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Sample records for non-virion type-1 membrane

  1. Characterization of retrokeratoprosthetic membranes in the Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Rebecca C; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Michaud, Norman A; Dohlman, Claes H; Colby, Kathryn A

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate retroprosthetic membranes that can occur in 25% to 65% of patients with the Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis (KPro). Two patients with Peter anomaly and 2 with neurotrophic scarred corneas underwent revisions of their type 1 KPros because of visually compromising retroprosthetic membranes. The excised membranes were studied by light microscopy with hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, and toluidine blue stains. Immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscopic examination were also used. Light microscopic examination revealed that the retro-KPro fibrous membranes originated from the host's corneal stroma. These mildly to moderately vascularized membranes grew through gaps in the Descemet membrane to reach behind the KPro back plate and adhere to the anterior iris surface, which had undergone partial lysis. In 2 cases, the fibrous membranes merged at the pupil with matrical portions of metaplastic lens epithelium, forming a bilayered structure that crossed the optical axis. Retro-KPro membranes stained positively for α-smooth muscle actin but negatively for pancytokeratin. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of actin filaments within myofibroblasts and small surviving clusters of metaplastic lens epithelial cells. Stromal downgrowth, rather than epithelial downgrowth, was the major element of the retro-KPro membranes in this series. Metaplastic lens epithelium also contributed to opacification of the visual axis. Florid membranous inflammation was not a prominent finding and thus probably not a requisite stimulus for membrane development. Further advances in prosthetic design and newer antifibroproliferative agents may reduce membrane formation.

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression correlates with membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase expression in colorectal cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongfei; Tatsuguchi, Atsushi; Shinji, Seiichi; Fujimori, Shunji; Tanaka, Shu; Gudis, Katya; Sugisaki, Yuichi; Furukawa, Kiyonori; Tajiri, Takashi; Fukuda, Yuh; Kishida, Teruyuki; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2006-08-01

    Elevated expression of cyclooxygenase-2 has been found in colorectal cancer. One of the mechanisms through which cyclooxygenase-2 affects tumorigenesis is through its overexpression, which leads to increased invasiveness of cancer cells. A crucial step in this pathway is thought to be the induction of membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase, which activates matrix metalloproteinase-2. However, to date there have been few clinicopathologic studies concerning cyclooxygenase-2-mediated invasiveness in human colorectal cancer tissues. We performed immunohistochemical analysis of the respective antigens on colorectal cancer specimens obtained by surgical resections from 96 patients with colorectal cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2 and membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase expression was positive exclusively in cancer cells in 88 cases (92 percent) and 23 cases (24 percent), respectively. All 23 cases expressing membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase also expressed cyclooxygenase-2. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression was positive in cancer cells in 20 cases (21 percent) and stromal cells in 52 cases (54 percent). Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in cancer cells correlated with lymphatic invasion and local recurrence. Statistically, a significant correlation was found between cyclooxygenase-2 and membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase expression, and membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression in cancer cells. There was no association between cyclooxygenase-2 expression and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression. However, immunostaining of serial sections revealed that in the majority of cases examined, nearly 100 percent of cancer cells expressing matrix metalloproteinase-2 also coexpressed cyclooxygenase-2. This study indicates strong association between both cyclooxygenase-2 and membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase expression, and membrane-type-1 matrix metalloproteinase and matrix metalloproteinase-2 in colorectal

  3. Epiretinal membrane: a treatable cause of visual disability in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Hannah M; Roxburgh, Richard H; Child, Nicholas; Polkinghorne, Philip J; Frampton, Chris; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of ocular abnormalities have been documented to occur in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. The objectives of this study were to investigate the macular and optic nerve morphology using optical coherence tomography in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1. A total of 30 myotonic dystrophy type 1 patients and 28 controls were recruited for participation. All participants underwent a thorough ophthalmologic examination, including spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of the macula and retinal nerve fibre layer. Images were reviewed by a retinal specialist ophthalmologist, masked to the diagnosis of the participants. Average macular thickness was significantly greater in the myotonic dystrophy group compared to controls [327.3 μm vs. 308.5 μm (p Visual acuity was reduced due to the presence of epiretinal membrane in six patient eyes and none of the control eyes. The presence of an epiretinal membrane was significantly correlated with increasing age in the patient group. We report an increased prevalence of epiretinal membrane in the myotonic dystrophy type 1 group. This may be a previously under-recognised form of visual impairment in this group. Epiretinal membranes can be treated surgically. We suggest that, in addition to a comprehensive clinical examination, optical coherence tomography examination is implemented as part of an ophthalmological assessment for the myotonic dystrophy type 1 patient with reduced visual acuity.

  4. The pancreatic zymogen granule membrane protein, GP2, binds Escherichia coli type 1 Fimbriae

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    Lowe Anson W

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GP2 is the major membrane protein present in the pancreatic zymogen granule, and is cleaved and released into the pancreatic duct along with exocrine secretions. The function of GP2 is unknown. GP2's amino acid sequence is most similar to that of uromodulin, which is secreted by the kidney. Recent studies have demonstrated uromodulin binding to bacterial Type 1 fimbria. The fimbriae serve as adhesins to host receptors. The present study examines whether GP2 also shares similar binding properties to bacteria with Type 1 fimbria. Commensal and pathogenic bacteria, including E. coli and Salmonella, express type 1 fimbria. Methods An in vitro binding assay was used to assay the binding of recombinant GP2 to defined strains of E. coli that differ in their expression of Type 1 fimbria or its subunit protein, FimH. Studies were also performed to determine whether GP2 binding is dependent on the presence of mannose residues, which is a known determinant for FimH binding. Results GP2 binds E. coli that express Type 1 fimbria. Binding is dependent on GP2 glycosylation, and specifically the presence of mannose residues. Conclusion GP2 binds to Type 1 fimbria, a bacterial adhesin that is commonly expressed by members of the Enterobacteriacae family.

  5. The Peri-islet Basement Membrane, a Barrier to Infiltrating Leukocytes in Type 1 Diabetes in Mouse and Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korpos, Eva; Kadri, Nadir; Kappelhoff, Reinhild

    2013-01-01

    We provide the first comprehensive analysis of the extracellular matrix (ECM) composition of peri-islet capsules, composed of the peri-islet basement membrane (BM) and subjacent interstitial matrix (IM), in development of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice and in human type 1 diabetes. Our data demonstr...

  6. Integrated functions of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase in regulating cancer malignancy: Beyond a proteinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Takeharu; Seiki, Motoharu

    2017-06-01

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is expressed in different types of invasive and proliferative cells, including cancer cells and stromal cells. MT1-MMP cleaves extracellular matrix proteins, membrane proteins and other pericellular proteins, thereby changing the cellular microenvironment and regulating signal activation. Critical roles of protease activity in cancer cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis have been demonstrated by many groups. MT1-MMP also has a non-protease activity in that it inhibits the oxygen-dependent suppression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) via Munc18-1-interacting protein 3 (Mint3) and thereby enhances the expression of HIF target genes. Elevated HIF activity in MT1-MMP-expressing cancer cells is a fundamental mechanism underlying the Warburg effect, a well-known phenomenon where malignant cancer cells exhibit a higher rate of glucose metabolism. Because specific intervention of HIF activation by MT1-MMP suppresses tumor formation by cancer cells in mice, both the proteolytic and non-proteolytic activities of MT1-MMP are important for tumor malignancy and function in an integrated manner. In this review, we summarize recent findings relating to how MT1-MMP activates HIF and its effects on cancer cells and stromal cells. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. Influence of membrane fluidity on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Shinji; Yusa, Keisuke; Monde, Kazuaki; Akaike, Takaaki; Maeda, Yosuke

    2005-01-01

    For penetration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), formation of fusion-pores might be required for accumulating critical numbers of fusion-activated gp41, followed by multiple-site binding of gp120 with receptors, with the help of fluidization of the plasma membrane and viral envelope. Correlation between HIV-1 infectivity and fluidity was observed by treatment of fluidity-modulators, indicating that infectivity was dependent on fluidity. A 5% decrease in fluidity suppressed the HIV-1 infectivity by 56%. Contrarily, a 5% increase in fluidity augmented the infectivity by 2.4-fold. An increased temperature of 40 deg C or treatment of 0.2% xylocaine after viral adsorption at room temperature enhanced the infectivity by 2.6- and 1.5-fold, respectively. These were inhibited by anti-CXCR4 peptide, implying that multiple-site binding was accelerated at 40 deg C or by xylocaine. Thus, fluidity of both the plasma membrane and viral envelope was required to form the fusion-pore and to complete the entry of HIV-1

  8. Oxidative stress and prostate cancer progression are elicited by membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Lan; Zucker, Stanley; Zarrabi, Kevin; Kadam, Pournima; Schmidt, Cathleen; Cao, Jian

    2011-10-01

    Oxidative stress caused by high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been correlated with prostate cancer aggressiveness. Expression of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), which has been implicated in cancer invasion and metastasis, is associated with advanced prostate cancer. We show here that MT1-MMP plays a key role in eliciting oxidative stress in prostate cancer cells. Stable MT1-MMP expression in less invasive LNCaP prostate cancer cells with low endogenous MT1-MMP increased activity of ROS, whereas MT1-MMP knockdown in DU145 cells with high endogenous MT1-MMP decreased activity of ROS. Expression of MT1-MMP increased oxidative DNA damage in LNCaP and in DU145 cells, indicating that MT1-MMP-mediated induction of ROS caused oxidative stress. MT1-MMP expression promoted a more aggressive phenotype in LNCaP cells that was dependent on elaboration of ROS. Blocking ROS activity using the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine abrogated MT1-MMP-mediated increase in cell migration and invasion. MT1-MMP-expressing LNCaP cells displayed an enhanced ability to grow in soft agar that required increased ROS. Using cells expressing MT1-MMP mutant cDNAs, we showed that ROS activation entails cell surface MT1-MMP proteolytic activity. Induction of ROS in prostate cancer cells expressing MT1-MMP required adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and was impeded by anti-β1 integrin antibodies. These results highlight a novel mechanism of malignant progression in prostate cancer cells that involves β1 integrin-mediated adhesion, in concert with MT1-MMP proteolytic activity, to elicit oxidative stress and induction of a more invasive phenotype.

  9. [Effect of extracted ZG from gardenia on Hep-2 cell membrane post infected with parainfluenza virus type 1 (PIV-1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shan-Shan; Huang, Yang; Zhao, Ye; Gao, Ying-Jie; Gong, Wen-Feng; Cui, Xiao-Lan

    2007-09-01

    In order to study the anti-viral mechanism of extracted ZG from Gardenia, the effect of extracted ZG on Hep-2 cell membrane potential, Na -K+-ATPase activity and membrane fluidity post infected with parainfluenza virus type 1 (PIV-1) was observed. Acetylcholine which was fluorescent labeled with DiBAC4 (3) was taken as positive control to observe the changes of membrane potential and was measured by flow cytometer. The phosphorus determination method and spectrophotometer were used to measure the Na+-K+-ATPase activity of Hep-2 cell membrane post PIV-1 infection. Hep-2 cell membrane phospholipids was labeled with fluorescent NBD-C6-HPC and membrane fluidity was measured by confocal laser scanning microscope. The results demonstated that after PIV-1 infection the Hep-2 cell membrane potential decreased significantly and the membrane was in the state of hyperpolarization, Na+-K+-ATPase activity increased and membrane fluidity decreased significantly. There was no apparent interferring effect of extracted ZG on the changes of membrane potential and Na+-K+-ATPase activity post PIV-1 infection, while membrane fluidity was improved significantly. Acetylcholine improved the state of hyperpolarization. The changes of membrane potential, Na -K+-ATPase activity and membrane fluidity might be the biomechanism of PIV-1 infectoin. The extracted ZG improved membrane fluidity to prevent from PIV-1 infection by protecting the cell membrane, which was probably the mechanism of anti-PIV-1 activity of the extracted ZG, but ZG probably had nothing to do with membrane potential and Na+-K+-ATPase activity.

  10. Visualization of polarized membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase activity in live cells by fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, Mingxing; Lu, Shaoying; Li, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Jing; Seong, Jihye; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; Shyy, John Y. -J.; Weiss, Stephen J.; Wang, Yingxiao

    2008-01-01

    Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) plays a critical role in cancer cell biology by proteolytically remodeling the extracellular matrix. Utilizing fluorescence resonance energy transfer ( FRET) imaging, we have developed a novel biosensor, with its sensing element anchoring at the

  11. Type-1 cannabinoid receptors reduce membrane fluidity of capacitated boar sperm by impairing their activation by bicarbonate.

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    Barbara Barboni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammalian spermatozoa acquire their full fertilizing ability (so called capacitation within the female genital tract, where they are progressively exposed to inverse gradients of inhibiting and stimulating molecules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present research, the effect on this process of anandamide, an endocannabinoid that can either activate or inhibit cannabinoid receptors depending on its concentration, and bicarbonate, an oviductal activatory molecule, was assessed, in order to study the role exerted by the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R in the process of lipid membrane remodeling crucial to complete capacitation. To this aim, boar sperm were incubated in vitro under capacitating conditions (stimulated by bicarbonate in the presence or in the absence of methanandamide (Met-AEA, a non-hydrolysable analogue of anandamide. The CB1R involvement was studied by using the specific inhibitor (SR141716 or mimicking its activation by adding a permeable cAMP analogue (8Br-cAMP. By an immunocytochemistry approach it was shown that the Met-AEA inhibits the bicarbonate-dependent translocation of CB1R from the post-equatorial to equatorial region of sperm head. In addition it was found that Met-AEA is able to prevent the bicarbonate-induced increase in membrane disorder and the cholesterol extraction, both preliminary to capacitation, acting through a CB1R-cAMP mediated pathway, as indicated by MC540 and filipin staining, EPR spectroscopy and biochemical analysis on whole membranes (CB1R activity and on membrane enriched fraction (C/P content and anisotropy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Altogether, these data demonstrate that the endocannabinoid system strongly inhibits the process of sperm capacitation, acting as membrane stabilizing agent, thus increasing the basic knowledge on capacitation-related signaling and potentially opening new perspectives in diagnostics and therapeutics of male infertility.

  12. Membrane Estrogen Receptor-α Interacts with Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Type 1a to Mobilize Intracellular Calcium in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

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    Kuo, John; Hariri, Omid R.; Bondar, Galyna; Ogi, Julie; Micevych, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Estradiol, acting on a membrane-associated estrogen receptor-α (mERα), induces an increase in free cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) needed for progesterone synthesis in hypothalamic astrocytes. To determine whether rapid estradiol signaling involves an interaction of mERα with metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1a (mGluR1a), changes in [Ca2+]i were monitored with the calcium indicator, Fluo-4 AM, in primary cultures of female postpubertal hypothalamic astrocytes. 17β-Estradiol over a range of 1 nm to 100 nm induced a maximal increase in [Ca2+]i flux measured as a change in relative fluorescence [ΔF Ca2+ = 615 ± 36 to 641 ± 47 relative fluorescent units (RFU)], whereas 0.1 nm of estradiol stimulated a moderate [Ca2+]i increase (275 ± 16 RFU). The rapid estradiol-induced [Ca2+]i flux was blocked with 1 μm of the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780 (635 ± 24 vs. 102 ± 11 RFU, P estradiol-induced membrane signaling in astrocytes. PMID:18948402

  13. Membrane Type-1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Its Upregulation by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α

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    Anna Janowska-Wieczorek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP has been implicated in tumor invasion, as well as trafficking of normal hematopoietic cells, and acts as a physiologic activator of proMMP-2. In this study we examined MT1-MMP expression in primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Because tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α is known to be elevated in AML, we also investigated the effect of TNF-α on MT1-MMP expression. We found (i MT1-MMP mRNA expression in 41 out of 43 primary AML samples tested; (ii activation of proMMP-2 in co-cultures of AML cells with normal bone marrow stromal cells; and (iii inhibition of proMMP-2 activation and trans-Matrigel migration of AML cells by gene silencing using MT1-MMP siRNA. Moreover, recombinant human TNF-α upregulated MT1-MMP expression in AML cells resulting in enhanced proMMP-2 activation and trans-Matrigel migration. Thus, AML cells express MT1-MMP and TNF-α enhances it leading to increased MMP-2 activation and most likely contributing to the invasive phenotype. We suggest that MT1-MMP, together with TNF-α, should be investigated as potential therapeutic targets in AML.

  14. The dimer interface of the membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase hemopexin domain: crystal structure and biological functions.

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    Tochowicz, Anna; Goettig, Peter; Evans, Richard; Visse, Robert; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Palmisano, Ralf; Ito, Noriko; Richter, Klaus; Maskos, Klaus; Franke, Daniel; Svergun, Dmitri; Nagase, Hideaki; Bode, Wolfram; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2011-03-04

    Homodimerization is an essential step for membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) to activate proMMP-2 and to degrade collagen on the cell surface. To uncover the molecular basis of the hemopexin (Hpx) domain-driven dimerization of MT1-MMP, a crystal structure of the Hpx domain was solved at 1.7 Å resolution. Two interactions were identified as potential biological dimer interfaces in the crystal structure, and mutagenesis studies revealed that the biological dimer possesses a symmetrical interaction where blades II and III of molecule A interact with blades III and II of molecule B. The mutations of amino acids involved in the interaction weakened the dimer interaction of Hpx domains in solution, and incorporation of these mutations into the full-length enzyme significantly inhibited dimer-dependent functions on the cell surface, including proMMP-2 activation, collagen degradation, and invasion into the three-dimensional collagen matrix, whereas dimer-independent functions, including gelatin film degradation and two-dimensional cell migration, were not affected. These results shed light on the structural basis of MT1-MMP dimerization that is crucial to promote cellular invasion.

  15. High levels of γ-H2AX foci and cell membrane oxidation in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannini, Caterina; Piaggi, Simona; Federico, Giovanni; Scarpato, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We aimed to detect signs of very early damage in peripheral cells of T1DM adolescents. • T1DM patients had high levels of oxidized cells and reduced expression of iNOS and NO. • Highly mutagenic lesions were markedly increased in the diabetic group, mainly in females. • The observed damage might increase the risk of cancer in the patients later in life. - Abstract: Oxidative stress caused by an excess of free radicals is implicated in the pathogenesis and development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and, in turn, it can lead to genome damage, especially in the form of DNA double-strand break (DSB). The DNA DSB is a potentially carcinogenic lesion for human cells. Thus, we aimed to evaluate whether the level of oxidative stress was increased in peripheral blood lymphocytes of a group of affected adolescents. In 35 T1DM adolescents and 19 healthy controls we assessed: (1) spontaneous and H 2 O 2 -induced oxidation of cell membrane using a fluorescence lipid probe; (2) spontaneous and LPS-induced expression of iNOS protein and indirect NO determination via cytofluorimetric analysis of O 2 − ; (3) immunofluorescent detection of the basal level of histone H2AX phosphorylation (γ-H2AX foci), a well-validated marker of DNA DSB. In T1DM, the frequencies of oxidized cells, both spontaneous and H 2 O 2 -induced (47.13 ± 0.02) were significantly higher than in controls (35.90 ± 0.03). Patients showed, in general, both a reduced iNOS expression and production of NO. Furthermore, the level of spontaneous nuclear damage, quantified as γ-H2AX foci, was markedly increased in T1DM adolescents (6.15 ± 1.08% of γ-H2AX + cells; 8.72 ± 2.14 γ-H2AXF/n; 9.26 ± 2.37 γ-H2AXF/np), especially in females. In the present study, we confirmed the role that oxidative stress plays in the disease damaging lipids of cell membrane and, most importantly, causing genomic damage in circulating white blood cells of affected adolescents. This also indicates that

  16. Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase Downregulates Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Binding to the Cell Surface and Intracellular Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassone, Evelyne; Valacca, Cristina; Mignatti, Paolo

    2015-02-01

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP, MMP-14), a transmembrane proteinase with an extracellular catalytic domain and a short cytoplasmic tail, degrades extracellular matrix components and controls diverse cell functions through proteolytic and non-proteolytic interactions with extracellular, intracellular, and transmembrane proteins. Here we show that in tumor cells MT1-MMP downregulates fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) signaling by reducing the amount of FGF-2 bound to the cell surface with high and low affinity. FGF-2 induces weaker activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase in MT1-MMP expressing cells than in cells devoid of MT1-MMP. This effect is abolished in cells that express proteolytically inactive MT1-MMP but persists in cells expressing MT1-MMP mutants devoid of hemopexin-like or cytoplasmic domain, showing that FGF-2 signaling is downregulated by MT1-MMP proteolytic activity. MT1-MMP expression results in downregulation of FGFR-1 and -4, and in decreased amount of cell surface-associated FGF-2. In addition, MT1-MMP strongly reduces the amount of FGF-2 bound to the cell surface with low affinity. Because FGF-2 association with low-affinity binding sites is a prerequisite for binding to its high-affinity receptors, downregulation of low-affinity binding to the cell surface results in decreased FGF-2 signaling. Consistent with this conclusion, FGF-2 induction of tumor cell migration and invasion in vitro is stronger in cells devoid of MT1- MMP than in MT1-MMP expressing cells. Thus, MT1-MMP controls FGF-2 signaling by a proteolytic mechanism that decreases the cell's biological response to FGF-2. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Imaging with radiolabelled anti-membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) antibody: potentials for characterizing atherosclerotic plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuge, Yuji; Takai, Nozomi; Ogawa, Yuki; Temma, Takashi; Nishigori, Kantaro; Ishino, Seigo; Kamihashi, Junko; Saji, Hideo; Zhao, Yan; Kiyono, Yasushi; Shiomi, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) activates pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-13 to their active forms and plays important roles in the destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. This study sought to determine the usefulness of 99m Tc-labelled monoclonal antibody (mAb), recognizing MT1-MMP, for imaging atherosclerosis in a rabbit model (WHHLMI rabbits). Anti-MT1-MMP monoclonal IgG 3 and negative control IgG 3 were radiolabelled with 99m Tc after derivatization with 6-hydrazinonicotinic acid (HYNIC) to yield 99m Tc-MT1-MMP mAb and 99m Tc-IgG 3 , respectively. WHHLMI and control rabbits were injected with these radio-probes. The aorta was removed and radioactivity was measured at 24 h after the injection. Autoradiography and histological studies were performed. 99m Tc-MT1-MMP mAb accumulation in WHHLMI rabbit aortas was 5.4-fold higher than that of control rabbits. Regional 99m Tc-MT1-MMP mAb accumulation was positively correlated with MT1-MMP expression (r = 0.59, p 99m Tc-IgG 3 accumulation was independent of MT1-MMP expression (r = 0.03, p = NS). The highest 99m Tc-MT1-MMP mAb accumulation was found in atheromatous lesions (4.8 ± 1.9, %ID x BW/mm 2 x 10 2 ), followed in decreasing order by fibroatheromatous (1.8 ± 1.3), collagen-rich (1.6 ± 1.0) and neointimal lesions (1.5 ± 1.5). In contrast, 99m Tc-IgG 3 accumulation was almost independent of the histological grade of lesions. Higher 99m Tc-MT1-MMP mAb accumulation in grade IV atheroma was shown in comparison with neointimal lesions or other more stable lesions. Nuclear imaging with 99m Tc-MT1-MMP mAb, in combination with CT and MRI, could provide new diagnostic imaging capabilities for detecting vulnerable plaques, although further investigations to improve target to blood ratios are strongly required. (orig.)

  18. Imaging with radiolabelled anti-membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) antibody: potentials for characterizing atherosclerotic plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuge, Yuji [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Hokkaido University, Department of Tracer Kinetics and Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan); Takai, Nozomi; Ogawa, Yuki; Temma, Takashi; Nishigori, Kantaro; Ishino, Seigo; Kamihashi, Junko; Saji, Hideo [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Zhao, Yan [Hokkaido University, Department of Tracer Kinetics and Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Kiyono, Yasushi [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); University of Fukui, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Fukui (Japan); Shiomi, Masashi [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Institute for Experimental Animals, Kobe (Japan)

    2010-11-15

    Membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) activates pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-13 to their active forms and plays important roles in the destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. This study sought to determine the usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc-labelled monoclonal antibody (mAb), recognizing MT1-MMP, for imaging atherosclerosis in a rabbit model (WHHLMI rabbits). Anti-MT1-MMP monoclonal IgG{sub 3} and negative control IgG{sub 3} were radiolabelled with {sup 99m}Tc after derivatization with 6-hydrazinonicotinic acid (HYNIC) to yield {sup 99m}Tc-MT1-MMP mAb and {sup 99m}Tc-IgG{sub 3}, respectively. WHHLMI and control rabbits were injected with these radio-probes. The aorta was removed and radioactivity was measured at 24 h after the injection. Autoradiography and histological studies were performed. {sup 99m}Tc-MT1-MMP mAb accumulation in WHHLMI rabbit aortas was 5.4-fold higher than that of control rabbits. Regional {sup 99m}Tc-MT1-MMP mAb accumulation was positively correlated with MT1-MMP expression (r = 0.59, p < 0.0001), while {sup 99m}Tc-IgG{sub 3} accumulation was independent of MT1-MMP expression (r = 0.03, p = NS). The highest {sup 99m}Tc-MT1-MMP mAb accumulation was found in atheromatous lesions (4.8 {+-} 1.9, %ID x BW/mm{sup 2} x 10{sup 2}), followed in decreasing order by fibroatheromatous (1.8 {+-} 1.3), collagen-rich (1.6 {+-} 1.0) and neointimal lesions (1.5 {+-} 1.5). In contrast, {sup 99m}Tc-IgG{sub 3} accumulation was almost independent of the histological grade of lesions. Higher {sup 99m}Tc-MT1-MMP mAb accumulation in grade IV atheroma was shown in comparison with neointimal lesions or other more stable lesions. Nuclear imaging with {sup 99m}Tc-MT1-MMP mAb, in combination with CT and MRI, could provide new diagnostic imaging capabilities for detecting vulnerable plaques, although further investigations to improve target to blood ratios are strongly required. (orig.)

  19. High levels of γ-H2AX foci and cell membrane oxidation in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannini, Caterina [Unità di Genetica, Dipartimento di Biologia, Pisa University, Pisa (Italy); Piaggi, Simona [Sezione di Patologia Sperimentale, Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, Pisa University, Pisa (Italy); Federico, Giovanni [Unità di Endocrinologia Pediatrica e Diabete, Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Sperimentale Pisa University, Pisa (Italy); Scarpato, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.scarpato@unipi.it [Unità di Genetica, Dipartimento di Biologia, Pisa University, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We aimed to detect signs of very early damage in peripheral cells of T1DM adolescents. • T1DM patients had high levels of oxidized cells and reduced expression of iNOS and NO. • Highly mutagenic lesions were markedly increased in the diabetic group, mainly in females. • The observed damage might increase the risk of cancer in the patients later in life. - Abstract: Oxidative stress caused by an excess of free radicals is implicated in the pathogenesis and development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and, in turn, it can lead to genome damage, especially in the form of DNA double-strand break (DSB). The DNA DSB is a potentially carcinogenic lesion for human cells. Thus, we aimed to evaluate whether the level of oxidative stress was increased in peripheral blood lymphocytes of a group of affected adolescents. In 35 T1DM adolescents and 19 healthy controls we assessed: (1) spontaneous and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced oxidation of cell membrane using a fluorescence lipid probe; (2) spontaneous and LPS-induced expression of iNOS protein and indirect NO determination via cytofluorimetric analysis of O{sub 2}{sup −}; (3) immunofluorescent detection of the basal level of histone H2AX phosphorylation (γ-H2AX foci), a well-validated marker of DNA DSB. In T1DM, the frequencies of oxidized cells, both spontaneous and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced (47.13 ± 0.02) were significantly higher than in controls (35.90 ± 0.03). Patients showed, in general, both a reduced iNOS expression and production of NO. Furthermore, the level of spontaneous nuclear damage, quantified as γ-H2AX foci, was markedly increased in T1DM adolescents (6.15 ± 1.08% of γ-H2AX{sup +} cells; 8.72 ± 2.14 γ-H2AXF/n; 9.26 ± 2.37 γ-H2AXF/np), especially in females. In the present study, we confirmed the role that oxidative stress plays in the disease damaging lipids of cell membrane and, most importantly, causing genomic damage in circulating white blood cells of affected adolescents

  20. An Ensemble Method to Distinguish Bacteriophage Virion from Non-Virion Proteins Based on Protein Sequence Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Yang, Runtao

    2015-09-09

    Bacteriophage virion proteins and non-virion proteins have distinct functions in biological processes, such as specificity determination for host bacteria, bacteriophage replication and transcription. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins from bacteriophage protein sequences is significant to understand the complex virulence mechanism in host bacteria and the influence of bacteriophages on the development of antibacterial drugs. In this study, an ensemble method for bacteriophage virion protein prediction from bacteriophage protein sequences is put forward with hybrid feature spaces incorporating CTD (composition, transition and distribution), bi-profile Bayes, PseAAC (pseudo-amino acid composition) and PSSM (position-specific scoring matrix). When performing on the training dataset 10-fold cross-validation, the presented method achieves a satisfactory prediction result with a sensitivity of 0.870, a specificity of 0.830, an accuracy of 0.850 and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.701, respectively. To evaluate the prediction performance objectively, an independent testing dataset is used to evaluate the proposed method. Encouragingly, our proposed method performs better than previous studies with a sensitivity of 0.853, a specificity of 0.815, an accuracy of 0.831 and MCC of 0.662 on the independent testing dataset. These results suggest that the proposed method can be a potential candidate for bacteriophage virion protein prediction, which may provide a useful tool to find novel antibacterial drugs and to understand the relationship between bacteriophage and host bacteria. For the convenience of the vast majority of experimental Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16,21735 scientists, a user-friendly and publicly-accessible web-server for the proposed ensemble method is established.

  1. Phase separation of the plasma membrane in human red blood cells as a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maulucci

    Full Text Available Glycosylation, oxidation and other post-translational modifications of membrane and transmembrane proteins can alter lipid density, packing and interactions, and are considered an important factor that affects fluidity variation in membranes. Red blood cells (RBC membrane physical state, showing pronounced alterations in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, could be the ideal candidate for monitoring the disease progression and the effects of therapies. On these grounds, the measurement of RBC membrane fluidity alterations can furnish a more sensitive index in T1DM diagnosis and disease progression than Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, which reflects only the information related to glycosylation processes. Here, through a functional two-photon microscopy approach we retrieved fluidity maps at submicrometric scale in RBC of T1DM patients with and without complications, detecting an altered membrane equilibrium. We found that a phase separation between fluid and rigid domains occurs, triggered by systemic effects on membranes fluidity of glycation and oxidation. The phase separation patterns are different among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. Blood cholesterol and LDL content are positively correlated with the extent of the phase separation patterns. To quantify this extent a machine learning approach is employed to develop a Decision-Support-System (DSS able to recognize different fluidity patterns in RBC. Preliminary analysis shows significant differences(p<0.001 among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. The development of an assay based on Phase separation of the plasma membrane of the Red Blood cells is a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and could allow customization and the selection of medical treatments in T1DM in clinical settings, and enable the early detection of complications.

  2. Phase separation of the plasma membrane in human red blood cells as a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Cordelli, Ermanno; Rizzi, Alessandro; De Leva, Francesca; Papi, Massimiliano; Ciasca, Gabriele; Samengo, Daniela; Pani, Giovambattista; Pitocco, Dario; Soda, Paolo; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Iannello, Giulio; De Spirito, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Glycosylation, oxidation and other post-translational modifications of membrane and transmembrane proteins can alter lipid density, packing and interactions, and are considered an important factor that affects fluidity variation in membranes. Red blood cells (RBC) membrane physical state, showing pronounced alterations in Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), could be the ideal candidate for monitoring the disease progression and the effects of therapies. On these grounds, the measurement of RBC membrane fluidity alterations can furnish a more sensitive index in T1DM diagnosis and disease progression than Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), which reflects only the information related to glycosylation processes. Here, through a functional two-photon microscopy approach we retrieved fluidity maps at submicrometric scale in RBC of T1DM patients with and without complications, detecting an altered membrane equilibrium. We found that a phase separation between fluid and rigid domains occurs, triggered by systemic effects on membranes fluidity of glycation and oxidation. The phase separation patterns are different among healthy, T1DM and T1DM with complications patients. Blood cholesterol and LDL content are positively correlated with the extent of the phase separation patterns. To quantify this extent a machine learning approach is employed to develop a Decision-Support-System (DSS) able to recognize different fluidity patterns in RBC. Preliminary analysis shows significant differences(pBlood cells is a potential tool for diagnosis and progression monitoring of type 1 diabetes mellitus, and could allow customization and the selection of medical treatments in T1DM in clinical settings, and enable the early detection of complications.

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef protein modulates the lipid composition of virions and host cell membrane microdomains

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    Geyer Matthias

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Nef protein of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses optimizes viral spread in the infected host by manipulating cellular transport and signal transduction machineries. Nef also boosts the infectivity of HIV particles by an unknown mechanism. Recent studies suggested a correlation between the association of Nef with lipid raft microdomains and its positive effects on virion infectivity. Furthermore, the lipidome analysis of HIV-1 particles revealed a marked enrichment of classical raft lipids and thus identified HIV-1 virions as an example for naturally occurring membrane microdomains. Since Nef modulates the protein composition and function of membrane microdomains we tested here if Nef also has the propensity to alter microdomain lipid composition. Results Quantitative mass spectrometric lipidome analysis of highly purified HIV-1 particles revealed that the presence of Nef during virus production from T lymphocytes enforced their raft character via a significant reduction of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine species and a specific enrichment of sphingomyelin. In contrast, Nef did not significantly affect virion levels of phosphoglycerolipids or cholesterol. The observed alterations in virion lipid composition were insufficient to mediate Nef's effect on particle infectivity and Nef augmented virion infectivity independently of whether virus entry was targeted to or excluded from membrane microdomains. However, altered lipid compositions similar to those observed in virions were also detected in detergent-resistant membrane preparations of virus producing cells. Conclusion Nef alters not only the proteome but also the lipid composition of host cell microdomains. This novel activity represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which Nef could manipulate HIV-1 target cells to facilitate virus propagation in vivo.

  4. Cholesterol trafficking and raft-like membrane domain composition mediate scavenger receptor class B type 1-dependent lipid sensing in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Etienne; Ghezzal, Sara; Lucchi, Géraldine; Truntzer, Caroline; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Demignot, Sylvie; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W; Leturque, Armelle; Rousset, Monique; Carrière, Véronique

    2018-02-01

    Scavenger receptor Class B type 1 (SR-B1) is a lipid transporter and sensor. In intestinal epithelial cells, SR-B1-dependent lipid sensing is associated with SR-B1 recruitment in raft-like/ detergent-resistant membrane domains and interaction of its C-terminal transmembrane domain with plasma membrane cholesterol. To clarify the initiating events occurring during lipid sensing by SR-B1, we analyzed cholesterol trafficking and raft-like domain composition in intestinal epithelial cells expressing wild-type SR-B1 or the mutated form SR-B1-Q445A, defective in membrane cholesterol binding and signal initiation. These features of SR-B1 were found to influence both apical cholesterol efflux and intracellular cholesterol trafficking from plasma membrane to lipid droplets, and the lipid composition of raft-like domains. Lipidomic analysis revealed likely participation of d18:0/16:0 sphingomyelin and 16:0/0:0 lysophosphatidylethanolamine in lipid sensing by SR-B1. Proteomic analysis identified proteins, whose abundance changed in raft-like domains during lipid sensing, and these included molecules linked to lipid raft dynamics and signal transduction. These findings provide new insights into the role of SR-B1 in cellular cholesterol homeostasis and suggest molecular links between SR-B1-dependent lipid sensing and cell cholesterol and lipid droplet dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional hierarchy of herpes simplex virus type-1 membrane proteins in corneal infection and virus transmission to ganglionic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Joong; Saied, Ahmad A; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Subramanian, Ramesh; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2014-12-01

    To determine the relative importance of viral glycoproteins gK, gM, gE and the membrane protein UL11 in infection of mouse corneas and ganglionic neurons. Mouse eyes were scarified and infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1(F), gE-null, gM-null, gK-null, or UL11-null viruses. Clinical signs of ocular disease were monitored daily. Virus shedding was determined at 24, 48 and 72 h post infection. Viral DNA within trigeminal ganglia (TG) was quantified by quantitative PCR at 30 d post infection. The gE-null virus replicated as efficiently as the parental virus and formed viral plaques approximately half-the-size in comparison with the HSV-1(F) wild-type virus. The UL11-null and gM-null viruses replicated approximately one log less efficiently than the wild-type virus, and formed plaques that were on average one-third the size and one-half the size of the wild-type virus, respectively. The gK-null virus replicated more than 3-logs less efficiently than the wild-type virus and formed very small plaques (5-10 cells). Mice infected with the wild-type virus exhibited mild clinical ocular symptoms, while mice infected with the mutant viruses did not show any significant ocular changes. The wild-type virus produced the highest virus shedding post infection followed by the gM-null, gE-null and UL11-null viruses, while no gK-null virus was detected at any time point. All TG collected from mice infected with the wild-type virus and 6-of-10 of TG retrieved from mice infected with the UL11-null virus contained high numbers of viral genomes. The gE-null and gM-null-infected ganglia contained moderate-to-low number of viral genomes in 4-of-10 and 2-of-10 mice, respectively. No viral genomes were detected in ganglionic tissues obtained from gK-null eye infections. The results show that gK plays the most important role among gM, gE and UL11 in corneal and ganglionic infection in the mouse eye model.

  6. The Klebsiella pneumoniae YfgL (BamB) lipoprotein contributes to outer membrane protein biogenesis, type-1 fimbriae expression, anti-phagocytosis, and in vivo virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Pei-Fang; Hsu, Chun-Ru; Chen, Chun-Tang; Lin, Tzu-Lung; Wang, Jin-Town

    2016-07-03

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen that causes several kinds of infections, including pneumonia, bacteremia, urinary tract infection and community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA). Adhesion is the critical first step in the infection process. Our previous work demonstrated that the transcellular translocation is exploited by K. pneumoniae strains to migrate from the gut flora into other tissues, resulting in systemic infections. However, the initial stages of K. pneumoniae infection remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that a K. pneumoniae strain deleted for yfgL (bamB) exhibited reduced adherence to and invasion of host cells; changed biogenesis of major β-barrel outer membrane proteins; decreased transcriptional expression of type-1 fimbriae; and increased susceptibility to vancomycin and erythromycin. The yfgL deletion mutant also had reduced ability to against neutrophil phagocytosis; exhibited decreased induction of host IL-6 production; and was profoundly attenuated for virulence in a K. pneumoniae model of bacteremia. Thus, the K. pneumoniae YfgL lipoprotein mediates in outer membrane proteins biogenesis and is crucial for anti-phagocytosis and survival in vivo. These data provide a new insight for K. pneumoniae attachment and such knowledge could facilitate preventive therapies or alternative therapies against K. pneumoniae.

  7. Volatile Organic Compound Gamma-Butyrolactone Released upon Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 Acute Infection Modulated Membrane Potential and Repressed Viral Infection in Human Neuron-Like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochford, Kevin; Chen, Feng; Waguespack, Yan; Figliozzi, Robert W; Kharel, Madan K; Zhang, Qiaojuan; Martin-Caraballo, Miguel; Hsia, S Victor

    2016-01-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type -1 (HSV-1) infections can cause serious complications such as keratitis and encephalitis. The goal of this study was to identify any changes in the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells that could potentially be used as an indicator of a response to stress. An additional objective was to study if any VOCs released from acute epithelial infection may influence subsequent neuronal infection to facilitate latency. To investigate these hypotheses, Vero cells were infected with HSV-1 and the emission of VOCs was analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (2D GC/MS). It was observed that the concentrations of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in particular changed significantly after a 24-hour infection. Since HSV-1 may establish latency in neurons after the acute infection, GBL was tested to determine if it exerts neuronal regulation of infection. The results indicated that GBL altered the resting membrane potential of differentiated LNCaP cells and promoted a non-permissive state of HSV-1 infection by repressing viral replication. These observations may provide useful clues towards understanding the complex signaling pathways that occur during the HSV-1 primary infection and establishment of viral latency.

  8. Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metal loproteinase Is Regulated by Sp1 through the Differential Activation of AKT, JNK, and ERK Pathways in Human Prostate Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isis C. Sroka

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available We and other investigators have previously shown that membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP is overexpressed in invasive prostate cancer cells. However, the mechanism for this expression is not known. Here, we show that MT1-MMP is minimally expressed in nonmalignant primary prostate cells, moderately expressed in DU-145 cells, and highly expressed in invasive PC-3 and PC-3N cells. Using human MT1-MMP promoter reporter plasmids and mobility shift assays, we show that Spi regulates MT1-MMP expression in DU-145, PC-3, and PC-3N cells and in PC3-N cells using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and silencing RNA. Investigation of signaling pathway showed that DU-145 cells express constitutively phosphorylated extracellular stress-regulated kinase (ERK, whereas PC-3 and PC-3N cells express constitutively phosphorylated AKT/PKB and c-Jun NH2 terminal kinase (JNK. We show that MT1-MMP and Spi levels are decreased in PC-3 and PC-3N cells when phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and JNK are inhibited, and that MT1-MMP levels are decreased in DU-145 cells when MEK is inhibited. Transient transfection of PC-3 and PC-3N cells with a dominant-negative JNK or p85, and of DU-145 cells with a dominant negative ERK, reduces MT1-MMP promoter activity. These results indicate differential signaling control of Spi-mediated transcriptional regulation of MT1-MMP in prostate cancer cell lines.

  9. Erythrocyte membrane omega-3 fatty acid levels and omega-3 fatty acid intake are not associated with conversion to type 1 diabetes in children with islet autoimmunity: the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Melissa R; Yin, Xiang; Seifert, Jennifer; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Eisenbarth, George S; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M

    2011-12-01

    We investigated whether omega-3 fatty acid intake and erythrocyte membrane omega-3 fatty acid levels are associated with conversion to type 1 diabetes in children with islet autoimmunity (IA). The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young is following children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes for the development of persistent IA, as defined as being positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, i, or insulin autoantibodies on two consecutive visits, and then for the development of type 1 diabetes, as diagnosed by a physician. One hundred and sixty-seven children with persistent IA were followed for a mean of 4.8 yr, and 45 of these developed type 1 diabetes at a mean age of 8.7 yr. Erythrocyte membrane fatty acids (as a percent of total lipid) and dietary fatty acid intake (estimated via food frequency questionnaire) were analyzed as time-varying covariates in proportional hazards survival analysis, with follow-up time starting at detection of the first autoantibody. Neither dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids nor omega-6 fatty acids were associated with conversion to type 1 diabetes, adjusting for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, family history of type 1 diabetes, age at first IA positivity, maternal age, maternal education, and maternal ethnicity. Adjusting for HLA-DR, family history of type 1 diabetes and age at first IA positivity, omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid levels of erythrocyte membranes were not associated with conversion to type 1 diabetes. In this observational study, omega-3 fatty acid intake and status are not associated with conversion to type 1 diabetes in children with IA. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase in melanocytic tumors of dogs and canine melanoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docampo, María-José; Cabrera, Jennifer; Rabanal, Rosa M; Bassols, Anna

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 and membrane-type 1 MMP (MT1-MMP) in melanocytomas and malignant melanomas of dogs, analyze in vitro production of MMPs by canine melanoma cell lines and primary dermal fibroblasts, and investigate mutual communication between tumor cells and fibroblasts and the influence of collagen on MMP regulation. 35 biopsy specimens from melanocytic tumors and primary dermal fibroblasts of dogs and 3 canine melanoma cell lines (CML-1, CML-10c2, and CML-6M). MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP were detected in tumor samples by use of immunohistochemical analysis. In vitro production was analyzed via reverse transcriptase-PCR assay, immunocytochemical analysis, zymography, and immunoblotting. MMP-9 was overexpressed in malignant melanomas, compared with expression in melanocytomas, whereas no significant differences in MMP-2 and MT1-MMP immunostaining were detected. Stromal cells also often had positive staining results. In vitro, all 3 melanoma cell lines and dermal fibroblasts had evidence of MMP-2 and MT1-MMP, but only melanoma cells had evidence of MMP-9. Coculture of CML-1 or CML-10c2 cells and dermal fibroblasts induced an increase in expression of the active form of MMP-2. Culture of melanoma cells on type I collagen increased the activation state of MT1-MMP. MMP-9 expression was increased in malignant melanomas of dogs. Stromal cells were a source for MMPs. Stromal cells, in combination with matrix components such as type I collagen, can interact with tumor cells to regulate MMP production. Information about MMP production and regulation could help in the development of new treatments.

  11. Conversion of Stationary to Invasive Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs): Role of Hypoxia in Membrane Type 1-Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Zucker, Stanley; Pulkoski-Gross, Ashleigh; Kuscu, Cem; Karaayvaz, Mihriban; Ju, Jingfang; Yao, Herui; Song, Erwei; Cao, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence has implicated the role of tumor initiating cells (TICs) in the process of cancer metastasis. The mechanism underlying the conversion of TICs from stationary to invasive remains to be characterized. In this report, we employed less invasive breast cancer TICs, SK-3rd, that displays CD44high/CD24low with high mammosphere-forming and tumorigenic capacities, to investigate the mechanism by which stationary TICs are converted to invasive TICs. Invasive ability of SK-3rd TICs was markedly enhanced when the cells were cultured under hypoxic conditions. Given the role of membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) in cancer invasion/metastasis, we explored a possible involvement of MT1-MMP in hypoxia-induced TIC invasion. Silencing of MT1-MMP by a shRNA approach resulted in diminution of hypoxia-induced cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo. Under hypoxic conditions, MT1-MMP redistributed from cytoplasmic storage pools to the cell surface of TICs, which coincides with the increased cell invasion. In addition, CD44, a cancer stem-like cell marker, inversely correlated with increased cell surface MT1-MMP. Interestingly, cell surface MT1-MMP gradually disappeared when the hypoxia-treated cells were switched to normoxia, suggesting the plasticity of TICs in response to oxygen content. Furthermore, we dissected the pathways leading to upregulated MT1-MMP in cytoplasmic storage pools under normoxic conditions, by demonstrating a cascade involving Twist1-miR10b-HoxD10 leading to enhanced MT1-MMP expression in SK-3rd TICs. These observations suggest that MT1-MMP is a key molecule capable of executing conversion of stationary TICs to invasive TICs under hypoxic conditions and thereby controlling metastasis. PMID:22679501

  12. Immunization with r-Lactococcus lactis expressing outer membrane protein A of Shigella dysenteriae type-1: evaluation of oral and intranasal route of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnik, B; Sharma, D; Padh, H; Desai, P

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the comparative immunogenic potential of food grade Lactococcus lactis expressing outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Shigella dysenteriae type-1 (SD-1) when administered either orally or intranasally. OmpA of SD-1 was cloned and expressed first in Escherichia coli and then in L. lactis. Presence of recombinant gene was confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and immunoblot analysis. Using immobilized metal affinity chromatography, OmpA was purified from recombinant E. coliBL21 (DE3) and subcutaneously administered in BALB/c mice. Detection of OmpA-specific IgG antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed the immunogenicity of OmpA. In order to establish r-L. lactis as a mucosal delivery vehicle, it was administered orally and nasally in BALB/c mice. Serum IgG and faecal IgA were assessed through ELISA to compare the relative potential of immunization routes and immunogenic potential of r-L. lactis. Immunization via the oral route proved superior to intranasal exposure. Recombinant L. lactis expressing OmpA of SD-1 was found to be immunogenic. Oral administration of r-L. lactis elicited higher systemic and mucosal immune response when compared with the nasal route. Using food grade recombinant L. lactis has implications in the development of a prophylactic against multidrug-resistant Shigella, which can be used as a prospective vaccine candidate. Evaluating mucosal routes of immunization demonstrated that the oral route of administration elicited better immune response against OmpA of Shigella. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Overexpression of proto-oncogene FBI-1 activates membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase in association with adverse outcome in ovarian cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Xiao-Feng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FBI-1 (factor that binds to the inducer of short transcripts of human immunodeficiency virus-1 is a member of the POK (POZ and Kruppel family of transcription factors and play important roles in cellular differentiation and oncogenesis. Recent evidence suggests that FBI-1 is expressed at high levels in a subset of human lymphomas and some epithelial solid tumors. However, the function of FBI-1 in human ovarian cancers remains elusive. Results In this study, we investigated the role of FBI-1 in human ovarian cancers, in particularly, its function in cancer cell invasion via modulating membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP. Significantly higher FBI-1 protein and mRNA expression levels were demonstrated in ovarian cancers samples and cell lines compared with borderline tumors and benign cystadenomas. Increased FBI-1 mRNA expression was correlated significantly with gene amplification (P = 0.037. Moreover, higher FBI-1 expression was found in metastatic foci (P = 0.036 and malignant ascites (P = 0.021, and was significantly associated with advanced stage (P = 0.012, shorter overall survival (P = 0.032 and disease-free survival (P = 0.016. In vitro, overexpressed FBI-1 significantly enhanced cell migration and invasion both in OVCA 420 and SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma cells, irrespective of p53 status, accompanied with elevated expression of MT1-MMP, but not MMP-2 or TIMP-2. Moreover, knockdown of MT1-MMP abolished FBI-1-mediated cell migration and invasion. Conversely, stable knockdown of FBI-1 remarkably reduced the motility of these cells with decreased expression of MT1-MMP. Promoter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation study indicated that FBI-1 could directly interact with the promoter spanning ~600bp of the 5'-flanking sequence of MT1-MMP and enhanced its expression in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, stable knockdown and ectopic expression of FBI-1 decreased and increased cell proliferation respectively in

  14. Type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes; Juvenile onset diabetes; Diabetes - type 1; High blood sugar - type 1 diabetes ... Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age. It is most often diagnosed in children, adolescents, or young adults. Insulin is ...

  15. Correlations of the glycemic variability with oxidative stress and erythrocytes membrane stability in patients with type 1 diabetes under intensive treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ricardo; Alves de Medeiros, Luciana; Moreira Cunha, Lucas; da Silva Garrote-Filho, Mario; Bernardino Neto, Morun; Tannus Jorge, Paulo; Santos Resende, Elmiro; Penha-Silva, Nilson

    2018-02-07

    This study aimed to evaluate the correlations of glycemic variability with erythrocyte membrane stability parameters and oxidative stress markers in patients with DM1 under intensive treatment. 90 patients with DM1 and under intensive treatment of the disease were evaluated in relation to anthropometric indices, records of glycemic averages and parameters of glycemic variability, biochemical dosages (glucose, uric acid, lipidogram, glycated hemoglobin, microalbuminuria, creatinine and iron) reticulocyte count, erythrocyte membrane stability parameters and oxidative stress markers (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS, and glutathione reductase, GR). Indicators of glycemic variability in the short and long term showed correlations with parameters of membrane stability and markers of oxidative stress (GR). In addition, the comparison of these same parameters between the subgroups consisting of quartiles of GV or glycemic control also showed significant differences. In the DM1 patients studied here, glycemic variability showed correlations with oxidative stress and erythrocyte membrane stability variables. This corroborates the hypothesis that glycemic fluctuations interfere with lipid peroxidation and cell membrane behavior, emphasizing its participation in mechanisms related to the development of chronic complications of diabetes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Diabetes Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is ... kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Type 1 diabetes happens most often in children and young adults ...

  17. Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2001-01-01

    Prediction of Type 1 diabetes at individual level is relevant for any possible intervention before clinical disease develops. Currently available markers of Type 1 diabetes include genetic specificities and immune markers, in addition to a positive family history. This chapter reviews the measures...... and methods of importance in predicting Type 1 diabetes. Based on numerical examples it is demonstrated that available markers have a low level of performance, even when combined. Even so, combined marker information may allow for the identification of the large majority of the general population who...... is at very low disease risk. The impact at population level of predicting Type 1 diabetes varies between societies because the performance of markers depends on levels of disease risk and distribution of markers within a population. The incorporation of the influence of non-genetic etiological factors may...

  18. Type 1 narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn, Matilda; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness with unintentional sleep attacks and cataplexy. The disorder is caused by a loss of hypocretinergic neurons in the brain. The specific loss of these neurons in narcolepsy is thought to result from an autoimmune...... attack, and this is supported by evidence of both environmental and genetic factors pointing toward an involvement of the immune system. However, definitive proof of an autoimmune etiology is still missing. Several different immune-mediated disorders targeting neurons are known, and many...

  19. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  20. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  1. Type 1 Tyrosinaemia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mannion, MA

    2016-06-01

    Tyrosinaemia type 1 (TYR1, OMIM# 276700) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that results from an enzyme defect that leads to a deficiency in fumarylacetoacetase (FAH)1. We present 3 cases of TYR1 in the Irish population over a 9 year period, the only cases known to have been diagnosed in Ireland since 1989. The common presenting symptom was hypoglycaemia and the diagnosis was made by the identification of the pathognomonic biomarker succinylacetone on urine organic acid analysis. We discuss the clinical presentation, biochemical and genetic results including one novel mutation. We also highlight the importance of early initiation of Nitisinone (NTBC), which reduces the complications of TYR1 and the incidence of liver transplantation in this population2.

  2. Biochemical evidence of the interactions of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) with adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT): potential implications linking proteolysis with energy metabolism in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radichev, Ilian A; Remacle, Albert G; Sounni, Nor Eddine; Shiryaev, Sergey A; Rozanov, Dmitri V; Zhu, Wenhong; Golubkova, Natalya V; Postnova, Tatiana I; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Strongin, Alex Y

    2009-04-28

    Invasion-promoting MT1-MMP (membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase) is a key element in cell migration processes. To identify the proteins that interact and therefore co-precipitate with this proteinase from cancer cells, we used the proteolytically active WT (wild-type), the catalytically inert E240A and the C-end truncated (tailless; DeltaCT) MT1-MMP-FLAG constructs as baits. The identity of the pulled-down proteins was determined by LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography tandem MS) and then confirmed by Western blotting using specific antibodies. We determined that, in breast carcinoma MCF cells (MCF-7 cells), ANT (adenine nucleotide translocator) efficiently interacted with the WT, E240A and DeltaCT constructs. The WT and E240A constructs also interacted with alpha-tubulin, an essential component of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In turn, tubulin did not co-precipitate with the DeltaCT construct because of the inefficient endocytosis of the latter, thus suggesting a high level of selectivity of our test system. To corroborate these results, we then successfully used the ANT2-FLAG construct as a bait to pull-down MT1-MMP, which was naturally produced by fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. We determined that the presence of the functionally inert catalytic domain alone was sufficient to cause the proteinase to interact with ANT2, thus indicating that there is a non-proteolytic mode of these interactions. Overall, it is tempting to hypothesize that by interacting with pro-invasive MT1-MMP, ANT plays a yet to be identified role in a coupling mechanism between energy metabolism and pericellular proteolysis in migrating cancer cells.

  3. Red wine polyphenolic compounds strongly inhibit pro-matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and its activation in response to thrombin via direct inhibition of membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak, Min-Ho; El Bedoui, Jasser; Anglard, Patrick; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2004-09-28

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of red wine is associated with a reduced risk of coronary disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that participate in extracellular matrix degradation have been involved in atherosclerotic plaque growth and instability. The present study examined whether red wine polyphenolic compounds (RWPCs) inhibit activation of MMP-2, a major gelatinase, in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Expression of pro-MMP-2 was assessed by Western and Northern blot analyses; MMP-2 activity was assessed by zymography and cell invasion by a modified Boyden's chamber assay. High levels of pro-MMP-2 and low levels of MMP-2 activity were found in conditioned medium from unstimulated VSMCs. Thrombin induced cell-associated pro-MMP-2 protein expression and MMP-2 activity in conditioned medium of VSMCs. The stimulatory effect of thrombin on MMP-2 activation was prevented by RWPCs in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner. Thrombin markedly increased cell-associated membrane type 1 (MT1)-MMP activity, the physiological activator of pro-MMP-2, and this response was not affected by RWPCs. However, addition of RWPCs directly to MT1-MMP abolished its metalloproteinase activity in a reversible manner. Finally, matrix invasion of VSMCs was stimulated by thrombin, and this response was prevented by RWPCs as efficiently as a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor. The present findings demonstrate that RWPCs effectively inhibit thrombin-induced matrix invasion of VSMCs, most likely by preventing the expression and activation of MMP-2 via direct inhibition of MT1-MMP activity. The inhibitory effect of RWPCs on the activation of pro-MMP-2 and matrix degradation might contribute to their beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system.

  4. Type 1 Diabetes and Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    Farabi, Sarah S.

    2016-01-01

    IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes.

  5. Type 1 Diabetes and Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF In people with type 1 diabetes, sleep may be disrupted as a result of both behavioral and physiological aspects of diabetes and its management. This sleep disruption may negatively affect disease progression and development of complications. This review highlights key research findings regarding sleep in people with type 1 diabetes.

  6. Living with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Count Glycemic Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type 1 Diabetes Get Started Safely ... Balancing nutrition, exercise and proper blood glucose management techniques with the rest of your life's priorities mean ...

  7. Dermatomyositis and Type 1 Interferons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Dermatomyositis is a poorly understood multisystem disease predominantly affecting skin and muscle. This review focuses on the potential role of a group of related cytokines, the type 1 interferons, in the pathogenesis of dermatomyositis. Type 1 interferon–inducible transcripts and proteins are uniquely elevated in dermatomyositis muscle compared with all other muscle diseases studied to date. The endothelial cell tubuloreticular inclusions present in affected dermatomyositis muscle are biomarkers of type 1 interferon exposure. The cell-poor lichenoid reaction in skin with predominant involvement of the basal epidermal cell layer and its topologic equivalent in muscle, perifascicular atrophy, may be lesions that develop directly in response to type 1 interferon signaling. PMID:20425524

  8. Downregulation of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs in malignant melanoma: inverse correlation with membrane-type 1-matrix metalloproteinase and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacomasso, Thiago; Trombetta-Lima, Marina; Sogayar, Mari C; Winnischofer, Sheila M B

    2014-02-01

    The invasive phenotype of many tumors is associated with an imbalance between the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), and the membrane-anchored reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK). RECK inhibits MMP-2, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP, and has been linked to patient survival and better prognosis in several types of tumors. However, despite the wide implication of these MMPs in melanoma establishment and progression, the role of RECK in this type of tumor is still unknown. Here, we analyzed the expression of RECK, TIMP1, TIMP2, TIMP3, MT1MMP, MMP2, and MMP9 in two publicly available melanoma microarray datasets and in a panel of human melanoma cell lines. We found that RECK is downregulated in malignant melanoma, accompanied by upregulation of MT1MMP and TIMP2. In both datasets, we observed that the group of samples displaying higher RECK levels show lower median expression levels of MT1MMP and TIMP2 and higher levels of TIMP3. When tested in a sample-wise manner, these correlations were statistically significant. Inverse correlations between RECK, MT1MMP, and TIMP2 were verified in a panel of human melanoma cell lines and in a further reduced model that includes a pair of matched primary tumor-derived and metastasis-derived cell lines. Taken together, our data indicate a consistent correlation between RECK, MT1MMP, and TIMP2 across different models of clinical samples and cell lines and suggest evidence of the potential use of this subset of genes as a gene signature for diagnosing melanoma.

  9. Puberty and type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhankar Chowdhury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various data on type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM have showed that the incidence of T1DM peaks at puberty. However, diabetes control and complications could be adversely affected by the physiological changes of puberty. In early years of insulin therapy, severe growth retardation with pubertal delay, like in Mauriac syndrome, have been reported. Insulin and leptin are metabolic factors, circulating in the periphery, which participate in the hypothalamic control of metabolism and reproduction. Insulin may be an important regulator of leptin in humans. Increased levels of advanced glycation end products suppress activation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH pulse generator, resulting in pubertal delay. Glycemic control deteriorates during puberty as the lean body mass doubles mainly over a period of 25 years, which increases insulin requirement. There is also an increase in insulin resistance over the period of puberty. In normal individuals, fasting and postprandial insulin concentrations reach a peak in both sexes in mid to late puberty. Puberty, at all stages, has the worst insulin resistance. It has been observed that an excessive GH secretion in T1DM during puberty has significant effects on ketogenesis. Adolescent T1DM tends to decompensate very rapidly and develop ketoacidosis when the late night insulin dose is omitted. Adolescence is a critical developmental phase that presents unique challenges and opportunities to individuals with diabetes, their families and their healthcare providers.

  10. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luzi Ettore

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1 is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndrome presented mostly by tumours of the parathyroids, endocrine pancreas and anterior pituitary, and characterised by a very high penetrance and an equal sex distribution. It occurs in approximately one in 30,000 individuals. Two different forms, sporadic and familial, have been described. The sporadic form presents with two of the three principal MEN1-related endocrine tumours (parathyroid adenomas, entero-pancreatic tumours and pituitary tumours within a single patient, while the familial form consists of a MEN1 case with at least one first degree relative showing one of the endocrine characterising tumours. Other endocrine and non-endocrine lesions, such as adrenal cortical tumours, carcinoids of the bronchi, gastrointestinal tract and thymus, lipomas, angiofibromas, collagenomas have been described. The responsible gene, MEN1, maps on chromosome 11q13 and encodes a 610 aminoacid nuclear protein, menin, with no sequence homology to other known human proteins. MEN1 syndrome is caused by inactivating mutations of the MEN1 tumour suppressor gene. This gene is probably involved in the regulation of several cell functions such as DNA replication and repair and transcriptional machinery. The combination of clinical and genetic investigations, together with the improving of molecular genetics knowledge of the syndrome, helps in the clinical management of patients. Treatment consists of surgery and/or drug therapy, often in association with radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Currently, DNA testing allows the early identification of germline mutations in asymptomatic gene carriers, to whom routine surveillance (regular biochemical and/or radiological screenings to detect the development of MEN1-associated tumours and lesions is recommended.

  11. Neurofibromatosis type 1 growth charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, M; Milani, S; Mammi, I; Boni, S; Monciotti, C; Tenconi, R

    1999-12-03

    Growth abnormalities such as macrocephaly and short stature have been described and are considered a consistent finding in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), one of the most common autosomal dominant disorders in man. We present here a clinical study on the growth profile of a sample of NF1 patients collected through a population-based registry that covers three contiguous regions of North-East Italy (NEI-NF Registry). Auxometric traits of 528 NF1 patients have been measured with the aim of drawing growth charts for height, weight, and head circumference (OFC). Height velocity charts were based on a subset of 143 children who underwent multiple measurements. No differences in height were apparent between NF1 and normal subjects up to age 7 (girls) and 12 (boys) years; subsequently, the 50th centile of NF1 subjects tends to overlap with the 25th centile of normal subjects, and the 3rd centile is much lower in NF1 subjects than in normal subjects, mainly during adolescence. The negatively skewed distribution of height seems to indicate that height growth impairment affects only a proportion of NF1 subjects; height growth impairment does not seem related to disease severity. As for weight, our data suggest that slight overweight is a characteristic of adult NF1 subjects (mainly among males), independent of disease severity. Height growth velocity is normal during childhood for both sexes, whereas the pubertal spurt is slightly anticipated and reduced in NF1 boys but not in girls. Our data confirm previous observations that macrocrania affects most NF1 subjects; the shape of the head growth curve is similar in NF1 and normal girls, whereas NF1 boys present an OFC pubertal growth spurt much more pronounced and delayed than normal boys. The disproportion between OFC and height seems to be related to disease severity in boys but not in girls. Growth charts presented here can be useful in neurofibromatosis clinics for the identification of the effects of secondary growth

  12. Insulin requirements in type 1 diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Nicoline; Ringholm, Lene; Stage, Edna

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the insulin requirements in women with type 1 diabetes during twin pregnancy compared with singleton pregnancy.......To evaluate the insulin requirements in women with type 1 diabetes during twin pregnancy compared with singleton pregnancy....

  13. Eating disorders in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, J.; Skinner, T. C.

    2005-01-01

    There is some debate in the literature as to whether there is an increased risk of developing eating disorders in individuals with type 1 diabetes. This review located 12 empirical studies of eating pathology in females with type 1 diabetes. Review of these papers indicates that there is no evide......There is some debate in the literature as to whether there is an increased risk of developing eating disorders in individuals with type 1 diabetes. This review located 12 empirical studies of eating pathology in females with type 1 diabetes. Review of these papers indicates...... that there is no evidence for an increase in the rates of anorexia or bulimia, in females with type 1 diabetes. However, the data do suggest that eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS) are more prevalent in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Key features of these articles are reviewed and discussed....

  14. Vitamin D and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    К.S. Biliaieva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data concerning the problem of vitamin D deficiency in adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1. A correlation between vitamin D deficiency and compensation of the disease is shown. The examination of adolescent patients suffering from type 1 diabetes mellitus found a connection between levels of vitamin D, duration and the degree of type 1 diabetes compensation. Further studies are focused on studying the impact and the correction of vitamin D status in children with diabetes mellitus type 1, on improving the glycemic control and quality of life of a patient.

  15. Outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte Møller; Damm, Peter; Moelsted-Pedersen, Lars

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare pregnancy outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies with the background population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This nationwide prospective multicenter study took place in eight Danish centers treating pregnant women with type 1 diabetes during 1993-...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to control the amount of sugar in the blood. Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age; however, it usually ... Insulin Antibody Test Encyclopedia: Diabetic Ketoacidosis Encyclopedia: Home Blood Sugar Testing Encyclopedia: Type 1 Diabetes Health Topic: Diabetes Medicines Health Topic: Diabetes Type ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: neurofibromatosis type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most people with neurofibromatosis type 1 have normal intelligence, learning disabilities and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) ... as neurofibromas can form along nerves throughout the body. It is unclear how mutations in the NF1 ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: distal arthrogryposis type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1 is a disorder characterized by joint deformities (contractures) that restrict movement in the hands and feet. ... distal arthrogryposis type 1 . However, researchers speculate that contractures may be related to problems with muscle contraction ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R, Giunti P. Clinical, genetic, molecular, and pathophysiological insights into spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. Cerebellum. 2008;7( ... editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is ...

  20. Liraglutide for treating type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Frandsen, Christian Seerup; Holst, Jens Juul

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Many persons with type 1 diabetes do not achieve glycemic targets, why new treatments, complementary to insulin, are of interest. Liraglutide, a long-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist could be a potential pharmacological supplement to insulin. This review discusses...... the mechanism of actions, efficacy and safety of liraglutide as add-on to insulin in persons with type 1 diabetes. AREAS COVERED: Physiological and clinical data on liraglutide in type 1 diabetes were reviewed. We searched the Cochrane library, MEDLINE and EMBASE, with the final search performed February 16...... there was no clinically relevant effect on HbA1c. Adverse events were mostly transient gastrointestinal side effects, primarily nausea. Based on the available data, liraglutide cannot be recommended as add-on therapy to insulin in persons with type 1 diabetes with the aim to improve glycemic control. Ongoing trials...

  1. Maculopathy and spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebranchu, Pierre; Le Meur, Guylène; Magot, Armelle

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia is a rare heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by cerebellar symptoms, often associated with other multisystemic signs. Mild optic neuropathy has been associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), but macular dysfunction has been reported...

  2. Auditory Impairment in Young Type 1 Diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yanlian; Xiao, Xiaoyan; Ren, Jianmin; Wang, Yajuan; Zhao, Faming

    2015-10-01

    More attention has recently been focused on auditory impairment of young type 1 diabetics. This study aimed to evaluate auditory function of young type 1 diabetics and the correlation between clinical indexes and hearing impairment. We evaluated the auditory function of 50 type 1 diabetics and 50 healthy subjects. Clinical indexes were measured along with analyzing their relation of auditory function. Type 1 diabetic patients demonstrated a deficit with elevated thresholds at right ear and left ear when compared to healthy controls (p p V and interwave I-V) and left ear (wave III, V and interwave I-III, I-V) in diabetic group significantly increased compared to those in control subjects (p p p p p <0.01). Type 1 diabetics exerted higher auditory threshold, slower auditory conduction time and cochlear impairment. HDL-cholesterol, diabetes duration, systemic blood pressure, microalbuminuria, GHbA1C, triglyceride, and age may affect the auditory function of type 1 diabetics. Copyright © 2015 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adrenal incidentaloma in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tančić-Gajić Milina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Neurofibromatosis type 1 is one of the most common genetically transmitted diseases with a high index of spontaneous mutations and extremely varied and unpredictable clinical manifestations. It is diagnosed by the existence of certain clinical criteria. The presence of numerous localised cutaneous neurofibromas or a plexiform neurofibroma is virtually pathognomonic of neurofibromatosis type 1. The incidence of pheochromocytoma in neurofibromatosis type 1 is 0.1-5.7%. CASE OUTLINE A 56-year old female patient was admitted for further evaluation of incidental adrenal tumour previously diagnosed on computerized tomography (CT. She had previously unrecognized neurofibromatosis type 1 and a clinical picture which could remind of pheochromocytoma. None of the catecholamine samples in 24 hr urine indicated functionally active pheochromocytoma. Chromogranin A was moderately increased. Decision for operation was made after performing the image techniques. Adrenal incidentaloma had features of pheochromocytoma on abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, with positive 131I-MIBG (iodine 131-labelled metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy. After being treated with phenoxybenzamine and propranolol, she was operated on. The pathohistological finding showed the case of left adrenal pheochromocytoma. CONCLUSION Detailed diagnostic procedure for pheochromocytoma should be performed with patients having neurofibromatosis type 1 and adrenal incidentaloma. Pheochromocytomas are rare tumours with fatal outcome if not duly recognized and cured.

  4. Neurofibromatosis type 1: clinical and radiological aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniz, Marcos Pontes; Souza, Antonio Soares; Bertelli, Erika Cristina Pavarino; Bertollo, Eny Maria Goloni

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 is a genetic disease with an incidence of approximately 1 in 3,000 people, characterized mainly by systemic and progressive involvement, manifesting by physical deformity and compromising of neurological functions. The diagnosis of the neurofibromatosis type 1 must be performed the earliest possible through clinical exams and familiar history. The use of imaging diagnosis as radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging is valuable for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up of patients and control of lesions, preventing complications. In this study we describe the clinical and radiological aspects of the neurofibromatosis type 1, considering clinical features, genetics, bone alterations in chest, vertebral column, upper and lower limbs, and craniofacial abnormalities. (author)

  5. Dehydroepiandrosterone in the type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duskova, M; Hruskovicova, H; Hill, M; Starka, L

    2012-04-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is believed to exert, besides others, positive effects on the insulin resistance or its secretion and glucose metabolism. There are several reports dealing with the DHEA levels and its effects in the type 2 diabetes mellitus, but less information is available on the type 1 diabetic subjects. Recently, a report dealing with the lack of the age-dependent decline of the DHEA levels in the type 2 diabetic subjects was published. The aim of the present study was to answer the question whether a comparable change in the aging pattern of the DHEA and its sulphate could be detected in the type 1 diabetes mellitus. The data regarding the DHEA and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) concentrations in the serum obtained from 116 patients with the type 1 diabetes mellitus and 259 controls were gathered from the database of the Institute of Endocrinology (Prague, Czech Republic). No significant differences in the level of the DHEA-S were found between the type 1 diabetics and controls either in men or women. However, lower DHEA levels were found in the type 1 diabetic women, but not in men. The age-dependent declines of both the DHEA and DHEA-S were similar to those in controls. In contrast to the type 2 diabetes, the levels of DHEA-S in the type 1 diabetic patients were practically identical with those in controls. In contrast to men, in women, the DHEA basal levels were lower than those seen in controls. The age dependence of both hormones followed the pattern of the decline in controls.

  6. Glycogenic Hepatopathy in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Atmaca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogenic hepatopathy is a rare cause of high transaminase levels in type 1 diabetes mellitus. This condition, characterized by elevated liver enzymes and hepatomegaly, is caused by irreversible and excessive accumulation of glycogen in hepatocytes. This is a case report on a 19-year-old male case, diagnosed with glycogenic hepatopathy. After the diagnosis was documented by liver biopsy, the case was put on glycemic control which led to significant decline in hepatomegaly and liver enzymes. It was emphasized that, in type 1 diabetes mellitus cases, hepatopathy should also be considered in the differential diagnoses of elevated liver enzyme and hepatomegaly.

  7. Immunogenetics of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    and components of the complement system. These histological ... Children who progress to T1D have IAAs of high affinity15 and also develop GADAs concomitantly or soon after the first IAA response. Spreading of the response to. IA-2 and IA-2Я often .... Early feeding may influence the risk of type 1. (T1D) later in life.

  8. Learning Disabilities in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of specific leaning disabilities (SLD in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 was determined in a cohort of 81 patients (43 males, 38 females; mean age 11 years 6 months; age range 8-16 followed at Children's Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia.

  9. Mouse adenovirus type 1 infection of macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashley, S.L.; Welton, A.R.; Harwood, K.M.; Rooijen, van N.; Spindler, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) causes acute and persistent infections in mice, with high levels of virus found in the brain, spinal cord and spleen in acute infections. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells throughout the mouse, and monocytes/macrophages have also been implicated as targets of the virus.

  10. Early infant feeding and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savilahti, Erkki; Saarinen, Kristiina M

    2009-06-01

    Infant feeding practices, particularly the type of milk feeding, have been associated with the development of type 1 diabetes. We studied the relationship between early infant feeding (during the first year of life) and diabetes in a large population-based cohort. In 1994-1995, 6,209 healthy full-term newborns participated in a study examining the effect of supplementary feeding, on development of allergy to cow's milk, in maternity hospitals. All supplements in the maternity hospitals were known. Mothers recorded the feeding of infants prospectively at home. In August 2006, from a nationwide diabetes registry, 45 children from our cohort were listed as having type 1 diabetes. The distribution of cases was similar in the randomized feeding groups: 9/1,789 in the group that received adapted cow's milk-based formula; 12/1,737 in those who received extensively hydrolyzed formula; 16/1,859 in those who received banked human milk; and 8 among those 824 exclusively breast-fed in the hospital. When children who had received cow's milk-based formula in the maternity hospital were compared with those without such exposure, less number of children in the former group had diabetes by age 8 (P = 0.026), but by the end of the follow-up (11.5 years) the difference disappeared (P = 0.16). Length of breast-feeding and introduction of cereals and other solid foods were similar among those developing type 1 diabetes and those remaining healthy, while early regular daily feeding with cow's milk-based formula tended to associate with lower risk for type 1 diabetes (OR 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.38-1.13; P = 0.08). In an extended, secondary analysis of a population-based cohort, very early exposure to cow's milk is not a risk factor for type 1 diabetes; it may in fact diminish its appearance before age 8.

  11. Premarriage counseling in Type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagan Priya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes is a challenging illness and needs lifelong diabetes self-care. At the same time, there is a significant stigma associated with it, especially with relation to marriage. There are concerns related to premarriage disclosure, marital relationship, ability to procreate, risk during pregnancy in women, and the risk of disease in children. In this document, we discuss the issue of disease-related stigma which may become a significant challenge for a prospective spouse and the impact of type 1 diabetes on marital relationships and procreation. We also highlight the need for premarriage counseling to ensure long-term success in achieving both individual and interpersonal well-being.

  12. Reporting Severe Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To describe potential factors influencing reporting of severe hypoglycemia in adult patients with type 1 diabetes and to analyze their effect on reported rates of severe hypoglycemia. RECENT FINDINGS: Reported rates of severe hypoglycemia defined as need for third party...... by partners report higher rates of severe hypoglycemia. There is a large variation between studies reporting incidence and prevalence of severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes, mainly explained by definition of severity, methods of reporting, and patient selection. These findings call...... hypoglycemia are 0.02-0.5 events per patient-year and 1-29%, respectively. When subjects with recurrent severe hypoglycemia in the past or suffering from impaired hypoglycemia awareness are excluded from participation in studies, lower rates are reported. Studies applying anonymous reporting or reporting...

  13. Genetic risk factors for type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pociot, Flemming; Lernmark, Åke

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed at the end of a prodrome of β-cell autoimmunity. The disease is most likely triggered at an early age by autoantibodies primarily directed against insulin or glutamic acid decarboxylase, or both, but rarely against islet antigen-2. After the initial appearance of one...... of the three stages can differ. Type 1 diabetes could serve as a disease model for organ-specific autoimmune disorders such as coeliac disease, thyroiditis, and Addison's disease, which show similar early markers of a prolonged disease process before clinical diagnosis....... of these autoantibody biomarkers, a second, third, or fourth autoantibody against either islet antigen-2 or the ZnT8 transporter might also appear. The larger the number of β-cell autoantibody types, the greater the risk of rapid progression to clinical onset of diabetes. This association does not necessarily mean...

  14. Erythropoietin during hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Høi-Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Preservation of cognitive function during hypoglycaemic episodes is crucial for patients with insulin-treated diabetes to avoid severe hypoglycaemic events. Erythropoietin has neuroprotective potential. However, the role of erythropoietin during hypoglycaemia is unclear. The aim of the stud....... CONCLUSIONS: Hypoglycaemia triggers a rise in plasma erythropoietin in patients with type 1 diabetes. The response is influenced by basal RAS activity. Erythropoietin may carry a neuroprotective potential during hypoglycaemia.......AIMS: Preservation of cognitive function during hypoglycaemic episodes is crucial for patients with insulin-treated diabetes to avoid severe hypoglycaemic events. Erythropoietin has neuroprotective potential. However, the role of erythropoietin during hypoglycaemia is unclear. The aim of the study...... was to explore plasma erythropoietin response to hypoglycaemia and the relationship to basal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity and cognitive function. METHODS: We performed a single-blinded, controlled, cross-over study with induced hypoglycaemia or maintained glycaemic level. Nine patients with type 1...

  15. Birth Weight in Type 1 Diabetic Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquemyn Yves

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim was to investigate whether birth weight in mothers with diabetes mellitus type 1 is higher as compared to nondiabetic controls. Methods. A retrospective study was performed using an existing database covering the region of Flanders, Belgium. Data included the presence of diabetes type 1, hypertension, parity, maternal age, the use artificial reproductive technology, fetal- neonatal death, congenital anomalies, admission to a neonatal intensive care unit, and delivery by Caesarean section or vaginally. Results. In the period studied, 354 women with diabetes type 1 gave birth and were compared with 177.471 controls. Women with type 1 diabetes more often had a maternal age of over 35 years (16.7% versus 12.0%, P=.008, OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.09–1.95. They more frequently suffered hypertension in pregnancy (19.5% versus 4.7%, P<.0001, OR 4.91; 95% CI 3.73–6.44. Perinatal death was significantly higher in the diabetes mellitus group (3.05% versus 0.73%, P<.0001, OR 4.28; 95% CI 2.22–8.01. Caesarean section was performed almost 5 times as frequently in the diabetes versus the control group (OR 4.57; 95% CI 3.70–5.65. Birth weight was significantly higher in diabetic pregnant women from 33 until 38 weeks included, but those reaching 39 weeks and later were not different with control groups. Conclusion. In Belgium, diabetic pregnancy still carries a high risk for fetal and maternal complications; in general birth weight is significantly higher but for those reaching term there is no significant difference in birth weight.

  16. Congenital CMV with LAD type 1 and NK cell deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Narendra; Thakur, Neha

    2013-08-01

    We report a rare case of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) in a patient who was subsequently diagnosed as leukocyte adhesion defect type 1 with natural killer cell deficiency. The clinical course was complicated by severe CMV pneumonitis during the newborn period. Thereafter the infant suffered from recurrent skin infections without pus formation, otitis media, and bronchopneumonia since 3 months of age. The patient had congenital CMV infection as urine and blood plasma was positive for CMV from day 12 onward. Neutrophil chemotaxis studies showed a decrease in directed chemotaxis. Neutrophils were dyspoetic and nonfunctional lacking HLA DR, CD11c, and CD18. Lymphocytes were polyclonal but lacked CD56, CD16, and surface membrane immunoglobulin.

  17. Genetics of Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friday, R P; Trucco, M; Pietropaolo, M

    1999-02-01

    Type 1 diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is the archetypal example of a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterised by selective destruction of a single cell type: the insulin-producing beta-cells of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans. The pathogenic equation for IDDM presents a complex interrelation of genetic and environmental factors, most of which have yet to be identified. Based on the observed familial aggregation of IDDM, it is certain that there is a decided heritable genetic susceptibility for developing autoimmune diabetes. The well-known association of IDDM with certain human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) was a major step toward understanding the role of inheritance in IDDM. Landmark molecular biological investigations of diabetes HLA susceptibility genes provided great potential for insights into the molecular basis for the autoimmune nature of the disease, beginning a story that continues to unfold. Although the association of certain HLA alleles with IDDM is very strong, this genetic locus is estimated to account for less than 50% of genetic contributions to disease susceptibility. The search for non-HLA susceptibility genes has received great attention in recent years. Albeit genome wide searches are wrought with controversy, such studies have suggested the association of numerous non-MHC loci with Type 1 diabetes that will require careful follow-up investigation. Cell biological and genetic functional analyses will provide clues that are indispensable for further progress. The necessary studies include research on immunological abnormalities that are present many years before the clinical onset of Type 1 diabetes.

  18. Therapeutic perspectives in type-1 diabetes

    CERN Document Server

    SINGH, PRACHI; TUPALLY, KARNAKER R; PODDAR, KINGSHUK; Tan, Aaron; VENKATESAN, VENKY; PAREKH, HARENDRA S; PASTORIN, GIORGIA

    2016-01-01

    This book provides critical insights into and appraisals of recent breakthroughs in type 1 diabetes modulation, with a particular emphasis on the potential impact of current prevention and treatment strategies. It also discusses recent successes and failures in clinical trials. Presenting an comprehensive overview of the disease, it is especially useful for newcomers in the field. It also includes illustrations, which make it easy for the reader to grasp the basic concepts involved. Furthermore, the tables include concise and easy-to-understand information on current clinical trials.

  19. Insulinbehandling af voksne med type 1-diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2015-01-01

    treatment can be delivered with insulin pumps. Adjustments of insulin dosing can be rationally based on dosing algorithms. This requires frequent glucose measurements and knowledge about dietary carbohydrate content. Today, the treatment and its complexity are individualized according to needs and wishes......Whereas insulin treatment of type 1 diabetes formerly was limited by the availability of one or a few types of insulin with suboptimal pharmacokinetic properties, insulin analogues with more fitting physiological action profiles have now been developed and ultimately near-physiological insulin...

  20. Why is type 1 diabetes increasing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egro, Francesco Maria

    2013-01-01

    A series of studies have reported a constant global rise in the incidence of type 1 diabetes. Epidemiological and immunological studies have demonstrated that environmental factors may influence the pathogenesis, leading to a cell-mediated pancreatic β-cell destruction associated with humoral immunity. The search for the triggering factor(s) has been going on for the past century, and yet they are still unknown. This review provides an overview of some of the most well-known theories found in the literature: hygiene, viral, vitamin D deficiency, breast milk and cow's milk hypotheses. Although the hygiene hypothesis appears to be the most promising, positive evidence from animal, human and epidemiological studies precludes us from completely discarding any of the other hypotheses. Moreover, due to contrasting evidence in the literature, a single factor is unlikely to cause an increase in the incidence of diabetes all over the world, which suggests that a multifactorial process might be involved. Although the immunological mechanisms are still unclear, there seems to be some overlap between the various hypotheses. It is thought that the emphasis should be shifted from a single to a multifactorial process and that perhaps the 'balance shift' model should be considered as a possible explanation for the rise in the incidence of type 1 diabetes.

  1. [Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Lado, C; Landín-Iglesias, G; Pintos-Martínez, E; Pastor-Benavent, N; Eirís-Puñal, J; Castro-Gago, M

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasias constitute a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders of uncertain aetiopathogenesis. They have been reported as being associated with deficiencies of complexes in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and with congenital disorders of glycosylation. On the basis of clinical and neuropathological criteria, two phenotypes can be distinguished in this condition. Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1 is characterised by hypoplasia of the pons and the cerebellum associated with the degeneration of the motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord. A 4-year-old female with symptoms of severe psychomotor retardation associated with microcephaly, important generalised hypotonia, muscle hypotrophy, contractions in the four limbs, absence of stretch reflex and epilepsy with onset in the neonatal period. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed pontocerebellar hypoplasia. An electroneuromyography showed a trace that was compatible with axonal neuropathy and a biopsy of the deltoid muscle revealed the existence of neurogenic muscular atrophy. In the MRC study conducted in muscle homogenate and in skin fibroblasts, complex IV values were found to be at the lower limits of what could be considered to be normal levels. Results of the genetic study for spinal muscular atrophy were negative. The case reported here could be included as a case of pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1. MRC studies can be of interest in cases of pontocerebellar hypoplasia in order to explain the role it plays in this disorder.

  2. Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetic Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Simon; Damm, Peter; Mersebach, Henriette; Skjøth, Trine Vang; Kaaja, Risto; Hod, Moshe; Durán-García, Santiago; McCance, David; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A recent randomized trial compared prandial insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin in type 1 diabetic pregnancy. The aim of this exploratory analysis was to investigate the incidence of severe hypoglycemia during pregnancy and compare women enrolled preconception with women enrolled during early pregnancy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS IAsp administered immediately before each meal was compared with human insulin administered 30 min before each meal in 99 subjects (44 to IAsp and 55 to human insulin) randomly assigned preconception and in 223 subjects (113 for IAsp and 110 for human insulin) randomly assigned in early pregnancy (IAsp versus human insulin were 0.9 versus 2.4, 0.9 versus 2.4, 0.3 versus 1.2, and 0.2 versus 2.2 episodes per patient per year, respectively (NS). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that initiation of insulin analog treatment preconception rather than during early pregnancy may result in a lower risk of severe hypoglycemia in women with type 1 diabetes. PMID:20007944

  3. Neurofibromatosis type 1: brain stem tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilaniuk, L.T.; Molloy, P.T.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Phillips, P.C.; Vaughan, S.N.; Liu, G.T.; Sutton, L.N.; Needle, M.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the clinical and imaging findings of brain stem tumours in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The NF1 patients imaged between January 1984 and January 1996 were reviewed and 25 patients were identified with a brain stem tumour. Clinical, radiographical and pathological results were obtained by review of records and images. Brain stem tumour identification occurred much later than the clinical diagnosis of NF1. Medullary enlargement was most frequent (68 %), followed by pontine (52 %) and midbrain enlargement (44 %). Patients were further subdivided into those with diffuse (12 patients) and those with focal (13 patients) tumours. Treatment for hydrocephalus was required in 67 % of the first group and only 15 % of the second group. Surgery was performed in four patients and revealed fibrillary astrocytomas, one of which progressed to an anaplastic astrocytoma. In 40 % of patients both brain stem and optic pathway tumours were present. The biological behaviour of brain stem tumours in NF1 is unknown. Diffuse tumours in the patients with NF1 appear to have a much more favourable prognosis than patients with similar tumours without neurofibromatosis type 1. (orig.). With 7 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, David; Doyle, Aoife; Firth, Richard G R; Byrne, Maria M; Daly, Sean; Mc Auliffe, Fionnuala; Foley, Micheal; Coulter-Smith, Samuel; Kinsley, Brendan T

    2010-03-01

    Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 is a disorder that ...

  6. Pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colstrup, Miriam; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Damm, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In 1989 the St. Vincent declaration set a five-year target for approximating outcomes of pregnancies in women with diabetes to those of the background population. We investigated and quantified the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes (T1DM...... outcomes was two to five times increased in women with T1DM compared with the general population. The goals of the St. Vincent declaration have not been achieved.......) to evaluate if the goals of the 1989 St. Vincent Declaration have been obtained concerning foetal and neonatal complications. Methods: Twelve population-based studies published within the last 10 years with in total 14 099 women with T1DM and 4 035 373 women from the background population were identified...

  7. Research progress of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-wei ZHANG

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1 is a kind of autosomal dominant genetic neurodegenerative disorder. To date, the pathogenesis of SCA1 remains unclear. Studies in numerous SCA1 experimental models, including transgenic mice, transgenic drosophila and induced pluripotent stem cells, have shown that phosphorylation of S776 in mutant ataxin-1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin-proteasome system and down-regulation of several components of RAS-MAPK-MSK1 pathway may involve in the pathogenesis of SCA1. In this review, the clinical and pathological features of SCA1, and the latest advances of pathogenesis, model systems and therapeutic exploration will be briefly summarized. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.05.017

  8. The intestinal microbiome in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, J L; Triplett, E W; Gevers, D; Xavier, R; Insel, R; Danska, J; Atkinson, M A

    2014-07-01

    Few concepts in recent years have garnered more disease research attention than that of the intestinal (i.e. 'gut') microbiome. This emerging interest has included investigations of the microbiome's role in the pathogenesis of a variety of autoimmune disorders, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Indeed, a growing number of recent studies of patients with T1D or at varying levels of risk for this disease, as well as in animal models of the disorder, lend increasing support to the notion that alterations in the microbiome precede T1D onset. Herein, we review these investigations, examining the mechanisms by which the microbiome may influence T1D development and explore how multi-disciplinary analysis of the microbiome and the host immune response may provide novel biomarkers and therapeutic options for prevention of T1D. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  9. Metformin in adults with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrie, John R; Chaturvedi, Nish; Ford, Ian

    2017-01-01

    but there are no data on its cardiovascular effects. We have therefore initiated an international double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (REMOVAL: REducing with MetfOrmin Vascular Adverse Lesions in type 1 diabetes) to examine whether metformin reduces progression of atherosclerosis in adults with T1D...... are randomized to metformin or matching placebo for 3 years with insulin titrated towards HbA1c 7.0% (53 mmol/mol). The primary endpoint is progression of averaged mean far wall common carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) measured by ultrasonography at baseline, 12, 24 and 36 months. This design provides 90...... of hypoglycaemia. CONCLUSION: REMOVAL is the largest clinical trial of adjunct metformin therapy in T1D to date and will provide clinically meaningful information on its potential to impact CV disease and other complications....

  10. Type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nete M; Westergaard, Tine; Frisch, Morten

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and multiple sclerosis (MS) contribute considerably to the burden of autoimmune diseases in young adults. Although HLA patterns of T1D and MS are considered mutually exclusive, individual and familial co-occurrence of the 2 diseases has been reported...... Multiple Sclerosis Register were used to identify patients with T1D, defined as patients in whom diabetes was diagnosed before age 20 years (N = 6078), and patients with MS (N = 11 862). First-degree relatives (N = 14,771) of patients with MS were identified from family information in the Danish Civil....... OBJECTIVE: To assess the co-occurrence of T1D and MS by estimating the risk for MS in patients with T1D and the risk for T1D in first-degree relatives of patients with MS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Two population-based disease registers, the Danish Hospital Discharge Register and the Danish...

  11. Emerging adulthood and Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallis, M; Willaing, I; Holt, R I G

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To compare clinical, psychological, education and social variables in emerging adults (aged 18-30 years) with Type 1 diabetes with their adult counterparts aged >30 years. METHODS: A single assessment multinational sample was surveyed as part of the larger second Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes...... experience and family support) and diabetes education factors. RESULTS: Emerging adults differed from adults aged >30 years with regard to a number of psychosocial variables. Emerging adults reported better overall quality of life, social support and support from their healthcare team compared with adults...... aged >30 years of age; however, emerging adults experienced greater diabetes-specific distress and were less engaged in self-management. Diabetes education was related to a number of indicators, while experience of discrimination was harmful, but these impacts did not differ between emerging adults...

  12. Type 1 neurofibromatosis with periodontal manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 also known as von Recklinghausen's disease is an autosomal dominant disease transmitted with a high degree of penetrance. The disease is expressed in different forms. NF1 accounts for almost 90% of the cases although nine types have been described to date. We report one such case of a 36-year-old female who presented with multiple nodules on the body. He was diagnosed to have NF1, having satisfied the diagnostic criteria for the same. Oral manifestations can be found in almost 72% of NF1 patients. This case report highlights the clinical features and diagnostic criteria of NF1, the prevalence and the significance of intraoral neurofibromas and the need for the dental practitioner to be aware of this condition.

  13. Type 1 diabetes care updates: Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandi Catherine Muze

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tanzania is located in east Africa with a population of 45 million. The country′s population is growing at 2.5% annually. The International Diabetes Federation Child Sponsorship Program was launched in Tanzania in 2005. The number of type 1 diabetes mellitus children enrolled in the changing diabetes in children program in Tanzania has augmented from almost below 50 in 2005 to over 1200 in 2014. The country had an overall trend of HbA1c value of 14% in 2005 while the same has reduced over the years to 10% in 2012-13. The program has been able to reduce the proportion of patients with HbA1c values of 11-14%; from 71.9% in 2008 to 49.8% in 2012-13. The challenges, which CDiC faces are misdiagnosis, low public awareness, and stigma especially in the reproductive age/adolescent groups.

  14. Gut Microbiota and Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Han

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D has increased rapidly and became a major public health concern worldwide. Various factors are associated with the development of T1D, such as diet, genome, and intestinal microbiota. The gastrointestinal (GI tract harbors a complex and dynamic population of microorganisms, the gut microbiota, which exert a marked influence on the host homeostasis and metabolic diseases. Recent evidence shows that altered gut bacterial composition (dysbiosis is highly associated with the pathogenesis of insulin dysfunction and T1D and, thus, targeting gut microbiota may serve as a therapeutic potential for T1D patients. In this study, we updated the effect of gut microbiota on T1D and potential mechanisms were discussed.

  15. Teenage pregnancy in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carmody, David

    2010-03-01

    Younger maternal age at delivery has been linked to adverse reproductive outcomes. Pregnancy complicated by type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. Optimising diabetic glycaemic control prior to pregnancy is known to reduce the rate of congenital abnormalities and improve pregnancy outcomes. Teenage pregnancies are not usually planned and little data exist on teenage pregnancy complicated by T1DM. We sought to identify the glycemic control achieved in teenage pregnancy with T1DM and to clarify if there is an associated increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes compared to those seen in older women with T1DM. We compared outcomes in 18 teenagers (TG) with 582 older women with T1DM (CON) from 1995-2007. TG booked to the combined diabetes-obstetrical service at a median gestational age of 11 weeks (range 6-22) compared to 7 weeks in CON (range 4-40, p < 0.02). Glycaemic was worse in TG compared to CON at 13, 26 and 35 weeks gestation, despite higher insulin doses. First trimester miscarriage rate did not differ between groups. Major congenital anomaly rate was 6.2% (1\\/16) compared to 3.2% in CON. This preliminary study has demonstrated that pregnant teenage women with T1DM book later to specialised care and have worse glycaemic control in pregnancy compared to older women with T1DM. This group also appear to be more insulin resistant than older women in early pregnancy. Our data would suggest that teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus may constitute a high-risk group for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  16. Obesity and type 1 diabetes mellitus management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillarón, J J; Benaiges, D; Mañé, L; Pedro-Botet, J; Flores Le-Roux, J A

    2015-03-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) traditionally had a low body mass index and microangiopathic complications were common. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, published in 1993, demonstrated that therapy aimed at maintaining HbA1c levels as close to normal as feasible reduced the incidence of microangiopathy. Since then, the use of intensive insulin therapy to optimise metabolic control became generalised, with two main side effects: a higher rate of severe hypoglycaemia and increased weight gain. Approximately 50% of patients with T1DM are currently obese or overweight, which reduces or nullifies the benefits of good metabolic control, and which has other negative consequences; therefore, strategies to achieve weight control in patients with T1DM are necessary. At present, treatment with GLP-1 and SGLT-2 inhibitors has yielded promising short-term results that need to be confirmed in studies with larger numbers of patients and long-term follow-up. It is possible that, in coming years, the applicability of bariatric surgery in obese patients with T1DM will be similar to that of the general population or T2DM.

  17. Lung parenchima changes in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilić, Aleksandra; Raljević, Snezana; Adzić, Tatjana; Vesna Skodrić-Trifunović; Stanimirović, Jelena

    2016-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also known as von Recklinghausen disease, is one of the most common single-gene disorders (mutation on chromosome 17q) and usually associated with cutaneous, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders in humans. NF1 is generally complicated with one or more neurobehavioral disorders or tumors located in the peripheral nervous system such as neurofibromas, peripheral nerve sheath tumor, pheochromocytoma, etc. In the available medical literature, the thoracic manifestations of NF1 have been rarely described in these patients. There are few reports about intrathoracic neurogenic tumors, kyphoscoliosis, pneu- monitis and pulmonary fibrosis in patients with NF1. A 65-year-old female was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit at the Lung Clinic of Belgrade University Clinical Center of Serbia. The patient's general condition was poor with shortness of breath and present cyanosis. At the same time, the skin changes similar to NF1 were noticed, which were additionally documented by her medical history and diagnosed as NF1. After the application of noninvasive mechanical ventilation and other emergency respiratory medicine measures, the patient soon felt better. The parenchymal changes were viewed by subsequent X-rays and CT scanning of the thorax. This is a case report presenting the NF1 associated with the abnormality of lung parenchyma established during diagnostic procedures at the Intensive Care Unit, Clinic of Pulmonology.

  18. [Learning disorders in neurofibromatosis type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Penas, J J

    2017-02-24

    Neurocognitive deficits and academic learning difficulties are the most common neurologic complication of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in childhood and can be responsible for significant lifetime morbidity. Children with NF1 show impairments in attention, visual perception, language, executive function, academic skills, and behavior. Studies in animal models suggest that the learning disabilities associated with NF1 are caused by excessive Ras activity that leads to increased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibition and to decreased long-term potentiation. To describe the frequency, severity, typology, and natural course of specific cognitive deficits in children with NF1. Cognitive and behavioral disorders affect between 50-80% of all children with NF1. We can define three subtypes of cognitive profiles in children with NF1 and learning disorder, including global learning disorder, specific learning disorder, and isolated attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The most common cognitive deficits are connected with visual-spatial impairment, however working memory and executive function deficits associated with prefrontal cortex dysfunction are also important. There is an extremely high frequency of cognitive problems in children with NF1, making cognitive dysfunction the most common complication to affect quality of life in these children. Early diagnosis and treatment of learning disorders in these patients leads to improved academic outcome.

  19. Type 1 diabetes guidelines: Are they enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Abdul Zargar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of insulin by Banting and Best in 1922 changed the landscape of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. Guidelines on T1DM should be evidence based and should emphasize comprehensive risk management. Guidelines would improve awareness amongst governments, state health care providers and the general public about the serious long-term implications of poorly managed diabetes and of the essential resources needed for optimal care. T1DM requires lifelong daily medication, regular control as well as access to facilities to manage acute and chronic complications. American Diabetes Association 2014 guidelines recommends annual nephropathy screening for albumin levels; random spot urine sample for albumin-to-creatinine ratio at start of puberty or age ≥10 years, whichever is earlier, once the child has had diabetes for 5 years. Hypertension should be screened for in T1DM patients by measuring blood pressure at each routine visit. Dyslipidemia in T1DM patients is important and patients should be screened if there is a family history of hypercholesterolemia or a cardiovascular event before the age of 55 years exists or if family history is unknown. Retinopathy is another important complication of diabetes and patients should be subjected to an initial dilated and comprehensive eye examination. Basic diabetes training should be provided for school staff, and they should be assigned with responsibilities for the care of diabetic children. Self-management should be allowed at all school settings for students.

  20. Lung parenchima changes in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, also known as von Recklinghausen disease, is one of the most common single-gene disorders (mutation on chromosome 17q and usually associated with cutaneous, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders in humans. NF1 is generally complicated with one or more neurobehavioral disorders or tumors located in the peripheral nervous system such as neurofibromas, peripheral nerve sheath tumor, pheochromocytoma, etc. In the available medical literature, the thoracic manifestations of NF1 have been rarely described in these patients. There are few reports about intrathoracic neurogenic tumors, kyphoscoliosis, pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis in patients with NF1. Case report. A 65-year-old female was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit at the Lung Clinic of Belgrade University Clinical Center of Serbia. The patient’s general condition was poor with shortness of breath and present cyanosis. At the same time, the skin changes similar to NF1 were noticed, which were additionally documented by her medical history and diagnosed as NF1. After the application of noninvasive mechanical ventilation and other emergency respiratory medicine measures, the patient soon felt better. The parenchymal changes were viewed by subsequent X-rays and CT scanning of the thorax. Conclusion. This is a case report presenting the NF1 associated with the abnormality of lung parenchyma established during diagnostic procedures at the Intensive Care Unit, Clinic of Pulmonology.

  1. The Genetic Architecture of Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T Jerram

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D is classically characterised by the clinical need for insulin, the presence of disease-associated serum autoantibodies, and an onset in childhood. The disease, as with other autoimmune diseases, is due to the interaction of genetic and non-genetic effects, which induce a destructive process damaging insulin-secreting cells. In this review, we focus on the nature of this interaction, and how our understanding of that gene–environment interaction has changed our understanding of the nature of the disease. We discuss the early onset of the disease, the development of distinct immunogenotypes, and the declining heritability with increasing age at diagnosis. Whilst Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA have a major role in causing T1D, we note that some of these HLA genes have a protective role, especially in children, whilst other non-HLA genes are also important. In adult-onset T1D, the disease is often not insulin-dependent at diagnosis, and has a dissimilar immunogenotype with reduced genetic predisposition. Finally, we discuss the putative nature of the non-genetic factors and how they might interact with genetic susceptibility, including preliminary studies of the epigenome associated with T1D.

  2. Celiac disease in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camarca Maria

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac Disease (CD occurs in patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D ranging the prevalence of 4.4-11.1% versus 0.5% of the general population. The mechanism of association of these two diseases involves a shared genetic background: HLA genotype DR3-DQ2 and DR4-DQ8 are strongly associated with T1D, DR3-DQ2 with CD. The classical severe presentation of CD rarely occurs in T1D patients, but more often patients have few/mild symptoms of CD or are completely asymptomatic (silent CD. In fact diagnosis of CD is regularly performed by means of the screening in T1D patients. The effects of gluten-free diet (GFD on the growth and T1D metabolic control in CD/T1D patient are controversial. Regarding of the GFD composition, there is a debate on the higher glycaemic index of gluten-free foods respect to gluten-containing foods; furthermore GFD could be poorer of fibers and richer of fat. The adherence to GFD by children with CD-T1D has been reported generally below 50%, lower respect to the 73% of CD patients, a lower compliance being more frequent among asymptomatic patients. The more severe problems of GFD adherence usually occur during adolescence when in GFD non compliant subjects the lowest quality of life is reported. A psychological and educational support should be provided for these patients.

  3. [Neuropsychological performance in neurofibromatosis type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Del Castillo, Lilia; Martínez Bermejo, Antonio; Portellano Pérez, José Antonio; Tirado Requero, Pilar; Garriz Luis, Alexandra; Velázquez Fragua, Ramón

    2017-08-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder with various clinical manifestations that affect the peripheral and central nervous system, as well as the skin, bones and endocrine and vascular system. There is still insufficient knowledge of neuropsychological effects of NF1 on children, and there is some controversy about the cognitive deficits that defines the cognitive profile of patients affected by this disorder. In this study an analysis is made of the neuropsychological performance of a group of patients affected by NF1, compared with a control group of healthy children. A comparison was made between the neuropsychological performance of a group of 23 boys and girls with a mean age of 8.7 years (+/-1.39) and diagnosed with NF1, and a control group consisting of 21 healthy children, with mean age of 8.9 years (+/- 1.41) and with similar socio-demographic characteristics. The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) was applied to evaluate the subjects of both groups. The group of patients affected with NF1 showed a lower performance in every primary index of WISC IV: Verbal Comprehension Index, Fluid Reasoning Index, Working Memory Index, Processing Speed Index, and full Scale IQ. Only in two subscales were no statistically significant differences observed: similarities and coding. The results show subtle and generalised neuropsychological alterations in the sample of children affected with NF1, which affect most of cognitive domains that have been evaluated. Proper specific and early neuropsychological treatment should be provided in order to prevent the high risk for these children of presenting learning difficulties and school failure. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Type 1 diabetes in India: Overall insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is also on increase like type 2 diabetes, even though not in the same proportion, but still with a trend of 3-5% increase/year. India has three new cases of T1DM/100,000 children of 0-14 years. Three sets of prevalence data shows 17.93 cases/100,000 children in Karnataka, 3.2 cases/100,000 children in Chennai, and 10.2 cases/100,000 children in Karnal (Haryana.T1DM may be autoimmune or idiopathic in nature and is present in 9% cases of insulin deficiency. T1DM is primarily caused by genetic factors, environmental factors, and disorder of the immune regulatory mechanism. A combination of all these three factors causes autoimmune disease, which may ultimately result in the destruction of pancreatic beta cells leading to hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis and potentially death, if not treated with insulin. Prediabetes is the phase before the onset of T1DM, which provides a window of opportunity for early intervention. All available interventions including steroids, immunosuppressants, and cyclosporins can be possibly applied during the prediabetes phase. The treatment goals for T1DM are simple and include maintaining near normal blood glucose levels and avoiding long-term complications, which is a constant juggle between insulin and maintaining an appropriate lifestyle. The Indian Council of Medical Research funded Registry of People with diabetes in India with young age at onset (YDR was started in the year 2006 with 10 collaborating centres across India. This registry is focusing on to provide an overview of diabetes in the young.

  5. Type 1 diabetes in India: Overall insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ashok Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is also on increase like type 2 diabetes, even though not in the same proportion, but still with a trend of 3-5% increase/year. India has three new cases of T1DM/100,000 children of 0-14 years. Three sets of prevalence data shows 17.93 cases/100,000 children in Karnataka, 3.2 cases/100,000 children in Chennai, and 10.2 cases/100,000 children in Karnal (Haryana). T1DM may be autoimmune or idiopathic in nature and is present in 9% cases of insulin deficiency. T1DM is primarily caused by genetic factors, environmental factors, and disorder of the immune regulatory mechanism. A combination of all these three factors causes autoimmune disease, which may ultimately result in the destruction of pancreatic beta cells leading to hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis and potentially death, if not treated with insulin. Prediabetes is the phase before the onset of T1DM, which provides a window of opportunity for early intervention. All available interventions including steroids, immunosuppressants, and cyclosporins can be possibly applied during the prediabetes phase. The treatment goals for T1DM are simple and include maintaining near normal blood glucose levels and avoiding long-term complications, which is a constant juggle between insulin and maintaining an appropriate lifestyle. The Indian Council of Medical Research funded Registry of People with diabetes in India with young age at onset (YDR) was started in the year 2006 with 10 collaborating centres across India. This registry is focusing on to provide an overview of diabetes in the young.

  6. Constipation in children with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Cecilie E; Krogh, Klaus; Siggaard, Charlotte; Joensson, Iben M; Haagerup, Annette

    2013-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a hereditary, heterogenic, and multiorganic disease. The NF1 phenotype shows great variability in expressivity and often includes symptoms from the central and peripheral nervous systems. Bowel symptoms have been reported, but gastrointestinal function in NF1 remains to be described in detail. In this first systematic study of bowel function in children with NF1, we aimed to investigate symptoms of constipation and test the hypotheses that children with NF1 have abnormally large rectum and prolonged colonic transit time (CTT). A total of 20 children with NF1 (age 8.2 ± 2.4 years) were evaluated with medical history; clinical examination; digital rectal examination; bowel and dietary diaries; Rome III criteria; measurement of rectal diameter by transabdominal ultrasound; and radiographic estimation of CTT. The control group for assessment of rectal diameter comprised 23 healthy children (mean age 9.1 ± 2.7 years). A total of 6 children with NF1 (30%) were constipated according to Rome III criteria. Average rectal diameter was significantly larger than for healthy children (32.9 ± 7.2 mm vs 21.4 ± 5.9 mm, P children was 53 hours (range 26-101). Compared with existing normative data, CTT was prolonged (>84 hours) in 3 (19%). Symptoms of constipation were surprisingly common in children with NF1. Correspondingly, rectal diameters were abnormally large and a higher proportion than expected had prolonged CTT. The underlying pathophysiology remains obscure, but we hypothesise that abnormalities of the enteric nervous system or disturbed cellular growth could be present.

  7. Environmental modulators of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banshi Saboo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In genetically susceptible subjects, type 1 diabetes (T1D appears to be a chronic immune- mediated disease with a subclinical prodromal period characterized by selective loss of insulin-releasing pancreatic beta cells. However, only a relatively small proportion of genetically susceptible subjects progress to clinical disease, which indicates that environmental factors are needed to trigger and drive the disease process in genetically predisposed subjects. In this article we provide a selective review on environmental factors involved in the pathogenesis of T1D. Accumulating evidence suggests that the proportion of subjects with high-risk human leukocyte antigen (HLA genotypes has decreased over the last decades among patients with newly diagnosed T1D, whereas the proportion of those with low-risk or even protective HLA genotypes has increased. These findings indicate that increased environmental pressure is responsible for progression to clinical diabetes in patients with less genetic predisposition. The birth cohort studies indicate that the first signs of beta cell autoimmunity may be induced during infancy before age 3, which implies that dietary factors for beta cell autoimmunity and T1D may be active in that time period, during which early nutrition provides essential exogenous exposure. Progression to clinical T1D typically needs the combination of genetic disease susceptibility, a diabetogenic trigger, and a high exposure to a driving antigen. The triggers appear to be enteroviruses and rotaviruses as well as components of the infant diet including cows milk and gluten, while the Mediterranean diet appears protective. The only definite enterovirus responsible for T1D is congenital rubella, which may be complicated by late development of T1D. There is a temporal association between enteroviral infection and future development of antibodies resulting in T1D. Clinical studies indicate that islet cell antibodies develop 3 months after birth

  8. Pregnancy outcome in type 1 diabetic women with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekbom, P; Damm, P; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    2001-01-01

    To determine the influence of microalbuminuria on pregnancy outcome in women with type 1 diabetes.......To determine the influence of microalbuminuria on pregnancy outcome in women with type 1 diabetes....

  9. Genetics Home Reference: medullary cystic kidney disease type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 Medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 Printable PDF Open All Close All ... is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Pelizaeus-Merzbacher- ...

  10. Diet Treatment Glucose Transporter Type 1 Deficiency (G1D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-17

    GLUT1DS1; Epilepsy; Glut1 Deficiency Syndrome 1, Autosomal Recessive; Glucose Metabolism Disorders; Glucose Transport Defect; Glucose Transporter Type 1 Deficiency Syndrome; Glucose Transporter Protein Type 1 Deficiency Syndrome

  11. Characteristics of children presenting with newly diagnosed type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Of these, half a million are children under the age of 15 years diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is increasing in incidence worldwide at a rate of 2 - 5% per year, and roughly 200 children are diagnosed with new-onset type 1 diabetes every day.[1] The condition is increasing in all age groups, with a ...

  12. Tests for genetic interactions in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morahan, Grant; Mehta, Munish; James, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between genetic and environmental factors lead to immune dysregulation causing type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune disorders. Recently, many common genetic variants have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, but each has modest individual effects. Familial clustering of type 1 ...

  13. Stigma Perceived and Experienced by Adults with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ulla Møller; Willaing, Ingrid; Ventura, Adriana D

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to (a) culturally and linguistically adapt the Type 1 Diabetes Stigma Assessment Scale (DSAS-1) from English (for Australia) into Danish and (b) examine psychometric properties of the measure among Danish adults with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: We performed a forward-backward t......OBJECTIVES: We aimed to (a) culturally and linguistically adapt the Type 1 Diabetes Stigma Assessment Scale (DSAS-1) from English (for Australia) into Danish and (b) examine psychometric properties of the measure among Danish adults with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: We performed a forward...... to advance research into the stigma perceived and experienced by adults with type 1 diabetes in a Danish context....

  14. Prelabor Cesarean Section and Risk of Childhood Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tine Dalsgaard; Bergholt, Thomas; Eriksson, Frank

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Unfavorable conditions associated with cesarean section may influence the risk of type 1 diabetes in offspring, but results from studies are conflicting. We aimed to evaluate the association between prelabor cesarean section and risk of childhood type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A Danish...... contributed 20,436,684 person-years, during which 4,400 were diagnosed with childhood type 1 diabetes. RESULTS: The hazard ratio for childhood type 1 diabetes was increased in children delivered by prelabor cesarean section compared with vaginal delivery when adjusted for year of birth, parity, sex, parental...... age, and education and paternal type 1 diabetes status at childbirth (HR 1.2; 95% CI 1.0 to 1.3), but not after additional adjustment for maternal type 1 diabetes status at childbirth (HR 1.1; 95% CI 0.95 to 1.2). Delivery by intrapartum cesarean section was not associated with childhood type 1...

  15. The natural history of type 1A diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenbarth, George S.; Jeffrey, Joy

    2008-01-01

    We can now predict the development of Type 1A (Immune Mediated) diabetes primarily through the determination of four biochemically characterized islet autoantibodies [insulin, GAD65, IA-2 (ICA512) and (Znt8)]. Prediction is possible because beta-cell destruction is chronically progressive and very slow in most, but not all individuals. We can also prevent type 1A diabetes in animal models and a major goal is the prevention of type 1A diabetes in man with multiple clinical trials underway. ...

  16. Metabolomic Biomarkers in the Progression to Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Anne Julie; Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is the snapshot of all detectable metabolites and lipids in biological materials and has potential in reflecting genetic and environmental factors contributing to the development of complex diseases, such as type 1 diabetes. The progression to seroconversion to development of type 1...... diabetes has been studied using this technique, although in relatively small cohorts and at limited time points. Overall, three observations have been consistently reported; phospholipids at birth are lower in children developing type 1 diabetes early in childhood, methionine levels are lower in children...... at seroconversion, and triglycerides are increased at seroconversion and associated to microbiome diversity, indicating an association between the metabolome and microbiome in type 1 diabetes progression....

  17. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism and type 1 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune multifactorial disease which has a great socio-economic impact. In Morocco, less is known about the contribution of Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles to type 1 diabetes susceptibility. Our study focused on evaluating the distribution of class II ...

  18. Partial sleep restriction decreases insulin sensitivity in type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke [Leiden Univ., LUMC; van Dijk, J. Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas; Hoogma, Roel P. L. M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P. M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep restriction results in decreased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that sleep duration is also a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. We studied seven patients (three men, four women) with type 1 diabetes: mean age 44

  19. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Type 1 diabetes is a serious, debilitating disease, with life-threatening complications, and the financial burden associated with the management of this disease is enormous. Early diagnosis and intervention can improve morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, in Africa, type 1 diabetes is poorly characterised, and there is ...

  20. Lymphocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    INTRODUCTION. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) is the effect of T cell dependant autoimmune destruction of insulin producing beta cells in the pancreatic islets. T cells are activated in response to islet dominant autoantigens, the result being the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus.1. Apoptosis (a combination of the ...

  1. Breast-feeding and childhood-onset type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardwell, Chris R; Stene, Lars C; Ludvigsson, Johnny

    2012-01-01

    To investigate if there is a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes in children breastfed or exclusively breastfed by performing a pooled analysis with adjustment for recognized confounders.......To investigate if there is a reduced risk of type 1 diabetes in children breastfed or exclusively breastfed by performing a pooled analysis with adjustment for recognized confounders....

  2. Audit on stillbirths in women with pregestational type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauenborg, Jeannet; Mathiesen, Elisabeth Reinhardt; Ovesen, Per Glud

    2003-01-01

    To audit stillbirth cases in women with type 1 diabetes to search for specific characteristics in order to improve antenatal care and treatment.......To audit stillbirth cases in women with type 1 diabetes to search for specific characteristics in order to improve antenatal care and treatment....

  3. Stem cell transplantation for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voltarelli Júlio C

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of stem cells to treat type 1 diabetes mellitus has been proposed for many years, both to downregulate the immune system and to provide β cell regeneration. Conclusion High dose immunosuppression followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is able to induce complete remission (insulin independence in most patients with early onset type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  4. Type 1,1-operators defined by vanishing frequency modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Jon

    This paper presents a general definition of pseudo-differential operators of type 1,1; the definition is shown to be the largest one that is both compatible with negligible operators and stable under vanishing frequency modulation. Elaborating counter-examples of Ching andHörmander, type 1...

  5. A Neuropsychological Perspective on Attention Problems in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templer, Alexandra K.; Titus, Jeffrey B.; Gutmann, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive problems are common in children with neurofibromatosis type 1 and they can often complicate treatment. The current literature review examines cognitive functioning in neurofibromatosis type 1, with a specific focus on executive functioning. This includes exploration of how deficits in executive functioning are expressed in children with…

  6. Management of Type 1 Diabetes in Schools: Whose Responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandali, Swarna L.; Gordon, Theresa A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2008) reports that approximately 0.2% of all persons under the age of 20 have been diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This represents 186,300 children and young adults. Type 1 diabetes has traditionally been a disease of children and adolescents. Although type 2 diabetes has in the past…

  7. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy/complex regional pain syndrome, type 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    over the left ankle was also present. (Fig. 6 and Figs 7a and 7b). There was contradiction between the two diagnoses of stress fractures and CPRS type 1. As CPRS type 1 is a clinical diagnosis the boy was treated as such. He was admitted into hospital and received epidural narcotic infusion with sympathetic blockage for a ...

  8. Thyroid Hormones and Glycaemic Indices in Types 1 and 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies comparing the relationship between thyroid hormones and the glycaemic indices in Types 1 and 2 diabetics are scanty. This study compared the relationship between thyroid hormones and glycaemic indices in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics on various therapies. The thyroid hormones, thyroid stimulating hormone ...

  9. Experimental Therapy Shows Promise for Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... triggers cells to take up sugar from the blood. In type 1 diabetes, the immune system The cells and tissues that ... people to eat or drink to raise their blood sugar levels. However, many people with type 1 diabetes can’t tell when their blood sugar is ...

  10. Efficacy of standardised herbal extracts in type 1 diabetes - an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reg. and Murraya koenigii (L.) Spreng. extracts have been studied in an experimental model of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes was induced in albino rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). Rats with fasting blood glucose (FBG) more than 250 mg/dl, 72 h after STZ administration, were treated ...

  11. Fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunir, E.; Nenfiati

    2018-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease caused by insulin deficiency that results from destruction of β-cells in the pancreas. Based on American Diabetes Association, there are two types of type 1 diabetes mellitus: type 1A (autoimmune) and 1B (idiopathic). In this case, we are presenting a new archetype of type 1 diabetes named fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus. This disease results from quick destruction of β-cells byanautoimmune mechanism. The manifestation of this disease consists of unspecific flu-like symptoms, abdominal symptoms, to specific hyperglycemia symptoms such as fatigue, malaise, change in mental status that are attributable to high blood glucose and ketosis. Laboratory examination reveals high blood glucose, normal glycosylated hemoglobin, ketosis or ketoacidosis, potassium depletion and elevation of liver function tests. Treatment consists of intravenous infusion followed by insulin injection for blood glucose control, followed by treatment of metabolic derangements such as acid-base and electrolyte disorder.

  12. Plasma disappearance of glycated and non-glycated albumin in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bent-Hansen, L; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Kverneland, Arne

    1993-01-01

    The fractional plasma escape rates of glycated and non-glycated albumin have earlier been measured in groups of Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients and control subjects. The escape of non-glycated albumin was similar in control subjects and normoalbuminuric patients, but elevated in pati...... to be the glycosaminoglycans of the glomerular basal membrane and the interstitial matrix....

  13. The molecular basis of type 1 glycogen storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, J Y

    2001-03-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1), also known as von Gierke disease, is a group of autosomal recessive metabolic disorders caused by deficiencies in the activity of the glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) system that consists of at least two membrane proteins, glucose-6-phosphate transporter (G6PT) and G6Pase. G6PT translocates glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) from cytoplasm to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and G6Pase catalyzes the hydrolysis of G6P to produce glucose and phosphate. Therefore, G6PT and G6Pase work in concert to maintain glucose homeostasis. Deficiencies in G6Pase and G6PT cause GSD-1a and GSD-1b, respectively. Both manifest functional G6Pase deficiency characterized by growth retardation, hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, kidney enlargement, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidemia. GSD-1b patients also suffer from chronic neutropenia and functional deficiencies of neutrophils and monocytes, resulting in recurrent bacterial infections as well as ulceration of the oral and intestinal mucosa. The G6Pase gene maps to chromosome 17q21 and encodes a 36-kDa glycoprotein that is anchored to the ER by 9 transmembrane helices with its active site facing the lumen. Animal models of GSD-1a have been developed and are being exploited to delineate the disease more precisely and to develop new therapies. The G6PT gene maps to chromosome 11q23 and encodes a 37-kDa protein that is anchored to the ER by 10 transmembrane helices. A functional assay for the recombinant G6PT protein has been established, which showed that G6PT functions as a G6P transporter in the absence of G6Pase. However, microsomal G6P uptake activity was markedly enhanced in the simultaneous presence of G6PT and G6Pase. The cloning of the G6PT gene now permits animal models of GSD-1b to be generated. These recent developments are increasing our understanding of the GSD-l disorders and the G6Pase system, knowledge that will facilitate the development of novel therapeutic approaches for

  14. NHSBSP type 1 interval cancers: a scientifically valid grouping?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, G.J.R.; Evans, A.J.; Burrell, H.C.; Lee, A.H.S.; Chakrabarti, J.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To assess whether there are differences in the pathological features or survival between the new National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) interval cancer classification system category of type 1 interval cancers, and the previously used, separate categories of occult, unclassified, and true interval cancers. Materials and methods: The prognostic pathological features (grade, lymph node stage, size, vascular invasion, oestrogen receptor status, and histological type) and survival of 428 type 1 interval invasive breast cancers were analysed by subgroup (occult, unclassified and true interval). Results: Occult cancers compared with other type 1 interval cancers were of significantly lower grade [38 of 52 (73%) versus 151 of 340 (44%) grade 1 or 2, p = 0.0005], more likely to be smaller size [37 of 51 (73%) versus 158 of 341 (46%) <20 mm, p = 0.0003] and more frequently of lobular type at histology [14 of 42 (32%) versus 50 of 286 (17%), p = 0.03]. There was no significant difference in pathological features of unclassified tumours compared with other type 1 tumours. There was no significant survival difference between different type 1 subgroups (p = 0.12). Conclusion: The NHSBSP type 1 interval cancers are a heterogeneous grouping with markedly differing pathological features. However, no significant survival difference is seen between the different type 1 subgroups

  15. NHSBSP type 1 interval cancers: a scientifically valid grouping?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, G.J.R. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: garethporter@doctors.org.uk; Evans, A.J. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Burrell, H.C. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Lee, A.H.S. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Chakrabarti, J. [Nottingham Breast Institute, City Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2007-03-15

    Aim: To assess whether there are differences in the pathological features or survival between the new National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) interval cancer classification system category of type 1 interval cancers, and the previously used, separate categories of occult, unclassified, and true interval cancers. Materials and methods: The prognostic pathological features (grade, lymph node stage, size, vascular invasion, oestrogen receptor status, and histological type) and survival of 428 type 1 interval invasive breast cancers were analysed by subgroup (occult, unclassified and true interval). Results: Occult cancers compared with other type 1 interval cancers were of significantly lower grade [38 of 52 (73%) versus 151 of 340 (44%) grade 1 or 2, p = 0.0005], more likely to be smaller size [37 of 51 (73%) versus 158 of 341 (46%) <20 mm, p = 0.0003] and more frequently of lobular type at histology [14 of 42 (32%) versus 50 of 286 (17%), p = 0.03]. There was no significant difference in pathological features of unclassified tumours compared with other type 1 tumours. There was no significant survival difference between different type 1 subgroups (p = 0.12). Conclusion: The NHSBSP type 1 interval cancers are a heterogeneous grouping with markedly differing pathological features. However, no significant survival difference is seen between the different type 1 subgroups.

  16. Type-1 pericytes participate in fibrous tissue deposition in aged skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2013-12-01

    In older adults, changes in skeletal muscle composition are associated with increased fibrosis, loss of mass, and decreased force, which can lead to dependency, morbidity, and mortality. Understanding the biological mechanisms responsible is essential to sustaining and improving their quality of life. Compared with young mice, aged mice take longer to recover from muscle injury; their tissue fibrosis is more extensive, and regenerated myofibers are smaller. Strong evidence indicates that cells called pericytes, embedded in the basement membrane of capillaries, contribute to the satellite-cell pool and muscle growth. In addition to their role in skeletal muscle repair, after tissue damage, they detach from capillaries and migrate to the interstitial space to participate in fibrosis formation. Here we distinguish two bona fide pericyte subtypes in the skeletal muscle interstitium, type-1 (Nestin-GFP(-)/NG2-DsRed(+)) and type-2 (Nestin-GFP(+)/NG2-DsRed(+)), and characterize their heretofore unknown specific roles in the aging environment. Our in vitro results show that type-1 and type-2 pericytes are either fibrogenic or myogenic, respectively. Transplantation studies in young animals indicate that type-2 pericytes are myogenic, while type-1 pericytes remain in the interstitial space. In older mice, however, the muscular regenerative capacity of type-2 pericytes is limited, and type-1 pericytes produce collagen, contributing to fibrous tissue deposition. We conclude that in injured muscles from aging mice, the pericytes involved in skeletal muscle repair differ from those associated with scar formation.

  17. New technologies in the treatment of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition characterized by insufficient production of insulin, a hormone needed for proper control of blood glucose levels. People with type 1 diabetes must monitor their blood glucose throughout the day using a glucose meter or a continuous glucose monitor, calculate...... how much insulin is needed to maintain normal blood glucose levels, and administer the insulin dose by pen injection or insulin pump infusion into the subcutaneous tissue. In recent years, several new technologies for the treatment of type 1 diabetes have been developed. This PhD thesis covers two...

  18. Epidemiology of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Anders

    1999-01-01

    Recent estimates suggest that more than 100,000 inhabitants in the Middle East suffer from type 1 diabetes and that about 6000 subjects in the region develop the disease each year. This paper illustrates how epidemiological principles and methods may assist in a rational assessment of the public...... health impact of type 1 diabetes in the Middle East. Making a series of assumptions, it is estimated that the future prevalence of type 1 diabetes in the region will increase slightly, but that the increase may be more pronounced if the disease incidence is increasing and the prognosis improved....... It is recommended that more valid information is established on the basic epidemiological features of type 1 diabetes in the Middle East, as this will provide the basis of more rational planning of the current and future diabetes healthcare in the region....

  19. On Generalized Type 1 Logistic Distribution | Ahsanullah | Afrika ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some distributional properties of the generalized type 1 logistic distribution are given. Based on these distributional property a characterization of this distribution is presented. Key words: Conditional Expectation; Reversed Hazard Rate; Characterization.

  20. Fertility treatment and childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettner, Laura Ozer; Matthiesen, Niels Bjerregaard; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between specific types of fertility treatment and childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus. DESIGN: Nationwide birth cohort study. SETTING: Not applicable. PATIENT(S): All pregnancies resulting in a live-born singleton child in Denmark from 1995 to 2003......, and 8,490 children were conceived by in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection. During the follow-up period, 2,011 (0.4%) children developed type 1 diabetes mellitus. The primary analyses showed no association between fertility treatment and childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus....... In secondary analyses, ovulation induction or intrauterine insemination with follicle-stimulating hormone was associated with an increased risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus (hazard ratio 3.22; 95% confidence interval 1.20 to 8.64). No clear associations were seen with other types of fertility treatment...

  1. Ketogenic Diet for Epilepsy with Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2010-01-01

    Researchers at Medical University Vienna, Austria, report the efficacy and safety of the ketogenic diet (KD) in treatment of epilepsy in a 3-year 6 month-old girl with diabetes type 1 followed for 15 months.

  2. Microalbuminuria and glycated hemoglobin in children with type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % of patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The main modifiable DNP initiation and progression factors in susceptible individuals may be sustained hyperglycemia and hypertension. The aim of the present work was to study glycemic control in ...

  3. The Effect of Type-1 Error on Deterrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, Henrik; Mungan, Murat C.

    2018-01-01

    According to a conventional view, type-1 error (wrongful conviction) is as detrimental to deterrence as type-2 error (wrongful acquittal), because type-1 error lowers the pay-off from acting within the law. This view has led to the claim that the pro-defendant bias of criminal procedure, and its...... rarely and for some crimes not at all when the lawful act is chosen, type-1 error conditional on adjudication affects deterrence less than type-2 error, and for some crimes not at all. For the latter crimes, type-1 errors concerning the identity of the offender may still be thought to either affect...... evidentiary standards of criminal law that apply uniformly....

  4. Heart rate variability in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Gardim, Camila Balsamo; Oliveira, Bruno Affonso P. de; Bernardo, Aline Fernanda B.; Gomes, Rayana Loch; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Lorençoni, Roselene Modolo R.; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To gather current information about the effects of type 1 diabetes mellitus on children's cardiac autonomic behavior.DATA SOURCES: The search of articles was conducted on PubMed, Ibecs, Medline, Cochrane, Lilacs, SciELO and PEDro databases using the MeSH terms: "autonomic nervous system", "diabetes mellitus", "child", "type 1 diabetes mellitus", "sympathetic nervous system" and "parasympathetic nervous system", and their respective versions in Portuguese (DeCS). Articles published f...

  5. Omkostningseffektivitet ved behandling af type 1-diabetes med insulinpumpe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Kirsten; Sohlberg, Anna; Goodall, Gordan

    2010-01-01

    This study's aim was to project the long-term clinical and economic outcomes of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) treatment compared to multiple daily injections (MDI) in type 1 diabetes patients in Denmark.......This study's aim was to project the long-term clinical and economic outcomes of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) treatment compared to multiple daily injections (MDI) in type 1 diabetes patients in Denmark....

  6. Interleukin-1 antagonism in type 1 diabetes of recent onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moran, Antoinette; Bundy, Brian; Becker, Dorothy J

    2013-01-01

    Innate immunity contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, but until now no randomised, controlled trials of blockade of the key innate immune mediator interleukin-1 have been done. We aimed to assess whether canakinumab, a human monoclonal anti-interleukin-1...... antibody, or anakinra, a human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, improved β-cell function in recent-onset type 1 diabetes....

  7. Type 1 renal tubular acidosis in a patient of Type 1 diabetes mellitus: Is it coincidence or coexistence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzafar Naik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 26-year-old male patient suffering from Type 1 diabetes mellitus got admitted with abdominal pain and high blood sugars. On further evaluation, he was found to have normal anion gap metabolic acidosis without ketonuria and urinary pH was alkaline. The patient was diagnosed as Type 1 renal tubular acidosis (RTA (distal RTA and was managed by alkali replacement in addition to control of blood sugars. The association of Type 1 RTA with Type 1 diabetes mellitus has been rarely reported in the literature. The association needs a different attention as diagnosis and management of diabetic ketoacidosis in such cases will be tricky. The case presented here is the first of its kind from our part of the world and second as far as English literature is concerned.

  8. Strategies for the prevention of autoimmune type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, J A; Knip, M; Mathieu, C

    2011-10-01

    European experts on autoimmune Type 1 diabetes met for 2 days in October 2010 in Cambridge, to review the state-of-the-art and to discuss strategies for prevention of Type 1 diabetes (http://www-gene.cimr.cam.ac.uk/todd/sub_pages/T1D_prevention_Cambridge_workshop_20_21Oct2010.pdf). Meeting sessions examined the epidemiology of Type 1 diabetes; possible underlying causes of the continuing and rapid increase in Type 1 diabetes incidence at younger ages; and lessons learned from previous prevention trials. Consensus recommendations from the meeting were: 1. Resources such as national diabetes registries and natural history studies play an essential role in developing and refining assays to be used in screening for risk factors for Type 1 diabetes. 2. It is crucial to dissect out the earliest physiological events after birth, which are controlled by the susceptibility genes now identified in Type 1 diabetes, and the environmental factors that might affect these phenotypes, in order to bring forward a mechanistic approach to designing future prevention trials. 3. Current interventions at later stages of disease, such as in newly diagnosed Type 1 diabetes, have relied mainly on non-antigen-specific mechanisms. For primary prevention-preventing the onset of autoimmunity-interventions must be based on knowledge of the actual disease process such that: participants in a trial would be stratified according the disease-associated molecular phenotypes; the autoantigen(s) and immune responses to them; and the manipulation of the environment, as early as possible in life. Combinations of interventions should be considered as they may allow targeting different components of disease, thus lowering side effects while increasing efficacy. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  9. Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Dysregulation in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrailkill, Kathryn M.; Bunn, Robert C.; Moreau, Cynthia S.; Cockrell, Gael E.; Simpson, Pippa M.; Coleman, Hannah N.; Frindik, J. Paul; Kemp, Stephen F.; Fowlkes, John L.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dysregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 may contribute pathologically to the development of diabetes complications, including diabetic retinopathy and coronary and peripheral arterial disease. Our objective was to explore whether systemic MMP-2 dysregulation could be demonstrated in type 1 diabetes and to determine how MMP-2 concentration relates to disease status. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this cross-sectional study, MMP-2 concentrations and MMP-2 activity were measured in plasma and limed urine samples from 93 type 1 diabetic and 50 healthy control subjects, aged 14–40 years. Relationships between MMP-2 concentrations in these biological fluids and subject characteristics (sex, age, and duration of type 1 diabetes), indexes of glycemic control (A1C, fasting plasma glucose, and continuous glucose monitoring system average daily glucose), and measurements of renal function (urinary albumin excretion and glomerular filtration rate} were examined. RESULTS Urine and plasma MMP-2 concentrations and plasma MMP-2 activity were all significantly elevated in type 1 diabetic subjects compared with those in control subjects. Urine MMP-2 concentrations, in particular, were correlated with several clinical parameters that infer increased risk for diabetic comorbidity and specifically for diabetic nephropathy, including higher A1C, longer duration of disease, evidence of renal hyperfiltration, and the presence of microalbuminuria. CONCLUSIONS Urine and plasma MMP-2 concentrations are dysregulated in type 1 diabetes; urinary excretion of MMP-2, in particular, might provide a unique biomarker of diabetes-induced intrarenal pathologic processes. PMID:17563344

  10. Advances in the cellular immunological pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Song, Lu-Jun; Qin, Xin-Yu

    2014-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease caused by the immune-mediated destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. In recent years, the incidence of type 1 diabetes continues to increase. It is supposed that genetic, environmental and immune factors participate in the damage of pancreatic β cells. Both the immune regulation and the immune response are involved in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, in which cellular immunity plays a significant role. For the infiltration of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte, B lymphocytes, natural killer cells, dendritic cells and other immune cells take part in the damage of pancreatic β cells, which ultimately lead to type 1 diabetes. This review outlines the cellular immunological mechanism of type 1 diabetes, with a particular emphasis to T lymphocyte and natural killer cells, and provides the effective immune therapy in T1D, which is approached at three stages. However, future studies will be directed at searching for an effective, safe and long-lasting strategy to enhance the regulation of a diabetogenic immune system with limited toxicity and without global immunosuppression. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  11. [Type 1 diabetes: from genetic predisposition to hypothetical environmental triggers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phlips, J-C; Radermecker, R P

    2012-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that results in a progressive (complete in most cases) destruction of insulin-secreting beta cells from Langerhans islets. Even if the autoimmune process becomes to be well known, no one is yet sure what specifically prompts the autoimmune response that destroys the body's ability to produce insulin. Etiology of this complex disease combines a genetic predisposition and still (almost) unknown environmental factors that trigger autoimmuninty specifically targeting beta cells. Genetic HLA predispositions are clearly identified. However, only few people with apparent genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes actually end up getting the disease. Moreover, the remarkable increase of type 1 diabetes prevalence observed in numerous countries can not be explained by genetics. Because genetic factors can't predict alone the development of type 1 diabetes, environmental factors must be involved such as viral infections, toxins from food, cow milk during childhood (instead of breast feeding) or vitamin D deficiency. This paper aims at describing the role of the genetic predisposition and the environmental hypothesis which can be involved in the development of type 1 diabetes. We will conclude by briefly describing clinical trials targeting either the immune response or the potentially toxic environment.

  12. Transition to Adult Care for Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Katharine C.; Markowitz, Jessica T.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adults with type 1 diabetes are at risk for poor glycemic control, gaps in medical care, and adverse health outcomes. With the increasing incidence in type 1 diabetes in the pediatric population, there will be an increase in the numbers of teens and young adults transferring their care from pediatric providers to adult diabetes services in the future. In recent years, the topic of transitioning pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes to adult diabetes care has been discussed at length in the literature and there have been many observational studies. However, there are few interventional studies and, to date, no randomized clinical trials. This paper discusses the rationale for studying this important area. We review both observational and interventional literature over the past several years, with a focus on new research. In addition, important areas for future research are outlined. PMID:22922877

  13. [Eating disorders and type 1 diabetes: about 4 clinical reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Márcia; Rodrigues, Dírcea; Gouveia, José Pinto; Bastos, Margarida; Carvalheiro, Manuela

    2011-12-01

    Type 1 Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease, often diagnosed in youth and associated with important psychological, familial and social disorders. Its intensive treatment with insulin and dietary changes is an extra stress factor in a stage of life already complicated. This vulnerability, coupled with low self-esteem and psychological factors typical of the youth, makes eating disorders twice as common in young girls with type 1 diabetes. The omission of insulin is the sole purging behavior used to lose weight, culminating in a poor glycemic control and increased acute and chronic complications. The treatment seeks to achieve specific objectives, depending on the associated psychiatric pathology. Because of its frequency, the clinician should be alert to early manifestations of this association. We present four clinical cases of young people with type 1 diabetes and eating disorders, which show the complexity of the approach and monitoring of these patients.

  14. Intervening before the onset of Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Jesper Irving

    2003-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: To set up a clinical trial to establish whether nicotinamide can prevent or delay clinical onset of Type 1 diabetes. METHOD: The European Nicotinamide Diabetes Intervention Trial is a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention trial undertaken in 18 European...... countries, Canada and the USA. Entry criteria were a first-degree family history of Type 1 diabetes, age 3-40 years, confirmed islet cell antibody (ICA) levels greater than or equal to 20 JDF units, and a non-diabetic OGTT; the study group was further characterised by intravenous glucose tolerance testing....../INTERPRETATION: ENDIT has shown that a trial of an intervention designed to halt or delay progression to Type 1 diabetes can be carried out on a multinational collaborative basis, as and when potentially safe and effective forms of intervention become available. Primary screening with biochemically defined...

  15. Early feeding and risk of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knip, Mikael; Virtanen, Suvi M; Becker, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Short-term breastfeeding and early exposure to complex dietary proteins, such as cow milk proteins and cereals, or to fruit, berries, and roots have been implicated as risk factors for ß cell autoimmunity, clinical type 1 diabetes, or both. The Trial to Reduce Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus...... in the Genetically at Risk (TRIGR) is an international, randomized, double-blind, controlled intervention trial designed to answer the question of whether weaning to an extensively hydrolyzed formula in infancy will decrease the risk of type 1 diabetes later in childhood. In our pilot study, weaning to a highly...... recruited 5606 newborn infants with a family member affected by type 1 diabetes and enrolled 2159 eligible subjects who carried a risk-conferring HLA genotype. All recruited mothers were encouraged to breastfeed. The intervention lasted for 6-8 mo with a minimum study formula exposure time of 2 mo...

  16. Severe hypoglycaemia in 1076 adult patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Pramming, Stig; Heller, Simon R

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Differences between studies in rates of severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetic cohorts are common and poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in unselected patients treated in different secondary care centres and to evaluate...... the influence of risk markers, clinical setting and selection. METHODS: Cross-sectional Danish-British multicentre survey of 1076 consecutive adult patients with clinical type 1 diabetes who completed a detailed questionnaire on hypoglycaemia and related issues. Key variable was the self-reported rate of severe......, the rate of severe hypoglycaemia was 0.35 episodes/patient-year and only retinopathy was a significant risk marker together with state of awareness. CONCLUSION: Severe hypoglycaemia remains a significant clinical problem in type 1 diabetes. The rate of severe hypoglycaemia and the influence of risk markers...

  17. Viruses and type 1 diabetes: ignorance acquires a better vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, E A M

    2012-04-01

    The hypothesis that a virus might in some way be involved in the causation of type 1 diabetes has a long history, but decades of research have failed to resolve the issue beyond reasonable doubt. Viruses could potentially play a primary role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes by initiating autoimmunity, a secondary role by promoting established immune responses, or a tertiary role by precipitating the onset of hyperglycaemia. There is currently little evidence to suggest that viruses play a primary role in the causation of type 1 diabetes, let alone a necessary or sufficient role. Secondary or tertiary roles remain possible, but have yet to be confirmed in prospective studies. © 2011 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  18. Presenting symptoms in type 1 vs. type 2 myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saaby, L.; Sarkisian, Laura; Poulsen, T. S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The classification of myocardial infarction (MI) into five types was introduced in 2007 as a component of the Universal definition. However, data outlining clinical symptoms in different MI types are limited. Purpose: To describe the presenting symptoms in patients with type 1 MI vs...... on the debut symptoms at the time of MI. The diagnosis and classification of MI were according to the Universal definition. Thus, a rise/fall pattern of troponin values was required with at least one value above the 99th percentile of the upper reference limit. Also, clilinical evidence of myocardial ischemia...... had to be present. Results: During the inclusion period 360 patients with a type 1 MI were indentified, whereas 119 patients had a type 2 MI. As shown in the Table patients with type 1 MI more frequently had chest pain/discomfort than type 2 MI patients. However, patients with type 2 MI more often...

  19. Abnormal islet sphingolipid metabolism in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Laurits J; Krogvold, Lars; Hasselby, Jane P

    2018-01-01

    treated NOD mice with fenofibrate, a known activator of sulfatide biosynthesis, to evaluate the effect on experimental autoimmune diabetes development. RESULTS: We found reduced amounts of sulfatide, 23% of the levels in control participants, in pancreatic islets of individuals with newly diagnosed type 1...... diabetes. These gene polymorphisms correlated with the degree of cellular islet autoimmunity in a cohort of individuals with type 1 diabetes. Finally, using fenofibrate, which activates sulfatide biosynthesis, we completely prevented diabetes in NOD mice and even reversed the disease in half of otherwise...... of human type 1 diabetes and whether increasing the levels of the sphingolipid sulfatide would prevent models of diabetes in NOD mice. METHODS: We examined the amount and distribution of sulfatide in human pancreatic islets by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy...

  20. The pregnancy journey for women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Helen; Speight, Jane; Bridgman, Heather

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe and develop a model of the pregnancy journey for women with type 1 diabetes. We undertook a thematic analysis of written interactions (n = 200; n = 2060 text excerpts) with an online counselling support service from 93 women with type 1 diabetes. Seven...... reassurance during Pregnancy; however, some women still worried, with peer support offering the most reassurance. In conclusion, women with type 1 diabetes potentially experience seven distinct phases of the pregnancy journey, with eight themes varying in significance across phases. Contemplation begins well...... Contemplation and Motherhood. During pregnancy, social identity and peer support were paramount. Negative emotions in Pregnancy, while connected to diabetes, also centred on the unborn baby. In Motherhood, diabetes-specific distress and depressed mood increased. Medicalisation was expected and offered...

  1. Confirmation of novel type 1 diabetes risk loci in families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, J D; Howson, J M M; Smyth, D

    2012-01-01

    Over 50 regions of the genome have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, mainly using large case/control collections. In a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study, 18 novel susceptibility loci were identified and replicated, including replication evidence from 2,319 families. Here, we, th......, the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC), aimed to exclude the possibility that any of the 18 loci were false-positives due to population stratification by significantly increasing the statistical power of our family study.......Over 50 regions of the genome have been associated with type 1 diabetes risk, mainly using large case/control collections. In a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study, 18 novel susceptibility loci were identified and replicated, including replication evidence from 2,319 families. Here, we...

  2. New technologies in the treatment of type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic condition characterized by insufficient production of insulin, a hormone needed for proper control of blood glucose levels. People with type 1 diabetes must monitor their blood glucose throughout the day using a glucose meter or a continuous glucose monitor, calculate...... how much insulin is needed to maintain normal blood glucose levels, and administer the insulin dose by pen injection or insulin pump infusion into the subcutaneous tissue. In recent years, several new technologies for the treatment of type 1 diabetes have been developed. This PhD thesis covers two...... studies of the effects of commercially available technologies--sensor-augmented pump therapy and automated insulin bolus calculators--when used in clinical practice. Both studies demonstrated that these technologies have the potential to improve diabetes care. In addition, two in-clinic studies related...

  3. Clustering of microvascular complications in Type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Lasse; Hulman, Adam; Charles, Morten

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: To describe to what extent microvascular complications exhibit clustering in persons with Type 1 diabetes, and to assess whether the presence of one complication modified the strength of the association between the other two. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the electronic...... duration and HbA1c, persons with neuropathy had an OR of 2.15 (95% CI: 1.73-2.66) for concurrent diabetic kidney disease. Those with retinopathy had an OR of 2.49 (1.92-3.24) for diabetic kidney disease and of 2.66 (1.94-3.64) for neuropathy. CONCLUSIONS: Microvascular complications in persons with Type 1...... medical records of 2276 persons with Type 1 diabetes treated in a specialized care hospital in Denmark in 2013. We used log-linear analysis to describe associations between diabetic kidney disease, neuropathy and retinopathy and logistic regression models to quantify the magnitude of associations...

  4. Disclosure of Type 1 diabetes at work among Finnish workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, P; Moilanen, L; Hänninen, V; Räsänen, K; Munir, F

    2017-01-01

    To determine which self-management factors and psychosocial work factors were associated with disclosing diabetes to colleagues, line managers and occupational health personnel among workers with Type 1 diabetes. A total of 767 working-aged respondents with Type 1 diabetes completed a Finnish cross-sectional survey named 'People with Type 1 Diabetes in Worklife'. Factor analysis was carried out, followed by logistic regressions to estimate the associations between self-management factors, psychosocial work factors and the likelihood of disclosure separately to colleagues, line managers and occupational health personnel. The models were adjusted for sociodemographic, diabetes-related and work-related variables. A total of 52% of the respondents had disclosed their diabetes to their colleagues, 45% to occupational health personnel and 28% to their line manager. Receiving social support and having good psychosocial work ability were significantly associated with disclosure to colleagues, line managers and occupational health personnel. Relations at work were associated with disclosure to colleagues and the line manager. Furthermore, opportunity to self-manage diabetes at work was associated with disclosure to colleagues. Line managers and colleagues have a remarkable role to play in providing workplace support to workers with Type 1 diabetes. Disclosure of Type 1 diabetes should be encouraged as line managers can provide workers with the right support, implement work adaptations and facilitate job retention. As only half of respondents disclosed their Type 1 diabetes at work, further research is required into the reasons for and consequences of not disclosing a diagnosis. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  5. Altered neuroendocrine sleep architecture in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Schmid, Sebastian M; Hallschmid, Manfred; Born, Jan; Schultes, Bernd

    2008-06-01

    The modulatory influence of nocturnal sleep on neuroendocrine secretory activity is increasingly recognized as a factor critical to health. Disturbances of sleep may arise from and contribute to the disease process in chronically ill patients with type 1 diabetes. Using standard polysomnography and repetitive blood sampling, neuroendocrine sleep architecture was assessed under well-controlled nonhypoglycemic conditions in 14 type 1 diabetic patients and 14 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex, and BMI. As expected, plasma glucose (P = 0.02) and serum insulin (P < 0.001) levels were constantly higher in type 1 diabetic patients than in healthy subjects throughout the night. Beside these characteristic alterations of glucose metabolism, type 1 diabetic patients displayed higher blood levels of growth hormone (P = 0.001) and epinephrine (P = 0.02) during the entire night and higher levels of ACTH (P = 0.01) as well as a tendency toward higher cortisol levels (P = 0.072) during the first night-half, compared with healthy control subjects. Patients spent slightly less time in slow wave sleep (P = 0.09) during the first night-half (where this sleep stage predominates), and overall exhibited an increased proportion of stage 2 sleep (P = 0.01). Correspondingly, assessment of mood and symptoms after sleep revealed that subjective sleep was less restorative in type 1 diabetic patients than in healthy subjects. Our data indicate distinct alterations in the neuroendocrine sleep architecture of patients with type 1 diabetes, which add to the generally adverse impact of the disease on the patients' health.

  6. Hand functions in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akpinar Pinar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Objective. Hand functions have an enormous impact on activities of daily living in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM, such as self-care, administering insulin injections, and preparing and eating meals. The aim of the study was to evaluate hand functions and grip strength in patients with type 1 and type 2 DM. Methods. This was an observational case-control study investigating the hand functions and grip strength in patients with type 1 and type 2 DM. The study comprised 41 patients with type 1 DM aged 25–50 years sex- and age-matched, 40 non-diabetic controls, and 91 patients with type 2 DM aged 40–65 years sex- and age-matched 60 non-diabetic controls. Patients with documented history of diabetic sensorimotor neuropathy and adhesive capsulitis were excluded. The Duruoz Hand Index was used to assess the functional hand disability. Grip strength was tested with a calibrated Jamar dynamometer. Results. The Duruoz Hand Index scores in patients with type 2 DM were significantly higher than in persons in the control group (p 0.05. Grip strength values of patients with type 1 DM were significantly lower compared to those in the control group (p < 0.05, whereas there was no significant difference between patients with type 2 DM and their control group. There was a negatively significant correlation between grip strength and the Duruoz Hand Index scores in patients with both type 1 and type 2 DM (p < 0.05. Conclusion. Patients with type 1 DM and type 2 DM have different degrees of hand disability as compared to healthy control groups.

  7. Partial Sleep Restriction Decreases Insulin Sensitivity in Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke; van Dijk, J. Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas; Hoogma, Roel P.L.M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sleep restriction results in decreased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that sleep duration is also a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied seven patients (three men, four women) with type 1 diabetes: mean age 44 ± 7 years, BMI 23.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2, and A1C 7.6 ± 0.3%. They were studied once after a night of normal sleep duration and once after a night of only 4 h of sleep...

  8. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Children and Adolescents With Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejerskov, Cecilie; Krogh, Klaus; Ostergaard, John R

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by symptoms of the skin and nervous system. A previous study indicated that constipation is common in children with NF1. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenotype and prevalence of gastroint......OBJECTIVES: Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by symptoms of the skin and nervous system. A previous study indicated that constipation is common in children with NF1. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phenotype and prevalence...

  9. Recurrent hypoglycemia in a patient of neurofibromatosis type 1 and type 1 diabetes mellitus: Munchausen′s syndrome mimicking Insulinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubaraq Naqash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old widow having neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1 and type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM was admitted for abdominal pain, vomiting and recent onset low blood sugars. During hospitalization, the patient developed recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia despite stopping insulin. A possibility of insulinoma was made due to the presence of abdominal pain, vomiting, hypoglycemia, and association of insulinoma with NF 1. However, surprisingly c-peptide was very low and plasma insulin levels were high. A detailed psychiatric evaluation of the patient revealed Munchausen′s syndrome as a cause of recurrent hypoglycemia. Unrecognized psychiatric illnesses in type 1 DM may lead to overzealous investigation. In conclusion, the clinical presentations of persons with factitious disorder are varied and impact every area of medicine, factitious causes should always be considered in unclarified recurrent hypoglycemia, especially in cases presented with dramatic but inconsistent medical history, and an unusual personal behavior.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 diversity has an impact on vaccine efficacy and drug resistance. It is important to know the circulating genetic variants and associated drug-resistance mutations in the context of scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Nigeria. The objective of this study was to ...

  11. Peptide and protein biomarkers for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Metz, Thomas O.

    2016-08-30

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus, or having type I diabetes mellitus, utilizing selected biomarkers described herein either alone or in combination. The present disclosure allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases. Also provided are arrays and kits that can be used to perform such methods.

  12. Sensor Augmented Pump Therapy Use in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carolan, E

    2016-11-01

    Tight metabolic control in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) reduces incidence and delays progression of micro-vascular complications. Severe hypoglycaemia remains a significant barrier to achieving optimal diabetes control. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) systems refine insulin delivery with programmable basal rates and mealtime bolusing

  13. Determinants of daily insulin use in Type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muis, Marian J.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Hoogma, Roel P. L. M.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Stolk, Ronald P.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin need for a given degree of glucose control varies markedly among individuals. We examined which factors determine daily insulin use in patients with Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed in 416 patients. Clinical parameters, medication use, physical

  14. Viral infections as potential triggers of type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Nienke; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Rozing, Jan; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    During the last decades, the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) has increased significantly, reaching percentages of 3% annually worldwide. This increase suggests that besides genetical factors environmental perturbations (including viral infections) are also involved in the pathogenesis of T1D. T1D

  15. Association between Diabetes Mellitus type 1 and Celiac Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Gluten sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease (CD)) has a strong association with diabetes mellitus (type 1DM). Since, 2-3% of CD patients have selective IgA deficiency, the majority of the available tests may fail to show the auto-antibodies (the IgA endomysial antibody (EMA). To prevent such a false negativity, ...

  16. Type 1 diabetes, glucocorticoids and the brain : a sweet connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revsin, Yanina

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral and autonomous neuropathies are well-known and devastating complications of type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, T1D can also impact the integrity of the central nervous system (CNS), and the reason why T1D affects CNS integrity remains to be elucidated. Studies on diabetic patients

  17. Neuroendocrine Tumour in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report the case of an HIV-positive female patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 who was treated for recurrent peptic ulcer disease and later developed diabetes mellitus and chronic diarrhoea. A metastasising somatostatinoma was histologically proven and evidence of a concomitant gastrin-producing neuroendocrine ...

  18. Disturbed lipid metabolism in glycogen storage disease type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, RHJ; Smit, GPA; Kuipers, F

    2002-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD1) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase, the enzyme catalysing the conversion of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) to glucose. GSD1 is associated with severe hyperlipidaemia and hepatic steatosis. The underlying mechanisms

  19. On the Mutation Rate of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, John W.; Hwang, Charles B. C.

    2005-01-01

    All seven DNA-based microbes for which carefully established mutation rates and mutational spectra were previously available displayed a genomic mutation rate in the neighborhood of 0.003 per chromosome replication. The pathogenic mammalian DNA virus herpes simplex type 1 has an estimated genomic mutation rate compatible with that value.

  20. Erythropoietin in patients with type 1 diabetes (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khantakova Е.А.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the literature on the issue of regulation of erythropoietin in patients with type 1 diabetes. The connection between the secretion of erythropoietin disturbance with the development and progression of diabetes complications has been observed. Various pleiotropic effects of erythropoietin have been considered

  1. Aldosterone synthase C-344T, angiotensin II type 1 receptor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-26

    Dec 26, 2014 ... RESEARCH ARTICLE. Aldosterone synthase C-344T, angiotensin II type 1 receptor A1166C and 11-β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase G534A gene polymorphisms and essential hypertension in the population of Odisha, India. MANISHA PATNAIK1,5, PALLABI PATI1, SURENDRA N. SWAIN2, MANOJ K.

  2. The vaccines for Bovine Herpesvirus Type 1: A review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-05

    Sep 5, 2011 ... Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) is the pathogen of Infectious Bovine Rhinothracheitis (IBR) disease, causing great economic losses in the livestock industry. Vaccine is a powerful means to control the virus. Here, the review described the currently available knowledge regarding to the advance in the ...

  3. Peptide and protein biomarkers for type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Metz, Thomas O.

    2014-06-10

    A method for identifying persons with increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus, or having type I diabetes mellitus, utilizing selected biomarkers described herein either alone or in combination. The present disclosure allows for broad based, reliable, screening of large population bases. Also provided are arrays and kits that can be used to perform such methods.

  4. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Børglum, A D; Brandt, C A

    1994-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) is an autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy associated with a DNA duplication on chromosome 17p11.2-p12 in the majority of cases. Most of the sporadic cases are due to a de novo duplication. We have screened for this duplication in 11 Danish patients...

  5. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 and NALP5, parathyroid autoantigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Bjorklund, Peyman; Hallgren, Asa; Pontynen, Nora; Szinnai, Gabor; Shikama, Noriko; Keller, Marcel P.; Ekwall, Olov; Kinkel, Sarah A.; Husebye, Eystein S.; Gustafsson, Jan; Rorsman, Fredrik; Peltonen, Leena; Betterle, Corrado; Perheentupa, Jaakko; Akerstrom, Goran; Westin, Gunnar; Scott, Hamish S.; Hollaender, Georg A.; Kampe, Olle

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a multiorgan autoimmune disorder caused by mutations in AIRE, the autoimmune regulator gene. Though recent studies concerning AIRE deficiency have begun to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of organ-specific autoimmunity in patients

  6. Lymphocyte apoptosis in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Beta cell apoptosis has been associated with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) onset in newly diagnosed diabetic patients. There is an emerging evidence that T cell-induced apoptosis is a dominant effector mechanism in diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1). Pancreatic β-cells derived from newly ...

  7. Case report: type 1 diabetes in monozygotic quadruplets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štechová, K.; Halbhuber, Z.; Hubáčková, M.; Kayserová, J.; Petruželková, L.; Včeláková, J.; Koloušková, S.; Ulmannová, T.; Faresjo, M.; Neuwirth, Aleš; Spíšek, R.; Šedivá, A.; Filipp, Dominik; Sumnik, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 4 (2012), s. 457-462 ISSN 1018-4813 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08066 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : autoimmunity * type 1 diabetes * beta cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.319, year: 2012

  8. The Effect of Type-1 Error on Deterrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, Henrik; Mungan, Murat C.

    A traditional view of law and economics holds that an increase in the probability with which a court will convict an innocent defendant (type-1 error) lowers deterrence as much as an increase in the probability with which the court will acquit a guilty defendant (type-2 error). We demonstrate tha...

  9. Bile salt and cholesterol metabolism in diabetes mellitus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker-van Waarde, Willemijntje Maria

    2006-01-01

    W.M. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) is associated with microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy) and macrovascular complications (cardiovascular disease). Macrovascular disease is the major cause of death in patients with DM1. The mortality rate due to coronary artery

  10. Laboratory surveillance of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 in Kwazulu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To collect data on the antimicrobial susceptibility of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 in KwaZulu-Natal, including the testing of newer therapeutic agents, and to evaluate the ability of laboratories to participate in a provincial surveillance programme. Design. Prospective descriptive study. Setting. Hospital laboratories in ...

  11. [Complex regional pain syndrome type 1: negating the myth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frolke, J.P.M.; Dongen, R.T.M. van; Meent, H. van de

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) was identified in the Netherlands more than 30 years ago, but since then the arguments supporting this diagnosis have become weaker. Incidence has decreased, it is often not possible to make a definite diagnosis, the pathophysiology remains unclear and

  12. Motor problems in children with neurofibromatosis type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Rietman (André); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne); Bongers, S. (Sanne); Gaukema, E. (Eddy); Van Abeelen, S. (Sandra); J.G.M. Hendriksen; C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); P.F.A. de Nijs (Pieter); M.C.Y. de Wit (Marie Claire)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Children with the neurogenetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) often have problems with learning and behaviour. In both parent reports and neuropsychological assessment, motor problems are reported in approximately one third to one half of the children with NF1.

  13. Milder phenotypes of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anand, G.; Padeniya, A.; Hanrahan, D.; Scheffer, H.; Zaiwalla, Z.; Cox, D.; Mann, N.; Hewertson, J.; Price, S.; Nemeth, A.; Arsov, T.; Scheffer, I.; Jayawant, S.; Pike, M.; McShane, T.

    2011-01-01

    Glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS) is a treatable condition resulting from impaired glucose transport into the brain. The classical presentation is with infantile-onset epilepsy and severe developmental delay. Non-classical phenotypes with movement disorders and early-onset

  14. Type 1,1-operators defined by vanishing frequency modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Jon

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a general definition of pseudo-differential operators of type 1,1; the definition is shown to be the largest one that is both compatible with negliible operators and stable under vanishing frequency modulation. Elaborating counter-examples of Ching, Hörmander and Parenti...

  15. Type 1,1-operators on spaces of temperate distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Jon

    This paper is a follow-up on the author’s general definition of pseudo-differential operators of type 1,1, in Hörmander’s sense. It is shown that such operators are always defined on the smooth functions that are temperate; and moreover are defined and continuous on the space of temperate...

  16. Increased basal glucose production in type 1 Gaucher's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corssmit, E. P.; Hollak, C. E.; Endert, E.; van Oers, M. H.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Romijn, J. A.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the metabolic effects of Gaucher's disease, glucose metabolism and parameters of fat metabolism were studied by indirect calorimetry and primed continuous infusion of [3-3H]glucose in seven clinically stable untreated patients with type 1 Gaucher's disease and in seven healthy matched

  17. Non HLA genetic markers association with type-1 diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The currently available data identified IDDM1 and IDDM2 as 2 susceptibility loci for type 1 diabetes (T1D). The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)/HLA region referred to as IDDM1 contains several 100 genes known to have a great influence on T1D risk. Within IDDM2, a minisatellite variable number of tandem repeats ...

  18. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and atopic diseases in children.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    Adapted from: Stankov K, Benc D, Draskovic D. Genetic and epigenetic factors in etiology of diabetes mellitus type 1. Pediatrics. 2013 Dec .... The prevalence of asthmatic symptoms in the T1D group was clearly lower than in the control group. However, the overall prevalence of atopy was not significantly different in these ...

  19. The epidemiology and pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-01

    Apr 1, 2011 ... different therapeutic options available to treat the different forms of diabetes. Worldwide, the incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing, with more children being obese on presentation as a result of the escalating prevalence of obesity in the youth.3 In addition, there is an epidemic of type. 2 diabetes in ...

  20. The vaccines for Bovine Herpesvirus Type 1: A review | Zhao ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) is the pathogen of Infectious Bovine Rhinothracheitis (IBR) disease, causing great economic losses in the livestock industry. Vaccine is a powerful means to control the virus. Here, the review described the currently available knowledge regarding to the advance in the field of BoHV-1 ...

  1. The cognitive profile of type 1 Gaucher disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biegstraaten, Marieke; Wesnes, Keith A.; Luzy, Cécile; Petakov, Milan; Mrsic, Mirando; Niederau, Claus; Giraldo, Pilar; Hughes, Derralynn; Mehta, Atul; Mengel, Karl-Eugen; Hollak, Carla E. M.; Maródi, László; van Schaik, Ivo N.

    2012-01-01

    The absence of neurological symptoms and signs is traditionally considered mandatory for a diagnosis of type 1 Gaucher disease (GD1), but in recent years many reports have emerged on neurological manifestations in GD1 patients. Nevertheless, it has been unclear whether cognitive deficits are part of

  2. Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Michael C; Gallen, Ian W; Smart, Carmel E; Taplin, Craig E; Adolfsson, Peter; Lumb, Alistair N; Kowalski, Aaron; Rabasa-Lhoret, Remi; McCrimmon, Rory J; Hume, Carin; Annan, Francesca; Fournier, Paul A; Graham, Claudia; Bode, Bruce; Galassetti, Pietro; Jones, Timothy W; Millán, Iñigo San; Heise, Tim; Peters, Anne L; Petz, Andreas; Laffel, Lori M

    2017-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a challenging condition to manage for various physiological and behavioural reasons. Regular exercise is important, but management of different forms of physical activity is particularly difficult for both the individual with type 1 diabetes and the health-care provider. People with type 1 diabetes tend to be at least as inactive as the general population, with a large percentage of individuals not maintaining a healthy body mass nor achieving the minimum amount of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity per week. Regular exercise can improve health and wellbeing, and can help individuals to achieve their target lipid profile, body composition, and fitness and glycaemic goals. However, several additional barriers to exercise can exist for a person with diabetes, including fear of hypoglycaemia, loss of glycaemic control, and inadequate knowledge around exercise management. This Review provides an up-to-date consensus on exercise management for individuals with type 1 diabetes who exercise regularly, including glucose targets for safe and effective exercise, and nutritional and insulin dose adjustments to protect against exercise-related glucose excursions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characteristics of children presenting with newly diagnosed type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The clinical presentation of type 1 diabetes in children can be acute or insidious, and symptoms may be subtle and frequently misinterpreted. Presentation with diabetic keto-acidosis (DKA) may be associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the paediatric population. This study aims to determine the ...

  4. Speech Disorders in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: A Sample Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyns, Marjan; Vandeweghe, Lies; Mortier, Geert; Janssens, Sandra; Van Borsel, John

    2010-01-01

    Background: Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal-dominant neurocutaneous disorder with an estimated prevalence of two to three cases per 10 000 population. While the physical characteristics have been well documented, speech disorders have not been fully characterized in NF1 patients. Aims: This study serves as a pilot to identify key…

  5. Articulation in Schoolchildren and Adults with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyns, Marjan; Mortier, Geert; Janssens, Sandra; Bogaert, Famke; D'Hondt, Stephanie; Van Borsel, John

    2012-01-01

    Several authors mentioned the occurrence of articulation problems in the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) population. However, few studies have undertaken a detailed analysis of the articulation skills of NF1 patients, especially in schoolchildren and adults. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine in depth the articulation skills of…

  6. Cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidich, M.J.; Walker, M.T.; Han, G. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Gottardi-Littell, N.R. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chandler, J.P. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Neurological Surgery, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2004-10-01

    We describe a case of cerebellar pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA) occurring in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The histomorphology of this uncommon glial (astrocytic) neoplasm is discussed. The occurrence of this tumor within the posterior fossa is extremely rare. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a cerebellar PXA in a patient with NF1. (orig.)

  7. Muscle phenotype in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Grete; Orngreen, Mette C; Preisler, Nicolai

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The pathogenesis of muscle involvement in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is not well understood. In this study, we characterized the muscle phenotype in patients with confirmed DM1. Methods: In 38 patients, muscle strength was tested by hand-held dynamometry. Myotonia...

  8. Chronic comorbidities in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazelifarsani, Soulmaz; Souverein, Patrick C.; Van Der Vorst, Marja M.J.; Knibbe, Catherijne A.J.; De Boer, Anthonius; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limited quantitative data exist on the burden of chronic comorbidities in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Such knowledge is necessary for the development of guidelines and prevention programs. Objectives: To determine the incidence of chronic comorbidities in

  9. Improving School Experiences for Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kise, Saori S.; Hopkins, Amanda; Burke, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is one of the most common metabolic diseases in children worldwide and the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is growing. T1D is complicated to manage and adolescents with diabetes face unique, age-specific challenges. The purpose of this article is to discuss ways in which schools can create a positive…

  10. Strategies for glucose control in people with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Finan, Daniel Aaron; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we apply a robust feedforward-feedback control strategy to people with type 1 diabetes. The feedforward controller consists of a bolus calculator which compensates the disturbance coming from meals. The feedback controller is based on a linearized description of the model describing...

  11. Nuclear Receptors and Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreijerink, K.M.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311470238

    2009-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an inherited syndrome that is characterized by the occurrence of tumours of the parathyroid glands, gastroenteropancreatic tumours, pitui-tary gland adenomas, as well as adrenal adenomas and neuro-endocrine tumours, often at a young age. MEN1 tumours can

  12. Insulin analogues and severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P L; Hansen, L S; Jespersen, M J

    2012-01-01

    The effect of insulin analogues on glycaemic control is well-documented, whereas the effect on avoidance of severe hypoglycaemia remains tentative. We studied the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia in unselected patients with type 1 diabetes treated with insulin analogues, human insulin, or mixed...

  13. Overnight glucose control in people with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Schmidt, Signe

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an individualized model predictive control (MPC) algorithm for overnight blood glucose stabilization in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The MPC formulation uses an asymmetric objective function that penalizes low glucose levels more heavily. We compute the model parameters...

  14. Imaging Finding of Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yum, Tae Jun; Cho, Hee Woo

    2012-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is an autosomal dominant inherited syndrome with characteristic clinical and radiological manifestations. Many reports on MEN1 have been published; however, no cases of radiologically diagnosed MEN1 have been reported. Therefore, we report on a radiologically diagnosed case of MEN1 with clinical symptoms of gastroduodenal ulcer.

  15. Membrane dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Current topics include membrane-protein interactions with regard to membrane deformation or curvature sensing by BAR domains. Also, we study the dynamics of membrane tubes of both cells and simple model membrane tubes. Finally, we study membrane phase behavior which has important implications...

  16. Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1: Definition, Etiopathogenesis, Diagnostics and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolic Tomislav

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiorenal Syndrome Type 1 (CRS-1 is defined as an acute worsening of heart function leading to acute kidney injury and/or dysfunction. It is an important cause of hospitalization which affects the diagnosis as well as the prognosis and treatment of patients. The purpose of this paper is to analyze causes that lead to the development of cardiorenal syndrome type 1 and its clinical consequences, as well as to emphasize the clinical importance of its early detection. The clinical studies and professional papers dealing with etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of cardiorenal syndrome type 1, have been analyzed. The most important role in the occurrence of cardio renal syndrome type 1 is played by hemodynamic mechanisms, activation of neurohumoral systems, inflammation and imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide (NO. Diagnosis of cardiorenal syndrome type 1 involves biomarkers of acute renal injury among which the most important are: neutrophil gelatinaseassociated lipocalin (NGAL, cystatin C, kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1, liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP, IL-18 and the values of nitrogen compounds in serum. In addition to a pharmacological therapy, various modalities of extracorporeal ultrafiltration are applied in treatment of CRS-1, particularly if there is resistance to the use of diuretic therapy. As opposed to the experimental models, in clinical practice acute renal injury is often diagnosed late so that the measures taken do not give the expected results and the protective role shown in experimental conditions do not give the same results. For all these reasons, it is necessary to analyze the pathophysiology of renal impairment in cardiorenal syndrome as well as detect early indicators of kidney injury that could have clinical benefit and positive impact on reducing the cost of treatment.

  17. Increased plasma osteoprotegerin concentrations in Type 1 diabetes with albuminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shen-tian; Xu, Jian-min; Wang, Meng; Chen, Fu-lian; Ding, Gang

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the plasma osteoprotegerin (OPG) levels in Type 1 diabetic patients with albuminuria. A total of 80 Type 1 diabetic subjects and 30 control subjects were enrolled. Diabetic subjects were divided into normoalbuminuric group, microalbuminuric group and macroalbuminuric group according to urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER) and serum creatinine measurements. Plasma osteoprotegerin level was measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. The serum OPG levels were significantly elevated in patients with microalbuminuria (3.62 ± 0.70 ng/l) and macroalbuminuria (4.45 ± 0.76 ng/l) as compared with patients with normoalbuminuria (2.77 ± 0.78 ng/l) and control subjects (2.29 ± 0.37 ng/l). And the plasma osteoprotegerin level in macroalbuminuric group was also higher than that in microalbuminuria group. The plasma osteoprotegerin level had a positive correlation with the fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose (2hPG), glycohemoglobin A1c (HbA1C), highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP)and UAER. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the plasma osteoprotegerin level was an independent factor associated with albuminuria in Type 1 diabetes. The plasma values of osteoprotegerin were elevated in Type 1 diabetic patients with nephropathy and gradually increased with the severity, so there is a association between plasma osteoprotegerin levels and the presence and severity of diabetic nephropathy. This finding supports the growing concept that osteoprotegerin may act as an important regulatory molecule in the angiopathy, and particularly, that it may be involved in the development of nephropathy in Type 1 diabetes.

  18. Consensus guidelines for management of glycogen storage disease type 1b - European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G; Rake, JP; Labrune, P; Leonard, JV; Moses, S; Ullrich, K; Wendel, U; Smit, GPA

    2002-01-01

    Life expectancy in glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1) has improved considerably. Its relative rarity implies that no metabolic centre has experience of large series of patients and therefore experience with long-term management and follow-up at each centre is limited. There is wide variation in

  19. Effects of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker on bones in mice with type 1 diabetes induced by streptozotocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Diao, Teng-Yue; Gu, Sa-Sa; Wu, Shu-Yan; Gebru, Yoseph A; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jing-Yu; Ran, Shu; Wong, Man-Sau

    2014-09-01

    This study was performed to address the pathological roles of the skeletal renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in type 1 diabetes-induced osteoporosis and the effects of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker losartan on bones in diabetic mice. Bone histomorphology was detected by H&E staining, Safranin O staining and X-ray radiography. Micro-CT was performed for the analysis of bone parameters. Gene and protein expression were determined by RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Type 1 diabetic mice displayed osteopenia phenotype, and losartan treatment had no osteoprotective effects on diabetic mice as shown by the reduction of bone mineral density and microarchitectural parameters at the proximal metaphysis of the tibia. The mRNA expression of AGT, renin receptor and ACE, and protein expression of renin and AT1R were markedly up-regulated in the bones of vehicle-treated diabetic mice compared to those of non-diabetic mice. The treatment with losartan further significantly increased the expression of AGT, renin, angiotensin II and AT1R, and reduced the expression of AT2R receptor as compared to those of diabetic mice. Local bone RAS functionally played a role in the development of type 1 diabetic osteoporosis, and losartan had no bone-sparing function in diabetes mice because of enhance skeletal RAS activity. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Abnormal islet sphingolipid metabolism in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Laurits J; Krogvold, Lars; Hasselby, Jane P; Kaur, Simranjeet; Claessens, Laura A; Russell, Mark A; Mathews, Clayton E; Hanssen, Kristian F; Morgan, Noel G; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Roep, Bart O; Gerling, Ivan C; Pociot, Flemming; Dahl-Jørgensen, Knut; Buschard, Karsten

    2018-04-18

    Sphingolipids play important roles in beta cell physiology, by regulating proinsulin folding and insulin secretion and in controlling apoptosis, as studied in animal models and cell cultures. Here we investigate whether sphingolipid metabolism may contribute to the pathogenesis of human type 1 diabetes and whether increasing the levels of the sphingolipid sulfatide would prevent models of diabetes in NOD mice. We examined the amount and distribution of sulfatide in human pancreatic islets by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Transcriptional analysis was used to evaluate expression of sphingolipid-related genes in isolated human islets. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and a T cell proliferation assay were used to identify type 1 diabetes related polymorphisms and test how these affect cellular islet autoimmunity. Finally, we treated NOD mice with fenofibrate, a known activator of sulfatide biosynthesis, to evaluate the effect on experimental autoimmune diabetes development. We found reduced amounts of sulfatide, 23% of the levels in control participants, in pancreatic islets of individuals with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, which were associated with reduced expression of enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism. Next, we discovered eight gene polymorphisms (ORMDL3, SPHK2, B4GALNT1, SLC1A5, GALC, PPARD, PPARG and B4GALT1) involved in sphingolipid metabolism that contribute to the genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes. These gene polymorphisms correlated with the degree of cellular islet autoimmunity in a cohort of individuals with type 1 diabetes. Finally, using fenofibrate, which activates sulfatide biosynthesis, we completely prevented diabetes in NOD mice and even reversed the disease in half of otherwise diabetic animals. These results indicate that islet sphingolipid metabolism is abnormal in type 1 diabetes and suggest that modulation may represent a novel therapeutic approach. The RNA expression data is

  1. Adolescents developing life skills for managing type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Gitte R; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Hommel, Eva

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore and illustrate how the Guided Self-Determination-Youth method influences the development of life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes supported by their parents and healthcare providers. BACKGROUND: Evidence-based methods that accomplish constructive cooperation between...... adolescents with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes, their parents and healthcare providers are needed. We adjusted an adult life skills intervention comprising reflection sheets and advanced communication for use by adolescent-parent-professional triads in outpatient visits. DESIGN: A qualitative realistic...... evaluation design comprising eight context-mechanism-outcome configurations directed the analysis of the Guided Self-Determination-Youth's influence on adolescent-parent-professional triads to evaluate what worked for whom, how and in what circumstances. Thirteen adolescents aged 13-18 years diagnosed...

  2. Therapeutic management of type 1 diabetes before and during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Damm, Peter; Nielsen, Lene Ringholm

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Pregnancy increases the risks of adverse outcomes for mother and infant in women with type 1 diabetes. Obtaining and maintaining adequate glycemic control during pregnancy is crucial for optimizing outcomes. Areas covered: The importance of prepregnancy planning and treatment during...... pregnancy is reviewed. The use of insulin analogues and antihypertensive drugs in diabetic pregnancy are in focus. The reader is presented with evidence discussing the importance of prepregnancy counseling and treatment during pregnancy in women with type 1 diabetes. Expert opinion: Tight glycemic control...... the risk of malformations. Screening for diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy and thyroid dysfunction is important, and indications for antihypertensive treatment and treatment of thyroid dysfunction need to be in focus before and during pregnancy....

  3. Maternal glycemic control and hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Kinsley, Brendan; Amiel, Stephanie A

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety and efficacy of insulin aspart (IAsp) versus regular human insulin (HI) in basal-bolus therapy with NPH insulin in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Subjects (n = 322) who were pregnant or planning pregnancy were randomized to IAsp...... in basal-bolus therapy with NPH insulin in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes and may potentially offer some benefits in terms of postprandial glucose control and preventing severe hypoglycemia....... with IAsp than HI (P = 0.003 and P = 0.044, respectively), as were mean plasma glucose levels 90 min after breakfast (P = 0.044 and P = 0.001, respectively). Maternal safety profiles and pregnancy outcomes were similar between treatments. CONCLUSIONS: IAsp is at least as safe and effective as HI when used...

  4. Improved prognosis in type 1 diabetic patients with nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Anne Sofie; Tarnow, Lise; Rossing, Peter

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In early studies, a median survival time of 5 to 7 years from onset of diabetic nephropathy was observed. Furthermore, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was the main cause of death. We prospectively assessed the impact of reno- and cardiovascular protective treatment on prognosis in type 1...... diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy. METHODS: We prospectively followed 199 type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy and 192 patients with normoalbuminuria for 10 years. Aggressive antihypertensive treatment was initiated in patients with diabetic nephropathy in mid 1980s, whereas statins......%) died; hereof, 25 deaths (42%) were ascribed to cardiovascular causes while 30 patients (50%) with nephropathy died with ESRD. The estimate of median survival time from onset of diabetic nephropathy was 21.7 years, SE 3.3 years. CONCLUSION: The survival of patients with diabetic nephropathy has improved...

  5. Insulin Administration for People with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Finan, Daniel Aaron; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we apply model predictive control (MPC) for control of blood glucose in people with type 1 diabetes. The two first control strategies are based on nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC). The first control strategy is based on meal announcement in advance, while the second one...... considers meal announcement at mealtimes only. They give a quantitative upper bound on the achievable control performance. The third control strategy is a feedforward-feedback control strategy. This strategy uses a time-varying setpoint to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia. The feedback controller computes...... the optimal basal insulin infusion rate. The feedforward controller consists of a bolus calculator. It computes the optimal bolus, along with the time-varying glucose setpoint. We test these three strategies on a virtual patient with type 1 diabetes. The numerical results demonstrate the robustness...

  6. Post-translational protein modifications in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wägner, A M; Cloos, P; Bergholdt, R

    2007-01-01

    that recognises and repairs isomerised Asn and Asp residues in proteins. The aim of this study was to assess the role of PIMT in the development of type 1 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis of 59 normal human tissues was performed with a monoclonal PIMT antibody. CGP3466B, which induces......-translational modifications and PIMT in the development of type 1 diabetes in the diabetes-prone BB rat, and perhaps also in humans...... expression of Pcmt1, was tested on MIN6 and INS1 cells, to assess its effect on Pcmt1 mRNA and PIMT levels (RT-PCR and western blot) and apoptosis. Forty-five diabetes-prone BioBreeding (BB) Ottawa Karlsburg (OK) rats were randomised to receive 0, 14 or 500 microg/kg (denoted as the control, low...

  7. Early risk stratification in pediatric type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    in HbA1c was either too small or happened too late. This study highlights that sight-threatening diabetic retinopathy remain a major concern in type 1 diabetes and the importance of early glycemic control. Identifying high-risk patients at a very early stage is not only desired for prevention...... of diabetic retinopathy - neuropathy and nephropathy similarly remain frequent in type 1 diabetes. Early risk stratification will allow for timely implementation of effective interventions and for individualized screening and diabetes care. The second and third studies of this thesis provide the longest...... prospective studies to date on both retinal vessel calibers and retinal fractal dimensions and their predictive value on diabetic microvascular complications. Semi-automated computer software has been developed to measure smaller changes in the retinal vessels on retinal photographs. Two of the first...

  8. ARX MPC for people with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Finan, Daniel Aaron; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease characterized by a lack of production of pancreatic insulin, consequently leading to high blood glucose concentrations (hyperglycemia). Hyperglycemia has negative health effects in the long term such as eye, nerve, and kidney disease. Exogenous insulin must......, or even death. Currently, insulin administration is performed by the subject with type 1 diabetes based on infrequent glucose measurements (in the form of finger-sticks), often resulting in an unsatisfactory blood glucose control. An artificial pancreas is a medical device that injects exogenous insulin...... be injected to keep the blood glucose in the normoglycemic range (approximately 60 – 140 mg/dL, or 3.3 – 8 mmol/L). However, the dosing of exogenous insulin must be done carefully, because low blood glucose concentrations (hypoglycemia) can have immediate and severe consequences like insulin shock, coma...

  9. Bartter Syndrome Type 1 Presenting as Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Vergine

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartter syndrome (BS type 1 (OMIM #601678 is a hereditary salt-losing renal tubular disorder characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, polyuria, recurrent vomiting, and growth retardation. It is caused by loss-of-function mutations of the SLC12A1 gene, encoding the furosemide-sensitive Na-K-Cl cotransporter. Recently, a phenotypic variability has been observed in patients with genetically determined BS, including absence of nephrocalcinosis, hypokalemia, and/or metabolic alkalosis in the first year of life as well as persistent metabolic acidosis mimicking distal renal tubular acidosis. We report the case of a child with a genetically determined diagnosis of Bartter syndrome type 1 who presented with a phenotype of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, with severe hypernatremia and urinary concentrating defect. In these atypical cases, molecular analysis is mandatory to define the diagnosis, in order to establish the correct clinical and therapeutic management.

  10. Oropharyngeal dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy type 1: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilz, Walmari; Baijens, Laura W J; Kremer, Bernd

    2014-06-01

    A systematic review was conducted to investigate the pathophysiology of and diagnostic procedures for oropharyngeal dysphagia in myotonic dystrophy (MD). The electronic databases Embase, PubMed, and The Cochrane Library were used. The search was limited to English, Dutch, French, German, Spanish, and Portuguese publications. Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the included articles. Swallowing assessment tools, the corresponding protocols, the studies' outcome measurements, and main findings are summarized and presented. The body of literature on pathophysiology of swallowing in dysphagic patients with MD type 1 remains scant. The included studies are heterogeneous with respect to design and outcome measures and hence are not directly comparable. More importantly, most studies had methodological problems. These are discussed in detail and recommendations for further research on diagnostic examinations for swallowing disorders in patients with MD type 1 are provided.

  11. Behavioral interventions for adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hampson, S. E.; Skinner, T. C.; Hart, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - To evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral interventions for adolescents with type 1 diabetes based on a systematic review of the literature. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - The literature was identified by searching 11 electronic databases, hand-searching 3 journals from their start...... dates, and contacting individual researchers. Only articles that reported evaluations of behavioral (including educational and psychosocial) interventions for adolescents (age range 9-21 years) with type 1 diabetes that included a control group were included in the present review. Data summarizing...... were RCTs. Effect sizes could be calculated for 18 interventions. The overall mean effect size calculated across all outcomes was 0.33 (median 0.21), indicating that these interventions have a small- to medium-sized beneficial effect on diabetes management. Interventions that were theoretically based...

  12. Improved prognosis of diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrésdóttir, Gudbjörg; Jensen, Majken L; Carstensen, Bendix

    2015-01-01

    The natural history of diabetic nephropathy offered an average survival of only 5-7 years. During the past decades, multiple changes in therapy and lifestyle have occurred. The prognosis of diabetic nephropathy after implementing stricter control of blood pressure (including increased use of long......-term renin-angiotensin system inhibition), lipids, and glycemia, along with less smoking and other lifestyle and treatment advancements, is inadequately analyzed. To clarify this, we studied 497 patients with type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy at the Steno Diabetes Center and compared them...... and nephropathy onset occurred later in life, mortality was reduced by 30%. Risk factors for decline in glomerular filtration rate, death, and other renal end points were generally in agreement with prior studies. Thus, with current treatment of nephropathy in type 1 diabetes, the prognosis and loss of renal...

  13. Diabetic vitrectomy in a large type 1 diabetes patient population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostri, Christoffer; la Cour, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    1996 and 2010. Surgical history was obtained from The Danish National Patient Register. RESULTS: The population consisted of 3980 patients with type 1 diabetes. Median follow-up was 10.0 years. In total, 106 patients underwent diabetic vitrectomy in the observation period. Surgery indications were...... (p diabetic vitrectomy increased in patients experiencing glycosylated haemoglobin A1c > 75 mmol/mol in the observation period (p blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mm......Hg, diabetes duration, age, gender and nephropathy were not associated with an increased risk of reaching diabetic vitrectomy (p > 0.05 for all variables). CONCLUSIONS: Diabetic vitrectomy is rarely required in a type 1 diabetes population with varying degrees of retinopathy, but the risk increases markedly...

  14. Eating disorders in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrotti, A; Catino, M; De Luca, F A; Morgese, G; Chiarelli, F

    1999-06-01

    Although the causes of eating disorders remain unclear, epidemiological evidence suggests that peripubertal changes in body shape and weight predispose young women to develop unhealthy eating attitudes. A psychiatric diagnosis of an eating disorder can be made in up to 10% of young women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 1 diabetes). Eating disorders, anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, pose a particularly serious risk to health in young diabetic people. Several features associated with type 1 diabetes and its treatment, such as weight gain, dietary restraint and food preoccupation, may predispose young diabetic women to develop a clinical or subclinical eating disorder. The coexistence of these conditions could lead to poor metabolic control and an increased risk of microvascular complications.

  15. Sleep and glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schnurbein, Julia; Boettcher, Claudia; Brandt, Stephanie; Karges, Beate; Dunstheimer, Desiree; Galler, Angela; Denzer, Christian; Denzer, Friederike; Vollbach, Heike; Wabitsch, Martin; Roenneberg, Till; Vetter, Celine

    2018-02-01

    Increasing evidence link sleep curtailment and circadian misalignment with adverse metabolic outcome. Adolescents might be most affected, given their late sleep timing and early school and work start times. Our aim was to examine the impact of poor sleeping habits on glycemic control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. This was a non-interventional multicenter study across Germany recruiting pubertally mature adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Medical records were used to collect information on diabetes duration, treatment, and complications. Participants self-reported sleep quality, timing, chronotype, and social jetlag-a measure of circadian misalignment. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was determined at the time of questionnaire response. We used multivariable linear regression models to examine associations between sleep and glycemic control. A total of 191 patients aged 16.5 years (mean HbA1c 8.0% [64 mmol/mol]) were included in this study. In multivariable adjusted analyses, sleep quality was significantly associated with HbA1c (mean difference; β = -0.07, P = .05). Stratified analysis indicated that this association might be stronger in boys and also in children with migration background. In contrast, neither sleep duration, sleep debt, chronotype, nor social jetlag was associated with HbA1c . Secondary analyses showed that social jetlag was significantly associated with levels of insulin requirements (mean difference; β = 0.035, P = .03). Our study suggests that poor sleep quality is associated with increased HbA1c in adolescents with type 1 diabetes and that higher levels of circadian misalignment are associated with increased insulin requirements. If replicated, our results indicate a clinical relevance of sleep habits in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Eating-Disordered Behaviour in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Sónia; Barros, Vânia; Rui Gomes, A

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate dysfunctional eating behaviour, self-esteem, social physique anxiety and quality of life in adolescents with type 1 diabetes who have differing desired weights and to evaluate the predictors of dysfunctional eating behaviour in these adolescents, with a focus on personal and psychological variables. We evaluated 79 adolescents with type 1 diabetes (mean age of 15.71 years) of both sexes (58.2% females) using the Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), the Social Physique Anxiety Scale (SPAS-R) and the Diabetes Quality of Life (DQoL) measure. Of the adolescents, 44 with type 1 diabetes reported the desire to maintain or increase their current weight, and 35 reported the desire to reduce their current weight. The participants with the desire to weigh less were mainly females who exercised regularly and demonstrated more frequent binge eating and purging. Additionally, this group exhibited an increased frequency of eating disturbances, such as restraint and eating, weight and shape concerns. Moreover, this group demonstrated increased social physique anxiety and decreased diabetes quality of life in relation to the impact of diabetes, worries about diabetes and satisfaction with life. Finally, predictors of eating disturbances included the desire for lower weight, higher social physique anxiety and lower diabetes-related quality of life. The desire for a lower weight in adolescents with type 1 diabetes may increase problems related to eating behaviour and general quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Varenicline may trigger severe hypoglycaemia in Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P.L.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U.; Thorsteinsson, B.

    2008-01-01

    is important to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity, especially in diabetes, use of effective drugs indicated for smoking cessation is rational. Case report We report multiple episodes of severe hypoglycaemia after starting varenicline in a 53-year-old woman with Type 1 diabetes. Since onset of diabetes......, intensified blood glucose monitoring and careful education of patients with diabetes treated with varenicline. Further investigation of the use of varenicline in patients with diabetes is warranted Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  18. Kenny-Caffey syndrome type 1 in an Egyptian girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotb Abbass Metwalley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenny-Caffey syndrome type 1 (KCS1 (OMIM 244460 is a rare syndrome characterized by growth retardation, uniformly small slender long bones with medullary stenosis, thickened cortex of the long bones, hypocalcemia possibly with tetany at an early age and normal intelligence. The primary outcome of KCS1 is short stature. We present here an Egyptian girl aged 32 months with typical feature of KCS1.

  19. Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS) type 1 validating case histories

    OpenAIRE

    P. Berger

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1 is challenging and unpredictable as the condition presents with vascular and neuropathic symptoms after nil or even minor injury to a peripheral nerve. The condition is one of a pain and motor dysfunction. The pathophysiology is not well understood and the relief of symptoms may change from being sympathetically mediated to sympathetically independent during  the course of the disease. At any stage physiotherapy has b...

  20. Endotracheal neurofibroma in neurofibromatosis type 1: an unusual manifestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willmann, Juergen K.; Weishaupt, Dominik; Smekal, A. von; Marincek, Borut; Kestenholz, Peter B.

    2002-01-01

    Tracheal involvement is an extremely rare manifestation in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1). We present a 33-year-old women with NF-1 suffering from progressive dyspnea. Multislice spiral CT revealed a neurofibroma located within the trachea with intratracheal extension. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an intratracheal neurofibroma which has been documented by CT. This indicates that multislice spiral CT allows accurate demonstration of localization and extent of this rare manifestation of neurofibromas. (orig.)

  1. Sleep and glycemic control in type 1 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Barone,Mark Thomaz Ugliara; Wey,Daniela; Schorr,Fabiola; Franco,Denise Reis; Carra,Mario Kehdi; Lorenzi Filho,Geraldo; Menna-Barreto,Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim in the present study was to elucidate how type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and sleep parameters interact, which was rarely evaluated up to the moment. Materials and methods Eighteen T1DM subjects without chronic complications, and 9 control subjects, matched for age and BMI, were studied. The following instruments used to evaluate sleep: the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, sleep diaries, actimeters, and polysomnography in a Sleep Lab. Glycemic control in T1DM individuals was evalua...

  2. Partial sleep restriction decreases insulin sensitivity in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke; van Dijk, J Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas; Hoogma, Roel P L M; Corssmit, Eleonora P M; Romijn, Johannes A

    2010-07-01

    Sleep restriction results in decreased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that sleep duration is also a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. We studied seven patients (three men, four women) with type 1 diabetes: mean age 44 +/- 7 years, BMI 23.5 +/- 0.9 kg/m(2), and A1C 7.6 +/- 0.3%. They were studied once after a night of normal sleep duration and once after a night of only 4 h of sleep. Sleep characteristics were assessed by polysomnography. Insulin sensitivity was measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies with an infusion of [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose. RESULTS Sleep duration was shorter in the night with sleep restriction than in the unrestricted night (469 +/- 8.5 vs. 222 +/- 7.1 min, P = 0.02). Sleep restriction did not affect basal levels of glucose, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), or endogenous glucose production. Endogenous glucose production during the hyperinsulinemic clamp was not altered during the night of sleep restriction compared with the night of unrestricted sleep (6.2 +/- 0.8 vs. 6.9 +/- 0.6 micromol x kg lean body mass(-1) x min(-1), NS). In contrast, sleep restriction decreased the glucose disposal rate during the clamp (25.5 +/- 2.6 vs. 22.0 +/- 2.1 micromol x kg lean body mass(-1) x min(-1), P = 0.04), reflecting decreased peripheral insulin sensitivity. Accordingly, sleep restriction decreased the rate of glucose infusion by approximately 21% (P = 0.04). Sleep restriction did not alter plasma NEFA levels during the clamp (143 +/- 29 vs. 133 +/- 29 micromol/l, NS). Partial sleep deprivation during a single night induces peripheral insulin resistance in these seven patients with type 1 diabetes. Therefore, sleep duration is a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  3. Atypical meningioma and extensive calvarium defects in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simsek, Enver [Department of Paediatrics, Duzce Medical Faculty, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey); Yavuz, Cevdet [Department of Neurosurgery, Duzce Medical Faculty, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey); Ustundag, Nil [Department of Pathology, Abant Izzet Baysal University School of Medicine, Konuralp-Duzce (Turkey)

    2003-08-01

    A 9-year-old girl with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) presented with a massive atypical meningioma and calvarial defect. Skull radiographs and cranial CT showed an extensive lytic bone lesion at the vertex. MRI demonstrated a large mass invading the calvarium and sagittal sinus. The histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnosis of the resected mass was atypical meningioma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of NF1 associated with atypical meningioma and massive calvarial defect in a child. (orig.)

  4. Involvement of the eye and orbit in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaonker C

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available 11 individuals were diagnosed to have neurofibromatosis type 1 and were examined for evidence of any ophthalmic lesions. Lisch nodules were the commonest manifestation of the disease and were present in 73% of all the patients (88% of those aged 16 years or more. 55% of the cases showed presence of neurofibroma on the lids. Other findings were optic glioma, unilateral sphenoid dysplasia with enlarged orbit, medullated nerve fibers and prominent corneal nerves with an incidence of 9% each.

  5. Multimodal imaging of choroidal nodules in neurofibromatosis type-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Choroidal nodules in neurofibromatosis type-1 are common and are best imaged with near-infrared reflectance (NIR imaging. The authors describe swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SSOCTA of choroidal nodules. These nodules are seen as hyperflow areas on SSOCTA and correlate well to bright patches on NIR imaging. The utility of multicolor scanning laser imaging in detecting these abnormalities is also described.

  6. Atypical meningioma and extensive calvarium defects in neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simsek, Enver; Yavuz, Cevdet; Ustundag, Nil

    2003-01-01

    A 9-year-old girl with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) presented with a massive atypical meningioma and calvarial defect. Skull radiographs and cranial CT showed an extensive lytic bone lesion at the vertex. MRI demonstrated a large mass invading the calvarium and sagittal sinus. The histopathological and immunohistochemical diagnosis of the resected mass was atypical meningioma. To our knowledge, this is the first case of NF1 associated with atypical meningioma and massive calvarial defect in a child. (orig.)

  7. Downregulation of angiotensin II type 1 receptors during sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, M; Ittner, K P; Hobbhahn, J; Taeger, K; Kurtz, A

    2001-08-01

    Our study aimed to characterize the mechanisms underlying the attenuated cardiovascular responsiveness toward the renin-angiotensin system during sepsis. For this purpose, we determined the effects of experimental Gram-negative and Gram-positive sepsis in rats. We found that sepsis led to a ubiquitous upregulation of NO synthase isoform II expression and to pronounced hypotension. Despite increased plasma renin activity and plasma angiotensin (Ang) II levels, plasma aldosterone concentrations were normal, and the blood pressure response to exogenous Ang II was markedly diminished in septic rats. Mimicking the fall of blood pressure during sepsis by short-term infusion of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside in normal rats did not alter their blood pressure response to exogenous Ang II. Therefore, we considered the possibility of an altered expression of Ang II receptors during sepsis. It turned out that Ang II type 1 receptor expression was markedly downregulated in all organs of septic rats. Further in vitro studies with rat renal mesangial cells showed that NO and a combination of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma) downregulated Ang II type 1 receptor expression in a synergistic fashion. In summary, our data suggest that sepsis causes a systemic downregulation of Ang II type 1 receptors that is likely mediated by proinflammatory cytokines and NO. We suggest that this downregulation of Ang II type 1 receptors is the main reason for the attenuated responsiveness of blood pressure and of aldosterone formation to Ang II and, therefore, contributes to the characteristic septic shock.

  8. Genetic and Environmental Pathways in Type 1 Diabetes Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    requirement that family pedigrees were consistent with the pattern of Mendelian inheritance of genetic markers between parents and offspring. It was...disequilib- rium test: history , subdivision, and admixture. Am J Hum Genet 1995: 57: 455–464. 146. MUELLER PW, ROGUS JJ, CLEARY PA et al. Genetics of...0619 TITLE: Genetic and Environmental Pathways in Type 1 Diabetes Complications PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Massimo Trucco, M.D

  9. Trabecular bone histomorphometry in humans with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Laura A G; Akhter, Mohammed P; Drincic, Andjela; Recker, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM) have markedly increased risk of fracture, but little is known about abnormalities in bone microarchitecture or remodeling properties that might give insight into the pathogenesis of skeletal fragility in these patients. We report here a case-control study comparing bone histomorphometric and micro-CT results from iliac biopsies in 18 otherwise healthy subjects with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with those from healthy age- and sex-matched non-diabetic control subjects. Five of the diabetics had histories of low-trauma fracture. Transilial bone biopsies were obtained after tetracycline labeling. The biopsy specimens were fixed, embedded, and scanned using a desktop μCT at 16 μm resolution. They were then sectioned and quantitative histomorphometry was performed as previously described by Recker et al. [1]. Two sections, >250 μm apart, were read from the central part of each biopsy. Overall there were no significant differences between diabetics and controls in histomorphometric or micro-CT measurements. However, fracturing diabetics had structural and dynamic trends different from nonfracturing diabetics by both methods of analysis. In conclusion, Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus does not result in abnormalities in bone histomorphometric or micro-CT variables in the absence of manifest complications from the diabetes. However, diabetics suffering fractures may have defects in their skeletal microarchitecture that may underlie the presence of excess skeletal fragility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Independent factors associated with depression in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manarte, Lucas Francisco; Dias, S; Góis, C; Boavida, J M

    2010-09-01

    Diabetes has been associated with depression since Thomas Willis' work in 1684 (Rubin and Peyrot in Diabetes Metab Rev 18:173-175, 2002). The aim of this study is to identify social and clinical factors independently associated with depression in individuals with type 1 diabetes. We carried out a descriptive transversal study with 110 type 1 diabetes patients, administered a questionnaire and obtained demographical and diabetes-related data (number of years from diagnosis, initial admission at diagnosis, glycated hemoglobin, number of complications, insulin dose, number of insulin injections per day, admission for ketoacidosis or hypoglycemia at diagnosis, and specific diabetes complications such as nephropathy, retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, coronariopathy, and amputation). Depressive symptoms were quantified using the Hamilton Score. We used T tests to investigate potential relations between the covariates and depression (Hamilton score). We concluded the following: as few as 10% of our patients had glycated hemoglobin under 7%; women had more symptoms of depression, and there are four independent factors associated with depression in individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus: age, Graffar score, admission for ketoacidosis, and insulin dose.

  11. [Prerenal kidney failure in type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloot, N C; Hübinger, A; Scherbaum, W A

    2003-12-05

    A 22-year-old man was admitted in a severely reduced condition. Type 1 diabetes mellitus had been diagnosed when he was 13 years old, hypothyroidism was treated with L-thyroxine for 2 years. For the past 3 years he suffered from repetitive hypoglycemia, combined with vertigo, weakness and low blood pressure. He presented with hypotension and hyperpigmentation of the skin. Pathological laboratory results were: serum creatinine 2.5 mg/dl; urea 145 mg/dl; sodium 124 mmol/l; potassium 8.3 mmol/l, HbA (1c) 9.1%. The ECG showed large T waves. Additionally, plasma aldosterone was decreased (diabetes mellitus type 1 and hypothyroidism (Schmidt-Carpenter-Syndrome) were diagnosed. Initially, the patient was treated with sodium chloride 0.9% i. v. and oral sodium 5 g 4 times/day. In addition, he was given hydrocortisone 100 mg i. v., and then switched to 40 mg per day (20-10-10 mg), fludrocortisone 0.05 mg/ day and L-thyroxine 75 microg/ day orally the clinical condition improved dramatically within 24 hours. Intensified conventional insulin therapy was continued. In patients with type 1 diabetes, especially in combination with associated organ-specific autoimmune diseases, autoimmune polyglandular syndrome should be considered and adequately treated with those hormones that are reduced.

  12. Clustering of microvascular complications in Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerg, Lasse; Hulman, Adam; Charles, Morten; Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Witte, Daniel Rinse

    2018-04-01

    To describe to what extent microvascular complications exhibit clustering in persons with Type 1 diabetes, and to assess whether the presence of one complication modified the strength of the association between the other two. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the electronic medical records of 2276 persons with Type 1 diabetes treated in a specialized care hospital in Denmark in 2013. We used log-linear analysis to describe associations between diabetic kidney disease, neuropathy and retinopathy and logistic regression models to quantify the magnitude of associations adjusting for potential confounders. The median duration of diabetes was 24 years and median HbA1c was 63 mmol/mol (7.9%). We found strong indication of clustering and found no evidence that presence of one complication modified the association between the other two. In models adjusted for diabetes duration and HbA 1c , persons with neuropathy had an OR of 2.15 (95% CI: 1.73-2.66) for concurrent diabetic kidney disease. Those with retinopathy had an OR of 2.49 (1.92-3.24) for diabetic kidney disease and of 2.66 (1.94-3.64) for neuropathy. Microvascular complications in persons with Type 1 diabetes exhibit strong clustering. However, the association between any pair of complications is not modified by the presence of the third. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Glutaric aciduria type 1: neuroimaging features with clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammad, Shaimaa Abdelsattar; Ahmed, Khaled A. [Ain-Shams University, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo (Egypt); Abdelkhalek, Heba Salah; Zaki, Osama K. [Ain-Shams University, Medical Genetics Unit, Pediatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-10-15

    Glutaric aciduria type 1 is a rare neurometabolic disease with high morbidity. To describe the MR imaging abnormalities in glutaric aciduria type 1 and to identify any association between the clinical and imaging features. MRI scans of 29 children (mean age: 16.9 months) with confirmed diagnosis of glutaric aciduria type 1 were retrospectively reviewed. Gray matter and white matter scores were calculated based on a previously published pattern-recognition approach of assessing leukoencephalopathies. Hippocampal formation and opercular topography were assessed in relation to the known embryological basis. MRI scores were correlated with morbidity score. The most consistent MRI abnormality was widened operculum with dilatation of the subarachnoid spaces surrounding underdeveloped frontotemporal lobes. Incomplete hippocampal inversion was also seen. The globus pallidus was the most frequently involved gray matter structure (86%). In addition to the central tegmental tract, white matter abnormalities preferentially involved the central and periventricular regions. The morbidity score correlated with the gray matter abnormality score (P = 0.004). Patients with dystonia had higher gray matter and morbidity scores. Morbidity is significantly correlated with abnormality of gray matter, rather than white matter, whether secondary to acute encephalopathic crisis or insidious onset disease. (orig.)

  14. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and exercise in competitive athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratjen, I; Weber, K S; Roden, M; Herrmann, M-E; Müssig, K

    2015-07-01

    The number of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus who are actively participating in competitive sports is increasing. Here, we aimed to assess individual experiences of competitive athletes with type 1 diabetes and to compare these experiences with current recommendations. A survey of 20 competitive athletes with type 1 diabetes, categorized as endurance (n=10) and non-endurance (n=10) athletes, was performed. Endurance and non-endurance athletes did not differ in gender distribution, age, body mass index, and known diabetes duration. Self-reported target blood glucose values prior to exercise were lower in non-endurance than in endurance athletes (195±34 vs. 137±28 mg/dl, P=0.001). The majority of all athletes experienced activity-induced hypo- and hyperglycemic events, independently of exercise type. However, endurance athletes used additional carbohydrate units to prevent activity-induced hypoglycemic events more frequently without monitoring their blood glucose levels than non-endurance athletes (50% vs. 0%, P=0.01). The reduction of the insulin dose on training and competition days compared to days without exercise was similar for endurance and non-endurance athletes. These results point to a very individual adaption of the athlete's therapy during training and competition. However, there are distinct differences in diabetes management between endurance and non-endurance athletes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Hypophosphatemic Osteomalacia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Insufficiency Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Yılmaz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis is a group of clinically related systemic disorders characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance. Hypophosphatemia may rarely develop due to phosphorus loss in the urine in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1. We present here a 42-year-old male patient with neurofibromatosis type 1, who has two-year history of bone pain and fatigue. Hypoproteinemia, very low blood phosphorus level, significant reduction in bone mineral density, and insufficiency fractures of the proximal femurs and left fibula were detected. It was considered that hypophosphatemic osteomalacia led to stress fractures. The fractures were sufficiently healed with bisphosphonate, vitamin D, calcium treatment and phosphorus-rich diet. The blood phosphorus level of the patient approached approximately the normal limits. Long-lasting spinal, arm and leg pain in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 must be carefully followed. It should be kept in mind that hypophosphatemic osteomalacia may occur in these patients. In addition to systemic examination, measurement of blood phosphorus level and bone mineral density must be done in order to prevent severe morbidities.

  16. Frequency of Ketoacidosis in Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Razavi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjectives: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (TIDM. Many patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes present with DKA. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency and the clinical presentation of diabetic ketoacidosis at the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus in youths in hamadan, Western Province of Iran.Methods: The Clinical and laboratory data of a total of 200 patients under 19 years of age with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes mellitus between 1995-2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 11.Results: 48 (24%of the children were presented in a state of ketoacidosis. Sever form of DKA (pH≤7.2 was observed in 54.5% of patients. The mean age at diagnosis was 7.3±5.15 years in DKA group and 8.59±3.07 in non-DKA group (p=0.22. 60.4% of patient with DKA were female whereas in the non-DKA group, 53.3% of patients were female, the difference was not significant (p=0.38. The duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 14.84±8.19 days in patients with DKA and 22.39±2.27 in the non-DKA group, (p=0.11. No significant difference was found between the age, sex and duration of the symptoms and occurance of DKA. Polydipsia (85.4 polyuria (83.3%, weakness (68.8% and abdominal pain (52.1% were the most frequently notified symptoms among the patients. In two cases, diagnosis of DKA was preceded by as appendicitis and the patient underwent appendectomy.Conclusion: Frequency of DKA at onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus was significant in the studied region. However, it was lower than other regions in Asia. Polydipsia, polyuria, fatigue and abdominal pain were the most common symptoms on presentation.

  17. Long-term mortality and retinopathy in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauslund, Jakob

    2010-05-01

    The incidence of type 1 diabetes is increasing in Denmark as well as the rest of the world. Due to diabetes-related micro- and macrovascular complications, the morbidity and the mortality is higher among type 1 diabetic patients. The aim of this thesis was to examine a population-based cohort of 727 type 1 diabetic patients from Fyn County, Denmark, with an onset of diabetes before 1 July 1973 in order to: (1) Evaluate the all-cause mortality rates and the influence of sex, duration of diabetes and calendar year of diagnosis in a 33-year follow-up (Paper I). (2) Examine glycaemic regulation, lipids and renal dysfunction as risk factors for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and IHD (Paper II). (3) Estimate the prevalence of DR as well as the 25-year incidence of PDR and associated risk factors in long-time surviving patients (Paper III). (4) To compare the grading of DR between ETDRS seven standard field 30 degrees stereoscopic colour films and nine field 45 degrees monoscopic digital colour images in long-term surviving patients (Paper IV). In the years 1973-2006 an overall MR of 22.3 per 1000 person-years was found. Furthermore a relative mortality of 3.4 was found as compared to the general population in Denmark. The relative mortality was especially high for patients aged 30-39 (SMR 9.8). There was a tendency towards a better survival for patients diagnosed after 1964. This was especially seen for men. Diabetes was the most common cause of death for those who died in the group. In 1993-1996 blood samples were drawn and glycaemic regulation, lipids and renal markers were subsequently used as predictors of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality and ischaemic heart disease. Glycaemic regulation, dyslipidaemia and creatinine were all significantly associated with all three endpoints. Furthermore, variations in glycaemic control were also identified as a risk factor for overall mortality. Two hundred and one patients were examined for diabetic

  18. Association between type 1, type 2 cytokines, diabetic autoantibodies and 25-hydroxyvitamin D in children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, I M; Nasr, A; Alsulaimani, A A; Alghamdi, H; Alswat, K A; Almalki, D M; Abushouk, A; Saleh, A M; Allam, G

    2016-12-01

    Vitamin D may play a role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). The aim of the current study was to determine the possible association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and circulating levels of type 1 and type 2 cytokines, as well as the pathophysiology of T1D in children. A total of 250 T1D patients and 250 sex- and age-matched T1D-free controls were screened for 25(OH)D, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), type 1 and type 2 cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP) and bone mineral metabolism, as well as antibodies against insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD 65) and islet cells. Our data showed that the plasma level of 25(OH)D was significantly lower in T1D patients and that there was a significant negative correlation between 25(OH)D levels and HbA1c values. There was a significant association between deficient levels of 25(OH)D and higher levels of cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-4 and IL-10) and CRP. Total blood hemoglobin, the hematocrit percentage, body mass index SDS values, phosphate and magnesium levels were significantly lower in T1D patients than in T1D-free subjects. The levels of parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase were significantly higher in T1D patients. Higher levels of cytokines were significantly associated with deficient levels of 25(OH)D. Moreover, in T1D patients, higher levels of islet antibodies, anti-GAD antibodies and anti-insulin antibodies were significantly associated with deficient levels of 25(OH)D. In type 1 diabetic children, deficient levels of 25(OH)D are associated with high levels of HbA1c, circulatory cytokines and antibody markers.

  19. Membrane fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    At Stanford University, Boxer lab, I worked on membrane fusion of small unilamellar lipid vesicles to flat membranes tethered to glass surfaces. This geometry closely resembles biological systems in which liposomes fuse to plasma membranes. The fusion mechanism was studied using DNA zippering...... between complementary strands linked to the two apposing membranes closely mimicking the zippering mechanism of SNARE fusion complexes....

  20. Biobased Membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, E.A.B.; Zlopasa, J.; Picken, S.J.

    2015-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of a composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane applicable to building material, such as concrete, cement, etc., to a meth od of applying said composition for forming a bio-compatible membrane, a biocompatible membrane, use of said membrane for various

  1. T-helper Cell Type-1 Transcription Factor T-Bet Is Down-regulated in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseghi, Hajar; Sanati, Mohammad Hossein; Jadali, Zohreh

    2016-10-01

    T cells have been identified as key players in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. However, the exact role of T-cell subpopulations in this pathway is presently unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess the expression pattern of two lineage-specifying transcription factors GATA-3 and T-bet, which are important in T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cell development, respectively. Gene expression analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was performed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Plasma levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 were also determined by ELISA. T-bet and IFN-γ gene expression was significantly lower in patients group compared with healthy controls (p<0.05). The expression of GATA-3 was relatively similar in patients and controls; however, IL-4 mRNAs were significantly increased in the PBMCs from patients as compared with normal controls (p<0.05). In addition, a marked increase in plasma IL-4 levels were observed in patient group compared with controls (p<0.001). To the contrary, IFN-γ protein levels were decreased in patients in comparison with controls (p<0.001). These data suggest additional implications of the role of Th1/Th2 imbalance for the immunopathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.

  2. ROLE OF MASTOIDECTOMY IN TYPE 1 TYMPANOPLASTY OF SAFE TYPE CHRONIC SUPPURATIVE OTITIS MEDIA- A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Ullah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM is one of the most common diseases of younger age in middle class population of the developing countries. Loss of hearing due to CSOM has a role in learning and intelligence of the students. There are multiple factors, which affect the tympanic membrane repair, mastoidectomy is one. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study at Era’s Lucknow Medical College and Hospital was planned to assess the effect of cortical mastoidectomy in safe type CSOM. For that, 120 patients were taken who were divided in two groups of 60 each. One group was subjected to tympanoplasty type 1 and other to cortical mastoidectomy and type 1 tympanoplasty. RESULTS After six months of follow up, it was found that graft rejection was 13 in group 1 compared to 12 in group2 and cortical mastoidectomy has almost no effect on graft acceptance and hearing gain in pure tone audiometry. CONCLUSION This study was planned to find the effect of cortical mastoidectomy in tympanoplasty type 1 in safe type CSOM. Two groups of 60 patients were taken. In one group, only tympanoplasty type 1 while in other cortical mastoidectomy along with tympanoplasty type 1 was done. After 6 months of follow up, no statistically significant difference was found in the graft rejection and hearing gain between the two groups.

  3. Characterization of soluble glycoprotein D-mediated herpes simplex virus type 1 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvitov, Marianna; Frampton, Arthur R.; Shah, Waris A.; Wendell, Steven K.; Ozuer, Ali; Kapacee, Zoher; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) entry into permissive cells involves attachment to cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and fusion of the virus envelope with the cell membrane triggered by the binding of glycoprotein D (gD) to cognate receptors. In this study, we characterized the observation that soluble forms of the gD ectodomain (sgD) can mediate entry of gD-deficient HSV-1. We examined the efficiency and receptor specificity of this activity and used sequential incubation protocols to determine the order and stability of the initial interactions required for entry. Surprisingly, virus binding to GAGs did not increase the efficiency of sgD-mediated entry and gD-deficient virus was capable of attaching to GAG-deficient cells in the absence of sgD. These observations suggested a novel binding interaction that may play a role in normal HSV infection

  4. Can thymic epithelial cells be infected by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1?

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    Klaysa Moreira-Ramos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is the cause of adult T cell leukaemias/lymphoma. Because thymic epithelial cells (TEC express recently defined receptors for the virus, it seemed conceivable that these cells might be a target for HTLV-1 infection. We developed an in vitro co-culture system comprising HTLV-1+-infected T cells and human TECs. Infected T cells did adhere to TECs and, after 24 h, the viral proteins gp46 and p19 were observed in TECs. After incubating TECs with culture supernatants from HTLV-1+-infected T cells, we detected gp46 on TEC membranes and the HTLV-1 tax gene integrated in the TEC genome. In conclusion, the human thymic epithelium can be infected in vitro by HTLV-1, not only via cell-cell contact, but also via exposure to virus-containing medium.

  5. Smooth muscle antibodies and type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Paolo; Muratori, Luigi; Agostinelli, Daniela; Pappas, Georgios; Veronesi, Lorenza; Granito, Alessandro; Cassani, Fabio; Terlizzi, Paolo; Lenzi, Marco; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2002-12-01

    Smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) characterize type 1 autoimmune hepatitis. Our aim was to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of different immunofluorescence substrates for the detection of SMA. Sera from 55 patients with type 1 AIH 20 with primary biliary cirrhosis, 20 with HCV-related chronic hepatitis and 25 blood donors were studied for SMA and anti-microfilaments reactivity by immunofluorescence on rat tissue sections, cultured fibroblasts and commercially available HEp-2 cells (collectively revealing the so called anti-actin pattern), and for the XR1 system by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. SMA was classified on the basis of its immunofluorescence pattern (V--vessels, G--glomerular, T--tubular). As further control group, we studied 26 patients with a diagnosis other than AIH, selected on the basis of a SMA-non-T/XR1 positivity. In patients with AIH the SMA-T pattern on rodent tissue, and anti-MF on fibroblasts and on HEp-2 cells were present in 80, 82 and 80%, respectively. Five out of 11 SMA-non T positive AIH patients were anti-MF positive. None of the pathological and healthy controls was positive for SMA-T or anti-MF reactivity. XR1 system was present in 84% of AIH patients and in 5% of pathological controls (p = 0.01). Two out of 26 SMA-non-T/XR1 positive sera were positive for anti-MF by fibroblasts and HEp-2 cells. A significant correlation was found between SMA-T pattern and anti-MF reactivity; no correlation was found between XR1 system and SMA-T pattern or anti-MF reactivity. SMA-T pattern is highly sensitive and specific first diagnostic test for type 1 AIH; anti-MF can be used as additional tool for the diagnosis, particularly when, despite the absence of the SMA-T pattern, AIH is strongly suspected.

  6. Glycaemic behaviour during breastfeeding in women with Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achong, N; McIntyre, H D; Callaway, L; Duncan, E L

    2016-07-01

    To describe glycaemia in both breastfeeding women and artificially feeding women with Type 1 diabetes, and the changes in glycaemia induced by suckling. A blinded continuous glucose monitor was applied for up to 6 days in eight breastfeeding and eight artificially feeding women with Type 1 diabetes 2-4 months postpartum. Women recorded glucose levels, insulin dosages, oral intake and breastfeeding episodes. A standardized breakfast was consumed on 2 days. A third group (clinic controls) were identified from a historical database. Carbohydrate intake tended to be higher in breastfeeding than artificially feeding women (P = 0.09) despite similar insulin requirements. Compared with breastfeeding women, the high blood glucose index and standard deviation of glucose were higher in artificially feeding women (P = 0.02 and 0.06, respectively) and in the clinical control group (P = 0.02 and 0.05, respectively). The low blood glucose index and hypoglycaemia were similar. After suckling, the low blood glucose index increased compared with before (P l) occurred within 3 h of suckling in 14% of suckling episodes, and was associated with time from last oral intake (P = 0.04) and last rapid-acting insulin (P = 0.03). After a standardized breakfast, the area under the glucose curve was positive. In breastfeeding women the area under the glucose curve was positive if suckling was avoided for 1 h after eating and negative if suckling occurred within 30 min of eating. Breastfeeding women with Type 1 diabetes had similar hypoglycaemia but lower glucose variability than artificially feeding women. Suckling reduced maternal glucose levels but did not cause hypoglycaemia in most episodes. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  7. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism in Males with Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Evelyn M; Lehman, Anna; Acott, Philip; Gillis, Jane; Metzger, Daniel L; Sirrs, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 is an autosomal recessive disorder with an incidence of 1 in 100,000. Long-term complications include chronic blood glucose lability, lactic academia, short stature, osteoporosis, delayed puberty, gout, progressive renal insufficiency, systemic or pulmonary hypertension, hepatic adenomas at risk for malignant transformation, anemia, vitamin D deficiency, hyperuricemic nephrocalcinosis, inflammatory bowel syndrome (type 1b), hypertriglyceridemia, and irregular menstrual cycles. We describe hypogonadotropic hypogonadism as a novel complication in glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1. Case Studies and Methods: Four unrelated patients with GSD 1a (N = 1) and 1b (N = 3) were found to have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism diagnosed at different ages. Institutional Research Ethics Board approval was obtained as appropriate. Participant consent was obtained. A retrospective chart review was performed and clinical symptoms and results of investigations summarized as a case series. All patients were confirmed biochemically to have low luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicular stimulating hormone (FSH), and correspondingly low total testosterone. Clinical symptoms of hypogonadism varied widely. Investigations for other causes of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism were unremarkable. In addition, all patients were found to have disproportionately low bone mineral density at the lumbar spine compared to the hip. Common to all patients was erratic metabolic control, including recurrent hypoglycemia and elevated lactate levels. Recurrent elevations in cortisol in response to hypoglycemia may be the underlying pathology leading to suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release. Incorporating clinical and/or biochemical screening of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis may be important in the management of this disease. Testosterone therapy however needs to be carefully considered because of the risk of hepatic adenomas.

  8. Quality of life of adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luce Marina F.C. da Costa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Diabetes mellitus is a highly prevalent chronic disease. Type 1 diabetes mellitus usually develops during infancy and adolescence and may affect the quality of life of adolescents. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of life of adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus in a metropolitan region of western central Brazil. METHODS: Adolescents aged 10-19 years who had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus at least 1 year previously were included. Patients with verbal communication difficulties, severe disease, and symptomatic hypo- or hyperglycemic crisis as well as those without an adult companion and who were 7%. In general, the adolescents consistently reported having a good quality of life. The median scores for the domains of the instrument were as follows: “satisfaction”: 35; “impact”: 51; and “worries“: 26. The total score for all domains was 112. Bivariate analysis showed significant associations among a lower family income, public health assistance, and insulin type in the “satisfaction” domain; and a lower family income, public health assistance, public school attendance, and a low parental education level in the “worries“ domain and for the total score. A longer time since diagnosis was associated with a lower total score. Multivariable analysis confirmed the association of a worse quality of life with public health assistance, time since diagnosis, and sedentary lifestyle in the “satisfaction” domain; female gender in the “worries” domain; and public health assistance for the total score. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the adolescents evaluated in this study viewed their quality of life as good. Specific factors that led to the deterioration of quality of life, including public assistance, time since diagnosis, sedentary lifestyle, and female gender, were identified. No potential conflict of interest was reported.

  9. Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 associated with parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Marie; Hjermind, Lena Elisabeth; Thomsen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    parkinsonism with rigidity, bradykinesia and a resting tremor. An MRI showed a normal substantia nigra, but a bilateral loss of substance in the basal ganglia, which is in contrast to the typically normal MRI in idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with single-photon emission...... Parkinson's disease remains unanswered.......Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) are allelic disorders caused by mutations in the CACNA1A gene on chromosome 19p13. It is well described that FHM1 can present with cerebellar signs, but parkinsonism has not previously...

  10. Partial Sleep Restriction Decreases Insulin Sensitivity in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke; van Dijk, J. Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas; Hoogma, Roel P.L.M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sleep restriction results in decreased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that sleep duration is also a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied seven patients (three men, four women) with type 1 diabetes: mean age 44 ± 7 years, BMI 23.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2, and A1C 7.6 ± 0.3%. They were studied once after a night of normal sleep duration and once after a night of only 4 h of sleep. Sleep characteristics were assessed by polysomnography. Insulin sensitivity was measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies with an infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose. RESULTS Sleep duration was shorter in the night with sleep restriction than in the unrestricted night (469 ± 8.5 vs. 222 ± 7.1 min, P = 0.02). Sleep restriction did not affect basal levels of glucose, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), or endogenous glucose production. Endogenous glucose production during the hyperinsulinemic clamp was not altered during the night of sleep restriction compared with the night of unrestricted sleep (6.2 ± 0.8 vs. 6.9 ± 0.6 μmol · kg lean body mass−1 · min−1, NS). In contrast, sleep restriction decreased the glucose disposal rate during the clamp (25.5 ± 2.6 vs. 22.0 ± 2.1 μmol · kg lean body mass−1 · min−1, P = 0.04), reflecting decreased peripheral insulin sensitivity. Accordingly, sleep restriction decreased the rate of glucose infusion by ∼21% (P = 0.04). Sleep restriction did not alter plasma NEFA levels during the clamp (143 ± 29 vs. 133 ± 29 μmol/l, NS). CONCLUSIONS Partial sleep deprivation during a single night induces peripheral insulin resistance in these seven patients with type 1 diabetes. Therefore, sleep duration is a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:20357381

  11. Type 1 diabetes and Ramadan fasting: A narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Vakili

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ramadan fasting is an important pillars of Islam .although patients and children expected from fasting during Ramadan, but every diabetic adolescents intends to fast should consult his diabetes management time, and intensive monitoring of blood glucose and urine ketones .close observation by endocrinologist, and weekly follow- up and highly individualized planning for each diabetic person is essential. In this Article we described general role that should be considered by type 1 diabetic people if they want to be fast during Ramadan.

  12. Diabetes Distress Among Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagger, Virginia; Hendrieckx, Christel; Sturt, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    with type 1 diabetes: the prevalence of DD; demographic, clinical, behavioral and psychosocial correlates of DD and interventions that reduce DD. Consistent with adult studies, around one third of adolescents experience elevated DD and this is frequently associated with suboptimal glycemic control, low self......Diabetes distress (DD) refers to the negative emotions arising from living with diabetes and the burden of self-management. Among adults, the prevalence and significance of DD are well established, but this is not the case among adolescents. This systematic review investigated among adolescents...

  13. Overnight glucose control in people with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiroux, Dimitri; Duun-Henriksen, Anne Katrine; Schmidt, Signe

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an individualized model predictive control (MPC) algorithm for overnight blood glucose stabilization in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The MPC formulation uses an asymmetric objective function that penalizes low glucose levels more heavily. We compute the model parameters...... in the MPC in a systematic way based on a priori available patient information. The model used by the MPC algorithm for filtering and prediction is an autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous input (ARIMAX) model implemented as a linear state space model in innovation form. The control...

  14. Varenicline may trigger severe hypoglycaemia in Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P.L.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U.; Thorsteinsson, B.

    2008-01-01

    is important to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity, especially in diabetes, use of effective drugs indicated for smoking cessation is rational. Case report We report multiple episodes of severe hypoglycaemia after starting varenicline in a 53-year-old woman with Type 1 diabetes. Since onset of diabetes......Background Varenicline is a new drug indicated for smoking cessation. It has primarily been investigated in healthy adults. The commonest side-effects are nausea, headache, sleep disturbance, constipation, flatulence and vomiting. Hypoglycaemia has not been reported. As smoking cessation...

  15. Evidence-based insulin treatment in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Iben Brock; Henriksen, J E; Hother-Nielsen, O

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Evaluation of the evidence base for recommending different insulin treatment regimens in type 1 diabetes. METHODS: A computerised literature survey was conducted using The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and the Pub Med database for the period of 1982-2007. RESULTS: A meta-analysis on only...... for a clinical trial, and only 5 trials on insulin analogues were performed as double-blinded. Current evidence suggests that CSII treatment results in a significant reduction in HbA1c without inducing more hypoglycaemia. Rapid-acting insulin analogues compared to human soluble insulin provide statistically...

  16. The soft-tissue manifestations of neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillier, J.C. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: julia.hillier@chelwest.nhs.uk; Moskovic, E. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Royal Mardsen Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-01

    The radiological appearances of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) are numerous and variable, because of the widespread presence of peripheral nerves. Knowledge of this variability can prevent unnecessary intervention. For example, occasionally lesions can be misinterpreted and biopsies performed unnecessarily. Thus, familiarity with the manifestations of this disease and the spectrum of associated abnormalities is an important part of the radiologist's armamentarium. This paper explores the manifold radiological appearances of extracranial NF-1 as experienced by the Sarcoma and Soft Tissue Tumour Unit at the Royal Marsden Hospital.

  17. The soft-tissue manifestations of neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillier, J.C.; Moskovic, E.

    2005-01-01

    The radiological appearances of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) are numerous and variable, because of the widespread presence of peripheral nerves. Knowledge of this variability can prevent unnecessary intervention. For example, occasionally lesions can be misinterpreted and biopsies performed unnecessarily. Thus, familiarity with the manifestations of this disease and the spectrum of associated abnormalities is an important part of the radiologist's armamentarium. This paper explores the manifold radiological appearances of extracranial NF-1 as experienced by the Sarcoma and Soft Tissue Tumour Unit at the Royal Marsden Hospital

  18. Sound energy absorbance characteristics of cartilage grafts used in type 1 tympanoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel Aslıer, Nesibe Gül; Gürkan, Selhan; Aslıer, Mustafa; Kirkim, Günay; Güneri, Enis Alpin; Ikiz, Ahmet Ömer

    2018-03-15

    The purpose of this prospective case-control study is to evaluate the sound energy absorbance characteristics of cartilage grafts in patients, who have undergone type 1 cartilage tympanoplasty. Thirty-four operated ears of 32 patients and 70 ears of 35 control subjects were included. Differences of pure-tone audiometry thresholds and wideband ambient-pressure absorbance ratios with respect to the graft material, graft thickness, cartilage surface area ratio and elapsed time after surgery were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristics curve was generated to detect the absorbance level at which the reconstructed tympanic membrane behaves as 'near-normal tympanic membrane'. In the surgical group, wideband energy absorbance ratios at all 1/2-octave band frequencies were significantly worse than normal ears. Energy absorbance ratios at 2000 and 2828Hz frequencies were higher in patients with tragal cartilage grafts. Higher absorbance ratios at 250-750Hz range were obtained in patients with 400μm cartilage graft thickness, <50% cartilage surface area ratio and ≥5 years since surgery. A multivariate generalized linear model revealed common effects of the independent variables at 8000Hz. The receiver operating characteristics analysis generated a cut-off level of 63.20% of sound energy absorbance at 1400Hz with 83% sensitivity and 88% specificity. Even though no differences in hearing thresholds were observed; graft material, graft thickness, cartilage surface area ratio and elapsed time after surgery affected the course of sound energy absorbance after type 1 cartilage tympanoplasty as evidenced by wideband tympanometry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Camel milk: a possible boon for type 1 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, R P; Tantia, P; Jain, S; Agrawal, R; Agrawal, V

    2013-11-03

    Poor nutrition in utero and in early life combined with over nutrition in later life may also play a role in epidemic of diabetes. The efficacy of camel milk consumption as an adjunct to routine diabetic management in type 1 diabetes is a approach showing new rays of hope to cope with this disorder by adding a food supplement with medicinal values. Research on the beneficial aspects of camel milk has been taking place in different corners of globe since last three decades. Continuous efforts to disclose the role of camel milk in diabetes has rendered it title of 'white gold'. Biochemical studies has revealed the components e.g. insulin like protein, lactoferrin, immunoglobulins are responsible for imparting camel milk the scientific weightage. In parallel, epidemiological surveys stating low prevalence of diabetes in communities consuming camel milk clearly indicate towards its hopeful role in maintaining hyperglycemia. This article shades light on camel milk production, composition, characteristics as well as it expresses positive effect of camel milk on blood glucose level, insulin dose, beta cell function. This review also compiles various epidemiological studies carried out to bring forth utility of camel milk suggesting it as a useful food supplement or alternative therapy for type 1 diabetic patients.

  20. Neglected-Noncompliant Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afdal .

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakDiabetes mellitus (DM tipe 1 merupakan kelainan sistemik akibat terjadinya gangguan metabolisme glukosayang ditandai oleh hiperglikemia kronis. Keadaan ini disebabkan oleh proses autoimun yang merusak sel βpankreas sehingga produksi insulin berkurang bahkan terhenti, penderitanya akan memerlukan asupan insulineksogen. Penyakit ini menimbulkan komplikasi kronik sehingga memerlukan manajemen pengobatan yangberkelanjutan dan edukasi pada pasien serta keluarganya. Penyakit yang tidak terkontrol akan menimbulkanberbagai komplikasi metabolisme, gangguan makrovaskular dan mikrovaskular yang menyebabkan penurunankualitas dan harapan hidup penderita.Kata Kunci : Diabetes melitus tipe 1, makrovaskular, mikrovaskularAbstractDiabetes mellitus (DM type 1 is a result of the systemic disorder of glucose metabolism disorder characterized bychronic hyperglycemia. This situation is caused by the autoimmune processes that destroy pancreatic β cellsresulting in the production of insulin is reduced even halted, the sufferer will require exogenous insulin intake. Thisraises the complications of chronic disease that requires ongoing medication management and education forpatients and their families. Uncontrolled disease will cause various metabolic complications, macrovascular andmicrovascular disorders that cause loss of quality and life expectancy of the patient.Keywords: Type 1 diabetes mellitus, macrovascular, microvascular

  1. Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS type 1 validating case histories

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    P. Berger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS type 1 is challenging and unpredictable as the condition presents with vascular and neuropathic symptoms after nil or even minor injury to a peripheral nerve. The condition is one of a pain and motor dysfunction. The pathophysiology is not well understood and the relief of symptoms may change from being sympathetically mediated to sympathetically independent during  the course of the disease. At any stage physiotherapy has been advocated as the corner stone and most important aspect of treatment in the rehabilitation of these individuals but unfortunately it has been difficult to execute when pain is exacerbated due to allodynia (unbearable to touch or move and hyperalgesia. Best results have been obtained if the patients are recognised and treated in the early or acute phase and it has been found that through careful assessment and analysis these patients can be recognised by previous events that have occurred in their initial case history. The treatment in the acute stage with physiotherapy modalities such as electrical stimulation and acupuncture will produce an early cessation of the symptoms and prevention of the disease developing into the fully blown CRPS type 1 with irreversible and possibly atrophic consequences. Case histories have been presented that illustrate these important aspects and demonstrate  the value of early and the appropriate physiotherapy that may be more successful than other pharmacological and physical interventions in this disease.

  2. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy/complex regional pain syndrome, type 1

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    S.H. Botha

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CPRS, type 1 is a pain disorder that develops unpredictably and can follow a minor injury. A 12-year-old boy presented with severe pain in the feet and could not walk or stand weight bearing. Normal X-rays showed osteopenic changes and radiolucent lines, which appeared to be stress fractures. Three-phase bone scintigraphy showed no uptake in the left lower leg on the blood pool phase or on the immediate or delayed images. This indicated typical CPRS type 1 in children. The uptake in the right foot was increased and the stress fracture and other illness could not be differentiated. Computed tomography was done to exclude stress fractures. Only osteopenic changes in both calcaneus bones were found and there was no evidence of cortical stress fractures. Magnetic resonance images revealed oedema in the calcaneus and talus bones of both feet. The patient received epidural narcotic infusion with sympathetic blockage for 1 week combined with extensive physiotherapy. The blood pool phase of the bone scan became normal within 2 weeks, and increased uptake in both feet was noticed. The patient was followed up with MRI every 3 months and the bone marrow oedema disappeared after 6 months.

  3. Carbohydrate counting for children with diabetes type 1

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    Juanita Mena-Gallego

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (DM1 is an endocrine disease with autoimmune bases that mainly affects children and adolescents. It is characterized by progressive loss of beta cells mass to a critical level where the ability to release the insulin, needed for the utilization of glucose by tissues, is affected, triggering microvascular damage, main long-term complication. Short-term complications are diabetic keto-acidosis and, secondary to insulin therapy, the hypoglycemia. Although insulin therapy is the mainstay of treatment, sometimes it is difficult to calculate the proper dosage for precise glycemic control; carbohydrate counting plays an important role here in the optimization of postprandial glycemic levels, which is demonstrated by the correct levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c. This review seeks to assess the available scientific evidence on the effectiveness of carbohydrate counting in children with DM1. Search until May 2014 was conducted in PubMed, Trip database, Cochrane and academic Google; three clinical trials performed in individuals under 18 were found. The studies demonstrate effectiveness but the quality is not strong enough. No systematic reviews were found. A more exhaustive search and possibly more clinical trials are needed to be recommended as a technique of metabolic control of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus in children.

  4. Self-efficacy scale for Brazilians with type 1 diabetes

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    Daniela Alves Gastal

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Diabetes is a public health problem and good glycemic control is able to prevent or contain its complications. Self-efficacy is a key factor in successfully achieving behavior goals. The aim of this study was to analyze the psychometric properties of the insulin management diabetes self-efficacy scale (IMDSES on type 1 diabetes patients from southern Brazil. DESIGN AND SETTING: Validation study in two cities in southern Brazil. METHODS: The psychometric properties of IMDSES were evaluated in a population of type 1 diabetes patients (n = 213, from September to December 2004, who were attended within the Brazilian public healthcare system. Principal component analysis was conducted to develop the subscales. Cronbach’s alpha was used as the reliability coefficient. RESULTS: The analysis of psychometric properties resulted in an IMDSES consisting of 20 items and three subscales: diet (alpha: 0.83, insulin (alpha: 0.92 and general management (alpha: 0.78 and accounted for 53% of the variance. Criteria validity was investigated through two parameters: glycohemoglobin, which showed significant association with self-efficacy on the insulin subscale (p = 0.04, and the variable "adherence", which was significantly associated with self-efficacy on two subscales (p < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the IMDSES is valid and reliable, and can be used to measure results from diabetes educational programs and to measure self-efficacy relating to diabetes management, for possible interventions.

  5. IgG4-unrelated type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Eriko; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Yoshida, Naoki; Hongo, Seiji; Miura, Shin; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Hamada, Shin; Kume, Kiyoshi; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Nakayama, Keisuke; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old male was referred to our hospital for the evaluation of hyperproteinemia. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed high fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the pancreas, bilateral lacrimal glands, submandibular glands, parotid glands, bilateral pulmonary hilar lymph nodes, and kidneys. Laboratory data showed an elevation of hepatobiliary enzymes, renal dysfunction, and remarkably high immunoglobulin (Ig) G levels, without elevated serum IgG4. Abdominal computed tomography revealed swelling of the pancreatic head and bilateral kidneys. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed an irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic head and stricture of the lower common bile duct. Histological examination by endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration revealed findings of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis without IgG4-positive plasma cells. Abnormal laboratory values and the swelling of several organs were improved by the treatment with steroids. The patient was diagnosed as having type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) based on the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria. Therefore, we encountered a case of compatible type 1 AIP without elevated levels of serum IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells. This case suggests that AIP phenotypes are not always associated with IgG4. PMID:26361429

  6. PSYCHOSOCIAL EFFECTS OF TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS IN CHILDREN

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    Madhava Vijaya Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study is to assess the psychological and general scholastic performances of the children with type 1 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS Study design is a hospital-based cross-sectional study. 42 children of age 1-15 years were enrolled for the study. Data collected from the records and from direct interviews of parents and children. Analysis were done based on CPMS and SDQ scoring system. Statistics was done using SPSS software and Student’s t-test was used for comparison. RESULTS Most of the children showed average school performance and reduction in school performance was noticed with advancing age. Psychological effects were experienced by all children and its severity increased with age. CONCLUSION Children with type 1 diabetes experience psychological stress due to the chronic nature of the illness. Financial constraints add to the stress. Severe stress was seen in older children and in girls. Regular follow up and counseling reduces the severity of stress.

  7. Heart rate variability in neonates of type 1 diabetic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Noirin E; Higgins, Mary F; Kinsley, Brendan F; Foley, Michael E; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a common finding in offspring of pre-gestational type 1 diabetic pregnancy. Echocardiographic and biochemical evidence of fetal cardiac dysfunction have also been reported. Studies suggest that offspring of diabetic mothers (ODM) undergo a fetal programming effect due to the hyperglycaemic intrauterine milieu which increases their risk of cardiovascular morbidity in adult life. Decreased neonatal heart rate variability (HRV) has been described in association with in-utero growth restriction, prematurity, sudden infant death syndrome and congenital heart disease. The effect of in-utero exposure to hyperglycaemia in diabetic pregnancy on neonatal HRV is unknown. Our aim was to determine if neonatal HRV differs between normal and diabetic pregnancy. This was a prospective observational study of 38 patients with pregestational type 1 diabetes and 26 controls. HRV assessment was performed using Powerlab (ADI Instruments Ltd). Heart rate variability assessment and cord blood sampling for pH and glucose were performed for all neonates. Maternal glycaemic control was assessed via measurement of glycosylated haemoglobin in each trimester in the diabetic cohort. Neonates of diabetic mothers had evidence of altered heart rate variability, with increased low frequency to high frequency ratio (LF: HF), suggestive of a shift towards sympathetic predominance (pheart to fluctuations in maternal glycaemia with subsequent alterations in HRV may explain why infants of diabetic mothers are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Molecular Genetics of Type 1 Glycogen Storage Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Chou J; Mansfield

    1999-04-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1), also known as von Gierke disease, is caused by a deficiency in the activity of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). It is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, kidney enlargement, growth retardation, lactic acidemia, hyperlipidemia and hyperuricemia. The disease presents with both clinical and biochemical heterogeneity consistent with the existence of two major subgroups, GSD-1a and GSD-1b, which have been confirmed at the molecular genetic level. GSD-1a, the most prevalent form, is caused by mutations in the G6Pase gene that abolish or greatly reduce enzymatic activity. The gene maps to chromosome 17q21 and encodes a microsomal transmembrane protein. Animal models of GSD-1a exist and are being exploited to delineate the disease more precisely. It has been proposed that GSD-1b is caused by a defect in the microsomal glucose-6-phosphate transporter. The gene responsible for GSD-1b has been mapped to chromosome 11q23 and a cDNA encoding a microsomal transmembrane protein has been identified. The function of this putative GSD-1b protein remains to be determined. These recent developments, along with newly characterized animal models of GSD-1a, are increasing our understanding of the interrelationship between the components of the G6Pase complex and type 1 glycogen storage diseases.

  9. Role of immune system in type 1 diabetes mellitus pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2014-09-01

    The immune system is the body's natural defense system against invading pathogens. It protects the body from infection and works to communicate an individual's well-being through a complex network of interconnected cells and cytokines. This system is an associated host defense. An uncontrolled immune system has the potential to trigger negative complications in the host. Type 1 diabetes results from the destruction of pancreatic β-cells by a β-cell-specific autoimmune process. Examples of β-cell autoantigens are insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, tyrosine phosphatase, and insulinoma antigen. There are many autoimmune diseases, but type 1 diabetes mellitus is one of the well-characterized autoimmune diseases. The mechanisms involved in the β-cell destruction are still not clear; it is generally believed that β-cell autoantigens, macrophages, dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and T lymphocytes are involved in the β-cell-specific autoimmune process. It is necessary to determine what exact factors are causing the immune system to become unregulated in such a manner as to promote an autoimmune response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Psychopathology and Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion in Type 1 Diabetes

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    Francesco Rotella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII is used as an option in patients with diabetes failing to multiple daily injections (MDI. Psychological factors may play a relevant role in the failure to attain therapeutic goals in patients on MDI. This could lead to an overrepresentation of psychopathology in patients treated with CSII. Methods. A consecutive series of 100 patients with type 1 diabetes was studied, collecting main clinical parameters and assessing psychopathology with the self-reported questionnaire Symptom Checklist 90-revised. Patients on CSII were then compared with those on MDI. Results. Of the 100 enrolled patients, 44 and 56 were on CSII and MDI, respectively. Among men, those on CSII were younger than those on MDI; conversely, no difference in age was observed in women. Women on CSII showed higher scores on most Symptom Checklist 90 subscales than those on MDI, whereas no differences were observed in men. Conclusion. Women with type 1 diabetes treated with CSII display higher levels of psychopathology than those on MDI. This is probably the consequence of the fact that patients selected for CSII are those failing to MDI. Higher levels of psychopathology could represent a limit for the attainment and maintenance of therapeutic goals with CSII.

  11. Depressive Symptoms at Critical Times in Youth With Type 1 Diabetes: Following Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis and Insulin Pump Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Dayna E; Volkening, Lisa K; Pober, David M; Muir, Andrew B; Young-Hyman, Deborah L; Laffel, Lori M

    2018-02-01

    Depressive symptoms occur at various times during the life cycle in persons with type 1 diabetes. We investigated depressive symptoms prospectively in youth with new-onset type 1 diabetes and in those beginning pump therapy. Youth with type 1 diabetes (N = 96), ages 10-17 years, completed the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) at baseline and at 1, 6, and 12 months after diabetes onset or pump start; scores ≥13 indicated clinical elevation. The change in depressive symptoms and the association between CDI score and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level were assessed over 1 year. The new-onset group (n = 54) had an HbA1c level of 11.4% ± 2.5%. The pump group (n = 42) had a diabetes duration of 4.1 ± 3.4 years and an HbA1c level of 8.3% ± 1.3%. The baseline median CDI was 5.0 in both groups and remained low over time (ranging from 2.0 to 3.5). Most youth (new onset 72%, pump 81%) scored pump groups. Youth with elevated CDI in the first month after diagnosis or pump start were significantly more likely to have a CDI score of ≥13 at 6 or 12 months, supporting recommendations to screen for depressive symptoms because of persistence over time. Those with new-onset diabetes and depressive symptoms in the first month had higher HbA1c at 6 months; confirmatory research is needed. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  12. Cutaneous manifestations of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 – case report and literature review

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    Julita A. Krahel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a type of polyendocrinopathy, inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Beside the classic triad of symptoms (candidiasis of the skin and mucous membranes, hypoparathyroidism and Addison’s disease, other skin and systemic diseases may be present. Objective . To present a patient with history of APS-1, in whom in addition to the classic triad of symptoms vitiligo, alopecia, and dental enamel hypoplasia and nail dystrophy were observed. Case report . A 43-year-old patient, with a history of APS-1 syndrome, was admitted to the hospital because of exacerbation of candidiasis of the mucous membranes of the mouth. Additionally, dystrophy of the nails and the dental enamel, generalized alopecia and extensive vitiligo were observed. Due to antifungal treatment partial clinical improvement was achieved. Conclusions . APS-1 is a potentially life-threatening complex set of symptoms. Consistent treatment and strict follow-up of patients with this syndrome are necessary.

  13. Quality of life of children with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieuwesteeg, Anke M; Pouwer, Frans; van der Kamp, Rozemarijn

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have to deal with a complex and demanding daily treatment regime which can have a negative impact on the quality of life (QoL) of these patients. The objective of the present study is to review studies that have compared generic quality...... unclear. CONCLUSIONS: Although children and adolescents with T1DM have to live with a demanding treatment regime, overall results revealed that their generic QoL is not impaired compared to healthy peers. However, disease-specific QoL problems, including a negative impact of diabetes on daily functioning......, and diabetes-related worries were certainly present. Longitudinal research is needed in order to provide tailored care for children of all ages with T1DM....

  14. Insulin pump therapy in children with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szypowska, Agnieszka; Schwandt, Anke; Svensson, Jannet

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intensified insulin delivery using multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is recommended in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) to achieve good metabolic control. OBJECTIVE: To examine the frequency of pump usage in T1D children treated...... diabetes patient registry. Datasets were aggregated over the most recent year of treatment for each patient. Data were collected until March 2016. To assess the organization of pump therapy a survey was carried out. RESULTS: Overall, 44.4% of T1D children were treated with CSII. The proportion of patients...... in SWEET (Better control in Paediatric and Adolescent diabeteS: Working to crEate CEnTers of Reference) centers and to compare metabolic control between patients treated with CSII vs MDI. METHODS: This study included 16 570 T1D children participating in the SWEET prospective, multicenter, standardized...

  15. [Complex regional pain syndrome type 1: negating the myth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölke, Jan Paul M; van Dongen, Robert T; van de Meent, Henk

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS-1) was identified in the Netherlands more than 30 years ago, but since then the arguments supporting this diagnosis have become weaker. Incidence has decreased, it is often not possible to make a definite diagnosis, the pathophysiology remains unclear and treatments are extremely diverse. Since the patient group is so heterogeneous, it is often unclear exactly which patients should be included. Disuse due to immobilization can give an identical clinical picture, including the inflammatory parameters that are seen in CRPS-1. CRPS-1 following injury can be prevented with exercise, and incidence is declining dramatically. Taking these factors into consideration, we support the view that CRPS-1 is not an illness but rather a 'disuse syndrome' as a result of immobilization, or there may be a missed underlying diagnosis.

  16. Segmental tubular sodium reabsorption in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieperink, H; Eshøj, O; Leyssac, P P

    1993-01-01

    Segmental tubular sodium reabsorption in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes was measured in 36 patients in a cross-sectional study including one group (n = 13) without significant albuminuria (UalbV 1), one group (n = 16) with albuminuria in the range from 30 to 300 mg 24 h-1......, and a group (n = 7) with nephropathy (UalbV > 300 mg 24 h-1). Lithium clearance was used to measure end proximal delivery. From end proximal delivery, 51Cr-EDTA clearance (GFR) and sodium clearance, segmental tubular reabsorption was calculated. For all patients, GFR was directly correlated with end proximal...... delivery (r = 0.62, p 1, the direct correlation between GFR and end proximal delivery was also significant (r = 0.77, p

  17. Arterial-ventricular coupling in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Simone; Rossing, Peter; Jensen, Jan S

    2018-01-01

    echocardiography. METHODS: In 305 type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients without known heart disease and with normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (biplane LVEF > 45%), we measured arterial stiffness as pulse wave velocity (PWV) and performed conventional and speckle-tracking echocardiography assessing global...... longitudinal strain (GLS) as a measure of systolic myocardial function. Associations between PWV and myocardial function were reported as standardized beta values from adjusted regression models including age, sex, mean arterial pressure, body mass index, HbA1c, diabetes duration, estimated glomerular...... filtration rate, degree of albuminuria, total cholesterol, heart rate and smoking. RESULTS: Patients were 54 (12) years [mean (SD)], 152 (50%) females, diabetes duration 31 (16) years, HbA1c65 (12) mmol/mol, LVEF 58 (5) %, GLS -18.2 (2.6) % and PWV 10.2 (3.4) m/s. There was no association between PWV...

  18. The role of iron in type 1 diabetes etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karen L.; Ellervik, Christina; Svensson, Jannet

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D) is rising, which might be due to the influence of environmental factors. Biological and epidemiological evidence has shown that excess iron is associated with beta-cell damage and impaired insulin secretion. AIM: In this review, our aim...... was to assess the association between iron and the risk of T1D. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE in July 2016. Studies investigating the effect of iron status/intake on the risk of developing T1D later were included, and study quality was evaluated. The results have...... been summarized in narrative form. RESULTS: From a total of 931 studies screened, we included 4 observational studies evaluating iron intake from drinking water or food during early life and the risk of T1D. The quality of the studies was moderate to high assessed via the nine-star Newcastle Ottawa...

  19. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

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    Tonelli, Francesco, E-mail: f.tonelli@dfc.unifi.it; Giudici, Francesco [Department of Clinical Physiopathology, Surgical Unit, Medical School, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla n° 3, Florence 50134 (Italy); Giusti, Francesca; Brandi, Maria Luisa [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical School and Regional Centre for Hereditary Endocrine Tumors, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla n° 3, Florence 50134 (Italy)

    2012-05-07

    We reviewed the literature about entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1) to clarify their demographic features, localization imaging, practice, and appropriate therapeutical strategies, analyzing the current approach to entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1. Despite the fact that hyperparathyroidism is usually the first manifestation of MEN1, the penetrance of these tumors is similar. They are characterized by multiplicity of lesions, variable expression of the tumors, and propensity for malignant degeneration. Both the histological type and the size of MEN1 neuroendocrine tumors correlate with malignancy. Monitoring of pancreatic peptides and use of imaging exams allow early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment, resulting in prevention of metastatic disease and improvement of long-term survival. Surgery is often the treatment of choice for MEN1-neuroendocrine tumors. The rationale for surgical approach is to curtail malignant progression of the disease, and to cure the associated biochemical syndrome, should it be present.

  20. Osteomyelitis in leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Ardalan, Maryam; H.Rafati, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 (LAD-1) is a rare, inherited immunodeficiency that affects one per million people yearly and usually presents with recurrent, indolent bacterial infections of the skin, mouth, and respiratory tract and impaired pus formation and wound healing. A 13-year-old girl...... diagnosed LAD-I at the age of 7 years was brought to the Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, because of a draining plaque on the left leg for 2.5 years. She had recurrent skin infections and had been treated with repeated courses of different antibiotic...... combinations, with temporary responses, since 5 years of age. Examination revealed a 7 x 8 cm minimally erythematous hyperpigmented plaque with multiple draining sinuses on the left leg. Tissue culture yielded Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Flow cytometry showed CD18 (18.79%), CD11a (51.59%), CD11b (18.61%) and CD11c...

  1. Breast feeding and the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyvik, K O; Green, A; Svendsen, Anders Jørgen

    1992-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to study the proposed inverse relationship between breast feeding and incidence of Type 1 diabetes mellitus. All Danish diabetic men born in Copenhagen during 1959-1964 and/or residing there for the first year of life (n = 119) were identified and a search made...... for their post-natal health visitor records. These include data on birth weight, birth length, immunizations, and feeding habits. A total of 77 cases were re-identified. No differences were found with respect to clinical characteristics between these cases and those not identified. For each diabetic subject, two...... control children with date of birth identical to the diabetic cases were drawn from health visitor records. Cases and controls did not differ with respect to maternal age, or birth weight or length. Overall, the statistical analysis failed to confirm the hypothesis of an association between duration...

  2. A Rare Cause of Pheochromocytoma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1-Noonan Syndrome

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    Mazhar Müslüm Tuna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis (NF Type 1 (NF-1 is an autosomal dominant disease with a prevalence of about 1/3000. NF-1 is a neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by cafe au lait macules, neurofibroma, optic glioma, lisch nodules, and symptoms involving other systems. Noonan syndrome (NS is a clinically heterogeneous disorder predominantly characterized by dysmorphic facial features, congenital heart disease, proportionate post-natal short stature, neck abnormalities, and chest deformities. NF-NS is a very rare overlapping syndrome sharing many features of both syndromes. Coexistence of pheochromocytoma, which can be life-threatening if not treated properly, is also a very rare complication of this disorder. Here, we report a patient who was admitted with a mass in the right upper quadrant and was diagnosed with pheochromocytoma and NFNS. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 227-31

  3. Primary Hyperparathyroidism in Patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

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    Grzegorz Piecha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary hyperparathyroidism may occur as a part of an inherited syndrome in a combination with pancreatic endocrine tumours and/or pituitary adenoma, which is classified as Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1. This syndrome is caused by a germline mutation in MEN-1 gene encoding a tumour-suppressor protein, menin. Primary hyperparathyroidism is the most frequent clinical presentation of MEN-1, which usually appears in the second decade of life as an asymptomatic hypercalcemia and progresses through the next decades. The most frequent clinical presentation of MEN-1-associated primary hyperparathyroidism is bone demineralisation and recurrent kidney stones rarely followed by chronic kidney disease. The aim of this paper is to present the pathomechanism, screening procedures, diagnosis, and management of primary hyperparathyroidism in the MEN-1 syndrome. It also summarises the recent advances in the pharmacological therapy with a new group of drugs—calcimimetics.

  4. Bone turnover markers in patients with type 1 Gaucher disease

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    Gaetano Giuffrida

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Bone complications occur frequently in Gaucher disease (GD and reduce the quality of life of these patients. Skeletal involvement is an important indication for treatment to ameliorate symptoms and reduce the risk of irreversible and debilitating disease. Bone biomarkers have been used to assess disease status and the response to therapy in a number of bone disorders. Here, we examine the literature for evidence of abnormalities in bone turnover markers in patients with type 1 GD to assess whether they might be useful for the assessment of bone involvement in GD. We have found that bone biomarkers in GD show highly variable results which do not currently support their routine use for clinical assessment of bone status, as an indication for therapy initiation, or for monitoring the response to therapy. A greater understanding of bone markers and their relation to the bone manifestations of GD is required.

  5. Multilevel model based glucose control for type-1 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gabin, Winston; Jacobsen, Elling W

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease that involves alterations at multiple biological levels, ranging from intracellular signalling to organ processes. Since glucose homeostasis is the consequence of complex interactions that involve a number of factors, the control of diabetes should be based on a multilevel analysis. In this paper, a novel approach to design of closed-loop glucose controllers based on multilevel models is presented. A control scheme is proposed based on combining a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model with an insulin signal transduction model for type 1 diabetes mellitus patients. Based on this, an insulin feedback control schemes is designed. Two main advantages of explicitly utilizing information at the intracellular level were obtained. First, significant reduction of hypoglycaemic risk by reducing the undershoot in glucose levels in response to added insulin. Second, robust performance for inter-patient changes, demonstrated through application of the multilevel control strategy to a well established in silico population of diabetic patients.

  6. Robust model identification applied to type 1diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finan, Daniel Aaron; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2010-01-01

    In many realistic applications, process noise is known to be neither white nor normally distributed. When identifying models in these cases, it may be more effective to minimize a different penalty function than the standard sum of squared errors (as in a least-squares identification method......). This paper investigates model identification based on two different penalty functions: the 1-norm of the prediction errors and a Huber-type penalty function. For data characteristic of some realistic applications, model identification based on these latter two penalty functions is shown to result in more...... accurate estimates of parameters than the standard least-squares solution, and more accurate model predictions for test data. The identification techniques are demonstrated on a simple toy problem as well as a physiological model of type 1 diabetes....

  7. Myths about type 1 diabetes: Awareness and education

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    Alok Kanungo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all healthcare professionals (HCPs are aware of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and various myths still exist in the society and among HCPs. The medical challenge in treating T1DM is the confusion between T1DM and T2DM and its management, which is very common and is observed with both general practitioners and parents of children with diabetes. There are multiple medical and social myths associated with diabetes, especially T1DM, prevalent in society. Diabetes management requires support and collaboration from family, school and society, which is sometimes difficult, as they are more discouraging than positive. The launch of the Changing Diabetes in Children program in India has created a lot of awareness and is helping patients and their parents understand the disease.

  8. Severe dyspnea in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

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    P.B. Poble

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 is a genetic disease in which pulmonary complications are rare, but severe, especially pulmonary hypertension (PH. The mechanisms underlying the onset of PH in patients with NF1 are unclear and might be multifactorial. In particular, the frequent presence of pulmonary parenchymal lesions makes etiological diagnosis of PH difficult. We describe here the case of a patient with NF1 admitted to our clinic with dyspnea and right heart failure revealing severe pre-capillary PH. Parenchymal lesions were mild and PH was attributed to pulmonary vascular involvement. Clinical and hemodynamic conditions of the patient improved under pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific combination therapy. This case suggests that treatment of PH due to pulmonary vascular involvement in NF1 may be aligned with recommendations for PAH treatment.

  9. NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE 1 OR GIANT MELANOCYTIC NEVUS: PROBLEMS OF DIAGNOSTIC

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    A. S. Ol’shanskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1 is a hereditary disease mainly affecting skin and peripheral nervous system. Individual signs of cutaneous manifestations of NF-1 can imitate or be combined with other neurocutaneous syndromes. At present on the outpatient phase is not always possible to conduct a detailed examination of the patients with NF-1 and to determine the indications for modern diagnostic examination in a specialized hospital. It can be important to verify the diagnosis. The authors presented short review of russian and foreign literature and clinical case of the patient with a specific lesion of the skin against the background of congenital giant melanocytic nevus. Problems of differential diagnosis of NF-1 and congenital giant pigmented nevus were analyzed.

  10. Immune Function of Vitamin D in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Jingbo Li

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is a well-known fat-soluble vitamin which is essential in the homeostasis of calcium and phosphorus. Vitamin D deficiency causes skeletal disorders, including rickets, osteomalacia, and osteoporosis. However, recent studies revealing the immunomodulatory effects of vitamin D have opened up a new understanding and possibility in this field. It has been proved that vitamin D is related to a variety of autoimmune diseases. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, being generally accepted as autoimmune mediated, is also proposed to be associated with the vitamin D status of the human body. Here, we reviewed briefly the epidemiological correlation between the vitamin D status and prevalence of T1DM, the possible mechanisms underlying this correlation, and clinical trials focusing on the therapeutic prospects of vitamin D in the treatment of T1DM.

  11. Genes affecting β-cell function in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløyel, Tina; Kaur, Simranjeet; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a multifactorial disease resulting from an immune-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. Several environmental and genetic risk factors predispose to the disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified around 50 genetic regions...... that affect the risk of developing T1D, but the disease-causing variants and genes are still largely unknown. In this review, we discuss the current status of T1D susceptibility loci and candidate genes with focus on the β cell. At least 40 % of the genes in the T1D susceptibility loci are expressed in human...... islets and β cells, where they according to recent studies modulate the β-cell response to the immune system. As most of the risk variants map to noncoding regions of the genome, i.e., promoters, enhancers, intergenic regions, and noncoding genes, their possible involvement in T1D pathogenesis as gene...

  12. Glucocorticoid receptors in monocytes in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, P; Binder, C

    1989-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor binding characteristics were investigated in 8 males with poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes mellitus and 14 healthy males. The cell type studied was monocytes, and a method for correction for heterogeneity in glucocorticoid binding in a mononuclear leucocyte population...... was introduced. The number of receptors and the dissociation constant KD were, respectively, 13,699 and 2.93 X 10(-8) mol/l for the control group and 15,788 and 2.75 X 10(-8) mol/l for diabetics (p greater than 0.05). In diabetics, KD correlated negatively with blood glucose (r = 0.762, p less than 0.......05) indicating an increased sensitivity to cortisol at high blood glucose levels. In 6 of the diabetics and 7 of the control group, a simultaneous insulin receptor study was carried out. However, glucocorticoid receptor binding characteristics did not correlate with insulin receptor binding characteristics...

  13. Infant Exposures and Development of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Brittni; Kroehl, Miranda; Lamb, Molly M.; Seifert, Jennifer; Barriga, Katherine; Eisenbarth, George S.; Rewers, Marian; Norris, Jill M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The incidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is increasing worldwide, with the most rapid increase among children younger than 5 years of age. OBJECTIVE To examine the associations between perinatal and infant exposures, especially early infant diet, and the development of T1DM. DESIGN The Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY) is a longitudinal, observational study. SETTING Newborn screening for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) was done at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Denver, Colorado. First-degree relatives of individuals with T1DM were recruited from the Denver metropolitan area. PARTICIPANTS A total of 1835 children at increased genetic risk for T1DM followed up from birth with complete prospective assessment of infant diet. Fifty-three children developed T1DM. EXPOSURES Early (children at increased genetic risk for T1DM is between 4 and 5 months of age. Breastfeeding while introducing new foods may reduce T1DM risk. PMID:23836309

  14. Bone loss in women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    tanderup joergensen, maj-britt; christensen, jesper olund; Svendsen, Ole Lander

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although osteoporosis has been investigated and debated in the diabetic population over the past decades, very little is known about the spontaneous changes in bone mineral density (BMD) and biochemical markers of bone turnover in pre- and postmenopausal type 1 diabetic (T1DM) women...... postmenopausal) were reexamined in 1997. Method: BMD was measured at femoral neck (f.n.), spine (L2 - L4), total body and forearm with DXA or SXA in 53 T1DM women. 4 years later a re-scan was carried out on 35 T1DM. Results: In premenopausal subjects a yearly decrease less than 1% at f.n., spine, forearm...... over time. Aim: To measure spontaneous changes in BMD and biochemical markers of bone turnover in pre- and postmenopausal T1DM women. Subjects: 53 T1DM women (31 premenopausal and 22 postmenopausal) from the outpatient clinic were enrolled in the study in 1993 and 35 (22 premenopausal, 13...

  15. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonelli, Francesco; Giudici, Francesco; Giusti, Francesca; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed the literature about entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome (MEN1) to clarify their demographic features, localization imaging, practice, and appropriate therapeutical strategies, analyzing the current approach to entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1. Despite the fact that hyperparathyroidism is usually the first manifestation of MEN1, the penetrance of these tumors is similar. They are characterized by multiplicity of lesions, variable expression of the tumors, and propensity for malignant degeneration. Both the histological type and the size of MEN1 neuroendocrine tumors correlate with malignancy. Monitoring of pancreatic peptides and use of imaging exams allow early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment, resulting in prevention of metastatic disease and improvement of long-term survival. Surgery is often the treatment of choice for MEN1-neuroendocrine tumors. The rationale for surgical approach is to curtail malignant progression of the disease, and to cure the associated biochemical syndrome, should it be present

  16. Endocrine function in 97 patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Mette Cathrine; Arlien-Søborg, P; Duno, M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the endocrine function and its association to number of CTG repeats in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Concentration of various hormones and metabolites in venous blood was used to assess the endocrine function in 97 patients with DM1...... LH, but normal testosterone levels, indicating relative insufficiency. Numbers of CTG repeats correlated directly with plasma PTH, phosphate, LH, and tended to correlate with plasma testosterone for males. This is the largest study of endocrine dysfunction in a cohort of Caucasian patients with DM1....... We found that patients with DM1 have an increased risk of abnormal endocrine function, particularly calcium metabolism disorders. However, the endocrine dysfunction appears not to be of clinical significance in all of the cases. Finally, we found correlations between CTG(n) expansion size and plasma...

  17. [Eating disorders in young adolescents with type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Reyna, Norma I; Gussinyer, Sandra; Raich, Rosa M; Gussinyer, Miquel; Tomàs, Josep; Carrascosa, Antonio

    2004-05-15

    We aimed at determining the prevalence of eating disorders (ED) in young adolescents with type 1 diabetes. 60 boys and 38 girls with type 1 diabetes and 321 boys and 254 girls, age-matched non-diabetic controls. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-40) and semistructured diagnostic interview on Eating Disorders Examination (EDE) were used. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin and insulin manipulation for weight loss were evaluated. No anorexia or bulimia were found in diabetic patients and non-diabetic controls. Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS) were more prevalent in diabetic patients than in controls, both in boys (1.7% vs 0.9%; odds ratio [OR] = 1.7; CI 95%, 0.2-17.6) and girls (5.3% vs 1.6%; OR = 3.2; CI 95%, 0.6-17.2). Sub-threshold ED were more common in male diabetic patients than in non-diabetic peers (10% vs 4.4%; OR = 2.4; CI 95%, 0.9-6.6), and in female diabetic patients than in non-diabetic peers (10.5% vs 9.9%; OR = 1.1; CI 95%, 0.4-3.2). No statistical differences were found regarding these results. Glycated hemoglobin values were higher in diabetic patients with ED (9.7% [1.52]; 5.6 [2.8], n = 13) than in those without ED (8.4% [1.5]; 5.1 [2.7], n = 85); p = 0.049. Nine diabetic patients (9.1%) manipulated insulin for weight loss. EDNOS were more prevalent in male and female diabetic patients than in non-diabetic peers. Sub-threshold ED were more prevalent in male diabetic patients than in non-diabetic peers, with no differences between female diabetic patients and their non-diabetic peers.

  18. Investigation on Carbohydrate Counting Method in Type 1 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Son

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The results from Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT have propounded the importance of the approach of treatment by medical nutrition when treating diabetes mellitus (DM. During this study, we tried to inquire carbohydrate (Kh count method’s positive effects on the type 1 DM treatment’s success as well as on the life quality of the patients. Methods. 22 of 37 type 1 DM patients who applied to Eskişehir Osmangazi University, Faculty of Medicine Hospital, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, had been treated by Kh count method and 15 of them are treated by multiple dosage intensive insulin treatment with applying standard diabetic diet as a control group and both of groups were under close follow-up for 6 months. Required approval was taken from the Ethical Committee of Eskişehir Osmangazi University, Medical Faculty, as well as informed consent from the patients. The body weight of patients who are treated by carbohydrate count method and multiple dosage intensive insulin treatment during the study beginning and after 6-month term, body mass index, and body compositions are analyzed. A short life quality and medical research survey applied. At statistical analysis, t-test, chi-squared test, and Mann-Whitney U test were used. Results. There had been no significant change determined at glycemic control indicators between the Kh counting group and the standard diabetic diet and multiple dosage insulin treatment group in our study. Conclusion. As a result, Kh counting method which offers a flexible nutrition plan to diabetic individuals is a functional method.

  19. Health Care Transition in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Katharine C.; Wolpert, Howard A.; Rhodes, Erinn T.; Laffel, Lori M.; Kleinman, Ken; Beste, Margaret G.; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I.; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine characteristics of the transition from pediatric to adult care in emerging adults with type 1 diabetes and evaluate associations between transition characteristics and glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We developed and mailed a survey to evaluate the transition process in emerging adults with type 1 diabetes, aged 22 to 30 years, receiving adult diabetes care at a single center. Current A1C data were obtained from the medical record. RESULTS The response rate was 53% (258 of 484 eligible). The mean transition age was 19.5 ± 2.9 years, and 34% reported a gap >6 months in establishing adult care. Common reasons for transition included feeling too old (44%), pediatric provider suggestion (41%), and college (33%). Less than half received an adult provider recommendation and 6 months between pediatric and adult care (adjusted odds ratio 0.47 [95% CI 0.25–0.88]). In multivariate analysis, pretransition A1C (β = 0.49, P < 0.0001), current age (β = −0.07, P = 0.03), and education (β = −0.55, P = 0.01) significantly influenced current posttransition A1C. There was no independent association of transition preparation with posttransition A1C (β = −0.17, P = 0.28). CONCLUSIONS Contemporary transition practices may help prevent gaps between pediatric and adult care but do not appear to promote improvements in A1C. More robust preparation strategies and handoffs between pediatric and adult care should be evaluated. PMID:22699289

  20. The management of type 1 diabetes in Australian primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Anne; Wilson, Valerie; Crisp, Jackie

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the management of type 1 diabetes in Australian primary schools: kindergarten-Year 2, from the parent's perspective. The study questions were: What diabetes treatment is being delivered? Who is providing the treatment? Where is the treatment given? A cross sectional, descriptive approach was used to collect data from parents (66) of children with type 1 diabetes attending an Australian primary school (kindergarten-Year 2). An online self-administered questionnaire was designed in Survey Monkey and was available via a dedicated Facebook page. Data were analysed using statistical analysis (SPSSv21). Blood glucose testing was occurring for all children, with 49% of children self testing. 77% of children were receiving an insulin bolus or injection at school. 34% was provided by the child and 53% of insulin was given via pump. Teachers, parents and teacher's aides also provided insulin at school. There was a statistically significant association between the number of children receiving insulin at school and the insulin delivery device, χ(2 )= 16.75, df = 1, p ≤ 0.000). Children using insulin pump therapy were more likely (97%) to receive insulin at school than children who used injections (55%). Children who were able to self-administer insulin were more likely to receive insulin (93%) at school than children who were unable to self-administer insulin (65%) (χ(2 )= 7.38, df = 1, p = 0.007) 81% of children received diabetes treatment in the classroom, with the remainder in the school administration office. Insulin administration across Australian primary schools was inconsistent. Not all children were receiving the recommended insulin treatment. Insulin pump therapy appears to increase access to this treatment at school.

  1. ECHOGRAPHIC PICTURE OF OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA IN NEUROFIBROMATOSIS TYPE-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kuzmanović

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Authors want to present echographic picture of orbital part of low-grade pilocytic astrocytoma involving the optic nerve and/or chiasm and optic tract (optic pathway glioma or visual pathway glioma.Methods. 4 children with neurofibromatosis type-1 complicated with optic pathway glioma diagnosed earlier with magnetic resonance were examined by ultrasound. Standardised A-scan technique was used for optic nerve width measurement. The 30° test and B-scan (axial, transverse and longitudinal sections of both eyes and orbits were performed as well.Results. The optic nerve diameter in our cases ranged from 4.48 to 8.5 mm. Two children had the left side optic pathway glioma, one boy had the right side optic pathway glioma and in one tumour was bilateral. The transversal section of the nerve revealed dark oval and in more perpendicular sections round void of the nerve. As the beam is swept towards the orbital apex void becomes more fusiform. The nerve and its sheaths are markedly widened. An abnormal increase in reflectivity and irregularity of the spike’s pattern is exhibited as well. No calcification along the sheaths is noticed. The transverse section of the tumour demonstrated an »inverse doughnut« sign. The outer whiter outline of the widened sheaths surrounds an inner darker circle. The longitudinal section revealed the optic nerve head continuing into the widened optic nerve. The 30° test was negative. The differential diagnosis of meningeoma, optic neuritis and orbital cysticercosis should be considered.Conclusions. Ultrasound as a cheap, safe, easily repeatable imaging method should become a method of choice for screening optic nerve tumours in neurofibromatosis type-1, especially in children, as well as for follow-up after treatment.

  2. Comparison of cartilage graft and fascia in type 1 tympanoplasty: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Wu, Xuewen; Peng, Xiaofei; Zhang, Yanni; Xie, Shaobing; Sun, Hong

    2016-11-01

    Tympanoplasty using cartilage grafts has a better graft take rate than that using temporalis fascia grafts. There are no significant differences between cartilage grafts and temporalis fascia grafts for hearing outcomes. Contrary to the sliced cartilage sub-group, full-thickness cartilage grafts generate better hearing outcomes than temporalis fascia grafts. Tympanic membrane perforation can cause middle ear relapsing infection and lead to hearing damage. Various techniques have been applied in order to reconstruct the tympanic membrane. Recently, cartilage grafts and temporalis fascia grafts have been widely used for tympanic membrane closure. A systemic review and meta-analysis was carried out based on published retrospective trials that investigated the efficacy of cartilage grafts and temporalis fascia grafts in type 1 tympanoplasty. Both graft take rates and mean AIR-BONE-GAP gains were analyzed. Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Embase were systematically searched. After a scientific investigation, we extracted the relevant data following our selection criteria. Odds ratio (OR) of graft take rates and mean difference (MD) of AIR-BONE-GAP gains were calculated within 95% confidence intervals. Eight eligible articles with 915 patients were reviewed. The pooled OR for graft take rate was 3.11 (95% CI =1.94-5.00; p = 0.43) and the difference between the two groups was significant, which means that the cartilage grafts group got a better graft take rate than the temporalis fascia grafts group. The pooled MD for mean AIR-BONE-GAP gain was 1.92 (95% CI = -0.12-3.95; p fascia grafts group. On the contrary, the pooled MD of sliced cartilage grafts sub-group was 0.12 (95% CI = -0.44-0.69; p = 0.61) and there was no significant difference between the sliced cartilage grafts and temporalis fascia group.

  3. Detergent extraction of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D by zwitterionic and non-ionic detergents and purification by ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling-Wester, S; Feijlbrief, M; Koedijk, DGAM; Welling, GW

    1998-01-01

    Detergents (surfactants) are the key reagents in the extraction and purification of integral membrane proteins. Zwitterionic and non-ionic detergents were used for the extraction of recombinant glycoprotein D (gD-1) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) from insect cells infected with recombinant

  4. Membranous nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... check for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis Complement levels Cryoglobulin test Treatment The goal of treatment ... not as helpful for people with membranous nephropathy. Medicines used treat membranous nephropathy include: Angiotensin-converting enzyme ( ...

  5. The Type 1 Diabetes - HLA Susceptibility Interactome - Identification of HLA Genotype-Specific Disease Genes for Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsson, C.; Hansen, Niclas Tue; Bergholdt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The individual contribution of genes in the HLA region to the risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D) is confounded by the high linkage disequilibrium (LD) in this region. Using a novel approach we have combined genetic association data with information on functional protein......-protein interactions to elucidate risk independent of LD and to place the genetic association into a functional context. Methodology/Principal Findings: Genetic association data from 2300 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HLA region was analysed in 2200 T1D family trios divided into six risk groups based...... on HLA-DRB1 genotypes. The best SNP signal in each gene was mapped to proteins in a human protein interaction network and their significance of clustering in functional network modules was evaluated. The significant network modules identified through this approach differed between the six HLA risk groups...

  6. Chiari type 1 malformation in Neurofibromatosis type 1: experience of a center and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraglia, E; Fabbrini, G; Di Biasi, C; Iacovino, C; Ferrazzano, G; Gualdi, G; Calvieri, S; Giustini, S

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the possible correlation and the true incidence between Neurofibromatosis type 1 and Arnold-Chiari malformation type I. We reviewed all clinical charts, neurological consultations and MRI scans of 428 NF1 patients followed by 1994 to 2014 in our Department. NF1 patients in our clinic are seen usually every year by both the dermatologist and the neurologist. All patients also undergo a brain and spinal cord with the same 1.5 Tesla MRI scan. We found a diagnosis of Arnold Chiari malformation type I in 9 of the 428 NF1 cases (2%). This frequency is higher than that expected on the basis of a chance association. Therefore we underline the importance of serial MRI studies in patients with NF1 to assess the presence of cranio-cervical anomalies. Future studies should try to better understand what are the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this close association.

  7. Synergy between type 1 fimbriae expression and C3 opsonisation increases internalisation of E. coli by human tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhou, Wuding; Hong, Yuzhi; Sacks, Steven H; Sheerin, Neil S

    2009-03-31

    Bacterial infection of the urinary tract is a common clinical problem with E. coli being the most common urinary pathogen. Bacterial uptake into epithelial cells is increasingly recognised as an important feature of infection. Bacterial virulence factors, especially fimbrial adhesins, have been conclusively shown to promote host cell invasion. Our recent study reported that C3 opsonisation markedly increases the ability of E. coli strain J96 to internalise into human proximal tubular epithelial cells via CD46, a complement regulatory protein expressed on host cell membrane. In this study, we further assessed whether C3-dependent internalisation by human tubular epithelial cells is a general feature of uropathogenic E. coli and investigated features of the bacterial phenotype that may account for any heterogeneity. In 31 clinical isolates of E. coli tested, C3-dependent internalisation was evident in 10 isolates. Type 1 fimbriae mediated-binding is essential for C3-dependent internalisation as shown by phenotypic association, type 1 fimbrial blockade with soluble ligand (mannose) and by assessment of a type 1 fimbrial mutant. we propose that efficient internalisation of uropathogenic E. coli by the human urinary tract depends on co-operation between type 1 fimbriae-mediated adhesion and C3 receptor -ligand interaction.

  8. [Anxiety disorders in type 1 neurofibromatosis: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekih-Romdhane, F; Othman, S; Sahnoun, C; Helayem, S; Abbes, Z; Bouden, A

    2015-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also known as Von Recklinghausen disease, is one of the most frequent human genetic diseases, with a prevalence of one case in 3000 births, an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, and a high rate of new mutations. NF1 has markedly variable clinical expression, with manifestations ranging from mild lesions to several complications and functional impairment. The complications are age-specific. Psychiatric disorders are more frequent in NF1 than in the general population, especially in children. They include dysthymia, depressive mood, anxiety, and personality disorders. Bipolar mood disorders or schizophrenia are rather rare. The majority of studies have focused on physical health and neurocognitive function in NF1, whereas psychiatric disorders associated with this disease remain unclear and poorly documented. This report is based on a clinical case and discusses the relationship between neurofibromatosis type 1 and psychiatric disorders, particularly anxiety disorders. This case concerns a 13-year-old girl, the first child of healthy and non-consanguineous parents. The patient's history showed normal psychomotor and psychoaffective development. Her father and paternal grandmother had isolated café-au-lait spots. In June 2013, a subcutaneous mass appeared in her right thigh. She consulted a neurologist and was explored. The physical examination revealed signs of NF1. She had café-au-lait spots on the trunk and extremities, and a neurofibroma in the right thigh. Bilateral ophthalmic examination revealed multiple Lish nodules. After 1 month, a psychiatric consultation was requested for sad mood and night terrors. Obsessive compulsive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were diagnosed according to the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition. The current psychiatric literature does not provide full explanations of anxiety symptoms associated with NF1. Some authors have tried to explain

  9. Genetic heterogeneity of usher syndrome type 1 in French families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larget-Piet, D.; Gerber, S.; Rozet, J.M. (INSERM, Paris (France)); Bonneau, D. (Clinique Medicale Infantile, Poitiers (France)); Marc, S.; Weissenbach, J. (Genethon, Evry (France)); Ghazi, I.; Dufier, J.L. (Hopital Laeennec, Paris (France)); David, A. (Service de Pediatrie III, Nantes (France)); Bitoun, P. (Service de Pediatrie, Bondy (France)) (and others)

    1994-05-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 (US1) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by profound congenital hearing impairment with unintelligible speech, early retinitis pigmentosa, and constant vestibular dysfunction. Three localizations have been described in US1: USH1A, 14q32; USH1B, 11q13.5; and USH1C, 11p15. Studying a series of 33 affected individuals belonging to 20 US1 pedigrees of French ancestry, the authors found that none of the three localizations accounted for all US1 families in the series. However, when the sample was split into two groups according to the geographic origin of the probands' grandparents, they were able to confirm the presence of a gene for US1 on chromosome 14q32 (USH1A) in 9 families originating from the Poitou region in Western France. Moreover, they refined the genetic mapping of USH1A by showing that the disease gene maps to the D14S13 locus, within the genetic interval defined by loci D14S78 and D14S250 (location score in log base 10 = 4.90). Consistent with this, nonsignificant lod score values for linkage to either USH1B or USH1C were found in this group. With regard to US1 families of other geographic origin (Normandy and Northern France, 11 families), nonsignificant lod scores for linkage to chromosome 11q13.5 were observed. However, the HOMOG test suggested that USH1B might account for the disease in 9/11 families in the series (families 10-19), the latter two families possibly being accounted for by USH1C (maximum likelihood for heterogeneity = 7.91 in lnL; heterogeneity versus homogeneity, P = 0.01; heterogeneity versus nonlinkage, P < 0.01). The present study supports the view that Usher syndrome type 1 is a genetically heterogeneous condition that is caused by at least three genes and possibly many more. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Increasing Type 1 Poliovirus Capsid Stability by Thermal Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Oluwapelumi O.; Nicol, Clare

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by poliovirus (PV). It can result in paralysis and may be fatal. Integrated global immunization programs using live-attenuated oral (OPV) and/or inactivated (IPV) PV vaccines have systematically reduced its spread and paved the way for eradication. Immunization will continue posteradication to ensure against reintroduction of the disease, but there are biosafety concerns for both OPV and IPV. They could be addressed by the production and use of virus-free virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines that mimic the “empty” capsids (ECs) normally produced in viral infection. Although ECs are antigenically indistinguishable from mature virus particles, they are less stable and readily convert into an alternative conformation unsuitable for vaccine purposes. Stabilized ECs, expressed recombinantly as VLPs, could be ideal candidate vaccines for a polio-free world. However, although genome-free PV ECs have been expressed as VLPs in a variety of systems, their inherent antigenic instability has proved a barrier to further development. In this study, we selected thermally stable ECs of type 1 PV (PV-1). The ECs are antigenically stable at temperatures above the conversion temperature of wild-type (wt) virions. We have identified mutations on the capsid surface and in internal networks that are responsible for EC stability. With reference to the capsid structure, we speculate on the roles of these residues in capsid stability and postulate that such stabilized VLPs could be used as novel vaccines. IMPORTANCE Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by PV and is on the verge of eradication. There are biosafety concerns about reintroduction of the disease from current vaccines that require live virus for production. Recombinantly expressed virus-like particles (VLPs) could address these inherent problems. However, the genome-free capsids (ECs) of wt PV are unstable and readily change antigenicity to a form not

  11. Whole body MR imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meerbeeck, S.F.L. van [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: stephen.vm@rad-vanmeerbeeck.be; Verstraete, K.L. [Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent University, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: koenraad.verstraete@ugent.be; Janssens, S.; Mortier, G. [Department of Medical Genetics, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2009-02-15

    Objective: To assess the value of whole body MR imaging in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Materials and methods: 24 patients (15-59 years; mean and median 36 years; 7 males; 17 females) with genetically proven neurofibromatosis type 1 were examined with whole body MR imaging. Axial and coronal T1- and fat-suppressed T2-weighted images (slice thickness 6-12 mm) were acquired on a 1.5 T MR unit (Symphony; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The images were reviewed by 2 radiologists: 1 senior, 1 junior. The criterion for a neurofibroma was a mass lesion with low signal intensity on T1 and high signal intensity on T2, along the course of a nerve. The location, size, general morphology and course along plexuses and nerves were evaluated. Cutaneous and subcutaneous neurofibromas were defined as 'superficial' neurofibromas. The other neurofibromas were regarded as 'deep' neurofibromas. Results: There were no major problems to differentiate neurofibromas from lymph nodes, vessels or cysts. The latter three were easily recognised by their typical shape and location, whereas neurofibromas occurred in regions where no mass lesion was anatomically expected. There was no relation between age and total number of neurofibromas throughout the body. Classification according to location and number of neurofibromas: 8 patients had only superficial neurofibromas, 1 only deep and 15 both superficial and deep lesions. Twelve patients had less than 15 neurofibromas and 12 had more. Classification according to course: in 8 patients the neurofibromas occurred along plexuses or proximal part of the intercostal nerves; in 16 patients the lesions were more peripheral. Classification according to morphology: 4 patients had plexiform neurofibromas and 20 patients had multiple solitary lesions. Twelve of these 20 patients had less than 15 lesions, and 8 had more. In 2 patients multiple solitary neurofibromas occurred along the nerve in a chain configuration. In one

  12. Membrane Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ashrafuzzaman, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Physics, mathematics and chemistry all play a vital role in understanding the true nature and functioning of biological membranes, key elements of living processes. Besides simple spectroscopic observations and electrical measurements of membranes we address in this book the phenomena of coexistence and independent existence of different membrane components using various theoretical approaches. This treatment will be helpful for readers who want to understand biological processes by applying both simple observations and fundamental scientific analysis. It provides a deep understanding of the causes and effects of processes inside membranes, and will thus eventually open new doors for high-level pharmaceutical approaches towards fighting membrane- and cell-related diseases.

  13. Evidence of changes in renal charge selectivity in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kverneland, A; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Vidal, P

    1986-01-01

    Altered filtration of macromolecules due to decreased electrical charge of the glomerular basement membrane might be the initial step in the development of albuminuria in patients with Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. We therefore investigated the selectivity index, i.e. renal...... clearance of non-glycated plasma albumin/clearance of glycated plasma albumin in 38 patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. The two albumin molecules differed slightly in charge, non-enzymatic glycated albumin being more anionic at physiological pH compared with unmodified plasma albumin. Glycated albumin...... in plasma and urine was determined by a specific, sensitive and highly reproducible chromatographic procedure. In diabetic patients with normal urinary albumin excretion, the selectivity index was increased three-fold compared with that of non-diabetic subjects (2 p less than 0.01). A significant...

  14. Molecular pathogenesis of long QT syndrome type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wu, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1 is a subtype of a congenital cardiac syndrome caused by mutation in the KCNQ1 gene, which encodes the α-subunit of the slow component of delayed rectifier K+ current (IKs channel. Arrhythmias in LQT1 are characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, as well as the occurrence of life-threatening cardiac events, frequently triggered by adrenergic stimuli (e.g., physical or emotional stress. During the past two decades, much advancement has been made in understanding the molecular pathogenesis underlying LQT1. Uncovering the genotype-phenotype correlations in LQT1 is of clinical importance to better understand the gene-specific differences that may influence the propensity for developing life-threatening arrhythmias under specific conditions. Elucidation of these mechanisms will also help to improve the diagnosis and management of this cardiac disorder based on gene-specific considerations. This review describes the current medical consensus and recent developments regarding the molecular pathogenesis of LQT1 and provides a novel insight into the adrenergic regulation of this disease.

  15. Eating disorders in young women with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodin, Gary; Olmsted, Marion P; Rydall, Anne C; Maharaj, Sherry I; Colton, Patricia A; Jones, Jennifer M; Biancucci, Lisa A; Daneman, Denis

    2002-10-01

    Research findings from the past decade regarding the association of type 1 diabetes mellitus and eating disorders are critically reviewed in this paper. Although there has been much debate regarding the specificity of this association, a recent large multisite case-controlled study demonstrated that the prevalence rates of both full syndrome and subthreshold eating disorders among adolescent and young adult women with diabetes are twice as high as in their nondiabetic peers. Further, a 4-year follow-up study showed that disordered eating behavior in young women with diabetes often persists and is associated with a threefold increase in the risk of diabetic retinopathy. These eating disturbances tend to be associated with impaired family functioning and with poor diabetes management. Health care professionals should maintain a high index of suspicion for the presence of an eating disturbance among young women with diabetes, particularly among those with persistently poor metabolic control and/or weight and shape concerns. Screening for such disturbances should begin during the prepubertal period among girls with diabetes. A brief psychoeducational intervention leads to a reduction in disturbed eating attitudes and behavior but is not sufficient to improve metabolic control. More intensive treatment approaches, which should include a family-based component, may be needed to improve metabolic control. The evaluation of these and other treatment approaches is indicated in view of the serious short- and long-term health risks associated with eating disorders in young women with diabetes.

  16. Fatal acute retropharyngeal hemorrhage in neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyron, Pierre-Antoine; Pollanen, Michael S

    2017-12-01

    We report the sudden death of a woman with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The decedent developed acute respiratory distress and died rapidly despite an emergent cricothyroidotomy. An autopsy with postmortem CT scan was performed to determine the cause of the fatal respiratory collapse and to determine if death was related to neurofibromatosis. Postmortem examination revealed the classical external hallmarks of neurofibromatosis, including innumerable cutaneous neurofibromas. In addition, there was a massive retropharyngeal hematoma with fatal extrinsic compression of the airway. On macroscopic examination A localized 3 cm diameter tumor nodule was found in the soft tissues of the neck. Histologic examination of the nodule revealed a neurofibroma. In addition, histologic sections of the hematoma and surrounding soft tissues revealed plexiform neurofibroma with infiltration of the walls of small blood vessels and of the right vertebral artery. The fatal retropharyngeal hemorrhage was caused by diffuse infiltration of the blood vessels of the neck by plexiform neurofibroma. We concluded that the underlying cause of death was NF1. This case underscores the protean nature of neurofibroma, particularly when diffuse interstitial hemorrhage is present. Infiltration of soft tissues by neurofibroma may only be detectable on histologic examination.

  17. Posttraumatic stress symptoms in children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes

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    Şişmanlar Şahika G

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies consistently found remarkable rates of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS in children with chronic diseases. But, only one study had searched PTSS in children with diabetes, until now. So, the present study aimed to examine incidence rate and predictors of PTSS in children with type 1 diabetes. Method PTSS were evaluated by Child Posttraumatic Stress Reaction Index in fifty four children with diabetes (aged between 8–18 years. This assessment was based on hypoglycaemia as the potential traumatic event. Children were also introduced a brief questionnaire about demographic and disease related information. Some other information was obtained from families, medical stuff and records. Among 54 children, forty two had complete information. Hence, to evaluate possible predictive factors related with PTSS, multiple regression analysis was conducted for 42 children. Results 18.5% of children were reported PTSS at severe or very severe level, and 51.9% were reported PTSS at moderate level or above. Multiple regression analyses were shown that child PTSS were not significantly related with possible predictive factors other than number of hypoglycaemic attacks for the last month. Conclusion The study results support that posttraumatic stress symptoms are not rarely seen in paediatric patients with diabetes, and even if not severe, hypoglycaemic attacks may be perceived as traumatic by the children with diabetes. But, because of some limitations, the results should be carefully interpreted.

  18. Autophagy induction by histone deacetylase inhibitors inhibits HIV type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Grant R; Bruckman, Rachel S; Chu, Yen-Lin; Spector, Stephen A

    2015-02-20

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are being evaluated in a "shock-and-kill" therapeutic approach to reverse human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) latency from CD4(+) T cells. Using this approach, HDACi have induced HIV RNA synthesis in latently infected cells from some patients. The hope is that the increase in viral production will lead to killing of the infected cell either by the virus itself or by the patient's immune system, a "sterilizing cure." Although administered within the context of combination antiretroviral therapy, the infection of bystander cells remains a concern. In this study, we investigated the effect of HDACi (belinostat, givinostat, panobinostat, romidepsin, and vorinostat) on the productive infection of macrophages. We demonstrate that the HDACi tested do not alter the initial susceptibility of macrophages to HIV infection. However, we demonstrate that HDACi decrease HIV release from macrophages in a dose-dependent manner (belinostat the canonical autophagy pathway. This mechanism involves unc-51-like autophagy-activating kinase 1 (ULK1) and the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin and requires the formation of autophagosomes and their maturation into autolysosomes in the absence of increased cell death. These data provide further evidence in support of a role for autophagy in the control of HIV infection and suggest that careful consideration of off-target effects will be essential if HDACi are to be a component of a multipronged approach to eliminate latently infected cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Bergmann glia are reduced in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwaku, Hiroki; Yagishita, Saburo; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Okazawa, Hitoshi

    2013-08-07

    Non-cell-autonomous pathology involving glial cells has been implicated in Purkinje cell degeneration. We reported previously that mutant ataxin-1, a causative gene product of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), prevents Bergmann glia proliferation in mutant ataxin-1 knockin mice and that suppressed Bergmann glia function leads to Purkinje cell degeneration. However, because reactive astrocytes are produced in response to brain injuries and diseases, Bergmann glia are also suspected to proliferate and increase in response to Purkinje cell degeneration, including during SCA1 pathogenesis. However, little is known about reactive Bergmann glia (Bergmann gliosis) and its beneficial or detrimental role. Given the lack of quantitative studies of Bergmann glia using specific molecular markers, we quantified Bergmann glia in human SCA1 brains with Bergmann glia-specific Sox2 staining and conventional hematoxylin and eosin staining. Our results showed reduced numbers of Bergmann glia in SCA1 patient brains and support the hypothesis that Bergmann glia loss contributes toward Purkinje cell degeneration in human SCA1.

  20. Obesity, insulin resistance, and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Sarit; Ellis, Samuel L

    2015-08-01

    To summarize recent studies about obesity, insulin resistance, and type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Overweight and obesity continue to be prevalent among individuals with T1DM. Obesity rates appear to have reached a plateau among children with T1DM in some parts of the world. The risk for development of T1DM is increased by obesity and may occur at an earlier age among obese individuals with a predisposition. Obesity increases the risk for comorbidities among individuals with T1DM, especially metabolic syndrome, and microvascular and macrovascular diseases. Metformin, glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist therapy, sodium glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor therapy, and bariatric surgery may be beneficial therapies for glucose control, comorbidity management, and obesity among adults with T1DM. Insulin resistance may be improved among obese individuals with T1DM by biguanides (metformin) and glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists (exenatide). We review the last 18 months of literature on obesity, insulin resistance, and T1DM to highlight new epidemiologic results and treatments.

  1. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection Associated with Atrial Myxoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwen; Pan, Zhigang; Ji, Yuan; Sheppard, Mary; Jeffries, Donald J.; Archard, Leonard C.; Zhang, Hongyi

    2003-01-01

    Some findings suggest an infectious factor in cardiac myxoma and certain histopathological features indicate herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. We hypothesized that HSV-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac myxoma. Paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 17 patients with atrial myxoma were investigated for HSV-1 antigen by immunohistochemistry and viral genomic DNA by nested polymerase chain reaction. The histogenesis and oncogenesis of atrial myxoma were assessed by the expression of calretinin, Ki67, and p53 protein, respectively. Autopsy myocardial samples, including endocardium from 12 patients who died by accident or other conditions, were used for comparison. HSV-1 antigen was detected in atrial myxoma from 12 of 17 patients: 8 of these 12 samples were positive also for HSV-1 DNA. No HSV-1 antigen or DNA was found in tissue from the comparison group. Antigens of HSV-2, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus were not found in atrial myxoma. Calretinin was found in myxoma cells of all 17 cases but Ki67 was present only in smooth muscle cells or infiltrating cells in some cases. p53 was not detectable in any myxoma. Most infiltrating cells were cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These data suggest that HSV-1 infection is associated with some cases of sporadic atrial myxoma and that these may result from a chronic inflammatory lesion of endocardium. PMID:14633612

  2. Physical Activity in Adolescent Females with Type 1 Diabetes

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    Bahareh Schweiger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We sought to identify amount of physical activity and relationship of physical activity to glycemic control among adolescent females 11 to 19 years of age with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. We also sought to evaluate associations of age and ethnicity with physical activity levels. Research Design and Methods. Adolescent females ages 11–19 years (n=203 were recruited during their outpatient diabetes appointment. Physical activity was obtained by self-report and was categorized as the number of days subjects had accumulated 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity during the past 7 days and for a typical week. Results. Girls reported being physically active for at least 60 minutes per day on 2.7±2.3 days in the last week, and on 3.1±2.2 days in a typical week. A greater number of physically active days in a typical week were associated with lower A1c (P=.049 in linear regression analysis. Conclusion. Adolescent females with T1DM report exercising for at least 60 minutes about 3 days per week, which does not meet the international recommendations of 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous activity per day. It is particularly important that adolescent girls with T1DM be encouraged to exercise since a greater number of physically active days per week is associated with better glycemic control.

  3. Preventing microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with complications of diabetes such as retinopathy, nephropathy, and cardiovascular complications have increased hospital stay with greater economic burden. Prevention of complications should be started before the onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM by working on risk factors and thereafter by intervention upon confirmatory diagnosis which can prevent further damage to β-cells. The actual risk of getting microvascular complications like microalbuminuria and retinopathy progression starts at glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c level of 7%. As per the American Diabetes Association, a new pediatric glycemic control target of HbA1c 20 years as compared to patients <10 years of age. Screening of these complications should be done regularly, and appropriate preventive strategies should be followed. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blocker reduce progression from microalbuminuria to macroalbuminuria and increase the regression rate to normoalbuminuria. Diabetic microvascular complications can be controlled with tight glycemic therapy, dyslipidemia management and blood pressure control along with renal function monitoring, lifestyle changes, including smoking cessation and low-protein diet. An integrated and personalized care would reduce the risk of development of microvascular complications in T1DM patients. The child with diabetes who receives limited care is more likely to develop long-term complications at an earlier age. Screening for subclinical complications and early interventions with intensive therapy is the need of the hour.

  4. Alveolar macrophage dysregulation in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, Farshid N; Brantly, Mark L; Markello, Thomas C; Helip-Wooley, Amanda; O'Brien, Kevin; Hess, Richard; Huizing, Marjan; Gahl, William A; Gochuico, Bernadette R

    2009-12-01

    Individuals with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 1 (HPS-1), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by defective biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles, develop an accelerated form of progressive fibrotic lung disease. The etiology of pulmonary fibrosis associated with HPS-1 is unknown. To investigate the potential pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis in HPS-1, lung cells and proteins from individuals with HPS-1 were studied. Forty-one subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis were evaluated with pulmonary function tests, high-resolution computed tomography scan, and bronchoscopy. Bronchoalveolar lavage cells and analytes were analyzed. Concentrations of total bronchoalveolar lavage cells and alveolar macrophages were significantly higher in epithelial lining fluid from subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis compared with healthy research volunteers. Concentrations of cytokines and chemokines (i.e., monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) in alveolar epithelial lining fluid were significantly higher in subjects with HPS-1 with and without pulmonary fibrosis compared with healthy research volunteers (P system in which to study the pathogenesis and treatment of HPS pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. Insulin sensitizer prevents and ameliorates experimental type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valitsky, Michael; Hoffman, Amnon; Unterman, Terry; Bar-Tana, Jacob

    2017-12-01

    Insulin-dependent type-1 diabetes (T1D) is driven by autoimmune β-cell failure, whereas systemic resistance to insulin is considered the hallmark of insulin-independent type-2 diabetes (T2D). In contrast to this canonical dichotomy, insulin resistance appears to precede the overt diabetic stage of T1D and predict its progression, implying that insulin sensitizers may change the course of T1D. However, previous attempts to ameliorate T1D in animal models or patients by insulin sensitizers have largely failed. Sensitization to insulin by MEthyl-substituted long-chain DICArboxylic acid (MEDICA) analogs in T2D animal models surpasses that of current insulin sensitizers, thus prompting our interest in probing MEDICA in the T1D context. MEDICA efficacy in modulating the course of T1D was verified in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats and autoimmune nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. MEDICA treatment normalizes overt diabetes in STZ diabetic rats when added on to subtherapeutic insulin, and prevents/delays autoimmune T1D in NOD mice. MEDICA treatment does not improve β-cell insulin content or insulitis score, but its efficacy is accounted for by pronounced total body sensitization to insulin. In conclusion, potent insulin sensitizers may counteract genetic predisposition to autoimmune T1D and amplify subtherapeutic insulin into an effective therapeutic measure for the treatment of overt T1D. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Physical exercise in type 1 diabetes: recommendations and care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Paulo Gomes Mascarenhas

    Full Text Available Abstract The management of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is based on three pillars: insulin therapy, nutrition, and regular practice of physical activity. Physical exercises are associated with metabolic demands that depend on the individual's energy stores and level of physical conditioning, and vary according to environmental conditions and intensity, duration, and type of exercise. All these factors, added to eventual distress with competitions, exert influence on glucose metabolism. The athletic career of diabetic individuals is often hindered by a risk of hypoglycemia during and after the exercise, frequent hyperglycemia before, during, and after certain physical activities, occurrence of ketoacidosis, and presence of chronic microvascular and macrovascular complications. Aerobic exercises reduce the levels of blood glucose while anaerobic exercise may promote transient hyperglycemia. Although diabetic individuals may achieve excellence in sport, their physical performance should be maximized by strict blood glucose control, adequate modifications in insulin dose on the day of the exercise, and appropriate nutritional intake. This review discusses the impact of physical exercise on glucose metabolism, as well as nutritional considerations and strategies appropriate to the practice of physical exercises by patients with T1DM.

  7. Age-related findings on MRI in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, Deepak S. [Children' s Hospital at Westmead, The T. Y. Nelson Department of Neurology, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Hyman, Shelley L. [Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Neurogenetics Research Unit, Sydney (Australia); Steinberg, Adam [Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Department of Radiology, Sydney (Australia); North, Kathryn N. [Children' s Hospital at Westmead, The T. Y. Nelson Department of Neurology, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Children' s Hospital at Westmead, Neurogenetics Research Unit, Sydney (Australia)

    2006-10-15

    T2 hyperintensities (T2H) on MRI are the most common CNS lesions in individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The aim was to determine the frequency, signal characteristics and localization of T2H at different ages. In addition, we examined the sensitivity of different MR imaging sequences in detecting these lesions. We studied prospectively a cohort of children, adolescents and young adults with NF1 using T2-volume (T2-V) and conventional MRI sequences. Lesions were designated as either discrete or diffuse, and the region of signal abnormality was recorded. A total of 103 patients were studied (age range 8.0-25.4 years, mean 13.9 years). The frequency, size, and intensity of T2H decreased with age in the basal ganglia (BG) and the cerebellum/brainstem (CB/BS). The majority of thalamic and CB/BS lesions were diffuse. Of the total cohort, 80% had diffuse bilateral hippocampal hyperintensities and 18.4% had hemispheric lesions best demonstrated on FLAIR; there was no significant difference in the frequency or signal intensity of hemispheric lesions with age. Lesions in the cerebral hemispheres and hippocampus imaged by MR do not change in prevalence over time, suggesting a different pathological basis from the lesions in the in BG and CB/BS that resolve with age. FLAIR and T2-V sequences are more sensitive in detecting lesions than standard T2-weighted sequences. (orig.)

  8. Age-related findings on MRI in neurofibromatosis type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, Deepak S.; Hyman, Shelley L.; Steinberg, Adam; North, Kathryn N.

    2006-01-01

    T2 hyperintensities (T2H) on MRI are the most common CNS lesions in individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The aim was to determine the frequency, signal characteristics and localization of T2H at different ages. In addition, we examined the sensitivity of different MR imaging sequences in detecting these lesions. We studied prospectively a cohort of children, adolescents and young adults with NF1 using T2-volume (T2-V) and conventional MRI sequences. Lesions were designated as either discrete or diffuse, and the region of signal abnormality was recorded. A total of 103 patients were studied (age range 8.0-25.4 years, mean 13.9 years). The frequency, size, and intensity of T2H decreased with age in the basal ganglia (BG) and the cerebellum/brainstem (CB/BS). The majority of thalamic and CB/BS lesions were diffuse. Of the total cohort, 80% had diffuse bilateral hippocampal hyperintensities and 18.4% had hemispheric lesions best demonstrated on FLAIR; there was no significant difference in the frequency or signal intensity of hemispheric lesions with age. Lesions in the cerebral hemispheres and hippocampus imaged by MR do not change in prevalence over time, suggesting a different pathological basis from the lesions in the in BG and CB/BS that resolve with age. FLAIR and T2-V sequences are more sensitive in detecting lesions than standard T2-weighted sequences. (orig.)

  9. Multimodal imaging in neurofibromatosis type 1-associated nerve sheath tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, J.; Adam, G.; Mautner, V.F.; Derlin, T.

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a neurogenetic disorder. Individuals with NF1 may develop a variety of benign and malignant tumors of which peripheral nerve sheath tumors represent the most frequent entity. Plexiform neurofibromas may demonstrate a locally destructive growth pattern, may cause severe symptoms and may undergo malignant transformation into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs). Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents the reference standard for detection of soft tissue tumors in NF1. It allows for identification of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas, for assessment of local tumor extent, and for evaluation of whole-body tumor burden on T2-weighted imaging. Multiparametric MRI may provide a comprehensive characterization of different tissue properties of peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and may identify parameters associated with malignant transformation. Due to the absence of any radiation exposure, whole-body MRI may be used for serial follow-up of individuals with plexiform neurofibromas. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission-tomography (FDG PET/CT) allows a highly sensitive and specific detection of MPNST, and should be used in case of potential malignant transformation of a peripheral nerve sheath tumor. PET/CT provides a sensitive whole-body tumor staging. The use of contrast-enhanced CT for diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors is limited to special indications. To obtain the most precise readings, optimized examination protocols and dedicated radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians familiar with the complex and variable morphologies of peripheral nerve sheath tumors are required.

  10. Trials and tribulations of managing type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipin Sethi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM management tools are education, empowerment, insulin, and diet control. Exercise should be of moderate intensity so as to avoid hypoglycaemia. It is prudent to ensure that the required insulin levels are achieved in all children in order to manage the disorder well. The total daily dose of insulin may be 0.6-1.0 u/kg body weight, and it may be 2/3, 1/3 for split mixed insulin, and 50/50 for multiple subcutaneous injections. The dosages for the pump also vary from child to child. Basal bolus regimen is important and necessary in all T1DM children. It is not necessary to use all types of insulin analogs in all T1DM children, and the decision should depend on cost and delivery limiting factors. The advantages of using analogues are that some of these exhibit low hypoglycemic events (especially nocturnal events with basal insulin and a few offer flexibility of administration to patients (most prandial analogs and some basal analogs.

  11. [New insulin types in type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Jordi

    2015-07-20

    Since its discovery almost a century ago, insulin remains the mainstay of treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Although progress in the synthesis of new formulations has been remarkable, the physiological profile of insulin is still different from that observed with preparations available nowadays. In the last decade, the introduction into clinical practice of insulin analogues has allowed significantly improvement in glycemic control and has facilitated the spread of basal/bolus patterns, the most physiological ones until now. Despite the benefits of basal analogues, glycemia often varies considerably when used as a single daily injection and this is why new molecules have been further investigated. Improvement has been achieved especially in terms of duration and rate of hypoglycemia, the main limiting factor of intensive therapy. This article reviews the available data concerning the new basal insulin analogues, degludec, pegylated lispro and glargine U300, and new formulations currently under development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. E-learning in Type 1 Medical Universities of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher ROKNI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Nowadays the Internet is the technological pedestal of organization in the information society and one of the main applications that the Internet offers is the Digital Library (DL. Each society, especially those that claim training of the public, predictably need implementation and endorsement these systems. The time of chalk and board is passed and the globalization and universal village demands a movement targeting to establish an information society. The university is said to be responsible for making "Human". In the era of information explosion, how can a university rely on a physical classroom, a tired teacher and some drowsy students listening to him? Internet "the sweet invention of man" is a bridge, between "slump" and "spurt". It is up to each authority in a university to design, employ, develop and evaluate a system embracing Internet, Multimedia, Network and so on to go parallel in modern era and to introduce the supreme system of E-learning in its program. Of different aspects of E-learning including computer networks, multimedia, search engines, electronic libraries, distance learning, and all that (Piskurich, 2003, most of the type 1 medical universities of Iran exploit, some how or another, all or some of them. These universities including Tehran, Iran, Shahid Beheshti, Mashhad, Isfahan, Tabriz, Shiraz, Ahwaz, and Kerman, at present encompass a powerful link with their audiences regarding digital libraries, search engine and authentic data bases. The present article is going to have a bird's eye view at various capacities of these universities in this regard.

  13. Cognitive dysfunction and hippocampal changes in experimental type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Edgardo O; Beauquis, Juan; Revsin, Yanina; Banzan, Arturo M; Roig, Paulina; De Nicola, Alejandro F; Saravia, Flavia

    2009-03-02

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is accompanied by a "diabetic encephalopathy" including hypersensitivity to stress, increased risk of stroke, dementia and cognitive impairment. In previous works we reported several brain alterations including a strong decrease in hippocampal proliferation and survival in both spontaneous and streptozotocin-induced models of experimental T1D. The aim of this study was to explore in streptozotocin-treated mice and other parameters associated to mild neurodegeneration in the dentate gyrus and the potential correlation with behavioural changes. The neurogenic status, measured by doublecortin (DCX) expression, showed an important decline in the number of positive cells in the subgranular zone (SGZ). However, neuronal migration was not affected. We found a marked enhancement of intracellular lipofuscin deposits, characteristic of increased oxidative stress and aging in both, the hilus and the SGZ and granular cell layer (GCL). Diabetic mice showed a significant impairment in learning and memory tests, exhibiting a higher latency to show an escape response and a poorer learning efficiency of an active avoiding response compared with control mice. Both, exploratory and non-exploratory activities in a conflictive environment in the asymmetric elevated plus maze were not affected by the diabetic condition. In conclusion, experimental diabetes showed clear signs of changes in the dentate gyrus, changes similar to those present in the aging process. Correlatively, these alterations were in line with a reduced performance in learning and memory tests. The mechanism that could potentially link neural and behavioural disturbances is not yet fully comprehended.

  14. Oral microbiota in autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Siddiqui, Huma; Marthinussen, Mihaela Cuida; Chen, Tsute; Jonsson, Roland; Oftedal, Bergithe Eikeland; Olsen, Ingar; Husebye, Eystein Sverre; Wolff, Anette Bøe

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) is a rare, childhood onset disease caused by mutations in the Autoimmune Regulator gene. The phenotypic expression is highly variable and includes disease manifestations in the oral cavity, including mucocutaneous candidiasis. Increasing evidence suggests a potential role of the skin, oral and gut microbiotas in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. To date, no information exists regarding the oral microbiota in APS-1. Objective: To assess the bacterial microbiota of whole saliva in APS-1 patients by using high throughput sequencing. Design: Whole unstimulated saliva was collected from 10 APS-1 patients and 17 healthy controls and examined by high throughput sequencing of the hypervariable region V1-V2 of 16S rRNA using the 454 GS Junior system. Metastats (http://cbcb.umd.edu/software/metastats) was used to analyse the pyrosequencing reads. Results: A reduction in the total number of bacterial genera and species was detected in APS-1 compared to healthy controls. The proportion of the major phyla Firmicutes was higher (60% vs 41%, p = 0.002) and Bacteroidetes lower (15% vs 28%, p = 0.007) in APS-1 compared to healthy controls. On the genus level, Streptococcus and Gemella were prevalent in APS-1. Conclusion: Our findings indicate a significantly altered oral microbiota in APS-1. PMID:29503707

  15. Weight Management in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottalib, Adham; Kasetty, Megan; Mar, Jessica Y; Elseaidy, Taha; Ashrafzadeh, Sahar; Hamdy, Osama

    2017-08-23

    Patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are typically viewed as lean individuals. However, recent reports showed that their obesity rate surpassed that of the general population. Patients with T1D who show clinical signs of type 2 diabetes such as obesity and insulin resistance are considered to have "double diabetes." This review explains the mechanisms of weight gain in patients with T1D and how to manage it. Weight management in T1D can be successfully achieved in real-world clinical practice. Nutrition therapy includes reducing energy intake and providing a structured nutrition plan that is lower in carbohydrates and glycemic index and higher in fiber and lean protein. The exercise plan should include combination stretching as well as aerobic and resistance exercises to maintain muscle mass. Dynamic adjustment of insulin doses is necessary during weight management. Addition of anti-obesity medications may be considered. If medical weight reduction is not achieved, bariatric surgery may also be considered.

  16. Type 1 diabetes: identifying and evaluating patient injection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spray, Jennifer

    A diagnosis of type 1 diabetes is life changing, both physically and psychologically. This transformation requires a solid rapport between the patient and the diabetic specialist team to ensure the condition is managed successfully. Nevertheless, all general ward nurses should be aware of issues surrounding insulin administration, and thus participate in opportunistic identification, evaluation and empowerment of such patients when hospitalized. Patients that may be mismanaging their condition, irrespective of the length of diagnosis, would then be identified and referred appropriately to the specialist nurse before unnecessary complications arise. It is, however, evident that such measures are overlooked as a result of other constraints. This article explores how the ward is an ideal environment for identifying and evaluating the practical, physical and psychological components of patient insulin administration, through a direct observational approach. Discussion surrounding contributory barriers pertaining to its neglect, proactive implications for practice that potentially could overcome such issues, along with the underpinning pathophysiology, are addressed. Nurses will thus gain a greater perspective concerning the significance of routinely evaluating the competencies of patients' insulin administration within the ward environment.

  17. Apoptosis of pancreatic β-cells in Type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Tomita

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM results from autoimmune destruction of pancreatic β-cells after an asymptomatic period over years. Insulitis activates antigen presenting cells, which trigger activating CD4+ helper-T cells, releasing chemokines/cytokines. Cytokines activate CD8+ cytotoxic–T cells, which lead to β-cell destruction. Apoptosis pathway consists of extrinsic (receptor-mediated and intrinsic (mitochondria-driven pathway. Extrinsic pathway includes Fas pathway to CD4+-CD8+ interaction, whereas intrinsic pathway includes mitochondria-driven pathway at a balance between anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and pro-apoptotic Bad, Bid, and Bik proteins. Activated cleaved caspse-3 is the converging point between extrinsic and intrinsic pathway. Apoptosis takes place only when pro-apoptotic proteins exceed anti-apoptotic proteins. Since the concordance rate of T1DM in identical twins is about 50%, environmental factors are involved in the development of T1DM, opening a door to find means to detect and prevent further development of autoimmune β-cell destruction for a therapeutic application.

  18. Sleep disorders in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boentert, Matthias; Knop, Katharina; Schuhmacher, Christine; Gess, Burkhard; Okegwo, Angelika; Young, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS) have been reported in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) type 1A and axonal subtypes of CMT, respectively. The aim of this case-control study was to investigate both prevalence and severity of OSA, RLS and periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) in adult patients with genetically proven CMT1. 61 patients with CMT1 and 61 insomnic control subjects were matched for age, sex, and Body Mass Index. Neurological disability in patients with CMT was assessed using the Functional Disability Scale (FDS). RLS diagnosis was based on a screening questionnaire and structured clinical interviews. All participants underwent overnight polysomnography. OSA was present in 37.7% of patients with CMT1 and 4.9% of controls (psleep quality. In addition to known risk factors, CMT may predispose to OSA. RLS is highly prevalent not only in axonal subtypes of CMT but also in primarily demyelinating subforms of CMT. PLMS are common in CMT1, but do not significantly impair sleep quality.

  19. Scoliosis in a Case of Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem SOLAK

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1 is a multisystemic disease, manifesting as abnormalities ofthe nervous tissue, bones, soft tissue, and skin. The entity is dominantly inherited and affects 1in 4000 individuals. Cafe-au-lait spots, peripheral neurofibromas, Lisch nodules and axillaryfreckling are the characteristics of NF1. Bone abnormalities are usually observed in NF1. Scoliosis is a skeletal anomaly reported to beassociated with NF1. We made a diagnosis of NF1 and scoliosis secondary to NF1 in our 26-year-old male case with complaints of low back pain, a mass on his left hip beginning 10 yearsago and growing and with cafe-au-lait spots on his back. We think that, in daily practice, it isimportant to look for cafe-au-lait spots with inspection in the patients coming with the complaintof low back pain and when these spots are observed a diagnosis of NF1 should be suspected.Besides, we wanted to emphasize that scoliosis should be searched in the patients with adiagnosis of NF1 and low back pain.

  20. The mathematician's control toolbox for management of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csete, Marie; Doyle, John

    2014-10-06

    Blood glucose levels are controlled by well-known physiological feedback loops: high glucose levels promote insulin release from the pancreas, which in turn stimulates cellular glucose uptake. Low blood glucose levels promote pancreatic glucagon release, stimulating glycogen breakdown to glucose in the liver. In healthy people, this control system is remarkably good at maintaining blood glucose in a tight range despite many perturbations to the system imposed by diet and fasting, exercise, medications and other stressors. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) results from loss of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, the beta cells. These cells serve as both sensor (of glucose levels) and actuator (insulin/glucagon release) in a control physiological feedback loop. Although the idea of rebuilding this feedback loop seems intuitively easy, considerable control mathematics involving multiple types of control schema were necessary to develop an artificial pancreas that still does not function as well as evolved control mechanisms. Here, we highlight some tools from control engineering used to mimic normal glucose control in an artificial pancreas, and the constraints, trade-offs and clinical consequences inherent in various types of control schemes. T1DM can be viewed as a loss of normal physiologic controls, as can many other disease states. For this reason, we introduce basic concepts of control engineering applicable to understanding pathophysiology of disease and development of physiologically based control strategies for treatment.

  1. [Glucose transporter protein type 1 (GLUT-1) deficiency syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm-Pettersen, Anette; Selmer, Kaja Kristine; Nakken, Karl O

    2011-05-06

    Glucose is the brain's main source of energy. To pass the blood-brain barrier, glucose transporter protein type 1 (GLUT-1) is essential. Mutations in the SLC2A1 gene which codes for GLUT-1 may therefore compromise the supply of glucose to the brain. The aim of this review is to describe the clinical consequences of such mutations, with special emphasis on GLUT-1 encephalopathy. This review is based on a non-systematic literature search in PubMed and the authors' experience within the field. Epileptic or epilepsy-like are usually the first symptom in children with the GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome. Later on these children suffer delayed psychomotor development, microcephaly, ataxia, spasticity or movement disorders. EEG abnormalities may develop. GLUT-1 deficiency syndrome should be suspected in children with epilepsy-like seizures and delayed development combined with a low content of glucose in spinal fluid. The diagnosis is confirmed by genetic testing. Treatment is a ketogenic diet, as ketone bodies pass the blood-brain barrier using other transport proteins than GLUT-1. GLUT-1-deficiency syndrome is a rare metabolic encephalopathy which is not well known and probably underdiagnosed. An early diagnosis and early start of a ketogenic diet may give these children a normal or nearly normal life.

  2. Type 1 diabetes and osteoporosis: A review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Dhaon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With better care and intensive insulin therapy, microvascular complications have reduced and longevity has increased in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM. Therefore, there is a need to change the focus from microvascular complications to cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. Though number of studies from other parts of the world show that patients with T1DM are at increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures, there is a paucity of data from India. A number of factors and mechanisms affecting bone health in patients with T1DM have been proposed. The main defect in genesis of osteoporosis is osteoblastic function, rather than osteoclastic overfunction. Assessment of bone mineral density by dual X-ray absorptiometry and other risk factors for osteoporosis, as a part of diagnostic procedure can help to design tailored treatment plans. A physically active healthy lifestyle, prevention of diabetic complications and adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation are the mainstay for prevention of osteoporosis. Treatment of osteoporosis is not evidence based but it is proposed to be similar to osteoporosis associated with other conditions. Bisphosphonates are the mainstay for treatment of osteoporosis in patients with T1DM. However, more studies are needed to make definitive guidelines on prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in patients with T1DM.

  3. Overweight and obesity in youth with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minges, Karl E; Whittemore, Robin; Grey, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Overweight and obesity in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is now prevalent and accounts for significant health consequences, including cardiovascular complications and dual diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Physical activity and lifestyle are modifiable and play an important role in the prevention and management of excessive weight, but it is unclear how these factors relate to overweight and obese youth with T1D. Thus, a systematic review was conducted to examine how physical activity, sedentary behavior, sleep, and diet are related to overweight/obesity in youth with T1D. Seven observational and intervention studies published between 1990 and 2013 were included in the review. Prevalence of overweight ranged from 12.5% to 33.3%. Overweight in youth with T1D was associated with infrequent napping, increased screen time, and skipping breakfast and dinner but was not related to time engaged in physical activity. Weight-related interventions indicated modest weight loss along with improved glycemic control. In light of this review, there is a need for high quality research that examines all levels of activity in youth with T1D to identify lifestyle modification targets for weight prevention and management.

  4. The future of type 1 cannabinoid receptor allosteric ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaverdashvili, Mariam; Laprairie, Robert B

    2018-02-01

    Allosteric modulation of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) holds great therapeutic potential. This is because allosteric modulators do not possess intrinsic efficacy, but instead augment (positive allosteric modulation) or diminish (negative allosteric modulation) the receptor's response to endogenous ligand. Consequently, CB1R allosteric modulators have an effect ceiling which allows for the tempering of CB1R signaling without the desensitization, tolerance, dependence, and psychoactivity associated with orthosteric compounds. Pain, movement disorders, epilepsy, obesity are all potential therapeutic targets for CB1R allosteric modulation. Several challenges exist for the development of CB1R allosteric modulators, such as receptor subtype specificity, translation to in vivo systems, and mixed allosteric/agonist/inverse agonist activity. Despite these challenges, elucidation of crystal structures of CB1R and compound design based on structure-activity relationships will advance the field. In this review, we will cover recent progress for CB1R allosteric modulators and discuss the future promise of this research.

  5. Recurrent primary hyperparathyroidism due to Type 1 parathyromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Monica; Krasne, David L; Singer, Frederick R; Giuliano, Armando E

    2017-02-01

    Parathyromatosis is a rare condition consisting of multiple nodules of benign hyperfunctioning parathyroid tissue scattered throughout the neck and superior mediastinum. As a potential cause of recurrent or persistent hyperparathyroidism, parathyromatosis is a challenging condition to diagnose and treat. The optimal evaluation and management of patients with parathyromatosis is not well established. The reported case involves a patient who was initially diagnosed with primary hyperparathyroidism. The diagnosis of Type 1 parathyromatosis was made after the patient developed recurrent hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcemia and osteoporosis 17 years after the initial operation and underwent two additional operations. The majority of parathyromatosis cases are diagnosed in the setting of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Consensus regarding the preoperative diagnosis and evaluation is lacking due to the paucity of cases of this rare clinical entity. Management involves complete surgical extirpation of all identifiable rests of parathyroid tissue. Intra-operative parathyroid hormone level monitoring and frozen section examination are excellent tools that could increase the rates of initial operative success. Despite this, long-term disease remission is rare, and medical therapy, including calcimimetics and bisphosphonates, may be required for postoperative or non-operative management.

  6. Peptide Immunotherapy for Type 1 Diabetes—Clinical Advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emma L.; Peakman, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Autoimmune and allergic diseases occur when an individual mounts an inappropriate immune response to a self-antigen or an innocuous environmental antigen. This triggers a pathogenic T-cell response resulting in damage to specific tissues and organs. In type 1 diabetes (T1D), this manifests as destruction of the insulin-secreting β cells, resulting in a life-long dependency on recombinant insulin. Modulation of the pathogenic T-cell response with antigen-specific peptide immunotherapy offers the potential to restore the immune homeostasis and prevent further tissue destruction. Recent clinical advances with peptide therapy approaches in both T1D and other diseases are beginning to show encouraging results. New technologies targeting the peptides to specific cell types are also moving from pre-clinical development to the clinic. While many challenges remain in clinical development, not least selection of the optimal dose and dosing frequency, this is clearly becoming a very active field of drug development. PMID:29541078

  7. Ribonucleotides Linked to DNA of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Ivan; Vonka, Vladimír

    1974-01-01

    Cells of a continuous cell line derived from rabbit embryo fibroblasts were infected with herpes simplex type 1 virus (HSV-1) and maintained in the presence of either [5-3H]uridine or [methyl-3H]thymidine or 32PO43−. Nucleocapsids were isolated from the cytoplasmic fraction, partially purified, and treated with DNase and RNase. From the pelleted nucleocapsids, DNA was extracted and purified by centrifugation in sucrose and cesium sulfate gradients. The acid-precipitable radioactivity of [5-3H]uridine-labeled DNA was partially susceptible to pancreatic RNase and alkaline treatment; the susceptibility to the enzyme decreased with increasing salt concentration. No drop of activity of DNA labeled with [3H]thymidine was observed either after RNase or alkali treatment. Base composition analysis of [5-3H]uridine-labeled DNA showed that the radioactivity was recovered as uracil and cytosine. In the cesium sulfate gradient, the purified [5-3H]uridine-labeled DNA banded at the same position as the 32P-labeled DNA. The present data tend to suggest that ribonucleotide sequences are present in HSV DNA, that they are covalently attached to the viral DNA, and that they can form double-stranded structures. PMID:4364894

  8. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  9. The development and plasticity of alveolar type 1 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Hernandez, Belinda J.; Martinez Alanis, Denise; Narvaez del Pilar, Odemaris; Vila-Ellis, Lisandra; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Evans, Scott E.; Ostrin, Edwin J.; Chen, Jichao

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar type 1 (AT1) cells cover >95% of the gas exchange surface and are extremely thin to facilitate passive gas diffusion. The development of these highly specialized cells and its coordination with the formation of the honeycomb-like alveolar structure are poorly understood. Using new marker-based stereology and single-cell imaging methods, we show that AT1 cells in the mouse lung form expansive thin cellular extensions via a non-proliferative two-step process while retaining cellular plasticity. In the flattening step, AT1 cells undergo molecular specification and remodel cell junctions while remaining connected to their epithelial neighbors. In the folding step, AT1 cells increase in size by more than 10-fold and undergo cellular morphogenesis that matches capillary and secondary septa formation, resulting in a single AT1 cell spanning multiple alveoli. Furthermore, AT1 cells are an unexpected source of VEGFA and their normal development is required for alveolar angiogenesis. Notably, a majority of AT1 cells proliferate upon ectopic SOX2 expression and undergo stage-dependent cell fate reprogramming. These results provide evidence that AT1 cells have both structural and signaling roles in alveolar maturation and can exit their terminally differentiated non-proliferative state. Our findings suggest that AT1 cells might be a new target in the pathogenesis and treatment of lung diseases associated with premature birth. PMID:26586225

  10. 9 CFR 113.117 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Isolate, Type 1. 113.117 Section 113.117 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... Isolate, Type 1. Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1, shall be prepared from cultures of Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 1 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated...

  11. Work ability among Finnish workers with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, P; Moilanen, L; Hänninen, V; Heikkinen, J; Räsänen, K

    2016-08-01

    Work ability represents the balance between individual resources, health status and job demands. As far as we are aware, these issues have not been examined in working people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). To examine how work-related and diabetes-related factors are associated with work ability among male and female workers. Questionnaires were mailed to a random sample of 2500 people with T1D from the Medication Reimbursement Register of The Social Insurance Institution of Finland. The associations of the predictors of poor work ability were examined in a logistic regression analysis. The final sample comprised 767 working people aged 18-64 with T1D; overall response rate 49%. One in every three working men and women with T1D had poor work ability. High job demands and low job control were associated with poor work ability in both genders. Physical work and low worktime control were significantly associated with poor work ability in men but not in women with T1D. A self-reported high value of glycosylated haemoglobin was the only diabetes-related variable associated with poor work ability in both men and women. Work-related factors and poor glycaemic control were associated with poor work ability in individuals with T1D. Thus, job control and worktime control should be taken into account in supporting the work ability of workers with T1D. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Decreased sleep stage transition pattern complexity in narcolepsy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Raffaele; Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Iloti, Martina; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    To analyze the complexity of the nocturnal sleep stage sequence in central disorders of hypersomnolence (CDH), with the hypothesis that narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) might exhibit distinctive sleep stage sequence organization and complexity. Seventy-nine NT1 patients, 22 narcolepsy type 2 (NT2), 22 idiopathic hypersomnia (IH), and 52 patients with subjective hypersomnolence (sHS) were recruited and their nocturnal sleep was polysomnographically recorded and scored. Group between-stage transition probability matrices were obtained and compared. Patients with NT1 differed significantly from all the other patient groups, the latter, in turn, were not different between each other. The individual probability of the R-to-N2 transition was found to be the parameter showing the difference of highest significance between the groups (lowest in NT1) and classified patients with or without NT1 with an accuracy of 78.9% (sensitivity 78.5% and specificity 79.2%), by applying a cut-off value of 0.15. The main result of this study is that the structure of the sleep stage transition pattern of hypocretin-deficient NT1 patients is significantly different from that of other forms of CDH and sHS, with normal hypocretin levels. The lower probability of R-to-N2 transition occurrence in NT1 appears to be a reliable polysomnographic feature with potential application at the individual level, for supportive diagnostic purposes. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Piroxicam inhibits herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astani, A; Albrecht, U; Schnitzler, P

    2015-05-01

    Piroxicam is a potent, nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) which also exhibits antipyretic activity. The antiviral effect of piroxicam against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was examined in vitro on RC-37 monkey kidney cells using a plaque reduction assay. Piroxicam was dissolved in ethanol or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined at 4 μg/ml and 75 μg/ml, respectively. The IC50 for the standard antiherpetic drug acyclovir was determined at 1.6 μM. At non-cytotoxic concentrations of these piroxicam solutions, plaque formation was significantly reduced by 62.4% for ethanolic piroxicam and 72.8% for piroxicam in DMSO. The mode of antiviral action of these drugs was assessed by time-on-addition assays. No antiviral effect was observed when cells were incubated with piroxicam prior to infection with HSV-1 or when HSV-1 infected cells were treated with dissolved piroxicam. Herpesvirus infection was, however, significantly inhibited when HSV-1 was incubated with piroxicam prior to the infection of cells. These results indicate that piroxicam affected the virus before adsorption, but not after penetration into the host cell, suggesting that piroxicam exerts a direct antiviral effect on HSV-1. Free herpesvirus was sensitive to piroxicam in a concentration-dependent manner and the inhibition of HSV-1 appears to occur before entering the cell but not after penetration of the virus into the cell. Considering the lipophilic nature of piroxicam, which enables it to penetrate the skin, it might be suitable for topical treatment of herpetic infections.

  14. Maternal Type 1 diabetes activates stress response in early placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauster, Martin; Majali-Martinez, Alejandro; Maninger, Sabine; Gutschi, Elisabeth; Greimel, Patrick H; Ivanisevic, Marina; Djelmis, Josip; Desoye, Gernot; Hiden, Ursula

    2017-02-01

    Human pregnancy and in particular the first trimester, is a period highly susceptible towards adverse insults such as oxidative stress, which may lead to inadequate embryonic and feto-placental development. Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased oxidative stress caused by hyperglycemia, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and inflammatory signals. In pregnancy, diabetes elevates the risk for early pregnancy loss, preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction, pathologies that origin from early placental maldevelopment. We hypothesized that maternal Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) induces oxidative stress in the first trimester human placenta. We quantified stress induced, cytoprotective proteins, i.e. heat shock protein (HSP)70 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and determined protein modifications as markers for oxidation and glycation, i.e. levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) or Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) modified proteins. Moreover, we measured expression levels of enzymes involved in antioxidant defense in the first trimester (week 7-9) placenta of normal and T1DM women by immunoblot and real-time qPCR. Primary human trophoblasts were isolated from first trimester placenta and the effects of oxygen, hyperglycemia and the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α on levels of HSP70 and HO-1 were analyzed. HSP70 (+19.9± 10.1%) and HO-1 (+63.5± 14.5%) were elevated (p placenta of T1DM women when compared to normal women. However, levels of HNE or CML modified proteins were unchanged. Also, expression of most antioxidant enzymes was unchanged, with only superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD3) being upregulated by 3.0-fold (p placenta of T1DM women may contribute to disturbances in placental development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pregnancy and pregnancy outcome in hepatitis C type 1b.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jabeen, T

    2012-02-03

    A large cohort of rhesus-negative women in Ireland were inadvertently infected with hepatitis C virus following exposure to contaminated anti-D immunoglobulin in 1977-8. This major iatrogenic episode was discovered in 1994. We studied 36 women who had been infected after their first pregnancy, and compared them to an age- and parity-matched control group of rhesus-positive women. The presence of hepatitis C antibody was confirmed in all 36 by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by recombinant immunoblot assay, while 26 (72%) of the cohort were HCV-RNA-positive (type 1b) on PCR testing. In the 20 years post-infection, all members of the study group had at least one pregnancy, and mean parity was 3.5. They had a total of 100 pregnancies and 85 of these went to term. There were four premature births, one being a twin pregnancy, and 11 spontaneous miscarriages. One miscarriage occurred in the pregnancy following HCV infection. There were two neonatal deaths due to severe congenital abnormalities in the PCR-positive women. Of the children born to HCV-RNA positive mothers, only one (2.3%) tested positive for the virus. Significant portal fibrosis on liver biopsy was confined to HCV-RNA-positive mothers apart from one single exception in the antibody-positive HCV-RNA-negative group. Comparison with the control group showed no increase in spontaneous miscarriage rate, and no significant difference in obstetric complications; birth weights were similar for the two groups.

  16. Dependent and paranoid personality patterns in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric, S; Sreckov, M; Basta, I; Lavrnic, D; Vujnic, M; Marjanovic, I; Rakocevic Stojanovic, V

    2014-04-01

    To analyze frequency and type of personality pattern in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), to correlate these findings with clinical data, and to assess its possible influence on quality of life (QoL). This cross-sectional study comprised 62 patients with DM1. Following measures were used: Muscular Impairment Rating Scale, Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices (RSPM), Millon Multiaxial Clinical Inventory I (MMCI), SF-36, and Individualized Neuromuscular Quality of Life (INQoL) questionnaires. The presence of at least one pathological personality trait with score above 85 on MMCI was found in 47 (75.8%) patients. After clinical interview, 36 (58.1%) subjects had significant personality impairment. The most common personality trait in our cohort of patients was dependent found in 51.6% of patients, followed by paranoid (38.7%). Higher score on dependent personality scale correlated with lower education (rho = -0.251, P = 0.049). Dependent personality scores significantly differed between patients with physical and intellectual work (93.1 ± 8.9 vs 66.9 ± 31.7, P = 0.011). Paranoid score was higher in patients with lower education (rho = -0.293, P = 0.021), lower score on RSPM test (rho = -0.398, P = 0.004) and larger number of CTG repeats (rho = 0.254, P = 0.046). Presence of dependent personality was not in association with QoL scores (P > 0.05). On the other hand, patients with paranoid personality trait had worse QoL than those without it (P < 0.05). Almost 60% of our patients with DM1 had clinically significant personality impairment, with dependent and paranoid personality patterns being the most common. Paranoid personality may decrease QoL in these patients, which gives us new opportunities for symptomatic therapy in DM1. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Engineered T Regulatory Type 1 Cells for Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Gregori

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available T regulatory cells, a specialized subset of T cells, are key players in modulating antigen (Ag-specific immune responses in vivo. Inducible T regulatory type 1 (Tr1 cells are characterized by the co-expression of CD49b and lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG-3 and the ability to secrete IL-10, TGF-β, and granzyme (Gz B, in the absence of IL-4 and IL-17. The chief mechanisms by which Tr1 cells control immune responses are secretion of IL-10 and TGF-β and killing of myeloid cells via GzB. Tr1 cells, first described in peripheral blood of patients who developed tolerance after HLA-mismatched fetal liver hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, have been proven to modulate inflammatory and effector T cell responses in several immune-mediated diseases. The possibility to generate and expand Tr1 cells in vitro in an Ag-specific manner has led to their clinical use as cell therapy in patients. Clinical grade protocols to generate or to enrich and expand Tr1 cell medicinal products have been established. Proof-of-concept clinical trials with Tr1 cell products have demonstrated the safety and the feasibility of this approach and indicated some clinical benefit. In the present review, we provide an overview on protocols established to induce/expand Tr1 cells in vitro for clinical application and on results obtained in Tr1 cell-based clinical trials. Moreover, we will discuss a recently developed protocol to efficient convert human CD4+ T cells into a homogeneous population of Tr1-like cells by lentiviral vector-mediated IL-10 gene transfer.

  18. Dietary intervention rescues myopathy associated with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Matthew A; Rupasinghe, Thusitha; Vasiljevski, Emily R; Evesson, Frances J; Mikulec, Kathy; Peacock, Lauren; Quinlan, Kate GR; Cooper, Sandra T; Roessner, Ute; Stevenson, David A; Little, David G; Schindeler, Aaron

    2018-02-15

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder with complex symptomology. In addition to a predisposition to tumors, children with NF1 can present with reduced muscle mass, global muscle weakness, and impaired motor skills, which can have a significant impact on quality of life. Genetic mouse models have shown a lipid storage disease phenotype may underlie muscle weakness in NF1. Herein we confirm that biopsy specimens from six individuals with NF1 similarly manifest features of a lipid storage myopathy, with marked accumulation of intramyocellular lipid, fibrosis, and mononuclear cell infiltrates. Intramyocellular lipid was also correlated with reductions in neurofibromin protein expression by western analysis. An RNASeq profile of Nf1null muscle from a muscle-specific Nf1 knockout mouse (Nf1MyoD-/-) revealed alterations in genes associated with glucose regulation and cell signaling. Comparison by lipid mass spectrometry demonstrated that Nf1null muscle specimens were enriched for long chain fatty acid (LCFA) containing neutral lipids, such as cholesterol esters and triacylglycerides, suggesting fundamentally impaired LCFA metabolism. The subsequent generation of a limb-specific Nf1 knockout mouse (Nf1Prx1-/-) recapitulated all observed features of human NF1 myopathy, including lipid storage, fibrosis, and muscle weakness. Collectively, these insights led to the evaluation of a dietary intervention of reduced LCFAs, and enrichment of medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs) with L-carnitine. Following 8-weeks of dietary treatment, Nf1Prx1-/- mice showed a 45% increase in maximal grip strength, and a 71% reduction in intramyocellular lipid staining compared with littermates fed standard chow. These data link NF1 deficiency to fundamental shifts in muscle metabolism, and provide strong proof of principal that a dietary intervention can ameliorate symptoms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  19. Targeting Innate Immunity for Type 1 Diabetes Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needell, James C; Zipris, Danny

    2017-09-27

    Despite immense research efforts, type 1 diabetes (T1D) remains an autoimmune disease without a known trigger or approved intervention. Over the last three decades, studies have primarily focused on delineating the role of the adaptive immune system in the mechanism of T1D. The discovery of Toll-like receptors in the 1990s has advanced the knowledge on the role of the innate immune system in host defense as well as mechanisms that regulate adaptive immunity including the function of autoreactive T cells. Recent investigations suggest that inflammation plays a key role in promoting a large number of autoimmune disorders including T1D. Data from the LEW1.WR1 rat model of virus-induced disease and the RIP-B7.1 mouse model of diabetes suggest that innate immune signaling plays a key role in triggering disease progression. There is also evidence that innate immunity may be involved in the course of T1D in humans; however, a small number of clinical trials have shown that interfering with the function of the innate immune system following disease onset exerts only a modest effect on β-cell function. The data implying that innate immune pathways are linked with mechanisms of islet autoimmunity hold great promise for the identification of novel disease pathways that may be harnessed for clinical intervention. Nevertheless, more work needs to be done to better understand mechanisms by which innate immunity triggers β-cell destruction and assess the therapeutic value in blocking innate immunity for diabetes prevention.

  20. [Atherogenic dyslipidemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillarón, Juan J; Sales, María P; Flores Le-Roux, Juana A; Castells, Ignasi; Benaiges, David; Sagarra, Enric; Pedro-Botet, Juan

    2013-12-07

    To assess the prevalence of lipid abnormalities, with special emphasis on atherogenic dyslipidemia and its relationship with chronic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Cross-sectional study including all patients aged 18 and over, diagnosed of T1DM attending the outpatient clinic at Hospital del Mar and Hospital de Granollers, in Barcelona, during 2008. Of the 291 enrolled patients, 17.2 and 7.9% had high density lipoproteins (HDL) cholesterol150 mg/dL, respectively. Hypoalphalipoproteinemic patients had a higher prevalence of peripheral neuropathy (28 vs. 7.1%, P<.001), macroalbuminuria (14 vs. 2.5%, P<.001) and higher concentrations of triglycerides (107.5 [55.8] vs. 82.7 [36] mg/dL, P<.0001) compared with those with normal/high HDL cholesterol levels. Hypertriglyceridemia was associated with increasing age (43.6 [11.2] vs. 37.6 [11.8] yr, P<.02), higher prevalence of hypertension (47.8 vs. 22.8%, P<.008), metabolic syndrome (82.6 vs. 22%, P<.001) and microangiopathic complications, lower insulin sensitivity (6.75 [2.1] vs. 8.54 [2.6] mg/Kg(-1)/min(-1), P<.004) compared with the normotriglyceridemic group. One in 5 patients with T1DM has hypoalphalipoproteinemia or hypertriglyceridemia and these conditions are associated with 3 fold-increase microangiopathy. Thus, in these patients glycemic and blood pressure but also lipid profile control must be optimum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. A lateral cephalometry study of patients with neurofibromatosis type 1.

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    Friedrich, Reinhard E; Lehmann, Jan-Marten; Rother, Jonathan; Christ, Georg; Zu Eulenburg, Christine; Scheuer, Hannah T; Scheuer, Hanna A

    2017-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant transmitted tumour suppressor syndrome and also a bone disease. Osseous dysplasia affecting the craniofacial region is characteristic of NF1. The aim of this study was to analyse the lateral cephalograms of NF1 patients in comparison to individuals who were not affected by this condition in order to describe the skeletal phenotype of NF1 in more detail. The study comprises the lateral cephalograms of 172 patients with established NF1 diagnoses (female = 85, male = 87). NF1 patients were distinguished by radiological and/or histological findings of the facial region suggestive of plexiform neurofibroma (PNF) or disseminated cutaneous NF (DNF). The analysed radiographs of a collection of 29 healthy volunteers with ideal occlusion served as controls. The focus of this analysis was cephalometrically defined angles. Cephalometric analyses of patients with DNF did not differ from those of controls for the vast majority of parameters. However, the measurement results of patients with PNF differed significantly from those of healthy volunteers and patients with DNF. The number of trigeminal nerve branches affected in PNF patients had an effect on the measurement results. Lateral cephalograms revealed no significant alteration of the facial skeleton in NF1 patients as compared to controls. Indeed, the stigma of a so-called 'NF1 facies' cannot be derived from the cephalometric findings presented. Notably, a wide range of deviating readings were recorded for individuals with facial PNF. Clinicians who treat patients with NF1 should be aware of deviations from cephalometric standards on lateral cephalograms in NF1 patients, especially when craniofacial surgical procedures are planned. Some of these findings, particularly asymmetries of the facial skeleton, could be indicators of an associated PNF. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Intrinsic Far-infrared Continua of Type-1 Quasars

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    Lyu, Jianwei; Rieke, George H., E-mail: jianwei@email.arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    The range of currently proposed active galactic nucleus (AGN) far-infrared templates results in uncertainties in retrieving host galaxy information from infrared observations and also undermines constraints on the outer part of the AGN torus. We discuss how to test and reconcile these templates. Physically, the fraction of the intrinsic AGN IR-processed luminosity compared with that from the central engine should be consistent with the dust-covering factor. In addition, besides reproducing the composite spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of quasars, a correct AGN IR template combined with an accurate library of star-forming galaxy templates should be able to reproduce the IR properties of the host galaxies, such as the luminosity-dependent SED shapes and aromatic feature strengths. We develop tests based on these expected behaviors and find that the shape of the AGN intrinsic far-IR emission drops off rapidly starting at ∼20 μ m and can be matched by an Elvis et al.-like template with a minor modification. Despite the variations in the near- to mid-IR bands, AGNs in quasars and Seyfert galaxies have remarkably similar intrinsic far-IR SEDs at λ ∼ 20–100 μ m, suggesting a similar emission character of the outermost region of the circumnuclear torus. The variations of the intrinsic AGN IR SEDs among the type-1 quasar population can be explained by the changing relative strengths of four major dust components with similar characteristic temperatures, and there is evidence for compact AGN-heated dusty structures at sub-kiloparsec scales in the far-IR.

  3. Multiple sleep alterations in mice lacking cannabinoid type 1 receptors.

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    Alessandro Silvani

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptors are highly expressed in the brain and play a role in behavior control. Endogenous cannabinoid signaling is modulated by high-fat diet (HFD. We investigated the consequences of congenital lack of CB1 receptors on sleep in mice fed standard diet (SD and HFD. CB1 cannabinoid receptor knock-out (KO and wild-type (WT mice were fed SD or HFD for 4 months (n = 9-10 per group. Mice were instrumented with electroencephalographic (EEG and electromyographic electrodes. Recordings were performed during baseline (48 hours, sleep deprivation (gentle handling, 6 hours, sleep recovery (18 hours, and after cage switch (insomnia model paradigm, 6 hours. We found multiple significant effects of genotype on sleep. In particular, KO spent more time awake and less time in non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS than WT during the dark (active period but not during the light (rest period, enhancing the day-night variation of wake-sleep amounts. KO had slower EEG theta rhythm during REMS. REMS homeostasis after sleep deprivation was less effective in KO than in WT. Finally, KO habituated more rapidly to the arousing effect of the cage-switch test than WT. We did not find any significant effects of diet or of diet x genotype interaction on sleep. The occurrence of multiple sleep alterations in KO indicates important roles of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in limiting arousal during the active period of the day, in sleep regulation, and in sleep EEG in mice.

  4. Sleep and glycemic control in type 1 diabetes.

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    Barone, Mark Thomaz Ugliara; Wey, Daniela; Schorr, Fabiola; Franco, Denise Reis; Carra, Mario Kehdi; Lorenzi Filho, Geraldo; Menna-Barreto, Luiz

    2015-02-01

    Our aim in the present study was to elucidate how type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and sleep parameters interact, which was rarely evaluated up to the moment. Eighteen T1DM subjects without chronic complications, and 9 control subjects, matched for age and BMI, were studied. The following instruments used to evaluate sleep: the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, sleep diaries, actimeters, and polysomnography in a Sleep Lab. Glycemic control in T1DM individuals was evaluated through: A1C, home fingertip glucometer for 10 days (concomitant with the sleep diary and actimeter), and CGM or concomitant with continuous glucose monitoring (during the polysomnography night). Comparing with the control group, individuals with diabetes presented more pronounced sleep extension from weekdays to weekends than control subjects (p = 0.0303). Among T1DM, glycemic variability (SD) was positively correlated with sleep latency (r = 0.6525, p = 0.0033); full awakening index and arousal index were positively correlated with A1C (r = 0.6544, p = 0.0081; and r = 0.5680, p = 0.0272, respectively); and mean glycemia values were negatively correlated with sleep quality in T1DM individuals with better glycemic control (mean glycemia < 154 mg/dL). Our results support the hypothesis of an interaction between sleep parameters and T1DM, where the glycemic control plays an important role. More studies are needed to unveil the mechanisms behind this interaction, which may allow, in the future, clinicians and educators to consider sleep in the effort of regulating glycemic control.

  5. Lower fasting blood glucose in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Aline Stangherlin; Jansen, Ann Kristine; Rodrigues, Luiz Oswaldo Carneiro; Matos, Camila Maria; Souza, Marcio Leandro Ribeiro; de Souza, Juliana Ferreira; Diniz, Maria de Fátima Haueisen Sander; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Diniz, Leonardo Mauricio; de Rezende, Nilton Alves; Riccardi, Vincent Michael

    2015-01-01

    Studies indicate a lower occurrence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Fasting blood glucose (FBG) level is the main criterion used to diagnose DM and glucose intolerance. Therefore, this study compared FBG level between adults with NF1 and non-NF1 controls. We selected clinical records of 57 out of 701 individuals attending the Neurofibromatosis Outpatient Reference Center of the Clinics Hospital of the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil. The selected patients with NF1 were matched to non-NF1 controls selected from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health according to sex, age (range, 35–74 years) and BMI at a ratio of 1:3. In both groups, individuals with DM were excluded. Median FBG level in the NF1 group (86 mg/dl (range, 56–127 mg/dl)) was lower than that in the non-NF1 control group (102 mg/dl (range, 85–146 mg/dl)) (P<0.001). Prevalence of FBG level ≥100 mg/dl in the NF1 group (16%) was lower than that in the non-NF1 control group (63%) (P<0.05). The chance of a high FBG level was 89% lower in the NF1 group (odds ratio, 0.112; 95% CI, 0.067–0.188) (P<0.05). In conclusion, adults with NF1 showed a lower FBG level and a lower prevalence of high FBG level compared with non-NF1 controls. PMID:26631381

  6. Cutaneous Manifestations Of Neurofibromatosis Type 1 In South India

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    Jeevankumar B

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1 is the most common form of neurofibromatosis. Since the significance of various cutaneous manifestations of NF-1 has not been known in Indian population, hence, the present study was undertaken. A total of 40 patients with NF-1 were identified between August 1998 to June 2000 with a prevalence rate of 20.4 per 10,000 individuals attending our clinic. Male to female ratio was 2.3: 1. The age of the patients ranged from 15 to 70 years with a mean age of 29.57 years. Most patients (18 cases belonged to age group of 21-30 years followed by 11-20 years age group (11 cases. Twenty four cases had onset of disease between 11-20 years of age and ten cases in 21-30 years age group. Thirty one of 40 cases presented with asymptomatic nodules, three sought medical opinion for cosmetic reasons and another three for hyper pigmented patch. Analysis of cutaneous manifestations showed, 39 of 40 cases (97.5% had neurofibromas. Palmar melanotic macules were noted in 36 (90% cases whereas café â€" au-lait macules were seen in 33(82.5% cases. Subsequent, less common findings were intertriginous freckles in 31(77.5% cases, plantar melanotic macules in 18(45% cases and generalized freckles in 4(10% cases. Statistical analysis of cases and controls revealed significant association of NF-1 with neurofibromas, palmar melanotic macules, café-au-lait macules, intertriginous freckles and plantar melanotic macules(p<0.001. This study brings into focus some of the cutaneous manifestations noted in South Indian patients especially palmar and plantar melanotic macules, not highlighted in the western literature.

  7. Hyperglycemia and externalizing behavior in children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, Ciara M; Northam, Elisabeth A; Donath, Susan M; Werther, George A; Cameron, Fergus J

    2007-09-01

    Ancedotally, parents report behavioral changes in their diabetic children who have fluctuating blood glucose levels. This study aimed to test associations between intercurrent glycemia and child behavior in an ambulant setting. Prepubertal children attending the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, with type 1 diabetes received glycemic assessment and simultaneous behavioral assessment on two occasions 6 months apart. Subjects wore a continuous glucose monitor over a 72-h period, and parents completed the Behavior Assessment System for Children at the two study time points. There was a high correlation between intra-individual externalizing and internalizing behavior scores (r = 0.88, P behavior score (beta = 1.7 [95% CI 0.6-2.8], adjusted r(2) = 0.088). Percentage of time in the normal (r = -0.2 [-0.3 to -0.5], adjusted r(2) = 0.068) and high (r = 0.2 [0.07-0.3], adjusted r(2) = 0.089) glycemic ranges were significantly associated with the mean externalizing behavior score. For every 5% increase in time in the normal glycemic range, there was a decrease in the externalizing behavior score of 1.0, and for every 5% increase in time in the high glycemic range there was an increase in the externalizing behavior score of 1.0. There was no significant association between MBG and the mean internalizing behavior score. Externalizing behaviors were associated with intercurrent glycemic status. These findings underscore the importance of understanding the mechanisms of this association and how it might impact ultimate diabetes outcomes.

  8. Cognitive and Behavioral Disorders in Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Nupan, Martha Milade; Velez Van Meerbeke, Alberto; López Cabra, Claudia Alejandra; Herrera Gomez, Paula Marcela

    2017-01-01

    The last systematic review of research on the behavior of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) was in 2012. Since then, several important findings have been published. Therefore, the study aim was to synthesize recent relevant work related to this issue. We conducted a systematic review of the literature. Relevant articles were identified using the electronic databases PubMed, PsycINFO, and Scopus and a manual search of references lists. Thirty of 156 articles identified met the inclusion criteria. A quality evaluation of the articles was performed and the information was synthesized using a narrative approach. Compared with controls, children and adolescents with NF1 present significant alterations in language, reading, visuospatial skills, motor function, executive function, attention, behavior, emotion, and social skills. The prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is important and can affect cognition and executive function variables. A high prevalence of autistic traits and autistic spectrum disorder were reported. The benefits of using statins to treat cognitive deficits are unclear. However, children with NF1 and ADHD seem to benefit from methylphenidate treatment. The presence of hyperintensities in brain magnetic resonance imaging data seem to be related to poor cognitive performance. Analysis of these lesions could help to predict cognitive alterations in children with NF1. There has been important progress to evaluate cognitive characteristics of children with NF1 and to determine the physiological mechanisms of the concomitant disorders. However, discrepancies in relation to intelligence, learning disabilities, attention deficits, and treatment remain. Further investigations on this topic are recommended.

  9. [Epidemiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus in children in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde Barreiro, S; Rodríguez Rigual, M; Bueno Lozano, G; López Siguero, J P; González Pelegrín, B; Rodrigo Val, M P; Compés Dea, M L

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiological studies in many regions and countries have contributed to determining the epidemiology of type 1 diabetes (T1DM) in children less than 15 years old. Studies in many regions of Spain have been published, but the national incidence is not really known. A review was made of the publications on the epidemiology of T1DM in Spain, selecting the references on patients less than 15 years old. Many epidemiological studies on T1DM in almost all regions in Spain have been published. The methodology of these studies is heterogeneous, with variations in geographical definition, duration, period of study, limit of age, and data collection. The incidence rates are variable, from 11.5 cases per 100,000/year in Asturias to 27.6 in Castilla-La Mancha. Some studies report the percentage of diabetic ketoacidosis at the time of diagnosis, which is usually in the range of 25-40%. Although there have been various epidemiological studies on T1DM in almost all regions in Spain, the methodology is heterogeneous. The mean incidence of T1DM in children less than 15 years old in Spain, stimated from the selected studies is 17,69 cases per 100,000/year. T1DM registers need to be created and updated, using standardized methodology, to get more reliable data of the epidemiology of T1DM in Spain in the near future. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Cognitive and Behavioral Disorders in Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

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    Martha Milade Torres Nupan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available AimThe last systematic review of research on the behavior of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 was in 2012. Since then, several important findings have been published. Therefore, the study aim was to synthesize recent relevant work related to this issue.MethodWe conducted a systematic review of the literature. Relevant articles were identified using the electronic databases PubMed, PsycINFO, and Scopus and a manual search of references lists. Thirty of 156 articles identified met the inclusion criteria. A quality evaluation of the articles was performed and the information was synthesized using a narrative approach.ResultsCompared with controls, children and adolescents with NF1 present significant alterations in language, reading, visuospatial skills, motor function, executive function, attention, behavior, emotion, and social skills. The prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is important and can affect cognition and executive function variables. A high prevalence of autistic traits and autistic spectrum disorder were reported. The benefits of using statins to treat cognitive deficits are unclear. However, children with NF1 and ADHD seem to benefit from methylphenidate treatment. The presence of hyperintensities in brain magnetic resonance imaging data seem to be related to poor cognitive performance. Analysis of these lesions could help to predict cognitive alterations in children with NF1.InterpretationThere has been important progress to evaluate cognitive characteristics of children with NF1 and to determine the physiological mechanisms of the concomitant disorders. However, discrepancies in relation to intelligence, learning disabilities, attention deficits, and treatment remain. Further investigations on this topic are recommended.

  11. Ocular Albinism Type 1 Regulates Melanogenesis in Mouse Melanocytes

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    Tianzhi Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate whether ocular albinism type 1 (OA1 is differentially expressed in the skin of mice with different coat colors and to determine its correlation with coat color establishment in mouse, the expression patterns and tissue distribution characterization of OA1 in the skin of mice with different coat colors were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence staining and Western blot. The qRT-PCR analysis revealed that OA1 mRNA was expressed in all mice skin samples tested, with the highest expression level in brown skin, a moderate expression level in black skin and the lowest expression level in gray skin. Positive OA1 protein bands were also detected in all skin samples by Western blot analysis. The relative expression levels of OA1 protein in both black and brown skin were significantly higher than that in gray skin, but there was no significant difference between black and brown mice. Immunofluorescence assays revealed that OA1 was mainly expressed in the hair follicle matrix, the inner and outer root sheath in the skin tissues with different coat colors. To get further insight into the important role of OA1 in the melanocytes’ pigmentation, we transfected the OA1 into mouse melanocytes and then detected the relative expression levels of pigmentation-related gene. Simultaneously, we tested the melanin content of melanocytes. As a result, the overexpression of OA1 significantly increased the expression levels of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF, tyrosinase (TYR, tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1 and premelanosome protein (PMEL. However, the tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP2 level was attenuated. By contrast, the level of glycoprotein non-metastatic melanoma protein b (GPNMB was unaffected by OA1 overexpression. Furthermore, we observed a significant increase in melanin content in mouse melanocyte transfected OA1. Therefore, we propose that OA1 may

  12. Renovascular hypertension in children with neurofibromatosis type 1

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    Peco-Antić Amira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension in pediatric patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1 is usually due to renal artery stenosis (RAS mainly involving the proximal part of the vessel. The treatment modalities are highly individualized. In severe and/or bilateral RAS, antihypertensive drugs are either ineffective or have the potential risk for acute renal failure, while percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA has limited success due to the ostial localization of RAS and the tough fibrotic tissue involved that is refractory to dilatation Renal autotransplantation has potential advantages when medical control and PTA/or bypass techniques failed. Here we report 5 year-old girl with NF 1 and hyponatremic hypertensive syndrome due to severe bilateral disease, occluded proximal part of the right artery and ostial stenosis (80% of the left one. Only left kidney was identified on 99 in Tc DTP A, but the right one was visualized on the renal ultrasonography and in the late phase of arterial renography due to well developed collateral circulation. Multiple antihyper-tensive drugs (nifedipine, labetolol and minoxidil in maximal doses and PTA failed to normalize BP while short term therapy with ACEIwith NF1 and hyponatremic hypertensive syndrome due to severe bilateral renovascular disease; occluded proximal part of the right renal artery and ostial stenosis (80% of the left one. Only left kidney was identified on 99m Tc DTPA, but the right one was visualized on the renal ultrasonography and in the late phase of arterial renography due to well developed collateral circulation. Multiple antyphypertensive drugs (nifedipine, labetolol and minoxidil in maximal doses and PTA failed to normalize BP while. short term therapy with ACEI, captopril induced transient acute renal failure. Autotransplantation of right kidney saved its function and improved BP control. Our current case Autotransplantation of right kidney saved its function and improved BP control. Our current

  13. Regulation of type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase by LXRα.

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    Yoriko Sakane

    Full Text Available The iodothyronine deiodinases are selenoenzymes that regulate the activity of thyroid hormone via specific inner- or outer-ring deiodination. In humans, type 1 deiodinase (D1 is highly expressed in the liver, but the mechanism by which its gene expression is regulated remains to be elucidated. Liver X receptor α (LXRα, a transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is highly expressed in the liver, where it functions as a sensor for excess intracellular oxysterols. LXRα interacts with other nuclear receptors on promoters of genes that contain a binding core sequence for nuclear receptors. In addition, it is reported that the promoter of the gene encoding human D1 (hDIO1 contains the core sequence for one of nuclear receptors, thyroid hormone receptor (TR. We investigated the involvement of LXRα in the regulation of hDIO1, in the liver. We performed hDIO1 promoter-reporter assays using a synthetic LXR agonist, T0901317, and compared promoter activity between a human liver carcinoma cell line, HepG2, and a clone of human embryonic kidney cells, TSA201. We defined the region between nucleotides -131 and -114, especially nucleotides -126 and -125, of the hDIO1 promoter as critical for basal and LXRα-mediated specific transcriptional activation in HepG2 cells. An increase in hDIO1 expression was observed in LXRα-stimulated cells, but absent in cycloheximide-treated cells, indicating that new protein synthesis is required for LXRα-mediated regulation of hDIO1. On the other hand, electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that LXRα and RXRα bound to the hDIO1 promoter. We also demonstrated that LXRα and TRβ compete with each other on this specific region of the promoter. In conclusion, our results indicated that LXRα plays a specific and important role in activation of TH by regulating D1, and that LXRα binds to and regulates the hDIO1 promoter, competing with TRβ on specific sequences within the promoter.

  14. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN CHILDREN WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Z ABDEYASDAN

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes melliuts is a chronic, metabolic disease that involves the macro and micro vascular complications and one of its maer ascular cowplications is the cardio vascular disease, as ,the risk of cardiovascular disease is 2-4 folds in diabetic patients in comparison with non diabetic individuals. The researches have demonstrated that the risk factors of the cardio vascular disease are formed at childhood. Therefore the preventive measures must begin from early childhood. So the present study was planned with the goals to determine and compare the cardia-vascular risk factors in the diabetic children with type 1 of diabetes mellitus. Method: This was an analytic, cross sectional study that has been done in two groups (case-control. In this research, 148 children, suffering from the typel diabetes mellitus being supported by the metabolism and endocrine research center, were chosen in the continues case manner and for the control group, 148 children, matched with the study group (according to the age and the sex, at 6-18 years old from the schools in Isfahan city randomly and at 2-6 years from the neiborhoods of the case group. The data-gathering tool was the questionnaires includes lipid profile, blood pressure, weight and height. To analyze the data we used the analytic (t student and logistic regression and descriptive (mean and standard deviation statistic methods and SPSS. Results: Findings revealed that the means of Lipid profile, systolic blood pressure and body mass index had not statistically significant differences in the two groups. But the mean of diastolic blood pressure and the mean arterial blood pressure in the control group were more than the case group and this difference was significant. The mean, 75 and 95 percentiles for cholesterol and LDL in all the age groups, mean, 75 and 95 percentile for triglyceride in all the age groups except the age group of 1-4 years in the diabetic and non diabetic groups were

  15. Regional differences in clinical care among patients with type 1 diabetes in Brazil: Brazilian Type 1 Diabetes Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marília B; Cobas, Roberta A; Matheus, Alessandra S; Tannus, Lucianne R; Negrato, Carlos Antonio; Rodacki, Melanie; Braga, Neuza; Cordeiro, Marilena M; Luescher, Jorge L; Berardo, Renata S; Nery, Marcia; Arruda-Marques, Maria do Carmo A; Calliari, Luiz E; Noronha, Renata M; Manna, Thais D; Zajdenverg, Lenita; Salvodelli, Roberta; Penha, Fernanda G; Foss, Milton C; Foss-Freitas, Maria C; Pires, Antonio C; Robles, Fernando C; Guedes, Mariadefátimas; Dib, Sergio A; Dualib, Patricia; Silva, Saulo C; Sepulvida, Janice; Almeida, Henriqueta G; Sampaio, Emerson; Rea, Rosangela; Faria, Ana Cristina R; Tschiedel, Balduino; Lavigne, Suzana; Cardozo, Gustavo A; Azevedo, Mirela J; Canani, Luis Henrique; Zucatti, Alessandra T; Coral, Marisa Helena C; Pereira, Daniela Aline; Araujo, Luiz Antonio; Tolentino, Monica; Pedrosa, Hermelinda C; Prado, Flaviane A; Rassi, Nelson; Araujo, Leticia B; Fonseca, Reine Marie C; Guedes, Alexis D; Matos, Odelissa S; Faria, Manuel; Azulay, Rossana; Forti, Adriana C; Façanha, Cristina; Montenegro, Ana Paula; Montenegro, Renan; Melo, Naira H; Rezende, Karla F; Ramos, Alberto; Felicio, João Sooares; Santos, Flavia M; Jezini, Deborah L; Cordeiro, Marilena M

    2012-10-29

    To determine the characteristics of clinical care offered to type 1 diabetic patients across the four distinct regions of Brazil, with geographic and contrasting socioeconomic differences. Glycemic control, prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, screening for chronic complications and the frequency that the recommended treatment goals were met using the American Diabetes Association guidelines were evaluated. This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study conducted from December 2008 to December 2010 in 28 secondary and tertiary care public clinics in 20 Brazilian cities in north/northeast, mid-west, southeast and south regions. The data were obtained from 3,591 patients (56.0% females and 57.1% Caucasians) aged 21.2 ± 11.7 years with a disease duration of 9.6 ± 8.1 years (region. Hypertension was more frequent in the mid-west (32%) and north/northeast (25%) than in the southeast (19%) and south (17%) regions (psoutheast region achieved LDL cholesterol goals and were treated with statins (pregions were screened for retinopathy and nephropathy, compared with patients from the south and southeast. Patients from the south/southeast regions had more intensive insulin regimens than patients from the north/northeast and mid-west regions (pregion (pregion (pregion were younger, non-Caucasian, from lower economic status, used less continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, performed less SBGM and were less overweight/obese (pregions, did not meet metabolic control goals and were not screened for diabetes-related chronic complications. These results should guide governmental health policy decisions, specific to each geographic region, to improve diabetes care and decrease the negative impact diabetes has on the public health system.

  16. A Type 1 Diabetes Genetic Risk Score Can Aid Discrimination Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oram, Richard A; Patel, Kashyap; Hill, Anita; Shields, Beverley; McDonald, Timothy J; Jones, Angus; Hattersley, Andrew T; Weedon, Michael N

    2016-03-01

    With rising obesity, it is becoming increasingly difficult to distinguish between type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) in young adults. There has been substantial recent progress in identifying the contribution of common genetic variants to T1D and T2D. We aimed to determine whether a score generated from common genetic variants could be used to discriminate between T1D and T2D and also to predict severe insulin deficiency in young adults with diabetes. We developed genetic risk scores (GRSs) from published T1D- and T2D-associated variants. We first tested whether the scores could distinguish clinically defined T1D and T2D from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) (n = 3,887). We then assessed whether the T1D GRS correctly classified young adults (diagnosed at 20-40 years of age, the age-group with the most diagnostic difficulty in clinical practice; n = 223) who progressed to severe insulin deficiency 0.280 (>50th centile in those with T1D) is indicative of T1D (50% sensitivity, 95% specificity). A low T1D GRS (young adults with diabetes, T1D GRS alone predicted progression to insulin deficiency (AUC 0.87 [95% CI 0.82-0.92]; P young adults with diabetes who will require insulin treatment. This will be an important addition to correctly classifying individuals with diabetes when clinical features and autoimmune markers are equivocal. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  17. LIPID PHOSPHATE PHOSPHOHYDROLASE TYPE 1 (LPP1) DEGRADES EXTRACELLULAR LYSOPHOSPHATIDIC ACID IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsig, Jose L.; Snyder, Ashley H.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; Skobeleva, Anastasia; Mataya, Chifundo; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Brindley, David N.; Lynch, Kevin R.

    2009-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lipid mediator that stimulates cell proliferation and growth and is involved in physiological and pathological processes such as wound healing, platelet activation, angiogenesis and the growth of tumors. Therefore, defining the mechanisms of LPA production and degradation are of interest in understanding the regulation of these processes. Extracellular LPA synthesis is relatively well understood whereas the mechanisms of its degradation are not. One route of LPA degradation is de-phosphorylation. A candidate enzyme is the integral membrane exophosphatase lipid phosphate phosphohydrolase type 1 (LPP1). We report here the development of a mouse wherein the LPP1 gene (Ppap2a) was disrupted. The homozygous mice, which are phenotypically unremarkable, generally lack LPP1 mRNA and multiple tissues exhibit a substantial (35–95%) reduction in LPA phosphatase activity. Compared to wild type littermates, Ppap2atr/tr animals have increased levels of plasma LPA and LPA injected intravenously is metabolized at a four-fold slower rate. Our results demonstrate that LPA is rapidly metabolized in the bloodstream and that LPP1 is an important determinant of this turnover. These results indicate that LPP1 is a catabolic enzyme for LPA in vivo. PMID:19215222

  18. Limited effects of Muc1 deficiency on mouse adenovirus type 1 respiratory infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Y; Procario, Megan C; Ashley, Shanna L; O'Neal, Wanda K; Pickles, Raymond J; Weinberg, Jason B

    2011-09-01

    Muc1 (MUC1 in humans) is a membrane-tethered mucin that exerts anti-inflammatory effects in the lung during bacterial infection. Muc1 and other mucins are also likely to form a protective barrier in the lung. We used mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1, also known as MAdV-1) to determine the role of Muc1 in the pathogenesis of an adenovirus in its natural host. Following intranasal inoculation of wild type mice, we detected increased TNF-α, a cytokine linked to Muc1 production, but no consistent changes in the production of lung Muc1, Muc5ac or overall lung mucus production. Viral loads were modestly higher in the lungs of Muc1(-/-) mice compared to Muc1(+/+) mice at several early time points but decreased to similar levels by 14 days post infection in both groups. However, cellular inflammation and the expression of CXCL1, CCL5, and CCL2 did not significantly differ between Muc1(-/-) and Muc1(+/+) mice. Our data therefore suggest that Muc1 may contribute to a physical barrier that protects against MAV-1 respiratory infection. However, our data do not reveal an anti-inflammatory effect of Muc1 that contributes to MAV-1 pathogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Idiopathic type 1 diabetes: a heterogenous disease or result of our ignorance?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Olga; Młynarski, Wojciech; Bodalski, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Based on etiology a new classification for diabetes mellitus was proposed by the Experts of WHO in 1999. According to the classification, type 1 diabetes was subclassified as type 1A (autoimmune) and type 1B (idiopathic). Both forms result from the destruction of beta cells, however in type 1A the process is immune-mediated but in type 1B the origin of the beta cells impairment is still unknown. Moreover, subtype B is considered to be very heterogeneous and the diagnostic criteria are still not clear. The purpose of this article was to review studies on the pathogenesis of idiopathic type 1 diabetes.

  20. Membrane paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Thorne, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    The membrane paradigm is a modified frozen star approach to modeling black holes, with particles and fields assuming a complex, static, boundary-layer type structure (membrane) near the event horizon. The membrane has no effects on the present or future evolution of particles and fields above itself. The mathematical representation is a combination of a formalism containing terms for the shear and bulk viscosity, surface pressure, momentum, temperature, entropy, etc., of the horizon and the 3+1 formalism. The latter model considers a family of three-dimensional spacelike hypersurfaces in one-dimensional time. The membrane model considers a magnetic field threading the hole and undergoing torque from the hole rotation. The field is cleaned by the horizon and distributed over the horizon so that ohmic dissipation is minimized. The membrane paradigm is invalid inside the horizon, but is useful for theoretically probing the properties of slowly evolving black holes

  1. Membrane processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Katarzyna

    2017-11-01

    The membrane processes have played important role in the industrial separation process. These technologies can be found in all industrial areas such as food, beverages, metallurgy, pulp and paper, textile, pharmaceutical, automotive, biotechnology and chemical industry, as well as in water treatment for domestic and industrial application. Although these processes are known since twentieth century, there are still many studies that focus on the testing of new membranes' materials and determining of conditions for optimal selectivity, i. e. the optimum transmembrane pressure (TMP) or permeate flux to minimize fouling. Moreover the researchers proposed some calculation methods to predict the membrane processes properties. In this article, the laboratory scale experiments of membrane separation techniques, as well their validation by calculation methods are presented. Because membrane is the "heart" of the process, experimental and computational methods for its characterization are also described.

  2. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and islet autoimmunity in children at increased risk for type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jill M; Yin, Xiang; Lamb, Molly M; Barriga, Katherine; Seifert, Jennifer; Hoffman, Michelle; Orton, Heather D; Barón, Anna E; Clare-Salzler, Michael; Chase, H Peter; Szabo, Nancy J; Erlich, Henry; Eisenbarth, George S; Rewers, Marian

    2007-09-26

    Cod liver oil supplements in infancy have been associated with a decreased risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus in a retrospective study. To examine whether intakes of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are associated with the development of islet autoimmunity (IA) in children. A longitudinal, observational study, the Diabetes Autoimmunity Study in the Young (DAISY), conducted in Denver, Colorado, between January 1994 and November 2006, of 1770 children at increased risk for type 1 diabetes, defined as either possession of a high diabetes risk HLA genotype or having a sibling or parent with type 1 diabetes. The mean age at follow-up was 6.2 years. Islet autoimmunity was assessed in association with reported dietary intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids starting at age 1 year. A case-cohort study (N = 244) was also conducted in which risk of IA by polyunsaturated fatty acid content of erythrocyte membranes (as a percentage of total lipids) was examined. Risk of IA, defined as being positive for insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, or insulinoma-associated antigen-2 autoantibodies on 2 consecutive visits and still autoantibody positive or having diabetes at last follow-up visit. Fifty-eight children developed IA. Adjusting for HLA genotype, family history of type 1 diabetes, caloric intake, and omega-6 fatty acid intake, omega-3 fatty acid intake was inversely associated with risk of IA (hazard ratio [HR], 0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.21-0.96; P = .04). The association was strengthened when the definition of the outcome was limited to those positive for 2 or more autoantibodies (HR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.09-0.58; P = .002). In the case-cohort study, omega-3 fatty acid content of erythrocyte membranes was also inversely associated with IA risk (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.41-0.96; P = .03). Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids is associated with reduced risk of IA in children at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes.

  3. Supporting Participation in Physical Education at School in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: Perceptions of Teachers, Youth with Type 1 Diabetes, Parents and Diabetes Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Freya; Kirk, Alison; Mutrie, Nanette; Moola, Fiona; Robertson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    It is not clear how best to support youth with type 1 diabetes to participate in physical education (PE) at school. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of facilitators and barriers to PE in youth with type 1 diabetes and to determine how schools can help these individuals to be physically active. Interviews and focus groups were…

  4. Development of a Coronary Heart Disease Risk Prediction Model for Type 1 Diabetes: The Pittsburgh CHD in Type 1 Diabetes Risk Mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zgibor, J.C.; Ruppert, K.; Orchard, T.J.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.; Fuller, J.H.; Chaturvedi, N.; Roberts, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim - To create a coronary heart disease (CHD) risk prediction model specific to type 1 diabetes. Methods - Development of the model used data from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study (EDC). EDC subjects had type 1 diabetes diagnosed between 1950 and 1980, received their

  5. Cannabinoid type 1 receptor antagonists for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Kate; Ussher, Michael H

    2011-03-16

    Selective type 1 cannabinoid (CB1) receptor antagonists may assist with smoking cessation by restoring the balance of the endocannabinoid system, which can be disrupted by prolonged use of nicotine. They also seeks to address many smokers' reluctance to persist with a quit attempt because of concerns about weight gain. To determine whether selective CB1 receptor antagonists (currently rimonabant and taranabant) increase the numbers of people stopping smoking To assess their effects on weight change in successful quitters and in those who try to quit but fail. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Review Group specialized register for trials, using the terms ('rimonabant' or 'taranabant') and 'smoking' in the title or abstract, or as keywords. We also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO, using major MESH terms. We acquired electronic or paper copies of posters of preliminary trial results presented at the American Thoracic Society Meeting in 2005, and at the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco European Meeting 2006. We also attempted to contact the authors of ongoing studies of rimonabant, and Sanofi Aventis (manufacturers of rimonabant). The most recent search was in January 2011. Types of studies Randomized controlled trialsTypes of participants Adult smokersTypes of interventions Selective CB1 receptor antagonists, such as rimonabant and taranabant. Types of outcome measures The primary outcome is smoking status at a minimum of six months after the start of treatment. We preferred sustained cessation rates to point prevalence, and biochemically verified cessation to self-reported quitting. We regarded smokers who drop out or are lost to follow up as continuing smokers. We have noted any adverse effects of treatment.A secondary outcome is weight change associated with the cessation attempt. Two authors checked the abstracts for relevance, and attempted to acquire full trial reports. One author extracted the data, and a second author checked

  6. Outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies: a nationwide, population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte; Damm, Peter; Moelsted-Pedersen, Lars

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare pregnancy outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies with the background population.......The aim of this study was to compare pregnancy outcomes in type 1 diabetic pregnancies with the background population....

  7. Fat and carbohydrate metabolism during exercise in phosphoglucomutase type 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Laforêt, Pascal; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoglucomutase type 1 (PGM1) deficiency is a rare metabolic myopathy in which symptoms are provoked by exercise.......Phosphoglucomutase type 1 (PGM1) deficiency is a rare metabolic myopathy in which symptoms are provoked by exercise....

  8. Risk factors for development of incipient and overt diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Peter; Hougaard, Philip; Parving, Hans-Henrik

    2002-01-01

    for patients aged > or =18 years with type 1 diabetes, with duration of diabetes > or =5 years, with normoalbuminuria (urinary albumin excretion rate medication. Risk factors for development......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate prospectively putative risk factors for development of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria in type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Prospective observational study of a cohort of type 1 diabetic patients followed in the outpatient clinic at Steno Diabetes Center...... of microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria in type 1 diabetic patients....

  9. Primordial membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Cellular membranes, which are self-assembled bilayer structures mainly composed of lipids, proteins and conjugated polysaccharides, are the defining feature of cell physiology. It is likely that the complexity of contemporary cells was preceded by simpler chemical systems or protocells during...... the various evolutionary stages that led from inanimate to living matter. It is also likely that primitive membranes played a similar role in protocell 'physiology'. The composition of such ancestral membranes has been proposed as mixtures of single hydrocarbon chain amphiphiles, which are simpler versions...

  10. Evidence of gene-gene interaction and age-at-diagnosis effects in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howson, Joanna M M; Cooper, Jason D; Smyth, Deborah J

    2012-01-01

    The common genetic loci that independently influence the risk of type 1 diabetes have largely been determined. Their interactions with age-at-diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, sex, or the major susceptibility locus, HLA class II, remain mostly unexplored. A large collection of more than 14,866 type 1...

  11. Complexity and Intensionality in a Type-1 Framework for Computable Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambov, Branimir Zdravkov

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a type-1 framework for computable analysis designed to facilitate efficient implementations and discusses properties that have not been well studied before for type-1 approaches: the introduction of complexity measures for type-1 representations of real functions, and ways to...... of machine precision floating point....

  12. Recurrent spontaneous hip dislocation in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galbraith, John G

    2011-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type-1 is a common genetic disorder which often affects the skeleton. Skeletal manifestations of neurofibromatosis type-1 include scoliosis, congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia and intraosseous cystic lesions. Dislocation of the hip associated with neurofibromatosis type-1 is a rare occurrence and is underreported in the literature.

  13. Comparison of temporalis fascia muscle and full-thickness cartilage grafts in type 1 pediatric tympanoplasties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegin, Yakup; Çelik, Mustafa; Koç, Arzu Karaman; Küfeciler, Levent; Elbistanlı, Mustafa Suphi; Kayhan, Fatma Tülin

    Various graft materials have been used to close tympanic membrane perforations. In the literature, there are few studies in pediatric populations comparing different graft materials. To our knowledge, there is no reported study that measured the thickness of the tragal cartilage in pediatric tympanoplasties. The tragal cartilage is not of uniform thickness in every patient. To compare anatomical and functional outcomes of temporalis fascia muscle and full-thickness tragal cartilage in type 1 pediatric tympanoplasties. In total, 78 patients (38 males, 40 females; average age 10.02±1.98 years; range, 7-18 years) who underwent type 1 tympanoplasties in our clinic were included. Demographics, anatomical, and functional outcomes were collected. Temporalis fascia muscle and tragal cartilage were used as graft materials. Tragal cartilage was used without thinning, and the thickness of tragal cartilage was measured using a micrometer. Anatomical and functional outcomes of cartilage and fascia were compared. Audiometric results comparing the cartilage and fascia groups were conducted at 6 months, and we continued to follow the patients to 1 year after surgery. An intact graft and an air-bone gap≤20dB were regarded as a surgical success. Results with a p-valuefascia group. In the fascia group, the preoperative air-bone gap was 33.68±11.44 dB and postoperative air-bone gap was 24.25±12.68dB. In the cartilage group, the preoperative air-bone gap was 35.68±12.94dB and postoperative air-bone gap was 26.11±12.87dB. The anatomical success rate in the cartilage group was significantly better than that for the fascia group (pfascia and cartilage groups (p>0.05). The average thickness of tragal cartilage in the pediatric population was 0.693±0.094mm in males and 0.687±0.058 mm in females. Our data suggest that the anatomical success rate for a cartilage tympanoplasty was higher than for a fascia tympanoplasty. Functional results with cartilage were not different than with

  14. Interaction between G Protein-Coupled Receptor 143 and Tyrosinase: Implications for Understanding Ocular Albinism Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Schiedel, Anke C; Manga, Prashiela

    2017-02-01

    Developmental eye defects in X-linked ocular albinism type 1 are caused by G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) mutations. Mutations result in dysfunctional melanosome biogenesis and macromelanosome formation in pigment cells, including melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium. GPR143, primarily expressed in pigment cells, localizes exclusively to endolysosomal and melanosomal membranes unlike most G protein-coupled receptors, which localize to the plasma membrane. There is some debate regarding GPR143 function and elucidating the role of this receptor may be instrumental for understanding neurogenesis during eye development and for devising therapies for ocular albinism type I. Many G protein-coupled receptors require association with other proteins to function. These G protein-coupled receptor-interacting proteins also facilitate fine-tuning of receptor activity and tissue specificity. We therefore investigated potential GPR143 interaction partners, with a focus on the melanogenic enzyme tyrosinase. GPR143 coimmunoprecipitated with tyrosinase, while confocal microscopy demonstrated colocalization of the proteins. Furthermore, tyrosinase localized to the plasma membrane when coexpressed with a GPR143 trafficking mutant. The physical interaction between the proteins was confirmed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. This interaction may be required in order for GPR143 to function as a monitor of melanosome maturation. Identifying tyrosinase as a potential GPR143 binding protein opens new avenues for investigating the mechanisms that regulate pigmentation and neurogenesis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The topology, structure and PE interaction of LITAF underpin a Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anita K; Wagstaff, Jane L; Manna, Paul T; Wartosch, Lena; Qamar, Seema; Garman, Elspeth F; Freund, Stefan M V; Roberts, Rhys C

    2016-12-07

    Mutations in Lipopolysaccharide-induced tumour necrosis factor-α factor (LITAF) cause the autosomal dominant inherited peripheral neuropathy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1C (CMT1C). LITAF encodes a 17 kDa protein containing an N-terminal proline-rich region followed by an evolutionarily-conserved C-terminal 'LITAF domain', which contains all reported CMT1C-associated pathogenic mutations. Here, we report the first structural characterisation of LITAF using biochemical, cell biological, biophysical and NMR spectroscopic approaches. Our structural model demonstrates that LITAF is a monotopic zinc-binding membrane protein that embeds into intracellular membranes via a predicted hydrophobic, in-plane, helical anchor located within the LITAF domain. We show that specific residues within the LITAF domain interact with phosphoethanolamine (PE) head groups, and that the introduction of the V144M CMT1C-associated pathogenic mutation leads to protein aggregation in the presence of PE. In addition to the structural characterisation of LITAF, these data lead us to propose that an aberrant LITAF-PE interaction on the surface of intracellular membranes contributes to the molecular pathogenesis that underlies this currently incurable disease.

  16. Health-related quality of life in people with type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: data from the Brazilian Type 1 Diabetes Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga de Souza, Ana Carolina Contente; Felício, João Soares; Koury, Camila Cavalcante; Neto, João Felício Abrahão; Miléo, Karem Barbosa; Santos, Flávia Marques; Negrato, Carlos Antonio; Motta, Ana Regina Bastos; Silva, Denisson Dias; Arbage, Thaís Pontes; Carvalho, Carolina Tavares; de Rider Brito, Hana Andrade; Yamada, Elizabeth Sumi; Cunha de Melo, Franciane Trindade; Resende, Fabricio de Souza; Ferreira, Juliana Cristina Cardoso; Gomes, Marilia Brito

    2015-12-24

    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (Type 1 DM) affects the psychological and emotional well-being of patients and their families. This study aims to evaluate the health- related quality of life (HRQoL) of people with Type 1 DM in Brazil, a country of continental proportions, using the EuroQol questionnaires. This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, multicenter study performed by the Brazilian Type 1 Diabetes Study Group, by analyzing EuroQol scores from 3,005 participants with Type 1 DM, in 28 public clinics in Brazil. Data on demography, economical status, chronic complications, glycemic control and lipid profile were also collected. The assessment of HRQoL by the EuroQol showed that the average score assigned to general health in Brazil is markedly lower than those found in two other Type 1 DM population-based studies conducted in Europe (EQ-VAS from the Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Brazil were 80.8 ± 15.2, 75.1 ± 18.4 and 72.5 ± 22, respectively). Additionally, our data suggest that a better glycemic control could positively impact the HRQoL of people with Type 1 DM, implying that each 1 % reduction in glycated haemoglobin might lead to an increase of 1.5 points in general health status assessed by the EuroQol. This is a population-based study evaluating the HRQoL of people with Type 1 DM in Brazil. Our data indicate a worse quality of health of people with Type 1 DM in Brazil in comparison to Europe, and suggest that a better glycemic control could positively impact the HRQoL of these individuals. However, this study points to the existence of additional factors not yet evaluated that could be determinant in the HRQoL of these people.

  17. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 and membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase co-regulate axonal outgrowth of mouse retinal ganglion cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaublomme, Djoere; Buyens, Tom; De Groef, Lies

    2014-01-01

    , we were able to show that broad-spectrum MMP inhibition reduces axon outgrowth of mouse retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), implicating MMPs as beneficial factors in axonal regeneration. Additional studies, using more specific MMP inhibitors and MMP-deficient mice, disclosed that both MMP-2 and MT1-MMP......, but not MMP-9, are involved in this process. Furthermore, administration of a novel antibody to MT1-MMP that selectively blocks pro-MMP-2 activation revealed a functional co-involvement of these proteinases in determining RGC axon outgrowth. Subsequent immunostainings showed expression of both MMP-2 and MT1......-MMP in RGC axons and glial cells. Finally, results from combined inhibition of MMP-2 and β1-integrin were suggestive for a functional interaction between these molecules. Overall, our data indicate MMP-2 and MT1-MMP as promising axonal outgrowth-promoting molecules. Axonal regeneration in the central...

  18. Do type 1 fimbriae promote inflammation in the human urinary tract?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergsten, G.; Wullt, B.; Schembri, Mark

    2007-01-01

    occasions, and the host response to type 1 fimbriae was quantified by intraindividual comparisons of the responses to the fim+ or fim- isogens, using cytokines and neutrophils as end-points. Type 1 fimbriae did not promote inflammation and adherence was poor, as examined on exfoliated cells in urine......Type 1 fimbriae have been implicated as virulence factors in animal models of urinary tract infection (UTI), but the function in human disease remains unclear. This study used a human challenge model to examine if type 1 fimbriae trigger inflammation in the urinary tract. The asymptomatic....... This was unexpected, as type 1 fimbriae enhanced the inflammatory response to the same strain in the murine urinary tract and as P fimbrial expression by E. coli 83972 enhances adherence and inflammation in challenged patients. We conclude that type 1 fimbriae do not contribute to the mucosal inflammatory response...

  19. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the carboxy terminus of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein induces alterations in the ionic permeability of Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comardelle, A M; Norris, C H; Plymale, D R; Gatti, P J; Choi, B; Fermin, C D; Haislip, A M; Tencza, S B; Mietzner, T A; Montelaro, R C; Garry, R F

    1997-11-20

    The carboxy-terminal 29 amino acids of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein (HIV-1 TM) are referred to as lentivirus lytic peptide 1 (LLP-1). Synthetic peptides corresponding to LLP-1 have been shown to induce cytolysis and to alter the permeability of cultured cells to various small molecules. To address the mechanisms by which LLP-1 induces cytolysis and membrane permeability changes, various concentrations of LLP-1 were incubated with Xenopus laevis oocytes, and two-electrode, voltage-clamp recording measurements were performed. LLP-1 at concentrations of 75 nM and above induced dramatic alterations in the resting membrane potential and ionic permeability of Xenopus oocytes. These concentrations of LLP-1 appeared to induce a major disruption of plasma membrane electrophysiological integrity. In contrast, concentrations of LLP-1 of 20-50 nM induced changes in membrane ionic permeability that mimic changes induced by compounds, such as the bee venom peptide melittin, that are known to form channel-like structures in biological membranes at sublytic concentrations. An analog of LLP-1 with greatly reduced cytolytic activity failed to alter the electrophysiological properties of Xenopus oocytes. Thus, by altering plasma membrane ionic permeability, the carboxy terminus of TM may contribute to cytolysis of HIV-1-infected CD4+ cells.

  20. Prolonged QTc interval predicts mortality in patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, P; Breum, L; Major-Pedersen, A

    2001-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate prolonged QTc interval and QT dispersion as predictors of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality after adjustment for well-established risk factors in Type 1 diabetic patients. METHODS: From a cohort of all adult Type 1 diabetic patients, duration of diabetes >or= 5 years...... was an independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality. CONCLUSION: QTc prolongation, but not increased QT dispersion, is an independent marker of increased mortality in patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus....

  1. Can We Learn From Viruses How to Prevent Type 1 Diabetes?

    OpenAIRE

    von Herrath, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    We will take a journey from basic pathogenetic mechanisms elicited by viral infections that play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes to clinical interventions, where we will discuss novel combination therapies. The role of viral infections in the development of type 1 diabetes is a rather interesting topic because in experimental models viruses appear capable of both accelerating as well as decelerating the immunological processes leading to type 1 diabetes. Consequently, I will disc...

  2. The Risk and Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Breast Cancer in Women with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Neurofibromatosis Type 1 PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Xia Wang, M.D., Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Henry Ford Health System...Molecular Characteristics of Breast Cancer in Women with Neurofibromatosis Type 1” 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0671 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6... Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in a multi- institutional setting. The first aim is to assess the incidence of breast cancer in this cohort and the clinical

  3. Surgical treatment of pancreatic endocrine tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Cerqueira Cesar Machado

    Full Text Available Surgical approaches to pancreatic endocrine tumors associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 may differ greatly from those applied to sporadic pancreatic endocrine tumors. Presurgical diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is therefore crucial to plan a proper intervention. Of note, hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 should be surgically treated before pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 resection, apart from insulinoma. Non-functioning pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 >1 cm have a high risk of malignancy and should be treated by a pancreatic resection associated with lymphadenectomy. The vast majority of patients with gastrinoma/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 present with tumor lesions at the duodenum, so the surgery of choice is subtotal or total pancreatoduodenectomy followed by regional lymphadenectomy. The usual surgical treatment for insulinoma/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 is distal pancreatectomy up to the mesenteric vein with or without spleen preservation, associated with enucleation of tumor lesions in the pancreatic head. Surgical procedures for glucagonomas, somatostatinomas, and vipomas/ multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 are similar to those applied to sporadic pancreatic endocrine tumors. Some of these surgical strategies for pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 still remain controversial as to their proper extension and timing. Furthermore, surgical resection of single hepatic metastasis secondary to pancreatic endocrine tumors/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 may be curative and even in multiple liver metastases surgical resection is possible. Hepatic trans-arterial chemo-embolization is usually associated with surgical resection. Liver transplantation may be needed for select cases. Finally, pre-surgical clinical and genetic diagnosis of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 syndrome and

  4. Self-stigma of Patients with Type 1 Diabetes and Their Coping Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Nishio, Ikuko; Chujo, Masami

    2017-01-01

    [Background] The purpose of this study was to examine the stigma and coping strategies of patients with type 1 diabetes.[Methods] Data were collected from 24 adult patients with type 1 diabetes via in-depth semi-structured interviews that took place in clinic waiting rooms. Qualitative and descriptive data analysis was conducted to identify stigma and coping strategies of patients with type 1 diabetes.[Results] Stigma of patients with type 1 diabetes consisted of four categories: (i) “hatred ...

  5. Gender differences in Type 1 credit rationing of small businesses in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naranchimeg Mijid

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores Type 1 credit rationing by gender using data from the 1998 and 2003 Survey of Small Business Finances (SSBF. Type 1 credit rationing occurs when borrowers receive a smaller loan than they requested. We use two measures of Type 1 credit rationing to examine whether it is related to gender discrimination in lending. Our results show that women business owners are not likely to be Type 1 rationed. However, newer female-owned firms receive significantly lower loan amounts than requested compared to their male-owned counterparts. We also find that less experienced women receive significantly lower loan amounts compared to less experienced men.

  6. Systematic review with meta-analysis: associations between coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfström, P; Sundström, J; Ludvigsson, J F

    2014-11-01

    In the past decade, a number of population-based studies have examined the prevalence of coeliac disease in individuals with type 1 diabetes but prevalences have differed considerably. To examine the prevalence of coeliac disease in individuals with type 1 diabetes. A systematic review of English-language articles published in PubMed Medline between 2000 and May 2014. Search terms included 'celiac disease' or 'coeliac disease' and 'diabetes mellitus'. Studies were selected with at least 100 individuals with type 1 diabetes being screened for coeliac disease where the coeliac diagnosis was later confirmed through small intestinal biopsy. Data synthesis used random-effects inverse variance-weighted models, and metaregression was used to examine heterogeneity in subgroups. A pooled analysis, based on 26,605 patients with type 1 diabetes, found a prevalence of biopsy-confirmed coeliac disease of 6.0% (95% CI = 5.0-6.9%). Heterogeneity was large (I(2) = 93.2%). The prevalence was lower in adults with type 1 diabetes (2.7%), and in mixed populations with both children and adults with type 1 diabetes (4.7%) than in children (6.2%) with type 1 diabetes (P coeliac disease prevalence between studies. More than one in twenty patients with type 1 diabetes have biopsy-verified coeliac disease. This prevalence is high enough to motivate screening for coeliac disease among patients with type 1 diabetes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Linking chronic infection and autoimmune diseases: Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, SLC11A1 polymorphisms and type-1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Paccagnini

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is still unknown; numerous studies are performed to unravel the environmental factors involved in triggering the disease. SLC11A1 is a membrane transporter that is expressed in late endosomes of antigen presenting cells involved in the immunopathogenic events leading to T1DM. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP has been reported to be a possible trigger in the development of T1DM.Fifty nine T1DM patients and 79 healthy controls were genotyped for 9 polymorphisms of SLC11A1 gene, and screened for the presence of MAP by PCR. Differences in genotype frequency were evaluated for both T1DM patients and controls. We found a polymorphism in the SLC11A1 gene (274C/T associated to type 1 diabetic patients and not to controls. The presence of MAP DNA was also significantly associated with T1DM patients and not with controls.The 274C/T SCL11A1 polymorphism was found to be associated with T1DM as well as the presence of MAP DNA in blood. Since MAP persists within macrophages and it is also processed by dendritic cells, further studies are necessary to evaluate if mutant forms of SLC11A1 alter the processing or presentation of MAP antigens triggering thereby an autoimmune response in T1DM patients.

  8. Isolation of the gene for murine glucose-6-phosphatase, the enzyme deficient in glycogen storage disease type 1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelly, L L; Lei, K J; Pan, C J; Sakata, S F; Ruppert, S; Schutz, G; Chou, J Y

    1993-10-15

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a (von Gierke disease) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase, the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis catalyzing the terminal step in gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis. Despite its clinical importance, this membrane-bound enzyme has eluded molecular characterization. Here we report the cloning and characterization of a murine glucose-6-phosphatase cDNA by screening a mouse liver cDNA library differentially with mRNA populations representing the normal and the albino deletion mouse known to express markedly reduced glucose-6-phosphatase activity. Additionally, we identified the gene that consists of 5 exons. Biochemical analyses indicate that the in vitro expressed enzyme is indistinguishable from mouse liver microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase exhibiting essentially identical kinetic constants, latency, thermal lability, and vanadate sensitivity. The characterization of the murine glucose-6-phosphatase gene opens the way for studying the molecular basis of GSD type 1a in humans and its etiology in an animal model.

  9. Robotic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette

    2008-01-01

    , Vivisection and Strange Metabolisms, were developed at the Centre for Information Technology and Architecture (CITA) at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Copenhagen as a means of engaging intangible digital data with tactile physical material. As robotic membranes, they are a dual examination...

  10. Hydrogen improves glycemic control in type1 diabetic animal model by promoting glucose uptake into skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Amitani

    Full Text Available Hydrogen (H(2 acts as a therapeutic antioxidant. However, there are few reports on H(2 function in other capacities in diabetes mellitus (DM. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of H(2 in glucose transport by studying cultured mouse C2C12 cells and human hepatoma Hep-G2 cells in vitro, in addition to three types of diabetic mice [Streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice, high-fat diet-induced type 2 diabetic mice, and genetically diabetic db/db mice] in vivo. The results show that H(2 promoted 2-[(14C]-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DG uptake into C2C12 cells via the translocation of glucose transporter Glut4 through activation of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K, protein kinase C (PKC, and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, although it did not stimulate the translocation of Glut2 in Hep G2 cells. H(2 significantly increased skeletal muscle membrane Glut4 expression and markedly improved glycemic control in STZ-induced type 1 diabetic mice after chronic intraperitoneal (i.p. and oral (p.o. administration. However, long-term p.o. administration of H(2 had least effect on the obese and non-insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes mouse models. Our study demonstrates that H(2 exerts metabolic effects similar to those of insulin and may be a novel therapeutic alternative to insulin in type 1 diabetes mellitus that can be administered orally.

  11. Shared Genetic Basis for Type 1 Diabetes, Islet Autoantibodies, and Autoantibodies Associated With Other Immune-Mediated Diseases in Families With Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsson, Caroline Anna; Pociot, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a polygenic autoimmune disease that is often present with autoantibodies directed against pancreatic islet proteins. Many genetic susceptibility loci are shared with other autoimmune or immune-mediated diseases that also cosegregate in families with T1D. The aim of this s......Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a polygenic autoimmune disease that is often present with autoantibodies directed against pancreatic islet proteins. Many genetic susceptibility loci are shared with other autoimmune or immune-mediated diseases that also cosegregate in families with T1D. The aim...... of this study was to investigate whether susceptibility loci identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of T1D were also associated with autoantibody positivity in individuals with diabetes. Fifty single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 6,556 multiethnic cases collected by the Type 1...

  12. Increased urinary orosomucoid excretion predicts preeclampsia in pregnant women with pregestational type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, MS; Hesse, D; Ekbom, P

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the urinary orosomucoid excretion (UOE) as a biomarker of preeclampsia and preterm delivery in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes.......We evaluated the urinary orosomucoid excretion (UOE) as a biomarker of preeclampsia and preterm delivery in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes....

  13. Uric acid is not associated with diabetic nephropathy and other complications in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilemann-Lyberg, Sascha; Hansen, Tine Willum; Persson, Frederik

    2018-01-01

    Background: To examine the association between plasma uric acid (UA) and the presence of diabetic complications including diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods: This study, which is cross-sectional in design, included 676 Caucasian type 1...

  14. Decreased body mass index during treatment with sodium oxybate in narcolepsy type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkelshoek, Mink S; Smolders, Isabelle M; Donjacour, Claire E H M; van der Meijden, Wisse P; van Zwet, Erik W; Fronczek, Rolf; Lammers, Gert Jan

    2018-01-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is characterised by an increase in body weight after disease onset, frequently leading to obesity. It was suggested that this weight gain may be counteracted by treatment with sodium oxybate. We here provide longitudinal body mass index data of patients with narcolepsy type 1 after

  15. Seroprevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV1) is a lymphotropic virus which can contribute to carcinogenesis in adult T-cell leukemia, myleopathy and other disorders. 20 million people are affected by this virus in the world. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of human T-cell lymph tropic virus type 1 ...

  16. Impaired sustained attention in adult patients with type 1 diabetes is related to diabetes per se

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Marieke [Leiden Univ., LUMC; Donga, Esther; van Schie, Mojca K. M.; Lammers, Gert Jan; van Zwet, Erik W.; Corssmit, Eleonora P. M.; Romijn, Johannes A.; van Dijk, J. Gert

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundPatients with type 1 diabetes have altered sleep characteristics and are thought to have deficits in sustained attention. We compared the sustained attention to response task (SART) of patients with type 1 diabetes to that of healthy controls, and related results with sleep characteristics

  17. Study of the association between the CAPSL-IL7R locus and type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santiago, J. L.; Alizadeh, B. Z.; Martinez, A.; Espino, L.; de la Calle, H.; Fernandez-Arquero, M.; Figueredo, M. A.; de la Concha, E. G.; Roep, B. O.; Koeleman, B. P. C.; Urcelay, E.

    2008-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis In the past few years, several genes outside the MHC region have been described as new susceptibility genetic factors to type 1 diabetes. An association between CAPSL-rs1445898 and type 1 diabetes was reported in a large white population and corroborated in a genome-wide analysis,

  18. New definition for the partial remission period in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Henrik B; Hougaard, Philip; Swift, Peter

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To find a simple definition of partial remission in type 1 diabetes that reflects both residual beta-cell function and efficacy of insulin treatment. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 275 patients aged type 1 diabetes. After 1, 6, and 12 months...

  19. Chromosome region 2p25 is linked and associated with type 1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a heterogeneous disorder which in- volves both genetic and environmental factors. ... Chromosome region 2p25 is linked and associated with type 1 diabetes in. Colombia. J. Genet. 89, 457–461] ... each primer and 1× Qiagen HotStarTaq Master Mix kit. The allelic sizes were determined using ...

  20. Aberrant gut microbiota composition at the onset of type 1 diabetes in young children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goffau, Marcus C.; Fuentes, Susana; van den Bogert, Bartholomeus; Honkanen, Hanna; de Vos, Willem M.; Welling, Gjalt; Hyoty, Heikki; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    Aims/hypothesis Recent studies indicate that an aberrant gut microbiota is associated with the development of type 1 diabetes, yet little is known about the microbiota in children who have diabetes at an early age. To this end, the microbiota of children aged 1-5 years with new-onset type 1 diabetes

  1. Elevated third-trimester haemoglobin A(1c) predicts preterm delivery in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekbom, Pia; Damm, Peter; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of preterm delivery is considerably elevated in women with type 1 diabetes. The aim of the study was to evaluate haemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) as a predictor of preterm delivery. Two hundred thirteen consecutive pregnant women with type 1 diabetes and normal urinary albumin excretion...

  2. Are family factors universally related to metabolic outcomes in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cameron, F. J.; Skinner, T. C.; de Beaufort, C. E.; Hoey, H.; Swift, P. G. F.; Aanstoot, H.; Aman, J.; Martul, P.; Chiarelli, F.; Daneman, D.; Danne, T.; Dorchy, H.; Kaprio, E. A.; Kaufman, F.; Kocova, M.; Mortensen, H. B.; Njolstad, P. R.; Phillip, M.; Robertson, K. J.; Schoenle, E. J.; Urakami, T.; Vanelli, M.; Ackermann, R. W.; Skovlund, S. E.

    Aims To assess the importance of family factors in determining metabolic outcomes in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes in 19 countries. Methods Adolescents with Type 1 diabetes aged 11-18 years, from 21 paediatric diabetes care centres, in 19 countries, and their parents were invited to participate.

  3. Age at menopause in women with type 1 diabetes mellitus : the OVADIA study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yarde, F.; van der Schouw, Y. T.; de Valk, H. W.; Franx, A.; Eijkemans, M. J. C.; Spierings, W.; Fauser, Bart; Broekmans, F. J. M.

    STUDY QUESTION: Is type 1 diabetes a determinant of advanced ovarian ageing, resulting in an early age at natural menopause? SUMMARY ANSWER: No clear evidence was provided that type 1 diabetes is a determinant of accelerated ovarian ageing resulting in an early menopause. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: The

  4. Clinical hypoglycemic effects of allium cepa (Red Onion) in Type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Type 1 diabetes mellitus is an autoimmune disease caused by destruction of pancreatic islet beta cells and characterized by defect in insulin secretion. Objectives: The present study was carried out to investigate the hypoglycemic effects of Allium cepa in patients with type 1 diabetic patients. Results: In the ...

  5. Retinal vessel calibre and micro- and macrovascular complications in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grauslund, J; Hodgson, L; Kawasaki, R

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the association between retinal vascular calibre and micro- and macrovascular complications in a population-based cohort of Danish type 1 diabetic patients. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 208 long-surviving type 1 diabetic pa...

  6. Steroids in adult men with type 1 diabetes: a tendency to hypogonadism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, Eveline W. C. M.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.; Lentjes, Eef G. W. M.; Romijn, Fred P. T. H. M.; Smulders, Yvo M.; Post, Wendy J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Krans, H. Michiel J.

    2003-01-01

    To compare steroids and their associations in men with type 1 diabetes and healthy control subjects. We studied 52 adult men with type 1 diabetes without microvascular complications, compared with 53 control subjects matched for age and BMI. Steroids and their binding globulins were assessed in a

  7. Cognitive function in adult offspring of women with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tine Dalsgaard; Mortensen, E L; Schmidt, L

    2011-01-01

    Maternal diabetes may affect offspring cognitive function. The objective of the study was to evaluate cognitive function and potential predictors hereof in adult offspring of women with Type 1 diabetes.......Maternal diabetes may affect offspring cognitive function. The objective of the study was to evaluate cognitive function and potential predictors hereof in adult offspring of women with Type 1 diabetes....

  8. DPD epitope-specific glutamic acid decarboxylase GAD)65 autoantibodies in children with Type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    To study whether DPD epitope-specific glutamate decarboxylase autoantibodies are found more frequently in children with milder forms of Type 1 diabetes. We prospectively evaluated 75 children with new-onset autoimmune Type 1 diabetes, in whom we collected demographic, anthropometric and clinical dat...

  9. Erythropoietin and vascular endothelial growth factor as risk markers for severe hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, P L; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Schalkwijk, C

    2010-01-01

    hypoglycaemia in a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes. DESIGN: Prospective observational follow-up study. METHODS: Totally 219 patients with type 1 diabetes (41% females, age 46+/-13 years (mean+/-s.d.), duration of diabetes 21+/-12 years, and HbAlc 8.5+/-1.1%) were followed in a 1-year observational study...

  10. Сorrection of retrograde ejaculation in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kurbatov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a new technique of correction of the retrograde ejaculation in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Currently, treated 12 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and retrograde ejaculation as a manifestation of urogenital form of autonomic diabetic neuropathy. The positive effect of the operation was achieved in 11 of 12 treated patients. Registered 2 cases of physiological pregnancy.

  11. Lessons learned from a lipid lowering trial in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishop Franziska K

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herein, we describe recruitment efforts for a trial of lipid-lowering medications in adolescents with type 1 diabetes, age 12–21 years. Based on our experience, future studies will require multiple centers to enroll a sufficient number of participants for adequate data to direct dyslipidemia medication treatment guidelines for adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

  12. Type 1/Type 2 Cytokine Serum Levels and Role of Interleukin-18 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: In view of the conflicting evidence of helper T cell type 1 (Th1) or type 2 (Th2) pattern of cytokine synthesis in steroid sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS), this study aimed to assess type-1/type-2 cytokines level in different stages of SSNS and to evaluate the role of IL-18. Methods: We prospectively studied ...

  13. Serum adipokines as biomarkers of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Minh Nguyet; Kolb, Hubert; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the adipokines adiponectin, leptin and resistin as serum biomarkers of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes.......We investigated the adipokines adiponectin, leptin and resistin as serum biomarkers of beta-cell function in patients with type 1 diabetes....

  14. Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 in a 12-year-old ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-12-20

    Dec 20, 2011 ... Case Study: Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 in a 12-year-old Ugandan girl. 65. 2013 Volume 18 ... Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type 1 (APS-1), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis- ectodermal dystrophy ... Serum phosphorus, magnesium and vitamin D levels ...

  15. Historical highlights and unsolved problems in glycogen storage disease type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Shimon W

    2002-10-01

    Thirty-three years after Von Gierke described the first patient with glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD1) in 1929, the Coris detected glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency. The first mutation of this enzyme was identified 41 years later and subsequently the gene was mapped to chromosome 17q21, its enzyme topology defined, a nine transmembrane helical model suggested, an enzyme deficient knockout mouse created and by infusing an adenoviral vector associated murine G6Pase gene, correction of the clinical and laboratory abnormalities was observed. A similar successful gene transfer has been performed in enzyme deficient canine puppies. To explain the function of the G6Pase complex, a multicomponent translocase catalytic model has been proposed in which different transporters shuttle glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and glucose across the microsomal membrane. It was suggested that GSD1b patients suffered from a G6P transporter (G6PT) defect and the first mutation in the G6PT gene subsequently recognised. The gene mapped to chromosome 11q23 and its structural organisation was defined which showed a close functional linkage between G6PT and hydrolysis. Nordlie identified the first patient with Pi transport deficiency (GSD1c). However putative GSD1c and 1d patients based on kinetic studies were found to harbour mutations in the G6PT gene so that GSD1 patients are presently divided into 1a and non-1a. G6PT deficient patients suffer from numerical and functional leucocyte defects. A mRNA leucocyte G6PT deficiency has been suggested to account for the glucose phosphorylation and subsequent calcium sequestration defects observed in theses cells. Inflammatory bowel disease which occurs frequently in GSD non-1a patients has been related to their leucocyte abnormalities. Dietary management of GSD1 patients, designed to maintain a normal blood glucose level can be achieved during the night by nocturnal gastric infusions of glucose-containing solution or

  16. Identification of growth hormone receptor in plexiform neurofibromas of patients with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Soares Gonçalves Cunha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of growth hormone receptor in plexiform neurofibromas of neurofibromatosis type 1 patients. INTRODUCTION: The development of multiple neurofibromas is one of the major features of neurofibromatosis type 1. Since neurofibromas commonly grow during periods of hormonal change, especially during puberty and pregnancy, it has been suggested that hormones may influence neurofibromatosis type 1 neurofibromas. A recent study showed that the majority of localized neurofibromas from neurofibromatosis type 1 patients have growth hormone receptor. METHODS: Growth hormone receptor expression was investigated in 5 plexiform neurofibromas using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Four of the 5 plexiform neurofibromas were immunopositive for growth hormone receptor. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that growth hormone may influence the development of plexiform neurofibromas in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1.

  17. Goblet cell carcinoid in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1-a rare combination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Tine; Holt, Nanna; Gronbaek, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are rare tumors primarily located in the gastrointestinal tract. Goblet cell carcinoid is a rare subgroup of neuroendocrine tumors located in the appendix. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by a mutation in the NF1 gene. Patients with neurofib......Neuroendocrine tumors are rare tumors primarily located in the gastrointestinal tract. Goblet cell carcinoid is a rare subgroup of neuroendocrine tumors located in the appendix. Neurofibromatosis type 1 is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by a mutation in the NF1 gene. Patients...... with neurofibromatosis type 1 have an increased incidence of typical neuroendocrine tumors, but it is unknown if this is the case with goblet cell carcinoids. We describe a patient with both neurofibromatosis type 1 and goblet cell carcinoid, that according to literature would occur in 0.00017 per million per year....... This may suggest a previously unknown association between neurofibromatosis type 1 and goblet cell carcinoids....

  18. Serological testing for coeliac disease in Type 1 diabetes mellitus: is immunoglobulin A level measurement necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, M; Leeds, J S; Hopper, A D; Wild, G; Egner, W; Tesfaye, S; Hadjivassiliou, M; Sanders, D S

    2013-07-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) measurement is advocated when case finding for coeliac disease in patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Currently, there is a paucity of contemporary studies assessing IgA deficiency in Type 1 diabetes. This study evaluates the prevalence of IgA deficiency in individuals with Type 1 diabetes, compared with patients with coeliac disease and control subjects. In addition, we evaluate whether routine IgA measurement is justifiable when case finding for coeliac disease in patients with Type 1 diabetes. All patients were assessed using IgA endomysial antibodies, IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies and total IgA levels. Altogether, 2434 individuals were tested: 1000 patients with Type 1 diabetes, 234 patients with coeliac disease and 1200 population control subjects. Definitive IgA deficiency was defined as total IgA levels coeliac disease (1.29%, n = 3/234; P = 0.041) when compared with population control subjects (prevalence of 0.17%, 2/1200). No statistical difference between Type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease for IgA deficiency was identified (P = 0.87). Of patients in the group with Type 1 diabetes, 3.3% (33/1000) had coeliac disease, and of those only one patient had IgA deficiency leading to an antibody-negative presentation. Both IgA-deficient individuals within the population control subjects had normal duodenal biopsies and no relevant symptoms. IgA deficiency is more common in Type 1 diabetes compared with population control subjects. Despite this, very few individuals with Type 1 diabetes and IgA deficiency appear to have villous atrophy on biopsy. These outcomes question the practice of routine IgA measurement when case finding for coeliac disease in patients with Type 1 diabetes. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  19. RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type 1 isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Amanda Perse da; Lopes, Juliana Freitas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of RNA interference to inhibit herpes simplex virus type-1 replication in vitro. For herpes simplex virus type-1 gene silencing, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 gene (sequence si-UL 39-1, si-UL 39-2, and si-UL 39-3) were used, which encode the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an essential enzyme for DNA synthesis. Herpes simplex virus type-1 was isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions from infected patients. All mucocutaneous lesions' samples were positive for herpes simplex virus type-1 by real-time PCR and by virus isolation; all herpes simplex virus type-1 from saliva samples were positive by real-time PCR and 50% were positive by virus isolation. The levels of herpes simplex virus type-1 DNA remaining after siRNA treatment were assessed by real-time PCR, whose results demonstrated that the effect of siRNAs on gene expression depends on siRNA concentration. The three siRNA sequences used were able to inhibit viral replication, assessed by real-time PCR and plaque assays and among them, the sequence si-UL 39-1 was the most effective. This sequence inhibited 99% of herpes simplex virus type-1 replication. The results demonstrate that silencing herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 expression by siRNAs effectively inhibits herpes simplex virus type-1 replication, suggesting that siRNA based antiviral strategy may be a potential therapeutic alternative. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  20. Association of type 1 diabetes and concentrations of drinking water components in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chafe, Roger; Aslanov, Rana; Sarkar, Atanu; Gregory, Peter; Comeau, Alex; Newhook, Leigh Anne

    2018-01-01

    To determine the association between drinking water quality and rates of type 1 diabetes in the Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) population, which has one of the highest incidences of type 1 diabetes reported globally. The study used a community-based, case-control design. We first calculated incidence rates of type 1 diabetes at the provincial, regional and community levels. The connection between incidence rates and components in public water supplies were then analyzed in three ways: to evaluate differences in water quality between communities with and without incident cases of type 1 diabetes, and to analyze the relationship between water quality and incidence rates of type 1 diabetes at both the community and regional levels. The provincial incidence of type 1 diabetes was 51.7/100 000 (0-14 year age group) for the period studied. In the community-based analysis, there were significant associations found between higher concentrations of arsenic (β=0.268, P=0.013) and fluoride (β=0.202, P=0.005) in drinking water and higher incidence of type 1 diabetes. In the regional analysis, barium (β=-0.478, P=0.009) and nickel (β=-0.354, P=0.050) concentrations were negatively associated with incidence of type 1 diabetes. We confirmed the high incidence of type 1 diabetes in NL. We also found that concentrations of some components in drinking water were associated with higher incidence of type 1 diabetes, but no component was found to have a significant association across the three different levels of analysis performed.

  1. Ligand-induced internalization of the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor independent of recognized signaling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawston, Erin E; Harikumar, Kaleeckal G; Miller, Laurence J

    2012-02-01

    distinct from that being studied. This interpretation was further supported by the inability of peptide 309-323 to inhibit its d-Trp-OPE-stimulated internalization. Thus the 309-323 region of the type 1 CCK receptor affects antagonist-stimulated internalization of this receptor, although its mechanism and interacting partner are not yet clear.

  2. Characterization of ryanodine receptor type 1 single channel activity using "on-nucleus" patch clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Larry E; Groom, Linda A; Dirksen, Robert T; Yule, David I

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we provide the first description of the biophysical and pharmacological properties of ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1) expressed in a native membrane using the on-nucleus configuration of the patch clamp technique. A stable cell line expressing rabbit RyR1 was established (HEK-RyR1) using the FLP-in 293 cell system. In contrast to untransfected cells, RyR1 expression was readily demonstrated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry in HEK-RyR1 cells. In addition, the RyR1 agonists 4-CMC and caffeine activated Ca(2+) release that was inhibited by high concentrations of ryanodine. On nucleus patch clamp was performed in nuclei prepared from HEK-RyR1 cells. Raising the [Ca(2+)] in the patch pipette resulted in the appearance of a large conductance cation channel with well resolved kinetics and the absence of prominent subconductance states. Current versus voltage relationships were ohmic and revealed a chord conductance of ∼750pS or 450pS in symmetrical 250mM KCl or CsCl, respectively. The channel activity was markedly enhanced by caffeine and exposure to ryanodine resulted in the appearance of a subconductance state with a conductance ∼40% of the full channel opening with a Po near unity. In total, these properties are entirely consistent with RyR1 channel activity. Exposure of RyR1 channels to cyclic ADP ribose (cADPr), nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) or dantrolene did not alter the single channel activity stimulated by Ca(2+), and thus, it is unlikely these molecules directly modulate RyR1 channel activity. In summary, we describe an experimental platform to monitor the single channel properties of RyR channels. We envision that this system will be influential in characterizing disease-associated RyR mutations and the molecular determinants of RyR channel modulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Infections by an Encephalitic Virus, Mouse Adenovirus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Shanna L.; Pretto, Carla D.; Stier, Matthew T.; Kadiyala, Padma; Castro-Jorge, Luiza; Hsu, Tien-Huei; Doherty, Robert; Carnahan, Kelly E.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) infection causes encephalitis in susceptible strains of mice and alters the permeability of infected brains to small molecules, which indicates disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Under pathological conditions, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) can disrupt the BBB through their proteolytic activity on basement membrane and tight junction proteins. We examined whether MAV-1 infection alters MMP activity in vivo and in vitro. Infected MAV-1-susceptible SJL mice had higher MMP2 and MMP9 activity in brains, measured by gelatin zymography, than mock-infected mice. Infected MAV-1-resistant BALB/c mice had MMP activity levels equivalent to those in mock infection. Primary SJL mouse brain endothelial cells (a target of MAV-1 in vivo) infected ex vivo with MAV-1 had no difference in activities of secreted MMP2 and MMP9 from mock cells. We show for the first time that astrocytes and microglia are also infected in vivo by MAV-1. Infected mixed primary cultures of astrocytes and microglia had higher levels of MMP2 and MMP9 activity than mock-infected cells. These results indicate that increased MMP activity in the brains of MAV-1-infected susceptible mice may be due to MMP activity produced by endothelial cells, astrocytes, and microglia, which in turn may contribute to BBB disruption and encephalitis in susceptible mice. IMPORTANCE RNA and DNA viruses can cause encephalitis; in some cases, this is accompanied by MMP-mediated disruption of the BBB. Activated MMPs degrade extracellular matrix and cleave tight-junction proteins and cytokines, modulating their functions. MAV-1 infection of susceptible mice is a tractable small-animal model for encephalitis, and the virus causes disruption of the BBB. We showed that MAV-1 infection increases enzymatic activity of two key MMPs known to be secreted and activated in neuroinflammation, MMP2 and MMP9, in brains of susceptible mice. MAV-1 infects endothelial cells, astrocytes, and

  4. Adiponectin is associated with early diabetic kidney disease in adults with type 1 diabetes: A Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornstad, Petter; Pyle, Laura; Kinney, Gregory L; Rewers, Marian; Johnson, Richard J; Maahs, David M; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2017-02-01

    The associations between elevated adiponectin and end-stage renal disease are well recognized and thought to be at least partially explained by reduced renal clearance. Conversely, the relationship between adiponectin and early diabetic kidney disease (DKD) with preserved glomerular filtration rate (GFR), including rapid GFR decline and incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) is unclear. We hypothesized that elevated adiponectin would be associated with early DKD in adults with type 1 diabetes. Adults with type 1 diabetes (n=646 at baseline, n=525 at 6years) had adiponectin and renal function by estimated GFR (eGFR) by CKD-EPI creatinine and albumin-excretion rate (AER) evaluated at baseline and 6years. Linear and logistic models evaluated the associations of baseline adiponectin with AER, macroalbuminuria (AER ≥200μg/min), eGFR, CKD (3mL/min/1.73m 2 /year). Models adjusted for age, sex, duration, HbA1c, SBP, LDL-C and current smoking. Compared to non-diabetics, adults with type 1 diabetes had significantly higher adiponectin, and the difference remained significant after adjusting for AER and/or eGFR (ptherapy. Adults with type 1 diabetes have higher adiponectin than their non-diabetic peers, and elevated adiponectin at baseline is independently associated with greater odds of developing early DKD over 6years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in glycogen storage disease type 1b. Results of the European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G.; Rake, J.P.; Labrune, P.; Leonard, J.V.; Moses, S.; Ullrich, K.; Wendel, U.; Groenier, K.H.; Smit, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    Patients with glycogen storage disease type 1b (GSD-1b) have neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction that predispose to frequent infections and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), for which granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) is given. To investigate the use and the value of GCSF treatment in

  6. The specific monomer/dimer equilibrium of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 is established in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Anke; Gibert, Arthur; Lampe, André; Grzesik, Paul; Rutz, Claudia; Furkert, Jens; Schmoranzer, Jan; Krause, Gerd; Wiesner, Burkhard; Schülein, Ralf

    2014-08-29

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the most important drug targets. Although the smallest functional unit of a GPCR is a monomer, it became clear in the past decades that the vast majority of the receptors form dimers. Only very recently, however, data were presented that some receptors may in fact be expressed as a mixture of monomers and dimers and that the interaction of the receptor protomers is dynamic. To date, equilibrium measurements were restricted to the plasma membrane due to experimental limitations. We have addressed the question as to where this equilibrium is established for the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1. By developing a novel approach to analyze single molecule fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy data for intracellular membrane compartments, we show that the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 has a specific monomer/dimer equilibrium that is already established in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). It remains constant at the plasma membrane even following receptor activation. Moreover, we demonstrate for seven additional GPCRs that they are expressed in specific but substantially different monomer/dimer ratios. Although it is well known that proteins may dimerize in the ER in principle, our data show that the ER is also able to establish the specific monomer/dimer ratios of GPCRs, which sheds new light on the functions of this compartment. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Compromised quality of life in patients with both Type 1 diabetes mellitus and coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, S F; Pouwer, F; Tushuizen, M E; Hoogma, R P; Mulder, C J; Simsek, S

    2013-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus and coeliac disease are two chronic illnesses associated with each other. Both diseases and their treatments can seriously impair quality of life. The objective of the present study was to investigate health-related quality of life in adult patients diagnosed with both Type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease and compare this with healthy control subjects and control subjects who have Type 1 diabetes only. A generic measure of health-related quality of life (RAND-36) and a measure of diabetes-specific quality of life (DQOL) questionnaires were sent to patients diagnosed with both Type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease. The control group consisted of patients with Type 1 diabetes without coeliac disease matched for age, gender and socio-economic status. Generic quality of life scores were compared with data from healthy Dutch control subjects. Fifty-seven patients with Type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease were included and no associations between clinical characteristics and quality of life were observed. Women reported a lower quality of life in social functioning, vitality and mental health than men (all P coeliac disease compared with patients with Type 1 diabetes. Compared with healthy control subjects, quality of life in patients with Type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease was significantly lower, particularly social functioning (Cohen's d = 0.76) and general health perception (Cohen's d = 0.86). The additional diagnosis of coeliac disease and treatment by gluten-free diet in adult patients with Type 1 diabetes has a considerable, negative impact on quality of life and diabetes-specific quality of life. Women are particularly affected and social functioning and general health perception is compromised. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  8. Risk Factors for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus among Children and Adolescents in Basrah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athar Abdul Samad Majeed

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Environmental factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus, many of these factors have been uncovered despite much research. A case-control study was carried out to determine the potential maternal, neonatal and early childhood risk factors for type 1 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents in Basrah.Methods: A total of 96 diabetic patients who have been admitted to the pediatric wards at 3 main hospitals in Basrah, and those who have visited primary health care centers over the period from the 4th of November 2006 to the end of May 2007 were recruited. In addition, 299 non-diabetic children were included, their age ranged from 18 months to 17 years.Results: Family history of type 1 diabetes mellitus and thyroid diseases in first and second degree relatives was found to be an independent risk factor for type 1 diabetes mellitus, (p<0.001. Regarding maternal habits and illnesses during pregnancy, the study has revealed that tea drinking during pregnancy is a risk factor for type 1 diabetes mellitus in their offspring, (p<0.05. In addition, maternal pre-eclampsia and infections were found to be significant risk factor for type 1 diabetes mellitus, (p<0.001. Neonatal infections, eczema and rhinitis during infancy were also significantly associated with development of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Moreover, the results revealed that duration of <6 months breast feeding is an important trigger of type 1 diabetes mellitus.Conclusion: Exposure to environmental risk factors during pregnancy (tea drinking, pre-eclampsia, and infectious diseases, neonatal period (respiratory distress, jaundice and infections and early infancy are thought to play an important role in triggering the immune process leading to B-cell destruction and the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

  9. Regulation of type 1 insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptors and IGF-I mRNA by age and nutrition in ovine skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, J M; Martyn, J A; Kirk, S P; Napier, J R; Bass, J J

    1996-02-01

    The relative abundance and location of type 1 IGF receptors in sheep muscles have been measured to determine whether changes occur during post-natal growth and nutritional stress. Using the technique of histological autoradiography, specific binding of 125I-IGF-I in muscle fibre and connective tissue of M. biceps femoris and M. gastrocnemius was demonstrated, as was specific binding to the tendon of M. gastrocnemius and the surrounding connective tissue. The binding site in both muscles was characterised as the type 1 IGF receptor in membrane preparations using competitive binding assay and SDS-PAGE. Type 1 receptors were more abundant in connective tissue than muscle fibre or tendon (P nutritional sensitivity of type 1 receptors are related to cell type in vivo. The overall decline of receptors with increasing age may be a feature of transition from linear animal growth to cell maintenance in adult animals. Connective tissue appears to be more sensitive than muscle fibre to nutrition, possibly allowing the reduction of non-essential metabolism during fasting.

  10. Coexistence of diabetes mellitus type 1 with diffuse systemic sclerosis - case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielosz, Ewa; Kurowska, Maria; Suszek, Dorota; Majdan, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic sclerodactyly is a frequently recognized skin finding that may occur in patients with diabetes mellitus but coexistence of diabetes and systemic sclerosis is rare. We describe a case of coexistence of type 1 diabetes mellitus and systemic sclerosis in 42-year-old man with the history of Raynaud's phenomenon, progressive diffuse hardening of the skin and sclerodactyly, slowly worsening with time. The medical history included type 1 diabetes since childhood with microvascular complications. The patient presented a typical capillaroscopic scleroderma-like pattern, antinuclear antibodies and sclerotic lesions in gastrointestinal system. Summing up, our case represents the rare coexistence of autoimmune diseases like diabetes mellitus type 1 and systemic sclerosis.

  11. Sleep Behaviors and Parent Functioning in Young Children With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Maureen; Herbert, Linda J; Cogen, Fran R; Streisand, Randi

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates sleep characteristics among young children with type 1 diabetes and associations with parent sleep and emotional functioning and diabetes care. Study participants included twenty-four parents of young children with type 1 diabetes (ages 2-5) enrolled in a pilot study of a randomized-controlled trial. Child sleep characteristics were within normal limits. However, increased child bedtime resistance and behavioral insomnia were related to greater parent stress, anxiety, and depression and use of an intensive insulin regimen. Type 1 diabetes management may impact child and parent sleep as well as parent emotional functioning. Implications for practice are presented.

  12. Type 1 diabetes, quality of life, occupational status and education level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helena B.; Ovesen, Louise L.; Mortensen, Laust H.

    2016-01-01

    : Compared to the general population, adults with type 1 diabetes experienced lower health-related quality of life, were more frequently unemployed, had more sick leave per year and were slightly better educated. Differences in health-related quality of life and employment increased with age and were larger......AIM: Type 1 diabetes requires extensive self-management to avoid complications and may have negative effects on the everyday life of people with the disease. The aim of this study was to compare adults with type 1 diabetes to the general population in terms of health-related quality of life......, occupational status (level of employment, working hours and sick leave) and education level. METHODS: 2415 adults (aged 18-98years) with type 1 diabetes were compared to 48,511 adults (aged 18-103years) from the general population. Data were obtained from two cross-sectional surveys conducted in 2010 and 2011...

  13. Validation of Algorithms for Basal Insulin Rate Reductions in Type 1 Diabetic Patients Practising Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Type 1 Diabetes With a Subcutaneous Insulin Pump; Adjustment of the Recommended Basal Insulin Flow Rate in the Event of Physical Activity; Adjustment of the Recommended Prandial Insulin in the Event of Physical Activity

  14. Increasing risk of psychiatric morbidity after childhood onset type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybdal, Daniel; Tolstrup, Janne S; Sildorf, Stine M

    2017-01-01

    of psychiatric disorders as well as the effects of age at onset and duration of type 1 diabetes on the risk of subsequently developing psychiatric morbidities. RESULTS: An increased risk of being diagnosed with mood disorders and anxiety, dissociative, eating, stress-related and somatoform disorders was observed......- or outpatient with type 1 diabetes before the age of 18, and afterwards diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder (n = 5084). Control individuals were matched according to sex and date of birth (n = 35,588). The Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess associations between type 1 diabetes and the incidence...... in both sexes in the years following type 1 diabetes onset, with the highest risk observed five years or more after onset (HR 1.55 [95% CI 1.38, 1.74]). The risk of psychoactive substance-misuse disorders increased significantly only in boys, and the risk of personality disorders increased only in girls...

  15. Type 1 diabetes risk in children born to women with fertility problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hargreave, Marie; Kjaer, Susanne K; Jørgensen, Marit E

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: While some studies have indicated that children born following fertility treatment are at an increased risk for insulin resistance and higher blood glucose levels, no study to date has investigated the risk of type 1 diabetes. In this large population-based cohort study we aim...... to assess the association between maternal fertility problems and the risk of type 1 diabetes in children. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Information on all children, born in Denmark from 1987 to 2010, was extracted from the Civil Registration System and linked with the Danish Infertility Cohort to identify maternal.......1%) were born to women with fertility problems. In all, 313 children born to women with fertility problems (0.36%) and 5176 children born to women without fertility problems (0.28%) were diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The risk of type 1 diabetes was not affected by maternal fertility status (hazard ratio...

  16. Modern technology for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus with end-stage renal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Aleksandrovna Krupinova; Sergei Andreevich Martinov; Alexandra Mikhaylovna Glazunova; Evgeny Vladimirovich Tarasov

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the clinical case of a patient with early development of terminal complications of type 1 diabetes with chronic decompensated carbohydrate metabolism. For 1 year, the patient was treated with hemodialysis and she subsequently underwent successful kidney transplantation.

  17. High osteoprotegerin is associated with development of foot ulcer in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zobel, Emilie H; von Scholten, Bernt Johan; Lajer, Maria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: The bone-related peptide osteoprotegerin has been linked to vascular calcification and peripheral vascular disease. We investigated the association between osteoprotegerin and development of foot complications in persons with type 1 diabetes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective...

  18. Identification of a SIRT1 mutation in a family with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biason-Lauber, Anna; Böni-Schnetzler, Marianne; Hubbard, Basil P

    2013-01-01

    developed an autoimmune disorder: four developed type 1 diabetes, and one developed ulcerative colitis. Initially, a 26-year-old man was diagnosed with the typical features of type 1 diabetes, including lean body mass, autoantibodies, T cell reactivity to β cell antigens, and a rapid dependence on insulin......Type 1 diabetes is caused by autoimmune-mediated β cell destruction leading to insulin deficiency. The histone deacetylase SIRT1 plays an essential role in modulating several age-related diseases. Here we describe a family carrying a mutation in the SIRT1 gene, in which all five affected members...... identify a role for SIRT1 in human autoimmunity and unveil a monogenic form of type 1 diabetes....

  19. Imaging of insulitis and beta cell mass in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Gialleonardo, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Nieuwe tracervloeistof verbetert onderzoek en behandeling diabetes type 1 Met behulp van Positron Emissie Tomografie (PET) kan onderzoek en behandeling van diabetes mogelijk aanzienlijk verbeterd worden. Dat blijkt uit het promotieonderzoek van Valentina Di Gialleonardo. Ontsteking in de

  20. Major Long-Term Benefits of Intensive Therapy for Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with type 1 diabetes are able to take advantage of these remarkable findings and to make intensive ... on Facebook ( American Diabetes Association ), Twitter ( @AmDiabetesAssn ) and Instagram ( @AmDiabetesAssn ) In this section Newsroom Press Releases 2018 ...

  1. Prediction of First Cardiovascular Disease Event in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Dorte; Andersen, Gregers Stig; Hansen, Christian Stevns

    2016-01-01

    AND RESULTS: From 4306 clinically diagnosed adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, we developed a prediction model for estimating the risk of first fatal or nonfatal CVD event (ischemic heart disease, ischemic stroke, heart failure, and peripheral artery disease). Detailed clinical data including......BACKGROUND: Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), but they are currently undertreated. There are no risk scores used on a regular basis in clinical practice for assessing the risk of CVD in type 1 diabetes mellitus. METHODS...... analysis). Second, based on results from the first step, Poisson regression analysis was used to derive the final model. The final CVD prediction model was externally validated in a different population of 2119 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. During a median follow-up of 6.8 years (interquartile...

  2. Evaluation of central nervous system in patients with glycogen storage disease type 1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydemir, Yusuf; Gürakan, Figen; Saltık Temizel, İnci Nur; Demir, Hülya; Oğuz, Kader Karlı; Yalnızoğlu, Dilek; Topçu, Meral; Özen, Hasan; Yüce, Aysel

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate structure and functions of central nervous system (CNS) in children with glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a. Neurological examination, psychometric tests, electroencephalography (EEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), visual evoked potentials (VEP) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) were performed. The results were compared between patients with good and poor metabolic control and healthy children. Twenty-three patients with GSD type 1a were studied. Twelve patients were in poor metabolic control group and 11 patients in good metabolic control group. Five patients had intellectual disability, 10 had EEG abnormalities, seven had abnormal VEP and two had abnormal BAEP results. MRI was abnormal in five patients. There was significant correlation between the number of hypoglycemic attacks and MRI abnormalities. Central nervous system may be affected in GSD type 1a even in patients with normal neurologic examination. Accumulation of abnormal results in patients with poor metabolic control supports the importance of metabolic control in GSD type 1a.

  3. comparative analysis of type 1 and type 2 cassava peeling machines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 CASSAVA PEELING MACHINES. C. Nathan1,* and U. J. Udosen2. 1 DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING FEDERAL POLYTECHNIC MUBI, ADAMAWA STATE, NIGERIA. 2 DEPARTMENT OF PRODUCTION ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF BENIN, BENIN ...

  4. Drugs from the Sea: A Marine Sponge-Derived Compound Prevents Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Van Kaer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one million Americans have Type 1 diabetes. This disease — also known as autoimmune or juvenile diabetes — strikes children suddenly, makes them dependent on insulin injections for life, and carries the constant threat of devastating complications. While it can and does strike adults, nearly half of all new cases are diagnosed in children. A child is diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes every hour. Type 1 diabetes is caused by the inability of a person’s pancreas to produce sufficient amounts of insulin to control their blood sugar levels and sustain life. While insulin injections allow affected individuals to control their blood sugar and stay alive, it is not a cure nor does it prevent the devastating complications of this disease, which include kidney failure, blindness, amputations, heart attack, and stroke. In Type 1 diabetes, the body’s own immune system goes awry, attacking and destroying insulin-producing cells in the pancreas.

  5. An Unusual Case of Fulminant Type 1 Diabetes during the Second Trimester of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Okuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fulminant type 1 diabetes is a new subtype of rapid-onset type 1 diabetes, with pancreatic exocrine dysfunction, that usually develops during the third trimester of pregnancy. We describe a patient with fulminant type 1 diabetes onset during her second trimester, resulting in premature delivery. The 34-year-old woman, without any known risk factors for diabetes mellitus, experienced a sudden stillbirth at 24-weeks gestation. Her blood glucose level was 950 mg/dL and she was positive for urine ketone bodies. The condition met all the diagnostic criteria for fulminant type 1 diabetes, and was diagnosed as such. Although this disease is rare, its progression is rapid, and its clinical course is severe and occasionally leads to death; therefore, a full knowledge of the disease is important to facilitate an accurate diagnosis.

  6. Prevalence of hypertension in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Borch-Johnsen, K

    1990-01-01

    antihypertensive treatment (if any). They were followed-up for a 58 (6-234) month period. We confirmed that hypertension is more common among Type 1 diabetic patients than in the general population and found the prevalence of essential hypertension similar in Type 1 diabetic patients to the non-diabetic population......The prevalence of hypertension in a representative sample (n = 10202) of the Danish general population aged 16-59 years was assessed to 4.4% based on three blood pressure readings. In Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients of similar age (n = 1703) the prevalence was determined in a similar...... way to 14.7% (p less than 0.00001). The excess prevalence in Type 1 diabetic patients was due to hypertension in patients with incipient and clinical nephropathy as the prevalence of hypertension among diabetic patients with normal urinary albumin excretion (essential hypertension) was 3.9%, similar...

  7. Influence of erythropoietin on cognitive performance during experimental hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of severe hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes has not decreased over the past decades. New treatment modalities minimizing the risk of hypoglycemic episodes and attenuating hypoglycemic cognitive dysfunction are needed. We studied if treatment with the neuroprotective hormone...

  8. Dissection of the Pathogenesis of Neurofibromatosis Type 1-Associated Myeloid Leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brannan, Camilynn

    2001-01-01

    Although most of the tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NFl) are benign in nature, malignant transformation of a subset of NF1 tumors is a serious complication, often leading to the death of the patient...

  9. Neurofibromatosis type 1: een overzicht van 196 patiënten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overweg-Plandsoen, W. C.; Weersink, R. G.; Sillevis Smitt, J. H.; Fleury, P.; van Asperen, C. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyse symptoms and complications in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). All patients were examined in a multidisciplinary outpatient neurofibromatosis clinic during a period of 10 years. DESIGN: Retrospective. SETTING: Academic Medical Center, University Hospital Amsterdam,

  10. Dissection of the Pathogenesis of Neurofibromatosis Type 1-Associated myeloid Leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    Although most of the tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NFl) are benign in nature, malignant transformation of a subset of NFl tumors is a serious complication, often leading to the death of the patient...

  11. Dissection of the Pathogenesis of Neurofibromatosis Type 1-Associated Myeloid Leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brannan, Camilynn

    2000-01-01

    Although most of the tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are benign in nature, malignant transformation of a subset of NF1 tumors is a serious complication, often leading to the death of the patient...

  12. Dissection of the Pathogenesis of Neurofibromatosis Type 1-Associated Myeloid Leukemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brannan, Camilynn

    1999-01-01

    Although most of the tumors associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are benign in nature, malignant transformation of a subset of NF1 tumors is a serious complication, often leading to the death of the patient...

  13. Hypoglycemia in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes: predictors and role of metabolic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2008-01-01

    In pregnancy with type 1 diabetes, we evaluated occurrence of mild and severe hypoglycemia and analyzed the influence of strict metabolic control, nausea, vomiting, and other potential predictors of occurrence of severe hypoglycemia....

  14. Medical and Psychological Risk Factors for Incident Hypertension in Type 1 Diabetic African-Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique S. Roy

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions. The development of hypertension in African-Americans living with type 1 diabetes appears to be multifactorial and includes both medical (overt proteinuria as well as psychological (high hostility risk factors.

  15. Prevention of type 1 diabetes by inducing subclinical dermatitis on a small area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engkilde, Kaare; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Hansen, Axel Jacob Kornerup

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We have previously epidemiologically shown that type 1 diabetes is inversely associated with contact allergy. This finding is intriguing as type 1 diabetes and contact allergy are two completely different diseases, although T cells are involved in both diseases. The objective of this s......-obese diabetic mice. The contact allergens gave a non-visible, subclinical dermatitis on the application site. Activation of NKT cells to the ear lymph nodes seems to be involved.......OBJECTIVE: We have previously epidemiologically shown that type 1 diabetes is inversely associated with contact allergy. This finding is intriguing as type 1 diabetes and contact allergy are two completely different diseases, although T cells are involved in both diseases. The objective...

  16. Diabetic Nephropathy and Microalbuminuria in Pregnant Women With Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Julie Agner; Asbjörnsdóttir, Björg; Callesen, Nicoline Foged

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy and microalbuminuria in pregnant women with type 2 diabetes in comparison with type 1 diabetes and to describe pregnancy outcomes in these women following the same antihypertensive protocol....

  17. Dog Exposure During the First Year of Life and Type 1 Diabetes in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernroth, Mona-Lisa; Svennblad, Bodil; Fall, Katja; Fang, Fang; Almqvist, Catarina; Fall, Tove

    2017-07-01

    The association between early exposure to animals and type 1 diabetes in childhood is not clear. To determine whether exposure to dogs during the first year of life is associated with the development of type 1 diabetes in childhood. A nationwide cohort study utilizing high-quality Swedish national demographic and health registers was conducted. A total of 840 593 children born in Sweden from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2010, were evaluated. Type 1 diabetes was identified using diagnosis codes from hospitals and dispensed prescriptions of insulin. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the association between exposure to dogs and risk of type 1 diabetes in childhood. The possible association was further investigated by performing dose-response and breed group-specific analyses. The cohort was followed up until September 30, 2012. Data analysis was conducted from October 15, 2015, to February 8, 2017. Having a parent who was registered as a dog owner during the child's first year of life. Childhood-onset type 1 diabetes. Of the 840 593 children reviewed, 408 272 (48.6%) were girls; mean (SD) age at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes was 5.1 (2.6) years. Dog exposure was identified in 102 035 children (12.1%). Follow-up started at age 1 year, and the children were followed up for as long as 10.7 years (median, 5.5 years). During follow-up, 1999 children developed type 1 diabetes. No association was found between exposure to dogs (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.00; 95% CI, 0.86-1.16) and type 1 diabetes in childhood. The size of the dog (adjusted HR per 10-cm increase in height, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.86-1.06) or number of dogs in the household (1 dog: adjusted HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.91-1.26; 2 dogs: 0.79; 95% CI, 0.54-1.15; ≥3 dogs: 0.50; 95% CI, 0.23-1.12; compared with nonexposed children) also was not associated with type 1 diabetes risk. An analysis of children whose parent had type 1 diabetes (210 events) yielded an adjusted HR of 0.71 (95% CI, 0

  18. Facial Plexiform neurofibromatosis in a patient with neurofibromatosis type1: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffat Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plexiform neurofibroma is a poorly circumscribed, diffuse enlargement of neural sheets that typically involves major nerve trunks of the head and neck region because of the rich innervations of this area. It is a benign tumor and is a virtually pathognomonic and often disabling feature of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1 or Von Recklinghausen’s disease. We hereby report a case of facial neurofibroma in an adult female with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1.

  19. Morphological and immunohistochemical comparison of intrapancreatic nerves between chronic pancreatitis and type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kota; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Yanagawa, Masato; Tomiyama, Takashi; Fukui, Toshiro; Uchida, Kazushige; Takaoka, Makoto; Nishio, Akiyoshi; Uemura, Yoshiko; Satoi, Sohei; Yamada, Hisao; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    The abdominal pain associated with chronic pancreatitis (CP) may be related to the increased number and size of intrapancreatic nerves. On the other hand, patients with type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) rarely suffer from the pain syndrome, and there are no previous studies concerning the histopathological findings of intrapancreatic nerves in patients with type 1 AIP. The current study is aimed at investigating the differences in the histopathological and immunohistochemical findings of intrapancreatic nerves in patients with CP and type 1 AIP. Neuroanatomical differences between CP and type 1 AIP were assessed by immunostaining with a pan-neuronal marker, protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5). The number (neural density) and area (neural hypertrophy) of PGP9.5-immunopositive nerves were quantitatively analyzed. Furthermore, the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF), and a high affinity receptor for NGF, tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA), was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Both neural density and hypertrophy were significantly greater in pancreatic tissue samples from patients with CP than those with normal pancreas or type 1 AIP. NGF expression was stronger in type 1 AIP than in CP, whereas TrkA expression in type 1 AIP was poorer than in CP. Although CP and type 1 AIP are both characterized by the presence of sustained pancreatic inflammation, they are different in terms of the density and hypertrophy of intrapancreatic nerve fibers. It is possible that this may be related to the difference in the activity of the NGF/TrkA-pathway between the two types of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Protection Against Type 1 Diabetes Upon Coxsackievirus B4 Infection and iNKT-Cell Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ghazarian, Liana; Diana, Julien; Beaudoin, Lucie; Larsson, Pär G.; Puri, Raj K.; van Rooijen, Nico; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin; Lehuen, Agnès

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells belong to the innate immune system and exercise a dual role as potent regulators of autoimmunity and participate in responses against different pathogens. They have been shown to prevent type 1 diabetes development and to promote antiviral responses. Many studies in the implication of environmental factors on the etiology of type 1 diabetes have suggested a link between enteroviral infections and the development of this disease. This study of the pancre...