantum dynamics of polyatomic systems since it avoids the exponential scaling problem of full-rank grid-based representations.

  7. Control of Nonadiabatic Passage through a Conical Intersection by a Dynamic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epshtein, Michael; Yifrach, Yair; Portnov, Alexander; Bar, Ilana

    2016-05-05

    Nonadiabatic processes, dominated by dynamic passage of reactive fluxes through conical intersections (CIs), are considered to be appealing means for manipulating reaction paths, particularly via initial vibrational preparation. Nevertheless, obtaining direct experimental evidence of whether specific-mode excitation affects the passage at the CI is challenging, requiring well-resolved time- or frequency-domain experiments. Here promotion of methylamine-d2 (CH3ND2) molecules to spectral-resolved rovibronic states on the excited S1 potential energy surface, coupled to sensitive D photofragment probing, allowed us to follow the N-D bond fission dynamics. The branching ratios between slow and fast D photofragments and the internal energies of the CH3ND(X̃) photofragments confirm correlated anomalies for predissociation initiated from specific rovibronic states. These anomalies reflect the existence of a dynamic resonance that strongly depends on the energy of the initially excited rovibronic states, the evolving vibrational mode on the repulsive S1 part during N-D bond elongation, and the manipulated passage through the CI that leads to CH3ND radicals excited with C-N-D bending. This resonance plays an important role in the bifurcation dynamics at the CI and can be foreseen to exist in other photoinitiated processes and to control their outcome.

  8. The cosmic dust analyser onboard cassini: ten years of discoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srama, R.; Kempf, S.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Altobelli, N.; Auer, S.; Beckmann, U.; Bugiel, S.; Burton, M.; Economomou, T.; Fechtig, H.; Fiege, K.; Green, S. F.; Grande, M.; Havnes, O.; Hillier, J. K.; Helfert, S.; Horanyi, M.; Hsu, S.; Igenbergs, E.; Jessberger, E. K.; Johnson, T. V.; Khalisi, E.; Krüger, H.; Matt, G.; Mocker, A.; Lamy, P.; Linkert, G.; Lura, F.; Möhlmann, D.; Morfill, G. E.; Otto, K.; Postberg, F.; Roy, M.; Schmidt, J.; Schwehm, G. H.; Spahn, F.; Sterken, V.; Svestka, J.; Tschernjawski, V.; Grün, E.; Röser, H.-P.

    2011-12-01

    The interplanetary space probe Cassini/Huygens reached Saturn in July 2004 after 7 years of cruise phase. The German cosmic dust analyser (CDA) was developed under the leadership of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg under the support of the DLR e.V. This instrument measures the interplanetary, interstellar and planetary dust in our solar system since 1999 and provided unique discoveries. In 1999, CDA detected interstellar dust in the inner solar system followed by the detection of electrical charges of interplanetary dust grains during the cruise phase between Earth and Jupiter. The instrument determined the composition of interplanetary dust and the nanometre-sized dust streams originating from Jupiter's moon Io. During the approach to Saturn in 2004, similar streams of submicron grains with speeds in the order of 100 km/s were detected from Saturn's inner and outer ring system and are released to the interplanetary magnetic field. Since 2004 CDA measured more than one million dust impacts characterising the dust environment of Saturn. The instrument is one of the three experiments which discovered the active ice geysers located at the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus in 2005. Later, a detailed compositional analysis of the water ice grains in Saturn's E ring system led to the discovery of large reservoirs of liquid water (oceans) below the icy crust of Enceladus. Finally, the determination of the dust-magnetosphere interaction and the discovery of the extended E ring (at least twice as large as predicted) allowed the definition of a dynamical dust model of Saturn's E ring describing the observed properties. This paper summarizes the discoveries of a 10-year story of success based on reliable measurements with the most advanced dust detector flown in space until today. This paper focuses on cruise results and findings achieved at Saturn with a focus on flux and density measurements. CDA discoveries related to the detailed dust stream

  9. Southern Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 9 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. In our final dust devil image we are again looking at the southern hemisphere of Mars. These tracks occur mainly on the northeast side of the topographic ridges. Of course, there are many exceptions, which makes understanding the dynamics that initiate the actual dust devil cyclone difficult. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -47.6, Longitude 317.3 East (42.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed

  10. Plentiful Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 8 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. These dust devil tracks occur on the northern plains of Mars. The majority of the surface seen in the image has been affected by the passage of dust devils. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -54.6, Longitude 79.3 East (280.7 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are

  11. Electrostatic Barrier Against Dust Growth in Protoplanetary Disks. I. Classifying the Evolution of Size Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Taku; Sakagami, Masa-aki

    2010-01-01

    Collisional growth of submicron-sized dust grains into macroscopic aggregates is the first step of planet formation in protoplanetary disks. These aggregates are considered to carry nonzero negative charges in the weakly ionized gas disks, but its effect on their collisional growth has not been fully understood so far. In this paper, we investigate how the charging of dust aggregates affects the evolution of their size distribution properly taking into account the charging mechanism in a weakly ionized gas. To clarify the role of the size distribution, we divide our analysis into two steps. First, we analyze the collisional growth of charged aggregates assuming a monodisperse (i.e., narrow) size distribution. We show that the monodisperse growth stalls due to the electrostatic repulsion when a certain condition is met, as is already expected in the previous work. Second, we numerically simulate dust coagulation using Smoluchowski's method to see how the outcome changes when the size distribution is allowed to...

  12. Distribution of dust during two dust storms in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ösp Magnúsdóttir, Agnes; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Ólafur; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2017-04-01

    Particulate matter mass concentrations and size fractions of PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10, and PM15 measured in transversal horizontal profile of two dust storms in southwestern Iceland are presented. Images from a camera network were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. Numerical simulations were used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources as 180,000 and 280,000 tons for each storm. The mean PM15 concentrations inside of the dust plumes varied from 10 to 1600 ?g?m?3 (PM10 = 7 to 583 ?g?m?3). The mean PM1 concentrations were 97-241 ?g?m?3 with a maximum of 261 ?g?m?3 for the first storm. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios of >0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34-0.63 show that suspension of volcanic materials in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations, similar to polluted urban areas in Europe or Asia. Icelandic volcanic dust consists of a higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. Both dust storms occurred in relatively densely inhabited areas of Iceland. First results on size partitioning of Icelandic dust presented here should challenge health authorities to enhance research in relation to dust and shows the need for public dust warning systems.

  13. Measurements of the Atmospheric Electric Field through a Triangular Array and the Long-range Saharan Dust Electrification in Southern Portugal

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, H G; Pereira, S; Barbosa, S M; Nicoll, K; Pereira, M Collares; Harrison, R G

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric electric field (AEF) measurements were carried out in three different sites forming a triangular array in Southern Portugal. The campaign was performed during the summer characterized by Saharan dust outbreaks; the 16th-17th July 2014 desert dust event is considered here. Evidence of long-range dust electrification is attributed to the air-Earth electrical current creating a positive space-charge inside of the dust layer. An increase of ~23 V/m is observed in AEF on the day of the dust event corresponding to space-charges of ~20-2 pCm-3 (charge layer thicknesses ~10-100 m). A reduction of AEF is observed after the dust event.

  14. [House dust mite allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrard, A; Pichler, C

    2012-04-01

    House dust mites can be found all over the world where human beings live independent from the climate. Proteins from the gastrointestinal tract- almost all known as enzymes - are the allergens which induce chronic allergic diseases. The inhalation of small amounts of allergens on a regular base all night leads to a slow beginning of the disease with chronically stuffed nose and an exercise induced asthma which later on persists. House dust mites grow well in a humid climate - this can be in well isolated dwellings or in the tropical climate - and nourish from human skin dander. Scales are found in mattresses, upholstered furniture and carpets. The clinical picture with slowly aggravating complaints leads quite often to a delayed diagnosis, which is accidently done on the occasion of a wider spectrum of allergy skin testing. The beginning of a medical therapy with topical steroids as nasal spray or inhalation leads to a fast relief of the complaints. Although discussed in extensive controversies in the literature - at least in Switzerland with the cold winter and dry climate - the recommendation of house dust mite avoidance measures is given to patients with good clinical results. The frequent ventilation of the dwelling with cold air in winter time cause a lower indoor humidity. Covering encasings on mattresses, pillow, and duvets reduces the possibility of chronic contact with mite allergens as well as the weekly changing the bed linen. Another option of therapy is the specific immunotherapy with extracts of house dust mites showing good results in children and adults. Using recombinant allergens will show a better quality in diagnostic as well as in therapeutic specific immunotherapy.

  15. Dust Removal Technolgy for a Mars In Situ Resource Utilization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, C. I.; Johansen, M. R.; Williams, B. S.; Hogue, M. D.; Mackey, P. J.; Clements, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Several In Situ Resource Utilization (lSRU) systems being considered to enable future manned exploration of Mars require capture of Martian atmospheric gas to extract oxygen and other commodities. However, the Martian atmosphere contains relatively large amounts of dust which must be removed in tbe collection systems of the ISRU chambers. The amount of atmospheric dust varies largely with the presence of daily dust devils and the less frequent but much more powerful global dust storms. A common and mature dust removal technology for terrestrial systems is the electrostatic precipitator. With this technology, dust particles being captured are imparted an electrostatic charge by means of a corona discharge. Charged dust particles are then driven to a region of high electric field which forces the particles onto a collector for capture. Several difficulties appear when this technology is adapted to the Martian atmospheric environment At the low atmospheric pressure of Mars, electrical breakdown occurs at much lower voltages than on Earth and corona discharge is difficult to sustain. In this paper, we report on our efforts to obtain a steady corona/glow discharge in a simulated Martian atmosphere of carbon dioxide at 9 millibars of pressure. We also present results on the design of a dust capture system under these atmospheric conditions.

  16. Anomalous kinetic energy of a system of dust particles in a gas discharge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, G. E., E-mail: norman@ihed.ras.ru; Stegailov, V. V., E-mail: stegailov@gmail.com; Timofeev, A. V., E-mail: timofeevalvl@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    The system of equations of motion of dust particles in a near-electrode layer of a gas discharge has been formulated taking into account fluctuations of the charge of a dust particle and the features of the nearelectrode layer of the discharge. The molecular dynamics simulation of the system of dust particles has been carried out. Performing a theoretical analysis of the simulation results, a mechanism of increasing the average kinetic energy of dust particles in the gas discharge plasma has been proposed. According to this mechanism, the heating of the vertical oscillations of dust particles is initiated by induced oscillations generated by fluctuations of the charge of dust particles, and the energy transfer from vertical to horizontal oscillations can be based on the parametric resonance phenomenon. The combination of the parametric and induced resonances makes it possible to explain an anomalously high kinetic energy of dust particles. The estimate of the frequency, amplitude, and kinetic energy of dust particles are close to the respective experimental values.

  17. Charge Transfer Dynamics from Photoexcited Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haiming; Yang, Ye; Wu, Kaifeng; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-05-01

    Understanding photoinduced charge transfer from nanomaterials is essential to the many applications of these materials. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding charge transfer from quantum dots (QDs), an ideal model system for investigating fundamental charge transfer properties of low-dimensional quantum-confined nanomaterials. We first discuss charge transfer from QDs to weakly coupled acceptors within the framework of Marcus nonadiabatic electron transfer (ET) theory, focusing on the dependence of ET rates on reorganization energy, electronic coupling, and driving force. Because of the strong electron-hole interaction, we show that ET from QDs should be described by the Auger-assisted ET model, which is significantly different from ET between molecules or from bulk semiconductor electrodes. For strongly quantum-confined QDs on semiconductor surfaces, the coupling can fall within the strong coupling limit, in which case the donor-acceptor interaction and ET properties can be described by the Newns-Anderson model of chemisorption. We also briefly discuss recent progress in controlling charge transfer properties in quantum-confined nanoheterostructures through wavefunction engineering and multiple exciton dissociation. Finally, we identify a few key areas for further research.

  18. A coal dust burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakhrshev, B.M.; Khasnullin, I.G.; Krauze, Ye.G.; Ushakov, Yu.A.; Zinovyev, V.G.

    1982-01-01

    The burner for combustion of coal dust fuel, primarily, in rotating furnaces, contains coaxially disposed pipes, a branch pipe for feeding in the air mixture and a rotating mechanism. The first two pipes are switched in to an air source. The third pipe on the input end has an oblique section and the pipe may be rotated around an axis by a mechanism. The first pipe has ports and it may be moved in an axial direction. By installing the third pipe in the first and second positions, it is possible to direct the dust coming from the branch pipe along the central (the larger part of the dust) or the central pipe, respectively, which makes it possible to regulate the configuration of the torch and its temperature. Hot air is sucked from the furnace through the ports in the perforated first pipe to the mouth of the burner, which makes it possible to intensify combustion. By moving the fifitpipe to the right it is possible to overlap the ports with the projections and to rule out suction of the air. The possibility of regulating combustion in wide ranges makes it possible to reduce the expenditure of fuel by 2 to 3 percent.

  19. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health

  20. Charged dust phenomena in the near-Earth space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, W. A.; Mahmoudian, A.

    2016-10-01

    Dusty (or complex) plasmas in the Earth’s middle and upper atmosphere ultimately result in exotic phenomena that are currently forefront research issues in the space science community. This paper presents some of the basic criteria and fundamental physical processes associated with the creation, evolution and dynamics of dusty plasmas in the near-Earth space environment. Recent remote sensing techniques to probe naturally created dusty plasma regions are also discussed. These include ground-based experiments employing high-power radio wave interaction. Some characteristics of the dusty plasmas that are actively produced by space-borne aerosol release experiments are discussed. Basic models that may be used to investigate the characteristics of such dusty plasma regions are presented.

  1. Clouds and Dust Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 2 July 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. This image was acquired during mid-spring near the North Pole. The linear water-ice clouds are now regional in extent and often interact with neighboring cloud system, as seen in this image. The bottom of the image shows how the interaction can destroy the linear nature. While the surface is still visible through most of the clouds, there is evidence that dust is also starting to enter the atmosphere. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.4, Longitude 180 East (180 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote

  2. Ab initio calculation of H + He$^+$ charge transfer cross sections for plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Loreau, J; Lauvergnat, D; Desouter-Lecomte, M; Vaeck, N

    2010-01-01

    The charge transfer in low energy (0.25 to 150 eV/amu) H($nl$) + He$^+(1s)$ collisions is investigated using a quasi-molecular approach for the $n=2,3$ as well as the first two $n=4$ singlet states. The diabatic potential energy curves of the HeH$^+$ molecular ion are obtained from the adiabatic potential energy curves and the non-adiabatic radial coupling matrix elements using a two-by-two diabatization method, and a time-dependent wave-packet approach is used to calculate the state-to-state cross sections. We find a strong dependence of the charge transfer cross section in the principal and orbital quantum numbers $n$ and $l$ of the initial or final state. We estimate the effect of the non-adiabatic rotational couplings, which is found to be important even at energies below 1 eV/amu. However, the effect is small on the total cross sections at energies below 10 eV/amu. We observe that to calculate charge transfer cross sections in a $n$ manifold, it is only necessary to include states with $n^{\\prime}\\leq n$...

  3. On the photoelectric quantum yield of small dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectron emission is crucial to electric charging of dust particles around main-sequence stars and gas heating in various dusty environments. An estimate of the photoelectric processes contains an ill-defined parameter called the photoelectric quantum yield, which is the total number of electrons ejected from a dust particle per absorbed photon. Here we revisit the so-called small particle effect of photoelectron emission and provide an analytical model to estimate photoelectric quantum yields of small dust particles in sizes down to nanometers. We show that the small particle effect elevates the photoelectric quantum yields of nanoparticles up to by a factor of 103 for carbon, water ice, and organics, and a factor of 102 for silicate, silicon carbide, and iron. We conclude the surface curvature of the particles is a quantity of great importance to the small particle effect, unless the particles are submicrometers in radius or larger.

  4. On the photoelectric quantum yield of small dust particles

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Photoelectron emission is crucial to electric charging of dust particles around main-sequence stars and gas heating in various dusty environments. An estimate of the photoelectric processes contains an ill-defined parameter called the photoelectric quantum yield, which is the total number of electrons ejected from a dust particle per absorbed photon. Here we revisit the so-called small particle effect of photoelectron emission and provide an analytical model to estimate photoelectric quantum yields of small dust particles in sizes down to nanometers. We show that the small particle effect elevates the photoelectric quantum yields of nanoparticles up to by a factor of $10^3$ for carbon, water ice, and organics, and a factor of $10^2$ for silicate, silicon carbide, and iron. We conclude the surface curvature of the particles is a quantity of great importance to the small particle effect, unless the particles are submicrometers in radius or larger.

  5. Thin and superthin ion current sheets. Quasi-adiabatic and nonadiabatic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Zelenyi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin anisotropic current sheets (CSs are phenomena of the general occurrence in the magnetospheric tail. We develop an analytical theory of the self-consistent thin CSs. General solitions of the Grad-Shafranov equation are obtained in a quasi-adiabatic approximation which neglects the jumps of the sheet adiabatic invariant Iz This is possible if the anisotropy of the initial distribution function is not too strong. The resulting structure of the thin CSs is interpreted as a sum of negative dia- and positive paramagnetic currents flowing near the neutral plane. In the immediate vicinity of the magnetic field reversal region the paramagnetic current arising from the meandering motion of the ions on Speiser orbits dominates. The maximum CS thick-ness is achieved in the case of weak plasma anisotropy and is of the order of the thermal ion gyroradius outside the sheet. A unified picture of thin CS scalings includes both the quasi-adiabatic regimes of weak and strong anisotropies and the nonadiabatic limit of super-strong anisotropy of the source ion distribution. The later limit corresponds to the case of almost field-aligned initial distribution, when the ratio of the drift velocity outside the CS to the thermal ion velocity exceeds the ratio of the magnetic field outside the CS to its value in-side the CS (vD/vT> B0/Bn. In this regime the jumps of Iz, become essential, and the current sheet thickness is approaching to some small but finite value, which depends upon the parameter Bn /B0. Convective electric field increases the effective anisotropy of the source distribution and might produce the essential CS thinning which could have important implications for the sub-storm dynamics.

  6. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer to carbon atoms: nonadiabatic surface-hopping dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shu-Hua; Xie, Bin-Bin; Fang, Qiu; Cui, Ganglong; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-21

    Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) between two highly electronegative atoms, for example, oxygen and nitrogen, has been intensely studied experimentally and computationally, whereas there has been much less theoretical work on ESIPT to other atoms such as carbon. We have employed CASSCF, MS-CASPT2, RI-ADC(2), OM2/MRCI, DFT, and TDDFT methods to study the mechanistic photochemistry of 2-phenylphenol, for which such an ESIPT has been observed experimentally. According to static electronic structure calculations, irradiation of 2-phenylphenol populates the bright S1 state, which has a rather flat potential in the Franck-Condon region (with a shallow enol minimum at the CASSCF level) and may undergo an essentially barrierless ESIPT to the more stable S1 keto species. There are two S1/S0 conical intersections that mediate relaxation to the ground state, one in the enol region and one in the keto region, with the latter one substantially lower in energy. After S1 → S0 internal conversion, the transient keto species can return back to the S0 enol structure via reverse ground-state hydrogen transfer in a facile tautomerization. This mechanistic scenario is verified by OM2/MRCI-based fewest-switches surface-hopping simulations that provide detailed dynamic information. In these trajectories, ESIPT is complete within 118 fs; the corresponding S1 excited-state lifetime is computed to be 373 fs in vacuum. Most of the trajectories decay to the ground state via the S1/S0 conical intersection in the keto region (67%), and the remaining ones via the enol region (33%). The combination of static electronic structure computations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations is expected to be generally useful for understanding the mechanistic photophysics and photochemistry of molecules with intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

  7. Optimizing Saharan dust CALIPSO retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Amiridis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate improvements in CALIPSO dust extinction retrievals over North Africa and Europe when corrections are applied regarding the Saharan dust lidar ratio assumption, the separation of dust portion in detected dust mixtures, and the averaging scheme introduced in the Level 3 CALIPSO product. First, a universal, spatially constant lidar ratio of 58 sr instead of 40 sr is applied to individual Level 2 dust-related backscatter products. The resulting aerosol optical depths show an improvement compared with synchronous and co-located AERONET measurements. An absolute bias of the order of −0.03 has been found, improving on the statistically significant biases of the order of −0.10 reported in the literature for the original CALIPSO product. When compared with the MODIS co-located AOD product, the CALIPSO negative bias is even less for the lidar ratio of 58 sr. After introducing the new lidar ratio for the domain studied, we examine potential improvements to the climatological CALIPSO Level 3 extinction product: (1 by introducing a new methodology for the calculation of pure dust extinction from dust mixtures and (2 by applying an averaging scheme that includes zero extinction values for the non-dust aerosol types detected. The scheme is applied at a horizontal spatial resolution of 1° × 1° for ease of comparison with the instantaneous and co-located dust extinction profiles simulated by the BSC-DREAM8b dust model. Comparisons show that the extinction profiles retrieved with the proposed methodology reproduce the well-known model biases per sub-region examined. The very good agreement of the proposed CALIPSO extinction product with respect to AERONET, MODIS and the BSC-DREAM8b dust model, makes this dataset an ideal candidate for the provision of an accurate and robust multi-year dust climatology over North Africa and Europe.

  8. Coherence-Controlled Nonadiabatic Dynamics via State-Space Decomposition: A Consistent Way To Incorporate Ehrenfest and Born-Oppenheimer-Like Treatments of Nuclear Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Guohua

    2016-11-03

    Accurately describing nuclear motion is crucial in electronically nonadiabatic dynamics simulations. In this work, a coherence-controlled (CC) approach is proposed based on the mapping between the classical state space and the full electronic matrix and that between the decomposed state space and different nuclear dynamics that allows nuclear motion to properly follow either Ehrenfest dynamics in the coherence domain or Born-Oppenheimer-like dynamics in the single-state domain in a consistent manner. This new method is applied to several benchmark models involving nonadiabatic transitions in two-state or three-state systems, and the obtained results are in excellent agreement with exact quantum calculations. As a generalization of the recently developed symmetrical quasiclassical approach and the augmented image (AI) version of the multistate trajectory approach, the proposed method is extremely efficient and numerically stable. Therefore, it has great potential for implementation in nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations for realistic complex systems, such as materials and biological molecules.

  9. Communication: On the competition between adiabatic and nonadiabatic dynamics in vibrationally mediated ammonia photodissociation in its A band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Changjian; Zhu, Xiaolei; Ma, Jianyi; Yarkony, David R.; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua

    2015-03-01

    Non-adiabatic processes play an important role in photochemistry, but the mechanism for conversion of electronic energy to chemical energy is still poorly understood. To explore the possibility of vibrational control of non-adiabatic dynamics in a prototypical photoreaction, namely, the A-band photodissociation of NH 3 ( X ˜ 1 A 1 ) , full-dimensional state-to-state quantum dynamics of symmetric or antisymmetric stretch excited NH 3 ( X ˜ 1 A 1 ) is investigated on recently developed coupled diabatic potential energy surfaces. The experimentally observed H atom kinetic energy distributions are reproduced. However, contrary to previous inferences, the NH 2 ( A ˜ 2 A 1 ) /NH 2 ( X ˜ 2 B 1 ) branching ratio is found to be small regardless of the initial preparation of NH 3 ( X ˜ 1 A 1 ) , while the internal state distribution of the preeminent fragment, NH 2 ( X ˜ 2 B 1 ) , is found to depend strongly on the initial vibrational excitation of NH 3 ( X ˜ 1 A 1 ) . The slow H atoms in photodissociation mediated by the antisymmetric stretch fundamental state are due to energy sequestered in the internally excited NH 2 ( X ˜ 2 B 1 ) fragment, rather than in NH 2 ( A ˜ 2 A 1 ) as previously proposed. The high internal excitation of the NH 2 ( X ˜ 2 B 1 ) fragment is attributed to the torques exerted on the molecule as it passes through the conical intersection seam to the ground electronic state of NH3. Thus in this system, contrary to previous assertions, the control of electronic state branching by selective excitation of ground state vibrational modes is concluded to be ineffective. The juxtaposition of precise quantum mechanical results with complementary results based on quasi-classical surface hopping trajectories provides significant insights into the non-adiabatic process.

  10. Calibration of impact ionization cosmic dust detectors: first tests to investigate how the dust density influences the signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin Sterken, Veerle; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Hillier, Jon; Fielding, Lee; Lovett, Joseph; Armes, Steven; Fechler, Nina; Srama, Ralf; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hornung, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    Impact ionization experiments have been performed since more than 40 years for calibrating cosmic dust detectors. A linear Van de Graaff dust accelerator was used to accelerate the cosmic dust analogues of submicron to micron-size to speeds up to 80 km s^-1. Different materials have been used for calibration: iron, carbon, metal-coated minerals and most recently, minerals coated with conductive polymers. While different materials with different densities have been used for instrument calibration, a comparative analysis of dust impacts of equal material but different density is necessary: porous or aggregate-like particles are increasingly found to be present in the solar system: e.g. dust from comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko [Fulle et al 2015], aggregate particles from the plumes of Enceladus [Gao et al 2016], and low-density interstellar dust [Westphal 2014 et al, Sterken et al 2015]. These recalibrations are relevant for measuring the size distributions of interplanetary and interstellar dust and thus mass budgets like the gas-to-dust mass ratio in the local interstellar cloud.We report about the calibrations that have been performed at the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility for investigating the influence of particle density on the impact ionization charge. We used the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyzer for the target, and compared hollow versus compact silica particles in our study as a first attempt to investigate experimentally the influence of dust density on the signals obtained. Also, preliminary tests with carbon aerogel were performed, and (unsuccessful) attempts to accelerate silica aerogel. In this talk we explain the motivation of the study, the experiment set-up, the preparation of — and the materials used, the results and plans and recommendations for future tests.Fulle, M. et al 2015, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, Volume 802, Issue 1, article id. L12, 5 pp. (2015)Gao, P. et al 2016, Icarus, Volume 264, p. 227-238Westphal, A. et al 2014, Science

  11. Acceleration of dust grains by means of the high energy ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorashadizadeh, S.M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sabzinezhad, F. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A.R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-08

    The acceleration of charged dust grains by a high energy ion beam is investigated by obtaining the dispersion relation. The Cherenkov and cyclotron acceleration mechanisms of dust grains are compared with each other. The role of dusty plasma parameters and the magnetic field strength in the acceleration process are discussed. In addition, the stimulated waves by an ion beam in a fully magnetized dust–ion plasma are studied. It is shown that these waves are unstable at different angles with respect to the external magnetic field. It is also indicated that the growth rates increase by either increasing the ion and dust densities or decreasing the magnetic field strength. Finally, the results of our research show that the high energy ion beam can accelerate charged dust grains.

  12. Fast numerical evaluation of time-derivative non-adiabatic couplings for mixed quantum-classical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a numerical differentiation scheme which eliminates evaluation of overlap determinants in calculating the time-derivative non-adiabatic couplings (TDNACs). Evaluation of these determinants was a bottleneck in previous implementations of mixed quantum-classical methods using numerical differentiation of electronic wave functions in the Slater-determinant representation. The central idea of our approach is, first, to reduce the analytic time derivatives of Slater determinants to time derivatives of molecular orbitals, and then to apply a finite-difference formula. Benchmark calculations prove the efficiency of the proposed scheme showing impressive several-order-of-magnitude speedups of the TDNAC calculation step for midsize molecules.

  13. Coupled Wavepackets for Non-Adiabatic Molecular Dynamics: A Generalization of Gaussian Wavepacket Dynamics to Multiple Potential Energy Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    White, Alexander; Mozyrsky, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Accurate simulation of the non-adiabatic dynamics of molecules in excited electronic states is key to understanding molecular photo-physical processes. Here we present a novel method, based on a semiclassical approximation, that is as efficient as the commonly used mean field Ehrenfest or ad hoc Surface Hopping methods and properly accounts for interference and decoherence effects. This novel method is an extension of Hellers Thawed Gaussian wavepacket dynamics that includes coupling between potential energy surfaces. The accuracy of the method can be systematically improved.

  14. Real-time monitoring of intracellular signal transduction in PC12 cells by non-adiabatic tapered optical fiber biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Asadollahi, A.; Noraeipoor, Z.; Dargahi, L.

    2014-05-01

    Real-time observation of intracellular process of signal transduction is very useful for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications as well as for basic research work of cell biology. For feasible and reagentless observation of intracellular alterations in real time, we examined the use of a nonadiabatic tapered optical fiber (NATOF) biosensor for monitoring of intracellular signal transduction that was mainly translocation of protein kinase C via refractive index change in PC12 cells adhered on tapered fiber sensor without any indicator reagent. PC12 cells were stimulated with KCl . Our results suggest that complex intracellular reactions could be real-time monitored and characterized by NATOF biosensor.

  15. Composition of Plasma Formed from Hypervelocity Dust Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, N.; Close, S.; Rymer, A. M.; Mocker, A.

    2012-12-01

    Dust impacts can occur on all solar system bodies but are especially prevalent in the case of the Saturnian moons that are near or within the dust torus produced by Enceladus's plumes. Depending on the mass and charge on these plume particles, they will be influenced by both gravitational and electrodynamic forces, resulting in a range of possible impact speeds on the moons. The plasma formed upon impact can have very different characteristics depending on impact speed and on the electric field due to surface charging at the impact point. Through recent tests conducted at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics using a Van de Graaff dust accelerator, iron dust particles were electrostatically accelerated to speeds of 3-65 km/s and impacted on a variety of target materials including metallic and glassy surfaces. The target surfaces were connected to a biasing supply to represent surface charging effects. Because of the high specific kinetic energy of the dust particles, upon impact they vaporize along with part of the target surface and a fraction of this material is ionized forming a dense plasma. The impacts produced both positive and negative ions. We made measurements of the net current imparted by this expanding plasma at a distance of several centimeters from the impact point. By setting the bias of the target, we impose an electric field on the charge population, allowing a measurement of plasma composition through time of flight analysis. The figure shows representative measurements of the net current measured by a retarding potential analyzer (RPA) from separate 18 and 19 km/s impacts of 7 fg particles on a glassy surface that was negatively and positively biased, respectively. This target was an optical solar reflector donated by J. Likar of Lockheed Martin for these experiments. These results show that ions of both positive and negative charge can be formed through the mechanism of dust impacts, and has implications on the surface plasma environment

  16. Dust coagulation in ISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  17. Flying Through Dust From Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    How can we tell what an asteroid is made of? Until now, weve relied on remote spectral observations, though NASAs recently launched OSIRIS-REx mission may soon change this by landing on an asteroid and returning with a sample.But what if we could learn more about the asteroids near Earth without needing to land on each one? It turns out that we can by flying through their dust.The aerogel dust collector of the Stardust mission. [NASA/JPL/Caltech]Ejected CluesWhen an airless body is impacted by the meteoroids prevalent throughout our solar system, ejecta from the body are flung into the space around it. In the case of small objects like asteroids, their gravitational pull is so weak that most of the ejected material escapes, forming a surrounding cloud of dust.By flying a spacecraft through this cloud, we could perform chemical analysis of the dust, thereby determining the asteroids composition. We could even capture some of the dust during a flyby (for example, by using an aerogel collector like in the Stardust mission) and bring it back home to analyze.So whats the best place to fly a dust-analyzing or -collecting spacecraft? To answer this, we need to know what the typical distribution of dust is around a near-Earth asteroid (NEA) a problem that scientists Jamey Szalay (Southwest Research Institute) and Mihly Hornyi (University of Colorado Boulder) address in a recent study.The colors show the density distribution for dust grains larger than 0.3 m around a body with a 10-km radius. The distribution is asymmetric, with higher densities on the apex side, shown here in the +y direction. [Szalay Hornyi 2016]Moon as a LaboratoryTo determine typical dust distributions around NEAs, Szalay and Hornyi first look at the distribution of dust around our own Moon, caused by the same barrage of meteorites wed expect to impact NEAs. The Moons dust cloud was measured in situ in 2013 and 2014 by the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) on board the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment

  18. Gravimetric dust sampling for control purposes and occupational dust sampling.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Unsted, AD

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the introduction of gravimetric dust sampling, konimeters had been used for dust sampling, which was largely for control purposes. Whether or not absolute results were achievable was not an issue since relative results were used to evaluate...

  19. Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

  20. On Meteoric Dust Particles in the Near-Earth Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Farahani, Majid Mazraeh Ei; Mohebalhojeh, Ali R.; Scales, Wayne

    2016-07-01

    Over 40 metric tons of meteoric dust enters the earth's atmosphere every day. This dust settles and creates natural dust layers in the altitude ranges between 80 and 100 kilometers which spans the earth's upper mesosphere to lower thermosphere. The dust layers in the lower atmosphere have a great impact on climate, human health as well as communication and navigation signals. The main goal of this study is the role of meteoric smoke particles on the formation of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC). Recent rocket experiments have detected the presence of these particles. Since these dust layers are immersed in the earth's upper atmosphere, they become charged due to collection of electrons and ions from the earth's ionospheric plasma. Noctilucent Clouds NLCs are a fascinating visual manifestation of these dust layers. So-called Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes PMSEs are radar echoes that are a direct consequence of the sub-visible charged dust that exists at altitudes above NLC regions. Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) are strong echoes that have been typically observed in the frequency range from 50MHz to 1.3GHz and in the altitude about 85km. Unlike PMSE, Polar mesospheric winter echoes (PMWE) are less known. PMWE appear at a lower altitude and is weaker in comparison with PMSE. The focus of this study is on meteoric smoke particles and how they affect PMWE source region. Parameters associated with smoke dust particles such as size distribution, charging characteristics, density and positive or negative charge will be considered. The second part of this presentation will be on the effect of gravity waves on PMC. Full coupling to a turbulent neutral field with a statistical analysis will be discussed. Impact of a neutral turbulence driving field on small amplitude plasma fluctuations in such a configuration and some of the important consequences will be also presented. This has important consequences for electric field and potential measurements on rocket probes as

  1. [Biological effect of wood dust].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska, A; Wojtczak, J; Bielichowska-Cybula, G; Domańska, A; Dutkiewicz, J; Mołocznik, A

    1993-01-01

    The biological effect of exposure to wood dust depends on its composition and the content of microorganisms which are an inherent element of the dust. The irritant and allergic effects of wood dust have been recognised for a long time. The allergic effect is caused by the wood dust of subtropical trees, e.g. western red cedar (Thuja plicata), redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), obeche (Triplochiton scleroxylon), cocabolla (Dalbergia retusa) and others. Trees growing in the European climate such as: larch (Larix), walnut (Juglans regia), oak (Quercus), beech (Fagus), pine (Pinus) cause a little less pronounced allergic effect. Occupational exposure to irritative or allergic wood dust may lead to bronchial asthma, rhinitis, alveolitis allergica, DDTS (Organic dust toxic syndrome), bronchitis, allergic dermatitis, conjunctivitis. An increased risk of adenocarcinoma of the sinonasal cavity is an important and serious problem associated with occupational exposure to wood dust. Adenocarcinoma constitutes about half of the total number of cancers induced by wood dust. An increased incidence of the squamous cell cancers can also be observed. The highest risk of cancer applies to workers of the furniture industry, particularly those dealing with machine wood processing, cabinet making and carpentry. The cancer of the upper respiratory tract develops after exposure to many kinds of wood dust. However, the wood dust of oak and beech seems to be most carcinogenic. It is assumed that exposure to wood dust can cause an increased incidence of other cancers, especially lung cancer and Hodgkin's disease. The adverse effects of microorganisms, mainly mould fungi and their metabolic products are manifested by alveolitis allergica and ODTS. These microorganisms can induce aspergillomycosis, bronchial asthma, rhinitis and allergic dermatitis.

  2. Flue Dust Agglomeration in the Secondary Lead Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitzgebel, Klaus

    1981-01-01

    A secondary lead smelter produces several tons of bag-house dust a day. Appropriate handling of this dust is mandatory to meet the proposed OSHA and EPA workroom and ambient standards. Dust agglomeration proved a successful approach. Dusts with a high concentration of PbCl2, or compounds containing PbCl2 can be agglomerated at much lower temperatures than samples with low PbCl2 concentrations. The chlorine sources are polyvinyl chloride (PVC) battery plate separators. Since PVC is used in Europe to a much greater extent than in the U.S., the composition of feedstock must be considered in equipment selection at U.S. secondary smelters. The vapor pressure characteristics of PbCl2 favor its evaporation at blast furnace temperatures. Condensation occurs in the gas cooling system. Recycling of baghouse dust leads to a buildup of PbCl2 in the smelter. Its removal from the system is eventually necessary through leaching, if charges with a high PVC content are processed.

  3. Jovian Dust Streams: A monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, H; Horányi, M; Graps, A L; Kempf, S; Srama, R; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G; Moissl, R; Johnson, T V; Grün, E; Krueger, Harald; Geissler, Paul; Horanyi, Mihaly; Graps, Amara L.; Kempf, Sascha; Srama, Ralf; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Moissl, Richard; Johnson, Torrence V.; Gruen, Eberhard

    2003-01-01

    Streams of high speed dust particles originate from Jupiter's innermost Galilean moon Io. After release from Io, the particles collect electric charges in the Io plasma torus, gain energy from the co-rotating electric field of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and leave the Jovian system into interplanetary space with escape speeds over $\\rm 200 km s^{-1}$. Galileo, which was the first orbiter spacecraft of Jupiter, has continuously monitored the dust streams during 34 revolutions about the planet between 1996 and 2002. The observed dust fluxes exhibit large orbit-to-orbit variability due to systematic and stochastic changes. After removal of the systematic variations, the total dust emission rate of Io has been calculated. It varies between $10^{-3}$ and $\\mathrm{10} \\rm kg s^{-1}$, and is typically in the range of 0.1 to $\\rm 1 kg s^{-1}$. We compare the dust emission rate with other markers of volcanic activity on Io like large-area surface changes caused by volcanic deposits and sightings of volcanic plumes.

  4. Photo-induced charge separation across the graphene-TiO2 interface is faster than energy losses: a time-domain ab initio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Run; English, Niall J; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2012-08-29

    Graphene-TiO(2) composites exhibit excellent potential for photovoltaic applications, provided that efficient photoinduced charge separation can be achieved at the interface. Once charges are separated, TiO(2) acts as an electron carrier, while graphene is an excellent hole conductor. However, charge separation competes with energy losses that can result in rapid electron-hole annihilation inside metallic graphene. Bearing this in mind, we investigate the mechanisms and, crucially, time scales of electron transfer and energy relaxation processes. Using nonadiabatic molecular dynamics formulated within the framework of time-domain density functional theory, we establish that the photoinduced electron transfer occurs several times faster than the electron-phonon energy relaxation (i.e., charge separation is efficient in the presence of electron-phonon relaxation), thereby showing that graphene-TiO(2) interfaces can form the basis for photovoltaic and photocatalytic devices using visible light. We identify the mechanisms for charge separation and energy losses, both of which proceed by rapid, phonon-induced nonadiabatic transitions within the manifold of the electronic states. Electron injection is ultrafast, owing to strong electronic coupling between graphene and TiO(2). Injection is promoted by both out-of-plane graphene motions, which modulate the graphene-TiO(2) distance and interaction, and high-frequency bond stretching and bending vibrations, which generate large nonadiabatic coupling. Both electron injection and energy transfer, injection in particular, accelerate for photoexcited states that are delocalized between the two subsystems. The theoretical results show excellent agreement with the available experimental data [Adv. Funct. Mater. 2009, 19, 3638]. The state-of-the-art simulation generates a detailed time-domain atomistic description of the interfacial charge separation and relaxation processes that are fundamental to a wide variety of applications

  5. Of data and dust

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie Hills

    2016-01-01

    The traditional image of an archive is one of dusty old boxes, books and papers. When your archive is digital, dust spells disaster. An innovative environmental sensor designed and built by a CERN IT specialist has become an essential element in the Laboratory’s data-preservation strategy.   The novel air particle monitoring sensor designed by CERN's Julien Leduc. CERN’s archive holds more than 130 petabytes of data from past and present high-energy physics experiments. Some of it is 40 years old, most of it needs to be kept forever, and all of it is held on tape cartridges (over 20,000 of them). The cartridges are held inside tape libraries with robotic arms that load them into tape drives where they can be read and written. Tape cartridges have many advantages over other data storage media, notably cost and long-term reliability, but topping the list of drawbacks is their vulnerability to contamination from airborne dust particles; a tiny piece of g...

  6. Mining dust filter. Bergbaustaubfilter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igelbuescher, H.; Hoelter, H.

    1988-12-28

    A dust filter for application underground, whose casing is designed as a transportable unit combinable with further casings and fitted with removable filter pockets. These filter pockets have a frame which seals towards the casing and with the lattices on which the filter cloth is stretched and with spacers holding the said lattices at a distance. Each casing as such has inspection ports that are operationable optionally on either side, and clean and crude gas channels on its upper side. The ends of these channels have coupleable head pieces, so that connection is made easy when casings are arranged in a line. Each crude gas channel is connected to the inside of the casing by means of perforations in the floor of said channel, whereas the clean gas channel, for its part, is in connection with the inside of the casing by means of a channel on the head side of the casing. It is thus possible to create a dust filter having practically any desired output by arranging individual modules in line, in which connection each individual module is reliably transportable on the facilities available below ground, as pre-fabricated above ground. Stable support of the sides of the filter cloths is ensured by the lattice that consists of reciprocally cranked longitudinal and transverse wires. 10 figs.

  7. Sulfur in Cometary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.

    1997-01-01

    The computer-intensive project consisted of the analysis and synthesis of existing data on composition of comet Halley dust particles. The main objective was to obtain a complete inventory of sulfur containing compounds in the comet Halley dust by building upon the existing classification of organic and inorganic compounds and applying a variety of statistical techniques for cluster and cross-correlational analyses. A student hired for this project wrote and tested the software to perform cluster analysis. The following tasks were carried out: (1) selecting the data from existing database for the proposed project; (2) finding access to a standard library of statistical routines for cluster analysis; (3) reformatting the data as necessary for input into the library routines; (4) performing cluster analysis and constructing hierarchical cluster trees using three methods to define the proximity of clusters; (5) presenting the output results in different formats to facilitate the interpretation of the obtained cluster trees; (6) selecting groups of data points common for all three trees as stable clusters. We have also considered the chemistry of sulfur in inorganic compounds.

  8. Erosion of dust aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Seizinger, Alexander; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to gain a deeper insight into how much different aggregate types are affected by erosion. Especially, it is important to study the influence of the velocity of the impacting projectiles. We also want to provide models for dust growth in protoplanetary disks with simple recipes to account for erosion effects. Methods: To study the erosion of dust aggregates we employed a molecular dynamics approach that features a detailed micro-physical model of the interaction of spherical grains. For the first time, the model has been extended by introducing a new visco-elastic damping force which requires a proper calibration. Afterwards, different sample generation methods were used to cover a wide range of aggregate types. Results: The visco-elastic damping force introduced in this work turns out to be crucial to reproduce results obtained from laboratory experiments. After proper calibration, we find that erosion occurs for impact velocities of 5 m/s and above. Though fractal aggregates as ...

  9. Plasma dust crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goree, John; Thomas, H.; Morfill, G.

    1994-01-01

    In a ground-based definition study, a concept for a new type of microgravity experiment is developed. We formed a new state of matter: a crystalline lattice structure of charged micron-size spheres, suspended in a charge-neutral plasma. The plasma is formed by a low-pressure radio-frequency argon discharge. Solid microspheres are introduced, and they gain a negative electric charge. They are cooled by molecular drag on the ambient neutral gas. They are detected by laser light scattering and video photography. Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that a two-dimensional nonquantum lattice forms through the Coulomb interaction of these spheres. Microgravity is thought to be required to observe a three-dimensional structure.

  10. Coulomb scatter of diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap under microgravity conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnikov, M. I., E-mail: miasnikovmi@mail.ru; D’yachkov, L. G.; Petrov, O. F.; Vasiliev, M. M., E-mail: mixxy@mail.ru; Fortov, V. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Savin, S. F.; Serova, E. O. [Korolev Rocket and Space Corporation Energia, ul. Lenina 4A (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The effect of a dc electric field on strongly nonideal Coulomb systems consisting of a large number (~10{sup 4}) of charged diamagnetic dust particles in a cusp magnetic trap are carried out aboard the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) within the Coulomb Crystal experiment. Graphite particles of 100–400 μm in size are used in the experiments. Coulomb scatter of a dust cluster and the formation of threadlike chains of dust particles are observed experimentally. The processes observed are simulated by the molecular dynamics (MD) method.

  11. Interaction of energetic electrons with dust whistler-mode waves in magnetospheric dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this Letter, a new conceptual approach has been presented to investigate the interaction of energetic electrons with dust whistler-mode waves in magnetospheric dusty (complex) plasmas. Dust whistler-mode waves generated in the presence of charged dust grains in the magnetized dusty plasma, can scatter the launched electrons into the loss-cone leading to precipitation into the upper atmosphere which is an important loss process in the radiation belts and provides a major source of energy for the diffuse and pulsating aurora. To study the scattered electrons and chaotic regions, a Hamiltonian model of the electron-dust wave interaction has been employed in the magnetospheric plasma by considering the launched electron beam self-fields. Numerical simulations indicate that an electron beam interacting with the whistler-mode wave can easily trigger chaos in the dust-free plasma, while in the presence of dust charged grains in the plasma, the chaotic regions are quenched to some extent in the magnetosphere. Consequently, the rate of scattered electrons into the loss-cone reduces for the regions that the dust grains are present.

  12. Andromeda's dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draine, B. T.; Aniano, G. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, Robert [CSIRO—Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NWS 1710 (Australia); Leroy, Adam, E-mail: draine@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: ganiano@ias.u-psud.fr [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance, out to R ≈ 25 kpc. The global dust mass is M {sub d} = 5.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, the global dust/H mass ratio is M {sub d}/M {sub H} = 0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is (q {sub PAH}) = 0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R = 5.6 kpc, a maximum at R = 11.2 kpc, and an outer ring at R ≈ 15.1 kpc. The dust/gas ratio varies from M {sub d}/M {sub H} ≈ 0.026 at the center to ∼0.0027 at R ≈ 25 kpc. From the dust/gas ratio, we estimate the interstellar medium metallicity to vary by a factor ∼10, from Z/Z {sub ☉} ≈ 3 at R = 0 to ∼0.3 at R = 25 kpc. The dust heating rate parameter (U) peaks at the center, with (U) ≈ 35, declining to (U) ≈ 0.25 at R = 20 kpc. Within the central kiloparsec, the starlight heating intensity inferred from the dust modeling is close to what is estimated from the stars in the bulge. The PAH abundance reaches a peak q {sub PAH} ≈ 0.045 at R ≈ 11.2 kpc. When allowance is made for the different spectrum of the bulge stars, q {sub PAH} for the dust in the central kiloparsec is similar to the overall value of q {sub PAH} in the disk. The silicate-graphite-PAH dust model used here is generally able to reproduce the observed dust spectral energy distribution across M31, but overpredicts 500 μm emission at R ≈ 2-6 kpc, suggesting that at R = 2-6 kpc, the dust opacity varies more steeply with frequency (with β ≈ 2.3 between 200 and 600 μm) than in the model.

  13. Dust and the Sick Building Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, Finn; Suadicani, Poul; Wohlfahrt Nielsen, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome......Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome...

  14. Beyond structure: ultrafast X-ray absorption spectroscopy as a probe of non-adiabatic wavepacket dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Simon P; Averbukh, Vitali; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S

    2016-12-16

    The excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of polyatomic molecules, leading to the coupling of structural and electronic dynamics, is a fundamentally important yet challenging problem for both experiment and theory. Ongoing developments in ultrafast extreme vacuum ultraviolet (XUV) and soft X-ray sources present new probes of coupled electronic-structural dynamics because of their novel and desirable characteristics. As one example, inner-shell spectroscopy offers localized, atom-specific probes of evolving electronic structure and bonding (via chemical shifts). In this work, we present the first on-the-fly ultrafast X-ray time-resolved absorption spectrum simulations of excited state wavepacket dynamics: photo-excited ethylene. This was achieved by coupling the ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) method, employing on-the-fly dynamics simulations, with high-level algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) X-ray absorption cross-section calculations. Using the excited state dynamics of ethylene as a test case, we assessed the ability of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to project out the electronic character of complex wavepacket dynamics, and evaluated the sensitivity of the calculated spectra to large amplitude nuclear motion. In particular, we demonstrate the pronounced sensitivity of the pre-edge region of the X-ray absorption spectrum to the electronic and structural evolution of the excited-state wavepacket. We conclude that ultrafast time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy may become a powerful tool in the interrogation of excited state non-adiabatic molecular dynamics.

  15. Site-selective deposition of gold nanoparticles using non-adiabatic reaction induced by optical near-fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Kokoro; Yatsui, Takashi; Kawazoe, Tadashi; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Ohtsu, Motoichi, E-mail: kitamura@nanophotonics.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Systems, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nanophotonics Research Center, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2010-07-16

    In this paper, we report on site-selective deposition of metal nanoparticles using a non-adiabatic photochemical reaction. Photoreduction of gold was performed in a silica gel membrane containing tetrachloroaurate (AuCl{sub 4}{sup -}) ions, using ZnO nanorods as the sources of optical near-field light, resulting in deposition of gold nanoparticles with an average diameter of 17.7 nm. The distribution of distances between the gold nanoparticles and nanorod traces revealed that the gold nanoparticles were deposited adjacent to the ZnO nanorods, reflecting the attenuation of the optical near-fields in the vicinity of the ZnO nanorods. We found that the emission wavelength from the ZnO nanorods was longer than the absorption edge wavelength of the tetrachloroaurate. Additionally, from the intensity distribution obtained by a finite-difference time-domain method, the gold deposited around the ZnO nanorods was found to be due to a non-adiabatic photochemical reaction.

  16. Spatiotemporal interference of photoelectron wave packets and the time scale of nonadiabatic transitions in the high-frequency regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Koudai

    2016-10-01

    The method of the envelope Hamiltonian [K. Toyota, U. Saalmann, and J. M. Rost, New J. Phys. 17, 073005 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/7/073005] is applied to further study a detachment dynamics of a model negative ion in one dimension in the high-frequency regime. This method is based on the Floquet approach, but the time dependency of an envelope function is explicitly kept for arbitrary pulse durations. Therefore, it is capable of describing not only a photon absorption or emission, but also a nonadiabatic transition which is induced by the time-varying envelope of the pulse. It was shown that the envelope Hamiltonian accurately retrieves the results obtained by the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and the underlying physics were well understood by the adiabatic approximation based on the envelope Hamiltonian. In this paper, we explore two more aspects of the detachment dynamics, which were not considered in our previous work. First, we determine the features of both a spatial and temporal interference of photoelectron wave packets in a photon-absorption process. We conclude that both of the interference mechanisms are universal in ionization dynamics in the high-frequency regime. Second, we extract a pulse duration which maximizes a yield of the nonadiabatic transition as a function of a pulse duration. It is shown that it becomes maximum when the pulse duration is comparable to a time scale of an electron.

  17. Ultrafast dual photoresponse of isolated biological chromophores: link to the photoinduced mode-specific non-adiabatic dynamics in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochenkova, Anastasia V; Andersen, Lars H

    2013-01-01

    The anionic wild-type Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) chromophore defines an entire class of naturally occurring chromophores, which are based on the oxydized tyrosine side chain. The GFP chromophore exhibits an enriched photoinduced non-adiabatic dynamics in the multiple excited-state decay channels. Deactivation includes vibrational resonant photodetachment and internal conversion. Here, we provide detailed insight into the efficiency of different vibrational modes in promoting a selective photoresponse in the bare GFP chromophore anion. We introduce a general theoretical model that is capable of accounting for the alternative non-equivalent pathways in internal conversion, and we outline the factors, by which the photo-initiated response may be altered in this channel. The topography around the planar minimum in S1 and the two distinct types of the S1/S0 conical intersections obtained through high-level ab initio calculations provide direct support to the proposed model. There are mode-selective ways to control the photoresponse and to direct it towards a single excited-state decay channel. By tuning the excitation wavelength, the photoresponse may be directed towards the ultrafast non-statistical electron emission coupled with vibrational (de)coherence, whereas a vibrational pre-excitation in the ground state may lead to the ultrafast non-statistical internal conversion through a conical intersection. We also discuss the implication of our results to the photo-initiated non-adiabatic dynamics in the proteins.

  18. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosols, tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, play an important role in modifying the Earth's energy balance and are essential for the formation of cloud droplets. Suspended dust particles lifted from the world's arid regions by strong winds contain essential minerals that can be transported great distances and deposited into the ocean or on other continents where productivity is limited by lack of usable minerals [1]. Dust can transport pathogens as well as minerals great distance, contributing to the spread of human and agricultural diseases, and a portion of dust can be attributed to human activity suggesting that dust radiative effects should be included in estimates of anthropogenic climate forcing. The greenish and brownish tints in figure 1 show the wide extent of monthly mean mineral dust transport, as viewed by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite Figure 1. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite. The brighter the color, the greater the aerosol loading. Red and reddish tints indicate aerosol dominated by small particles created primarily from combustion processes. Green and brownish tints indicate larger particles created from wind-driven processes, usually transported desert dust. Note the bright green band at the southern edge of the Saharan desert, the reddish band it must cross if transported to the southwest and the long brownish transport path as it crosses the Atlantic to South America. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov). Even though qualitatively we recognize the extent and importance of dust transport and the role that it plays in fertilizing nutrient-limited regions, there is much that is still unknown. We are just now beginning to quantify the amount of dust that exits one continental region and the

  19. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  20. Nonadiabatic decomposition of gas-phase RDX through conical intersections: an ONIOM-CASSCF study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A; Bernstein, E R

    2011-05-05

    Topographical exploration of nonadiabatically coupled ground- and excited-electronic-state potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the isolated RDX molecule was performed using the ONIOM methodology: Computational results were compared and contrasted with the previous experimental results for the decomposition of this nitramine energetic material following electronic excitation. One of the N-NO(2) moieties of the RDX molecule was considered to be an active site. Electronic excitation of RDX was assumed to be localized in the active site, which was treated with the CASSCF algorithm. The influence of the remainder of the molecule on the chosen active site was calculated by either a UFF MM or RHF QM method. Nitro-nitrite isomerization was predicted to be a major excited-electronic-state decomposition channel for the RDX molecule. This prediction directly corroborates previous experimental results obtained through photofragmentation-fragment detection techniques. Nitro-nitrite isomerization of RDX was found to occur through a series of conical intersections (CIs) and was finally predicted to produce rotationally cold but vibrationally hot distributions of NO products, also in good agreement with the experimental observation of rovibrational distributions of the NO product. The ONIOM (CASSCF:UFF) methodology predicts that the final step in the RDX dissociation occurs on its S(0) ground-electronic-state potential energy surface (PES). Thus, the present work clearly indicates that the ONIOM method, coupled with a suitable CASSCF method for the active site of the molecule, at which electronic excitation is assumed to be localized, can predict hitherto unexplored excited-electronic-state PESs of large energetic molecules such as RDX, HMX, and CL-20. A comparison of the decomposition mechanism for excited-electronic-state dimethylnitramine (DMNA), a simple analogue molecule of nitramine energetic materials, with that for RDX, an energetic material, was also performed. CASSCF