WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-swirling coaxial-jet particle-laden

  1. Experimental investigation of turbulence modulation in particle-laden coaxial jets by Phase Doppler Anemometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mergheni, M.A. [CORIA UMR 6614 CNRS, Universite et INSA de ROUEN, Avenue de l' Universite, BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray, Cedex (France)]|[LESTE Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Sautet, J.C.; Godard, G. [CORIA UMR 6614 CNRS, Universite et INSA de ROUEN, Avenue de l' Universite, BP 12, 76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray, Cedex (France); Ben Ticha, H.; Ben Nasrallah, S. [LESTE Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia)

    2009-03-15

    The effect of solid particles on the flow characteristics of axisymmetric turbulent coaxial jets for two flow conditions was studied. Simultaneous measurements of size and velocity distributions of continuous and dispersed phases in a two-phase flow are presented using a Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) technique. Spherical glass particles with a particle diameter range from 102 to 212 {mu}m were used in this two-phase flow, the experimental results indicate a significant influence of the solid particles and the Re on the flow characteristics. The data show that the gas phase has lower mean velocity in the near-injector region and a higher mean velocity at the developed region. Near the injector at low Reynolds number (Re = 2839) the presence of the particles dampens the gas-phase turbulence, while at higher Reynolds number (Re = 11 893) the gas-phase turbulence and the velocity fluctuation of particle-laden jets are increased. The particle velocity at higher Reynolds number (Re = 11 893) and is lower at lower Reynolds number (Re = 2839). The slip velocity between particles and gas phase existed over the flow domain was examined. More importantly, the present experiment results suggest that, consideration of the gas characteristic length scales is insufficient to predict gas-phase turbulence modulation in gas-particle flows. (author)

  2. PASSIVE CONTROL OF PARTICLE DISPERSION IN A PARTICLE-LADEN CIRCULAR JET USING ELLIPTIC CO-ANNULAR FLOW: A MEANS FOR IMPROVING UTILIZATION AND EMISSION REDUCTIONS IN PULVERIZED COAL BURNER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsan R. Choudhuri

    2003-06-01

    A passive control technology utilizing elliptic co-flow to control the particle flinging and particle dispersion in a particle (coal)-laden flow was investigated using experimental and numerical techniques. Preferential concentration of particles occurs in particle-laden jets used in pulverized coal burner and causes uncontrollable NO{sub x} formation due to inhomogeneous local stoichiometry. This particular project was aimed at characterizing the near-field flow behavior of elliptic coaxial jets. The knowledge gained from the project will serve as the basis of further investigation on fluid-particle interactions in an asymmetric coaxial jet flow-field and thus is important to improve the design of pulverized coal burners where non-homogeneity of particle concentration causes increased NO{sub x} formation.

  3. Study of powder formation in reactive coaxial jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablitzer, C.

    1999-01-01

    One step of the conversion of gaseous UF 6 to solid UO 2 by dry route is the formation of particles of UO 2 F 2 in a triple coaxial jet UF 6 /N 2 /H 2 O. The characteristics of resulting powder have an influence on the properties of final particles of UO 2 , and then on the quality of pellets of nuclear fuel. So a good control of this step of the process is of interest. This study deals with an experimental investigation and a modelling of the influence of various parameters on particles obtained by reaction in a turbulent coaxial jet. For example, the influence of absolute and relative velocities of gases on particle size distributions has been investigated. Two kinds of experimental studies have been undertaken. First, the development of mixing layers in the near field of the jet has been evaluated with temperature measurements. Then, particle size distributions have been measured with a turbidimetric sensor, for particles obtained by hydrolysis of gaseous metallic chlorides (SnCl 4 , TiCl 4 ) in double and triple coaxial jets. A model has been proposed for mixing of gases and growth of particles. It takes into account the development of mixing layers, meso-mixing, micro-mixing and growth of particles through agglomeration. The influence of operating parameters, especially velocities, on experimental results appear to be different for TiCl 4 /H 2 O jets and SnCl 4 /H 2 O jets. In fact, a comparison of theoretical and experimental results shows that particles obtained by hydrolysis of TiCl 4 seem to grow mainly through agglomeration whereas another growth phenomenon may be involved for particles obtained by hydrolysis of SnCl 4 . (author)

  4. Study of fuel powder formation in reactive coaxial jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablitzer, C.

    1999-01-01

    One step of the conversion of gaseous UF 6 to solid UO 2 by dry route is the formation of particles of UO 2 F 2 in a triple coaxial jet UF 6 /N 2 /H 2 O. The characteristics of resulting powder have an influence on the properties of final particles of UO 2 , and then on the quality of pellets of nuclear fuel. So a good control of this step of the process is of interest. This study deals with an experimental investigation and modelling of the influence of various parameters on particles obtained by reaction in a turbulent coaxial jet. For example, the influence of absolute and relative velocities of gases on particle size distributions has been investigated. Two kinds of experimental studies have been undertaken. First, the development of mixing layers in the near field of the jet has been evaluated with temperature measurements. Then, particle size distributions have been measured with e turbidimetric sensor, for particles obtained by hydrolysis of gaseous metallic chlorides (SnCl 4 , TiCl 4 ) in double and triple coaxial jets. A model has been proposed for mixing of gases and growth of particles. It takes into account the development of mixing layers, meso-mixing, micro-mixing and growth of particles through agglomeration. The influence of operating parameters, especially velocities, on experimental results appear to be different for TiCl 4 /H 2 O jets and SnCl 4 /H 2 O jets. In fact, a comparison of theoretical and experimental results shows that particles obtained by hydrolysis of TiCl 4 seem to grow mainly through agglomeration whereas another growth phenomenon may be involved for particles obtained by hydrolysis of SnCl 4 . (authors)

  5. A numerical study of non-isothermal turbulent coaxial jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriaa, Wassim; Abderrazak, Kamel; Mhiri, Hatem [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Laboratoire de Mecanique des Fluides et Thermique, Monastir (Tunisia); Palec, Georges le; Bournot, Philippe [Institut de Mecanique de Marseille, Marseille (France)

    2008-07-15

    In this work, we propose to study non isothermal air-air coaxial jets with two different approaches: parabolic and elliptic approaches. The standard k-{epsilon} model and the RSM model were applied in this study. The numerical resolution of the equations governing this flow type was carried out for: the parabolic approach, by a ''home-made'' CFD code based on a finite difference method, and the elliptic approach by an industrial code (FLUENT) based on a finite volume method. In forced convection mode (Fr={infinity}), the two turbulence models are valid for the prediction of the mean flow. But for turbulent sizes, k-{epsilon} model gives results closer to those achieved in experiments compared to RSM Model. Concerning the limit of validity of the parabolic and elliptic approaches, we showed that for velocities ratio r lower than 1, the results of the two approaches were satisfactory. On the other hand, for r>1, the difference between the results became increasingly significant. In mixed convection mode (Fr{approx_equal}20), the results obtained by the two turbulence models for the mean axial velocity were very different even in the plume region. For the temperature and the turbulent sizes the two models give satisfactory results which agree well with the correlations suggested by the experimenters for X{>=}20. Thus, the second order model with {sigma}{sub t}=0.85 is more effective for a coaxial jet study in a mixed convection mode. (orig.)

  6. Dynamic self-organization in particle-laden channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.; Vreman, A.W.

    2006-01-01

    We study dynamic flow-structuring and mean-flow properties of turbulent particle-laden riser-flow at significant particle volume fractions of about 1.5%. We include particle–particle as well as particle–fluid interactions through inelastic collisions and drag forces, in a so-called four-way coupled

  7. Numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.; McLaughlin, J.B.; Kontomaris, K.; Portela, L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents results for the behavior of particle-laden gases in a small Reynolds number vertical channel down flow. Results will be presented for the effects of particle feedback on the gas-phase turbulence and for the concentration profile of the particles. The effects of density ratio,

  8. Radiometric methods in the measurement of particle-laden flows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zych, M.; Hanus, R.; Vlasák, Pavel; Jaszczur, M.; Petryka, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 318, August (2017), s. 491-500 ISSN 0032-5910 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : particle-laden flow * radiotracer * gamma absorption * cross-correlation * polymetallic nodules Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.942, year: 2016

  9. Scaling during capillary thinning of particle-laden drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thete, Sumeet; Wagoner, Brayden; Basaran, Osman

    2017-11-01

    A fundamental understanding of drop formation is crucial in many applications such as ink-jet printing, microfluidic devices, and atomization. During drop formation, the about-to-form drop is connected to the fluid hanging from the nozzle via a thinning filament. Therefore, the physics of capillary thinning of filaments is key to understanding drop formation and has been thoroughly studied for pure Newtonian fluids using theory, simulations, and experiments. In some of the applications however, the forming drop and hence the thinning filament may contain solid particles. The thinning dynamics of such particle-laden filaments differs radically from that of particle-free filaments. Moreover, our understanding of filament thinning in the former case is poor compared to that in the latter case despite the growing interest in pinch-off of particle-laden filaments. In this work, we go beyond similar studies and experimentally explore the impact of solid particles on filament thinning by measuring both the radial and axial scalings in the neck region. The results are summarized in terms of a phase diagram of capillary thinning of particle-laden filaments.

  10. Numerical Simulation of Hydrogen Air Supersonic Coaxial Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharavath, Malsur; Manna, Pulinbehari; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, the turbulent structure of coaxial supersonic H2-air jet is explored numerically by solving three dimensional RANS equations along with two equation k-ɛ turbulence model. Grid independence of the solution is demonstrated by estimating the error distribution using Grid Convergence Index. Distributions of flow parameters in different planes are analyzed to explain the mixing and combustion characteristics of high speed coaxial jets. The flow field is seen mostly diffusive in nature and hydrogen diffusion is confined to core region of the jet. Both single step laminar finite rate chemistry and turbulent reacting calculation employing EDM combustion model are performed to find the effect of turbulence-chemistry interaction in the flow field. Laminar reaction predicts higher H2 mol fraction compared to turbulent reaction because of lower reaction rate caused by turbulence chemistry interaction. Profiles of major species and temperature match well with experimental data at different axial locations; although, the computed profiles show a narrower shape in the far field region. These results demonstrate that standard two equation class turbulence model with single step kinetics based turbulence chemistry interaction can describe H2-air reaction adequately in high speed flows.

  11. IHT: Tools for Computing Insolation Absorption by Particle Laden Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grout, R. W.

    2013-10-01

    This report describes IHT, a toolkit for computing radiative heat exchange between particles. Well suited for insolation absorption computations, it is also has potential applications in combustion (sooting flames), biomass gasification processes and similar processes. The algorithm is based on the 'Photon Monte Carlo' approach and implemented in a library that can be interfaced with a variety of computational fluid dynamics codes to analyze radiative heat transfer in particle-laden flows. The emphasis in this report is on the data structures and organization of IHT for developers seeking to use the IHT toolkit to add Photon Monte Carlo capabilities to their own codes.

  12. An experimental study of the supersonic, dual, coaxial jets impinging on an inclined flat plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Bae; Lee, Jun Hee; Woo, Sun Hoon; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2002-01-01

    The impinging supersonic jets have been applied for rocket launching system, thrust control, gas turbine blade cooling, etc. Recently the supersonic, dual, coaxial jets are being extensively used in many diverse fields of industrial processes since they lead to more improved performance, compared with the conventional supersonic jets impinging on an object. In the present study, experimentation is carried out to investigate the supersonic, dual, coaxial jets impinging on an inclined flat plate. A convergent-divergent nozzle with a design Mach number of 2.0 and annular sonic nozzle are used to make the dual, coaxial jet flows. The angle of the impinging flat plate is varied from 30 .deg. to 60 .deg. and the distance between the dual coaxial nozzle and flat plate is also varied. Detailed pressures on the impinging plate are measured to analyze the flow fields, which are also visualized using Schlieren optical method

  13. Particle-laden flow from geophysical to Kolmogorov scales

    CERN Document Server

    Clercx, Herman; Uijttewaal, Wim

    2007-01-01

    The dispersion of particles in a flow is of central importance in various geophysical and environmental problems. The spreading of aerosols and soot in the air, the growth and dispersion of plankton blooms in seas and oceans, or the transport of sediment in rivers, estuaries and coastal regions are striking examples. These problems are characterized by strong nonlinear coupling between several dynamical mechanisms. As a result, processes on widely different length and time scales are simultaneously of importance. The multiscale nature of this challenging field motivated the EUROMECH colloquium on particle-laden flow that was held at the University of Twente in 2006. This book contains a selection of the papers that were presented.

  14. Direct Numerical Simulations of Particle-Laden Turbulent Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebakumar, Anand Samuel; Premnath, Kannan; Abraham, John

    2017-11-01

    In a recent experimental study, Lau and Nathan (2014) reported that the distribution of particles in a turbulent pipe flow is strongly influenced by the Stokes number (St). At St lower than 1, particles migrate toward the wall and at St greater than 10 they tend to migrate toward the axis. It was suggested that this preferential migration of particles is due to two forces, the Saffman lift force and the turbophoretic force. Saffman lift force represents a force acting on the particle as a result of a velocity gradient across the particle when it leads or lags the fluid flow. Turbophoretic force is induced by turbulence which tends to move the particle in the direction of decreasing turbulent kinetic energy. In this study, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is employed to simulate a particle-laden turbulent channel flow through Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). We find that the preferential migration is a function of particle size in addition to the St. We explain the effect of the particle size and St on the Saffman lift force and turbophoresis and present how this affects particle concentration at different conditions.

  15. Transition to turbulence and noise radiation in heated coaxial jet flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloor, Michael, E-mail: gloor@ifd.mavt.ethz.ch; Bühler, Stefan; Kleiser, Leonhard [Institute of Fluid Dynamics, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    Laminar-turbulent transition and noise radiation of a parametrized set of subsonic coaxial jet flows with a hot primary (core) stream are investigated numerically by Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) and direct noise computation. This study extends our previous research on local linear stability of heated coaxial jet flows by analyzing the nonlinear evolution of initially laminar flows disturbed by a superposition of small-amplitude unstable eigenmodes. First, a baseline configuration is studied to shed light on the flow dynamics of coaxial jet flows. Subsequently, LESs are performed for a range of Mach and Reynolds numbers to systematically analyze the influences of the temperature and the velocity ratios between the primary and the secondary (bypass) stream. The results provide a basis for a detailed analysis of fundamental flow-acoustic phenomena in the considered heated coaxial jet flows. Increasing the primary-jet temperature leads to an increase of fluctuation levels and to an amplification of far-field noise, especially at low frequencies. Strong mixing between the cold bypass stream and the hot primary stream as well as the intermittent character of the flow field at the end of the potential core lead to a pronounced noise radiation at an aft angle of approximately 35{sup ∘}. The velocity ratio strongly affects the shear-layer development and therefore also the noise generation mechanisms. Increasing the secondary-stream velocity amplifies the dominance of outer shear-layer perturbations while the disturbance growth rates in the inner shear layer decrease. Already for r{sub mic} > 40R{sub 1}, where r{sub mic} is the distance from the end of the potential core and R{sub 1} is the core-jet radius, a perfect 1/r{sub mic} decay of the sound pressure amplitudes is observed. The potential-core length increases for higher secondary-stream velocities which leads to a shift of the center of the dominant acoustic radiation in the downstream direction.

  16. Correlation of optical emission and turbulent length scale in a coaxial jet diffusion flame

    OpenAIRE

    松山, 新吾; Matsuyama, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the correlation between optical emission and turbulent length scale in a coaxial jet diffusion flame. To simulate the H2O emission from an H2/O2 diffusion flame, radiative transfer is calculated on flame data obtained by numerical simulation. H2O emission characteristics are examined for a one-dimensional opposed-flow diffusion flame. The results indicate that H2O emission intensity is linearly dependent on flame thickness. The simulation of H2O emission is then exte...

  17. Effect of outer stagnation pressure on jet structure in supersonic coaxial jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myoung Jong; Woo, Sang Woo; Lee, Byeong Eun; Kwon, Soon Bum

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics of dual coaxial jet which composed of inner supersonic nozzle of 26500 in constant expansion rate with 1.91 design Mach number and outer converging one with 40 .deg. C converging angle with the variation of outer nozzle stagnation pressure are experimentally investigated in this paper. In which the stagnation pressure for the inner supersonic nozzle is 750kPa thus, the inner jet leaving the nozzle is slightly underexpanded. The plenum pressure of outer nozzle are varied from 200 to 600kPa. Flow visualizations by shadowgraph method, impact pressure and centerline static pressure measurements of dual coaxial jet are presented. The results show that the presence of outer jet affects significantly the structures and pressure distributions of inner jet. And outer jet causes Mach disk which does not appear for the case of single jet stream. As the stagnation pressure of outer jet increases, impact pressure undulation is severe, but the average impact pressure keeps high far downstream

  18. A Level-set based framework for viscous simulation of particle-laden supersonic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pratik; Sen, Oishik; Jacobs, Gustaaf; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2017-06-01

    Particle-laden supersonic flows are important in natural and industrial processes, such as, volcanic eruptions, explosions, pneumatic conveyance of particle in material processing etc. Numerical study of such high-speed particle laden flows at the mesoscale calls for a numerical framework which allows simulation of supersonic flow around multiple moving solid objects. Only a few efforts have been made toward development of numerical frameworks for viscous simulation of particle-fluid interaction in supersonic flow regime. The current work presents a Cartesian grid based sharp-interface method for viscous simulations of interaction between supersonic flow with moving rigid particles. The no-slip boundary condition is imposed at the solid-fluid interfaces using a modified ghost fluid method (GFM). The current method is validated against the similarity solution of compressible boundary layer over flat-plate and benchmark numerical solution for steady supersonic flow over cylinder. Further validation is carried out against benchmark numerical results for shock induced lift-off of a cylinder in a shock tube. 3D simulation of steady supersonic flow over sphere is performed to compare the numerically obtained drag co-efficient with experimental results. A particle-resolved viscous simulation of shock interaction with a cloud of particles is performed to demonstrate that the current method is suitable for large-scale particle resolved simulations of particle-laden supersonic flows.

  19. Design of a Facility for Studying Shock-Cell Noise on Single and Coaxial Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Guariglia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Shock-cell noise occurs in aero-engines when the nozzle exhaust is supersonic and shock-cells are present in the jet. In commercial turbofan engines, at cruise, the secondary flow is often supersonic underexpanded, with the formation of annular shock-cells in the jet and consequent onset of shock-cell noise. This paper aims at describing the design process of the new facility FAST (Free jet AeroacouSTic laboratory at the von Karman Institute, aimed at the investigation of the shock-cell noise phenomenon on a dual stream jet. The rig consists of a coaxial open jet, with supersonic capability for both the primary and secondary flow. A coaxial silencer was designed to suppress the spurious noise coming from the feeding lines. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations of the coaxial jet and acoustic simulations of the silencer have been carried out to support the design choices. Finally, the rig has been validated by performing experimental measurements on a supersonic single stream jet and comparing the results with the literature. Fine-scale PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry coupled with a microphone array in the far field have been used in this scope. Preliminary results of the dual stream jet are also shown.

  20. Simulation and scaling analysis of a spherical particle-laden blast wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Y.; Balachandar, S.

    2018-05-01

    A spherical particle-laden blast wave, generated by a sudden release of a sphere of compressed gas-particle mixture, is investigated by numerical simulation. The present problem is a multiphase extension of the classic finite-source spherical blast-wave problem. The gas-particle flow can be fully determined by the initial radius of the spherical mixture and the properties of gas and particles. In many applications, the key dimensionless parameters, such as the initial pressure and density ratios between the compressed gas and the ambient air, can vary over a wide range. Parametric studies are thus performed to investigate the effects of these parameters on the characteristic time and spatial scales of the particle-laden blast wave, such as the maximum radius the contact discontinuity can reach and the time when the particle front crosses the contact discontinuity. A scaling analysis is conducted to establish a scaling relation between the characteristic scales and the controlling parameters. A length scale that incorporates the initial pressure ratio is proposed, which is able to approximately collapse the simulation results for the gas flow for a wide range of initial pressure ratios. This indicates that an approximate similarity solution for a spherical blast wave exists, which is independent of the initial pressure ratio. The approximate scaling is also valid for the particle front if the particles are small and closely follow the surrounding gas.

  1. Simulation and scaling analysis of a spherical particle-laden blast wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Y.; Balachandar, S.

    2018-02-01

    A spherical particle-laden blast wave, generated by a sudden release of a sphere of compressed gas-particle mixture, is investigated by numerical simulation. The present problem is a multiphase extension of the classic finite-source spherical blast-wave problem. The gas-particle flow can be fully determined by the initial radius of the spherical mixture and the properties of gas and particles. In many applications, the key dimensionless parameters, such as the initial pressure and density ratios between the compressed gas and the ambient air, can vary over a wide range. Parametric studies are thus performed to investigate the effects of these parameters on the characteristic time and spatial scales of the particle-laden blast wave, such as the maximum radius the contact discontinuity can reach and the time when the particle front crosses the contact discontinuity. A scaling analysis is conducted to establish a scaling relation between the characteristic scales and the controlling parameters. A length scale that incorporates the initial pressure ratio is proposed, which is able to approximately collapse the simulation results for the gas flow for a wide range of initial pressure ratios. This indicates that an approximate similarity solution for a spherical blast wave exists, which is independent of the initial pressure ratio. The approximate scaling is also valid for the particle front if the particles are small and closely follow the surrounding gas.

  2. Influence of lubrication forces in direct numerical simulations of particle-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitri, Rohit; Peters, Frank; Padding, Johan; Kuipers, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Accurate numerical representation of particle-laden flows is important for fundamental understanding and optimizing the complex processes such as proppant transport in fracking. Liquid-solid flows are fundamentally different from gas-solid flows because of lower density ratios (solid to fluid) and non-negligible lubrication forces. In this interface resolved model, fluid-solid coupling is achieved by incorporating the no-slip boundary condition implicitly at particle's surfaces by means of an efficient second order ghost-cell immersed boundary method. A fixed Eulerian grid is used for solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the particle-particle interactions are implemented using the soft sphere collision and sub-grid scale lubrication model. Due to the range of influence of lubrication force on a smaller scale than the grid size, it is important to implement the lubrication model accurately. In this work, different implementations of the lubrication model on particle dynamics are studied for various flow conditions. The effect of a particle surface roughness on lubrication force and the particle transport is also investigated. This study is aimed at developing a validated methodology to incorporate lubrication models in direct numerical simulation of particle laden flows. This research is supported from Grant 13CSER014 of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  3. Uncertainty quantification in Eulerian-Lagrangian models for particle-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, Vasileios; Jacobs, Gustaaf; Udaykumar, Hs

    2017-11-01

    A common approach to ameliorate the computational burden in simulations of particle-laden flows is to use a point-particle based Eulerian-Lagrangian model, which traces individual particles in their Lagrangian frame and models particles as mathematical points. The particle motion is determined by Stokes drag law, which is empirically corrected for Reynolds number, Mach number and other parameters. The empirical corrections are subject to uncertainty. Treating them as random variables renders the coupled system of PDEs and ODEs stochastic. An approach to quantify the propagation of this parametric uncertainty to the particle solution variables is proposed. The approach is based on averaging of the governing equations and allows for estimation of the first moments of the quantities of interest. We demonstrate the feasibility of our proposed methodology of uncertainty quantification of particle-laden flows on one-dimensional linear and nonlinear Eulerian-Lagrangian systems. This research is supported by AFOSR under Grant FA9550-16-1-0008.

  4. Simultaneous measurement of particle and fluid velocities in particle-laden flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, D. X.; Lee, D. Y.

    2009-01-01

    For the velocity measurement in a particle-laden fluid flow, the fluid velocity and the inherently dispersed particle velocity can be analyzed by using PIV and PTV, respectively. Since the PIV result statistically represents the average displacement of all the particles in a PIV image, it is inevitable that the PIV result includes the influence of the dispersed particles' displacement if a single CCD camera is used to simultaneously measure the fluid velocity and the dispersed particle velocity. The influence of dispersed particles should be excluded before the PIV analysis in order to evaluate the fluid velocity accurately. In this study, the optimum replacement brightness of dispersed particles to minimize the false influence of dispersed particles on the PIV analysis was theoretically derived. Simulation results show that the modification of dispersed particle brightness can significantly reduce the PIV error caused by the dispersed particles. This modification method was also verified in the analysis of an actual experimental case of the particle-laden fluid flow in a triangular grooved channel

  5. Study of fuel powder formation in reactive coaxial jets; Etude de la formation de poudre dans des jets coaxiaux reactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablitzer, C

    1999-11-09

    One step of the conversion of gaseous UF{sub 6} to solid UO{sub 2} by dry route is the formation of particles of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} in a triple coaxial jet UF{sub 6}/N{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O. The characteristics of resulting powder have an influence on the properties of final particles of UO{sub 2}, and then on the quality of pellets of nuclear fuel. So a good control of this step of the process is of interest. This study deals with an experimental investigation and modelling of the influence of various parameters on particles obtained by reaction in a turbulent coaxial jet. For example, the influence of absolute and relative velocities of gases on particle size distributions has been investigated. Two kinds of experimental studies have been undertaken. First, the development of mixing layers in the near field of the jet has been evaluated with temperature measurements. Then, particle size distributions have been measured with e turbidimetric sensor, for particles obtained by hydrolysis of gaseous metallic chlorides (SnCl{sub 4}, TiCl{sub 4}) in double and triple coaxial jets. A model has been proposed for mixing of gases and growth of particles. It takes into account the development of mixing layers, meso-mixing, micro-mixing and growth of particles through agglomeration. The influence of operating parameters, especially velocities, on experimental results appear to be different for TiCl{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O jets and SnCl{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O jets. In fact, a comparison of theoretical and experimental results shows that particles obtained by hydrolysis of TiCl{sub 4} seem to grow mainly through agglomeration whereas another growth phenomenon may be involved for particles obtained by hydrolysis of SnCl{sub 4}. (authors)

  6. Erosion of a grooved surface caused by impact of particle-laden flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sohyun; Yang, Eunjin; Kim, Ho-Young

    2016-11-01

    Solid erosion can be a life-limiting process for mechanical elements in erosive environments, thus it is of practical importance in many industries such as construction, mining, and coal conversion. Erosion caused by particle-laden flow occurs through diverse mechanisms, such as cutting, plastic deformation, brittle fracture, fatigue and melting, depending on particle velocity, total particle mass and impingement angle. Among a variety of attempts to lessen erosion, here we investigate the effectiveness of millimeter-sized grooves on the surface. By experimentally measuring the erosion rates of smooth and triangular-grooved surfaces under various impingement angles, we find that erosion can be significantly reduced within a finite range of impingement angles. We show that such erosion resistance is attributed to the swirls of air within grooves and the differences in erosive strength of normal and slanted impact. In particular, erosion is mitigated when we increase the effective area under normal impact causing plastic deformation and fracture while decreasing the area under slanted impact that cuts the surface to a large degree. Our quantitative model for the erosion rate of grooved surfaces considering the foregoing effects agrees with the measurement results.

  7. A sharp interface Cartesian grid method for viscous simulation of shocked particle-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pratik; Sen, Oishik; Jacobs, Gustaaf; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2017-09-01

    A Cartesian grid-based sharp interface method is presented for viscous simulations of shocked particle-laden flows. The moving solid-fluid interfaces are represented using level sets. A moving least-squares reconstruction is developed to apply the no-slip boundary condition at solid-fluid interfaces and to supply viscous stresses to the fluid. The algorithms developed in this paper are benchmarked against similarity solutions for the boundary layer over a fixed flat plate and against numerical solutions for moving interface problems such as shock-induced lift-off of a cylinder in a channel. The framework is extended to 3D and applied to calculate low Reynolds number steady supersonic flow over a sphere. Viscous simulation of the interaction of a particle cloud with an incident planar shock is demonstrated; the average drag on the particles and the vorticity field in the cloud are compared to the inviscid case to elucidate the effects of viscosity on momentum transfer between the particle and fluid phases. The methods developed will be useful for obtaining accurate momentum and heat transfer closure models for macro-scale shocked particulate flow applications such as blast waves and dust explosions.

  8. Cloud-In-Cell modeling of shocked particle-laden flows at a ``SPARSE'' cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverniers, Soren; Jacobs, Gustaaf; Sen, Oishik; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2017-11-01

    A common tool for enabling process-scale simulations of shocked particle-laden flows is Eulerian-Lagrangian Particle-Source-In-Cell (PSIC) modeling where each particle is traced in its Lagrangian frame and treated as a mathematical point. Its dynamics are governed by Stokes drag corrected for high Reynolds and Mach numbers. The computational burden is often reduced further through a ``Cloud-In-Cell'' (CIC) approach which amalgamates groups of physical particles into computational ``macro-particles''. CIC does not account for subgrid particle fluctuations, leading to erroneous predictions of cloud dynamics. A Subgrid Particle-Averaged Reynolds-Stress Equivalent (SPARSE) model is proposed that incorporates subgrid interphase velocity and temperature perturbations. A bivariate Gaussian source distribution, whose covariance captures the cloud's deformation to first order, accounts for the particles' momentum and energy influence on the carrier gas. SPARSE is validated by conducting tests on the interaction of a particle cloud with the accelerated flow behind a shock. The cloud's average dynamics and its deformation over time predicted with SPARSE converge to their counterparts computed with reference PSIC models as the number of Gaussians is increased from 1 to 16. This work was supported by AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-16-1-0008.

  9. The effect of wall geometry in particle-laden turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdehkakha, Hoora; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2016-11-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flow plays a significant role in various industrial applications, as turbulence alters the exchange of momentum and energy between particles and fluid flow. In wall-bounded flows, inhomogeneity in turbulent properties is the primary cause of turbophoresis that leads the particles toward the walls. Conversely, shear-induced lift force on the particles can become important if large scale vortical structures are present. The objective of this study is to understand the effects of geometry on fluid flows and consequently on particles transport and concentration. Direct numerical simulations combined with point particle Lagrangian tracking are performed for several geometries such as a pipe, channel, square duct, and squircle (rounded-corners duct). In non-circular ducts, anisotropic and inhomogeneous Reynolds stresses are the most influential phenomena that produce the secondary flows. It has been shown that these motions can have a significant impact on transporting momentum, vorticity, and energy from the core of the duct to the corners. The main focus of the present study is to explore the effects of near the wall structures and secondary flows on turbophoresis, lift, and particle concentration.

  10. Research on effect of turbulence models for numerical simulation of temperature fluctuation caused by coaxial-jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qiong; Lu Daogang; Lu Jing

    2012-01-01

    The 3D temperature fluctuation phenomenon caused by the mixing of the coaxial-jet hot and cold fluids was simulated by Fluent software. Several special turbulence models were applied to prediction of this phenomenon, i.e. large eddy simulation model (LES), Reynolds stress model (RSM) and standard k-ω model. By the comparison of the computed data and experimental ones, it is shown that LES is capable of predicting the mixing process. LES model best predicts the time-averaged temperature in the radius, height and azimuth directions. Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes method (RANS) predicts the extended mixing of the hot and cold fluids. It is also shown that the transient temperature fluctuations are accurately predicted by LES model, while those not by RANS. (authors)

  11. Investigating the dynamics of Vulcanian explosions: scaled laboratory experiments of particle-laden puffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, A. B.; Phillips, J. C.; Chojnicki, K. N.

    2006-12-01

    Scaled laboratory experiments analogous to Vulcanian eruptions were conducted, producing particle-laden jets and plumes. A reservoir of a mixture of water and isopropanol plus solid particles (kaolin or Ballotini glass spheres) was pressurized and suddenly released via a rapid-release valve into a 2 ft by 2 ft by 4 ft plexiglass tank containing fresh water. The duration of the subsequent flow was limited by the potential energy associated with the pressurized fluid rather than by the available volume of fluid or by the duration of the valve opening. Particle size (4 &45 microns) and concentration (0 to 10 vol%) were varied in order to change particle settling characteristics and control bulk mixture density (960 kg m-3 to 1060 kg m-3). Water and isopropanol in varying proportions created a light interstitial fluid to simulate buoyant volcanic gases in erupted mixtures. Variations in reservoir pressure and vent size allowed exploration of controlling source parameters; total momentum injected (M) and total buoyancy injected (B). Mass flux at the vent was measured by an in-line Coriolis flowmeter sampling at 100 Hz, allowing rapidly varying M and B to be recorded. The velocity-height relationship of each experiment was measured from high-speed video footage, permitting classification into the following groups: long continuously accelerating jets; accelerating jets transitioning to plumes; and collapsing fountains which generated density currents. Field-documented Vulcanian explosions exhibit this same wide range of behavior, demonstrating that regimes obtained in the laboratory are relevant to natural systems. A generalized framework of results was defined as follows. Increasing M/B for small particles (4 microns; settling time>>experiment duration) pushes the system from collapsing fountains to low-energy plumes to high-energy, continuously accelerating jets; increasing M/B for large particles (45 microns; settling time non-dimensional groups were combined to

  12. Ultra-high-speed digital in-line holography system applied to particle-laden supersonic underexpanded jet flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Buchmann, Nicolas A.; Soria, Julio

    2012-01-01

    -fluid interactions in these high-speed flows special high performance techniques are required. The present work is an investigation into the applicability of magnified digital in-line holography with ultra-high-speed recording for the study of three-dimensional supersonic particle-laden flows. An optical setup...... × 10mm calibration grid and 120 μm particles on a glass plate. In the case with the calibration grid it is found that accurate determination of the depthwise position is possible. However, when applying the same technique to the particle target, significant problems are encountered. © 2012...

  13. Experimental investigation on effect of inlet velocity ratios for 3-D temperature fluctuation caused by coaxial-jet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Qiong; Lu Daogang; Zhang Pan; Shi Wenbo; Tian Lu

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was performed to study the effect of inlet velocity ratios for 3-D temperature fluctuation caused by coaxial-jet flows based on the 3-D temperature and 2-D velocity fields. The experiment results show that the mixing behavior is completed at the bottom of test section in R<1 condition. The averaged temperatures at the bottom of the flow field are asymmetric in R1 condition, the intensities of temperature fluctuations are less than those in R≤1 conditions. The strong temperature fluctuations occur in the regions between the hot and cold flow, as well as between the hot flow and environmental flow in this case. The frequencies of temperature fluctuations are less than 7 Hz. (authors)

  14. Particle Laden Turbulence in a Radiation Environment Using a Portable High Preformace Solver Based on the Legion Runtime System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Hilario; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2017-11-01

    Soleil-X is a multi-physics solver being developed at Stanford University as a part of the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program II. Our goal is to conduct high fidelity simulations of particle laden turbulent flows in a radiation environment for solar energy receiver applications as well as to demonstrate our readiness to effectively utilize next generation Exascale machines. The novel aspect of Soleil-X is that it is built upon the Legion runtime system to enable easy portability to different parallel distributed heterogeneous architectures while also being written entirely in high-level/high-productivity languages (Ebb and Regent). An overview of the Soleil-X software architecture will be given. Results from coupled fluid flow, Lagrangian point particle tracking, and thermal radiation simulations will be presented. Performance diagnostic tools and metrics corresponding the the same cases will also be discussed. US Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  15. Assessment of particle-tracking models for dispersed particle-laden flows implemented in OpenFOAM and ANSYS FLUENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Greifzu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study two benchmark problems for turbulent dispersed particle-laden flow are investigated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD. How the CFD programs OpenFOAM and ANSYS FLUENT model these flows is tested and compared. The numerical results obtained with Lagrangian–Eulerian (LE point-particle (PP models for Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS simulations of the fluid flow in steady state and transient modes are compared with the experimental data available in the literature. The effect of the dispersion model on the particle motion is investigated in particular, as well as the order of coupling between the continuous carrier phase and the dispersed phase. First, a backward-facing step (BFS case is validated. As a second case, the confined bluff body (CBB is used. The simulated fluid flows correspond well with the experimental data for both test cases. The results for the dispersed solid phase reveal a good accordance between the simulation results and the experiments. It seems that particle dispersion is slightly under-predicted when ANSYS FLUENT is used, whereas the applied solver in OpenFOAM overestimates the dispersion somewhat. Only minor differences between the coupling schemes are detected due to the low volume fractions and mass loadings that are investigated. In the BFS test case the importance of the spatial dimension of the numerical model is demonstrated. Even if it is reasonable to assume a two-dimensional fluid flow structure, it is crucial to simulate the turbulent particle-laden flow with a three-dimensional model since the turbulent dispersion of the particles is three-dimensional.

  16. Temperature fluctuation caused by coaxial-jet flow: Experiments on the effect of the velocity ratio R ⩾ 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Qiong; Li, Hongyuan; Lu, Daogang; Chang, Mu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect on temperature fluctuation from velocity ratio was studied by experiment. • The distribution of time-averaged temperatures is the axial-symmetry in R ⩾ 1. • The region of intense temperature fluctuation in R = 1 is different from that of R > 1. • The intensity of temperature fluctuation under R > 1 is weaker than that of R = 1. - Abstract: The temperature fluctuation appears in the core outlet region due to the different of the temperature and velocity of the coolant, which can cause thermal stresses and the high-cycle thermal fatigue on solid boundaries. So, it is necessary to analyze the characteristics of the temperature fluctuation. In the present study, a comparative experiment was performed to analyze the effect on the temperature fluctuation caused by the coaxial-jet flow from the inlet cold and hot fluid velocity ratios (R ⩾ 1). In the condition of R ⩾ 1, the distribution of the time-averaged temperature is the axial-symmetry. In the cold fluid field, the temperature field is divided into four parts, including the first steady region, linear region, nonlinear region and the second steady region along the axial direction, while that is lack of the first steady state region in the hot fluid field. In the condition of R = 1, due to the velocity of the cold fluid is equivalent to that of the hot fluid, the cold fluid flow can be severely disturbed by the hot flow. The intense temperature fluctuation mainly distributed in the annular region at bottom region and the circular region in the upper region. While, in the condition of R > 1, the inertia of the cold fluid is larger than that of the hot fluid. The hot fluid will attach itself to the periphery of the cold fluid. The intense temperature fluctuation distributed in the annular region between the cold and hot fluid and the periphery of the hot fluid. However, the intensity of temperature fluctuation under R > 1 is weaker than that of R = 1.

  17. Temperature fluctuation caused by coaxial-jet flow: Experiments on the effect of the velocity ratio R ⩾ 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Qiong, E-mail: lian24111@163.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Passive Safety Technology for Nuclear Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Li, Hongyuan, E-mail: lihongyuan@ncepu.edu.cn [School of Control and Computer Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Lu, Daogang, E-mail: ludaogang@ncepu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of Passive Safety Technology for Nuclear Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Chang, Mu, E-mail: changmu123@163.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Passive Safety Technology for Nuclear Energy, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • The effect on temperature fluctuation from velocity ratio was studied by experiment. • The distribution of time-averaged temperatures is the axial-symmetry in R ⩾ 1. • The region of intense temperature fluctuation in R = 1 is different from that of R > 1. • The intensity of temperature fluctuation under R > 1 is weaker than that of R = 1. - Abstract: The temperature fluctuation appears in the core outlet region due to the different of the temperature and velocity of the coolant, which can cause thermal stresses and the high-cycle thermal fatigue on solid boundaries. So, it is necessary to analyze the characteristics of the temperature fluctuation. In the present study, a comparative experiment was performed to analyze the effect on the temperature fluctuation caused by the coaxial-jet flow from the inlet cold and hot fluid velocity ratios (R ⩾ 1). In the condition of R ⩾ 1, the distribution of the time-averaged temperature is the axial-symmetry. In the cold fluid field, the temperature field is divided into four parts, including the first steady region, linear region, nonlinear region and the second steady region along the axial direction, while that is lack of the first steady state region in the hot fluid field. In the condition of R = 1, due to the velocity of the cold fluid is equivalent to that of the hot fluid, the cold fluid flow can be severely disturbed by the hot flow. The intense temperature fluctuation mainly distributed in the annular region at bottom region and the circular region in the upper region. While, in the condition of R > 1, the inertia of the cold fluid is larger than that of the hot fluid. The hot fluid will attach itself to the periphery of the cold fluid. The intense temperature fluctuation distributed in the annular region between the cold and hot fluid and the periphery of the hot fluid. However, the intensity of temperature fluctuation under R > 1 is weaker than that of R = 1.

  18. The effect of non-uniform mass loading on the linear, temporal development of particle-laden shear layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senatore, Giacomo [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Universita di Pisa, Pisa 56122 (Italy); Davis, Sean; Jacobs, Gustaaf, E-mail: gjacobs@mail.sdsu.edu [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, San Diego State University, San Diego, 92182 California (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The effect of non-uniformity in bulk particle mass loading on the linear development of a particle-laden shear layer is analyzed by means of a stochastic Eulerian-Eulerian model. From the set of governing equations of the two-fluid model, a modified Rayleigh equation is derived that governs the linear growth of a spatially periodic disturbance. Eigenvalues for this Rayleigh equation are determined numerically using proper conditions at the co-flowing gas and particle interface locations. For the first time, it is shown that non-uniform loading of small-inertia particles (Stokes number (St) <0.2) may destabilize the inviscid mixing layer development as compared to the pure-gas flow. The destabilization is triggered by an energy transfer rate that globally flows from the particle phase to the gas phase. For intermediate St (1 < St < 10), a maximum stabilizing effect is computed, while at larger St, two unstable modes may coexist. The growth rate computations from linear stability analysis are verified numerically through simulations based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) model based on the inviscid Euler equations and a point particle model. The growth rates found in numerical experiments using the EL method are in very good agreement with growth rates from the linear stability analysis and validate the destabilizing effect induced by the presence of particles with low St.

  19. Reynolds number and settling velocity influence for finite-release particle-laden gravity currents in a basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, E. P.; Espath, L. F. R.; Laizet, S.; Silvestrini, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    Three-dimensional highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of particle-laden gravity currents are presented for the lock-exchange problem in an original basin configuration, similar to delta formation in lakes. For this numerical study, we focus on gravity currents over a flat bed for which density differences are small enough for the Boussinesq approximation to be valid. The concentration of particles is described in an Eulerian fashion by using a transport equation combined with the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, with the possibility of particles deposition but no erosion nor re-suspension. The focus of this study is on the influence of the Reynolds number and settling velocity on the development of the current which can freely evolve in the streamwise and spanwise direction. It is shown that the settling velocity has a strong influence on the spatial extent of the current, the sedimentation rate, the suspended mass and the shape of the lobe-and-cleft structures while the Reynolds number is mainly affecting the size and number of vortical structures at the front of the current, and the energy budget.

  20. Flame structure of methane/oxygen shear coaxial jet with velocity ratio using high-speed imaging and OH*, CH* chemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Myungbo; Noh, Kwanyoung; Yoon, Woongsup

    2018-06-01

    In this study, the effects of gaseous methane/oxygen injection velocity ratio on the shear coaxial jet flame structure are analyzed using high-speed imaging along with OH* and CH* chemiluminescence. The images show that, as the velocity ratio is increased, the visual flame length increases and wrinkles of the flame front are developed further downstream. The region near the equivalence ratio 1 condition in the flame could be identified by the maximum OH* position, and this region is located further downstream as the velocity ratio is increased. The dominant CH* chemiluminescence is found in the near-injector region. As the velocity ratio is decreased, the signal intensity is higher at the same downstream distance in each flame. From the results, as the velocity ratio is decreased, there is increased entrainment of the external jet, the mixing of the two jets is enhanced, the region near the stoichiometric mixture condition is located further upstream, and consequently, the flame length decreases.

  1. Effect of settling particles on the stability of a particle-laden flow in a vertical plane channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronin, S. A.; Osiptsov, A. N.

    2018-03-01

    The stability of a viscous particle-laden flow in a vertical plane channel in the presence of the gravity force is studied. The flow is described using a two-fluid "dusty-gas" model with negligibly small volume fraction of fines and two-way coupling of the phases. Two different profiles of the particle number density in the main flow are considered: homogeneous and non-homogeneous in the form of two layers symmetric about the channel axis. The novel element of the linear-stability problem formulation is a particle velocity slip in the main flow caused by the gravity-induced settling of the dispersed phase. The eigenvalue problem for a linearized system of governing equations is solved using the orthonormalization and QZ algorithms. For a uniform particle number density distribution, it is found that there exists a domain in the plane of Froude and Stokes numbers, in which the two-phase flow in a vertical channel is stable for an arbitrary Reynolds number. This stability domain corresponds to relatively small-inertia particles and large velocity-slip in the main flow. In contrast to the flow with a uniform particle number density distribution, the stratified dusty-gas flow in a vertical channel is unstable over a wide range of governing parameters. The instability at small Reynolds numbers is determined by the gravitational mode characterized by small wavenumbers (long-wave instability), while at larger Reynolds numbers the instability is dominated by the shear mode with the time-amplification factor larger than that of the gravitational mode. The results of the study can be used for optimization of a large number of technological processes, including those in riser reactors, pneumatic conveying in pipeline systems, hydraulic fracturing, and well cementing.

  2. Ultra-high-speed digital in-line holography system applied to particle-laden supersonic underexpanded jet flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Buchmann, Nicolas A.; Soria, Julio

    2012-01-01

    -fluid interactions in these high-speed flows special high performance techniques are required. The present work is an investigation into the applicability of magnified digital in-line holography with ultra-high-speed recording for the study of three-dimensional supersonic particle-laden flows. An optical setup...... × 10mm calibration grid and 120 μm particles on a glass plate. In the case with the calibration grid it is found that accurate determination of the depthwise position is possible. However, when applying the same technique to the particle target, significant problems are encountered....

  3. Direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flows with two- and four-way coupling effects: budgets of Reynolds stress and streamwise enstrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritselis, Chris D

    2016-01-01

    The budgets of the Reynolds stress and streamwise enstrophy are evaluated through direct numerical simulations for the turbulent particle-laden flow in a vertical channel with momentum exchange between the two phases. The influence of the dispersed particles on the budgets is examined through a comparison of the particle-free and the particle-laden cases at the same Reynolds number of Re b = 5600 based on the bulk fluid velocity and the distance between the channel walls. Results are obtained for particle ensembles with four response times in simulations with and without streamwise gravity and inter-particle collisions at average mass (volume) fractions of 0.2 (2.7 × 10 −5 ) and 0.5 (6.8 × 10 −5 ). The particle feedback force on the flow of the carrier phase is modeled by a point-force approximation (PSIC-method). It is shown that all the terms in the budgets of the Reynolds stress components are decreased in the presence of particles. The level of reduction depends on the particle response time and it is higher under the effects of gravity and inter-particle collisions. A considerable reduction in all the terms of the streamwise enstrophy budget is also observed. In particular, all production mechanisms, and mainly vortex stretching, are inhibited in the particulate flows and thus the production of streamwise vorticity is significantly damped. A further insight into the direct particle effects on the fluid turbulence is provided by analyzing in detail the fluid–fluid, fluid–particle and particle–particle correlations, and the spectra of the fluid–particle energy exchange rate. The present results indicate that the turbulence production, dissipation and pressure–strain term are generally large quantities, but their summation is relatively small and comparable to the fluid–particle direct energy exchange rate. Consequently, the particle contribution can potentially increase or decrease the fluctuating fluid velocities and eventually control the

  4. Direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flows with two- and four-way coupling effects: models of terms in the Reynolds stress budgets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dritselis, Chris D, E-mail: dritseli@mie.uth.gr [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece)

    2017-04-15

    In the first part of this study (Dritselis 2016 Fluid Dyn. Res. 48 015507), the Reynolds stress budgets were evaluated through point-particle direct numerical simulations (pp-DNSs) for the particle-laden turbulent flow in a vertical channel with two- and four-way coupling effects. Here several turbulence models are assessed by direct comparison of the particle contribution terms to the budgets, the dissipation rate, the pressure-strain rate, and the transport rate with the model expressions using the pp-DNS data. It is found that the models of the particle sources to the equations of fluid turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate cannot represent correctly the physics of the complex interaction between turbulence and particles. A relatively poor performance of the pressure-strain term models is revealed in the particulate flows, while the algebraic models for the dissipation rate of the fluid turbulence kinetic energy and the transport rate terms can adequately reproduce the main trends due to the presence of particles. Further work is generally needed to improve the models in order to account properly for the momentum exchange between the two phases and the effects of particle inertia, gravity and inter-particle collisions. (paper)

  5. Direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flows with two- and four-way coupling effects: models of terms in the Reynolds stress budgets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritselis, Chris D

    2017-01-01

    In the first part of this study (Dritselis 2016 Fluid Dyn. Res. 48 015507), the Reynolds stress budgets were evaluated through point-particle direct numerical simulations (pp-DNSs) for the particle-laden turbulent flow in a vertical channel with two- and four-way coupling effects. Here several turbulence models are assessed by direct comparison of the particle contribution terms to the budgets, the dissipation rate, the pressure-strain rate, and the transport rate with the model expressions using the pp-DNS data. It is found that the models of the particle sources to the equations of fluid turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate cannot represent correctly the physics of the complex interaction between turbulence and particles. A relatively poor performance of the pressure-strain term models is revealed in the particulate flows, while the algebraic models for the dissipation rate of the fluid turbulence kinetic energy and the transport rate terms can adequately reproduce the main trends due to the presence of particles. Further work is generally needed to improve the models in order to account properly for the momentum exchange between the two phases and the effects of particle inertia, gravity and inter-particle collisions. (paper)

  6. Viscosity of particle laden films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timounay Yousra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform retraction experiments on soap films where large particles bridge the two interfaces. Local velocities are measured by PIV during the unstationnary regime. The velocity variation in time and space can be described by a continuous fluid model from which effective viscosity (shear and dilatational of particulate films is measured. The 2D effective viscosity of particulate films η2D increases with particle surface fraction ϕ: at low ϕ, it tends to the interfacial dilatational viscosity of the liquid/air interfaces and it diverges at the critical particle surface fraction ϕc ≃ 0.84. Experimental data agree with classical viscosity laws of hard spheres suspensions adapted to the 2D geometry, assuming viscous dissipation resulting from the squeeze of the liquid/air interfaces between the particles. Finally, we show that the observed viscous dissipation in particulate films has to be considered to describe the edge velocity during a retraction experiment at large particle coverage.

  7. Viscosity of particle laden films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timounay, Yousra; Rouyer, Florence

    2017-06-01

    We perform retraction experiments on soap films where large particles bridge the two interfaces. Local velocities are measured by PIV during the unstationnary regime. The velocity variation in time and space can be described by a continuous fluid model from which effective viscosity (shear and dilatational) of particulate films is measured. The 2D effective viscosity of particulate films η2D increases with particle surface fraction ϕ: at low ϕ, it tends to the interfacial dilatational viscosity of the liquid/air interfaces and it diverges at the critical particle surface fraction ϕc ≃ 0.84. Experimental data agree with classical viscosity laws of hard spheres suspensions adapted to the 2D geometry, assuming viscous dissipation resulting from the squeeze of the liquid/air interfaces between the particles. Finally, we show that the observed viscous dissipation in particulate films has to be considered to describe the edge velocity during a retraction experiment at large particle coverage.

  8. Coaxial jets stability and control possibility

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Trávníček, Zdeněk; Hrubý, Jan; Vogel, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 4, - (2005), s. 121-130. ISBN 83-89334-82-8 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2076203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : jets * stability * visualization Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  9. Mixing in Shear Coaxial Jets (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    relevant boundary layers 9. Thermodynamic states (2 phase, 1 phase) 10. Transverse Acoustic mode from chamber/siren, f=f(c, geometry St=fDij/Uij 11...stability theory for inviscid instability of a hyperbolic tangent velocity profile for free boundary layers • U(y)=0.5[1 + tanh(y)] • Chigier and Beer , 1964...acoustics Natural OJ excited IJ excited From Chigier NA. and Beer JM, The Flow Region Near the Nozzle in Double Concentric Jets, J of

  10. Capillary Thinning of Particle-laden Drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Brayden; Thete, Sumeet; Jahns, Matt; Doshi, Pankaj; Basaran, Osman

    2015-11-01

    Drop formation is central in many applications such as ink-jet printing, microfluidic devices, and atomization. During drop formation, a thinning filament is created between the about-to-form drop and the fluid hanging from the nozzle. Therefore, the physics of capillary thinning of filaments is key to understanding drop formation and has been thoroughly studied for pure Newtonian fluids. The thinning dynamics is, however, altered completely when the fluid contains particles, the physics of which is not well understood. In this work, we explore the impact of solid particles on filament thinning and drop formation by using a combination of experiments and numerical simulations.

  11. Acoustic Excitation of Liquid Fuel Droplets and Coaxial Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    would also like to acknowledge the support of the NASA Microgravity Combustion program which made possible the completion of this research and Maj...fuels exposed to different acoustic excitation conditions in a laboratory environment and during free-fall (microgravity) conditions in a NASA drop tower...then sent to two amplifiers, one for each piezo-siren. The amplifiers were a Krohn-Hite (model 7500) and a Trek (model PZD2000A), which amplified the

  12. Biomass Pyrolysis in DNS of Turbulent Particle-Laden Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Fröhlich, Jochen; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Armenio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Biomass is important for co-firing in coal power plants thereby reducing CO2 emissions. Modeling the combustion of biomass involves various physical and chemical processes, which take place successively and even simultaneously [1, 2]. An important step in biomass combustion is pyrolysis, in which

  13. Charge interaction between particle-laden fluid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Kirkwood, John; Lask, Mauricio; Fuller, Gerald

    2010-03-02

    Experiments are described where two oil/water interfaces laden with charged particles move at close proximity relative to one another. The particles on one of the interfaces were observed to be attracted toward the point of closest approach, forming a denser particle monolayer, while the particles on the opposite interface were repelled away from this point, forming a particle depletion zone. Such particle attraction/repulsion was observed even if one of the interfaces was free of particles. This phenomenon can be explained by the electrostatic interaction between the two interfaces, which causes surface charges (charged particles and ions) to redistribute in order to satisfy surface electric equipotential at each interface. In a forced particle oscillation experiment, we demonstrated the control of charged particle positions on the interface by manipulating charge interaction between interfaces.

  14. Hydrodynamic Stability Analysis of Particle-Laden Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, T. S.; Majdalani, J.

    2014-11-01

    Fluid-wall interactions within solid rocket motors can result in parietal vortex shedding giving rise to hydrodynamic instabilities, or unsteady waves, that translate into pressure oscillations. The oscillations can result in vibrations observed by the rocket, rocket subsystems, or payload, which can lead to changes in flight characteristics, design failure, or other undesirable effects. For many years particles have been embedded in solid rocket propellants with the understanding that their presence increases specific impulse and suppresses fluctuations in the flowfield. This study utilizes a two dimensional framework to understand and quantify the aforementioned two-phase flowfield inside a motor case with a cylindrical grain perforation. This is accomplished through the use of linearized Navier-Stokes equations with the Stokes drag equation and application of the biglobal ansatz. Obtaining the biglobal equations for analysis requires quantification of the mean flowfield within the solid rocket motor. To that end, the extended Taylor-Culick form will be utilized to represent the gaseous phase of the mean flowfield while the self-similar form will be employed for the particle phase. Advancing the mean flowfield by quantifying the particle mass concentration with a semi-analytical solution the finalized mean flowfield is combined with the biglobal equations resulting in a system of eight partial differential equations. This system is solved using an eigensolver within the framework yielding the entire spectrum of eigenvalues, frequency and growth rate components, at once. This work will detail the parametric analysis performed to demonstrate the stabilizing and destabilizing effects of particles within solid rocket combustion.

  15. Hydrodynamic Stability Analysis of Particle-Laden Solid Rocket Motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, T S; Majdalani, J

    2014-01-01

    Fluid-wall interactions within solid rocket motors can result in parietal vortex shedding giving rise to hydrodynamic instabilities, or unsteady waves, that translate into pressure oscillations. The oscillations can result in vibrations observed by the rocket, rocket subsystems, or payload, which can lead to changes in flight characteristics, design failure, or other undesirable effects. For many years particles have been embedded in solid rocket propellants with the understanding that their presence increases specific impulse and suppresses fluctuations in the flowfield. This study utilizes a two dimensional framework to understand and quantify the aforementioned two-phase flowfield inside a motor case with a cylindrical grain perforation. This is accomplished through the use of linearized Navier-Stokes equations with the Stokes drag equation and application of the biglobal ansatz. Obtaining the biglobal equations for analysis requires quantification of the mean flowfield within the solid rocket motor. To that end, the extended Taylor-Culick form will be utilized to represent the gaseous phase of the mean flowfield while the self-similar form will be employed for the particle phase. Advancing the mean flowfield by quantifying the particle mass concentration with a semi-analytical solution the finalized mean flowfield is combined with the biglobal equations resulting in a system of eight partial differential equations. This system is solved using an eigensolver within the framework yielding the entire spectrum of eigenvalues, frequency and growth rate components, at once. This work will detail the parametric analysis performed to demonstrate the stabilizing and destabilizing effects of particles within solid rocket combustion

  16. Fully stratified particle-laden flow in horizontal circular pipe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlasák, Pavel; Kysela, Bohuš; Chára, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 2 (2014), s. 179-185 ISSN 0272-6351. [7th International Conference for Conveying and Handling of Particulate Solids (CHoPS). Friedrichshafen, 10.09.2013-13.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP105/10/1574 Institutional support: RVO:67985874 Keywords : coarse-grained slurry * flow structure * liquid local velocity * particle velocity * PIV Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.523, year: 2014

  17. Target Lagrangian kinematic simulation for particle-laden flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S; Lightstone, M F; Tullis, S

    2016-09-01

    The target Lagrangian kinematic simulation method was motivated as a stochastic Lagrangian particle model that better synthesizes turbulence structure, relative to stochastic separated flow models. By this method, the trajectories of particles are constructed according to synthetic turbulent-like fields, which conform to a target Lagrangian integral timescale. In addition to recovering the expected Lagrangian properties of fluid tracers, this method is shown to reproduce the crossing trajectories and continuity effects, in agreement with an experimental benchmark.

  18. Turbulence modulation in dilute particle-laden flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias; Lightstone, M. F.; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2009-01-01

    augmentation of the carrier phase turbulence is expected, and small particles, for which attenuation is expected. The new model is derived directly from the balance equations of fluid flow and represents a combination of the so-called standard and consistent approaches. The performance of the new model......A new particle source term to account for the effect of particles on the turbulence equations based on the Euler/Lagrange approach is introduced and compared with existing models and experimental data. Three different sizes of particles are considered to cover the range of large particles, where...

  19. Nano-Ignition Torch Applied to Cryogenic H2/O2 Coaxial Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    16197 4 III. Instrumentation A high-speed pyrometer, model KGA 740 HS from Mikron Infrared Inc., covering a temperature range from 300...oxidizer and aluminum powder as a fuel. The granulated SRF was used in the ignition capsules that are reported here and they were made from rubber

  20. Droplet Combustion and Non-Reactive Shear-Coaxial Jets with and without Transverse Acoustic Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    node, there is no droplet deflection, but there is limited evidence for this. Recent studies at UCLA and at NASA Glenn Research Center by Dattarajan et...generator supplied continuous sine wave signals, which were amplified via Trek PZD2000A high-voltage amplifiers, to each piezo-siren. The waveform...1.3. Verify the wire on Channel 1 of the Tenma oscilloscope (Model No. 72-6800) comes from the output voltage monitor on the Trek -1 amplifier and the

  1. Droplet Combustion and Non-Reactive Shear-Coaxial Jets with Transverse Acoustic Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    for this. Recent studies at UCLA and at NASA Glenn Research Center by Dattarajan et al. [20, 21] have focused on methanol droplet combustion...via Trek PZD2000A high-voltage amplifiers, to each piezo-siren. The waveform generators output signals were locked in frequency. However, their phase...1.3. Verify the wire on Channel 1 of the Tenma oscilloscope (Model No. 72-6800) comes from the output voltage monitor on the Trek -1 amplifier

  2. Design of a facility for studying shock-cell noise on single and coaxial jets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guariglia, Daniel; Rubio Carpio, A.; Schram, Christophe

    2018-01-01

    Shock-cell noise occurs in aero-engines when the nozzle exhaust is supersonic and shock-cells are present in the jet. In commercial turbofan engines, at cruise, the secondary flow is often supersonic underexpanded, with the formation of annular shock-cells in the jet and consequent onset of

  3. Interphasial energy transfer and particle dissipation in particle-laden wall turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, L.; Andersson, H.I.; Gillissen, J.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of mechanical energy between solid spherical particles and a Newtonian carrier fluid has been explored in two-way coupled direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow. The inertial particles have been treated as individual point particles in a Lagrangian framework and their

  4. Direct numerical simulation of particle laden flow in a human airway bifurcation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stylianou, Fotos S.; Sznitman, Josué; Kassinos, Stavros C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An anatomically realistic model of a human airway bifurcation is constructed. • Direct numerical simulations are used to study laminar and turbulent airflow. • Aerosol deposition in the bifurcation is studied with lagrangian particle tracking. • Carinal vortices forming during steady expiration are reported for the first time. • Stokes number determines deposition differences between inspiration and expiration. - Abstract: During the delivery of inhaled medicines, and depending on the size distribution of the particles in the formulation, airway bifurcations are areas of preferential deposition. Previous studies of laminar flow through airway bifurcations point to an interplay of inertial and centrifugal forces that leads to rich flow phenomena and controls particle deposition patterns. However, recent computational studies have shown that the airflow in the upper human airways is turbulent during much of the respiratory cycle. The question of how the presence of turbulence modifies these effects remains open. In this study, we perform for the first time Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of fully developed turbulent flow through a single human airway bifurcation model, emulating steady prolonged inspiration and expiration. We use the rich information obtained from the DNS in order to identify key structures in the flow field and scrutinize their role in determining deposition patterns in the bifurcation. We find that the vortical structures present in the bifurcation during expiration differ from those identified during inspiration. While Dean vortices are present in both cases, a set of three dimensional “carinal vortices” are identified only during expiration. A set of laminar simulations in the same geometries, but at lower Reynolds numbers, allow us to identify key differences in aerosol deposition patterns between laminar and turbulent respiration. We also report deposition fractions for representative Stokes numbers for both laminar and turbulent conditions. Given the suspected role of external mechanical stress on the airway epithelium in determining mucus clearance and chronic disease development, here we report wall shear stress distributions for both the turbulent and laminar cases. Finally, we also perform Large Eddy Simulations (LES) and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations for the same configuration in order to asses their performance as compared to DNS. We find that LES and RANS perform well and that they are able to capture the key characteristics of the flow field. The agreement between DNS and RANS holds true only for the mean flow field, which is primarily influenced by curvature effects.

  5. Equilibrium-eulerian les model for turbulent poly-dispersed particle-laden flow

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo

    2013-04-01

    An efficient Eulerian method for poly-dispersed particles in turbulent flows is implemented, verified and validated for a channel flow. The approach couples a mixture model with a quadrature-based moment method for the particle size distribution in a LES framework, augmented by an approximate deconvolution method to reconstructs the unfiltered velocity. The particle velocity conditioned on particle size is calculated with an equilibrium model, valid for low Stokes numbers. A population balance equation is solved with the direct quadrature method of moments, that efficiently represents the continuous particle size distribution. In this first study particulate processes are not considered and the capability of the model to properly describe particle transport is investigated for a turbulent channel flow. First, single-phase LES are validated through comparison with DNS. Then predictions for the two-phase system, with particles characterised by Stokes numbers ranging from 0.2 to 5, are compared with Lagrangian DNS in terms of particle velocity and accumulation at the walls. Since this phenomenon (turbophoresis) is driven by turbulent fluctuations and depends strongly on the particle Stokes number, the approximation of the particle size distribution, the choice of the sub-grid scale model and the use of an approximate deconvolution method are important to obtain good results. Our method can be considered as a fast and efficient alternative to classical Lagrangian methods or Eulerian multi-fluid models in which poly-dispersity is usually neglected.

  6. GPU acceleration of Eulerian-Lagrangian particle-laden turbulent flow simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, David; Sweet, James; Thain, Douglas

    2017-11-01

    The Lagrangian point-particle approximation is a popular numerical technique for representing dispersed phases whose properties can substantially deviate from the local fluid. In many cases, particularly in the limit of one-way coupled systems, large numbers of particles are desired; this may be either because many physical particles are present (e.g. LES of an entire cloud), or because the use of many particles increases statistical convergence (e.g. high-order statistics). Solving the trajectories of very large numbers of particles can be problematic in traditional MPI implementations, however, and this study reports the benefits of using graphical processing units (GPUs) to integrate the particle equations of motion while preserving the original MPI version of the Eulerian flow solver. It is found that GPU acceleration becomes cost effective around one million particles, and performance enhancements of up to 15x can be achieved when O(108) particles are computed on the GPU rather than the CPU cluster. Optimizations and limitations will be discussed, as will prospects for expanding to two- and four-way coupled systems. ONR Grant No. N00014-16-1-2472.

  7. Interfacial deflection and jetting of a paramagnetic particle-laden fluid: theory and experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Scott S. H.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of experiments and mathematical analysis of the deformation of a free surface by an aggregate of magnetic particles. The system we study is differentiated from ferrofluid systems because it contains regions rich with magnetic material as well as regions of negligible magnetic content. In our experiments, the magnetic force from a spherical permanent magnet collects magnetic particles to a liquid-air interface, and deforms the free surface to form a hump. The hump is composed of magnetic and non-magnetic regions due to the particle collection. When the magnet distance falls below a threshold value, we observe the transition of the hump to a jet. The mathematical model we develop, which consists of a numerical solution and an asymptotic approximation, captures the shape of the liquid-air interface during the deformation stage and a scaling prediction for the critical magnet distance for the hump to become a jet. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. Equilibrium-eulerian les model for turbulent poly-dispersed particle-laden flow

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo; Marchisio, Daniele Luca; Chidambaram, Narayanan; Fox, Rodney O.

    2013-01-01

    An efficient Eulerian method for poly-dispersed particles in turbulent flows is implemented, verified and validated for a channel flow. The approach couples a mixture model with a quadrature-based moment method for the particle size distribution in a LES framework, augmented by an approximate deconvolution method to reconstructs the unfiltered velocity. The particle velocity conditioned on particle size is calculated with an equilibrium model, valid for low Stokes numbers. A population balance equation is solved with the direct quadrature method of moments, that efficiently represents the continuous particle size distribution. In this first study particulate processes are not considered and the capability of the model to properly describe particle transport is investigated for a turbulent channel flow. First, single-phase LES are validated through comparison with DNS. Then predictions for the two-phase system, with particles characterised by Stokes numbers ranging from 0.2 to 5, are compared with Lagrangian DNS in terms of particle velocity and accumulation at the walls. Since this phenomenon (turbophoresis) is driven by turbulent fluctuations and depends strongly on the particle Stokes number, the approximation of the particle size distribution, the choice of the sub-grid scale model and the use of an approximate deconvolution method are important to obtain good results. Our method can be considered as a fast and efficient alternative to classical Lagrangian methods or Eulerian multi-fluid models in which poly-dispersity is usually neglected.

  9. Hybrid fs/ps CARS for Sooting and Particle-laden Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmeister, Kathryn N. Gabet; Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Kearney, Sean P.

    2015-12-01

    We report the application of ultrafast rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for temperature and relative oxygen concentration measurements in the plume emanating from a burning aluminized ammonium perchlorate propellant strand. Combustion of these metal-based propellants is a particularly hostile environment for laserbased diagnostics, with intense background luminosity, scattering and beam obstruction from hot metal particles that can be as large as several hundred microns in diameter. CARS spectra that were previously obtained using nanosecond pulsed lasers in an aluminumparticle- seeded flame are examined and are determined to be severely impacted by nonresonant background, presumably as a result of the plasma formed by particulateenhanced laser-induced breakdown. Introduction of fs/ps laser pulses enables CARS detection at reduced pulse energies, decreasing the likelihood of breakdown, while simultaneously providing time-gated elimination of any nonresonant background interference. Temperature probability densities and temperature/oxygen correlations were constructed from ensembles of several thousand single-laser-shot measurements from the fs/ps rotational CARS measurement volume positioned within 3 mm or less of the burning propellant surface. Preliminary results in canonical flames are presented using a hybrid fs/ps vibrational CARS system to demonstrate our progress towards acquiring vibrational CARS measurements for more accurate temperatures in the very high temperature propellant burns.

  10. Hybrid fs/ps CARS for Sooting and Particle-laden Flames [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmeister, Kathryn N. Gabet; Guildenbecher, Daniel Robert; Kearney, Sean P.

    2016-01-01

    We report the application of ultrafast rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for temperature and relative oxygen concentration measurements in the plume emanating from a burning aluminized ammonium perchlorate propellant strand. Combustion of these metal-based propellants is a particularly hostile environment for laserbased diagnostics, with intense background luminosity, scattering and beam obstruction from hot metal particles that can be as large as several hundred microns in diameter. CARS spectra that were previously obtained using nanosecond pulsed lasers in an aluminumparticle- seeded flame are examined and are determined to be severely impacted by nonresonant background, presumably as a result of the plasma formed by particulateenhanced laser-induced breakdown. Introduction of fs/ps laser pulses enables CARS detection at reduced pulse energies, decreasing the likelihood of breakdown, while simultaneously providing time-gated elimination of any nonresonant background interference. Temperature probability densities and temperature/oxygen correlations were constructed from ensembles of several thousand single-laser-shot measurements from the fs/ps rotational CARS measurement volume positioned within 3 mm or less of the burning propellant surface. Preliminary results in canonical flames are presented using a hybrid fs/ps vibrational CARS system to demonstrate our progress towards acquiring vibrational CARS measurements for more accurate temperatures in the very high temperature propellant burns.

  11. A second-order accurate immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for particle-laden flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih, E-mail: fan.1@osu.edu

    2014-07-01

    A new immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) is presented for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The immersed boundary method (IBM) recently developed by Breugem (2012) [19] is adopted in the present method, development including the retraction technique, the multi-direct forcing method and the direct account of the inertia of the fluid contained within the particles. The present IB-LBM is, however, formulated with further improvement with the implementation of the high-order Runge–Kutta schemes in the coupled fluid–particle interaction. The major challenge to implement high-order Runge–Kutta schemes in the LBM is that the flow information such as density and velocity cannot be directly obtained at a fractional time step from the LBM since the LBM only provides the flow information at an integer time step. This challenge can be, however, overcome as given in the present IB-LBM by extrapolating the flow field around particles from the known flow field at the previous integer time step. The newly calculated fluid–particle interactions from the previous fractional time steps of the current integer time step are also accounted for in the extrapolation. The IB-LBM with high-order Runge–Kutta schemes developed in this study is validated by several benchmark applications. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the IB-LBM has the capacity to resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order accuracy. The optimal retraction distances for spheres and tubes that help the method achieve the second-order accuracy are found to be around 0.30 and −0.47 times of the lattice spacing, respectively. Simulations of the Stokes flow through a simple cubic lattice of rotational spheres indicate that the lift force produced by the Magnus effect can be very significant in view of the magnitude of the drag force when the practical rotating speed of the spheres is encountered. This finding may lead to more comprehensive studies of the effect of the particle rotation on fluid–solid drag laws. It is also demonstrated that, when the third-order or the fourth-order Runge–Kutta scheme is used, the numerical stability of the present IB-LBM is better than that of all methods in the literature, including the previous IB-LBMs and also the methods with the combination of the IBM and the traditional incompressible Navier–Stokes solver. - Highlights: • The IBM is embedded in the LBM using Runge–Kutta time schemes. • The effectiveness of the present IB-LBM is validated by benchmark applications. • For the first time, the IB-LBM achieves the second-order accuracy. • The numerical stability of the present IB-LBM is better than previous methods.

  12. Effects of aerodynamic particle interaction in turbulent non-dilute particle-laden flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salewski, Mirko; Fuchs, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    Aerodynamic four-way coupling models are necessary to handle two-phase flows with a dispersed phase in regimes in which the particles are neither dilute enough to neglect particle interaction nor dense enough to bring the mixture to equilibrium. We include an aerodynamic particle interaction model...... levels in the flow then decrease. The impact of the stochastic particle description on the four-way coupling model is shown to be relatively small. If particles are also allowed to break up according to a wave breakup model, the particles become polydisperse. An ad hoc model for handling polydisperse...

  13. A simple dynamic subgrid-scale model for LES of particle-laden turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, George Ilhwan; Bassenne, Maxime; Urzay, Javier; Moin, Parviz

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a dynamic model for large-eddy simulations is proposed in order to describe the motion of small inertial particles in turbulent flows. The model is simple, involves no significant computational overhead, contains no adjustable parameters, and is flexible enough to be deployed in any type of flow solvers and grids, including unstructured setups. The approach is based on the use of elliptic differential filters to model the subgrid-scale velocity. The only model parameter, which is related to the nominal filter width, is determined dynamically by imposing consistency constraints on the estimated subgrid energetics. The performance of the model is tested in large-eddy simulations of homogeneous-isotropic turbulence laden with particles, where improved agreement with direct numerical simulation results is observed in the dispersed-phase statistics, including particle acceleration, local carrier-phase velocity, and preferential-concentration metrics.

  14. Modeling and analysis of large-eddy simulations of particle-laden turbulent boundary layer flows

    KAUST Repository

    Rahman, Mustafa M.

    2017-01-05

    We describe a framework for the large-eddy simulation of solid particles suspended and transported within an incompressible turbulent boundary layer (TBL). For the fluid phase, the large-eddy simulation (LES) of incompressible turbulent boundary layer employs stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and a virtual wall model similar to the work of Cheng, Pullin & Samtaney (J. Fluid Mech., 2015). This LES model is virtually parameter free and involves no active filtering of the computed velocity field. Furthermore, a recycling method to generate turbulent inflow is implemented. For the particle phase, the direct quadrature method of moments (DQMOM) is chosen in which the weights and abscissas of the quadrature approximation are tracked directly rather than the moments themselves. The numerical method in this framework is based on a fractional-step method with an energy-conservative fourth-order finite difference scheme on a staggered mesh. This code is parallelized based on standard message passing interface (MPI) protocol and is designed for distributed-memory machines. It is proposed to utilize this framework to examine transport of particles in very large-scale simulations. The solver is validated using the well know result of Taylor-Green vortex case. A large-scale sandstorm case is simulated and the altitude variations of number density along with its fluctuations are quantified.

  15. Modeling and analysis of large-eddy simulations of particle-laden turbulent boundary layer flows

    KAUST Repository

    Rahman, Mustafa M.; Samtaney, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    layer employs stretched spiral vortex subgrid-scale model and a virtual wall model similar to the work of Cheng, Pullin & Samtaney (J. Fluid Mech., 2015). This LES model is virtually parameter free and involves no active filtering of the computed

  16. A second-order accurate immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for particle-laden flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2014-07-01

    A new immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) is presented for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The immersed boundary method (IBM) recently developed by Breugem (2012) [19] is adopted in the present method, development including the retraction technique, the multi-direct forcing method and the direct account of the inertia of the fluid contained within the particles. The present IB-LBM is, however, formulated with further improvement with the implementation of the high-order Runge-Kutta schemes in the coupled fluid-particle interaction. The major challenge to implement high-order Runge-Kutta schemes in the LBM is that the flow information such as density and velocity cannot be directly obtained at a fractional time step from the LBM since the LBM only provides the flow information at an integer time step. This challenge can be, however, overcome as given in the present IB-LBM by extrapolating the flow field around particles from the known flow field at the previous integer time step. The newly calculated fluid-particle interactions from the previous fractional time steps of the current integer time step are also accounted for in the extrapolation. The IB-LBM with high-order Runge-Kutta schemes developed in this study is validated by several benchmark applications. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the IB-LBM has the capacity to resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order accuracy. The optimal retraction distances for spheres and tubes that help the method achieve the second-order accuracy are found to be around 0.30 and -0.47 times of the lattice spacing, respectively. Simulations of the Stokes flow through a simple cubic lattice of rotational spheres indicate that the lift force produced by the Magnus effect can be very significant in view of the magnitude of the drag force when the practical rotating speed of the spheres is encountered. This finding may lead to more comprehensive studies of the effect of the particle rotation on fluid-solid drag laws. It is also demonstrated that, when the third-order or the fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme is used, the numerical stability of the present IB-LBM is better than that of all methods in the literature, including the previous IB-LBMs and also the methods with the combination of the IBM and the traditional incompressible Navier-Stokes solver.

  17. Large eddy simulation modeling of particle-laden flows in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salesky, S.; Giometto, M. G.; Chamecki, M.; Lehning, M.; Parlange, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    The transport, deposition, and erosion of heavy particles over complex terrain in the atmospheric boundary layer is an important process for hydrology, air quality forecasting, biology, and geomorphology. However, in situ observations can be challenging in complex terrain due to spatial heterogeneity. Furthermore, there is a need to develop numerical tools that can accurately represent the physics of these multiphase flows over complex surfaces. We present a new numerical approach to accurately model the transport and deposition of heavy particles in complex terrain using large eddy simulation (LES). Particle transport is represented through solution of the advection-diffusion equation including terms that represent gravitational settling and inertia. The particle conservation equation is discretized in a cut-cell finite volume framework in order to accurately enforce mass conservation. Simulation results will be validated with experimental data, and numerical considerations required to enforce boundary conditions at the surface will be discussed. Applications will be presented in the context of snow deposition and transport, as well as urban dispersion.

  18. Stochastic Modeling of Direct Radiation Transmission in Particle-Laden Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banko, Andrew; Villafane, Laura; Kim, Ji Hoon; Esmaily Moghadam, Mahdi; Eaton, John K.

    2017-11-01

    Direct radiation transmission in turbulent flows laden with heavy particles plays a fundamental role in systems such as clouds, spray combustors, and particle-solar-receivers. Owing to their inertia, the particles preferentially concentrate and the resulting voids and clusters lead to deviations in mean transmission from the classical Beer-Lambert law for exponential extinction. Additionally, the transmission fluctuations can exceed those of Poissonian media by an order of magnitude, which implies a gross misprediction in transmission statistics if the correlations in particle positions are neglected. On the other hand, tracking millions of particles in a turbulence simulation can be prohibitively expensive. This work presents stochastic processes as computationally cheap reduced order models for the instantaneous particle number density field and radiation transmission therein. Results from the stochastic processes are compared to Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) simulations using the particle positions obtained from the point-particle DNS of isotropic turbulence at a Taylor Reynolds number of 150. Accurate transmission statistics are predicted with respect to MCRT by matching the mean, variance, and correlation length of DNS number density fields. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-NA0002373-1 and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DGE-114747.

  19. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Parkinson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier–Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two and three dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring model performance in capturing the range of dynamics on a range of meshes. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. The use of adaptive mesh optimisation is shown to reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude in comparison with fixed, uniform mesh simulations. This leads to a substantial reduction in computational cost. The computational savings and flexibility afforded by adaptivity along with the flexibility of FE methods make this model well suited to simulating turbidity currents in complex domains.

  20. Interfacial deflection and jetting of a paramagnetic particle-laden fluid: theory and experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Tsai, Scott S. H.; Griffiths, Ian M.; Li, Zhenzhen; Kim, Pilnam; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the results of experiments and mathematical analysis of the deformation of a free surface by an aggregate of magnetic particles. The system we study is differentiated from ferrofluid systems because it contains regions rich with magnetic

  1. Fundamental Combustion Processes of Particle-Laden Shear Flows in Solid Fuel Ramjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-05-17

    iclIs can be used together to generate better performances. A new Zec ,,nique has recently been developed in which boron particles are coated with...34 Final Rept., AEDC-R-76-158, July 1, 1975-Sept. 30, 1976. 6. Peters , C. E., Phares, W. J., "Analytical Model of Supersonic, Turbulent, Near-Wake Flows

  2. Investigation of particle-laden turbulent flow in free shear turbulent combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, A.C.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Ellzey, J.; Daily, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Explicit numerical mixed phase simulations are described which couple random gasdynamic motions to inertiallly interactive gas borne particles. Theses simulations are numerical experiments intended to provide data for investigating the interaction between a developing turbulent free shear layer and gas borne solid particles it entrains. The simulations predict most probable distributions of dispersed phase trajectories, standard deviations, and gas phase mixing dynamics which include the concomitant back-influences of the particle phase on the carrier gas flow. Data for refinement of the computational scheme and physical verification are provided by experiment. The experimental evidence is developed in a splitter plate divided, two-channel free shear mixing combustion tube. A variety of particle concentrations and particle size distributions are admitted into non-combusting or combusting flows with selected heat release levels. The computations, in turn, provide guidance on design and selection of new experiments

  3. Prediction of a Densely Loaded Particle-Laden Jet using a Euler-Lagrange Dense Spray Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakseresht, Pedram; Apte, Sourabh V.

    2017-11-01

    Modeling of a dense spray regime using an Euler-Lagrange discrete-element approach is challenging because of local high volume loading. A subgrid cluster of droplets can lead to locally high void fractions for the disperse phase. Under these conditions, spatio-temporal changes in the carrier phase volume fractions, which are commonly neglected in spray simulations in an Euler-Lagrange two-way coupling model, could become important. Accounting for the carrier phase volume fraction variations, leads to zero-Mach number, variable density governing equations. Using pressure-based solvers, this gives rise to a source term in the pressure Poisson equation and a non-divergence free velocity field. To test the validity and predictive capability of such an approach, a round jet laden with solid particles is investigated using Direct Numerical Simulation and compared with available experimental data for different loadings. Various volume fractions spanning from dilute to dense regimes are investigated with and without taking into account the volume displacement effects. The predictions of the two approaches are compared and analyzed to investigate the effectiveness of the dense spray model. Financial support was provided by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  4. Navier-Stokes simulation with constraint forces: finite-difference method for particle-laden flows and complex geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfler, K; Schwarzer, S

    2000-06-01

    Building on an idea of Fogelson and Peskin [J. Comput. Phys. 79, 50 (1988)] we describe the implementation and verification of a simulation technique for systems of non-Brownian particles in fluids at Reynolds numbers up to about 20 on the particle scale. This direct simulation technique fills a gap between simulations in the viscous regime and high-Reynolds-number modeling. It also combines sufficient computational accuracy with numerical efficiency and allows studies of several thousand, in principle arbitrarily shaped, extended and hydrodynamically interacting particles on regular work stations. We verify the algorithm in two and three dimensions for (i) single falling particles and (ii) a fluid flowing through a bed of fixed spheres. In the context of sedimentation we compute the volume fraction dependence of the mean sedimentation velocity. The results are compared with experimental and other numerical results both in the viscous and inertial regime and we find very satisfactory agreement.

  5. Competition between drag and Coulomb interactions in turbulent particle-laden flows using a coupled-fluid-Ewald-summation based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2018-03-01

    We present a numerical study on inertial electrically charged particles suspended in a turbulent carrier phase. Fluid-particle interactions are accounted for in an Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) framework and coupled to a Fourier-based Ewald summation method, referred to as the particle-particle-particle-mesh (P3M ) method, to accurately capture short- and long-range electrostatic forces in a tractable manner. The EL P3M method is used to assess the competition between drag and Coulomb forces for a range of Stokes numbers and charge densities. Simulations of like- and oppositely charged particles suspended in a two-dimensional Taylor-Green vortex and three-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence are reported. It is found that even in dilute suspensions, the short-range electric potential plays an important role in flows that admit preferential concentration. Suspensions of oppositely charged particles are observed to agglomerate in the form of chains and rings. Comparisons between the particle-mesh method typically employed in fluid-particle calculations and P3M are reported, in addition to one-point and two-point statistics to quantify the level of clustering as a function of Reynolds number, Stokes number, and nondimensional electric settling velocity.

  6. Comprehensive Benchmark Suite for Simulation of Particle Laden Flows Using the Discrete Element Method with Performance Profiles from the Multiphase Flow with Interface eXchanges (MFiX) Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peiyuan [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Brown, Timothy [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Fullmer, William D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Hauser, Thomas [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Hrenya, Christine [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Grout, Ray [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sitaraman, Hariswaran [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-29

    Five benchmark problems are developed and simulated with the computational fluid dynamics and discrete element model code MFiX. The benchmark problems span dilute and dense regimes, consider statistically homogeneous and inhomogeneous (both clusters and bubbles) particle concentrations and a range of particle and fluid dynamic computational loads. Several variations of the benchmark problems are also discussed to extend the computational phase space to cover granular (particles only), bidisperse and heat transfer cases. A weak scaling analysis is performed for each benchmark problem and, in most cases, the scalability of the code appears reasonable up to approx. 103 cores. Profiling of the benchmark problems indicate that the most substantial computational time is being spent on particle-particle force calculations, drag force calculations and interpolating between discrete particle and continuum fields. Hardware performance analysis was also carried out showing significant Level 2 cache miss ratios and a rather low degree of vectorization. These results are intended to serve as a baseline for future developments to the code as well as a preliminary indicator of where to best focus performance optimizations.

  7. Future Development for Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schlamp, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    .... Consider Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), which started by double-exposing a photographic film with the image of an illuminated particle-laden flow and where today turn-key, off-the-shelf CCD systems are available for purchase...

  8. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. Vishwadeep Saxena. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 27 Issue 6 December 2002 pp 657-673. Computation of flow and thermal fields in a model CVD reactor · Vishwadeep Saxena K Muralidhar V Eswaran · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Mixing of coaxial jets within a tube in the ...

  9. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. V Eswaran. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 27 Issue 6 December 2002 pp 657-673. Computation of flow and thermal fields in a model CVD reactor · Vishwadeep Saxena K Muralidhar V Eswaran · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Mixing of coaxial jets within a tube in the presence of ...

  10. Numerical investigation on liquid sheets interaction characteristics of liquid-liquid coaxial swirling jets in bipropellant thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Jia-Wei; Li, Guo-Xiu; Yu, Yu-Song

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A LES-VOF model is conducted to simulate atomization of coaxial swirling jets. • Structure and flow field of coaxial swirling jets are investigated. • Merging process occurs at the nozzle exit and generates additional perturbation. • The Rayleigh mode instability dominates the breakup of ligaments. - Abstract: Spray atomization process of a liquid-liquid coaxial swirl injector in bipropellant thruster has been investigated using volume of fluid (VOF) method coupled with large eddy simulation methodology. With fine grid resolution, detailed flow field of interacted liquid sheet has been captured and analyzed. For coaxial swirling jet, static pressure drop in the region between the liquid sheets makes two liquid sheets to approach each other and merge. A strong pressure, velocity and turbulent fluctuations are calculated near the contact position of two coaxial jets. Simulation results indicate that additional perturbations are generated due to strong radial and axial shear effects between coaxial jets. Observation of droplet formation process reveals that the Rayleigh mode instability dominates the breakup of the ligament. Droplet diameter and distribution have been investigated quantitatively. The mean diameter of the coaxial jets is between that of the inner and the outer jets. Compared with the individual swirling jets, wider size distributions of droplets are produced in the coaxial jets.

  11. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. K Muralidhar. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 27 Issue 6 December 2002 pp 657-673. Computation of flow and thermal fields in a model CVD reactor · Vishwadeep Saxena K Muralidhar V Eswaran · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. Mixing of coaxial jets within a tube in the presence of ...

  12. Computation of flow and thermal fields in a model CVD reactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mixing of coaxial jets within a tube in the presence of blockage has been numerically studied. This configuration is encountered during the modelling of flow and heat transfer in CVD (chemical vapour deposition) reactors. For the conditions prevailing in the reactor, the Reynolds numbers are low and flow can be taken to be ...

  13. Equilibrium chemical reaction of supersonic hydrogen-air jets (the ALMA computer program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghobashi, S.

    1977-01-01

    The ALMA (axi-symmetrical lateral momentum analyzer) program is concerned with the computation of two dimensional coaxial jets with large lateral pressure gradients. The jets may be free or confined, laminar or turbulent, reacting or non-reacting. Reaction chemistry is equilibrium.

  14. X-ray Radiography Measurements of Shear Coaxial Rocket Injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    Shear coaxial jets can be found in a number of combustion devices – Turbofan engine exhaust , air blast furnaces, and liquid rocket engines ...water and gaseous nitro-gen as propellant simulants at atmospheric backpressure , the effect of momentum flux ratio and mass flux ratio, are...the effect of momentum flux ratio, mass flux ratio and post thickness on the liquid mass distribution – Use quantitative centerline profiles to

  15. Simulation of particle suspensions at the Institute for Computational Physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harting, J.D.R.; Hecht, M.; Herrmann, H.J.; Nagel, W.E.; Jäger, W.; Resch, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    In this report we describe some of our projects related to the simulation of particle-laden flows. We give a short introduction to the topic and the methods used, namely the Stochastic Rotation Dynamics and the lattice Boltzmann method. Then, we show results from our work related to the behaviour of

  16. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Samar Reda Al-Sayed Ali; Abdel Hamid Ahmed Hussein; Adel Abdel Menam Saleh Nofal; Salah Elden Ibrahim Hasseb Elnaby; Haytham Abdelrafea Elgazzar; Hassan Abdel Sabour

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β) titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC) and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resist...

  17. Structural aspects of coaxial oxy-fuel flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditaranto, M.; Sautet, J. C.; Samaniego, J. M.

    Oxy-fuel combustion has been proven to increase thermal efficiency and to have a potential for NOx emission reduction. The study of 25-kW turbulent diffusion flames of natural gas with pure oxygen is undertaken on a coaxial burner with quarl. The structural properties are analysed by imaging the instantaneous reaction zone by OH* chemiluminescence and measuring scalar and velocity profiles. The interaction between the flame front and the shear layers present in the coaxial jets depends on the momentum ratio which dictates the turbulent structure development. Flame length and NOx emission sensitivity to air leaks in the combustion chamber are also investigated.

  18. Scale-similar clustering of heavy particles in the inertial range of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariki, Taketo; Yoshida, Kyo; Matsuda, Keigo; Yoshimatsu, Katsunori

    2018-03-01

    Heavy particle clustering in turbulence is discussed from both phenomenological and analytical points of view, where the -4 /3 power law of the pair-correlation function is obtained in the inertial range. A closure theory explains the power law in terms of the balance between turbulence mixing and preferential-concentration mechanism. The obtained -4 /3 power law is supported by a direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulence.

  19. Magnetoresponsive discoidal photonic crystals toward active color pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Soo; Kim, Ju Hyeon; Lee, Joon-Seok; Sim, Jae Young; Seo, Jung Yoon; Oh, You-Kwan; Yang, Seung-Man; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2014-09-03

    Photonic microdisks with a multilayered structure are designed from photocurable suspensions by step-by-step photolithography. In each step of photolithography, either a colloidal photonic crystal or a magnetic-particle-laden layer is stacked over the windows of a photomask. Sequential photolithography enables the creation of multilayered photonic microdisks that have brilliant structural colors that can be switched by an external magnetic field. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Gas stream cleaning system and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunchal, S. Kumar; Erck, Louis J.; Harris, Harry A.

    1979-04-13

    An oil mist and solid particle laden gas from an oil shale retorting operation is initially treated with a temperature controlled oil spray and then by a coalescer to reduce the quantity of oil mist and remove most of the solid particle content of the gas stream and then finally treated by an electrostatic precipitator to essentially remove the oil mist remaining in the gas.

  1. A novel method for the preparation of electrophoretic display microcapsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiao-Meng; He, Jing; Liu, Sheng-Yun [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen, Jian-Feng [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Research Center of the Ministry of Education for High Gravity Engineering and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Le, Yuan, E-mail: leyuan@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Organic-Inorganic Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • The electrophoretic display microcapsules were prepared by coaxial jet method aided by gas spray. • The positions of inner tube, liquid and gas flow rate of the process were investigated. • The size and shell thickness of the prepared microcapsules were controllable. • The prepared microcapsules had high coating ratio and exhibit reversible response to DC field. - Abstract: The narrow distributed electrophoretic display microcapsules containing electrophoretic ink were prepared using coaxial jet method aided by gas spray. Experimental results showed the size and shell thickness of the microcapsules could be controlled by adjusting flow rates of core and shell fluids as well as gas. The as-prepared white and red microcapsules, with average size of 100 and 200 μm respectively, had high coating ratio (above 90%) and exhibited reversible response to DC electric field. Compared with the approach of other microencapsulation methods, the new technique not only has a simple procedure but also provides a more effective way of size control. This novel method is expected to prepare microcapsules with potential application in the fields of electronic paper and other material science.

  2. Numerical investigation on turbulence mixing characteristics under thermal striping flows. Investigations on fluid temperature fluctuation phenomena in air and sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Satoshi [Customer System Co. Ltd., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    1999-05-01

    A three-dimensional thermal striping analysis was carried out using a direct numerical simulation code DINUS-3, for a coaxial jet configuration using air and sodium as a working fluid, within the framework of the EJCC thermo-hydraulic division. From the analysis, the following results have been obtained: (1) Calculated potential core length in air and sodium turbulence flows agreed with a theoretical value (5d - 7d ; d : diameter of jet nozzle) in the two-dimensional free jet theory. (2) Hydraulic characteristics in sodium flows as the potential core length can be estimated by the use of that of air flow characteristics. (3) Shorter thermally potential core length defined by spatial temperature distribution was evaluated in sodium flows, compared with that in air flows. This is due to the higher thermal conductivity of sodium. (4) Thermal characteristics in sodium flows as the thermally potential core length can not be evaluated, based on that air thermal characteristics. (author)

  3. Computation of turbulent reacting flow in a solid-propellant ducted rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yei-Chin; Chou, Wen-Fuh; Liu, Sheng-Shyang

    1995-05-01

    A mathematical model for computation of turbulent reacting flows is developed under general curvilinear coordinate systems. An adaptive, streamline grid system is generated to deal with the complex flow structures in a multiple-inlet solid-propellant ducted rocket (SDR) combustor. General tensor representations of the k-epsilon and algebraic stress (ASM) turbulence models are derived in terms of contravariant velocity components, and modification caused by the effects of compressible turbulence is also included in the modeling. The clipped Gaussian probability density function is incorporated in the combustion model to account for fluctuations of properties. Validation of the above modeling is first examined by studying mixing and reacting characteristics in a confined coaxial-jet problem. This is followed by study of nonreacting and reacting SDR combustor flows. The results show that Gibson and Launder's ASM incorporated with Sarkar's modification for compressible turbulence effects based on the general curvilinear coordinate systems yields the most satisfactory prediction for this complicated SDR flowfield.

  4. Experimental study of inverted-annular-flow hydrodynamics utilizing an adiabatic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jarlais, G.

    1983-03-01

    In experiments, inverted annular flow was simulated adiabatically with turbulent water jets, issuing downward from long aspect nozzles, enclosed in gas annuli. Velocities, diameters, and gas species were varied, and core jet length, shape, break-up mode, and dispersed-core droplet sizes were recorded at approximately 750 data points. Inverted annular flow was observed to develop into inverted slug flow at low relative velocities, and into dispersed droplet flow at high relative velocities. For both of the above transitions from inverted annular flow, correlations for core jet length were developed by extending work done on free liquid jets to include this new, coaxial, jet disintegration phenomenon. Jet break-up length is correlated as a function of jet diameter, jet Reynolds number, jet Weber number, void fraction, and gas Weber number. Correlations for core shape, break-up mechanisms and dispersed core droplet size for the case of transition to inverted slug flow were developed

  5. Hydrodynamic stability of inverted annular flow in an adiabatic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.; Linehan, J.

    1986-01-01

    Inverted annular flow was simulated adiabatically with turbulent water jets, issuing downward from large aspect ratio nozzles, enclosed in gas annuli. Velocities, diameters, and gas species were varied, and core jet length, shape, breakup mode, and dispersed core droplet sizes were recorded at approximately 750 data points. Inverted annular flow destabilization led to inverted slug flow at low relative velocities, and to dispersed droplet flow, core breakup length correlations were developed by extending work on free liquid jets to include this coaxial, jet disintegration phenomenon. The results show length dependence upon D/sub J/, Re/sub J/, We/sub J/, α, and We/sub G/,rel. Correlations for core shape, breakup mechanisms, and dispersed core droplet size were also developed, by extending the results of free jet stability, roll wave entrainment, and churn turbulent droplet stability studies

  6. Dual-Pump CARS Development and Application to Supersonic Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2012-01-01

    A dual-pump Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) instrument has been developed to obtain simultaneous measurements of temperature and absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in supersonic combustion and generate databases for validation and development of CFD codes. Issues that compromised previous attempts, such as beam steering and high irradiance perturbation effects, have been alleviated or avoided. Improvements in instrument precision and accuracy have been achieved. An axis-symmetric supersonic combusting coaxial jet facility has been developed to provide a simple, yet suitable flow to CFD modelers. Approximately one million dual-pump CARS single shots have been collected in the supersonic jet for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Data have been acquired with a H2 co-flow (combustion case) or a N2 co-flow (mixing case). Results are presented and the effects of the compressibility and of the heat release are discussed.

  7. A study of the condensation of a high-velocity vapor jet on a coflowing turbulent liquid jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsiannikov, V. A.; Levin, A. A.

    A method for the experimental determination of the local value of the heat transfer coefficient under conditions of jet condensation is proposed which employs a heat balance expression in differential form. The method is used in an experimental study of the heat transfer characteristics of the condensation of a high-velocity coaxial jet of a slightly superheated (3 percent) steam on a coflowing cylindrical turbulent water jet. In the experiment, the relative velocities reach hundreds of m/s; the temperature nonequilibrium of the phases is high, as is the steam flow mass density during the initial contact; heat transfer between the phases is significant. The results can be used as the basis for determining experimental criterial dependences for jet condensation.

  8. Analysis of the Vortex Street Generated at the Core-Bypass Lip of a Jet-Engine Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, José; Legrand, Mathieu; Nauri, Sara; Rodríguez, Pedro A.; Lecuona, Antonio

    The reduction of the noise generated by jet-engine aircrafts is of growing concern in the present society. A better understanding of the aircraft noise production and the development of predictive tools is of great interest. Within this framework, the CoJeN (Coaxial Jet Noise) European Project includes the measurement of the flow field and the noise generated by typical turbofan jet-engine nozzles. One of the many aspects of interest is the occasional presence of acoustic tones of a defined frequency, symptomatic of the presence of quasiperiodic coherent structures within the flow. This chapter analyzes the characteristics of a vortex street in the core-bypass lip of one of the nozzles under study. The measurements were made by means of advanced PIV techniques within the above-mentioned project.

  9. Local lubrication model for spherical particles within incompressible Navier-Stokes flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, B.; Weynans, L.; Bergmann, M.

    2018-03-01

    The lubrication forces are short-range hydrodynamic interactions essential to describe suspension of the particles. Usually, they are underestimated in direct numerical simulations of particle-laden flows. In this paper, we propose a lubrication model for a coupled volume penalization method and discrete element method solver that estimates the unresolved hydrodynamic forces and torques in an incompressible Navier-Stokes flow. Corrections are made locally on the surface of the interacting particles without any assumption on the global particle shape. The numerical model has been validated against experimental data and performs as well as existing numerical models that are limited to spherical particles.

  10. Local lubrication model for spherical particles within incompressible Navier-Stokes flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, B; Weynans, L; Bergmann, M

    2018-03-01

    The lubrication forces are short-range hydrodynamic interactions essential to describe suspension of the particles. Usually, they are underestimated in direct numerical simulations of particle-laden flows. In this paper, we propose a lubrication model for a coupled volume penalization method and discrete element method solver that estimates the unresolved hydrodynamic forces and torques in an incompressible Navier-Stokes flow. Corrections are made locally on the surface of the interacting particles without any assumption on the global particle shape. The numerical model has been validated against experimental data and performs as well as existing numerical models that are limited to spherical particles.

  11. Simulating immersed particle collisions: the Devil's in the details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegert, Edward; Vowinckel, Bernhard; Meiburg, Eckart

    2015-11-01

    Simulating densely-packed particle-laden flows with any degree of confidence requires accurate modeling of particle-particle collisions. To this end, we investigate a few collision models from the fluids and granular flow communities using sphere-wall collisions, which have been studied by a number of experimental groups. These collisions involve enough complexities--gravity, particle-wall lubrication forces, particle-wall contact stresses, particle-wake interactions--to challenge any collision model. Evaluating the successes and shortcomings of the collision models, we seek improvements in order to obtain more consistent results. We will highlight several implementation details that are crucial for obtaining accurate results.

  12. 3D printing of microtube in solid phantom to simulate tissue oxygenation and perfusion (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiang; Xue, Yue; Wang, Haili; Shen, Shu Wei; Zhou, Ximing; Liu, Guangli; Dong, Erbao; Xu, Ronald X.

    2017-03-01

    Tissue-simulating phantoms with interior vascular network may facilitate traceable calibration and quantitative validation of many medical optical devices. However, a solid phantom that reliably simulates tissue oxygenation and blood perfusion is still not available. This paper presents a new method to fabricate hollow microtubes for blood vessel simulation in solid phantoms. The fabrication process combines ultraviolet (UV) rapid prototyping technique with fluid mechanics of a coaxial jet flow. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a UV-curable polymer are mixed at the designated ratio and extruded through a coaxial needle device to produce a coaxial jet flow. The extruded jet flow is quickly photo-polymerized by ultraviolet (UV) light to form vessel-simulating solid structures at different sizes ranging from 700 μm to 1000 μm. Microtube structures with adequate mechanical properties can be fabricated by adjusting material compositions and illumination intensity. Curved, straight and stretched microtubes can be formed by adjusting the extrusion speed of the materials and the speed of the 3D printing platform. To simulate vascular structures in biologic tissue, we embed vessel-simulating microtubes in a gel wax phantom of 10 cm x10 cm x 5 cm at the depth from 1 to 2 mm. Bloods at different oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration levels are circulated through the microtubes at different flow rates in order to simulate different oxygenation and perfusion conditions. The simulated physiologic parameters are detected by a tissue oximeter and a laser speckle blood flow meter respectively and compared with the actual values. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed 3D printing process is able to produce solid phantoms with simulated vascular networks for potential applications in medical device calibration and drug delivery studies.

  13. A volume-filtered formulation to capture particle-shock interactions in multiphase compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shallcross, Gregory; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2017-11-01

    Compressible particle-laden flows are common in engineering systems. Applications include but are not limited to water injection in high-speed jet flows for noise suppression, rocket-plume surface interactions during planetary landing, and explosions during coal mining operations. Numerically, it is challenging to capture these interactions due to the wide range of length and time scales. Additionally, there are many forms of the multiphase compressible flow equations with volume fraction effects, some of which are conflicting in nature. The purpose of this presentation is to develop the capability to accurately capture particle-shock interactions in systems with a large number of particles from dense to dilute regimes. A thorough derivation of the volume filtered equations is presented. The volume filtered equations are then implemented in a high-order, energy-stable Eulerian-Lagrangian framework. We show this framework is capable of decoupling the fluid mesh from the particle size, enabling arbitrary particle size distributions in the presence of shocks. The proposed method is then assessed against particle-laden shock tube data. Quantities of interest include fluid-phase pressure profiles and particle spreading rates. The effect of collisions in 2D and 3D are also evaluated.

  14. A variational multiscale method for particle-cloud tracking in turbomachinery flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, A.; Rispoli, F.; Sheard, A. G.; Takizawa, K.; Tezduyar, T. E.; Venturini, P.

    2014-11-01

    We present a computational method for simulation of particle-laden flows in turbomachinery. The method is based on a stabilized finite element fluid mechanics formulation and a finite element particle-cloud tracking method. We focus on induced-draft fans used in process industries to extract exhaust gases in the form of a two-phase fluid with a dispersed solid phase. The particle-laden flow causes material wear on the fan blades, degrading their aerodynamic performance, and therefore accurate simulation of the flow would be essential in reliable computational turbomachinery analysis and design. The turbulent-flow nature of the problem is dealt with a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes model and Streamline-Upwind/Petrov-Galerkin/Pressure-Stabilizing/Petrov-Galerkin stabilization, the particle-cloud trajectories are calculated based on the flow field and closure models for the turbulence-particle interaction, and one-way dependence is assumed between the flow field and particle dynamics. We propose a closure model utilizing the scale separation feature of the variational multiscale method, and compare that to the closure utilizing the eddy viscosity model. We present computations for axial- and centrifugal-fan configurations, and compare the computed data to those obtained from experiments, analytical approaches, and other computational methods.

  15. Swirl effect on flow structure and mixing in a turbulent jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravtsov, Z. D.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Dulin, V. M.

    2018-03-01

    The paper reports on experimental study of turbulent transport in the initial region of swirling turbulent jets. The particle image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence techniques are used to investigate the flow structure and passive scalar concentration, respectively, in free air jet with acetone vapor. Three flow cases are considered, viz., non-swirling jets and swirling jets with and without vortex breakdown and central recirculation zone. Without vortex breakdown, the swirl is shown to promote jet mixing with surrounding air and to decrease the jet core length. The vortex core breakdown further enhances mixing as the jet core disintegrates at the nozzle exit.

  16. Case study for co and counter swirling domestic burners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Kotb

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, the influence of equivalence ratio for co and counter-swirl domestic burners compared with non-swirl design on the thermal efficiency as well as CO emissions has been studied using liquefied petroleum gas (LPG. Also, the flame stability, and pot height, which is defined as the burner-to-pot distance (H, of the co and counter domestic burners were compared. The analysis of the results showed that, for both swirl burners co and counter one the thermal efficiency under all operation conditions tested is higher than the non-swirled burner (base burner. For example, the thermal efficiency increased by 8.8%, and 5.8% than base burner for co and counter swirl, respectively at Reynolds number equal 2000 and equivalence ratio 1. The co and counter swirl burners show lower CO emission than the base burner. The co swirl burner has wider operation range than counter swirl. With the increase of pot height, the thermal efficiency of all burners decreases because the flame and combustion gases are cooled due to mixing with ambient air. As a result, the heat transfer is decreased due to atmospheric loss, which decrease the thermal efficiency.

  17. Particle clustering within a two-phase turbulent pipe jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Timothy; Nathan, Graham

    2016-11-01

    A comprehensive study of the influence of Stokes number on the instantaneous distributions of particles within a well-characterised, two-phase, turbulent pipe jet in a weak co-flow was performed. The experiments utilised particles with a narrow size distribution, resulting in a truly mono-disperse particle-laden jet. The jet Reynolds number, based on the pipe diameter, was in the range 10000 developed technique. The results show that particle clustering is significantly influenced by the exit Stokes number. Particle clustering was found to be significant for 0 . 3 financial contributions by the Australian Research Council (Grant No. DP120102961) and the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (Grant No. USO034).

  18. Numerical Simulations of the Impact and Spreading of a Particulate Drop on a Solid Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jun Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two-dimensional numerical simulations of the impact and spreading of a droplet containing a number of small particles on a flat solid surface, just after hitting the solid surface, to understand particle effects on spreading dynamics of a particle-laden droplet for the application to the industrial inkjet printing process. The Navier-Stokes equation is solved by a finite-element-based computational scheme that employs the level-set method for the accurate interface description between the drop fluid and air and a fictitious domain method for suspended particles to account for full hydrodynamic interaction. Focusing on the particle effect on droplet spreading and recoil behaviors, we report that suspended particles suppress the droplet oscillation and deformation, by investigating the drop deformations for various Reynolds numbers. This suppressed oscillatory behavior of the particulate droplet has been interpreted with the enhanced energy dissipation due to the presence of particles.

  19. Method for improved gas-solids separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusik, C.L.; He, B.X.

    1990-11-13

    Methods are disclosed for the removal of particulate solids from a gas stream at high separation efficiency, including the removal of submicron size particles. The apparatus includes a cyclone separator type of device which contains an axially mounted perforated cylindrical hollow rotor. The rotor is rotated at high velocity in the same direction as the flow of an input particle-laden gas stream to thereby cause enhanced separation of particulate matter from the gas stream in the cylindrical annular space between the rotor and the sidewall of the cyclone vessel. Substantially particle-free gas passes through the perforated surface of the spinning rotor and into the hollow rotor, from where it is discharged out of the top of the apparatus. Separated particulates are removed from the bottom of the vessel. 4 figs.

  20. Euler–Lagrange simulation of gas–solid pipe flow with smooth and rough wall boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias; Yin, Chungen

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulation of upward turbulent particle-laden pipe flow is performed with the intention to reveal the influence of surface roughness on the velocity statistics of the particle phase. A rough wall collision model, which models the surface as being sinusoidal, is proposed to account...... for the wall boundary condition ranging for smooth surfaces to very rough surfaces. This model accounts for the entire range of possible surface roughness found in pipes and industrial pneumatic equipment from smooth plastic pipes over machined steel pipes to cast iron surfaces. The model is based...... on a geometric interpretation of the wall collision process where the particle restitution coefficient is based on the data presented by Sommerfeld and Huber [1]. Simulations are performed using the Eulerian–Lagrangian methodology for the dilute one-way coupling regime. Results are reported for 3 different sizes...

  1. Effects of solid inertial particles on the velocity and temperature statistics of wall bounded turbulent flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadhadi; Lessani, B.

    2016-01-01

    and particles, and the scatter plotsof fluid-particle temperature differences are presented. In addition, the variations of different budgetterms for the turbulent kinetic energy equation and fluctuating temperature variance equation in thepresence of particles are reported. The fluid turbulent heat flux...... is reduced by the presence of particles,and in spite of the additional heat exchange between the carrier fluid and the particles, the total heattransfer rate stays always lower for particle-laden flows. To further clarify this issue, the total Nusseltnumber is split into a turbulence contribution...... and a particle contribution, and the effects of particles inertiaon fluid turbulent heat flux and fluid-particle heat transfer are examined in detail...

  2. Field dependent response of magnetorheological elastomers utilizing spherical Fe particles versus Fe nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H J; Wereley, N M; Bell, R C; Planinsek, J L; II, J A Filer

    2009-01-01

    This study compares the dynamic response of nanowire-based magnetorheological elastomers (MREs), to those containing conventional spherical particles. MRE samples were fabricated by curing the iron particle laden elastomeric material in a magnetic field. Material characteristics of the MRE samples were evaluated using a material test machine that was modified to measure static and frequency dependent characteristics of these samples under different magnetic fields. The MRE samples consisted of a silicone rubber matrix containing various weight fractions of iron particles of differing morphology. Nanowires were used to enhance the interaction forces and contact area between particles. The static and dynamic properties of the MREs were evaluated under a compressive load for the various compositions and weight fractions. The stress vs. strain characteristics were measured for each sample. The equivalent damping coefficient of the MRE samples was measured and characterized under magnetic fields of differing intensities. The dynamic characteristic (dynamic stiffness) was measured under sinusoidal excitation in the frequency domain.

  3. Changes of inflammatory cells in rat lungs exposed to diesel emissions; Diesel haiki bakuro ni yoru rat hai no ensho saibo no henka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, A. [Japan Automobile Research Institute Inc., Tsukuba (Japan); Kagawa, J. [Tokyo Women`s Medical College, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    Study was made on the effect of exposure to diesel emissions on inflammatory cells in a rat lungs. Four kinds of exposure gases with different contents of NO2 and particulate were prepared by diluting diesel emissions. Rats were exposed to diluted diesel emissions for 24 months, and inflammatory cells were detected morphologically in light microscopic and TEM specimens. As a result, particle-laden- alveolar macrophages increased dose- and time-dependently into the submucosa of intrapulmonary bronchioles, alveolar spaces and interstitume of alveolar walls, and bronchoassociated lymphatic tissues. Mast cells infiltrated into the interspaces of epithelial cells in airways. In the submucosa of the terminal bronchioles and the interstitume of alveolar walls, some sorts of inflammatory cells such as mast cells, plasma cells, neutrophils and lymphocytes infiltrated, and some cells showed cell-to-cell contacts. However, the airways were rarely injured by infiltration of inflammatory cells except for a fibrotic change. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Acute and subacute pulmonary toxicity caused by a single intratracheal instillation of colloidal silver nanoparticles in mice: pathobiological changes and metallothionein responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewamatawong, Theerayuth; Banlunara, Wijit; Maneewattanapinyo, Pattwat; Thammachareon, Chuchaat; Ekgasit, Sanong

    2014-01-01

    To study the acute and subacute pulmonary toxicity of colloidal silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs), 0 or 100 ppm of Ag-NPs were instilled intratracheally in mice. Cellular and biochemical parameters in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and histological alterations were determined 1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days after instillation. Ag-NPs induced moderate pulmonary inflammation and injury on BALF indices during the acute period; however, these changes gradually regressed in a time-dependent manner. Concomitant histopathological and laminin immunohistochemical findings generally correlated to BALF data. Superoxide dismutase and metallothionein expression occurred in particle-laden macrophages and alveolar epithelial cells, which correlated to lung lesions in mice treated with Ag-NPs. These findings suggest that instillation of Ag-NPs causes transient moderate acute lung inflammation and tissue damage. Oxidative stress may underlie the induction of injury to lung tissue. Moreover, the expression of metallothionein in tissues indicated the protective response to exposure to Ag-NPs.

  5. Science & Technology Review April 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2007-02-27

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Shaking the Foundations of Solar-System Science--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention--The first samples retrieved from a comet are a treasure trove of surprises to Laboratory researchers; (3) Fire in the Hole--Underground coal gasification may help to meet future energy supply challenges with a production process from the past; (4) Big Physics in Small Spaces--A newly developed computer model successfully simulates particle-laden fluids flowing through complex microfluidic systems; (5) A New Block on the Periodic Table--Livermore and Russian scientists add a new block to the periodic table with the creation of element 118; and (6) A Search for Patterns and Connections--Throughout his career, Edward Teller searched for mathematical solutions to explain the physical world.

  6. A discrete element and ray framework for rapid simulation of acoustical dispersion of microscale particulate agglomerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2016-03-01

    In industry, particle-laden fluids, such as particle-functionalized inks, are constructed by adding fine-scale particles to a liquid solution, in order to achieve desired overall properties in both liquid and (cured) solid states. However, oftentimes undesirable particulate agglomerations arise due to some form of mutual-attraction stemming from near-field forces, stray electrostatic charges, process ionization and mechanical adhesion. For proper operation of industrial processes involving particle-laden fluids, it is important to carefully breakup and disperse these agglomerations. One approach is to target high-frequency acoustical pressure-pulses to breakup such agglomerations. The objective of this paper is to develop a computational model and corresponding solution algorithm to enable rapid simulation of the effect of acoustical pulses on an agglomeration composed of a collection of discrete particles. Because of the complex agglomeration microstructure, containing gaps and interfaces, this type of system is extremely difficult to mesh and simulate using continuum-based methods, such as the finite difference time domain or the finite element method. Accordingly, a computationally-amenable discrete element/discrete ray model is developed which captures the primary physical events in this process, such as the reflection and absorption of acoustical energy, and the induced forces on the particulate microstructure. The approach utilizes a staggered, iterative solution scheme to calculate the power transfer from the acoustical pulse to the particles and the subsequent changes (breakup) of the pulse due to the particles. Three-dimensional examples are provided to illustrate the approach.

  7. Interfacial rheology of model particles at liquid interfaces and its relation to (bicontinuous) Pickering emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, J. H. J.; Vermant, J.

    2018-01-01

    Interface-dominated materials are commonly encountered in both science and technology, and typical examples include foams and emulsions. Conventionally stabilised by surfactants, emulsions can also be stabilised by micron-sized particles. These so-called Pickering-Ramsden (PR) emulsions have received substantial interest, as they are model arrested systems, rather ubiquitous in industry and promising templates for advanced materials. The mechanical properties of the particle-laden liquid-liquid interface, probed via interfacial rheology, have been shown to play an important role in the formation and stability of PR emulsions. However, the morphological processes which control the formation of emulsions and foams in mixing devices, such as deformation, break-up, and coalescence, are complex and diverse, making it difficult to identify the precise role of the interfacial rheological properties. Interestingly, the role of interfacial rheology in the stability of bicontinuous PR emulsions (bijels) has been virtually unexplored, even though the phase separation process which leads to the formation of these systems is relatively simple and the interfacial deformation processes can be better conceptualised. Hence, the aims of this topical review are twofold. First, we review the existing literature on the interfacial rheology of particle-laden liquid interfaces in rheometrical flows, focussing mainly on model latex suspensions consisting of polystyrene particles carrying sulfate groups, which have been most extensively studied to date. The goal of this part of the review is to identify the generic features of the rheology of such systems. Secondly, we will discuss the relevance of these results to the formation and stability of PR emulsions and bijels.

  8. Towards Eulerian-Eulerian large eddy simulation of reactive two-phase plows; Vers la simulation des grandes echelles en formulation Euler-Euler des ecoulements reactifs diphasiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, A.

    2004-03-15

    Particle laden flows occur in industrial applications ranging from droplets in gas turbines to fluidized bed in chemical industry. Prediction of the dispersed phase properties such as concentration and dynamics are crucial for the design of more efficient devices that meet the new pollutant regulations of the European community. Numerical simulation coupling Lagrangian tracking of discrete particles with DNS or LES of the carrier phase provide a well established powerful tool to investigate particle laden flows. Such numerical methods have the drawback of being numerically very expensive for practical applications. Numerical simulations based on separate Eulerian balance equations for both phases, coupled through inter-phase exchange terms might be an effective alternative approach. This approach has been validated for the case of tracer particles with very low inertia that follow the carrier phase almost instantaneously due to their small response time compared with the micro-scale time scales of the carrier phase. Objective of this thesis is to extend this approach to more inertial particles that occur in practical applications such as fuel droplets in gas turbine combustors. Existing results suggest a separation of the dispersed phase velocity into a correlated and an uncorrelated component. The energy related to the uncorrelated component is about 30% of the total particle kinetic energy when the particle relaxation time is comparable to the Lagrangian integral time scale. The presence of this uncorrelated motion leads to stress terms in the Eulerian balance equation for the particle momentum. Models for this stress terms are proposed and tested. Numerical simulations in the Eulerian framework are validated by comparison with simulations using Lagrangian particle tracking. Additionally coupling of the Eulerian transport equations for the particles to combustion models is tested. (author)

  9. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed Ali, Samar Reda; Hussein, Abdel Hamid Ahmed; Nofal, Adel Abdel Menam Saleh; Elgazzar, Haytham Abdelrafea; Sabour, Hassan Abdel

    2017-01-01

    Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β) titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC) and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resistance of the titanium alloy. The goal was to create a uniform distribution of hard WC particles that is crack-free and nonporous to enhance the wear resistance of such alloy. This was achieved by changing the laser cladding parameters to reach the optimum conditions for favorable mechanical properties. The laser cladding samples were subjected to thorough microstructure examinations, microhardness and abrasion tests. Phase identification was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results revealed that the best clad layers were achieved at a specific heat input value of 59.5 J·mm−2. An increase by more than three folds in the microhardness values of the clad layers was achieved and the wear resistance was improved by values reaching 400 times. PMID:29036935

  10. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Reda Al-Sayed Ali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resistance of the titanium alloy. The goal was to create a uniform distribution of hard WC particles that is crack-free and nonporous to enhance the wear resistance of such alloy. This was achieved by changing the laser cladding parameters to reach the optimum conditions for favorable mechanical properties. The laser cladding samples were subjected to thorough microstructure examinations, microhardness and abrasion tests. Phase identification was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The obtained results revealed that the best clad layers were achieved at a specific heat input value of 59.5 J·mm−2. An increase by more than three folds in the microhardness values of the clad layers was achieved and the wear resistance was improved by values reaching 400 times.

  11. Laser Powder Cladding of Ti-6Al-4V α/β Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed Ali, Samar Reda; Hussein, Abdel Hamid Ahmed; Nofal, Adel Abdel Menam Saleh; Hasseb Elnaby, Salah Elden Ibrahim; Elgazzar, Haytham Abdelrafea; Sabour, Hassan Abdel

    2017-10-15

    Laser cladding process was performed on a commercial Ti-6Al-4V (α + β) titanium alloy by means of tungsten carbide-nickel based alloy powder blend. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used with coaxial jet nozzle coupled with a standard powder feeding system. Four-track deposition of a blended powder consisting of 60 wt % tungsten carbide (WC) and 40 wt % NiCrBSi was successfully made on the alloy. The high content of the hard WC particles is intended to enhance the abrasion resistance of the titanium alloy. The goal was to create a uniform distribution of hard WC particles that is crack-free and nonporous to enhance the wear resistance of such alloy. This was achieved by changing the laser cladding parameters to reach the optimum conditions for favorable mechanical properties. The laser cladding samples were subjected to thorough microstructure examinations, microhardness and abrasion tests. Phase identification was obtained by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The obtained results revealed that the best clad layers were achieved at a specific heat input value of 59.5 J·mm -2 . An increase by more than three folds in the microhardness values of the clad layers was achieved and the wear resistance was improved by values reaching 400 times.

  12. Investigation of air-assisted sprays submitted to high frequency transverse acoustic fields: Droplet clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficuciello, A.; Blaisot, J. B.; Richard, C.; Baillot, F.

    2017-06-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of a high amplitude transverse acoustic field on coaxial jets is presented in this paper. Water and air are used as working fluids at ambient pressure. The coaxial injectors are placed on the top of a semi-open resonant cavity where the acoustic pressure fluctuations of the standing wave can reach a maximum peak-to-peak amplitude of 12 kPa at the forcing frequency of 1 kHz. Several test conditions are considered in order to quantify the influence of injection conditions, acoustic field amplitude, and injector position with respect to the standing wave acoustic field. A high speed back-light visualization technique is used to characterize the jet response. Image processing is used to obtain valuable information about the jet behavior. It is shown that the acoustic field drastically affects the atomization process for all atomization regimes. The position of the injector in the acoustic field determines the jet response, and a droplet-clustering phenomenon is highlighted in multi-point injection conditions and quantified by determining discrete droplet location distributions. A theoretical model based on nonlinear acoustics related to the spatial distribution of the radiation pressure exerted on an object explains the behavior observed.

  13. Flame-vortex interaction and mixing behaviors of turbulent non-premixed jet flames under acoustic forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Munki; Choi, Youngil; Oh, Jeongseog; Yoon, Youngbin [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-12-15

    This study examines the effect of acoustic excitation using forced coaxial air on the flame characteristics of turbulent hydrogen non-premixed flames. A resonance frequency was selected to acoustically excite the coaxial air jet due to its ability to effectively amplify the acoustic amplitude and reduce flame length and NO{sub x} emissions. Acoustic excitation causes the flame length to decrease by 15% and consequently, a 25% reduction in EINO{sub x} is achieved, compared to coaxial air flames without acoustic excitation at the same coaxial air to fuel velocity ratio. Moreover, acoustic excitation induces periodical fluctuation of the coaxial air velocity, thus resulting in slight fluctuation of the fuel velocity. From phase-lock PIV and OH PLIF measurement, the local flow properties at the flame surface were investigated under acoustic forcing. During flame-vortex interaction in the near field region, the entrainment velocity and the flame surface area increased locally near the vortex. This increase in flame surface area and entrainment velocity is believed to be a crucial factor in reducing flame length and NO{sub x} emission in coaxial jet flames with acoustic excitation. Local flame extinction occurred frequently when subjected to an excessive strain rate, indicating that intense mass transfer of fuel and air occurs radially inward at the flame surface. (author)

  14. Multiple Δt strategy for particle image velocimetry (PIV) error correction, applied to a hot propulsive jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, J; Lecuona, A; Nauri, S; Legrand, M; Rodríguez, P A

    2009-01-01

    PIV (particle image velocimetry) is a measurement technique with growing application to the study of complex flows with relevance to industry. This work is focused on the assessment of some significant PIV measurement errors. In particular, procedures are proposed for estimating, and sometimes correcting, errors coming from the sensor geometry and performance, namely peak-locking and contemporary CCD camera read-out errors. Although the procedures are of general application to PIV, they are applied to a particular real case, giving an example of the methodology steps and the improvement in results that can be obtained. This real case corresponds to an ensemble of hot high-speed coaxial jets, representative of the civil transport aircraft propulsion system using turbofan engines. Errors of ∼0.1 pixels displacements have been assessed. This means 10% of the measured magnitude at many points. These results allow the uncertainty interval associated with the measurement to be provided and, under some circumstances, the correction of some of the bias components of the errors. The detection of conditions where the peak-locking error has a period of 2 pixels instead of the classical 1 pixel has been made possible using these procedures. In addition to the increased worth of the measurement, the uncertainty assessment is of interest for the validation of CFD codes

  15. Models for fluid flows with heat transfer in mixed convection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mompean Munhoz da Cruz, G.

    1989-06-01

    Second order models were studied in order to predict turbulent flows with heat transfer. The equations used correspond to the characteristic scale of turbulent flows. The order of magnitude of the terms of the equation is analyzed by using Reynolds and Peclet numbers. The two-equation model (K-ε) is applied in the hydrodynamic study. Two models are developed for the heat transfer analysis: the Prt + teta 2 and the complete model. In the first model, the turbulent thermal diffusivity is calculated by using the Prandtl number for turbulent flow and an equation for the variance of the temperature fluctuation. The second model consists of three equations concerning: the turbulent heat flow, the variance of the temperature fluctuation and its dissipation ratio. The equations were validated by four experiments, which were characterized by the analysis of: the air flow after passing through a grid of constant average temperature and with temperature gradient, an axysymmetric air jet submitted to high and low heating temperature, the mixing (cold-hot) of two coaxial jets of sodium at high Peclet number. The complete model is shown to be the most suitable for the investigations presented [fr

  16. Jet Noise Scaling in Dual Stream Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2010-01-01

    Power spectral laws in dual stream jets are studied by considering such flows a superposition of appropriate single-stream coaxial jets. Noise generation in each mixing region is modeled using spectral power laws developed earlier for single stream jets as a function of jet temperature and observer angle. Similarity arguments indicate that jet noise in dual stream nozzles may be considered as a composite of four single stream jets representing primary/secondary, secondary/ambient, transition, and fully mixed zones. Frequency filter are designed to highlight spectral contribution from each jet. Predictions are provided at an area ratio of 2.0--bypass ratio from 0.80 to 3.40, and are compared with measurements within a wide range of velocity and temperature ratios. These models suggest that the low frequency noise in unheated jets is dominated by the fully mixed region at all velocity ratios, while the high frequency noise is dominated by the secondary when the velocity ratio is larger than 0.80. Transition and fully mixed jets equally dominate the low frequency noise in heated jets. At velocity ratios less than 0.50, the high frequency noise from primary/bypass becomes a significant contributing factor similar to that in the secondary/ambient jet.

  17. Multiple Δt strategy for particle image velocimetry (PIV) error correction, applied to a hot propulsive jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, J.; Lecuona, A.; Nauri, S.; Legrand, M.; Rodríguez, P. A.

    2009-07-01

    PIV (particle image velocimetry) is a measurement technique with growing application to the study of complex flows with relevance to industry. This work is focused on the assessment of some significant PIV measurement errors. In particular, procedures are proposed for estimating, and sometimes correcting, errors coming from the sensor geometry and performance, namely peak-locking and contemporary CCD camera read-out errors. Although the procedures are of general application to PIV, they are applied to a particular real case, giving an example of the methodology steps and the improvement in results that can be obtained. This real case corresponds to an ensemble of hot high-speed coaxial jets, representative of the civil transport aircraft propulsion system using turbofan engines. Errors of ~0.1 pixels displacements have been assessed. This means 10% of the measured magnitude at many points. These results allow the uncertainty interval associated with the measurement to be provided and, under some circumstances, the correction of some of the bias components of the errors. The detection of conditions where the peak-locking error has a period of 2 pixels instead of the classical 1 pixel has been made possible using these procedures. In addition to the increased worth of the measurement, the uncertainty assessment is of interest for the validation of CFD codes.

  18. Experimental and numerical investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Meyer, K.E.

    2009-01-01

    Experimental data for velocity field, temperatures, and gas composition have been obtained from a 50 kW axisymmetric non-swirling natural gas fired combustion setup under two different settings. The reactor was constructed to simulate the conditions in the freeboard of a grate-fired boiler...... but under well-defined conditions. The experimental results are compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling predictions, using the eddy dissipation model (EDM) its well as the eddy dissipation concept (EDC). The use of EDC allows for implementation of more advanced combustion schemes; we have...... tested the four-step global mechanism by Jones and Lindstedt (Combust. Flame 1988, 73, 233-249), and the 16 species and 41 reaction skeletal mechanism by Yang and Pope (Combust. Flame 1998, 112 16-32). The CFD model captured the main features of the combustion process and flow patterns. The application...

  19. Experimental and CFD investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jimmy

    Reliable and accurate modeling capabilities for combustion systems are valuable tools for optimization of the combustion process. This work concerns primary precautions for reducing NO emissions, thereby abating the detrimental effects known as “acid rain”, and minimizing cost for flue gas...... treatment. The aim of this project is to provide validation data for Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models relevant for grate firing combustion conditions. CFD modeling is a mathematical tool capable of predicting fluid flow, mixing and chemical reaction with thermal conversion and transport. Prediction......, but under well-defined conditions. Comprehensive experimental data for velocity field, temperatures, and gas composition are obtained from a 50 kW axisymmetric non-swirling natural gas fired combustion setup under two different settings. Ammonia is added to the combustion setup in order to simulate fuel...

  20. Experimental and numerical investigation of gas phase freeboard combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jimmy; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Hvid, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    In part 1 of the present work (10.1021/ef900752a), experimental data and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling predictions for velocity field, temperatures, and major species were compared fora 50 kW axisymmetric, non-swirling natural gas Fired combustion setup, constructed to simulate...... the conditions in the freeboard of it grate-fired boiler. Here, in part 2, the ability of CFD to predict volatile N oxidation to NO and N(2) is evaluated. Trace amounts of ammonia were added to the natural gas, and local measurements of NH(3) and NO in the reactor were compared to modeling predictions. Different...... modeling approaches, including global schemes and analytically reduced mechanisms, were tested in the CFD calculations. In addition, the simplified schemes were compared to reference calculations with a detailed mechanism under isothermal plug flow reactor conditions. While none of the global ammonia...

  1. The investigation of soot and temperature distributions in a visualized direct injection diesel engine using laser diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong-taek; Kim, Ki-bum; Lee, Ki-hyung

    2008-11-01

    Based upon the method of temperature calibration using the diffusion flame, the temperature and soot concentrations of the turbulent flame in a visualized diesel engine were qualitatively measured. Two different cylinder heads were used to investigate the effect of swirl ratio within the combustion chamber. From this experiment, we find that the highest flame temperature of the non-swirl head engine is approximately 2400 K and that of the swirl head engine is 2100 K. In addition, as the pressure of fuel injection increases, the in-cylinder temperature increases due to the improved combustion of a diesel engine. This experiment represented the soot quantity in the KL factor and revealed that the KL factor was high when the fuel collided with the cylinder wall. Moreover, the KL factor was also high in the area of the chamber where the temperature dropped rapidly.

  2. Investigation into the heat transfer performance of helically ribbed surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firth, R.J.

    1981-12-01

    The first part of an investigation into flow and heat transfer in annular channels and seven pin clusters is described. One of the main aims of the project is to improve cluster heat transfer prediction codes for helically ribbed surfaces. A study is made of the heat transfer and flow characteristics of a helically ribbed pin in an annular channel. It is shown that the swirling flow, which is induced by the helical ribs, gives rise to substantially enhanced diffusivity levels. This phenomenon had not been taken into account by previous analysis techniques. The methods for analysing heat transfer and pressure drop data from annular channels which were originally developed for non-swirling flow are generalised to accommodate swirling flow. The new methods are shown to be consistent with empirical data. Roughness parameter data is presented for helically ribbed surfaces with an axial rib pitch into height ratio of about 7. (author)

  3. Numerical simulation of a low-swirl impinging jet with a rotating convergent nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borynyak, K.; Hrebtov, M.; Bobrov, M.; Kozyulin, N.

    2018-03-01

    The paper presents the results of Large Eddy Simulation of a swirling impinging jet with moderate Reynolds number (104), where the swirl is organized via the rotation of a convergent nozzle. The results show that the effect of the swirl in this configuration leads to an increase of axial velocity, compared to the non-swirling case. It is shown that turbulent stress plays an important role in this effect. The vortex structure of the jet consists of multiple pairs of nearly parallel helical vortices with opposite signs of rotation. The interaction of vortices in the near region of the jet leads to radial contraction of the jet’s core which in turn, causes an the increase in the axial velocity.

  4. Modification of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence by solid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wontae

    2005-12-01

    Particle-laden flows are prevalent in natural and industrial environments. Dilute loadings of small, heavy particles have been observed to attenuate the turbulence levels of the carrier-phase flow, up to 80% in some cases. We attempt to increase the physical understanding of this complex phenomenon by studying the interaction of solid particles with the most fundamental type of turbulence, which is homogeneous and isotropic with no mean flow. A flow facility was developed that could create air turbulence in a nearly-spherical chamber by means of synthetic jet actuators mounted on the corners. Loudspeakers were used as the actuators. Stationary turbulence and natural decaying turbulence were investigated using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry for the base flow qualification. Results indicated that the turbulence was fairly homogeneous throughout the measurement domain and very isotropic, with small mean flow. The particle-laden flow experiments were conducted in two different environments, the lab and in micro-gravity, to examine the effects of particle wakes and flow structure distortion caused by settling particles. The laboratory experiments showed that glass particles with diameters on the order of the turbulence Kolmogorov length scale attenuated the fluid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and dissipation rate with increasing particle mass loadings. The main source of fluid TKE production in the chamber was the speakers, but the loss of potential energy of the settling particles also resulted in a significant amount of production of extra TKE. The sink of TKE in the chamber was due to the ordinary fluid viscous dissipation and extra dissipation caused by particles. This extra dissipation could be divided into "unresolved" dissipation caused by local velocity disturbances in the vicinity of the small particles and dissipation caused by large-scale flow distortions from particle wakes and particle clusters. The micro-gravity experiments in NASA's KC-135

  5. Turbulent mixing of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid at low-Mach number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battista, F.; Casciola, C. M.; Picano, F.

    2014-01-01

    Supercritical fluids near the critical point are characterized by liquid-like densities and gas-like transport properties. These features are purposely exploited in different contexts ranging from natural products extraction/fractionation to aerospace propulsion. Large part of studies concerns this last context, focusing on the dynamics of supercritical fluids at high Mach number where compressibility and thermodynamics strictly interact. Despite the widespread use also at low Mach number, the turbulent mixing properties of slightly supercritical fluids have still not investigated in detail in this regime. This topic is addressed here by dealing with Direct Numerical Simulations of a coaxial jet of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid. Since acoustic effects are irrelevant in the low Mach number conditions found in many industrial applications, the numerical model is based on a suitable low-Mach number expansion of the governing equation. According to experimental observations, the weakly supercritical regime is characterized by the formation of finger-like structures – the so-called ligaments – in the shear layers separating the two streams. The mechanism of ligament formation at vanishing Mach number is extracted from the simulations and a detailed statistical characterization is provided. Ligaments always form whenever a high density contrast occurs, independently of real or perfect gas behaviors. The difference between real and perfect gas conditions is found in the ligament small-scale structure. More intense density gradients and thinner interfaces characterize the near critical fluid in comparison with the smoother behavior of the perfect gas. A phenomenological interpretation is here provided on the basis of the real gas thermodynamics properties

  6. Turbulent mixing of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid at low-Mach number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battista, F.; Casciola, C. M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sapienza University, via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Picano, F. [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Padova, via Venezia 1, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Supercritical fluids near the critical point are characterized by liquid-like densities and gas-like transport properties. These features are purposely exploited in different contexts ranging from natural products extraction/fractionation to aerospace propulsion. Large part of studies concerns this last context, focusing on the dynamics of supercritical fluids at high Mach number where compressibility and thermodynamics strictly interact. Despite the widespread use also at low Mach number, the turbulent mixing properties of slightly supercritical fluids have still not investigated in detail in this regime. This topic is addressed here by dealing with Direct Numerical Simulations of a coaxial jet of a slightly supercritical van der Waals fluid. Since acoustic effects are irrelevant in the low Mach number conditions found in many industrial applications, the numerical model is based on a suitable low-Mach number expansion of the governing equation. According to experimental observations, the weakly supercritical regime is characterized by the formation of finger-like structures – the so-called ligaments – in the shear layers separating the two streams. The mechanism of ligament formation at vanishing Mach number is extracted from the simulations and a detailed statistical characterization is provided. Ligaments always form whenever a high density contrast occurs, independently of real or perfect gas behaviors. The difference between real and perfect gas conditions is found in the ligament small-scale structure. More intense density gradients and thinner interfaces characterize the near critical fluid in comparison with the smoother behavior of the perfect gas. A phenomenological interpretation is here provided on the basis of the real gas thermodynamics properties.

  7. Hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/Large-Eddy Simulations of a Coaxial Supersonic Free-Jet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, Robert A.; Edwards, Jack R.

    2010-01-01

    Reynolds-averaged and hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations have been applied to a supersonic coaxial jet flow experiment. The experiment was designed to study compressible mixing flow phenomenon under conditions that are representative of those encountered in scramjet combustors. The experiment utilized either helium or argon as the inner jet nozzle fluid, and the outer jet nozzle fluid consisted of laboratory air. The inner and outer nozzles were designed and operated to produce nearly pressure-matched Mach 1.8 flow conditions at the jet exit. The purpose of the computational effort was to assess the state-of-the-art for each modeling approach, and to use the hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations to gather insight into the deficiencies of the Reynolds-averaged closure models. The Reynolds-averaged simulations displayed a strong sensitivity to choice of turbulent Schmidt number. The initial value chosen for this parameter resulted in an over-prediction of the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, but the opposite trend was observed when argon was used as the injectant. A larger turbulent Schmidt number greatly improved the comparison of the results with measurements for the helium simulations, but variations in the Schmidt number did not improve the argon comparisons. The hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations also over-predicted the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, while under-predicting the rate of mixing when argon was used as the injectant. The primary reason conjectured for the discrepancy between the hybrid simulation results and the measurements centered around issues related to the transition from a Reynolds-averaged state to one with resolved turbulent content. Improvements to the inflow conditions were suggested as a remedy to this dilemma. Second-order turbulence statistics were also compared to their modeled Reynolds-averaged counterparts to evaluate the effectiveness of common turbulence closure

  8. Hybrid Reynolds-Averaged/Large-Eddy Simulations of a Co-Axial Supersonic Free-Jet Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baurle, R. A.; Edwards, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Reynolds-averaged and hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations have been applied to a supersonic coaxial jet flow experiment. The experiment utilized either helium or argon as the inner jet nozzle fluid, and the outer jet nozzle fluid consisted of laboratory air. The inner and outer nozzles were designed and operated to produce nearly pressure-matched Mach 1.8 flow conditions at the jet exit. The purpose of the computational effort was to assess the state-of-the-art for each modeling approach, and to use the hybrid Reynolds-averaged/large-eddy simulations to gather insight into the deficiencies of the Reynolds-averaged closure models. The Reynolds-averaged simulations displayed a strong sensitivity to choice of turbulent Schmidt number. The baseline value chosen for this parameter resulted in an over-prediction of the mixing layer spreading rate for the helium case, but the opposite trend was noted when argon was used as the injectant. A larger turbulent Schmidt number greatly improved the comparison of the results with measurements for the helium simulations, but variations in the Schmidt number did not improve the argon comparisons. The hybrid simulation results showed the same trends as the baseline Reynolds-averaged predictions. The primary reason conjectured for the discrepancy between the hybrid simulation results and the measurements centered around issues related to the transition from a Reynolds-averaged state to one with resolved turbulent content. Improvements to the inflow conditions are suggested as a remedy to this dilemma. Comparisons between resolved second-order turbulence statistics and their modeled Reynolds-averaged counterparts were also performed.

  9. Dual-Pump CARS Development and Application to Supersonic Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnotti, Gaetano

    Successful design of hypersonic air-breathing engines requires new computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for turbulence and turbulence-chemistry interaction in supersonic combustion. Unfortunately, not enough data are available to the modelers to develop and validate their codes, due to difficulties in taking measurements in such a harsh environment. Dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is a non-intrusive, non-linear, laser-based technique that provides temporally and spatially resolved measurements of temperature and absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in H2-air flames. A dual-pump CARS instrument has been developed to obtain measurements in supersonic combustion and generate databases for the CFD community. Issues that compromised previous attempts, such as beam steering and high irradiance perturbation effects, have been alleviated or avoided. Improvements in instrument precision and accuracy have been achieved. An axis-symmetric supersonic combusting coaxial jet facility has been developed to provide a simple, yet suitable flow to CFD modelers. The facility provides a central jet of hot "vitiated air" simulating the hot air entering the engine of a hypersonic vehicle flying at Mach numbers between 5 and 7. Three different silicon carbide nozzles, with exit Mach number 1, 1.6 and 2, are used to provide flows with the effects of varying compressibility. H2 co-flow is available in order to generate a supersonic combusting free jet. Dual-pump CARS measurements have been obtained for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Approximately one million Dual-pump CARS single shots have been collected in the supersonic jet for varying values of flight and exit Mach numbers at several locations. Data have been acquired with a H2 co-flow (combustion case) or a N 2 co-flow (mixing case). Results are presented and the effects of the compressibility and of the heat release are discussed.

  10. Mixing enhancement in a scramjet combustor using fuel jet injection swirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesberg, Sonja M.

    The scramjet engine has proven to be a viable means of powering a hypersonic vehicle, especially after successful flights of the X-51 WaveRider and various Hy-SHOT test vehicles. The major challenge associated with operating a scramjet engine is the short residence time of the fuel and oxidizer in the combustor. The fuel and oxidizer have only milliseconds to mix, ignite and combust in the combustion chamber. Combustion cannot occur until the fuel and oxidizer are mixed on a molecular level. Therefore the improvement of mixing is of utmost interest since this can increase combustion efficiency. This study investigated mixing enhancement of fuel and oxidizer within the combustion chamber of a scramjet by introducing swirl to the fuel jet. The investigation was accomplished with numerical simulations using STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamic software. The geometry of the University of Virginia Supersonic Combustion Facility was used to model the isolator, combustor and nozzle of a scramjet engine for simulation purposes. Experimental data from previous research at the facility was used to verify the simulation model before investigating the effect of fuel jet swirl on mixing. The model used coaxial fuel jet with a swirling annular jet. Single coaxial fuel jet and dual coaxial fuel jet configurations were simulated for the investigation. The coaxial fuel jets were modelled with a swirling annular jet and non-swirling core jet. Numerical analysis showed that fuel jet swirl not only increased mixing and entrainment of the fuel with the oxidizer but the mixing occurred further upstream than without fuel jet swirl. The burning efficiency was calculated for the all the configurations. An increase in burning efficiency indicated an increase in the mixing of H2 with O2. In the case of the single fuel jet models, the maximum burning efficiency increase due to fuel injection jet swirl was 23.3%. The research also investigated the possibility that interaction between two

  11. Preferrential Concentration of Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Preferential concentration in turbulence is a process that causes inertial particles to cluster in regions of high strain (in-between high vorticity regions), with specifics depending on their stopping time or Stokes number. This process is thought to be of importance in various problems including cloud droplet formation and aerosol transport in the atmosphere, sprays, and also in the formation of asteroids and comets in protoplanetary nebulae. In protoplanetary nebulae, the initial accretion of primitive bodies from freely-floating particles remains a problematic subject. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] in turbulent nebulae. One scenario that can lead directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects, avoiding the problematic m-km size range, involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in protoplanetary turbulence. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles generally known as "chondrules" [2]. Thus, while it is arcane, turbulent preferential concentration acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. Here, we present the statistical determination of particle multiplier distributions from numerical simulations of particle-laden isotopic turbulence, and a cascade model for modeling turbulent concentration at lengthscales and Reynolds numbers not accessible by numerical simulations. We find that the multiplier distributions are scale dependent at the very largest scales but have scale-invariant properties under a particular variable normalization at smaller scales.

  12. The Influence of Turbulent Coherent Structure on Suspended Sediment Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. H.; Tsai, C.

    2017-12-01

    The anomalous diffusion of turbulent sedimentation has received more and more attention in recent years. With the advent of new instruments and technologies, researchers have found that sediment behavior may deviate from Fickian assumptions when particles are heavier. In particle-laden flow, bursting phenomena affects instantaneous local concentrations, and seems to carry suspended particles for a longer distance. Instead of the pure diffusion process in an analogy to Brownian motion, Levy flight which allows particles to move in response to bursting phenomena is suspected to be more suitable for describing particle movement in turbulence. And the fractional differential equation is a potential candidate to improve the concentration profile. However, stochastic modeling (the Differential Chapmen-Kolmogorov Equation) also provides an alternative mathematical framework to describe system transits between different states through diffusion/the jump processes. Within this framework, the stochastic particle tracking model linked with advection diffusion equation is a powerful tool to simulate particle locations in the flow field. By including the jump process to this model, a more comprehensive description for suspended sediment transport can be provided with a better physical insight. This study also shows the adaptability and expandability of the stochastic particle tracking model for suspended sediment transport modeling.

  13. Visualization of Projectile Flying at High Speed in Dusty Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Chihiro; Watanabe, Yasumasa; Suzuki, Kojiro

    2017-10-01

    Considering a spacecraft that encounters particle-laden environment, such as dust particles flying up over the regolith by the jet of the landing thruster, high-speed flight of a projectile in such environment was experimentally simulated by using the ballistic range. At high-speed collision of particles on the projectile surface, they may be reflected with cracking into smaller pieces. On the other hand, the projectile surface will be damaged by the collision. To obtain the fundamental characteristics of such complicated phenomena, a projectile was launched at the velocity up to 400 m/s and the collective behaviour of particles around projectile was observed by the high-speed camera. To eliminate the effect of the gas-particle interaction and to focus on only the effect of the interaction between the particles and the projectile's surface, the test chamber pressure was evacuated down to 30 Pa. The particles about 400μm diameter were scattered and formed a sheet of particles in the test chamber by using two-dimensional funnel with a narrow slit. The projectile was launched into the particle sheet in the tangential direction, and the high-speed camera captured both projectile and particle motions. From the movie, the interaction between the projectile and particle sheet was clarified.

  14. Mathematical modeling of the flash converting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, H.Y.; Perez-Tello, M.; Riihilahti, K.M. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    An axisymmetric mathematical model for the Kennecott-Outokumpu flash converting process for converting solid copper matte to copper is presented. The model is an adaptation of the comprehensive mathematical model formerly developed at the University of Utah for the flash smelting of copper concentrates. The model incorporates the transport of momentum, heat, mass, and reaction kinetics between gas and particles in a particle-laden turbulent gas jet. The standard k-{epsilon} model is used to describe gas-phase turbulence in an Eulerian framework. The particle-phase is treated from a Lagrangian viewpoint which is coupled to the gas-phase via the source terms in the Eulerian gas-phase governing equations. Matte particles were represented as Cu{sub 2}S yFeS, and assumed to undergo homogeneous oxidation to Cu{sub 2}O, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and SO{sub 2}. A reaction kinetics mechanism involving both external mass transfer of oxygen gas to the particle surface and diffusion of oxygen through the porous oxide layer is proposed to estimate the particle oxidation rate Predictions of the mathematical model were compared with the experimental data collected in a bench-scale flash converting facility. Good agreement between the model predictions and the measurements was obtained. The model was used to study the effect of different gas-injection configurations on the overall fluid dynamics in a commercial size flash converting shaft. (author)

  15. Particle dispersing system and method for testing semiconductor manufacturing equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrachood, Madhavi; Ghanayem, Steve G.; Cantwell, Nancy; Rader, Daniel J.; Geller, Anthony S.

    1998-01-01

    The system and method prepare a gas stream comprising particles at a known concentration using a particle disperser for moving particles from a reservoir of particles into a stream of flowing carrier gas. The electrostatic charges on the particles entrained in the carrier gas are then neutralized or otherwise altered, and the resulting particle-laden gas stream is then diluted to provide an acceptable particle concentration. The diluted gas stream is then split into a calibration stream and the desired output stream. The particles in the calibration stream are detected to provide an indication of the actual size distribution and concentration of particles in the output stream that is supplied to a process chamber being analyzed. Particles flowing out of the process chamber within a vacuum pumping system are detected, and the output particle size distribution and concentration are compared with the particle size distribution and concentration of the calibration stream in order to determine the particle transport characteristics of a process chamber, or to determine the number of particles lodged in the process chamber as a function of manufacturing process parameters such as pressure, flowrate, temperature, process chamber geometry, particle size, particle charge, and gas composition.

  16. Lagrangian Particle Tracking in a Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Hypersonic Reentry Flows in Dusty Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Eric; Lv, Yu; Ihme, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    Recent interest in human-scale missions to Mars has sparked active research into high-fidelity simulations of reentry flows. A key feature of the Mars atmosphere is the high levels of suspended dust particles, which can not only enhance erosion of thermal protection systems but also transfer energy and momentum to the shock layer, increasing surface heat fluxes. Second-order finite-volume schemes are typically employed for hypersonic flow simulations, but such schemes suffer from a number of limitations. An attractive alternative is discontinuous Galerkin methods, which benefit from arbitrarily high spatial order of accuracy, geometric flexibility, and other advantages. As such, a Lagrangian particle method is developed in a discontinuous Galerkin framework to enable the computation of particle-laden hypersonic flows. Two-way coupling between the carrier and disperse phases is considered, and an efficient particle search algorithm compatible with unstructured curved meshes is proposed. In addition, variable thermodynamic properties are considered to accommodate high-temperature gases. The performance of the particle method is demonstrated in several test cases, with focus on the accurate prediction of particle trajectories and heating augmentation. Financial support from a Stanford Graduate Fellowship and the NASA Early Career Faculty program are gratefully acknowledged.

  17. Effect of Finite Particle Size on Convergence of Point Particle Models in Euler-Lagrange Multiphase Dispersed Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nili, Samaun; Park, Chanyoung; Haftka, Raphael T.; Kim, Nam H.; Balachandar, S.

    2017-11-01

    Point particle methods are extensively used in simulating Euler-Lagrange multiphase dispersed flow. When particles are much smaller than the Eulerian grid the point particle model is on firm theoretical ground. However, this standard approach of evaluating the gas-particle coupling at the particle center fails to converge as the Eulerian grid is reduced below particle size. We present an approach to model the interaction between particles and fluid for finite size particles that permits convergence. We use the generalized Faxen form to compute the force on a particle and compare the results against traditional point particle method. We apportion the different force components on the particle to fluid cells based on the fraction of particle volume or surface in the cell. The application is to a one-dimensional model of shock propagation through a particle-laden field at moderate volume fraction, where the convergence is achieved for a well-formulated force model and back coupling for finite size particles. Comparison with 3D direct fully resolved numerical simulations will be used to check if the approach also improves accuracy compared to the point particle model. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  18. Effect of Pore Structure on Soot Deposition in Diesel Particulate Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Yamamoto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, in the after-treatment of diesel exhaust gas, a diesel particulate filter (DPF has been used to trap nano-particles of the diesel soot. However, as there are more particles inside the filter, the pressure which corresponds to the filter backpressure increases, which worsens the fuel consumption rate, together with the abatement of the available torque. Thus, a filter with lower backpressure would be needed. To achieve this, it is necessary to utilize the information on the phenomena including both the soot transport and its removal inside the DPF, and optimize the filter substrate structure. In this paper, to obtain useful information for optimization of the filter structure, we tested seven filters with different porosities and pore sizes. The porosity and pore size were changed systematically. To consider the soot filtration, the particle-laden flow was simulated by a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM. Then, the flow field and the pressure change were discussed during the filtration process.

  19. Cell structures caused by settling particles in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changhoon; Park, Sangro

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent thermal convection is an important phenomenon frequently found in nature and industrial processes, often with laden particles. In the last several decades, the vast majority of studies have addressed single phase convective flow with focus on the scaling relation of flow parameters associated with heat transfer. Particle-laden Rayleigh-Bénard convection, however, has not been sufficiently studied. In this study, modulation of cell structures by settling particles in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a doubly periodic square channel is investigated using direct numerical simulation with a point particle approach. Flow parameters are fixed at Rayleigh number=106, Prandtl number=0.7, the aspect ratio=6, and Froude number=0.19. We report from the simulations that settling heavy particles modulate irregular large-scale thermal plume structures into organized polygonal cell structures. Different shapes of flow structures are obtained for different particle diameters and mass loadings. We found that polygonal cell structures arise due to asymmetric feedback force exerted by particles onto hot and cold plumes. Increasing the number of particles augments the asymmetry and the polygonal cell structures become smaller, eventually going to the hexagonal structures.

  20. Giant larvaceans: biologically equivalent flapping flexible foils exhibit bending modes that enhance fluid transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katija, Kakani; Sherman, Alana; Robison, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    The midwater region of the ocean (below the euphotic zone and above the benthos) is one of the largest ecosystems on our planet, yet remains one of the least explored. Little-known marine organisms that inhabit midwater have developed life strategies that contribute to their evolutionary success, and may inspire engineering solutions for societally relevant challenges. A group of midwater organisms, known as giant larvaceans (genus Bathochordaeus), beat their tails to drive food and particle-laden water through complex, mucus filtering structures to feed. Giant larvaceans, whose motion and kinematics resemble flapping flexible foils, range in size from 1 to 10 cm in length, and can be found between the surface and 400 m. Using remotely-operated vehicles and DeepPIV, an instrument that enables in situ particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements, the filtration rates and kinematics of giant larvaceans were investigated. These measurements yielded filtration rates for giant larvaceans as high as 80 L/hr, which exceeds expected filtration rates by a factor of 2 when compared with other larvacean groups. Comparing tail kinematics between Bathochordeaus and smaller larvaceans reveals differences in tail bending modes, where a hinge is present throughout the tail beat in giant larvaceans. Using laboratory PIV measurements with swimming animals and soft-bodied mechanical mimics, we reveal how these differences in tail kinematics can lead to enhanced fluid transport. This work has been supported by the Packard Foundation.

  1. Effects of preferential concentration on direct radiation transmission in a turbulent duct flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafane, Laura; Banko, Andrew; Kim, Ji Hoon; Elkins, Chris; Eaton, John

    2017-11-01

    Inertial particles in turbulent flows preferentially concentrate, giving rise to spatial and temporal fluctuations of particle number density that affect radiation transmission through the medium. Positive particle correlations enhance direct transmission when compared to the exponential attenuation predicted by the Beer's Law for randomly distributed particles. In the context of a particle based solar receiver, this work studies the effects of preferential concentration and optical depth on direct transmission through a particle laden turbulent duct flow. Time resolved measurements of transmission through the mixture were performed for various particle loadings and Reynolds numbers, thus varying particle correlation lengths, optical depth and concentration fluctuations. These measurements were made using a photodiode to record the transmission of a collimated laser beam along the wall bisector of the duct. A synchronized high-speed camera provided particle positions along most of the beam path. Average and fluctuating radiation transmission results are compared to predictions derived from the imaged number density fields and to simplified analytical models. Simplified models are able to capture the correct trends with varying loading and preferential concentration. This work is funded by the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration, Grant #DE-NA0002373-1.

  2. Hybrid solar collector using nonimaging optics and photovoltaic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Roland; Yablonovitch, Eli; Jiang, Lun; Widyolar, Bennett K.; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud; Scranton, Gregg; Cygan, David; Kozlov, Alexandr

    2015-08-01

    The project team of University of California at Merced (UC-M), Gas Technology Institute, and Dr. Eli Yablonovitch of University of California at Berkeley developed a novel hybrid concentrated solar photovoltaic thermal (PV/T) collector using nonimaging optics and world record single-junction Gallium arsenide (GaAs) PV components integrated with particle laden gas as thermal transfer and storage media, to simultaneously generate electricity and high temperature dispatchable heat. The collector transforms a parabolic trough, commonly used in CSP plants, into an integrated spectrum-splitting device. This places a spectrum-sensitive topping element on a secondary reflector that is registered to the thermal collection loop. The secondary reflector transmits higher energy photons for PV topping while diverting the remaining lower energy photons to the thermal media, achieving temperatures of around 400°C even under partial utilization of the solar spectrum. The collector uses the spectral selectivity property of Gallium arsenide (GaAs) cells to maximize the exergy output of the system, resulting in an estimated exergy efficiency of 48%. The thermal media is composed of fine particles of high melting point material in an inert gas that increases heat transfer and effectively stores excess heat in hot particles for later on-demand use.

  3. Mathematical modeling of the flash converting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, H Y; Perez-Tello, M; Riihilahti, K M [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    An axisymmetric mathematical model for the Kennecott-Outokumpu flash converting process for converting solid copper matte to copper is presented. The model is an adaptation of the comprehensive mathematical model formerly developed at the University of Utah for the flash smelting of copper concentrates. The model incorporates the transport of momentum, heat, mass, and reaction kinetics between gas and particles in a particle-laden turbulent gas jet. The standard k-{epsilon} model is used to describe gas-phase turbulence in an Eulerian framework. The particle-phase is treated from a Lagrangian viewpoint which is coupled to the gas-phase via the source terms in the Eulerian gas-phase governing equations. Matte particles were represented as Cu{sub 2}S yFeS, and assumed to undergo homogeneous oxidation to Cu{sub 2}O, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and SO{sub 2}. A reaction kinetics mechanism involving both external mass transfer of oxygen gas to the particle surface and diffusion of oxygen through the porous oxide layer is proposed to estimate the particle oxidation rate Predictions of the mathematical model were compared with the experimental data collected in a bench-scale flash converting facility. Good agreement between the model predictions and the measurements was obtained. The model was used to study the effect of different gas-injection configurations on the overall fluid dynamics in a commercial size flash converting shaft. (author)

  4. Laser diagnostics of materials and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, A. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Several examples are given of the ability of laser-based diagnostic techniques to make noninvasive measurements in hostile environments. Using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering both majority and minority species concentrations, as well as temperature, have been measured in the hot, high-pressure, particle-laden stream of a coal gasifier. In addition, numerous toxic and corrosive elements in the gasifier stream have been identified, but not yet quantified. In addition to providing the capability for making analytical determinations, laser techniques have been extensively employed to measure the rates of elementary chemical reactions. Recently, the temperature regime over which such meaurements are possible has been expanded. Although much of the laser diagnostic activity to date has involved investigations of the gas phase, significant information concerning heterogeneous phenomena can still be inferred. For instance, gas-solid reactions can manifest themselves as changes in vapor phase composition. Furthermore, in the future we expect expanded studies involving reactions of refractory metals (both atoms and clusters) and additional investigations of processes occurring at interfaces and on surfaces

  5. Power spectral density of velocity fluctuations estimated from phase Doppler data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedelsky, Jan; Lizal, Frantisek; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and its modifications such as PhaseDoppler Particle Anemometry (P/DPA) is point-wise method for optical nonintrusive measurement of particle velocity with high data rate. Conversion of the LDA velocity data from temporal to frequency domain - calculation of power spectral density (PSD) of velocity fluctuations, is a non trivial task due to nonequidistant data sampling in time. We briefly discuss possibilities for the PSD estimation and specify limitations caused by seeding density and other factors of the flow and LDA setup. Arbitrary results of LDA measurements are compared with corresponding Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA) data in the frequency domain. Slot correlation (SC) method implemented in software program Kern by Nobach (2006) is used for the PSD estimation. Influence of several input parameters on resulting PSDs is described. Optimum setup of the software for our data of particle-laden air flow in realistic human airway model is documented. Typical character of the flow is described using PSD plots of velocity fluctuations with comments on specific properties of the flow. Some recommendations for improvements of future experiments to acquire better PSD results are given.

  6. Power spectral density of velocity fluctuations estimated from phase Doppler data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA and its modifications such as PhaseDoppler Particle Anemometry (P/DPA is point-wise method for optical nonintrusive measurement of particle velocity with high data rate. Conversion of the LDA velocity data from temporal to frequency domain – calculation of power spectral density (PSD of velocity fluctuations, is a non trivial task due to nonequidistant data sampling in time. We briefly discuss possibilities for the PSD estimation and specify limitations caused by seeding density and other factors of the flow and LDA setup. Arbitrary results of LDA measurements are compared with corresponding Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA data in the frequency domain. Slot correlation (SC method implemented in software program Kern by Nobach (2006 is used for the PSD estimation. Influence of several input parameters on resulting PSDs is described. Optimum setup of the software for our data of particle-laden air flow in realistic human airway model is documented. Typical character of the flow is described using PSD plots of velocity fluctuations with comments on specific properties of the flow. Some recommendations for improvements of future experiments to acquire better PSD results are given.

  7. Numerical simulation of sand jet in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azimi, A.H.; Zhu, D.; Rajaratnam, N. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2008-07-01

    A numerical simulation of sand jet in water was presented. The study involved a two-phase flow using two-phase turbulent jets. A literature review was also presented, including an experiment on particle laden air jet using laser doppler velocimetry (LDV); experiments on the effect of particle size and concentration on solid-gas jets; an experimental study of solid-liquid jets using particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique where mean velocity and fluctuations were measured; and an experimental study on solid-liquid jets using the laser doppler anemometry (LDA) technique measuring both water axial and radial velocities. Other literature review results included a photographic study of sand jets in water; a comparison of many two-phase turbulent flow; and direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation to study the effect of particle in gas jet flow. The mathematical model and experimental setup were also included in the presentation along with simulation results for sand jets, concentration, and kinetic energy. The presentation concluded with some proposed future studies including numerical simulation of slurry jets in water and numerical simulation of slurry jets in MFT. tabs., figs.

  8. Errors analysis in the evaluation of particle concentration by PDA on a turbulent two-phase jet: application for cross section and transit time methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Esteban; García, Juan A.; García, Ignacio; Aísa, Luis A.

    2009-09-01

    Phase-Doppler anemometry (PDA) is a powerful tool for two-phase flow measurements and testing. Particle concentration and mass flux can also be evaluated using the raw particle data supplied by this technique. The calculation starts from each particle velocity, diameter, transit time data, and the total measurement time. There are two main evaluation strategies. The first one uses the probe volume effective cross section, and it is usually simplified assuming that particles follow quasi one-directional trajectories. In the text, it will be called the cross section method. The second one includes a set of methods which will be denoted as “Generalized Integral Methods” (GIM). Concentration algorithms such as the transit time method (TTM) and the integral volume method (IVM) are particular cases of the GIM. In any case, a previous calibration of the measurement volume geometry is necessary to apply the referred concentration evaluation methods. In this study, concentrations and mass fluxes both evaluated by the cross-section method and the TTM are compared. Experimental data are obtained from a particle-laden jet generated by a convergent nozzle. Errors due to trajectory dispersion, burst splitting, and multi-particle signals are discussed.

  9. Heat transfer in heterogeneous propellant combustion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewster, M.Q.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that heat transfer plays an important role in several critical areas of heterogeneous, solid-propellant combustion systems. These areas include heat feedback to the propellant surface, heat transfer between burning aluminum droplets and their surroundings, heat transfer to internal insulation systems, and heat transfer to aft-end equipment. Gas conduction dominates heat feedback to the propellant surface in conventional ammonium perchlorate (AP) composite propellants, although particle radiative feedback also plays a significant role in combustion of metalized propellants. Particle radiation plays a dominant role in heat transfer to internal insulation, compared with that of convection. However, conduction by impingement of burning aluminum particles, which has not been extensively studied, may also be significant. Radiative heat loss plays an important role in determining the burning rate of molten aluminum particles due to a highly luminous, oxide particle-laden, detached flame envelope. Radiation by aluminum oxide smoke particles also plays a dominant role in heat transfer from the exhaust plume to aft-end equipment. Uncertainties in aluminum oxide particle-size distribution and optical properties still make it difficult to predict radiative plume heat transfer accurately from first principles

  10. AOI 1— COMPUTATIONAL ENERGY SCIENCES:MULTIPHASE FLOW RESEARCH High-fidelity multi-phase radiation module for modern coal combustion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modest, Michael

    2013-11-15

    The effects of radiation in particle-laden flows were the object of the present research. The presence of particles increases optical thickness substantially, making the use of the “optically thin” approximation in most cases a very poor assumption. However, since radiation fluxes peak at intermediate optical thicknesses, overall radiative effects may not necessarily be stronger than in gas combustion. Also, the spectral behavior of particle radiation properties is much more benign, making spectral models simpler (and making the assumption of a gray radiator halfway acceptable, at least for fluidized beds when gas radiation is not large). On the other hand, particles scatter radiation, making the radiative transfer equation (RTE) much more di fficult to solve. The research carried out in this project encompassed three general areas: (i) assessment of relevant radiation properties of particle clouds encountered in fluidized bed and pulverized coal combustors, (ii) development of proper spectral models for gas–particulate mixtures for various types of two-phase combustion flows, and (iii) development of a Radiative Transfer Equation (RTE) solution module for such applications. The resulting models were validated against artificial cases since open literature experimental data were not available. The final models are in modular form tailored toward maximum portability, and were incorporated into two research codes: (i) the open-source CFD code OpenFOAM, which we have extensively used in our previous work, and (ii) the open-source multi-phase flow code MFIX, which is maintained by NETL.

  11. Simulation of turbid underflows generated by the plunging of a river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Ahmed; Imran, Jasim

    2001-07-01

    When the density of sediment-laden river water exceeds that of the lake or ocean into which it discharges, the river plunges to the bottom of the receiving water body and continues to flow as a hyperpycnal flow. These particle-laden underflows, also known as turbidity currents, can travel remarkable distances and profoundly influence the seabed morphology from shoreline to abyss by depositing, eroding, and dispersing large quantities of sediment particles. Here we present a new approach to investigating the transformation of a plunging river flow into a turbidity current. Unlike previous workers using experimental and numerical treatments, we consider the evolution of a turbidity current from a river as different stages of a single flow process. From initial commotion to final stabilization, the transformation of a river (open channel flow) into a density-driven current (hyperpycnal flow) is captured in its entirety by a numerical model. Successful implementation of the model in laboratory and field cases has revealed the dynamics of a complex geophysical flow that is extremely difficult to observe in the field or model in the laboratory.

  12. Wrinkles, folds, and plasticity in granular rafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Josserand, Christophe; Protière, Suzie

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the mechanical response of a compressed monolayer of large and dense particles at a liquid-fluid interface: a granular raft. Upon compression, rafts first wrinkle; then, as the confinement increases, the deformation localizes in a unique fold. This characteristic buckling pattern is usually associated with floating elastic sheets, and as a result, particle laden interfaces are often modeled as such. Here, we push this analogy to its limits by comparing quantitative measurements of the raft morphology to a theoretical continuous elastic model of the interface. We show that, although powerful to describe the wrinkle wavelength, the wrinkle-to-fold transition, and the fold shape, this elastic description does not capture the finer details of the experiment. We describe an unpredicted secondary wavelength, a compression discrepancy with the model, and a hysteretic behavior during compression cycles, all of which are a signature of the intrinsic discrete and frictional nature of granular rafts. It suggests also that these composite materials exhibit both plastic transition and jamming dynamics.

  13. Multi-fidelity uncertainty quantification in large-scale predictive simulations of turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Gianluca; Jofre-Cruanyes, Lluis; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2017-11-01

    The performance characterization of complex engineering systems often relies on accurate, but computationally intensive numerical simulations. It is also well recognized that in order to obtain a reliable numerical prediction the propagation of uncertainties needs to be included. Therefore, Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) plays a fundamental role in building confidence in predictive science. Despite the great improvement in recent years, even the more advanced UQ algorithms are still limited to fairly simplified applications and only moderate parameter dimensionality. Moreover, in the case of extremely large dimensionality, sampling methods, i.e. Monte Carlo (MC) based approaches, appear to be the only viable alternative. In this talk we describe and compare a family of approaches which aim to accelerate the convergence of standard MC simulations. These methods are based on hierarchies of generalized numerical resolutions (multi-level) or model fidelities (multi-fidelity), and attempt to leverage the correlation between Low- and High-Fidelity (HF) models to obtain a more accurate statistical estimator without introducing additional HF realizations. The performance of these methods are assessed on an irradiated particle laden turbulent flow (PSAAP II solar energy receiver). This investigation was funded by the United States Department of Energy's (DoE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) under the Predicitive Science Academic Alliance Program (PSAAP) II at Stanford University.

  14. Evaluation of kriging based surrogate models constructed from mesoscale computations of shock interaction with particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Oishik, E-mail: oishik-sen@uiowa.edu [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Gaul, Nicholas J., E-mail: nicholas-gaul@ramdosolutions.com [RAMDO Solutions, LLC, Iowa City, IA 52240 (United States); Choi, K.K., E-mail: kyung-choi@uiowa.edu [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Jacobs, Gustaaf, E-mail: gjacobs@sdsu.edu [Aerospace Engineering, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92115 (United States); Udaykumar, H.S., E-mail: hs-kumar@uiowa.edu [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Macro-scale computations of shocked particulate flows require closure laws that model the exchange of momentum/energy between the fluid and particle phases. Closure laws are constructed in this work in the form of surrogate models derived from highly resolved mesoscale computations of shock-particle interactions. The mesoscale computations are performed to calculate the drag force on a cluster of particles for different values of Mach Number and particle volume fraction. Two Kriging-based methods, viz. the Dynamic Kriging Method (DKG) and the Modified Bayesian Kriging Method (MBKG) are evaluated for their ability to construct surrogate models with sparse data; i.e. using the least number of mesoscale simulations. It is shown that if the input data is noise-free, the DKG method converges monotonically; convergence is less robust in the presence of noise. The MBKG method converges monotonically even with noisy input data and is therefore more suitable for surrogate model construction from numerical experiments. This work is the first step towards a full multiscale modeling of interaction of shocked particle laden flows.

  15. Turbidity current flow over an erodible obstacle and phases of sediment wave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Moshe; Glinsky, Michael E.

    2012-06-01

    We study the flow of particle-laden turbidity currents down a slope and over an obstacle. A high-resolution 2-D computer simulation model is used, based on the Navier-Stokes equations. It includes poly-disperse particle grain sizes in the current and substrate. Particular attention is paid to the erosion and deposition of the substrate particles, including application of an active layer model. Multiple flows are modeled from a lock release that can show the development of sediment waves (SW). These are stream-wise waves that are triggered by the increasing slope on the downstream side of the obstacle. The initial obstacle is completely erased by the resuspension after a few flows leading to self consistent and self generated SW that are weakly dependant on the initial obstacle. The growth of these waves is directly related to the turbidity current being self sustaining, that is, the net erosion is more than the net deposition. Four system parameters are found to influence the SW growth: (1) slope, (2) current lock height, (3) grain lock concentration, and (4) particle diameters. Three phases are discovered for the system: (1) "no SW," (2) "SW buildup," and (3) "SW growth". The second phase consists of a soliton-like SW structure with a preserved shape. The phase diagram of the system is defined by isolating regions divided by critical slope angles as functions of current lock height, grain lock concentration, and particle diameters.

  16. Phase coexistence in thin liquid films stabilized by colloidal particles: equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blawzdziewicz, J.; Wajnryb, E.

    2005-01-01

    Phase equilibria between regions of different thickness in thin liquid films stabilized by colloidal particles are investigated using a quasi-two-dimensional thermodynamic formalism. Appropriate equilibrium conditions for the film tension, normal pressure, and chemical potential of the particles in the film are formulated, and it is shown that the relaxation of these parameters occurs consecutively on three distinct time scales. Film stratification is described quantitatively for a hard-sphere suspension using a Monte-Carlo method to evaluate thermodynamic equations of state. Coexisting phases are determined for systems in constrained- and full-equilibrium states that correspond to different stages of film relaxation. We also evaluated the effective viscosity coefficients for two-dimensional compressional and shear flows of a film and the self and collective mobility coefficients of the stabilizing particles. The hydrodynamic calculations were performed using a multiple-reflection representation of Stokes flow between two free surfaces. In this approach, the particle-laden film is equivalent to a periodic system of spheres with a unit cell that is much smaller in the transverse direction than in the lateral direction. (author)

  17. Errors analysis in the evaluation of particle concentration by PDA on a turbulent two-phase jet: application for cross section and transit time methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Esteban; Garcia, Juan A.; Garcia, Ignacio; Aisa, Luis A. [University of Zaragoza, Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Centro Politecnico Superior, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2009-09-15

    Phase-Doppler anemometry (PDA) is a powerful tool for two-phase flow measurements and testing. Particle concentration and mass flux can also be evaluated using the raw particle data supplied by this technique. The calculation starts from each particle velocity, diameter, transit time data, and the total measurement time. There are two main evaluation strategies. The first one uses the probe volume effective cross section, and it is usually simplified assuming that particles follow quasi one-directional trajectories. In the text, it will be called the cross section method. The second one includes a set of methods which will be denoted as ''Generalized Integral Methods'' (GIM). Concentration algorithms such as the transit time method (TTM) and the integral volume method (IVM) are particular cases of the GIM. In any case, a previous calibration of the measurement volume geometry is necessary to apply the referred concentration evaluation methods. In this study, concentrations and mass fluxes both evaluated by the cross-section method and the TTM are compared. Experimental data are obtained from a particle-laden jet generated by a convergent nozzle. Errors due to trajectory dispersion, burst splitting, and multi-particle signals are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Fuego/Scefire MPMD Coupling L2 Milestone Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Flint [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tencer, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pautz, Shawn D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Drumm, Clifton R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This milestone campaign was focused on coupling Sandia physics codes SIERRA low Mach module Fuego and RAMSES Boltzmann transport code Sceptre(Scefire). Fuego enables simulation of low Mach, turbulent, reacting, particle laden flows on unstructured meshes using CVFEM for abnormal thermal environments throughout SNL and the larger national security community. Sceptre provides simulation for photon, neutron, and charged particle transport on unstructured meshes using Discontinuous Galerkin for radiation effects calculations at SNL and elsewhere. Coupling these ”best of breed” codes enables efficient modeling of thermal/fluid environments with radiation transport, including fires (pool, propellant, composite) as well as those with directed radiant fluxes. We seek to improve the experience of Fuego users who require radiation transport capabilities in two ways. The first is performance. We achieve this through leveraging additional computational resources for Scefire, reducing calculation times while leaving unaffected resources for fluid physics. This approach is new to Fuego, which previously utilized the same resources for both fluid and radiation solutions. The second improvement enables new radiation capabilities, including spectral (banded) radiation, beam boundary sources, and alternate radiation solvers (i.e. Pn). This summary provides an overview of these achievements.

  19. Demonstration of a 100-kWth high-temperature solar thermochemical reactor pilot plant for ZnO dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepf, E.; Villasmil, W.; Meier, A.

    2016-05-01

    Solar thermochemical H2O and CO2 splitting is a viable pathway towards sustainable and large-scale production of synthetic fuels. A reactor pilot plant for the solar-driven thermal dissociation of ZnO into metallic Zn has been successfully developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Promising experimental results from the 100-kWth ZnO pilot plant were obtained in 2014 during two prolonged experimental campaigns in a high flux solar simulator at PSI and a 1-MW solar furnace in Odeillo, France. Between March and June the pilot plant was mounted in the solar simulator and in-situ flow-visualization experiments were conducted in order to prevent particle-laden fluid flows near the window from attenuating transparency by blocking incoming radiation. Window flow patterns were successfully characterized, and it was demonstrated that particle transport could be controlled and suppressed completely. These results enabled the successful operation of the reactor between August and October when on-sun experiments were conducted in the solar furnace in order to demonstrate the pilot plant technology and characterize its performance. The reactor was operated for over 97 hours at temperatures as high as 2064 K; over 28 kg of ZnO was dissociated at reaction rates as high as 28 g/min.

  20. Preferential Concentration Of Solid Particles In Turbulent Horizontal Circular Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehee; Yang, Kyung-Soo

    2017-11-01

    In particle-laden turbulent pipe flow, turbophoresis can lead to a preferential concentration of particles near the wall. To investigate this phenomenon, one-way coupled Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) has been performed. Fully-developed turbulent pipe flow of the carrier fluid (air) is at Reτ = 200 based on the pipe radius and the mean friction velocity, whereas the Stokes numbers of the particles (solid) are St+ = 0.1 , 1 , 10 based on the mean friction velocity and the kinematic viscosity of the fluid. The computational domain for particle simulation is extended along the axial direction by duplicating the domain of the fluid simulation. By doing so, particle statistics in the spatially developing region as well as in the fully-developed region can be obtained. Accumulation of particles has been noticed at St+ = 1 and 10 mostly in the viscous sublayer, more intensive in the latter case. Compared with other authors' previous results, our results suggest that drag force on the particles should be computed by using an empirical correlation and a higher-order interpolation scheme even in a low-Re regime in order to improve the accuracy of particle simulation. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No. 2015R1A2A2A01002981).

  1. Field deployment test of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technology at the Yucca Mountain Exploratory Studies Facility, Test Alcove No. 1, March 2-9, 1994: Milestone Report LA4047

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacic, J.; Pettit, D.; Cremers, D.

    1996-01-01

    A field test in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada was performed to determine the feasibility of real-time elemental analysis of rock encountered in air core drilling using the technique of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Over the period March 2-9, 1994, hundreds of LIBS spectra were collected in real-time, reflecting the elemental composition of dust produced at the drill head of the second horizontal core hole in Test Alcove No. 1. The particle-laden, drill-coring effluent air stream served as the means to obtain a representative rock sample immediately surrounding the drill bit. LIBS spectra were taken with the spectral range centered at 250, 330, 410, and 500 nm so that representative, overlapping spectral coverage from 200 to 550 nm was obtained for the dust. Spectral lines for the major elements Si, Al, K, Na, and Fe and the minor elements Ca, Mg, Ti, and Mn were observed. Some simple engineering improvements to the cyclone separator were identified if this approach to dust analysis is pursued in the future

  2. The stratified Boycott effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Tom; Blanchette, Francois; Bush, John W. M.

    2005-04-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the flows generated by monodisperse particles settling at low Reynolds number in a stably stratified ambient with an inclined sidewall. In this configuration, upwelling beneath the inclined wall associated with the Boycott effect is opposed by the ambient density stratification. The evolution of the system is determined by the relative magnitudes of the container depth, h, and the neutral buoyancy height, hn = c0(ρp-ρf)/|dρ/dz|, where c0 is the particle concentration, ρp the particle density, ρf the mean fluid density and dρ/dz Boycott layer transports dense fluid from the bottom to the top of the system; subsequently, the upper clear layer of dense saline fluid is mixed by convection. For sufficiently strong stratification, h > hn, layering occurs. The lowermost layer is created by clear fluid transported from the base to its neutral buoyancy height, and has a vertical extent hn; subsequently, smaller overlying layers develop. Within each layer, convection erodes the initially linear density gradient, generating a step-like density profile throughout the system that persists after all the particles have settled. Particles are transported across the discrete density jumps between layers by plumes of particle-laden fluid.

  3. A correction procedure for thermally two-way coupled point-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Jeremy; Ganguli, Swetava; Mani, Ali; Lele, Sanjiva

    2017-11-01

    Development of a robust procedure for the simulation of two-way coupled particle-laden flows remains a challenge. Such systems are characterized by O(1) or greater mass of particles relative to the fluid. The coupling of fluid and particle motion via a drag model means the undisturbed fluid velocity evaluated at the particle location (which is needed in the drag model) is no longer equal to the interpolated fluid velocity at the particle location. The same issue arises in problems of dispersed flows in the presence of heat transfer. The heat transfer rate to each particle depends on the difference between the particle's temperature and the undisturbed fluid temperature. We borrow ideas from the correction scheme we have developed for particle-fluid momentum coupling by developing a procedure to estimate the undisturbed fluid temperature given the disturbed temperature field created by a point-particle. The procedure is verified for the case of a particle settling under gravity and subject to radiation. The procedure is developed in the low Peclet, low Boussinesq number limit, but we will discuss the applicability of the same correction procedure outside of this regime when augmented by appropriate drag and heat exchange correlations. Supported by DOE, J. H. Supported by NSF GRF

  4. Numerical and Experimental Study of Mixing Processes Associated with Hydrogen and High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonell, Vincent; Hill, Scott; Akbari, Amin; McDonell, Vincent

    2011-09-30

    As simulation capability improves exponentially with increasingly more cost effective CPUs and hardware, it can be used ?routinely? for engineering applications. Many commercial products are available and they are marketed as increasingly powerful and easy to use. The question remains as to the overall accuracy of results obtained. To support the validation of the CFD, a hierarchical experiment was established in which the type of fuel injection (radial, axial) as well as level of swirl (non-swirling, swirling) could be systematically varied. The effort was limited to time efficient approaches (i.e., generally RANS approaches) although limited assessment of time resolved methods (i.e., unsteady RANS and LES) were considered. Careful measurements of the flowfield velocity and fuel concentration were made using both intrusive and non-intrusive methods. This database was then used as the basis for the assessment of the CFD approach. The numerical studies were carried out with a statistically based matrix. As a result, the effect of turbulence model, fuel type, axial plane, turbulent Schmidt number, and injection type could be studied using analysis of variance. The results for the non-swirling cases could be analyzed as planned, and demonstrate that turbulence model selection, turbulence Schmidt number, and the type of injection will strongly influence the agreement with measured values. Interestingly, the type of fuel used (either hydrogen or methane) has no influence on the accuracy of the simulations. For axial injection, the selection of proper turbulence Schmidt number is important, whereas for radial injection, the results are relatively insensitive to this parameter. In general, it was found that the nature of the flowfield influences the performance of the predictions. This result implies that it is difficult to establish a priori the ?best? simulation approach to use. However, the insights from the relative orientation of the jet and flow do offer some

  5. Modelling of local extinction and reignition of the flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, A.; Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland); Kjaeldman, L. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Jaeaeskelaeinen, K. [Imatran Voima Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The influence of the relations between the chemical time scale and the turbulent time scale on local extinction in turbulent flames has been studied. The results from the numerical investigation of a non-swirling flame in a sudden-expansion combustor was compared with measurements and computations reported in the literature. The turbulence-chemistry interaction was modelled using the Eddy-Dissipation Concept (EDC). In the study, different turbulent time scales were used; the Kolmogorov related time scale proposed in the EDC model and two turbulent time scales related to k/{epsilon}. The chemical time scale has been obtained from a model based on calculations with a comprehensive chemical reaction scheme. The results indicate that the Kolmogorov related time scale of the EDC model is too short to be used as an extinction criterium. The two k/{epsilon} related time scales both resulted in a closer agreement between the numerically obtained and the measured results. The result indicates that the time scale used in the EDC model should be further investigated before confident results from modelling of flows with extinction effects can be obtained. (author)

  6. Cathode erosion in high-current high-pressure arc

    CERN Document Server

    Nemchinsky, V A

    2003-01-01

    Cathode erosion rate was experimentally investigated for two types of arcs: one with tungsten cathode in nitrogen atmosphere and one with hafnium cathode in oxygen atmosphere. Conditions were typical for plasma arc cutting systems: gas pressure from 2 to 5 atm, arc current from 200 to 400 A, gas flow rate from 50 to 130 litre min sup - sup 1. It was found that the actual cathode evaporation rate G is much lower than G sub 0 , the evaporation rate that follows from the Hertz-Knudsen formula: G = nu G sub 0. The difference is because some of the evaporated particles return back to the cathode. For conditions of our experiments, the factor nu could be as low as 0.01. It was shown experimentally that nu depends strongly on the gas flow pattern close to the cathode. In particular, swirling the gas increases nu many times. To explain the influence of gas swirling, model calculations of gas flows were performed. These calculations revealed difference between swirling and non-swirling flows: swirling the gas enhances...

  7. Modelling of local extinction and reignition of the flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, A; Kilpinen, P; Hupa, M [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland); Kjaeldman, L [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland); Jaeaeskelaeinen, K [Imatran Voima Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The influence of the relations between the chemical time scale and the turbulent time scale on local extinction in turbulent flames has been studied. The results from the numerical investigation of a non-swirling flame in a sudden-expansion combustor was compared with measurements and computations reported in the literature. The turbulence-chemistry interaction was modelled using the Eddy-Dissipation Concept (EDC). In the study, different turbulent time scales were used; the Kolmogorov related time scale proposed in the EDC model and two turbulent time scales related to k/{epsilon}. The chemical time scale has been obtained from a model based on calculations with a comprehensive chemical reaction scheme. The results indicate that the Kolmogorov related time scale of the EDC model is too short to be used as an extinction criterium. The two k/{epsilon} related time scales both resulted in a closer agreement between the numerically obtained and the measured results. The result indicates that the time scale used in the EDC model should be further investigated before confident results from modelling of flows with extinction effects can be obtained. (author)

  8. Planar Pressure Field Determination in the Initial Merging Zone of an Annular Swirling Jet Based on Stereo-PIV Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Van den Bulck

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the static pressure field of an annular swirling jet is measured indirectly using stereo-PIV measurements. The pressure field is obtained from numerically solving the Poisson equation, taken into account the axisymmetry of the flow. At the boundaries no assumptions are made and the exact boundary conditions are applied. Since all source terms can be measured using stereo-PIV and the boundary conditions are exact, no assumptions other than axisymmetry had to be made in the calculation of the pressure field. The advantage of this method of indirect pressure measurement is its high spatial resolution compared to the traditional pitot probes. Moreover this method is non-intrusive while the insertion of a pitot tube disturbs the flow. It is shown that the annular swirling flow can be divided into three regimes: a low, an intermediate and a high swirling regime. The pressure field of the low swirling regime is the superposition of the pressure field of the non-swirling jet and a swirl induced pressure field due to the centrifugal forces of the rotating jet. As the swirl increases, the swirl induced pressure field becomes dominant and for the intermediate and high swirling regimes, the simple radial equilibrium equation holds.

  9. Experimental study of the effects of swirl and air dilution on biogas non-premixed flame stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowhani Amir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation of the stability limits of biogas in a swirling non-premixed burner has been carried out. A mixture of 60% methane (CH4 and 40% carbon dioxide (CO2 was used to reach the typical biogas composition. Vane swirlers with 30º, 45º and 60º angles were used to make the swirling air. The biogas stability limits and flame behavior under swirling conditions were tested. Besides, effects of air dilution with nitrogen (N2 and CO2 on biogas stability limits were investigated. The results show that using swirl can enhance the flame stability limits approximately four or five times comparing to non-swirling air stream. Adding N2/CO2 to the air had negative effects on the flame stability but no changes were observed in the flame structure. The maximum air dilution was also obtained when 27% and 15% N2 was added to the swirling air under strong and weak swirl, respectively.

  10. Planar Pressure Field Determination in the Initial Merging Zone of an Annular Swirling Jet Based on Stereo-PIV Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanierschot, Maarten; Van den Bulck, Eric

    2008-11-28

    In this paper the static pressure field of an annular swirling jet is measured indirectly using stereo-PIV measurements. The pressure field is obtained from numerically solving the Poisson equation, taken into account the axisymmetry of the flow. At the boundaries no assumptions are made and the exact boundary conditions are applied. Since all source terms can be measured using stereo-PIV and the boundary conditions are exact, no assumptions other than axisymmetry had to be made in the calculation of the pressure field. The advantage of this method of indirect pressure measurement is its high spatial resolution compared to the traditional pitot probes. Moreover this method is non-intrusive while the insertion of a pitot tube disturbs the flow. It is shown that the annular swirling flow can be divided into three regimes: a low, an intermediate and a high swirling regime. The pressure field of the low swirling regime is the superposition of the pressure field of the non-swirling jet and a swirl induced pressure field due to the centrifugal forces of the rotating jet. As the swirl increases, the swirl induced pressure field becomes dominant and for the intermediate and high swirling regimes, the simple radial equilibrium equation holds.

  11. A Variable Turbulent Schmidt Number Formulation for Scramjet Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X.; Edwards, J. R.; Hassan, H. A.; Cutler, A. D.

    2004-01-01

    Schmidt numbers is used to model the supersonic coaxial jet mixing experiments involving He, O2 and air.

  12. Numerical investigation of the influence of particle-particle and particle-wall collisions in turbulent wall-bounded flows at high mass loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alletto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The present work deals with the simulation of turbulent particle-laden flows at high mass loadings. In order to achieve this goal, the fluid flow is described by means of the eddy-resolving concept known as Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) and the particles are described in a Lagrangian frame of reference. Special emphasis is placed on the interparticle collisions and the impact of solid particles on rough walls. Both mechanisms are shown to be crucial for the correct description of the particle dynamics in wall-bounded flows. In order to distinguish the present methodology from the variety of methods available in the literature to treat turbulent flows laden with solid particles, the thesis starts with an overview of different simulation techniques to calculate this class of flows. In this overview special care is taken to underline the parameter space, where the different simulation methods are valid. After that, the governing equations and the boundary conditions applied for the continuous phase of the Euler-Lagrange approach used in the present thesis are given. In the subsequent section the governing equations for the solid particles and their interaction with smooth and rough walls are discussed. Here a new wall roughness model for the particles which incorporates an amplitude parameter used in technical applications such as the mean roughness height or the root-mean-squared roughness is presented. After that, the coupling mechanisms between the phases and the algorithmic realization are discussed. Furthermore, a new agglomeration model capable to treat interparticle collisions with friction is presented. However, the agglomeration model is not evaluated in such a detail as the interparticle collisions and the particle-wall collisions. The reason is that it does not represent a central aspect of this thesis. The numerical methods for the continuous and the disperse phase are presented in the subsequent section. The efficient algorithm to detect the interparticle

  13. Numerical investigation of the influence of particle-particle and particle-wall collisions in turbulent wall-bounded flows at high mass loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alletto, Michael

    2014-05-16

    The present work deals with the simulation of turbulent particle-laden flows at high mass loadings. In order to achieve this goal, the fluid flow is described by means of the eddy-resolving concept known as Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) and the particles are described in a Lagrangian frame of reference. Special emphasis is placed on the interparticle collisions and the impact of solid particles on rough walls. Both mechanisms are shown to be crucial for the correct description of the particle dynamics in wall-bounded flows. In order to distinguish the present methodology from the variety of methods available in the literature to treat turbulent flows laden with solid particles, the thesis starts with an overview of different simulation techniques to calculate this class of flows. In this overview special care is taken to underline the parameter space, where the different simulation methods are valid. After that, the governing equations and the boundary conditions applied for the continuous phase of the Euler-Lagrange approach used in the present thesis are given. In the subsequent section the governing equations for the solid particles and their interaction with smooth and rough walls are discussed. Here a new wall roughness model for the particles which incorporates an amplitude parameter used in technical applications such as the mean roughness height or the root-mean-squared roughness is presented. After that, the coupling mechanisms between the phases and the algorithmic realization are discussed. Furthermore, a new agglomeration model capable to treat interparticle collisions with friction is presented. However, the agglomeration model is not evaluated in such a detail as the interparticle collisions and the particle-wall collisions. The reason is that it does not represent a central aspect of this thesis. The numerical methods for the continuous and the disperse phase are presented in the subsequent section. The efficient algorithm to detect the interparticle

  14. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sebring, R.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Oberdorster, G. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States))

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment of one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. 2d-LCA - an alternative to x-wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2014-11-01

    The 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-LCA) is an innovative sensor for two-dimensional velocity measurements in fluids. It uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon and SU-8 as a sensing element and is capable of performing mesurements with extremly high temporal resolutions up to 150 kHz. The size of the cantilever defines its spatial resolution, which is in the order of 150 μm only. Another big feature is a large angular range of 180° in total. The 2d-LCA has been developed as an alternative measurement method to x-wires with the motivation to create a sensor that can operate in areas where the use of hot-wire anemometry is difficult. These areas include measurements in liquids and in near-wall or particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high speed flows. Comparative measurements with the 2d-LCA and hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the new anemometer. The data of both measurement techniques were analyzed using the same stochastic methods including a spectral analysis as well as an inspection of increment statistics and structure functions. Furthermore, key parameters, such as mean values of both velocity components, angles of attack and the characteristic length scales were determined from both data sets. The analysis reveals a great agreement between both anemometers and thus confirms the new approach.

  16. The 2d-LCA as an alternative to x-wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2015-11-01

    The 2d-Laser Cantilever Anemometer (2d-LCA) is an innovative sensor for two-dimensional velocity measurements in fluids. It uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon and SU-8 as a sensing element and is capable of performing mesurements with extremly high temporal resolutions up to 150kHz. The size of the cantilever defines its spatial resolution, which is in the order of 150 μm only. Another big feature is a large angular range of 180° in total. The 2d-LCA has been developed as an alternative measurement method to x-wires with the motivation to create a sensor that can operate in areas where the use of hot-wire anemometry is difficult. These areas include measurements in liquids and in near-wall or particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high speed flows. Comparative measurements with the 2d-LCA and hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the new anemometer. The data of both measurement techniques were analyzed using the same stochastic methods including a spectral analysis as well as an inspection of increment statistics and structure functions. Furthermore, key parameters, such as mean values of both velocity components, angles of attack and the characteristic length scales were determined from both data sets. The analysis reveals a great agreement between both anemometers and thus confirms the new approach.

  17. Simulation of deterministic energy-balance particle agglomeration in turbulent liquid-solid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njobuenwu, Derrick O.; Fairweather, Michael

    2017-08-01

    An efficient technique to simulate turbulent particle-laden flow at high mass loadings within the four-way coupled simulation regime is presented. The technique implements large-eddy simulation, discrete particle simulation, a deterministic treatment of inter-particle collisions, and an energy-balanced particle agglomeration model. The algorithm to detect inter-particle collisions is such that the computational costs scale linearly with the number of particles present in the computational domain. On detection of a collision, particle agglomeration is tested based on the pre-collision kinetic energy, restitution coefficient, and van der Waals' interactions. The performance of the technique developed is tested by performing parametric studies on the influence of the restitution coefficient (en = 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8), particle size (dp = 60, 120, 200, and 316 μm), Reynolds number (Reτ = 150, 300, and 590), and particle concentration (αp = 5.0 × 10-4, 1.0 × 10-3, and 5.0 × 10-3) on particle-particle interaction events (collision and agglomeration). The results demonstrate that the collision frequency shows a linear dependency on the restitution coefficient, while the agglomeration rate shows an inverse dependence. Collisions among smaller particles are more frequent and efficient in forming agglomerates than those of coarser particles. The particle-particle interaction events show a strong dependency on the shear Reynolds number Reτ, while increasing the particle concentration effectively enhances particle collision and agglomeration whilst having only a minor influence on the agglomeration rate. Overall, the sensitivity of the particle-particle interaction events to the selected simulation parameters is found to influence the population and distribution of the primary particles and agglomerates formed.

  18. Numerical investigation of the effects of large particles on wall-turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Y.; Banerjee, S.

    1997-01-01

    Particle-laden turbulent flows, at average volume fraction less than 4x10 -4 , in open channels are numerically simulated by using a pseudospectral method. The motion of particles, that are large compared with the dissipative length scale, is coupled to the fluid motion by a method that generates a open-quotes virtualclose quotes no-slip boundary on the particle surface by imposition of an external force field on the grid-points enclosed by the particle. Cases for both moving and stationary particles, lying on the wall, are simulated. The investigations focus on particle-turbulence interaction. It is found that particles increase turbulence intensities and Reynolds stress. By examining higher order turbulence statistics and doing a quadrant analysis of the Reynolds stress, it is found that the ejection-sweep cycle is affected emdash primarily through suppression of sweeps by the smaller particles and enhancement of sweep activity by the larger particles. An assessment of the impact of these findings on scalar transfer is made, as enhancement of wall heat/mass transfer rates is a motivation of the overall work on this subject. In the cases considered, comparison of the calculations with an existing experiment was possible, and shows good agreement. At present, due to limitations in available computational resources, this method cannot be used when the particle diameter is smaller than the smallest turbulence scale (e.g. the Kolmogorov length scale) and the volume fraction is of the same order as studied in this paper, i.e. between 10 -3 and 10 -4 . copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  19. Bio-inspired particle separator design based on the food retention mechanism by suspension-feeding fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, Tien-Chieh; Piedrahita, Raul H; Cheer, Angela

    2012-01-01

    A new particle separator is designed using a crossflow filtration mechanism inspired by suspension-feeding fish in this study. To construct the model of the bio-inspired particle separator, computational fluid dynamics techniques are used, and parameters related to separator shape, fluid flow and particle properties that might affect the performance in removing particles from the flow, are varied and tested. The goal is to induce a flow rotation which enhances the separation of particles from the flow, reduce the particle-laden flow that exits via a collection zone at the lower/posterior end of the separator, while at the same time increase the concentration of particles in that flow. Based on preliminary particle removal efficiency tests, an exiting flow through the collection zone of about 8% of the influent flow rate is selected for all the performance tests of the separator including trials with particles carried by air flow instead of water. Under this condition, the simulation results yield similar particle removal efficiencies in water and air but with different particle properties. Particle removal efficiencies (percentage of influent particles that exit through the collection zone) were determined for particles ranging in size from 1 to 1500 µm with a density between 1000 and 1150 kg m −3 in water and 2 and 19 mm and 68 and 2150 kg m −3 in air. As an example, removal efficiencies are 66% and 64% for 707 µm diameter particles with a density of 1040 kg m −3 in water and for 2 mm particles with a density of 68 kg m −3 in air, respectively. No significant performance difference is found by geometrically scaling the inlet diameter of the separator up or down in the range from 2.5 to 10 cm. (paper)

  20. Revised data book for evaluation of combustion and gasification models: Final report, Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.R.; Rasband, M.W.; Smoot, L.D.

    1987-10-01

    During the previous contract (DE-AC21-81MC16518) a major task was to identify, collect and publish detailed experimental data for evaluation of comprehensive gasification/combustion codes. A review of the literature was completed and prospective data were identified for inclusion in this data book in five categories of increasing complexity: (1) non-reacting, gaseous flows (58 cases); (2) non-reacting, particle-laden flows (43 cases); (3) gaseous combustion (34 cases); (4) pulverized coal combustion (57 cases); (5) entrained coal gasification (6 cases). Selection of these data was based on a set of criteria which included data completeness, availability of detailed, digital profiles for several properties (e.g., species concentrations, velocity, temperature) and data accuracy. From these 198 cases, which were referenced in the final report (Vol. III), the data base was reduced to a total of 35 sets of data from 8 laboratories, with at least 3 cases in each category above. For these 35 cases, the measured data, together with geometrical dimensions and test conditions were documented in a uniform tabular format. These data were also stored on a magnetic tape for distribution. During this follow-on contract (DE-AC21-85MC22059), the accuracy of the data was checked and several additional corrections were made. The format for reporting the data (Appendix B) was simplified. Also, a review of additional data sets available from the Combustion Laboratory and other sources was completed. In all, 213 cases from 52 investigators at 18 laboratories were considered and 37 cases are included in this data book from 22 different investigations at 8 independent laboratories. 81 refs.

  1. Simulation technique for slurries interacting with moving parts and deformable solids with applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutabaruka, Patrick; Kamrin, Ken

    2018-04-01

    A numerical method for particle-laden fluids interacting with a deformable solid domain and mobile rigid parts is proposed and implemented in a full engineering system. The fluid domain is modeled with a lattice Boltzmann representation, the particles and rigid parts are modeled with a discrete element representation, and the deformable solid domain is modeled using a Lagrangian mesh. The main issue of this work, since separately each of these methods is a mature tool, is to develop coupling and model-reduction approaches in order to efficiently simulate coupled problems of this nature, as in various geological and engineering applications. The lattice Boltzmann method incorporates a large eddy simulation technique using the Smagorinsky turbulence model. The discrete element method incorporates spherical and polyhedral particles for stiff contact interactions. A neo-Hookean hyperelastic model is used for the deformable solid. We provide a detailed description of how to couple the three solvers within a unified algorithm. The technique we propose for rubber modeling/coupling exploits a simplification that prevents having to solve a finite-element problem at each time step. We also developed a technique to reduce the domain size of the full system by replacing certain zones with quasi-analytic solutions, which act as effective boundary conditions for the lattice Boltzmann method. The major ingredients of the routine are separately validated. To demonstrate the coupled method in full, we simulate slurry flows in two kinds of piston valve geometries. The dynamics of the valve and slurry are studied and reported over a large range of input parameters.

  2. Ceria-containing uncoated and coated hydroxyapatite-based galantamine nanocomposites for formidable treatment of Alzheimer's disease in ovariectomized albino-rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, Sanaa M R; Darwish, Atef S; Kamal, Sara M

    2016-08-01

    This paper upraises delivery and therapeutic actions of galantamine drug (GAL) against Alzheimer's disease (AD) in rat brain through attaching GAL to ceria-containing hydroxyapatite (GAL@Ce-HAp) as well ceria-containing carboxymethyl chitosan-coated hydroxyapatite (GAL@Ce-HAp/CMC) nanocomposites. Physicochemical features of such nanocomposites were analyzed by XRD, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis spectrophotometer, N2-BET, DLS, zeta-potential measurements, SEM, and HR-TEM. Limited interactions were observed in GAL@Ce-HAp with prevailed existence of dispersed negatively charged rod-like particles conjugated with ceria nanodots. On contrary, GAL@Ce-HAp/CMC was well-structured developing aggregates of uncharged tetragonal-shaped particles laden with accession of ceria quantum dots. Such nanocomposites were i.p. injected into ovariectomized AD albino-rats at galantamine dose of 2.5mg/kg/day for one month, then brain tissues were collected for biochemical and histological tests. GAL@Ce-HAp adopted as a promising candidate for AD curativeness, whereas oxidative stress markers were successfully upregulated, degenerated neurons in hippocampal and cerebral tissues were wholly recovered and Aβ-plaques were vanished. Also, optimizable in-vitro release for GAL and nanoceria were displayed from GAL@Ce-HAp, while delayed in-vitro release for those species were developed from GAL@Ce-HAp/CMC. This proof of concept work allow futuristic omnipotency of rod-like hydroxyapatite particles for selective delivery of GAL and nanoceria to AD affected brain areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Multi and mixed 3D-printing of graphene-hydroxyapatite hybrid materials for complex tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakus, Adam E; Shah, Ramille N

    2017-01-01

    With the emergence of three-dimensional (3D)-printing (3DP) as a vital tool in tissue engineering and medicine, there is an ever growing need to develop new biomaterials that can be 3D-printed and also emulate the compositional, structural, and functional complexities of human tissues and organs. In this work, we probe the 3D-printable biomaterials spectrum by combining two recently established functional 3D-printable particle-laden biomaterial inks: one that contains hydroxyapatite microspheres (hyperelastic bone, HB) and another that contains graphene nanoflakes (3D-graphene, 3DG). We demonstrate that not only can these distinct, osteogenic, and neurogenic inks be co-3D-printed to create complex, multimaterial constructs, but that composite inks of HB and 3DG can also be synthesized. Specifically, the printability, microstructural, mechanical, electrical, and biological properties of a hybrid material comprised of 1:1 HA:graphene by volume is investigated. The resulting HB-3DG hybrid exhibits mixed characteristics of the two distinct systems, while maintaining 3D-printability, electrical conductivity, and flexibility. In vitro assessment of HB-3DG using mesenchymal stem cells demonstrates the hybrid material supports cell viability and proliferation, as well as significantly upregulates both osteogenic and neurogenic gene expression over 14 days. This work ultimately demonstrates a significant step forward towards being able to 3D-print graded, multicompositional, and multifunctional constructs from hybrid inks for complex composite tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 274-283, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Screening of candidate corrosion resistant materials for coal combustion environments -- Volume 4. Final report, January 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    The development of a silicon carbide heat exchanger is a critical step in the development of the Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) power system. SiC is the only material that provides the necessary combination of resistance to creep, thermal shock, and oxidation. While the SiC structural materials provide the thermomechanical and thermophysical properties needed for an efficient system, the mechanical properties of the SiC tubes are severely degraded through corrosion by the coal combustion products. To obtain the necessary service life of thousands of hours at temperature, a protective coating is needed that is stable with both the SiC tube and the coal combustion products, resists erosion from the particle laden gas stream, is thermal-shock resistant, adheres to SiC during repeated thermal shocks (start-up, process upsets, shut-down), and allows the EFCC system to be cost competitive. The candidate protective materials identified in a previous effort were screened for their stability to the EFCC combustion environment. Bulk samples of each of the eleven candidate materials were prepared, and exposed to coal slag for 100 hours at 1,370 C under flowing air. After exposure the samples were mounted, polished, and examined via x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. In general, the alumina-based materials behaved well, with comparable corrosion depths in all five samples. Magnesium chromite formed a series of reaction products with the slag, which included an alumina-rich region. These reaction products may act as a diffusion barrier to slow further reaction between the magnesium chromite and the slag and prove to be a protective coating. As for the other materials; calcium titanate failed catastrophically, the CS-50 exhibited extension microstructural and compositional changes, and zirconium titanate, barium zironate, and yttrium chromite all showed evidence of dissolution with the slag.

  5. Ceria-containing uncoated and coated hydroxyapatite-based galantamine nanocomposites for formidable treatment of Alzheimer's disease in ovariectomized albino-rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahba, Sanaa M.R. [Zoology Department, Women College, Ain Shams University, 11566 Cairo (Egypt); Darwish, Atef S., E-mail: atef_mouharam@sci.asu.edu.eg [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Kamal, Sara M. [Zoology Department, Women College, Ain Shams University, 11566 Cairo (Egypt)

    2016-08-01

    This paper upraises delivery and therapeutic actions of galantamine drug (GAL) against Alzheimer's disease (AD) in rat brain through attaching GAL to ceria-containing hydroxyapatite (GAL@Ce-HAp) as well ceria-containing carboxymethyl chitosan-coated hydroxyapatite (GAL@Ce-HAp/CMC) nanocomposites. Physicochemical features of such nanocomposites were analyzed by XRD, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, UV–vis spectrophotometer, N{sub 2}-BET, DLS, zeta-potential measurements, SEM, and HR-TEM. Limited interactions were observed in GAL@Ce-HAp with prevailed existence of dispersed negatively charged rod-like particles conjugated with ceria nanodots. On contrary, GAL@Ce-HAp/CMC was well-structured developing aggregates of uncharged tetragonal-shaped particles laden with accession of ceria quantum dots. Such nanocomposites were i.p. injected into ovariectomized AD albino-rats at galantamine dose of 2.5 mg/kg/day for one month, then brain tissues were collected for biochemical and histological tests. GAL@Ce-HAp adopted as a promising candidate for AD curativeness, whereas oxidative stress markers were successfully upregulated, degenerated neurons in hippocampal and cerebral tissues were wholly recovered and Aβ-plaques were vanished. Also, optimizable in-vitro release for GAL and nanoceria were displayed from GAL@Ce-HAp, while delayed in-vitro release for those species were developed from GAL@Ce-HAp/CMC. This proof of concept work allow futuristic omnipotency of rod-like hydroxyapatite particles for selective delivery of GAL and nanoceria to AD affected brain areas. - Highlights: • Ceria affords existence of negatively charged rod-like architecture hydroxyapatite. • Carboxymethyl chitosan-coated apatite adopts neutral tetragonal-shaped species. • Ceria-containing apatite-based galantamine composite is potent anti-Alzheimer drug. • Typical neurons act via Alzheimer curing by ceria-loading apatite-based galantamine.

  6. Final Report: Model interacting particle systems for simulation and macroscopic description of particulate suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter J. Mucha

    2007-08-30

    Suspensions of solid particles in liquids appear in numerous applications, from environmental settings like river silt, to industrial systems of solids transport and water treatment, and biological flows such as blood flow. Despite their importance, much remains unexplained about these complicated systems. Mucha's research aims to improve understanding of basic properties of suspensions through a program of simulating model interacting particle systems with critical evaluation of proposed continuum equations, in close collaboration with experimentalists. Natural to this approach, the original proposal centered around collaboration with studies already conducted in various experimental groups. However, as was detailed in the 2004 progress report, following the first year of this award, a number of the questions from the original proposal were necessarily redirected towards other specific goals because of changes in the research programs of the proposed experimental collaborators. Nevertheless, the modified project goals and the results that followed from those goals maintain close alignment with the main themes of the original proposal, improving efficient simulation and macroscopic modeling of sedimenting and colloidal suspensions. In particular, the main investigations covered under this award have included: (1) Sedimentation instabilities, including the sedimentation analogue of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (for heavy, particle-laden fluid over lighter, clear fluid). (2) Ageing dynamics of colloidal suspensions at concentrations above the glass transition, using simplified interactions. (3) Stochastic reconstruction of velocity-field dependence for particle image velocimetry (PIV). (4) Stochastic modeling of the near-wall bias in 'nano-PIV'. (5) Distributed Lagrange multiplier simulation of the 'internal splash' of a particle falling through a stable stratified interface. (6) Fundamental study of velocity fluctuations in sedimentation

  7. Ceria-containing uncoated and coated hydroxyapatite-based galantamine nanocomposites for formidable treatment of Alzheimer's disease in ovariectomized albino-rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahba, Sanaa M.R.; Darwish, Atef S.; Kamal, Sara M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper upraises delivery and therapeutic actions of galantamine drug (GAL) against Alzheimer's disease (AD) in rat brain through attaching GAL to ceria-containing hydroxyapatite (GAL@Ce-HAp) as well ceria-containing carboxymethyl chitosan-coated hydroxyapatite (GAL@Ce-HAp/CMC) nanocomposites. Physicochemical features of such nanocomposites were analyzed by XRD, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, UV–vis spectrophotometer, N_2-BET, DLS, zeta-potential measurements, SEM, and HR-TEM. Limited interactions were observed in GAL@Ce-HAp with prevailed existence of dispersed negatively charged rod-like particles conjugated with ceria nanodots. On contrary, GAL@Ce-HAp/CMC was well-structured developing aggregates of uncharged tetragonal-shaped particles laden with accession of ceria quantum dots. Such nanocomposites were i.p. injected into ovariectomized AD albino-rats at galantamine dose of 2.5 mg/kg/day for one month, then brain tissues were collected for biochemical and histological tests. GAL@Ce-HAp adopted as a promising candidate for AD curativeness, whereas oxidative stress markers were successfully upregulated, degenerated neurons in hippocampal and cerebral tissues were wholly recovered and Aβ-plaques were vanished. Also, optimizable in-vitro release for GAL and nanoceria were displayed from GAL@Ce-HAp, while delayed in-vitro release for those species were developed from GAL@Ce-HAp/CMC. This proof of concept work allow futuristic omnipotency of rod-like hydroxyapatite particles for selective delivery of GAL and nanoceria to AD affected brain areas. - Highlights: • Ceria affords existence of negatively charged rod-like architecture hydroxyapatite. • Carboxymethyl chitosan-coated apatite adopts neutral tetragonal-shaped species. • Ceria-containing apatite-based galantamine composite is potent anti-Alzheimer drug. • Typical neurons act via Alzheimer curing by ceria-loading apatite-based galantamine.

  8. NASA Tech Briefs, August 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Topics covered include: Mars Science Laboratory Drill; Ultra-Compact Motor Controller; A Reversible Thermally Driven Pump for Use in a Sub-Kelvin Magnetic Refrigerator; Shape Memory Composite Hybrid Hinge; Binding Causes of Printed Wiring Assemblies with Card-Loks; Coring Sample Acquisition Tool; Joining and Assembly of Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Through Capacitive Discharge; 670-GHz Schottky Diode-Based Subharmonic Mixer with CPW Circuits and 70-GHz IF; Self-Nulling Lock-in Detection Electronics for Capacitance Probe Electrometer; Discontinuous Mode Power Supply; Optimal Dynamic Sub-Threshold Technique for Extreme Low Power Consumption for VLSI; Hardware for Accelerating N-Modular Redundant Systems for High-Reliability Computing; Blocking Filters with Enhanced Throughput for X-Ray Microcalorimetry; High-Thermal-Conductivity Fabrics; Imidazolium-Based Polymeric Materials as Alkaline Anion-Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes; Electrospun Nanofiber Coating of Fiber Materials: A Composite Toughening Approach; Experimental Modeling of Sterilization Effects for Atmospheric Entry Heating on Microorganisms; Saliva Preservative for Diagnostic Purposes; Hands-Free Transcranial Color Doppler Probe; Aerosol and Surface Parameter Retrievals for a Multi-Angle, Multiband Spectrometer LogScope; TraceContract; AIRS Maps from Space Processing Software; POSTMAN: Point of Sail Tacking for Maritime Autonomous Navigation; Space Operations Learning Center; OVERSMART Reporting Tool for Flow Computations Over Large Grid Systems; Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of Particle-Laden Temporal Mixing Layers; Projection of Stabilized Aerial Imagery Onto Digital Elevation Maps for Geo-Rectified and Jitter-Free Viewing; Iterative Transform Phase Diversity: An Image-Based Object and Wavefront Recovery; 3D Drop Size Distribution Extrapolation Algorithm Using a Single Disdrometer; Social Networking Adapted for Distributed Scientific Collaboration; General Methodology for Designing Spacecraft Trajectories

  9. The CO{sub 2} capture performance of a high-intensity vortex spray scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javed, K.H.; Mahmud, T.; Purba, E. [University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    The present study focuses on the enhancement of CO{sub 2} capture efficiency using a high-intensity vortex spray scrubber by imparting swirl to the gas flow, which has the ability to augment the rates of heat and mass transfer. Experimental investigations into the reactive absorption of CO{sub 2} from a mixture of air-CO{sub 2} into an aqueous solution of NaOH in a laboratory-scale counter-current spray scrubber have been carried out. The mass transfer characteristics, in terms of the overall gas phase mass transfer coefficient (K{sub g}a) were investigated for both the swirling and the non-swirling (axial) gas flows through the scrubber in order to quantify the effect of swirl. The effects of the gas/liquid flow rates, flow arrangements, scrubber height and spray nozzle type on the CO{sub 2} capture performance were examined. For both the axial and the swirling flows, the K{sub g}a increases initially with increasing gas flow rate up to a certain limit, beyond which it becomes essentially constant, whereas the K{sub g}a increases continuously with the liquid flow rate within the measured range. The counter-current gas-droplets flow provides higher mass transfer rates compared with those in co-current flow. The K{sub g}a deceases with the increase in the tower height. The spray nozzle producing finer droplets provides enhanced mass transfer rates. It is found that imparting swirl in the gas flow enhances the K(g)a up to around 49% compared with that in axial flows.

  10. Investigation on heat transfer enhancement and pressure loss of double swirl chambers cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Lin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available By merging two standard swirl chambers, an alternative cooling configuration named double swirl chambers (DSC has been developed. In the DSC cooling configuration, the main physical phenomena of the swirl flow in swirl chamber and the advantages of swirl flow in heat transfer augmentation are maintained. Additionally, three new physical phenomena can be found in DSC cooling configuration, which result in a further improvement of the heat transfer: (1 impingement effect has been observed, (2 internal heat exchange has been enhanced between fluids in two swirls, and (3 “∞” shape swirl has been generated because of cross effect between two chambers, which improves the mixing of the fluids. Because of all these improvements, the DSC cooling configuration leads to a higher globally-averaged thermal performance parameter (Nu¯¯/Nu∞/(f/f01/3 than standard swirl chamber. In particular, at the inlet region, the augmentation of the heat transfer is nearly 7.5 times larger than the fully developed non-swirl turbulent flow and the circumferentially averaged Nusselt number coefficient is 41% larger than the standard swirl chamber. Within the present work, a further investigation on the DSC cooling configuration has been focused on the influence of geometry parameters e.g. merging ratio of chambers and aspect ratio of inlet duct on the cooling performance. The results show a very large influence of these geometry parameters in heat transfer enhancement and pressure drop ratio. Compared with the basic configuration of DSC cooling, the improved configuration with 20% to 23% merging ratio shows the highest globally-averaged thermal performance parameter. With the same cross section area in tangential inlet ducts, the DSC cooling channel with larger aspect ratio shows larger heat transfer enhancement and at the same time reduced pressure drop ratio, which results in a better globally-averaged thermal performance parameter.

  11. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flows in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaeizadeh, Araz

    The two-phase compressible scalar filtered mass density function (FMDF) model is further developed and employed for large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent spray combustion in internal combustion (IC) engines. In this model, the filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved in a generalized curvilinear coordinate system with high-order, multi-block, compact differencing schemes for the turbulent velocity and pressure. However, turbulent mixing and combustion are computed with a new two-phase compressible scalar FMDF model. The spray and droplet dispersion/evaporation are modeled with a Lagrangian method. A new Lagrangian-Eulerian-Lagrangian computational method is employed for solving the flow, spray and scalar equation. The pressure effect in the energy equation, as needed in compressible flows, is included in the FMDF formulation. The performance of the new compressible LES/FMDF model is assessed by simulating the flow field and scalar mixing in a rapid compression machine (RCM), in a shock tube and in a supersonic co-axial jet. Consistency of temperatures predicted by the Eulerian finite-difference (FD) and Lagrangian Monte Carlo (MC) parts of the LES/FMDF model are established by including the pressure on the FMDF. It is shown that the LES/FMDF model is able to correctly capture the scalar mixing in both compressible subsonic and supersonic flows. Using the new two-phase LES/FMDF model, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, spray and combustion in the RCM with flat and crevice piston are studied. It is shown that the temperature distribution in the RCM with crevice piston is more uniform than the RCM with flat piston. The fuel spray characteristics and the spray parameters affecting the fuel mixing inside the RCM in reacting and non-reacting flows are also studied. The predicted liquid penetration and flame lift-off lengths for respectively non-reacting and reacting sprays are found to compare well with the available experimental data. Temperatures and evaporated fuel mass fractions as predicted by the LES-FD and FMDF-MC for both reacting and non-reacting cases are shown to be consistent inside the RCM. Several non-reacting and reacting flows relevant to IC engines are also simulated with the new two-phase LES/FMDF model. The non-reacting flows in three geometrical configurations are considered: (1) a poppet valve in a sudden expansion, (2) a simple piston-cylinder assembly with a stationary open valve and harmonically moving flat piston, and (3) a realistic 3-valve single-cylinder direct-injection spark-ignition engine. The first and the second configurations are considered for validation of LES and for better understanding of the large-scale unsteady flow motions around the valve in the cylinder as generated by the piston movement. The predicted flow statistics by LES for the first two configurations compare well with the available experimental data. The LES results for third flow configuration show significant cycle-to-cycle variations (CCV) in the velocity field but insignificant CCV in the thermodynamic variables. During the intake stroke, the in-cylinder flow is highly inhomogeneous and turbulent, but during the compression stroke the flow becomes more homogeneous as turbulent decays. Turbulent mixing and combustion (with and without spray) in the 3-valve engine are simulated using the new two-phase compressible LES/FMDF model. Consistency of LES and FMDF results for single-phase reacting flows without spray but with flame ignition and premixed flame propagation, and two-phase reacting flows with spray, mixing and non-premixed combustion indicates the applicability and accuracy of the LES/FMDF model for complex turbulent combustion systems with moving boundaries.

  12. Large-eddy simulation and Lagrangian stochastic modelling of solid particle and droplet dispersion and mixing. Application to atmospheric pollution; Dispersion et melange turbulents de particules solides et de gouttelettes par une simulation des grandes echelles et une modelisation stochastique lagrangienne. Application a la pollution de l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinkovic, I.

    2005-07-15

    -frequency of breakup/coalescence phenomena, this stochastic process is equivalent to the evolution of the probability density function of droplet radii, which is governed by a Fokker-Planck equation. The parameters of the model are obtained dynamically by relating them to the local resolved properties of the dispersed phase compared to the main fluid. Within each grid cell, mass conservation is applied. The model is validated by comparison with the agglomeration model of Ho and Sommerfeld (2002), the stochastic model for secondary breakup of Apte et al. (2003) and the experimental results on secondary breakup in a coaxial jet of Lasheras et al. (1998). The large-eddy simulation coupled with Lagrangian particle tracking and the model for droplet coalescence and breakup is applied to the study of the atmospheric dispersion of wet cooling tower plumes. The simulations are done for different droplet size distributions and volume fractions. We focused on the influence of these parameters on mean concentration, concentration variance and mass flux profiles. In order to gain insight into the transport of solid particles and droplets in a turbulent boundary layer flow, the evolution of particles that were initially distributed in an uniform way in the flow, is analysed. This simple test case represents a first approach for understanding the phenomena that take place within large clouds of pollution, sand storms or when fog disappears under the influence of a rising wind. The period and the size of regions of preferential concentration are determined. This regions are of particular interest in the study of atmospheric dispersion of particles because they can lead to pollution peaks in an otherwise, not polluted atmosphere. (author)

  13. On the formulation and assessment of flamelet-generated manifolds applied to two-phase turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojko, Brian T.

    solving the 1D flame equations at varying drop sizes, where the source terms for energy, mixture fraction, and progress variable are cataloged as a function of normalized diameter. A unique coupling of the DFGM and planar UFGM is developed and is used to account for individual and gas phase combustion processes in turbulent combustion situations, such as spray flames, particle laden blasts, etc. The DFGM for the methanol and aluminum droplets are used in mixed Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian formulations of compressible multiphase flows. System level simulations are conducted and compared experimental data for a methanol spray flame and an aluminized blast studied at the Explosives Components Facility (ECF) at Sandia National Laboratories.

  14. Guidelines for the formulation of Lagrangian stochastic models for particle simulations of single-phase and dispersed two-phase turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Chibbaro, Sergio; Pope, Stephen B.

    2014-11-01

    developments can be safely built, which is also relevant for stochastic subgrid models for particle-laden flows in the context of Large Eddy Simulations.

  15. Sediments in Arctic sea ice: Implications for entrainment, transport and release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurnberg, D.; Wollenburg, I.; Dethleff, D.; Eicken, H.; Kassens, H.; Letzig, T.; Reimnitz, E.; Thiede, Jorn

    1994-01-01

    Despite the Arctic sea ice cover's recognized sensitivity to environmental change, the role of sediment inclusions in lowering ice albedo and affecting ice ablation is poorly understood. Sea ice sediment inclusions were studied in the central Arctic Ocean during the Arctic 91 expedition and in the Laptev Sea (East Siberian Arctic Region Expedition 1992). Results from these investigations are here combined with previous studies performed in major areas of ice ablation and the southern central Arctic Ocean. This study documents the regional distribution and composition of particle-laden ice, investigates and evaluates processes by which sediment is incorporated into the ice cover, and identifies transport paths and probable depositional centers for the released sediment. In April 1992, sea ice in the Laptev Sea was relatively clean. The sediment occasionally observed was distributed diffusely over the entire ice column, forming turbid ice. Observations indicate that frazil and anchor ice formation occurring in a large coastal polynya provide a main mechanism for sediment entrainment. In the central Arctic Ocean sediments are concentrated in layers within or at the surface of ice floes due to melting and refreezing processes. The surface sediment accumulation in central Arctic multi-year sea ice exceeds by far the amounts observed in first-year ice from the Laptev Sea in April 1992. Sea ice sediments are generally fine grained, although coarse sediments and stones up to 5 cm in diameter are observed. Component analysis indicates that quartz and clay minerals are the main terrigenous sediment particles. The biogenous components, namely shells of pelecypods and benthic foraminiferal tests, point to a shallow, benthic, marine source area. Apparently, sediment inclusions were resuspended from shelf areas before and incorporated into the sea ice by suspension freezing. Clay mineralogy of ice-rafted sediments provides information on potential source areas. A smectite

  16. Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and Scale-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelbaum, Richard; Xia, Fei; Gopan, Akshay; Kumfer, Benjamin

    2014-09-30

    Washington University in St. Louis and its project partners are developing a unique pressurized oxy-combustion process that aims to improve efficiency and costs by reducing the recycling of flue gas to near zero. Normally, in the absence of recycled flue gas or another inert gas, combustion of fuel and oxygen results in a dramatic increase in temperature of the combustion products and radiant energy, as compared to combustion in air. High heat flux to the boiler tubes may result in a tube surface temperatures that exceed safe operating limits. In the Staged Pressurized Oxy-Combustion (SPOC) process, this problem is addressed by staging the delivery of fuel and by novel combustion design that allows control of heat flux. In addition, the main mode of heat transfer to the steam cycle is by radiation, as opposed to convection. Therefore, the requirement for recycling large amounts of flue gas, for temperature control or to improve convective heat transfer, is eliminated, resulting in a reduction in auxiliary loads. The following report contains a detailed summary of scientific findings and accomplishments for the period of Oct. 1, 2013 to Sept 30, 2014. Results of ASPEN process and CFD modelling activities aimed at improving the SPOC process and boiler design are presented. The effects of combustion pressure and fuel moisture on the plant efficiency are discussed. Combustor pressure is found to have only a minor impact beyond 16 bar. For fuels with moisture content greater than approx 30%, e.g. coal/water slurries, the amount of latent heat of condensation exceeds that which can be utilized in the steam cycle and plant efficiency is reduced significantly. An improved boiler design is presented that achieves a more uniform heat flux profile. In addition, a fundamental study of radiation in high-temperature, high-pressure, particle-laden flows is summarized which provides a more complete understanding of heat transfer in these unusual conditions and to allow for

  17. Effects of subchronic inhalation exposure of rats to emissions from a diesel engine burning soybean oil-derived biodiesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, G L; Hobbs, C H; Blair, L F; Barr, E B; Hahn, F F; Jaramillo, R J; Kubatko, J E; March, T H; White, R K; Krone, J R; Ménache, M G; Nikula, K J; Mauderly, J L; Van Gerpen, J; Merceica, M D; Zielinska, B; Stankowski, L; Burling, K; Howell, S

    2002-10-01

    There is increasing interest in diesel fuels derived from plant oils or animal fats ("biodiesel"), but little information on the toxicity of biodiesel emissions other than bacterial mutagenicity. F344 rats were exposed by inhalation 6 h/day, 5 days/wk for 13 wk to 1 of 3 dilutions of emissions from a diesel engine burning 100% soybean oil-derived fuel, or to clean air as controls. Whole emissions were diluted to nominal NO(x) concentrations of 5, 25, or 50 ppm, corresponding to approximately 0.04, 0.2, and 0.5 mg particles/m(3), respectively. Biologically significant, exposure-related effects were limited to the lung, were greater in females than in males, and were observed primarily at the highest exposure level. There was a dose-related increase in the numbers of alveolar macrophages and the numbers of particles in the macrophages, as expected from repeated exposure, but no neutrophil response even at the highest exposure level. The macrophage response was reduced 28 days after cessation of the exposure. Among the high-level females, the group mean lung weight/body weight ratio was increased, and minimal, multifocal bronchiolar metaplasia of alveolar ducts was observed in 4 of 30 rats. Lung weights were not significantly increased, and metaplasia of the alveolar ducts was not observed in males. An increase in particle-laden macrophages was the only exposure-related finding in lungs at the intermediate and low levels, with fewer macrophages and fewer particles per macrophage at the low level. Alveolar histiocytosis was observed in a few rats in both exposed and control groups. There were statistically significant, but minor and not consistently exposure-related, differences in body weight, nonpulmonary organ weights, serum chemistry, and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the brain. There were no significant exposure-related effects on survival, clinical signs, feed consumption, ocular toxicity, hematology, neurohistology, micronuclei in bone marrow, sister

  18. In Situ Imaging of Particle Formation and Dynamics in Reactive Material Deflagrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Kyle T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-12

    Reactive composites utilizing nanoparticles have been the topic of extensive research in the past two decades. The driver for this is that, as the particle size is decreased, the mixing scale between constituents is greatly reduced, which has long thought to increase the rate of chemical reaction. While a general trend of increased reactivity has been seen for metal / metal oxide, or thermite, reactive materials, some results have demonstrated diminishing returns as the particle size is further decreased. Recent results have shown that nanoparticles, which are typically aggregates of several primary particles, can undergo very rapid coalescence to form micron particles once a critical temperature is reached. Experiments on this topic to date have been performed on very small sample masses, and sometimes under vacuum; conditions which are not representative of the environment during a deflagration. In this feasibility study, a custom burn tube was used to ignite and react 100 mg powdered thermite samples in long acrylic tubes. X-ray imaging at APS Sector 32 was performed to image the particle field as a function of distance and time as the rarefied particle cloud expanded and flowed down the tube. Five different thermite formulations were investigated, Al / CuO, Al / Fe2O3, Al / SnO2, Al / WO3, and Al / Fe2O3, along with Al / CuO formulations with different sizes of Al particles ranging from 80 nm to approximate 10 μm. The results clearly show that the sample powder reacts and unloads into a distribution of larger micron-scale particles (~5-500 μm), which continue to react and propagate as the particle-laden stream flows down the tube. This was the first direct imaging of the particle field during a thermite deflagration, and gives significant insight into the evolution of reactants to products. Analysis of phase is currently being pursued to determine whether this method can be used to extract

  19. Continuum viscoplastic simulation of a granular column collapse on large slopes : μ(I) rheology and lateral wall effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nathan; Mangeney, Anne; Ionescu, Ioan; Bouchut, Francois

    2016-04-01

    The description of the mechanical behaviour of granular flows and in particular of the static/flowing transition is still an open and challenging issue with strong implication for hazard assessment [{Delannay et al.}, 2016]. In particular, {detailed quantitative} comparison between numerical models and observations is necessary to go further in this direction. We simulate here dry granular flows resulting from the collapse of granular columns on an inclined channel (from horizontal to 22^o) and compare precisely the results with laboratory experiments performed by {Mangeney et al.} [2010] and {Farin et al.} [2014]. Incompressibility is assumed despite the dilatancy observed in the experiments (up to 10%). The 2-D model is based on the so-called μ(I) rheology that induces a Drucker-Prager yield stress and a variable viscosity. A nonlinear Coulomb friction term, representing the friction on the lateral walls of the channel is added to the model. We demonstrate that this term is crucial to accurately reproduce granular collapses on slopes higher than 10o whereas it remains of little effect on horizontal slope [{Martin et al.}, 2016]. We show that the use of a variable or a constant viscosity does not change significantly the results provided that these viscosities are of the same order [{Ionescu et al.}, 2015]. However, only a fine tuning of the constant viscosity (η = 1 Pa.s) makes it possible to predict the slow propagation phase observed experimentally on large slopes. This was not possible when using, without tuning, the variable viscosity calculated from the μ(I) rheology with the parameters estimated from experiments. Finally, we discuss the well-posedness of the model with variable and constant viscosity based in particular on the development of shear bands observed in the numerical simulations. References Delannay, R., Valance, A., Mangeney, A., Roche, O., and Richard, P., 2016. Granular and particle-laden flows: from laboratory experiments to field

  20. Channel flow induced by wall injection of fluid and particles; Ecoulement induit par injection parietale de fluide et de particules dans un conduit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feraille, Th.; Casalis, G. [Aerodynamics and Energetics Modeling Dept., 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2003-12-01

    the particles. Then, the evolution of the Eigenmodes from a given injection speed of the particles to another one is deduced by affinity, all other parameters being fixed. With a fixed Stokes number, stability results for a finite Reynolds number and results for the inviscid flow bring together when augmenting the particle mass concentration at the wall. Therefore, by knowing single phase flow results and the evolution of stability characteristics of the two phase flow in the inviscid case, it it easy to determine whether particle-laden Taylor flow is more or less stable than the monophasic Taylor flow for large particle mass concentration. (authors)

  1. Analysis of cloud condensation nuclei composition and growth kinetics using a pumped counterflow virtual impactor and aerosol mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Slowik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new method of determining the size and composition of CCN-active aerosol particles. Method utility is illustrated through a series of ambient measurements. A continuous-flow thermal-gradient diffusion chamber (TGDC, pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI, and Aerodyne time-of-flight mass spectrometer (AMS are operated in series. Ambient particles are sampled into the TGDC, where a constant supersaturation is maintained, and CCN-active particles grow to ~2.5 ± 0.5 μm. The output flow from the TGDC is directed into the PCVI, where a counterflow of dry N2 gas opposes the particle-laden flow, creating a region of zero axial velocity. This stagnation plane can only be traversed by particles with sufficient momentum, which depends on their size. Particles that have activated in the TGDC cross the stagnation plane and are entrained in the PCVI output flow, while the unactivated particles are diverted to a pump. Because the input gas is replaced by the counterflow gas with better than 99 % efficiency at the stagnation plane, the output flow consists almost entirely of dry N2 and water evaporates from the activated particles. In this way, the system yields an ensemble of CCN-active particles whose chemical composition and size are analyzed using the AMS. Measurements of urban aerosol in downtown Toronto identified an external mixture of CCN-active particles consisting almost entirely of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfate, with CCN-inactive particles of the same size consisting of a mixture of ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, and organics. We also discuss results from the first field deployment of the TGDC-PCVI-AMS system, conducted from mid-May to mid-June 2007 in Egbert, Ontario, a semirural site ~80 km north of Toronto influenced both by clean air masses from the north and emissions from the city. Organic-dominated particles sampled during a major biogenic event exhibited higher CCN activity and/or faster

  2. Large eddy simulations of coal jet flame ignition using the direct quadrature method of moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedel, Julien

    The Direct Quadrature Method of Moments (DQMOM) was implemented in the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) tool ARCHES to model coal particles. LES coupled with DQMOM was first applied to nonreacting particle-laden turbulent jets. Simulation results were compared to experimental data and accurately modeled a wide range of particle behaviors, such as particle jet waviness, spreading, break up, particle clustering and segregation, in different configurations. Simulations also accurately predicted the mean axial velocity along the centerline for both the gas phase and the solid phase, thus demonstrating the validity of the approach to model particles in turbulent flows. LES was then applied to the prediction of pulverized coal flame ignition. The stability of an oxy-coal flame as a function of changing primary gas composition (CO2 and O2) was first investigated. Flame stability was measured using optical measurements of the flame standoff distance in a 40 kW pilot facility. Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of the facility provided valuable insight into the experimentally observed data and the importance of factors such as heterogeneous reactions, radiation or wall temperature. The effects of three parameters on the flame stand-off distance were studied and simulation predictions were compared to experimental data using the data collaboration method. An additional validation study of the ARCHES LES tool was then performed on an air-fired pulverized coal jet flame ignited by a preheated gas flow. The simulation results were compared qualitatively and quantitatively to experimental observations for different inlet stoichiometric ratios. LES simulations were able to capture the various combustion regimes observed during flame ignition and to accurately model the flame stand-off distance sensitivity to the stoichiometric ratio. Gas temperature and coal burnout predictions were also examined and showed good agreement with experimental data. Overall, this research shows that high

  3. Guidelines for the formulation of Lagrangian stochastic models for particle simulations of single-phase and dispersed two-phase turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Chibbaro, Sergio; Pope, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    developments can be safely built, which is also relevant for stochastic subgrid models for particle-laden flows in the context of Large Eddy Simulations

  4. Enhancement of the SPARC90 code to pool scrubbing events under jet injection regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, C., E-mail: ceberes@iie.upv.es [Instituto de Ingeniería Energética, Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Escrivá, A.; Muñoz-Cobo, J.L. [Instituto de Ingeniería Energética, Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Herranz, L.E., E-mail: luisen.herranz@ciemat.es [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research Division of Nuclear Fission, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Review of the most recent literature concerning submerged jets. • Emphasize all variables and processes occurring along the jet region. • Highlight the gaps of knowledge still existing related to submerged jets. • Enhancement of SPARC90-Jet to estimate aerosol removal under jet injection regime. • Validation of the SPARC90-Jet results against pool scrubbing experimental data. - Abstract: Submerged gaseous jets may have an outstanding relevance in many industrial processes and may be of particular significance in severe nuclear accident scenarios, like in the Fukushima accident. Even though pool scrubbing has been traditionally associated with low injection velocities, there are a number of potential scenarios in which fission product trapping in aqueous ponds might also occur under jet injection regime (like SGTR meltdown sequences in PWRs and SBO ones in BWRs). The SPARC90 code was developed to determine the fission product trapping in pools during severe accidents. The code assumes that carrier gas arrives at the water ponds at low or moderate velocities and it forms a big bubble that eventually detaches from the injection pipe. However, particle laden gases may enter the water at very high velocities resulting in a submerged gas jet instead. This work presents the fundamentals, major hypotheses and changes introduced into the code in order to estimate particle removal during gas injection in pools under the jet regime (SPARC90-Jet). A simplified and reliable approach to submerged jet hydrodynamics has been implemented on the basis of updated equations for jet hydrodynamics and aerosol removal, so that gas–liquid and droplet-particles interactions are described. The code modifications have been validated as far as possible. However, no suitable hydrodynamic tests have been found in the literature, so that an indirect validation has been conducted through comparisons against data from pool scrubbing experiments. Besides, this validation

  5. Enhancement of the SPARC90 code to pool scrubbing events under jet injection regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berna, C.; Escrivá, A.; Muñoz-Cobo, J.L.; Herranz, L.E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Review of the most recent literature concerning submerged jets. • Emphasize all variables and processes occurring along the jet region. • Highlight the gaps of knowledge still existing related to submerged jets. • Enhancement of SPARC90-Jet to estimate aerosol removal under jet injection regime. • Validation of the SPARC90-Jet results against pool scrubbing experimental data. - Abstract: Submerged gaseous jets may have an outstanding relevance in many industrial processes and may be of particular significance in severe nuclear accident scenarios, like in the Fukushima accident. Even though pool scrubbing has been traditionally associated with low injection velocities, there are a number of potential scenarios in which fission product trapping in aqueous ponds might also occur under jet injection regime (like SGTR meltdown sequences in PWRs and SBO ones in BWRs). The SPARC90 code was developed to determine the fission product trapping in pools during severe accidents. The code assumes that carrier gas arrives at the water ponds at low or moderate velocities and it forms a big bubble that eventually detaches from the injection pipe. However, particle laden gases may enter the water at very high velocities resulting in a submerged gas jet instead. This work presents the fundamentals, major hypotheses and changes introduced into the code in order to estimate particle removal during gas injection in pools under the jet regime (SPARC90-Jet). A simplified and reliable approach to submerged jet hydrodynamics has been implemented on the basis of updated equations for jet hydrodynamics and aerosol removal, so that gas–liquid and droplet-particles interactions are described. The code modifications have been validated as far as possible. However, no suitable hydrodynamic tests have been found in the literature, so that an indirect validation has been conducted through comparisons against data from pool scrubbing experiments. Besides, this validation

  6. Transport of cyazofamid and kresoxim methyl in runoff at the plot and catchment scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrancq, Marie; Joaquín García Verdú, Antonio; Maillard, Elodie; Imfeld, Gwenaël; Payraudeau, Sylvain

    2013-04-01

    Surface runoff and erosion during the course of rainfall events represent major processes of pesticides transport from agricultural land to aquatic ecosystem. In general, field and catchment studies on pesticide transfer are carried out separately. A study at both scales may enable to improve the understanding of scale effects on processes involved in pesticides transport and to give clues on the source areas within an agricultural catchment. In this study, the transport in runoff of two widely used fungicides, i.e. kresoxim methyl (KM) and cyazofamid (CY) was assessed in a 43 ha vineyard catchment and the relative contribution of the total fungicides export from one representative plot was evaluated. During an entire period of fungicide application, from May to August 2011, the discharge and loads of dissolved and particle-laden KM and CY were monitored at the plot and catchment scales. The results showed larger export coefficient of KM and CY from catchment (0.064 and 0.041‰ for KM and CY respectively) than from the studied plot (0.009 and 0.023 ‰ for KM and CY respectively). It suggests that the plot margins especially the road network contributed as well to the fungicide loads. This result underlines the impact of fungicide drift on non-target areas. Furthermore, a larger rainfall threshold is necessary at the plot scale to trigger runoff and mobilise pesticides than on the road network. At the plot scale, a rapid dissipation of the both fungicides in the top soil was observed. It highlights that the risky period encompasses the first rainfall events triggering runoff after the applications. At both scales, KM and CY were not detected in suspended solids (i.e. > 0.7 µm). However their partitioning in runoff water differed. 64.1 and 91.8% of the KM load was detected in the dissolved phase (i.e. particulate phase (i.e. between 0.22 and 0.7 µm) at the plot and catchment scales respectively. Although KM and CY have similar lab-defined properties, our results

  7. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    . The particle dispersion in a dilute particle-laden air jet is studied and the dense flow in a plane shear cell. Experimental results were not available for these two cases. However, for the particle-laden jet the computations show correctly the increased dispersion width when the turbulence model is used, and that kinetic energy is transferred from the fluid to the particle phase. For the dense shear cell on the other hand, especially close to the moving bottom plate turbulent kinetic energy is transferred from the particle to the fluid phase, indicating the existence of true particle turbulence. The last turbulent test case, a riser flow, is compared to selected experimental data. In this case it is obvious that the turbulence model gives more realistic velocity profiles and good agreement with the measured rms fluctuations in the particle phase. A flux boundary condition which allows collisional dissipation of particle phase kinetic energy at the riser walls seems crucial for an accurate solution.

  8. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    dispersion in a dilute particle-laden air jet is studied and the dense flow in a plane shear cell. Experimental results were not available for these two cases. However, for the particle-laden jet the computations show correctly the increased dispersion width when the turbulence model is used, and that kinetic energy is transferred from the fluid to the particle phase. For the dense shear cell on the other hand, especially close to the moving bottom plate turbulent kinetic energy is transferred from the particle to the fluid phase, indicating the existence of true particle turbulence. The last turbulent test case, a riser flow, is compared to selected experimental data. In this case it is obvious that the turbulence model gives more realistic velocity profiles and good agreement with the measured rms fluctuations in the particle phase. A flux boundary condition which allows collisional dissipation of particle phase kinetic energy at the riser walls seems crucial for an accurate solution.

  9. Review of PSI studies on reactor physics and thermal fluid dynamics of pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2014-01-01

    density ratios are expected in air ingress scenarios at an HTR. As a spin-off from aerosol studies for severe accidents, theoretical studies were started on graphite dust in pebble bed reactors. Wear and tear of the fuel spheres can produce significant quantities of graphite dust. Simulations of the pebble flow in a random package have been carried out in a generic full-size reactor geometry (440’000 pebbles) using the discrete-element method (DEM). The simulations provide the residence time distribution of the pebbles and the spatial distribution of wear. The model is ready for an implementation of a dust production term. In parallel, preliminary results on dust deposition were obtained for a particle laden flow around a single sphere and a linear arrangement of spheres. For this purpose a RANS turbulence model was coupled with a continuous random walk model for the integration of the particle trajectories in Lagrangian coordinates. Based on the outlined expertise, PSI plans to intensify the work on HTR in the future. (author)

  10. Tsunami-induced boulder transport - combining physical experiments and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetjen, Jan; Engel, Max; May, Simon Matthias; Schüttrumpf, Holger; Brueckner, Helmut; Prasad Pudasaini, Shiva

    2016-04-01

    since they have been largely neglected. In order to tackle these gaps, we develop a novel BTM in two steps. First, scaled physical experiments are performed that determine the exact hydrodynamic processes within a tsunami during boulder transportations. Furthermore, the experiments are the basis for calibrating the numerical BTM. The BTM is based on the numerical two-phase mass flow model of Pudasaini (2012) that employs an advanced and unified high-resolution computational tool for mixtures consisting of the solid and fluid components and their interactions. This allows for the motion of the boulder while interacting with the particle-laden tsunami on the inundated coastal plane as a function of the total fluid and solid stresses. Our approach leads to fundamentally new insights in to the essential physical processes in BTM. Goto, K., Chavanich, S. A., Imamura, F., Kunthasap, P., Matsui, T., Minoura, K., Sugawara, D. and Yanagisawa, H.: Distribution, origin and transport process of boulders deposited by the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami at Pakarang Cape, Thailand. Sediment. Geol., 202, 821-837, 2007. Imamura, F., Goto, K. and Ohkubo, S.: A numerical model of the transport of a boulder by tsunami. J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 113, C01008, 2008. Pudasaini, S. P.: A general two-phase debris flow model. J. Geophys. Res. Earth Surf., 117, F03010, 2012.

  11. A combined field and numerical approach to understanding dilute pyroclastic density current dynamics and hazard potential: Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Brittany D.; Gravley, Darren M.; Clarke, Amanda B.; Lindsay, Jan M.; Bloomberg, Simon H.; Agustin-Flores, Javier; Németh, Károly

    2014-04-01

    The most dangerous and deadly hazards associated with phreatomagmatic eruptions in the Auckland Volcanic Field (AVF; Auckland, New Zealand) are those related to volcanic base surges - dilute, ground-hugging, particle laden currents with dynamic pressures capable of severe to complete structural damage. We use the well-exposed base surge deposits of the Maungataketake tuff ring (Manukau coast, Auckland), to reconstruct flow dynamics and destructive potential of base surges produced during the eruption. The initial base surge(s) snapped trees up to 0.5 m in diameter near their base as far as 0.7-0.9 km from the vent. Beyond this distance the trees were encapsulated and buried by the surge in growth position. Using the tree diameter and yield strength of the wood we calculate that dynamic pressures (Pdyn) in excess of 12-35 kPa are necessary to cause the observed damage. Next we develop a quantitative model for flow of and sedimentation from a radially-spreading, dilute pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) to determine the damage potential of the base surges produced during the early phases of the eruption and explore the implications of this potential on future eruptions in the region. We find that initial conditions with velocities on the order of 65 m s- 1, bulk density of 38 kg m- 3 and initial, near-vent current thicknesses of 60 m reproduce the field-based Pdyn estimates and runout distances. A sensitivity analysis revealed that lower initial bulk densities result in shorter run-out distances, more rapid deceleration of the current and lower dynamic pressures. Initial velocity does not have a strong influence on run-out distance, although higher initial velocity and slope slightly decrease runout distance due to higher rates of atmospheric entrainment. Using this model we determine that for base surges with runout distances of up to 4 km, complete destruction can be expected within 0.5 km from the vent, moderate destruction can be expected up to 2 km, but much

  12. Theoretical modelling of nuclear waste flows - 16377

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.F.; Biggs, S.R.; Fairweather, M.; Njobuenwu, D.; Yao, J.

    2009-01-01

    A large amount of nuclear waste is stored in tailings ponds as a solid-liquid slurry, and liquid flows containing suspensions of solid particles are encountered in the treatment and disposal of this waste. In processing this waste, it is important to understand the behaviour of particles within the flow in terms of their settling characteristics, their propensity to form solid beds, and the re-suspension characteristics of particles from a bed. A clearer understanding of such behaviour would allow the refinement of current approaches to waste management, potentially leading to reduced uncertainties in radiological impact assessments, smaller waste volumes and lower costs, accelerated clean-up, reduced worker doses, enhanced public confidence and diminished grounds for objection to waste disposal. Mathematical models are of significant value in nuclear waste processing since the extent of characterisation of wastes is in general low. Additionally, waste processing involves a diverse range of flows, within vessels, ponds and pipes. To investigate experimentally all waste form characteristics and potential flows of interest would be prohibitively expensive, whereas the use of mathematical models can help to focus experimental studies through the more efficient use of existing data, the identification of data requirements, and a reduction in the need for process optimisation in full-scale experimental trials. Validated models can also be used to predict waste transport behaviour to enable cost effective process design and continued operation, to provide input to process selection, and to allow the prediction of operational boundaries that account for the different types and compositions of particulate wastes. In this paper two mathematical modelling techniques, namely Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and large eddy simulation (LES), have been used to investigate particle-laden flows in a straight square duct and a duct with a bend. The flow solutions provided by

  13. Volcanic ash ingestion by a large gas turbine aeroengine: fan-particle interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Andreas; Clarkson, Rory; Durant, Adam; Cassiani, Massimo; Stohl, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Airborne particles from explosive volcanic eruptions are a major safety threat for aviation operations. The fine fraction of the emitted particles (fan blades and rotor-path components, and can also cause contamination or blockage of electrical systems and the fuel system such as fuel nozzles and air bleed filters. Ash particles that enter the hot-section of the engine (combustor and turbine stages; temperature between 1400-1800°C) are rapidly heated above the glass transition temperature (about 650-1000°C) and become soft (or form a melt) and can stick as re-solidified deposits on nozzle guide vanes. The glass deposits change the internal aerodynamic airflow in the engine and can affect the cooling capability of the different components by clogging the cooling inlets/outlets, which can lead to a loss of power or flame-out. The nature of volcanic ash ingestion is primarily influenced by the fan at the front of the engine which produces the thrust that drives the aircraft. The ingested air is split between the core (compressor/combustor/turbine) and bypass (thrust) at a ratio of typically between, 1:5-10 on modern engines. Consequently, the ash particles are fractionated between the core and bypass by the geometry and dynamics of the fan blades. This study uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of particle-laden airflows into a turbofan engine under different atmospheric and engine operation conditions. The main aim was to investigate the possible centrifugal effect of the fan blades as a function of particle size, and to relate this to the core intake concentration. We generated a generic 3D axial high-bypass turbofan engine using realistic dimensions of the turbofan, engine intake and other aerodynamically relevant parts. The CFD experiments include three scenarios of aircraft performance (climb, cruise and descent) and for two different typical altitude ranges (10000 and 39000 ft). The fluid dynamics simulations were carried out using a commercial

  14. Measurements of Turbulence Attenuation by a Dilute Dispersion of Solid Particles in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, John; Hwang, Wontae; Cabral, Patrick

    2002-11-01

    This research addresses turbulent gas flows laden with fine solid particles at sufficiently large mass loading that strong two-way coupling occurs. By two-way coupling we mean that the particle motion is governed largely by the flow, while the particles affect the gas-phase mean flow and the turbulence properties. Our main interest is in understanding how the particles affect the turbulence. Computational techniques have been developed which can accurately predict flows carrying particles that are much smaller than the smallest scales of turbulence. Also, advanced computational techniques and burgeoning computer resources make it feasible to fully resolve very large particles moving through turbulent flows. However, flows with particle diameters of the same order as the Kolmogorov scale of the turbulence are notoriously difficult to predict. Some simple flows show strong turbulence attenuation with reductions in the turbulent kinetic energy by up to a factor of five. On the other hand, some seemingly similar flows show almost no modification. No model has been proposed that allows prediction of when the strong attenuation will occur. Unfortunately, many technological and natural two-phase flows fall into this regime, so there is a strong need for new physical understanding and modeling capability. Our objective is to study the simplest possible turbulent particle-laden flow, namely homogeneous, isotropic turbulence with a uniform dispersion of monodisperse particles. We chose such a simple flow for two reasons. First, the simplicity allows us to probe the interaction in more detail and offers analytical simplicity in interpreting the results. Secondly, this flow can be addressed by numerical simulation, and many research groups are already working on calculating the flow. Our detailed data can help guide some of these efforts. By using microgravity, we can further simplify the flow to the case of no mean velocity for either the turbulence or the particles. In fact

  15. Experimental and numerical investigation on cladding of corrosion-erosion resistant materials by a high power direct diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Parisa

    In oil and gas industry, soil particles, crude oil, natural gas, particle-laden liquids, and seawater can carry various highly aggressive elements, which accelerate the material degradation of component surfaces by combination of slurry erosion, corrosion, and wear mechanisms. This material degradation results into the loss of mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, and impact strength; leading to detachment, delamination, cracking, and ultimately premature failure of components. Since the failure of high valued equipment needs considerable cost and time to be repaired or replaced, minimizing the tribological failure of equipment under aggressive environment has been gaining increased interest. It is widely recognized that effective management of degradation mechanisms will contribute towards the optimization of maintenance, monitoring, and inspection costs. The hardfacing techniques have been widely used to enhance the resistance of surfaces against degradation mechanisms. Applying a surface coating improves wear and corrosion resistance and ensures reliability and long-term performance of coated parts. A protective layer or barrier on the components avoids the direct mechanical and chemical contacts of tool surfaces with process media and will reduce the material loss and ultimately its failure. Laser cladding as an advanced hardfacing technique has been widely used for industrial applications in order to develop a protective coating with desired material properties. During the laser cladding, coating material is fused into the base material by means of a laser beam in order to rebuild a damaged part's surface or to enhance its surface function. In the hardfacing techniques such as atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF), and laser cladding, mixing of coating materials with underneath surface has to be minimized in order to utilize the properties of the coating material most effectively. In this regard, laser cladding offers