WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-universal scalar masses

  1. Cosmology or Catastrophe? A non-minimally coupled scalar in an inhomogeneous universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caputa, Paweł; Haque, Sheikh Shajidul; Olson, Joseph; Underwood, Bret

    2013-01-01

    A non-minimally coupled scalar field can have, in principle, a negative effective Planck mass squared which depends on the scalar field. Surprisingly, an isotropic and homogeneous cosmological universe with a non-minimally coupled scalar field is perfectly smooth as the rolling scalar field causes the effective Planck mass to change sign and pass through zero. However, we show that any small deviations from homogeneity diverge as the effective Planck mass vanishes, with catastrophic consequences for the cosmology. The physical origin of the divergence is due to the presence of non-zero scalar anisotropic stress from the non-minimally coupled scalar field. Thus, while the homogeneous and isotropic cosmology appears surprisingly sensible when the effective Planck mass vanishes, inhomogeneities tell a different story. (paper)

  2. Supersymmetry Searches in GUT Models with Non-Universal Scalar Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Cannoni, M.; Gómez, M.E.; Lola, S.; Ruiz de Austri, R.

    2016-03-22

    We study SO(10), SU(5) and flipped SU(5) GUT models with non-universal soft supersymmetry-breaking scalar masses, exploring how they are constrained by LHC supersymmetry searches and cold dark matter experiments, and how they can be probed and distinguished in future experiments. We find characteristic differences between the various GUT scenarios, particularly in the coannihilation region, which is very sensitive to changes of parameters. For example, the flipped SU(5) GUT predict the possibility of $\\tilde{t}_1-\\chi$ coannihilation, which is absent in the regions of the SO(10) and SU(5) GUT parameter spaces that we study. We use the relic density predictions in different models to determine upper bounds for the neutralino masses, and we find large differences between different GUT models in the sparticle spectra for the same LSP mass, leading to direct connections of distinctive possible experimental measurements with the structure of the GUT group. We find that future LHC searches for generic missing $E_T$...

  3. Supersymmetry searches in GUT models with non-universal scalar masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannoni, M.; Gómez, M.E. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Experimentales, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Ellis, J. [Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Physics Department, King' s College London, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Lola, S. [Department of Physics, University of Patras, 26500 Patras (Greece); De Austri, R. Ruiz, E-mail: mirco.cannoni@dfa.uhu.es, E-mail: John.Ellis@cern.ch, E-mail: mario.gomez@dfa.uhu.es, E-mail: magda@physics.upatras.gr, E-mail: rruiz@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, IFIC-UV/CSIC, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-03-01

    We study SO(10), SU(5) and flipped SU(5) GUT models with non-universal soft supersymmetry-breaking scalar masses, exploring how they are constrained by LHC supersymmetry searches and cold dark matter experiments, and how they can be probed and distinguished in future experiments. We find characteristic differences between the various GUT scenarios, particularly in the coannihilation region, which is very sensitive to changes of parameters. For example, the flipped SU(5) GUT predicts the possibility of ∼t{sub 1}−χ coannihilation, which is absent in the regions of the SO(10) and SU(5) GUT parameter spaces that we study. We use the relic density predictions in different models to determine upper bounds for the neutralino masses, and we find large differences between different GUT models in the sparticle spectra for the same LSP mass, leading to direct connections of distinctive possible experimental measurements with the structure of the GUT group. We find that future LHC searches for generic missing E{sub T}, charginos and stops will be able to constrain the different GUT models in complementary ways, as will the Xenon 1 ton and Darwin dark matter scattering experiments and future FERMI or CTA γ-ray searches.

  4. Rotational perturbations of Friedmann universes in Einstein zero mass scalar theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krori, K.D.; Sarmah, J.C.; Goswami, D.

    1983-01-01

    The authors find that except in the case of 'perfect dragging', the zero mass scalar field has a damping effect on the rotation of matter. One of the three cases studied here shows that the scalar field may exist only during a certain interval in the course of the evolution of the universe. The zero mass scaler field has acquired particular importance recently because of a suggestion by Weinberg and Wilezek that there should exist a pseudo-scalar boson, the so-called axion, of negligible mass

  5. New holographic scalar field models of dark energy in non-flat universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, K., E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fehri, J. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-02-08

    Motivated by the work of Granda and Oliveros [L.N. Granda, A. Oliveros, Phys. Lett. B 671 (2009) 199], we generalize their work to the non-flat case. We study the correspondence between the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models with the new holographic dark energy model in the non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics for these scalar field models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe. In the limiting case of a flat universe, i.e. k=0, all results given in [L.N. Granda, A. Oliveros, Phys. Lett. B 671 (2009) 199] are obtained.

  6. New holographic scalar field models of dark energy in non-flat universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K.; Fehri, J.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the work of Granda and Oliveros [L.N. Granda, A. Oliveros, Phys. Lett. B 671 (2009) 199], we generalize their work to the non-flat case. We study the correspondence between the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models with the new holographic dark energy model in the non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics for these scalar field models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe. In the limiting case of a flat universe, i.e. k=0, all results given in [L.N. Granda, A. Oliveros, Phys. Lett. B 671 (2009) 199] are obtained.

  7. Universal contributions to scalar masses from five dimensional supergravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dudas, Emilian

    2012-01-01

    We compute the effective Kahler potential for matter fields in warped compactifications, starting from five dimensional gauged supergravity, as a function of the matter fields localization. We show that truncation to zero modes is inconsistent and the tree-level exchange of the massive gravitational multiplet is needed for consistency of the four-dimensional theory. In addition to the standard Kahler coming from dimensional reduction, we find the quartic correction coming from integrating out the gravity multiplet. We apply our result to the computation of scalar masses, by assuming that the SUSY breaking field is a bulk hypermultiplet. In the limit of extreme opposite localization of the matter and the spurion fields, we find zero scalar masses, consistent with sequestering arguments. Surprisingly enough, for all the other cases the scalar masses are tachyonic. This suggests the holographic interpretation that a CFT sector always generates operators contributing in a tachyonic way to scalar masses. Viability...

  8. b-τ unification with gaugino and s fermion mass non-universality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallis, C.

    2004-01-01

    In the context of a SUSY GUT inspired MSSM version, the low energy consequences of the asymptotic b-τ Yukawa coupling unification are examined, under the assumption of universal or non-universal boundary conditions for the gaugino and s fermion masses. Gaugino non-universality is applied, so that the SUSY corrections to b-quark mass can be reconciled with the present experimental data on muon anomalous magnetic moment. Restrictions on the parameter space, originating from the cold dark matter abundance in the universe, the inclusive branching ratio of b→sγ and the accelerator data are, also, investigated and the scalar neutralino-proton cross section is calculated. In the case of a bino-like LSP and universal boundary conditions for the s fermion masses, the constraints, arising from the cold dark matter and BR(b→sγ) can be simultaneously satisfied, mainly thanks to the A-pole effect or the neutralino-stau coannihilations. In addition, s fermion mass non-universality provides the possibility of new coannihilation phenomena (neutralino-sbottom or neutralino-tau sneutrino-stau), which facilitate the simultaneous satisfaction of all the above requirements. In both cases above, the neutralino abundance can essentially decrease for a wino or higgsino like LSP creating regions of parameter space with additional neutralino-chargino and/or heavier neutralino coannihilations. The neutralino-sbottom mass proximity significantly ameliorates the detectability of LSP

  9. Scalar quarkonium masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.; Weingarten, D.

    1996-01-01

    We evaluate the valence approximation to the mass of scalar quarkonium for a range of different parameters. Our results strongly suggest that the infinite volume continuum limit of the mass of ss scalar quarkonium lies well below the mass of f J (1710). The resonance f 0 (1500) appears to the best candidate for ss scalar quarkonium. (orig.)

  10. Interacting new agegraphic tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models of dark energy in non-flat universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, K., E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledian, M.S.; Felegary, F.; Azarmi, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-03-29

    We study the correspondence between the tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models with the interacting new agegraphic dark energy model in the non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics for these scalar field models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe.

  11. Interacting new agegraphic tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models of dark energy in non-flat universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K.; Khaledian, M.S.; Felegary, F.; Azarmi, Z.

    2010-01-01

    We study the correspondence between the tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models with the interacting new agegraphic dark energy model in the non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics for these scalar field models, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe.

  12. Lower Limits on Soft Supersymmetry-Breaking Scalar Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.; Olive, Keith A.; Ellis, John; Olive, Keith A.

    2002-01-01

    Working in the context of the CMSSM, we argue that phenomenological constraints now require the universal soft supersymmetry-breaking scalar mass m_0 be non-zero at the input GUT scale. This conclusion is primarily imposed by the LEP lower limit on the Higgs mass and the requirement that the lightest supersymmetric particle not be charged. We find that m_0 > 0 for all tan beta if mu 0 only when tan beta sim 8 and one allows an uncertainty of 3+ GeV in the theoretical calculation of the Higgs mass. Upper limits on flavour-changing neutral interactions in the MSSM squark sector allow substantial violations of non-universality in the m_0 values, even if their magnitudes are comparable to the lower limit we find in the CMSSM. Also, we show that our lower limit on m_0 at the GUT scale in the CMSSM is compatible with the no-scale boundary condition m_0 = 0 at the Planck scale.

  13. Non-universal gaugino mass GUT models in the light of dark matter and LHC constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakrabortty, Joydeep; Mohanty, Subhendra; Rao, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    We perform a comprehensive study of SU(5), SO(10) and E(6) supersymmetric GUT models where the gaugino masses are generated through the F-term breaking vacuum expectation values of the non-singlet scalar fields. In these models the gauginos are non-universal at the GUT scale unlike in the mSUGRA scenario. We discuss the properties of the LSP which is stable and a viable candidate for cold dark matter. We look for the GUT scale parameter space that leads to the the lightest SM like Higgs mass in the range of 122–127 GeV compatible with the observations at ATLAS and CMS, the relic density in the allowed range of WMAP-PLANCK and compatible with other constraints from colliders and direct detection experiments. We scan universal scalar (m 0 G ), trilinear coupling A 0 and SU(3) C gaugino mass (M 3 G ) as the independent free parameters for these models. Based on the gaugino mass ratios at the GUT scale, we classify 25 SUSY GUT models and find that of these only 13 models satisfy the dark matter and collider constraints. Out of these 13 models there is only one model where there is a sizeable SUSY contribution to muon (g−2)

  14. On the creation of scalar particles in an early stage of the Friedmann closed-universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hideki; Nariai, Hidekazu.

    1982-03-01

    Under impetus of the two experimental studies on neutrinos by Reines-group and Lyubimov's, it has been shown by Zel'dovich et al. that the cosmological universe is closed, provided that the neutrino masses m sub(#betta#sub(i)) (i = e, μ, tau) satisfy the inequality μ/i m sub(#betta#sub(i))c 2 >= 20 ev. In a previous paper, the senior author dealt with the creation of scalar particles in an expanding universe with non-flat 3-space, but the case of a closed universe was practically ignored owing to the situation that the positive frequency part (in the sense of the author) of a quantized scalar field is not well-defined in that universe. In view of these circumstances, the creation of scalar particles in an early stage of the Friedmann closed-universe is searched for, on the supposition that the Fulling condition is preferable to define the positive frequency part in question near the early stage (as well as the later one). (author)

  15. Scalar field mass in generalized gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2009-01-01

    The notions of mass and range of a Brans-Dicke-like scalar field in scalar-tensor and f(R) gravity are subject to an ambiguity that hides a potential trap. We spell out this ambiguity and identify a physically meaningful and practical definition for these quantities. This is relevant when giving a mass to this scalar in order to circumvent experimental limits on the PPN parameters coming from solar system experiments.

  16. Primordial black holes from scalar field evolution in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Eric; Kusenko, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Scalar condensates with large expectation values can form in the early universe, for example, in theories with supersymmetry. The condensate can undergo fragmentation into Q-balls before decaying. If the Q-balls dominate the energy density for some period of time, statistical fluctuations in their number density can lead to formation of primordial black holes (PBH). In the case of supersymmetry the mass range is limited from above by 1 023 g . For a general charged scalar field, this robust mechanism can generate black holes over a much broader mass range, including the black holes with masses of 1-100 solar masses, which is relevant for LIGO observations of gravitational waves. Topological defects can lead to formation of PBH in a similar fashion.

  17. The MSSM Parameter Space with Non-Universal Higgs Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Santoso, Y; Ellis, John; Olive, Keith A.; Santoso, Yudi

    2002-01-01

    Without assuming that Higgs masses have the same values as other scalar masses at the input GUT scale, we combine constraints on the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) coming from the cold dark matter density with the limits from direct searches at accelerators such as LEP, indirect measurements such as b to s gamma decay and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. The requirement that Higgs masses-squared be positive at the GUT scale imposes important restrictions on the MSSM parameter space, as does the requirement that the LSP be neutral. We analyze the interplay of these constraints in the (mu, m_A), (mu, m_{1/2}), (m_{1/2}, m_0) and (m_A, tan beta) planes. These exhibit new features not seen in the corresponding planes in the constrained MSSM in which universality is extended to Higgs masses.

  18. Phenomenology of non-universal gaugino masses and implications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    universal gaugino masses for the phenomenology of Higgs bosons in the context of large hadron collider. Keywords. Supersymmetry; non-universal gaugino masses; Higgs bosons. PACS Nos 12.60.Jv; 11.30.Er; 14.80.Ly. 1. Introduction.

  19. Reconstructing interacting entropy-corrected holographic scalar field models of dark energy in the non-flat universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, K; Khaledian, M S [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Street, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jamil, Mubasher, E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: MS.Khaledian@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: mjamil@camp.nust.edu.pk [Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics (CAMP), National University of Sciences and Technology (NUST), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-02-15

    Here we consider the entropy-corrected version of the holographic dark energy (DE) model in the non-flat universe. We obtain the equation of state parameter in the presence of interaction between DE and dark matter. Moreover, we reconstruct the potential and the dynamics of the quintessence, tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models according to the evolutionary behavior of the interacting entropy-corrected holographic DE model.

  20. One-loop masses of open-string scalar fields in string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Noriaki

    2008-01-01

    In phenomenological models with D-branes, there are in general open-string massless scalar fields, in addition to closed-string massless moduli fields corresponding to the compactification. It is interesting to focus on the fate of such scalar fields in models with broken supersymmetry, because no symmetry forbids their masses. The one-loop effect may give non-zero masses to them, and in some cases mass squared may become negative, which means the radiative gauge symmetry breaking. In this article we investigate and propose a simple method for calculating the one-loop corrections using the boundary state formalism. There are two categories of massless open-string scalar fields. One consists the gauge potential fields corresponding to compactified directions, which can be understood as scalar fields in uncompactified space-time (related with Wilson line degrees of freedom). The other consists 'gauge potential fields' corresponding to transverse directions of D-brane, which emerge as scalar fields in D-brane world-volume (related with brane moduli fields). The D-brane boundary states with constant backgrounds of these scalar fields are constructed, and one-loop scalar masses are calculated in the closed string picture. Explicit calculations are given in the following four concrete models: one D25-brane with a circle compactification in bosonic string theory, one D9-brane with a circle compactification in superstring theory, D3-branes at a supersymmetric C 3 /Z 3 orbifold singularity, and a model of brane supersymmetry breaking with D3-branes and anti-D7-branes at a supersymmetric C 3 /Z 3 orbifold singularity. We show that the sign of the mass squared has a strong correlation with the sign of the related open-string one-loop vacuum amplitude.

  1. Structures of conserved currents and mass spectra for scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Meiun.

    1979-05-01

    Considering the commutators between a scalar field and a conserved current, we shall clarify the connection between the mass spectrum for a scalar field and the structures of a current. For a special form of currents involving c-number functions, non-invariance of the vacuum under the corresponding transformation entails the existence of a massive mode. It is shown that once a type of currents is specified, the pole structures for sub(o) depend only on c-number parts of J sub(μ)(x). We shall show that non-vanishing Goldstone commutator does not automatically imply the degeneracy of the vacuum state, and discuss the applicability of the Goldstone theorem. (author)

  2. Rapidly rotating neutron stars with a massive scalar field—structure and universal relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doneva, Daniela D.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    2016-01-01

    We construct rapidly rotating neutron star models in scalar-tensor theories with a massive scalar field. The fact that the scalar field has nonzero mass leads to very interesting results since the allowed range of values of the coupling parameters is significantly broadened. Deviations from pure general relativity can be very large for values of the parameters that are in agreement with the observations. We found that the rapid rotation can magnify the differences several times compared to the static case. The universal relations between the normalized moment of inertia and quadrupole moment are also investigated both for the slowly and rapidly rotating cases. The results show that these relations are still EOS independent up to a large extend and the deviations from pure general relativity can be large. This places the massive scalar-tensor theories amongst the few alternative theories of gravity that can be tested via the universal I -Love- Q relations.

  3. Rapidly rotating neutron stars with a massive scalar field—structure and universal relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doneva, Daniela D.; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S., E-mail: daniela.doneva@uni-tuebingen.de, E-mail: yazad@phys.uni-sofia.bg [Theoretical Astrophysics, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen 72076 (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    We construct rapidly rotating neutron star models in scalar-tensor theories with a massive scalar field. The fact that the scalar field has nonzero mass leads to very interesting results since the allowed range of values of the coupling parameters is significantly broadened. Deviations from pure general relativity can be very large for values of the parameters that are in agreement with the observations. We found that the rapid rotation can magnify the differences several times compared to the static case. The universal relations between the normalized moment of inertia and quadrupole moment are also investigated both for the slowly and rapidly rotating cases. The results show that these relations are still EOS independent up to a large extend and the deviations from pure general relativity can be large. This places the massive scalar-tensor theories amongst the few alternative theories of gravity that can be tested via the universal I -Love- Q relations.

  4. Non-Gaussianity from self-ordering scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa, Daniel G.; Caldwell, Robert R.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The Universe may harbor relics of the post-inflationary epoch in the form of a network of self-ordered scalar fields. Such fossils, while consistent with current cosmological data at trace levels, may leave too weak an imprint on the cosmic microwave background and the large-scale distribution of matter to allow for direct detection. The non-Gaussian statistics of the density perturbations induced by these fields, however, permit a direct means to probe for these relics. Here we calculate the bispectrum that arises in models of self-ordered scalar fields. We find a compact analytic expression for the bispectrum, evaluate it numerically, and provide a simple approximation that may be useful for data analysis. The bispectrum is largest for triangles that are aligned (have edges k 1 ≅2k 2 ≅2k 3 ) as opposed to the local-model bispectrum, which peaks for squeezed triangles (k 1 ≅k 2 >>k 3 ), and the equilateral bispectrum, which peaks at k 1 ≅k 2 ≅k 3 . We estimate that this non-Gaussianity should be detectable by the Planck satellite if the contribution from self-ordering scalar fields to primordial perturbations is near the current upper limit.

  5. Phase Transitions in the Early Universe: The Cosmology of Non-Minimal Scalar Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kost, Jeffrey D.

    Light scalar fields such as axions and string moduli can play an important role in early-universe cosmology. However, many factors can significantly impact their late-time cosmological abundances. For example, in cases where the potentials for these fields are generated dynamically--such as during cosmological mass-generating phase transitions--the duration of the time interval required for these potentials to fully develop can have significant repercussions. Likewise, in scenarios with multiple scalars, mixing amongst the fields can also give rise to an effective timescale that modifies the resulting late-time abundances. Previous studies have focused on the effects of either the first or the second timescale in isolation. In this thesis, by contrast, we examine the new features that arise from the interplay between these two timescales when both mixing and time-dependent phase transitions are introduced together. First, we find that the effects of these timescales can conspire to alter not only the total late-time abundance of the system--often by many orders of magnitude--but also its distribution across the different fields. Second, we find that these effects can produce large parametric resonances which render the energy densities of the fields highly sensitive to the degree of mixing as well as the duration of the time interval over which the phase transition unfolds. Finally, we find that these effects can even give rise to a "re-overdamping" phenomenon which causes the total energy density of the system to behave in novel ways that differ from those exhibited by pure dark matter or vacuum energy. All of these features therefore give rise to new possibilities for early-universe phenomenology and cosmological evolution. They also highlight the importance of taking into account the time dependence associated with phase transitions in cosmological settings. In the second part of this thesis, we proceed to study the early-universe cosmology of a Kaluza-Klein (KK

  6. Investigation of Scalar Implicatures of Binus University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Herlina Karjo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Scalar implicatures are based on a range of quantifiers ordered in terms of informational strength, for example in quantity: some, most, all; in frequency: sometimes, often, and always. This study measures the scalar implicatures among university students who learn English as a foreign language. The participants for this study are fourth semester English Department students at Binus University. Using the same instruments as in Slabakova (2009 and Noveck’s study (2001 the present study aims to find out the general ability of the university students of computing scalar implicatures and to discover the level of pragmatic/logical competence of the university students with regards to their gender and grade point average. The results show that the students with GPA lower than three are more logical than those with GPA higher than three; while female students are more pragmatic than male students.

  7. Accelerating Universe and the Scalar-Tensor Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunori Fujii

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available To understand the accelerating universe discovered observationally in 1998, we develop the scalar-tensor theory of gravitation originally due to Jordan, extended only minimally. The unique role of the conformal transformation and frames is discussed particularly from a physical point of view. We show the theory to provide us with a simple and natural way of understanding the core of the measurements, Λobs ∼ t0−2 for the observed values of the cosmological constant and today’s age of the universe both expressed in the Planckian units. According to this scenario of a decaying cosmological constant, Λobs is this small only because we are old, not because we fine-tune the parameters. It also follows that the scalar field is simply the pseudo Nambu–Goldstone boson of broken global scale invariance, based on the way astronomers and astrophysicists measure the expansion of the universe in reference to the microscopic length units. A rather phenomenological trapping mechanism is assumed for the scalar field around the epoch of mini-inflation as observed, still maintaining the unmistakable behavior of the scenario stated above. Experimental searches for the scalar field, as light as ∼ 10−9 eV, as part of the dark energy, are also discussed.

  8. The dark sector from interacting canonical and non-canonical scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Souza, Rudinei C; Kremer, Gilberto M

    2010-01-01

    In this work general models with interactions between two canonical scalar fields and between one non-canonical (tachyon type) and one canonical scalar field are investigated. The potentials and couplings to the gravity are selected through the Noether symmetry approach. These general models are employed to describe interactions between dark energy and dark matter, with the fields being constrained by the astronomical data. The cosmological solutions of some cases are compared with the observed evolution of the late Universe.

  9. Early universe with modified scalar-tensor theory of gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Ranajit; Sarkar, Chandramouli; Sanyal, Abhik Kumar

    2018-05-01

    Scalar-tensor theory of gravity with non-minimal coupling is a fairly good candidate for dark energy, required to explain late-time cosmic evolution. Here we study the very early stage of evolution of the universe with a modified version of the theory, which includes scalar curvature squared term. One of the key aspects of the present study is that, the quantum dynamics of the action under consideration ends up generically with de-Sitter expansion under semiclassical approximation, rather than power-law. This justifies the analysis of inflationary regime with de-Sitter expansion. The other key aspect is that, while studying gravitational perturbation, the perturbed generalized scalar field equation obtained from the perturbed action, when matched with the perturbed form of the background scalar field equation, relates the coupling parameter and the potential exactly in the same manner as the solution of classical field equations does, assuming de-Sitter expansion. The study also reveals that the quantum theory is well behaved, inflationary parameters fall well within the observational limit and quantum perturbation analysis shows that the power-spectrum does not deviate considerably from the standard one obtained from minimally coupled theory.

  10. Lifting scalar-quark and -lepton masses with sideways U(1)-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, J.F.; Wada, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenological consequences of an SUSY model with a gauged O'Raifeartaigh sector on scalar partner masses. The model has the gauge symmetry SU(5) x U(1). We find that this form of spontaneous SUSY breaking leads to large scalar partner masses through one loop graphs without changing quark and lepton masses from tree values, and without breaking SU(5) symmetries by the scalar partner sector. To calculate the scalar partner masses we extend previous work on supergraph techniques to include cases when SUSY is broken at tree level. We are able to sum exactly the corrections to unbroken propagators with the aid of a supersymmetric version of tree-level Dyson equations. We show how the same ideas can be implemented in an SU(5) gauge model where the normal Higgs give large masses radiatively to the scalar-quarks and -leptons. 7 references

  11. Scalar-Tensor Black Holes Embedded in an Expanding Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakova, Daria; Latosh, Boris

    2018-02-01

    In this review we focus our attention on scalar-tensor gravity models and their empirical verification in terms of black hole and wormhole physics. We focus on a black hole, embedded in an expanding universe, describing both cosmological and astrophysical scales. We show that in scalar-tensor gravity it is quite common that the local geometry is isolated from the cosmological expansion, so that it does not backreact on the black hole metric. We try to extract common features of scalar-tensor black holes in an expanding universe and point out the gaps that must be filled.

  12. Scalar-Tensor Black Holes Embedded in an Expanding Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Tretyakova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we focus our attention on scalar-tensor gravity models and their empirical verification in terms of black hole and wormhole physics. We focus on black holes, embedded in an expanding universe, describing both cosmological and astrophysical scales. We show that in scalar-tensor gravity it is quite common that the local geometry is isolated from the cosmological expansion, so that it does not backreact on the black hole metric. We try to extract common features of scalar-tensor black holes in an expanding universe and point out the issues that are not fully investigated.

  13. On a quantized scalar field in the de Sitter and Nariai universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu.

    1984-08-01

    After canonical quantization of a massive or massless scalar field in the de Sitter and Nariai universes (both of which satisfy the same Einstein equations with a non-vanishing cosmological constant, Rsub(μν)=Agsub(μν), but their topological structures differ from each other), the uniquely obtained 4-dimensional commutation functions in both universes are comparatively studied with due emphasis on their topological structures, as well as the difference of couplings to the background universe. (author)

  14. A new two-faced scalar solution and cosmological SUSY breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmakova, Marina

    2010-01-01

    We propose a possible new way to resolve the long standing problem of strong supersymmetry breaking coexisting with a small cosmological constant. We consider a scalar component of a minimally coupled N = 1 supermultiplet in a general Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) expanding universe. We argue that a tiny term, proportional to H 2 ∼ 10 -122 in Plank's units, appearing in the field equations due to this expansion will provide both, the small vacuum energy and the heavy mass of the scalar supersymmetric partner. We present a non-perturbative solution for the scalar field with an unusual dual-frequency behavior. This solution has two characteristic mass scales related to the Hubble parameter as H 1/4 and H 1/2 measured in Plank's units.

  15. Effect of scalar field mass on gravitating charged scalar solitons and black holes in a cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponglertsakul, Supakchai, E-mail: supakchai.p@gmail.com; Winstanley, Elizabeth, E-mail: E.Winstanley@sheffield.ac.uk

    2017-01-10

    We study soliton and black hole solutions of Einstein charged scalar field theory in cavity. We examine the effect of introducing a scalar field mass on static, spherically symmetric solutions of the field equations. We focus particularly on the spaces of soliton and black hole solutions, as well as studying their stability under linear, spherically symmetric perturbations of the metric, electromagnetic field, and scalar field.

  16. Propagators for a scalar field in some Bianchi-type I universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu.

    1976-05-01

    As a sequel to previous papers on bi-scalar propagators in the Friedmann universes and a special Kasner universe (whose underlying space-time is flat), their counterparts for a massless scalar field in some Bianchi-type I universe (which is intrinsically curved and anisotropic) are derived by means of Hadamard's procedure and ours, the latter of which becomes inevitable in the realm of quantized field. The retarded propagator thus obtained is applied to the generation of the scalar field from a point source and a spatially uniform distribution of sources, respectively. In the former case, the luminosity formula for a point source is derived, which is an anisotropic version of Robertson's formula in the Friedmann universes. In the latter case, it is shown that the scalar field may behave as either a perfect fluid obeying Zel'dovich's hardest equation of state or an imperfect fluid whose equation of state violates the energy condition. Implication of the above three works on the occasion of quantizing the scalar field is also touched upon. (auth.)

  17. Fractional statistics, exceptional preons, scalar dark matter, lepton number violation, neutrino masses, and hidden gauge structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, A.

    1985-09-01

    A brief review is given of the basics of fractional statistics, which is based on the Dirac-Bohm-Aharanov effect. Some group theoretic aspects of exceptional preons are breifly described, and a theory is proposed containing hypercolor and hyperflavor with G/sub HC/ x G/sub HF/ = E(6) x E(6) and preons in (27,27). It is also suggested that the dark matter in the universe is due to a scalar field which transforms as a singlet under SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) and interacts only via the Higgs boson. Some speculation is made on the existence and physical consequences of a SU(2) singet charged scalar field which couples to two lepton doublet, necessarily violating electron, muon, and tauon numbers. The Majorana masses of neutrinos are discussed as the result of breaking the total lepton number. Abelian gauge field hidden inside non-abelian gauge theory is briefly described in analogy to the electromagnetic potential term. 20 refs

  18. Masses of scalar and axial-vector B mesons revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang [Academia Sinica, Institute of Physics, Taipei (China); Yu, Fu-Sheng [Lanzhou University, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou (China)

    2017-10-15

    mass measurement of D{sub 0}{sup *} mesons, especially the neutral one, to see if the non-strange scalar charmed meson is heavier than the strange partner as suggested by the recent LHCb measurement of the D{sub 0}{sup *±}. (orig.)

  19. Scalar transport across the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in jets: Schmidt number effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tiago S.; B. da Silva, Carlos; Idmec Team

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of a passive scalar field near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface (TNTI) is analysed through direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent planar jets, with Reynolds numbers ranging from 142 <= Reλ <= 246 , and Schmidt numbers from 0 . 07 <= Sc <= 7 . The steepness of the scalar gradient, as observed from conditional profiles near the TNTI, increases with the Schmidt number. Conditional scalar gradient budgets show that for low and moderate Schmidt numbers a diffusive superlayer emerges at the TNTI, where the scalar gradient diffusion dominates, while the production is negligible. For low Schmidt numbers the growth of the turbulent front is commanded by the molecular diffusion, whereas the scalar gradient convection is negligible. The authors acknowledge the Laboratory for Advanced Computing at University of Coimbra for providing HPC, computing, consulting resources that have contributed to the research results reported within this paper. URL http://www.lca.uc.pt.

  20. Gravity localization in non-minimally coupled scalar thick braneworlds with a Gauss-Bonnet term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malagon-Morejon, D; Quiros, I; Herrera-Aguilar, A

    2011-01-01

    We consider a warped five-dimensional thick braneworld with a four-dimensional Poincare invariant space-time in the framework of scalar matter non-minimally coupled to gravity plus a Gauss-Bonnet term in the bulk. Scalar field and higher curvature corrections to the background equations as well as the perturbed equations are shown. A relationship between 4-dimensional and 5-dimensional Planck masses is studied in general terms. By imposing finiteness of the 4-dimensional Planck mass and regularity of the geometry, the localization properties of the tensor modes of the first order perturbed geometry are analized for an important class of solutions motivated by models with scalar fields which are minimally coupled to gravity. In order to study the gravity localization properties for this model, the normalizability condition for the lowest level of the tensor fluctuations is analized. We see that for the class of solutions examined, gravity in 4 dimensions is recovered if the curvature invariants are regular and Planck masses are finite.

  1. Scalar sector extensions and the Higgs mass fine-tuning problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Indrani

    2014-01-01

    One of the ways to address the fine-tuning problem in the Standard Model is to assume the existence of some symmetry which keeps the quantum corrections to the Higgs mass to a manageable level. This condition, known after Veltman who first propounded it, is unfortunately not satisfied in the SM, given that we know all the masses. We discuss how one can get back the Veltman Condition if one or more gauge singlet scalars are introduced in the model. We show that the most favored solution is the case where the singlet scalar does not mix with the SM doublet, and thus can act as a viable cold dark matter candidate. Furthermore, the fine-tuning problem of the new scalars necessitates the introduction of vector like fermions. Thus, singlet scalar(s) and vector fermions are minimal enhancements over the Standard Model to alleviate the fine-tuning problem. We also show that the model predicts Landau poles for all the scalar couplings, whose positions depend only on the number of such singlets. Thus, introduction of some new physics at that scale becomes inevitable. We also discuss how the model confronts the LHC constraints and the latest XENON100 data. Some more such extensions, with higher scalar multiplets, are also discussed. (author)

  2. On conditional scalar increment and joint velocity-scalar increment statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hengbin; Wang Danhong; Tong Chenning

    2004-01-01

    Conditional velocity and scalar increment statistics are usually studied in the context of Kolmogorov's refined similarity hypotheses and are considered universal (quasi-Gaussian) for inertial-range separations. In such analyses the locally averaged energy and scalar dissipation rates are used as conditioning variables. Recent studies have shown that certain local turbulence structures can be captured when the local scalar variance (φ 2 ) r and the local kinetic energy k r are used as the conditioning variables. We study the conditional increments using these conditioning variables, which also provide the local turbulence scales. Experimental data obtained in the fully developed region of an axisymmetric turbulent jet are used to compute the statistics. The conditional scalar increment probability density function (PDF) conditional on (φ 2 ) r is found to be close to Gaussian for (φ 2 ) r small compared with its mean and is sub-Gaussian and bimodal for large (φ 2 ) r , and therefore is not universal. We find that the different shapes of the conditional PDFs are related to the instantaneous degree of non-equilibrium (production larger than dissipation) of the local scalar. There is further evidence of this from the conditional PDF conditional on both (φ 2 ) r and χ r , which is largely a function of (φ 2 ) r /χ r , a measure of the degree of non-equilibrium. The velocity-scalar increment joint PDF is close to joint Gaussian and quad-modal for equilibrium and non-equilibrium local velocity and scalar, respectively. The latter shape is associated with a combination of the ramp-cliff and plane strain structures. Kolmogorov's refined similarity hypotheses also predict a dependence of the conditional PDF on the degree of non-equilibrium. Therefore, the quasi-Gaussian (joint) PDF, previously observed in the context of Kolmogorov's refined similarity hypotheses, is only one of the conditional PDF shapes of inertial range turbulence. The present study suggests that

  3. Propagators for a scalar field in a homogeneous expanding universe, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu; Tanabe, Kenji.

    1975-11-01

    In view of a recent interest in the quantum field-theoretical creation of particles in a big-bang universe (which, via the problem how their vacuum state should be defined, will be connected with their propagators whose structure depends also on that of the universe), our previous formulae for bi-scalar Green's functions corresponding to a massless scalar field in the radiation- and matter-dominated stages of the Friedmann universe with flat 3-space are extended in a classical level. One is to derive the formulae for a massive scalar field in the same universe, and another lies in deriving the ones applicable to the respective stages of a closed universe with spherical topology. As an application, we discuss a massless scalar field (e.g., photons or gravitons defined suitably) and its physical property in the cases where its source distribution is spatially uniform and where that is of a delta-singularity. It is shown that the energy-momentum tensor in the first case is formally the same as a perfect fluid whose sound velocity relative to the light velocity is unity, while the tensor in the second case leads naturally to Robertson's formula for the apparent luminosity of a receding galaxy. The behavior of photons or gravitons generated from a turbulent medium in an early universe is also dealt with. (auth.)

  4. On the scalar electron mass limit from single photon experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grivaz, J.F.

    1987-03-01

    We discuss how the 90% C.L. lower limit on the mass of the scalar electron, as extracted from the single photon experiments, is affected by the way the background from radiative neutrino pair production is handled. We argue that some of the results presented at the Berkeley conference are overoptimistic, and that the mass lower limit is 65 GeV rather than the advertized value of 84 GeV, for the case of degenerate scalar electrons with massless photinos

  5. Propagators for a quantized scalar field in a static closed universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu; Azuma, Takahiro.

    1978-07-01

    In a previous paper, a massive scalar field in an expanding closed universe was canonically quantized by taking full account of its coupling-type with the background universe and of the latter's topological (spherical or elliptic) nature. General formulae (including the parts of vacuum fluctuation which should after all be removed by a suitable regularization) for the energy density and pressure of the quantized medium were derived. Various propagators for the quantized scalar field were also dealt with, because the Feynman propagator in particular became important as soon as the pair-creation of those particles was called for. However, there will be an intimate relation between the former hydrodynamic quantities and the pair-creation of their constituents. Accordingly, this problem is studied in detail by adopting a static closed universe (for simplicity in the reduction of various expressions derived in the previous paper) and examining the behavior of various bi-scalar propagators in the universe. (author)

  6. Possible evolution of a bouncing universe in cosmological models with non-minimally coupled scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozdeeva, Ekaterina O.; Vernov, Sergey Yu.; Skugoreva, Maria A.; Toporensky, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    We explore dynamics of cosmological models with bounce solutions evolving on a spatially flat Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker background. We consider cosmological models that contain the Hilbert-Einstein curvature term, the induced gravity term with a negative coupled constant, and even polynomial potentials of the scalar field. Bounce solutions with non-monotonic Hubble parameters have been obtained and analyzed. The case when the scalar field has the conformal coupling and the Higgs-like potential with an opposite sign is studied in detail. In this model the evolution of the Hubble parameter of the bounce solution essentially depends on the sign of the cosmological constant.

  7. U(3)-flavor nonet scalar as an origin of the flavor mass spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Yoshio

    2008-01-01

    According to an idea that the quark and lepton mass spectra originate in a VEV structure of a U(3)-flavor nonet scalar Φ, the mass spectra of the down-quarks and charged leptons are investigated. The U(3) flavor symmetry is spontaneously and completely broken by non-zero and non-degenerated VEVs of Φ, without passing any subgroup of U(3). The ratios (m e +m μ +m τ )/(√(m e )+√(m μ )+√(m τ )) 2 and √(m e m μ m τ )/(√(m e )+√(m μ )+√(m τ )) 3 are investigated based on a toy model

  8. Scalar mass relations and flavor violations in supersymmetric theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1996-01-01

    Supersymmetry provides the most promising solution to the gauge hierarchy problem. For supersymmetry to stablize the hierarchy, it must be broken at the weak scale. The combination of weak scale supersymmetry and grand unification leads to a successful prediction of the weak mixing angle to within 1% accuracy. If supersymmetry is a symmetry of nature, the mass spectrum and the flavor mixing pattern of the scalar superpartners of all the quarks and leptons will provide important information about a more fundamental theory at higher energies. We studied the scalar mass relations which follow from the assumption that at high energies there is a grand unified theory which leads to a significant prediction of the weak mixing angle; these will serve as important tests of grand unified theories. Two intragenerational mass relations for each of the light generations are derived. A third relation is also found which relates the Higgs masses and the masses of all three generation scalars. In a realistic supersymmetric grand unified theory, nontrivial flavor mixings are expected to exist at all gaugino vertices. This could lead to important contributions to the neutron electric dipole moment, the decay mode p → K 0 μ + , weak scale radiative corrections to the up-type quark masses, and lepton flavor violating signals such as μ → eγ. These also provide important probes of physics at high energy scales. Supersymmetric theories involving a spontaneously broken flavor symmetry can provide a solution to the supersymmetric flavor-changing problem and an understanding of the fermion masses and mixings. We studied the possibilities and the general conditions under which some fermion masses and mixings can be obtained radiatively. We also constructed theories of flavor in which the first generation fermion masses arise from radiative corrections while flavor-changing constraints are satisfied. 69 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs

  9. Metric-affine formalism of higher derivative scalar fields in cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mingzhe; Wang, Xiulian

    2012-01-01

    Higher derivative scalar field theories have received considerable attention for the potentially explanations of the initial state of the universe or the current cosmic acceleration which they might offer. They have also attracted many interests in the phenomenological studies of infrared modifications of gravity. These theories are mostly studied by the metric variational approach in which only the metric is the fundamental field to account for the gravitation. In this paper we study the higher derivative scalar fields with the metric-affine formalism where the affine connection is treated arbitrarily at the beginning. Because the higher derivative scalar fields couple to the connection directly in a covariant theory these two formalisms will lead to different results. These differences are suppressed by the powers of the Planck mass and are usually expected to have small effects. But in some cases they may cause non-negligible deviations. We show by a higher derivative dark energy model that the two formalisms lead to significantly different pictures of the future universe

  10. Search for scalar top and scalar bottom quarks at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2002-01-01

    Searches for a scalar top quark and a scalar bottom quark have been performed using a data sample of 438 pb-1 at centre-of-mass energies of sqrt(s) = 192 - 209 GeV collected with the OPAL detector at LEP. No evidence for a signal was found. The 95% confidence level lower limit on the scalar top quark mass is 97.6 GeV if the mixing angle between the supersymmetric partners of the left- and right-handed states of the top quark is zero. When the scalar top quark decouples from the Z0 boson, the lower limit is 95.7 GeV. These limits were obtained assuming that the scalar top quark decays into a charm quark and the lightest neutralino, and that the mass difference between the scalar top quark and the lightest neutralino is larger than 10 GeV. The complementary decay mode of the scalar top quark decaying into a bottom quark, a charged lepton and a scalar neutrino has also been studied. The lower limit on the scalar top quark mass is 93.0 GeV for this decay mode, if the mass difference between the scalar top quark a...

  11. Classical behavior of a scalar field in the inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Misao; Nambu, Yasusada; Nakao, Ken-ichi.

    1987-09-01

    Extending the coarse-graining approach of Starobinsky, we formulate a theory to deal with the dynamics of a scalar field in inflationary universe models. We find a set of classical Langevin equations which describes the large scale behavior of the scalar field, provided that the coarse-grained size is greater than the effective compton wavelength of the scalar field. The corresponding Fokker-Planck equation is also derived which is defined on the phase space of the scalar field. We show that our theory is essentially equivalent to the one-loop field theory in de Sitter space and reduces to that of Starobinsky in a strong limit of the slow roll-over condition. Analysis of a simple Higgs potential model is done and the implications are discussed. (author)

  12. Intermittency and universality of small scales of passive scalar in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2014-11-01

    Recent experiments and Direct Numerical Simulations (DNSs) suggest that the small scale statistics of passive scalar may not be as ``universal'' as in the velocity case. To address this problem, we study the moments of scalar increment in steady turbulence at Rλ > 800 by using DNS up to the grid points of 40963. In order for the scalar and turbulent flow to be as faithful as possible to the assumptions that would be made in theories, Scalar 1 and Scalar 2 are simultaneously convected by the identical isotropic turbulent flow but excited by two different methods. Scalar 1 is excited by the random scalar injection which is isotropic, Gaussian and white in time at low wavenumber band, while Scalar 2 is excited by the uniform mean scalar gradient. The moments of two scalars as functions of the separation vector are expanded in terms of the Legendre polynomials to extract the scaling exponents of the moments up to the 4th anisotropic sector for Scalar 2. It is found that the exponents of the isotropic sectors seem to have the same values at separation distances in the narrow range over which the 4/3 law holds simultaneously for two scalars. The exponents of the anisotropic sectors and the cumulants of the moments will also be reported. HPCI, JHPCN, Grant-in-Aid for Sci. Res. No.24360068, Ministry of Edu. Sci., Japan.

  13. Ab initio approach to the non-perturbative scalar Yukawa model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, YangDepartment of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 50011, USA; Karmanov, V.A.(Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninsky Prospekt 53, Moscow, 119991, Russia); Maris, P.(Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 50011, USA); Vary, J.P.(Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 50011, USA)

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first non-perturbative calculation of the scalar Yukawa model in the single-nucleon sector up to four-body Fock sector truncation (one "scalar nucleon" and three "scalar pions"). The light-front Hamiltonian approach with a systematic non-perturbative renormalization is applied. We study the $n$-body norms and the electromagnetic form factor. We find that the one- and two-body contributions dominate up to coupling $\\alpha \\approx 1.7$. As we approach the coupling $\\alpha \\appr...

  14. Instanton-induced scalar potential for the universal hypermultiplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketov, Sergei V.

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the scalar potential in the gauged N=2 supergravity with a single hypermultiplet, whose generic quaternionic moduli space metric has an Abelian isometry. This isometry is gauged by the use of a graviphoton gauge field. The hypermultiplet metric and the scalar potential are both governed by the single real potential that is a solution to the 3d (integrable) continuous Toda equation. An explicit solution, controlled by the Eisenstein series E 3/2 , is found in the case of the D-instanton-corrected universal hypermultiplet moduli space metric having an U(1)xU(1) isometry, with one of the isometries being gauged

  15. Instanton-induced scalar potential for the universal hypermultiplet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketov, Sergei V. E-mail: ketov@comp.metro-u.ac.jp

    2003-04-21

    We calculate the scalar potential in the gauged N=2 supergravity with a single hypermultiplet, whose generic quaternionic moduli space metric has an Abelian isometry. This isometry is gauged by the use of a graviphoton gauge field. The hypermultiplet metric and the scalar potential are both governed by the single real potential that is a solution to the 3d (integrable) continuous Toda equation. An explicit solution, controlled by the Eisenstein series E{sub 3/2}, is found in the case of the D-instanton-corrected universal hypermultiplet moduli space metric having an U(1)xU(1) isometry, with one of the isometries being gauged.

  16. Thermal spectrum of pseudo-scalar glueballs and Debye screening mass from holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Nelson R.F.; Ferreira, Luiz F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-10-15

    The finite temperature spectrum of pseudo-scalar glueballs in a plasma is studied using a holographic model. The 0{sup -+} glueball is represented by a pseudo-scalar (axion) field living in a five dimensional geometry that comes from a solution of Einstein equations for gravity coupled with a dilaton scalar field. The spectral function obtained from the model shows a clear peak corresponding to the quasi-particle ground state. Analyzing the variation of the position of the peak with temperature, we describe the thermal behavior of the Debye screening mass of the plasma. As a check of consistency, the zero temperature limit of the model is also investigated. The glueball masses obtained are consistent with previous lattice results. (orig.)

  17. Coupled scalar fields in a flat FRW universe. Renormalisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baacke, Juergen [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany). Fakultaet Physik; Covi, Laura [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kevlishvili, Nina [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, Tbilisi (Georgia)

    2010-06-15

    We study the non-equilibrium dynamics of a system of coupled scalar fields in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe. We consider the evolution of spatially homogeneous ''classical'' fields and of their quantum fluctuations including the quantum backreaction in the one-loop approximation. We discuss in particular the dimensional regularisation of the coupled system and a special subtraction procedure in order to obtain the renormalised equations of motion and the renormalised energy-momentum tensor and ensure that the energy is well-defined and covariantly conserved. These results represent at the same time a theoretical analysis and a viable scheme for stable numerical simulations. As an example for an application of the general formalism, we present simulations for a hybrid inflationary model. (orig.)

  18. Massive scalar counterpart of gravitational waves in scalarized neutron star binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing [Sun Yat-sen University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-09-15

    In analogy with spontaneous magnetization of ferromagnets below the Curie temperature, a neutron star (NS), with a compactness above a certain critical value, may undergo spontaneous scalarization and exhibit an interior nontrivial scalar configuration. Consequently, the exterior spacetime is changed, and an external scalar field appears, which subsequently triggers a scalarization of its companion. The dynamical interplay produces a gravitational scalar counterpart of tensor gravitational waves. In this paper, we resort to scalar-tensor theory and demonstrate that the gravitational scalar counterpart from a double neutron star (DNS) and a neutron star-white dwarf (NS-WD) system become massive. We report that (1) a gravitational scalar background field, arising from convergence of external scalar fields, plays the role of gravitational scalar counterpart in scalarized DNS binary, and the appearance of a mass-dimensional constant in a Higgs-like gravitational scalar potential is responsible for a massive gravitational scalar counterpart with a mass of the order of the Planck scale; (2) a dipolar gravitational scalar radiated field, resulting from differing binding energies of NS and WD, plays the role of a gravitational scalar counterpart in scalarized orbital shrinking NS-WDs, which oscillates around a local and scalar-energy-density-dependent minimum of the gravitational scalar potential and obtains a mass of the order of about 10{sup -21} eV/c{sup 2}. (orig.)

  19. Mixed Inert scalar triplet dark matter, radiative neutrino masses and leptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Bin Lu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The neutral component of an inert scalar multiplet with hypercharge can provide a stable dark matter particle when its real and imaginary parts have a splitting mass spectrum. Otherwise, a tree-level dark-matter-nucleon scattering mediated by the Z boson will be much above the experimental limit. In this paper we focus on a mixed inert scalar triplet dark matter scenario where a complex scalar triplet with hypercharge can mix with another real scalar triplet without hypercharge through their renormalizable coupling to the standard model Higgs doublet. We consider three specified cases that carry most of the relevant features of the full parameter space: (i the neutral component of the real triplet dominates the dark matter particle, (ii the neutral component of the complex triplet dominates the dark matter particle; and (iii the neutral components of the real and complex triplets equally constitute the dark matter particle. Subject to the dark matter relic abundance and direct detection constraint, we perform a systematic study on the allowed parameter space with particular emphasis on the interplay among triplet-doublet terms and gauge interactions. In the presence of these mixed inert scalar triplets, some heavy Dirac fermions composed of inert fermion doublets can be utilized to generate a tiny Majorana neutrino mass term at one-loop level and realize a successful leptogenesis for explaining the cosmic baryon asymmetry.

  20. Generalized second law of thermodynamics for non-canonical scalar field model with corrected-entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sudipta; Mamon, Abdulla Al; Debnath, Ujjal

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have considered a non-canonical scalar field dark energy model in the framework of flat FRW background. It has also been assumed that the dark matter sector interacts with the non-canonical dark energy sector through some interaction term. Using the solutions for this interacting non-canonical scalar field dark energy model, we have investigated the validity of generalized second law (GSL) of thermodynamics in various scenarios using first law and area law of thermodynamics. For this purpose, we have assumed two types of horizons viz apparent horizon and event horizon for the universe and using first law of thermodynamics, we have examined the validity of GSL on both apparent and event horizons. Next, we have considered two types of entropy-corrections on apparent and event horizons. Using the modified area law, we have examined the validity of GSL of thermodynamics on apparent and event horizons under some restrictions of model parameters. (orig.)

  1. Testing feasibility of scalar-tensor gravity by scale dependent mass and coupling to matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, D. F.; Salzano, V.; Capozziello, S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate whether there is any cosmological evidence for a scalar field with a mass and coupling to matter which change accordingly to the properties of the astrophysical system it ''lives in,'' without directly focusing on the underlying mechanism that drives the scalar field scale-dependent-properties. We assume a Yukawa type of coupling between the field and matter and also that the scalar-field mass grows with density, in order to overcome all gravity constraints within the Solar System. We analyze three different gravitational systems assumed as ''cosmological indicators'': supernovae type Ia, low surface brightness spiral galaxies and clusters of galaxies. Results show (i) a quite good fit to the rotation curves of low surface brightness galaxies only using visible stellar and gas-mass components is obtained; (ii) a scalar field can fairly well reproduce the matter profile in clusters of galaxies, estimated by x-ray observations and without the need of any additional dark matter; and (iii) there is an intrinsic difficulty in extracting information about the possibility of a scale-dependent massive scalar field (or more generally about a varying gravitational constant) from supernovae type Ia.

  2. Search for Higgs Bosons in SUSY Cascades in CMS and Dark Matter with Non-universal Gaugino Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Huitu, Katri; Laamanen, Jari; Lehti, Sami; Roy, Sourov; Salminen, Tapio

    2008-01-01

    In grand unified theories (GUT), non-universal boundary conditions for the gaugino masses may arise at the unification scale, and affect the observability of the neutral MSSM Higgs bosons (h/H/A) at the LHC. The implications of such non-universal gaugino masses are investigated for the Higgs boson production in the SUSY cascade decay chain gluino --> squark quark, squark --> neutralino_2 quark, neutralino_2 --> neutralino_1 h/H/A, h/H/A --> b b-bar produced in pp interactions. In the singlet representation with universal gaugino masses only the light Higgs boson can be produced in this cascade with the parameter region of interest for us, while with non-universal gaugino masses heavy neutral MSSM Higgs boson production may dominate. The allowed parameter space in the light of the WMAP constraints on the cold dark matter relic density is investigated in the above scenarios for gaugino mass parameters. We also demonstrate that combination of representations can give the required amount of dark matter in any poi...

  3. On the creation of scalar particles in some anisotropic universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu.

    1978-01-01

    Because of an importance of the particle creation (especially, its possible fulfilment of the black-body law with a definite temperature) in an early universe to various other cosmological problems we study how the creation of scalar particles occurs in the Bianchi-type I anisotropic universe adopted in our previous works on the quantized scalar field. It is shown that, as in a special isotropic case dealt with in recent papers, the creation may occur at the sacrifice of the requirement that the quantization procedure should reproduce the usual theory for a free field in the limit when the anisotropic universe changes into the Minkowski space-time. It is further shown that the creation occurs in accordance with the black-body law only in a 2-dimensional hyper-surface relating to the anisotropic cosmic expansion, provided that we fix two arbitrary constants appearing in a general expression for the Feynman propagator in terms of a procedure similar to that in the isotropic case. A speculation on the isotropization of our model-universe is also made from the standpoint of seeking for how the thermal equilibrium in the whole universe is attained. (auth.)

  4. On the creation of scalar particles in some anisotropic universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu

    1978-01-01

    Because of an importance of the particle creation (especially, its possible fulfilment of the black-body law with a definite temperature) in an early universe to various other cosmological problems, we study how the creation of scalar particles occurs in the Bianchi-type I anisotropic universe adopted in our previous works on the quantized scalar field. It is shown that, as in a special isotropic case dealt with in recent papers, the creation may occur at the sacrifice of the requirement that the quantization procedure should reproduce the usual theory for a free field in the limit when the anisotropic universe changes into the Minkowski space-time. It is further shown that the creation occurs in accordance with the black-body law only in a 2-dimensional hyper-surface relating to the anisotropic cosmic expansion, provided that we fix two arbitrary constants appearing in a general expression for the Feynman propagator in terms of a procedure similar to that in the isotropic case. A speculation on the isotropization of our model-universe is also made from the standpoint of seeking the attainment of the thermal equilibrium in the whole universe. (author)

  5. Stability of braneworlds with non-minimally coupled multi-scalar fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Feng-Wei; Gu, Bao-Min [Lanzhou University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou (China); Lanzhou University, Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of the Ministry of Education, Lanzhou (China); Liu, Yu-Xiao [Lanzhou University, Research Center of Gravitation, Lanzhou (China)

    2018-02-15

    Linear stability of braneworld models constructed with multi-scalar fields is very different from that of single-scalar field models. It is well known that both the tensor and the scalar perturbations of the latter are stable at linear level. However, in general there is no effective method to deal with the stability problem of the scalar perturbations for braneworld models constructed with non-minimally coupled multi-scalar fields. In this work we present a systematic covariant approach to deal with the scalar perturbations. By introducing the orthonormal bases in field space and making the Kaluza-Klein decomposition, we get a set of coupled Schroedinger-like equations of the scalar perturbation modes. Using the nodal theorem, we show that the result is model-dependent. For superpotential derived brane models, the scalar perturbations are stable, but there exist normalizable scalar zero modes, which will result in unacceptable fifth force on the brane. We also use this method to analyze the f(R) braneworld model with an explicit solution and find that the scalar perturbations are stable and the scalar zero modes cannot be localized on the brane, which ensures that there is no extra long-range force and the Newtonian potential on the brane can be recovered. (orig.)

  6. Quasistationary solutions of scalar fields around accreting black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis-Gual, Nicolas; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Izquierdo, Paula; Font, José A.; Montero, Pedro J.

    2016-08-01

    Massive scalar fields can form long-lived configurations around black holes. These configurations, dubbed quasibound states, have been studied both in the linear and nonlinear regimes. In this paper, we show that quasibound states can form in a dynamical scenario in which the mass of the black hole grows significantly due to the capture of infalling matter. We solve the Klein-Gordon equation numerically in spherical symmetry, mimicking the evolution of the spacetime through a sequence of analytic Schwarzschild black hole solutions of increasing mass. It is found that the frequency of oscillation of the quasibound states decreases as the mass of the black hole increases. In addition, accretion leads to an increase of the exponential decay of the scalar field energy. We compare the black hole mass growth rates used in our study with estimates from observational surveys and extrapolate our results to values of the scalar field masses consistent with models that propose scalar fields as dark matter in the universe. We show that, even for unrealistically large mass accretion rates, quasibound states around accreting black holes can survive for cosmological time scales. Our results provide further support to the intriguing possibility of the existence of dark matter halos based on (ultralight) scalar fields surrounding supermassive black holes in galactic centers.

  7. Global structure of exact scalar hairy dynamical black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying [Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University,No. 5 Yiheyuan Rd, Beijing, 100871 P.R. (China); Chen, Bin [Center for High Energy Physics, Peking University,No. 5 Yiheyuan Rd, Beijing, 100871 P.R. (China); Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology,Peking University, No. 5 Yiheyuan Rd, Beijing, 100871 P.R. (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter,No. 5 Yiheyuan Rd, Beijing, 100871 P.R. (China); Lü, H. [Center for Advanced Quantum Studies, Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing, 100875 P.R. (China)

    2016-05-30

    We study the global structure of some exact scalar hairy dynamical black holes which were constructed in Einstein gravity either minimally or non-minimally coupled to a scalar field. We find that both the apparent horizon and the local event horizon (measured in luminosity coordinate) monotonically increase with the advanced time as well as the Vaidya mass. At late advanced times, the apparent horizon approaches the event horizon and gradually becomes future outer. Correspondingly, the space-time arrives at stationary black hole states with the relaxation time inversely proportional to the 1/(n−1) power of the final black hole mass, where n is the space-time dimension. These results strongly support the solutions describing the formation of black holes with scalar hair. We also obtain new charged dynamical solutions in the non-minimal theory by introducing an Maxwell field which is non-minimally coupled to the scalar. The presence of the electric charge strongly modifies the dynamical evolution of the space-time.

  8. Standard model false vacuum inflation: correlating the tensor-to-scalar ratio to the top quark and Higgs boson masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masina, Isabella; Notari, Alessio

    2012-05-11

    For a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs boson masses, the standard model Higgs potential develops a false minimum at energies of about 10(16)  GeV, where primordial inflation could have started in a cold metastable state. A graceful exit to a radiation-dominated era is provided, e.g., by scalar-tensor gravity models. We pointed out that if inflation happened in this false minimum, the Higgs boson mass has to be in the range 126.0±3.5  GeV, where ATLAS and CMS subsequently reported excesses of events. Here we show that for these values of the Higgs boson mass, the inflationary gravitational wave background has be discovered with a tensor-to-scalar ratio at hand of future experiments. We suggest that combining cosmological observations with measurements of the top quark and Higgs boson masses represent a further test of the hypothesis that the standard model false minimum was the source of inflation in the universe.

  9. Anyone for non-scalarity?

    OpenAIRE

    Duffley, Patrick; Larrivée, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the status of scalarity in the analysis of the meaning of the English determiner any. The latter’s position as a prime exemplar of the category of polarity-sensitive items has led it to be generally assumed to have scalar meaning. Scalar effects are absent however from a number of common uses of this word. This suggests that any does not involve scales as part of its core meaning, but produces them as a derived interpretative property. The role of three factors in the deri...

  10. Squark and slepton masses as probes of supersymmetric SO(10) unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian Ananthanarayan; P. N. Pandita

    2003-09-01

    We carry out a detailed analysis of the non-universal supersymmetry breaking scalar masses arising in SO(10) supersymmetric unification. By considering patterns of squark and slepton masses, we show that a set of sum rules for the sfermion masses is independent of the manner in which SO(10) breaks. We discuss the reasons for this remarkable result. The phenomenology arising from such non-universality is shown to be practically unaffected by the symmetry breaking pattern.

  11. An axion-like scalar field environment effect on binary black hole merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qing; Ji, Li-Wei; Hu, Bin; Cao, Zhou-Jian; Cai, Rong-Gen

    2018-06-01

    The environment, such as an accretion disk, could modify the signal of the gravitational wave from astrophysical black hole binaries. In this article, we model the matter field around intermediate-mass binary black holes by means of an axion-like scalar field and investigate their joint evolution. In detail, we consider equal mass binary black holes surrounded by a shell of axion-like scalar field both in spherically symmetric and non-spherically symmetric cases, and with different strengths of the scalar field. Our result shows that the environmental scalar field could essentially modify the dynamics. Firstly, in the spherically symmetric case, with increase of the scalar field strength, the number of circular orbits for the binary black hole is reduced. This means that the scalar field could significantly accelerate the merger process. Secondly, once the scalar field strength exceeds a certain critical value, the scalar field could collapse into a third black hole with its mass being larger than that of the binary. Consequently, the new black hole that collapses from the environmental scalar field could accrete the binary promptly and the binary collides head-on with each other. In this process, there is almost no quadrupole signal produced, and, consequently, the gravitational wave is greatly suppressed. Thirdly, when the scalar field strength is relatively smaller than the critical value, the black hole orbit could develop eccentricity through accretion of the scalar field. Fourthly, during the initial stage of the inspiral, the gravitational attractive force from the axion-like scalar field could induce a sudden turn in the binary orbits, hence resulting in a transient wiggle in the gravitational waveform. Finally, in the non-spherical case, the scalar field could gravitationally attract the binary moving toward the center of mass for the scalar field and slow down the merger process.

  12. Non-commutative and commutative vacua effects in a scalar torsion scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikhahmadi, Haidar, E-mail: h.sh.ahmadi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghamohammadi, Ali, E-mail: a.aghamohamadi@iausdj.ac.ir [Sanandaj Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saaidi, Khaled, E-mail: ksaaidi@uok.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-07

    In this work, the effects of non-commutative and commutative vacua on the phase space generated by a scalar field in a scalar torsion scenario are investigated. For both classical and quantum regimes, the commutative and non-commutative cases are compared. To take account the effects of non-commutativity, two well known non-commutative parameters, θ and β, are introduced. It should be emphasized, the effects of β which is related to momentum sector has more key role in comparison to θ which is related to space sector. Also the different boundary conditions and mathematical interpretations of non-commutativity are explored.

  13. Non-commutative and commutative vacua effects in a scalar torsion scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikhahmadi, Haidar; Aghamohammadi, Ali; Saaidi, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the effects of non-commutative and commutative vacua on the phase space generated by a scalar field in a scalar torsion scenario are investigated. For both classical and quantum regimes, the commutative and non-commutative cases are compared. To take account the effects of non-commutativity, two well known non-commutative parameters, θ and β, are introduced. It should be emphasized, the effects of β which is related to momentum sector has more key role in comparison to θ which is related to space sector. Also the different boundary conditions and mathematical interpretations of non-commutativity are explored.

  14. Thermodynamics of AdS black holes in Einstein-Scalar gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lü, H. [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University,Beijing 100875 (China); Pope, C.N. [George P. & Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy,Texas A& M University,College Station, TX 77843 (United States); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University,Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 OWA (United Kingdom); Wen, Qiang [Department of Physics, Renmin University of China,Beijing 100872 (China)

    2015-03-31

    We study the thermodynamics of n-dimensional static asymptotically AdS black holes in Einstein gravity coupled to a scalar field with a potential admitting a stationary point with an AdS vacuum. Such black holes with non-trivial scalar hair can exist provided that the mass-squared of the scalar field is negative, and above the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound. We use the Wald procedure to derive the first law of thermodynamics for these black holes, showing how the scalar hair (or “charge”) contributes non-trivially in the expression. We show in general that a black hole mass can be deduced by isolating an integrable contribution to the (non-integrable) variation of the Hamiltonian arising in the Wald construction, and that this is consistent with the mass calculated using the renormalised holographic stress tensor and also, in those cases where it is defined, with the mass calculated using the conformal method of Ashtekar, Magnon and Das. Similar arguments can also be given for the smooth solitonic solutions in these theories. Neither the black hole nor the soliton solutions can be constructed explicitly, and we carry out a numerical analysis to demonstrate their existence and to provide approximate checks on some of our thermodynamic results.

  15. Phenomenology of supersymmetry with scalar sequestering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Gilad; Roy, Tuhin S.; Schmaltz, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The defining feature of scalar sequestering is that the minimal supersymmetric standard model squark and slepton masses as well as all entries of the scalar Higgs mass matrix vanish at some high scale. This ultraviolet boundary condition--scalar masses vanish while gaugino and Higgsino masses are unsuppressed--is independent of the supersymmetry breaking mediation mechanism. It is the result of renormalization group scaling from approximately conformal strong dynamics in the hidden sector. We review the mechanism of scalar sequestering and prove that the same dynamics which suppresses scalar soft masses and the B μ term also drives the Higgs soft masses to -|μ| 2 . Thus the supersymmetric contribution to the Higgs mass matrix from the μ term is exactly canceled by the soft masses. Scalar sequestering has two tell-tale predictions for the superpartner spectrum in addition to the usual gaugino mediation predictions: Higgsinos are much heavier (μ > or approx. TeV) than scalar Higgses (m A ∼few hundred GeV), and third generation scalar masses are enhanced because of new positive contributions from Higgs loops.

  16. Inflationary universe from higher derivative quantum gravity coupled with scalar electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrzakulov, R. [Department of General & Theoretical Physics and Eurasian Center for Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan); Odintsov, S.D. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, ICE/CSIC-IEEC, Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciències, Torre C5-Parell-2a pl, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEC-CSIC), Campus UAB, Carrer de Can Magrans, s/n 08193 Cerdanyola del Valles, Barcelona (Spain); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics (TUSUR) 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Sebastiani, L., E-mail: lorenzo.sebastiani@unitn.it [Department of General & Theoretical Physics and Eurasian Center for Theoretical Physics, Eurasian National University, Astana 010008 (Kazakhstan)

    2016-06-15

    We study inflation for a quantum scalar electrodynamics model in curved space–time and for higher-derivative quantum gravity (QG) coupled with scalar electrodynamics. The corresponding renormalization-group (RG) improved potential is evaluated for both theories in Jordan frame where non-minimal scalar-gravitational coupling sector is explicitly kept. The role of one-loop quantum corrections is investigated by showing how these corrections enter in the expressions for the slow-roll parameters, the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio and how they influence the bound of the Hubble parameter at the beginning of the primordial acceleration. We demonstrate that the viable inflation maybe successfully realized, so that it turns out to be consistent with last Planck and BICEP2/Keck Array data.

  17. Holographic dark energy in Brans-Dicke cosmology with chameleon scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setare, M.R., E-mail: rezakord@ipm.i [Department of Science of Bijar, University of Kurdistan, Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jamil, Mubasher, E-mail: mjamil@camp.edu.p [Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics, National University of Sciences and Technology, Rawalpindi 46000 (Pakistan)

    2010-06-07

    We study a cosmological implication of holographic dark energy in the Brans-Dicke gravity. We employ the holographic model of dark energy to obtain the equation of state for the holographic energy density in non-flat (closed) universe enclosed by the event horizon measured from the sphere of horizon named L. Our analysis shows that one can obtain the phantom crossing scenario if the model parameter {alpha} (of order unity) is tuned accordingly. Moreover, this behavior is achieved by treating the Brans-Dicke scalar field as a Chameleon scalar field and taking a non-minimal coupling of the scalar field with matter. Hence one can generate phantom-like equation of state from a holographic dark energy model in non-flat universe in the Brans-Dicke cosmology framework.

  18. Holographic dark energy in Brans-Dicke cosmology with chameleon scalar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setare, M.R.; Jamil, Mubasher

    2010-01-01

    We study a cosmological implication of holographic dark energy in the Brans-Dicke gravity. We employ the holographic model of dark energy to obtain the equation of state for the holographic energy density in non-flat (closed) universe enclosed by the event horizon measured from the sphere of horizon named L. Our analysis shows that one can obtain the phantom crossing scenario if the model parameter α (of order unity) is tuned accordingly. Moreover, this behavior is achieved by treating the Brans-Dicke scalar field as a Chameleon scalar field and taking a non-minimal coupling of the scalar field with matter. Hence one can generate phantom-like equation of state from a holographic dark energy model in non-flat universe in the Brans-Dicke cosmology framework.

  19. The tunneling universe in scalar-tensor theory with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sunggeun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the wavefunction of the universe with a tunneling boundary condition is considered in the context of the Brans-Dicke-type scalar-tensor theory with matter. The matter may be interpreted as a D-particle (or D0-brane) in string theory when the Brans-Dicke parameter ω is -1. We study two simple examples. The first example, the γ=0 (matter) case, has a scale factor duality even if the low energy string action is coupled to matter. The universe undergoes quantum transition from super-inflationary (pre-big-bang) to deflationary (post-big-bang) phase. We calculate the transition rate by solving the Wheeler-DeWitt equation and find that it is non-vanishing. The two phases are disconnected classically. The second example is the γ=1/3(radiation) case. With the help of earlier work this matter can be identified with a D0-brane in string theory. In this case, due to the absence of the scale factor duality and the complicated relations between scale factor and dilaton, it is hard to interpret the wavefunction as a pre- and post-big-bang phase

  20. Universality in the relaxation dynamics of the composed black-hole-charged-massive-scalar-field system: The role of quantum Schwinger discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Hod

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The quasinormal resonance spectrum {ωn(μ,q,M,Q}n=0n=∞ of charged massive scalar fields in the charged Reissner–Nordström black-hole spacetime is studied analytically in the large-coupling regime qQ≫Mμ (here {μ,q} are respectively the mass and charge coupling constant of the field, and {M,Q} are respectively the mass and electric charge of the black hole. This physical system provides a striking illustration for the validity of the universal relaxation bound τ×T≥ħ/π in black-hole physics (here τ≡1/ℑω0 is the characteristic relaxation time of the composed black-hole-scalar-field system, and T is the Bekenstein–Hawking temperature of the black hole. In particular, it is shown that the relaxation dynamics of charged massive scalar fields in the charged Reissner–Nordström black-hole spacetime may saturate this quantum time-times-temperature inequality. Interestingly, we prove that potential violations of the bound by light scalar fields are excluded by the Schwinger-type pair-production mechanism (a vacuum polarization effect, a quantum phenomenon which restricts the physical parameters of the composed black-hole-charged-field system to the regime qQ≪M2μ2/ħ.

  1. Non-commutative and commutative vacua effects in a scalar torsion scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidar Sheikhahmadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of non-commutative and commutative vacua on the phase space generated by a scalar field in a scalar torsion scenario are investigated. For both classical and quantum regimes, the commutative and non-commutative cases are compared. To take account the effects of non-commutativity, two well known non-commutative parameters, θ and β, are introduced. It should be emphasized, the effects of β which is related to momentum sector has more key role in comparison to θ which is related to space sector. Also the different boundary conditions and mathematical interpretations of non-commutativity are explored.

  2. Neutralino Dark Matter in non-universal and non-minimal SUSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, S.F.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss neutralino dark matter in non-universal SUSY including the NUHM, SU(5) with non-universal gauginos. In the MSSM we argue from naturalness that non-universal soft mass parameters are preferred, with non-universal gaugino masses enabling supernatural dark matter beyond the MSSM, we also discuss neutralino dark matter in the U SSM and E 6 SSM. In the E 6 SSM a light neutralino LSP coming from the inert Higgsino and singlino sector is unavoidable and makes an attractive dark matter candidate.

  3. Scalar field vacuum expectation value induced by gravitational wave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Preston; McDougall, Patrick; Ragsdale, Michael; Singleton, Douglas

    2018-06-01

    We show that a massless scalar field in a gravitational wave background can develop a non-zero vacuum expectation value. We draw comparisons to the generation of a non-zero vacuum expectation value for a scalar field in the Higgs mechanism and with the dynamical Casimir vacuum. We propose that this vacuum expectation value, generated by a gravitational wave, can be connected with particle production from gravitational waves and may have consequences for the early Universe where scalar fields are thought to play an important role.

  4. Initial behavior of a quantized scalar field the associated pair-creation in several anisotropic universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu

    1981-01-01

    As a sequel to previous works on the definition of a positive frequency part of a quantized scalar field near an initial stage of several Robertson-Walker universes with flat, open or closed 3-space and the associated pair-creation of those particles, an attempt is made to seek for the same concept in several Bianchi-type I anisotropic universes. It is shown that, if the positive frequency part is introduced, the pair-creation of scalar particles and their spectral law are uniquely determined, as in the case of isotropic universes. (author)

  5. Search for Scalar Top and Scalar Bottom Quarks at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 189 GeV at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hoch, M.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    Searches for a scalar top quark and a scalar bottom quark have been performed using a data sample of 182 pb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 189 GeV collected with the OPAL detector at LEP. No evidence for a signal was found. The 95% confidence level lower limit on the scalar top quark mass is 90.3 GeV if the mixing angle between the supersymmetric partners of the left- and right-handed states of the top quark is zero. In the worst case, when the scalar top quark decouples from the Z boson, the lower limit is 87.2 GeV. These limits were obtained assuming that the scalar top quark decays into a charm quark and the lightest neutralino, and that the mass difference between the scalar top quark and the lightest neutralino is larger than 10 GeV. The complementary decay mode of the scalar top quark decaying into a bottom quark, a charged lepton and a scalar neutrino has also been studied. From a search for the scalar bottom quark, a mass limit of 88.6 GeV was obtained if the mass difference between the scalar bottom...

  6. The self-force on a non-minimally coupled static scalar charge outside a Schwarzschild black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Demian H J; Tsokaros, Antonios A; Wiseman, Alan G

    2007-01-01

    The finite part of the self-force on a static, non-minimally coupled scalar test charge outside a Schwarzschild black hole is zero. This result is determined from the work required to slowly raise or lower the charge through an infinitesimal distance. Unlike similar force calculations for minimally-coupled scalar charges or electric charges, we find that we must account for a flux of field energy that passes through the horizon and changes the mass and area of the black hole when the charge is displaced. This occurs even for an arbitrarily slow displacement of the non-minimally coupled scalar charge. For a positive coupling constant, the area of the hole increases when the charge is lowered and decreases when the charge is raised. The fact that the self-force vanishes for a static, non-minimally coupled scalar charge in Schwarzschild spacetime agrees with a simple prediction of the Quinn-Wald axioms. However, Zel'nikov and Frolov computed a non-vanishing self-force for a non-minimally coupled charge. Our method of calculation closely parallels the derivation of Zel'nikov and Frolov, and we show that their omission of this unusual flux is responsible for their (incorrect) result. When the flux is accounted for, the self-force vanishes. This correction eliminates a potential counter example to the Quinn-Wald axioms. The fact that the area of the black hole changes when the charge is displaced brings up two interesting questions that did not arise in similar calculations for static electric charges and minimally coupled scalar charges. (1) How can we reconcile a decrease in the area of the black hole horizon with the area theorem which concludes that δArea horizon ≥ 0? The key hypothesis of the area theorem is that the stress-energy tensor must satisfy a null-energy condition T αβ l α l β ≥ 0 for any null vector l α . We explicitly show that the stress-energy associated with a non-minimally coupled field does not satisfy this condition, and this violation of

  7. Off-equilibrium infrared structure of self-interacting scalar fields: Universal scaling, vortex-antivortex superfluid dynamics, and Bose-Einstein condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jian; Schlichting, Soeren; Venugopalan, Raju; Wang, Qun

    2018-05-01

    We map the infrared dynamics of a relativistic single-component (N =1 ) interacting scalar field theory to that of nonrelativistic complex scalar fields. The Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equation, describing the real-time dynamics of single-component ultracold Bose gases, is obtained at first nontrivial order in an expansion proportional to the powers of λ ϕ2/m2 where λ , ϕ , and m are the coupling constant, the scalar field, and the particle mass respectively. Our analytical studies are corroborated by numerical simulations of the spatial and momentum structure of overoccupied scalar fields in (2+1)-dimensions. Universal scaling of infrared modes, vortex-antivortex superfluid dynamics, and the off-equilibrium formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate are observed. Our results for the universal scaling exponents are in agreement with those extracted in the numerical simulations of the GP equation. As in these simulations, we observe coarsening phase kinetics in the Bose superfluid with strongly anomalous scaling exponents relative to that of vertex resummed kinetic theory. Our relativistic field theory framework further allows one to study more closely the coupling between superfluid and normal fluid modes, specifically the turbulent momentum and spatial structure of the coupling between a quasiparticle cascade to the infrared and an energy cascade to the ultraviolet. We outline possible applications of the formalism to the dynamics of vortex-antivortex formation and to the off-equilibrium dynamics of the strongly interacting matter formed in heavy-ion collisions.

  8. Self-gravitating black hole scalar wigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Juan; Bernal, Argelia; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Megevand, Miguel; Núñez, Darío; Sarbach, Olivier

    2017-07-01

    It has long been known that no static, spherically symmetric, asymptotically flat Klein-Gordon scalar field configuration surrounding a nonrotating black hole can exist in general relativity. In a series of previous papers, we proved that, at the effective level, this no-hair theorem can be circumvented by relaxing the staticity assumption: for appropriate model parameters, there are quasibound scalar field configurations living on a fixed Schwarzschild background which, although not being strictly static, have a larger lifetime than the age of the universe. This situation arises when the mass of the scalar field distribution is much smaller than the black hole mass, and following the analogies with the hair in the literature we dubbed these long-lived field configurations wigs. Here we extend our previous work to include the gravitational backreaction produced by the scalar wigs. We derive new approximate solutions of the spherically symmetric Einstein-Klein-Gordon system which represent self-gravitating scalar wigs surrounding black holes. These configurations interpolate between boson star configurations and Schwarzschild black holes dressed with the long-lived scalar test field distributions discussed in previous papers. Nonlinear numerical evolutions of initial data sets extracted from our approximate solutions support the validity of our approach. Arbitrarily large lifetimes are still possible, although for the parameter space that we analyze in this paper they seem to decay faster than the quasibound states. Finally, we speculate about the possibility that these configurations could describe the innermost regions of dark matter halos.

  9. Scalar Potential Model progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, John

    2007-04-01

    Because observations of galaxies and clusters have been found inconsistent with General Relativity (GR), the focus of effort in developing a Scalar Potential Model (SPM) has been on the examination of galaxies and clusters. The SPM has been found to be consistent with cluster cellular structure, the flow of IGM from spiral galaxies to elliptical galaxies, intergalactic redshift without an expanding universe, discrete redshift, rotation curve (RC) data without dark matter, asymmetric RCs, galaxy central mass, galaxy central velocity dispersion, and the Pioneer Anomaly. In addition, the SPM suggests a model of past expansion, past contraction, and current expansion of the universe. GR corresponds to the SPM in the limit in which a flat and static scalar potential field replaces the Sources and Sinks such as between clusters and on the solar system scale which is small relative to the distance to a Source. The papers may be viewed at http://web.infoave.net/˜scjh/ .

  10. Comparison between two scalar field models using rotation curves of spiral galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Hernández, Lizbeth M.; Rodríguez-Meza, Mario A.; Matos, Tonatiuh

    2018-04-01

    Scalar fields have been used as candidates for dark matter in the universe, from axions with masses ∼ 10-5eV until ultra-light scalar fields with masses ∼ Axions behave as cold dark matter while the ultra-light scalar fields galaxies are Bose-Einstein condensate drops. The ultra-light scalar fields are also called scalar field dark matter model. In this work we study rotation curves for low surface brightness spiral galaxies using two scalar field models: the Gross-Pitaevskii Bose-Einstein condensate in the Thomas-Fermi approximation and a scalar field solution of the Klein-Gordon equation. We also used the zero disk approximation galaxy model where photometric data is not considered, only the scalar field dark matter model contribution to rotation curve is taken into account. From the best-fitting analysis of the galaxy catalog we use, we found the range of values of the fitting parameters: the length scale and the central density. The worst fitting results (values of χ red2 much greater than 1, on the average) were for the Thomas-Fermi models, i.e., the scalar field dark matter is better than the Thomas- Fermi approximation model to fit the rotation curves of the analysed galaxies. To complete our analysis we compute from the fitting parameters the mass of the scalar field models and two astrophysical quantities of interest, the dynamical dark matter mass within 300 pc and the characteristic central surface density of the dark matter models. We found that the value of the central mass within 300 pc is in agreement with previous reported results, that this mass is ≈ 107 M ⊙/pc2, independent of the dark matter model. And, on the contrary, the value of the characteristic central surface density do depend on the dark matter model.

  11. Can dark matter be a scalar field?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, J.F.; Malatrasi, J.L.G. [Universidade Estadual Paulista ' Júlio de Mesquita Filho' , Campus Experimental de Itapeva—R. Geraldo Alckmin, 519, Itapeva, SP (Brazil); Pereira, S.H. [Universidade Estadual Paulista ' Júlio de Mesquita Filho' , Departamento de Física e Química, Campus de Guaratinguetá, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha, 333, 12516-410—Guaratinguetá, SP (Brazil); Andrade-Oliveira, F., E-mail: jfjesus@itapeva.unesp.br, E-mail: shpereira@gmail.com, E-mail: malatrasi440@gmail.com, E-mail: felipe.oliveira@port.ac.uk [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Road, PO1 3FX, Portsmouth (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study a real scalar field as a possible candidate to explain the dark matter in the universe. In the context of a free scalar field with quadratic potential, we have used Union 2.1 SN Ia observational data jointly with a Planck prior over the dark matter density parameter to set a lower limit on the dark matter mass as m ≥0.12 H {sub 0}{sup -1} eV ( c = h-bar =1). For the recent value of the Hubble constant indicated by the Hubble Space Telescope, namely H {sub 0}=73±1.8 km s{sup -1}Mpc{sup -1}, this leads to m ≥1.56×10{sup -33} eV at 99.7% c.l. Such value is much smaller than m ∼ 10{sup -22} eV previously estimated for some models. Nevertheless, it is still in agreement with them once we have not found evidences for a upper limit on the scalar field dark matter mass from SN Ia analysis. In practice, it confirms free real scalar field as a viable candidate for dark matter in agreement with previous studies in the context of density perturbations, which include scalar field self interaction.

  12. Astrophysical constraints on singlet scalars at LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.; Masoumi, Ali

    2017-04-01

    We consider the viability of new heavy gauge singlet scalar particles at colliders such as the LHC . Our original motivation for this study came from the possibility of a new heavy particle of mass ~ TeV decaying significantly into two photons at colliders, such as LHC, but our analysis applies more broadly. We show that there are significant constraints from astrophysics and cosmology on the simplest UV complete models that incorporate such new particles and its associated collider signal. The simplest and most obvious UV complete model that incorporates such signals is that it arises from a new singlet scalar (or pseudo-scalar) coupled to a new electrically charged and colored heavy fermion. Here we show that these new fermions (and anti-fermions) would be produced in the early universe, then form new color singlet heavy mesons with light quarks, obtain a non-negligible freeze-out abundance, and remain in kinetic equilibrium until decoupling. These heavy mesons possess interesting phenomenology, dependent on their charge, including forming new bound states with electrons and protons. We show that a significant number of these heavy states would survive for the age of the universe and an appreciable number would eventually be contained within the earth and solar system. We show that this leads to detectable consequences, including the production of highly energetic events from annihilations on earth, new spectral lines, and, spectacularly, the destabilization of stars. The lack of detection of these consequences rules out such simple UV completions, putting pressure on the viability of such new particles at LHC . To incorporate such a scalar would require either much more complicated UV completions or even further new physics that provides a decay channel for the associated fermion.

  13. Astrophysical constraints on singlet scalars at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.; Masoumi, Ali, E-mail: mark.hertzberg@tufts.edu, E-mail: ali@cosmos.phy.tufts.edu [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    We consider the viability of new heavy gauge singlet scalar particles at colliders such as the LHC . Our original motivation for this study came from the possibility of a new heavy particle of mass ∼ TeV decaying significantly into two photons at colliders, such as LHC, but our analysis applies more broadly. We show that there are significant constraints from astrophysics and cosmology on the simplest UV complete models that incorporate such new particles and its associated collider signal. The simplest and most obvious UV complete model that incorporates such signals is that it arises from a new singlet scalar (or pseudo-scalar) coupled to a new electrically charged and colored heavy fermion. Here we show that these new fermions (and anti-fermions) would be produced in the early universe, then form new color singlet heavy mesons with light quarks, obtain a non-negligible freeze-out abundance, and remain in kinetic equilibrium until decoupling. These heavy mesons possess interesting phenomenology, dependent on their charge, including forming new bound states with electrons and protons. We show that a significant number of these heavy states would survive for the age of the universe and an appreciable number would eventually be contained within the earth and solar system. We show that this leads to detectable consequences, including the production of highly energetic events from annihilations on earth, new spectral lines, and, spectacularly, the destabilization of stars. The lack of detection of these consequences rules out such simple UV completions, putting pressure on the viability of such new particles at LHC . To incorporate such a scalar would require either much more complicated UV completions or even further new physics that provides a decay channel for the associated fermion.

  14. Non-relativistic scalar field on the quantum plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahan, A.

    2005-01-01

    We apply the coherent state approach to the non-commutative plane to check the one-loop finiteness of the two-point and four-point functions of a non-relativistic scalar field theory in 2+1 dimensions. We show that the two-point and four-point functions of the model are finite at one-loop level and one recovers the divergent behavior of the model in the limit θ->0 + by appropriate redefinition of the non-commutativity parameter

  15. Search for scalar-tensor gravity theories with a non-monotonic time evolution of the speed-up factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, A [Dept Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, E30071-Murcia (Spain); Serna, A [Dept Fisica, Computacion y Comunicaciones, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, E03202-Elche (Spain); Alimi, J-M [Lab. de l' Univers et de ses Theories (LUTH, CNRS FRE2462), Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, F92195-Meudon (France)

    2002-08-21

    We present a method to detect, in the framework of scalar-tensor gravity theories, the existence of stationary points in the time evolution of the speed-up factor. An attractive aspect of this method is that, once the particular scalar-tensor theory has been specified, the stationary points are found through a simple algebraic equation which does not contain any integration. By applying this method to the three classes of scalar-tensor theories defined by Barrow and Parsons, we have found several new cosmological models with a non-monotonic evolution of the speed-up factor. The physical interest of these models is that, as previously shown by Serna and Alimi, they predict the observed primordial abundance of light elements for a very wide range of baryon density. These models are then consistent with recent CMB and Lyman-{alpha} estimates of the baryon content of the universe.

  16. Stability of Einstein static universe in gravity theory with a non-minimal derivative coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qihong [Hunan Normal University, Department of Physics and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Changsha, Hunan (China); Zunyi Normal College, School of Physics and Electronic Science, Zunyi (China); Wu, Puxun [Hunan Normal University, Department of Physics and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Changsha, Hunan (China); Peking University, Center for High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Yu, Hongwei [Hunan Normal University, Department of Physics and Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications, Changsha, Hunan (China)

    2018-01-15

    The emergent mechanism provides a possible way to resolve the big-bang singularity problem by assuming that our universe originates from the Einstein static (ES) state. Thus, the existence of a stable ES solution becomes a very crucial prerequisite for the emergent scenario. In this paper, we study the stability of an ES universe in gravity theory with a non-minimal coupling between the kinetic term of a scalar field and the Einstein tensor. We find that the ES solution is stable under both scalar and tensor perturbations when the model parameters satisfy certain conditions, which indicates that the big-bang singularity can be avoided successfully by the emergent mechanism in the non-minimally kinetic coupled gravity. (orig.)

  17. Stability of Einstein static universe in gravity theory with a non-minimal derivative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qihong; Wu, Puxun; Yu, Hongwei

    2018-01-01

    The emergent mechanism provides a possible way to resolve the big-bang singularity problem by assuming that our universe originates from the Einstein static (ES) state. Thus, the existence of a stable ES solution becomes a very crucial prerequisite for the emergent scenario. In this paper, we study the stability of an ES universe in gravity theory with a non-minimal coupling between the kinetic term of a scalar field and the Einstein tensor. We find that the ES solution is stable under both scalar and tensor perturbations when the model parameters satisfy certain conditions, which indicates that the big-bang singularity can be avoided successfully by the emergent mechanism in the non-minimally kinetic coupled gravity.

  18. Self-accelerating universe in scalar-tensor theories after GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisostomi, Marco; Koyama, Kazuya

    2018-04-01

    The recent simultaneous detection of gravitational waves and a gamma-ray burst from a neutron star merger significantly shrank the space of viable scalar-tensor theories by demanding that the speed of gravity is equal to that of light. The survived theories belong to the class of degenerate higher order scalar-tensor theories. We study whether these theories are suitable as dark energy candidates. We find scaling solutions in the matter dominated universe that lead to de Sitter solutions at late times without the cosmological constant, realizing self-acceleration. We evaluate quasistatic perturbations around self-accelerating solutions and show that the stringent constraints coming from astrophysical objects and gravitational waves can be satisfied, leaving interesting possibilities to test these theories by cosmological observations.

  19. Creation of quantized particles, gravitons, and scalar perturbations by the expanding universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Quantum creation processes during the very rapid early expansion of the universe are believed to give rise to temperature anisotropies and polarization patterns in the CMB radiation. These have been observed by satellites such as COBE, WMAP, and PLANCK, and by bolometric instruments placed near the South Pole by the BICEP collaborations. The expected temperature anisotropies are well-confirmed. The B-mode polarization patterns in the CMB are currently under measurement jointly by the PLANCK and BICEP groups to determine the extent to which the B-modes can be attributed to gravitational waves from the creation of gravitons in the earliest universe.As the original discoverer of the quantum phenomenon of particle creation from vacuum by the expansion of the universe, I will explain how the discovery came about and how it relates to the current observations. The first system that I considered when I started my Ph.D. thesis in 1962 was the quantized minimally-coupled scalar field in an expanding FLRW (Friedmann, Lemaitré, Robertson, Walker) universe having a general continuous scale factor a(t) with continuous time derivatives. I also considered quantized fermion fields of spin-1/2 and the spin-1 massless photon field, as well as the quantized conformally-invariant field equations of arbitrary integer and half-integer spins that had been written down in the classical context for general gravitational metrics by Penrose.It was during 1962 that I proved that quanta of the minimally-coupled scalar field were created by the general expanding FLRW universe. This was relevant also to the creation of quantized perturbations of the gravitational field, since these perturbations satisfied linear field equations that could be quantized in the same way as the minimally-coupled scalar field equation. In fact, in 1946, E.M. Lifshitz had considered the classical Einstein gravitational field in FLRW expanding universes and had shown that the classical linearized Einstein field

  20. Isotropic background for interacting two fluid scenario coupled with zero mass scalar field in modified gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirde, V.R.; Shekh, S.H.

    2016-01-01

    The modified theories of gravity have engrossed much attention in the last decade, especially f(R) gravity. In this contextual exploration, we investigate interaction between barotropic fluid and dark energy with zero-mass scalar field for the spatially homogeneous and isotropic flat FRW universe. In this universe, the field equations correspond to the particular choice of f(R) = R+bR m . The exact solutions of the field equations are obtained by applying volumetric power law and exponential law of expansion. In power and exponential law of expansion, the universe shows both matter dominated and DE era for b ≤ 0 and b ≥ 0 and remain present in dark era respectively, but power law model is fully occupying with real matter for b > 0 and for b < 0 exponential model expands with negative pressure and remain present in matter dominated phase respectively. The physical behavior of the universe has been discussed by using some physical quantities

  1. Reconstructing an interacting holographic polytropic gas model in a non-flat FRW universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K; Abdolmaleki, A

    2010-01-01

    We study the correspondence between the interacting holographic dark energy and the polytropic gas model of dark energy in a non-flat FRW universe. This correspondence allows one to reconstruct the potential and the dynamics for the scalar field of the polytropic model, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe.

  2. Reconstructing an interacting holographic polytropic gas model in a non-flat FRW universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, K; Abdolmaleki, A, E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Street, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-05-01

    We study the correspondence between the interacting holographic dark energy and the polytropic gas model of dark energy in a non-flat FRW universe. This correspondence allows one to reconstruct the potential and the dynamics for the scalar field of the polytropic model, which describe accelerated expansion of the universe.

  3. Family number non-conservation induced by the supersymmetric mixing of scalar leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.J.S.

    1987-08-01

    The most egregious aspect of (N = 1) supersymmetric theories is that each particle state is accompanied by a 'super-partner', a state with identical quantum numbers save that it differs in spin by one half unit. For the leptons these are scalars and are called ''sleptons'', or scalar leptons. These consist of the charged sleptons (selectron, smuon, stau) and the scalar neutrinos ('sneutrinos'). We examine a model of supersymmetry with soft breaking terms in the electroweak sector. Explicit mixing among the scalar leptons results in a number of effects, principally non-conservation of lepton family number. Comparison with experiment permits us to place constraints upon the model. 49 refs., 12 figs

  4. Mass change and motion of a scalar charge in cosmological spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Roland; Poisson, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Continuing previous work reported in an earlier paper (Burko, Harte and Poisson 2002 Phys. Rev. D 65 124006), we calculate the self-force acting on a point scalar charge in a wide class of cosmological spacetimes. The self-force produces two types of effect. The first is a time-changing inertial mass, and this is calculated exactly for a particle at rest relative to the cosmological fluid. We show that for certain cosmological models, the mass decreases and then increases back to its original value. For all other models except de Sitter spacetime, the mass is restored only to a fraction of its original value. For de Sitter spacetime the mass steadily decreases. The second effect is a deviation relative to geodesic motion, and we calculate this for a charge that moves slowly relative to the dust in a matter-dominated cosmology. We show that the net effect of the self-force is to push on the particle. We show that this is not an artefact of the scalar theory: the electromagnetic self-force acting on an electrically charged particle also pushes on the particle. The paper concludes with a demonstration that the pushing effect can also occur in the context of slow-motion electrodynamics in flat spacetime

  5. Searches for scalar top and scalar bottom quarks at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Becker, U; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Brient, J C; Machefert, F P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Hühn, T; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Morawitz, P; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Ealet, A; Fouchez, D; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Tilquin, A; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Williams, R W; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    Searches for scalar top and bottom quarks have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data sample consists of 21.7 pb^-1 taken at sqrt{s} = 161, 170, and 172~GeV and 5.7 pb^-1 taken at sqrt{s} = 130 and 136~GeV. No evidence for scalar top quarks or scalar bottom quarks was found in the channels stop --> c chi, stop --> b l snu, and sbottom --> b chi. For the channel stop --> c chi a limit of 67 GeV/c^2 has been set on the scalar top quark mass, independent of the mixing angle between the supersymmetric partners of the left and right-handed states of the top quark. This limit assumes a mass difference between the stop and the chi of at least 10 GeV/c^2. For the channel stop --> b l snu the mixing-angle independent scalar top limit is 70 GeV/c^2, assuming a mass difference between the stop and the snu of at least 10 GeV/c^2. For the channel sbottom --> b chi, a limit of 73 GeV/c^2 has been set on the mass of the supersymmetric partner of the left-handed state of the bottom quark. T...

  6. Arbitrary scalar-field and quintessence cosmological models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S.N.; Mak, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of the initial inflationary scenario of the Universe and of its late-time acceleration can be described by assuming the existence of some gravitationally coupled scalar fields φ, with the inflaton field generating inflation and the quintessence field being responsible for the late accelerated expansion. Various inflationary and late-time accelerated scenarios are distinguished by the choice of an effective self-interaction potential V(φ), which simulates a temporarily non-vanishing cosmological term. In this work, we present a new formalism for the analysis of scalar fields in flat isotropic and homogeneous cosmological models. The basic evolution equation of the models can be reduced to a first-order non-linear differential equation. Approximate solutions of this equation can be constructed in the limiting cases of the scalar-field kinetic energy and potential energy dominance, respectively, as well as in the intermediate regime. Moreover, we present several new accelerating and decelerating exact cosmological solutions, based on the exact integration of the basic evolution equation for scalar-field cosmologies. More specifically, exact solutions are obtained for exponential, generalized cosine hyperbolic, and power-law potentials, respectively. Cosmological models with power-law scalar field potentials are also analyzed in detail. (orig.)

  7. Screening masses in quenched (2+1)d Yang-Mills theory: Universality from dynamics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigori, Rafael B.

    2010-01-01

    We compute the spectrum of gluonic screening-masses in the 0 ++ channel of quenched 3d Yang-Mills theory near the phase-transition. Our finite-temperature lattice simulations are performed at scaling region, using state-of-art techniques for thermalization and spectroscopy, which allows for thorough data extrapolations to thermodynamic limit. Ratios among mass-excitations with the same quantum numbers on the gauge theory, 2d Ising and λφ 4 models are compared, resulting in a nice agreement with predictions from universality. In addition, a gauge-to-scalar mapping, previously employed to fit QCD Green's functions at deep IR, is verified to dynamically describe these universal spectroscopic patterns.

  8. Family number non-conservation induced by the supersymmetric mixing of scalar leptons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, M.J.S.

    1987-08-01

    The most egregious aspect of (N = 1) supersymmetric theories is that each particle state is accompanied by a 'super-partner', a state with identical quantum numbers save that it differs in spin by one half unit. For the leptons these are scalars and are called ''sleptons'', or scalar leptons. These consist of the charged sleptons (selectron, smuon, stau) and the scalar neutrinos ('sneutrinos'). We examine a model of supersymmetry with soft breaking terms in the electroweak sector. Explicit mixing among the scalar leptons results in a number of effects, principally non-conservation of lepton family number. Comparison with experiment permits us to place constraints upon the model. 49 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Baryon- and lepton-number non-conserving processes and intermediate mass scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieves, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis of the possible mechanisms to mediate various baryon- and lepton-number non-conserving processes is presented. Processes considered include the Δ(B+L) = 0 proton decay, ΔB = 2 neutron-antineutron oscillations and neutrino Majorana masses. Among our results we find that, in the absence of elementary scalars and exotic fermions, all the renormalizable interactions of vector bosons and ordinary fermions conserve B-L. Therefore, the observation of Δ(B-L) not equal 0 processes would imply the existence of elementary scalars and/or exotic fermions. (orig.)

  10. Searches for scalar top and scalar bottom quarks at LEP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J. C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Cavanaugh, R.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Huehn, T.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Morawitz, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Tilquin, A.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Serin, L.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Foss, J.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-11-01

    Searches for scalar top and bottom quarks have been performed with data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP. The data sample consists of 21.7 pb-1 taken at sqrt(s) = 161, 170, and 172 GeV and 5.7 pb-1 taken at sqrt(s) = 130 and 136 GeV. No evidence for scalar top quarks or scalar bottom quarks was found in the channels t~-->cχ, t~-->blν~, and b~-->bχ. For the channel t~-->cχ a limit of 67 GeV/c2has been set on the scalar top quark mass, independent of the mixing angle between the supersymmetric partners of the left and right-handed states of the top quark. This limit assumes a mass difference between the t~ and the χ of at least 10 GeV/c2. For the channel t~-->blν~ the mixing-angle independent scalar top limit is 70 GeV/c2, assuming a mass difference between the t~ and the ν~ of at least 10 GeV/c2. For the channel b~-->bχ, a limit of 73 GeV/c2has been set on the mass of the supersymmetric partner of the left-handed state of the bottom quark. This limit is valid if the mass difference between the b~ and the χ is at least 10 GeV/c2.

  11. New Gauss-Bonnet Black Holes with Curvature-Induced Scalarization in Extended Scalar-Tensor Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doneva, Daniela D; Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S

    2018-03-30

    In the present Letter, we consider a class of extended scalar-tensor-Gauss-Bonnet (ESTGB) theories for which the scalar degree of freedom is excited only in the extreme curvature regime. We show that in the mentioned class of ESTGB theories there exist new black-hole solutions that are formed by spontaneous scalarization of the Schwarzschild black holes in the extreme curvature regime. In this regime, below certain mass, the Schwarzschild solution becomes unstable and a new branch of solutions with a nontrivial scalar field bifurcates from the Schwarzschild one. As a matter of fact, more than one branch with a nontrivial scalar field can bifurcate at different masses, but only the first one is supposed to be stable. This effect is quite similar to the spontaneous scalarization of neutron stars. In contrast to the standard spontaneous scalarization of neutron stars, which is induced by the presence of matter, in our case, the scalarization is induced by the curvature of the spacetime.

  12. Scalar field dark matter with spontaneous symmetry breaking and the 3.5 keV line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Catarina; Rosa, João G.; Bertolami, O.

    2018-06-01

    We show that the present dark matter abundance can be accounted for by an oscillating scalar field that acquires both mass and a non-zero expectation value from interactions with the Higgs field. The dark matter scalar field can be sufficiently heavy during inflation, due to a non-minimal coupling to gravity, so as to avoid the generation of large isocurvature modes in the CMB anisotropies spectrum. The field begins oscillating after reheating, behaving as radiation until the electroweak phase transition and afterwards as non-relativistic matter. The scalar field becomes unstable, although sufficiently long-lived to account for dark matter, due to mass mixing with the Higgs boson, decaying mainly into photon pairs for masses below the MeV scale. In particular, for a mass of ∼7 keV, which is effectively the only free parameter, the model predicts a dark matter lifetime compatible with the recent galactic and extragalactic observations of a 3.5 keV X-ray line.

  13. Contributed report: Probing non-universal gaugino masses ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Experiments at Fermilab Tevatron Run I [1] have obtained important bounds on the chargino–neutralino sector of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model using the clean trilepton signal. However, the analyses used the universal gaugino mass hypothesis at the GUT scale (MG) motivated by the minimal ...

  14. Complete two-loop effective potential approximation to the lightest Higgs scalar boson mass in supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    I present a method for accurately calculating the pole mass of the lightest Higgs scalar boson in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model, using a mass-independent renormalization scheme. The Higgs scalar self-energies are approximated by supplementing the exact one-loop results with the second derivatives of the complete two-loop effective potential in Landau gauge. I discuss the dependence of this approximation on the choice of renormalization scale, and note the existence of particularly poor choices, which fortunately can be easily identified and avoided. For typical input parameters, the variation in the calculated Higgs boson mass over a wide range of renormalization scales is found to be of the order of a few hundred MeV or less, and is significantly improved over previous approximations

  15. Factorization for radiative heavy quarkonium decays into scalar Glueball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Ruilin [INPAC, Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology,Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University,Dongchuan RD 800, Shanghai 200240 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics,Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Zhongguancun E. St. 55, Beijing 100190 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics,Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Yuquan RD 19B, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-09-24

    We establish the factorization formula for scalar Glueball production through radiative decays of vector states of heavy quarkonia, e.g. J/ψ, ψ(2S) and Υ(nS), where the Glueball mass is much less than the parent heavy quarkonium mass. The factorization is demonstrated explicitly at one-loop level through the next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections to the hard kernel, the non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) long-distance matrix elements (LDMEs) of the heavy quarkonium, and the light-cone distribution amplitude (LCDA) of scalar Glueball. The factorization provides a comprehensive theoretical approach to investigate Glueball production in the radiative decays of vector states of heavy quarkonia and determine the physic nature of Glueball. We discuss the scale evolution equation of LCDA for scalar Glueball. In the end, we extract the value of the decay constant of Scalar Glueball from Lattice QCD calculation and analyze the mixing effect among f{sub 0}(1370), f{sub 0}(1500) and f{sub 0}(1710).

  16. Higgs mass range from standard model false vacuum inflation in scalar-tensor gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masina, I.; Notari, A.

    2012-01-01

    If the standard model is valid up to very high energies it is known that the Higgs potential can develop a local minimum at field values around 10(15)-10(17) GeV, for a narrow band of values of the top quark and Higgs masses. We show that in a scalar-tensor theory of gravity such Higgs false vacu....... This prediction could be soon tested at the Large Hadron Collider. Our inflationary scenario could also be further checked by better constraining the spectral index and the tensor-to-scalar ratio....

  17. Search for scalar fermions and long-lived scalar leptons at centre-of-mass energies of 130 GeV to 172 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cerruti, C; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Collins, P; Colomer, M; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Damgaard, G; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Gris, P; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Krstic, J; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Masik, J; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neufeld, N; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rakoczy, D; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Silvestre, R; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Chikilev, O G; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1999-01-01

    Data taken by DELPHI during the 1995 and 1996 LEP runs have been used to search for the supersymmetric partners of electron, muon and tau leptons and of top and bottom quarks. The observations are in agreement with standard model predictions. Limits are set on sfermion masses. Searches for long lived scalar leptons from low scale supersymmetry breaking models exclude stau masses below 55~GeV/c$^2$ at the 95\\% confidence level, irrespective of the gravitino mass.

  18. Scalar loops and the Higgs mass in the Salam-Weinberg-Glashow model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, P.

    1982-08-01

    It is shown that spontaneous symmetry breaking is predominantly driven by scalar loops in the standard Salam-Weinberg-Glashow model if lambda approx.=0(e 2 ). The Higgs mass is predicted to be 0(64 GeV), which is considerably higher than the Coleman Weinberg prediction. (author)

  19. Higgs scalar in the grand desert with observable proton lifetime in SU(5) and small neutrino masses in SO(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kynshi, M.L.; Parida, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    We find that the presence of a real scalar in the grand desert transforming as ζ(3,0,8) under SU(2) L xU(1) Y xSU(3) C ensures the agreement of the GUT predictions with the data from CERN LEP and proton lifetime (τ p ). The mass of ζ is predicted to be close to the Peccei-Quinn symmetry-breaking scale. The computation of the threshold effects in SU(5) with Higgs representations 24, 5, and 75 shows that the maximum allowed τ p for reasonable superheavy Higgs boson masses is accessible to experimental tests at low energies. The additional predictions in SO(10) are small neutrino masses compatible with solutions to the solar-neutrino problem and the dark matter of the Universe

  20. Green's function for the scalar field in the early Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, A.; Mallik, S.

    1987-01-01

    We derive the thermal Green's function for the scalar field in a de Sitter space-time and apply it to the problem of the early Universe. Field fluctuations relevant for inflation arise predominantly from wavelengths of the order of the inverse Hubble constant. Sufficient inflation is obtained in a Coleman-Weinberg model, provided the coupling constant is small enough. The results are insensitive to the choice of the vacuum of the field theory

  1. Scalar perturbations of two-dimensional Horava-Lifshitz black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Miguel; Gonzalez-Espinoza, Manuel; Saavedra, Joel; Vargas-Arancibia, Diego

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we study the stability of black hole solutions found in the context of dilatonic Horava-Lifshitz gravity in 1 + 1 dimensions by means of the quasinormal modes approach. In order to find the corresponding quasinormal modes, we consider the perturbations of massive and massless scalar fields minimally coupled to gravity. In both cases, we found that the quasinormal modes have a discrete spectrum and are completely imaginary, which leads to damping modes. For a massive scalar field and a non-vanishing cosmological constant, our results suggest unstable behavior for large values of the scalar field mass. (orig.)

  2. Momentum and scalar transport at the turbulent/non-turbulent interface of a jet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerweel, J.; Fukushima, C.; Pedersen, Jakob Martin

    2009-01-01

    and well-defined bounding interface between the turbulent and non-turbulent regions of flow. The jet carries a fluorescent dye measured with planar laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and the surface discontinuity in the scalar concentration is identified as the fluctuating turbulent jet interface. Thence...... velocity and mean scalar and a tendency towards a singularity in mean vorticity. These actual or asymptotic discontinuities are consistent with the conditional mean momentum and scalar transport equations integrated across the interface. Measurements of the fluxes of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy...

  3. Scalar field dark matter and the Higgs field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Bertolami

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the possibility that dark matter corresponds to an oscillating scalar field coupled to the Higgs boson. We argue that the initial field amplitude should generically be of the order of the Hubble parameter during inflation, as a result of its quasi-de Sitter fluctuations. This implies that such a field may account for the present dark matter abundance for masses in the range 10−6–10−4eV, if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is within the range of planned CMB experiments. We show that such mass values can naturally be obtained through either Planck-suppressed non-renormalizable interactions with the Higgs boson or, alternatively, through renormalizable interactions within the Randall–Sundrum scenario, where the dark matter scalar resides in the bulk of the warped extra-dimension and the Higgs is confined to the infrared brane.

  4. Low energy constraints and scalar leptoquarks⋆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajfer Svjetlana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of a colored weak doublet scalar state with mass below 1 TeV can provide an explanation of the observed branching ratios in B → D(∗τντ decays. Constraints coming from Z → bb̄, muon g − 2, lepton flavor violating decays are derived. The colored scalar is accommodated within 45 representation of SU(5 group of unification. We show that presence of color scalar can improve mass relations in the up-type quark sector mass. Impact of the colored scalar embedding in 45-dimensional representation of SU(5 on low-energy phenomenology is also presented.

  5. Lepton flavor violation and scalar dark matter in a radiative model of neutrino masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esch, Sonja; Klasen, Michael; Lamprea, David R. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Muenster (Germany); Yaguna, Carlos E. [Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Escuela de Fisica, Tunja (Colombia)

    2018-02-15

    We consider a simple extension of the Standard Model that can account for the dark matter and explain the existence of neutrino masses. The model includes a vector-like doublet of SU(2), a singlet fermion, and two scalar singlets, all of them odd under a new Z{sub 2} symmetry. Neutrino masses are generated radiatively by one-loop processes involving the new fields, while the dark matter candidate is the lightest neutral particle among them. We focus specifically on the case where the dark matter particle is one of the scalars and its relic density is determined by its Yukawa interactions. The phenomenology of this setup, including neutrino masses, dark matter and lepton flavor violation, is analyzed in some detail. We find that the dark matter mass must be below 600 GeV to satisfy the relic density constraint. Lepton flavor violating processes are shown to provide the most promising way to test this scenario. Future μ → 3e and μ-e conversion experiments, in particular, have the potential to probe the entire viable parameter space of this model. (orig.)

  6. Sound of Dark Matter: Searching for Light Scalars with Resonant-Mass Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Dimopoulos, Savas; Van Tilburg, Ken

    2016-01-22

    The fine-structure constant and the electron mass in string theory are determined by the values of scalar fields called moduli. If the dark matter takes on the form of such a light modulus, it oscillates with a frequency equal to its mass and an amplitude determined by the local dark-matter density. This translates into an oscillation of the size of a solid that can be observed by resonant-mass antennas. Existing and planned experiments, combined with a dedicated resonant-mass detector proposed in this Letter, can probe dark-matter moduli with frequencies between 1 kHz and 1 GHz, with much better sensitivity than searches for fifth forces.

  7. Higgs mass prediction with non-universal soft supersymmetry breaking in MSSM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Codoban, S.; Jurcisin, M.; Kazakov, D.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the MSSM (Minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model) the non-universal boundary conditions of soft SUSY breaking parameters are considered. Taking as input the top, bottom and Z-boson masses, the values of the gauge couplings at the EW scale and the infrared quasi-fixed points for Yukawa couplings and the soft parameters the mass of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson is found to be m h = 92.7 -4.9 +10 ± 5 ± 0.4 GeV/c 2 for the low tan(β) case and m h 125.7 -9.0 +6.4 ± 5 ± 0.4 GeV/c 2 (μ > 0) or m h 125.4 -9.0 +6.6 ± 5 ± 0.4 Ge V/c 2 (μ < 0) in the case of large tan(β). (authors)

  8. Interacting viscous ghost tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models of dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K; Fahimi, K

    2013-01-01

    We study the correspondence between the interacting viscous ghost dark energy model with the tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models in the framework of Einstein gravity. We consider a spatially non-flat FRW universe filled with interacting viscous ghost dark energy and dark matter. We reconstruct both the dynamics and potential of these scalar field models according to the evolutionary behavior of the interacting viscous ghost dark energy model, which can describe the accelerated expansion of the universe. Our numerical results show that the interaction and viscosity have opposite effects on the evolutionary properties of the ghost scalar field models. (paper)

  9. Scalar loops and the Higgs mass in the Salam-Weinberg-Glashow model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, P.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that spontaneous symmetry breaking is predominantly driven by scalar loops in the standard Salam-Weinberg-Glashow model if lambdaapproximately equal to O(e 2 ). The Higgs mass is predicted to be O(64 GeV), which is considerably higher than the Coleman-Weinberg prediction (1973 Phys. Rev. D 7 1888). (author)

  10. Scalar Dissipation Modeling for Passive and Active Scalars: a priori Study Using Direct Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selle, L. C.; Bellan, Josette

    2006-01-01

    Transitional databases from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of three-dimensional mixing layers for single-phase flows and two-phase flows with evaporation are analyzed and used to examine the typical hypothesis that the scalar dissipation Probability Distribution Function (PDF) may be modeled as a Gaussian. The databases encompass a single-component fuel and four multicomponent fuels, two initial Reynolds numbers (Re), two mass loadings for two-phase flows and two free-stream gas temperatures. Using the DNS calculated moments of the scalar-dissipation PDF, it is shown, consistent with existing experimental information on single-phase flows, that the Gaussian is a modest approximation of the DNS-extracted PDF, particularly poor in the range of the high scalar-dissipation values, which are significant for turbulent reaction rate modeling in non-premixed flows using flamelet models. With the same DNS calculated moments of the scalar-dissipation PDF and making a change of variables, a model of this PDF is proposed in the form of the (beta)-PDF which is shown to approximate much better the DNS-extracted PDF, particularly in the regime of the high scalar-dissipation values. Several types of statistical measures are calculated over the ensemble of the fourteen databases. For each statistical measure, the proposed (beta)-PDF model is shown to be much superior to the Gaussian in approximating the DNS-extracted PDF. Additionally, the agreement between the DNS-extracted PDF and the (beta)-PDF even improves when the comparison is performed for higher initial Re layers, whereas the comparison with the Gaussian is independent of the initial Re values. For two-phase flows, the comparison between the DNS-extracted PDF and the (beta)-PDF also improves with increasing free-stream gas temperature and mass loading. The higher fidelity approximation of the DNS-extracted PDF by the (beta)-PDF with increasing Re, gas temperature and mass loading bodes well for turbulent reaction rate

  11. Scalar eletrodynamics in three dimensions with topological mass terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, E.R.B. de.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction between a charged scalar field and a gauge field in a three-dimensional space-time is studied. The topological mass term (the Chern-Simons term) is added to the system and it is investigated how this term, odd by P and Τ symmetry, modifies the corrections to the propagators and vertices of this theory. These corrections are obtained to order e 2 in perturbation theory. In the correction of the linear vertex a new type term arises. Although this term, which comes from the topological one, presents and abnormal parity, the Ward's identity is still valid. (Author) [pt

  12. Squark and slepton mass relations in grand unified theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.; Hall, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    In the minimal supersymmetric standard model, assuming universal scalar masses at large energies, there are four intragenerational relations between the masses of the squarks and sleptons for each light generation. In this paper we study the scalar mass relations which follow only from the assumption that at large energies there is a grand unified theory which leads to a significant prediction of the weak mixing angle. Two new intragenerational mass relations for each of the light generations are derived. In addition, a third mass relation is found which relates the Higgs boson masses, the masses of the third generation scalars, and the masses of the scalars of the lighter generations. Verification of a fourth mass relation, involving only the charged slepton masses, provides a signal for SO(10) unification

  13. Inflation of the early cold Universe filled with a nonlinear scalar field and a nonideal relativistic Fermi gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashitskii, E. A.; Pentegov, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    We consider a possible scenario for the evolution of the early cold Universe born from a fairly large quantum fluctuation in a vacuum with a size a_0 ≫ l_P (where l_P is the Planck length) and filled with both a nonlinear scalar field φ, whose potential energy density U(φ) determines the vacuum energy density λ, and a nonideal Fermi gas with short-range repulsion between particles, whose equation of state is characterized by the ratio of pressure P(n_F) to energy density ε(n_F) dependent on the number density of fermions n_F. As the early Universe expands, the dimensionless quantity ν(n_F) = P(n_F)/ε(n_F) decreases with decreasing n_F from its maximum value ν_m_a_x = 1 for n_F → ∞ to zero for n_F → 0. The interaction of the scalar and gravitational fields, which is characterized by a dimensionless constant ξ, is proportional to the scalar curvature of four-dimensional space R = κ[3P(n_F)–ε(n_F)–4λ] (where κ is Einstein’s gravitational constant), and contains terms both quadratic and linear in φ. As a result, the expanding early Universe reaches the point of first-order phase transition in a finite time interval at critical values of the scalar curvature R = R_c =–μ"2/ξ and radius a_c ≫ a_0. Thereafter, the early closed Universe “rolls down” from the flat inflection point of the potential U(φ) to the zero potential minimum in a finite time. The release of the total potential energy of the scalar field in the entire volume of the expanding Universe as it “rolls down” must be accompanied by the production of a large number of massive particles and antiparticles of various kinds, whose annihilation plays the role of the Big Bang. We also discuss the fundamental nature of Newton’ gravitational constant G_N.

  14. Cosmological dynamics with non-minimally coupled scalar field and a constant potential function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrycyna, Orest; Szydłowski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Dynamical systems methods are used to investigate global behaviour of the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model in gravitational theory with a non-minimally coupled scalar field and a constant potential function. We show that the system can be reduced to an autonomous three-dimensional dynamical system and additionally is equipped with an invariant manifold corresponding to an accelerated expansion of the universe. Using this invariant manifold we find an exact solution of the reduced dynamics. We investigate all solutions for all admissible initial conditions using theory of dynamical systems to obtain a classification of all evolutional paths. The right-hand sides of the dynamical system depend crucially on the value of the non-minimal coupling constant therefore we study bifurcation values of this parameter under which the structure of the phase space changes qualitatively. We found a special bifurcation value of the non-minimal coupling constant which is distinguished by dynamics of the model and may suggest some additional symmetry in matter sector of the theory

  15. Cosmological dynamics with non-minimally coupled scalar field and a constant potential function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrycyna, Orest [Theoretical Physics Division, National Centre for Nuclear Research, Hoża 69, 00-681 Warszawa (Poland); Szydłowski, Marek, E-mail: orest.hrycyna@ncbj.gov.pl, E-mail: marek.szydlowski@uj.edu.pl [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, Orla 171, 30-244 Kraków (Poland)

    2015-11-01

    Dynamical systems methods are used to investigate global behaviour of the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model in gravitational theory with a non-minimally coupled scalar field and a constant potential function. We show that the system can be reduced to an autonomous three-dimensional dynamical system and additionally is equipped with an invariant manifold corresponding to an accelerated expansion of the universe. Using this invariant manifold we find an exact solution of the reduced dynamics. We investigate all solutions for all admissible initial conditions using theory of dynamical systems to obtain a classification of all evolutional paths. The right-hand sides of the dynamical system depend crucially on the value of the non-minimal coupling constant therefore we study bifurcation values of this parameter under which the structure of the phase space changes qualitatively. We found a special bifurcation value of the non-minimal coupling constant which is distinguished by dynamics of the model and may suggest some additional symmetry in matter sector of the theory.

  16. Unitarity constraints in the standard model with a singlet scalar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sin Kyu; Park, Jubin

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the discovery of a new scalar field and amelioration of the electroweak vacuum stability ascribed to a singlet scalar field embedded in the standard model (SM), we examine the implication of the perturbative unitarity in the SM with a singlet scalar field. Taking into account the full contributions to the scattering amplitudes, we derive unitarity conditions on the scattering matrix which can be translated into bounds on the masses of the scalar fields. In the case that the singlet scalar field develops vacuum expectation value (VEV), we get the upper bound on the singlet scalar mass varying with the mixing between the singlet and Higgs scalars. On the other hand, the mass of the Higgs scalar can be constrained by the unitarity condition in the case that the VEV of the singlet scalar is not generated. Applying the upper bound on the Higgs mass to the scenario of the unitarized Higgs inflation, we discuss how the unitarity condition can constrain the Higgs inflation. The singlet scalar mass is not constrained by the unitarity itself when we impose Z 2 in the model because of no mixing with the Higgs scalar. But, regarding the singlet scalar field as a cold dark matter candidate, we derive upper bound on the singlet scalar mass by combining the observed relic abundance with the unitarity condition.

  17. Universality of spectrum of passive scalar variance at very high Schmidt number in isotropic steady turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki

    2012-11-01

    Spectrum of passive scalar variance at very high Schmidt number up to 1000 in isotropic steady turbulence has been studied by using very high resolution DNS. Gaussian random force and scalar source which are isotropic and white in time are applied at low wavenumber band. Since the Schmidt number is very large, the system was integrated for 72 large eddy turn over time for the system to forgot the initial state. It is found that the scalar spectrum attains the asymptotic k-1 spectrum in the viscous-convective range and the constant CB is found to be 5.7 which is larger than 4.9 obtained by DNS under the uniform mean scalar gradient. Reasons for the difference are inferred as the Reynolds number effect, anisotropy, difference in the scalar injection, duration of time average, and the universality of the constant is discussed. The constant CB is also compared with the prediction by the Lagrangian statistical theory for the passive scalar. The scalar spectrum in the far diffusive range is found to be exponential, which is consistent with the Kraichnan's spectrum. However, the Kraichnan spectrum was derived under the assumption that the velocity field is white in time, therefore theoretical explanation of the agreement needs to be explored. Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research No. 21360082, Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  18. Dark sector impact on gravitational collapse of an electrically charged scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakonieczna, Anna [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University,Plac Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Institute of Agrophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences,Doświadczalna 4, 20-290 Lublin (Poland); Rogatko, Marek [Institute of Physics, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University,Plac Marii Curie-Skłodowskiej 1, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Nakonieczny, Łukasz [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-11-04

    Dark matter and dark energy are dominating components of the Universe. Their presence affects the course and results of processes, which are driven by the gravitational interaction. The objective of the paper was to examine the influence of the dark sector on the gravitational collapse of an electrically charged scalar field. A phantom scalar field was used as a model of dark energy in the system. Dark matter was modeled by a complex scalar field with a quartic potential, charged under a U(1)-gauge field. The dark components were coupled to the electrically charged scalar field via the exponential coupling and the gauge field-Maxwell field kinetic mixing, respectively. Complete non-linear simulations of the investigated process were performed. They were conducted from regular initial data to the end state, which was the matter dispersal or a singularity formation in a spacetime. During the collapse in the presence of dark energy dynamical wormholes and naked singularities were formed in emerging spacetimes. The wormhole throats were stabilized by the violation of the null energy condition, which occurred due to a significant increase of a value of the phantom scalar field function in its vicinity. The square of mass parameter of the dark matter scalar field potential controlled the formation of a Cauchy horizon or wormhole throats in the spacetime. The joint impact of dark energy and dark matter on the examined process indicated that the former decides what type of an object forms, while the latter controls the amount of time needed for the object to form. Additionally, the dark sector suppresses the natural tendency of an electrically charged scalar field to form a dynamical Reissner-Nordström spacetime during the gravitational collapse.

  19. Cosmic variance in inflation with two light scalars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonga, Béatrice; Brahma, Suddhasattwa; Deutsch, Anne-Sylvie; Shandera, Sarah, E-mail: bpb165@psu.edu, E-mail: suddhasattwa.brahma@gmail.com, E-mail: asdeutsch@psu.edu, E-mail: shandera@gravity.psu.edu [Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos and Physics Department, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    We examine the squeezed limit of the bispectrum when a light scalar with arbitrary non-derivative self-interactions is coupled to the inflaton. We find that when the hidden sector scalar is sufficiently light ( m ∼< 0.1 H ), the coupling between long and short wavelength modes from the series of higher order correlation functions (from arbitrary order contact diagrams) causes the statistics of the fluctuations to vary in sub-volumes. This means that observations of primordial non-Gaussianity cannot be used to uniquely reconstruct the potential of the hidden field. However, the local bispectrum induced by mode-coupling from these diagrams always has the same squeezed limit, so the field's locally determined mass is not affected by this cosmic variance.

  20. Passive Scalar Evolution in Peripheral Region

    OpenAIRE

    Lebedev, V. V.; Turitsyn, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    We consider evolution of a passive scalar (concentration of pollutants or temperature) in a chaotic (turbulent) flow. A universal asymptotic behavior of the passive scalar decay (homogenization) related to peripheral regions (near walls) is established. The passive scalar moments and its pair correlation function in the peripheral region are analyzed. A special case investigated in our paper is the passive scalar decay along a pipe.

  1. Symmetry breaking and scalar bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gildener, E.; Weinberg, S.

    1976-01-01

    There are reasons to suspect that the spontaneous breakdown of the gauge symmetries of the observed weak and electromagnetic interactions may be produced by the vacuum expectation values of massless weakly coupled elementary scalar fields. A method is described for finding the broken-symmetry solutions of such theories even when they contain arbitrary numbers of scalar fields with unconstrained couplings. In any such theory, there should exist a number of heavy Higgs bosons, with masses comparable to the intermediate vector bosons, plus one light Higgs boson, or ''scalon'' with mass of order αG/sub F/sub 1/2/. The mass and couplings of the scalon are calculable in terms of other masses, even without knowing all the details of the theory. For an SU(2) direct-product U(1) model with arbitrary numbers of scalar isodoublets, the scalon mass is greater than 5.26 GeV; a likely value is 7--10 GeV. The production and decay of the scalon are briefly considered. Some comments are offered on the relation between the mass scales associated with the weak and strong interactions

  2. Scalar formalism for non-Abelian gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hostler, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    The gauge field theory of an N-dimensional multiplet of spin- 1/2 particles is investigated using the Klein--Gordon-type wave equation ]Pi x (1+isigma) x Pi+m 2 ]Phi = 0, Pi/sub μ/equivalentpartial/partialix/sub μ/-eA/sub μ/, investigated before by a number of authors, to describe the fermions. Here Phi is a 2 x 1 Pauli spinor, and sigma repesents a Lorentz spin tensor whose components sigma/sub μ//sub ν/ are ordinary 2 x 2 Pauli spin matrices. Feynman rules for the scalar formalism for non-Abelian gauge theory are derived starting from the conventional field theory of the multiplet and converting it to the new description. The equivalence of the new and the old formalism for arbitrary radiative processes is thereby established. The conversion to the scalar formalism is accomplished in a novel way by working in terms of the path integral representation of the generating functional of the vacuum tau-functions, tau(2,1, xxx 3 xxx)equivalent , where Psi/sub in/ is a Heisenberg operator belonging to a 4N x 1 Dirac wave function of the multiplet. The Feynman rules obtained generalize earlier results for the Abelian case of quantum electrodynamics

  3. Radiative seesaw-type mechanism of fermion masses and non-trivial quark mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbelaez, Carolina; Hernandez, A.E.C.; Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Ivan [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso-CCTVal, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-06-15

    We propose a predictive inert two-Higgs doublet model, where the standard model (SM) symmetry is extended by S{sub 3} x Z{sub 2} x Z{sub 12} and the field content is enlarged by extra scalar fields, charged exotic fermions and two heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos. The charged exotic fermions generate a non-trivial quark mixing and provide one-loop-level masses for the first- and second-generation charged fermions. The masses of the light active neutrinos are generated from a one-loop-level radiative seesaw mechanism. Our model successfully explains the observed SM fermion mass and mixing pattern. (orig.)

  4. The Non-universality of the Low-mass End of the IMF is Robust against the Choice of SSP Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiniello, C.; Trager, S. C.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    We perform a direct comparison of two state-of-the art single stellar population (SSP) models that have been used to demonstrate the non-universality of the low-mass end of the initial mass function (IMF) slope. The two public versions of the SSP models are restricted to either solar abundance

  5. Inflation of the early cold Universe filled with a nonlinear scalar field and a nonideal relativistic Fermi gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashitskii, E. A., E-mail: pashitsk@iop.kiev.ua; Pentegov, V. I., E-mail: pentegov@iop.kiev.ua [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Physics (Ukraine)

    2017-03-15

    We consider a possible scenario for the evolution of the early cold Universe born from a fairly large quantum fluctuation in a vacuum with a size a{sub 0} ≫ l{sub P} (where l{sub P} is the Planck length) and filled with both a nonlinear scalar field φ, whose potential energy density U(φ) determines the vacuum energy density λ, and a nonideal Fermi gas with short-range repulsion between particles, whose equation of state is characterized by the ratio of pressure P(n{sub F}) to energy density ε(n{sub F}) dependent on the number density of fermions n{sub F}. As the early Universe expands, the dimensionless quantity ν(n{sub F}) = P(n{sub F})/ε(n{sub F}) decreases with decreasing n{sub F} from its maximum value ν{sub max} = 1 for n{sub F} → ∞ to zero for n{sub F} → 0. The interaction of the scalar and gravitational fields, which is characterized by a dimensionless constant ξ, is proportional to the scalar curvature of four-dimensional space R = κ[3P(n{sub F})–ε(n{sub F})–4λ] (where κ is Einstein’s gravitational constant), and contains terms both quadratic and linear in φ. As a result, the expanding early Universe reaches the point of first-order phase transition in a finite time interval at critical values of the scalar curvature R = R{sub c} =–μ{sup 2}/ξ and radius a{sub c} ≫ a{sub 0}. Thereafter, the early closed Universe “rolls down” from the flat inflection point of the potential U(φ) to the zero potential minimum in a finite time. The release of the total potential energy of the scalar field in the entire volume of the expanding Universe as it “rolls down” must be accompanied by the production of a large number of massive particles and antiparticles of various kinds, whose annihilation plays the role of the Big Bang. We also discuss the fundamental nature of Newton’ gravitational constant G{sub N}.

  6. Dynamical analysis for a scalar-tensor model with Gauss-Bonnet and non-minimal couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granda, L.N.; Jimenez, D.F. [Universidad del Valle, Departamento de Fisica, Cali (Colombia)

    2017-10-15

    We study the autonomous system for a scalar-tensor model of dark energy with Gauss-Bonnet and non-minimal couplings. The critical points describe important stable asymptotic scenarios including quintessence, phantom and de Sitter attractor solutions. Two functional forms for the coupling functions and the scalar potential are considered: power-law and exponential functions of the scalar field. For the exponential functions the existence of stable quintessence, phantom or de Sitter solutions, allows for an asymptotic behavior where the effective Newtonian coupling becomes constant. The phantom solutions could be realized without appealing to ghost degrees of freedom. Transient inflationary and radiation-dominated phases can also be described. (orig.)

  7. Radiative decays involving f0(980) and a0(980) and mixing between low and high mass scalar mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, T.; Kitamura, I.; Morisita, N.

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the experimental data for φ->f 0 (980)γ, φ->a 0 (980)γ, f 0 (980)->γγ and a 0 (980)->γγ decay widths in a framework where f 0 (980) and a 0 (980) are assumed to be mainly qqq-bar q-bar low mass scalar mesons and mixed with qq-bar high mass scalar mesons. Applied the vector meson dominance model (VDM), these decays amplitudes are expressed by coupling parameters B describing the S (qqq-bar q-bar scalar meson)-V (vector meson)-V (vector meson) coupling and B ' describing the S ' (qq-bar scalar meson)-V-V coupling. Adopting the magnitudes for B and B ' as 3∼2.8 GeV -1 and ∼12 GeV -1 , respectively, the mixing angle between a 0 (980) and a 0 (1450) as ∼9 o , and the mixing parameter λ 01 causing the mixing between I=0 qqq-bar q-bar state and qq-bar state as ∼0.24 GeV 2 , we can interpret these experimental data, consistently

  8. The Emergent Universe scheme and tunneling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labraña, Pedro [Departamento de Física, Universidad del Bío-Bío, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C, Concepción, Chile and Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Matèria and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat (Spain)

    2014-07-23

    We present an alternative scheme for an Emergent Universe scenario, developed previously in Phys. Rev. D 86, 083524 (2012), where the universe is initially in a static state supported by a scalar field located in a false vacuum. The universe begins to evolve when, by quantum tunneling, the scalar field decays into a state of true vacuum. The Emergent Universe models are interesting since they provide specific examples of non-singular inflationary universes.

  9. Unifying Dark Matter and Dark Energy with non-Canonical Scalars

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Swagat S.; Sahni, Varun

    2018-01-01

    Non-canonical scalar fields with the Lagrangian ${\\cal L} = X^\\alpha - V(\\phi)$, possess the attractive property that the speed of sound, $c_s^{2} = (2\\,\\alpha - 1)^{-1}$, can be exceedingly small for large values of $\\alpha$. This allows a non-canonical field to cluster and behave like warm/cold dark matter on small scales. We demonstrate that simple potentials such as $V = V_0\\coth^2{\\phi}$ and the Starobinsky-type potential $V(\\phi) = V_0 \\left ( 1 - e^{-{\\phi}}\\right )^{2}$ can unify dark...

  10. Fast and accurate CMB computations in non-flat FLRW universes

    CERN Document Server

    Lesgourgues, Julien

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method for calculating CMB anisotropies in a non-flat Friedmann universe, relying on a very stable algorithm for the calculation of hyperspherical Bessel functions, that can be pushed to arbitrary precision levels. We also introduce a new approximation scheme which gradually takes over in the flat space limit, and significant speeds-up calculations. Our method is implemented in the Boltzmann code CLASS. It can be used to benchmark the accuracy of the CAMB code in curved space, which is found to match expectations. For default precision settings, corresponding to 0.1% for scalar temperature spectra and 0.2% for scalar polarisation spectra, our code is two to three times faster, depending on curvature. We also simplify the temperature and polarisation source terms significantly, so the different contributions to the $C_\\ell$'s are easy to identify inside the code.

  11. Nucleon scalar matrix elements with N{sub f}=2+1+1 twisted mass fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinter, Simon; Drach, Vincent; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2011-12-15

    We investigate scalar matrix elements of the nucleon using N{sub f}=2+1+1 flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions at a fixed value of the lattice spacing of a{approx}0.078 fm. We compute disconnected contributions to the relevant three-point functions using an efficient noise reduction technique. Using these methods together with an only multiplicative renormalization applicable for twisted mass fermions, allows us to obtain accurate results in the light and strange sector. (orig.)

  12. Scalar electron production in e+e- annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Yamada, S.; Ishikawa, K.

    1983-05-01

    The single scalar electron production process e + e - -> esup(+-) + Photino + scalar electron (scalar electron -> esup(-+) + Photino), with the detection of e + as well as e - , provides a clean method to detect scalar electrons when their masses are not lighter than the beam energy. We made a complete calculation of the process and evaluated the production cross sections. (orig.)

  13. The missing mass of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lachieze-Rey, M.

    2002-01-01

    The existence of dark matter is suggested by 2 facts: 1) the real mass of matter inside galaxies must be 10 times greater than the observed mass to explain the values of the spinning velocity of galaxies around their centers. Furthermore the value of this velocity does not depend a lot on the distance to the center of the galaxy, this implies that the missing mass is uniformly distributed inside galaxies; 2) According to general relativity, massive celestial bodies produce a curvature of space-time that generates a deviation of light beams. These deviations have been studied and it appears that they require the presence of a far more important quantity of matter than the quantity reduced to visible matter. The missing mass issue arises 3 problems, the first problem comes from the existence of a great part of ordinary (baryonic) matter that is invisible: the global mass of stars represents only 10 % of the total baryonic mass of the universe. This invisible ordinary matter might exist in condensed form in black-hole, giant planets or brown dwarfs roaming the galaxies. The second problem arose when most scientists were convinced of the existence of huge quantity of non-baryonic matter, 10 times more abundant than the baryonic matter. The supersymmetric extension of the standard model allows the existence of particles that might be candidate for carrying this non-baryonic mass. The third problem appeared recently when measurement of the curvature of the space-time has shown that the 3 forms of matter: visible matter, invisible ordinary matter and non-baryonic matter contribute together to only one third of the total energy of the universe. (A.C.)

  14. Scale-invariant scalar metric fluctuations during inflation: non-perturbative formalism from a 5D vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anabitarte, M.; Bellini, M.; Madriz Aguilar, Jose Edgar

    2010-01-01

    We extend to 5D an approach of a 4D non-perturbative formalism to study scalar metric fluctuations of a 5D Riemann-flat de Sitter background metric. In contrast with the results obtained in 4D, the spectrum of cosmological scalar metric fluctuations during inflation can be scale invariant and the background inflaton field can take sub-Planckian values. (orig.)

  15. The evolving Planck mass in classically scale-invariant theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannike, K.; Raidal, M.; Spethmann, C.; Veermäe, H. [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics,Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2017-04-05

    We consider classically scale-invariant theories with non-minimally coupled scalar fields, where the Planck mass and the hierarchy of physical scales are dynamically generated. The classical theories possess a fixed point, where scale invariance is spontaneously broken. In these theories, however, the Planck mass becomes unstable in the presence of explicit sources of scale invariance breaking, such as non-relativistic matter and cosmological constant terms. We quantify the constraints on such classical models from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis that lead to an upper bound on the non-minimal coupling and require trans-Planckian field values. We show that quantum corrections to the scalar potential can stabilise the fixed point close to the minimum of the Coleman-Weinberg potential. The time-averaged motion of the evolving fixed point is strongly suppressed, thus the limits on the evolving gravitational constant from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and other measurements do not presently constrain this class of theories. Field oscillations around the fixed point, if not damped, contribute to the dark matter density of the Universe.

  16. The evolving Planck mass in classically scale-invariant theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannike, K.; Raidal, M.; Spethmann, C.; Veermäe, H.

    2017-04-01

    We consider classically scale-invariant theories with non-minimally coupled scalar fields, where the Planck mass and the hierarchy of physical scales are dynamically generated. The classical theories possess a fixed point, where scale invariance is spontaneously broken. In these theories, however, the Planck mass becomes unstable in the presence of explicit sources of scale invariance breaking, such as non-relativistic matter and cosmological constant terms. We quantify the constraints on such classical models from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis that lead to an upper bound on the non-minimal coupling and require trans-Planckian field values. We show that quantum corrections to the scalar potential can stabilise the fixed point close to the minimum of the Coleman-Weinberg potential. The time-averaged motion of the evolving fixed point is strongly suppressed, thus the limits on the evolving gravitational constant from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and other measurements do not presently constrain this class of theories. Field oscillations around the fixed point, if not damped, contribute to the dark matter density of the Universe.

  17. Calculation of cell face velocity of non-staggered grid system

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wang

    2012-07-28

    In this paper, the cell face velocities in the discretization of the continuity equation, the momentum equation, and the scalar equation of a non-staggered grid system are calculated and discussed. Both the momentum interpolation and the linear interpolation are adopted to evaluate the coefficients in the discretized momentum and scalar equations. Their performances are compared. When the linear interpolation is used to calculate the coefficients, the mass residual term in the coefficients must be dropped to maintain the accuracy and convergence rate of the solution. © Shanghai University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012.

  18. Black holes evaporation and big mass particle (maximon, intermediate boson) creation in nonstationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man'ko, V.I.; Markov, M.A.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter considers the process of creation of particles with maximally big masses (maximons, intermediate bosons) in the nonstationary Universe within the framework of neutral and charged scalar field theory. The conclusions of the matter creation model for real particles (resonances) and hypothetical particles (maximons, friedmons, intermediate bosons) are analyzed. It is determined that if the mechanism of maximon's creation exists, then these particles must be stable. The maximons could be the final states of decaying black holes. A possible mechanism of cosmic ray creation as a result of ''vacuum'' generation of known unstable particles is discussed. The limits upon the mass and the life time of intermediate bosons are calculated. It is demonstrated that the creation of masses greater than 10 GeV, and with life times less than 10- 24 sec and quantity of elementary particles greater than 100 are in contradiction with the particle creation mechanism and the experimental mass density in the Universe. The formalism of the examined method and its vacuum properties are discussed in an appendix

  19. Thermal dark matter co-annihilating with a strongly interacting scalar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondini, S.; Laine, M.

    2018-04-01

    Recently many investigations have considered Majorana dark matter co-annihilating with bound states formed by a strongly interacting scalar field. However only the gluon radiation contribution to bound state formation and dissociation, which at high temperatures is subleading to soft 2 → 2 scatterings, has been included. Making use of a non-relativistic effective theory framework and solving a plasma-modified Schrödinger equation, we address the effect of soft 2 → 2 scatterings as well as the thermal dissociation of bound states. We argue that the mass splitting between the Majorana and scalar field has in general both a lower and an upper bound, and that the dark matter mass scale can be pushed at least up to 5…6TeV.

  20. Search for scalar top quarks decaying into scalar tau leptons with ATLAS at sqrt{s} =8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00358725; Colijn, Auke Pieter

    2017-10-06

    This thesis presents a search for Supersymmetry carried out in a particular scenario arising from the Gauge Mediated Supersymmetry breaking mechanism that assumes a massless gravitino as lightest supersymmetric particle, a scalar tau lepton as next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle and the top squark as the lightest among the quark superpartners. The analysis is performed using the data collected by ATLAS at a centre-of-mass energy √s = 8 TeV during 2012 data taking, for a total of 20.3 fb−1 of integrated luminosity of proton-proton collisions. Scalar top quark candidates are searched for in events with either two light leptons, one hadronically decaying tau and one light lepton or two hadronically decaying taus in the final state. No significant excess over the Standard Model expectation is found and the results are interpreted as 95% confidence lower limits not top squark and scalar tau masses. Depending on the scalar tau mass, lower limits between 490 and 650 GeV are placed on the top squark mass wit...

  1. The scalar-photon 3-point vertex in massless quenched scalar QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concha-Sánchez, Y; Gutiérrez-Guerrero, L X; Fernández-Rangel, L A

    2016-01-01

    Non perturbative studies of Schwinger-Dyson equations (SDEs) require their infinite, coupled tower to be truncated in order to reduce them to a practically solvable set. In this connection, a physically acceptable ansatz for the three point vertex is the most favorite choice. Scalar quantum electrodynamics (sQED) provides a simple and neat platform to address this problem. The most general form of the scalar-photon three point vertex can be expressed in terms of only two independent form factors, longitudinal and transverse. Ball and Chiu have demonstrated that the longitudinal vertex is fixed by requiring the Ward-Fradkin-Green- Takahashi identity (WFGTI), while the transverse vertex remains undetermined. In massless quenched sQED, we propose the transverse part of the non perturbative scalar-photon vertex. (paper)

  2. Geometry of the Scalar Sector

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, Rodrigo; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2016-01-01

    The $S$-matrix of a quantum field theory is unchanged by field redefinitions, and so only depends on geometric quantities such as the curvature of field space. Whether the Higgs multiplet transforms linearly or non-linearly under electroweak symmetry is a subtle question since one can make a coordinate change to convert a field that transforms linearly into one that transforms non-linearly. Renormalizability of the Standard Model (SM) does not depend on the choice of scalar fields or whether the scalar fields transform linearly or non-linearly under the gauge group, but only on the geometric requirement that the scalar field manifold ${\\mathcal M}$ is flat. We explicitly compute the one-loop correction to scalar scattering in the SM written in non-linear Callan-Coleman-Wess-Zumino (CCWZ) form, where it has an infinite series of higher dimensional operators, and show that the $S$-matrix is finite. Standard Model Effective Field Theory (SMEFT) and Higgs Effective Field Theory (HEFT) have curved ${\\mathcal M}$, ...

  3. Initial behavior of a quantized scalar field and the associated pair-creation in several isotropic closed and open universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu.

    1981-01-01

    The concept of a positive frequency part near the initial epoch in a big-bang universe or its counterpart in other (say, de Sitter) one for a canonically quantized scalar field is important in discussing the associated pair-creation of those particles. Therefore, an attempt is made to define the positive frequency part in such isotropic closed and open universes that the scalar wave equation can be exactly solved. Except for some closed universe, the parts in question and, therefore, the Feynman propagators in the remaining universes are uniquely settled. Then it is shown that (1) the pair-creation in the Friedmann open universe (which is very interesting not only from observational, but also from theoretical viewpoints) is essentially equivalent to that in the Chitre-Hartle universe with flat 3-space and (2) the respective pair-creations in expanding metrics with open and flat 3-spaces of the de Sitter universe are different from each other, as insisted upon by Gibbons and Hawking basing on the original static metric. (author)

  4. Initial behavior of a quantized scalar field and the associated pair-creation in several isotropic closed and open universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nariai, Hidekazu

    1982-01-01

    The concept of a positive frequency part near the initial epoch in a big-bang universe or its counterpart in other (say, de Sitter) one for a canonically quantized scalar field is important in discussing the associated pair-creation of those particles. Therefore, an attempt is made to define the positive frequency part in such isotropic closed and open universes that the scalar wave equation can be exactly solved. Except for some closed universe, the parts in question and, therefore, the Feynman propagators in the remaining universes are uniquely settled. Then it is shown that (1) the pair-creation in the Friedmann open universe (which is very interesting not only from observational, but also from theoretical viewpoints) is essentially equivalent to that in the Chitre-Hartle universe with flat 3-space and (2) the respective pair-creations in expanding metrics with open and flat 3-spaces of the de Sitter universe are different from each other, as insisted upon by Gibbons and Hawking basing on the original static metric. (author)

  5. Fast and accurate CMB computations in non-flat FLRW universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesgourgues, Julien; Tram, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    We present a new method for calculating CMB anisotropies in a non-flat Friedmann universe, relying on a very stable algorithm for the calculation of hyperspherical Bessel functions, that can be pushed to arbitrary precision levels. We also introduce a new approximation scheme which gradually takes over in the flat space limit and leads to significant reductions of the computation time. Our method is implemented in the Boltzmann code class. It can be used to benchmark the accuracy of the camb code in curved space, which is found to match expectations. For default precision settings, corresponding to 0.1% for scalar temperature spectra and 0.2% for scalar polarisation spectra, our code is two to three times faster, depending on curvature. We also simplify the temperature and polarisation source terms significantly, so the different contributions to the Cl 's are easy to identify inside the code.

  6. Fast and accurate CMB computations in non-flat FLRW universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesgourgues, Julien; Tram, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method for calculating CMB anisotropies in a non-flat Friedmann universe, relying on a very stable algorithm for the calculation of hyperspherical Bessel functions, that can be pushed to arbitrary precision levels. We also introduce a new approximation scheme which gradually takes over in the flat space limit and leads to significant reductions of the computation time. Our method is implemented in the Boltzmann code class. It can be used to benchmark the accuracy of the camb code in curved space, which is found to match expectations. For default precision settings, corresponding to 0.1% for scalar temperature spectra and 0.2% for scalar polarisation spectra, our code is two to three times faster, depending on curvature. We also simplify the temperature and polarisation source terms significantly, so the different contributions to the C ℓ  's are easy to identify inside the code

  7. A theory of scalar mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooft, G. t'; Isidori, G.; Maiani, L.; Polosa, A.D.; Riquer, V.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the effect of the instanton induced, six-fermion effective Lagrangian on the decays of the lightest scalar mesons in the diquark-antidiquark picture. This addition allows for a remarkably good description of light scalar meson decays. The same effective Lagrangian produces a mixing of the lightest scalars with the positive parity qq-bar states. Comparing with previous work where the qq-bar mesons are identified with the nonet at 1200-1700 MeV, we find that the mixing required to fit the mass spectrum is in good agreement with the instanton coupling obtained from light scalar decays. A coherent picture of scalar mesons as a mixture of tetraquark states (dominating in the lightest mesons) and heavy qq-bar states (dominating in the heavier mesons) emerges

  8. Holography for a non-inflationary early universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinterbichler, Kurt [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,31 Caroline St. N, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Stokes, James; Trodden, Mark [Center for Particle Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy,University of Pennsylvania,209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2015-01-19

    We construct a gravitational dual of the pseudo-conformal universe, a proposed alternative to inflation in which a conformal field theory in nearly flat space develops a time dependent vacuum expectation value. Constructing this dual amounts to finding five-dimensional domain-wall spacetimes with anti-de Sitter asymptotics, for which the wall has the symmetries of four-dimensional de Sitter space. This holographically realizes the characteristic symmetry breaking pattern so(2,4)→so(1,4) of the pseudo-conformal universe. We present an explicit example with a massless scalar field, using holographic renormalization to obtain general expressions for the renormalized scalar and stress-tensor one-point functions. We discuss the relationship between these solutions and those of four-dimensional holographic defect conformal field theories which break so(2,4)→so(2,3).

  9. Holography for a non-inflationary early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinterbichler, Kurt; Stokes, James; Trodden, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We construct a gravitational dual of the pseudo-conformal universe, a proposed alternative to inflation in which a conformal field theory in nearly flat space develops a time dependent vacuum expectation value. Constructing this dual amounts to finding five-dimensional domain-wall spacetimes with anti-de Sitter asymptotics, for which the wall has the symmetries of four-dimensional de Sitter space. This holographically realizes the characteristic symmetry breaking pattern so(2,4)→so(1,4) of the pseudo-conformal universe. We present an explicit example with a massless scalar field, using holographic renormalization to obtain general expressions for the renormalized scalar and stress-tensor one-point functions. We discuss the relationship between these solutions and those of four-dimensional holographic defect conformal field theories which break so(2,4)→so(2,3).

  10. Search for the first generation scalar leptoquarks with D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cothenet, A.

    2004-05-01

    This work was dedicated to the search for pairs of first generation scalar leptoquarks one decaying into ej and the other into νj. The experimental data used (175,6 pb -1 ) is that collected during the run-II of the D0 experiment at Tevatron. The production cross-sections of scalar leptoquark pairs has been assessed at a 95% confidence level for different values of the mass. The comparison of these values with theoretical values has led us to state that for a branching ratio β = 0.5 the existence of scalar leptoquarks with a mass lower than 194 GeV is not possible. For a branching ratio β = 1, some scalar leptoquarks with mass < 238 GeV may be excluded while for β = 0.5, some scalar leptoquarks with mass < 213 GeV are excluded

  11. Higgs scalar in heavy-vector-meson decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frampton, P.H.; Wada, W.W.

    1979-01-01

    For both UPSILON (9.5,b-barb) and T (t-bart), the decay into Higgs scalar plus photon is calculated, employing a triangle-diagram estimate for the dependence of this decay matrix element on the Higgs-scalar mass. This mass dependence gives a significant supression, but the decay should still be readily observable, if energetically allowed

  12. Scalar-tensor theory of fourth-order gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accioly, A.J.; Goncalves, A.T.

    1986-04-01

    A scalar-tensor theory of fourth-order gravity is considered. Some cosmological consequences, due to the presence of the scalar field, as well as of metric derivatives higher than second order, are analysed. In particular, upperbpunds are obtained for the coupling constant α and for the scale factor of the universe, respectively. The discussion is restricted to Robertson-Walker universes. (Author) [pt

  13. Extending Chiral Perturbation Theory with an Isosinglet Scalar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin; Langaeble, Kasper; Sannino, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    We augment the chiral Lagrangian by an isosinglet scalar and compute the one-loop radiative corrections to the pion mass and decay constant, as well as the scalar mass. The calculations are carried out for different patterns of chiral symmetry breaking of immediate relevance for phenomenology...

  14. LATTICEEASY A Program for Lattice Simulations of Scalar Fields in an Expanding Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Felder, G; Tkachev, Igor; Felder, Gary

    2008-01-01

    We describe a C++ program that we have written and made available for calculating the evolution of interacting scalar fields in an expanding universe. The program is particularly useful for the study of reheating and thermalization after inflation. The program and its full documentation are available on the Web at http://physics.stanford.edu/gfelder/latticeeasy. In this paper we provide a brief overview of what the program does and what it is useful for.

  15. Quantum scalar-metric cosmology with Chaplygin gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumder, Barun

    2011-01-01

    A spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model with generalized Chaplygin gas is studied in the context of scalar-metric formulation of cosmology. Schutz's mechanism for the perfect fluid is applied with generalized Chaplygin gas and the classical and quantum dynamics for this model is studied. It is found that the only surviving matter degree of freedom played the role of cosmic time. For the quantum mechanical description it is possible to find the wave packet which resulted from the linear superposition of the wave functions of the Schroedinger-Wheeler-DeWitt (SWD) equation, which is a consequence of the above formalism. The wave packets show two distinct dominant peaks and propagate in the direction of increasing scale factor. It may happen that our present universe originated from one of those peaks. The many-world and ontological interpretation of quantum mechanics is applied to investigate about the behavior of the scale factor and the scalar field (considered for this model). In both the cases the scale factor avoids singularity and a bouncing non-singular universe is found.

  16. On the absence of scalar hair for charged rotating black holes in non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    black holes with exterior non-abelian gauge field or Skyrmion field [8–10] have put ... solutions for charged rotating space-time with a minimally coupled scalar field from the ...... 125, 2163 (1962). [26] G Magnano and L M Sokolowski, Phys.

  17. Scalar conservation and boundedness in simulations of compressible flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbareddy, Pramod K.; Kartha, Anand; Candler, Graham V.

    2017-11-01

    With the proper combination of high-order, low-dissipation numerical methods, physics-based subgrid-scale models, and boundary conditions it is becoming possible to simulate many combustion flows at relevant conditions. However, non-premixed flows are a particular challenge because the thickness of the fuel/oxidizer interface scales inversely with Reynolds number. Sharp interfaces can also be present in the initial or boundary conditions. When higher-order numerical methods are used, there are often aphysical undershoots and overshoots in the scalar variables (e.g. passive scalars, species mass fractions or progress variable). These numerical issues are especially prominent when low-dissipation methods are used, since sharp jumps in flow variables are not always coincident with regions of strong variation in the scalar fields: consequently, special detection mechanisms and dissipative fluxes are needed. Most numerical methods diffuse the interface, resulting in artificial mixing and spurious reactions. In this paper, we propose a numerical method that mitigates this issue. We present methods for passive and active scalars, and demonstrate their effectiveness with several examples.

  18. Spinning Kerr black holes with stationary massive scalar clouds: the large-coupling regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [Marine sciences, The Ruppin Academic Center,Ruppin, Emeq Hefer 40250 (Israel); Biotechnology, The Hadassah Academic College,37 Hanevi’im St., Jerusalem 9101001 (Israel)

    2017-01-09

    We study analytically the Klein-Gordon wave equation for stationary massive scalar fields linearly coupled to spinning Kerr black holes. In particular, using the WKB approximation, we derive a compact formula for the discrete spectrum of scalar field masses which characterize the stationary composed Kerr-black-hole-massive-scalar-field configurations in the large-coupling regime Mμ≫1 (here M and μ are respectively the mass of the central black hole and the proper mass of the scalar field). We confirm our analytically derived formula for the Kerr-scalar-field mass spectrum with numerical data that recently appeared in the literature.

  19. Energy momentum tensor in theories with scalar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joglekar, S.D.

    1992-01-01

    The renormalization of energy momentum tensor in theories with scalar fields and two coupling constants is considered. The need for addition of an improvement term is shown. Two possible forms for the improvement term are: (i) One in which the improvement coefficient is a finite function of bare parameters of the theory (so that the energy-momentum tensor can be derived from an action that is a finite function of bare quantities), (ii) One in which the improvement coefficient is a finite quantity, i.e. finite function of the renormalized quantities are considered. Four possible model of such theories are (i) Scalar Q.E.D. (ii) Non-Abelian theory with scalars, (iii) Yukawa theory, (iv) A model with two scalars. In all these theories a negative conclusion is established: neither forms for the improvement terms lead to a finite energy momentum tensor. Physically this means that when interaction with external gravity is incorporated in such a model, additional experimental input in the form of root mean square mass radius must be given to specify the theory completely, and the flat space parameters are insufficient. (author). 12 refs

  20. Symmetry inheritance of scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivica Smolić

    2015-01-01

    Matter fields do not necessarily have to share the symmetries with the spacetime they live in. When this happens, we speak of the symmetry inheritance of fields. In this paper we classify the obstructions of symmetry inheritance by the scalar fields, both real and complex, and look more closely at the special cases of stationary and axially symmetric spacetimes. Since the symmetry noninheritance is present in the scalar fields of boson stars and may enable the existence of the black hole scalar hair, our results narrow the possible classes of such solutions. Finally, we define and analyse the symmetry noninheritance contributions to the Komar mass and angular momentum of the black hole scalar hair. (paper)

  1. The big bang as a result of the first-order phase transition driven by a change of the scalar curvature in an expanding early Universe: The “hyperinflation” scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashitskii, E. A., E-mail: pashitsk@iop.kiev.ua; Pentegov, V. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute of Physics (Ukraine)

    2016-01-15

    We suggest that the Big Bang could be a result of the first-order phase transition driven by a change in the scalar curvature of the 4D spacetime in an expanding cold Universe filled with a nonlinear scalar field φ and neutral matter with an equation of state p = νε (where p and ε are the pressure and energy density of the matter, respectively). We consider the Lagrangian of a scalar field with nonlinearity φ{sup 4} in a curved spacetime that, along with the term–ξR|φ|{sup 2} quadratic in φ (where ξ is the interaction constant between the scalar and gravitational fields and R is the scalar curvature), contains the term ξRφ{sub 0}(φ + φ{sup +}) linear in φ, where φ{sub 0} is the vacuum mean of the scalar field amplitude. As a consequence, the condition for the existence of extrema of the scalar-field potential energy is reduced to an equation cubic in φ. Provided that ν > 1/3, the scalar curvature R = [κ(3ν–1)ε–4Λ] (where κ and Λ are Einstein’s gravitational and cosmological constants, respectively) decreases with decreasing ε as the Universe expands, and a first-order phase transition in variable “external field” parameter proportional to R occurs at some critical value R{sub c} < 0. Under certain conditions, the critical radius of the early Universe at the point of the first-order phase transition can reach an arbitrary large value, so that this scenario of unrestricted “inflation” of the Universe may be called “hyperinflation.” After the passage through the phase-transition point, the scalar-field potential energy should be rapidly released, which must lead to strong heating of the Universe, playing the role of the Big Bang.

  2. Scalar particle creation in an anisotropic universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, B.K.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of quantized scalar field creation in an anisotropic spatially homogeneous background universe is reexamined from a Schroedinger-picture point of view. For each mode a complete set of orthonormal wave functions, psi/subN/, is obtained using the method of Salusti and Zirilli. These wave functions are valid at all times even if there is an initial cosmological singularity and depend only on the solution of the classical equation of motion. The wave functions are fixed completely by requiring the classical solution to have positive-frequency WKB form when the universe reaches the stage of adiabatic expansion. These wave functions are eigenfunctions of a conserved number operator which has the usual particle interpretation in the adiabatic regime. An intitial state near the singularity is chosen as a superposition of the wave functions, psi/subN/, and the particle number in the adiabatic regime is calculated. For plane-wave initial states, which follow the classical behavior near the singularity, the final particle number depends only on the parameters of the initial wave packet. For an initial state which instantaneously diagonalizes the Hamiltonian, an (arbitrary) initial time must be chosen. If the mode in question is in the adiabatic regime at that time almost no particle creation occurs. If it is not adiabatic, creation occurs and becomes infinite if the initial time is taken to be that of the singularity. This creation is a consequence of the failure of particle number to be well defined in this regime. Comparisons with other particle-creation studies are made

  3. Viable tensor-to-scalar ratio in a symmetric matter bounce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath Raveendran, Rathul; Chowdhury, Debika; Sriramkumar, L.

    2018-01-01

    Matter bounces refer to scenarios wherein the universe contracts at early times as in a matter dominated epoch until the scale factor reaches a minimum, after which it starts expanding. While such scenarios are known to lead to scale invariant spectra of primordial perturbations after the bounce, the challenge has been to construct completely symmetric bounces that lead to a tensor-to-scalar ratio which is small enough to be consistent with the recent cosmological data. In this work, we construct a model involving two scalar fields (a canonical field and a non-canonical ghost field) to drive the symmetric matter bounce and study the evolution of the scalar perturbations in the model. We find that the model can be completely described in terms of a single parameter, viz. the ratio of the scale associated with the bounce to the value of the scale factor at the bounce. We evolve the scalar perturbations numerically across the bounce and evaluate the scalar power spectra after the bounce. We show that, while the scalar and tensor perturbation spectra are scale invariant over scales of cosmological interest, the tensor-to-scalar ratio proves to be much smaller than the current upper bound from the observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies by the Planck mission. We also support our numerical analysis with analytical arguments.

  4. Intermediate inflation from a non-canonical scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezazadeh, K.; Karami, K. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran St., Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi, P., E-mail: rezazadeh86@gmail.com, E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.ir, E-mail: parvin.karimi67@yahoo.com [Center for Excellence in Astronomy and Astrophysics (CEAA-RIAAM), P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    We study the intermediate inflation in a non-canonical scalar field framework with a power-like Lagrangian. We show that in contrast with the standard canonical intermediate inflation, our non-canonical model is compatible with the observational results of Planck 2015. Also, we estimate the equilateral non-Gaussianity parameter which is in well agreement with the prediction of Planck 2015. Then, we obtain an approximation for the energy scale at the initial time of inflation and show that it can be of order of the Planck energy scale, i.e. M{sub P} ∼ 10{sup 18}GeV. We will see that after a short period of time, inflation enters in the slow-roll regime that its energy scale is of order M{sub P}/100 ∼ 10{sup 16}GeV and the horizon exit takes place in this energy scale. We also examine an idea in our non-canonical model to overcome the central drawback of intermediate inflation which is the fact that inflation never ends. We solve this problem without disturbing significantly the nature of the intermediate inflation until the time of horizon exit.

  5. Loop integration results using numerical extrapolation for a non-scalar integral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doncker, E. de; Shimizu, Y.; Fujimoto, J.; Yuasa, F.; Kaugars, K.; Cucos, L.; Van Voorst, J.

    2004-01-01

    Loop integration results have been obtained using numerical integration and extrapolation. An extrapolation to the limit is performed with respect to a parameter in the integrand which tends to zero. Results are given for a non-scalar four-point diagram. Extensions to accommodate loop integration by existing integration packages are also discussed. These include: using previously generated partitions of the domain and roundoff error guards

  6. Family number non-conservation induced by the super-symmetric mixing of scalar leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.J.S.

    1987-01-01

    We examine a model of supersymmetry with soft breaking terms in the electroweak sector. Explicit mixing among the scalar leptons results in a number of effects, principally non-conservation of lepton family number. Comparison with experiment permits us to place constraints upon the model

  7. Experiments for obtaining field influence mass particles.

    CERN Document Server

    Yahalomi, E

    2010-01-01

    Analyzing time dilation experiments the existence of a universal field interacting with moving mass particles is obtained. It is found that mass particle changes its properties depend on its velocity relative to this universal scalar field and not on its velocity relative to the laboratory. High energy proton momentum, energy and mass were calculated obtaining new results. Experiments in high energy accelerators are suggested as additional proofs for the existence of this universal field. This universal field may explain some results of other high energy experiments.

  8. Toward a Strongly Interacting Scalar Higgs Particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, Abouzeid M.; El-Houssieny, M.

    2008-01-01

    We calculate the vacuum energy of the non-Hermitian and PT symmetric (-gφ 4 ) 2+1 scalar field theory. Rather than the corresponding Hermitian theory and due to the asymptotic freedom property of the theory, the vacuum energy does not blow up for large energy scales which is a good sign to solve the hierarchy problem when using this model to break the U(1)xSU(2) symmetry in the standard model. The theory is strongly interacting and in fact, all the dimensionful parameters in the theory like mass and energy are finite even for very high energy scales. Moreover, relative to the vacuum energy for the Hermitian φ 4 theory, the vacuum energy of the non-Hermitian and PT symmetric (-gφ 4 ) 2+1 theory is tiny, which is a good sign toward the solution of the cosmological constant problem. Remarkably, these features of the non-Hermitian and PT symmetric (-gφ 4 ) 2+1 scalar field theory make it very plausible to be employed as a Higgs mechanism in the standard model instead of the problematic Hermitian Higgs mechanism

  9. Search for Scalar Leptons and Scalar Quarks at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Roux, B.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2004-01-01

    Scalar partners of quarks and leptons, predicted in supersymmetric models, are searched for in e^+e^- collisions at centre-of-mass energies between 192GeV and 209GeV at LEP. No evidence for any such particle is found in a data sample of 450 pb^-1. Upper limits on their production cross sections are set and lower limits on their masses are derived in the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model.

  10. Using the Theme of Mass Extinctions to Teach Science to Non-Science Major College and University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boness, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The general public is heavily exposed to "news" and commentary---and arts and entertainment---that either inadvertently misrepresents science or even acts to undermine it. Climate change denial and evolution denial is well funded and pervasive. Even university-educated people get little exposure to the aims, methods, debates, and results of scientific inquiry because unless they earn degrees in science they typically only take one or two introductory science courses at the university level. This presentation reports the development of a new, non-science major Seattle University course on mass extinctions throughout earth history. Seattle University is an urban, Jesuit Catholic university. The topic of mass extinctions was chosen for several reasons: (1) To expose the students to a part of current science that has rich historical roots yet by necessity uses methods and reasoning from geology, geophysics, oceanography, physics, chemistry, biology, and astronomy. This multidisciplinary course provides some coverage of sciences that the student would not typically ever see beyond secondary school. (2) To enable the students to learn enough to follow some of the recent and current debates within science (e.g., mass extinctions by asteroid impact versus massive volcanism, ocean anoxia, and ocean acidification), with the students reading some of the actual literature, such as articles in Science, Nature, or Nature Geoscience. (3) To emphasize the importance of "deep time" as evolutionary biological processes interact with massive environmental change over time scales from hundreds of millions of years down to the seconds and hours of an asteroid or comet strike. (4) To show the effects of climate change in the past, present, and future, due to both natural and anthropogenic causes. (5) To help the student critically evaluate the extent to which their future involves a human-caused mass extinction.

  11. The scalar-scalar-tensor inflationary three-point function in the axion monodromy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Debika; Sreenath, V.; Sriramkumar, L.

    2016-11-01

    The axion monodromy model involves a canonical scalar field that is governed by a linear potential with superimposed modulations. The modulations in the potential are responsible for a resonant behavior which gives rise to persisting oscillations in the scalar and, to a smaller extent, in the tensor power spectra. Interestingly, such spectra have been shown to lead to an improved fit to the cosmological data than the more conventional, nearly scale invariant, primordial power spectra. The scalar bi-spectrum in the model too exhibits continued modulations and the resonance is known to boost the amplitude of the scalar non-Gaussianity parameter to rather large values. An analytical expression for the scalar bi-spectrum had been arrived at earlier which, in fact, has been used to compare the model with the cosmic microwave background anisotropies at the level of three-point functions involving scalars. In this work, with future applications in mind, we arrive at a similar analytical template for the scalar-scalar-tensor cross-correlation. We also analytically establish the consistency relation (in the squeezed limit) for this three-point function. We conclude with a summary of the main results obtained.

  12. The scalar-scalar-tensor inflationary three-point function in the axion monodromy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, Debika; Sriramkumar, L.; Sreenath, V.

    2016-01-01

    The axion monodromy model involves a canonical scalar field that is governed by a linear potential with superimposed modulations. The modulations in the potential are responsible for a resonant behavior which gives rise to persisting oscillations in the scalar and, to a smaller extent, in the tensor power spectra. Interestingly, such spectra have been shown to lead to an improved fit to the cosmological data than the more conventional, nearly scale invariant, primordial power spectra. The scalar bi-spectrum in the model too exhibits continued modulations and the resonance is known to boost the amplitude of the scalar non-Gaussianity parameter to rather large values. An analytical expression for the scalar bi-spectrum had been arrived at earlier which, in fact, has been used to compare the model with the cosmic microwave background anisotropies at the level of three-point functions involving scalars. In this work, with future applications in mind, we arrive at a similar analytical template for the scalar-scalar-tensor cross-correlation. We also analytically establish the consistency relation (in the squeezed limit) for this three-point function. We conclude with a summary of the main results obtained.

  13. Non-commutative gauge Gravity: Second- order Correction and Scalar Particles Creation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaim, S.

    2009-01-01

    A noncommutative gauge theory for a charged scalar field is constructed. The invariance of this model under local Poincare and general coordinate transformations is verified. Using the general modified field equation, a general Klein-Gordon equation up to the second order of the noncommu- tativity parameter is derived. As an application, we choose the Bianchi I universe. Using the Seiberg-Witten maps, the deformed noncommutative metric is obtained and a particle production process is studied. It is shown that the noncommutativity plays the same role as an electric field, gravity and chemical potential.

  14. Neutron star mergers as a probe of modifications of general relativity with finite-range scalar forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagunski, Laura; Zhang, Jun; Johnson, Matthew C.; Lehner, Luis; Sakellariadou, Mairi; Liebling, Steven L.; Palenzuela, Carlos; Neilsen, David

    2018-03-01

    Observations of gravitational radiation from compact binary systems provide an unprecedented opportunity to test general relativity in the strong field dynamical regime. In this paper, we investigate how future observations of gravitational radiation from binary neutron star mergers might provide constraints on finite-range forces from a universally coupled massive scalar field. Such scalar degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) are a characteristic feature of many extensions of general relativity. For concreteness, we work in the context of metric f (R ) gravity, which is equivalent to general relativity and a universally coupled scalar field with a nonlinear potential whose form is fixed by the choice of f (R ). In theories where neutron stars (or other compact objects) obtain a significant scalar charge, the resulting attractive finite-range scalar force has implications for both the inspiral and merger phases of binary systems. We first present an analysis of the inspiral dynamics in Newtonian limit, and forecast the constraints on the mass of the scalar and charge of the compact objects for the Advanced LIGO gravitational wave observatory. We then perform a comparative study of binary neutron star mergers in general relativity with those of a one-parameter model of f (R ) gravity using fully relativistic hydrodynamical simulations. These simulations elucidate the effects of the scalar on the merger and postmerger dynamics. We comment on the utility of the full waveform (inspiral, merger, postmerger) to probe different regions of parameter space for both the particular model of f (R ) gravity studied here and for finite-range scalar forces more generally.

  15. Generalised teleparallel quintom dark energy non-minimally coupled with the scalar torsion and a boundary term

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamonde, Sebastian; Marciu, Mihai; Rudra, Prabir

    2018-04-01

    Within this work, we propose a new generalised quintom dark energy model in the teleparallel alternative of general relativity theory, by considering a non-minimal coupling between the scalar fields of a quintom model with the scalar torsion component T and the boundary term B. In the teleparallel alternative of general relativity theory, the boundary term represents the divergence of the torsion vector, B=2∇μTμ, and is related to the Ricci scalar R and the torsion scalar T, by the fundamental relation: R=‑T+B. We have investigated the dynamical properties of the present quintom scenario in the teleparallel alternative of general relativity theory by performing a dynamical system analysis in the case of decomposable exponential potentials. The study analysed the structure of the phase space, revealing the fundamental dynamical effects of the scalar torsion and boundary couplings in the case of a more general quintom scenario. Additionally, a numerical approach to the model is presented to analyse the cosmological evolution of the system.

  16. Schwarzschild black holes can wear scalar wigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranco, Juan; Bernal, Argelia; Degollado, Juan Carlos; Diez-Tejedor, Alberto; Megevand, Miguel; Alcubierre, Miguel; Núñez, Darío; Sarbach, Olivier

    2012-08-24

    We study the evolution of a massive scalar field surrounding a Schwarzschild black hole and find configurations that can survive for arbitrarily long times, provided the black hole or the scalar field mass is small enough. In particular, both ultralight scalar field dark matter around supermassive black holes and axionlike scalar fields around primordial black holes can survive for cosmological times. Moreover, these results are quite generic in the sense that fairly arbitrary initial data evolve, at late times, as a combination of those long-lived configurations.

  17. Scalar lepton search with the CELLO detector at PETRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrend, H.J.; Chen, C.; Fenner, H.; Field, J.H.; Schroeder, V.; Sindt, H.; D'Agostini, G.; Apel, W.D.; Banerjee, S.; Bodenkamp, J.

    1982-04-01

    We report on the search for 'supersymmetric' scalar leptons conducted with the CELLO detector, at the PETRA e + e - storage ring. 11.1 pb -1 of high energy data were analysed (33 GeV < √s < 36.72 GeV). At a 95% C.L., the existence of a scalar e is ruled out for masses between 2 GeV and 16.8 GeV; correspondingly, a scalar μ is excluded between 3.3 GeV and 16 GeV, and a scalar tau between 6 GeV and 15.3 GeV, as well as between the tau mass and 3.8 GeV. (orig.)

  18. Scalar field collapse in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Narayan; Paul, Tanmoy

    2018-02-01

    We consider a "scalar-Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet" theory in four dimension, where the scalar field couples non-minimally with the Gauss-Bonnet (GB) term. This coupling with the scalar field ensures the non-topological character of the GB term. In this scenario, we examine the possibility for collapsing of the scalar field. Our result reveals that such a collapse is possible in the presence of Gauss-Bonnet gravity for suitable choices of parametric regions. The singularity formed as a result of the collapse is found to be a curvature singularity which is hidden from the exterior by an apparent horizon.

  19. Simple standard model extension by heavy charged scalar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, E.; Volobuev, I.

    2018-05-01

    We consider a Standard Model (SM) extension by a heavy charged scalar gauged only under the UY(1 ) weak hypercharge gauge group. Such an extension, being gauge invariant with respect to the SM gauge group, is a simple special case of the well-known Zee model. Since the interactions of the charged scalar with the Standard Model fermions turn out to be significantly suppressed compared to the Standard Model interactions, the charged scalar provides an example of a long-lived charged particle being interesting to search for at the LHC. We present the pair and single production cross sections of the charged scalar at different colliders and the possible decay widths for various boson masses. It is shown that the current ATLAS and CMS searches at 8 and 13 TeV collision energy lead to the bounds on the scalar boson mass of about 300-320 GeV. The limits are expected to be much larger for higher collision energies and, assuming 15 a b-1 integrated luminosity, reach about 2.7 TeV at future 27 TeV LHC thus covering the most interesting mass region.

  20. Scalar production in models with 1 and 2 Higgs doublets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Carvalho, F.L. de.

    1991-03-01

    A standard electroweak interaction model is studied based on the introduction of an additional scalar doublet which rises two neutral scalars, one pseudoscalar and two charged scalars. The doublet introduction gives the possibility to implement constraints issued by the supersymmetry, restricting therefore those scalar masses. (L.C.J.A.)

  1. Thermally Generated Gauge Singlet Scalars as Self-Interacting Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, J

    2002-01-01

    We show that a gauge singlet scalar S with a coupling to the Higgs doublet of the form lambda_{S} S^{\\dagger}S H^{\\dagger}H and with the S mass entirely generated by the Higgs expectation value has a thermally generated relic density Omega_{S} \\approx 0.3 if m_{S} \\approx (2.9-10.5)(Omega_{S}/0.3)^{1/5}(h/0.7)^{2/5} MeV for Higgs boson masses in the range 115 GeV to 1 TeV. Remarkably, this is very similar to the range (m_{S} = (6.6-15.4)\\eta^{2/3} MeV) required in order for the self-interaction (\\eta/4)(S^{\\dagger}S)^{2} to account for self-interacting dark matter when \\eta is about 1. The corresponding coupling is lambda_{S} \\approx (2.7 \\times 10^{-10} - 3.6 \\times 10^{-9})(Omega_{S}/0.3)^{2/5}(h/0.7)^{4/5}, implying that such scalars are very weakly coupled to the Standard Model sector. More generally, for the case where the S mass is at least partially due to a bare mass term, if m_{S} \\approx 10 \\eta^{2/3} MeV, corresponding to self-interacting dark matter, then in order not to overpopulate the Universe ...

  2. Non-Gaussian path integration in self-interacting scalar field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaya, Ali

    2004-01-01

    In self-interacting scalar field theories kinetic expansion is an alternative way of calculating the generating functional for Green's functions where the zeroth order non-Gaussian path integral becomes diagonal in x-space and reduces to the product of an ordinary integral at each point which can be evaluated exactly. We discuss how to deal with such functional integrals and propose a new perturbative expansion scheme which combines the elements of the kinetic expansion with the usual perturbation theory techniques. It is then shown that, when the cutoff dependences of the bare parameters in the potential are chosen to have a well defined non-Gaussian path integral without the kinetic term, the theory becomes trivial in the continuum limit

  3. Scalar dark matter: real vs complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hongyan; Zheng, Sibo [Department of Physics, Chongqing University,Chongqing 401331 (China)

    2017-03-27

    We update the parameter spaces for both a real and complex scalar dark matter via the Higgs portal. In the light of constraints arising from the LUX 2016 data, the latest Higgs invisible decay and the gamma ray spectrum, the dark matter resonant mass region is further restricted to a narrow window between 54.9−62.3 GeV in both cases, and its large mass region is excluded until 834 GeV and 3473 GeV for the real and complex scalar, respectively.

  4. Scalar dark matter: real vs complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Hongyan; Zheng, Sibo

    2017-01-01

    We update the parameter spaces for both a real and complex scalar dark matter via the Higgs portal. In the light of constraints arising from the LUX 2016 data, the latest Higgs invisible decay and the gamma ray spectrum, the dark matter resonant mass region is further restricted to a narrow window between 54.9−62.3 GeV in both cases, and its large mass region is excluded until 834 GeV and 3473 GeV for the real and complex scalar, respectively.

  5. Scalar trace anomaly and anti-gravitational interaction in a perturbative approach to self-consistent cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunzig, E.; Nardone, P.

    1984-01-01

    We present a perturbative approach to the equations controlling the behavior of the recently proposed self-consistent, causal, singularity-free cosmologies. This approach sheds a new light on the threshold mass which governs both the (in)stability of empty Minkowski space and the existence of these cosmologies. An unexpected fact arises at the lower order of this perturbative scheme: the mass of the massive (scalar) field coupled non-minimally to gravitation is completely absorbed in a rescaling of the gravitational constant. The latter becomes negative, thereby causing an effective anti-gravitational interaction when the corresponding mass exceeds the minkowskian instability threshold. Moreover, the source of this effective antigravitational interaction is the usual scalar trace anomaly associated with the residual massless part of the matter field. (orig.)

  6. Gauss–Bonnet cosmology with induced gravity and a non-minimally coupled scalar field on the brane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozari, Kourosh; Fazlpour, Behnaz

    2008-01-01

    We construct a cosmological model with a non-minimally coupled scalar field on the brane, where Gauss–Bonnet and induced gravity effects are taken into account. This model has 5D character at both high and low energy limits but reduces to 4D gravity for intermediate scales. While induced gravity is a manifestation of the IR limit of the model, the Gauss–Bonnet term and non-minimal coupling of the scalar field and induced gravity are essentially related to the UV limit of the scenario. We study the cosmological implications of this scenario focusing on the late time behavior of the solutions. In this setup, non-minimal coupling plays the role of an additional fine-tuning parameter that controls the initial density of the predicted finite density big bang. Also, non-minimal coupling has important implications for the bouncing nature of the solutions

  7. Scalar field collapse in Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Narayan [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Department of Physical Sciences, Nadia, West Bengal (India); Paul, Tanmoy [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Department of Theoretical Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2018-02-15

    We consider a ''scalar-Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet'' theory in four dimension, where the scalar field couples non-minimally with the Gauss-Bonnet (GB) term. This coupling with the scalar field ensures the non-topological character of the GB term. In this scenario, we examine the possibility for collapsing of the scalar field. Our result reveals that such a collapse is possible in the presence of Gauss-Bonnet gravity for suitable choices of parametric regions. The singularity formed as a result of the collapse is found to be a curvature singularity which is hidden from the exterior by an apparent horizon. (orig.)

  8. Dalitz plot analysis of the decay D(+)-->K(-)pi(+)pi(+) and indication of a low-mass scalar Kpi resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitala, E M; Amato, S; Anjos, J C; Appel, J A; Ashery, D; Banerjee, S; Bediaga, I; Blaylock, G; Bracker, S B; Burchat, P R; Burnstein, R A; Carter, T; Carvalho, H S; Copty, N K; Cremaldi, L M; Darling, C; Denisenko, K; Devmal, S; Fernandez, A; Fox, G F; Gagnon, P; Göbel, C; Gounder, K; Halling, A M; Herrera, G; Hurvits, G; James, C; Kasper, P A; Kwan, S; Langs, D C; Leslie, J; Lundberg, B; Magnin, J; Massafferri, A; MayTal-Beck, S; Meadows, B; de Mello Neto, J R T; Mihalcea, D; Milburn, R H; de Miranda, J M; Napier, A; Nguyen, A; d'Oliveira, A B; O'Shaughnessy, K; Peng, K C; Perera, L P; Purohit, M V; Quinn, B; Radeztsky, S; Rafatian, A; Reay, N W; Reidy, J J; dos Reis, A C; Rubin, H A; Sanders, D A; Santha, A K S; Santoro, A F S; Schwartz, A J; Sheaff, M; Sidwell, R A; Slaughter, A J; Sokoloff, M D; Solano Salinas, C J; Stanton, N R; Stefanski, R J; Stenson, K; Summers, D J; Takach, S; Thorne, K; Tripathi, A K; Watanabe, S; Weiss-Babai, R; Wiener, J; Witchey, N; Wolin, E; Yang, S M; Yi, D; Yoshida, S; Zaliznyak, R; Zhang, C

    2002-09-16

    We study the Dalitz plot of the decay D(+)-->K(-)pi(+)pi(+) with a sample of 15090 events from Fermilab experiment E791. Modeling the decay amplitude as the coherent sum of known Kpi resonances and a uniform nonresonant term, we do not obtain an acceptable fit. If we allow the mass and width of the K(*)(0)(1430) to float, we obtain values consistent with those from PDG but the chi(2) per degree of freedom of the fit is still unsatisfactory. A good fit is found when we allow for the presence of an additional scalar resonance, with mass 797+/-19+/-43 MeV/c(2) and width 410+/-43+/-87 MeV/c(2). The mass and width of the K(*)(0)(1430) become 1459+/-7+/-5 MeV/c(2) and 175+/-12+/-12 MeV/c(2), respectively. Our results provide new information on the scalar sector in hadron spectroscopy.

  9. $SU(2)$ gauge theory with two fundamental flavours: scalar and pseudoscalar spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Arthur, Rudy; Hietanen, Ari; Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the scalar and pseudoscalar spectrum of the $SU(2)$ gauge theory with $N_f=2$ flavours of fermions in the fundamental representation using non perturbative lattice simulations. We provide first benchmark estimates of the mass of the lightest $0(0^{+})$ ($\\sigma$), $0(0^{-})$ ($\\eta'$) and $1(0^+)$ ($a_0$) states, including estimates of the relevant disconnected contributions. We find $m_{a_0}/F_{\\rm{PS}}= 16.7(4.9)$, $m_\\sigma/F_{\\rm{PS}}=19.2(10.8)$ and $m_{\\eta'}/F_{\\rm{PS}} = 12.8(4.7)$. These values for the masses of light scalar states provide crucial information for composite extensions of the Standard Model from the unified Fundamental Composi te Higgs-Technicolor theory \\cite{Cacciapaglia:2014uja} to models of composite dark matter.

  10. Passive scalar transport mediated by laminar vortex rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, R H; Rodríguez, G, E-mail: rohernan@ing.uchile.cl [LEAF-NL, Depto. Ingeniería Civil Mecánica, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 2777, Santiago (Chile)

    2017-04-15

    Numerical simulations were used to study the dynamics of a passive conserved scalar quantity entrained by a self-propelling viscous vortex ring. The transport and mixing process of the passive scalar variable were studied considering two initial scalar distributions: (i) The scalar substance was introduced into the ring during its formation, further focusing in the shedding into the wake of the ring; (ii) A disk-like scalar layer was placed in the ring’s path where the entrainment of the scalar substance into the ring bubble was studied as a function of the ring strength. In both cases, the scalar concentration inside the vortex bubble exhibits a steady decay with time. In the second case, it was shown that the entrained scalar mass grows with both the Reynolds number of the ring and the thickness of the scalar layer in the propagation direction. The ring can be viewed as a mechanism for scalar transportation along important distances. (paper)

  11. NLO corrections to differential cross sections for pseudo-scalar Higgs boson production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, B.; Smith, J.; Tejeda-Yeomans, M.E.; Neerven, W.L. van

    2003-01-01

    We have computed the full next-to-leading (NLO) QCD corrections to the differential distributions d 2 σ/(dp T dy) for pseudo-scalar Higgs (A) production at large hadron colliders. This calculation has been carried out using the effective Lagrangian approach which is valid as long as the mass of the pseudo-scalar Higgs boson m A and its transverse momentum p T do not exceed the top-quark mass m t . The shape of the distributions hardly differ from those obtained for scalar Higgs (H) production because, apart from the overall coupling constant and mass, there are only small differences between the partonic differential distributions for scalar and pseudo-scalar production. Therefore, there are only differences in the magnitudes of the hadronic differential distributions which can be mainly attributed to the unknown mixing angle β describing the pseudo-scalar Higgs coupling to the top quarks

  12. Scalar Hidden-Charm Tetraquark States with QCD Sum Rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Zun-Yan; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Jun-Xia; Yu, Guo-Liang

    2018-02-01

    In this article, we study the masses and pole residues of the pseudoscalar-diquark-pseudoscalar-antidiquark type and vector-diquark-vector-antidiquark type scalar hidden-charm cu\\bar{c}\\bar{d} (cu\\bar{c}\\bar{s}) tetraquark states with QCD sum rules by taking into account the contributions of the vacuum condensates up to dimension-10 in the operator product expansion. The predicted masses can be confronted with the experimental data in the future. Possible decays of those tetraquark states are also discussed. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11375063, the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities under Grant Nos. 2016MS155 and 2016MS133

  13. The mixing of scalar mesons and the baryon-baryon interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, L.R.

    2011-01-01

    By introducing the mixing of scalar mesons in the chiral SU(3) quark model, we dynamically investigate the baryon-baryon interaction. The hyperon-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon interactions are studied by solving the resonating group method (RGM) equation in a coupled-channel calculation. In our present work, the experimental lightest pseudoscalar π, K, η, η' mesons correspond exactly to the chiral nonet pseudoscalar fields π, K, η, η' in the chiral SU(3) quark model. The η, η' mesons are considered as the mixing of singlet and octet mesons, and the mixing angle θ ps is taken to be -23 . For scalar nonet mesons, we suppose that there exists a correspondence between the experimental lightest scalar f 0 (600), κ, a 0 (980), f 0 (980) mesons and the theoretical scalar nonet σ, κ, σ', ε fields in the chiral SU(3) quark model. For scalar mesons, we consider two different mixing cases: one is the ideal mixing and another is the θ s = 19 mixing. The masses of the σ' and ε mesons are taken to be 980MeV, which are just the masses of the experimental a 0 (980), f 0 (980) mesons. The mass of the σ meson is an adjustable parameter and is decided by fitting the binding energy of the deuteron, the masses of 560MeV and 644MeV are obtained for the ideal mixing and the θ s = 19 mixing, respectively. We find that, in order to reasonably describe the YN interactions, the mass of the κ meson is near 780MeV for the ideal mixing. However, we must enhance the mass of the κ meson for the θ s = 19 mixing, the 1050MeV is favorably used in the present work. The experimental σ and κ scalar mesons are very strange, both have larger widths. Hence, no matter what kind of mixing is considered, all the masses of scalar mesons we used in the present work seem to be consistent with the present PDG information. (orig.)

  14. Leading quantum gravitational corrections to scalar QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N.E.J.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the leading post-Newtonian and quantum corrections to the non-relativistic scattering amplitude of charged scalars in the combined theory of general relativity and scalar QED. The combined theory is treated as an effective field theory. This allows for a consistent quantization of the gravitational field. The appropriate vertex rules are extracted from the action, and the non-analytic contributions to the 1-loop scattering matrix are calculated in the non-relativistic limit. The non-analytical parts of the scattering amplitude, which are known to give the long range, low energy, leading quantum corrections, are used to construct the leading post-Newtonian and quantum corrections to the two-particle non-relativistic scattering matrix potential for two charged scalars. The result is discussed in relation to experimental verifications

  15. Global integrability of cosmological scalar fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J.; Przybylska, Maria; Stachowiak, Tomasz; Szydłowski, Marek

    2008-11-01

    We investigate the Liouvillian integrability of Hamiltonian systems describing a universe filled with a scalar field (possibly complex). The tool used is the differential Galois group approach, as introduced by Morales-Ruiz and Ramis. The main result is that the generic systems with minimal coupling are non-integrable, although there still exist some values of parameters for which integrability remains undecided; the conformally coupled systems are only integrable in four known cases. We also draw a connection with the chaos present in such cosmological models, and the issues of the integrability restricted to the real domain.

  16. Global integrability of cosmological scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, Andrzej J; Przybylska, Maria; Stachowiak, Tomasz; Szydlowski, Marek

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the Liouvillian integrability of Hamiltonian systems describing a universe filled with a scalar field (possibly complex). The tool used is the differential Galois group approach, as introduced by Morales-Ruiz and Ramis. The main result is that the generic systems with minimal coupling are non-integrable, although there still exist some values of parameters for which integrability remains undecided; the conformally coupled systems are only integrable in four known cases. We also draw a connection with the chaos present in such cosmological models, and the issues of the integrability restricted to the real domain

  17. Scalar potential for the gauged Heisenberg algebra and a non-polynomial antisymmetric tensor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Auria, R.; Ferrara, S.; Trigiante, M.; Vaula, S.

    2005-01-01

    We study some issues related to the effective theory of Calabi-Yau compactifications with fluxes in type II theories. At first the scalar potential for a generic electric Abelian gauging of the Heisenberg algebra, underlying all possible gaugings of R-R isometries, is presented and shown to exhibit, in some circumstances, a 'dual' no-scale structure under the interchange of hypermultiplets and vector multiplets. Subsequently a new setting of such theories, when all R-R scalars are dualized into antisymmetric tensors, is discussed. This formulation falls in the class of non-polynomial tensor theories considered long ago by Freedman and Townsend and it may be relevant for the introduction of both electric and magnetic charges

  18. 'Finite' non-Gaussianities and tensor-scalar ratio in large volume Swiss-cheese compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, Aalok; Shukla, Pramod

    2009-01-01

    Developing on the ideas of (Section 4 of) [A. Misra, P. Shukla, Moduli stabilization, large-volume dS minimum without anti-D3-branes, (non-)supersymmetric black hole attractors and two-parameter Swiss cheese Calabi-Yau's, Nucl. Phys. B 799 (2008) 165-198, (arXiv: 0707.0105)] and [A. Misra, P. Shukla, Large volume axionic Swiss-cheese inflation, Nucl. Phys. B 800 (2008) 384-400, (arXiv: 0712.1260 [hep-th])] and using the formalisms of [S. Yokoyama, T. Suyama, T. Tanaka, Primordial non-Gaussianity in multi-scalar slow-roll inflation, (arXiv: 0705.3178 [astro-ph]); S. Yokoyama, T. Suyama, T. Tanaka, Primordial non-Gaussianity in multi-scalar inflation, Phys. Rev. D 77 (2008) 083511, (arXiv: 0711.2920 [astro-ph])], after inclusion of perturbative and non-perturbative α' corrections to the Kaehler potential and (D1- and D3-)instanton generated superpotential, we show the possibility of getting finite values for the non-linear parameter f NL while looking for non-Gaussianities in type IIB compactifications on orientifolds of the Swiss cheese Calabi-Yau WCP 4 [1,1,1,6,9] in the L(arge) V(olume) S(cenarios) limit. We show the same in two contexts. First is multi-field slow-roll inflation with D3-instanton contribution coming from a large number of multiple wrappings of a single (Euclidean) D3-brane around the 'small' divisor yielding f NL ∼O(1). The second is when the slow-roll conditions are violated and for the number of the aforementioned D3-instanton wrappings being of O(1) but more than one, yielding f NL ∼O(1). Based on general arguments not specific to our (string-theory) set-up, we argue that requiring curvature perturbations not to grow at horizon crossing and at super-horizon scales, automatically picks out hybrid inflationary scenarios which in our set up can yield f NL ∼O(1) and tensor-scalar ratio of O(10 -2 ). For all our calculations, the world-sheet instanton contributions to the Kaehler potential coming from the non-perturbative α ' corrections

  19. Dynamical origin of the electroweak scale and the 125 GeV scalar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Di Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We consider a fully dynamical origin for the masses of weak gauge bosons and heavy quarks of the Standard Model. Electroweak symmetry breaking and the gauge boson masses arise from new strong dynamics, which leads to the appearance of a composite scalar in the spectrum of excitations. In order to generate mass for the Standard Model fermions, we consider extended gauge dynamics, effectively represented by four fermion interactions at presently accessible energies. By systematically treating these interactions, we show that they lead to a large reduction of the mass of the scalar resonance. Therefore, interpreting the scalar as the recently observed 125 GeV state implies that the mass originating solely from new strong dynamics can be much heavier, i.e. of the order of 1 TeV. In addition to reducing the mass of the scalar resonance, we show that the four-fermion interactions allow for contributions to the oblique corrections in agreement with the experimental constraints. The couplings of the scalar resonance with the Standard Model gauge bosons and fermions are evaluated, and found to be compatible with the current LHC results. Additional new resonances are expected to be heavy, with masses of the order of a few TeVs, and hence accessible in future experiments.

  20. Dynamical origin of the electroweak scale and the 125 GeV scalar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Chiara, Stefano; Foadi, Roshan; Tuominen, Kimmo; Tähtinen, Sara

    2015-01-01

    We consider a fully dynamical origin for the masses of weak gauge bosons and heavy quarks of the Standard Model. Electroweak symmetry breaking and the gauge boson masses arise from new strong dynamics, which leads to the appearance of a composite scalar in the spectrum of excitations. In order to generate mass for the Standard Model fermions, we consider extended gauge dynamics, effectively represented by four fermion interactions at presently accessible energies. By systematically treating these interactions, we show that they lead to a large reduction of the mass of the scalar resonance. Therefore, interpreting the scalar as the recently observed 125 GeV state implies that the mass originating solely from new strong dynamics can be much heavier, i.e. of the order of 1 TeV. In addition to reducing the mass of the scalar resonance, we show that the four-fermion interactions allow for contributions to the oblique corrections in agreement with the experimental constraints. The couplings of the scalar resonance with the Standard Model gauge bosons and fermions are evaluated, and found to be compatible with the current LHC results. Additional new resonances are expected to be heavy, with masses of the order of a few TeVs, and hence accessible in future experiments.

  1. Scalar perturbations in the late Universe: viability of the Chaplygin gas models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhmadi-López, Mariam [Departamento de Física, Universidade da Beira Interior, 6200 Covilhã (Portugal); Brilenkov, Maxim; Brilenkov, Ruslan [Department of Theoretical Physics, Odessa National University, Dvoryanskaya st. 2, Odessa 65082 (Ukraine); Morais, João [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, P.O. Box 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Zhuk, Alexander, E-mail: mbl@ubi.pt, E-mail: maxim.brilenkov@gmail.com, E-mail: ruslan.brilenkov@gmail.com, E-mail: jviegas001@ikasle.ehu.eus, E-mail: ai.zhuk2@gmail.com [Astronomical Observatory, Odessa National University, Dvoryanskaya st. 2, Odessa 65082 (Ukraine)

    2015-12-01

    We study the late-time evolution of the Universe where dark energy (DE) is parametrised by a modified generalised Chaplygin gas (mGCG) on top of cold dark matter (CDM) . We also take into account the radiation content of the Universe. In this context, the late stage of the evolution of the universe refers to the epoch where CDM is already clustered into inhomogeneously distributed discrete structures (galaxies, groups and clusters of galaxies). Under these conditions, the mechanical approach is an adequate tool to study the Universe deep inside the cell of uniformity. To be more accurate, we study scalar perturbations of the Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker metric due to inhomogeneities of CDM as well as fluctuations of radiation and mGCG, the later driving the late-time acceleration of the universe. Our analysis applies as well to the case where mGCG plays the role of DM and DE . We select the sets of parameters of the mGCG that are compatible with the mechanical approach. These sets define prospective mGCG models. By comparing the selected sets of models with some of the latest observational data results, we conclude that the mGCG is in tight agreement with those observations particularly for a mGCG playing the role of DE and DM.

  2. Spontaneous scalarization with an extremely massive field and heavy neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Soichiro; Suyama, Teruaki

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the internal structure and the mass-radius relation of neutron stars in a recently proposed scalar-tensor theory dubbed asymmetron in which a massive scalar field undergoes spontaneous scalarization inside neutron stars. We focus on the case where the Compton wavelength is shorter than 10 km, which has not been investigated in the literature. By solving the modified Einstein equations, either purely numerically or by partially using a semianalytic method, we find that not only the weakening of gravity by spontaneous scalarization but also the scalar force affect the internal structure significantly in the massive case. We also find that the maximum mass of neutron stars is larger for certain parameter sets than that in general relativity and reaches 2 M⊙ even if the effect of strange hadrons is taken into account. There is even a range of parameters where the maximum mass of neutron stars largely exceeds the threshold that violates the causality bound in general relativity.

  3. Scalar mesons and the search for the 0++ glueball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoma, U.

    2003-01-01

    The possibility that gluonic excitations of hadronic matter or of the QCD vacuum may exist is perhaps one of the most fascinating topics in hadron spectroscopy. Glueballs are predicted by many models; in particular, present-day lattice gauge calculations require their existence. All these models agree that the lightest glueball should have scalar quantum numbers and a mass around 1.6GeV, which corresponds to the mass region where the scalar q anti q-mesons are expected. Therefore, mixing effects can complicate the search for the glueball. Experiments indeed show an overpopulation of states, for which many different interpretations exist. This reflects the complexity of the situation. New data from various experiments on scalar states give hints toward an interpretation of the scalar states. But still many questions remain. (orig.)

  4. Scalar mesons and the search for the 0++ Glueball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrike Thoma

    2002-01-01

    The possibility that gluonic excitations of hadronic matter or of the QCD vacuum may exist is perhaps one of the most fascinating topics in hadron spectroscopy. Glueballs are predicted by many models; in particular present-day lattice gauge calculations require their existence. All these models agree that the lightest glueball should have scalar quantum numbers and a mass around 1.6 GeV, which corresponds to the mass region where the scalar qq[bar]-mesons are expected. Therefore mixing effects can complicate the search for the glueball. Experiments indeed show an overpopulation of states, for which many different interpretations exist. This reflects the complexity of the situation. New data from various experiments on scalar states give hints toward an interpretation of the scalar states. But, still many questions remain

  5. Gauge-invariant scalar and field strength correlators in 3d

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, Mikko

    1998-01-01

    Gauge-invariant non-local scalar and field strength operators have been argued to have significance, e.g., as a way to determine the behaviour of the screened static potential at large distances, as order parameters for confinement, as input parameters in models of confinement, and as gauge-invariant definitions of light constituent masses in bound state systems. We measure such "correlators" in the 3d pure SU(2) and SU(2)+Higgs models on the lattice. We extract the corresponding mass parameters and discuss their scaling and physical interpretation. We find that the finite part of the MS-bar scheme mass measured from the field strength correlator is large, more than half the glueball mass. We also determine the non-perturbative contribution to the Debye mass in the 4d finite T SU(2) gauge theory with a method due to Arnold and Yaffe, finding $\\delta m_D\\approx 1.06(4)g^2T$.

  6. On a family of (1+1)-dimensional scalar field theory models: Kinks, stability, one-loop mass shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso-Izquierdo, A., E-mail: alonsoiz@usal.es [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada and IUFFyM, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain); Mateos Guilarte, J. [Departamento de Fisica Fundamental and IUFFyM, Universidad de Salamanca (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    In this paper we construct a one-parametric family of (1+1)-dimensional one-component scalar field theory models supporting kinks. Inspired by the sine-Gordon and {phi}{sup 4} models, we look at all possible extensions such that the kink second-order fluctuation operators are Schroedinger differential operators with Poeschl-Teller potential wells. In this situation, the associated spectral problem is solvable and therefore we shall succeed in analyzing the kink stability completely and in computing the one-loop quantum correction to the kink mass exactly. When the parameter is a natural number, the family becomes the hierarchy for which the potential wells are reflectionless, the two first levels of the hierarchy being the sine-Gordon and {phi}{sup 4} models. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct a family of scalar field theory models supporting kinks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second-order kink fluctuation operators involve Poeschl-Teller potential wells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We compute the one-loop quantum correction to the kink mass with different methods.

  7. Is Sextans dwarf galaxy in a scalar field dark matter halo?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lora, V.; Magaña, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The Bose-Einstein condensate/scalar field dark matter model, considers that the dark matter is composed by spinless-ultra-light particles which can be described by a scalar field. This model is an alternative model to the Λ-cold dark matter paradigm, and therefore should be studied at galactic and cosmological scales. Dwarf spheroidal galaxies have been very useful when studying any dark matter theory, because the dark matter dominates their dynamics. In this paper we study the Sextans dwarf spheroidal galaxy, embedded in a scalar field dark matter halo. We explore how the dissolution time-scale of the stellar substructures in Sextans, constrain the mass, and the self-interacting parameter of the scalar field dark matter boson. We find that for masses in the range (0.12< m φ <8) ×10 -22 eV, scalar field dark halos without self-interaction would have cores large enough to explain the longevity of the stellar substructures in Sextans, and small enough mass to be compatible with dynamical limits. If the self-interacting parameter is distinct to zero, then the mass of the boson could be as high as m φ ≈2×10 -21 eV, but it would correspond to an unrealistic low mass for the Sextans dark matter halo . Therefore, the Sextans dwarf galaxy could be embedded in a scalar field/BEC dark matter halo with a preferred self-interacting parameter equal to zero

  8. Search for scalar gluons with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079195; Zerwas, Dirk

    This thesis describes the search for new color-octet scalar particles in the ATLAS experiment data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For a wide range of mass, the decay of the scalar to two SM partons dominates. This motivates the search for these new scalars in multijet final states, where they would manifest as dijet resonances. As the new scalars are products in pairs, a final state containing at least four jets is used as a search environment. A method is developed to extract a possible scalar resonance from the multijet QCD background and is used to search for such scalar in the data from the ATLAS experiment collected in 2010 and 2011. The data are in agreement with the estimation of the background and limits are set on the scalar production cross section as a function of the scalar mass. Interpreting these limits in models of supersymmetry, the scalar gluon of the MRSSM and of the hybrid N=1/N=2 model is excluded at the 95 % CL between 100 and 287 GeV. Limits are also interpreted in a model of gauge ...

  9. Black holes with surrounding matter in scalar-tensor theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Carucci, Isabella P; Pani, Paolo; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2013-09-13

    We uncover two mechanisms that can render Kerr black holes unstable in scalar-tensor gravity, both associated with the presence of matter in the vicinity of the black hole and the fact that this introduces an effective mass for the scalar. Our results highlight the importance of understanding the structure of spacetime in realistic, astrophysical black holes in scalar-tensor theories.

  10. Scalar tetraquark candidates on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlin, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the investigation of scalar tetraquark candidates from lattice QCD. It is motivated by a previous study originating in the twisted mass collaboration. The initial tetraquark candidate of choice is the a 0 (980), an isovector in the nonet of light scalars (J P =0 + ). This channel is still poorly understood. It displays an inverted mass hierarchy to what is expected from the conventional quark model and the a 0 (980) and f 0 (980) feature a surprising mass degeneracy. For this reasons the a 0 (980) is a long assumed tetraquark candidate in the literature. We follow a methodological approach by studying the sensitivity of the scalar spectrum with fully dynamical quarks to a large basis of two-quark and four-quark creation operators. Ultimately, the candidate has to be identified in the direct vicinity of two two-particles states, which is understandably inevitable for a tetraquark candidate. To succeed in this difficult task two-meson creation operators are essential to employ in this channel. By localized four-quark operators we intend to probe the Hamiltonian on eigenstates with a closely bound four-quark structure.

  11. Scalar tetraquark candidates on the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlin, Joshua

    2017-07-01

    The topic of this thesis is the investigation of scalar tetraquark candidates from lattice QCD. It is motivated by a previous study originating in the twisted mass collaboration. The initial tetraquark candidate of choice is the a{sub 0}(980), an isovector in the nonet of light scalars (J{sup P}=0{sup +}). This channel is still poorly understood. It displays an inverted mass hierarchy to what is expected from the conventional quark model and the a{sub 0}(980) and f{sub 0}(980) feature a surprising mass degeneracy. For this reasons the a{sub 0}(980) is a long assumed tetraquark candidate in the literature. We follow a methodological approach by studying the sensitivity of the scalar spectrum with fully dynamical quarks to a large basis of two-quark and four-quark creation operators. Ultimately, the candidate has to be identified in the direct vicinity of two two-particles states, which is understandably inevitable for a tetraquark candidate. To succeed in this difficult task two-meson creation operators are essential to employ in this channel. By localized four-quark operators we intend to probe the Hamiltonian on eigenstates with a closely bound four-quark structure.

  12. A Riemannian scalar measure for diffusion tensor images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astola, L.J.; Fuster, A.; Florack, L.M.J.

    2010-01-01

    We study a well-known scalar quantity in Riemannian geometry, the Ricci scalar, in the context of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI), which is an emerging non-invasive medical imaging modality. We derive a physical interpretation for the Ricci scalar and explore experimentally its significance in DTI.

  13. Scalar-tensor linear inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artymowski, Michał [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Racioppi, Antonio, E-mail: Michal.Artymowski@uj.edu.pl, E-mail: Antonio.Racioppi@kbfi.ee [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2017-04-01

    We investigate two approaches to non-minimally coupled gravity theories which present linear inflation as attractor solution: a) the scalar-tensor theory approach, where we look for a scalar-tensor theory that would restore results of linear inflation in the strong coupling limit for a non-minimal coupling to gravity of the form of f (φ) R /2; b) the particle physics approach, where we motivate the form of the Jordan frame potential by loop corrections to the inflaton field. In both cases the Jordan frame potentials are modifications of the induced gravity inflationary scenario, but instead of the Starobinsky attractor they lead to linear inflation in the strong coupling limit.

  14. Non-minimal derivative coupling scalar field and bulk viscous dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostaghel, Behrang [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moshafi, Hossein [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Department of Physics, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Movahed, S.M.S. [Shahid Beheshti University, Department of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Inspired by thermodynamical dissipative phenomena, we consider bulk viscosity for dark fluid in a spatially flat two-component Universe. Our viscous dark energy model represents phantom-crossing which avoids big-rip singularity. We propose a non-minimal derivative coupling scalar field with zero potential leading to accelerated expansion of the Universe in the framework of bulk viscous dark energy model. In this approach, the coupling constant, κ, is related to viscosity coefficient, γ, and the present dark energy density, Ω{sub DE}{sup 0}. This coupling is bounded as κ element of [-1/9H{sub 0}{sup 2}(1 - Ω{sub DE}{sup 0}), 0]. We implement recent observational data sets including a joint light-curve analysis (JLA) for SNIa, gamma ray bursts (GRBs) for most luminous astrophysical objects at high redshifts, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) from different surveys, Hubble parameter from HST project, Planck CMB power spectrum and lensing to constrain model free parameters. The joint analysis of JLA + GRBs + BAO + HST shows that Ω{sub DE}{sup 0} = 0.696 ± 0.010, γ = 0.1404 ± 0.0014 and H{sub 0} = 68.1 ± 1.3. Planck TT observation provides γ = 0.32{sup +0.31}{sub -0.26} in the 68% confidence limit for the viscosity coefficient. The cosmographic distance ratio indicates that current observed data prefer to increase bulk viscosity. The competition between phantom and quintessence behavior of the viscous dark energy model can accommodate cosmological old objects reported as a sign of age crisis in the ΛCDM model. Finally, tension in the Hubble parameter is alleviated in this model. (orig.)

  15. Rényi entropy, stationarity, and entanglement of the conformal scalar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeongseog; Lewkowycz, Aitor [Department of Physics, Princeton University,Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Perlmutter, Eric [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge,Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Safdi, Benjamin R. [Department of Physics, Princeton University,Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2015-03-16

    We extend previous work on the perturbative expansion of the Rényi entropy, S{sub q}, around q=1 for a spherical entangling surface in a general CFT. Applied to conformal scalar fields in various spacetime dimensions, the results appear to conflict with the known conformal scalar Rényi entropies. On the other hand, the perturbative results agree with known Rényi entropies in a variety of other theories, including theories of free fermions and vector fields and theories with Einstein gravity duals. We propose a resolution stemming from a careful consideration of boundary conditions near the entangling surface. This is equivalent to a proper treatment of total-derivative terms in the definition of the modular Hamiltonian. As a corollary, we are able to resolve an outstanding puzzle in the literature regarding the Rényi entropy of N=4 super-Yang-Mills near q=1. A related puzzle regards the question of stationarity of the renormalized entanglement entropy (REE) across a circle for a (2+1)-dimensional massive scalar field. We point out that the boundary contributions to the modular Hamiltonian shed light on the previously-observed non-stationarity. Moreover, IR divergences appear in perturbation theory about the massless fixed point that inhibit our ability to reliably calculate the REE at small non-zero mass.

  16. Rényi entropy, stationarity, and entanglement of the conformal scalar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongseog; Lewkowycz, Aitor; Perlmutter, Eric; Safdi, Benjamin R.

    2015-03-01

    We extend previous work on the perturbative expansion of the Rényi entropy, S q , around q = 1 for a spherical entangling surface in a general CFT. Applied to conformal scalar fields in various spacetime dimensions, the results appear to conflict with the known conformal scalar Rényi entropies. On the other hand, the perturbative results agree with known Rényi entropies in a variety of other theories, including theories of free fermions and vector fields and theories with Einstein gravity duals. We propose a resolution stemming from a careful consideration of boundary conditions near the entangling surface. This is equivalent to a proper treatment of total-derivative terms in the definition of the modular Hamiltonian. As a corollary, we are able to resolve an outstanding puzzle in the literature regarding the Rényi entropy of super-Yang-Mills near q = 1. A related puzzle regards the question of stationarity of the renormalized entanglement entropy (REE) across a circle for a (2+1)-dimensional massive scalar field. We point out that the boundary contributions to the modular Hamiltonian shed light on the previously-observed non-stationarity. Moreover, IR divergences appear in perturbation theory about the massless fixed point that inhibit our ability to reliably calculate the REE at small non-zero mass.

  17. Neutron Star Structure in the Presence of Conformally Coupled Scalar Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Joseph; Bose, Benjamin; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2014-01-01

    Neutron star models are studied in the context of scalar-tensor theories of gravity in the presence of a conformally coupled scalar field, using two different numerical equations of state (EoS) representing different degrees of stiffness. In both cases we obtain a complete solution by matching the interior numerical solution of the coupled Einstein-scalar field hydrostatic equations, with an exact metric on the surface of the star. These are then used to find the effect of the scalar field and its coupling to geometry, on the neutron star structure, particularly the maximum neutron star mass and radius. We show that in the presence of a conformally coupled scalar field, neutron stars are less dense and have smaller masses and radii than their counterparts in the minimally coupled case, and the effect increases with the magnitude of the scalar field at the center of the star.

  18. The mixing of scalar mesons and the baryon-baryon interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, L.R. [Liaoning Normal University, Department of Physics, Dalian (China)

    2011-02-15

    By introducing the mixing of scalar mesons in the chiral SU(3) quark model, we dynamically investigate the baryon-baryon interaction. The hyperon-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon interactions are studied by solving the resonating group method (RGM) equation in a coupled-channel calculation. In our present work, the experimental lightest pseudoscalar {pi}, K, {eta}, {eta}' mesons correspond exactly to the chiral nonet pseudoscalar fields {pi}, K, {eta}, {eta}' in the chiral SU(3) quark model. The {eta}, {eta}' mesons are considered as the mixing of singlet and octet mesons, and the mixing angle {theta}{sub ps} is taken to be -23 . For scalar nonet mesons, we suppose that there exists a correspondence between the experimental lightest scalar f{sub 0}(600), {kappa}, a{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(980) mesons and the theoretical scalar nonet {sigma}, {kappa}, {sigma}', {epsilon} fields in the chiral SU(3) quark model. For scalar mesons, we consider two different mixing cases: one is the ideal mixing and another is the {theta}{sub s} = 19 mixing. The masses of the {sigma}' and {epsilon} mesons are taken to be 980MeV, which are just the masses of the experimental a{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(980) mesons. The mass of the {sigma} meson is an adjustable parameter and is decided by fitting the binding energy of the deuteron, the masses of 560MeV and 644MeV are obtained for the ideal mixing and the {theta}{sub s} = 19 mixing, respectively. We find that, in order to reasonably describe the YN interactions, the mass of the {kappa} meson is near 780MeV for the ideal mixing. However, we must enhance the mass of the {kappa} meson for the {theta}{sub s} = 19 mixing, the 1050MeV is favorably used in the present work. The experimental {sigma} and {kappa} scalar mesons are very strange, both have larger widths. Hence, no matter what kind of mixing is considered, all the masses of scalar mesons we used in the present work seem to be consistent with the present PDG information

  19. The charged black-hole bomb: A lower bound on the charge-to-mass ratio of the explosive scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-04-01

    The well-known superradiant amplification mechanism allows a charged scalar field of proper mass μ and electric charge q to extract the Coulomb energy of a charged Reissner-Nordström black hole. The rate of energy extraction can grow exponentially in time if the system is placed inside a reflecting cavity which prevents the charged scalar field from escaping to infinity. This composed black-hole-charged-scalar-field-mirror system is known as the charged black-hole bomb. Previous numerical studies of this composed physical system have shown that, in the linearized regime, the inequality q / μ > 1 provides a necessary condition for the development of the superradiant instability. In the present paper we use analytical techniques to study the instability properties of the charged black-hole bomb in the regime of linearized scalar fields. In particular, we prove that the lower bound q/μ>√{rm /r- - 1/ rm /r+ - 1 } provides a necessary condition for the development of the superradiant instability in this composed physical system (here r± are the horizon radii of the charged Reissner-Nordström black hole and rm is the radius of the confining mirror). This analytically derived lower bound on the superradiant instability regime of the composed black-hole-charged-scalar-field-mirror system is shown to agree with direct numerical computations of the instability spectrum.

  20. Interacting entropy-corrected new agegraphic dark energy in the non-flat universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, Kayoomars [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Pasdaran Street, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sorouri, Arash, E-mail: KKarami@uok.ac.i [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Here, we consider the entropy-corrected version of the new agegraphic dark energy (NADE) model in the non-flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We derive the exact differential equation that determines the evolution of the entropy-corrected NADE density parameter in the presence of interaction with dark matter. We also obtain the equation of state and deceleration parameters and present a necessary condition for the selected model to cross the phantom divide. Moreover, we reconstruct the potential and the dynamics of the phantom scalar field according to the evolutionary behavior of the interacting entropy-corrected new agegraphic model.

  1. Leading quantum gravitational corrections to scalar QED

    OpenAIRE

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the leading post-Newtonian and quantum corrections to the non-relativistic scattering amplitude of charged scalars in the combined theory of general relativity and scalar QED. The combined theory is treated as an effective field theory. This allows for a consistent quantization of the gravitational field. The appropriate vertex rules are extracted from the action, and the non-analytic contributions to the 1-loop scattering matrix are calculated in the non-relativistic limit. The n...

  2. WIMP Dark Matter and Unitarity-Conserving Inflation via a Gauge Singlet Scalar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahlhoefer, Felix; McDonald, John

    2015-07-01

    A gauge singlet scalar with non-minimal coupling to gravity can drive inflation and later freeze out to become cold dark matter. We explore this idea by revisiting inflation in the singlet direction (S-inflation) and Higgs Portal Dark Matter in light of the Higgs discovery, limits from LUX and observations by Planck. We show that large regions of parameter space remain viable, so that successful inflation is possible and the dark matter relic abundance can be reproduced. Moreover, the scalar singlet can stabilise the electroweak vacuum and at the same time overcome the problem of unitarity-violation during inflation encountered by Higgs Inflation, provided the singlet is a real scalar. The 2-σ Planck upper bound on n s imposes that the singlet mass is below 2 TeV, so that almost the entire allowed parameter range can be probed by XENON1T.

  3. Electroweak symmetry breaking in supersymmetric models with heavy scalar superpartners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chankowski, Piotr H.; Falkowski, Adam; Pokorski, Stefan; Wagner, Jakub

    2004-01-01

    We propose a novel mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking in supersymmetric models, as the one recently discussed by Birkedal, Chacko and Gaillard, in which the Standard Model Higgs doublet is a pseudo-Goldstone boson of some global symmetry. The Higgs mass parameter is generated at one-loop level by two different, moderately fine-tuned sources of the global symmetry breaking. The mechanism works for scalar superpartner masses of order 10 TeV, but gauginos can be light. The scale at which supersymmetry breaking is mediated to the visible sector has to be low, of order 100 TeV. Fine-tuning in the scalar potential is at least two orders of magnitude smaller than in the MSSM with similar soft scalar masses. The physical Higgs boson mass is (for tanβ >> 1) in the range 120-135 GeV

  4. Self-acceleration in scalar-bimetric theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brax, Philippe; Valageas, Patrick

    2018-05-01

    We describe scalar-bimetric theories where the dynamics of the Universe are governed by two separate metrics, each with an Einstein-Hilbert term. In this setting, the baryonic and dark matter components of the Universe couple to metrics which are constructed as functions of these two gravitational metrics. More precisely, the two metrics coupled to matter are obtained by a linear combination of their vierbeins, with scalar-dependent coefficients. The scalar field, contrary to dark-energy models, does not have a potential of which the role is to mimic a late-time cosmological constant. The late-time acceleration of the expansion of the Universe can be easily obtained at the background level in these models by appropriately choosing the coupling functions appearing in the decomposition of the vierbeins for the baryonic and dark matter metrics. We explicitly show how the concordance model can be retrieved with negligible scalar kinetic energy. This requires the scalar coupling functions to show variations of order unity during the accelerated expansion era. This leads in turn to deviations of order unity for the effective Newton constants and a fifth force that is of the same order as Newtonian gravity, with peculiar features. The baryonic and dark matter self-gravities are amplified although the gravitational force between baryons and dark matter is reduced and even becomes repulsive at low redshift. This slows down the growth of baryonic density perturbations on cosmological scales, while dark matter perturbations are enhanced. These scalar-bimetric theories have a perturbative cutoff scale of the order of 1 AU, which prevents a precise comparison with Solar System data. On the other hand, we can deduce strong requirements on putative UV completions by analyzing the stringent constraints in the Solar System. Hence, in our local environment, the upper bound on the time evolution of Newton's constant requires an efficient screening mechanism that both damps the fifth

  5. μ - e conversion in nuclei within the CMSSM seesaw: universality versus non-universality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arganda, Ernesto; Herrero, MarIa J.; Teixeira, Ana M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study μ-e conversion in nuclei within the context of the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, enlarged by three right handed neutrinos and their supersymmetric partners, and where the neutrino masses are generated via a seesaw mechanism. Two different scenarios with either universal or non-universal soft supersymmetry breaking Higgs masses at the gauge coupling unification scale are considered. In the first part we present a complete one-loop computation of the conversion rate for this process that includes the photon-, Z-boson, and Higgs-boson penguins, as well as box diagrams, and compare their size in the two considered scenarios. Then, in these two scenarios we analyse the relevance of the various parameters on the conversion rates, particularly emphasising the role played by the heavy neutrino masses, tan β, and especially θ 13 . In the case of hierachical heavy neutrinos, an extremely high sensitivity of the rates to θ 13 is indeed found. The last part of this work is devoted to the study of the interesting loss of correlation between the μ-e conversion and μ→eγ rates that occurs in the non-universal scenario. In the case of large tan β and light H 0 Higgs boson, an enhanced ratio of the μ-e to μ→eγ rates, with respect to the universal case is found, and this could be tested with the future experimental sensitivities

  6. Cosmological perturbations in the entangled inflationary universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Pérez, Salvador J.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the model of a multiverse made up of universes that are created in entangled pairs that conserve the total momentum conjugated to the scale factor is presented. For the background spacetime, assumed is a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric with a scalar field with mass m minimally coupled to gravity. For the fields that propagate in the entangled spacetimes, the perturbations of the spacetime and the scalar field, whose quantum states become entangled too, are considered. They turn out to be in a quasithermal state, and the corresponding thermodynamical magnitudes are computed. Three observables are expected to be caused by the creation of the universes in entangled pairs: a modification of the Friedmann equation because of the entanglement of the spacetimes, a modification of the effective value of the potential of the scalar field by the backreaction of the perturbation modes, and a modification of the spectrum of fluctuations because the thermal distribution is induced by the entanglement of the partner universes. The later would be a distinctive feature of the creation of universes in entangled pairs.

  7. The light scalar mesons as tetraquarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gernot Eichmann

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical solution of the four-quark Bethe–Salpeter equation for ground-state scalar tetraquarks with JPC=0++. We find that the four-body equation dynamically generates pseudoscalar-meson poles in the Bethe–Salpeter amplitude. The resulting tetraquarks are genuine four-quark states that are dominated by pseudoscalar meson–meson correlations. Diquark–antidiquark contributions are subleading because of their larger mass scale. In the light quark sector, the sensitivity of the tetraquark wave function to the pion poles leads to an isoscalar tetraquark mass Mσ∼350 MeV which is comparable to that of the σ/f0(500. The masses of its multiplet partners κ and a0/f0 follow a similar pattern. This provides support for a tetraquark interpretation of the light scalar meson nonet in terms of ‘meson molecules’.

  8. Scalar mesons and the search for the 0{sup ++} glueball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoma, U. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2003-11-01

    The possibility that gluonic excitations of hadronic matter or of the QCD vacuum may exist is perhaps one of the most fascinating topics in hadron spectroscopy. Glueballs are predicted by many models; in particular, present-day lattice gauge calculations require their existence. All these models agree that the lightest glueball should have scalar quantum numbers and a mass around 1.6GeV, which corresponds to the mass region where the scalar q anti q-mesons are expected. Therefore, mixing effects can complicate the search for the glueball. Experiments indeed show an overpopulation of states, for which many different interpretations exist. This reflects the complexity of the situation. New data from various experiments on scalar states give hints toward an interpretation of the scalar states. But still many questions remain. (orig.)

  9. Scalar mesons and the search for the 0{sup ++} Glueball

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrike Thoma

    2002-10-01

    The possibility that gluonic excitations of hadronic matter or of the QCD vacuum may exist is perhaps one of the most fascinating topics in hadron spectroscopy. Glueballs are predicted by many models; in particular present-day lattice gauge calculations require their existence. All these models agree that the lightest glueball should have scalar quantum numbers and a mass around 1.6 GeV, which corresponds to the mass region where the scalar qq[bar]-mesons are expected. Therefore mixing effects can complicate the search for the glueball. Experiments indeed show an overpopulation of states, for which many different interpretations exist. This reflects the complexity of the situation. New data from various experiments on scalar states give hints toward an interpretation of the scalar states. But, still many questions remain.

  10. Conformal standard model with an extended scalar sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latosiński, Adam [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut),Mühlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Lewandowski, Adrian; Meissner, Krzysztof A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw,Pasteura 5, 02-093 Warsaw (Poland); Nicolai, Hermann [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut),Mühlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-10-26

    We present an extended version of the Conformal Standard Model (characterized by the absence of any new intermediate scales between the electroweak scale and the Planck scale) with an enlarged scalar sector coupling to right-chiral neutrinos. The scalar potential and the Yukawa couplings involving only right-chiral neutrinos are invariant under a new global symmetry SU(3){sub N} that complements the standard U(1){sub B−L} symmetry, and is broken explicitly only by the Yukawa interaction, of order O(10{sup −6}), coupling right-chiral neutrinos and the electroweak lepton doublets. We point out four main advantages of this enlargement, namely: (1) the economy of the (non-supersymmetric) Standard Model, and thus its observational success, is preserved; (2) thanks to the enlarged scalar sector the RG improved one-loop effective potential is everywhere positive with a stable global minimum, thereby avoiding the notorious instability of the Standard Model vacuum; (3) the pseudo-Goldstone bosons resulting from spontaneous breaking of the SU(3){sub N} symmetry are natural Dark Matter candidates with calculable small masses and couplings; and (4) the Majorana Yukawa coupling matrix acquires a form naturally adapted to leptogenesis. The model is made perturbatively consistent up to the Planck scale by imposing the vanishing of quadratic divergences at the Planck scale (‘softly broken conformal symmetry’). Observable consequences of the model occur mainly via the mixing of the new scalars and the standard model Higgs boson.

  11. Killing scalar of non-linear σ-model on G/H realizing the classical exchange algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    The Poisson brackets for non-linear σ-models on G/H are set up on the light-like plane. A quantity which transforms irreducibly by the Killing vectors, called Killing scalar, is constructed in an arbitrary representation of G. It is shown to satisfy the classical exchange algebra

  12. Experimental tests for the Babu-Zee two-loop model of Majorana neutrino masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierra, Diego Aristizabal; Hirsch, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The smallness of the observed neutrino masses might have a radiative origin. Here we revisit a specific two-loop model of neutrino mass, independently proposed by Babu and Zee. We point out that current constraints from neutrino data can be used to derive strict lower limits on the branching ratio of flavour changing charged lepton decays, such as μ→eγ. Non-observation of Br(μ→eγ) at the level of 10 -13 would rule out singly charged scalar masses smaller than 590 GeV (5.04 TeV) in case of normal (inverse) neutrino mass hierarchy. Conversely, decay branching ratios of the non-standard scalars of the model can be fixed by the measured neutrino angles (and mass scale). Thus, if the scalars of the model are light enough to be produced at the LHC or ILC, measuring their decay properties would serve as a direct test of the model as the origin of neutrino masses

  13. Experimental tests for the Babu-Zee two-loop model of Majorana neutrino masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristizabal, D.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: The smallness of the observed neutrino masses might have a radiative origin. Here we revisit a specific two-loop model of neutrino mass, independently proposed by Babu and Zee. We point out that current constraints from neutrino data can be used to derive strict lower limits on the branching ratio of flavour changing charged lepton decays, such as μ → e γ. Non-observation of Br(μ → e γ) at the level of 10 -13 would rule out singly charged scalar masses smaller than 590 GeV (5.04 TeV) in case of normal (inverse) neutrino mass hierarchy. Conversely, decay branching ratios of the non-standard scalars of the model can be fixed by the measured neutrino angles (and mass scale). Thus, if the scalars of the model are light enough to be produced at the LHC or ILC, measuring their decay properties would serve as a direct test of the model as the origin of neutrino masses. (author)

  14. Convergence of scalar-tensor theories towards general relativity and primordial nucleosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna, A; Alimi, J-M; Navarro, A

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the conditions for convergence towards general relativity of scalar-tensor gravity theories defined by an arbitrary coupling function α (in the Einstein frame). We show that, in general, the evolution of the scalar field (φ) is governed by two opposite mechanisms: an attraction mechanism which tends to drive scalar-tensor models towards Einstein's theory, and a repulsion mechanism which has the contrary effect. The attraction mechanism dominates the recent epochs of the universe evolution if, and only if, the scalar field and its derivative satisfy certain boundary conditions. Since these conditions for convergence towards general relativity depend on the particular scalar-tensor theory used to describe the universe evolution, the nucleosynthesis bounds on the present value of the coupling function, α 0 , strongly differ from some theories to others. For example, in theories defined by α ∝ |φ| analytical estimates lead to very stringent nucleosynthesis bounds on α 0 (∼ -19 ). By contrast, in scalar-tensor theories defined by α ∝ φ much larger limits on α 0 (∼ -7 ) are found

  15. Horizon-preserving dualities and perturbations in non-canonical scalar field cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geshnizjani, Ghazal; Kinney, William H.; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad

    2012-01-01

    We generalize the cosmological duality between inflation and cyclic contraction under the interchange a↔H to the case of non-canonical scalar field theories with varying speed of sound. The single duality in the canonical case generalizes to a family of three dualities constructed to leave the cosmological acoustic horizon invariant. We find three classes of models: (I) DBI inflation, (II) the non-canonical generalization of cyclic contraction, and (III) a new cosmological solution with rapidly decreasing speed of sound and relatively slowly growing scale factor, which we dub stalled cosmology. We construct dual analogs to the inflationary slow roll approximation, and solve for the curvature perturbation in all three cases. Both cyclic contraction and stalled cosmology predict a strongly blue spectrum for the curvature perturbations inconsistent with observations

  16. Revisitation of chaos in Bianchi IX Universe and in generalized scalar-tensor cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, Thierry; Di Menza, Laurent

    2003-01-01

    We show that there is a threshold for the onset of chaos in cosmology for the Universe described as a dynamical system derived from the Einstein equations of general relativity (GR). In the case of the mixmaster model (homogeneous and anisotropic cosmology with a Bianchi IX metric) the chaos occurs precisely at the prescribed necessary value H vac =0 of the GR for the energy of the Universe while the system is found regular for H vac >0 and chaotic for H vac <0 with respect to its pure vacuum part. In the case of generalized scalar tensor theories within the Bianchi IX model we show using the ADM formalism and a conformal transformation that the energy of the dynamical system as compared to vacuum lies below the threshold thus the system is not exhibiting chaos and the conclusion still holds in the presence of ordinary matter as well. The suppression of chaos occurs in a similar way for stiff matter alone

  17. Exotic Higgs decays in a neutrino mass model with discrete S3 symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharyya, G; Päs, H

    2010-01-01

    Exotic Higgs decays can arise in lepton flavor models with horizontal symme- tries. We investigate the scalar sector of a neutrino mass model using an S3 family symmetry as an example. The model’s symmetry leads to an enlarged scalar sector with features that might be used to test the model experimentally, such as scalar particles with masses below 1 TeV and manifestly non-zero ma- trix elements for lepton flavor violating decays. We compare different decay channels of the scalars as well as leptonic processes that violate lepton flavor, in order to compare model predictions with experimental bounds.

  18. Search for scalar bottom quarks from gluino decays in collisions at.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciverez, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; di Giovanni, G P; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J L; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Dennis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-05-05

    We searched for scalar bottom quarks 156 pb(-1) of pp collisions at radicalS = 1.96 recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab II experiment at the Tevatron. Scalar bottom quarks can be produced from gluino decays in -parity conserving models of supersymmetry when the mass of the gluino exceeds that of the scalar bottom quark. Then, a scalar bottom quark can decay into a bottom quark and a neutralino. To search for this scenario, we investigated events with large missing transverse energy and at least three jets, two or more of which were identified as containing a secondary vertex from the hadronization of quarks. We found four candidate events, where 2.6 +/- 0.7 are expected from standard model processes, and placed 95% confidence level lower limits on gluino and scalar bottom quark masses of up to 280 and 240 GeV/c(2), respectively.

  19. Scalar self-interactions loosen constraints from fifth force searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubser, Steven S.; Khoury, Justin

    2004-01-01

    The mass of a scalar field mediating a fifth force is tightly constrained by experiments. We show, however, that adding a quartic self-interaction for such a scalar makes most tests much less constraining: the nonlinear equation of motion masks the coupling of the scalar to matter through the chameleon mechanism. We discuss consequences for fifth force experiments. In particular, we find that, with quartic coupling of order unity, a gravitational strength interaction with matter is allowed by current constraints. We show that our chameleon scalar field results in experimental signatures that could be detected through modest improvements of current laboratory set-ups

  20. Oscillating scalar fields in extended quintessence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Pi, Shi; Scherrer, Robert J.

    2018-01-01

    We study a rapidly oscillating scalar field with potential V (ϕ )=k |ϕ |n nonminimally coupled to the Ricci scalar R via a term of the form (1 -8 π G0ξ ϕ2)R in the action. In the weak coupling limit, we calculate the effect of the nonminimal coupling on the time-averaged equation of state parameter γ =(p +ρ )/ρ . The change in ⟨γ ⟩ is always negative for n ≥2 and always positive for n change to be infinitesimally small at the present time whenever the scalar field dominates the expansion, but constraints in the early universe are not as stringent. The rapid oscillation induced in G also produces an additional contribution to the Friedman equation that behaves like an effective energy density with a stiff equation of state, but we show that, under reasonable assumptions, this effective energy density is always smaller than the density of the scalar field itself.

  1. Search for scalar leptons at LEP with the L3 detector

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Lei

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, I present a search for scalar leptons in e+e- annihilation using the L3 detector at LEP. Data collected in 1999 and 2000, at center-of-mass energies between 192 GeV and 208 GeV, was used in this analysis. This work covered the scalar lepton searches in both SUGRA and GMSB models. To achieve this analysis, a parametrized selection was developed to handle the different event signatures in SUGRA models. Improvement of the L3 simulation and reconstruction program packages was carried out so that one can simulated the scalar leptons in GMSB models correctly. The simulation of the L3 Time Expansion Chamber (TEC) dE/dx measurement was rewritten to facilitate the analysis for a stable slepton signal, which is relevant in some parts of the parameter space in GMSB models. In this analysis, we didn't abserve any significant indication of scalar lepton production of any type. We achieved the following mass exclusion limits for scalar leptons in SUGRA models, for large dM: M(scalar e) > 97 GeV (expected 97...

  2. On the creation of scalar particles in an early stage of the Friedmann closed-universe II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hideki; Nariai, Hidekazu.

    1982-09-01

    As a sequel to the previous work, the creation of scalar particles in an expanding closed-universe is studied in terms of our Feynman propagator and of fixing a pair of particle states. It is shown that the obtained spectral law for the creation of particles is identical with the previous one derived in terms of the vacuum expectation value at an initial time eta = eta sub(i) of the number operator at late time eta = eta sub(f). (author)

  3. Scalar Quantum Electrodynamics: Perturbation Theory and Beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, A.; Gutierrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Concha-Sanchez, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we calculate scalar propagator in arbitrary dimensions and gauge and the three-point scalar-photon vertex in arbitrary dimensions and Feynman gauge, both at the one loop level. We also discuss constraints on their non perturbative structure imposed by requirements of gauge invariance and perturbation theory

  4. Meson-mass generation by instantons, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, T [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan); Shigemoto, K

    1979-05-01

    In a previous work we discussed how pseudo-scalar mesons and scalar mesons acquire their masses by instantons in the colored gauge field. We considered there the two-flavor model with chiral U(2) x U(2) symmetry. In the present paper the same problem is discussed, including the chiral flavor U(3) x U(3) symmetry. An importance of non-local effects due to instantons is emphasized.

  5. On the power law of passive scalars in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2015-11-01

    It has long been considered that the moments of the scalar increment with separation distance r obey power law with scaling exponents in the inertial convective range and the exponents are insensitive to variation of pumping of scalar fluctuations at large scales, thus the scaling exponents are universal. We examine the scaling behavior of the moments of increments of passive scalars 1 and 2 by using DNS up to the grid points of 40963. They are simultaneously convected by the same isotropic steady turbulence atRλ = 805 , but excited by two different methods. Scalar 1 is excited by the random scalar injection which is isotropic, Gaussian and white in time at law wavenumber band, while Scalar 2 is excited by the uniform mean scalar gradient. It is found that the local scaling exponents of the scalar 1 has a logarithmic correction, meaning that the moments of the scalar 1 do not obey simple power law. On the other hand, the moments of the scalar 2 is found to obey the well developed power law with exponents consistent with those in the literature. Physical reasons for the difference are explored. Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research 15H02218 and 26420106, NIFS14KNSS050, HPCI project hp150088 and hp140024, JHPCN project jh150012.

  6. Dynamic freeze-in: impact of thermal masses and cosmological phase transitions on dark matter production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael J.; Breitbach, Moritz; Kopp, Joachim; Mittnacht, Lukas

    2018-03-01

    The cosmological abundance of dark matter can be significantly influenced by the temperature dependence of particle masses and vacuum expectation values. We illustrate this point in three simple freeze-in models. The first one, which we call kinematically induced freeze-in, is based on the observation that the effective mass of a scalar temporarily becomes very small as the scalar potential undergoes a second order phase transition. This opens dark matter production channels that are otherwise forbidden. The second model we consider, dubbed vev-induced freeze-in, is a fermionic Higgs portal scenario. Its scalar sector is augmented compared to the Standard Model by an additional scalar singlet, S, which couples to dark matter and temporarily acquires a vacuum expectation value (a two-step phase transition or "vev flip-flop"). While ≠ 0, the modified coupling structure in the scalar sector implies that dark matter production is significantly enhanced compared to the = 0 phases realised at very early times and again today. The third model, which we call mixing-induced freeze-in, is similar in spirit, but here it is the mixing of dark sector fermions, induced by non-zero , that temporarily boosts the dark matter production rate. For all three scenarios, we carefully dissect the evolution of the dark sector in the early Universe. We compute the DM relic abundance as a function of the model parameters, emphasising the importance of thermal corrections and the proper treatment of phase transitions in the calculation.

  7. Cosmological evolution and Solar System consistency of massive scalar-tensor gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pirey Saint Alby, Thibaut Arnoulx; Yunes, Nicolás

    2017-09-01

    The scalar-tensor theory of Damour and Esposito-Farèse recently gained some renewed interest because of its ability to suppress modifications to general relativity in the weak field, while introducing large corrections in the strong field of compact objects through a process called scalarization. A large sector of this theory that allows for scalarization, however, has been shown to be in conflict with Solar System observations when accounting for the cosmological evolution of the scalar field. We here study an extension of this theory by endowing the scalar field with a mass to determine whether this allows the theory to pass Solar System constraints upon cosmological evolution for a larger sector of coupling parameter space. We show that the cosmological scalar field goes first through a quiescent phase, similar to the behavior of a massless field, but then it enters an oscillatory phase, with an amplitude (and frequency) that decays (and grows) exponentially. We further show that after the field enters the oscillatory phase, its effective energy density and pressure are approximately those of dust, as expected from previous cosmological studies. Due to these oscillations, we show that the scalar field cannot be treated as static today on astrophysical scales, and so we use time-dependent perturbation theory to compute the scalar-field-induced modifications to Solar System observables. We find that these modifications are suppressed when the mass of the scalar field and the coupling parameter of the theory are in a wide range, allowing the theory to pass Solar System constraints, while in principle possibly still allowing for scalarization.

  8. Weakly dynamic dark energy via metric-scalar couplings with torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sur, Sourav; Bhatia, Arshdeep Singh, E-mail: sourav.sur@gmail.com, E-mail: arshdeepsb@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, New Delhi, 110 007 (India)

    2017-07-01

    We study the dynamical aspects of dark energy in the context of a non-minimally coupled scalar field with curvature and torsion. Whereas the scalar field acts as the source of the trace mode of torsion, a suitable constraint on the torsion pseudo-trace provides a mass term for the scalar field in the effective action. In the equivalent scalar-tensor framework, we find explicit cosmological solutions representing dark energy in both Einstein and Jordan frames. We demand the dynamical evolution of the dark energy to be weak enough, so that the present-day values of the cosmological parameters could be estimated keeping them within the confidence limits set for the standard LCDM model from recent observations. For such estimates, we examine the variations of the effective matter density and the dark energy equation of state parameters over different redshift ranges. In spite of being weakly dynamic, the dark energy component differs significantly from the cosmological constant, both in characteristics and features, for e.g. it interacts with the cosmological (dust) fluid in the Einstein frame, and crosses the phantom barrier in the Jordan frame. We also obtain the upper bounds on the torsion mode parameters and the lower bound on the effective Brans-Dicke parameter. The latter turns out to be fairly large, and in agreement with the local gravity constraints, which therefore come in support of our analysis.

  9. A non-perturbative approach to the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism in massless scalar QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malbouisson, A.P.C.; Nogueira, F.S.; Svaiter, N.F.

    1995-08-01

    We rederived non-perturbatively the Coleman-Weinberg expression for the effective potential for massless scalar QED. Our result is not restricted to small values of the coupling constants. This shows that the Coleman-Weinberg result can be established beyond the range of perturbation theory. Also, we derive it in a manifestly renormalization group invariant way. It is shown that with the derivation given no Landau ghost singularity arises. The finite temperature case is discussed. (author). 13 refs

  10. Inflation in a Scale Invariant Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Pedro G. [Oxford U.; Hill, Christopher T. [Fermilab; Noller, Johannes [Zurich U.; Ross, Graham G. [Oxford U., Theor. Phys.

    2018-02-16

    A scale-invariant universe can have a period of accelerated expansion at early times: inflation. We use a frame-invariant approach to calculate inflationary observables in a scale invariant theory of gravity involving two scalar fields - the spectral indices, the tensor to scalar ratio, the level of isocurvature modes and non-Gaussianity. We show that scale symmetry leads to an exact cancellation of isocurvature modes and that, in the scale-symmetry broken phase, this theory is well described by a single scalar field theory. We find the predictions of this theory strongly compatible with current observations.

  11. Convergence of scalar-tensor theories towards general relativity and primordial nucleosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna, A [Dept. Fisica y Computacion, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, E03202-Elche (Spain); Alimi, J-M [LAEC, CNRS-UMR 8631, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, F92195-Meudon (France); Navarro, A [Dept. Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, E30071-Murcia (Spain)

    2002-03-07

    In this paper, we analyse the conditions for convergence towards general relativity of scalar-tensor gravity theories defined by an arbitrary coupling function {alpha} (in the Einstein frame). We show that, in general, the evolution of the scalar field ({phi}) is governed by two opposite mechanisms: an attraction mechanism which tends to drive scalar-tensor models towards Einstein's theory, and a repulsion mechanism which has the contrary effect. The attraction mechanism dominates the recent epochs of the universe evolution if, and only if, the scalar field and its derivative satisfy certain boundary conditions. Since these conditions for convergence towards general relativity depend on the particular scalar-tensor theory used to describe the universe evolution, the nucleosynthesis bounds on the present value of the coupling function, {alpha}{sub 0}, strongly differ from some theories to others. For example, in theories defined by {alpha} {proportional_to} |{phi}| analytical estimates lead to very stringent nucleosynthesis bounds on {alpha}{sub 0}({approx}<10{sup -19}). By contrast, in scalar-tensor theories defined by {alpha} {proportional_to} {phi} much larger limits on {alpha}{sub 0}({approx}<10{sup -7}) are found.

  12. Pulsar timing signal from ultralight scalar dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khmelnitsky, Andrei; Rubakov, Valery

    2014-01-01

    An ultralight free scalar field with mass around 10 −23 −10 −22 eV is a viable dark mater candidate, which can help to resolve some of the issues of the cold dark matter on sub-galactic scales. We consider the gravitational field of the galactic halo composed out of such dark matter. The scalar field has oscillating in time pressure, which induces oscillations of gravitational potential with amplitude of the order of 10 −15 and frequency in the nanohertz range. This frequency is in the range of pulsar timing array observations. We estimate the magnitude of the pulse arrival time residuals induced by the oscillating gravitational potential. We find that for a range of dark matter masses, the scalar field dark matter signal is comparable to the stochastic gravitational wave signal and can be detected by the planned SKA pulsar timing array experiment

  13. Condensation phenomena in two-flavor scalar QED at finite chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Alexander; Gattringer, Christof

    2014-01-01

    We study condensation in two-flavored, scalar QED with non-degenerate masses at finite chemical potential. The conventional formulation of the theory has a sign problem at finite density which can be solved using an exact reformulation of the theory in terms of dual variables. We perform a Monte Carlo simulation in the dual representation and observe a condensation at a critical chemical potential $\\mu_c$. After determining the low-energy spectrum of the theory we try to establish a connection between $\\mu_c$ and the mass of the lightest excitation of the system, which are naively expected to be equal. It turns out, however, that the relation of the critical chemical potential to the mass spectrum in this case is non-trivial: Taking into account the form of the condensate and making some simplifying assumptions we suggest an adequate explanation which is supported by numerical results.

  14. Dark energy in scalar-tensor theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, J.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate several aspects of dynamical dark energy in the framework of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. We provide a classification of scalar-tensor coupling functions admitting cosmological scaling solutions. In particular, we recover that Brans-Dicke theory with inverse power-law potential allows for a sequence of background dominated scaling regime and scalar field dominated, accelerated expansion. Furthermore, we compare minimally and non-minimally coupled models, with respect to the small redshift evolution of the dark energy equation of state. We discuss the possibility to discriminate between different models by a reconstruction of the equation-of-state parameter from available observational data. The non-minimal coupling characterizing scalar-tensor models can - in specific cases - alleviate fine tuning problems, which appear if (minimally coupled) quintessence is required to mimic a cosmological constant. Finally, we perform a phase-space analysis of a family of biscalar-tensor models characterized by a specific type of σ-model metric, including two examples from recent literature. In particular, we generalize an axion-dilaton model of Sonner and Townsend, incorporating a perfect fluid background consisting of (dark) matter and radiation. (orig.)

  15. Dark energy in scalar-tensor theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, J.

    2007-12-15

    We investigate several aspects of dynamical dark energy in the framework of scalar-tensor theories of gravity. We provide a classification of scalar-tensor coupling functions admitting cosmological scaling solutions. In particular, we recover that Brans-Dicke theory with inverse power-law potential allows for a sequence of background dominated scaling regime and scalar field dominated, accelerated expansion. Furthermore, we compare minimally and non-minimally coupled models, with respect to the small redshift evolution of the dark energy equation of state. We discuss the possibility to discriminate between different models by a reconstruction of the equation-of-state parameter from available observational data. The non-minimal coupling characterizing scalar-tensor models can - in specific cases - alleviate fine tuning problems, which appear if (minimally coupled) quintessence is required to mimic a cosmological constant. Finally, we perform a phase-space analysis of a family of biscalar-tensor models characterized by a specific type of {sigma}-model metric, including two examples from recent literature. In particular, we generalize an axion-dilaton model of Sonner and Townsend, incorporating a perfect fluid background consisting of (dark) matter and radiation. (orig.)

  16. Universality in all-{alpha}{sup Prime} order corrections to BPS/non-BPS brane world volume theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatefi, Ehsan, E-mail: ehatefi@ictp.it [International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste (Italy); Park, I.Y., E-mail: inyongpark05@gmail.com [Department of Natural and Physical Sciences, Philander Smith College, Little Rock, AR 72223 (United States)

    2012-11-21

    Knowledge of all-{alpha}{sup Prime} higher derivative corrections to leading order BPS and non-BPS brane actions would serve in future endeavor of determining the complete form of the non-abelian BPS and tachyonic effective actions. In this paper, we note that there is a universality in the all-{alpha}{sup Prime} order corrections to BPS and non-BPS branes. We compute amplitudes between one Ramond-Ramond C-field vertex operator and several SYM gauge/scalar vertex operators. Specifically, we evaluate in closed form string correlators of two-point amplitudes A{sup C{phi}}, A{sup CA}, a three-point amplitude A{sup C{phi}{phi}}, and a four-point amplitude A{sup C{phi}{phi}{phi}}. We carry out pole and contact term analysis. In particular we reproduce some of the contact terms and the infinite massless poles of A{sup C{phi}{phi}{phi}} by SYM vertices obtained through the universality.

  17. On symmetry inheritance of nonminimally coupled scalar fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barjašić, Irena; Smolić, Ivica

    2018-04-01

    We present the first symmetry inheritance analysis of fields non-minimally coupled to gravity. In this work we are focused on the real scalar field ϕ with nonminimal coupling of the form ξφ2 R . Possible cases of symmetry noninheriting fields are constrained by the properties of the Ricci tensor and the scalar potential. Examples of such spacetimes can be found among those which are ‘dressed’ with the stealth scalar field, a nontrivial scalar field configuration with the vanishing energy–momentum tensor. We classify the scalar field potentials which allow symmetry noninheriting stealth field configurations on top of the exact solutions of the Einstein’s gravitational field equation with the cosmological constant.

  18. Exact solutions for scalar field cosmology in f(R) gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, S. D.; Goswami, R.; Chervon, S. V.; Nikolaev, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    We study scalar field FLRW cosmology in the content of f(R) gravity. Our consideration is restricted to the spatially flat Friedmann universe. We derived the general evolution equations of the model, and showed that the scalar field equation is automatically satisfied for any form of the f(R) function. We also derived representations for kinetic and potential energies, as well as for the acceleration in terms of the Hubble parameter and the form of the f(R) function. Next we found the exact cosmological solutions in modified gravity without specifying the f(R) function. With negligible acceleration of the scalar curvature, we found that the de Sitter inflationary solution is always attained. Also we obtained new solutions with special restrictions on the integration constants. These solutions contain oscillating, accelerating, decelerating and even contracting universes. For further investigation, we selected special cases which can be applied with early or late inflation. We also found exact solutions for the general case for the model with negligible acceleration of the scalar curvature in terms of special Airy functions. Using initial conditions which represent the universe at the present epoch, we determined the constants of integration. This allows for the comparison of the scale factor in the new solutions with that for current stage of the universe evolution in the ΛCDM model.

  19. Theory and phenomenology of the MSSM with heavy scalars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal Hernandez, N.

    2008-09-01

    This work is dedicated to the study of different phenomenological aspects of supersymmetry with on one hand the physics of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) in the case of heavy scalar superparticles and its implications at the LHC and on the other hand the characteristics of black matter particles and their detection in colliders and in astro-particle experiments. The first chapter presents the Standard Model, the supersymmetry theory and how the supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model can solve some concerns of the Standard Model. In the second chapter we present the MSSM with heavy scalars. In this model all the scalar particles have masses beyond the TeV and consequently even next generations of colliders will not be able to detect them. We recall why heavy scalars are necessary. In the third chapter we present the construction of MSSM parameters with heavy scalars and we show that the future ILC (International Linear Collider) will be able to set the value of these parameters with a satisfactory accuracy. The last chapter deals with dark matter particles like WIMPS, their detection sensitivity in the XENON experiment and the reconstruction of their masses will be analyzed. We have also studied the direct detection of WIMPS via the observation of some products of their annihilation

  20. Non-perturbative Calculation of the Scalar Yukawa Theory in Four-Body Truncation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yang; Maris, P.; Vary, J. P.; Karmanov, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    The quenched scalar Yukawa theory is solved in the light-front Tamm–Dancoff approach including up to four constituents (one scalar nucleon, three scalar pions). The Fock sector dependent renormalization is implemented. By studying the Fock sector norms, we find that the lowest two Fock sectors dominate the state even in the large-coupling region. The one-body sector shows convergence with respect to the Fock sector truncation. However, the four-body norm exceeds the three-body norm at the coupling α≈1.7 . (author)

  1. Exotic Material as Interactions Between Scalar Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson G. A.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Many theoretical papers refer to the need to create exotic materials with average negative energies for the formation of space propulsion anomalies such as "wormholes" and "warp drives". However, little hope is given for the existence of such material to resolve its creation for such use. From the standpoint that non-minimally coupled scalar fields to gravity appear to be the current direction mathematically. It is proposed that exotic material is really scalar field interactions. Within this paper the Ginzburg-Landau (GL scalar fields associated with superconductor junctions isinvestigated as a source for negative vacuum energy fluctuations, which could be used to study the interactions among energyfluctuations, cosmological scalar (i.e., Higgs fields, and gravity.

  2. Scalar multi-wormholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, A I; Kashargin, P E; Sushkov, Sergey V

    2016-01-01

    In 1921 Bach and Weyl derived the method of superposition to construct new axially symmetric vacuum solutions of general relativity. In this paper we extend the Bach–Weyl approach to non-vacuum configurations with massless scalar fields. Considering a phantom scalar field with the negative kinetic energy, we construct a multi-wormhole solution describing an axially symmetric superposition of N wormholes. The solution found is static, everywhere regular and has no event horizons. These features drastically tell the multi-wormhole configuration from other axially symmetric vacuum solutions which inevitably contain gravitationally inert singular structures, such as ‘struts’ and ‘membranes’, that keep the two bodies apart making a stable configuration. However, the multi-wormholes are static without any singular struts. Instead, the stationarity of the multi-wormhole configuration is provided by the phantom scalar field with the negative kinetic energy. Anther unusual property is that the multi-wormhole spacetime has a complicated topological structure. Namely, in the spacetime there exist 2 N asymptotically flat regions connected by throats. (paper)

  3. Neutrino mass, leptogenesis and FIMP dark matter in a U(1)_{B-L} model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Anirban; Choubey, Sandhya; Khan, Sarif

    2017-12-01

    The Standard Model (SM) is inadequate to explain the origin of tiny neutrino masses, the dark matter (DM) relic abundance and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. In this work, to address all three puzzles, we extend the SM by a local U(1)_{B-L} gauge symmetry, three right-handed (RH) neutrinos for the cancellation of gauge anomalies and two complex scalars having non-zero U(1)_{B-L} charges. All the newly added particles become massive after the breaking of the U(1)_{B-L} symmetry by the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of one of the scalar fields φ _H. The other scalar field, φ _DM, which does not have any VEV, becomes automatically stable and can be a viable DM candidate. Neutrino masses are generated using the Type-I seesaw mechanism, while the required lepton asymmetry to reproduce the observed baryon asymmetry can be attained from the CP violating out of equilibrium decays of the RH neutrinos in TeV scale. More importantly within this framework, we study in detail the production of DM via the freeze-in mechanism considering all possible annihilation and decay processes. Finally, we find a situation when DM is dominantly produced from the annihilation of the RH neutrinos, which are at the same time also responsible for neutrino mass generation and leptogenesis.

  4. Asymptotic behavior and Hamiltonian analysis of anti-de Sitter gravity coupled to scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henneaux, Marc; Martinez, Cristian; Troncoso, Ricardo; Zanelli, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    We examine anti-de Sitter gravity minimally coupled to a self-interacting scalar field in D>=4 dimensions when the mass of the scalar field is in the range m * 2 = 2 * 2 +l -2 . Here, l is the AdS radius, and m * 2 is the Breitenlohner-Freedman mass. We show that even though the scalar field generically has a slow fall-off at infinity which back reacts on the metric so as to modify its standard asymptotic behavior, one can still formulate asymptotic conditions (i) that are anti-de Sitter invariant; and (ii) that allows the construction of well-defined and finite Hamiltonian generators for all elements of the anti-de Sitter algebra. This requires imposing a functional relationship on the coefficients a, b that control the two independent terms in the asymptotic expansion of the scalar field. The anti-de Sitter charges are found to involve a scalar field contribution. Subtleties associated with the self-interactions of the scalar field as well as its gravitational back reaction, not discussed in previous treatments, are explicitly analyzed. In particular, it is shown that the fields develop extra logarithmic branches for specific values of the scalar field mass (in addition to the known logarithmic branch at the B-F bound)

  5. Cosmic inflation constrains scalar dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommi Tenkanen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In a theory containing scalar fields, a generic consequence is a formation of scalar condensates during cosmic inflation. The displacement of scalar fields out from their vacuum values sets specific initial conditions for post-inflationary dynamics and may lead to significant observational ramifications. In this work, we investigate how these initial conditions affect the generation of dark matter in the class of portal scenarios where the standard model fields feel new physics only through Higgs-mediated couplings. As a representative example, we will consider a $ Z_2 $ symmetric scalar singlet $ s $ coupled to Higgs via $ \\lambda \\Phi ^\\dagger \\Phi s^2 $. This simple extension has interesting consequences as the singlet constitutes a dark matter candidate originating from non-thermal production of singlet particles out from a singlet condensate, leading to a novel interplay between inflationary dynamics and dark matter properties.

  6. Kerr black holes with scalar hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdeiro, Carlos A R; Radu, Eugen

    2014-06-06

    We present a family of solutions of Einstein's gravity minimally coupled to a complex, massive scalar field, describing asymptotically flat, spinning black holes with scalar hair and a regular horizon. These hairy black holes (HBHs) are supported by rotation and have no static limit. Besides mass M and angular momentum J, they carry a conserved, continuous Noether charge Q measuring the scalar hair. HBHs branch off from the Kerr metric at the threshold of the superradiant instability and reduce to spinning boson stars in the limit of vanishing horizon area. They overlap with Kerr black holes for a set of (M, J) values. A single Killing vector field preserves the solutions, tangent to the null geodesic generators of the event horizon. HBHs can exhibit sharp physical differences when compared to the Kerr solution, such as J/M^{2}>1, a quadrupole moment larger than J^{2}/M, and a larger orbital angular velocity at the innermost stable circular orbit. Families of HBHs connected to the Kerr geometry should exist in scalar (and other) models with more general self-interactions.

  7. Spontaneous Scalarization of Black Holes and Compact Stars from a Gauss-Bonnet Coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Hector O; Sakstein, Jeremy; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Sotiriou, Thomas P; Berti, Emanuele

    2018-03-30

    We identify a class of scalar-tensor theories with coupling between the scalar and the Gauss-Bonnet invariant that exhibit spontaneous scalarization for both black holes and compact stars. In particular, these theories formally admit all of the stationary solutions of general relativity, but these are not dynamically preferred if certain conditions are satisfied. Remarkably, black holes exhibit scalarization if their mass lies within one of many narrow bands. We find evidence that scalarization can occur in neutron stars as well.

  8. Thermal inflation with a thermal waterfall scalar field coupled to a light spectator scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Lyth, David H.; Rumsey, Arron

    2017-05-01

    A new model of thermal inflation is introduced, in which the mass of the thermal waterfall field is dependent on a light spectator scalar field. Using the δ N formalism, the "end of inflation" scenario is investigated in order to ascertain whether this model is able to produce the dominant contribution to the primordial curvature perturbation. A multitude of constraints are considered so as to explore the parameter space, with particular emphasis on key observational signatures. For natural values of the parameters, the model is found to yield a sharp prediction for the scalar spectral index and its running, well within the current observational bounds.

  9. Primordial Black Holes from Supersymmetry in the Early Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Eric; Kusenko, Alexander

    2017-07-21

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model generically predict that in the early Universe a scalar condensate can form and fragment into Q balls before decaying. If the Q balls dominate the energy density for some period of time, the relatively large fluctuations in their number density can lead to formation of primordial black holes (PBH). Other scalar fields, unrelated to supersymmetry, can play a similar role. For a general charged scalar field, this robust mechanism can generate black holes over the entire mass range allowed by observational constraints, with a sufficient abundance to account for all dark matter in some parameter ranges. In the case of supersymmetry the mass range is limited from above by 10^{23}  g. We also comment on the role that topological defects can play for PBH formation in a similar fashion.

  10. Dissipation and fluctuation of quantum fields in expanding universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morikawa, M.

    1990-01-01

    A stochastic dynamics of a long-wavelength part of a scalar field in an expanding universe is derived by using the influence functional method. Dissipation as well as fluctuation are derived for general parameters: a mass, a coupling to the scalar curvature, and a cutoff scale parameter. A dissipation-fluctuation relation is found with a temperature which is proportional to the Hawking temperature, but system dependent. The method is further applied to an expanding universe with a power law and yields the dispersion which agrees with that obtained by the regularization method. The back reaction to the background de Sitter space itself is also obtained

  11. Canonical single field slow-roll inflation with a non-monotonic tensor-to-scalar ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germán, Gabriel [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo [Instituto de Física, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Apdo. postal J-48, CP 72570, Puebla, Pue., México (Mexico); Hidalgo, Juan Carlos [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. postal 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca, Morelos, México (Mexico); Sussman, Roberto A., E-mail: gabriel@fis.unam.mx, E-mail: aherrera@ifuap.buap.mx, E-mail: hidalgo@fis.unam.mx, E-mail: sussman@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. postal 70-543, 04510 México D. F., México (Mexico)

    2016-05-01

    We take a pragmatic, model independent approach to single field slow-roll canonical inflation by imposing conditions, not on the potential, but on the slow-roll parameter ε(φ) and its derivatives ε'(φ) and ε''(φ), thereby extracting general conditions on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r and the running n {sub sk} at φ {sub H} where the perturbations are produced, some 50–60 e -folds before the end of inflation. We find quite generally that for models where ε(φ) develops a maximum, a relatively large r is most likely accompanied by a positive running while a negligible tensor-to-scalar ratio implies negative running. The definitive answer, however, is given in terms of the slow-roll parameter ξ{sub 2}(φ). To accommodate a large tensor-to-scalar ratio that meets the limiting values allowed by the Planck data, we study a non-monotonic ε(φ) decreasing during most part of inflation. Since at φ {sub H} the slow-roll parameter ε(φ) is increasing, we thus require that ε(φ) develops a maximum for φ > φ {sub H} after which ε(φ) decrease to small values where most e -folds are produced. The end of inflation might occur trough a hybrid mechanism and a small field excursion Δφ {sub e} ≡ |φ {sub H} −φ {sub e} | is obtained with a sufficiently thin profile for ε(φ) which, however, should not conflict with the second slow-roll parameter η(φ). As a consequence of this analysis we find bounds for Δφ {sub e} , r {sub H} and for the scalar spectral index n {sub sH} . Finally we provide examples where these considerations are explicitly realised.

  12. Stochastic inflation lattice simulations: Ultra-large scale structure of the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salopek, D.S.

    1990-11-01

    Non-Gaussian fluctuations for structure formation may arise in inflation from the nonlinear interaction of long wavelength gravitational and scalar fields. Long wavelength fields have spatial gradients α -1 triangledown small compared to the Hubble radius, and they are described in terms of classical random fields that are fed by short wavelength quantum noise. Lattice Langevin calculations are given for a ''toy model'' with a scalar field interacting with an exponential potential where one can obtain exact analytic solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation. For single scalar field models that are consistent with current microwave background fluctuations, the fluctuations are Gaussian. However, for scales much larger than our observable Universe, one expects large metric fluctuations that are non-Guassian. This example illuminates non-Gaussian models involving multiple scalar fields which are consistent with current microwave background limits. 21 refs., 3 figs

  13. Stability of a Noncanonical Scalar Field Model during Cosmological Date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ossoulian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the noncanonical model of scalar field, the cosmological consequences of a pervasive, self-interacting, homogeneous, and rolling scalar field are studied. In this model, the scalar field potential is “nonlinear” and decreases in magnitude with increasing the value of the scalar field. A special solution of the nonlinear field equations of ϕ that has time dependency as fixed point is obtained. The fixed point relies on the noncanonical term of action and γ-parameter; this parameter appeared in energy density of scalar field redshift. By means of such fixed point the different eigenvalues of the equation of motion will be obtained. In different epochs in the evolution of the Universe for different values of q and n, the potentials as a function of scalar field are attained. The behavior of baryonic perturbations in linear perturbation scenario as a considerable amount of energy density of scalar field at low redshifts prevents the growth of perturbations in the ordinary matter fluid. The energy density in the scalar field is not appreciably perturbed by nonrelativistic gravitational fields, in either the radiation or matter dominant or scalar field dominated epoch.

  14. Nonsingular solutions and instabilities in Einstein-scalar-Gauss-Bonnet cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sberna, Laura; Pani, Paolo

    2017-12-01

    It is generically believed that higher-order curvature corrections to the Einstein-Hilbert action might cure the curvature singularities that plague general relativity. Here we consider Einstein-scalar-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, the only four-dimensional, ghost-free theory with quadratic curvature terms. For any choice of the coupling function and of the scalar potential, we show that the theory does not allow for bouncing solutions in the flat and open Friedmann universe. For the case of a closed universe, using a reverse-engineering method, we explicitly provide a bouncing solution which is nevertheless linearly unstable in the scalar gravitational sector. Moreover, we show that the expanding, singularity-free, early-time cosmologies allowed in the theory are unstable. These results rely only on analyticity and finiteness of cosmological variables at early times.

  15. f(R) gravity: scalar perturbations in the late Universe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eingorn, M.; Novák, Jan; Zhuk, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 8 (2014), s. 3005 ISSN 1434-6044 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : nonlinear f(R) gravity * scalar cosmological perturbations * scalaron Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 5.084, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-3005-1

  16. Exotic Material as Interactions Between Scalar Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson G. A.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Many theoretical papers refer to the need to create exotic materials with average negative energies for the formation of space propulsion anomalies such as “wormholes” and “warp drives”. However, little hope is given for the existence of such material to resolve its creation for such use. From the standpoint that non-minimally coupled scalar fields to gravity appear to be the current direction mathematically. It is proposed that exotic material is really scalar field interactions. Within this paper the Ginzburg- Landau (GL scalar fields associated with superconductor junctions is investigated as a source for negative vacuum energy fluctuations, which could be used to study the interactions among energy fluctuations, cosmological scalar (i. e., Higgs fields, and gravity.

  17. Neutral and charged scalar mesons, pseudoscalar mesons, and diquarks in magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Wang, Xinyang; Yu, Lang; Huang, Mei

    2018-04-01

    We investigate both (pseudo)scalar mesons and diquarks in the presence of external magnetic field in the framework of the two-flavored Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, where mesons and diquarks are constructed by infinite sum of quark-loop chains by using random phase approximation. The polarization function of the quark-loop is calculated to the leading order of 1 /Nc expansion by taking the quark propagator in the Landau level representation. We systematically investigate the masses behaviors of scalar σ meson, neutral and charged pions as well as the scalar diquarks, with respect to the magnetic field strength at finite temperature and chemical potential. It is shown that the numerical results of both neutral and charged pions are consistent with the lattice QCD simulations. The mass of the charge neutral pion keeps almost a constant under the magnetic field, which is preserved by the remnant symmetry of QCD ×QED in the vacuum. The mass of the charge neutral scalar σ is around two times quark mass and increases with the magnetic field due to the magnetic catalysis effect, which is an typical example showing that the polarized internal quark structure cannot be neglected when we consider the meson properties under magnetic field. For the charged particles, the one quark-antiquark loop contribution to the charged π± increases essentially with the increase of magnetic fields due to the magnetic catalysis of the polarized quarks. However, the one quark-quark loop contribution to the scalar diquark mass is negative comparing with the point-particle result and the loop effect is small.

  18. Scalar mesons and radiative vector meson decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokalp, A.; Ylmaz, O

    2002-01-01

    The light scalar mesons with vacuum quantum numbers J p =0 ++ have fundamental importance in understanding low energy QCD phenomenology and the symmetry breaking mechanisms in QCD. The nature and quark substructure of the best known scalar mesons, isoscalar σ(500), f0(980) and isovector a0(980) have been a subject of continuous controversy. The radioactive decay of neutral vector mesons ρ, w and φ into a single photon and a pair of neutral pseudoscalar mesons have been studied in order to obtain information on the nature of these scalar mesons. For such studies, it is essential that a reliable understanding of the mechanisms for these decays should be at hand. In this work, we investigate the particularly interesting mechanism of the exchange of scalar mesons for the radiative vector meson decays by analysing the experimental results such as measured decay rates and invariant mass spectra and compare them with the theoretical prediction of different reaction mechanisms

  19. Scalar fields nonminimally coupled to pp waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayon-Beato, Eloy; Hassaiene, Mokhtar

    2005-01-01

    Here, we report pp waves configurations of three-dimensional gravity for which a scalar field nonminimally coupled to them acts as a source. In absence of self-interaction the solutions are gravitational plane waves with a profile fixed in terms of the scalar wave. In the self-interacting case, only power-law potentials parameterized by the nonminimal coupling constant are allowed by the field equations. In contrast with the free case the self-interacting scalar field does not behave like a wave since it depends only on the wave-front coordinate. We address the same problem when gravitation is governed by topologically massive gravity and the source is a free scalar field. From the pp waves derived in this case, we obtain at the zero topological mass limit, new pp waves solutions of conformal gravity for any arbitrary value of the nonminimal coupling parameter. Finally, we extend these solutions to the self-interacting case of conformal gravity

  20. Neutrino mass, leptogenesis and FIMP dark matter in a U(1){sub B-L} model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Anirban; Khan, Sarif [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Mumbai (India); Choubey, Sandhya [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Mumbai (India); AlbaNova University Center, Department of Theoretical Physics, School of Engineering Sciences, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-12-15

    The Standard Model (SM) is inadequate to explain the origin of tiny neutrino masses, the dark matter (DM) relic abundance and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe. In this work, to address all three puzzles, we extend the SM by a local U(1){sub B-L} gauge symmetry, three right-handed (RH) neutrinos for the cancellation of gauge anomalies and two complex scalars having non-zero U(1){sub B-L} charges. All the newly added particles become massive after the breaking of the U(1){sub B-L} symmetry by the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of one of the scalar fields φ{sub H}. The other scalar field, φ{sub DM}, which does not have any VEV, becomes automatically stable and can be a viable DM candidate. Neutrino masses are generated using the Type-I seesaw mechanism, while the required lepton asymmetry to reproduce the observed baryon asymmetry can be attained from the CP violating out of equilibrium decays of the RH neutrinos in TeV scale. More importantly within this framework, we study in detail the production of DM via the freeze-in mechanism considering all possible annihilation and decay processes. Finally, we find a situation when DM is dominantly produced from the annihilation of the RH neutrinos, which are at the same time also responsible for neutrino mass generation and leptogenesis. (orig.)

  1. Color-suppression of non-planar diagrams in bosonic bound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga Nogueira, J. H.; Ji, Chueng-Ryong; Ydrefors, E.; Frederico, T.

    2018-02-01

    We study the suppression of non-planar diagrams in a scalar QCD model of a meson system in 3 + 1 space-time dimensions due to the inclusion of the color degrees of freedom. As a prototype of the color-singlet meson, we consider a flavor-nonsinglet system consisting of a scalar-quark and a scalar-antiquark with equal masses exchanging a scalar-gluon of a different mass, which is investigated within the framework of the homogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equation. The equation is solved by using the Nakanishi representation for the manifestly covariant bound-state amplitude and its light-front projection. The resulting non-singular integral equation is solved numerically. The damping of the impact of the cross-ladder kernel on the binding energies are studied in detail. The color-suppression of the cross-ladder effects on the light-front wave function and the elastic electromagnetic form factor are also discussed. As our results show, the suppression appears significantly large for Nc = 3, which supports the use of rainbow-ladder truncations in practical non-perturbative calculations within QCD.

  2. Non-Maximal Tripartite Entanglement Degradation of Dirac and Scalar Fields in Non-Inertial Frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Salman; Khan, Niaz Ali; Khan, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    The π-tangle is used to study the behavior of entanglement of a nonmaximal tripartite state of both Dirac and scalar fields in accelerated frame. For Dirac fields, the degree of degradation with acceleration of both one-tangle of accelerated observer and π-tangle, for the same initial entanglement, is different by just interchanging the values of probability amplitudes. A fraction of both one-tangles and the π-tangle always survives for any choice of acceleration and the degree of initial entanglement. For scalar field, the one-tangle of accelerated observer depends on the choice of values of probability amplitudes and it vanishes in the range of infinite acceleration, whereas for π-tangle this is not always true. The dependence of π-tangle on probability amplitudes varies with acceleration. In the lower range of acceleration, its behavior changes by switching between the values of probability amplitudes and for larger values of acceleration this dependence on probability amplitudes vanishes. Interestingly, unlike bipartite entanglement, the degradation of π-tangle against acceleration in the case of scalar fields is slower than for Dirac fields. (general)

  3. Correspondence of f(R,∇R) Modified Gravity with Scalar Field Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawad, Abdul; Debnath, Ujjal

    2014-01-01

    This paper is devoted to study the scalar field dark energy models by taking its different aspects in the framework of f(R,∇R) gravity. We consider flat FRW universe to construct the equation of state parameter governed by f(R,∇R) gravity. The stability of the model is discussed with the help of squared speed of sound parameter. It is found that models show quintessence behavior of the universe in stable as well as unstable modes. We also develop the correspondence of f(R,∇R) model with some scalar field dark energy models like quintessence, tachyonic field, k-essence, dilaton, hessence, and DBI-essence. The nature of scalar fields and corresponding scalar potentials is being analyzed in f(R,∇R) gravity graphically which show consistency with the present day observations about accelerated phenomenon

  4. Second-order hydrodynamics and universality in non-conformal holographic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinert, Philipp; Probst, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    We study second-order hydrodynamic transport in strongly coupled non-conformal field theories with holographic gravity duals in asymptotically anti-de Sitter space. We first derive new Kubo formulae for five second-order transport coefficients in non-conformal fluids in (3+1) dimensions. We then apply them to holographic RG flows induced by scalar operators of dimension Δ=3. For general background solutions of the dual bulk geometry, we find explicit expressions for the five transport coefficients at infinite coupling and show that a specific combination, H̃=2ητ π −2(κ−κ ∗ )−λ 2 , always vanishes. We prove analytically that the Haack-Yarom identity H=2ητ π −4λ 1 −λ 2 =0, which is known to be true for conformal holographic fluids at infinite coupling, also holds when taking into account leading non-conformal corrections. The numerical results we obtain for two specific families of RG flows suggest that H vanishes regardless of conformal symmetry. Our work provides further evidence that the Haack-Yarom identity H=0 may be universally satisfied by strongly coupled fluids.

  5. Second-order hydrodynamics and universality in non-conformal holographic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinert, Philipp; Probst, Jonas [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-19

    We study second-order hydrodynamic transport in strongly coupled non-conformal field theories with holographic gravity duals in asymptotically anti-de Sitter space. We first derive new Kubo formulae for five second-order transport coefficients in non-conformal fluids in (3+1) dimensions. We then apply them to holographic RG flows induced by scalar operators of dimension Δ=3. For general background solutions of the dual bulk geometry, we find explicit expressions for the five transport coefficients at infinite coupling and show that a specific combination, H̃=2ητ{sub π}−2(κ−κ{sup ∗})−λ{sub 2}, always vanishes. We prove analytically that the Haack-Yarom identity H=2ητ{sub π}−4λ{sub 1}−λ{sub 2}=0, which is known to be true for conformal holographic fluids at infinite coupling, also holds when taking into account leading non-conformal corrections. The numerical results we obtain for two specific families of RG flows suggest that H vanishes regardless of conformal symmetry. Our work provides further evidence that the Haack-Yarom identity H=0 may be universally satisfied by strongly coupled fluids.

  6. The trace anomaly and massless scalar degrees of freedom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianotti, Maurizio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mottola, Emil [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The trace anomaly of quantum fields in electromagnetic or gravitational backgrounds implies the existence of massless scalar poles in physical amplitudes involving the stress-energy tensor. Considering first the axial anomaly and using QED as an example, we compute the full one-loop triangle amplitude of the fermionic stress tensor with two current vertices, {open_square}T{sup {mu}{nu}}J{sup {alpha}}J{sup {beta}}, and exhibit the scalar pole in this amplitude associated with the trace anomaly, in the limit of zero electron mass m{yields}0. To emphasize the infrared aspect of the anomaly, we use a dispersive approach and show that this amplitude and the existence of the massless scalar pole is determined completely by its ultraviolet finite terms, together with the requirements of Poincare invariance of the vacuum, Bose symmetry under interchange of J{sup {alpha}} and J{sup {beta}}, and vector current and stress-tensor conservation. We derive a sum rule for the appropriate positive spectral function corresponding to the discontinuity of the triangle amplitude, showing that it becomes proportional to {delta}(k{sup 2}) and therefore contains a massless scalar intermediate state in the conformal limit of zero electron mass. The effective action corresponding to the trace of the triangle amplitude can be expressed in local form by the introduction of two scalar auxiliary fields which satisfy massless wave equations. These massless scalar degrees of freedom couple to classical sources, contribute to gravitational scattering processes, and can have long range gravitational effects.

  7. Solution of Effective-Mass Dirac Equation with Scalar-Vector and Pseudoscalar Terms for Generalized Hulthén Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altuğ Arda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We find the exact bound state solutions and normalization constant for the Dirac equation with scalar-vector-pseudoscalar interaction terms for the generalized Hulthén potential in the case where we have a particular mass function m(x. We also search the solutions for the constant mass where the obtained results correspond to the ones when the Dirac equation has spin and pseudospin symmetry, respectively. After giving the obtained results for the nonrelativistic case, we search then the energy spectra and corresponding upper and lower components of Dirac spinor for the case of PT-symmetric forms of the present potential.

  8. Study of inflationary generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas for standard and tachyon scalar fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2014-07-15

    We consider an inflationary universe model in the context of the generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas by taking the matter field as standard and tachyon scalar fields. We evaluate the corresponding scalar fields and scalar potentials during the intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by modifying the first Friedmann equation. In each case, we evaluate the number of e-folds, scalar as well as tensor power spectra, scalar spectral index, and the important observational parameter, the tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflation. The graphical behavior of this parameter shows that the model remains incompatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data in each case. (orig.)

  9. Study of inflationary generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas for standard and tachyon scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, M.; Saleem, Rabia

    2014-01-01

    We consider an inflationary universe model in the context of the generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas by taking the matter field as standard and tachyon scalar fields. We evaluate the corresponding scalar fields and scalar potentials during the intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by modifying the first Friedmann equation. In each case, we evaluate the number of e-folds, scalar as well as tensor power spectra, scalar spectral index, and the important observational parameter, the tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflation. The graphical behavior of this parameter shows that the model remains incompatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data in each case. (orig.)

  10. Energy-momentum tensor in theories with scalar fields and two coupling constants. I. Non-Abelian case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joglekar, S.D.; Misra, A.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we generalize our earlier discussion of renormalization of the energy-momentum tensor in scalar QED to that in non-Abelian gauge theories involving scalar fields. We show the need for adding an improvement term to the conventional energy-momentum tensor. We consider two possible forms for the improvement term: (i) one in which the improvement coefficient is a finite function of bare parameters of the theory (so that the energy-momentum tensor can be derived from an action that is a finite function of bare quantities); (ii) one in which the improvement coefficient is a finite quantity, i.e., a finite function of renormalized parameters. We establish a negative result; viz., neither form leads to a finite energy-momentum tensor to O(e 2 λ/sup n/)

  11. Analysis of the scalar doubly charmed hexaquark state with QCD sum rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhi-Gang [North China Electric Power University, Department of Physics, Baoding (China)

    2017-09-15

    In this article, we study the scalar-diquark-scalar-diquark-scalar-diquark type hexaquark state with the QCD sum rules by carrying out the operator product expansion up to the vacuum condensates of dimension 16. We obtain a lowest hexaquark mass of 6.60{sup +0.12}{sub -0.09} GeV, which can be confronted with the experimental data in the future. (orig.)

  12. Scalar sector of the 3 3 1 model with three Higgs triplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang Ngoc Long

    1997-10-01

    A scalar sector of the 3 3 1 model with three Higgs triplets is considered. The mass spectrum, eigenstates and interactions of the Higgs and the SM gauge bosons are derived. We show that one of the neutral scalars can be identified with the standard model Higgs boson, and in the considered potential there is no mixing between scalars having VEV and ones without VEV. (author)

  13. Local structure of scalar flux in turbulent passive scalar mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduri, Aditya; Donzis, Diego

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the properties of scalar flux is important in the study of turbulent mixing. Classical theories suggest that it mainly depends on the large scale structures in the flow. Recent studies suggest that the mean scalar flux reaches an asymptotic value at high Peclet numbers, independent of molecular transport properties of the fluid. A large DNS database of isotropic turbulence with passive scalars forced with a mean scalar gradient with resolution up to 40963, is used to explore the structure of scalar flux based on the local topology of the flow. It is found that regions of small velocity gradients, where dissipation and enstrophy are small, constitute the main contribution to scalar flux. On the other hand, regions of very small scalar gradient (and scalar dissipation) become less important to the scalar flux at high Reynolds numbers. The scaling of the scalar flux spectra is also investigated. The k - 7 / 3 scaling proposed by Lumley (1964) is observed at high Reynolds numbers, but collapse is not complete. A spectral bump similar to that in the velocity spectrum is observed close to dissipative scales. A number of features, including the height of the bump, appear to reach an asymptotic value at high Schmidt number.

  14. Probing new charged scalars with neutrino trident production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Gabriel; Plestid, Ryan

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of using neutrino trident production to probe leptophilic charged scalars at future high intensity neutrino experiments. We show that under specific assumptions, this production process can provide competitive sensitivity for generic charged scalars as compared to common existing bounds. We also investigate how the recently proposed mixed-flavor production—where the two oppositely charged leptons in the final state need not be muon flavored—can give a 20%-50% increase in sensitivity for certain configurations of new physics couplings as compared to traditional trident modes. We then categorize all renormalizable leptophilic scalar extensions based on their representation under SU (2 )×U (1 ), and discuss the Higgs triplet and Zee-Babu models as explicit UV realizations. We find that the inclusion of additional doubly charged scalars and the need to reproduce neutrino masses make trident production uncompetitive with current bounds for these specific UV completions. Our work represents the first application of neutrino trident production to study charged scalars. Additionally, it is the first application of mixed-flavor trident production to study physics beyond the standard model more generally.

  15. Phase transition for black holes with scalar hair and topological black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myung, Yun Soo

    2008-01-01

    We study phase transitions between black holes with scalar hair and topological black holes in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetimes. As the ground state solutions, we introduce the non-rotating BTZ black hole in three dimensions and topological black hole with hyperbolic horizon in four dimensions. For the temperature matching only, we show that the phase transition between black hole with scalar hair (Martinez-Troncoso-Zanelli black hole) and topological black hole is second-order by using differences between two free energies. However, we do not identify what order of the phase transition between scalar and non-rotating BTZ black holes occurs in three dimensions, although there exists a possible decay of scalar black hole to non-rotating BTZ black hole

  16. Non-universal SUSY breaking, hierarchy and squark degeneracty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hitoshi.

    1995-01-01

    I discuss non-trivial effects in the soft SUSY breaking terms which appear when one integrates out heavy fields. The effects exist only when the SUSY breaking terms are non-universal. They may spoil (1) the hierarchy between the weak and high-energy scales, or (2) degeneracy among the squark masses even in the presense of a horizontal symmetry. I argue, in the end, that such new effects may be useful in probing physics at high-energy scales from TeV-scale experiments

  17. On scalar condensate baryogenesis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiriloval, D.P.; Valchanov, T.V.

    2004-09-01

    We discuss the scalar field condensate baryogenesis model, which is among the baryogenesis scenarios preferred today, compatible with inflation. According to that model a complex scalar field φ, carrying baryon charge B≠0 is generated at inflation. The baryon excess in the Universe results from the φ decay at later stages of Universe evolution (T 15 GeV). We updated the model's parameters range according to the current observational cosmological constraints and analyzed numerically φ evolution after the inflationary stage till its decay φ → qq-barlγ. During that period oscillated with a decreasing amplitude due to Universe expansion and particle production processes due to the coupling of the field to fermions gφf 1 f 2 . It was shown that particle creation processes play an essential role for evolution and its final value. It may lead to a considerable decrease of the field's amplitude for large g and/or large H values, which reflects finally into strong damping of the baryon charge carried by the condensate. The analysis suggests that for a natural range of the model's parameters the observed value of the baryon asymmetry can be obtained and the model can serve as a successful baryogenesis model, compatible with inflation. (author)

  18. A novel approach to finely tuned supersymmetric standard models: The case of the non-universal Higgs mass model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Yin, Wen

    2018-02-01

    Discarding the prejudice about fine tuning, we propose a novel and efficient approach to identify relevant regions of fundamental parameter space in supersymmetric models with some amount of fine tuning. The essential idea is the mapping of experimental constraints at a low-energy scale, rather than the parameter sets, to those of the fundamental parameter space. Applying this method to the non-universal Higgs mass model, we identify a new interesting superparticle mass pattern where some of the first two generation squarks are light whilst the stops are kept heavy as 6 TeV. Furthermore, as another application of this method, we show that the discrepancy of the muon anomalous magnetic dipole moment can be filled by a supersymmetric contribution within the 1{σ} level of the experimental and theoretical errors, which was overlooked by previous studies due to the extremely fine tuning required.

  19. Non-perturbative scalar potential inspired by type IIA strings on rigid CY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrov, Sergei [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb (L2C), UMR 5221, CNRS-Université de Montpellier,F-34095, Montpellier (France); Ketov, Sergei V. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University,1-1 Minami-ohsawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), The University of Tokyo,Chiba 277-8568 (Japan); Institute of Physics and Technology, Tomsk Polytechnic University,30 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Wakimoto, Yuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University,1-1 Minami-ohsawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2016-11-10

    Motivated by a class of flux compactifications of type IIA strings on rigid Calabi-Yau manifolds, preserving N=2 local supersymmetry in four dimensions, we derive a non-perturbative potential of all scalar fields from the exact D-instanton corrected metric on the hypermultiplet moduli space. Applying this potential to moduli stabilization, we find a discrete set of exact vacua for axions. At these critical points, the stability problem is decoupled into two subspaces spanned by the axions and the other fields (dilaton and Kähler moduli), respectively. Whereas the stability of the axions is easily achieved, numerical analysis shows instabilities in the second subspace.

  20. Dark matter and electroweak phase transition in the mixed scalar dark matter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuewen; Bian, Ligong

    2018-03-01

    We study the electroweak phase transition in the framework of the scalar singlet-doublet mixed dark matter model, in which the particle dark matter candidate is the lightest neutral Higgs that comprises the C P -even component of the inert doublet and a singlet scalar. The dark matter can be dominated by the inert doublet or singlet scalar depending on the mixing. We present several benchmark models to investigate the two situations after imposing several theoretical and experimental constraints. An additional singlet scalar and the inert doublet drive the electroweak phase transition to be strongly first order. A strong first-order electroweak phase transition and a viable dark matter candidate can be accomplished in two benchmark models simultaneously, for which a proper mass splitting among the neutral and charged Higgs masses is needed.

  1. Microscopic universality of complex matrix model correlation functions at weak non-Hermiticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akemann, G.

    2002-01-01

    The microscopic correlation functions of non-chiral random matrix models with complex eigenvalues are analyzed for a wide class of non-Gaussian measures. In the large-N limit of weak non-Hermiticity, where N is the size of the complex matrices, we can prove that all k-point correlation functions including an arbitrary number of Dirac mass terms are universal close to the origin. To this aim we establish the universality of the asymptotics of orthogonal polynomials in the complex plane. The universality of the correlation functions then follows from that of the kernel of orthogonal polynomials and a mapping of massive to massless correlators

  2. The Effective Hamiltonian in the Scalar Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dineykhan, M D; Zhaugasheva, S A; Sakhyev, S K

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of an investigation of the asymptotic behaviour of the polarization loop for the scalar particles in the external electromagnetic field the relativistic corrections to the Hamiltonian are determined. The constituent mass of the particles in the bound state is analytically derived. It is shown that the constituent mass of the particles differs from the mass of the particles in the free state. The corrections connected with the Thomas precession have been calculated.

  3. Scalar potential from de Sitter brane in 5D and effective cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masato

    2004-01-01

    We derive the scalar potential in zero mode effective action arising from a de Sitter brane embedded in five dimensions with bulk cosmological constant Λ. The scalar potential for a scalar field canonically normalized is given by the sum of exponential potentials. In the case of Λ = 0 and Λ > 0, we point out that the scalar potential has an unstable maximum at the origin and exponentially vanishes for large positive scalar field. In the case of Λ < 0, the scalar potential has an unstable maximum at the origin and a local minimum. It is shown that the positive cosmological constant in dS brane is reduced by negative potential energy of scalar at minimum and that effective cosmological constant depends on a dimensionless quantity. Furthermore, we discuss the fate of our universe including the potential energy of the scalar. (author)

  4. Goldstone pion and other mesons using a scalar confining interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, F.; Milana, J.

    1994-01-01

    A covariant wave equation for q bar q interactions with an interaction kernel composed of the sum of constant vector and linear scalar confining interactions is solved for states with two quarks with identical mass. The model includes an NJL-like mechanism which links the dynamical breaking of chiral symmetry to the spontaneous generation of quark mass and the appearance of a low mass Goldstone pion. A novel feature of this approach is that it automatically explains the small mass of the pion even though the linear potential is a scalar interaction in Dirac space, and hence breaks chiral symmetry. Solutions for mesons composed of light quarks (π,ρ, and low lying excited states) and heavy quarks (ρ c , J/Ψ, and low lying excited states) are presented and discussed

  5. CMB scale dependent non-Gaussianity from massive gravity during inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domènech, Guillem; Hiramatsu, Takashi; Lin, Chunshan; Sasaki, Misao [Center for Gravitational Physics, Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Shiraishi, Maresuke [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Chiba, 277-8583 (Japan); Wang, Yi, E-mail: guillem.domenech@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: hiramatz@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: chunshan.lin@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: shiraishi-m@t.kagawa-nct.ac.jp, E-mail: phyw@ust.hk [Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2017-05-01

    We consider a cosmological model in which the tensor mode becomes massive during inflation, and study the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization bispectra arising from the mixing between the scalar mode and the massive tensor mode during inflation. The model assumes the existence of a preferred spatial frame during inflation. The local Lorentz invariance is already broken in cosmology due to the existence of a preferred rest frame. The existence of a preferred spatial frame further breaks the remaining local SO(3) invariance and in particular gives rise to a mass in the tensor mode. At linear perturbation level, we minimize our model so that the vector mode remains non-dynamical, while the scalar mode is the same as the one in single-field slow-roll inflation. At non-linear perturbation level, this inflationary massive graviton phase leads to a sizeable scalar-scalar-tensor coupling, much greater than the scalar-scalar-scalar one, as opposed to the conventional case. This scalar-scalar-tensor interaction imprints a scale dependent feature in the CMB temperature and polarization bispectra. Very intriguingly, we find a surprizing similarity between the predicted scale dependence and the scale-dependent non-Gaussianities at low multipoles hinted in the WMAP and Planck results.

  6. Search for scalar quarks in $e^{+}e^{-}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; Bruneliere, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocme, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, J.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Paneque, D.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Barklow, T.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.J.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J.M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.C.; Machefert, F.; Rouge, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R.D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S.A.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; White, R.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Clarke, D.P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Holldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Muller, A.S.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Loomis, C.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.J.; de Vivie de Regie, J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M.G.; Jones, L.T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P.N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-01-01

    Search for Scalar Quarks in e+e- Collisions at sqrt(s) up to 209 GeV Searches for scalar top, scalar bottom and mass-degenerate scalar quarks are performed in the data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies up to 209 GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 675 pb-1. No evidence for the production of such particles is found in the decay channels stop->c/u chi, stop->b l snu, sbottom-> b chi, squark-> q chi or in the stop four-body decay channel stop-> b chi f f' studied for the first time at LEP. The results of these searches yield improved mass lower limits. In particular, an absolute lower limit of 63GeV/c2 is obtained for the stop mass, at 95% confidence level, irrespective of stop lifetime and decay branching ratios.

  7. Collapsing spherical star in Scalar-Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity with a quadratic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Soumya

    2018-04-01

    We study the evolution of a self interacting scalar field in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theory in four dimension where the scalar field couples non minimally with the Gauss-Bonnet term. Considering a polynomial coupling of the scalar field with the Gauss-Bonnet term, a self-interaction potential and an additional perfect fluid distribution alongwith the scalar field, we investigate different possibilities regarding the outcome of the collapsing scalar field. The strength of the coupling and choice of the self-interaction potential serves as the pivotal initial conditions of the models presented. The high degree of non-linearity in the equation system is taken care off by using a method of invertibe point transformation of anharmonic oscillator equation, which has proven itself very useful in recent past while investigating dynamics of minimally coupled scalar fields.

  8. Astrophysical constraints on scalar field models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolami, O.; Paramos, J.

    2005-01-01

    We use stellar structure dynamics arguments to extract bounds on the relevant parameters of two scalar field models: the putative scalar field mediator of a fifth force with a Yukawa potential and the new variable mass particle models. We also analyze the impact of a constant solar inbound acceleration, such as the one reported by the Pioneer anomaly, on stellar astrophysics. We consider the polytropic gas model to estimate the effect of these models on the hydrostatic equilibrium equation and fundamental quantities such as the central temperature. The current bound on the solar luminosity is used to constrain the relevant parameters of each model

  9. Light stop mass limits from Higgs rate measurements in the MSSM: is MSSM electroweak baryogenesis still alive after all?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebler, Stefan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY),Notkestraße 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim [Department of Physics and Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics (SCIPP),University of California Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2016-04-22

    We investigate the implications of the Higgs rate measurements from Run 1 of the LHC for the mass of the light scalar top partner (stop) in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We focus on light stop masses, and we decouple the second, heavy stop and the gluino to the multi-TeV range in order to obtain a Higgs mass of ∼125 GeV. We derive lower mass limits for the light stop within various scenarios, taking into account the effects of a possibly light scalar tau partner (stau) or chargino on the Higgs rates, of additional Higgs decays to undetectable “new physics”, as well as of non-decoupling of the heavy Higgs sector. Under conservative assumptions, the stop can be as light as 123 GeV. Relaxing certain theoretical and experimental constraints, such as vacuum stability and model-dependent bounds on sparticle masses from LEP, we find that the light stop mass can be as light as 116 GeV. Our indirect limits are complementary to direct limits on the light stop mass from collider searches and have important implications for electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM as a possible explanation for the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe.

  10. Light stop mass limits from Higgs rate measurements in the MSSM. Is MSSM electroweak baryogenesis still alive after all?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebler, Stefan [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim [California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; California Univ., Santa Cruz, CA (United States). Santa Cruz Inst. for Particle Physics (SCIPP)

    2015-12-15

    We investigate the implications of the Higgs rate measurements from Run 1 of the LHC for the mass of the light scalar top partner (stop) in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We focus on light stop masses, and we decouple the second, heavy stop and the gluino to the multi-TeV range in order to obtain a Higgs mass of ∝125 GeV. We derive lower mass limits for the light stop within various scenarios, taking into account the effects of a possibly light scalar tau partner (stau) or chargino on the Higgs rates, of additional Higgs decays to undetectable new physics, as well as of non-decoupling of the heavy Higgs sector. Under conservative assumptions, the stop can be as light as 123 GeV. Relaxing certain theoretical and experimental constraints, such as vacuum stability and model-dependent bounds on sparticle masses from LEP, we find that the light stop mass can be as light as 116 GeV. Our indirect limits are complementary to direct limits on the light stop mass from collider searches and have important implications for electroweak baryogenesis in the MSSM as a possible explanation for the observed matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe.

  11. Gravitational mass in an expanding universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannan, S.

    1986-01-01

    A test for the Hawking definition of mass is given in a Tolman--Bondi model that asymptotically approaches the open Friedmann universe. An expanding universe filled with dustlike matter of zero pressure is considered. The matter distribution is spherically symmetric but nonhomogeneous. With appropriate boundary conditions, the calculation yields a finite and nonzero value for the Hawking mass, measured as a deviation from a ''renormalized'' zero mass in the unperturbed Friedmann model. These boundary conditions are more restrictive than those found for a model with gravitational radiation

  12. A uniqueness criterion for the Fock quantization of scalar fields with time-dependent mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortez, Jeronimo; Mena Marugan, Guillermo A; Olmedo, Javier; Velhinho, Jose M

    2011-01-01

    A major problem in the quantization of fields in curved spacetimes is the ambiguity in the choice of a Fock representation for the canonical commutation relations. There exists infinite number of choices leading to different physical predictions. In stationary scenarios, a common strategy is to select a vacuum (or a family of unitarily equivalent vacua) by requiring invariance under the spacetime symmetries. When stationarity is lost, a natural generalization consists in replacing time invariance by unitarity in the evolution. We prove that when the spatial sections are compact, the criterion of a unitary dynamics, together with the invariance under the spatial isometries, suffices to select a unique family of Fock quantizations for a scalar field with time-dependent mass. (fast track communication)

  13. Constraining extended scalar sectors at the LHC and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilnicka, Agnieszka; Robens, Tania; Stefaniak, Tim

    2018-04-01

    We give a brief overview of beyond the Standard Model (BSM) theories with an extended scalar sector and their phenomenological status in the light of recent experimental results. We discuss the relevant theoretical and experimental constraints, and show their impact on the allowed parameter space of two specific models: the real scalar singlet extension of the Standard Model (SM) and the Inert Doublet Model. We emphasize the importance of the LHC measurements, both the direct searches for additional scalar bosons, as well as the precise measurements of properties of the Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV. We show the complementarity of these measurements to electroweak and dark matter observables.

  14. Event horizon and scalar potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duruisseau, J.P.; Tonnelat, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The introduction of a scalar potential with a more general scheme than General Relativity eliminates the event horizon. Among possible solutions, the Schwarzschild one represents a singular case. A study of the geodesic properties of the matching with an approximated interior solution are given. A new definition of the gravitational mass and chi function is deduced. (author)

  15. Phenomenology of U(1){sub F} extension of inert-doublet model with exotic scalars and leptons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhargyal, Lobsang [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, HBNI, Allahabad (India)

    2018-02-15

    In this work we will extend the inert-doublet model (IDM) by adding a new U(1){sub F} gauge symmetry to it, under which, a Z{sub 2} even scalar (φ{sub 2}) and Z{sub 2} odd right handed component of two exotic charged leptons (F{sub eR}, F{sub μR}), are charged. We also add one Z{sub 2} even real scalar (φ{sub 1}) and one complex scalar (φ), three neutral Majorana right handed fermions (N{sub 1}, N{sub 2}, N{sub 3}), two left handed components of the exotic charged leptons (F{sub eL}, F{sub μL}) as well as F{sub τ} are all odd under the Z{sub 2}, all of which are not charged under the U(1){sub F}. With these new particles added to the IDM, we have a model which can give two scalar DM candidates, together they can explain the present DM relic density as well as the muon (g-2) anomaly simultaneously. Also in this model the neutrino masses are generated at one loop level. One of the most peculiar feature of this model is that non-trivial solution to the axial gauge anomaly free conditions lead to the prediction of a stable very heavy partner to the electron (F{sub e}), whose present collider limit (13 TeV LHC) on its mass should be around m{sub F{sub e}} ≥ few TeV. (orig.)

  16. Constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio for non-power-law models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vázquez, J. Alberto; Bridges, M.; Ma, Yin-Zhe; Hobson, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent cosmological observations hint at a deviation from the simple power-law form of the primordial spectrum of curvature perturbations. In this paper we show that in the presence of a tensor component, a turn-over in the initial spectrum is preferred by current observations, and hence non-power-law models ought to be considered. For instance, for a power-law parameterisation with both a tensor component and running parameter, current data show a preference for a negative running at more than 2.5σ C.L. As a consequence of this deviation from a power-law, constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r are slightly broader. We also present constraints on the inflationary parameters for a model-independent reconstruction and the Lasenby and Doran (LD) model. In particular, the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio from the LD model are: r LD = 0.11±0.024. In addition to current data, we show expected constraints from Planck-like and CMB-Pol sensitivity experiments by using Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo sampling chains. For all the models, we have included the Bayesian Evidence to perform a model selection analysis. The Bayes factor, using current observations, shows a strong preference for the LD model over the standard power-law parameterisation, and provides an insight into the accuracy of differentiating models through future surveys

  17. Status of the scalar singlet dark matter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athron, Peter; Balázs, Csaba; Bringmann, Torsten; Buckley, Andy; Chrząszcz, Marcin; Conrad, Jan; Cornell, Jonathan M.; Dal, Lars A.; Edsjö, Joakim; Farmer, Ben; Jackson, Paul; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Krislock, Abram; Kvellestad, Anders; McKay, James; Mahmoudi, Farvah; Martinez, Gregory D.; Putze, Antje; Raklev, Are; Rogan, Christopher; Saavedra, Aldo; Savage, Christopher; Scott, Pat; Serra, Nicola; Weniger, Christoph; White, Martin

    2017-08-01

    One of the simplest viable models for dark matter is an additional neutral scalar, stabilised by a Z_2 symmetry. Using the GAMBIT package and combining results from four independent samplers, we present Bayesian and frequentist global fits of this model. We vary the singlet mass and coupling along with 13 nuisance parameters, including nuclear uncertainties relevant for direct detection, the local dark matter density, and selected quark masses and couplings. We include the dark matter relic density measured by Planck, direct searches with LUX, PandaX, SuperCDMS and XENON100, limits on invisible Higgs decays from the Large Hadron Collider, searches for high-energy neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun with IceCube, and searches for gamma rays from annihilation in dwarf galaxies with the Fermi-LAT. Viable solutions remain at couplings of order unity, for singlet masses between the Higgs mass and about 300 GeV, and at masses above ˜ 1 TeV. Only in the latter case can the scalar singlet constitute all of dark matter. Frequentist analysis shows that the low-mass resonance region, where the singlet is about half the mass of the Higgs, can also account for all of dark matter, and remains viable. However, Bayesian considerations show this region to be rather fine-tuned.

  18. Scalar-metric and scalar-metric-torsion gravitational theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldersley, S.J.

    1977-01-01

    The techniques of dimensional analysis and of the theory of tensorial concomitants are employed to study field equations in gravitational theories which incorporate scalar fields of the Brans-Dicke type. Within the context of scalar-metric gravitational theories, a uniqueness theorem for the geometric (or gravitational) part of the field equations is proven and a Lagrangian is determined which is uniquely specified by dimensional analysis. Within the context of scalar-metric-torsion gravitational theories a uniqueness theorem for field Lagrangians is presented and the corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are given. Finally, an example of a scalar-metric-torsion theory is presented which is similar in many respects to the Brans-Dicke theory and the Einstein-Cartan theory

  19. Manifestations of quantum gravity in scalar QED phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S.D.; Romeo, A.

    1995-01-01

    Quantum gravitational corrections to the effective potential, at the one-loop level and in the leading-log approximation, for scalar quantum electrodynamics with higher-derivative gravity, which is taken as an effective theory for quantum gravity (QG), are calculated. We point out the appearance of relevant phenomena caused by quantum gravity, such as dimensional transmutation, QG-driven instabilities of the potential, QG corrections to scalar-to-vector mass ratios, and curvature-induced phase transitions, whose existence is shown by means of analytical and numerical study

  20. Are particle rest masses variable: Theory and constraints from solar system experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekenstein, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Particle rest mass variation in spacetime is considered. According to Dicke, if this is the case various null experiments indicate that all masses vary in the same way. Their variation relative to the Planck-Wheeler mass defines a universal scalar rest-mass field. We construct the relativistic dynamics for this field based on very general assumptions. In addition, we assume Einstein's equations to be valid in Planck-Wheeler units. A special case of the theory coincides with Dicke's reformulation of Brans-Dicke theory as general relativity with variable rest masses. In the general case the rest-mass field is some power r of a scalar field which obeys an ordinary scalar equation with coupling to the curvature of strength q. The r and q are the only parameters of the theory. Comparison with experiment is facilitated by recasting the theory into units in which rest masses are constant, the Planck-Wheeler mass varies, and the metric satisfies the equations of a small subset of the scalar-tensor theories of gravitation. The results of solar system experiments, usually used to test general relativity, are here used to delimit the acceptable values of r and q. We conclude that if cosmological considerations are not invoked, then the solar system experiments do not rule out the possibility of rest-mass variability. That is, there are theories which agree with all null and solar system experiments, and yet contradict the strong equivalence principle by allowing rest masses to vary relative to the Planck-Wheeler mass. We show that the field theory of the rest-mass field can be quantized and interpreted in terms of massless scalar quanta which interact very weakly with matter. This explains why they have not turned up in high-energy experiments. In future reports we shall investigate the implications of various cosmological and astrophysical data for the theory of variable rest masses. The ultimate goal is a firm decision on whether rest masses vary or not

  1. Rotation curves of high-resolution LSB and SPARC galaxies with fuzzy and multistate (ultralight boson) scalar field dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, T.; Fernández-Hernández, L. M.; Matos, T.; Rodríguez-Meza, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    Cold dark matter (CDM) has shown to be an excellent candidate for the dark matter (DM) of the Universe at large scales; however, it presents some challenges at the galactic level. The scalar field dark matter (SFDM), also called fuzzy, wave, Bose-Einstein condensate, or ultralight axion DM, is identical to CDM at cosmological scales but different at the galactic ones. SFDM forms core haloes, it has a natural cut-off in its matter power spectrum, and it predicts well-formed galaxies at high redshifts. In this work we reproduce the rotation curves of high-resolution low surface brightness (LSB) and SPARC galaxies with two SFDM profiles: (1) the soliton+NFW profile in the fuzzy DM (FDM) model, arising empirically from cosmological simulations of real, non-interacting scalar field (SF) at zero temperature, and (2) the multistate SFDM (mSFDM) profile, an exact solution to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon equations for a real, self-interacting SF, with finite temperature into the SF potential, introducing several quantum states as a realistic model for an SFDM halo. From the fits with the soliton+NFW profile, we obtained for the boson mass 0.212 motivated framework additional or alternative to the FDM profile.

  2. Static Universe model existing due to the matter-dark energy coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabo Bizet, A.; Cabo Montes de Oca, A.

    2007-08-01

    The work investigates a static, isotropic and almost homogeneous Universe containing a real scalar field modeling the Dark-Energy (quintaessence) interacting with pressureless matter. It is argued that the interaction between matter and the Dark Energy, is essential for the very existence of the considered solution. Assuming the possibility that Dark-Energy can be furnished by the Dilaton (a scalar field reflecting the condensation of string states with zero angular momentum) we fix the value of scalar field at the origin to the Planck scale. It became possible to fix the ratio of the amount of Dark Energy to matter energy, in the currently estimated value (0.7)/0.3 and also the observed magnitude of the Hubble constant. The small value of the mass for the scalar field chosen for fixing the above ratio and Hubble effect strength, results to be of the order of 10 -29 cm -1 , a small value which seems to be compatible with the zero mass of the Dilaton in the lowest approximations. (author)

  3. Preheating the universe in hybrid inflation

    CERN Document Server

    García-Bellido, J

    1998-01-01

    One of the fundamental problems of modern cosmology is to explain the origin of all the matter and radiation in the Universe today. The inflationary model predicts that the oscillations of the scalar field at the end of inflation will convert the coherent energy density of the inflaton into a large number of particles, responsible for the present entropy of the Universe. The transition from the inflationary era to the radiation era was originally called reheating, and we now understand that it may consist of three different stages: preheating, in which the homogeneous inflaton field decays coherently into bosonic waves (scalars and/or vectors) with large occupation numbers; backreaction and rescattering, in which different energy bands get mixed; and finally decoherence and thermalization, in which those waves break up into particles that thermalize and acquire a black body spectrum at a certain temperature. These three stages are non-perturbative, non-linear and out of equilibrium, and we are just beginning ...

  4. Scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect with longitudinally polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allman, B. E.; Lee, W.-T.; Motrunich, O. I.; Werner, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    In the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect, a charged particle (electron) interacts with the scalar electrostatic potential U in the field-free (i.e., force-free) region inside an electrostatic cylinder (Faraday cage). Using a perfect single-crystal neutron interferometer we have performed a ''dual'' scalar Aharonov-Bohm experiment by subjecting polarized thermal neutrons to a pulsed magnetic field. The pulsed magnetic field was spatially uniform, precluding any force on the neutrons. Aligning the direction of the pulsed magnetic field to the neutron magnetic moment also rules out any classical torque acting to change the neutron polarization. The observed phase shift is purely quantum mechanical in origin. A detailed description of the experiment, performed at the University of Missouri Research Reactor, and its interpretation is given in this paper. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  5. Cosmological D-instantons and cyclic universes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergshoeff, E A; Collinucci, A; Roest, D; Russo, J G; Townsend, P K

    2005-01-01

    For models of gravity coupled to hyperbolic sigma models, such as the metric-scalar sector of IIB supergravity, we show how smooth trajectories in the 'augmented target space' connect FLRW cosmologies to non-extremal D-instantons through a cosmological singularity. In particular, we find closed cyclic universes that undergo an endless sequence of big-bang to big-crunch cycles separated by instanton 'phases'. We also find 'big-bounce' universes in which a collapsing closed universe bounces off its cosmological singularity to become an open expanding universe

  6. Charged black holes with scalar hair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying; Lü, H. [Center for Advanced Quantum Studies, Department of Physics,Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2015-09-10

    We consider a class of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton theories, in which the dilaton coupling to the Maxwell field is not the usual single exponential function, but one with a stationary point. The theories admit two charged black holes: one is the Reissner-Nordstrøm (RN) black hole and the other has a varying dilaton. For a given charge, the new black hole in the extremal limit has the same AdS{sub 2}×Sphere near-horizon geometry as the RN black hole, but it carries larger mass. We then introduce some scalar potentials and obtain exact charged AdS black holes. We also generalize the results to black p-branes with scalar hair.

  7. Quasinormal modes of the BTZ black hole under scalar perturbations with a non-minimal coupling: exact spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panotopoulos, Grigoris

    2018-06-01

    We perturb the non-rotating BTZ black hole with a non-minimally coupled massless scalar field, and we compute the quasinormal spectrum exactly. We solve the radial equation in terms of hypergeometric functions, and we obtain an analytical expression for the quasinormal frequencies. In addition, we compare our analytical results with the 6th order semi-analytical WKB method, and we find an excellent agreement. The impact of the nonminimal coupling as well as of the cosmological constant on the quasinormal spectrum is briefly discussed.

  8. Direct Searches for Scalar Leptoquarks at the Run II Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Daniel Edward [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2004-08-01

    This dissertation sets new limits on the mass of the scalar leptoquark from direct searches carried out at the Run II CDF detector using data from March 2001 to October 2003. The data analyzed has a total time-integrated measured luminosity of 198 pb-1 of p$\\bar{p}$ collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV. Leptoquarks are assumed to be pair-produced and to decay into a lepton and a quark of the same generation. They consider two possible leptoquark decays: (1) β = BR(LQ → μq) = 1.0, and (2) β = BR(LQ → μq) = 0.5. For the β = 1 channel, they focus on the signature represented by two isolated high-pT muons and two isolated high-pT jets. For the β = 1/2 channel, they focus on the signature represented by one isolated high-pT muon, large missing transverse energy, and two isolated high-pT jets. No leptoquark signal is experimentally detected for either signature. Using the next to leading order theoretical cross section for scalar leptoquark production in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions [1], they set new mass limits on second generation scalar leptoquarks. They exclude the existence of second generation scalar leptoquarks with masses below 221(175) GeV/c2 for the β = 1(1/2) channels.

  9. Generating scale-invariant tensor perturbations in the non-inflationary universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Mingzhe

    2014-01-01

    It is believed that the recent detection of large tensor perturbations strongly favors the inflation scenario in the early universe. This common sense depends on the assumption that Einstein's general relativity is valid at the early universe. In this paper we show that nearly scale-invariant primordial tensor perturbations can be generated during a contracting phase before the radiation dominated epoch if the theory of gravity is modified by the scalar–tensor theory at that time. The scale-invariance protects the tensor perturbations from suppressing at large scales and they may have significant amplitudes to fit BICEP2's result. We construct a model to achieve this purpose and show that the universe can bounce to the hot big bang after long time contraction, and at almost the same time the theory of gravity approaches to general relativity through stabilizing the scalar field. Theoretically, such models are dual to inflation models if we change to the frame in which the theory of gravity is general relativity. Dual models are related by the conformal transformations. With this study we reinforce the point that only the conformal invariant quantities such as the scalar and tensor perturbations are physical. How did the background evolve before the radiation time depends on the frame and has no physical meaning. It is impossible to distinguish different pictures by later time cosmological probes.

  10. Generating scale-invariant tensor perturbations in the non-inflationary universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhe Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is believed that the recent detection of large tensor perturbations strongly favors the inflation scenario in the early universe. This common sense depends on the assumption that Einstein's general relativity is valid at the early universe. In this paper we show that nearly scale-invariant primordial tensor perturbations can be generated during a contracting phase before the radiation dominated epoch if the theory of gravity is modified by the scalar–tensor theory at that time. The scale-invariance protects the tensor perturbations from suppressing at large scales and they may have significant amplitudes to fit BICEP2's result. We construct a model to achieve this purpose and show that the universe can bounce to the hot big bang after long time contraction, and at almost the same time the theory of gravity approaches to general relativity through stabilizing the scalar field. Theoretically, such models are dual to inflation models if we change to the frame in which the theory of gravity is general relativity. Dual models are related by the conformal transformations. With this study we reinforce the point that only the conformal invariant quantities such as the scalar and tensor perturbations are physical. How did the background evolve before the radiation time depends on the frame and has no physical meaning. It is impossible to distinguish different pictures by later time cosmological probes.

  11. Bianchi type-I model with conformally invariant scalar and electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accioly, A.J.; Vaidya, A.N.; Som, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    A Bianchi type-I exact solution of the Einstein theory representing the homogeneous anisotropic models with the electromagnetic field and the conformally invariant scalar field is studied. The solution contains Kasner model, pure electromagnetic and pure scalar models as special cases. It is found that the models evolve from an initial Kasner type to a final open Friedmann type universe. (Author) [pt

  12. Energy levels of a scalar particle in a static gravitational field close to the black hole limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossel, G. H.; Berengut, J. C.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2011-10-01

    The bound-state energy levels of a scalar particle in the gravitational field of finite-sized objects with interiors described by the Florides and Schwarzschild metrics are found. For these metrics, bound states with zero energy (where the binding energy is equal to the rest mass of the scalar particle) only exist when a singularity occurs in the metric. Therefore, in contrast to the Coulomb case, no pairs are produced in the non-singular static metric. For the Florides metric the singularity occurs in the black hole limit, while for the Schwarzschild interior metric it corresponds to infinite pressure at the center. Moreover, the energy spectrum is shown to become quasi-continuous as the metric becomes singular.

  13. Scalar, Axial, and Tensor Interactions of Light Nuclei from Lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Emmanuel; Davoudi, Zohreh; Detmold, William; Gambhir, Arjun S.; Orginos, Kostas; Savage, Martin J.; Shanahan, Phiala E.; Wagman, Michael L.; Winter, Frank; Nplqcd Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    Complete flavor decompositions of the matrix elements of the scalar, axial, and tensor currents in the proton, deuteron, diproton, and 3He at SU(3)-symmetric values of the quark masses corresponding to a pion mass mπ˜806 MeV are determined using lattice quantum chromodynamics. At the physical quark masses, the scalar interactions constrain mean-field models of nuclei and the low-energy interactions of nuclei with potential dark matter candidates. The axial and tensor interactions of nuclei constrain their spin content, integrated transversity, and the quark contributions to their electric dipole moments. External fields are used to directly access the quark-line connected matrix elements of quark bilinear operators, and a combination of stochastic estimation techniques is used to determine the disconnected sea-quark contributions. The calculated matrix elements differ from, and are typically smaller than, naive single-nucleon estimates. Given the particularly large, O (10 %), size of nuclear effects in the scalar matrix elements, contributions from correlated multinucleon effects should be quantified in the analysis of dark matter direct-detection experiments using nuclear targets.

  14. Gravitino and scalar {tau}-lepton decays in supersymmetric models with broken R-parity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajer, Jan

    2010-06-15

    Mildly broken R-parity is known to provide a solution to the cosmological gravitino problem in supergravity extensions of the Standard Model. In this work we consider new effects occurring in the R-parity breaking Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model including right-handed neutrino superfields. We calculate the most general vacuum expectation values of neutral scalar fields including left- and right-handed scalar neutrinos. Additionally, we derive the corresponding mass mixing matrices of the scalar sector. We recalculate the neutrino mass generation mechanisms due to right- handed neutrinos as well as by cause of R-parity breaking. Furthermore, we obtain a, so far, unknown formula for the neutrino masses for the case where both mechanisms are effective. We then constrain the couplings to bilinear R-parity violating couplings in order to accommodate R-parity breaking to experimental results. In order to constrain the family structure with a U(1){sub Q} flavor symmetry we furthermore embed the particle content into an SU(5) Grand Unified Theory. In this model we calculate the signal of decaying gravitino dark matter as well as the dominant decay channel of a likely NLSP, the scalar {tau}-lepton. Comparing the gravitino signal with results of the Fermi Large Area Telescope enables us to find a lower bound on the decay length of scalar {tau}-leptons in collider experiments. (orig.)

  15. Gravitino and scalar τ-lepton decays in supersymmetric models with broken R-parity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajer, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Mildly broken R-parity is known to provide a solution to the cosmological gravitino problem in supergravity extensions of the Standard Model. In this work we consider new effects occurring in the R-parity breaking Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model including right-handed neutrino superfields. We calculate the most general vacuum expectation values of neutral scalar fields including left- and right-handed scalar neutrinos. Additionally, we derive the corresponding mass mixing matrices of the scalar sector. We recalculate the neutrino mass generation mechanisms due to right- handed neutrinos as well as by cause of R-parity breaking. Furthermore, we obtain a, so far, unknown formula for the neutrino masses for the case where both mechanisms are effective. We then constrain the couplings to bilinear R-parity violating couplings in order to accommodate R-parity breaking to experimental results. In order to constrain the family structure with a U(1) Q flavor symmetry we furthermore embed the particle content into an SU(5) Grand Unified Theory. In this model we calculate the signal of decaying gravitino dark matter as well as the dominant decay channel of a likely NLSP, the scalar τ-lepton. Comparing the gravitino signal with results of the Fermi Large Area Telescope enables us to find a lower bound on the decay length of scalar τ-leptons in collider experiments. (orig.)

  16. THE NON-UNIVERSALITY OF THE LOW-MASS END OF THE IMF IS ROBUST AGAINST THE CHOICE OF SSP MODEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiniello, C.; Trager, S. C.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2015-01-01

    We perform a direct comparison of two state-of-the art single stellar population (SSP) models that have been used to demonstrate the non-universality of the low-mass end of the initial mass function (IMF) slope. The two public versions of the SSP models are restricted to either solar abundance patterns or solar metallicity, too restrictive if one aims to disentangle elemental enhancements, metallicity changes, and IMF variations in massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) with star formation histories different from those in the solar neighborhood. We define response functions (to metallicity and α-abundance) to extend the parameter space for each set of models. We compare these extended models with a sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) ETG spectra with varying velocity dispersions. We measure equivalent widths of optical IMF-sensitive stellar features to examine the effect of the underlying model assumptions and ingredients, such as stellar libraries or isochrones, on the inference of the IMF slope down to ∼0.1 M ⊙ . We demonstrate that the steepening of the low-mass end of the IMF based on a non-degenerate set of spectroscopic optical indicators is robust against the choice of the stellar population model. Although the models agree in a relative sense (i.e., both imply more bottom-heavy IMFs for more massive systems), we find non-negligible differences in the absolute values of the IMF slope inferred at each velocity dispersion by using the two different models. In particular, we find large inconsistencies in the quantitative predictions of the IMF slope variations and abundance patterns when sodium lines are used. We investigate the possible reasons for these inconsistencies

  17. THE NON-UNIVERSALITY OF THE LOW-MASS END OF THE IMF IS ROBUST AGAINST THE CHOICE OF SSP MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiniello, C. [Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-8l740 Garching (Germany); Trager, S. C.; Koopmans, L. V. E. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands)

    2015-04-20

    We perform a direct comparison of two state-of-the art single stellar population (SSP) models that have been used to demonstrate the non-universality of the low-mass end of the initial mass function (IMF) slope. The two public versions of the SSP models are restricted to either solar abundance patterns or solar metallicity, too restrictive if one aims to disentangle elemental enhancements, metallicity changes, and IMF variations in massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) with star formation histories different from those in the solar neighborhood. We define response functions (to metallicity and α-abundance) to extend the parameter space for each set of models. We compare these extended models with a sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) ETG spectra with varying velocity dispersions. We measure equivalent widths of optical IMF-sensitive stellar features to examine the effect of the underlying model assumptions and ingredients, such as stellar libraries or isochrones, on the inference of the IMF slope down to ∼0.1 M{sub ⊙}. We demonstrate that the steepening of the low-mass end of the IMF based on a non-degenerate set of spectroscopic optical indicators is robust against the choice of the stellar population model. Although the models agree in a relative sense (i.e., both imply more bottom-heavy IMFs for more massive systems), we find non-negligible differences in the absolute values of the IMF slope inferred at each velocity dispersion by using the two different models. In particular, we find large inconsistencies in the quantitative predictions of the IMF slope variations and abundance patterns when sodium lines are used. We investigate the possible reasons for these inconsistencies.

  18. Meson and baryon families as vibronic states in sl(2) quantum universal enveloping algebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwao, Syurei; Ono, Yasuji

    1990-01-01

    A mass formula of the q-deformed modified harmonic oscillator type in the sl(2) quantum universal enveloping algebra is proposed for the meson and baryon families, by taking into account the known theories as a guide. Specifying the vibronic quantum number, the deformation parameter and associated ones of the theory are determined from available data for the scalar, pseudoscalar, vector meson and baryon families. The parameters determined from totally ten families not only predict many unobserved states, but also give restrictions on the observable number of states. The method may admit taking into account non-perturbative effects. (author)

  19. Analytical study of a Kerr-Sen black hole and a charged massive scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Canisius

    2017-11-01

    It is reported that Kerr-Newman and Kerr-Sen black holes are unstable to perturbations of charged massive scalar field. In this paper, we study analytically the complex frequencies which characterize charged massive scalar fields in a near-extremal Kerr-Sen black hole. For near-extremal Kerr-Sen black holes and for charged massive scalar fields in the eikonal large-mass M ≫μ regime, where M is the mass of the black hole, and μ is the mass of the charged scalar field, we have obtained a simple expression for the dimensionless ratio ωI/(ωR-ωc) , where ωI and ωR are, respectively, the imaginary and real parts of the frequency of the modes, and ωc is the critical frequency for the onset of super-radiance. We have also found our expression is consistent with the result of Hod [Phys. Rev. D 94, 044036 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.94.044036] for the case of a near-extremal Kerr-Newman black hole and the result of Zouros and Eardly [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 118, 139 (1979), 10.1016/0003-4916(79)90237-9] for the case of neutral scalar fields in the background of a near-extremal Kerr black hole.

  20. Search for Scalar Diphoton Resonances in the Mass Range $65-600$ GeV with the ATLAS Detector in $pp$ Collision Data at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 $TeV$

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibson, Stephen; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Feng; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; 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Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; 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Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; 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Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-10-20

    A search for scalar particles decaying via narrow resonances into two photons in the mass range $65-600$ GeV is performed using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV $pp$ collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The recently discovered Higgs boson is treated as a background. No significant evidence for an additional signal is observed. The results are presented as limits at the 95 % confidence level on the production cross-section of a scalar boson times branching ratio into two photons, in a fiducial volume where the reconstruction efficiency is approximately independent of the event topology. The upper limits set extend over a considerably wider mass range than previous searches.

  1. Effect of the chameleon scalar field on brane cosmological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisabr, Y.; Ahmadi, F.

    2017-11-01

    We have investigated a brane world model in which the gravitational field in the bulk is described both by a metric tensor and a minimally coupled scalar field. This scalar field is taken to be a chameleon with an appropriate potential function. The scalar field interacts with matter and there is an energy transfer between the two components. We find a late-time asymptotic solution which exhibits late-time accelerating expansion. We also show that the Universe recently crosses the phantom barrier without recourse to any exotic matter. We provide some thermodynamic arguments which constrain both the direction of energy transfer and dynamics of the extra dimension.

  2. Effect of the chameleon scalar field on brane cosmological evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bisabr

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated a brane world model in which the gravitational field in the bulk is described both by a metric tensor and a minimally coupled scalar field. This scalar field is taken to be a chameleon with an appropriate potential function. The scalar field interacts with matter and there is an energy transfer between the two components. We find a late-time asymptotic solution which exhibits late-time accelerating expansion. We also show that the Universe recently crosses the phantom barrier without recourse to any exotic matter. We provide some thermodynamic arguments which constrain both the direction of energy transfer and dynamics of the extra dimension.

  3. Exotic colored scalars at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Kfir; Efrati, Aielet; Frugiuele, Claudia; Nir, Yosef [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, 7610001 (Israel)

    2017-02-21

    We study the phenomenology of exotic color-triplet scalar particles X with charge |Q|=2/3,4/3,5/3,7/3,8/3 and 10/3. If X is an SU(2){sub W}-non-singlet, mass splitting within the multiplet allows for cascade decays of the members into the lightest state. We study examples where the lightest state, in turn, decays into a three-body W{sup ±}jj final state, and show that in such case the entire multiplet is compatible with indirect precision tests and with direct collider searches for continuum pair production of X down to m{sub X}∼250 GeV. However, bound states S, made of XX{sup †} pairs at m{sub S}≈2m{sub X}, form under rather generic conditions and their decay to diphoton can be the first discovery channel of the model. Furthermore, for SU(2){sub W}-non-singlets, the mode S→W{sup +}W{sup −} may be observable and the width of S→γγ and S→jj may appear large as a consequence of mass splittings within the X-multiplet. As an example we study in detail the case of an SU(2){sub W}-quartet, finding that m{sub X}≃450 GeV is allowed by all current searches.

  4. The edge of entanglement: getting the boundary right for non-minimally coupled scalar fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Christopher P. [C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics,Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University,Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Nishioka, Tatsuma [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, The University of Tokyo,Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-12-27

    In entanglement computations for a free scalar field with coupling to background curvature, there is a boundary term in the modular Hamiltonian which must be correctly specified in order to get sensible results. We focus here on the entanglement in flat space across a planar interface and (in the case of conformal coupling) other geometries related to this one by Weyl rescaling of the metric. For these “half-space entanglement” computations, we give a new derivation of the boundary term and revisit how it clears up a number of puzzles in the literature, including mass corrections and twist operator dimensions. We also discuss how related boundary terms may show up in other field theories.

  5. N-body simulations for coupled scalar-field cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Baojiu; Barrow, John D.

    2011-01-01

    We describe in detail the general methodology and numerical implementation of consistent N-body simulations for coupled-scalar-field models, including background cosmology and the generation of initial conditions (with the different couplings to different matter species taken into account). We perform fully consistent simulations for a class of coupled-scalar-field models with an inverse power-law potential and negative coupling constant, for which the chameleon mechanism does not work. We find that in such cosmological models the scalar-field potential plays a negligible role except in the background expansion, and the fifth force that is produced is proportional to gravity in magnitude, justifying the use of a rescaled gravitational constant G in some earlier N-body simulation works for similar models. We then study the effects of the scalar coupling on the nonlinear matter power spectra and compare with linear perturbation calculations to see the agreement and places where the nonlinear treatment deviates from the linear approximation. We also propose an algorithm to identify gravitationally virialized matter halos, trying to take account of the fact that the virialization itself is also modified by the scalar-field coupling. We use the algorithm to measure the mass function and study the properties of dark-matter halos. We find that the net effect of the scalar coupling helps produce more heavy halos in our simulation boxes and suppresses the inner (but not the outer) density profile of halos compared with the ΛCDM prediction, while the suppression weakens as the coupling between the scalar field and dark-matter particles increases in strength.

  6. Self-gravitating static non-critical black holes in 4 D Einstein-Klein-Gordon system with nonminimal derivative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunara, Bobby Eka; Yaqin, Ainol

    2018-06-01

    We study static non-critical hairy black holes of four dimensional gravitational model with nonminimal derivative coupling and a scalar potential turned on. By taking an ansatz, namely, the first derivative of the scalar field is proportional to square root of a metric function, we reduce the Einstein field equation and the scalar field equation of motions into a single highly nonlinear differential equation. This setup implies that the hair is secondary-like since the scalar charge-like depends on the non-constant mass-like quantity in the asymptotic limit. Then, we show that near boundaries the solution is not the critical point of the scalar potential and the effective geometries become spaces of constant scalar curvature.

  7. Interference effects of two scalar boson propagators on the LHC search for the singlet fermion DM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, P., E-mail: pko@kias.re.kr; Li, Jinmian, E-mail: jmli@kias.re.kr

    2017-02-10

    A gauge invariant UV-completion for singlet fermion DM interacting with the standard model (SM) particles involves a new singlet scalar. Therefore the model contains two scalar mediators, mixtures of the SM Higgs boson and a singlet scalar boson. Collider phenomenology of the interference effect between these two scalar propagators is studied in this work. This interference effect can be either constructive or destructive in the DM production cross section depending on both singlet scalar and DM masses, and it will soften the final state jets in the full mass region. Applying the CMS mono-jet search to our model, we find the interference effect plays a very important role in the DM search sensitivity, and the DM production cross section of our model is more than one order of magnitude below the LHC sensitivity at current stage.

  8. Inert doublet dark matter with an additional scalar singlet and 125 GeV Higgs boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta Banik, Amit; Majumdar, Debasish [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Astroparticle Physics and Cosmology Division, Kolkata (India)

    2014-11-15

    In this work we consider a model for particle dark matter where an extra inert Higgs doublet and an additional scalar singlet is added to the Standard Model (SM) Lagrangian. The dark matter candidate is obtained from only the inert doublet. The stability of this one component dark matter is ensured by imposing a Z{sub 2} symmetry on this additional inert doublet. The additional singlet scalar has a vacuum expectation value (VEV) and mixes with the Standard Model Higgs doublet, resulting in two CP even scalars h{sub 1} and h{sub 2}. We treat one of these scalars, h{sub 1}, to be consistent with the SM Higgs-like boson of mass around 125 GeV reported by the LHC experiment. These two CP even scalars contribute to the annihilation cross section of this inert doublet dark matter, resulting in a larger dark matter mass region that satisfies the observed relic density. We also investigate the h{sub 1} → γγ and h{sub 1} → γ Z processes and compared these with LHC results. This is also used to constrain the dark matter parameter space in the present model. We find that the dark matter candidate in the mass region 60-80 GeV (m{sub 1} = 125 GeV, mass of h{sub 1}) satisfies the recent bound from LUX direct detection experiment. (orig.)

  9. Search for the first generation scalar leptoquarks with D0; Recherche de leptoquarks scalaires de premiere generation aupres de D0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cothenet, A

    2004-05-15

    This work was dedicated to the search for pairs of first generation scalar leptoquarks one decaying into ej and the other into {nu}j. The experimental data used (175,6 pb{sup -1}) is that collected during the run-II of the D0 experiment at Tevatron. The production cross-sections of scalar leptoquark pairs has been assessed at a 95% confidence level for different values of the mass. The comparison of these values with theoretical values has led us to state that for a branching ratio {beta} = 0.5 the existence of scalar leptoquarks with a mass lower than 194 GeV is not possible. For a branching ratio {beta} = 1, some scalar leptoquarks with mass < 238 GeV may be excluded while for {beta} = 0.5, some scalar leptoquarks with mass < 213 GeV are excluded.

  10. Wave function of the Universe, preferred reference frame effects and metric signature transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaffarnejad, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational model of non-minimally coupled Brans Dicke (BD) scalar field 0 with dynamical unit time-like four vector field is used to study flat Robertson Walker (RW) cosmology in the presence of variable cosmological parameter V (ϕ) = Λϕ. Aim of the paper is to seek cosmological models which exhibit metric signature transition. The problem is studied in both classical and quantum cosmological approach with large values of BD parameter ω >> 1. Scale factor of RW metric is obtained as which describes nonsingular inflationary universe in Lorentzian signature sector. Euclidean signature sector of our solution describes a re-collapsing universe and is obtained from analytic continuation of the Lorentzian sector by exchanging . Dynamical vector field together with the BD scalar field are treated as fluid with time dependent barotropic index. They have regular (dark) matter dominance in the Euclidean (Lorentzian) sector. We solved Wheeler De Witt (WD) quantum wave equation of the cosmological system. Assuming a discrete non-zero ADM mass we obtained solutions of the WD equation as simple harmonic quantum Oscillator eigen functionals described by Hermite polynomials. Absolute values of these eigen functionals have nonzero values on the hypersurface in which metric field has signature degeneracy. Our eigen functionals describe nonzero probability of the space time with Lorentzian (Euclidean) signature for . Maximal probability corresponds to the ground state j = 0. (paper)

  11. Excluding scalar gluons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, K.; Krasemann, H.

    1979-08-01

    We investigate the Dalitz plot population and thrust angular distribution for the Orthoquarkonium decay Q anti Q → 3 scalar gluons. The Dalitz plot for scalar gluons is populated in corners where events are 2 jet like and this disagrees with existing Upsilon data. The scalar gluon thrust angular distribution is also in striking disagreement with the UPSILON data and so scalar gluons are completely ruled out. (orig.)

  12. Effects of numerical dissipation and unphysical excursions on scalar-mixing estimates in large-eddy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Nek; Matheou, Georgios; Dimotakis, Paul

    2017-11-01

    Artificial numerical dissipation decreases dispersive oscillations and can play a key role in mitigating unphysical scalar excursions in large eddy simulations (LES). Its influence on scalar mixing can be assessed through the resolved-scale scalar, Z , its probability density function (PDF), variance, spectra, and the budget of the horizontally averaged equation for Z2. LES of incompressible temporally evolving shear flow enabled us to study the influence of numerical dissipation on unphysical scalar excursions and mixing estimates. Flows with different mixing behavior, with both marching and non-marching scalar PDFs, are studied. Scalar fields for each flow are compared for different grid resolutions and numerical scalar-convection term schemes. As expected, increasing numerical dissipation enhances scalar mixing in the development stage of shear flow characterized by organized large-scale pairings with a non-marching PDF, but has little influence in the self-similar stage of flows with marching PDFs. Flow parameters and regimes sensitive to numerical dissipation help identify approaches to mitigate unphysical excursions while minimizing dissipation.

  13. On Climbing Scalars in String Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dudas, E; Sagnotti, A

    2010-01-01

    In string models with "brane supersymmetry breaking" exponential potentials emerge at (closed-string) tree level but are not accompanied by tachyons. Potentials of this type have long been a source of embarrassment in flat space, but can have interesting implications for Cosmology. For instance, in ten dimensions the logarithmic slope |V'/V| lies precisely at a "critical" value where the Lucchin--Matarrese attractor disappears while the scalar field is \\emph{forced} to climb up the potential when it emerges from the Big Bang. This type of behavior is in principle perturbative in the string coupling, persists after compactification, could have trapped scalar fields inside potential wells as a result of the cosmological evolution and could have also injected the inflationary phase of our Universe.

  14. Status of the scalar singlet dark matter model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athron, Peter; Balazs, Csaba [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); Bringmann, Torsten; Dal, Lars A.; Krislock, Abram; Raklev, Are [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Oslo (Norway); Buckley, Andy [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Chrzaszcz, Marcin [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Polish Academy of Sciences, H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Conrad, Jan; Edsjoe, Joakim; Farmer, Ben [AlbaNova University Centre, Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Cornell, Jonathan M. [McGill University, Department of Physics, Montreal, QC (Canada); Jackson, Paul; White, Martin [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); University of Adelaide, Department of Physics, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Kahlhoefer, Felix [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Kvellestad, Anders; Savage, Christopher [NORDITA, Stockholm (Sweden); McKay, James; Scott, Pat [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, London (United Kingdom); Mahmoudi, Farvah [Univ. Lyon, Univ. Lyon 1, ENS de Lyon, CNRS, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon UMR5574, Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CERN, Theoretical Physics Department, Geneva (Switzerland); Martinez, Gregory D. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Putze, Antje [LAPTh, Universite de Savoie, CNRS, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Rogan, Christopher [Harvard University, Department of Physics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Saavedra, Aldo [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Tera-scale (Australia); The University of Sydney, Centre for Translational Data Science, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies, School of Physics, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Serra, Nicola [Universitaet Zuerich, Physik-Institut, Zurich (Switzerland); Weniger, Christoph [University of Amsterdam, GRAPPA, Institute of Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: The GAMBIT Collaboration

    2017-08-15

    One of the simplest viable models for dark matter is an additional neutral scalar, stabilised by a Z{sub 2} symmetry. Using the GAMBIT package and combining results from four independent samplers, we present Bayesian and frequentist global fits of this model. We vary the singlet mass and coupling along with 13 nuisance parameters, including nuclear uncertainties relevant for direct detection, the local dark matter density, and selected quark masses and couplings. We include the dark matter relic density measured by Planck, direct searches with LUX, PandaX, SuperCDMS and XENON100, limits on invisible Higgs decays from the Large Hadron Collider, searches for high-energy neutrinos from dark matter annihilation in the Sun with IceCube, and searches for gamma rays from annihilation in dwarf galaxies with the Fermi-LAT. Viable solutions remain at couplings of order unity, for singlet masses between the Higgs mass and about 300 GeV, and at masses above ∝ 1 TeV. Only in the latter case can the scalar singlet constitute all of dark matter. Frequentist analysis shows that the low-mass resonance region, where the singlet is about half the mass of the Higgs, can also account for all of dark matter, and remains viable. However, Bayesian considerations show this region to be rather fine-tuned. (orig.)

  15. Higgs phase in non-Abelian gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaymakcalan, O.S.

    1981-06-01

    A non-Abelian gauge theory involving scalar fields with non-tachyonic mass terms in the Lagrangian is considered, in order to construct a finite energy density trial vacuum for this theory. The usual scalar potential arguments suggest that the vacuum of such a theory would be in the perturbative phase. However, the obvious choices for a vacuum in this phase, the Axial gauge and the Coulomb gauge bare vacua, do not have finite energy densities even with an ultraviolet cutoff. Indeed, it is a non-trivial problem to construct finite energy density vacua for non-Abelian gauge theories and this is intimately connected with the gauge fixing degeneracies of these theories. Since the gauge fixing is achieved in the Unitary gauge, this suggests that the Unitary gauge bare vacuum might be a finite energy trial vacuum and, despite the form of the scalar potential, the vacuum of this theory might be in a Higgs phase rather than the perturbative phase

  16. Supergravity, Dark Energy and the Fate of the Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmakova, Marina

    2002-09-27

    We propose a description of dark energy and acceleration of the universe in extended supergravities with de Sitter (dS) solutions. Some of them are related to M-theory with non-compact internal spaces. Masses of ultra-light scalars in these models are quantized in units of the Hubble constant: m{sup 2} = nH{sup 2}. If dS solution corresponds to a minimum of the effective potential, the universe eventually becomes dS space. If dS solution corresponds to a maximum or a saddle point, which is the case in all known models based on N = 8 supergravity, the flat universe eventually stops accelerating and collapses to a singularity. We show that in these models, as well as in the simplest models of dark energy based on N = 1 supergravity, the typical time remaining before the global collapse is comparable to the present age of the universe, t = O(10{sup 10}) years. We discuss the possibility of distinguishing between various models and finding our destiny using cosmological observations.

  17. Searching for an oscillating massive scalar field as a dark matter candidate using atomic hyperfine frequency comparisons

    OpenAIRE

    Hees, A.; Guéna, J.; Abgrall, M.; Bize, S.; Wolf, P.

    2016-01-01

    We use six years of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but pr...

  18. Primordial Non-Gaussianity in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Desjacques

    2010-01-01

    generated the cosmological fluctuations observed today. Any detection of significant non-Gaussianity would thus have profound implications for our understanding of cosmic structure formation. The large-scale mass distribution in the Universe is a sensitive probe of the nature of initial conditions. Recent theoretical progress together with rapid developments in observational techniques will enable us to critically confront predictions of inflationary scenarios and set constraints as competitive as those from the Cosmic Microwave Background. In this paper, we review past and current efforts in the search for primordial non-Gaussianity in the large-scale structure of the Universe.

  19. Cosmological simulations using a static scalar-tensor theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RodrIguez-Meza, M A [Depto. de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Col. Escandon, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F (Mexico); Gonzalez-Morales, A X [Departamento Ingenierias, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prol. Paseo de la Reforma 880 Lomas de Santa Fe, Mexico D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Gabbasov, R F [Depto. de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Col. Escandon, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F (Mexico); Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L [Depto. de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Col. Escandon, Apdo. Postal 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F (Mexico)

    2007-11-15

    We present {lambda}CDM N-body cosmological simulations in the framework of of a static general scalar-tensor theory of gravity. Due to the influence of the non-minimally coupled scalar field, the gravitational potential is modified by a Yukawa type term, yielding a new structure formation dynamics. We present some preliminary results and, in particular, we compute the density and velocity profiles of the most massive group.

  20. Covariant conserved currents for scalar-tensor Horndeski theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J.; Bičák, J.

    2018-04-01

    The scalar-tensor theories have become popular recently in particular in connection with attempts to explain present accelerated expansion of the universe, but they have been considered as a natural extension of general relativity long time ago. The Horndeski scalar-tensor theory involving four invariantly defined Lagrangians is a natural choice since it implies field equations involving at most second derivatives. Following the formalisms of defining covariant global quantities and conservation laws for perturbations of spacetimes in standard general relativity, we extend these methods to the general Horndeski theory and find the covariant conserved currents for all four Lagrangians. The current is also constructed in the case of linear perturbations involving both metric and scalar fields. As a specific illustration, we derive a superpotential that leads to the covariantly conserved current in the Branse-Dicke theory.

  1. Universities and Marketing Mass Communication in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffo, Stefano

    2004-01-01

    Marketing mass communication is a quite recent reality of Italian (mainly public) university system. Up to the last decade, these institutions had a certain reluctance to use marketing in order to raise funds and acquire students. The change was made possible through a variety of factors, among which the extension of mass university, a higher…

  2. Inflation, quintessence, and the origin of mass

    OpenAIRE

    Wetterich, C.Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany

    2015-01-01

    In a unified picture both inflation and present dynamical dark energy arise from the same scalar field. The history of the Universe describes a crossover from a scale invariant "past fixed point" where all particles are massless, to a "future fixed point" for which spontaneous breaking of the exact scale symmetry generates the particle masses. The cosmological solution can be extrapolated to the infinite past in physical time - the universe has no beginning. This is seen most easily in a fram...

  3. Scalar dark matter in the B−L model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodejohann, Werner; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2015-01-01

    The U(1) B−L extension of the Standard Model requires the existence of right-handed neutrinos and naturally realizes the seesaw mechanism of neutrino mass generation. We study the possibility of explaining the dark matter in this model with an additional scalar field, ϕ DM , that is a singlet of the Standard Model but charged under U(1) B−L . An advantage of this scenario is that the stability of ϕ DM can be guaranteed by appropriately choosing its B−L charge, without the need of an extra ad hoc discrete symmetry. We investigate in detail the dark matter phenomenology of this model. We show that the observed dark matter density can be obtained via gauge or scalar interactions, and that semi-annihilations could play an important role in the latter case. The regions consistent with the dark matter density are determined in each instance and the prospects for detection in future experiments are analyzed. If dark matter annihilations are controlled by the B−L gauge interaction, the mass of the dark matter particle should lie below 5 TeV and its direct detection cross section can be easily probed by XENON1T; if instead they are controlled by scalar interactions, the dark matter mass can be much larger and the detection prospects are less certain. Finally, we show that this scenario can be readily extended to accommodate multiple dark matter particles

  4. AdS gravity and the scalar glueball spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vento, Vicente [Departament de Fisica Teorica, Universitat de Valencia y Institut de Fisica Corpuscular, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2017-09-15

    The scalar glueball spectrum has attracted much attention since the formulation of Quantum Chromodynamics. Different approaches give very different results for the glueball masses. We revisit the problem from the perspective of the AdS/CFT correspondence. (orig.)

  5. Production of inert scalars at the high energy e+e− colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemi, Majid; Krawczyk, Maria; Najjari, Saereh; Żarnecki, Aleksander Filip

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenology of the light charged and neutral scalars in Inert Doublet Model at future e + e − colliders with center of mass energies of 0.5 and 1 TeV, and integrated luminosity of 500 fb −1 . The analysis covers two production processes, e + e − →H + H − and e + e − →AH, and consists of signal selections, cross section determinations as well as dark matter mass measurements. Several benchmark points are studied with focus on H ± →W ± H and A→ZH decays. It is concluded that the signal will be well observable in different final states allowing for mass determination of all new scalars with statistical precision of the order of few hundred MeV.

  6. A tale of two timescales: Mixing, mass generation, and phase transitions in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Kost, Jeff; Thomas, Brooks

    2016-02-01

    Light scalar fields such as axions and string moduli can play an important role in early-universe cosmology. However, many factors can significantly impact their late-time cosmological abundances. For example, in cases where the potentials for these fields are generated dynamically—such as during cosmological mass-generating phase transitions—the duration of the time interval required for these potentials to fully develop can have significant repercussions. Likewise, in scenarios with multiple scalars, mixing amongst the fields can also give rise to an effective timescale that modifies the resulting late-time abundances. Previous studies have focused on the effects of either the first or the second timescale in isolation. In this paper, by contrast, we examine the new features that arise from the interplay between these two timescales when both mixing and time-dependent phase transitions are introduced together. First, we find that the effects of these timescales can conspire to alter not only the total late-time abundance of the system—often by many orders of magnitude—but also its distribution across the different fields. Second, we find that these effects can produce large parametric resonances which render the energy densities of the fields highly sensitive to the degree of mixing as well as the duration of the time interval over which the phase transition unfolds. Finally, we find that these effects can even give rise to a "reoverdamping" phenomenon which causes the total energy density of the system to behave in novel ways that differ from those exhibited by pure dark matter or vacuum energy. All of these features therefore give rise to new possibilities for early-universe phenomenology and cosmological evolution. They also highlight the importance of taking into account the time dependence associated with phase transitions in cosmological settings.

  7. Scalar mixing in LES/PDF of a high-Ka premixed turbulent jet flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jiaping; Yang, Yue

    2016-11-01

    We report a large-eddy simulation (LES)/probability density function (PDF) study of a high-Ka premixed turbulent flame in the Lund University Piloted Jet (LUPJ) flame series, which has been investigated using direct numerical simulation (DNS) and experiments. The target flame, featuring broadened preheat and reaction zones, is categorized into the broken reaction zone regime. In the present study, three widely used mixing modes, namely the Interaction by Exchange with the Mean (IEM), Modified Curl (MC), and Euclidean Minimum Spanning Tree (EMST) models are applied to assess their performance through detailed a posteriori comparisons with DNS. A dynamic model for the time scale of scalar mixing is formulated to describe the turbulent mixing of scalars at small scales. Better quantitative agreement for the mean temperature and mean mass fractions of major and minor species are obtained with the MC and EMST models than with the IEM model. The multi-scalar mixing in composition space with the three models are analyzed to assess the modeling of the conditional molecular diffusion term. In addition, we demonstrate that the product of OH and CH2O concentrations can be a good surrogate of the local heat release rate in this flame. This work is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11521091 and 91541204).

  8. Late time solution for interacting scalar in accelerating spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokopec, Tomislav, E-mail: t.prokopec@uu.nl [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Spinoza Institute and EMME$\\Phi$, Utrecht University, Postbus 80.195, Utrecht, 3508 TD The Netherlands (Netherlands)

    2015-11-01

    We consider stochastic inflation in an interacting scalar field in spatially homogeneous accelerating space-times with a constant principal slow roll parameter ε. We show that, if the scalar potential is scale invariant (which is the case when scalar contains quartic self-interaction and couples non-minimally to gravity), the late-time solution on accelerating FLRW spaces can be described by a probability distribution function (PDF) ρ which is a function of φ/H only, where φ=φ( x-vector ) is the scalar field and H=H(t) denotes the Hubble parameter. We give explicit late-time solutions for ρarrow ρ{sub ∞}(φ/H), and thereby find the order ε corrections to the Starobinsky-Yokoyama result. This PDF can then be used to calculate e.g. various n-point functions of the (self-interacting) scalar field, which are valid at late times in arbitrary accelerating space-times with ε= constant.

  9. Vector and scalar charmonium resonances with lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, C. B.; Leskovec, Luka; Mohler, Daniel; Prelovsek, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    We perform an exploratory lattice QCD simulation of DD¯ scattering, aimed at determining the masses as well as the decay widths of charmonium resonances above open charm threshold. Neglecting coupling to other channels, the resulting phase shift for DD¯ scattering in p-wave yields the well-known vector resonance ψ(3770). For m π = 156 MeV, the extracted resonance mass and the decay width agree with experiment within large statistical uncertainty. The scalar charmonium resonances present a puzzle, since only the ground state χ c0 (1P) is well understood, while there is no commonly accepted candidate for its first excitation. We simulate DD¯ scattering in s-wave in order to shed light on this puzzle. The resulting phase shift supports the existence of a yet-unobserved narrow resonance with a mass slightly below 4 GeV. A scenario with this narrow resonance and a pole at χ c0 (1P) agrees with the energy-dependence of our phase shift. In addition, further lattice QCD simulations and experimental efforts are needed to resolve the puzzle of the excited scalar charmonia

  10. Unified cosmology with scalar-tensor theory of gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajahmad, Behzad [Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sanyal, Abhik Kumar [Jangipur College, Department of Physics, Murshidabad (India)

    2017-04-15

    Unlike the Noether symmetry, a metric independent general conserved current exists for non-minimally coupled scalar-tensor theory of gravity if the trace of the energy-momentum tensor vanishes. Thus, in the context of cosmology, a symmetry exists both in the early vacuum and radiation dominated era. For slow roll, symmetry is sacrificed, but at the end of early inflation, such a symmetry leads to a Friedmann-like radiation era. Late-time cosmic acceleration in the matter dominated era is realized in the absence of symmetry, in view of the same decayed and redshifted scalar field. Thus, unification of early inflation with late-time cosmic acceleration with a single scalar field may be realized. (orig.)

  11. Unified cosmology with scalar-tensor theory of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajahmad, Behzad; Sanyal, Abhik Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Unlike the Noether symmetry, a metric independent general conserved current exists for non-minimally coupled scalar-tensor theory of gravity if the trace of the energy-momentum tensor vanishes. Thus, in the context of cosmology, a symmetry exists both in the early vacuum and radiation dominated era. For slow roll, symmetry is sacrificed, but at the end of early inflation, such a symmetry leads to a Friedmann-like radiation era. Late-time cosmic acceleration in the matter dominated era is realized in the absence of symmetry, in view of the same decayed and redshifted scalar field. Thus, unification of early inflation with late-time cosmic acceleration with a single scalar field may be realized. (orig.)

  12. Self-interacting scalar fields at high-temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deur, Alexandre [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    We study two self-interacting scalar field theories in their high-temperature limit using path integrals on a lattice. We first discuss the formalism and recover known potentials to validate the method. We then discuss how these theories can model, in the high-temperature limit, the strong interaction and General Relativity. For the strong interaction, the model recovers the known phenomenology of the nearly static regime of heavy quarkonia. The model also exposes a possible origin for the emergence of the confinement scale from the approximately conformal Lagrangian. Aside from such possible insights, the main purpose of addressing the strong interaction here - given that more sophisticated approaches already exist - is mostly to further verify the pertinence of the model in the more complex case of General Relativity for which non-perturbative methods are not as developed. The results have important implications on the nature of Dark Matter. In particular, non-perturbative effects naturally provide flat rotation curves for disk galaxies, without need for non-baryonic matter, and explain as well other observations involving Dark Matter such as cluster dynamics or the dark mass of elliptical galaxies. (orig.)

  13. Long wavelength limit of evolution of cosmological perturbations in the universe where scalar fields and fluids coexist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamazaki, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    We present the LWL formula which represents the long wavelength limit of the solutions of evolution equations of cosmological perturbations in terms of the exactly homogeneous solutions in the most general case where multiple scalar fields and multiple perfect fluids coexist. We find the conserved quantity which has origin in the adiabatic decaying mode, and by regarding this quantity as the source term we determine the correction term which corrects the discrepancy between the exactly homogeneous perturbations and the k→0 limit of the evolutions of cosmological perturbations. This LWL formula is useful for investigating the evolutions of cosmological perturbations in the early stage of our universe such as reheating after inflation and the curvaton decay in the curvaton scenario. When we extract the long wavelength limits of evolutions of cosmological perturbations from the exactly homogeneous perturbations by the LWL formula, it is more convenient to describe the corresponding exactly homogeneous system with not the cosmological time but the scale factor as the evolution parameter. By applying the LWL formula to the reheating model and the curvaton model with multiple scalar fields and multiple radiation fluids, we obtain the S formula representing the final amplitude of the Bardeen parameter in terms of the initial adiabatic and isocurvature perturbations

  14. Black-hole solutions with scalar hair in Einstein-scalar-Gauss-Bonnet theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, G.; Bakopoulos, A.; Kanti, P.

    2018-04-01

    In the context of the Einstein-scalar-Gauss-Bonnet theory, with a general coupling function between the scalar field and the quadratic Gauss-Bonnet term, we investigate the existence of regular black-hole solutions with scalar hair. Based on a previous theoretical analysis, which studied the evasion of the old and novel no-hair theorems, we consider a variety of forms for the coupling function (exponential, even and odd polynomial, inverse polynomial, and logarithmic) that, in conjunction with the profile of the scalar field, satisfy a basic constraint. Our numerical analysis then always leads to families of regular, asymptotically flat black-hole solutions with nontrivial scalar hair. The solution for the scalar field and the profile of the corresponding energy-momentum tensor, depending on the value of the coupling constant, may exhibit a nonmonotonic behavior, an unusual feature that highlights the limitations of the existing no-hair theorems. We also determine and study in detail the scalar charge, horizon area, and entropy of our solutions.

  15. Search for Chameleon Scalar Fields with the Axion Dark Matter Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybka, G.; Hotz, M.; Rosenberg, L. J; Asztalos, S. J.; Carosi, G.; Hagmann, C.; Kinion, D.; van Bibber, K.; Hoskins, J.; Martin, C.; Sikivie, P.; Tanner, D. B.; Bradley, R.; Clarke, J.

    2010-01-01

    Scalar fields with a 'chameleon' property, in which the effective particle mass is a function of its local environment, are common to many theories beyond the standard model and could be responsible for dark energy. If these fields couple weakly to the photon, they could be detectable through the afterglow effect of photon-chameleon-photon transitions. The ADMX experiment was used in the first chameleon search with a microwave cavity to set a new limit on scalar chameleon-photon coupling β γ excluding values between 2x10 9 and 5x10 14 for effective chameleon masses between 1.9510 and 1.9525 μeV.

  16. The twelve-flavor β-function and dilaton tests of the sextet scalar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fodor Zoltan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss near-conformal gauge theories beyond the standard model (BSM where interesting results on the twelve-flavor β-function of massless fermions in the fundamental representation of the SU(3 color gauge group and dilaton tests of the light scalar with two massless fermions in the two-index symmetric tensor (sextet representation can be viewed as parts of the same BSM paradigm under investigation. The clear trend in the decreasing size of β-functions at fixed renormalized gauge coupling is interpreted as a first indicator how the conformal window (CW is approached in correlation with emergent near-conformal light scalars. BSM model building close to the CW will be influenced by differing expectations on the properties of the emergent light 0++ scalar either as a σ-particle of chiral symmetry breaking (ΧS B, or as a dilaton of scale symmetry breaking. The twelve-flavor β-function emerges as closest to the CW, perhaps near-conformal, or perhaps with an infrared fixed point (IRFP at some unexplored strong coupling inside the CW. It is premature to speculate on dilaton properties of the twelveflavor model since the near-conformal realization remains an open question. However, it is interesting and important to investigate dilaton tests of the light sextet scalar whose β-function is closest to the CW in the symmetry breaking phase and emerges as the leading candidate for dilaton tests of the light scalar. We report results from high precision analysis of the twelve-flavor β-function [1] refuting its published IRFP [2, 3]. We present our objections to recent claims [4, 5] for non-universal behavior of staggered fermions used in our analysis. We also report our first analysis of dilaton tests of the light 0++ scalar in the sextet model and comment on related post-conference developments. The dilaton test is the main thrust of this conference contribution including presentation #405 on the nf = 12 β-function and presentation #260 on dilaton

  17. Missing mass of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazure, A.

    1989-01-01

    The first evidence for missing mass or dark matter comes from the 30's. On one hand, Oort noted that in the solar neighbourhood the mass of the stars (inferred from count numbers) cannot account for their observed velocities. On the other hand, observation on the sky of various galaxy condensations like the Coma cluster let suppose that they are actual bound systems and not only statistical fluctuations. However, with such an assumption, Zwicky concluded that the velocity dispersion of galaxies in Coma required 100 times more mass than contained in galaxies. Since this period, refined observations, analyses and a reevaluation of the cosmic distance scale reduced this factor but the problem is still present. It is particularly striking for spiral galaxies where systematic observations of rotation curves lead to infer the presence of spherical massive halos. These dynamical evidences form the first missing mass problem. The second one appears with the development of Great Unified Theories for which the natural laboratory is the very early Universe. A consequence of these theories is that our Universe could be closed by exotic particles which interact only gravitationally [fr

  18. Universality classes far from equilibrium. From heavy-ion collisions to superfluid Bose systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boguslavski, Kirill

    2016-01-01

    Quantum many-body systems far from equilibrium can approach a nonthermal fixed point during their real-time evolution. One example is scalar field theory, which occurs in models of cosmological inflation, and similar examples are found for non-Abelian plasmas relevant for heavy-ion collisions and for ultracold Bose gases. Investigating nonthermal fixed points of different microscopic theories, we present two novel universality classes that provide links between these systems. One of them involves nonrelativistic, N-component relativistic and expanding scalar systems. It occurs in the deep infrared regime of very high occupancies and is governed by a self-similar evolution. Its nonequilibrium dynamics leads to the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate. The scaling properties of this region can be described by a vertex-resummed kinetic theory that is based on a systematic large-N expansion at next-to-leading order. The other novel universality class encompasses scalar field theories and non-Abelian plasmas in a longitudinally expanding background and corresponds to an early dynamical stage of heavy-ion collisions in the high-energy limit. We show that these systems share the same self-similar scaling properties for a wide range of momenta in a limit where particles are weakly coupled but their occupancy is high. Both universality classes are found in separate momentum regions in a longitudinally expanding N-component scalar field theory. We argue that the important role of the infrared dynamics ensures that key features of our results for scalar and gauge theories cannot be reproduced consistently in conventional kinetic theory frameworks. Moreover, the observed universality connects different physics disciplines from heavy-ion collisions to ultracold atoms, making a remarkable link between the world's hottest and coldest matter.

  19. Universality classes far from equilibrium. From heavy-ion collisions to superfluid Bose systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boguslavski, Kirill

    2016-07-27

    Quantum many-body systems far from equilibrium can approach a nonthermal fixed point during their real-time evolution. One example is scalar field theory, which occurs in models of cosmological inflation, and similar examples are found for non-Abelian plasmas relevant for heavy-ion collisions and for ultracold Bose gases. Investigating nonthermal fixed points of different microscopic theories, we present two novel universality classes that provide links between these systems. One of them involves nonrelativistic, N-component relativistic and expanding scalar systems. It occurs in the deep infrared regime of very high occupancies and is governed by a self-similar evolution. Its nonequilibrium dynamics leads to the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate. The scaling properties of this region can be described by a vertex-resummed kinetic theory that is based on a systematic large-N expansion at next-to-leading order. The other novel universality class encompasses scalar field theories and non-Abelian plasmas in a longitudinally expanding background and corresponds to an early dynamical stage of heavy-ion collisions in the high-energy limit. We show that these systems share the same self-similar scaling properties for a wide range of momenta in a limit where particles are weakly coupled but their occupancy is high. Both universality classes are found in separate momentum regions in a longitudinally expanding N-component scalar field theory. We argue that the important role of the infrared dynamics ensures that key features of our results for scalar and gauge theories cannot be reproduced consistently in conventional kinetic theory frameworks. Moreover, the observed universality connects different physics disciplines from heavy-ion collisions to ultracold atoms, making a remarkable link between the world's hottest and coldest matter.

  20. Search for scalar mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    The search for I = 0 0 ++ mesons is described. The crucial role played by the states in the 1 GeV region is highlighted. An analysis program that with unimpeachable data would produce definitive results on these is outlined and shown with present data to provide prima facie evidence for dynamics beyond that of the quark model. The authors briefly speculate on the current status of the lowest mass scalar mesons and discuss how experiment can resolve the unanswered issues. 30 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  1. Universal formula for the holographic speed of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Andrade, Tomás; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Mann, Robert

    2018-06-01

    We consider planar hairy black holes in five dimensions with a real scalar field in the Breitenlohner-Freedman window and derive a universal formula for the holographic speed of sound for any mixed boundary conditions of the scalar field. As an example, we numerically construct the most general class of planar black holes coupled to a single scalar field in the consistent truncation of type IIB supergravity that preserves the SO (3) × SO (3) R-symmetry group of the gauge theory. For this particular family of solutions, we find that the speed of sound exceeds the conformal value. From a phenomenological point of view, the fact that the conformal bound can be violated by choosing the right mixed boundary conditions is relevant for the existence of neutron stars with a certain mass-size relationship for which a large value of the speed of sound codifies a stiff equation of state. In the way, we also shed light on a puzzle regarding the appearance of the scalar charges in the first law. Finally, we generalize the formula of the speed of sound to arbitrary dimensional scalar-metric theories whose parameters lie within the Breitenlohner-Freedman window.

  2. Anisotropic Bianchi Type-I and Type-II Bulk Viscous String Cosmological Models Coupled with Zero Mass Scalar Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswarlu, R.; Sreenivas, K.

    2014-06-01

    The LRS Bianchi type-I and type-II string cosmological models are studied when the source for the energy momentum tensor is a bulk viscous stiff fluid containing one dimensional strings together with zero-mass scalar field. We have obtained the solutions of the field equations assuming a functional relationship between metric coefficients when the metric is Bianchi type-I and constant deceleration parameter in case of Bianchi type-II metric. The physical and kinematical properties of the models are discussed in each case. The effects of Viscosity on the physical and kinematical properties are also studied.

  3. Application of sonoelastography: Comparison of performance between mass and non-mass lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Eun Sook; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Rock Bum; Noh, Woo-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of the conventional ultrasonography (US) and sonoelastography (SE) in three conditions of all lesions, confined to mass, and confined to non-mass lesion and to compare the performance of each modality between mass and non-mass lesion. Materials and methods: A total 364 patients with 375 lesions were evaluated with US and subsequently SE before performing US-guided biopsy. Two radiologists retrospectively analyzed conventional US and elasticity images by consensus. The US findings were classified as mass or non-mass lesion. With final pathology as reference, in each case of all lesions, masses, and non-mass lesions, areas under the ROC curves (Az) were calculated and compared for the two techniques. The comparison of Az values between the curves for US and SE, and between the curves for mass and non-mass lesion was performed. Results: Among 375 lesions, 104 (28%) lesions were malignant and 271 (72%) lesions were benign. 36 (9.6%) of 375 lesions were classified as non-mass lesion at US. There were statistically significant difference of performance between US and SE in cases of all lesion (p = 0.003) and mass (p = 0.023). However, there was no statistically significant difference of performance in case of non-mass lesion (p = 0.5). Comparisons of the Az values of US and SE between mass and non-mass lesions were not statistically significant (p = 0.745, p = 0.415, respectively). Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference of performance of US and SE between mass and non-mass lesion.

  4. A nonlinear dynamics for the scalar field in Randers spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, J.E.G. [Universidade Federal do Cariri (UFCA), Instituto de formação de professores, Rua Olegário Emídio de Araújo, Brejo Santo, CE, 63.260.000 (Brazil); Maluf, R.V. [Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC), Departamento de Física, Campus do Pici, Fortaleza, CE, C.P. 6030, 60455-760 (Brazil); Almeida, C.A.S., E-mail: carlos@fisica.ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC), Departamento de Física, Campus do Pici, Fortaleza, CE, C.P. 6030, 60455-760 (Brazil)

    2017-03-10

    We investigate the properties of a real scalar field in the Finslerian Randers spacetime, where the local Lorentz violation is driven by a geometrical background vector. We propose a dynamics for the scalar field by a minimal coupling of the scalar field and the Finsler metric. The coupling is intrinsically defined on the Randers spacetime, and it leads to a non-canonical kinetic term for the scalar field. The nonlinear dynamics can be split into a linear and nonlinear regimes, which depend perturbatively on the even and odd powers of the Lorentz-violating parameter, respectively. We analyze the plane-waves solutions and the modified dispersion relations, and it turns out that the spectrum is free of tachyons up to second-order.

  5. Radiatively generated hierarchy of lepton and quark masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, A.E. Cárcamo; Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Ivan [Centro Científico Tecnológico de Valparaíso-CCTVal, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María,Casilla 110-V, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2017-02-24

    We propose a model for radiatively generating the hierarchy of the Standard Model (SM) fermion masses: tree-level top quark mass; 1-loop bottom, charm, tau and muon masses; 2-loop masses for the light up, down and strange quarks as well as for the electron; and 4-loop masses for the light active neutrinos. Our model is based on a softly-broken S{sub 3}×Z{sub 2} discrete symmetry. Its scalar sector consists only of one SM Higgs doublet and three electrically neutral SM-singlet scalars. We do not need to invoke either electrically charged scalar fields, or an extra SU{sub 2L} scalar doublet, or the spontaneous breaking of the discrete group, which are typical for other radiative models in the literature. The model features a viable scalar dark matter candidate.

  6. Non-equilibrium scalar two point functions in AdS/CFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keränen, Ville [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford,1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Kleinert, Philipp [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford,1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Merton College, University of Oxford,Merton Street, Oxford OX1 4JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-22

    In the first part of the paper, we discuss different versions of the AdS/CFT dictionary out of equilibrium. We show that the Skenderis-van Rees prescription and the “extrapolate” dictionary are equivalent at the level of “in-in” two point functions of free scalar fields in arbitrary asymptotically AdS spacetimes. In the second part of the paper, we calculate two point correlation functions in dynamical spacetimes using the “extrapolate” dictionary. These calculations are performed for conformally coupled scalar fields in examples of spacetimes undergoing gravitational collapse, the AdS{sub 2}-Vaidya spacetime and the AdS{sub 3}-Vaidya spacetime, which allow us to address the problem of thermalization following a quench in the boundary field theory. The computation of the correlators is formulated as an initial value problem in the bulk spacetime. Finally, we compare our results for AdS{sub 3}-Vaidya to results in the previous literature obtained using the geodesic approximation and we find qualitative agreement.

  7. Non-equilibrium scalar two point functions in AdS/CFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keränen, Ville; Kleinert, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, we discuss different versions of the AdS/CFT dictionary out of equilibrium. We show that the Skenderis-van Rees prescription and the “extrapolate” dictionary are equivalent at the level of “in-in” two point functions of free scalar fields in arbitrary asymptotically AdS spacetimes. In the second part of the paper, we calculate two point correlation functions in dynamical spacetimes using the “extrapolate” dictionary. These calculations are performed for conformally coupled scalar fields in examples of spacetimes undergoing gravitational collapse, the AdS 2 -Vaidya spacetime and the AdS 3 -Vaidya spacetime, which allow us to address the problem of thermalization following a quench in the boundary field theory. The computation of the correlators is formulated as an initial value problem in the bulk spacetime. Finally, we compare our results for AdS 3 -Vaidya to results in the previous literature obtained using the geodesic approximation and we find qualitative agreement.

  8. Third generation masses from a two Higgs model fixed point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froggatt, C.D.; Knowles, I.G.; Moorhouse, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    The large mass ratio between the top and bottom quarks may be attributed to a hierarchy in the vacuum expectation values of scalar doublets. We consider an effective renormalisation group fixed point determination of the quartic scalar and third generation Yukawa couplings in such a two doublet model. This predicts a mass m t =220 GeV and a mass ratio m b /m τ =2.6. In its simplest form the model also predicts the scalar masses, including a light scalar with a mass of order the b quark mass. Experimental implications are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Vast Antimatter Regions and Scalar Condensate Baryogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kirilova, D.; Panayotova, M.; Valchanov, T.

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of natural and abundant creation of antimatter in the Universe in a SUSY-baryogenesis model with a scalar field condensate is described. This scenario predicts vast quantities of antimatter, corresponding to galaxy and galaxy cluster scales today, separated from the matter ones by baryonically empty voids. Theoretical and observational constraints on such antimatter regions are discussed.

  10. Scalar metric fluctuations in space-time matter inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anabitarte, Mariano; Bellini, Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    Using the Ponce de Leon background metric, which describes a 5D universe in an apparent vacuum: G-bar AB =0, we study the effective 4D evolution of both, the inflaton and gauge-invariant scalar metric fluctuations, in the recently introduced model of space-time matter inflation

  11. Dirac and non-Dirac conditions in the two-potential theory of magnetic charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John; Evans, Timothy J.; Singleton, Douglas; Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir; Folomeev, Vladimir

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the Cabbibo-Ferrari, two-potential approach to magnetic charge coupled to two different complex scalar fields, Φ _1 and Φ _2, each having different electric and magnetic charges. The scalar field, Φ _1, is assumed to have a spontaneous symmetry breaking self-interaction potential which gives a mass to the "magnetic" gauge potential and "magnetic" photon, while the other "electric" gauge potential and "electric" photon remain massless. The magnetic photon is hidden until one reaches energies of the order of the magnetic photon rest mass. The second scalar field, Φ _2, is required in order to make the theory non-trivial. With only one field one can always use a duality rotation to rotate away either the electric or magnetic charge, and thus decouple either the associated electric or magnetic photon. In analyzing this system of two scalar fields in the Cabbibo-Ferrari approach we perform several duality and gauge transformations, which require introducing non-Dirac conditions on the initial electric and magnetic charges. We also find that due to the symmetry breaking the usual Dirac condition is altered to include the mass of the magnetic photon. We discuss the implications of these various conditions on the charges.

  12. Constraining scalar fields with stellar kinematics and collisional dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Barranco, Juan; Bernal, Argelia; Rezzolla, Luciano

    2010-01-01

    The existence and detection of scalar fields could provide solutions to long-standing puzzles about the nature of dark matter, the dark compact objects at the centre of most galaxies, and other phenomena. Yet, self-interacting scalar fields are very poorly constrained by astronomical observations, leading to great uncertainties in estimates of the mass m φ and the self-interacting coupling constant λ of these fields. To counter this, we have systematically employed available astronomical observations to develop new constraints, considerably restricting this parameter space. In particular, by exploiting precise observations of stellar dynamics at the centre of our Galaxy and assuming that these dynamics can be explained by a single boson star, we determine an upper limit for the boson star compactness and impose significant limits on the values of the properties of possible scalar fields. Requiring the scalar field particle to follow a collisional dark matter model further narrows these constraints. Most importantly, we find that if a scalar dark matter particle does exist, then it cannot account for both the dark-matter halos and the existence of dark compact objects in galactic nuclei

  13. Physics of the interior of a black hole with an exotic scalar matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshkevich, Andrey; Shatskiy, Alexander; Hansen, Jakob; Novikov, Dmitriy; Novikov, Igor; Park, Dong-Ho

    2010-01-01

    We use a numerical code to consider the nonlinear processes arising when a Reissner-Nordstroem black hole is irradiated by an exotic scalar field ( modeled as a free massless scalar field with an opposite sign for its energy-momentum tensor). These processes are quite different from the processes arising in the case of the same black hole being irradiated by a pulse of a normal scalar field. In our case, we did not observe the creation of a spacelike strong singularity in the T region of the space-time. We investigate the antifocusing effects in the gravity field of the exotic scalar field with the negative energy density and the evolution of the mass function. We demonstrate the process of the vanishing of the black hole when it is irradiated by a strong pulse of an exotic scalar field.

  14. One-loop renormalization of a gravity-scalar system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, I.Y. [Philander Smith College, Department of Applied Mathematics, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Extending the renormalizability proposal of the physical sector of 4D Einstein gravity, we have recently proposed renormalizability of the 3D physical sector of gravity-matter systems. The main goal of the present work is to conduct systematic one-loop renormalization of a gravity-matter system by applying our foliation-based quantization scheme. In this work we explicitly carry out renormalization of a gravity-scalar system with a Higgs-type potential. With the fluctuation part of the scalar field gauged away, the system becomes renormalizable through a metric field redefinition. We use dimensional regularization throughout. One of the salient aspects of our analysis is how the graviton propagator acquires the ''mass'' term. One-loop calculations lead to renormalization of the cosmological and Newton constants. We discuss other implications of our results as well: time-varying vacuum energy density and masses of the elementary particles as well as the potential relevance of Neumann boundary condition for black hole information. (orig.)

  15. One-loop renormalization of a gravity-scalar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, I.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Extending the renormalizability proposal of the physical sector of 4D Einstein gravity, we have recently proposed renormalizability of the 3D physical sector of gravity-matter systems. The main goal of the present work is to conduct systematic one-loop renormalization of a gravity-matter system by applying our foliation-based quantization scheme. In this work we explicitly carry out renormalization of a gravity-scalar system with a Higgs-type potential. With the fluctuation part of the scalar field gauged away, the system becomes renormalizable through a metric field redefinition. We use dimensional regularization throughout. One of the salient aspects of our analysis is how the graviton propagator acquires the ''mass'' term. One-loop calculations lead to renormalization of the cosmological and Newton constants. We discuss other implications of our results as well: time-varying vacuum energy density and masses of the elementary particles as well as the potential relevance of Neumann boundary condition for black hole information. (orig.)

  16. One-loop renormalization of a gravity-scalar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, I. Y.

    2017-05-01

    Extending the renormalizability proposal of the physical sector of 4D Einstein gravity, we have recently proposed renormalizability of the 3D physical sector of gravity-matter systems. The main goal of the present work is to conduct systematic one-loop renormalization of a gravity-matter system by applying our foliation-based quantization scheme. In this work we explicitly carry out renormalization of a gravity-scalar system with a Higgs-type potential. With the fluctuation part of the scalar field gauged away, the system becomes renormalizable through a metric field redefinition. We use dimensional regularization throughout. One of the salient aspects of our analysis is how the graviton propagator acquires the "mass" term. One-loop calculations lead to renormalization of the cosmological and Newton constants. We discuss other implications of our results as well: time-varying vacuum energy density and masses of the elementary particles as well as the potential relevance of Neumann boundary condition for black hole information.

  17. Investigation of the scalar spectrum in SU (3) with eight degenerate flavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Lattice Strong Dynamics collaboration is investigating the properties of a SU(3) gauge theory with Nf = 8 light fermions on the lattice. We measure the masses of the lightest pseudoscalar, scalar and vector states using simulations with the nHYP staggered-fermion action on large volumes and at small fermion masses, reaching Mρ/Mπ ≈ 2.2. The axial-vector meson and the nucleon are also studied for the same range of fermion masses. One of the interesting features of this theory is the dynamical presence of a light flavor-singlet scalar state with 0++ quantum numbers that is lighter than the vector resonance and has a mass consistent with the one of the pseudoscalar state for the whole fermion mass range explored. We comment on the existence of such state emerging from our lattice simulations and on the challenges of its analysis. Moreover we highlight the difficulties in pursuing simulations in the chiral regime of this theory using large volumes.

  18. Search for massive colored scalars in four-jet final states in √s = 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Aderholz, M.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    A search for pair-produced scalar particles decaying to a four-jet final state is presented. The analysis is performed using an integrated luminosity of 34 pb -1 recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2010. No deviation from the Standard Model is observed. For a scalar mass of 100 GeV (190 GeV) the limit on the scalar gluon pair production cross section at 95% confidence level is 1 nb (0.28 nb). When these results are interpreted as mass limits, scalar-gluons (hyperpions) with masses of 100 to 185 GeV (100 to 155 GeV) are excluded at 95% confidence level with the exception of a mass window of width about 5 GeV (15 GeV) around 140 GeV.

  19. Searching for an Oscillating Massive Scalar Field as a Dark Matter Candidate Using Atomic Hyperfine Frequency Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, A; Guéna, J; Abgrall, M; Bize, S; Wolf, P

    2016-08-05

    We use 6 yrs of accurate hyperfine frequency comparison data of the dual rubidium and caesium cold atom fountain FO2 at LNE-SYRTE to search for a massive scalar dark matter candidate. Such a scalar field can induce harmonic variations of the fine structure constant, of the mass of fermions, and of the quantum chromodynamic mass scale, which will directly impact the rubidium/caesium hyperfine transition frequency ratio. We find no signal consistent with a scalar dark matter candidate but provide improved constraints on the coupling of the putative scalar field to standard matter. Our limits are complementary to previous results that were only sensitive to the fine structure constant and improve them by more than an order of magnitude when only a coupling to electromagnetism is assumed.

  20. A protocol for the secure two-party quantum scalar product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Li-Bao, E-mail: helibao@mail.ustc.edu.cn [National High Performance Computing Center, Department of Computer Science and Technology, USTC, Hefei 230027 (China); Suzhou Institute for Advanced Study, USTC, Suzhou 215123 (China); Huang, Liu-Sheng; Yang, Wei; Xu, Rui [National High Performance Computing Center, Department of Computer Science and Technology, USTC, Hefei 230027 (China); Suzhou Institute for Advanced Study, USTC, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2012-03-19

    Secure scalar product serves as an important primitive for secure multi-party computation and has a wide application in different areas, such as statistical analysis, data mining, computational geometry, etc. How to collaboratively compute the correct scalar product result without leaking any participants' private information becomes the primary principle of designing secure scalar product schemes. In this Letter, we present a secure two-party quantum scalar product scheme via quantum entanglement and quantum measurement with the help of a non-colluding third party (TP). Furthermore, the scheme is proven to be secure under various kinds of outside attacks and participant attacks. -- Highlights: ► We extend the secure two-party scalar product to the quantum field. ► Our protocol is built upon quantum entanglement and quantum measurement. ► Communication cost is acceptable if the elements of participants' private vectors are not too sparse. ► Participants will leak no private information under the no-collusion model.

  1. A protocol for the secure two-party quantum scalar product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Li-Bao; Huang, Liu-Sheng; Yang, Wei; Xu, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Secure scalar product serves as an important primitive for secure multi-party computation and has a wide application in different areas, such as statistical analysis, data mining, computational geometry, etc. How to collaboratively compute the correct scalar product result without leaking any participants' private information becomes the primary principle of designing secure scalar product schemes. In this Letter, we present a secure two-party quantum scalar product scheme via quantum entanglement and quantum measurement with the help of a non-colluding third party (TP). Furthermore, the scheme is proven to be secure under various kinds of outside attacks and participant attacks. -- Highlights: ► We extend the secure two-party scalar product to the quantum field. ► Our protocol is built upon quantum entanglement and quantum measurement. ► Communication cost is acceptable if the elements of participants' private vectors are not too sparse. ► Participants will leak no private information under the no-collusion model.

  2. Scalar field localization on a brane with cosmological constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoroku, Kazuo; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the localization of a massive scalar for both dS and AdS branes, where the scalar mass is varied from the massive-particle region to the tachyon region. We find that the eigenmass m of the localized mode satisfies a simple relation m 2 = cM 2 with a positive constant c for the dS brane, and m 2 = c 1 M 2 + c 2 with positive constants c 1 and c 2 for the AdS brane. We discuss the relation of these results to the stability of the brane and also some cosmological problems

  3. Scalar Statistics along Inertial Particle Trajectory in Isotropic Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ya-Ming, Liu; Zhao-Hui, Liu; Hai-Feng, Han; Jing, Li; Han-Feng, Wang; Chu-Guang, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    The statistics of a passive scalar along inertial particle trajectory in homogeneous isotropic turbulence with a mean scalar gradient is investigated by using direct numerical simulation. We are interested in the influence of particle inertia on such statistics, which is crucial for further understanding and development of models in non-isothermal gas-particle flows. The results show that the scalar variance along particle trajectory decreases with the increasing particle inertia firstly; when the particle's Stokes number S t is less than 1.0, it reaches the minimal value when S t is around 1.0, then it increases if S t increases further. However, the scalar dissipation rate along the particle trajectory shows completely contrasting behavior in comparison with the scalar variance. The mechanical-to-thermal time scale ratios averaged along particle, p , are approximately two times smaller than that computed in the Eulerian frame r, and stay at nearly 1.77 with a weak dependence on particle inertia. In addition, the correlations between scalar dissipation and now structure characteristics along particle trajectories, such as strain and vorticity, are also computed, and they reach their maximum and minimum, 0.31 and 0.25, respectively, when S t is around 1.0. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  4. Observation of the scalar Aharonov-Bohm effect by neutron interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allman, B.E.; Cimmino, A.; Klein, A.G.; Opat, G.I.; Kaiser, H.; Werner, S.A.; Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO

    1993-01-01

    A phase shift for de Broglie waves due to the action of a scalar potential in an otherwise field-free (i.e. force-free) region of space is known as the scalar Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect. Unlike the more familiar AB effect due to the magnetic vector potential, the scalar effect has hitherto remained unverified due, presumably, to technical difficulties in electron interferometry. An analogous interferometric experiment was performed with thermal neutrons subject to pulsed magnetic fields. The observations were carried out at the University of Missouri Research Reactor, using a skew-symmetric perfect silicon crystal neutron interferometer. The expected phase shifts have been observed to a high degree of accuracy. A detailed description of the experiment and its interpretation is given in this paper. 26 refs., 11 figs

  5. Standard coupling unification in SO(10), hybrid seesaw neutrino mass and leptogenesis, dark matter, and proton lifetime predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parida, M.K.; Nayak, Bidyut Prava; Satpathy, Rajesh [Centre of Excellence in Theoretical and Mathematical Sciences,Siksha ‘O’ Anusandhan University,Khandagiri Square, Bhubaneswar 751030 (India); Awasthi, Ram Lal [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research,Knowledge City, Sector 81, SAS Nagar, Manauli 140306 (India)

    2017-04-12

    We discuss gauge coupling unification of SU(3){sub C}×SU(2){sub L}×U(1){sub Y} descending directly from non-supersymmetric SO(10) while providing solutions to the three outstanding problems of the standard model: neutrino masses, dark matter, and the baryon asymmetry of the universe. Conservation of matter parity as gauged discrete symmetry for the stability and identification of dark matter in the model calls for high-scale spontaneous symmetry breaking through 126{sub H} Higgs representation. This naturally leads to the hybrid seesaw formula for neutrino masses mediated by heavy scalar triplet and right-handed neutrinos. Being quadratic in the Majorana coupling, the seesaw formula predicts two distinct patterns of right-handed neutrino masses, one hierarchical and another not so hierarchical (or compact), when fitted with the neutrino oscillation data. Predictions of the baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis are investigated through the decays of both the patterns of RHν masses. A complete flavor analysis has been carried out to compute CP-asymmetries including washouts and solutions to Boltzmann equations have been utilised to predict the baryon asymmetry. The additional contribution to vertex correction mediated by the heavy left-handed triplet scalar is noted to contribute as dominantly as other Feynman diagrams. We have found successful predictions of the baryon asymmetry for both the patterns of right-handed neutrino masses. The SU(2){sub L} triplet fermionic dark matter at the TeV scale carrying even matter parity is naturally embedded into the non-standard fermionic representation 45{sub F} of SO(10). In addition to the triplet scalar and the triplet fermion, the model needs a nonstandard color octet fermion of mass ∼5×10{sup 7} GeV to achieve precision gauge coupling unification at the GUT mass scale M{sub U}{sup 0}=10{sup 15.56} GeV. Threshold corrections due to superheavy components of 126{sub H} and other representations are estimated and found to be

  6. Anisotropic inflation from charged scalar fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Movahed, S.M. Sadegh; Zarei, Moslem

    2011-01-01

    We consider models of inflation with U(1) gauge fields and charged scalar fields including symmetry breaking potential, chaotic inflation and hybrid inflation. We show that there exist attractor solutions where the anisotropies produced during inflation becomes comparable to the slow-roll parameters. In the models where the inflaton field is a charged scalar field the gauge field becomes highly oscillatory at the end of inflation ending inflation quickly. Furthermore, in charged hybrid inflation the onset of waterfall phase transition at the end of inflation is affected significantly by the evolution of the background gauge field. Rapid oscillations of the gauge field and its coupling to inflaton can have interesting effects on preheating and non-Gaussianities

  7. Excited scalar and pseudoscalar mesons in the extended linear sigma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parganlija, Denis [Technische Universitaet Wien, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Vienna (Austria); Giacosa, Francesco [Jan Kochanowski University, Institute of Physics, Kielce (Poland); Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    We present an in-depth study of masses and decays of excited scalar and pseudoscalar anti qq states in the Extended Linear Sigma Model (eLSM). The model also contains ground-state scalar, pseudoscalar, vector and axial-vector mesons. The main objective is to study the consequences of the hypothesis that the f{sub 0}(1790) resonance, observed a decade ago by the BES Collaboration and recently by LHCb, represents an excited scalar quarkonium. In addition we also analyse the possibility that the new a{sub 0}(1950) resonance, observed recently by BABAR, may also be an excited scalar state. Both hypotheses receive justification in our approach although there appears to be some tension between the simultaneous interpretation of f{sub 0}(1790)/a{sub 0}(1950) and pseudoscalar mesons η(1295), π(1300), η(1440) and K(1460) as excited anti qq states. (orig.)

  8. Space-time philosophy reconstructed via massive Nordström scalar gravities? Laws vs. geometry, conventionality, and underdetermination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, J. Brian

    2016-02-01

    What if gravity satisfied the Klein-Gordon equation? Both particle physics from the 1920-30s and the 1890s Neumann-Seeliger modification of Newtonian gravity with exponential decay suggest considering a "graviton mass term" for gravity, which is algebraic in the potential. Unlike Nordström's "massless" theory, massive scalar gravity is strictly special relativistic in the sense of being invariant under the Poincaré group but not the 15-parameter Bateman-Cunningham conformal group. It therefore exhibits the whole of Minkowski space-time structure, albeit only indirectly concerning volumes. Massive scalar gravity is plausible in terms of relativistic field theory, while violating most interesting versions of Einstein's principles of general covariance, general relativity, equivalence, and Mach. Geometry is a poor guide to understanding massive scalar gravity(s): matter sees a conformally flat metric due to universal coupling, but gravity also sees the rest of the flat metric (barely or on long distances) in the mass term. What is the 'true' geometry, one might wonder, in line with Poincaré's modal conventionality argument? Infinitely many theories exhibit this bimetric 'geometry,' all with the total stress-energy's trace as source; thus geometry does not explain the field equations. The irrelevance of the Ehlers-Pirani-Schild construction to a critique of conventionalism becomes evident when multi-geometry theories are contemplated. Much as Seeliger envisaged, the smooth massless limit indicates underdetermination of theories by data between massless and massive scalar gravities-indeed an unconceived alternative. At least one version easily could have been developed before General Relativity; it then would have motivated thinking of Einstein's equations along the lines of Einstein's newly re-appreciated "physical strategy" and particle physics and would have suggested a rivalry from massive spin 2 variants of General Relativity (massless spin 2, Pauli and Fierz

  9. The mass gap, the confining string and the physics of (lattice) topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teper, M.

    1985-01-01

    The authors summarize some recent (Monte Carlo) calculations of the mass gap and string tension in SU(3) (lattice) gauge theory. In the range of couplings where both are measured, 5.5 ≤ β ≤ 5.9, the authors find no universal β(g) function, but the mass gap shows asymptotic scaling. The authors show how to use the finite lattice-size dependence of these quantities to extract the triple scalar-glueball coupling, g/sup 2//4π, and to obtain evidence for simple string physics at long distances. They then comment on the properties of topology on a lattice - in particular on the breakdown of the index theorem - and its (lack of) impact on quenched fermion physics. The authors construct a method for probing the underlying instanton structure of the full non-perturbative vacuum, and present evidence that such a structure is indeed there once the lattice spacing is small enough [β ≥ 2.7 in SU(2)]. The instantons the authors find are large - order inverse mass gap - and relatively stable against vacuum fluctuations, so that they may influence the non-perturbative physics of the theory

  10. Search for third-generation leptoquarks and scalar bottom quarks in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt{s}=7\\;TeV $

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Gonzalez, J. Suarez; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Suarez, R. Gonzalez; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Velde, C. Vander; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Rios, A. A. Ocampo; Ryckbosch, D.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Garcia, J. M. Vizan; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Junior, M. Correa Martins; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Figueiredo, D. Matos; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Da Silva, W. L. Prado; Santoro, A.; Jorge, L. Soares; Sznajder, A.; Pereira, A. Vilela; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Tomei, T. R. Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Montoya, C. A. Carrillo; Gomez, J. P.; Moreno, B. Gomez; Oliveros, A. F. Osorio; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Kamel, A. Ellithi; Awad, A. M. Kuotb; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Van Hove, P.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Ahmad, W. Haj; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Martin, M. Aldaya; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Costanza, F.; Dammann, D.; Pardos, C. Diez; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, F.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Cipriano, P. M. Ribeiro; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Gosselink, M.; Haller, J.; Hermanns, T.; Höing, R. S.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Sibille, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Pardo, P. Lobelle; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Röcker, S.; Schilling, F. -P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Mittal, M.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Roy, D.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Mehdiabadi, S. Paktinat; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; de Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. 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P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Ceballos, G. Gomez; Goncharov, M.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Krajczar, K.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Cooper, S. I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zenz, S. C.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Vargas, J. E. Ramirez; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Marono, M. Vidal; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Walker, M.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Don, C. Kottachchi Kankanamge; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Belknap, D.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Mozer, M. U.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Results are presented from a search for third-generation leptoquarks and scalar bottom quarks in a sample of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 inverse femtobarns. A scenario where the new particles are pair produced and each decays to a b quark plus a tau neutrino or neutralino is considered. The number of observed events is found to be in agreement with the standard model prediction. Upper limits are set at 95% confidence level on the production cross sections. Leptoquarks with masses below about 450 GeV are excluded. Upper limits in the mass plane of the scalar quark and neutralino are set such that scalar bottom quark masses up to 410 GeV are excluded for neutralino masses of 50 GeV.

  11. Phenomenological signatures of additional scalar bosons at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddenbrock, Stefan von; Kar, Deepak; Mellado, Bruce; Reed, Robert G.; Ruan, Xifeng [University of the Witwatersrand, School of Physics, Johannesburg, Wits (South Africa); Chakrabarty, Nabarun; Mukhopadhyaya, Biswarup [Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Regional Centre for Accelerator-Based Particle Physics, Jhunsi, Allahabad (India); Cornell, Alan S.; Kumar, Mukesh [University of the Witwatersrand, National Institute for Theoretical Physics, School of Physics and Mandelstam Institute for Theoretical Physics, Johannesburg, Wits (South Africa); Mandal, Tanumoy [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-10-15

    We investigate the search prospects for new scalars beyond the standard model at the large hadron collider (LHC). In these studies two real scalars S and χ have been introduced in a two Higgs-doublet model (2HDM), where S is a portal to dark matter (DM) through its interaction with χ, a DM candidate and a possible source of missing transverse energy (E{sub T}{sup miss}). Previous studies focussed on a heavy scalar H decay mode H → hχχ, which was studied using an effective theory in order to explain a distortion in the Higgs boson (h) transverse momentum spectrum (von Buddenbrock et al. in arXiv:1506.00612 [hep-ph], 2015). In this work, the effective decay is understood more deeply by including a mediator S, and the focus is changed to H → hS, SS with S → χχ. Phenomenological signatures of all the new scalars in the proposed 2HDM are discussed in the energy regime of the LHC, and their mass bounds have been set accordingly. Additionally, we have performed several analyses with final states including leptons and E{sub T}{sup miss}, with H → 4W, t(t)H → 6 W and A → ZH channels, in order to understand the impact these scalars have on current searches. (orig.)

  12. Moduli, Scalar Charges, and the First Law of Black Hole Thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, G.; Kallosh, R.; Kol, B.

    1996-01-01

    We show that under variation of moduli fields φ the first law of black hole thermodynamics becomes dM=κdA/8π +ΩdJ+ψdq+χdp-Σdφ, where Σ are the scalar charges. Also the ADM mass is extremized at fixed A, J, (p,q) when the moduli fields take the fixed value φ fix (p,q) which depend only on electric and magnetic charges. Thus the double-extreme black hole minimizes the mass for fixed conserved charges. We can now explain the fact that extreme black holes fix the moduli fields at the horizon φ=φ fix (p,q): φ fix is such that the scalar charges vanish: Σ(φ fix ,(p,q))=0. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  13. Viable dark matter via radiative symmetry breaking in a scalar singlet Higgs portal extension of the standard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, T G; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Contreras, D; Mann, R B

    2014-05-02

    We consider the generation of dark matter mass via radiative electroweak symmetry breaking in an extension of the conformal standard model containing a singlet scalar field with a Higgs portal interaction. Generating the mass from a sequential process of radiative electroweak symmetry breaking followed by a conventional Higgs mechanism can account for less than 35% of the cosmological dark matter abundance for dark matter mass M(s)>80 GeV. However, in a dynamical approach where both Higgs and scalar singlet masses are generated via radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, we obtain much higher levels of dark matter abundance. At one-loop level we find abundances of 10%-100% with 106 GeVdark matter mass. The dynamical approach also predicts a small scalar-singlet self-coupling, providing a natural explanation for the astrophysical observations that place upper bounds on dark matter self-interaction. The predictions in all three approaches are within the M(s)>80 GeV detection region of the next generation XENON experiment.

  14. Some aspects of quantum field theory in non-Minkowskian space-times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toms, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Several aspects of quantum field theory in space-times which are different from Minkowski space-time, either because of the presence of a non-zero curvature or as a consequence of the topology of the manifold, are discussed. The Casimir effect is a quantum field theory in a space-time which has a different topology. A short review of some of its popular derivations is presented with comments. Renormalization of interacting scalar field theories in a flat space-time with a non-Minkowskian topology is considered. The presence of a non-trivial topology can lead to additional non-local divergent terms in the Schwinger-Dyson equations for a general scalar field theory; however, the theory may be renormalized with the same choice of counterterms as in Minkowski space-time. Propagators can develop poles corresponding to the generation of a topological mass. Zeta-function regularization is shown to fit naturally into the functional approach to the effective potential. This formalism is used to calculate the effective potential for some scalar field theories in non-Minkowskian space-times. Topological mass generation is discussed, and it is shown how radiative corrections can lead to spontaneous symmetry breaking. One- and two-loop contributions to the vacuum energy density are obtained for both massless and massive fields. In the massive case the role of renormalization in removing non-local divergences is discussed

  15. Poisson cohomology of scalar multidimensional Dubrovin-Novikov brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlet, Guido; Casati, Matteo; Shadrin, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    We compute the Poisson cohomology of a scalar Poisson bracket of Dubrovin-Novikov type with D independent variables. We find that the second and third cohomology groups are generically non-vanishing in D > 1. Hence, in contrast with the D = 1 case, the deformation theory in the multivariable case is non-trivial.

  16. Non-singular bounce scenarios in loop quantum cosmology and the effective field description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Yi-Fu; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2014-01-01

    A non-singular bouncing cosmology is generically obtained in loop quantum cosmology due to non-perturbative quantum gravity effects. A similar picture can be achieved in standard general relativity in the presence of a scalar field with a non-standard kinetic term such that at high energy densities the field evolves into a ghost condensate and causes a non-singular bounce. During the bouncing phase, the perturbations can be stabilized by introducing a Horndeski operator. Taking the matter content to be a dust field and an ekpyrotic scalar field, we compare the dynamics in loop quantum cosmology and in a non-singular bouncing effective field model with a non-standard kinetic term at both the background and perturbative levels. We find that these two settings share many important properties, including the result that they both generate scale-invariant scalar perturbations. This shows that some quantum gravity effects of the very early universe may be mimicked by effective field models

  17. Entanglement growth after a global quench in free scalar field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotler, Jordan S. [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Hertzberg, Mark P. [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Mezei, Márk [Princeton Center for Theoretical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Mueller, Mark T. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-11-28

    We compute the entanglement and Rényi entropy growth after a global quench in various dimensions in free scalar field theory. We study two types of quenches: a boundary state quench and a global mass quench. Both of these quenches are investigated for a strip geometry in 1, 2, and 3 spatial dimensions, and for a spherical geometry in 2 and 3 spatial dimensions. We compare the numerical results for massless free scalars in these geometries with the predictions of the analytical quasiparticle model based on EPR pairs, and find excellent agreement in the limit of large region sizes. At subleading order in the region size, we observe an anomalous logarithmic growth of entanglement coming from the zero mode of the scalar.

  18. The scalar wave equation in a Schwarzschild spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.M.; Schmidt, B.G.

    1978-09-01

    This paper studies the asymptotic behaviour of solutions of the zero rest mass scalar wave equation in the Schwarzschild spacetime in a neighbourhood of spatial infinity, which includes parts of future and past null infinity. The behaviour of such fields is essentially different from that which accurs in a flat spacetime. (orig.) [de

  19. Open Wilson lines and generalized star product in noncommutative scalar field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiem, Youngjai; Sato, Haru-Tada; Rey, Soo-Jong; Yee, Jung-Tay

    2002-01-01

    Open Wilson line operators and a generalized star product have been studied extensively in noncommutative gauge theories. We show that they also show up in noncommutative scalar field theories as universal structures. We first point out that the dipole picture of noncommutative geometry provides an intuitive argument for the robustness of the open Wilson lines and generalized star products therein. We calculate the one-loop effective action of noncommutative scalar field theory with a cubic self-interaction and show explicitly that the generalized star products arise in the nonplanar part. It is shown that, at the low-energy, large noncommutativity limit, the nonplanar part is expressible solely in terms of the scalar open Wilson line operator and descendants

  20. Gravitational peculiarities of a scalar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleber, A.; Fonseca Teixeira, A.F. da

    1979-11-01

    The zero-adjoint of a time-static Ricci-flat solution to Einstein's field equations is investigated. It represents a spacetime curved solely by a massless scalar field. The cylindrical symmetry is assumed to permit both planar and non-planar geodetic motions. Unusual, velocity-dependent gravitational features are encountered from these geodesics. (Author) [pt

  1. Minimal and non-minimal standard models: Universality of radiative corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passarino, G.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of describing electroweak processes by means of models with a non-minimal Higgs sector is analyzed. The renormalization procedure which leads to a set of fitting equations for the bare parameters of the lagrangian is first reviewed for the minimal standard model. A solution of the fitting equations is obtained, which correctly includes large higher-order corrections. Predictions for physical observables, notably the W boson mass and the Z O partial widths, are discussed in detail. Finally the extension to non-minimal models is described under the assumption that new physics will appear only inside the vector boson self-energies and the concept of universality of radiative corrections is introduced, showing that to a large extent they are insensitive to the details of the enlarged Higgs sector. Consequences for the bounds on the top quark mass are also discussed. (orig.)

  2. Probing neutrino and Higgs sectors in { SU(2) }_1 × { SU(2) }_2 × { U(1) }_Y model with lepton-flavor non-universality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hue, L. T.; Arbuzov, A. B.; Ngan, N. T. K.; Long, H. N.

    2017-05-01

    The neutrino and Higgs sectors in the { SU(2) }_1 × { SU(2) }_2 × { U(1) }_Y model with lepton-flavor non-universality are discussed. We show that active neutrinos can get Majorana masses from radiative corrections, after adding only new singly charged Higgs bosons. The mechanism for the generation of neutrino masses is the same as in the Zee models. This also gives a hint to solving the dark matter problem based on similar ways discussed recently in many radiative neutrino mass models with dark matter. Except the active neutrinos, the appearance of singly charged Higgs bosons and dark matter does not affect significantly the physical spectrum of all particles in the original model. We indicate this point by investigating the Higgs sector in both cases before and after singly charged scalars are added into it. Many interesting properties of physical Higgs bosons, which were not shown previously, are explored. In particular, the mass matrices of charged and CP-odd Higgs fields are proportional to the coefficient of triple Higgs coupling μ . The mass eigenstates and eigenvalues in the CP-even Higgs sector are also presented. All couplings of the SM-like Higgs boson to normal fermions and gauge bosons are different from the SM predictions by a factor c_h, which must satisfy the recent global fit of experimental data, namely 0.995<|c_h|<1. We have analyzed a more general diagonalization of gauge boson mass matrices, then we show that the ratio of the tangents of the W-W' and Z-Z' mixing angles is exactly the cosine of the Weinberg angle, implying that number of parameters is reduced by 1. Signals of new physics from decays of new heavy fermions and Higgs bosons at LHC and constraints of their masses are also discussed.

  3. Massive spin-one fields from couplings with five massless real scalars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizdadea, Constantin; Cioroianu, Eugen-Mihaita; Saliu, Solange-Odile

    2017-12-01

    In this paper we implement a new procedure by which one may generate mass for a vector field in the context of its interactions to a system of five real scalar fields. This purpose will be achieved by means of the general multi-step program from [1] adapted to the present situation: (1) we begin with a free theory in four space-time dimensions whose Lagrangian action is given by the sum between the standard Maxwell action and that for a collection consisting in five massless real scalar fields; (2) we construct a general class of gauge theories whose free limit is that from step (1) by means of the deformation of the solution to the master equation [2, 3] with the help of local BRST cohomology [4-6]; (3) we perform some suitable redefinitions of the free parameters that label interacting theories from (2) such that the mass terms become manifest in the new free limit. The outputs of our procedure can be synthesized in: (A) the vector field acquires mass; (B) the scalar fields gain gauge transformations; (C) the gauge algebras of the interacting theories are Abelian; (D) the propagator of the massive vector field emerging from the gauge-fixed actions behaves, in the limit of large Euclidean momenta, like that from the massless case.

  4. Self-consistent Dark Matter simplified models with an s-channel scalar mediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Nicole F.; Busoni, Giorgio; Sanderson, Isaac W., E-mail: n.bell@unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: giorgio.busoni@unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: isanderson@student.unimelb.edu.au [ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2017-03-01

    We examine Simplified Models in which fermionic DM interacts with Standard Model (SM) fermions via the exchange of an s -channel scalar mediator. The single-mediator version of this model is not gauge invariant, and instead we must consider models with two scalar mediators which mix and interfere. The minimal gauge invariant scenario involves the mixing of a new singlet scalar with the Standard Model Higgs boson, and is tightly constrained. We construct two Higgs doublet model (2HDM) extensions of this scenario, where the singlet mixes with the 2nd Higgs doublet. Compared with the one doublet model, this provides greater freedom for the masses and mixing angle of the scalar mediators, and their coupling to SM fermions. We outline constraints on these models, and discuss Yukawa structures that allow enhanced couplings, yet keep potentially dangerous flavour violating processes under control. We examine the direct detection phenomenology of these models, accounting for interference of the scalar mediators, and interference of different quarks in the nucleus. Regions of parameter space consistent with direct detection measurements are determined.

  5. Self-consistent Dark Matter simplified models with an s-channel scalar mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Nicole F.; Busoni, Giorgio; Sanderson, Isaac W.

    2017-01-01

    We examine Simplified Models in which fermionic DM interacts with Standard Model (SM) fermions via the exchange of an s -channel scalar mediator. The single-mediator version of this model is not gauge invariant, and instead we must consider models with two scalar mediators which mix and interfere. The minimal gauge invariant scenario involves the mixing of a new singlet scalar with the Standard Model Higgs boson, and is tightly constrained. We construct two Higgs doublet model (2HDM) extensions of this scenario, where the singlet mixes with the 2nd Higgs doublet. Compared with the one doublet model, this provides greater freedom for the masses and mixing angle of the scalar mediators, and their coupling to SM fermions. We outline constraints on these models, and discuss Yukawa structures that allow enhanced couplings, yet keep potentially dangerous flavour violating processes under control. We examine the direct detection phenomenology of these models, accounting for interference of the scalar mediators, and interference of different quarks in the nucleus. Regions of parameter space consistent with direct detection measurements are determined.

  6. Kolmogorov similarity hypotheses for scalar fields: sampling intermittent turbulent mixing in the ocean and galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    Kolmogorov's three universal similarity hypotheses are extrapolated to describe scalar fields like temperature mixed by turbulence. The analogous first and second hypotheses for scalars include the effects of Prandtl number and rate-of-strain mixing. Application of velocity and scalar similarity hypotheses to the ocean must take into account the damping of active turbulence by density stratification and the Earth's rotation to form fossil turbulence. By the analogous Kolmogorov third hypothesis for scalars, temperature dissipation rates χ averaged over lengths r > L K should be lognormally distributed with intermittency factors σ 2 that increase with increasing turbulence energy length scales L O as σ ln r 2 approx = μ θ ln(L O /r). Tests of kolmogorovian velocity and scalar universal similarity hypotheses for very large ranges of turbulence length and timescales are provided by data from the ocean and the galactic interstellar medium. These ranges are from 1 to 9 decades in the ocean, and over 12 decades in the interstellar medium. The universal constant for turbulent mixing intermittency μ θ is estimated from oceanic data to be 0.44±0.01, which is remarkably close to estimates for Kolmorgorov's turbulence intermittency constant μ of 0.45±0.05 from galactic as well as atmospheric data. Extreme intermittency complicates the oceanic sampling problem, and may lead to quantitative and qualitative undersampling errors in estimates of mean oceanic dissipation rates and fluxes. Intermittency of turbulence and mixing in the interstellar medium may be a factor in the formation of stars. (author)

  7. Quantum tunneling from rotating black holes with scalar hair in three dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakalli, I.; Gursel, H. [Eastern Mediterranean University, Department of Physics, Mersin-10 (Turkey)

    2016-06-15

    We study the Hawking radiation of scalar and Dirac particles (fermions) emitted from a rotating scalar hair black hole (RSHBH) within the context of three dimensional (3D) Einstein gravity using non-minimally coupled scalar field theory. Amalgamating the quantum tunneling approach with the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, we obtain the tunneling rates of the outgoing particles across the event horizon. Inserting the resultant tunneling rates into the Boltzmann formula, we then obtain the Hawking temperature (T{sub H}) of the 3D RSHBH. (orig.)

  8. Scalar perturbations and conformal transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, J.C.; Tossa, J.

    1995-11-01

    The non-minimal coupling of gravity to a scalar field can be transformed into a minimal coupling through a conformal transformation. We show how to connect the results of a perturbation calculation, performed around a Friedman-Robertson-Walker background solution, before and after the conformal transformation. We work in the synchronous gauge, but we discuss the implications of employing other frames. (author). 16 refs

  9. Nonlinear photons in the type-I Bianchi universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svaiter, N.F.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown that there exist several anisotropic solutions for the non-minimal coupled electromagnetic and gravitational field equations. A solution to vacuum is firstly presented, and afterwards a solution with matter and electric field, where the photon acquires a 'mass' proportional to the square root of the curvature scalar. This solution presents a true singularity in τ=0. A Kasner-like solution is also presented, with matter to the Einstein equations, where appears an ultra-relativistic perfect fluid (p=p). These two models give a good description of the universe dynamics in the neighborhood of the singularity. In this model, near to the singularity, does not occur the phenomenon described by lifshitz of the 'vacuum stage' because the influence of the matter can not be disregarded in regions near to the singularity. (L.C.) [pt

  10. The search for scalar mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, M.R.

    1988-09-01

    The search of I = 0 0 ++ mesons is described. We highlight the crucial role played by the states in the 1 GeV region. An analysis program that with unimpeachable data would produce definitive results on these is outlined and shown with present data to provide prima facie evidence for dynamics beyond that of the quark model. We briefly speculate on the current status of the lowest mass scalar mesons and discuss how experiment can resolve the unanswered issues. 30 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  11. Electroweak phase transition in an extension of the standard model with scalar color octet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, S. W.; Shim, Seong-A; Oh, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    In an extension of the standard model with a scalar color octet, the possibility of the strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is studied by examining the finite-temperature effective Higgs potential at the one-loop level. It is found that there are wide regions in the parameter space that allow the strongly first-order electroweak phase transition, where the Higgs boson mass is larger than the experimental lower bound of 115 GeV, and the masses of the scalar color octet is around 200 GeV. The parameter regions may be explored at the LHC with respect to the electroweak phase transition.

  12. The Charged Lepton Mass Matrix and Non-zero θ13 with TeV Scale New Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashed, Ahmed; Datta, Alakabha

    2012-03-01

    We provide an explicit structure of the charged lepton mass matrix which is 2-3 symmetric except for a single breaking of this symmetry by the muon mass. We identify a flavor symmetric limit for the mass matrices where the first generation is decoupled from the other two in the charged lepton sector while in the neutrino sector the third generation is decoupled from the first two generations. The leptonic mixing in the symmetric limit can be, among other structures, the bi-maximal (BM) or the tri-bimaximal (TBM) mixing. Symmetry breaking effects are included both in the charged lepton and the neutrino sector to produce corrections to the leptonic mixing and explain the recent θ13 measurements. A model that extends the SM by three right handed neutrinos, an extra Higgs doublet, and two singlet scalars is introduced to generate the leptonic mixing.[4pt] This work was supported in part by the US-Egypt Joint Board on Scientific and Technological Co-operation award (Project ID: 1855) administered by the US Department of Agriculture, summer grant from the College of Liberal Arts, University of Mississippi and in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1068052 and 1066293 and the hospitality of the Aspen Center for Physics.

  13. Nonperturbative production of massless scalars during inflation and generation of gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goolsby-Cole, Cody; Sorbo, Lorenzo, E-mail: cgoolsby@physics.umass.edu, E-mail: sorbo@physics.umass.edu [Amherst Center for Fundamental Interactions, Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 01003 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    We discuss the possibility of a feature in the spectrum of inflationary gravitational waves sourced by a scalar field χ whose vacuum fluctuations are amplified by a rapidly time dependent mass. Unlike previous work which has focused on the case in which the mass of the field χ vanishes only for an instant before becoming massive again, we study a system where the scalar field becomes and remains massless through the end of inflation. After applying appropriate constraints to our parameters, we find, for future CMB experiments, a small contribution to the tensor-to-scalar ratio which can be at most of the order r ∼ 10{sup −5}. At smaller scales probed by gravitational interferometers, on the other hand, the energy density in the gravitational waves produced this way might be above the projected sensitivity of LISA, Ω{sub GW} h {sup 2} ∼ 10{sup −13}, in a narrow region of parameter space. If there is more than one χ species, then these amplitudes are enhanced by a factor equal to the number of those species.

  14. Black holes in an expanding universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Gary W; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2010-04-02

    An exact solution representing black holes in an expanding universe is found. The black holes are maximally charged and the universe is expanding with arbitrary equation of state (P = w rho with -1 < or = for all w < or = 1). It is an exact solution of the Einstein-scalar-Maxwell system, in which we have two Maxwell-type U(1) fields coupled to the scalar field. The potential of the scalar field is an exponential. We find a regular horizon, which depends on one parameter [the ratio of the energy density of U(1) fields to that of the scalar field]. The horizon is static because of the balance on the horizon between gravitational attractive force and U(1) repulsive force acting on the scalar field. We also calculate the black hole temperature.

  15. Open string topological amplitudes and gaugino masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Narain, K.S.; Taylor, T.R.

    2005-09-01

    We discuss the moduli-dependent couplings of the higher derivative F-terms (TrW 2 ) h-1 , where W is the gauge N =1 chiral superfield. They are determined by the genus zero topological partition function F (0,h) , on a world-sheet with h boundaries. By string duality, these terms are also related to heterotic topological amplitudes studied in the past, with the topological twist applied only in the left-moving supersymmetric sector of the internal N =(2,0) superconformal field theory. The holomorphic anomaly of these couplings relates them to terms of the form Π n (TrW 2 ) h-2 , where Π's represent chiral projections of non-holomorphic functions of chiral superfields. An important property of these couplings is that they violate R-symmetry for h ≥ 3. As a result, once supersymmetry is broken by D-term expectation values, (TrW 2 ) 2 generates gaugino masses that can be hierarchically smaller than the scalar masses, behaving as m 1/2 ∼ m 0 4 in string units. Similarly, ΠTrW 2 generates Dirac masses for non-chiral brane fermions, of the same order of magnitude. This mechanism can be used for instance to obtain fermion masses at the TeV scale for scalar masses as high as m 0 ∼ O (10 13 ) GeV. We present explicit examples in toroidal string compactifications with intersecting D-branes. (author)

  16. Search for scalar top quark pair production in natural gauge mediated supersymmetry models with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Akiyama, Kunihiro; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amorós, Gabriel; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blondel, Alain; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Bondioli, Mario; Boonekamp, Maarten; Booth, Chris; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Botterill, David; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozhko, Nikolay; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Brodet, Eyal; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Heather; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Capasso, Luciano; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Bryan; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cauz, Diego; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Chareyre, Eve; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Illectra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocca, Claudia; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coe, Paul; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cogneras, Eric; Colas, Jacques; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colon, German; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Costin, Tudor; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cowden, Christopher; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crupi, Roberto; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Lotto, Barbara; de Mora, Lee; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Papa, Carlo; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Deng, Jianrong; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diblen, Faruk; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobinson, Robert; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolenc, Irena; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; 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Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Forbush, David Alan; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froeschl, Robert; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; 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Giusti, Paolo; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glitza, Karl-Walter; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; Gonzalez, Saul; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Gosdzik, Bjoern; Goshaw, Alfred; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Grau, Nathan; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grinstein, Sebastian; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guida, Angelo; Guindon, Stefan; Guler, Hulya; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gushchin, Vladimir; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Haider, Stefan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Haller, Johannes; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hare, Gabriel; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Karl; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hawkins, Donovan; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; He, Mao; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Henry-Couannier, Frédéric; Hensel, Carsten; Henß, Tobias; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horn, Claus; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hruska, Ivan; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Husemann, Ulrich; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Imori, Masatoshi; Ince, Tayfun; Inigo-Golfin, Joaquin; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishikawa, Akimasa; Ishino, Masaya; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakubek, Jan; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jenni, Peter; Jeremie, Andrea; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Lars; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kaplon, Jan; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katsoufis, Elias; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kayl, Manuel; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kennedy, John; Kenyon, Mike; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Min Suk; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiver, Andrey; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knecht, Neil; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Kollefrath, Michael; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kootz, Andreas; Koperny, Stefan; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, James; Kraus, Jana; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruth, Andre; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kuhn, Dietmar; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kummer, Christian; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Labbe, Julien; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lamanna, Massimo; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lane, Jenna; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Maner, Christophe; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; LeGeyt, Benjamin; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepold, Florian; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lichtnecker, Markus; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Chuanlei; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, Xinchou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Andreas; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Lumb, Debra; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Macana Goia, Jorge Andres; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Mader, Wolfgang; Maenner, Reinhard; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mameghani, Raphael; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Mangeard, Pierre-Simon; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Martens, Kalen; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matricon, Pierre; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Mayne, Anna; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; McGlone, Helen; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Meyer, Thomas Christian; Meyer, W Thomas; Miao, Jiayuan; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Miyazaki, Kazuki; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mockett, Paul; Moed, Shulamit; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molina-Perez, Jorge; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montesano, Simone; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morin, Jerome; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicolas, Ludovic; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nishiyama, Tomonori; Nisius, Richard; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nordberg, Markus; Norton, Peter; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nugent, Ian Michael; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neale, Steve; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okada, Shogo; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orlov, Iliya; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Park, Woochun; Parker, Andy; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pecsy, Martin; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Persembe, Seda; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Poghosyan, Tatevik; Pohl, Martin; Polci, Francesco; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomarede, Daniel Marc; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Zhonghua; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quinonez, Fernando; Raas, Marcel; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Rador, Tonguc; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinherz-Aronis, Erez; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijpstra, Manouk; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodriguez, Diego; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosenberg, Eli; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexander; Rozen, Yoram; 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Dean; Schamov, Andrey; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitz, Martin; Schöning, André; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Jan; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwierz, Rainer; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shibata, Akira; Shichi, Hideharu; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Maria; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Douglas; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Soni, Nitesh; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spila, Federico; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straes