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Sample records for non-suicidal self-injurious behavior

  1. Narrative Therapy and Non-Suicidal-Self-Injurious Behavior: Externalizing the Problem and Internalizing Personal Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Rachel M.; Kress, Victoria E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present an intervention, the externalization of client problems, which can be used to address non-suicidal-self-injurious behavior. Specific externalization techniques are discussed, including naming the problem, letter writing, and drawing. A case application and implications for practice are presented.

  2. Adolescent Non-Suicidal Self-Injury: Analysis of the Youth Risk Behavior Survey Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelianchik-Key, Kelly; Byrd, Rebekah J.; La Guardia, Amanda C.

    2016-01-01

    Issues regarding the diagnosis and treatment of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) continue to be of increasing concern to practitioners in educational and mental health settings. Given this rising concern, it is important to note that the majority of research regarding self-injury has focused on the symptomology and treatment of Caucasian females;…

  3. Non-Suicidal and Suicidal Self-Injurious Behavior among Flemish Adolescents : A Web-Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baetens, I.; Claes, L.; Muehlenkamp, J.; Grietens, Hans; Onghena, P.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal self-injury (SSI) in a sample of 1,417 Flemish adolescents aged 12 to 18, as well as psychosocial differences between adolescents engaging in NSSI and adolescents engaging in SSI. Participants completed an

  4. Non-Suicidal and Suicidal Self-Injurious Behavior among Flemish Adolescents : A Web-Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baetens, I.; Claes, L.; Muehlenkamp, J.; Grietens, Hans; Onghena, P.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal self-injury (SSI) in a sample of 1,417 Flemish adolescents aged 12 to 18, as well as psychosocial differences between adolescents engaging in NSSI and adolescents engaging in SSI. Participants completed an

  5. Preserved Error-Monitoring in Borderline Personality Disorder Patients with and without Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Vega

    Full Text Available The presence of non-suicidal self-injury acts in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD is very prevalent. These behaviors are a public health concern and have become a poorly understood phenomenon in the community. It has been proposed that the commission of non-suicidal self-injury might be related to a failure in the brain network regulating executive functions. Previous studies have shown that BPD patients present an impairment in their capacity to monitor actions and conflicts associated with the performance of certain actions, which suppose an important aspect of cognitive control.We used Event Related Potentials to examine the behavioral and electrophysiological indexes associated with the error monitoring in two BPD outpatients groups (17 patients each differentiated according to the presence or absence of non-suicidal self-injury behaviors. We also examined 17 age- and intelligence- matched healthy control participants.The three groups did not show significant differences in event-related potentials associated with errors (Error-Related Negativity and Pe nor in theta power increase following errors.This is the first study investigating the behavioral and electrophysiological error monitoring indexes in BPD patients characterized by their history of non-suicidal self-injury behaviors. Our results show that error monitoring is preserved in BPD patients and suggest that non-suicidal self-injury acts are not related to a dysfunction in the cognitive control mechanisms.

  6. Preserved Error-Monitoring in Borderline Personality Disorder Patients with and without Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Daniel; Vilà-Balló, Adrià; Soto, Àngel; Amengual, Julià; Ribas, Joan; Torrubia, Rafael; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Marco-Pallarés, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Background The presence of non-suicidal self-injury acts in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is very prevalent. These behaviors are a public health concern and have become a poorly understood phenomenon in the community. It has been proposed that the commission of non-suicidal self-injury might be related to a failure in the brain network regulating executive functions. Previous studies have shown that BPD patients present an impairment in their capacity to monitor actions and conflicts associated with the performance of certain actions, which suppose an important aspect of cognitive control. Method We used Event Related Potentials to examine the behavioral and electrophysiological indexes associated with the error monitoring in two BPD outpatients groups (17 patients each) differentiated according to the presence or absence of non-suicidal self-injury behaviors. We also examined 17 age- and intelligence- matched healthy control participants. Results The three groups did not show significant differences in event-related potentials associated with errors (Error-Related Negativity and Pe) nor in theta power increase following errors. Conclusions This is the first study investigating the behavioral and electrophysiological error monitoring indexes in BPD patients characterized by their history of non-suicidal self-injury behaviors. Our results show that error monitoring is preserved in BPD patients and suggest that non-suicidal self-injury acts are not related to a dysfunction in the cognitive control mechanisms. PMID:26636971

  7. An Exploratory Study of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Suicidal Behaviors in Adolescent Latinas

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    Gulbas, Lauren E.; Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; De Luca, Susan M.; Tyler, Tee R.; Zayas, Luis H.

    2015-01-01

    To date, there is little research to validate empirically differences between non-suicidal self-injurious behavior (NSSI) and attempted suicide among Latina adolescents. Understanding the characteristics and contextual features of self-harmful behaviors among Latina teens is a critical public health and social justice matter given the disproportionate rates of attempted suicide and anticipated population growth of this vulnerable group. In this article, we draw on an ecodevelopmental model to focus attention on factors in the sociocultural environment that shape suicidal and non-suicidal self-injurious behaviors. Through analysis of qualitative interviews conducted with girls who used NSSI (n = 18), attempted suicide (n = 29), used NSSI and attempted suicide (n = 8,) and had no reported lifetime history of self-harm (n = 28), we describe the sociocultural factors that shaped psychosocial vulnerabilities and gave rise to decisions to use NSSI or attempt suicide. Our analysis revealed that adolescents who engaged in NSSI perceived their negative feelings as something that could be controlled through self-injurious acts, whereas powerlessness was a theme underlying the emotional states of girls who attempted suicide. When NSSI ceased to function as a mechanism for control, girls came to sudden decisions to attempt suicide. Most teens identified specific, and often multiple, situations that induced these intense affective states and shaped decisions to inflict self-harm. Two situational experiences emerged as particularly salient and promising for subsequent studies on self-harmful behaviors among Latina adolescents: transnational stress and bullying. We describe each of these and offer suggestions for future research and practice. PMID:26052816

  8. [Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) and Suicidal Behavior Disorder in the DSM-5].

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    Plener, Paul L; Kapusta, Nestor D; Brunner, Romuald; Kaess, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) and Suicidal Behavior Disorder (SBD) were included as diagnostic categories in Section 3 of the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) of the American Psychiatric Association (APA). Thus, these diagnostic entities were not recognized as formal clinical diagnoses, but rather for the first time clearly defined in a classificatory system to standardize further research in this field. This paper introduces both concepts and addresses the discussion about NSSI and suicidal behavior disorder based on a selective review of the literature. First studies using the new definitions are introduced. In Germany the prevalence of NSSI is estimated to lie at about 4 %, of SBD at about 9 %. It can be expected that in the future the new definitions will lead to a better comparability of study outcomes with regards to NSSI and suicidal behavior disorder.

  9. Preventing Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adolescents: The Signs of Self-Injury Program

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    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Walsh, Barent W.; McDade, Moira

    2010-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) continues to be a problem among youth and there is a great need for programming aimed at reducing NSSI in adolescents. The signs of self-injury program is the first known NSSI school-based prevention program for adolescents that attempts to increase knowledge, improve help-seeking attitudes and behaviors, and…

  10. Risk of Suicidal Ideation in Adolescents with Both Self-Asphyxial Risk-Taking Behavior and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brausch, Amy M.; Decker, Kristina M.; Hadley, Andrea G.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined adolescent participation in self-asphyxial risk-taking behaviors (SAB), sometimes known as the "choking game," and its relationship with other adolescent risk behaviors, including non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Researchers proposed that participation in SAB and NSSI would be associated with suicidal behavior, disordered…

  11. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adolescents

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    Lloyd-Richardson, Elizabeth E.

    2010-01-01

    While awareness of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) appears to be increasing among school counselors, social workers, nurses, and others who work with youth, it remains one of the most difficult behaviors to encounter, with few professionals feeling well equipped to handle these situations. This introductory article aims to define NSSI, describe…

  12. School Response to Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toste, Jessica R.; Heath, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a growing concern among professionals working with youth. Recent studies exploring the occurrence of NSSI in middle and high schools indicate that 15% to 20% of students will admit to having engaged in this behavior at least once. The alarming number of adolescents engaging in NSSI poses a challenge to all…

  13. The association of non-suicidal self-injury and suicidal behavior according to DSM-5 in adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

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    Groschwitz, Rebecca C; Kaess, Michael; Fischer, Gloria; Ameis, Nina; Schulze, Ulrike M E; Brunner, Romuald; Koelch, Michael; Plener, Paul L

    2015-08-30

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal behaviors frequently occur among adolescent psychiatric patients. Although those behaviors are distinct with regards to intent, NSSI has been shown to be an important risk-factor for suicide attempts. However, the association of NSSI and Suicidal Behavior Disorder (SBD) according to DSM-5 criteria has not yet been investigated. For investigating distinctive features and mutual risk-factors of NSSI-disorder and SBD, adolescent psychiatric inpatients (N=111, aged 12-19 years; 65.8% females) were interviewed using the Self-Injurious-Thoughts-And-Behaviors-Interview-German (SITBI-G). NSSI started significantly earlier in life (M=12.5 years, SD=2.2) than first suicide attempts (M=14.1 years, SD=2.0). Patients meeting NSSI-disorder and/or SBD were significantly more likely to be female and to be diagnosed with an affective disorder. NSSI-disorder and SBD seem to have several distinctive features (i.e. age of onset or frequency), but also seem to share certain mutual risk-factors (i.e. affective disorders, female gender). While both NSSI and SBD seem to be maintained by mainly automatic negative reinforcement, positive automatic and social functions were rated significantly higher for NSSI. Most importantly, NSSI seems to be a strong risk factor for the occurrence of SBD (even when controlling for suicidal ideation) and should therefore always be assessed when dealing with psychiatric adolescent patients.

  14. Adversity, emotion regulation, and non-suicidal self-injury in eating disorders.

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    Vieira, Ana Isabel; Ramalho, Sofia; Brandão, Isabel; Saraiva, Joana; Gonçalves, Sónia

    2016-01-01

    The comorbidity between non-suicidal self-injury and eating disorder behaviors suggests that psychosocial factors may play a role in both types of behaviors. This study aimed to assess the presence of non-suicidal self-injury in 66 eating disorder patients and to analyze the associations among adversity, emotion regulation, non-suicidal self-injury, and disordered eating behavior. A total of 24 participants (36.4%) reported non-suicidal self-injury. Patients endorsing self-injury had a higher severity of disordered eating behavior. More difficulties in emotion regulation and a greater number of methods of non-suicidal self-injury were associated with a higher severity of eating pathology. Clinicians should consider these relationships in the assessment and treatment of eating disorders.

  15. Cognitive and Emotion-Regulatory Mediators of the Relationship between Behavioral Approach System Sensitivity and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Frequency

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    Burke, Taylor A.; Stange, Jonathan P.; Hamilton, Jessica L.; Cohen, Jonah N.; O’Garro-Moore, Jared; Daryanani, Issar; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2014-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is highly prevalent among late adolescents and predicts the onset of suicidal ideation and behavior. Although research has established an association between the behavioral approach system (BAS) and NSSI, less research has explored mechanisms underlying this relationship. The authors examined negative and positive emotion regulation patterns, as well as the BAS-relevant cognitive style of self-criticism, as potential mechanisms through which a hypersensitive BA...

  16. Non-suicidal self-injury.

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    Wilkinson, Paul

    2013-02-01

    More than 20 % of adolescents may self-injure. Often there is no suicidal intent; rather the intent is to reduce distressing affect, inflict self-punishment and/or signal personal distress to important others. Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is both deliberate and contains no desire to die and therefore aetiology is likely to be at least partly different to suicidal behaviour per se. Interestingly, NSSI is associated with subsequent suicide attempts suggesting that these behaviours and their related psychology may lie on the same risk trajectory. NSSI does not, however, appear in DSM-IV or ICD-10 as a disorder; and does not constitute a component of any current anxious or depressive syndrome. This lack of nosological recognition coupled with clear psychopathological importance is to be recognised in the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, with NSSI being classified as a syndrome in its own right. We agree that this is appropriate and is likely to have several positive consequences including improving communication between professionals and patients, informing treatment and management decisions and increasing research into the nature, course and outcome of NSSI. We agree that while suicidal and non-suicidal self-harm are often seen together, they are not the same behaviour and that it is both valid and useful to separate them.

  17. Comparison of clinical and demographic characteristics among borderline personality disorder patients with and without suicidal attempts and non-suicidal self-injury behaviors.

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    Pérez, Sandra; Marco, José H; García-Alandete, Joaquín

    2014-12-30

    Research has shown that both suicidal and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) behaviors are co-morbid phenomena that are present in BPD patients, considered phenomenologically distinct, and associated with different methods, motives, frequency, and severity of psychopathology. This study is aimed at extending previous research by examining differences in demographical, clinical and psychological characteristics of BPD patients with or without a history of Suicide Attempts (SAs) and/or NSSI behaviors. Our sample included 89 outpatients with a BPD diagnosis assessed through clinical, structured interviews, and self-reports. The major findings showed that patients with a history of suicide attempts and non-suicidal self-injury were characterized by major number of lifetime suicide attempts and more severe feelings of hopelessness than patients with NSSI. Additionally, more violent thoughts towards others were observed in patients with NSSI. These results support a relatively more severe profile inherent in patients with SA and NSSI and allow us to differentiate NSSI from suicide attempts, highlighting the importance of evaluating and treating hopelessness and exploring the tendency to have violent thoughts towards others in this clinical population.

  18. Emotion dysregulation mediates the influence of relationship difficulties on non-suicidal self-injury behavior in young adults.

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    Yurkowski, Kim; Martin, Jodi; Levesque, Christine; Bureau, Jean-François; Lafontaine, Marie-France; Cloutier, Paula

    2015-08-30

    This study examined associations between relationship difficulties with parents and peers and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Particular emphasis was placed on examining mediating pathways through emotion dysregulation, as per commonly accepted theory. Participants were 1153 university students (905 females; Mage=19.35 years, S.D.=1.49); 79 of these participants had engaged in NSSI during the previous 6 months (63 females, Mage=19.35 years, S.D.=1.51). Participants completed questionnaires assessing NSSI, quality of relationships with parents and peers, and emotion dysregulation. Hierarchical logistic regressions suggest that the quality of parent-child relationships has a greater impact on the prediction of NSSI engagement than the quality of peer relationships. Results of a structural equation model showed that feelings of alienation in both parent and peer relationships had indirect effects on NSSI through deficits in emotion regulation (ER). Results suggest the importance of examining emotion dysregulation in association with NSSI, and that both parent and peer relationships are implicated in NSSI engagement through emotion regulation deficits. Important clinical implications regarding the need to acknowledge both emotion dysregulation and interpersonal difficulties when treating NSSI in young adults are discussed.

  19. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in the Media

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    Purington, Amanda; Whitlock, Janis

    2010-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a common and increasingly prevalent maladaptive coping method, often used by adolescents. The role of the media in the transmission of NSSI acceptance and adoption in mainstream culture is explored in this article. The increasing reach of the media, the particular susceptibility of adolescent and young adults to…

  20. Dialectical behavior therapy for adolescent binge eating, purging, suicidal behavior, and non-suicidal self-injury: a pilot study.

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    Fischer, Sarah; Peterson, Claire

    2015-03-01

    There are few published randomized controlled trials examining treatment for symptoms of bulimia nervosa (BN) in adolescents. Additionally, many adolescents presenting for treatment for BN symptoms endorse co-occurring mood disturbances, suicidality, and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), and may not meet full Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV-Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) diagnostic criteria for BN. In addition to the limited number of randomized controlled trials, published treatment studies of BN symptoms in adolescence do not specifically address the multiple comorbid symptoms that these adolescents often report. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of an outpatient dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) program for adolescents with symptoms of BN, suicide attempts, and NSSI. Ten eligible participants enrolled in the study; 3 dropped within 4 weeks of initiating treatment. In addition to binge eating and suicidal behavior, participants also endorsed a number of other comorbid mood disorders and substance abuse. Seven participants completed 6 months of treatment and 6-month follow-up assessments. Treatment included access to a crisis management system, individual therapy, skills training, and a therapist consultation team. At posttreatment, participants had significantly reduced self-harm; (Cohen's d = 1.35), frequency of objective binge episodes (Cohen's d = .46), frequency of purging (Cohen's d = .66), and Global Eating Disorder Examination scores (Cohen's d = .64). At follow-up, 6 participants were abstinent of NSSI; 3 participants were abstinent from binge eating. At follow-up, treatment gains were maintained and enhanced. Results indicate that it is feasible to address multiple forms of psychopathology during the treatment of BN symptoms in this age-group.

  1. Untended Wounds: Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

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    Maddox, Brenna B.; Trubanova, Andrea; White, Susan W.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have examined non-suicidal self-injury in community and clinical samples, but there is no published research on non-suicidal self-injury in individuals with autism spectrum disorder. This lack of research is surprising, since individuals with autism spectrum disorder have high rates of risk factors for non-suicidal self-injury,…

  2. The Role of Depressive Symptoms, Family Invalidation and Behavioral Impulsivity in the Occurrence and Repetition of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Chinese Adolescents: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study

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    You, Jianing; Leung, Freedom

    2012-01-01

    This study used zero-inflated poisson regression analysis to examine the role of depressive symptoms, family invalidation, and behavioral impulsivity in the occurrence and repetition of non-suicidal self-injury among Chinese community adolescents over a 2-year period. Participants, 4782 high school students, were assessed twice during the…

  3. Measurement of perceived functions of non-suicidal self-injury for Chinese adolescents.

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    Leong, Choi Hong; Wu, Anise M S; Poon, Mary Man-Yee

    2014-01-01

    Due to the lack of validated assessment tools for motives of non-suicidal self-injury behaviors in the Chinese contexts, this study aims to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Functional Assessment of Self-Mutilation (C-FASM). A total of 345 secondary school students (mean age = 11.41 years), who reported non-suicidal self-injury in the past year, voluntarily participated in the questionnaire survey. Confirmatory factor analysis results supported a second-order model of 4 motivational factors. The overall scale scores had significant correlations with depression, anxiety, impulsiveness, self-esteem, social support, and suicidal ideation. The internal consistency of the scale was also satisfactory. The C-FASM is a valid and reliable instrument for assessing non-suicidal self-injury among nonclinical Chinese adolescents.

  4. A meta-analysis on the relation between peer victimization and adolescent non-suicidal self-injury.

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    van Geel, Mitch; Goemans, Anouk; Vedder, Paul

    2015-12-15

    Several studies suggest that there are relations between children's or adolescents' self-injurious behaviors and peer victimization. In the current study, a meta-analysis was performed to study the relations between non-suicidal self-injury and peer victimization. Non-suicidal self-injury focuses on self-injurious behaviors without suicidal intent, that result in immediate tissue damage and are not socially sanctioned within one's culture or for display. Using a meta-analysis, effect sizes of existing studies can be statistically summarized, and publication bias and moderators can be analyzed. The databases PsycINFO, MEDLINE, ERIC and ProQuest were searched for relevant articles. Articles were only included if they focused on children or adolescents, if they focused on non-clinical samples, and if they focused on self-injuring behaviors as opposed to thoughts or ideation. We found nine studies with fourteen independent samples and a total of 20,898 adolescents and children reporting on the relation between peer victimization and non-suicidal self-injury. Our analysis showed positive and significant relations between non-suicidal self-injury and peer victimization. Further analyses showed an absence of publication bias. Younger children that were victimized reported significantly more non-suicidal self-injury than older children. By preventing peer victimization we may potentially prevent non-suicidal self-injury in children and adolescents.

  5. Untangling a Complex Web: How Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Suicide Attempts Differ

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    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Kerr, Patrick L.

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal behavior is complex and often difficult to untangle. While most self-injurers never exhibit suicidality, there is evidence of a correlation between suicidality and NSSI, and a clear overlap of risk between the two behaviors. Therefore, it is important to both prevention and…

  6. Body Image as a Mediator of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adolescents

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    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Brausch, Amy M.

    2012-01-01

    Attitudes towards the body have been largely overlooked as a potential risk factor for adolescent non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) despite theorizing that a negative body image may play a critical role in the development of this behavior. The current study used structural equation modeling to evaluate the fit of a theoretical model specifying body…

  7. Body Image as a Mediator of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Brausch, Amy M.

    2012-01-01

    Attitudes towards the body have been largely overlooked as a potential risk factor for adolescent non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) despite theorizing that a negative body image may play a critical role in the development of this behavior. The current study used structural equation modeling to evaluate the fit of a theoretical model specifying body…

  8. Non-suicidal self-injury and other self-directed violent behaviors in India: A review of definitions and research.

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    Gandhi, Amarendra; Luyckx, Koen; Maitra, Shubhada; Claes, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    The interpersonal theory of suicide suggests that most forms of self-directed violent behaviors lie on a continuum, with each behavior successively increasing the capability of committing suicide. There is increasing evidence to suggest that the continuum may begin with Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI). This theory can be important in developing interventions for suicide prevention. However, in India, consistent usage of definitions of various forms of self-directed violent behaviors is lacking. In the present study, we reviewed definitions of various forms of self-directed violent behaviors that have been investigated in India. Further, we compared the usage of these definitions with the usage by WHO. Additionally, we reviewed NSSI research in India. Thirty-eight publications were identified by a comprehensive electronic search undertaken in Indian psychiatry, psychology, and mental health-related databases. Inconsistent definitions of eight self-directed violent behaviors were observed in Indian literature. Agreement on consistent definitions of various forms of self-directed behaviors is essential. Based on the findings of the current review, it can be suggested that culturally relevant large-scale research on NSSI in India is required to confirm the limited evidence that suggests high prevalence of NSSI in India.

  9. Untended wounds: Non-suicidal self-injury in adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Brenna B; Trubanova, Andrea; White, Susan W

    2016-05-12

    Recent studies have examined non-suicidal self-injury in community and clinical samples, but there is no published research on non-suicidal self-injury in individuals with autism spectrum disorder. This lack of research is surprising, since individuals with autism spectrum disorder have high rates of risk factors for non-suicidal self-injury, including depression and poor emotion regulation skills. Using an online survey, we examined non-suicidal self-injury methods, frequency, severity, functions, and initial motivations in adults with autism spectrum disorder (n = 42). We also compared their non-suicidal self-injury characteristics to those of a gender-matched group of adults without autism spectrum disorder (n = 42). Of the participants with autism spectrum disorder, 50% reported a history of non-suicidal self-injury. This proportion is higher than non-suicidal self-injury rates previously reported for college students, adult community samples, and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder, which suggests that adults with autism spectrum disorder have increased risk for engaging in non-suicidal self-injury. Women with autism spectrum disorder were significantly more likely to endorse non-suicidal self-injury, relative to men with autism spectrum disorder. A history of non-suicidal self-injury was not related to current depression or emotion dysregulation for the participants with autism spectrum disorder. Non-suicidal self-injury characteristics among the adults with autism spectrum disorder were similar to non-suicidal self-injury in adults without autism spectrum disorder. These preliminary findings highlight the need for increased awareness and further research about non-suicidal self-injury within autism spectrum disorder.

  10. Behavioral and emotional responses to interpersonal stress: A comparison of adolescents engaged in non-suicidal self-injury to adolescent suicide attempters.

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    Kim, Kerri L; Cushman, Grace K; Weissman, Alexandra B; Puzia, Megan E; Wegbreit, Ezra; Tone, Erin B; Spirito, Anthony; Dickstein, Daniel P

    2015-08-30

    Prominent theoretical models and existing data implicate interpersonal factors in the development and maintenance of suicidal behavior and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). However, no known study has yet used computerized behavioral tasks to objectively assess responses to interpersonal conflict/collaboration among teens engaged in NSSI or having made a suicide attempt. The current study, therefore, compared interpersonal functioning indexed by the Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) task among three mutually exclusive groups, adolescents (ages 13-17): engaged in NSSI only without history of a suicide attempt (n=26); who made a suicide attempt without history of NSSI (n=26); and typically developing controls (n=26). Participants also completed the Interpersonal Sensitivity Measure to assess their general sensitivity to/awareness of others' behaviors and feelings. No significant between-group differences were found in PD task performance; however, compared to typically developing control participants and those who had made a suicide attempt, the NSSI group reported significantly more stress during the task. Additionally, NSSI participants rated themselves as more interpersonally sensitive compared to both attempters and typically developing controls. Given the lack of knowledge about whether these groups either differentially activate the same circuitry during stressful interpersonal interactions or instead rely on alternative, compensatory circuits, future work using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging is warranted.

  11. Cognitive and Emotion-Regulatory Mediators of the Relationship between Behavioral Approach System Sensitivity and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Taylor A.; Stange, Jonathan P.; Hamilton, Jessica L.; Cohen, Jonah N.; O’Garro-Moore, Jared; Daryanani, Issar; Abramson, Lyn Y.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2014-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is highly prevalent among late adolescents and predicts the onset of suicidal ideation and behavior. Although research has established an association between the behavioral approach system (BAS) and NSSI, less research has explored mechanisms underlying this relationship. The authors examined negative and positive emotion regulation patterns, as well as the BAS-relevant cognitive style of self-criticism, as potential mechanisms through which a hypersensitive BAS might be related to NSSI frequency. Late adolescents (N=177) with high and moderate BAS levels completed measures of self-criticism, positive emotion regulation, brooding, and both lifetime and last year frequency of NSSI. Results indicated that self-criticism and positive emotion dampening independently mediated the relationship between BAS and last year frequency of NSSI. Self-criticism also mediated the relationship between BAS and lifetime frequency of NSSI. Results suggest that cognitive and emotion-regulatory styles may help to explain why high BAS individuals are likely to engage in NSSI. PMID:25443691

  12. [Non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents: current issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Olga Lili; Mészáros, Gergely; Balázs, Judit

    2015-03-01

    Although non-suicidal self-injury (NNSI), a behavior with a typical onset during adolescence, is a well-researched topic in the international literature and affects numerous adolescents both in clinical and non-clinical populations, it is rarely studied in Hungary. The aim of our paper is to review the historical and cultural background, terms and definitions used in the international and Hungarian literature, the epidemiology, the psychosocial correlates and the theories for possible predictors and functions of NSSI. Terms and definitions for NSSI evolved in international but not in Hungarian literature. Most frequently found functions for NSSI were affect regulation, self-punishment, anti-suicide, anti-dissociation. NSSI is also used to affirm interpersonal boundaries, for sensation seeking and to influence others. Prevalence of NSSI is 15-46% in community and 40-80% in clinical sample in adolescents. Hungarian results on prevalence of NSSI are relatively low in comparison with international data (7-17% in adolescent community sample). NSSI is often associated with psychiatric disorders: DSM-IV Axis I disorders are present in 88% and Axis II disorders are present in 67% of adolescent self-injurer samples. NSSI and suicidal behavior are two different but not independent phenomena: correlation is approximately 50% in community and 70% in clinical population. In conclusion we would like to highlight that NSSI affects numerous adolescents and it is often comorbid with other psychiatric disorders, thus developing adequate Hungarian terminology, increasing the amount of Hungarian studies and the up-to-date knowledge of the clinicians are necessary.

  13. Non-suicidal self-injury and depressive symptoms during middle adolescence: a longitudinal analysis.

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    Marshall, Sheila K; Tilton-Weaver, Lauree C; Stattin, Håkan

    2013-08-01

    Previous research has shown a consistent positive association between non-suicidal self-injury and depressive symptoms. However, the direction of the effects has not been examined. To understand whether non-suicidal self-injury predicts depressive symptoms or vice versa, we examined the relations between non-suicidal self-injury and depressive symptoms across three waves of self-report data collected 1 year apart from 506 Swedish adolescents (47% girls; M age = 13.21; SD = .57) who were attending 7th grade at the onset of the study. The results suggest that depressive symptoms predict increases in non-suicidal self-injury 1 year later between the first and second waves of the study. Between the second and third waves of the study depressive symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury were significantly correlated indicating co-occurrence with no direction of effect rather than depressive symptoms predicting non-suicidal self-injury or vice versa. Group comparisons revealed no differences for boys and girls. The findings help clarify the relationships between non-suicidal self-injury and depressive symptoms during middle adolescence.

  14. [Non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts: grounding of differential diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitkowski, D; Petermann, F

    2010-01-01

    Three criteria for differential diagnosis of non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts were validated by means of more recent empirical studies. Criteria concerning motives (functions), methods of self-injury (medical severity), lifetime frequency and lifetime number of episodes were investigated. Literature research showed only a few studies concentrated on a direct comparison of non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts. Therefore, studies examing the relationship of suicide intent to the relevant features, are considered, too. Empirical results concerning motives (functions), methods (medical severity), lifetime frequency and number of episodes were compared to the three criteria. Except for lifetime frequency, studies support the criteria. However, in the case of motives, a more differentiated examination is needed to distinguish between non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts. To optimize the assessment, guidelines should be slightly modified. Because of the phenomenological overlap of non-suicidal self-injury and suicide attempts, a dimensional assessment can be helpful.

  15. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Interpersonal Violence in Suicide Attempters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlin, Hanna; Moberg, Tomas; Hirvikoski, Tatja; Jokinen, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    The current study compared characteristics of suicidal behavior and interpersonal violence in suicide attempters with and without a history of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). A total of 100 suicide attempters were assessed with Karolinska Interpersonal Violence Scale (KIVS) and Karolinska Suicide History Interview concerning interpersonal violence and NSSI. There was a high degree of comorbid NSSI in suicide attempters (44%). Suicide attempters with NSSI-history reported more interpersonal violence as adults and more severe suicidal behavior compared to suicide attempters without NSSI. Comorbid NSSI was related to severity of suicidal behavior in a gender specific manner. Comorbid NSSI in suicide attempters may increase suicide and violence risk.

  16. Differences in psychological symptoms and self-competencies in non-suicidal self-injurious Flemish adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baetens, Imke; Claes, Laurence; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer; Grietens, Hans; Onghena, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine differences in psychological symptoms and sense of self-competence between adolescents with and without non-suicidal self-injurious behavior. We collected data in a sample of 281 Flemish adolescents. Psychological symptoms and self-competencies were assess

  17. Suicide Probability in Adolescents With a History of Childhood Maltreatment: The Role of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury, Emotion Regulation Difficulties, and Forms of Self-Criticism

    OpenAIRE

    Khanipour; Hakim shooshtari; Bidaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Suicidal attempt and non-suicidal self-injury are very common in adolescents with a history of childhood maltreatment. By identifying correlates of these kinds of high-risk behaviors, it is possible to prevent and decrease completed suicide. Objectives The aims of this study were: 1) to compare adolescents with a history of childhood maltreatment with non-suicidal self injury (NSSI) or past suicidal attempt in terms of ...

  18. Invited Commentary: Understanding Brain Mechanisms of Pain Processing in Adolescents' Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Elizabeth; Bosk, Abigail; Pao, Maryland

    2010-01-01

    Whereas non-suicidal self injury (NSSI) is reported in 13-23% of adolescents and is an increasingly studied topic, there has been little investigation into the pathophysiology behind self-injury. This commentary examines recent research into pain and emotional distress to discuss implications for the manner we should understand, research, and…

  19. The effects of non-suicidal self-injury on parenting behaviors: a longitudinal analyses of the perspective of the parent

    OpenAIRE

    Baetens, Imke; Claes, Laurence; Onghena, Patrick; Grietens, Hans; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Pieters, Ciska; Wiersema, Jan R.; Griffith, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study is the first to examine predictors and consequences of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescence using parent-reported data in a longitudinal design. Across three time points, we examined the reciprocal effects of parent-reported parenting behaviors as they are related to adolescents' NSSI. Methods: The present study is a three-wave prospective study in a large sample of community adolescents and their parents. At time 1 (age 12), the sample consisted of...

  20. The association of genetic predisposition to depressive symptoms with non-suicidal and suicidal self-injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewski, D.F.; Renteria, M.E.; Abdellaoui, A.; Medland, S.E.; Few, L.R.; Gordon, S.D.; Madden, P.A.F.; Montgomery, G.W.; Trull, T.J.; Heath, A.C.; Statham, D.J.; Martin, N.G.; Zietsch, B.P.; Verweij, K.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Non-suicidal and suicidal self-injury are very destructive, yet surprisingly common behaviours. Depressed mood is a major risk factor for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. We conducted a genetic risk prediction study to examine the polygenic overlap of depressi

  1. Self-Injurious Behavior and Suicide Attempts among Indonesian College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresno, Fiona; Ito, Yoshimi; Mearns, Jack

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the prevalence of self-injurious behavior and suicide attempts among college students in Indonesia and examines risk factors distinguishing between 3 groups: self-injury with suicide attempt, non-suicidal self-injury, and non-self-injury. Self-report questionnaires measuring self-injury and suicide attempts, negative mood…

  2. The mediating role of non-suicidal self-injury in the relationship between impulsivity and suicidal behavior among inpatients receiving treatment for substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anestis, Michael D; Tull, Matthew T; Lavender, Jason M; Gratz, Kim L

    2014-08-15

    Several theories posit a direct role of impulsivity in suicidal behavior. The interpersonal-psychological theory of suicidal behavior (IPTS) argues that the relationship between impulsivity and suicidal behavior is explained by the painful and/or provocative experiences (PPEs) often encountered by impulsive individuals. It thus seems plausible that nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), itself associated with impulsivity, might account for the relationship between impulsivity and suicidal behavior. We examined data from 93 adult inpatients (54.8% male) seeking treatment for substance use disorders. Patients completed a structured interview assessing prior suicidal behavior and a series of self-report questionnaires examining impulsivity, NSSI, and psychopathology. Four impulsivity dimensions (negative urgency, positive urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance) were associated with lifetime number of suicide attempts and/or suicide potential. Furthermore, results supported our hypotheses, as all but one relation was better accounted for by NSSI and, in the one exception, the direct effect was non-significant. Findings are consistent with the IPTS and suggest that suicidal behavior may not be a direct manifestation of impulsivity, but facilitated through exposure to PPEs capable of altering an individual׳s relationship to pain and fear of death.

  3. Is non-suicidal self-injury an "addiction"? A comparison of craving in substance use and non-suicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Sarah Elizabeth; Glenn, Catherine Rose; Klonsky, Elisha David

    2012-05-15

    There is debate among researchers regarding the most appropriate conceptual model of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Some argue that NSSI is best viewed within an addictions framework. Because craving of substances is a key concept in the addictions literature, we sought to compare the nature of craving in NSSI and substance use. Measures of NSSI, substance use, and craving were administered to a sample of adolescents (n=58) receiving psychiatric treatment. It was found that total craving scores were significantly lower for NSSI than for substances. Item-level analyses suggested that substances are craved in a variety of contexts, whereas NSSI is typically craved in the context of negative emotions. The pattern of results remained the same when analyses were limited to patients who engaged in both NSSI and substance use. Thus, findings appear to be due to differences in the nature of the behaviors themselves rather than to individual differences between those who engage in NSSI or use substances. We conclude that, while both behaviors have powerful reinforcement contingencies, NSSI appears to be almost exclusively maintained by negative reinforcement (e.g., the reduction of aversive emotions). Findings are more consistent with emotion regulation than addiction models of NSSI.

  4. Interactive Family Dynamics and Non-suicidal Self-Injury in Psychiatric Adolescent Patients: A Single Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, Michela; Miscioscia, Marina; Sisti, Marta; Comis, Ilaria; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) is a common, multifaceted phenomenon among adolescents. Recent researchers have shown that a number of psychological and psychiatric correlates are implicated in the onset/repetition of NSSI, but those previous studies did not directly observe the family interaction patterns of this clinical population. In this paper, the quality of family interactions was observed using the Lausanne Trilogue Play procedure to deepen the specific interactive dimensions associated with NSSI in adolescents. The results of a single case study showed a lack of positive emotional exchanges, a parenting style expressing hostility, a high level of control and difficulties in triangulation. Through this method, the authors show that a better understanding of the role of family interactions is crucial and could improve the assessment and treatment of Non-Suicidal Self-Injurious behaviors. Research and clinical implications are discussed.

  5. Interactive Family Dynamics and Non-suicidal Self-Injury in Psychiatric Adolescent Patients: A Single Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatta, Michela; Miscioscia, Marina; Sisti, Marta; Comis, Ilaria; Battistella, Pier Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) is a common, multifaceted phenomenon among adolescents. Recent researchers have shown that a number of psychological and psychiatric correlates are implicated in the onset/repetition of NSSI, but those previous studies did not directly observe the family interaction patterns of this clinical population. In this paper, the quality of family interactions was observed using the Lausanne Trilogue Play procedure to deepen the specific interactive dimensions associated with NSSI in adolescents. The results of a single case study showed a lack of positive emotional exchanges, a parenting style expressing hostility, a high level of control and difficulties in triangulation. Through this method, the authors show that a better understanding of the role of family interactions is crucial and could improve the assessment and treatment of Non-Suicidal Self-Injurious behaviors. Research and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:28220084

  6. Negative life events and non-suicidal self-injury in an adolescent inpatient sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Richard T; Frazier, Elisabeth A; Cataldo, Andrea M; Simon, Valerie A; Spirito, Anthony; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2014-01-01

    Although life stressors have been implicated in the aetiology of various forms of psychopathology related to non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), particularly depression and suicidal behavior, they have rarely been examined in relation with NSSI. The objective of the current study was to assess the association between life stressors and NSSI in adolescent inpatients. Adolescent inpatients (n = 110) completed measures of life events, NSSI, and depressive symptoms at 3 time-points over a 9-month period. Higher rates of life stressors were significantly associated with greater NSSI. This finding held even after covarying concurrent depressive symptoms and gender. Life stressors may have a unique role in the pathogenesis of NSSI. Directions for future research and clinical implications are discussed.

  7. Predicting Persistence of Non-suicidal Self-Injury in Suicidal Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Shirley; Kuehn, Kevin; Melvin, Caitlin; Weinstock, Lauren M.; Andover, Margaret S.; Selby, Edward A.; Solomon, Joel B.; Spirito, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This study examined prospective predictors of persistent non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit for suicidal behaviors and followed naturalistically for six months. Seventy-one (77%) participants reported NSSI at baseline and 40 (56%) persisted at the six month follow-up. Those who endorsed automatic positive reinforcement (APR) as the predominant reason for NSSI, were more likely to persist in NSSI. Depression over follow-up, but not at baseline, also predicted persistence. These results suggest that helping high risk adolescents to identify alternative ways of generating emotion(s) to counter the effects of APR that may accompany NSSI, should be a high priority treatment target. PMID:25907682

  8. Understanding Non-Suicidal Self-Injury: Perceptions of School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Chris; Armstrong, Stephen A.; Couch, Lisa; Bore, Samuel K.

    2010-01-01

    This national exploratory study examined the perceptions of secondary school counselors' (n = 81) understanding of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Two one-way ANOVAs revealed no statistically significant differences between middle and high school counselors on their perceptions of the prevalence of NSSI. Descriptive analyses revealed that a…

  9. How Do People Stop Non-Suicidal Self-Injury? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummé, Tess Alexandra; Mildred, Helen; Knight, Tess

    2016-08-16

    The current paper reviews extant quantitative and qualitative literature into how Non-Suicidal Self-Injury cessation occurs, and individuals' experiences of stopping. Specific search criteria utilizing a PRISMA format were used across 5 databases, which resulted in 454 papers being identified. After utilizing exclusion criteria and then review, nine of the 454 papers identified were retained for extensive synthesis and critique.

  10. Perceived Dimensions of Parenting and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Jean-Francois; Martin, Jodi; Freynet, Nathalie; Poirier, Alexane Ali; Lafontaine, Marie-France; Cloutier, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Family experiences are influential in the development of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). The current study aimed to identify specific dimensions underlying early parent-child relationships in association with NSSI. It was hypothesized that all relationship dimensions would be related with NSSI, with some dimensions being stronger predictors when…

  11. School Counsellors' Understanding of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury: Experiences and International Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Jamie M.; Heath, Nancy L.; Toste, Jessica R.; Ross, Shana

    2011-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a concern among professionals working with youth. The present study examined school counsellors' experiences, training and school preparedness, perceived knowledge, beliefs, and intervention approaches related to NSSI. Participants were 470 school counsellors (417 female, 53 male) from across North America (156…

  12. Safety First: The Role of Trust and School Safety in Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Rick Nelson; Sornberger, Michael J.; Toste, Jessica R.; Heath, Nancy L.; McLouth, Rusty

    2011-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) has become very prominent among adolescents in middle and high school settings. However, little research has evaluated the role of the school environment in the behaviour. This study examined whether indices of school trust and perceived safety were predictive of NSSI behaviour. Results indicate that these variables…

  13. Non-suicidal self-injury among Dutch and Belgian adolescents: Personality, stress and coping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiekens, G.; Bruffaerts, R.; Nock, M.K.; Ven, M.O.M. van de; Witteman, C.L.M.; Mortier, P.; Demyttenaere, K.; Claes, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examines: (1) the prevalence of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) among Dutch and Belgian adolescents, (2) the associations between Big Five personality traits and NSSI engagement/versatility (i.e., number of NSSI methods), and (3) whether these associations are mediated by perce

  14. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Indirect Self-Harm among Danish High School Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Bo; la Cour, Peter; Skandsen, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Background: Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and indirect self-harm are prevalent among adolescents, but it is rare to see them described as related topics. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is a correlation between the frequencies of NSSI and indirect self...

  15. Adolescents' Perspectives of Youth Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Emily; Hasking, Penelope; Martin, Graham

    2017-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is of increasing concern, yet many adolescents who self-injure are reluctant to seek professional help. Instead, they turn to friends for support, although it is unclear what these friends can offer. This study aimed to identify adolescents' views of how peers and online friends can help young people who…

  16. Non-suicidal self-injury among Dutch and Belgian adolescents: Personality, stress and coping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiekens, G.; Bruffaerts, R.; Nock, M.K.; Ven, M.O.M. van de; Witteman, C.L.M.; Mortier, P.; Demyttenaere, K.; Claes, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examines: (1) the prevalence of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) among Dutch and Belgian adolescents, (2) the associations between Big Five personality traits and NSSI engagement/versatility (i.e., number of NSSI methods), and (3) whether these associations are mediated by perce

  17. Perceived Parental Monitoring and Sexual Orientation Moderate Lifetime Acts of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benau, Erik M; Jenkins, Abigail L; Conner, Bradley T

    2016-05-02

    Being non-heterosexual, particularly bisexual, is associated with high rates of engagement in NSSI amongst young adults. The goal of the present study was to determine if parenting practices, specifically parental monitoring, and sexual orientation moderate engagement with NSSI. Undergraduates (N = 1,353) completed a survey on sexual orientation, non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) acts, and multiple aspects of perceived parental monitoring during high school. Moderation analyses revealed that most facets of parental monitoring were similarly negatively correlated with NSSI for both individuals whose sexual orientation where nearly, or entirely, gay and heterosexual youth. Youth who were neither exclusively heterosexual nor exclusively gay (mixed sexual orientation) reported the most NSSI acts, and no facet of parental monitoring predicted reduced NSSI acts for this group. While previous literature shows that many aspects of parental monitoring may be protective against engagement in health risk behaviors, the present study adds to these findings that similar aspects are negatively associated with self-injurious behavior for some, but not all, individuals. More research is needed to better understand the causes of increased NSSI for individuals with a mixed sexual orientation.

  18. Clinical Correlates of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) in an Outpatient Sample of Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Nieto, Rebeca; Carballo, Juan J; Díaz de Neira Hernando, Mónica; de León-Martinez, Victoria; Baca-García, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents is a major public health concern. The first goal of our study was to describe the characteristics and functions of NSSI and NSSI thoughts in an adolescent outpatient sample. The second goal was to examine which clinical factors discriminate between these two groups of patients. A group of 267 subjects was recruited from the Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatric Services, Jiménez Díaz Foundation (Madrid, Spain) from November 2011 to October 2012. All participants were administered the Spanish version of the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview (SITBI). A total of 21.7% of patients reported having engaged in NSSI at least once in their lifetime. The most strongly endorsed function for NSSI was automatic negative reinforcement. In comparison with patients in the NSSI Thoughts group and the control group, patients in the NSSI group scored higher in Internalization of Anger and in all the scales comprising the Children's Depression Inventory. Our findings on the prevalence and functions of NSSI are consistent with the literature. NSSI was mainly performed for emotion regulation purposes; specifically, NSSI seems to be used to cope with anger and depression. In addition, internalization of anger might play a significant role in the maintenance of this behavior.

  19. The co-occurrence of non-suicidal self-injury and attempted suicide among adolescents: distinguishing risk factors and psychosocial correlates

    OpenAIRE

    Andover Margaret S; Morris Blair W; Wren Abigail; Bruzzese Margaux E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Although attempted suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) are distinct behaviors differing in intent, form, and function, the behaviors co-occur at a high rate in both adults and adolescents. Researchers have begun to investigate the association between attempted suicide and NSSI among adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to present current research on this association. First, we discuss definitional issues associated with self-injurious behaviors. Next, we present research...

  20. Correlates of Non-suicidal Self-injury and Suicide Attempts in Bulimic Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Gómez-Expósito

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the implication of personality, impulsivity, and emotion regulation difficulties in patients with a bulimic-spectrum disorder (BSD and suicide attempts (SA, BSD patients with non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI, and BSD patients without these behaviors. Method: 122 female adult BSD patients were assessed using self-report questionnaires. Patients were clustered post-hoc into three groups depending on whether they presented BSD without NSSI or SA (BSD, BSD with lifetime NSSI (BSD+NSSI or BSD with lifetime SA (BSD+SA. Results: The BSD+NSSI and BSD+SA groups presented more emotion regulation difficulties, more eating and general psychopathology, and increased reward dependence in comparison with the BSD group. In addition, BSD+SA patients specifically showed problems with impulse control, while also presenting higher impulsivity than both the BSD and BSD+NSSI groups. No differences in impulsivity between the BSD and BSD+NSSI groups were found. Conclusions: The results show that BSD + NSSI and BSD+SA share a common profile characterized by difficulties in emotion regulation and low reward dependence, but differ in impulsivity and cooperativeness. This suggests that self-injury, in patients without a history of suicide attempts (i.e. BSD+NSSI, may have a regulatory role rather than being due to impulsivity.

  1. The role of parental psychopathology and personality in adolescent non-suicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromatsky, Molly A; Waszczuk, Monika A; Perlman, Greg; Salis, Katie Lee; Klein, Daniel N; Kotov, Roman

    2017-02-01

    Adolescent non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), a significant risk factor for suicidal behavior, is strongly associated with adolescent psychopathology and personality traits, particularly those characterized by poor self-regulation. Some parental psychopathology and personality traits have also been identified as risk factors for adolescent NSSI, but specific parental characteristics and mechanisms involved in this association have not been systematically examined. The current study comprehensively investigated the contribution of parental psychopathology and personality to adolescent NSSI using data from the baseline wave of the Adolescent Development of Emotion and Personality Traits (ADEPT) study of 550 adolescent girls (mean age = 14.39 years, SD = 0.63) and their biological parents. We first investigated whether parental lifetime psychiatric diagnoses, and personality and clinical (rumination, self-criticism, emotional reliance) traits were associated with adolescent NSSI. We also tested whether adolescent history of psychiatric illness, personality, and clinical traits mediated the associations between parental characteristics and adolescent NSSI. Parental substance use disorder, adult-ADHD symptoms, self-criticism, and lower agreeableness and conscientiousness were associated with offspring's NSSI. These associations were mediated through adolescent characteristics. In contrast, parental mood and anxiety disorders and neuroticism were unrelated to adolescent NSSI. The results suggest that parental traits and disorders characterized by self-regulatory difficulties and lack of support constitute risk factors for self-injury in adolescent girls, acting via adolescent traits. This demonstrates that parental influences play a significant role in the etiology of adolescent NSSI.

  2. Correlates of Non-suicidal Self-Injury and Suicide Attempts in Bulimic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Expósito, Alexandra; Wolz, Ines; Fagundo, Ana B.; Granero, Roser; Steward, Trevor; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Agüera, Zaida; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the implication of personality, impulsivity, and emotion regulation difficulties in patients with a bulimic-spectrum disorder (BSD) and suicide attempts (SA), BSD patients with non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), and BSD patients without these behaviors. Method: One hundred and twenty-two female adult BSD patients were assessed using self-report questionnaires. Patients were clustered post-hoc into three groups depending on whether they presented BSD without NSSI or SA (BSD), BSD with lifetime NSSI (BSD + NSSI) or BSD with lifetime SA (BSD + SA). Results: The BSD + NSSI and BSD + SA groups presented more emotion regulation difficulties, more eating and general psychopathology, and increased reward dependence in comparison with the BSD group. In addition, BSD + SA patients specifically showed problems with impulse control, while also presenting higher impulsivity than both the BSD and BSD + NSSI groups. No differences in impulsivity between the BSD and BSD + NSSI groups were found. Conclusions: The results show that BSD + NSSI and BSD + SA share a common profile characterized by difficulties in emotion regulation and low reward dependence, but differ in impulsivity and cooperativeness. This suggests that self-injury, in patients without a history of suicide attempts (i.e., BSD + NSSI), may have a regulatory role rather than being due to impulsivity. PMID:27597836

  3. Correlates of Non-suicidal Self-Injury and Suicide Attempts in Bulimic Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Expósito, Alexandra; Wolz, Ines; Fagundo, Ana B; Granero, Roser; Steward, Trevor; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Agüera, Zaida; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the implication of personality, impulsivity, and emotion regulation difficulties in patients with a bulimic-spectrum disorder (BSD) and suicide attempts (SA), BSD patients with non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), and BSD patients without these behaviors. One hundred and twenty-two female adult BSD patients were assessed using self-report questionnaires. Patients were clustered post-hoc into three groups depending on whether they presented BSD without NSSI or SA (BSD), BSD with lifetime NSSI (BSD + NSSI) or BSD with lifetime SA (BSD + SA). The BSD + NSSI and BSD + SA groups presented more emotion regulation difficulties, more eating and general psychopathology, and increased reward dependence in comparison with the BSD group. In addition, BSD + SA patients specifically showed problems with impulse control, while also presenting higher impulsivity than both the BSD and BSD + NSSI groups. No differences in impulsivity between the BSD and BSD + NSSI groups were found. The results show that BSD + NSSI and BSD + SA share a common profile characterized by difficulties in emotion regulation and low reward dependence, but differ in impulsivity and cooperativeness. This suggests that self-injury, in patients without a history of suicide attempts (i.e., BSD + NSSI), may have a regulatory role rather than being due to impulsivity.

  4. Non-suicidal self-injury among children with hearing loss and intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Bushra; Tariq, Amina; Rafi, Zeeshan

    2017-10-01

    To find the prevalence and to identify the predictors of non-suicidal self-injury among school-going children.. This cross-sectional study was conducted at the University of Gujrat, Gujrat Pakistan, from September 2015 to October 2016, and comprised children with intellectual disability and hearing loss. Participants were recruited from schools for special children located in Gujranwala, Jhelum and Gujrat. Multistage stratified sampling technique was used. Of the 325 children, 178(50.4%) had intellectual disability and 175(49.6%) had hearing loss. Findings indicated that the prevalence of self-injurious behaviour was higher in children with intellectual disability 48(27%) compared to their counterparts with hearing loss 3(2%). Neural network, when administered on whole data set, indicated type of disability 0.474(100%), education/training 0.99(20.9%) and access of counselling 0.114(24%) as important predictors of non-suicidal self-injury in both groups. On the other hand, the degree of disability (hearing loss 0.42[100%]; intellectual disability 0.32[100%]), education/ training (hearing loss 0.18[43%]; intellectual disability 0.27[84.5%]) and access of counselling (hearing loss 0.175[41.8%]; intellectual disability 0.256[78.7%]) were important predictors of non-suicidal self-injury among the participants, when neural network was run on the split files on the basis of disability. The prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury among children with intellectual disability was higher as compared to those with hearing loss.

  5. Clinical specificity of acute versus chronic self-injury: measurement and evaluation of repetitive non-suicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Maura; Presaghi, Fabio; Cerutti, Rita

    2014-01-30

    Overall, previous studies on the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) behaviors in the general population have stressed the importance of differentiating between occasional and repetitive NSSI, examining different severity levels (e.g., frequency and variety of methods), as well as investigating the diverse psychopathological correlates of NSSI. However, existing NSSI measures have not been explicitly developed by to comply with the NSSI diagnostic criteria proposed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The purpose of this study is to develop a measure of repetitive NSSI by considering its essential features, as described in the proposed DSM-5 as well as in other clinically relevant aspects emerging from case reports. Two independent samples of participants (N1=383 young adults and 251 adolescents; N2=953 adolescents) belonging to the general population were involved in the present study. The questionnaire showed satisfactory fit statistics and reliably discriminated between occasional and repetitive self-injurers (Area Under Curve, AUC=0.755). The pattern of correlations with psychopathological measures confirmed a more clinically-compromised profile for repetitive rather than occasional self-injurers.

  6. Psychotherapeutic approaches to non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Washburn Jason J; Richardt Sarah L; Styer Denise M; Gebhardt Michelle; Juzwin K R; Yourek Adrienne; Aldridge Delia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents is gaining increasing attention in both clinical and scientific arenas. The lifetime prevalence of NSSI is estimated to vary between 7.5% to 8% for preadolescents, increasing to between 12% and 23% for adolescents. Despite the prevalence and the increasing interest in NSSI, few psychotherapeutic treatments have been designed specifically for NSSI, and no treatments have been evaluated specifically for the treatment of NSSI among adole...

  7. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury: The Movie Industry's Influence on Its Stigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymondy, Courtney M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI is a concerning behavior disproportionately affecting adolescents today. Rates of NSSI have increased, as have depictions of NSSI in the media. Therefore, some researchers believe that increased media exposure is contributing to increased rates of NSSI. Research has shown that NSSI is a coping mechanism and/or a cry for help among those who display such behaviors. However, studies also show that many adolescents with this behavior do not seek help. This may be because persons engaging in NSSI feel that their behavior, thoughts, or feelings are stigmatized by the general population. The purpose of this study is twofold: first, to describe the level of stigma that currently exists among a college population; and second, to examine the relationship between popular media exposure to NSSI and perceptions, or stigma, toward NSSI. Seventy-eight college students completed a survey including a stigma measure, an exposure measure, and reacted to a vignette describing a scene from Catherine Hardwicke’s movie, Thirteen (2003. Analyses revealed the level of stigma was at a mid-level, and that it was not significantly related to reported level of movie media exposure.

  8. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adolescence: The Role of Shame, Self-Criticism and Fear of Self-Compassion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Ana; Pinto Gouveia, José; Cunha, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a serious and relatively prevalent problem in adolescence. Although several studies have identified risk factors for the aetiology and maintenance of NSSI, little is known about the impact of individual and contextual variables in such pervasive behaviors among adolescents. Objective: This paper aims…

  9. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adolescence: The Role of Shame, Self-Criticism and Fear of Self-Compassion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Ana; Pinto Gouveia, José; Cunha, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a serious and relatively prevalent problem in adolescence. Although several studies have identified risk factors for the aetiology and maintenance of NSSI, little is known about the impact of individual and contextual variables in such pervasive behaviors among adolescents. Objective: This paper aims…

  10. The roles of social stress and decision-making in non-suicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Heather T; Andover, Margaret S; Armey, Michael F

    2015-10-30

    Research suggests that individuals with a history of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) do not have difficulty generating alternatives to social problems but choose more negative solutions, suggesting a deficit in decision-making. However, studies report no significant differences in risky decision-making on a performance-based task among individuals with and without NSSI histories. A limitation of these studies is that decision-making was only assessed at baseline. As individuals with a history of NSSI typically self-injure when experiencing negative emotions, decision-making ability may become impaired specifically in the presence of these emotions. The aim of the current study was to investigate decision-making ability among individuals with and without NSSI histories both at baseline and following a distressing social exclusion task. We compared individuals with (n=48) and without (n=72) NSSI histories on the Iowa Gambling Task, a behavioral measure of risky decision-making, before and after exclusion or inclusion on the Cyberball task. Results indicated no significant group differences in performance regardless of condition. When participants were grouped by racial/ethnic minority status, results indicated that non-Hispanic White individuals with a history of NSSI exhibited deterioration in risky decision-making ability following social exclusion. Potential explanations for these findings and clinical implications are discussed.

  11. Poor sleep quality and nightmares are associated with non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianchen; Chen, Hua; Bo, Qi-Gui; Fan, Fang; Jia, Cun-Xian

    2017-03-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is prevalent and is associated with increased risk of suicidal behavior in adolescents. This study examined which sleep variables are associated with NSSI, independently from demographics and mental health problems in Chinese adolescents. Participants consisted of 2090 students sampled from three high schools in Shandong, China and had a mean age of 15.49 years. Participants completed a sleep and health questionnaire to report their demographic and family information, sleep duration and sleep problems, impulsiveness, hopelessness, internalizing and externalizing problems, and NSSI. A series of regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations between sleep variables and NSSI. Of the sample, 12.6 % reported having ever engaged in NSSI and 8.8 % engaged during the last year. Univariate logistic analyses demonstrated that multiple sleep variables including short sleep duration, insomnia symptoms, poor sleep quality, sleep insufficiency, unrefreshed sleep, sleep dissatisfaction, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, snoring, and nightmares were associated with increased risk of NSSI. After adjusting for demographic and mental health variables, NSSI was significantly associated with sleeping adolescents.

  12. Non-suicidal self-injury, attempted suicide, and suicidal intent among psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andover, Margaret S; Gibb, Brandon E

    2010-06-30

    Although attempted suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) differ in several important ways, a significant number of individuals report histories of both behaviors. The current study further examined the relations between NSSI and attempted suicide among psychiatric inpatients. Self-report questionnaires were administered to 117 psychiatric inpatients at a general hospital (M=39.45 years old, S.D.=12.84 years, range=17-73 years). We found that presence and number of NSSI episodes were significantly related to presence and number of suicide attempts. Supporting the importance of NSSI assessment, patients' history of NSSI (presence and frequency) was more strongly associated with history of suicide attempts than were patients' depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and symptoms of borderline personality disorder, and as strongly associated with suicide attempt history as current levels of suicidal ideation. Finally, among patients with a history of suicide attempts, those with an NSSI history reported significantly greater lethal intent for their most severe attempt, and patients' number of prior NSSI episodes was positively correlated with the level of lethal intent associated with their most severe suicide attempt.

  13. [Non-suicidal self-injury as autonomous diagnosis - implications for research and clinic of the DSM-5 proposal to establish the diagnosis of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plener, Paul L; Kapusta, Nestor D; Kölch, Michael G; Kaess, Michael; Brunner, Romuald

    2012-03-01

    In both classificatory systems DSM-IV and ICD-10 self-injury is a symptom of borderline personality disorder (BPD). But it has been shown empirically that self-injury can also occur independent of BPD, for example, as a component of depressive states or even in adolescents without classifiable psychopathology. The scientific discussion about future diagnostic criteria recently led to a proposal to include Non-Suicidal Self-Injury as an independent disorder in the upcoming DSM-5 classification system. Based on recent epidemiological studies of adolescents in Germany, one may assume that approximately 4% of all youths in middle to late adolescence would fulfill the prevalence criterion (criterion A) of the proposed DSM-5 disorder (that is, at least five self-injury incidents within the previous 12 months). A precise classification of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury based on empirical research is needed to further the research, treatment, and prevention of this diagnosis.

  14. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury-Does social support make a difference?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens Nygaard; Møhl, Bo; DePanfilis, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Teenagers and young adults who had experienced child maltreatment, being bullied in school and other serious life events have an increased risk of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI), but some individuals manage to escape serious stressful life events. The research question is: does social support make....... The survey obtained a 67% response rate (N=2,980). The incidence rate of NSSI among this sample was estimated at 2.7% among young adult respondents. Participants with a history of child maltreatment, being bullied in school or other traumatic life events reported a rate of NSSI 6 times greater than...

  15. The co-occurrence of non-suicidal self-injury and attempted suicide among adolescents: distinguishing risk factors and psychosocial correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andover, Margaret S; Morris, Blair W; Wren, Abigail; Bruzzese, Margaux E

    2012-03-30

    Although attempted suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) are distinct behaviors differing in intent, form, and function, the behaviors co-occur at a high rate in both adults and adolescents. Researchers have begun to investigate the association between attempted suicide and NSSI among adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to present current research on this association. First, we discuss definitional issues associated with self-injurious behaviors. Next, we present research on the co-occurrence of attempted suicide and NSSI, including prevalence and associations with self-injury characteristics. We then discuss psychosocial variables associated with engaging in both NSSI and attempted suicide or one type of self-injury alone. Finally, we present the research to date on risk factors uniquely associated with either attempted suicide or NSSI. Implications for mental health professionals and future avenues of research are discussed.

  16. The co-occurrence of non-suicidal self-injury and attempted suicide among adolescents: distinguishing risk factors and psychosocial correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andover Margaret S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although attempted suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI are distinct behaviors differing in intent, form, and function, the behaviors co-occur at a high rate in both adults and adolescents. Researchers have begun to investigate the association between attempted suicide and NSSI among adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to present current research on this association. First, we discuss definitional issues associated with self-injurious behaviors. Next, we present research on the co-occurrence of attempted suicide and NSSI, including prevalence and associations with self-injury characteristics. We then discuss psychosocial variables associated with engaging in both NSSI and attempted suicide or one type of self-injury alone. Finally, we present the research to date on risk factors uniquely associated with either attempted suicide or NSSI. Implications for mental health professionals and future avenues of research are discussed.

  17. Descriptive Characteristics and Initial Psychometric Properties of the Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Disorder Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Sarah E; Davis, Tchiki; Klonsky, E David

    2016-06-07

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is highly prevalent and associated with tissue damage, emotional distress, and psychiatric disorders. While often discussed in the context of Borderline Personality Disorder and suicide, research demonstrates that NSSI is distinct from these constructs and should be viewed as an independent diagnostic category. Recently, Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Disorder (NSSID) was included in the revised Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as a condition for further study. In this article, we describe the properties of a self-report measure designed to assess proposed criteria for NSSID. Undergraduate students at 2 large, public universities completed the NSSID Scale (NSSIDS) along with other measures of NSSI characteristics and psychopathology. Among participants with a history of NSSI, approximately half (54.55%) met diagnostic criteria for NSSID. Participants were most frequently excluded from an NSSID diagnosis on the basis of criterion A (frequency of NSSI) and criterion E (distress or impairment related to NSSI), while participants were least likely to be excluded from diagnosis on the basis of criterion D (NSSI method exclusions) and criterion F (diagnostic "rule-outs"). Consistent with previous literature, the most commonly reported precipitants to NSSI were negative feelings or thoughts (criterion C2). Participants who met criteria for NSSID reported more severe depression, anxiety, and NSSI than participants who engaged in NSSI but did not meet criteria for NSSID. These results support the use of the NSSIDS as a reliable and valid self-report measure of NSSID symptoms.

  18. Non-suicidal self-injury: clinical presentation, assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Katie; Ali, Parveen

    2016-09-28

    Non-suicidal self-injury is a common behaviour in adolescents and young adults, and may be associated with mental health disorders, risk of suicidal behaviour (ideation and attempts), and a need for clinical services. Nurses, in particular those working in emergency departments and mental health settings, have a crucial role in the assessment, treatment and care of individuals who have self-injured. It is essential for nurses to assess an individual's risk of more serious harm or accidental death, regardless of intent. It is also important to understand the variations in non-suicidal self-injurious behaviour in terms of its presentation, features and functions, to provide appropriate person-centred care. Nurses should assist individuals in identifying the triggers or cues for their behaviour, exploring treatment options, and monitoring their behaviour and risk in the long term. This article describes the profile of people who self-injure, and the issues related to assessment and management of such patients presenting in emergency departments. A description of who self-injures and why, and how people self-injure; developmental aspects of these behaviours, including short and long-term outcomes; and the available treatments is presented.

  19. The associations between non-suicidal self-injury and borderline personality disorder features among Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jianing; Leung, Freedom; Lai, Ching Man; Fu, Kei

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the relative importance of four major BPD features, that is, affective instability, disturbed interpersonal relationship, unstable sense of self, and behavioral impulsivity, in explaining the presence, initiation, repetition, and discontinuation of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among a 2-year follow-up sample of 4,782 (68.5% girls) Hong Kong Chinese secondary school students. Affective instability, disturbed interpersonal relationship and behavioral impulsivity were significantly associated with the presence of NSSI both concurrently and longitudinally. These three BPD features were also related to the future initiation of NSSI. On the other hand, only behavioral impulsivity made a significant contribution to the repetition of NSSI. Additionally, a lower level of affective instability was also associated with quitting NSSI. We discussed some possible mechanisms underlying the effects of different BPD features on different developmental stages of NSSI.

  20. Association of aggression and non-suicidal self injury: a school-based sample of adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Tang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI in adolescent has drawn increasing attention because it is associated with subsequent depression, drug abuse, anxiety disorders, and suicide. In the present study, we aimed to estimate the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI in a school-based sample of Chinese adolescents and to explore the association between aggression and NSSI. METHODS: This study was part of a nationwide study on aggression among adolescents in urban areas of China. A sample of 2907 school students including 1436 boys and 1471 girls were randomly selected in Guangdong Province, with their age ranging from 10 to 18 years old. NSSI, aggression, emotional management and other factors were measured by self-administrated questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate the association between aggression and NSSI, after adjustment for participants' emotional management, and other potential confounding variables. RESULTS: The one year self-reported prevalence of NSSI was 33.6%. Of them, 21.7% engaged in 'minor NSSI', 11.9% in 'moderate/severe NSSI'. 96.9% of self-injuries engaged in one to five different types of NSSI in the past year. Hostility, verbal and indirect aggression was significantly associated with self-reported NSSI after adjusting for other potential factors both in 'minor NSSI' and 'moderate/severe NSSI'. Hostility, verbal and indirect aggression was significantly associated with greater risk of 'minor NSSI' and 'moderate/severe NSSI' in those who had poor emotional management ability. CONCLUSION: These findings highlight a high prevalence of NSSI and indicate the importance of hostility, verbal and indirect aggression as potentially risk factor for NSSI among Chinese adolescents.

  1. Effects of rumination and optimism on the relationship between psychological distress and non-suicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Alicia K; Hasking, Penelope; Martin, Graham

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, increasing concern regarding non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents has prompted investigation of factors that may prevent this behavior. This study examined the relationship between psychological distress and NSSI in a community sample of adolescents, and the moderating effect of both optimism and rumination on this association. Two thousand five hundred seventy-two participants (12-18 years) completed self-report questionnaires assessing psychological distress, cognitive, and emotional characteristics, and NSSI history. Ten percent of the sample reported a history of NSSI, and as hypothesized, optimism moderated the relationship between psychological distress and NSSI; the association was only evident when optimism was low. Rumination was not found to moderate the relationship between psychological distress and NSSI. These findings highlight the utility of considering optimism in NSSI prevention and early intervention programs.

  2. Functions, Consequences, and Frequency of Non-suicidal Self-Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraff, Pooja D; Trujillo, Natasha; Pepper, Carolyn M

    2015-09-01

    We examined the correspondence between reported reasons and consequences for a specific act of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), and their relationship with lifetime NSSI frequency. College students with a history of NSSI (n = 52) indicated reasons for and consequences from their most recent NSSI episode. A match was coded when a reason and its corresponding consequence(s) were both endorsed by the participant. Reasons and consequences were significantly correlated, but their correspondence was not related to lifetime NSSI frequency. Automatic negative reasons explained lifetime NSSI frequency, but consequences and match between reasons and consequences did not. Reported reasons for NSSI may be more important in understanding maintenance of NSSI than either consequences or match.

  3. On the Creative Edge: Exploring Motivations for Creating Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Content Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seko, Yukari; Kidd, Sean A; Wiljer, David; McKenzie, Kwame J

    2015-10-01

    The last decade has witnessed an exponential growth in user-generated online content featuring Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI), including photography, digital video, poems, blogging, and drawings. Although the increasing visibility of NSSI content has evoked public concern over potential health risks, little research has investigated why people are drawn to create and publish such content. This article reports the findings from a qualitative analysis of online interviews with 17 individuals who produce NSSI content. A thematic analysis of participants' narratives identified two prominent motives: self-oriented motivation (to express self and creativity, to reflect on NSSI experience, to mitigate self-destructive urges) and social motivation (to support similar others, to seek out peers, to raise social awareness). Participants also reported a double-edged impact of NSSI content both as a trigger and a deterrent to NSSI.

  4. Brooding, Reflection, and Distraction: Relation to Non-Suicidal Self-Injury versus Suicide Attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco-Roman, Lillian; Jurska, Justyna; Quiñones, Victoria; Miranda, Regina

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the relation between cognitive response styles (i.e., brooding, reflection, distraction) and cognitive inflexibility in differentially predicting history of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) only, suicide attempt (SA) only, or both (NSSI + SA). College students (N = 352) completed self-report measures of rumination, distraction, and self-harm history, a diagnostic interview, and a computerized task measuring cognitive flexibility. Brooding uniquely predicted SA-only history, while reflection uniquely predicted history of NSSI-only and NSSI + SA. Distraction was associated with lower odds of NSSI-only and NSSI + SA. Cognitive inflexibility was not significantly associated with self-harm history. Cognitive vulnerabilities may help identify individuals who are at risk for self-harm and may differentiate between NSSI and SA.

  5. Psychotherapeutic approaches to non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Jason J; Richardt, Sarah L; Styer, Denise M; Gebhardt, Michelle; Juzwin, K R; Yourek, Adrienne; Aldridge, Delia

    2012-03-30

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents is gaining increasing attention in both clinical and scientific arenas. The lifetime prevalence of NSSI is estimated to vary between 7.5% to 8% for preadolescents, increasing to between 12% and 23% for adolescents. Despite the prevalence and the increasing interest in NSSI, few psychotherapeutic treatments have been designed specifically for NSSI, and no treatments have been evaluated specifically for the treatment of NSSI among adolescents. Consequently, child and adolescent clinicians are left with little evidence-based guidance for treating this challenging population. To provide some guidance, evaluations of treatments for adults with NSSI and for adolescents with related conditions, such as deliberate self-harm and borderline personality disorder, are reviewed. Clinical guidelines and resources are also discussed to assist with the gaps in the knowledge base for treatment of NSSI among adolescents.

  6. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury among Adolescents in Amman, Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanania, Joan W; Heath, Nancy L; Emery, Amber A; Toste, Jessica R; Daoud, Fawzi A

    2015-01-01

    While previous research has demonstrated cross-national differences in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), most studies to date have taken place in North America. The present study investigated the prevalence and characteristics of NSSI in a sample of 952 Jordanian adolescents (49.8% female) between the ages of 11-19 years. Participants completed a screening measure to assess occurrence of NSSI and its characteristics. Results indicate an overall lifetime prevalence of 22.6% (n = 215), with significantly more males (26.98%, n = 129) than females (18.14%, n = 86) reporting having engaged in NSSI at least once in their lifetime. This study provides empirical evidence that adolescent engagement in NSSI occurs at similar prevalence levels in Jordan, relative to North American samples, whereas gender comparisons of prevalence and characteristics revealed several differences.

  7. Non-suicidal self-injury in high school students: Associations with identity processes and statuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyckx, Koen; Gandhi, Amarendra; Bijttebier, Patricia; Claes, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) refers to the direct, deliberate destruction of one's body tissue without suicidal intent. Research has highlighted the importance of identity synthesis versus confusion for NSSI. However, the association with identity processes and statuses remains unknown. A total of 568 adolescents reported on NSSI, identity, anxiety, and depression. Although identity processes of identification with commitment (negatively) and ruminative exploration (positively) were related to NSSI variables, these relationships were no longer significant when controlling for anxiety and depression. When examining identity statuses (using cluster analysis), individuals who had engaged in NSSI in the past (but not currently) were more likely to be in the moratorium cluster and less likely to be in the achievement cluster. Individuals who were currently engaging in NSSI were more likely to be in the troubled diffusion cluster. Clinicians should be attentive to the complex interplay between identity and NSSI when treating adolescents.

  8. Psychotherapeutic approaches to non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washburn Jason J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI among adolescents is gaining increasing attention in both clinical and scientific arenas. The lifetime prevalence of NSSI is estimated to vary between 7.5% to 8% for preadolescents, increasing to between 12% and 23% for adolescents. Despite the prevalence and the increasing interest in NSSI, few psychotherapeutic treatments have been designed specifically for NSSI, and no treatments have been evaluated specifically for the treatment of NSSI among adolescents. Consequently, child and adolescent clinicians are left with little evidence-based guidance for treating this challenging population. To provide some guidance, evaluations of treatments for adults with NSSI and for adolescents with related conditions, such as deliberate self-harm and borderline personality disorder, are reviewed. Clinical guidelines and resources are also discussed to assist with the gaps in the knowledge base for treatment of NSSI among adolescents.

  9. Brooding, reflection, and distraction: Relation to non-suicidal self-injury versus suicide attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco-Roman, Lillian; Jurska, Justyna; Quiñones, Victoria; Miranda, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The present study examined the relation between cognitive response styles (i.e., brooding, reflection, distraction) and cognitive inflexibility in differentially predicting history of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) only, suicide attempt (SA) only, or both (NSSI+SA). Methods College students (N = 352) completed self-report measures of rumination, distraction, and self-harm history, a diagnostic interview, and a computerized task measuring cognitive flexibility. Results Brooding uniquely predicted SA-only history, while reflection uniquely predicted history of NSSI-only and NSSI+SA. Distraction was associated with lower odds of NSSI-only and NSSI+SA. Cognitive inflexibility was not significantly associated with self-harm history. Conclusion Cognitive vulnerabilities may help identify individuals who are at risk for self-harm and may differentiate between NSSI and SA. PMID:25517765

  10. Representations of non-suicidal self-injury in motion pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trewavas, Christopher; Hasking, Penelope; McAllister, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate representations of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in popular media. Forty-one motion pictures were viewed, coded, and analyzed. NSSI was correlated with mental illness, child maltreatment, and substance abuse. NSSI was generally portrayed as severe, habitual and covert. Further, depictions of NSSI were often sensationalized and featured prominently. NSSI was less likely to be associated with completed suicide than other psychological factors, but more closely associated with suicide than NSSI is in the community. Although NSSI was associated with psychiatric illness, few characters were receiving psychiatric care at the time of NSSI. However a significant proportion received support after engaging in NSSI. The portrayal of NSSI is generally accurate regarding correlates and function, but is inaccurately associated with suicide. Implications of the relatively accurate portrayal of NSSI are discussed in light of the potential for imitation, and the possibility of using cinematherapy to promote effective problem resolution.

  11. The Influence of Romantic Attachment and Intimate Partner Violence on Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Christine; Lafontaine, Marie-France; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Cloutier, Paula; Dandurand, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    Several theoretical models for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) have been proposed. Despite an abundance of theoretical speculation, few empirical studies have examined the impact of intimate relationship functioning on NSSI. The present study examines the influence of romantic attachment and received intimate partner violence (physical,…

  12. The Role of Cognitive Distortion in the Relationship between Abuse, Assault, and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weismoore, Julie T.; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between childhood abuse, assault, cognitive distortion, and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a clinical adolescent sample. The sample included one hundred eighty-five psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents and their parents. Adolescent participants were predominantly female (71.4%),…

  13. A Multiple Mediational Test of the Relationship between Childhood Maltreatment and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenk, Chad E.; Noll, Jennie G.; Cassarly, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress symptoms, depressive symptoms, and psychological dysregulation have been shown to mediate the relationship between child maltreatment and non-suicidal self-injury. However, these proposed mediators often co-occur and previous research has not tested mediation when all variables are assessed simultaneously. The current study…

  14. Bullying and victimization, depressive mood, and non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents: The moderating role of parental support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claes, L.; Luyckx, K.; Baetens, I.; Ven, M.O.M. van de; Witteman, C.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the associations of bullying and victimization with non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), as well as the mediating role of depressive mood in a sample of 785 adolescents. Further, we explored the moderating role of parental support in these associations. All participants completed questio

  15. Borderline Personality Symptoms Differentiate Non-Suicidal and Suicidal Self-Injury in Ethnically Diverse Adolescent Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Ertelt, Troy W.; Miller, Alec L.; Claes, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    Background: There is little research on how specific borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms relate to suicide attempts or suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) within adolescent populations, which is important to know given the recent proposal of an NSSI disorder. Even less well known is whether specific BPD symptoms distinguish NSSI…

  16. Child Maltreatment, Subsequent Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and the Mediating Roles of Dissociation, Alexithymia and Self-Blame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swannell, Sarah; Martin, Graham; Page, Andrew; Hasking, Penelope; Hazell, Philip; Taylor, Anne; Protani, Melinda

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although child maltreatment is associated with later non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), the mechanism through which it might lead to NSSI is not well understood. The current retrospective case-control study examined associations between child maltreatment and later NSSI, and investigated the mediating roles of dissociation, alexithymia,…

  17. Non-suicidal self-injury with and without borderline personality disorder: differences in self-injury and diagnostic comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brianna J; Dixon-Gordon, Katherine L; Austin, Sara B; Rodriguez, Marcus A; Zachary Rosenthal, M; Chapman, Alexander L

    2015-11-30

    Although non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) occurs in people with and without borderline personality disorder (BPD), few studies have compared the clinical characteristics of these two groups. The present study sampled adults with a history of NSSI and compared those with and without BPD on (a) NSSI features, (b) co-occurring psychiatric disorders, and (c) severity of depression, suicidal ideation and emotion dysregulation. Participants (NSSI+BPD, n=46; NSSI Only, n=54) completed semi-structured interviews and self-report measures. Whereas the groups did not differ in age of NSSI onset, the NSSI+BPD group engaged in more frequent, recent and severe NSSI, and reported higher rates of skin carving, head banging, self-punching and self-scratching than the NSSI Only group. Participants with BPD also showed greater diagnostic comorbidity, particularly for anxiety disorders, but did not differ from participants without BPD in rates of mood, substance or psychotic disorders. The NSSI+BPD group reported more severe depressive symptomatology, suicidal ideation and emotion dysregulation than the NSSI Only group. Supplementary analyses on the subset of participants with recent (past year) NSSI revealed similarly medium to large differences between those with and without BPD. Implications for assessment and treatment are discussed.

  18. Suicide Probability in Adolescents With a History of Childhood Maltreatment: The Role of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury, Emotion Regulation Difficulties, and Forms of Self-Criticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanipour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Suicidal attempt and non-suicidal self-injury are very common in adolescents with a history of childhood maltreatment. By identifying correlates of these kinds of high-risk behaviors, it is possible to prevent and decrease completed suicide. Objectives The aims of this study were: 1 to compare adolescents with a history of childhood maltreatment with non-suicidal self injury (NSSI or past suicidal attempt in terms of suicide probability, and 2 to investigate the association between NSSI, forms of self-criticism, emotion regulation difficulties, and suicide probability. Patients and Methods Participants were 169 adolescents living in Iranian social welfare centers who had a history of childhood maltreatment. The Suicide Probability Scale, Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, Forms of Self-criticism, and the Non-Suicidal Self injury (NSSI checklist were used for assessment. Results Adolescents with NSSI and suicidal attempts had higher rates of suicide ideation than adolescents with NSSI-only (P < 0.05. Feelings of inadequacy, self-hatred, difficulty with impulse control, and frequency of NSSI can predict 50% variance of suicide probability (P < 0.001. Conclusions Adolescents with histories of suicidal attempts and NSSI, compared with adolescents with NSSI-only, were more prone to suicide. Self-criticism, poor impulse control, and the frequency of NSSI were the main risk factors associated with suicide probability in adolescents with a history of childhood maltreatment.

  19. Suicide Probability in Adolescents With a History of Childhood Maltreatment: The Role of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury, Emotion Regulation Difficulties, and Forms of Self-Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanipour, Hamid; Hakim Shooshtari, Mitra; Bidaki, Reza

    2016-06-01

    Suicidal attempt and non-suicidal self-injury are very common in adolescents with a history of childhood maltreatment. By identifying correlates of these kinds of high-risk behaviors, it is possible to prevent and decrease completed suicide. The aims of this study were: 1) to compare adolescents with a history of childhood maltreatment with non-suicidal self injury (NSSI) or past suicidal attempt in terms of suicide probability, and 2) to investigate the association between NSSI, forms of self-criticism, emotion regulation difficulties, and suicide probability. Participants were 169 adolescents living in Iranian social welfare centers who had a history of childhood maltreatment. The Suicide Probability Scale, Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, Forms of Self-criticism, and the Non-Suicidal Self injury (NSSI) checklist were used for assessment. Adolescents with NSSI and suicidal attempts had higher rates of suicide ideation than adolescents with NSSI-only (P criticism, poor impulse control, and the frequency of NSSI were the main risk factors associated with suicide probability in adolescents with a history of childhood maltreatment.

  20. Early Maladaptive Schemas in Eating Disordered Patients With or Without Non-Suicidal Self-Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Els; Dierckx, Eva; Schoevaerts, Katrien; Claes, Laurence

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) in function of eating disorder (ED) subtypes (restrictive/bulimic) and the presence/absence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Female inpatients (N = 491) completed the Young Schema Questionnaire and the Self-Injury Questionnaire. The influence of ED subtype and the presence/absence of NSSI and their interaction on the EMS were investigated by means of a MANCOVA. The results showed main effects of ED subtype and the presence of NSSI on EMS. Patients with bulimia scored significantly higher on insufficient self-control and emotional deprivation, which are more related to cluster B compared with restrictive patients, whereas restrictive patients scored significantly higher on social undesirability, failure to achieve, subjugation and unrelenting standards compared with patients with bulimia that are more related to cluster C. Patients with ED with NSSI reported significantly higher EMS levels compared with patients without NSSI, suggesting that they could be of particular interest to benefit from schema therapy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  1. Non-suicidal self-injury and emotion regulation: a review on facial emotion recognition and facial mimicry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is an increasingly prevalent, clinically significant behavior in adolescents and can be associated with serious consequences for the afflicted person. Emotion regulation is considered its most frequent function. Because the symptoms of NSSI are common and cause impairment, it will be included in Section 3 disorders as a new disorder in the revised Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). So far, research has been conducted mostly with patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) showing self-injurious behavior. Therefore, for this review the current state of research regarding emotion regulation, NSSI, and BPD in adolescents is presented. In particular, the authors focus on studies on facial emotion recognition and facial mimicry, as social interaction difficulties might be a result of not recognizing emotions in facial expressions and inadequate facial mimicry. Although clinical trials investigating the efficacy of psychological treatments for NSSI among adolescents are lacking, especially those targeting the capacity to cope with emotions, clinical implications of the improvement in implicit and explicit emotion regulation in the treatment of NSSI is discussed. Given the impact of emotion regulation skills on the effectiveness of psychotherapy, neurobiological and psychophysiological outcome variables should be included in clinical trials. PMID:23421964

  2. Self Injurious Behavior in Adolescents

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    Evrim Aktepe

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Self injury is a kind of behavior which begins in early adolescence and difficult to determine because remains suppressed. Most often forms are to cut and hit own. To be exposed to sexual abuse and stressfully life events are known as risk factors for self injurious behavior. High anxiety, depression and hostility levels, decrease of self esteem, suicidal attempts and thoughts are usually together with self injurious behavior and it may be mediating to emotional regulation. To explain the functions of self injurious behavior automatic and social support theories and social learning theories have suggested. The relation between suicidality and self injurious behavior is complex for adolescents. There is no enough knowledge if self injurious behavior aggravates the risk of completed suicide. Although it’s a frequent behavior there are limited randomized controlled studies which examine specific treatment approaches. Dialectic behavior treatment is the type of treatment which shown as most effective for adults. To determine the needs to stop the behavior, to manage emotional senses and urges and to learn more healthy ways for needs to youth are necessary in treatment of self injurious behavior. Treatment also includes determining suicidal risk and comorbid psychiatric disorders. In self injurious behavior medical treatment is useful for comorbid psychiatric disorders. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(2.000: 201-210

  3. Differences in Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Suicide Attempts in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brausch, Amy M.; Gutierrez, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    As suicide attempts and self-injury remain predominant health risks among adolescents, it is increasingly important to be able to distinguish features of self-harming adolescents from those who are at risk for suicidal behaviors. The current study examined differences between groups of adolescents with varying levels of self-harmful behavior in a…

  4. Position Paper for Guiding Response to Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasking, Penelope A.; Heath, Nancy L.; Kaess, Michael; Lewis, Stephen P.; Plener, Paul L.; Walsh, Barent W.; Whitlock, Janis; Wilson, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    Around the world, school staff are increasingly expressing concern about nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and how best to address this behavior in the school setting. However, there is a notable lack of informed guidance for schools, and clear inconsistencies in the practices school staff adopt. In this position paper we draw on our collective…

  5. Ecological Momentary Assessment of Affective and Interpersonal Instability in Adolescent Non-Suicidal Self-Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Philip S; Koenig, Julian; Funke, Vera; Parzer, Peter; Resch, Franz; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich W; Kaess, Michael

    2016-12-19

    Affective and interpersonal instability, both core features of Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), have been suggested to underlie non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) is the method of choice when investigating dynamic processes. Previously no study addressed affective and interpersonal instability in daily life of adolescents engaging in NSSI. Female adolescents with NSSI (n = 26) and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 20) carried e-diaries on 2 consecutive weekends and were prompted in hourly intervals to rate their momentary affective state and feelings of attachment towards their mother and best friend. The majority of participants in the NSSI group also fulfilled diagnostic criteria for BPD (73%). Squared successive differences were calculated to quantify instability. Adolescents with NSSI reported less positive affect, t (44) = 6.94, p friend, t (44) = 4.36, p friend: t (44) = -4.57, p friend, r = 0.42, p < 0.05, but not instability of attachment towards the mother, r = 0.06, p = 0.79. In line with previous work in adults, NSSI is associated with affective and interpersonal instability assessed by EMA in adolescents. Preliminary findings highlight the association of affective and interpersonal instability with diagnostic criteria for BPD. Clinical implications and avenues for further research are discussed.

  6. Research with adolescents who engage in non-suicidal self-injury: ethical considerations and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Richardson, Elizabeth E; Lewis, Stephen P; Whitlock, Janis L; Rodham, Karen; Schatten, Heather T

    2015-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) has emerged as a significant psychiatric issue among youth. In addition to its high prevalence rates, NSSI is associated with a number of psychiatric issues and confers risk for varying degrees of physical injury. It is also a risk factor for attempted suicide. Thus, youth who engage in NSSI represent a vulnerable and high-risk population and researchers are likely to encounter a variety of ethical challenges when conducting NSSI research. Accordingly, it is critical that researchers be familiar with the major ethical issues involved in NSSI research and how to effectively account for and address them. This is important both prior to obtaining clearance from their Institutional Review Boards and when carrying out their research. To date, there is no consolidated resource to delineate the ethical challenges inherent to NSSI research and how these can be effectively navigated throughout the research process. The goals of this paper are to review international best practices in NSSI research across the various contexts within which it is studied, to offer guidelines for managing these issues, to identify areas in which variation in approaches prohibits decisive recommendations, and to generate questions in need of further consideration among scholars in this field.

  7. International prevalence of adolescent non-suicidal self-injury and deliberate self-harm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muehlenkamp Jennifer J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The behaviours of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI and deliberate self-harm (DSH are prevalent among adolescents, and an increase of rates in recent years has been postulated. There is a lack of studies to support this postulation, and comparing prevalence across studies and nations is complicated due to substantial differences in the methodology and nomenclature of existing research. Methods We conducted a systematic review of current (2005 - 2011 empirical studies reporting on the prevalence of NSSI and DSH in adolescent samples across the globe. Results Fifty-two studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria were obtained for analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between NSSI (18.0% SD = 7.3 and DSH (16.1% SD = 11.6 studies. Assessment using single item questions led to lower prevalence rates than assessment with specific behaviour checklists. Mean prevalence rates have not increased in the past five years, suggesting stabilization. Conclusion NSSI and DSH have a comparable prevalence in studies with adolescents from different countries. The field would benefit from adopting a common approach to assessment to aide cross-cultural study and comparisons.

  8. The Relationship Between Mindfulness, Depressive Symptoms, and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Amongst Adolescents.

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    Heath, Nancy L; Carsley, Dana; De Riggi, Melissa E; Mills, Devin; Mettler, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Mindfulness is often part of treatment for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI); however, there has been limited research examining the role of mindfulness in NSSI. Thus, the current study sought to investigate the relationship among mindfulness, depressive symptoms, and NSSI (past year) in adolescents (N = 764; 56.8% female, M age = 14.42, SD = 0.64) with consideration of gender. Adolescents with recent NSSI (n = 74; 83.8% female, M age = 14.36, SD = 0.56) and a matched for age and gender no-NSSI group completed measures of mindfulness and depression. Findings revealed that mindfulness and depressive symptoms were negatively correlated, although significantly less so for the NSSI group. Second, the NSSI group reported greater depressive symptoms and less mindfulness. Finally, mindfulness was found to partially mediate the effect of depressive symptoms on NSSI. The present study is the first to provide empirical support for the protective role of mindfulness in NSSI.

  9. Examining non-suicidal self-injury among adolescents with mental health needs, in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Shannon L; Baiden, Philip; Theall-Honey, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents with mental health needs and specific factors associated with NSSI among adolescents aged 14 to 18 years who received mental health services in adult mental health facilities in Ontario, Canada. Data on 2,013 adolescents were obtained from the Ontario Mental Health Reporting System using the Resident Assessment Instrument-Mental Health (RAI-MH) and were analyzed using logistic regression. Approximately, 20.2% (407 adolescents) of the sample engaged in NSSI within the last 12 months. Results from multivariate logistic regression indicate that females were 2.19 times more likely to engage in NSSI than males. Intentional misuse of prescription medication emerged as the most important factor associated with NSSI. Other factors found to be associated with NSSI included multiple psychiatric admissions, sexual abuse, use of alcohol, mood disorders (e.g., depression), adjustment disorders, personality disorders and symptoms of depression. The article discusses the implications of the findings, with suggestions for future research.

  10. [The function of music in the context of non-suicidal self injury].

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    Stegemann, Thomas; Brüggemann-Etchart, Annika; Badorrek-Hinkelmann, Anna; Romer, Georg

    2010-01-01

    Music and non-suicidal self injury (NSSI) are both of extraordinary importance for adolescents with respect to expressing emotions, and demonstrating protest. Nevertheless, little is known about the interrelation between these phenomena, in particular about the function of music in the context of NSSI. The aim of our study was to investigate the connections between music and auto-aggressive behaviour and suicidality in adolescents. We developed a specific questionnaire for this purpose, which was used together with a self-reporting depression inventory in 40 subjects in a child and adolescent psychiatric clinic. We enrolled inpatients between 13 and 18 years who had presented with NSSI and/or suicidality during the last three months. Music proved to be very important to the patients and seemed to have an emotionally elevating function. Moreover, music was in some cases an integral part of the NSSI-scenario, but also was used to inhibit autoaggressive tendencies. In a qualitative analysis, it could be demonstrated that music and lyrics are associated with affect regulation, anti-dissociation and interpersonal influence. Music seems to fulfil similar self-regulatory functions as have been described for NSSI and can thus be considered, as a substitute to have a protective effect. There were no indications that specific music preferences are directly linked to NSSI or suicidality.

  11. Non-suicidal self-injury: the contribution of general personality functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N; Lengel, Gregory J; Grant, Demond M

    2013-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a public health problem of increasing significance. The purpose of the present study was to determine if individuals with and without a history of NSSI would differ significantly on the domains and facets of the Five Factor Model (FFM) as well as the facets from the UPPS-P Impulsive Behaviour Scale. Self-report measures of personality, borderline personality disorder and NSSI were administered to an undergraduate sample (n = 211). Individuals who had engaged in NSSI had significantly elevated levels of FFM facets of neuroticism (i.e. anxiousness, angry hostility, depressiveness, self-consciousness, impulsiveness and vulnerability) and openness (i.e. aesthetics, feelings and values) and significantly lower levels of conscientiousness (i.e. order, achievement, self-discipline and deliberation). Additionally, those with an NSSI history scored higher on UPPS-P negative urgency, lack of premeditation and lack of perseverance. The knowledge gained from this study provides further support for personality's role in NSSI. This information may aid in the identification of risk factors for NSSI and assist in efforts examining interventions for NSSI that are targeted toward personality-relevant strategies.

  12. Short-term psychotherapeutic treatment in adolescents engaging in non-suicidal self-injury: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Gloria; Brunner, Romuald; Parzer, Peter; Resch, Franz; Kaess, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, prevalence rates of adolescent non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) range between 13 and 45%. In Germany, lifetime prevalence of NSSI is around 25% in non-clinical samples, and the one-year prevalence for repetitive NSSI is 4%. NSSI is present in the context of several axis I and II disorders (for example, affective disorders or borderline personality disorder); however, preliminary evidence suggests that it would be justified to consider NSSI as its own diagnostic category. ...

  13. Non-suicidal self-injury (Nssi in adolescent inpatients: assessing personality features and attitude toward death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrara Mauro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI is a common concern among hospitalized adolescents, and can have significant implications for short and long-term prognosis. Little research has been devoted on how personality features in severely ill adolescents interact with NSSI and "attitude toward life and death" as a dimension of suicidality. Developing more specific assessment methodologies for adolescents who engage in self-harm without suicidal intent is relevant given the recent proposal of a non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI disorder and may be useful in predicting risk in psychiatrically impaired subjects. Methods Consecutively hospitalized adolescents in a psychiatric unit (N = 52; 71% females; age 12-19 years, reporting at least one recent episode of self-harm according to the Deliberate Self-harm Inventory, were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Mental Disorders and Personality Disorders (SCID I and II, the Children's Depression Inventory and the Multi-Attitude Suicide Tendency Scale (MAST. Results Mean age onset of NSSI in the sample was 12.3 years. All patients showed "repetitive" NSSI (high frequency of self-harm, covering different modalities. Results revealed that 63.5% of adolescents met criteria for Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD and that the rest of the sample also met criteria for personality disorders with dysregulated traits. History of suicide attempts was present in 46.1% of cases. Elevated depressive traits were found in 53.8%. Results show a statistically significant negative correlation between the score on the "Attraction to Life" subscale of the MAST and the frequency and diversification of self-harming behaviors. Conclusions Most adolescent inpatients with NSSI met criteria for emotionally dysregulated personality disorders, and showed a reduced "attraction to life" disposition and significant depressive symptoms. This peculiar psychopathological configuration must be addressed in the

  14. Conceptualizing the neurobiology of non-suicidal self-injury from the perspective of the Research Domain Criteria Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlund Schreiner, Melinda; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Begnel, Erin D; Cullen, Kathryn R

    2015-10-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) commonly starts in adolescence and is associated with an array of negative outcomes. Neurobiological research investigating NSSI is in its early stages and most studies have examined this behavior within the context of specific diagnoses. However, the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative encourages researchers to examine brain-behavior relationships across diagnoses. This review on the neurobiology associated with NSSI is organized using the domains proposed by RDoC: Negative Valence, Positive Valence, Cognitive, Social Processes, and Arousal/Regulatory Systems. Evidence of neurobiological anomalies is found in each of these domains. We also propose future research directions, especially in regard to human development. Future NSSI studies should address this behavior independent of diagnosis, examine relevant constructs across multiple units of analysis, and assess how systems change across development and course of illness. These advances will be essential for guiding neurobiologically informed intervention and prevention strategies to target NSSI. In doing so, we may prevent the associated negative outcomes across the lifespan.

  15. Non-suicidal self-injury and firesetting: shared and unique correlates among school-based adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Alicia K; Hasking, Penelope; Martin, Graham

    2015-04-01

    Distinct behaviors such as non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and firesetting may represent functionally equivalent attempts to regulate difficult affective/cognitive or social experiences during adolescence. This study examined possible mechanisms leading to NSSI, as opposed to firesetting, as well as co-occurrence of these behaviors. Participants aged 12-18 years (N = 2,356; 67.5 % female) completed self-report questionnaires measuring NSSI and firesetting, as well as socio-demographic and psychosocial factors including personality traits related to impulsivity and anxiety, negative life events, emotion regulation, and coping. The findings indicated the presence of general risk factors (e.g., negative life events and poor coping) that increase the likelihood that adolescents will engage in any of a range of maladaptive behaviors. The probability of at-risk adolescents engaging in NSSI was increased by psychological states (i.e., rumination and poor self-esteem), whereas socio-demographic and personality traits were associated with firesetting. Implications for prevention and early intervention initiatives are discussed.

  16. Functions, lifetime frequency, and variety of methods of non-suicidal self-injury among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraff, Pooja D; Pepper, Carolyn M

    2014-10-30

    Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and intrapersonal functions of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) have both been found to have strong relationships with NSSI. The present study examines their role in the lifetime frequency and variety of NSSI methods, taken as indicators of severity of NSSI. We hypothesized that intrapersonal functions would explain frequency and variety of NSSI beyond the effects of interpersonal functions. Further we hypothesized that intrapersonal functions would moderate the effect of BPD characteristics on frequency of NSSI. College students (n=52) who endorsed at least one lifetime act of NSSI completed self-report measures and semi-structured interviews about NSSI behaviors, frequency, variety and functions, and BPD symptoms. Results supported the hypotheses that intrapersonal functions play a role in the lifetime frequency and variety of NSSI behaviors in addition to that of interpersonal functions, but did not support the role of intrapersonal functions as a moderator. Findings are discussed in terms of relative importance of all factors involved in explaining severity of NSSI, measured as lifetime frequency and variety.

  17. Emotional face recognition in adolescent suicide attempters and adolescents engaging in non-suicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Karen E; Jones, Richard N; Cushman, Grace K; Galvan, Thania; Puzia, Megan E; Kim, Kerri L; Spirito, Anthony; Dickstein, Daniel P

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the bio-behavioral mechanisms underlying and differentiating suicide attempts from non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents. Adolescents who attempt suicide or engage in NSSI often report significant interpersonal and social difficulties. Emotional face recognition ability is a fundamental skill required for successful social interactions, and deficits in this ability may provide insight into the unique brain-behavior interactions underlying suicide attempts versus NSSI in adolescents. Therefore, we examined emotional face recognition ability among three mutually exclusive groups: (1) inpatient adolescents who attempted suicide (SA, n = 30); (2) inpatient adolescents engaged in NSSI (NSSI, n = 30); and (3) typically developing controls (TDC, n = 30) without psychiatric illness. Participants included adolescents aged 13-17 years, matched on age, gender and full-scale IQ. Emotional face recognition was evaluated using the diagnostic assessment of nonverbal accuracy (DANVA-2). Compared to TDC youth, adolescents with NSSI made more errors on child fearful and adult sad face recognition while controlling for psychopathology and medication status (ps Adolescent inpatients engaged in NSSI showed greater deficits in emotional face recognition than TDC, but not inpatient adolescents who attempted suicide. Further results suggest the importance of psychopathology in emotional face recognition. Replication of these preliminary results and examination of the role of context-dependent emotional processing are needed moving forward.

  18. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Disorder: An Empirical Investigation in Adolescent Psychiatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Catherine R.; Klonsky, E. David

    2013-01-01

    Objective Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a growing public health concern, especially among adolescents. In the current edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, NSSI is classified as a criterion of borderline personality disorder (BPD). However, a distinct NSSI disorder will now be included in DSM-5 as a “condition requiring further study.” Importantly, at this time, there is little direct evidence supporting the DSM-5 proposal over the DSM-IV classification. To address this need, the current study examined the extent to which NSSI occurs independently of BPD, and has clinical significance beyond a diagnosis of BPD in adolescent psychiatric patients. Method NSSI disorder was assessed based on the proposed DSM-5 criteria in 198 adolescents ages 12 to 18 (74% female; 64% Caucasian, 14% Hispanic, 10% African American, and 12% mixed/other ethnicity) from a psychiatric hospital. Major Axis I disorders, Axis II BPD, and suicide ideation and attempts were assessed with structured clinical interviews; emotion dysregulation and loneliness were measured with validated self-report questionnaires. Results First, results indicate that NSSI disorder occurs independently of BPD. Specifically, although there was overlap between the occurrence of BPD and NSSI disorder, this overlap was no greater than that between BPD and other Axis I disorders (e.g., anxiety and mood disorders). Second, NSSI disorder demonstrated unique associations with clinical impairment – indexed by suicide ideation and attempts, emotion dysregulation, and loneliness – over and above a BPD diagnosis. Conclusions Taken together, findings support the classification of NSSI as a distinct and clinically significant diagnostic entity. PMID:23682597

  19. Self-esteem and non-suicidal self-injury in adulthood: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Rebecca L; Slater, Hayley; Jomar, Khowla; Mitzman, Susan; Taylor, Peter James

    2017-10-15

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a self-destructive act that represents a considerable burden on the individual and society. Low self-esteem may be a psychological variable that is related to NSSI. However, little is known about the nature of this relationship in adulthood. This systematic review therefore aimed to provide a synthesis of the available literature on the relationship between self-esteem and NSSI. Articles were independently identified and risk of bias assessed by two reviewers searching PsycINFO, CINAHL, Medline and Web of Science databases. Inclusion criteria were: (1) a mean sample age of eighteen years or over (2) full manuscripts available in English (3) assessment of NSSI (4) assessment(s) of self-esteem. A narrative synthesis of results was undertaken. A random-effects meta-analysis of differences in self-esteem between NSSI and non-NSSI groups was also undertaken. Seventeen studies were identified and indicated a significant negative relationship between self-esteem and NSSI. The meta-analysis indicated lower self-esteem in those with experiences of NSSI versus those without, d = 0.59 - 1.17. Results suggested that although low self-esteem and NSSI are related in both clinical and non-clinical populations, there are a number of factors which also influence this relationship. The absence of longitudinal research is a major limitation of this literature. It will be important for clinicians to consider the impact of self-esteem in those seeking support for NSSI. Further research should undertake longitudinal research to better understand the self-esteem and NSSI relationship. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of mental health first aid guidelines for deliberate non-suicidal self-injury: A Delphi study

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    Kitchener Betty A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is estimated that around 4% of the population engages, or has engaged, in deliberate non-suicidal self-injury. In clinical samples, the figures rise as high as 21%. There is also evidence to suggest that these figures may be increasing. A family member or friend may suspect that a person is injuring themselves, but very few people know how to respond if this is the case. Simple first aid guidelines may help members of the public assist people to seek and receive the professional help they require to overcome self-injury. Methods This research was conducted using the Delphi methodology, a method of reaching consensus in a panel of experts. Experts recruited to the panels included 26 professionals, 16 people who had engaged in self-injurious behaviour in the past and 3 carers of people who had engaged in self-injurious behaviour in the past. Statements about providing first aid to a person engaged in self-injurious behaviour were sought from the medical and lay literature, but little was found. Panel members were asked to respond to general questions about first aid for NSSI in a variety of domains and statements were extracted from their responses. The guidelines were written using the items most consistently endorsed by the consumer and professional panels. Results Of 79 statements rated by the panels, 18 were accepted. These statements were used to develop the guidelines appended to this paper. Conclusion There are a number of actions which are considered to be useful for members of the public when they encounter someone who is engaging in deliberate, non-suicidal self-injury. These guidelines will be useful in revising curricula for mental health first aid and NSSI first aid training programs. They can also be used by members of the public who want immediate information about how to assist a person who is engaging in such behaviour.

  1. The link between dissociation and both suicide attempts and non-suicidal self-injury: Meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calati, Raffaella; Bensassi, Ismaïl; Courtet, Philippe

    2017-01-17

    Dissociative disorders (DD) are frequently associated with suicidal behaviors. We performed the first meta-analysis of studies comparing rates of suicide attempts (SA) and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in psychiatric individuals with and without DD. We included: 1) studies comparing SA and NSSI rates in psychiatric individuals with and without DD; 2) studies comparing Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) scores in both SA and NSSI psychiatric patients versus non SA and non NSSI ones. Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager Software and STROBE statement were used. Nineteen studies were included in the analyses. DD patients were more likely to report both previous SA and NSSI in comparison to non DD patients. Importantly, results remained highly significant in both outcomes but with no more heterogeneity when including studies using a DSM-based method to diagnose DD. Both SA and NSSI patients reported higher DES scores in comparison to non SA and non NSSI patients. The presence of DD diagnosis or higher DES scores seems to be related to both SA and NSSI in psychiatric patients. Hence, it may be reasonable to hypothesize the presence of a dissociative subtype in a subset of these patients, which should be considered as a transdiagnostic factor and should be carefully assessed.

  2. Non-suicidal Self-Injury in Eating Disordered Patients: Associations with Heart Rate Variability and State-Trait Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Giner-Bartolome

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI is commonly present in individuals with eating disorders (EDs and is often employed as a maladaptive emotion regulation strategy to avoid or abate negative emotions. One of the most prevalent negative emotions experienced by self-injurers is anxiety; however, this emotion has not been extensively studied in this population. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the influence of anxiety on NSSI in patients with ED from two different dimensions: state anxiety and trait anxiety.Methods: The study comprised a total of 66 females: 12 ED patients with NSSI, 32 ED patients without a history of NSSI, and 22 healthy controls. State and trait anxiety were assessed by means of State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S-T and physiological data [i.e., heart rate variability (HRV] were collected.Results: STAI-trait scores were significantly higher in ED patients with NSSI than ED patients without NSSI. Furthermore, when conducting logistic regression analyses higher STAI-trait scores were associated with NSSI in ED patients. However, no differences in STAI-state scores and HRV were found between ED patients with and without NSSI.Discussion: The present findings suggest that anxiety as a trait is associated with the use of maladaptive strategies (i.e., NSSI in ED patients. These results uphold the need to target trait anxiety in ED treatment in order to prevent possible NSSI behaviors.

  3. Non-suicidal Self-Injury in Eating Disordered Patients: Associations with Heart Rate Variability and State-Trait Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner-Bartolome, Cristina; Mallorquí-Bagué, Núria; Tolosa-Sola, Iris; Steward, Trevor; Jimenez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is commonly present in individuals with eating disorders (EDs) and is often employed as a maladaptive emotion regulation strategy to avoid or abate negative emotions. One of the most prevalent negative emotions experienced by self-injurers is anxiety; however, this emotion has not been extensively studied in this population. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the influence of anxiety on NSSI in patients with ED from two different dimensions: state anxiety and trait anxiety. Methods: The study comprised a total of 66 females: 12 ED patients with NSSI, 32 ED patients without a history of NSSI, and 22 healthy controls. State and trait anxiety were assessed by means of State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S-T) and physiological data [i.e., heart rate variability (HRV)] were collected. Results: STAI-trait scores were significantly higher in ED patients with NSSI than ED patients without NSSI. Furthermore, when conducting logistic regression analyses higher STAI-trait scores were associated with NSSI in ED patients. However, no differences in STAI-state scores and HRV were found between ED patients with and without NSSI. Discussion: The present findings suggest that anxiety as a trait is associated with the use of maladaptive strategies (i.e., NSSI) in ED patients. These results uphold the need to target trait anxiety in ED treatment in order to prevent possible NSSI behaviors.

  4. The French Version of the Reflective Functioning Questionnaire: Validity Data for Adolescents and Adults and Its Association with Non-Suicidal Self-Injury.

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    Deborah Badoud

    Full Text Available The capacity to understand one's own actions and those of others in terms of cognitive and affective mental states (i.e., reflective functioning or mentalizing is thought to play a critical role in both typical and atypical development. To date, however, no self-report tool is available for assessing reflective functioning ability in French-speaking samples. The first aim of this study is to investigate the reliability and validity of the reflective functioning questionnaire (RFQ in French-speaking adolescents and adults. Secondly, we investigate whether low levels of reflective functioning were associated with non-suicidal self-injury.130 adolescents (66 females, Mage = 15.72, SDage = 1.74 and 253 adults (168 females, Mage = 23.10, SDage = 2.56 completed a French translation of the RFQ and a battery of self-reported questionnaires to assess a set of clinical (alexithymia; borderline traits; internalizing and externalizing symptoms and psychological (empathy; mindfulness variables.The current results showed configural invariance of the original two-factor structure of the RFQ across French-speaking adolescents and adults and satisfactory reliability and construct validity of the two subscales. Furthermore, we observed that recent episodes of non-suicidal self-injury were associated with lower levels of reflective functioning in the adult, but not in the adolescent, sample.The present research has methodological and clinical implications in that it provides the first evidence that the RFQ can be used to reliably assess reflective functioning in French-speaking population. The study further shows that impaired ability to consider mental states that lie behind behaviors might play a role in non-suicidal self-injury, at least in adults.

  5. Emotion regulation, coping and alcohol use as moderators in the relationship between non-suicidal self-injury and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Fiona; Hasking, Penelope

    2010-03-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury is a risk factor for more severe self-injury and later suicide, yet is relatively under-researched in non-clinical populations. In order to prevent more severe self-injury and later suicide, understanding of non-suicidal self-injury is imperative. This study aimed to examine whether coping skills, emotion regulation and alcohol use moderate the relationship between psychological distress and non-suicidal self-injury. Two hundred eighty-nine young adults completed self-report questionnaires assessing the variables of interest. Of the sample, 47.4% reported a history of non-suicidal self-injury. Adaptive coping strategies protected those who were psychologically distressed from severe self-injury. However for those who reported greater distress, this protective effect was negated by heavy alcohol use. Coping skills training may serve to protect young people from self-injury, although those who are severely distressed may also benefit from strategies to limit alcohol use.

  6. Mapping non suicidal self-injury in adolescence: Development and confirmatory factor analysis of the Impulse, Self-harm and Suicide Ideation Questionnaire for Adolescents (ISSIQ-A).

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    Carvalho, Célia Barreto; Nunes, Carolina; Castilho, Paula; da Motta, Carolina; Caldeira, Suzana; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2015-06-30

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is the deliberate, self-inflicted destruction of body tissue without suicidal intent and an important clinical phenomenon. Rates of NSSI appear to be disproportionately high in adolescents and young adults, and is a risk factor for suicidal ideation and behavior. The present study reports the psychometric properties of the Impulse, Self-harm and Suicide Ideation Questionnaire for Adolescents (ISSIQ-A), a measure designed to comprehensively assess the impulsivity, NSSI behaviors and suicide ideation. An additional module of this questionnaire assesses the functions of NSSI. Results of Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) of the scale on 1722 youths showed items' suitability and confirmed a model of four different dimensions (Impulse, Self-harm, Risk-behavior and Suicide ideation) with good fit and validity. Further analysis showed that youth׳s engagement in self-harm may exert two different functions: to create or alleviate emotional states, and to influence social relationships. Our findings contribute to research and assessment on non-suicidal self-injury, suggesting that the ISSIQ-A is a valid and reliable measure to assess impulse, self-harm and suicidal thoughts, in adolescence.

  7. The interaction of affective states and cognitive vulnerabilities in the prediction of non-suicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonah N; Stange, Jonathan P; Hamilton, Jessica L; Burke, Taylor A; Jenkins, Abigail; Ong, Mian-Li; Heimberg, Richard G; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2015-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a serious public health concern and remains poorly understood. This study sought to identify both cognitive and affective vulnerabilities to NSSI and examine their interaction in the prediction of NSSI. A series of regressions indicated that low levels of positive affect (PA) moderated the relationships between self-criticism and brooding and NSSI. The associations of self-criticism and brooding with greater frequency of NSSI were attenuated by higher levels of PA. The interaction of cognitive and affective vulnerabilities is discussed within the context of current NSSI theory.

  8. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Clinical Correlates and Impact on Psychosocial Treatment Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Heather A; Weinstein, Sally M; West, Amy E

    2017-07-20

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in childhood is not well documented, especially among youth with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). The current study evaluated prevalence and correlates of NSSI, and its impact on intervention response, in a randomized trial of Child- and Family-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CFF-CBT) versus Treatment As Usual (TAU), adjunctive to pharmacotherapy. This study included 72 children ages 7-13 (58% male) with PBD. NSSI and correlates were assessed at baseline; mood and psychiatric severity were measured longitudinally. NSSI was common: 31% endorsed NSSI behaviors; 10% reported thoughts of NSSI, in the absence of behaviors. Children engaging in NSSI reported higher depression, psychosis, suicidality, and hopelessness; lower self-esteem; and reduced family help-seeking in univariate analyses. In a multivariate logistic regression, high child depression and psychosis, and low family help-seeking, remained significantly associated with baseline NSSI. In mixed-effects regression models, presence of NSSI at baseline did not influence the response of depressive symptoms to treatment. Children who endorsed NSSI experienced steeper response trajectories for psychiatric severity, regardless of treatment group. Youth who denied NSSI showed poorer response to TAU for manic symptoms; mania trajectories in CFF-CBT were similar across youth. Thus, NSSI in PBD is common and associated with impairment. As children might engage in NSSI for different reasons, the function of NSSI should be considered in treatment. Since children without NSSI fared worse in TAU, it may be important to ensure that youth with PBD receive structured, intensive interventions. CFF-CBT was efficacious regardless of NSSI, and thus shows promise for high-risk children with PBD.

  9. 大学生自伤行为的强化敏感性基础%Patterns of reinforcement sensitivity for non-suicidal self-injury in college students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应梦婷; 江光荣; 于丽霞; 鲁婷

    2016-01-01

    Reinforcement sensitity, as an important personality trait, affects individual’s emotional, motivational and behavioral process, especially relates to emotion reactivity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that two dimensions of reinforcement sensitivity—BIS sensitivity and BAS sensitivity—exhibit strong associations with emotion management difficulties, which are considered as main characteristics of non-suicidal self-injury. Individuals at the far poles of BIS and BAS dimensions are at increased risk for developing various types of psychopathology, some of which have high correlations with non-suicidal self-injury. In order to investigate the relation between reinforcement sensitivity and non-suicidal self-injury, two studies were conducted. Study 1 examined the associations between dimensions of reinforcement sensitivity and non-suicidal self-injury by using self-report measures. The BIS/BAS Scales and the Chinese version of Self-Harm Inventory were used to assess reinforcement sensitivity and non-suicidal self-injury, respectively. Data were collected among 717 college students and were analyzed using ordinal logistic regression. Results showed that BIS/BAS sensitivity significantly predicted non-suicidal self-injury. As to BAS sensitivity, BAS-FunSeeking was the only dimension that contributed to non-suicidal self-injury. On the basis of Study 1, Study 2 further explored different patterns of BIS/BAS sensitivity between people who engaged in non-suicidal self-injury for two different purposes. The Q-TASK and the CARROT were used as two behavioral measures of BIS sensitivity and BAS sensitivity, respectively. Two groups of self-injurers (emotion managing vs. novelty seeking) as well as one control group participated in two experiments. Data obtained from 127 participants were analyzed by MANOVA. The Findings indicated that there were different patterns of reinforcement sensitivity for non-suicidal self-injury with different functions. Participants who

  10. Differentiating Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Risky Drinking: a Role for Outcome Expectancies and Self-Efficacy Beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasking, Penelope

    2017-01-20

    Social cognitive theory articulates a role for two key thought processes in governing volitional behaviour: outcome expectancies and self-efficacy expectancies. These cognitions are behaviour-specific, and should thus differentiate people who engage in one behaviour over another. This paper presents the results of a study applying social cognitive theory to explore how outcome expectancies and self-efficacy expectancies differentially relate to non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and risky alcohol use amongst a sample of young adults. A sample of 389 undergraduate students completed self-report questionnaires assessing their engagement in NSSI, alcohol consumption, their beliefs about the anticipated consequences of self-injury and alcohol consumption (outcome expectancies), and their belief in their ability to resist self-injury or risky drinking (resistance self-efficacy). Generally, people who self-injure rather than drink are characterised by a belief in the ability to resist drinking, coupled with stronger positive, and weaker negative, NSSI expectancies. People who self-injure are less likely to think alcohol reduces tension than people who do not self-injure. People who engaged in both NSSI and risky drinking report more anxiety than participants who engaged only in risky drinking and lowered ability to resist self-injury. Overall, the findings suggest that a unique combination of beliefs differentially predict NSSI and drinking. The pattern of results suggests potential avenues for future research to delineate why people engage in one behaviour rather than another and to inform future prevention and early intervention initiatives.

  11. Impact of Childhood Abuse on the Risk of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Mainland Chinese Adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhui Wan

    Full Text Available Childhood abuse has been associated with significant increases in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI behaviors in adolescents; however, only general definitions of this risk indicator have been examined. This study identified relationships between specific forms of childhood abuse and NSSI in mainland Chinese adolescents.A total of 14,221 cases were retained from an epidemiological study involving adolescents from junior and senior middle schools. Information relating to the perpetrator, perceived harm, timing of exposure to different types of childhood abuse, and NSSI were obtained. Logistic regression was used to analyze relationships between each form of childhood abuse and NSSI.Approximately 51.0% of the students reported at least one abusive childhood experience. Nearly one in four students (24.9% reported that they had engaged in NSSI in the past 12 months. Each type of childhood abuse, occurring at any time within the first 16 years of life, especially in situations of continuous exposure, was significantly associated with NSSI. A significant graded relationship was found between number of abusive childhood experiences and NSSI. Students maltreated by parents or others were at high risk of engaging in NSSI, the risk was greater in students maltreated by both; students who had been exposed to childhood abuse with no perceived harm still demonstrated an elevated risk for NSSI. The pattern of associations did not vary by gender.These findings suggest that experiencing any of various forms of childhood abuse should be considered a risk factor for NSSI during adolescence. Further research should focus upon psychosocial, neural, and genetic factors that might moderate or mediate the onset of NSSI in adolescents who have experienced childhood abuse.

  12. Brief report: the association between non-suicidal self-injury, self-concept and acquaintance with self-injurious peers in a sample of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurence; Houben, Adinda; Vandereycken, Walter; Bijttebier, Patricia; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer

    2010-10-01

    The current study investigated the association between non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), self-concept and acquaintance with NSSI peers in a sample of 150 high school students (60% female) with a mean age of 15.56 (SD=2.00) years. Analyses showed that students with NSSI rated themselves lower on academic intelligence, physical attractiveness, social skills and emotional stability than their non-NSSI peers. The self-injurers also had more friends who engaged in NSSI, and having more NSSI acquaintances was negatively related to self-esteem. It could be that adolescents with lower self-esteem are more attracted to self-injuring peers, or that adolescents with low self-esteem are more vulnerable to copy NSSI to deal with their problems or to gain a certain identity in their peer group. Future studies must test these possible NSSI pathways.

  13. Buffering the effects of peer victimization on adolescent non-suicidal self-injury: The role of self-compassion and family cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongqiang; You, Jianing; Hou, Yang; Du, Chao; Lin, Min-Pei; Zheng, Xiaoling; Ma, Congfen

    2016-12-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a significant behavioral problem among adolescents all over the world. This study examined the longitudinal relationship between peer victimization and NSSI, as well as the buffering effects of self-compassion and family cohesion on this relationship. Data were collected at two time points from 525 secondary school students (226 girls; Mage = 12.97, SD = 1.02) in China. Results showed that peer victimization (marginally) significantly predicted NSSI over time even after controlling for Wave 1 NSSI. This association was weakened under the condition of high levels of self-compassion. Findings of this study emphasize the buffering effect of self-compassion in the relationship between peer victimization and NSSI, and are informative for prevention and intervention of this behavioral problem.

  14. Co-Occurring Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Firesetting Among At-Risk Adolescents: Experiences of Negative Life Events, Mental Health Problems, Substance Use, and Suicidality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Alicia; Hasking, Penelope; Martin, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Co-occurring internalizing and externalizing problem behaviors in adolescence typically marks more severe psychopathology and poorer psychosocial functioning than engagement in a single problem behavior. We examined the negative life events, emotional and behavioral problems, substance use, and suicidality of school-based adolescents reporting both non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and repetitive firesetting, compared to those engaging in either behavior alone. Differences in NSSI characteristics among self-injurers who set fires, compared to those who did not, were also assessed. A total of 384 at-risk adolescents aged 12-18 years (58.8% female) completed self-report questionnaires measuring NSSI, firesetting, and key variables of interest. Results suggest that adolescents who both self-injure and deliberately set fires represent a low-prevalence but distinct high-risk subgroup, characterized by increased rates of interpersonal difficulties, mental health problems and substance use, more severe self-injury, and suicidal behavior. Implications for prevention and early intervention initiatives are discussed.

  15. Predicting Risk for Suicide: A Preliminary Examination of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and the Acquired Capability Construct in a College Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackman, Emily H; Morris, Blair W; Andover, Margaret S

    2016-01-01

    The interpersonal psychological theory of suicide provides a useful framework for considering the relationship between non-suicidal self-injury and suicide. Researchers propose that NSSI increases acquired capability for suicide. We predicted that both NSSI frequency and the IPTS acquired capability construct (decreased fear of death and increased pain tolerance) would separately interact with suicidal ideation to predict suicide attempts. Undergraduate students (N = 113) completed self-report questionnaires, and a subsample (n = 66) also completed a pain sensitivity task. NSSI frequency significantly moderated the association between suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. However, in a separate model, acquired capability did not moderate this relationship. Our understanding of the relationship between suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior can be enhanced by factors associated with NSSI that are distinct from the acquired capability construct.

  16. Camphor burns of the palm and non-suicidal self-injury: An uncommonly reported, but socially relevant issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kumar Chittoria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Camphor is a waxy white sublimating chemical derived from natural as well as synthetic sources and widely used in various communities worldwide for a number of medicinal, culinary, and religious reasons. Camphor is burnt as an offering to God in many religious communities. We report three incidences of self inflicted injury from burning camphor on the palm resulting in full thickness burns. Non-suicidal self-injury is socially unacceptable destruction or alteration of body tissue when there is no suicidal intent or pervasive developmental disorder and we have explored an association between this and burn injury. This report also highlights the unique social and cultural pattern of this burn injury and the importance of psycho-therapeautic help for these victims.

  17. Camphor burns of the palm and non-suicidal self-injury: An uncommonly reported, but socially relevant issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittoria, Ravi Kumar; Mohapatra, Devi Prasad; Friji, Meethale Thiruvoth; Kumar, S Dinesh; Asokan, Arjun; Pandey, Sandhya

    2014-05-01

    Camphor is a waxy white sublimating chemical derived from natural as well as synthetic sources and widely used in various communities worldwide for a number of medicinal, culinary, and religious reasons. Camphor is burnt as an offering to God in many religious communities. We report three incidences of self inflicted injury from burning camphor on the palm resulting in full thickness burns. Non-suicidal self-injury is socially unacceptable destruction or alteration of body tissue when there is no suicidal intent or pervasive developmental disorder and we have explored an association between this and burn injury. This report also highlights the unique social and cultural pattern of this burn injury and the importance of psycho-therapeautic help for these victims.

  18. Non-suicidal self-injury and suicidality in trans people: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Ellen; Claes, Laurence; Bouman, Walter Pierre; Witcomb, Gemma L; Arcelus, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Literature has described high levels of mental health problems among trans people, such as depression, resulting in increased levels of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) behaviour and suicidality (suicidal thoughts, suicide attempts and suicide rates). With the aim of systematically reviewing the available literature in this field, this study identifies 31 papers that explore the rates of NSSI and suicidality in trans people. From reviewing the literature, it was revealed that trans people have a higher prevalence of NSSI and suicidality compared to the cisgender (non-trans) population. There appear to be some gender differences within these rates, with trans men at a greater risk for NSSI behaviour. Prevalence rates differ depending on the different stages of transition, but they are still overall greater than the cisgender population. The study concludes that trans individuals are at a greater risk of NSSI behaviour and suicidality than the cisgender population, and discusses risk factors and the need to develop effective preventative interventions.

  19. The Association of Interpersonal and Intrapersonal Emotional Experiences with Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Young Adults.

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    Jacobson, Colleen McClain; Hill, Ryan M; Pettit, Jeremy W; Grozeva, Dima

    2015-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), the intentional damage to body tissue without the intent to die, is a prevalent public health problem in the U.S. and around the world. The current study sought to identify intrapersonal (emotional reactivity) and interpersonal (emotional expressiveness to others) correlates of NSSI in order to provide insight into how to best tailor prevention and treatment efforts. Four hundred and forty nine college students were surveyed about various psychological characteristics as well as engagement in NSSI. Results indicated that those who have difficulty expressing emotions are at an increased risk for NSSI even after controlling for depressive symptoms and that emotional expressiveness acts as a partial mediator between depression and NSSI. Emotional expressiveness should be a target of treatment among people who engage in NSSI.

  20. Psychological Distress and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury: The Mediating Roles of Rumination, Cognitive Reappraisal, and Expressive Suppression.

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    Richmond, Sally; Hasking, Penelope; Meaney, Rebecca

    2017-01-02

    This study sought to explore the relationships between depression, anxiety, stress, and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), and the mediating roles of rumination and emotion regulation in this relationship. The sample comprised 1,586 Australian university students who completed a self-report questionnaire assessing the relevant variables. Of the sample, 8.9% engaged in NSSI in the 4 weeks prior to the survey. Depression, anxiety, and stress each exerted a direct effect on NSSI, and each relationship was mediated by cognitive reappraisal. The relationship between stress and NSSI was also mediated by expressive suppression. The results imply intervention efforts aimed at teaching adaptive emotion regulation strategies for students experiencing high levels of psychological distress may reduce the frequency of NSSI.

  1. Emotion regulation in first episode adolescent non-suicidal self-injury: what difference does a year make?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, David; Hasking, Penelope; Martin, Graham

    2014-10-01

    We examined the roles of cognitive reappraisal, expressive suppression, and rumination in first episode non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents, and the impact of age-related differences in emotion regulation use. Adverse life events and psychological distress played a significant role in NSSI onset. Being male and less use of cognitive reappraisal contributed to NSSI risk but only in regard to 12-month incidence; this effect was not observed when predicting 24-month incidence. Neither expressive suppression nor rumination was related to NSSI onset in our sample. Age-related differences in emotion regulation were found, but did not modify the above relationships. Findings hint at the possible impact of developmental changes in adolescents' cognitive-emotional processing and their subsequent risk of NSSI. Results support further investigation into prevention and early intervention initiatives aimed at assisting adolescents cope with acute life stressors to prevent/delay first episode NSSI.

  2. The impact of social contagion on non-suicidal self-injury: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, Stephanie; Jackson, Benita; Swenson, Lance; Crawford, Heather

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we explore social contagion as an understudied risk factor for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents and young adults, populations with a high prevalence of NSSI. We review empirical studies reporting data on prevalence and risk factors that, through social contagion, may influence the transmission of NSSI. Findings in this literature are consistent with social modeling/learning of NSSI increasing risk of initial engagement in NSSI among individuals with certain individual and/or psychiatric characteristics. Preliminary research suggests iatrogenic effects of social contagion of NSSI through primary prevention are not likely. Thus, social contagion factors may warrant considerable empirical attention. Intervention efforts may be enhanced, and social contagion reduced, by implementation of psychoeducation and awareness about NSSI in schools, colleges, and treatment programs.

  3. Adolescent non-suicidal self-injury: A cross-national study of community samples from Italy, the Netherlands and the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giletta, M.; Scholte, R.H.J.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; Ciairano, S.; Prinstein, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined rates and correlates of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) across three non-clinical adolescent samples from different countries. Surveys were administered to 1862 adolescents (M (age) = 15.69, S.D. = 0.87) from Italy (n = 827), the Netherlands (n = 675), and United States (n = 360)

  4. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Our Schools: A Review and Research-Informed Guidelines for School Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Riggi, Melissa E.; Moumne, Samira; Heath, Nancy L.; Lewis, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), the immediate and deliberate destruction of one's own body tissue, without suicidal intent, and not for purposes that are socially accepted, is a critical concern for youth in schools. Despite significant scholarly advances and increasing clinical awareness of NSSI, many school mental health professionals (MHPs)…

  5. Characteristics and Co-Occurrence of Adolescent Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Suicidal Behaviours in Pediatric Emergency Crisis Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Paula; Martin, Jodi; Kennedy, Allison; Nixon, Mary K.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.

    2010-01-01

    During the potentially tumultuous adolescent period, non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts are relatively common, particularly amongst youth who present to mental health services. These phenomena frequently co-occur but their relationship is unclear. This study evaluated clinical data from 468 youth between the ages of 12 and 17…

  6. A Comparison of Linear versus Non-Linear Models of Aversive Self-Awareness, Dissociation, and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury among Young Adults

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    Armey, Michael F.; Crowther, Janis H.

    2008-01-01

    Research has identified a significant increase in both the incidence and prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). The present study sought to test both linear and non-linear cusp catastrophe models by using aversive self-awareness, which was operationalized as a composite of aversive self-relevant affect and cognitions, and dissociation as…

  7. Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Functions of Non Suicidal Self-Injury: Associations with Emotional and Social Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brianna J.; Chapman, Alexander L.; Layden, Brianne K.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the functions of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) has important implications for the development and refinement of theoretical models and treatments of NSSI. Emotional and social vulnerabilities associated with five common functions of NSSI-emotion relief (ER), feeling generation (FG), self-punishment (SP), interpersonal influence…

  8. Is non-suicidal self-injury an “addiction”? A comparison of craving in substance use and non-suicidal self-injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor, Sarah Elizabeth; Glenn, Catherine Rose; Klonsky, Elisha David

    2012-01-01

    There is debate among researchers regarding the most appropriate conceptual model of NSSI. Some argue that NSSI is best viewed within an addictions framework. Because craving of substances is a key concept in the addictions literature, we sought to compare the nature of craving in NSSI and substance use. Measures of NSSI, substance use, and craving were administered to a sample of adolescents (n = 58) receiving psychiatric treatment. It was found that total craving scores were significantly lower for NSSI than for substances. Item-level analyses suggested that substances are craved in a variety of contexts, whereas NSSI is typically craved in the context of negative emotions. The pattern of results remained the same when analyses were limited to patients who engaged in both NSSI and substance use. Thus, findings appear to be due to differences in the nature of the behaviors themselves rather than to individual differences between those who engage in NSSI or use substances. We conclude that, while both behaviors have powerful reinforcement contingencies, NSSI appears to be almost exclusively maintained by negative reinforcement (e.g., the reduction of aversive emotions). Findings are more consistent with emotion regulation than addiction models of NSSI. PMID:22401975

  9. Functions of non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents and young adults with Borderline Personality Disorder symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Naomi; Londahl-Shaller, Esme A; Piatigorsky, Auran; Fordwood, Samantha; Stuart, Barbara K; McNiel, Dale E; Klonsky, E David; Ozer, Elizabeth M; Yaeger, Alison M

    2014-05-15

    Rates of deliberate non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) increase during adolescence and young adulthood, particularly in clinical samples, making these important developmental stages for understanding the functions of NSSI. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) symptoms also begin to emerge in adolescence, though little research has examined relationships between BPD symptoms and the functions of NSSI in youth, the primary goal of the present study. Adolescents and young adults recruited from an outpatient psychotherapy clinic (N=36) endorsed a range of NSSI functions on the Inventory of Statements about Self-Injury (Klonsky and Glenn, 2009). Participants engaged in NSSI to serve intrapersonal functions (e.g., regulate affect, punish oneself) more frequently than interpersonal functions (e.g., bond with peers, establish autonomy). As predicted, linear regression analyses indicated that BPD affective dysregulation symptoms were associated with the intrapersonal but not the interpersonal functions of NSSI. In contrast, BPD interpersonal dysfunction symptoms were differentially associated with the interpersonal rather than intrapersonal functions of NSSI. These preliminary data indicate that clusters of BPD symptoms show unique relationships with functions of NSSI in treatment-seeking adolescents and young adults, relationships that can be used to target specific functions of NSSI in treatment planning.

  10. Longitudinal development of pain sensitivity in adolescent non-suicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Julian; Rinnewitz, Lena; Niederbäumer, Maren; Strozyk, Tabea; Parzer, Peter; Resch, Franz; Kaess, Michael

    2017-02-04

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with reduced pain sensitivity (PS). Existing theories posit that altered PS is a risk factor for NSSI. Cross-sectional data suggest that PS normalizes in those terminating self-injury. However, previously no study addressed the longitudinal course of PS in patients engaging in NSSI. We addressed changes in PS and clinical symptomatology in adolescents with NSSI (n = 18) and matched controls (n = 19) over one year. Despite significant clinical improvements, PS did not change in the NSSI group but decreased in controls. Greater NSSI reduction was associated with increased pain tolerance. Findings are discussed in the light of current theories on PS in NSSI.

  11. The role of seeing blood in non-suicidal self-injury in female patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoum, Janina; Reitz, Sarah; Krause-Utz, Annegret; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Willis, Franziska; Kuniss, Sarah; Baumgärtner, Ulf; Mancke, Falk; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Schmahl, Christian

    2016-12-30

    Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) often engage in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), to reduce arousal levels under stress. However, the importance of seeing blood for the effect of NSSI is yet unknown. The present pilot study examined 20 female BPD patients and 20 healthy controls (HC) to assess the role of seeing blood on arousal, pain, urge for NSSI (ratings) and heart rate (continuously measured). Participants completed two sessions consisting of stress induction (forced mental arithmetics with white noise), followed by a seven second non-invasive pain stimulus with a blade to the volar forearm. At one session, only the painful blade stimulus was applied, at the other, artificial blood was added. For arousal, a significantly stronger decrease was revealed in the BPD than in the HC group, however with no significant effects between blood and non-blood conditions. Concerning urge for NSSI, the BPD showed a significantly greater decrease in blood condition over time than the HC group. Interestingly, heart rate decreased stronger over time in the HC group during the blood condition than in BPD. For tension relief by non-damaging mechanical painful stimulus the addition of visible blood showed neither subjective (arousal, urge for NSSI), nor objective (heart rate) advantages.

  12. Predictors of onset for non-suicidal self-injury within a school-based sample of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Tori; Martin, Graham; Hasking, Penelope; Page, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    This paper reports on a prospective study exploring risk factors specifically related to the onset of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) during adolescence. We examined cumulative incidence and predictors of onset of NSSI over 1 year among 1,973 school-based adolescents (13-19 years old; M = 14.9, SD = 0.96) from five states in Australia. Data showed cumulative incidence of 3.8 % (95 % CI [3.0-4.7 %]) over 1 year. Multiple socio-demographic and psychosocial factors were assessed using sequential logistic regression models. Onset of NSSI was associated with being female (OR = 3.47, 95 % CI [1.48-8.18]), being born outside of Australia (OR = 3.05, 95 % CI [1.10-8.47]), not identifying as religious or spiritual (OR = 1.80, 95 % CI [1.04-3.10]), increased psychological distress (OR = 1.12, 95 % CI [1.08-1.16]), poor social support from family (OR = 0.89, 95 % CI [0.83-0.95]), poor self-esteem (OR = 0.90, 95 % CI [0.83-0.98]), and poor problem-solving coping (OR = 0.90, 95 % CI [0.82-0.99]). These findings may assist to better identify young people more likely to start self-injuring and also highlight issues to provide a focus for prevention initiatives.

  13. Differential neural processing of social exclusion in adolescents with non-suicidal self-injury: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groschwitz, Rebecca C; Plener, Paul L; Groen, Georg; Bonenberger, Martina; Abler, Birgit

    2016-09-30

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is highly prevalent in adolescence and has been suggested as an autonomous diagnosis in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5). Social rejection is as potential risk-factor for NSSI and depression in adolescence. Objectives of this study were to identify differences in neural processing of social rejection in depressed adolescents with and without co-morbid NSSI and healthy controls. Participants were 28 depressed adolescents (14 with co-morbid NSSI, 79% females) and 15 healthy controls, with an average age of 15.2 years (SD=1.8). Social exclusion was implemented using the Cyberball paradigm 'Cyberball' during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). All participants reported feelings of social exclusion after fMRI scanning. Investigating the effects of NSSI, we found that depressed adolescents with NSSI showed relatively enhanced activation of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC) compared to depressed adolescents without NSSI and also compared to healthy controls. Results point towards divergent processing of social exclusion in depressed adolescents with NSSI as compared to adolescents with mere depression in brain regions previously related to the processing of social exclusion. This finding of distinct neurophysiological responses may stimulate further research on individual treatment approaches.

  14. Non-suicidal self-injury prospectively predicts interpersonal stressful life events and depressive symptoms among adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Taylor A; Hamilton, Jessica L; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2015-08-30

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is the deliberate self-harm of one's tissue, engaged in without lethal intent, and occurs frequently among late adolescents. Although research has indicated that NSSI predicts depression, the potential psychosocial mechanisms through which engagement in NSSI makes one susceptible to future depressive symptoms remain unclear. The present study examined whether NSSI increases the risk of experiencing stressful life events, which, in turn, heightens the risk for subsequent depressive symptoms. Drawn from a sample specifically selected for adolescents at high and low risk for developing bipolar spectrum disorders, a total of 110 late-adolescents (mean age=18.74, SD=.69; 73% female) were administered measures of lifetime and past year engagement in NSSI and current depressive symptomatology. Approximately 6 months later, they completed a measure of depressive symptoms and a questionnaire and interview assessing life events that occurred over the 6-month interval. Results suggest that the frequency of lifetime and past year NSSI predicted the occurrence of interpersonal stressful life events beyond the effects of initial depressive symptoms, but only for late adolescent girls. Results further suggest that higher levels of interpersonal stressful life events mediated the relationship between NSSI frequency and prospective increases in depressive symptoms among girls.

  15. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury--Does social support make a difference? An epidemiological investigation of a Danish national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Mogens Nygaard; Møhl, Bo; DePanfilis, Diane; Vammen, Katrine Schjødt

    2015-06-01

    Teenagers and young adults who had experienced child maltreatment, being bullied in school and other serious life events have an increased risk of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI), but some individuals manage to escape serious stressful life events. The research question is: does social support make a difference? A national representative sample of 4,718 persons born in 1984 were selected for an interview about their childhood, maltreatment, serious life events and social support in order to test if social support during childhood is a statistical mediator between childhood disadvantages and NSSI. The survey obtained a 67% response rate (N=2,980). The incidence rate of NSSI among this sample was estimated at 2.7% among young adult respondents. Participants with a history of child maltreatment, being bullied in school or other traumatic life events reported a rate of NSSI 6 times greater than participants without this history (odds ratio: 6.0). The correlation between traumatic life events during adolescence and NSSI is reduced when low social support is accounted for in the statistical model (padolescents who are engaged in NSSI with respect and dignity when they are treated in the health care system. Results further imply that increasing social support may reduce the likelihood of NSSI.

  16. A prospective study of the influence of the UPPS model of impulsivity on the co-occurrence of bulimic symptoms and non-suicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Claire M; Fischer, Sarah

    2012-12-01

    Individuals with bulimia nervosa (BN) often report co-morbid symptoms of non suicidal self-injury (NSSI). This study examined the influence of (lack of) perseverance, (lack of) premeditation, sensation seeking, and negative urgency (the tendency to act rashly when experiencing negative affect) on these two behavior patterns. We hypothesized that negative urgency influences vulnerability to multiple maladaptive behavior patterns, thus influencing the co-occurrence of NSSI and BN symptoms. 489 young adult women completed baseline assessments, and 209 completed an eight month follow-up assessment. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the influence of four personality pathways to impulsive behavior simultaneously on both behaviors at baseline, and the incremental predictive utility of traits on both behaviors at eight month follow up. Additionally, we examined the influence of NSSI at baseline on symptoms of BN at follow up, and symptoms of BN at baseline on NSSI at follow up. Negative urgency accounted for significant variance in NSSI and eating pathology. Baseline (lack of) perseverance contributed significantly to binge eating frequency at follow-up, when accounting for baseline symptoms. NSSI at baseline was associated with increased purging at follow-up. Individual differences in impulsivity appear to influence both NSSI and eating pathology.

  17. Why alternative teenagers self-harm: exploring the link between non-suicidal self-injury, attempted suicide and adolescent identity

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Robert; Sproeber, Nina; Groschwitz, Rebecca C; Preiss, Marthe; Plener, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Background: The term ‘self-harm’ encompasses both attempted suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Specific adolescent subpopulations such as ethnic or sexual minorities, and more controversially, those who identify as ‘Alternative’ (Goth, Emo) have been proposed as being more likely to self-harm, while other groups such as ‘Jocks’ are linked with protective coping behaviours (for example exercise). NSSI has autonomic (it reduces negative emotions) and social (it communicates distres...

  18. [Autotelic activities aimed at the alteration of the human body from socially accepted to pathological forms: about non-suicidal self-injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmar, Sandor

    2016-03-01

    The author lays down that non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) constitutes an increasingly more common and serious public health problem, especially during the age of adolescence. In spite of the fact that the phenomenon has been known since the beginning of human mankind even in animals, we have not been able to either give a clear explanation or prevent its spreading yet. The author reviews the conceptual disturbances, behavioural phenotypes, cultural-historical and mythological antecedents related to self-injury, just as the controversial concepts, reasons of unclearness of the concepts, and clinical classification of self-injuries, and he outlines a new categorisation/ classification of the explanation of autotelic activities aimed at the alteration of the human body. He reviews the relationship between self-injuries and other psychological signs and symptoms and psychiatric illnesses, the explanations of developing self-injurious behaviour and further research directions. Besides the different models of self-injury he presents a holistic model. Besides the therapeutic guidelines of self-injurious behaviour, he calls the attention to the importance of genetic and nervous system researches, psychological and spiritual research, the importance of mental education and prevention, and he also lists some more essential questions future researchers have to find the answers for if we would like all children to be allowed to enter the adults' world in a healthy and sound state.

  19. The Synopsis, Influential Factors and Intervention of the Non-suicidal Self-injury Behavior among the Adolescences%青少年非自杀性自我伤害行为现状、影响因素及干预

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄任之; 丁立平; 黄敏

    2013-01-01

    近十年来,非自杀性自我伤害行为(Non-suicidal Self-Injury,NSSI)日益受到研究者的关注.对NSSI和自杀的关系,理论界存在两种不同的假设.NSSI起源于青少年,非常隐蔽而具有极大的危险性,与许多精神疾病和异常行为相关,不断增高的发生率促使研究者对其进行了特征、成因、早期评估和治疗等方面的探索.未来的研究还需要进一步地精细其定义和提高相关的研究技术.

  20. [How do adolescents view non-suicidal self-injury? Differences between affected and non-affected adolescents in a school sample].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauber, Rachel; Weizenegger, Benedict; Schmeck, Klaus; Schmid, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Despite the growing number of epidemiologic studies about the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), little knowledge exists regarding the way adolescents view NSSI, whether differences in the attitudes towards NSSI between affected and non-affected adolescents exist and whether the acquaintance with adolescents engaging in NSSI influence one's attitudes towards self-injury? In an epidemiological study of non-suicidal self-injury, we assessed the attitudes of 447 ninth grade students (age 15 years SD = 0.7, 52% male) NSSI using a self-constructed questionnaire with three factors. Sixty one (13.6%) pupils reported that they had intentionally injured themselves once in their life time. 43% (n = 179) indicated that they discuss the topic with others, though over half of these pupils 54% (n = 98) stated feeling burdened by discussions with friends affected by NSSI. Comparisons between affected and non-affected adolescents revealed that adolescents who had never exhibited NSSI tend to believe that NSSI is mostly interpersonally motivated. Moreover, the adolescents affected by NSSI assessed the emotional reaction as more appropriate than non-affected adolescents. This should be considered in the design and refinement of inpatient treatment concepts. Our results suggest focusing on intrapersonal motives in psychotherapeutic sessions and reducing interpersonal motives for self-injurious behaviour through the establishment of clear and transparent milieu therapeutic structural conditions.

  1. Meaning in life and non-suicidal self-injury: A follow-up study with participants with Borderline Personality Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco, José H; Garcia-Alandete, Joaquín; Pérez, Sandra; Guillen, Verónica; Jorquera, Mercedes; Espallargas, Pilar; Botella, Cristina

    2015-12-15

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is considered one of the defining features of people diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Longitudinal studies are needed to identify factors predicting future NSSI in BPD participants. Several studies have shown that low meaning in life is associated with mental health problems, addiction problems, depression, hopelessness, and suicide. The purpose of this paper is to examine whether meaning in life predicts the frequency of NSSI behaviors during the one-year follow-up. The sample was composed up of 80 participants with a BPD diagnosis. We assessed the frequency of NSSI behaviors over a 12-month follow-up period. The results suggest that the participants who had low meaning in life had more frequency of NSSI, depression, and hopelessness at baseline, and more frequency of NSSI during the follow-up, than participants with high meaning in life. The predictor variables: Frequency of NSSI at base line, depression, hopelessness, and meaning in life, significantly predicted the frequency of NSSI during the one-year follow-up. Therefore, meaning in life was the only predictor of NSSI during the follow-up period.

  2. Family-based risk factors for non-suicidal self-injury: Considering influences of maltreatment, adverse family-life experiences, and parent-child relational risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jodi; Bureau, Jean-François; Yurkowski, Kim; Fournier, Tania Renaud; Lafontaine, Marie-France; Cloutier, Paula

    2016-06-01

    The current investigation addressed the potential for unique influences of perceived childhood maltreatment, adverse family-life events, and parent-child relational trauma on the lifetime occurrence and addictive features of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Participants included 957 undergraduate students (747 females; M = 20.14 years, SD = 3.88) who completed online questionnaires regarding the key variables under study. Although self-injuring youth reported more experiences with each family-based risk factor, different patterns of association were found when lifetime engagement in NSSI or its addictive features were under study. Perceived parent-child relational trauma was uniquely linked with NSSI behavior after accounting for perceived childhood maltreatment; adverse family-life events had an additional unique association. In contrast, perceived paternal maltreatment was uniquely related with NSSI's addictive features. Findings underline the importance of studying inter-related family-based risk factors of NSSI simultaneously for a comprehensive understanding of familial correlates of NSSI behavior and its underlying features.

  3. Non-suicidal self-injury, youth, and the Internet: What mental health professionals need to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis Stephen P

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI content and related e-communication have proliferated on the Internet in recent years. Research indicates that many youth who self-injure go online to connect with others who self-injure and view others’ NSSI experiences and share their own through text and videos platforms. Although there are benefits to this behaviour in terms of receiving peer support, these activities can introduce these young people to risks, such as NSSI reinforcement through the sharing of stories and strategies, as well as, risks for triggering of NSSI urges. Due to the nature of these risks mental health professionals need to know about these risks and how to effectively assess adolescents’ online activity in order to adequately monitor the effects of the purported benefits and risks associated with NSSI content. This article offers research informed clinical guidelines for the assessment, intervention, and monitoring of online NSSI activities. To help bridge the gap between youth culture and mental health culture, these essentials include descriptions of Community, Social Networking, and Video/Photo Sharing websites and the terms associated with these websites. Assessment of these behaviours can be facilitated by a basic Functional Assessment approach that is further informed using specific recommended online questions tailored to NSSI online and an assessment of the frequency, duration, and time of day of the online activities. Intervention in this area should initially assess readiness for change and use motivational interviewing to encourage substitution of healthier online activities for the activities that may currently foster harm.

  4. Non-suicidal self-injury, youth, and the Internet: What mental health professionals need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) content and related e-communication have proliferated on the Internet in recent years. Research indicates that many youth who self-injure go online to connect with others who self-injure and view others’ NSSI experiences and share their own through text and videos platforms. Although there are benefits to this behaviour in terms of receiving peer support, these activities can introduce these young people to risks, such as NSSI reinforcement through the sharing of stories and strategies, as well as, risks for triggering of NSSI urges. Due to the nature of these risks mental health professionals need to know about these risks and how to effectively assess adolescents’ online activity in order to adequately monitor the effects of the purported benefits and risks associated with NSSI content. This article offers research informed clinical guidelines for the assessment, intervention, and monitoring of online NSSI activities. To help bridge the gap between youth culture and mental health culture, these essentials include descriptions of Community, Social Networking, and Video/Photo Sharing websites and the terms associated with these websites. Assessment of these behaviours can be facilitated by a basic Functional Assessment approach that is further informed using specific recommended online questions tailored to NSSI online and an assessment of the frequency, duration, and time of day of the online activities. Intervention in this area should initially assess readiness for change and use motivational interviewing to encourage substitution of healthier online activities for the activities that may currently foster harm. PMID:22463379

  5. Non-suicidal self-injury and life stress: A systematic meta-analysis and theoretical elaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Richard T; Cheek, Shayna M; Nestor, Bridget A

    2016-07-01

    Recent years have seen a considerable growth of interest in the study of life stress and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). The current article presents a systematic review of the empirical literature on this association. In addition to providing a comprehensive meta-analysis, the current article includes a qualitative review of the findings for which there were too few cases (i.e., <3) for reliable approximations of effect sizes. Across the studies included in the meta-analysis, a significant but modest relation between life stress and NSSI was found (pooled OR=1.81 [95% CI=1.49-2.21]). After an adjustment was made for publication bias, the estimated effect size was smaller but still significant (pooled OR=1.33 [95% CI=1.08-1.63]). This relation was moderated by sample type, NSSI measure type, and length of period covered by the NSSI measure. The empirical literature is characterized by several methodological limitations, particularly the frequent use of cross-sectional analyses involving temporal overlap between assessments of life stress and NSSI, leaving unclear the precise nature of the relation between these two phenomena (e.g., whether life stress may be a cause, concomitant, or consequence of NSSI). Theoretically informed research utilizing multi-wave designs, assessing life stress and NSSI over relatively brief intervals, and featuring interview-based assessments of these constructs holds promise for advancing our understanding of their relation. The current review concludes with a theoretical elaboration of the association between NSSI and life stress, with the aim of providing a conceptual framework to guide future study in this area.

  6. Non-suicidal Self-injury in Different Eating Disorder Types: Relevance of Personality Traits and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammed A; Steiger, Howard; Jimenez-Murcia, Susana; Israel, Mimi; Granero, Roser; Agüera, Zaida; Castro, Rita; Sánchez, Isabel; Riesco, Nadine; Menchón, José M; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    The study explored lifetime prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in female and male individuals with eating disorders (ED) and compared ED symptoms, general psychopathology and personality traits across individuals with and without a history of NSSI. The incremental discriminative capacity of gender on the manifestation of lifetime NSSI was also studied. A total sample of 1649 consecutively admitted ED patients (1515 women and 134 men) participated in the current study [339 ED + NSSI (ED with NSSI) and 1310 ED - NSSI (ED without NSSI)]. Specific self-report measures were included and other clinical and psychopathological indices. The observed lifetime prevalence of NSSI was 20.6% (20.9% in women and 17.2% in men). NSSI was not associated with ED type or gender. However, ED + NSSI patients exhibited more impulsive behaviour, substance-abuse disorders and additional impulse-control disorders, were younger and had more previous treatments. Age was shown to affect the presentation of NSSI. Additionally, ED + NSSI patients exhibited more severe ED and general psychopathological symptoms and had more dysfunctional personality traits when compared with ED - NSSI. ED + NSSI was found to be positively associated with harm avoidance and self-transcendence but negatively with reward dependence, self-directedness and cooperativeness. Thus, the variables with stronger capacity to identify the presence of ED + NSSI were younger age, harm avoidance, self-directedness and self-transcendence. A lack of association between sex and ED subtype with the presence of NSSI was observed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  7. Differential neural processing of unpleasant haptic sensations in somatic and affective partitions of the insula in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonenberger, Martina; Plener, Paul L; Groschwitz, Rebecca C; Grön, Georg; Abler, Birgit

    2015-12-30

    Altered perception and neural processing of pain have been observed during non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Evidence suggests that this phenomenon could be associated with the affective rather than the somatosensory dimension of pain. Sub-partitions of the insula have been suggested to process these different aspects differentially. In the present study, activation within the posterior, middle, and anterior partitions of the insula upon unpleasant electric stimulation was compared between subjects with a history of NSSI and healthy controls. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated a sample of 30 subjects, 14 of them with a lifetime history of NSSI. Unpleasant electric stimulation to the dorsum of the non-dominant hand was performed at four levels of increasing intensity. Significantly increasing posterior insula activation, which is likely to reflect the somatosensory aspects of unpleasant haptic sensations, was found upon parametrically increasing electric stimulation in both groups. By contrast, activation of the anterior insula, rather related to the more affective aspects of distressing stimuli, was significantly modulated only in the control group, but not in subjects with NSSI. These findings may support present hypotheses of altered processing of the more affective aspects of unpleasant or distressing experiences in NSSI, as a putatively relevant factor for understanding the etiology of this behavior.

  8. Basic Psychological Need Satisfaction, Emotion Dysregulation, and Non-suicidal Self-Injury Engagement in Young Adults: An Application of Self-Determination Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, A Ann; Heath, Nancy L; Mills, Devin J

    2016-03-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a public health concern that affects young adults at alarming rates. The present study examines the role of satisfaction of self-determination theory's three basic needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness in young adults' NSSI engagement. University students who reported ever having engaged in NSSI (n = 40, 85 % female; Mage = 20.10, SD = 1.66) reported significantly lower levels of the satisfaction of all three needs, as well as more difficulties with all aspects of emotion regulation (non-acceptance of emotional responses, difficulty engaging in goal directed behavior, impulse control, lack of emotional awareness, limited access to regulation strategies, lack of emotional clarity), compared to students with no history of NSSI (n = 46, 91 % female; Mage = 19.79, SD = 1.37). Results of a logistic regression analysis revealed that need satisfaction added to the prediction of NSSI group membership after controlling for the effects of emotion regulation. Satisfaction of the need for competence and limited access to emotion regulation strategies accounted for significant variance in NSSI in the final model. The findings suggest that self-determination theory may be a useful framework under which to conceptualize NSSI and that the need for competence may be particularly salient for University students.

  9. The Role of Basic Need Satisfaction in the Onset, Maintenance, and Cessation of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury: An Application of Self-Determination Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, A Ann; Heath, Nancy L; Mills, Devin J

    2016-07-20

    The present study applied self-determination theory to examine the onset, maintenance, and cessation of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents. Specifically, the study examined the relationship between the basic psychological needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness, and NSSI status. Participants were classified into the NSSI Maintain (n = 30), NSSI Start (n = 44), NSSI Stop (n = 21), or Control (n = 98) groups based on NSSI status over 2 time points within a 12-month period. Repeated measures multiple analysis of variance was employed. Satisfaction of the need for competence decreased over time in all adolescents. Adolescents who maintained NSSI behavior reported significantly lower levels of need satisfaction compared to adolescents reporting no history of NSSI engagement, and adolescents who began NSSI over the course of the study reported significantly lower levels of need satisfaction compared to those reporting no history of NSSI engagement. The findings suggest that need satisfaction varies as a function of NSSI status.

  10. Non-suicidal self-injury and suicidal ideation as predictors of suicide attempts in adolescent girls: a multi-wave prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lori N; Pilkonis, Paul A; Hipwell, Alison E; Keenan, Kate; Stepp, Stephanie D

    2015-04-01

    Although both suicide ideation (SI) and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) are known risk factors for suicidal behavior, few longitudinal studies have examined whether having a history of one or both of these factors prospectively predicts increased risk for suicide attempts. According to the theory of acquired capability for suicide, engagement in NSSI may reduce inhibitions around self-inflicted violence, imparting greater risk for suicide attempts among those with SI than would be observed in those with SI who do not have a history of NSSI. We used prospective data from the Pittsburgh Girls Study, a large community sample, to compare groups of girls reporting no SI or NSSI, SI only, or both NSSI and SI between early to late adolescence on any lifetime or recent suicide attempts in late adolescence and early adulthood. As compared to girls with no SI or NSSI history and those with only an SI history, girls with a history of both NSSI and SI were significantly more likely to subsequently report both lifetime and recent suicide attempts. Results are consistent with the acquired capability theory for suicide and suggest that adolescent girls who have engaged in NSSI and also report SI represent a particularly high-risk group in need of prevention and intervention efforts.

  11. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Indirect Self-Harm among Danish High School Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Bo; la Cour, Peter; Skandsen, Annika

    2014-01-01

    -harm (e.g., eating problems, alcohol and drug use) and how this may be influenced by gender. Method: Questionnaires about NSSI (e.g., cutting, burning, scratching, hitting oneself) and indirect self-harm were distri­buted to high school students in theCopenhagen area (N = 5650; response rate 53%; females...... of NSSI as compared with females, and clinicians must look for gender-specific signs of NSSI. It is argued that NSSI can be perceived as a “social pathology,” but it is also indicated that NSSI and indirect self-harm can be evaluated as an expression of ordinary behavior among modern high school students...... 60.8%). Results: A total of 21.5% of the survey respondents had engaged in NSSI (lifetime prevalence), and 16.2% had practiced NSSI within the previous year. Gender differences in NSSI methods were identified. A total of 53.9% of the students had engaged in one or more types of indirect self...

  12. Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Indirect Self-Harm among Danish High School Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Bo; la Cour, Peter; Skandsen, Annika

    2014-01-01

    -harm (e.g., eating problems, alcohol and drug use) and how this may be influenced by gender. Method: Questionnaires about NSSI (e.g., cutting, burning, scratching, hitting oneself) and indirect self-harm were distri­buted to high school students in theCopenhagen area (N = 5650; response rate 53%; females...... 60.8%). Results: A total of 21.5% of the survey respondents had engaged in NSSI (lifetime prevalence), and 16.2% had practiced NSSI within the previous year. Gender differences in NSSI methods were identified. A total of 53.9% of the students had engaged in one or more types of indirect self...... of NSSI as compared with females, and clinicians must look for gender-specific signs of NSSI. It is argued that NSSI can be perceived as a “social pathology,” but it is also indicated that NSSI and indirect self-harm can be evaluated as an expression of ordinary behavior among modern high school students...

  13. Understanding and Managing Self-Injurious Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirpoli, Thomas J.; Lloyd, John Wills

    1987-01-01

    The literature review looks at self-injurious behaviors in handicapped students in terms of characteristics, prevalence, etiology (biological, psychological, and as learned behavior), and management including extinction, positive punishment, negative punishment, and reinforcement of other behaviors. Problems in areas of management, administration,…

  14. Non-suicidal self-injury as a predictor of active and passive suicidal ideation among Iraq/Afghanistan war veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrel, Nathan A; Gratz, Kim L; Tull, Matthew T; Morissette, Sandra B; Meyer, Eric C; DeBeer, Bryann B; Silvia, Paul J; Calhoun, Patrick C; Beckham, Jean C

    2015-06-30

    The present study examined the association between lifetime non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and current suicidal ideation among Iraq/Afghanistan veterans. NSSI was positively associated with passive, active, and concurrent active-passive suicidal ideation at the bivariate level. NSSI remained a predictor of active, OR=5.15, and concurrent active-passive suicidal ideation, OR=7.01, when other risk factors were considered. These findings suggest that NSSI may be a particularly useful marker of active suicidal ideation among veterans.

  15. The Role of Non-suicidal Self-Injury and Binge-Eating/Purging Behaviours in the Caregiving Experience Among Mothers and Fathers of Adolescents with Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depestele, Lies; Lemmens, Gilbert M D; Dierckx, Eva; Baetens, Imke; Schoevaerts, Katrien; Claes, Laurence

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the caregiving experiences of mothers and fathers of restrictive and binge-eating/purging eating disordered (ED) inpatients with and without non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Sixty-five mothers and 65 fathers completed the Experience of Caregiving Inventory. All inpatients completed the Self-Injury Questionnaire-Treatment Related to assess NSSI and the Eating Disorder Evaluation Scale to assess eating disorder symptoms. Mothers reported significant more negative and more positive caregiving experiences compared with fathers. Mothers (but not fathers) of restrictive ED patients reported more positive caregiving experiences compared with mothers of binge-eating/purging patients. The presence of NSSI in ED patients was associated with more negative caregiving experiences of both parents. Mothers and fathers of ED inpatients differ in caregiving experiences, and both binge-eating behaviours and NSSI negatively affect their caregiving experience. Therefore, supportive interventions for parents of ED patients are necessary, especially of those patients who engage in NSSI.

  16. Non-suicidal self-injury among psychiatric outpatient adolescent offspring of Croatian posttraumatic stress disorder male war veterans: Prevalence and psychosocial correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boričević Maršanić, Vlatka; Aukst Margetić, Branka; Ožanić Bulić, Suzana; Đuretić, Irena; Kniewald, Hrvoje; Jukić, Tatjana; Paradžik, Ljubica

    2015-05-01

    The children of male veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at particularly high risk of emotional and behavioral problems. However, no studies have examined non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in this population of youth. To determine the prevalence and psychosocial correlates of lifetime NSSI in a sample of psychiatric outpatient adolescent offspring of Croatian PTSD male veterans. Consecutive outpatient adolescent offspring of Croatian male PTSD veterans, aged 12 to 18 years, were assessed on the Deliberate Self Harm Inventory, the Youth Self-Report, the Family Assessment Device, the Parental Bonding Instrument and the Demographics Questionnaire. Of the whole sample, 52.7% of adolescents reported NSSI at least once during their lifetime. Lifetime NSSI was significantly associated with internalizing symptoms (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.14; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-4.42, p = .040), poor family functioning (adjusted OR = 6.54; 95% CI: 2.02-21.22, p = .002), lower maternal and paternal care (adjusted OR = 0.47; 95% CI: 0.40-0.56, p = .000 and adjusted OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.73-0.91, p = .000, respectively) and higher paternal control (adjusted OR = 1.84; 95% CI: 1.59-2.14, p = .000) in multivariate analysis. No association was found between lifetime NSSI and any of the socio-demographic variables. NSSI is a significant clinical problem in outpatient adolescent offspring of PTSD male veterans, which may be influenced by clinical and family factors. Interventions aimed at reducing internalizing symptoms and improving family functioning and parental behaviors are needed in the treatment of adolescent offspring of male PTSD veterans engaging in NSSI. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Clinical and psychosocial correlates of non-suicidal self-injury within a sample of children and adolescents with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Goldstein, Tina; Birmaher, Boris; Goldstein, Benjamin; Hunt, Jeffrey; Ryan, Neal; Axelson, David; Strober, Michael; Gill, Mary Kay; Hanley, Andrea; Keller, Martin

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence and correlates of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among children and adolescents diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BP). Four hundred-thirty two youth with a diagnosis of BP and their parents, including 193 children and 239 adolescents, completed a diagnostic interview and instruments to assess youth clinical and illness history, youth comorbidity, parental mood disorder, and psychosocial functioning. Approximately 22% of children and 22% of adolescents reported NSSI during the course of their most recent mood episode. In a multivariate model controlling for global impairment, among children, a BPI or BPII diagnosis (versus BPNOS), psychosis, separation anxiety disorder, and greater severity of depressive symptoms were found to be associated with NSSI. Among adolescents, a mixed episode, a suicide attempt, greater severity of depressive symptoms, and poor psychosocial functioning were found to be associated with NSSI. Neither the presence of a youth comorbid disruptive behavior disorder nor a parental mood disorder was associated with NSSI. The primary limitations of this study include the use of a cross-sectional study design, lack of a control group, and limited generalizability of study results to non-clinical and ethnically diverse samples. NSSI is not uncommon among youth with BP, particularly those who present with BPI or BPII, psychosis, a mixed episode, suicidal behavior, severe depressive symptoms, separation anxiety, and/or poor psychosocial functioning. However, the relative importance of these factors in relation to NSSI may vary with age. Treatments for BP that are developmentally sensitive, examine the function of NSSI for each youth, and teach adaptive skills to address emotional and social needs, may prove to be most successful. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Family dynamics and self-injury behaviors: a correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Ruth Ogden; Pavkov, Thomas W; Hecker, Lorna L; Seliner, Michelle M

    2014-04-01

    This study tested the relationship between family dynamics and self-injury. A total of 189 participants responded to a web-based survey collecting information related to previous self-injury behaviors and family dynamics. Participants were over 18 years old who had used self-injury (intentionally harming themselves physically to relieve painful emotions without suicidal intent), but who had not used self-injury for over a year. Results indicated that healthy family dynamics were negatively correlated and associated with higher scores of self-injury behaviors. This study offers some evidence that family dynamics influence self-injury behaviors. The implications for family therapy are discussed.

  19. 自伤青少年的冲动性%Impulsivity in Non-Suicidal Self-Injurious Adolescents in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于丽霞; 凌霄; 江光荣

    2013-01-01

    以自我报告、行为学和脑电为指标,检验自伤青少年的冲动性.研究l,对820名普通中学生和72名工读生进行问卷调查,探讨自伤行为与情绪调节困难、冲动性的关系.结果表明,冲动性能够预测自伤行为,且预测效应量大于情绪调节困难.研究2,采用Go/Nogo范式的ERPs实验,检验自伤组与对照组冲动控制的行为学与脑电差异.结果表明,自伤组Nogo正确反应的N2波幅显著高于对照组,N2潜伏期在部分电极点处高于对照组.脑电地形图显示两者的脑电差异主要体现在前额叶区.结论:自伤青少年的冲动性高于同龄普通青少年.%Impulsivity has been proposed as an important risk factor in Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI). Yet, research outcomes on the relationship of impulsivity to NSSI have been mixed. The present study clarifies this relationship using event-related potentials (ERPs), along with self-reports and behavioral measures. Study 1 aimed to detect the prediction of emotion dysregulation and impulsivity to NSSI. 820 local common high school students and 72 counterparts with problematic behaviors were surveyed, and then the relation among NSSI, difficulties of emotion regulation (DER) and impulsivity were investigated by self-report measurements. Regression analysis results indicated that both DER and impulsivity could well predict NSSI, and contribution of impulsivity was much bigger than that of DER. In Study 2, a Go/Nogo paradigm was adopted to test the impulsivity of the injurers using behavioural measures and Nogo-N2 of ERPs. Participants were 12 confirmed self-injurious adolescents and 12 typical school middle students chosen from Study 1. The group differences (injurers vs controls) in behavior (response time and false alarm) and ERPs index (N2 amplitude and latency in successful Nogo trials) were analyzed in detail. Results disclosed that the NSSI group's probability of false alarm was higher than the control group

  20. Depersonalization disorder and self-injurious behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, D; Stein, D J; Hollander, E

    1995-01-01

    Depersonalization is a subjective sense of unreality regarding various aspects of the self, experienced as disconnectedness from one's own body, mentations, feelings, or actions. When episodes of depersonalization are recurrent or persistent and lead to distress or dysfunction, the diagnosis of depersonalization disorder is made. Certain similarities in phenomenology, comorbidity, neurochemistry, and treatment response suggest a relationship to the obsessive-compulsive spectrum. However, depersonalization is a very poorly studied condition, and any conclusions must be viewed tentatively. Self-injurious behaviors are defined as intentionally self-inflicted bodily injuries without lethal intent. Basic categories are briefly described. Subsequently, the phenomenology and biology of both impulsive and compulsive self-injurious behaviors, and their relationship to the obsessive-compulsive spectrum, are discussed.

  1. Resting cardiac function in adolescent non-suicidal self-injury: The impact of borderline personality disorder symptoms and psychosocial functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Julian; Rinnewitz, Lena; Parzer, Peter; Resch, Franz; Thayer, Julian F; Kaess, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) is reduced in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with comorbid psychopathology, in particular BPD. We aimed to examine differences in cardiac function (vmHRV and heart rate [HR]) comparing adolescents (12-17 years) engaging in NSSI (n=30) and healthy controls (n=30). Further, we aimed to determine clinical concomitants of cardiac function in patients with NSSI. Analyses showed no significant group differences on cardiac function. Controlling for a host of confounding variables resting state HR and vmHRV in adolescents with NSSI were significantly correlated with BPD symptoms and the current level of functioning.

  2. Borderline personality disorder features, emotion dysregulation and non-suicidal self-injury: Preliminary findings in a sample of community-dwelling Italian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somma, Antonella; Sharp, Carla; Borroni, Serena; Fossati, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    In order to assess the relationships among borderline personality disorder features, non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and emotion dysregulation, 122 community-dwelling Italian adolescents were administered by the Italian translations of the Borderline Personality Features Scale for Children-11, the Deliberate Self-Harm Inventory and the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS). Regression models showed that both Deliberate Self-Harm Inventory (DSHI) and DERS scores significantly predicted Borderline Personality Features Scale for Children-11 total score; moreover, the DSHI total score significantly predicted the DERS total score. Our findings suggest that borderline personality features in adolescence are moderately, albeit significantly related to NSSI, and that emotion dysregulation does not completely account for the association between borderline personality features and NSSI, although it seems to explain a non-trivial proportion of this relationship. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The relationship between interpersonal trauma history and the functions of non-suicidal self-injury in young adults: An experience sampling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Sarah; Stermac, Lana

    2017-05-16

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) has been reported to serve a range of functions for individuals who engage in it. Despite considerable variation in NSSI functions between individuals, limited attention has been paid to exploring relationships between NSSI functions and other characteristics of self-injuring individuals, such as trauma history. This is despite allusion to trauma history in the suggested etiology of some NSSI functions (e.g., anti-dissociation, self-punishment). The present study used a 21-day online daily diary to explore possible relationships between common NSSI functions and past interpersonal trauma in community young adults (n = 38). The interpersonal boundaries and anti-dissociation functions significantly related to interpersonal trauma severity in multiple regression analyses; the interpersonal boundaries function continued to significantly relate to interpersonal trauma severity when controlling for the number of NSSI functions endorsed.

  4. The longitudinal course of non-suicidal self-injury and deliberate self-harm: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plener, Paul L; Schumacher, Teresa S; Munz, Lara M; Groschwitz, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) has been proposed as diagnostic entity and was added to the section 3 of the DSM 5. Nevertheless, little is known about the long-term course of this disorder and many studies have pointed to the fact that NSSI seems to be volatile over time. We aimed to assemble studies providing longitudinal data about NSSI and furthermore included studies using the definition of deliberate self-harm (DSH) to broaden the epidemiological picture. Using a systematic search strategy, we were able to retrieve 32 studies reporting longitudinal data about NSSI and DSH. We furthermore aimed to describe predictors for the occurrence of NSSI and DSH that were identified in these longitudinal studies. Taken together, there is evidence for an increase in rates of NSSI and DSH in adolescence with a decline in young adulthood. With regards to predictors, rates of depressive symptoms and female gender were often reported as predictor for both NSSI and DSH.

  5. How Can We Stop Our Children from Hurting Themselves? Stages of Change, Motivational Interviewing, and Exposure Therapy Applications for Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in children and adolescents is a major public health problem. Fortunately, we can apply functional analysis, in conjunction with empirically validated NSSI assessment measurements, to precisely evaluate the biopsychosocial risk factors and reinforcements that contextualize NSSI. Empirically validated behavioral…

  6. Prone to excitement: adolescent females with Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) show altered cortical pattern to emotional and NSS-related material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plener, Paul L; Bubalo, Nikola; Fladung, Anne K; Ludolph, Andrea G; Lulé, Dorothée

    2012-01-01

    Emotion-regulation difficulties have been identified as one of the core components in Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), a behaviour often beginning in adolescence. This pilot study evaluated differences in emotion processing between 18 female adolescents with and without NSSI by using verbal responses and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Responses to pictures taken from the International Affective Picture System and slides with reference to NSSI were recorded both by verbal rating of valence and arousal and by fMRI. The NSSI group rated pictures with self-injurious reference as significantly more arousing than controls. For emotional pictures, the NSSI group showed a significantly stronger brain response in the amygdala, hippocampus and anterior cingulate cortex bilaterally. Depression explained differences between groups in the limbic area. Furthermore, the NSSI group also showed increased activity in the middle orbitofrontal cortex, and inferior and middle frontal cortex when viewing NSSI picture material. Participants with NSSI showed decreased activity in correlation to arousal in the occipital cortex and to valence in inferior frontal cortex when watching emotional pictures. The fMRI data support the notion that individuals with NSSI show an altered neural pattern for emotional and NSSI pictures. Behavioural data highlight proneness to excitement regarding NSSI topics. This fMRI study provides evidence for emotion-regulation deficits in the developing brain of adolescents with NSSI.

  7. The Role of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Binge-Eating/Purging Behaviours in Family Functioning in Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depestele, Lies; Claes, Laurence; Dierckx, Eva; Baetens, Imke; Schoevaerts, Katrien; Lemmens, Gilbert M D

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate family functioning of restrictive and binge-eating/purging eating disordered adolescents with or without non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), as perceived by the patients and their parents (mothers and fathers). In total, 123 patients (between 14 and 24 years), 98 mothers and 79 fathers completed the Family Assessment Device. Patients completed the Self-Injury Questionnaire-Treatment Related and the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised. No main effects were found of restrictive versus binge-eating/purging behaviour nor of presence/absence of NSSI. For the parents, a significant interaction between binge-eating/purging behaviour and NSSI emerged: Mothers and fathers reported worse family functioning in the binge-eating/purging group in presence of NSSI, whereas mothers reported worse family functioning in the restrictive group without NSSI. Parental perception of family functioning is affected by the combined presence of binge-eating/purging behaviour and NSSI. This finding should be taken into account when treating families living with eating disorders.

  8. The addictive model of self-harming (non-suicidal and suicidal behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilario eBlasco-Fontecilla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Behavioral addictions such as gambling, sun-tanning, shopping, internet use, work, exercise, or even love and sex are frequent, and share many characteristics and common neurobiological and genetic underpinnings with substance addictions (i.e., tolerance, withdrawal, and relapse. Recent literature suggests that both non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI and suicidal behavior (SB can also be conceptualized as addictions. The major aim of this mini review is to review the literature and explore the neurobiological and psychological mechanisms underlying the addiction to self-harming behaviors.Method: This is a narrative review. The authors performed literature searches on PubMed and Google for suicidal behavior, self-harming, addiction, and major repeaters. Given the scarce literature on the topic, a subset of the most closely related studies was selected. The authors also focused on three empirical studies testing the hypothesis that major repeaters (individuals with ≥5 lifetime suicide attempts represent a distinctive suicidal phenotype, and are the individuals at risk of developing an addiction to SB. Results: The authors reviewed the concept of behavioral addictions and major repeaters, current empirical evidence testing concerning whether or not NSSI and SB can be understood as addictions, and the putative mechanisms underlying them.Conclusion: Our review suggests that both NSSI and SB can be conceptualized as addictions. This is relevant because if some individual’s self-harming behaviors are better conceptualized as an addiction, treatment approaches could be tailored to this addiction.

  9. The Relationship between Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and the UPPS-P Impulsivity Facets in Eating Disorders and Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurence; Islam, Mohammed A.; Fagundo, Ana B.; Jimenez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Agüera, Zaida; Rossi, Elisa; Menchón, José M.; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the association between Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) and the UPPS-P impulsivity facets in eating disorder patients and healthy controls. The prevalence of NSSI in eating disorder (ED) patients ranged from 17% in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN-R) patients to 43% in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN). In healthy controls (HC), the prevalence of NSSI was 19%. Eating disorder patients from the binge eating/purging type showed significantly more NSSI compared to restrictive ED and HC participants. Binge-eating/purging ED patients also scored significantly higher on Negative/Positive Urgency, Lack of Premeditation and Lack of Perseverance compared to HC and restrictive ED patients. Comparable findings were found between ED patients and HC with and without NSSI; ED patients and HC with NSSI scored significantly higher in four of the five UPPS-P dimensions compared to participants without NSSI; Sensation Seeking was the exception. Finally, the presence of NSSI in HC/ED patients was particularly predicted by low levels of Perseverance. Therefore, the treatment of ED patients with NSSI certainly needs to focus on the training of effortful control. PMID:25993565

  10. The role of emotion regulation strategies and dissociation in non-suicidal self-injury for women with borderline personality disorder and comorbid eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Haro, María V; Wessman, Inga; Botella, Cristina; García-Palacios, Azucena

    2015-11-01

    Different dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies are observed in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and comorbid eating disorders (EDs) who report non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of two well-defined emotion regulation strategies (i.e. expressive suppression and cognitive reappraisal) and dissociation with NSSI. The participants were sixty-eight women diagnosed with BPD and comorbid ED. A cross-sectional research design was used, and clinical interviews and self-report questionnaires were administered to collect data. Multiple regression was conducted to analyze the relationship of two emotion regulation strategies and dissociation with NSSI. According to the results, for low cognitive reappraisal scores, an increase in dissociation leads to an increase in NSSI; however, as cognitive reappraisal increases, higher dissociation is associated with fewer NSSI. When expressive suppression is low, an increase in cognitive reappraisal is associated with a decrease in NSSI; however, as suppression increases, a higher cognitive reappraisal has less effect on decreasing NSSI. These findings indicate that cognitive reappraisal reduces the harmful effects that dissociation has on NSSI, and that expressive suppression interferes with the beneficial effects of cognitive reappraisal on NSSI. Therefore, targeting expressive suppression before cognitive reappraisal is conducted may enhance treatment outcomes for patients with BPD and comorbid ED.

  11. Non-suicidal self-injury during an exposure-based treatment in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder and borderline features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Antje; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Priebe, Kathlen; Dyer, Anne S; Steil, Regina; Schmahl, Christian; Bohus, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and features of borderline personality disorder (BPD) often show non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). However, patients with on-going NSSI are mostly excluded from PTSD treatments and NSSI during PTSD treatment has rarely been investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the course of NSSI during an exposure-based PTSD treatment. This study focused on a subset (n = 34) of data from a randomised controlled trial that tested the efficacy of a residential PTSD programme (DBT-PTSD) in comparison to a treatment-as-usual wait-list. In this subset we compared a) NSSI during treatment between participants who had or had not engaged in NSSI pre-treatment and b) NSSI between treatment weeks that included exposure interventions vs. those that did not. We further compared the outcome between participants with vs. without NSSI at pre-treatment. At pre-treatment, 62% participants reported on-going NSSI. During treatment, the percentage of participants carrying out NSSI decreased to 38% (p = 0.003). The rates of NSSI were similar in treatment weeks with exposure compared to weeks without. Similar results were observed for the frequency of NSSI. At the end of treatment, participants showed comparable improvement in PTSD symptoms regardless of whether or not they had exhibited NSSI beforehand.

  12. Cross-sectional and temporal association between non-suicidal self-injury and suicidal ideation in young adults: The explanatory roles of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Carol; Rogers, Megan L; Joiner, Thomas E

    2016-12-30

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a strong predictor of suicidal ideation and attempts. Consistent with the interpersonal theory of suicide, preliminary evidence suggests that NSSI is associated with higher levels of perceived burdensomeness (PB) and thwarted belongingness (TB). However, no study to date has examined the cross-sectional and prospective relationships between NSSI, TB, PB, and suicidal ideation (SI). To fill this gap, this study examined the mediating role of TB and PB in the relationship between NSSI and SI at baseline and follow-up. Young adults (N=49) with and without histories of NSSI completed self-report measures of TB, PB, and SI at three time points over two months. NSSI history was associated with higher levels of PB, TB, and SI at all time points. TB and PB significantly accounted for the relationship between NSSI history and SI at baseline. However, the relationship between NSSI history and SI at follow-up was mediated by PB, not TB. Findings provide evidence for the roles of TB and PB in the relationship between NSSI and SI, and partial support for the interpersonal theory of suicide. Future research and clinical implications are discussed.

  13. Non-suicidal Self-injury among Adolescents%青少年非自杀性自我伤害行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈辉

    2013-01-01

    非自杀性自我伤害(Non-suicidal self-injury,NSSI)是指个体以不同的方式故意破坏自己的身体组织,但无明确自杀意图的自我伤害行为.非自杀性自我伤害与自杀有极强的相关性,且增加了自杀的风险.青春期是自我伤害行为的高发时期,自我伤害已成为危害青少年身心健康的重要公共卫生问题.本文从故意自我伤害的概念和分类出发,简要阐述青少年非自杀性自我伤害的发生现状、基本特征及危险因素,对青少年自我伤害后的评估和治疗策略进行了归纳和综述,并提出未来的研究方向.

  14. Non-suicidal self-injury in patients with eating disorder: associations with identity formation above and beyond anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurence; Luyckx, Koen; Bijttebier, Patricia; Turner, Brianna; Ghandi, Amarendra; Smets, Jos; Norre, Jan; Van Assche, Leen; Verheyen, Els; Goris, Yvienne; Hoksbergen, Ingrid; Schoevaerts, Katrien

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the association between non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and problems in identity formation among patients with eating disorder (ED). NSSI is highly prevalent in ED, and problems with identity formation are characteristic of both NSSI and ED. Few studies, however, have investigated identity formation in patients with ED with and without NSSI while taking into account comorbid psychopathology (e.g. anxiety and depression). Therefore, we investigated the relationships between NSSI characteristics, identity confusion/synthesis, and anxiety/depression in 99 female patients with ED by means of self-report questionnaires. The results showed that 58.6% of the patients with ED engaged in at least one type of NSSI (most frequently cutting), with no significant differences in rates of NSSI or identity problems among ED subtypes. Presence, versatility and automatic negative reinforcement functions of NSSI were each significantly and positively related to identity confusion and negatively related to identity synthesis. Even after controlling for age, anxiety, and depression, lack of identity synthesis remained a significant predictor of NSSI in patients with ED. Given that NSSI may constitute an effort to deal with identity confusion/synthesis in patients with ED, therapists should take this developmental task into account while treating patients with ED with NSSI.

  15. Prevalence, correlates, and prospective predictors of non-suicidal self-injury among New Zealand adolescents: cross-sectional and longitudinal survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garisch, Jessica Anne; Wilson, Marc Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is common among adolescents and linked to many maladaptive outcomes. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and correlates of NSSI among a community sample of New Zealand adolescents. A self-report questionnaire was administered to adolescents at time 1 (N = 1162, mean age = 16.35), and approximately five months later (time 2, N = 830, mean age = 16.49). Prevalence and bivariate correlations were assessed at both time points, and cross-lag correlations using matched data (N = 495, mean age = 16.23). Lifetime history of NSSI was 48.7 % (females 49.4 %, males 48 %). Consistent with previous international research, NSSI was associated with higher Alexithymia, depression, anxiety, bullying, impulsivity, substance abuse, abuse history and sexuality concerns and lower mindfulness, resilience and self-esteem. Cross-lag correlations suggested NSSI is directly (perhaps causally) related to psychological vulnerability in various domains (e.g., increased depression and lower self-esteem), while bullying may be more distal to NSSI, rather than a proximal predictor.

  16. Association between non-suicidal self-injuries and suicide attempts in Chinese adolescents and college students: a cross-section study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Tang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study examined the association between non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI and suicide attempts among Chinese adolescents and college students. METHODS: A total sample of 2013 Chinese students were randomly selected from five schools in Wuhan, China, including 1101 boys and 912 girls with the age ranging between 10 and 24 years. NSSI, suicidal ideation, suicide attempts and depressive symptoms were measured by self-rated questionnaires. Self-reported suicide attempts were regressed on suicidal ideation and NSSI, controlling for participants' depressive symptoms, and demographic characteristics. RESULTS: The self-reported prevalence rates of NSSI, suicidal ideation, suicide attempts were 15.5%, 8.8%, and 3.5%, respectively. Logistic regression analyses indicated that NSSI was significantly associated with self-reported suicide attempts. Analyses examining the conditional association of NSSI and suicidal ideation with self-reported suicide attempts revealed that NSSI was significantly associated with greater risk of suicide attempts in those not reporting suicidal ideation than those reporting suicidal ideation in the past year. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the importance of NSSI as a potentially independent risk factor for suicide attempts among Chinese/Han adolescents and college students.

  17. Adolescent non-suicidal self-injury: a cross-national study of community samples from Italy, the Netherlands and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giletta, Matteo; Scholte, Ron H J; Engels, Rutger C M E; Ciairano, Silvia; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2012-05-15

    This study examined rates and correlates of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) across three non-clinical adolescent samples from different countries. Surveys were administered to 1862 adolescents (M(age)=15.69, S.D.=0.87) from Italy (n=827), the Netherlands (n=675), and United States (n=360), including measures of NSSI, substance use, internal (i.e., depressive symptoms, loneliness), and interpersonal factors (i.e., peer victimization, peer preference). After controlling for socio-demographic differences, similar prevalence of NSSI was found across the three samples, with approximately 24% of the adolescents reporting at least one NSSI episode within the last year. Multivariate logistic regressions showed that adolescents' victimization and higher levels of depressive symptoms and family-related loneliness were associated concurrently with NSSI comparably in all three samples. However, multi-group analyses indicated that the association between NSSI and substance use varied significantly across samples, indicating that NSSI related more strongly to substance use (i.e., cigarette smoking and frequent marijuana use) in the sample from the United States rather than the samples from the Netherlands and Italy. Findings provide evidence of NSSI and suggest high similarities in rates and correlates across samples from different countries. Future research should further explore NSSI cross-nationally.

  18. Victimization Profiles, Non-Suicidal Self-Injury, Suicide Attempt, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptomology: Application of Latent Class Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Katie; Boduszek, Daniel; Sharratt, Kathryn

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have incorporated multiple dimensions of victimization or examined whether victimization profiles differ by gender. Consequently, the present study sought to extend prior research by using latent class analysis (LCA) to identify naturally occurring subgroups of individuals who have experienced victimization, and to test for sex differences. Data from 4,016 females and 3,032 males in the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) were analyzed. Evidence of the existence of similar victimization subtypes for both males and females emerged, with a three-class solution providing the best fit to the data for both sexes. Furthermore, the classes were labeled "low victimization" (the baseline class; Class 3), the "high victimization class" (Class 1), and "the bullying and domestic violence class" (Class 2) for both males and females. Multinomial logistic regression was used to interpret the nature of the latent classes, or groups, by estimating the associations with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) dimensions, suicide attempt, and non-suicidal self-injury. Although different constellations of victimization experiences did not emerge through the gender-specific analyses, the nature of the associations between class membership and external variables differed between males and females. Findings highlight the heterogeneity of victimization experiences and their relations to functioning, and have implications for policy and practice implications.

  19. Prevalence and function of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a community sample of adolescents, using suggested DSM-5 criteria for a potential NSSI disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterqvist, Maria; Lundh, Lars-Gunnar; Dahlström, Orjan; Svedin, Carl Göran

    2013-07-01

    Previous prevalence rates of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents have varied considerably. In the present cross-sectional study, prevalence rates, characteristics and functions of NSSI were assessed in a large randomized community sample consisting of 3,060 (50.5 % female) Swedish adolescents aged 15-17 years. The suggested criteria for NSSI disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, (DSM-5) were used to assess prevalence rates with the aim of arriving at a more precise estimate. Out of the whole sample, 1,088 (35.6 %) adolescents (56.2 % female) reported at least one episode of NSSI during the last year, of which 205 (6.7 %) met suggested DSM-5 criteria for a potential NSSI disorder diagnosis. The NSSI disorder diagnosis was significantly more common in girls (11.1 % vs. 2.3 %, χ (2) (1, N = 3046) = 94.08, p reinforcement) resulted in a slightly better fit. The most frequently reported factors were positive and negative automatic reinforcement. A majority of functions were significantly more often reported by girls than boys. The implications of the suggested DSM-5 criteria and reported functions are discussed.

  20. Effects of suppression and acceptance of sadness on the urge for non-suicidal self-injury and self-punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svaldi, Jennifer; Dorn, Christina; Matthies, Swantje; Philipsen, Alexandra

    2012-12-30

    The present study wanted to test the course of the urge for non-suicidal self-injury (UNSSI) and the urge for self-punishment (USP) when suppressing or accepting upcoming emotions in response to a sadness-inducing film clip in female participants with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Thirty-six women with BPD were allocated either to a condition in which they were asked to engage in expressive suppression or acceptance while watching a sadness-inducing film clip. Ratings of UNSSI, USP, and positive and negative emotions were assessed prior to the clip (baseline), immediately after it (t1) and after a 5min waiting period (t2), during which participants viewed landscape pictures. Additionally, physiological measures were obtained. Main results revealed a significant increase in UNSSI from baseline to t2 in the acceptance, but not in the suppression group. Furthermore, USP scores significantly increased from baseline to t2 in the acceptance, but not in the suppression condition. However, there was no differential impact on the sympathetic and parasympathetic branch depending on strategy. The results are in line with recent literature showing that expressive suppression in BPD may also have an adaptive function.

  1. Is non-suicidal self-injury related to impulsivity in anorexia nervosa? Results from self-report and performance-based tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurence; Fagundo, Ana B; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Agüera, Zaida; Giner-Bartolome, Cristina; Granero, Roser; Sánchez, Isabel; Riesco, Nadine; Menchón, Jose Manuel; Tarrega, Salomé; Fernandez-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the association between non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and impulsivity in anorexia nervosa (AN) patients by means of self-report and behavioural tasks. In total, 60 female AN patients were included in the study, filled out the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11) and performed three performance-based tasks to assess different facets of impulsivity. Overall, 30% of the AN patients engaged in at least one form of NSSI during their lifetime. AN patients with and without NSSI did not significantly differ on the BIS-11 impulsiveness scale. On the performance-based measures, few differences emerged between AN patients with and without NSSI. Patients with NSSI showed more perseverations and perseveration errors (p < .05). The associations between self-report and performance-based measures were rather low, except for the association between the BIS-11 and Wisconsin Card Sorting Task perseveration responses and errors (correlations |r| range between .32 and .42). The implications for theory and treatment of AN patients with and without NSSI will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  2. The Relationship between Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and the UPPS-P Impulsivity Facets in Eating Disorders and Healthy Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Claes

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated the association between Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI and the UPPS-P impulsivity facets in eating disorder patients and healthy controls. The prevalence of NSSI in eating disorder (ED patients ranged from 17% in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN-R patients to 43% in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN. In healthy controls (HC, the prevalence of NSSI was 19%. Eating disorder patients from the binge eating/purging type showed significantly more NSSI compared to restrictive ED and HC participants. Binge-eating/purging ED patients also scored significantly higher on Negative/Positive Urgency, Lack of Premeditation and Lack of Perseverance compared to HC and restrictive ED patients. Comparable findings were found between ED patients and HC with and without NSSI; ED patients and HC with NSSI scored significantly higher in four of the five UPPS-P dimensions compared to participants without NSSI; Sensation Seeking was the exception. Finally, the presence of NSSI in HC/ED patients was particularly predicted by low levels of Perseverance. Therefore, the treatment of ED patients with NSSI certainly needs to focus on the training of effortful control.

  3. The Mediating Effects of Emotion Regulation and Dyadic Coping on the Relationship Between Romantic Attachment and Non-suicidal Self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Christine; Lafontaine, Marie-France; Bureau, Jean-François

    2017-02-01

    Insecure attachment is believed to play a fundamental role in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). In fact, the quality of parent-child attachment relationships has become an emerging topic attracting a growing number of theoretical and research contributions in the field of NSSI. However, despite these considerable advances in the scientific study of NSSI, progress pertaining to investigating the quality of romantic attachment relationship is lacking. In an effort to expand current knowledge, the present study aims to not only explore the relationships between romantic attachment and NSSI, but also to explore the mechanisms by which these two variables relate by examining the mediating role that emotion regulation and dyadic coping might play in this relationship. Participants consisted of 797 (81.9 % female) university students, all of whom were involved in a romantic relationship for at least 6 months and between the ages of 17 and 25. Results revealed that although difficulties in emotion regulation mediated the relationships between romantic attachment insecurity (i.e., attachment anxiety and avoidance) and NSSI, dyadic coping was not found to be a significant mediator. These results highlight the importance of attachment security and internal processes to manage stress in the prevention of NSSI.

  4. The Relationship between Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and the UPPS-P Impulsivity Facets in Eating Disorders and Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurence; Islam, Mohammed A; Fagundo, Ana B; Jimenez-Murcia, Susana; Granero, Roser; Agüera, Zaida; Rossi, Elisa; Menchón, José M; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the association between Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) and the UPPS-P impulsivity facets in eating disorder patients and healthy controls. The prevalence of NSSI in eating disorder (ED) patients ranged from 17% in restrictive anorexia nervosa (AN-R) patients to 43% in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN). In healthy controls (HC), the prevalence of NSSI was 19%. Eating disorder patients from the binge eating/purging type showed significantly more NSSI compared to restrictive ED and HC participants. Binge-eating/purging ED patients also scored significantly higher on Negative/Positive Urgency, Lack of Premeditation and Lack of Perseverance compared to HC and restrictive ED patients. Comparable findings were found between ED patients and HC with and without NSSI; ED patients and HC with NSSI scored significantly higher in four of the five UPPS-P dimensions compared to participants without NSSI; Sensation Seeking was the exception. Finally, the presence of NSSI in HC/ED patients was particularly predicted by low levels of Perseverance. Therefore, the treatment of ED patients with NSSI certainly needs to focus on the training of effortful control.

  5. An investigation of non-suicidal self-injury and coping styles in undergraduates%大学生非自杀性自伤行为和应对方式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔慧芬; 陈瑜

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨大学生非自杀性自伤行为以及应对方式的特征.方法 使用应对方式问卷和自编非自杀性自伤行为问卷,对当地某高校480名一年级大学生进行问卷调查.结果 466名大一学生完成调查,12.2%(57名)报告既往曾有过自伤,其中67%多次自伤(≥2次);最常见的心理动机是缓解不良情绪.与无自伤组相比,自伤组自责、幻想因子得分高(P <0.05,P<0.01),解决问题、求助、合理化因子得分低(P<0.05,P<0.01);自伤组女生的自责因子得分比男生高(P<0.05).结论 非自杀性自伤行为在大学生中发生率较高,具有故意性、反复性、自我隐蔽、损伤程度轻等特征,与自杀行为有本质区别.自伤学生以消极应对方式为主,通过自伤行为来缓解心理应激或冲突.%Objective To explore the characteristics of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and the coping styles in university students. Methods A total of 480 freshmen in one university in Nanjing were assessed with self-designed NSSI questionnaire and Coping Style Scale ( CSS). Results A total of 466 students completed the survey. Prevalence of NSSI was 12.2% (57 cases) , and 67% of the students had multiple NSSI (more than 2 times). The most common motivation was to relieve negative feelings. Scores of self-blame and fantasy in NSSI students were significandy higher than those in non-NSSI students (P <0. 05 and 0. 01 respectively). Scores of problem-resolving, help - seeking and rationalization in NSSI students were significantly lower than those in non-NSSI students (P <0. 05). Score of self-blame in females with NSSI was significantly higher than that in males with NSSI ( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion Non-suicidal self-injury behavior is common in undergraduates. It is featured with intentional injury, taking place repeatedly, taking place secretly and mild degree of injury, which has essential distinction with suicidal behavior. Subjects with non-suicidal self-injury

  6. Methodological issues associated with collecting sensitive information over the telephone - experience from an Australian non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) prevalence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Collecting population data on sensitive issues such as non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is problematic. Case note audits or hospital/clinic based presentations only record severe cases and do not distinguish between suicidal and non-suicidal intent. Community surveys have largely been limited to school and university students, resulting in little much needed population-based data on NSSI. Collecting these data via a large scale population survey presents challenges to survey methodologists. This paper addresses the methodological issues associated with collecting this type of data via CATI. Methods An Australia-wide population survey was funded by the Australian Government to determine prevalence estimates of NSSI and associations, predictors, relationships to suicide attempts and suicide ideation, and outcomes. Computer assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) on a random sample of the Australian population aged 10+ years of age from randomly selected households, was undertaken. Results Overall, from 31,216 eligible households, 12,006 interviews were undertaken (response rate 38.5%). The 4-week prevalence of NSSI was 1.1% (95% ci 0.9-1.3%) and lifetime prevalence was 8.1% (95% ci 7.6-8.6). Methodological concerns and challenges in regard to collection of these data included extensive interviewer training and post interview counselling. Ethical considerations, especially with children as young as 10 years of age being asked sensitive questions, were addressed prior to data collection. The solution required a large amount of information to be sent to each selected household prior to the telephone interview which contributed to a lower than expected response rate. Non-coverage error caused by the population of interest being highly mobile, homeless or institutionalised was also a suspected issue in this low prevalence condition. In many circumstances the numbers missing from the sampling frame are small enough to not cause worry, especially when compared with

  7. Methodological issues associated with collecting sensitive information over the telephone - experience from an Australian non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI prevalence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fullerton Simon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collecting population data on sensitive issues such as non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI is problematic. Case note audits or hospital/clinic based presentations only record severe cases and do not distinguish between suicidal and non-suicidal intent. Community surveys have largely been limited to school and university students, resulting in little much needed population-based data on NSSI. Collecting these data via a large scale population survey presents challenges to survey methodologists. This paper addresses the methodological issues associated with collecting this type of data via CATI. Methods An Australia-wide population survey was funded by the Australian Government to determine prevalence estimates of NSSI and associations, predictors, relationships to suicide attempts and suicide ideation, and outcomes. Computer assisted telephone interviewing (CATI on a random sample of the Australian population aged 10+ years of age from randomly selected households, was undertaken. Results Overall, from 31,216 eligible households, 12,006 interviews were undertaken (response rate 38.5%. The 4-week prevalence of NSSI was 1.1% (95% ci 0.9-1.3% and lifetime prevalence was 8.1% (95% ci 7.6-8.6. Methodological concerns and challenges in regard to collection of these data included extensive interviewer training and post interview counselling. Ethical considerations, especially with children as young as 10 years of age being asked sensitive questions, were addressed prior to data collection. The solution required a large amount of information to be sent to each selected household prior to the telephone interview which contributed to a lower than expected response rate. Non-coverage error caused by the population of interest being highly mobile, homeless or institutionalised was also a suspected issue in this low prevalence condition. In many circumstances the numbers missing from the sampling frame are small enough to not cause worry

  8. Experimental analysis and extinction of self-injurious escape behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, B A; Pace, G M; Kalsher, M J; Cowdery, G E; Cataldo, M F

    1990-01-01

    Three studies are presented in which environmental correlates of self-injurious behavior were systematically examined and later used as the basis for treatment. In Study 1, 7 developmentally disabled subjects were exposed to a series of conditions designed to identify factors that maintain self-injurious behavior: attention contingent on self-injurious behavior (positive reinforcement), escape from or avoidance of demands contingent on self-injurious behaviour (negative reinforcement), alone (automatic reinforcement), and play (control). Results of a multielement design showed that each subject's self-injurious behavior occurred more frequently in the demand condition, suggesting that the behavior served an avoidance or escape function. Six of the 7 subjects participated in Study 2. During educational sessions, "escape extinction" was applied as treatment for their self-injurious behavior in a multiple baseline across subjects design. Results showed noticeable reduction or elimination of self-injurious behavior for each subject and an increase in compliance with instructions in all subjects for whom compliance data were taken. The 7th subject, whose self-injurious behavior during Study 1 occurred in response to medical demands (i.e., physical examinations), participated in Study 3. Treatment was comprised of extinction, as in Study 2, plus reinforcement for tolerance of the examination procedure, and was evaluated in a multiple baseline across settings design. Results showed that the treatment was successful in eliminating self-injurious behavior and that its effects transferred across eight new therapists and three physicians. General implications for the design, interpretation, and uses of assessment studies are discussed.

  9. Non-suicidal self-injury maintenance and cessation among adolescents: a one-year longitudinal investigation of the role of objectified body consciousness, depression and emotion dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Jamie; Heath, Nancy; Hu, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Using the objectification theory, scholars have theorized the sense of detachment and disregard for the body that results from continued body objectification are believed to put a person at greater risk for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), due to a lack of emotional investment in the body. The goal of the current study was to longitudinally investigate the association between body objectification and NSSI among an early adolescent sample. The overall sample consisted of 120 participants (56 % female) who ranged in age from 11 to 13 years of age (M = 12.34, SD = .48). Participants were followed over the course of a 12-month period, and classified into three groups of interest; adolescents who reported maintaining NSSI behaviour over the course of a year (NSSI Maintain group, n = 20), adolescents who reported stopping the behaviour over the course of a year (NSSI Stop group, n = 40), and a comparison group of adolescents who did not report engaging in NSSI (n = 60). Using a 3 (NSSI Maintain, NSSI Stop, and Comparison) X 2 (Gender) X 2 (Time 1 and Time 2) repeated measures multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA), results indicated a significant group by time interaction, showing group differences with respect to body shame and body surveillance over time. Specifically, both NSSI groups reported significantly greater body shame and body surveillance over time than the non-NSSI group. Additionally, the NSSI Maintain group reported significantly greater body surveillance at T2 when compared to the NSSI Stop and non-NSSI group. The NSSI Maintain group also reported significantly more emotion dysregulation difficulties and depressive symptoms at T2 when compared to the NSSI Stop and non-NSSI group. The influence of body objectification as a core intrapersonal risk factor related to the maintenance and cessation of NSSI behaviour is discussed, as are clinical implications considering body objectification as an important variable in prevention and

  10. Non-suicidal self-injury and suicidal ideation in relation to eating and general psychopathology among college-age women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichen, Dawn M; Kass, Andrea E; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E; Gibbs, Elise; Trockel, Mickey; Barr Taylor, C; Wilfley, Denise E

    2016-01-30

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal ideation are potent risk factors for suicide and are associated with general and eating disorder-specific psychopathology. Limited research has examined the effects of combined NSSI+suicidal ideation thus concurrent examination is needed to understand potential differential effects on psychopathology. College-aged women (N=508) completed self-report measures of NSSI, suicidal ideation, general psychopathology, and Eating Disorder-specific psychopathology. MANOVAs determined whether the NSSI/SI status groups differed on general and eating disorder pathology measures as a set. Significant MANOVAs were followed up with univariate ANOVAs and posthoc tests. Thirteen women endorsed NSSI+Suicidal Ideation, 70 endorsed NSSI-only, 25 endorsed Suicidal Ideation-only, and 400 endorsed no NSSI/Suicidal Ideation. Both general and eating disorder-specific psychopathology differed across groups. NSSI+Suicidal Ideation and Suicidal Ideation-only groups typically endorsed higher general psychopathology than the no NSSI/Suicidal Ideation and NSSI-only groups. Regarding eating disorder pathology, the NSSI+Suicidal Ideation group was more pathological than no NSSI/Suicidal Ideation and NSSI-only, except on the weight concerns scale, where NSSI+Suicidal Ideation only differed from no NSSI/Suicidal Ideation. The NSSI+Suicidal Ideation group was only greater than Suicidal Ideation-only on measures of depression and eating concern. Results highlight the importance of screening for both NSSI and suicidal ideation, especially for individuals with eating disorder symptoms. Likewise, screening for eating disorder pathology may be beneficial for individuals presenting with NSSI and suicidal ideation.

  11. Experimental Analysis and Extinction of Self-Injurious Escape Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Brian A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Three studies investigated environmental correlates of self-injurious behavior in seven developmentally disabled children and adolescents which were then later used for treatment. Correlates investigated included positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, automatic reinforcement, and control. "Escape extinction" was successfully…

  12. [Prevalence and functions of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors in a sample of Spanish adolescents assessed in mental health outpatient departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz de Neira, Mónica; García-Nieto, Rebeca; de León-Martinez, Victoria; Pérez Fominaya, Margarita; Baca-García, Enrique; Carballo, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Suicidal and self-injurious behaviors in adolescents are a major public health concern. However, the prevalence of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors in Spanish outpatient adolescents is unknown. A total of 267 adolescents between 11 and 18 year old were recruited from the Child and Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatric Services, Jiménez Díaz Foundation (Madrid, Spain) from November 1st 2011 to October 31st 2012. All participants were administered the Spanish version of the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Inventory, which is a structured interview that assesses the presence, frequency, and characteristics of suicidal ideation, suicide plans, suicide gestures, suicide attempts, and non-suicidal self-injury. One-fifth (20.6%) of adolescents reported having had suicidal ideation at least once during their lifetime. Similarly, 2.2% reported suicide plans, 9.4% reported suicide gesture, 4.5% attempted suicide, and 21.7% reported non-suicidal self-injury, at least once during their lifetime. Of the whole sample, 47.6% of adolescents reported at least one of the studied thoughts or behaviors in their lifetime. Among them, 47.2% reported 2 or more of these thoughts or behaviors. Regarding the reported function of each type of thoughts and behaviors examined, most were performed for emotional regulation purposes, except in the case of suicide gestures (performed for the purposes of social reinforcement). The high prevalence and high comorbidity of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors, together with the known risk of transition among them, underline the need of a systematic and routine assessment of these thoughts and behaviors in adolescents assessed in mental health departments. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Revealing the form and function of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors: A real-time ecological assessment study among adolescents and young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, Matthew K.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.; Sterba, Sonya K.

    2010-01-01

    Self-injurious behaviors are among the leading causes of death worldwide. However, the basic nature of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (SITBs) is not well-understood because prior studies have relied on long-term, retrospective, aggregate, self-report assessment methods. We used ecological momentary assessment methods to measure suicidal and non-suicidal SITBs as they naturally occur in real-time. Participants were 30 adolescents and young adults with a recent history of self-injury who completed signal- and event-contingent assessments on handheld computers over a 14-day period, resulting in the collection of data on 1262 thought and behavior episodes. Participants reported an average of 5.0 thoughts of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) per week, most often of moderate intensity and short duration (1–30 minutes), and 1.6 episodes of NSSI per week. Suicidal thoughts occurred less frequently (1.1 per week), were of longer duration, and led to self-injurious behavior (i.e., suicide attempts) less often. Details are reported about the contexts in which SITBs most often occur (e.g., what participants were doing, who they were with, and what they were feeling before and after each episode). This study provides a first glimpse of how SITBs are experienced in everyday life and has significant implications for scientific and clinical work on self-injurious behaviors. PMID:19899851

  14. Self-Injurious Behavior in Correctional and Noncorrectional Psychiatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillbrand, Marc

    1993-01-01

    Examined prevalence and selected correlates of self-injurious behavior (SIB) among inmates (n=23) referred for treatment to maximum-security forensic hospital, non-SIB inmates (n=23), and noncorrections SIB patients (n=30). Found two distinct patterns of SIB: pattern consistent with conceptualization of SIB as expression of generalized behavioral…

  15. Deficiency in the Opioid Hypotheses of Self-Injurious Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bryan H.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This commentary critiques two papers by Curt Sandman, pointing out interpretive problems in models explaining self-injurious behavior in terms of opioids. Withdrawal effects are emphasized as an alternative to hypotheses asserting congenital opioid excess as a cause of sensory depression or an addiction to a relative excess of opioid activity in…

  16. Behavioral Treatment of Self-Injury, 1964 to 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahng, SungWoo; Iwata, Brian A.; Lewin, Adam B.

    2002-01-01

    An analysis of 396 articles (that included 706 participants) on the treatment of self-injurious behavior found the use of reinforcement-based interventions has increased during the past decade, whereas the use of punishment-based interventions has decreased slightly; both of these trends coincide with an increase in the use of functional…

  17. Special Educators and Nonsuicidal Self-Injurious Behavior: Self-Injury Training, Exposure, and Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Andrea D.; Morris, Carrie Wachter

    2012-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior (NSSIB) is one of the most perplexing and challenging behaviors special educators come across in their schools. Thus, there is a need for special educators to be equipped with information regarding NSSIB to help identify students with disabilities who engage in these behaviors and provide them with appropriate…

  18. [Factors Associated With Suicide Attempts and Nonsuicidal Self-Injurious Behaviors in Patients With Eating Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Guarín, Maritza; Rodríguez Malagón, Nelcy; Gempeler Rueda, Juanita; Garzón, Daniel Felipe

    2013-01-01

    Suicide attempt (SA) and non-suicidal self-injurious behaviors (NSSI) have been described in patients with eating disorders (ED), and they have been associated with increased morbidity and poor prognosis. To explore the presence of SA and NSSI in patients attending an outpatient ED program, as well as to evaluate the associated variables and the correlation between both types of behaviors. A total of 908 patients of both sexes attending the Equilibrio outpatient program in Bogotá were studied. The histories of SA and NSSI were systematically examined in the development of medical history by direct and structured questions to the patient, and then validated during interviews with the family. Sociodemographic and clinical variables, as well as history of traumatic experiences, were also studied. Simple frequencies were calculated, and a bivariate analysis was performed between SA, NSSI, and the other variables of the study. Finally, two models of association were designed for the multivariate analysis, using variables of clinical importance and statistical significance. SA sometime in their lives was reported by 13% of the patients, and 26% of them reported NSSI. The variables associated with SA were bipolar disorder (OR: 3.86, 95% CI; 2.4-6.1), borderline personality, purgative subtype of ED, and self-injury. Sexual abuse was associated with NSSI (OR: 3.48, 95%CI; 2.2-5.4), as well as bipolar disorder, trichotillomania, and suicide attempt. SA and NSSI are frequent in patients with eating disorders with multiple comorbidities, increased impulsivity and emotional dysregulation, and they should be explored and treated. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Momentum versus extinction effects in the treatment of self-injurious escape behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    Zarcone, J R; Iwata, B A; Hughes, C.E; Vollmer, T R

    1993-01-01

    An individual's self-injurious escape behavior was treated using a high-probability instructional sequence with and without extinction. When presented alone, the high-probability sequence did not reduce self-injurious behavior. When escape extinction was implemented either alone or in combination with the high-probability sequence, self-injury decreased and compliance increased, suggesting that extinction may be a necessary component of the treatment for behavior problems maintained by escape.

  20. Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents (DBT-A: a clinical Trial for Patients with suicidal and self-injurious Behavior and Borderline Symptoms with a one-year Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Csilla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, there are no empirically validated treatments of good quality for adolescents showing suicidality and non-suicidal self-injurious behavior. Risk factors for suicide are impulsive and non-suicidal self-injurious behavior, depression, conduct disorders and child abuse. Behind this background, we tested the main hypothesis of our study; that Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for Adolescents is an effective treatment for these patients. Methods Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT has been developed by Marsha Linehan - especially for the outpatient treatment of chronically non-suicidal patients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. The modified version of DBT for Adolescents (DBT-A from Rathus & Miller has been adapted for a 16-24 week outpatient treatment in the German-speaking area by our group. The efficacy of treatment was measured by a pre-/post- comparison and a one-year follow-up with the aid of standardized instruments (SCL-90-R, CBCL, YSR, ILC, CGI. Results In the pilot study, 12 adolescents were treated. At the beginning of therapy, 83% of patients fulfilled five or more DSM-IV criteria for borderline personality disorder. From the beginning of therapy to one year after its end, the mean value of these diagnostic criteria decreased significantly from 5.8 to 2.75. 75% of patients were kept in therapy. For the behavioral domains according to the SCL-90-R and YSR, we have found effect sizes between 0.54 and 2.14. During treatment, non-suicidal self-injurious behavior reduced significantly. Before the start of therapy, 8 of 12 patients had attempted suicide at least once. There were neither suicidal attempts during treatment with DBT-A nor at the one-year follow-up. Conclusions The promising results suggest that the interventions were well accepted by the patients and their families, and were associated with improvement in multiple domains including suicidality, non-suicidal self-injurious behavior, emotion

  1. Self-injurious Behavior in a Young Child with Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Satyakam; Sahoo, Alok Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a rare inherited disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase-1. Few reports on behavioral aspects especially self-injurious behavior in LNS patients are available. We report a case of LNS in an 8-year-old male child, who presented with characteristic self-injurious behavior.

  2. Psychosurgery for self-injurious behavior in Tourette's disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandan, Sharadamani; Wigg, Cindy L; Thomas, Christopher R; Coffey, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    One of the most serious and difficult-to-treat conditions in child and adolescent psychiatry is self-injurious behavior (SIB). SIB can be associated with a number of psychiatric disorders, including mental retardation, schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder, pervasive developmental disorders, stereotypic movement disorder, and Tourette's Disorder. A variety of neurosurgical procedures have been used to treat both intractable SIB and severe Tourette's Disorder. Understandably, there are few reports concerning psychosurgery in children and adolescents for any condition or disorder. This report describes the use of cingulotomy and subsequent limbic leucotomy in an adolescent boy with Tourette's Disorder for SIB. His repetitive and medically serious SIB and failure of all other treatments prompted this intervention after careful, comprehensive review and discussion. Following the second surgery, the severity and frequency of his SIB were reduced.

  3. Investigation of mortality and morbidity associated with severe self-injurious behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieseler, N A; Hanson, R H; Nord, G

    1995-07-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to determine whether severe self-injurious behavior was associated with shortened lengths of life or greater sensory impairments for Minnesota Regional Treatment Center residents with developmental disabilities. The client records of 209 institutionalized individuals who died between January 1, 1980, and December 31, 1989, were reviewed. The data revealed that the 29 clients who exhibited severe self-injury did not live significantly shorter lives compared to matched cohorts without self-injury. However, those clients with severe self-injury were found to have a significantly higher incidence of vision and hearing impairments than did the matched cohorts. Implications of these findings were discussed.

  4. A Comparison of Shock Intensity in the Treatment of Longstanding and Severe Self-Injurious Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Don E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The severe self-injurious behavior of a woman with profound mental retardation was treated with 3.5 milliamps of shock combined with reinforcement and extinction techniques, with minimal results. Treatment with the Hot Shot Power Mite, which delivers 18.5 milliamps, combined with reinforcement for compliance and extinction of self-injurious escape…

  5. Risk Factors Associated with Self-Injurious Behaviors in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerden, Emma G.; Oatley, Hannah K.; Mak-Fan, Kathleen M.; McGrath, Patricia A.; Taylor, Margot J.; Szatmari, Peter; Roberts, S. Wendy

    2012-01-01

    While self-injurious behaviors (SIB) can cause significant morbidity for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), little is known about its associated risk factors. We assessed 7 factors that may influence self-injury in a large cohort of children with ASD: (a) atypical sensory processing; (b) impaired cognitive ability; (c) abnormal…

  6. The relationship between self-injurious behavior and self-disclosure in adolescents with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomek, Anat Brunstein; Lev-Wiesel, Rachel; Shellac, Evia; Hadas, Arik; Berger, Uri; Horwitz, Mira; Fennig, Silvana

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the current study is to examine the association between self disclosure and self-injurious behaviors among adolescent patients diagnosed with an eating disorder. Sixty three female patients who fulfilled the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria of eating disorders were included (i.e. anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder and eating disorders not otherwise specified). Participants' age ranged from 11.5 to 20 years (M = 15.42, SD = 1.82). Participants completed self- report questionnaires about eating disorders, self-disclosure, self-injurious behaviors (FASM) and depression (BDI-II) RESULTS: 82.5% of the sample endorsed severe self-injurious behaviors. A moderate negative relationship was found between general disclosure to parents and self-injurious behaviors indicating that patients who generally self-disclose to their parents (on different topics, apart from suicidal ideation) engage less frequently in self-injurious behaviors. In addition, the more patients self-disclose their suicidal ideation to others, the more they tend to self-injure. Self-disclosure to parents on any topic may buffer against self-injurious behaviors and therefore it is important to work with adolescents suffering from eating disorders on effective self disclosure. In addition, self-disclosure about suicidal ideation to others by adolescents suffering from eating disorders should always be taken seriously, since it may be related to self-injurious behaviors.

  7. Self-Injurious Behavior, Self-Restraint, and Compulsive Behaviors in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Philippa; Oliver, Chris; Hall, Scott

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of questionnaires completed by caregivers of 77 individuals with Cornelia de Lange syndrome in the United Kingdom found a significant association between self-injurious behaviors and self-restraint, and those displaying both behaviors displayed significantly more compulsions than did those not exhibiting them. Findings extend the…

  8. Comparison of Behavioral Intervention and Sensory-Integration Therapy in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Sarah; Leader, Geraldine; Healy, Olive

    2009-01-01

    The current study investigates the comparative effects of sensory-integration therapy and behavioral interventions on rates of self-injurious behavior (SIB) in a 9-year-old boy with diagnosis of autism. A functional analysis was conducted to identify the variables maintaining the self-injurious behavior. This analysis demonstrated that SIB was…

  9. Meta-analysis on non-suicidal self-injury among college students in China%中国大学生非自杀性自伤检出率的Meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘珍; 毛绍菊; 唐寒梅; 傅燕艳; 孙玮璇; 廖志林; 李瑊妮; 邱红恒; 朱金云

    2016-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the epidemiology and distribution characteristics of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among undergraduates in China.Methods PubMed,CNKI,Wanfang and VIP databases was used to collect studies related to NSSI among college students in China from January 1989 to August 2015.Two reviewers screened literature,extracted data and evaluated the risk of bias of included studies,and then meta-analysis was performed by using CMA 2 software.Results A total of 23 studies were included,with 73 677 individuals.The report rate of NSSI was 16.6% [95%CI(10.7%-24.7%)].Subgroup analysis showed that the report rate of NSSI among male college students in China (16.2%) was lower than that of female (17.8%),the difference was statistically significant(P<0.01).Report rate of NSSI among college students in the eastern,central and western regions in China was 21.9%,23.0% and 2.1%,respectively,with statistically significant differences(P<0.01).Sensitivity analysis detected that the quality of the literature had a little effect on the results.Conclusion The detection rate of non-suicidal self-injury among college students in China was higher with significant gender and regional characteristics.%目的 系统评价中国大学生非自杀性自伤的检出率及其分布特征,为了解我国大学生NSSI检出率的分布情况提供更可靠的信息.方法 计算机检索PubMed、CNKI、万方数据库和VIP数据库,搜集关于我国大学生非自杀性自伤检出率研究的文献,检索时限为1989年1月至2015年8月.英文检索词包括undergraduate/college/university;self-injury/self-harm/self-mutilation/self-abuse/autolesion/autotomy/autosadism等,中文检索词包括大学生/大学/高校、自(我)伤(害)/自残/自虐.由2名研究者独立进行文献筛选、资料提取和评价纳入研究的偏倚风险后,采用CMA 2.0软件进行Me-ta分析.结果 共纳入23个研究,总样本量73 677人,非

  10. Emotional Dysregulation and Interpersonal Difficulties as Risk Factors for Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Adolescent Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Molly; Zeman, Janice; Erdley, Cynthia; Lisa, Ludmila; Sim, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine a model of factors that place psychiatrically hospitalized girls at risk for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). The role of familial and peer interpersonal difficulties, as well as emotional dysregulation, were examined in relationship to NSSI behaviors. Participants were 99 adolescent girls (83.2% Caucasian;…

  11. REDUCING COVERT SELF-INJURIOUS BEHAVIOR MAINTAINED BY AUTOMATIC REINFORCEMENT THROUGH A VARIABLE MOMENTARY DRO PROCEDURE

    OpenAIRE

    Toussaint, Karen A; Tiger, Jeffrey H

    2012-01-01

    Covert self-injurious behavior (i.e., behavior that occurs in the absence of other people) can be difficult to treat. Traditional treatments typically have involved sophisticated methods of observation and often have employed positive punishment procedures. The current study evaluated the effectiveness of a variable momentary differential reinforcement contingency in the treatment of covert self-injury. Neither positive punishment nor extinction was required to produce decreased skin picking.

  12. Use of negative reinforcement in the treatment of self-injurious behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    Steege, M W; Wacker, D P; Cigrand, K C; Berg, W K; Novak, C G; Reimers, T M; Sasso, G M; DeRaad, A

    1990-01-01

    Behavioral assessment procedures were used to determine the maintaining conditions of self-injury exhibited by 2 children with severe multiple handicaps. For both children, negative reinforcement (escape from grooming activities) was determined to be the maintaining reinforcer for self-injury (hand/arm biting) within an alternating treatments design. The treatment packages involved the use of negative reinforcement (brief escape from grooming activities) contingent upon a behavior that was in...

  13. A Review of Behavioral Treatments for Self-Injurious Behaviors of Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Lo Vullo, Santino V.

    2008-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are considered to be among the most serious of the mental health conditions. Concomitant with many cases of ASD is intellectual disability. Further compounding the disability is the fact that both conditions are known risk factors for self-injurious behavior (SIB). To date, the most effective intervention methods,…

  14. Compulsive, self-injurious, and autistic behavior in children and adolescents with fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott S; Lightbody, Amy A; Reiss, Allan L

    2008-01-01

    Compulsive, self-injurious, and autistic behaviors were examined in 31 boys and 29 girls with fragile X syndrome aged 5 to 20 years. Self-injurious behavior occurred in 58% of boys and 17% of girls, whereas compulsive behavior occurred in 72% of boys and 55% of girls and did not appear to be associated with self-injurious behavior. Fifty percent of boys and 20% of girls met diagnostic criteria for autism on the ADOS-G. Girls who showed compulsive behavior had lower levels of FMRP than girls who did not show compulsive behavior, and boys with autistic symptoms had lowered levels of cortisol. Taken together, these data suggest that autistic and compulsive behaviors are highly prevalent in fragile X syndrome and that lowered levels of FMRP and cortisol may be biological markers for these behaviors.

  15. 中学生非自杀性自伤的危险因素研究%The prevalence and risk factors for non-suicidal self injury among middle school students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁素改; 闫敬; 朱翠珍; 司徒明镜; 杜娜; 黄颐

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of non⁃suicidal self injury among middle school students. Methods Data were collected from 2 140 middle school students with the mean age of 13.92 by stratified sampling method. All students were evaluated with Beck Depression Scale (BDI),Barratt Im⁃pulsiveness Scale ( BIS ) , Adolescent Self⁃Rating Life Events Check List ( ASLEC ) , Adolescents Health related Risk Behaviors Inventory ( AHRBI ) , Chinese version of Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales ( FACES II⁃CV) ,and self⁃made investigate questionnaire. Results The prevalence of non⁃suicidal self injury a⁃mong local middle school students was 23.2%,total 495 adolescents were endorsed non⁃suicidal self injury,and 49.7% were girls.The results of in multivariable logistic regression showed the main risk factors for non⁃suicidal self injury among adolescents were being female,depressive symptoms,impulsiveness,negative life events and health re⁃lated risk behaviors. Conclusion Non⁃suicidal self injury is high among Chinese adolescent in the city of Dujian⁃gyan,and it is necessary to take effective interventions.%目的:了解中学生非自杀性自伤行为的流行情况,探讨其危险因素。方法采用自编调查问卷、Beck抑郁量表、Barratt冲动量表、青少年生活事件量表、青少年健康相关危险行为问卷及家庭亲密度和适应性量表,通过分层抽样随机抽取都江堰市2所高中学校和6所初中学校2140名中学生进行问卷调查。结果在2140名都江堰市中学生中曾有非自杀性自伤者495人(23.1%),女生246人(49.7%)。多因素Logistic回归显示:女性、抑郁、冲动、负性生活事件、健康相关的危险行为是中学生非自杀性自伤的危险因素。结论该地区中学生非自杀性自伤行为检出率较高,需对相关危险因素采取有效的干预措施。

  16. The Association between Repetitive, Self-Injurious and Aggressive Behavior in Children with Severe Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Chris; Petty, Jane; Ruddick, Loraine; Bacarese-Hamilton, Monique

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the independent association between adaptive behavior, communication and repetitive or ritualistic behaviors and self-injury, aggression and destructive behavior to identify potential early risk markers for challenging behaviors. Data were collected for 943 children (4-18 years, M = 10.88) with severe intellectual disabilities. Odds…

  17. Treatment Strategies for Self-Injurious Behavior in a Large Service-Delivery Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmeyer, Bernd K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The scope of psychoactive drug use within a statewide (Texas) institutional service delivery network was examined, with a focus on its role in the treatment of self-injurious behavior and other aberrant behaviors in the retarded. Insufficient use of behavioral technology and overuse of physical and chemical restraints were indicated. (Author/DB)

  18. Correlation between Non-Suicidal Self-Injury and Borderline Personality Disorder:A Meta-Analysis%非自杀性自伤与边缘性人格障碍相关性 Meta 分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴名道; 况荣华[; 毛绍菊; 唐寒梅; 傅燕艳; 李瑊妮; 邱红恒; 朱金云; 黄鹏

    2016-01-01

    目的:系统评价非自杀性自伤(NSSI)与边缘性人格障碍(BPD)之间的相关性。方法计算机检索 Elsevi-er、PubMed、CNKI、Medline 和 WangFang Data 数据库,搜集国内外关于 NSSI 与 BPD 关系的原始研究,检索时限均为建库至2015年12月31日。在2名研究者独立进行文献筛选、资料提取和纳入研究的偏倚风险评价后,采用RevMan5.0软件进行 Meta 分析。结果共纳入9个研究。3个研究报道了 BPD 与 NSSI 的相关性,其中 NSSI 组242例,对照组1100例,Meta 分析结果显示,NSSI 组的 BPD 比例高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(Peto OR=9.02,95%CI :6.20~13.10)。6个研究报道了 BPD 症状评分与 NSSI 的相关性,其中 NSSI 组1751例,对照组13630例,Meta 分析结果显示,NSSI 组的 BPD 症状评分高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(SMD=1.54,95%CI :1.08~1.99)。结论NSSI 与 BPD 之间存在相关性。但受纳入研究的质量、数量和类型的限制,NSSI 与 BPD 是否存在因果关联有待更多证据予以验证。%Objective To systematically review the correlation between non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI)and borderline personality disorder(BPD).Methods We searched Elsevier,PubMed, CNKI,Medline and Wanfang Data from inception to December 31,2015 to collect the original studies about the relationship between NSSI and BPD.Two researchers screened literature,ex-tracted data and evaluated the risk of bias in included studies independently,and then the meta-a-nalysis was performed by using RevMan5.0.Results A total of 9 studies were included.Among them,3 studies including 242 patients and 1100 controls reported the correlation between BPD and NSSI.The meta-analysis showed that the proportion of BPD in NSSI group was higher than that in control group(Peto OR = 9.02,95%CI 6.20-13.10).Six studies including 1751 patients and 13 630 controls reported the correlation between NSSI and

  19. The Use of Massage Therapy in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Christopher; And Others

    The report documents the theoretical basis and application of massage therapy, with six students who exhibited self-injurious behaviors (SIB), in two studies. The first study investigated the relationship between physical and/or emotional stress and self-abusive behavior in five severely mentally impaired students. Subjects received two to three…

  20. Self-Injurious Behavior within the Menstrual Cycle of Women with Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Derek V.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Catamenial and behavioral records of nine women with mental retardation who exhibited self-injurious behavior (SIB) were analyzed for six months. Analysis confirmed that SIB was cyclic across the menstrual cycle, with the highest frequency occurring in the early follicular and late follicular phases. (Author/JDD)

  1. Procedures Used to Modify Self-Injurious Behaviors in Visually Impaired, Mentally Retarded Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Julie; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The article reviews the use and limitations of medical and behavioral approaches (restraints, shock, drugs, punishment and aversive stimulation, reinforcement of incompatible behaviors, and overcorrection) to reduce self injury in visually impaired, mentally retarded persons. Legal and ethical considerations are pointed out. (Author/CL)

  2. The Use of Massage Therapy in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Christopher; And Others

    The report documents the theoretical basis and application of massage therapy, with six students who exhibited self-injurious behaviors (SIB), in two studies. The first study investigated the relationship between physical and/or emotional stress and self-abusive behavior in five severely mentally impaired students. Subjects received two to three…

  3. Reducing Covert Self-Injurious Behavior Maintained by Automatic Reinforcement through a Variable Momentary DRO Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Karen A.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    Covert self-injurious behavior (i.e., behavior that occurs in the absence of other people) can be difficult to treat. Traditional treatments typically have involved sophisticated methods of observation and often have employed positive punishment procedures. The current study evaluated the effectiveness of a variable momentary differential…

  4. Long-term use of electrical aversion treatment with self-injurious behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duker, P.C.C.; Seys, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve severely and profoundly mentally retarded individuals with life-threatening self-injurious behaviors were exposed to electrical aversion treatment using a remotely controlled device. Long-term effectiveness was assessed for periods ranging from 2 to 47 months for the 12 individuals,

  5. Relations between Nonsuicidal Self-Injury and Suicidal Behavior in Adolescence: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salome Grandclerc

    Full Text Available Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI and suicidal behaviors, both important issues in adolescent health care, are frequently associated and possibly clinically related. Our objective was to explore the views of relations between nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal behaviors during adolescence and young adulthood (11-25 years expressed in the scientific (medical and psychological literature. We adopted a textual approach to the process of synthesis to tell the story of the findings from the included studies. Our narrative systematic review of 64 articles found that they share the same risk factors. Integrated models envision nonsuicidal self-injury as a gateway enabling teens to acquire the capability for suicide. Because suicidal behavior short-circuits thought, it is difficult to conceive an intention to die during adolescents' acts of self-injury. Intention is constructed by the narrative of the act, influenced by numerous elements from the psychopathologic, cultural, religious, and philosophic context. Techniques of mentalizing-based treatments and work on the meaning that adolescents attribute to their behaviors might improve care.

  6. Characterization of Self-Injurious Behaviors in Children and Adults with Smith-Magenis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Brenda; Dirrigl, Karen Haines; Simon, Elliot W.

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence and severity of self-injurious behavior (SIB) in 29 children and adults with Smith-Magenis syndrome, a genetic disorder usually involving moderate mental retardation. Findings confirmed the near universal presence of SIB in this population. The overall prevalence of SIB increased with age. Number of types of SIB…

  7. Pruritus induced self injury behavior: an overlooked risk factor for amputation in diabetic neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, David; George, Mary Catherine; Tamler, Ronald; Lushing, Julia; Nmashie, Alexandra; Simpson, David M

    2014-03-01

    Pruritus is a risk factor for self-injury behavior (SIB) in sensory polyneuropathies. Although diabetes patients have elevated risk for pruritus, there are no reports of SIB in diabetic neuropathy. We present the case of a diabetes patient with neuropathy, whose pruritus induced SIB, resulted in partial amputation of a toe.

  8. Models of the Opiate System in Self-Injurious Behavior: A Reply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demet, Edward M.; Sandman, Curt A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper answers criticism (EC 601 030) of the authors' work regarding opioid explanations of self-injurious behavior. Possible withdrawal effects are ruled out as an explanation, in favor of opioid excess leading to sensory depression and addiction to relative excesses of opioid activity in the brain. Alternative models of consequences of…

  9. Alexithymia as a Mediator between Childhood Trauma and Self-Injurious Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paivio, Sandra C.; McCulloch, Chantal R.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to test whether alexithymia mediates the relationship between childhood maltreatment and self-injurious behaviors (SIB) in college women. Method: The sample was comprised of 100 female undergraduate students. Measures were the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire [D. Bernstein, L. Fink, Manual for the Childhood…

  10. Relations between Nonsuicidal Self-Injury and Suicidal Behavior in Adolescence: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandclerc, Salome; De Labrouhe, Diane; Spodenkiewicz, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal behaviors, both important issues in adolescent health care, are frequently associated and possibly clinically related. Our objective was to explore the views of relations between nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal behaviors during adolescence and young adulthood (11–25 years) expressed in the scientific (medical and psychological) literature. We adopted a textual approach to the process of synthesis to tell the story of the findings from the included studies. Our narrative systematic review of 64 articles found that they share the same risk factors. Integrated models envision nonsuicidal self-injury as a gateway enabling teens to acquire the capability for suicide. Because suicidal behavior short-circuits thought, it is difficult to conceive an intention to die during adolescents' acts of self-injury. Intention is constructed by the narrative of the act, influenced by numerous elements from the psychopathologic, cultural, religious, and philosophic context. Techniques of mentalizing-based treatments and work on the meaning that adolescents attribute to their behaviors might improve care. PMID:27089157

  11. Self-Injurious Behaviors on the Net: A Survey of Resources for School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Michael; Haberstroh, Shane; Marbach, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Self-injurious behaviors (SIBs) are encountered almost daily by some school counselors, and although many resources are cited and referenced in textbooks and professional journals, few online resources have been explored in the literature. In this article, the authors give an overview of the most visited Web sites related to information about…

  12. Predictive Factors of Suicide Attempt and Non-Suicidal Self-Harm in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Salman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Suicide is the third cause of mortality in America, second leading cause of death in developed countries, and one of the major health problems. Self-harm is self-inflicted damage to one’s self with or without suicidal intent. In the present study, the predictive factors of suicide attempt and non-suicidal self-harm were evaluated in patients referred to emergency department (ED with these problem. Methods: The total number of 45 patients with suicide attempt or self-harm admitted to ED were included. Clinical symptoms, thoughts and behaviors of suicidal, and non-suicidal self-harm in these patients were evaluated at baseline. Suicidality, suicidal intent and ideation, non-suicidal self-injury, social withdrawal, disruptive behavior, and poor family functions were evaluated at admission time. Brief clinical visits were scheduled for the twelfth weeks. In the twelfth week, patients returned for their final visit to determine their maintenance treatment. Finally data were analyzed using chi-squared and multiple logistic regression. Results: Forty five patients were included in the study (56.1% female. The mean age of patients was 23.3±10.2 years (range: 15-75; 33.3% married. Significant association of suicide and self-injury was presented at the baseline and in the month before attempting (p=0.001. The most important predictive factors of suicide and self-harm based on univariate analysis were depression (suicidal and non-suicidal items of Hamilton depression rating scale, anxiety, hopelessness, younger age, history of non-suicidal self-harm and female gender (p<0.05. The participants’ quality of life analysis showed a significant higher quality in physical component summary (p=0.002, mental component summary (p=0.001, and general health (p=0.001 at follow up period. Conclusion: At the time of admission in ED, suicide attempt and non-suicidal self-harm are subsequent clinical markers for the patient attempting suicide again. The

  13. Mediators' Emotional Responses to Self-Injurious Behavior: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossman, Dominique A.; Hastings, Richard P.; Brown, Tony

    2002-01-01

    Sixty mediators from British schools for children with mental retardation watched one of five matched videos depicting no self-injury, self-injury maintained by positive reinforcement, self-injury maintained by negative reinforcement, and self-injury unrelated to social events. Self-injury maintained by negative reinforcement was associated with…

  14. Suicidal and self-injurious behavior among patients with alcohol and drug abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Sharqi AM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Mohammed Al-Sharqi,1 Khaled Saad Sherra,2 Abdulhameed Abdullah Al-Habeeb,3 Naseem Akhtar Qureshi3,41Private Clinic, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Psychiatric Department, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Egypt; 3General Administration for Mental Health and Social Services, 4General Directorate of Research and Studies, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaBackground: Self-injurious behavior, a major public health problem globally, is linked with alcohol and drug abuse. This cross-sectional study aimed to identify the prevalence and correlates of self-harming behavior in patients with alcohol or drug abuse problems.Methods: This was a one-year study that recruited a convenience sample of 736 outpatients and inpatients identified with alcohol or drug abuse, and was conducted at Al-Amal mental health hospitals in three major cities. All consecutively selected patients were interviewed on five working days for data collection on a semistructured sociodemographic form using the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale Risk Assessment version.Results: In addition to the socioclinical profile revealed, 50.7% of respondents reported any suicidal ideation, while 6.9% reported self-injurious behavior without intent to die. Any suicidal and self-injurious behavior was reported by 13.1% of participants. A total of 71.3% of respondents reported any recent negative activating events. In addition to any treatment history, observed correlates were hopelessness (60.7%, perceived burden on family (29.5%, refusing a safety plan (26.1%, and sexual abuse (11%. Conversely, reasons for living (64.9%, fear of death or dying due to pain and suffering (64.3%, and spirituality (92% were largely endorsed as protective factors. There were multiple significant odds ratios (P ≤ 0.01 revealed when independent socioclinical variables were compared with dependent variables in terms of suspected risk and protective factors. In an adjusted logistic regression model

  15. The behavioral neurobiology of self-injurious behavior in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, G W; Clarke, A S

    1990-01-01

    1. Self-injurious behavior (SIB) is prevalent among institutionalized children, but the efficacy of current behavioral and pharmacological treatments is marginal. 2. There is evidence that SIB in humans has a neurobiological basis. A better understanding of the neurobiological factors that may promote or cause SIB is necessary for the development of effective pharmacologic treatments. 3. SIB that is similar in some respects to SIB in humans occurs in nonhuman primates that have been deprived of social experience early in life. An analysis of the "cause" of SIB suggests that it is a relatively straight-forward example of the development of neurobiological and behavioral aspects of aggressive behavior in the absence of social factors that would normally bring the behavior under environmental control. Once induced, however, it becomes environmentally autonomous and its proximal cause is neurobiological in nature. 4. There are three lines of evidence that nonhuman primate SIB is linked to malfunctions in the norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5HT) neurotransmitter systems. The activity of these systems appears to be altered by psychosocial deprivation. The functional relationship between the two systems appears to be altered or absent in socially deprived monkeys. Pharmacologic agents that act on these systems alter SIB in monkeys. 5. Preliminary data from socially deprived rhesus monkeys are consistent in major respects with studies linking altered serotonin systems to self-injurious behavior and suicidal motivation in humans who also probably suffer from social deprivation. 6. Taken together, these findings indicate that developmental study of biogenic amine systems, particularly finding ways to circumvent deficits in, or restore functional linkages between, the 5HT and NE systems, will lead to a greater understanding of the neurobiologic basis of SIB in humans and animals and will enable us to develop more effective treatments of SIB.

  16. Self-restraint as positive reinforcement for self-injurious behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R G; Lerman, D C; Iwata, B A

    1996-01-01

    Many individuals who engage in self-injurious behavior (SIB) also exhibit self-restraint. We compared rates of SIB exhibited by a 32-year-old woman diagnosed with profound retardation across conditions in which access to restraint was (a) continuously available, (b) presented as a consequence for SIB, or (c) unavailable. Rates of SIB increased when access to restraint was contingent upon SIB and decreased when restraint was unavailable, suggesting that self-restraint functioned as positive reinforcement for SIB.

  17. Emotional dysregulation, internalizing symptoms, and self-injurious and suicidal behavior: Structural equation modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranzler, Amy; Fehling, Kara B; Anestis, Michael D; Selby, Edward A

    2016-07-01

    This study used structural equation modeling to examine the relationships between emotion dysregulation, internalizing symptoms, nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), and suicide. One hundred forty-eight undergraduates completed a brief structured interview and self-report measures of emotion dysregulation, internalizing symptoms, and NSSI and suicidal behaviors. Results indicated a significant indirect effect of emotion dysregulation on NSSI via internalizing symptoms and on suicide attempts via NSSI. Findings provide a more nuanced understanding of the indirect association between emotion dysregulation and NSSI and suicidal behaviors. Implications for the potential utility of targeting internalizing symptoms as well as emotion dysregulation in interventions addressing NSSI and suicidal behaviors are discussed.

  18. Comparative study of schizophrenic patients who committed suicide or self - injurious behaviors during hospitalization%精神分裂症患者住院期间自杀自伤行为研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨孔军; 肖水源; 李学武; 廖春平; 戴静

    2015-01-01

    investigated with self - made inventory,the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale(BPRS),Hamilton Depression Scale- 17 item(HAMD - 17),Clinical Global Impression(CGIS),which were divided into two groups according to with or without suicide or self - injurious behaviors. Results ①The detection rate of suicide or self - injurious behaviors of schizophrenic inpatients was 19. 80% . ②Compared with non - suicide or self - injurious behaviors group during hospitalization,the prevalent of the incidence of no career(25. 6% ),poor economic conditions(25. 6% ),poor social support(56. 4% ),positive family history(48. 7% ),history of at-tempted suicide(79. 5% ),having obvious stress events two weeks before admission(46. 2% ),comorbiding with substance abuse (25. 6% ),with hallucinations or delusions(89. 7% ),paranoid type(53. 8% )in suicide or self - injurious behaviors group were sig-nificantly higher(P < 0. 05 or 0. 01). Logistic regression analysis showed that poor economic conditions,obvious stress events two weeks before admission,history of suicide attempts were the risk factors for suicide or self - injurious behaviors. ③Total scores of BPRS、HAMD - 17 in suicide or self - injurious behaviors group were significantly higher than those in non - suicide or self - injurious behaviors group at the time of admission and the 2nd ,4th weekend(P < 0. 01). The score of CGI in suicide or self - injurious behaviors group were significantly higher than those in non - suicide or self - injurious behaviors group in the second weekend(P < 0. 01). Con-clusion The detection rate of suicide or self - injurious behaviors of schizophrenic inpatients is high. We should attach great impor-tance to suicide or self - injury suicide behaviors in the schizophrenia inpatients,especially the patients with poor economic conditions, 2 weeks prior to admission with obvious stress events,history of attempted suicide and high HAMD - 17 scores.

  19. Behavioral forecasts do not improve the prediction of future behavior: a prospective study of self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janis, Irene Belle; Nock, Matthew K

    2008-10-01

    Clinicians are routinely encouraged to use multimodal assessments incorporating information from multiple sources when determining an individual's risk of dangerous or self-injurious behavior; however, some sources of information may not improve prediction models and so should not be relied on in such assessments. The authors examined whether individuals' prediction of their own future behavior improves prediction over using history of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (SITB) alone. Sixty-four adolescents with a history of SITB were interviewed regarding their past year history of SITB, asked about the likelihood that they would engage in future SITB, and followed over a 6-month period. Individuals' forecasts of their future behavior were related to subsequent SITB, but did not improve prediction beyond the use of SITB history. In contrast, history of SITB improved prediction of subsequent SITB beyond individuals' behavioral forecasts. Clinicians should rely more on past history of a behavior than individuals' forecasts of future behavior in predicting SITB.

  20. Self-injury, suicide ideation, and sexual orientation: differences in causes and correlates among high school students

    OpenAIRE

    Whitney DeCamp; Bakken, Nicholas W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Research has suggested that sexual minority youth are more likely to experience a number of behavioral and health-related risk factors due to their exposure to negative attitudes and beliefs about sexual minorities. Few studies, however, have examined the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among sexual minority youth. With self-cutting and suicidal ideation common in middle and high schools, understanding the antecedents and correlates of such behavior may hel...

  1. The association between self-injurious behaviors and autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minshawi NF

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Noha F Minshawi,1 Sarah Hurwitz,2 Jill C Fodstad,1 Sara Biebl,3 Danielle H Morriss,4 Christopher J McDougle51Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Christian Sarkine Autism Treatment Center, James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 2School of Education, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA; 3Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health, Sanford Health, Fargo, ND, USA; 4Medical College of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA; 5Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Lurie Center for Autism, Massachusetts General Hospital and MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: A key area of concern in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are self-injurious behaviors (SIBs. These are behaviors that an individual engages in that may cause physical harm, such as head banging, or self-biting. SIBs are more common in children with ASD than those who are typically developing or have other neurodevelopmental disabilities. Therefore, it is important that clinicians who work with children with ASD have a solid understanding of SIB. The purpose of this paper is to review the research on the epidemiology of SIB in children with ASD, factors that predict the presence of SIB in this population, and the empirically supported behavioral treatments available.Keywords: self-injury, autism spectrum disorders, applied behavior analysis

  2. An exploratory study of nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal behaviors in adolescent Latinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbas, Lauren E; Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; De Luca, Susan M; Tyler, Tee R; Zayas, Luis H

    2015-07-01

    To date, there is little research to validate empirically differences between nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior (NSSI) and attempted suicide among Latina adolescents. Understanding the characteristics and contextual features of self-harmful behaviors among Latina teens is a critical public health and social justice matter given the disproportionate rates of attempted suicide and anticipated population growth of this vulnerable group. In this article, we draw on an ecodevelopmental model to focus attention on factors in the sociocultural environment that shape suicidal behaviors and NSSIs. Through analysis of qualitative interviews conducted with girls who used NSSI (n = 18), attempted suicide (n = 29), used NSSI and attempted suicide (n = 8,) and had no reported lifetime history of self-harm (n = 28), we describe the sociocultural factors that shaped psychosocial vulnerabilities and gave rise to decisions to use NSSI or attempt suicide. Our analysis revealed that adolescents who engaged in NSSI perceived their negative feelings as something that could be controlled through self-injurious acts, whereas powerlessness was a theme underlying the emotional states of girls who attempted suicide. When NSSI ceased to function as a mechanism for control, girls came to sudden decisions to attempt suicide. Most teens identified specific, and often multiple, situations that induced intense affective states and shaped decisions to inflict self-harm. Two situational experiences emerged as particularly salient and promising for subsequent studies on self-harmful behaviors among Latina adolescents: transnational stress and bullying. We describe each of these and offer suggestions for future research and practice.

  3. Effects of Social Context on Social Interaction and Self-Injurious Behavior in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arron, Kate; Oliver, Chris; Hall, Scott; Sloneem, Jenny; Forman, Debbie; McClintock, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome is reported to be associated with self-injurious behavior (SIB) and social avoidance. We used analog methodology to examine the effect of manipulating adult social contact on social communicative behaviors and SIB in 16 children with this syndrome. For 9 participants engagement behavior was related to levels of adult…

  4. Effects of reinforcement for alternative behavior during punishment of self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R H; Iwata, B A; Conners, J; Roscoe, E M

    1999-01-01

    A number of variables influence the effectiveness of punishment and may determine the extent to which less intrusive forms of punishment may be used as alternatives to more intrusive interventions. For example, it has been suggested that response suppression during punishment may be facilitated if reinforcement is concurrently available for an alternative response. However, results of basic research demonstrating this finding have not been replicated with interventions more commonly prescribed as treatments for problem behavior. We evaluated the effects of relatively benign punishment procedures (reprimands or brief manual restraint) on the self-injurious behavior of 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with mental retardation, when access to reinforcement for alternative behavior (manipulation of leisure materials) was and was not available. In all cases, punishment produced greater response suppression when reinforcement for an alternative response was available.

  5. Self-injurious behavior and foreign body entrapment in the root canal of a mandibular lateral incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B N Rangeeth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-injurious behavior is a deliberate alteration or damage without suicidal indent. Herein, we report a patient who had caused intentionally self-trauma to his left lower permanent canine and placed a long metallic foreign body into the root canal. History revealed a habit of placing metallic objects in the form of stapler pins into the mouth, but closer examination revealed the habit to be more as a method of self-injurious behavior. Following an episode of severe pain, the tooth was endodontically treated after removal of the foreign body that was corroding. Clinical significance of the case report is that the patient may just be put off as having a habit of inserting foreign objects into the mouth, but the behavior was more self-injurious in nature.

  6. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: Relationship to Behavioral and Self-Rating Measures of Impulsivity and Self-Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Closkey, Michael S.; Look, Amy E.; Chen, Eunice Y.; Pajoumand, Golnaz; Berman, Mitchell E.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research using self-report measures has shown an association between nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior (NSSI) and impulsive tendencies. However, self-injurers have not been shown to be different from comparison groups on laboratory tasks putatively assessing impulsive behavior. One explanation for these contradictory findings is that…

  7. Copy Number Variants Associated with 14 Cases of Self-Injurious Behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Shirley

    Full Text Available Copy number variants (CNVs were detected and analyzed in 14 probands with autism and intellectual disability with self-injurious behavior (SIB resulting in tissue damage. For each proband we obtained a clinical history and detailed behavioral descriptions. Genetic anomalies were observed in all probands, and likely clinical significance could be established in four cases. This included two cases having novel, de novo copy number variants and two cases having variants likely to have functional significance. These cases included segmental trisomy 14, segmental monosomy 21, and variants predicted to disrupt the function of ZEB2 (encoding a transcription factor and HTR2C (encoding a serotonin receptor. Our results identify variants in regions previously implicated in intellectual disability and suggest candidate genes that could contribute to the etiology of SIB.

  8. The role of self-injury in behavioral flexibility and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, David; Eberle, Kiersten; Walder, Christin S; Kemp, Aaron S; Lenjav, Mohammed; Sandman, Curt A

    2014-07-01

    Severe and persistent self-injurious behavior (SIB) is notoriously difficult to understand and to treat. The current study used self-organization theory to investigate the possible relationship between SIB and changing levels of behavioral flexibility. Data consisted of categorical time-series of sequential behaviors from individuals with developmental disabilities and severe SIB. Orbital Decomposition was used to analyze each series for measures of structure and entropy. Overall, results showed evidence for self-organization in behavior patterns. Second, series including SIB were on average more flexible than those without SIB; while, higher numbers of SIB events (perseveration) were associated with higher behavioral rigidity and structural disintegration. Finally, there was evidence that behavioral flexibility almost always shifts reliably after a discrete bout of SIB, either increasing or decreasing in complexity. Altogether, these results may provide a deeper and more theoretically grounded understanding of the function of SIB beyond the traditional behavioral paradigm involving simple stimulus-response or response-consequence relations. Instead, some behaviors, such as SIB, may serve a resilience-making function as more global regulators of behavioral flexibility and coherence.

  9. Lesch-Nyhan syndrome: The saga of metabolic abnormalities and self-injurious behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Nitesh; Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Sardana, Divesh; Bansal, Kalpana

    2017-02-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is an X-linked recessive disorder of purine metabolism caused by a mutation in Xq26.2-q26.3 (OMIM 308000.0004). The presence of the diagnostic triad, i.e. signs of self-injurious behavior (SIB) and results of pedigree analysis and novel molecular biology & genetic testing, confirms the diagnosis of LNS. With a level of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase 1 (HPRT1) enzyme activity < 2%, patients develop neurological, neurocognitive, and neuromotor symptoms along with SIB. Described here is a case of 4-year-old boy who was diagnosed with LNS. The boy displayed SIB, i.e. biting of the lips and fingers, and he had cerebral venous sinus thrombosis caused by LNS.

  10. Drivers of Disparity: Differences in Socially Based Risk Factors of Self-Injurious and Suicidal Behaviors among Sexual Minority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blosnich, John; Bossarte, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (ie, sexual minority) populations have increased prevalence of both self-injurious and suicidal behaviors, but reasons for these disparities are poorly understood. Objective: To test the association between socially based stressors (eg, victimization, discrimination) and self-injurious behavior, suicide ideation, and…

  11. Factors Associated with Self-Injurious Behaviors in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Findings from Two Large National Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soke, G. N.; Rosenberg, S. A.; Hamman, R. F.; Fingerlin, T.; Rosenberg, C. R.; Carpenter, L.; Lee, L. C.; Giarelli, E.; Wiggins, L. D.; Durkin, M. S.; Reynolds, A.; DiGuiseppi, C.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we explored potential associations among self-injurious behaviors (SIB) and a diverse group of protective and risk factors in children with autism spectrum disorder from two databases: Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network and the Autism Speaks-Autism Treatment Network (AS-ATN). The presence of SIB was…

  12. Brief Report: Prevalence of Self-Injurious Behaviors among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder--A Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soke, Gnakub N.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hamman, Richard F.; Fingerlin, Tasha; Robinson, Cordelia; Carpenter, Laura; Giarelli, Ellen; Lee, Li-Ching; Wiggins, Lisa D.; Durkin, Maureen S.; DiGuiseppi, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Self-injurious behaviors (SIB) have been reported in more than 30% of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in clinic-based studies. This study estimated the prevalence of SIB in a large population-based sample of children with ASD in the United States. A total of 8,065 children who met the surveillance case definition for ASD in the…

  13. Drug-Refractory Aggression, Self-Injurious Behavior, and Severe Tantrums in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Chart Review Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Benjamin A.; Wink, Logan K.; Early, Maureen; Shaffer, Rebecca; Minshawi, Noha; McDougle, Christopher J.; Erickson, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Aggression, self-injurious behavior, and severe tantrums are impairing symptoms frequently experienced by individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Despite US Food and Drug Administration approval of two atypical antipsychotics targeting these symptoms in youth with autistic disorder, they remain frequently drug refractory. We define…

  14. The Relationship between Pain, Self-Injury, and Other Problem Behaviors in Young Children with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtemanche, Andrea B.; Black, William R.; Reese, R. Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Research has suggested that individuals who engage in self-injurious behavior may have enhanced expressions of pain, which contradicts previous assertions of blunted pain sensitivity in this population. The purpose of this study was to measure expressions of pain among young children being evaluated for autism and other neurodevelopmental…

  15. Heart Rate and the Role of the Active Receiver during Contingent Electric Shock for Severe Self-Injurious Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duker, Pieter C.; Van den Munckhof, Marcia

    2007-01-01

    Five individuals, who were treated for severe self-injurious behaviors (SIB) with contingent electric shock, participated. Hereby, each occurrence of the target response was followed by a remotely administered aversive consequence. Participants' heart rates were compared at times when the active device of the equipment for the above procedure was…

  16. Heart rate and the role of the active receiver during contingent electric shock for severe self-injurious behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duker, P.C.C.; Munckhof, M.W.J. van den

    2007-01-01

    Five individuals, who were treated for severe self-injurious behaviors with contingent electric shock, participated. Hereby, each occurrence of the target response was followed by a remotely administered aversive consequence. Participants’ heart rates were compared at times when the active device of

  17. Potential Risk Factors for the Development of Self-Injurious Behavior among Infants at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimian, Adele F.; Botteron, Kelly N.; Dager, Stephen R.; Elison, Jed T.; Estes, Annette M.; Pruett, John R., Jr.; Schultz, Robert T.; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Piven, Joseph; Wolff, Jason J.

    2017-01-01

    Prevalence of self-injurious behavior (SIB) is as high as 50% among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Identification of risk factors for the development of SIB is critical to early intervention and prevention. However, there is little empirical research utilizing a prospective design to identify early risk factors for SIB. The purpose…

  18. Basing the treatment of stereotypic and self-injurious behaviors on hypotheses of their causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repp, A C; Felce, D; Barton, L E

    1988-01-01

    Stereotypic and self-injurious behaviors are common forms of maladaptive responding demonstrated by severely handicapped persons. Various review papers suggest that no single treatment procedure is universally effective. Although there may be many reasons for this finding, one could be that people engage in these behaviors for various reasons, and that procedures that are incompatible with the cause of the behavior are unlikely to be effective. These studies also suggest many hypotheses for the development and maintenance of these behaviors, three of which are the self-stimulation, positive reinforcement, and negative reinforcement hypotheses. The purpose of this paper was to determine whether one of these hypotheses could be matched to the cause of the behavior and used as an effective treatment procedure. We therefore compared one hypothesis with one other for 3 subjects in a three-phase study. During baseline, data were taken in two classrooms for each subject, and a judgement was made about the hypothesis most likely to be related to the cause of the behavior. During the second phase, a treatment based on that hypothesis was used in one classroom, and a treatment based on another hypothesis was used in the second classroom. During the third phase, the treatment that was most effective in the second phase was used in both classrooms. Results showed that a successful treatment program can be developed on an hypothesis of why the behavior occurred during baseline. Results are discussed in terms of supporting the argument that treatment programs should be based on a functional analysis of the behavior in its environmental context.

  19. 四川省1312名中学生非自杀性自伤行为检出率及其危险因素研究%Study on the detection rate and risk factors regarding non-suicidal serf-injurious behavior in middle school students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫敬; 朱翠珍; 司徒明镜; 杜娜; 黄颐

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解中学生非自杀性自伤行为的检出率及其危险因素.方法 采用青少年危险行为评定量表(RBQ-A)、家庭环境量表简式(FES-F)、调查用抑郁白评量表(CES-D)、青少年生活事件量表(ASLEC)、青少年社会支持量表(SSSA)及自制的一般情况调查量表,于2011年4月以多阶段抽样的方法对四川省彭州市和三台县抽取的1312名中学生进行调查,收回有效问卷1288份;采用多因素logistic回归分析,筛选出中学生非自杀性自伤行为的主要危险因素.结果 1288名中学生中,有22.67%的人在近一年内曾有过非自杀性自伤行为,男女生检出率分别为22.70%、22.64%,两者差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).有63.36%的人曾采用多种不同的方式进行自我伤害,割伤或烫伤自己者中以男生居多,为26.88%,女生为11.36%.有非自杀性自伤行为者的ASLEC、CES-D的量表分数较无自伤行为者高,而SSSA量表分数则低于无白伤者.logistic回归分析结果显示,家庭矛盾、抑郁情绪、负性生活事件、社会支持少是中学生发生非自杀性白伤行为的主要危险因素.结论 当地中学生非自杀性自伤行为发生率很高,应依据其主要危险因素采取必要的干预措施.%Objective To understand the prevalence and risk factors of non-suicidal self-injury in middle school students.Methods 1312 middle school students of Pengzhou and Santai were selected to fill in a Risky Behavior Questionnaire for Adoluscents (RBQ-A),Family Environment Scale ( FES ),Center for Epidemiological Survey,Depression Scale (CES-D),Adolescent Self-Rating Life Events Check List (ASLEC),Social Support Scale for Adolescents (SSSA) and self-administered questionnaire.In all the research subjects,1288 were qualified for the study in April 2011 before the risk factors for non-suicidal self-injury were identified by logistic regression.Results In 1288 middle school students,22.67% had a history of non-suicidal

  20. Stereotyped and self-injurious behavior in children with developmental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukhutova G.L.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Stereotyped behavior is defined as rhythmically repeated movements constant in shape and amplitude. They are natural at certain levels of neuromuscular maturation in early age, yet in case of some developmental disorders they attain pathological forms, last significantly longer and hamper everyday adaptation including self-injurious behavior. Stereotypies are observed in case of various impairments like autism, mental retardation, blindness, deafness and in children in orphanage. The general point for all these impairments is the presence of some kind of deprivation: sensory or social. It is suggested that children with autism and mental retardation experience difficulties with development and coordination of visual, auditory and tactile-kinesthetic signals, and that is why they are exposed to a kind of deprivation similar to that of blind and deaf children. Pathogenesis of stereotyped behavior is often regarded as provoked by abnormal functioning ofdopamine-ergic and GABA-ergic neurons of the system: frontal cortex-thalamus-cerebellum, whose development takes several years of life and is extremely sensitive to impoverished environment.

  1. Boy Crisis? Sex Differences in Self-Injurious Behaviors and the Effects of Gender Role Conflicts Among College Students in China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chao, Qiuling; Yang, Xueyan; Luo, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    In Western research, self-injurious behaviors are commonly viewed as “feminine” behavior. In this present study, using the data from a survey administered to 960 first- and second-year students...

  2. Opioid Antagonists May Reverse Endogenous Opiate “Dependence” in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Sandman, Curt A.; Aaron S. Kemp

    2011-01-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) is a primary reason that individuals with neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDD) are either retained in restrictive environments or are administered psychotropic medication. There are no known causes and no universally accepted treatments for this complex behavior among individuals with NDD. There is developing evidence, however, that individuals exhibiting SIB have a disturbance of the opiate-mediated pain and pleasure system. One hypothesis is that SIB reflects ...

  3. The role of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in sequentially dependent self-injurious behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Curt A; Touchette, Paul E; Marion, Sarah D; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra

    2008-11-01

    Self-injuring behavior (SIB) is a life-threatening behavior exhibited by many species, including humans, and has no known cause and no agreed upon treatment. The role of the stress axis in the maintenance of this mysterious behavior was examined in subjects with life-long SIB. Over a 6-year period, 40 hr of direct observations of behavior and the environment were recorded on palmtop computers while 36 residential subjects (28 target and 8 control subjects) conducted their daily activities. Blood samples were collected in morning and evening for all subjects and within minutes after a self-injuring act in 28 target subjects who exhibited SIB to determine levels of ACTH and B-endorphin (BE). Self-injuring events in the patient group were significantly sequentially dependent (i.e., the only predictor of a self-injuring act was an antecedent self-injuring act). Higher morning levels of BE relative to ACTH predicted [r(df=27) = .57, p < .001] the sequentially dependent pattern of SIB. This effect was validated in a subgroup retested several months later [r(df=22) = .60, p < .001]. A subgroup of seven subjects exhibiting sequentially dependent patterns were administered an opiate blocker (naltrexone) in a double-blind, crossover design with an additional 14 hr/week of observation for 7 weeks. Naltrexone challenge interrupted the sequential pattern (improved behavior) in subjects with elevated BE immediately following SIB (r = .85, p < .01). The pattern of results supported the conclusion that the stress axis played a significant role in the maintenance of complex episodes of self-injury.

  4. Examination of Aggression and Self Injury in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Serious Behavioral Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Devon; Hallett, Victoria; McDougle, Christopher J.; Aman, Michael G.; McCracken, James T.; Tierney, Elaine; Arnold, L. Eugene; Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Lecavalier, Luc; Handen, Benjamin; Swiezy, Naomi; Johnson, Cynthia; Bearss, Karen; Vitiello, Benedetto; Scahill, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis This study identified subtypes of aggression in a sample of 206 children (174 boys, 32 girls) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who participated in two risperidone trials conducted by the Research Units on Pediatric Psychopharmacology (RUPP) Autism Network. The classification of aggression subtypes was based on a review of brief narratives documented at baseline. The narratives were derived from a parent interview about the child’s two most pressing problems. Five subtypes of aggression emerged: hot aggression only, cold aggression only, self-injurious behavior (SIB) only, aggression and SIB, and non-aggressive. The aggression and SIB group had the highest proportion of children with IQ below 70. Children in the hot aggression group were slightly younger and had higher scores on the ABC-Irritability subscale than the non-aggression group. The SIB only group had the highest ABC-Irritability score. All groups showed a high rate of positive response to risperidone with no differences across subtypes. These study findings extend our understanding of aggression in ASD and may be useful to guide further study on biological mechanisms and individualized treatment in ASD. PMID:24231167

  5. Development of new forms of self-injurious behavior following total dental extraction in Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert de la Cuadra, Livia; Torres, Rosa J; Beltrán, Luis M; Sánchez, Arantxa; Puig, Juan G

    2016-12-01

    We report two Lesch-Nyhan Disease (LND) patients who developed new forms of self-injurious behavior following total dental extraction. Patients 1 and 2 were submitted to total teeth extraction at the age of 13 and 8 years, respectively, due to continuous self-biting, not prevented by mouth guards. Severity of dystonia was markedly reduced and quality of life improved. After 12 and 17 months, respectively, patient 1 started rubbing one foot against other and scratching toenails with his hands, and patient 2 stuck his legs and feet against hard objects. These forms of self-injury behavior could be easily prevented with protective materials, according to the mothers.

  6. Associations between sexual abuse and family conflict/violence, self-injurious behavior, and substance use: the mediating role of depressed mood and anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsdottir, Bryndis Bjork; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Gudjonsson, Gisli H; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik

    2011-03-01

    To examine whether depressed mood and anger mediate the effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior and substance use. A cross-sectional national survey was conducted including 9,085 16-19 year old students attending all high schools in Iceland in 2004. Participants reported frequency of sexual abuse, family conflict/violence, self-injurious behavior, substance use, depressed mood, and anger. Sexual abuse and family conflict/violence had direct effects on self-injurious behavior and substance use among both genders, when controlling for age, family structure, parental education, anger, and depressed mood. More importantly, the indirect effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior among both males and females were twice as strong through depressed mood as through anger, while the indirect effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on substance use were only significant through anger. These results indicate that in cases of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence, substance use is similar to externalizing behavior, where anger seems to be a key mediating variable, opposed to internalizing behavior such as self-injurious behavior, where depressed mood is a more critical mediator. Practical implications highlight the importance of focusing on a range of emotions, including depressed mood and anger, when working with stressed adolescents in prevention and treatment programs for self-injurious behavior and substance use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using a Behavioral Approach to Decrease Self-Injurious Behavior in an Adolescent with Severe Autism: A Data-Based Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Miriam C.; Taber-Doughty, Teresa; Wendt, Oliver; Smalts, Sherilyn S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at higher risk for developing self-injurious behaviors (SIB) and other challenging behaviors than typically developing individuals. SIBs often occur owing to deficits in communicative ability and can have undesirable consequences in an individual's environment. This study demonstrated the use of…

  8. Constipation Associated with Self-Injurious and Aggressive Behavior Exhibited by a Child Diagnosed with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Tory J.; Ringdahl, Joel E.; Bosch, Joni J.; Falcomata, Terry S.; Luke, Jeffrey R.; Andelman, Marc S.

    2009-01-01

    A functional analysis was conducted to identify the role environmental variables had on the maintenance of self-injury and aggression. At the outset of the evaluation, an abdominal x-ray showed a moderate to large amount of stool throughout the colon (i.e., constipation). Consequently, medication was administered to promote bowel emptying. Initial…

  9. Association between victimization by bullying and direct self injurious behavior among adolescence in Europe: a ten-country study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstein Klomek, Anat; Snir, Avigal; Apter, Alan; Carli, Vladimir; Wasserman, Camilla; Hadlaczky, Gergö; Hoven, Christina W; Sarchiapone, Marco; Balazs, Judit; Bobes, Julio; Brunner, Romuald; Corcoran, Paul; Cosman, Doina; Haring, Christian; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Kaess, Michael; Postuvan, Vita; Sisask, Merike; Tubiana, Alexandra; Varnik, Airi; Žiberna, Janina; Wasserman, Danuta

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have examined the association between victimization by bullying and both suicide ideation and suicide attempts. The current study examined the association between victimization by bullying and direct-self-injurious behavior (D-SIB) among a large representative sample of male and female adolescents in Europe. This study is part of the Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe (SEYLE) study and includes 168 schools, with 11,110 students (mean age = 14.9, SD = 0.89). Students were administered a self-report survey within the classroom, in which they were asked about three types of victimization by bullying (physical, verbal and relational) as well as direct self-injurious behavior (D-SIB). Additional risk factors (symptoms of depression and anxiety, suicide ideation, suicide attempts, loneliness, alcohol consumption, drug consumption), and protective factors (parent support, peer support, pro-social behavior) were included. The three types of victimization examined were associated with D-SIB. Examination of gender as moderator of the association between victimization (relational, verbal, and physical) and D-SIB yielded no significant results. As for the risk factors, depression, but not anxiety, partially mediated the effect of relational victimization and verbal victimization on D-SIB. As for the protective factors, students with parent and peer support and those with pro-social behaviors were at significantly lower risk of engaging in D-SIB after being victimized compared to students without support/pro-social behaviors. This large-scale study has clearly demonstrated the cross-sectional association between specific types of victimization with self-injurious behavior among adolescents and what may be part of the risk and protective factors in this complex association.

  10. Opioid Antagonists May Reverse Endogenous Opiate “Dependence” in the Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt A. Sandman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-injurious behavior (SIB is a primary reason that individuals with neurodevelopmental disabilities (NDD are either retained in restrictive environments or are administered psychotropic medication. There are no known causes and no universally accepted treatments for this complex behavior among individuals with NDD. There is developing evidence, however, that individuals exhibiting SIB have a disturbance of the opiate-mediated pain and pleasure system. One hypothesis is that SIB reflects insensitivity to pain and general sensory depression (hypoalgesia, perhaps related to chronic elevation of endogenous opiates. For instance, many self-injurious individuals do not exhibit the usual signs of pain after their “injurious” behavior. Moreover, for some individuals the addictive properties of elevated endogenous opiates (euphoria may be responsible for maintaining their SIB. In this perspective, SIB may be viewed as an addiction because it supplies the "fix" for tolerant, down-regulated opiate receptors. Reports that levels of endogenous opiates at rest and after SIB episodes predict positive responses to opiate blockers (e.g., naltrexone provide further support for opiate-mediated SIB and form the basis for a rational treatment strategy. Although the long term effects of opiate blockers on SIB are unknown, reduction in SIB following acute treatment provides support that a specific biological system may be dysregulated in a subgroup of patients. It is concluded that naltrexone produces a clinically significant reduction in the serious and life-threatening behavior of self injury for individuals who have not been responsive to any other type of treatment. Several suggestions and cautions are provided for regimens of naltrexone treatment of SIB.

  11. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents: Theory, Treatment Adaptations, and Empirical Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Heather A.; Cheavens, Jennifer S.; Fristad, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) was originally developed for chronically suicidal adults with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and emotion dysregulation. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indicate DBT is associated with improvements in problem behaviors, including suicide ideation and behavior, non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), attrition,…

  12. Self-Injury in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptom that results from a variety of factors. Adolescents who have difficulty talking about their feelings may show their emotional tension, physical discomfort, pain and low self-esteem with self-injurious behaviors. Although some teenagers may ...

  13. 自伤行为的心理治疗分析%Analysis of Psychological Treatment of Self Injurious Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭秀华

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the psychological characteristics of self injuriousbehavior, to explore the effective treatment Methods .Methods Analysis of the psychological characteristics of patients with suicidal behavior,suicidal behavior assessment approach,to explore the psychological treatment.Results Self injurious behavior belongs to the adverse response of human psychological process,the main reason of this problem is emotional management disorder,cognitive behavioraltherapy is the treatment method,but the effect is not obvious.Conclusion In evaluating injury patients,to focus on patients' motivation, psychological barriers,self mutilation,self injury history,the core goal of treatment is to help patients to improve the ability of emotional management.%目的 分析自伤行为者的心理特征,探讨有效的治疗方法.方法 分析自伤行为患者的心理特征,结合自伤行为的评估办法,探讨心理治疗办法.结果 自伤行为属于人类心理应对过程中出现的不良应对措施,出现该问题的主要原因就是情绪管理障碍,治疗方法是行为认知法,但是治疗效果并不明显.结论 在评估自伤患者时,需要重点观察患者的行为动机、心理障碍、自伤功能、自伤史等问题,核心治疗目标则是帮助病患提高情绪管理的能力.

  14. Associations between Sexual Abuse and Family Conflict/Violence, Self-Injurious Behavior, and Substance Use: The Mediating Role of Depressed Mood and Anger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsdottir, Bryndis Bjork; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Gudjonsson, Gisli H.; Sigurdsson, Jon Fridrik

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether depressed mood and anger mediate the effects of sexual abuse and family conflict/violence on self-injurious behavior and substance use. Methods: A cross-sectional national survey was conducted including 9,085 16-19 year old students attending all high schools in Iceland in 2004. Participants reported frequency of…

  15. Multiple Factors in the Long-Term Effectiveness of Contingent Electric Shock Treatment for Self-Injurious Behavior: A Case Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linscheid, Thomas R.; Reichenbach, Heidi

    2002-01-01

    Data are presented to document the initial dramatic reduction in self-injurious behavior and the ongoing effectiveness of contingent electric shock treatment of an adolescent. Positive effects of the intervention are documented, as is information on the interaction of a medical condition, psychoactive mediation status, and staff changes. (Contains…

  16. Self-Injury: Answers to Questions for Parents, Teachers, & Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke, Bruce L.

    This guide to preventing self-injurious behavior, in question-and-answer format, is intended for parents, teachers, and other caregivers of people with disabilities. It describes the more common types of self-injurious behavior, discusses methods for identifying causes of self injury, and outlines interventions. Specifically, the guide covers: (1)…

  17. Multidisciplinary assessment and treatment of self-injurious behavior in autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability: integration of psychological and biological theory and approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshawi, Noha F; Hurwitz, Sarah; Morriss, Danielle; McDougle, Christopher J

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this review is to consider the psychological (largely behavioral) and biological [neurochemical, medical (including genetic), and pharmacological] theories and approaches that contribute to current thinking about the etiology and treatment of self-injurious behavior (SIB) in individuals with autism spectrum disorder and/or intellectual disability. Algorithms for the assessment and treatment of SIB in this context, respectively, from a multidisciplinary, integrative perspective are proposed and challenges and opportunities that exist in clinical and research settings are discussed.

  18. Investigating the Relationship between Self-Injurious Behavior, Social Deficits, and Cooccurring Behaviors in Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Waters

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that self-injurious behavior (SIB is related to social deficits and cooccurring problem behaviors in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. A sample of 95 participants with ASD was assessed on presence and frequency of SIB (Behavior Problems Inventory, social deficits (the Matson Evaluation of Social Skills with Youngsters-II and cooccurring problem behaviors (ASD-Comorbidity-Child version. A model was created and tested to explain the relationship between these variables. Results showed that the model was acceptable in presenting the relationships between these variables. This information could be used to help predict which individuals are at risk of developing further cooccurring behavioral problems and determine risk markers for the development of social deficits.

  19. Pallidal deep-brain stimulation associated with complete remission of self-injurious behaviors in a patient with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deon, Laura L; Kalichman, Miriam A; Booth, Cynthia L; Slavin, Konstantin V; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah J

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to review the management of a boy with Lesch-Nyhan syndrome with deep-brain stimulation who had remission of self-injurious behaviors as a result. This patient was treated with intrathecal baclofen and, later, with deep-brain stimulation to reduce hypertonia. Goals were to improve wheelchair positioning for school attendance and to reduce the use of restraints for comfort. Intrathecal baclofen was implanted twice and decreased the hypertonia, but both were explanted because of infection. Deep-brain stimulation was initiated 2.5 years ago, and since that time, comfort and function have improved and caregiver burden has decreased. Improvements in dystonia with deep-brain stimulation have also occurred, and self-injurious behaviors have resolved.

  20. An investigation of the motivations driving the online representation of self-injury: a thematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodham, K; Gavin, J; Lewis, S P; St Dennis, J M; Bandalli, P

    2013-01-01

    The objetive of the study was to identify a) the motivations for communicating about non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in a publicly accessible online forum, b) The significance (if any) of the "publicness" of the behavior. Using a Thematic Analysis of 423 text-based posts from an online NSSI forum, 5 motivations for using the site were identified: confessional, marking a turning point, acting as a deterrent, dispelling myths and offering or seeking support. Motivations for using the site differ markedly from motivations for engaging in NSSI and tend to be more outwardly focused. The publicness of the site therefore seems to be significant in terms of bearing witness, providing the opportunity to confront negative stereotypes, and the ability to seek and offer support to like-minded individuals.

  1. Four Distinct Subgroups of Self-Injurious Behavior among Chinese Adolescents: Findings from a Latent Class Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xiuhong; Ming, Qingsen; Zhang, Jibiao; Wang, Yuping; Liu, Mingli; Yao, Shuqiao

    2016-01-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) among adolescents is an important public health issue worldwide. It is still uncertain whether homogeneous subgroups of SIB can be identified and whether constellations of SIBs can co-occur due to the high heterogeneity of these behaviors. In this study, a cross-sectional study was conducted on a large school-based sample and latent class analysis was performed (n = 10,069, mean age = 15 years) to identify SIB classes based on 11 indicators falling under direct SIB (DSIB), indirect SIB (ISIB), and suicide attempts (SAs). Social and psychological characteristics of each subgroup were examined after controlling for age and gender. Results showed that a four-class model best fit the data and each class had a distinct pattern of co-occurrence of SIBs and external measures. Class 4 (the baseline/normative group, 65.3%) had a low probability of SIB. Class 3 (severe SIB group, 3.9%) had a high probability of SIB and the poorest social and psychological status. Class 1 (DSIB+SA group, 14.2%) had similar scores for external variables compared to class 3, and included a majority of girls [odds ratio (OR) = 1.94]. Class 2 (ISIB group, 16.6%) displayed moderate endorsement of ISIB items, and had a majority of boys and older adolescents (OR = 1.51). These findings suggest that SIB is a heterogeneous entity, but it may be best explained by four homogenous subgroups that display quantitative and qualitative differences. Findings in this study will improve our understanding on SIB and may facilitate the prevention and treatment of SIB.

  2. Four Distinct Subgroups of Self-Injurious Behavior among Chinese Adolescents: Findings from a Latent Class Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuhong Xin

    Full Text Available Self-injurious behavior (SIB among adolescents is an important public health issue worldwide. It is still uncertain whether homogeneous subgroups of SIB can be identified and whether constellations of SIBs can co-occur due to the high heterogeneity of these behaviors. In this study, a cross-sectional study was conducted on a large school-based sample and latent class analysis was performed (n = 10,069, mean age = 15 years to identify SIB classes based on 11 indicators falling under direct SIB (DSIB, indirect SIB (ISIB, and suicide attempts (SAs. Social and psychological characteristics of each subgroup were examined after controlling for age and gender. Results showed that a four-class model best fit the data and each class had a distinct pattern of co-occurrence of SIBs and external measures. Class 4 (the baseline/normative group, 65.3% had a low probability of SIB. Class 3 (severe SIB group, 3.9% had a high probability of SIB and the poorest social and psychological status. Class 1 (DSIB+SA group, 14.2% had similar scores for external variables compared to class 3, and included a majority of girls [odds ratio (OR = 1.94]. Class 2 (ISIB group, 16.6% displayed moderate endorsement of ISIB items, and had a majority of boys and older adolescents (OR = 1.51. These findings suggest that SIB is a heterogeneous entity, but it may be best explained by four homogenous subgroups that display quantitative and qualitative differences. Findings in this study will improve our understanding on SIB and may facilitate the prevention and treatment of SIB.

  3. Relative influences of establishing operations and reinforcement contingencies on self-injurious behavior during functional analyses.

    OpenAIRE

    Worsdell, A S; Iwata, B A; Conners, J; Kahng, S W; Thompson, R H

    2000-01-01

    In the typical functional analysis in which the antecedent and consequent events associated with problem behavior are manipulated, the control condition involves elimination of both the relevant establishing operation (EO) and its associated contingency through a schedule of noncontingent reinforcement (usually fixed-time [FT] 30 s). In some functional analyses, however, antecedent events are manipulated in the absence of differential consequences, and a common test condition in such analyses...

  4. The functions of nonsuicidal self-injury: converging evidence for a two-factor structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonsky, E David; Glenn, Catherine R; Styer, Denise M; Olino, Thomas M; Washburn, Jason J

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified more than a dozen functions of non-suicidal self-injury (NSI), but the conceptual and empirical overlap among these functions remains unclear. The present study examined the structure of NSI functions in two large samples of patients receiving acute-care treatment for NSI. Two different measures of NSI functions were utilized to maximize generalizability of findings: one sample (n = 946) was administered the Inventory of Statements About Self-injury (ISAS; Klonsky and Glenn in J Psychopathol Behav Assess 31:215-219, 2009), and a second sample (n = 211) was administered the Functional Assessment of Self-Mutilation (FASM; Lloyd et al. in Self-mutilation in a community sample of adolescents: descriptive characteristics and provisional prevalence rates. Poster session at the annual meeting of the Society for Behavioral Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 1997). Exploratory factor analyses revealed that both measures exhibited a robust two-factor structure: one factor represented Intrapersonal functions, such as affect regulation and anti-dissociation, and a second factor represented Social functions, such as interpersonal influence and peer bonding. In support of the two-factor structure's construct validity, the factors exhibited a pattern of correlations with indicators of NSI severity that was consistent with past research and theory. Findings have important implications for theory, research, and treatment. In particular, the two-factor framework should guide clinical assessment, as well as future research on the implications of NSI functions for course, prognosis, treatment, and suicide risk.

  5. The prevalence of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury (NSSI in a representative sample of the German population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul L. Plener

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI is a proposed new “condition for further study” in the DSM-5. To date no prevalence data has been available on this diagnostic entity from a representative sample of the general population. Methods A representative sample of the German population (N = 2509, mean age = 48.8 years, SD = 18.1, female 55.4 % completed the NSSI section of the German version of the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview (SITBI-G. Results A history of NSSI at least once during lifetime was reported by 3.1 % of all participants, with higher lifetime prevalence rates in younger age groups. DSM-5 NSSI disorder criteria were met by 0.3 %. The most common function of NSSI was automatic negative reinforcement (e.g. to alleviate negative feelings. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting rates for the proposed NSSI category in DSM-5 from a representative sample of the general population. In comparison to findings from community samples of adolescents, adults seem to have lower lifetime prevalence rates of NSSI, thus making it necessary to emphasize prevention and treatment efforts in younger age groups.

  6. Is non-suicidal self-injury an “addiction”? A comparison of craving in substance use and non-suicidal self-injury

    OpenAIRE

    Victor, Sarah Elizabeth; Glenn, Catherine Rose; Klonsky, Elisha David

    2012-01-01

    There is debate among researchers regarding the most appropriate conceptual model of NSSI. Some argue that NSSI is best viewed within an addictions framework. Because craving of substances is a key concept in the addictions literature, we sought to compare the nature of craving in NSSI and substance use. Measures of NSSI, substance use, and craving were administered to a sample of adolescents (n = 58) receiving psychiatric treatment. It was found that total craving scores were significantly l...

  7. Lower levels of cannabinoid 1 receptor mRNA in female eating disorder patients: association with wrist cutting as impulsive self-injurious behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Marc; Eberlein, Christian; de Zwaan, Martina; Kornhuber, Johannes; Bleich, Stefan; Frieling, Helge

    2012-12-01

    The cannabinoid 1 (CB 1) receptor as the primary mediator of the endocannabinoid (EC) system was found to play a role in eating disorders (EDs), depression, anxiety, and suicidal behavior. The CB 1 receptor is assumed to play a crucial role in the central reward circuitry with impact on body weight and personality traits like novelty-seeking behavior. In a previous study we found higher levels of CB 1 receptor mRNA in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) compared to healthy control women (HCW). The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible influence of the EC and the CB 1 receptor system on wrist cutting as self-injurious behavior (SIB) in women with EDs (n=43; AN: n=20; BN: n=23). Nine ED patients with repetitive wrist cutting (AN, n=4; BN, n=5) were compared to 34 ED patients without wrist cutting and 26 HCW. Levels of CB 1 receptor mRNA were determined in peripheral blood samples using quantitative real-time PCR. ED patients with self-injurious wrist cutting exhibited significantly lower CB 1 receptor mRNA levels compared with ED patients without wrist cutting and HCW. No significant differences were found between ED patients without a history of wrist cutting and HCW. Furthermore, a negative association was detected between CB 1 receptor mRNA levels and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting a down-regulation of CB 1 receptor mRNA in patients with EDs and wrist cutting as SIB. Due to the small sample size, our results should be regarded as preliminary and further studies are warranted to reveal the underlying mechanisms.

  8. Research progress in assessment methods of non-suicidal self-injurious behavior among adolescents%青少年非自杀性自伤行为评估方法研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘婉; 万宇辉; 陶芳标; 郝加虎

    2016-01-01

    目的 目前非自杀性自伤行为(NSSI)被视为广泛而普遍的公共卫生问题,在世界范围内的学校儿童和青少年群体中都存在很高的发生率,也是青少年自杀行为发生的最有力预测因子之一.但世界范围内,对NSSI的认识尚不统一,相关的评价方法也有多种,为此,本文对近年来国内外NSSI相关评价方法进行综述,了解青少年非自杀性自伤行为的评价方法.

  9. Clinical and theoretical issues in self-injurious behavior Questões teórico-clínicas do comportamento de automutilação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Yaryura-Tobias

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview of pathological self-injurious behavior (SIB. Historical and cultural aspects, epidemiology, classification and clinical aspects and pathogenesis are described. The importance of comprehensive assessment of symptomatology and functions of SIB for treatment planning are discussed.O presente artigo apresenta um panorama do comportamento de automutilação patológica. São descritos aspectos históricos e culturais, epidemiologia, classificação e aspectos clínicos e patogênese. É discutida ainda a importância de uma avaliação compreensiva da sintomatologia e das funções do comportamento para fins de tratamento.

  10. The Use of Physical Restraint in the Treatment of Self-Injury and as Positive Reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favell, Judith E.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Three experiments investigated the effects of a treatment package on the self-injurious behavior of three profoundly retarded persons (ages 8-27 years) who appeared to enjoy the physical restraints used to prevent their self-injury. (Author)

  11. 5-HTTLPR × interpersonal stress interaction and nonsuicidal self-injury in general community sample of youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Benjamin L; Barrocas, Andrea L; Young, Jami F; Haberstick, Brett; Smolen, Andrew

    2015-02-28

    No research with youth has investigated whether measured genetic risk interacts with stressful environment (G⁎E) to explain engagement in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Two independent samples of youth were used to test the a priori hypothesis that the Transporter-Linked Polymorphic Region (5-HTTLPR) would interact with chronic interpersonal stress to predict NSSI. We tested this hypothesis with children and adolescents from United States public schools in two independent samples (N׳s=300 and 271) using identical procedures and methods. They were interviewed in person with the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview to assess NSSI engagement and with the UCLA Chronic Stress Interview to assess interpersonal stress. Buccal cells were collected for genotyping of 5-HTTLPR. For both samples, ANOVAs revealed the hypothesized G*E. Specifically, short carriers who experienced severe interpersonal stress exhibited the highest level of NSSI engagement. Replicated across two independent samples, results provide the first demonstration that youth at high genetic susceptibility (5-HTTLPR) and high environmental exposure (chronic interpersonal stress) are at heightened risk for NSSI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sexual orientation and non-suicidal self-injury: a meta-analytic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batejan, Kristen L; Jarvi, Stephanie M; Swenson, Lance P

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct the first meta-analysis comparing risk for NSSI between sexual minority and heterosexual persons. Eleven published and 4 unpublished studies were reviewed, describing associations between sexual orientation and NSSI in 7,147 sexual minority and 61,701 heterosexual participants. The overall weighted effect size for the relationship between sexual orientation and NSSI using a random-effects model was OR = 3.00 (95% CI = 2.46-3.66), indicating a medium-to-large effect. Sexual minority adolescents and bisexuals were found to be at particularly high-risk. These findings highlight the need to examine mechanisms linking sexual orientation and NSSI in future research. Building on these findings can add to understanding the associations between sexual orientation, NSSI, and suicidality, as well as prevention/intervention.

  13. Effect of morphine injection on self-injurious behavior in rats%吗啡注射对大鼠自伤行为的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯坤; 高玉峰; 罗庆华; 杜莲; 蒙华庆; 周文华; 张富强; 唐甩恩

    2008-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of morphine injection on serf-injurious behavior in rats. Methods SD rats were tested randomly in saline controls group, yoked-morphine controls group and morphine self-administration group. Male SD rats were trained by nose-poke response to serf-administer morphine (1mg/kg, i. v. ,perinfusion,limit 50 infusions per day for 14 days of 4-hour training sessions daily). To record the extent and rate of serf-injurious behavior in each group. Results Stable morphine serf-administration behavior which induced by light cues was successfully established, with (35±4) active nose-poke responses per session. From the 10th day ratio of self-injurious behavior had reached 100% in yoked-morphine controls group and morphine serf-administra- tion group,92% rats injured by biting fools. But there had no significant difference in the degree of serf-injurious between two groups by wilcoxon statistics methods(P<0.05). Conclusion Severe serf-injurious behavior of rats could be induced by morphine injection model,it's style was similar with the classic model and the rate of serf-in- jurious behavior increased during the training. This behavior might be related to the pharmacological effects of psy- choactive substances, but not the rewarding effect, specific mechanisms needs further study.%目的 观察吗啡注射对大鼠自伤行为(self-injurious behavior,SIB)的影响及不同给药模式之间自伤行为的差别.方法 将SD(Sprague-Dawley)大鼠随机分为生理盐水对照组,吗啡自身给药组,yoked-吗啡对照组.通过鼻触反应建立由灯光线索诱导的静脉自身给药模型,同时记录自身给药训练期间(每次剂量1 mg/kg,每日限量50次,14d,每天4h)各组的自残程度及自残率的变化.结果 首先建立了稳定的灯光线索诱导的吗啡自身给药模型,有效鼻触反应数(35±4)次,其次自训练第10天起,自身给药组及yoked-吗啡组自伤行为的发生率均达到100%,92%的大鼠为前

  14. Self-injury, suicide ideation, and sexual orientation: differences in causes and correlates among high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCamp, Whitney; W.Bakken, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Research has suggested that sexual minority youth are more likely to experience a number of behavioral and health-related risk factors due to their exposure to negative attitudes and beliefs about sexual minorities. Few studies, however, have examined the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among sexual minority youth. With self-cutting and suicidal ideation common in middle and high schools, understanding the antecedents and correlates of such behavior may help identify troubled students and initiate preventative measures. Methods: Bivariate probit regression analyses are performed using data from 7,326 high school students collected via the Delaware Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Results: Results indicate that bullying victimization, fighting, substance use, sexual behavior, depression, and unhealthy dieting behaviors were generally associated with NSSI and suicidal ideation. Some effects - including those from sexual activity, substance use, and unhealthy dieting behaviors significantly differed based on gender and orientation. Conclusions: Risk factors for suicide and NSSI vary by gender and orientation. Both prevention/intervention specialists and researchers should consider the intersection of these risk factors with sexual orientation in their efforts. PMID:26401756

  15. Self-injury, suicide ideation, and sexual orientation: differences in causes and correlates among high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCamp, Whitney; Bakken, Nicholas W

    2016-01-01

    Research has suggested that sexual minority youth are more likely to experience a number of behavioral and health-related risk factors due to their exposure to negative attitudes and beliefs about sexual minorities. Few studies, however, have examined the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among sexual minority youth. With self-cutting and suicidal ideation common in middle and high schools, understanding the antecedents and correlates of such behavior may help identify troubled students and initiate preventative measures. Bivariate probit regression analyses are performed using data from 7,326 high school students collected via the Delaware Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Results indicate that bullying victimization, fighting, substance use, sexual behavior, depression, and unhealthy dieting behaviors were generally associated with NSSI and suicidal ideation. Some effects--including those from sexual activity, substance use, and unhealthy dieting behaviors--significantly differed based on gender and orientation. Risk factors for suicide and NSSI vary by gender and orientation. Both prevention/intervention specialists and researchers should consider the intersection of these risk factors with sexual orientation in their efforts. © 2016 KUMS, All rights reserved.

  16. The Relationship between Childhood Psychological Abuse and Neglect and Self Injurious Behavior of Students in Higher Vocational Colleges%童年心理虐待与忽视和高职生自伤行为的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代辰旭; 张野; 张珊珊; 李紫糸

    2016-01-01

    为了研究童年心理虐待与忽视和高职生自伤行为的关系,采用儿童心理虐待与忽视量表和青少年自我伤害问卷对辽宁省某职业技术学校的730名高职生进行调查,结果表明:大部分高职生存在心理虐待与忽视和自伤行为,性别、生源地、独生子女均存在显著性差异;二者呈正相关,且自伤行为可以解释童年心理虐待与忽视。文章对心理虐待与忽视和自伤行为的原因进行分析,并从不同角度提出对策。%In order to study the relationship between childhood psychological abuse and neglect and the self injurious behavior of students in higher vocational colleges, the child psychological abuse and neglect scale and adolescent self harm questionnaire on a vocational technical school in Liaoning Province 730 vocational college students were investigated. The results showed that most of the students in higher vocational colleges had psychological abuse and neglect and self injurious behavior, and there were significant differences in gender, origin and only child. They were positively correlated, and self injurious behavior can explain childhood psychological abuse and neglect. This article carries on the analysis on the causes of psychological abuse and neglect and self injurious behavior, and puts forward the countermeasures from different angles.

  17. Side effects of extinction: prevalence of bursting and aggression during the treatment of self-injurious behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    Lerman, D C; Iwata, B A; Wallace, M D

    1999-01-01

    Findings from basic and applied research suggest that treatment with operant extinction may produce adverse side effects; two of these commonly noted are an increase in the frequency of the target response (extinction burst) and an increase in aggression (extinction-induced aggression). Although extinction is often used to treat problem behavior in clinical settings, few applied studies have examined the prevalence of these side effects or their possible attenuation with other operant procedu...

  18. Self-injury, suicide ideation, and sexual orientation: differences in causes and correlates among high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney DeCamp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Researchhas suggested that sexual minority youth are more likely to experience a number of behavioral and health-related risk factors due to their exposure to negative attitudes and beliefs about sexual minorities. Few studies, however, have examined the prevalence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI among sexual minority youth. With self-cutting and suicidal ideation common in middle and high schools, understanding the antecedents and correlates of such behaviormay help identify troubled students and initiate preventative measures. METHODS: Bivariate probit regression analyses are performed using data from 7,326 high school students collected via the Delaware Youth Risk Behavior Survey. RESULTS: Results indicate that bullying victimization, fighting, substance use, sexual behavior, depression, and unhealthy dieting behaviors were generally associated with NSSI and suicidal ideation. Some effects - including those from sexual activity, substance use, and unhealthy dieting behaviors – significantly differed based on gender and orientation. CONCLUSIONS: Risk factors for suicide and NSSI vary by gender and orientation. Both prevention/intervention specialists and researchers should consider the intersection of these risk factors with sexual orientation in their efforts.

  19. How does self-injury feel? Examining automatic positive reinforcement in adolescent self-injurers with experience sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Edward A; Nock, Matthew K; Kranzler, Amy

    2014-02-28

    One of the most frequently reported, yet understudied, motivations for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) involves automatic positive reinforcement (APR), wherein sensations arising from NSSI reinforce and promote the behavior. The current study used experience sampling methodology with a clinical sample of self-injuring adolescents (N=30) over a 2-week period during which the adolescents reported NSSI behaviors, and rated if an APR motivation was present, and if so whether that motivation pertained to feeling "pain," "stimulation," or "satisfaction." Over 50% of the sample reported at least one instance of NSSI for APR reasons. No significant differences were found on demographic factors or psychiatric comorbidity for those with and without an APR motivation. However, those with an APR motivation reported elevated NSSI thoughts, longer duration of those thoughts, and more NSSI behaviors. They also reported more alcohol use thoughts, alcohol use, impulsive spending, and binge eating. The most commonly reported sensation following NSSI for APR was "satisfaction." However those endorsing feeling pain reported the most NSSI behaviors. These findings provide new information about the APR motivations for NSSI and shed light on the different sensations felt.

  20. Skin-picking in individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome: Prevalence, functional assessment, and its comorbidity with compulsive and self-injurious behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Didden, H.C.M.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Curfs, L.M.G.

    2007-01-01

    Background  Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are at increased risk for mental health and behaviour problems, such as skin-picking and compulsive behaviours. Prevalence and functional assessment of skin-picking, and its association with compulsive behaviour and self-injury, were investiga

  1. Differences between suicide and non-suicidal self-harm behaviours: a literary review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Halicka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the current information of WHO, suicide is one of the 20 most common causes of death in the whole population. Suicides constitute one of the most common causes of death amongst teenagers. Apart from suicide, another significant, however much less known phenomenon is the non-suicidal self-injury. Despite the fact that we know much less about self-harm than about suicide, the results of research during the last years indicate that self-harm occurs more frequently in the population of adolescents – suicides constitute 10% in the population of teenagers, and 7-14% of adolesncets report to have performed a self-harm act at least once in their live. The last transnational research shows that the frequency of self-destructive behaviours in adolescents is at the level of 24% of the whole population, which might indicate an intensification of this phenomenon. In some cases self-injury takes place with a clear intention of committing suicide, or a self-destructive act, which often precedes a suicidal attempt long before the final decision to carry it out. Nevertheless, In the majority of cases self-injury is not performed with the intention of death. Therefore a question might be posed: do self-harm acts constitute a separate category of behaviours, or do they inevitably lead to a suicidal death? When answering this question, we ought to take a closer look at both phenomena to have a better knowledge about their etiology, risk factors, and to understand when they co-occur, and when they belong to different categories of self-aggressive behaviours.

  2. Risk-factor differences for nonsuicidal self-injury and suicide attempts in Mexican psychiatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study compared sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities with substance use, and impulsivity features in three groups of psychiatric patients – suicide attempters, nonsuicidal self-injury, and nonsuicidal without self-injury – to determine the predictive factors for nonsuicidal self-injury or suicide behavior. Patients and methods Demographic features and self-reported substance use were assessed in 384 Mexican psychiatric patients. Impulsivity features were evalu...

  3. Evidence for Reciprocal Interaction Effects among Adults with Self-Injury and Their Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jason J.; Clary, Jamie; Harper, Vickie N.; Bodfish, James W.; Symons, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Patterns of caregiver responses to client adaptive behavior were compared between adults with intellectual disabilities with and without self-injurious behavior. Participants with moderate to profound intellectual disability and self-injury (n = 89) and age/IQ matched control participants (n = 20) were selected from a large sample of adults living…

  4. Is Nonsuicidal Self Injury Associated With Parenting and Family Factors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baetens, Imke; Claes, Laurence; Martin, Graham; Onghena, Patrick; Grietens, Hans; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Pieters, Ciska; Wiersema, Jan R.; Griffith, James W.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the association of parenting and family factors with nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) in preadolescents. A sample of 1,439 preadolescents and their parents were assessed by means of (a) adolescent-reported parenting behaviors (support and behavioral/psychological control

  5. Is Nonsuicidal Self Injury Associated With Parenting and Family Factors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baetens, Imke; Claes, Laurence; Martin, Graham; Onghena, Patrick; Grietens, Hans; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Pieters, Ciska; Wiersema, Jan R.; Griffith, James W.

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the association of parenting and family factors with nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) in preadolescents. A sample of 1,439 preadolescents and their parents were assessed by means of (a) adolescent-reported parenting behaviors (support and behavioral/psychological control

  6. 青少年自我伤害行为的常用评估方法%The Assessment Methods of Self-injurious Behavior Commonly Used Among the Adolescents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄任之; 刘明矾; 何文; 詹小平

    2011-01-01

    本文综述了国外评估青少年自我伤害行为的6种工具,分别是自杀观念问卷(SIQ)、筛查问卷(SQ)、贝克自杀观念量表(BSI)、自我毁损的功能评估(FASM)、自我伤害想法和行为访谈表(SITBI)和自我伤害的内隐联想测验(IAT),对它们的各自的评估范围、功能、内容和不足进行了逐一的介绍.%A review was conducted to introduce 6 common tools of self-injurious behavior administrated to the adolescents, I.e., the Suicide Ideation Questionnaire(SIQ), Screening Questionnaire(SQ), Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation(BSI), the Functional Assessment of Self-Mutilation(FASM), Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview (SITBI) and the Implicit Association Test(IAT). Their scope, functions, content, and defects were assessed respectively.

  7. The Effects of Physical Restraint on Self-Injurious Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N. N.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Brief (one minute) response contingent physical restraint was shown in two experiments with a 16-year-old profoundly retarded institutionalized girl to be more effective in controlling self-injurious behavior (SIB) than three minute physical restraint, which in the first study produced an increase in SIB. (CL)

  8. Interpersonal Features and Functions of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer; Brausch, Amy; Quigley, Katherine; Whitlock, Janis

    2013-01-01

    Etiological models of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) suggest interpersonal features may be important to understand this behavior, but social functions and correlates have not been extensively studied. This study addresses existing limitations by examining interpersonal correlates and functions of NSSI within a stratified random sample of 1,243…

  9. 自伤行为的心理学评估与治疗%Psychological assessment and treatment of self-injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于丽霞; 江光荣; 吴才智

    2011-01-01

    Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI, or Self-Injury, SI) is the intentional destruction of body tissue without suicidal intent and for purposes not socially sanctioned. In a functional view, SI is a dysfunctional behavior for emotion regulation, and the main problem of SI is emotion dysregulatioa In treating self-injures, therapists should assess the motive of SI, other mental or personality disorders, the history, and the function of SI. In clinical practice, good relationship between therapist and client is faundament for successful treatment, and the main target is to make clients get emotion regulation skill. As to the treatments, several treatments, such as Dialected Behavior Treatment, Problem Solving Treatment, Dynamic Treatment and so on, have been identified the same effectiveness and to manage risk of SI.%自伤行为是一种适应不良的应对方式,其核心问题是情绪管理障碍.在对自伤患者进行评估时,咨询师应重点关注行为的动机、共生性心理障碍、自伤史和自伤的功能.在临床治疗过程中,良好的治疗关系是成功治疗的基础,核心治疗目标是使当事人获得情绪管理技能.从治疗方法看,当前没有专门针对自伤的治疗,经实证检验最多的是认知行为类疗法,但没有发现哪种方法的疗效更优越.各种疗法在具体操作上有共同特点.

  10. Overlapping genetic and environmental influences on nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal ideation: Different outcomes, same etiology?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewski, D.F.; Creemers, H.E.; Lynskey, M.T.; Madden, P.A.F.; Heath, A.C.; Statham, D.J.; Martin, N.G.; Verweij, C.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal self-injury are very harmful behaviors and are associated with several psychiatric disorders. In the recently developed fifth edition of the DSM, NSSI and suicidal behavior disorder are for the first time introduced as conditions in their own ri

  11. Overlapping genetic and environmental influences on nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal ideation: different outcomes, same etiology?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewski, D.F.; Creemers, H.E.; Lynskey, M.T.; Madden, P.A.F.; Heath, A.C.; Statham, D.J.; Martin, N.G.; Verweij, K.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Importance: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal self-injury are very harmful behaviors and are associated with several psychiatric disorders. In the recently developed fifth edition of the DSM, NSSI and suicidal behavior disorder are for the first time introduced as conditions in their own r

  12. [Dissociative disorder and self-injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Shun'ichi

    2011-01-01

    Both the number of patients with dissociative disorder and that of those with self-injury have been increasing since the end of the twentieth century, suggesting that dissociation and self-injury might be closely related. When dissociative disorder coexists with self-injury, it implies self-punishment and a wish to be understood by others. Although many cases of self-injury observed since 2000 lacked traumatic experiences and were not accompanied by pathological dissociative symptoms, the patients did have dissociative tendencies. According to the results of our study examining self-injury in patients with eating disorders, we observed that self-injury, dissociative tendency and insulation from others are related to each other. This suggests that affects, sensations and representations are dissociated, losing their normal response order, and that the pervasive idea that "pain=secure" is formed in a patient from childhood based on influence from their parents. Self-injury appears to be an activation of this pervasive idea that is triggered by a stressful situation, when the dissociative psychological segmentation of effects and their representations are present in the background.

  13. Adolescent Peer Victimization, Peer Status, Suicidal Ideation, and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Examining Concurrent and Longitudinal Associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heilbron, N.; Prinstein, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined concurrent and longitudinal associations among peer victimization, peer status, and self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (i.e., suicidal ideation and nonsuicidal self-injury [NSSI]) over a 2-year period. A community sample of 493 adolescents (51% girls) in Grades 6-8 participate

  14. Adolescent Peer Victimization, Peer Status, Suicidal Ideation, and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: Examining Concurrent and Longitudinal Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbron, Nicole; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined concurrent and longitudinal associations among peer victimization, peer status, and self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (i.e., suicidal ideation and nonsuicidal self-injury [NSSI]) over a 2-year period. A community sample of 493 adolescents (51% girls) in Grades 6-8 participated in the study. Participants completed measures…

  15. Does parental monitoring moderate the relationship between bullying and adolescent nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal behavior? A community-based self-report study of adolescents in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzer, Vanessa; Haffner, Johann; Parzer, Peter; Resch, Franz; Kaess, Michael

    2015-06-24

    Being a victim of bullying in school is clearly linked to various social, emotional, and behavioral problems including self-harm behavior. However, it is not known whether even occasional victimization has similar negative consequences and whether protective factors such as social support may prevent those harmful developments. The present study therefore focuses on the nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal behavior (SB) in victims of bullying and the potentially moderating effect of parental monitoring. In all, a cross-sectional sample of 647 adolescents (mean age 12.8 years) were surveyed concerning bullying experiences, NSSI and SB, and parental monitoring. A total of 14.4% of respondents reported being a victim of frequent bullying in the past few months (with verbal and social bullying playing the most important role), which increased the risks of both NSSI (OR = 11.75) and SB (OR = 6.08). This relationship could also be shown for occasional victims of bullying (35.6%), although to a lesser extent. Parental monitoring had a significant protective effect on SB in victims of occasional bullying. However, parental monitoring did not show any protective effect in victims of repetitive bullying. Victims of bullying show a substantial risk for engaging in self-harm behavior. Therefore, the dissemination of anti-bullying programs in schools would probably also prevent such disorders. Parental participation in school-based prevention may increase its effect; this also matches the results of the present study, showing that parental monitoring may be able to buffer the negative effects of bullying victimization, at least to a certain degree.

  16. Using Qualitative Methods to Explore Non-Disclosure: The Example of Self-Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Borrill PhD

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to investigate non-disclosure are hampered by the very aspect being examined, namely an unwillingness to disclose non-disclosure. Although qualitative interviews may be considered to be an appropriate method for in-depth exploration of personal experiences, a lack of anonymity and the desire to conform to what is perceived to be socially acceptable limit its application in sensitive research. The current study, using a qualitative approach, addresses non-disclosure in the context of non-suicidal self-injury. Twenty-five young adults from diverse cultural backgrounds were interviewed in depth about their perceptions of self-injury, without the researchers asking directly whether the participants had ever self-harmed. Two techniques were used to enhance discussion within the qualitative interview: participants were invited to (a discuss three hypothetical scenarios and (b explore alternative interpretations of statistical data on patterns of self-harm. Key themes emerged regarding disclosure, gender issues, and culturally shaped concerns about the consequences of disclosure. The contributions of each element of the interview to understanding participants' perceptions are highlighted and alternative methodological approaches for examining disclosure are discussed.

  17. Funções neuropsicológicas associadas a condutas autolesivas: revisão integrativa de literatura Neuropsychological functions associated to self-injurious behavior: integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Lopes Arcoverde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Esse estudo tem como objetivo descrever fatores neuropsicológicos associados a condutas autolesivas, com base em revisão integrativa da literatura realizada através de bases de dados eletrônicas da Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde. O instrumento foi uma ficha com informações referentes a cada artigo. Foram encontrados 59 artigos e 21 (36% atendiam aos critérios para inclusão na amostra, que foram: artigos publicados em português ou inglês entre 2000 e 2009, disponíveis publicamente ou através do portal Periódicos Capes. Dificuldades relacionadas a resolução de problemas e tomada de decisões (38%; impulsividade (24%; regulação emocional (21% e estresse psicológico (17% foram fatores associados à autolesão. Os resultados sugerem correlação entre condutas autolesivas e problemas nos circuitos pré-frontais, envolvidos nos mecanismos neurais das funções citadas.This study aims to describe neuropsychological factors associated to self-injurious behavior based on an integrative literature review of papers accessed through electronic databases in the Virtual Healthcare Library. As instrument, we used information forms for each paper. A total of 59 papers were found and 21 (36% matched inclusion criterion: publication in Portuguese or English from 2000 to 2009 publicly available or available at CAPES Portal of Electronic Scientific Journals. Difficulties related to functions such as problem solving and decision making abilities (38%, impulsiveness (24%, emotional regulation (21% and psychological stress (17% were associated to self-harm. Results suggest that problems in pre-frontal circuits of the brain may be related to self-harm, since they are involved in the mechanisms of the mentioned neural functions.

  18. Association between regression and self injury among children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Eboni I; York, Janet M; Lee, Li-Ching; Zimmerman, Andrew W

    2014-02-01

    Self injurious behaviors (SIBs) are challenging clinical problems in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). This study is one of the first and largest to utilize inpatient data to examine the associations between autism, developmental regression, and SIBs. Medical records of 125 neurobehavioral hospitalized patients with diagnoses of ASDs and SIBs between 4 and 17 years of age were reviewed. Data were collected from medical records on the type and frequency of SIBs and a history of language, social, or behavioral regression during development. The children with a history of any type of developmental regression (social, behavioral, or language) were more likely to have a diagnosis of autistic disorder than other ASD diagnoses. There were no significant differences in the occurrence of self injurious or other problem behaviors (such as aggression or disruption) between children with and without regression. Regression may influence the diagnostic considerations in ASDs but does not seem to influence the clinical phenotype with regard to behavioral issues. Additional data analyses explored the frequencies and subtypes of SIBs and other medical diagnoses in ASDs, with intellectual disability and disruptive behavior disorder found most commonly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Self-Injury in Lesch-Nyhan Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lowell T.; Ernst, Monique

    1994-01-01

    Questionnaires completed by parents of 40 patients with Lesch-Nyhan disease provide information on developmental history, life course, management, medication, variability, and topography of self-injury. Analysis indicated that patients could not inhibit self-injury but could predict it and request restraints; self-injury was strongly related to…

  20. Relationship between High School Students' Self-injurious Behavior and Emotional Policy and Family Emotional Expression%中学生自伤行为与自我情绪策略和家庭情绪表达的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈蕾

    2015-01-01

    Students' self-injurious behavior tended to increase, by the concern in society, and their mood including depression, anxiety, personality disorders, etc., associated with a high degree of psychological disorders. Key for self-injurious behavior stu-dies concern that self-injurious behavior of individual emotional self-regulating capacity weaknesses, including high emotional intensity, low tolerance for emotional expression and emotions can not, emotional regulation difficulties, but there are still contro-versial. Moreover, differences between the source individual emotional strategy did not cause widespread concern, some studies show that the difference emotion expression family is an important factor in the formation of individual emotional impact of the policy, but not confirmed. In this paper, the relationship between high school students self-injurious behavior and emotional self-expression strategies and household sentiment as the main basis for discussion, launched a special report.%中学生自伤行为成上升趋势,受到社会的关注,且其对包括抑郁情绪、焦虑、人格障碍等在内的心理障碍有着高度的关联.对于自伤行为的研究关注的重点在于自伤行为个体自我情绪调节能力的缺陷,包括高情绪强度、对情绪的低容忍度以及情绪表达不能、情绪调节困难,但目前还存在争议.此外,个体情绪策略的差异源没有引起广泛的关注,有研究认为,家庭情绪表达的差异是影响个体情绪策略形成的重要因素,但并未经证实.本文就以中学生自伤行为与自我情绪策略和家庭情绪表达的关系作为主要的论述基础,展开专题报告.

  1. Investigation and functional assessment of self-injurious behavior in higher vocational college students%高职学生自伤行为调查及功能性评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李苏燕; 程勤华; 贾孙玉; 曾银川

    2015-01-01

    目的了解高职学生自伤行为的现状及检出率,并对自伤行为进行功能性评估,为高职学生自伤行为的预防和干预提供参考依据。方法采用整群随机抽样方法抽取浙江省杭州市2014级900名新入校高职学生为调查对象,采用自编的大学生自伤行为问卷调查高职学生自伤行为时的想法、目的及功能。结果853名高职学生有效完成调查,其中52.3%报告有自伤行为,6.4%经常自伤,自伤行为在性别方面差异无统计学意义(χ2=0.047, P=0.977)。67.6%的个体初次发生自伤行为是在12~15岁,19.5%是在16~20岁;自伤方式中,66.7%用手打玻璃或墙壁等硬物体,52.4%用手打脸或身体其它部位;自伤行为功能评估发现81.2%是宣泄情绪,69.4%是弥补过错或者惩罚自己,68.2%是获得关注,16.3%是获得某种快感,13.8%是鼓励或鞭策自己,2.5%是模仿崇拜或喜欢的人。结论高职学生自伤行为的检出率较高;自伤行为发生时间早,实施前考虑时问短,行为冲动;缓解不良情绪是个体自伤最常见的动机;早期创伤经验可能会增加个体自伤行为的发生。%Objective To dnow the reported rate and functional evaluation of vocational college studentsˊself-injurious kehavior, to provide a theoretical reference for the prevention and intervention. Methods Using random cluster sampling method from Hangzhou city of Zhejiang Province,2014 grade 900 new school of higher vocational students as research sample,use the questionnaire of college studentsˊself-injurious kehavior,also investigate the idea,purpose and function as self-injurious kehavior happened. Results 853 vo=cational students complete the survey effectively,52. 3% of them reported self-injurious kehavior. 6. 4% often injury themselves,there is no significant difference in terms of gender self-injurious kehavior(χ2 =0. 047,P=0. 977). 67. 6% of individuals who exercised self-injury for

  2. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury as a Time-Invariant Predictor of Adolescent Suicide Ideation and Attempts in a Diverse Community Sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, K.; Fox, K.R.; Prinstein, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Longitudinal data on adolescent self-injury are rare. Little is known regarding the associations between various forms of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors over time, particularly within community samples that are most relevant for prevention efforts. This study examined nonsuicidal s

  3. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury as a Time-Invariant Predictor of Adolescent Suicide Ideation and Attempts in a Diverse Community Sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, K.; Fox, K.R.; Prinstein, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Longitudinal data on adolescent self-injury are rare. Little is known regarding the associations between various forms of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors over time, particularly within community samples that are most relevant for prevention efforts. This study examined nonsuicidal s

  4. The Treatment of Covert Self-Injury through Contingencies on Response Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Nancy C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Covert self-injurious behavior in a 21-year old with mild mental retardation and cerebral palsy was treated by first identifying tangible and social reinforcers and then providing reinforcers contingent on absence of tissue damage identified during physical examination. Almost complete success was achieved and maintained over 10 months. (DB)

  5. Evaluating a Training Intervention for Assessing Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: The HIRE Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutt, Corrine C.; Buser, Trevor J.; Buser, Juleen K.

    2016-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effectiveness of a brief training intervention with graduate counseling students who used the HIRE (history, interest in change, reasons for engaging in the behavior, and exposure to risk; Buser & Buser, 2013b) model for the informal assessment of nonsuicidal self-injury. The intervention group demonstrated…

  6. The Virtual Cutting Edge: The Internet and Adolescent Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Janis L.; Powers, Jane L.; Eckenrode, John

    2006-01-01

    The 2 studies reported here use observational data from message boards to investigate how adolescents solicit and share information related to self-injurious behavior. Study 1 examines the prevalence and nature of these message boards, their users, and most commonly discussed topics. Study 2 was intended to explore the correlations between content…

  7. Emotional Responses to Self-Injury Imagery among Adults with Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Stacy Shaw; Linehan, Marsha M.; Sylvers, Patrick; Chittams, Jesse; Rizvi, Shireen L.

    2008-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts (SAs) are especially prevalent in borderline personality disorder. One proposed mechanism for the maintenance of NSSI and SAs is escape conditioning, whereby immediate reductions in aversive emotional states negatively reinforce the behaviors. Psychophysiological and subjective indicators of…

  8. The roles of behavioural activation and inhibition among young adults engaging in self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Abigail L; Seelbach, Abigail C; Conner, Bradley T; Alloy, Lauren B

    2013-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a prevalent behaviour, particularly among young adults. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms underlying NSSI or the personality correlates of these behaviours. The goal of this study was to examine the roles of the behavioural activation and inhibition systems (BAS and BIS) in NSSI. A total of 604 undergraduates completed two self-report measures of BAS and BIS, as well as NSSI history. Logistic and negative binomial linear regressions were used to examine the relationships between measures of BAS and BIS and the presence and course characteristics of NSSI. Approximately 30% of participants reported a history of NSSI. High scores on BAS (drive, reward and fun seeking), combined with low scores on BIS total, predicted NSSI history. However, the opposite was also true, with high levels of BIS total, combined with low levels of BAS (drive, reward and fun seeking), also predicting NSSI history. In addition, several BAS by BIS interactions predicted an NSSI course characterized by more acts and methods used. This study supports the roles of both BAS and BIS in NSSI and takes the first step in identifying how these personality correlates may help identify individuals at risk for NSSI.

  9. Non-suicidal self-injury in adolescence : A longitudinal study of the relationship between NSSI, psychological distress and perceived parenting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baetens, Imke; Claes, Laurence; Onghena, Patrick; Grietens, Hans; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Pieters, Ciska; Wiersema, Jan R.; Griffith, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The present study investigates whether either adolescents' psychological distress and/or perceived parenting predicted the occurrence of NSSI. Furthermore, the consequences of NSSI are examined in a three-wave longitudinal study. Design: The sample at time 1 (age 12) consisted of 1396 ado

  10. Frequency and preventative interventions for non-suicidal self-injury and suicidal behaviour in primary school-age children: a scoping review protocol

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Danai Bem; Charlotte Connor; Colin Palmer; Sunita Channa; Max Birchwood

    2017-01-01

    ... reviews of preventative interventions for NSSI and suicide in adolescents, few have explored its prevalence in younger children and the potential impact of preventative interventions at this stage of life...

  11. Perinatal and psychosocial circumstances associated with risk of attempted suicide, non-suicidal self-injury and psychiatric service use. A longitudinal study of young people.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Young, Robert

    2011-11-18

    Abstract Background Past studies using large population based datasets link certain perinatal circumstances (birth weight, parity, etc) with mental health outcomes such as suicide, self-harm and psychiatric problems. Problematically, population datasets omit a number of social confounds. The aim of this study is to replicate past research linking perinatal circumstances and mental health (suicidality and use of psychiatric services) and to determine if such associations remain after adjusting for social circumstances. Methods A longitudinal school-based survey of 2157 young people (surveyed at age 11, 13, 15) followed up in early adulthood (age 19). At age 11 parents of participants provided information about perinatal circumstances (birth weight, birth complications, etc.) and psychiatric service use. Participants provided data about their mental health at age 15 (attempted suicide, suicidal thoughts) and at ages 19 (self-harm, psychiatric service use). In addition, data were collected about their social and psychosocial circumstances (gender, deprivation, religion, sexual behaviour, etc.). Results Predictably, social factors were linked to mental health outcomes. For example, those with same sex partners were more likely (OR 4.84) to self-harm than those without a same sex partner. With a single exception, in both unadjusted and adjusted models, perinatal circumstances were not or only marginally associated with mental health outcomes. The exception was the number of birth complications; young people with two or more complications were approximately 2-3 times more likely than those without complications to use psychiatric services. Conclusions While we failed to replicate results found using large population based datasets, some of our results are compatible with prior research findings. Further, evidence from this study supports the influence of perinatal circumstances (birth complications) on later psychiatric problems, or at least higher than expected contact with psychiatric service.

  12. Perinatal and psychosocial circumstances associated with risk of attempted suicide, non-suicidal self-injury and psychiatric service use. A longitudinal study of young people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Robert

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Past studies using large population based datasets link certain perinatal circumstances (birth weight, parity, etc with mental health outcomes such as suicide, self-harm and psychiatric problems. Problematically, population datasets omit a number of social confounds. The aim of this study is to replicate past research linking perinatal circumstances and mental health (suicidality and use of psychiatric services and to determine if such associations remain after adjusting for social circumstances. Methods A longitudinal school-based survey of 2157 young people (surveyed at age 11, 13, 15 followed up in early adulthood (age 19. At age 11 parents of participants provided information about perinatal circumstances (birth weight, birth complications, etc. and psychiatric service use. Participants provided data about their mental health at age 15 (attempted suicide, suicidal thoughts and at ages 19 (self-harm, psychiatric service use. In addition, data were collected about their social and psychosocial circumstances (gender, deprivation, religion, sexual behaviour, etc.. Results Predictably, social factors were linked to mental health outcomes. For example, those with same sex partners were more likely (OR 4.84 to self-harm than those without a same sex partner. With a single exception, in both unadjusted and adjusted models, perinatal circumstances were not or only marginally associated with mental health outcomes. The exception was the number of birth complications; young people with two or more complications were approximately 2-3 times more likely than those without complications to use psychiatric services. Conclusions While we failed to replicate results found using large population based datasets, some of our results are compatible with prior research findings. Further, evidence from this study supports the influence of perinatal circumstances (birth complications on later psychiatric problems, or at least higher than expected contact with psychiatric service.

  13. Victimization profiles, non-suicidal self-injury, suicide attempt, and post-traumatic stress disorder symptomology: application of latent class analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dhingra, Katie; Boduszek, Daniel; Sharratt, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have incorporated multiple dimensions of victimization or examined whether victimization profiles differ by gender. Consequently, the present study sought to extend prior research by using latent class analysis (LCA) to identify naturally occurring subgroups of individuals who have experienced victimization, and to test for sex differences. Data from 4,016 females and 3,032 males in the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) were analyzed. Evidence of the existence of similar v...

  14. Perinatal and psychosocial circumstances associated with risk of attempted suicide, non-suicidal self-injury and psychiatric service use. A longitudinal study of young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert; Riordan, Vincent; Stark, Cameron

    2011-11-18

    Past studies using large population based datasets link certain perinatal circumstances (birth weight, parity, etc) with mental health outcomes such as suicide, self-harm and psychiatric problems. Problematically, population datasets omit a number of social confounds. The aim of this study is to replicate past research linking perinatal circumstances and mental health (suicidality and use of psychiatric services) and to determine if such associations remain after adjusting for social circumstances. A longitudinal school-based survey of 2157 young people (surveyed at age 11, 13, 15) followed up in early adulthood (age 19). At age 11 parents of participants provided information about perinatal circumstances (birth weight, birth complications, etc.) and psychiatric service use. Participants provided data about their mental health at age 15 (attempted suicide, suicidal thoughts) and at ages 19 (self-harm, psychiatric service use). In addition, data were collected about their social and psychosocial circumstances (gender, deprivation, religion, sexual behaviour, etc.). Predictably, social factors were linked to mental health outcomes. For example, those with same sex partners were more likely (OR 4.84) to self-harm than those without a same sex partner. With a single exception, in both unadjusted and adjusted models, perinatal circumstances were not or only marginally associated with mental health outcomes. The exception was the number of birth complications; young people with two or more complications were approximately 2-3 times more likely than those without complications to use psychiatric services. While we failed to replicate results found using large population based datasets, some of our results are compatible with prior research findings. Further, evidence from this study supports the influence of perinatal circumstances (birth complications) on later psychiatric problems, or at least higher than expected contact with psychiatric service.

  15. Risk-factor differences for nonsuicidal self-injury and suicide attempts in Mexican psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresán A

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ana Fresán,1 Beatriz Camarena,2 Thelma Beatriz González-Castro,3 Carlos Alfonso Tovilla-Zárate,4 Isela E Juárez-Rojop,5 Lilia López-Narváez,5 Alicia E González-Ramón,4 Yazmín Hernández-Díaz3 1Subdirección de Investigaciones Clínicas, Instituto Nacional de Psiquiatría Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz, México City, 2Departamento de Genética Psiquiátrica, Instituto Nacional de Psiquiatría Ramón de la Fuente Muñiz, México City, 3División Académica Multidisciplinaria de Jalpa de Méndez, Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Jalpa de Méndez, 4División Académica Multidisciplinaria de Comalcalco, Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco, Comalcalco, 5Hospital General de Yajalón, Secretaría de Salud, Yajalón, Chiapas, México Background: The present study compared sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities with substance use, and impulsivity features in three groups of psychiatric patients – suicide attempters, nonsuicidal self-injury, and nonsuicidal without self-injury – to determine the predictive factors for nonsuicidal self-injury or suicide behavior.Patients and methods: Demographic features and self-reported substance use were assessed in 384 Mexican psychiatric patients. Impulsivity features were evaluated using the Plutchik Impulsivity Scale. Comparison analyses between groups were performed and a logistic regression model used to determine the factors associated with nonsuicidal with self-injury behavior and suicidal behavior.Results: Different predictive factors were observed for nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal behavior. Females were more likely to present nonsuicidal self-injury behaviors (odds ratio [OR] 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.18–0.93; P=0.03. For suicide attempters, the factors associated were younger age (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.85–0.93; P<0.001, less than 6 years of schooling (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.06–0.6; P=0.004, and higher impulsivity traits, such as self-control (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.03

  16. The Association Between Masculinity and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jonathan D; Kearns, Jaclyn C; Ledoux, Annie M; Addis, Michael E; Marx, Brian P

    2015-12-30

    Several known risk factors for nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), such as negative emotionality and deficits in emotion skills, are also associated with masculinity. Researchers and clinicians suggest that masculine norms around emotional control and self-reliance may make men more likely to engage in self-harm. Masculinity has also been implicated as a potential risk factor for suicide and other self-damaging behaviors. However, the association between masculinity and NSSI has yet to be explored. In the current study, a sample of 912 emerging adults from two universities in the Northeastern United States completed a web-based questionnaire assessing adherence to masculine norms, engagement in NSSI, and known risk factors for NSSI (demographics and number of self-injurers known). Stronger adherence to masculine norms predicted chronic NSSI (five or more episodes throughout the life span) above and beyond other known risk factors. Adherence to masculine norms was related to methods of NSSI. Clinical implications are discussed, including discussions of masculine norms in treatment settings. Future research should examine what specific masculine norms are most closely linked to NSSI and other self-damaging behaviors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Lifetime and 12-Month Nonsuicidal Self-Injury and Academic Performance in College Freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekens, Glenn; Claes, Laurence; Demyttenaere, Koen; Auerbach, Randy P; Green, Jennifer G; Kessler, Ronald C; Mortier, Philippe; Nock, Matthew K; Bruffaerts, Ronny

    2016-10-01

    We examined whether nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with academic performance in college freshmen, using census-based web surveys (N = 7,527; response = 65.4%). NSSI was assessed with items from the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview and subsequently linked with the administratively recorded academic year percentage (AYP). Freshmen with lifetime and 12-month NSSI showed a reduction in AYP of 3.4% and 5.9%, respectively. The college environment was found to moderate the effect of 12-month NSSI, with more strongly reduced AYPs in departments with higher-than-average mean departmental AYPs. The findings suggest that overall stress and test anxiety are underlying processes between NSSI membership and academic performance.

  18. Continuous Access to Competing Stimulation as Intervention for Self-Injurious Skin Picking in a Child with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Mara V.; Luiselli, James K.; Baker, Lorianne

    2009-01-01

    Children with autism frequently display self-injurious behavior (SIB), but skin picking--a less severe topography of SIB--has not been the focus of much clinical research. The present study evaluated a home-based intervention that was implemented with a 9-year-old girl who had autism and picked her fingers with resulting tissue damage. The…

  19. 大连市1463名初中生非自杀自我伤害行为的流行病学调查%An epidemiological study for no-suicide self-injury behavior of 1463 junior school students in Dalian city

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王蕾; 孙月吉; 林媛; 金鑫; 梁杰; 徐国庆; 郑亚; 沈慧娟; 朱程清

    2012-01-01

    the NSSI was from "their Own Idea".2.7% of the NSSI can "Feel Relief" through NSSI behavior.93% of NSSI was to regulate their mood.100% students of NSSI against NSSI behavior by " Reading Books or Listening Music",in which 60% of NSSI believe the method was helpful to relax their mind.78.5% of the NSSI resisted NSSI behavior by "Watching TV or Playing Games",but they did not get enough effects.60% NSSI considered themselves without the need to treat.41.3% of NSSI had never been to treat.2.5% of NSSI went to hospital for the wound.Conclusion NSSI is often be found in junior school students,and highest ratio is at 13 years old.The most common method of NSSI is "Cutting Skin".More NSSI aim is to release their emotion,and self-injury behavior accordance with their inner thoughts.NSSI behavior often is secret,and reading and listening to music "is cut off from the relative effective way to conduct.NSSI are seldom to initiative doctor,and education organ,parents and society in a three-dimensional one of the system is necessary.

  20. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury and Suicidal Risk Among Emerging Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Chloe A; Willoughby, Teena

    2016-10-01

    Although nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) has been differentiated from suicidal behavior on the basis of nonlethal intent in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, NSSI often is associated with increased suicidal risk. However, there is a paucity of large-scale longitudinal examinations on the associations among NSSI, suicidal ideation, and suicidal attempts, particularly among community-based samples. In the present study, we examined whether NSSI in first-year university was associated with increased risk for later suicidal ideation and attempts over time among students. Participants included 940 emerging adults (70.8% female, mean age = 19.05 years) from a mid-sized Canadian university who volunteered to participate in a longitudinal research project starting in first-year university (participants were surveyed annually over five waves). Binary logistic regression analyses revealed that the odds of experiencing suicidal ideation across times 2-5 were 2.04 times as high for emerging adults who engaged in NSSI at baseline (even after controlling for suicidal ideation and attempts at baseline) as for individuals who did not engage in NSSI. Furthermore, the odds of attempting suicide across times 2-5 were 3.46 times as high for emerging adults who engaged in NSSI at baseline (even after controlling for suicidal ideation and attempts at baseline) as for individuals who did not engage in NSSI. Findings suggest that the presence of NSSI in first-year university may be an important marker of later suicidal risk, reflecting increased risk for both suicidal ideation and attempts across the university years among emerging adults. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Self-Injury: The Secret Language of Pain for Teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Len; Kortum, Julie

    2004-01-01

    Why would students purposefully harm themselves? Why would they cut their own wrists, yet not be suicidal? These questions are addressed in this article that explores the myths and types of self-injury in which children and teenagers engage. Research indicates a connection between self-injurers and home abuse, and anorexia. This article discusses…

  2. The Self-Injury Hypothesis: Addressing a Neurologist's Concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedye, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper responds to a critique (EC 601 489) of a paper on the possible involuntary nature of self-injurious movements in persons with mental retardation, resulting from undiagnosed frontal lobe seizures. The response discusses electroencephalographic techniques, the importance of observable ictal phenomena, the need for other corroborating…

  3. Oral self-injuries: clinical findings in a series of 19 patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cannavale, Rosangela; Itro, Angelo; Campisi, Giuseppina; Compilato, Domenico; Colella, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Self-injury (SI) is defined as a behavioral disturbance consisting of a deliberate harm to one’s own body without suicidal intent, it is not uncommon and ranges in severity from simple nail-biting to more extreme forms of self-mutilation. The head neck region may be the target of such lesions. SI is associated with several medical conditions, of which it can represent the first clinical sign. Aim of this paper is to describe a series of oral SI, giving special emphasis to the clin...

  4. Predictive Factors of Suicide Attempt and Non-Suicidal Self-Harm in Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Saad Salman; Jawaria Idrees; Fahad Hassan; Fariha Idrees; Mashaal Arifullah; Sareer Badshah

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Suicide is the third cause of mortality in America, second leading cause of death in developed countries, and one of the major health problems. Self-harm is self-inflicted damage to one’s self with or without suicidal intent. In the present study, the predictive factors of suicide attempt and non-suicidal self-harm were evaluated in patients referred to emergency department (ED) with these problem. Methods: The total number of 45 patients with suicide attempt or self-harm admitt...

  5. An Exploratory Study of the Nature and Extent of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury among College Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrosini D. Kokaliari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the extent and nature of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI among 165 students attending an all-women’s college. Associations between NSSI behaviors and demographics, borderline personality disorder (BPD, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, and attachment styles were investigated. Statistically significant relationships between the severity of NSSI and demographic characteristics and BPD and PTSD were explored using bivariate analysis. Within this population, presence of NSSI behavior was significantly associated with age, years in college, nonheterosexual orientation, BPD, PTSD, and preoccupied attachment styles. There were also marginally significant associations with race and financial status. Severity of NSSI behaviors was significantly associated with age, years in college, BPD pathology, and primary parent’s level of education. A logistic regression analysis was developed that predicted NSSI behavior with 67% accuracy based on these findings. This study has implications for clinical practice.

  6. 青少年常见身心病理症状流行情况及其对6个月后自杀和自伤行为的影响%Situation of common psychosomatic symptom in adolescent and its influence on 6 months later suicide and self-injurious behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹慧; 陶芳标; 黄蕾; 万宇辉; 孙莹; 苏普玉; 郝加虎

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of common psychosomatic symptoms among Chinese adolescents and the influence on 6 months later suicide and self-injurious behavior.Methods Based on the cluster sampling method,the participants who were recruited from 8 cities from 3 areas in China,including Eastern areas (Beijing,Shaoxing and Guangzhou),Middle areas( Ezhou,Harbin and Taiyuan ) and Western areas (Guiyang and Chongqing ),were administered by multidimensional sub-health questionnaire of adolescents ( MSQA ) in March 2008.Demographics,life style,psychosomatic symptoms,suicide and self-injurious behavior were also assessed.A total of 17 622 questionnaires were valid at baseline.Six months later,14 407 questionnaires were eligible for two waves investigation.Analysis of Pearson chi-square and logistic model regression analysis were employed to compare the incidence of psychosomatic symptoms,suicide and self-injurious behaviors among different areas and to explore the possible risk factors of those symptoms and behaviors.Results At baseline,rates of total common physiological and psychological symptoms were 24.1% ( 4255/17 622 ) and 30.9% ( 5447/17 622 ),respectively,with the highest being eating and drinking too much(6.4%,1130/17 622) and hardly feel ease to learn at home ( 11.8%,2087/17 622).In males,the rate of common psychological symptoms(30.7%,2637/8599) was higher than physiological symptoms ( 24.0%,2061/8599 ) ( P < 0.05 ) ; in females,the rate of common psychological symptoms ( 31.1%,2810/9023 ) was higher than physiological symptoms ( 24.3 %,2194/9023) (P <0.05 ).The rate of the common psychosomatic symptoms in senior high school students (46.8%,2905/6208) were significantly higher than those in middle high school students (37.3%,2337/6262) and college students ( 33.2%,1711/5152 ) ( all P values < 0.05 ).Students from Western areas had the highest incidences of the common physiological and psychological symptoms (30.2%,1471

  7. A Preliminary Application of Social Cognitive Theory to Nonsuicidal Self-Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasking, Penelope; Rose, Alyssa

    2016-08-01

    Researchers have established a relationship between exposure to nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), and increased probability of engaging in the behavior, but few have endeavored to explain the mechanisms underlying the relationship. We drew on Social Cognitive Theory to argue that core cognitions, including NSSI outcome expectancies and self-efficacy expectancies, moderate this relationship. We also explored whether knowledge about NSSI and attitudes toward the behavior played a role in this relationship. A sample of 389 university students (73.1 % female, M age = 20.90, SD = 2.36), completed online questionnaires assessing the constructs of interest. Our findings support the application of Social Cognitive Theory to better understanding NSSI, with clear links between expectancies, self-efficacy and NSSI. Further, these cognitions moderated a number of exposure-NSSI relationships. Implications of these findings for theory, research and intervention are discussed.

  8. Self-Injurious Behaviour in Cornelia De Lange Syndrome: 2. Association with Environmental Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloneem, J.; Arron, K.; Hall, S. S.; Oliver, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Self-injurious behaviour is commonly seen in Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). However, there has been limited research into the aetiology of self-injury in CdLS and whether environmental factors influence the behaviour. Methods: We observed the self-injury of 27 individuals with CdLS and 17 participants who did not have CdLS matched…

  9. Testing an equifinality model of nonsuicidal self-injury among early adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Kate; Hipwell, Alison E; Stepp, Stephanie D; Wroblewski, Kristen

    2014-08-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a common behavior among females that has been shown to confer risk for continued self-injury and suicidal attempts. NSSI can be viewed conceptually as behavior that is pathognomonic with aggression and/or depression. Empirical research on concurrent correlates supports this concept: numerous and diverse factors are shown to be significantly associated with self-harm, including depression, emotion dysregulation, impulsivity, and aggression and other conduct problems, as well as environmental stressors such as bullying, harsh parenting, and negative life events. In the present study, we test hypotheses regarding developmental precursors (measured from ages 8 to 12 years) to NSSI in young adolescent girls (ages 13-14 years), specifically whether aggression, depression, and environmental stressors distinguish girls with and without self-harm, and whether there is evidence for multiple developmental pathways to NSSI. Data were derived from the longitudinal Pittsburgh Girls Study. In this community sample of girls, the prevalence of NSSI at ages 13 or 14 years of age was 6.0%. Initial levels in dimensions measured within the depression, aggression, and environmental stressor domains accounted for variance in NSSI in early adolescence. Changes over time in relational aggression and assertiveness were also significantly associated with risk for NSSI. To a large extent, adolescent NSSI was predicted by psychological deficits and stress exposure that began early in childhood. Risk indices were calculated using the 85th or 15th percentile. Close to 80% of girls who engaged in NSSI during adolescence were identified by at least one risk domain in childhood. A sizable proportion of adolescent girls who later engaged in NSSI had childhood risk scores in all three domains; the remaining girls with adolescent NSSI were relatively evenly distributed across the other risk domain profiles. The observation that multiple pathways to NSSI exist suggests

  10. Self-Criticism and Depressive Symptoms Mediate the Relationship Between Emotional Experiences With Family and Peers and Self-Injury in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Ana; Pinto-Gouveia, José; Cunha, Marina; Carvalho, Sérgio

    2016-10-07

    Although the relationship between negative childhood experiences, peer victimization, depressive symptoms, and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) is widely recognized, the mechanisms involved are not fully understood, especially among adolescents. This study aims to test the mediating role of both self-criticism and depressive symptoms in the relationship between memories of negative or positive experiences, current peer victimization, and NSSI. The sample consists 854 Portuguese adolescents, 451 female and 403 male, with ages between 12 and 18 years (M = 14.89; SD = 1.79), from middle and secondary schools. Participants answered self-report measures. Results from path analysis showed that memories of negative experiences, the absence of positive memories with family in childhood and peer victimization indirectly impact on NSSI through self-criticism and depressive symptoms. In addition, these stressful experiences led to depressive symptoms through self-criticism. Lastly, the most severe form of self-criticism indirectly impacts on NSSI through depressive symptoms, even though it also has a strong direct effect. It suggests that negative experiences with parents and peer victimization, as well as the absence of positive memories with family, have a negative impact on NSSI when these experiences are linked with a sense of self-hatred and depressive symptoms.

  11. Testing the Relations Between Impulsivity-Related Traits, Suicidality, and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: A Test of the Incremental Validity of the UPPS Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lynam, Donald R.; Joshua D. Miller; Miller, Drew J.; Bornovalova, Marina A.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has received significant attention as a predictor of suicidal behavior (SB) and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Despite significant promise, trait impulsivity has received less attention. Understanding the relations between impulsivity and SB and NSSI is confounded, unfortunately, by the heterogeneous nature of impulsivity. This study examined the relations among 4 personality pathways to impulsive behavior studied via the UPPS model of impulsivity and SB...

  12. Dating Violence and Self-Injury among Undergraduate College Students: Attitudes and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christine E.; Wester, Kelly L.; Paladino, Derrick A.

    2008-01-01

    An Internet-based survey about dating violence and self-injury was completed by 1,777 undergraduates. A regression analysis tested if recent dating violence victimization and perpetration experiences predicted whether participants self-injured in the past 90 days, after controlling for demographic variables and attitudes toward self-injury and…

  13. Self-Injurious Behaviour in Cornelia De Lange Syndrome: 1. Prevalence and Phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, C.; Sloneem, J.; Hall, S.; Arron, K.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Self-injurious behaviour is frequently identified as part of the behavioural phenotype of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS). We conducted a case-control study of the prevalence and phenomenology of self-injurious behaviour (SIB) in CdLS. Methods: A total of 54 participants with CdLS were compared with 46 individuals who were comparable…

  14. The Association Between Environmental Events and Self-Injurious Behaviour in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, J.; Oliver, C.; Hall, S.; Arron, K.; Sloneem, J.; Petty, J.

    2005-01-01

    There has been limited empirical research into the environmental causes of self-injury in Cornelia de Lange syndrome. The present study examined the variability of self-injurious behaviour in Cornelia de Lange syndrome across environmental setting events. Additionally, the association between setting events and more specific environmental events…

  15. Dating Violence and Self-Injury among Undergraduate College Students: Attitudes and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Christine E.; Wester, Kelly L.; Paladino, Derrick A.

    2008-01-01

    An Internet-based survey about dating violence and self-injury was completed by 1,777 undergraduates. A regression analysis tested if recent dating violence victimization and perpetration experiences predicted whether participants self-injured in the past 90 days, after controlling for demographic variables and attitudes toward self-injury and…

  16. Experiences of self-injury and aggression among women admitted to forensic psychiatric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenius, Heidi; Strand, Susanne

    2017-05-01

    Self-injury and institutional violence are well-known characteristics of female forensic psychiatric patients, but research on patients' experiences of these behaviours is limited. The aim of the study was to investigate how female forensic psychiatric patients describe their self-injury and aggression. The authors performed qualitative in-depth interviews with 13 female forensic psychiatric inpatients. The interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis resulted in three themes describing the process of handling negative thoughts and emotions by using self-injury or aggression towards others and thereby experiencing satisfaction. Both self-injury and aggression were experienced as strategies for emotional regulation. The forensic psychiatric care was perceived as important for the women in developing less harmful strategies for coping with negative thoughts and emotions instead of injuring themselves or others. Self-injury and aggression are often risk-assessed separately, but results from the present study suggest that these behaviours need a more holistic approach.

  17. Prevalence of self-injury performed by adolescents aged 16–19 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Pawłowska

    2016-02-01

    1. Self-injury is performed by 14% of adolescents aged 16–19 years, significantly more girls than boys. 2. Significantly more adolescents who perform self-injury, as compared to those who do not do it, use psychoactive substances, get drunk, report planning suicide, neglect school and more often consume alcohol. 3. Significantly more adolescents who perform self-injury, as compared to those who do not perform it, raised in a single parent family inform about alcohol addiction of a family member, conflicts with parents and the experienced psychological and physical violence experienced from their parents and peers. Significantly more girls who perform self-injury, as compared to those who do not perform it, experienced sexual abuse. 4. Performing self-injury by adolescents coexists with factors motivating to this type of behaviours: sense of helplessness, rejection, loneliness, sense of guilt, anger, impulsiveness, desire for revenge, school problems, conflicts with parents and peers.

  18. Self-injurious behaviour (SIB)--from definition to human rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, A

    1993-01-01

    This article is part of a special section on 'self-injurious behaviour and autism' and is mainly based on a book edited by Luiselli, Matson and Singh (1992) addressing empirical data on self-injurious behaviour and mental retardation from a behavioural perspective. Within the overview of the book some information on autism is also presented and critically discussed. Self-injurious behaviour is a poorly understood phenomenon and problematic in many ways; its definition is not easy; little is known about the causes and neuroscientific models. Demographic data are scarce and functional analysis and interventions (behavioural techniques, medication, education) need to be further developed, under the protection of human rights committees.

  19. [Self-injury in Japan: epidemiological features from the nationwide survey data of 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ae, Ryusuke; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Tsuboi, Satoshi; Kojo, Takao; Yoshida, Honami; Kitamura, Kunio

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the epidemiological features of self-injury in Japan, and to investigate the factors associated with a history of self-injury, using nationwide random sample data on Japan in 2010. Questionnaires were distributed to 2,693 subjects, aged 16-49 years, randomly selected from the all over Japan using 2-stage stratified random sampling; the answers regarding self-injury were analyzed. Potential risk factors were compared between those who answered that they had a history of self-injury (self-injury group) and those who answered that they did not (non-self-injury group). Responses were obtained from 1,540 participants (response rate, 57.2%). Lifetime prevalence of having 1 or more self-injury events was 7.1% overall (3.9% for men; 9.5% for women) and approximately half of them reported a repetitive history of self-injury. Lifetime prevalence of self-injury was highest in those aged 16-29 years (9.9%, 16-29 years; 5.6%, 30-39 years; 5.7%, 40-49 years). Lifetime prevalence among women (16-29 years, 30-39 years, and 40-49 years) decreased with age (15.7%, 7.5%, and 5.8%, respectively), however, that among men increased with age (3.0%, 3.4%, and 5.5%, respectively). Compared with the non-self-injury group, those in the self-injury group were significantly more likely to have a history of cigarette smoking (self-injury group, 47.5%; non-self-injury group, 28.2%; adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 2.18 [1.32-3.58]), childhood abuse (23.6% and 3.7%, respectively, 4.24 [2.18-8.25]), induced abortion (30.3% and 12.7%, respectively, 1.93[1.13-3.30]); moreover, they were significantly less likely to answer that they had a happy life when they were junior high school students (41.1% and 78.6%, respectively, 0.45 [0.25-0.79]). In addition, those in the self-injury group were more likely to report a history of parental divorce, that they did not have good communication with their parents, and that they did not have respect and

  20. Nonsuicidal self-injury in sexual minority college students: a test of theoretical integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J; Hilt, Lori M; Ehlinger, Peter P; McMillan, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    Individuals identifying as a sexual minority report engaging in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) at substantially higher rates compared to their heterosexual peers. Given that NSSI is a known risk factor for suicide, it is important to understand the processes unique to being a sexual minority that increases risk for NSSI so that adequate prevention efforts can be established. The current study integrated Minority Stress Theory and the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide to test a model of NSSI and suicide risk. A total of 137 college students who identified as a sexual minority completed an anonymous on-line study assessing NSSI, suicidal thoughts/behaviors, and constructs of the minority stress and interpersonal theories. Two linear regressions using bootstrapping analyses were conducted to test our hypotheses. Minority stress was directly associated with NSSI and via perceived burdensomeness, explaining 27 % of the variance. NSSI was associated with increased risk for suicide thoughts/behaviors directly, and through acquired capability, explaining 45 % of the variance. These findings provide evidence that unique stressors individuals face as a result of their sexual minority status increases risk for self-harm by influencing cognitive and emotional processes such as burdensomeness and acquired capability. Implications for prevention, intervention, and future research are briefly discussed.

  1. Psychosocial factors for non-suicidal self-injury among urban middle school students in Guangdong Province%广东省城市中学生自伤行为社会心理因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐杰; 马颖; 郭勇; 刘慧燕; 邢燕菲; 陈艳琳; 余毅震

    2014-01-01

    目的 了解广东省城市中学生自伤行为现状及社会心理因素,为预防和干预中学生自伤行为的发生提供科学依据.方法 分层随机整群抽取广州市、阳江市、阳春市2 907名10~18岁的中学生,调查其自伤行为发生情况及社会心理因素.结果 调查近1 a内有1次以上自伤行为者占31.2%.其中有5次及以上自伤行为(经常自伤行为)者占14.6%,男女经常自伤行为发生率分别为14.1%和15.1%,性别间差异无统计学意义(x2=0.531,P=0.466);自伤方式以拽头发、掐自己、打自己为主;单因素分析显示,经常自伤行为者(≥5次以上)及偶有自伤行为者(1~4次)人际关系归因得分(内控性、外控性)高于无自伤行为者(F值分别为14.813,40.456,P值均<0.01),而自尊得分低于无自伤行为者(F=30.364,P<0.05);多分类Logistic回归分析显示,偶有自伤行为与内控性、自尊、独生子女、性别有关;而经常自伤行为与外控性、自尊和独生子女有关(P值均<0.05).结论 城市中学生自伤行为发生率较高,受人际关系归因、自尊、性别及独生子女等社会心理因素影响.

  2. Investigation on non-suicidal self-injury in 1035 university students%1035名大学生非自杀性自伤行为及相关心理特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑜; 李箕君

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and other characteristics of non — suicidal self—injury in university students. Methods 1035 freshmen from three universities in Nanjing selected using cluster sampling method completed the survey. Data were analyzed by t — test and Chi — square test for gender differences. Results Lifetime NSSI prevalence rates averaged in 11. 3%. Nearly one half of those harmed themselves more than 3 times. Females were more likely than males to have self—injury during the past year (P<0. 05). The most common body location self — imurers reported was upper limb. The most common method was scratching or pinching with fingernails or other objects to the point that bleeding occurred or mark appeared on the skin. Males were more likely to use multiple methods. The most common psychological motivation was to alleviate negative emotions. Conclusions NSSI is common in university students but varies significantly by gender.%目的 了解大学生非自杀性自伤行为的流行状况及相关特征.方法 采取整群方便抽样方法,调查一年级大学生自伤行为的发生率等特征,并分析不同性别自伤行为的差异.结果 有11.3%既往有过自伤,其中44.4%反复自伤(≥3次);27.4%在近一年内有过自伤,以女生多见(P<0.05).最常见自伤部位是上肢;最常见自伤方式是故意掐拧自己;男生更倾向于采用多种方式(P<0.05).最常见的心理动机是缓解不良情绪.结论 非自杀性自伤在大学生中发生率较高,具有反复性,损伤程度轻,心理动机复杂.不同性别的学生自伤特点不同.

  3. 北京市高校大学生自伤行为及其影响因素分析%Non-suicidal self-injury and its influencing factors among college students in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    攸佳宁; 钟杰; 梁耀坚

    2013-01-01

    目的 了解大学生自伤行为与其心理因素和父母养育方式的关系,为大学生自伤行为的干预和预防提供依据.方法 方便抽取北京市2所大学在校学生794名,调查过去1 a内自伤行为的发生率和频率,同时测量自尊、自我挫败感、抑郁症状、边缘性人格障碍症状、无效家庭环境及父母教养方式,探讨自伤行为的影响因素.结果 有11.8%的大学生在过去1 a中有过1次或以上自伤行为,男生发生率(15.3%)高于女生(8.7%).多因素Logistic回归分析表明,父母亲惩罚、严厉的教养方式是自伤的危险因素(β男=3.42,P=0.025;β女=2.33,P=0.001),而情感温暖、理解的教养方式是自伤行为的保护因素(β男=-2.10,P=0.002;女生:β女=-1.60,P=0.045).结论 自伤行为在大学生中较为普遍,家庭教养方式对自伤行为有重要影响.应研究以家庭辅导为主的干预和预防策略.

  4. 青少年自伤网络展示的动机及其影响%The Motivations and Influences of the Adolescents' Online Presentation of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁婷; 江光荣; 魏华; 林秀彬; 韦辉; 应梦婷

    2016-01-01

    自我伤害行为是一种复杂且危险的心理病理行为,它会给个体的身心带来不同程度的损害.随着互联网的普遍使用,网络已经成为青少年生活中不可或缺的部分,近年来研究者开始关注到青少年的自伤网络展示行为.研究显示,许多自伤青少年会在网络上展示自己的自伤行为;个体一般是在自我表达、提供和寻求帮助等动机的作用下对自己的自伤行为或经历进行展示;这些展示的内容既可能会让更多的人模仿或强化自伤,也可能会为自伤者提供社会支持,有助于他们减少自伤行为.

  5. Personality Traits of Chinese Adolescents with Non-suicidal Self Injury and Suicide Attempt%非自杀性自伤与自杀未遂的中学生人格特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁素改; 闫敬; 朱翠珍; 司徒明镜; 杜娜; 符雪垠; 黄颐

    2014-01-01

    目的 了解非自杀性自伤及自杀未遂中学生的人格特征.方法 通过分层抽样方法抽取都江堰市2 131名中学生,其中男生1 085人,女生1 046人,平均年龄为(13.92±1.63)岁,采用艾森克人格问卷(EPQ,儿童版)和自编的自我伤害行为问卷对其进行调查.根据自我伤害行为问卷调查结果将受访中学生分为4组,即非自杀性自伤组(NSSI组),自杀未遂组(SA组),自伤自杀组(NSSI+ SA组)和对照组(NoSH组).采用单因素方差分析、多元协方差分析(以性别和年龄为协变量)和事后检验等,比较EPQ各因子在各组间的差异.结果 受访中学生中非自杀性自伤的检出率为23.18%,自杀未遂的检出率为3.19%,其中非自杀性自伤组有446人(20.93%),自杀未遂组有20人(0.94%),自伤自杀组有48人(2.25%),对照组有1 617人(75.88%).与对照组人格特征相比较,典型的精神质、外倾明显以及神经质者均易采取自我伤害行为;自伤自杀组的精神质分数显著高于非自杀性自伤组(P<0.008 3,d=0.59),内-外倾分数在自伤自杀组较非自杀性自伤组有增高趋势(P>0.008 3,d=0.38).结论 人格特征与青少年自伤自杀行为关系密切,应根据中学生的人格特征给予适当引导和干预.

  6. 大学生非自杀性自伤行为危险因素分析%Related factors to non-suicidal self-injury in college students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄琴琴; 张连生

    2016-01-01

    目的:构建多水平模型探讨大学生非自杀性自伤行为的现况及相关因素.非自杀性自伤行为是指个体在没有明确自杀意图的情况下故意、重复地改变或伤害自己身体组织且不被社会认可的行为.方法:选取某综合性大学三所学院21个班级的644名学生,分别采用传统二分类logistic回归模型和二分类两水平logistic回归模型,对父母关系、情绪管理、人格倾向等因素进行分析,探讨影响自伤行为的危险因素.结果:自伤行为检出率21.0%,最常用的3种形式依次为拽扯头发、故意掐自己、故意打自己.自伤行为在班级水平上具有聚集性,两水平模型结果显示父母经常吵架(OR=1.38,95% CI 1.02~1.87)、消极情绪管理(OR=1.31,95%CI 1.05 ~1.64)、药物依赖(OR=1.93,95%CI1.22 ~3.04)、神经质(情绪稳定性差)(OR=1.42,95% CI 1.04~1.94)是自伤行为的危险因素.结论:自伤行为存在班级水平聚集,提示该行为可能受班级环境影响.此外自伤行为与父母关系和自身特质(情绪管理、神经质和药物依赖)存在相关.

  7. 广东省中学生情绪管理与自伤行为的相关性%Emotional regulation and non-suicide self-injury among middle school students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐杰; 马颖; 郭勇; 刘慧燕; 邢燕菲; 陈艳琳; 余毅震

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨中学生情绪管理与自伤行为的关系,为中学生自伤行为的干预提供科学依据.方法 分层随机整群抽取广州市、阳江市、阳春市3 096名初中和高中学生进行问卷调查,分析情绪管理与自伤行为的相关性.结果 中学生自伤行为发生率为14.6%,偶有自伤行为发生率为16.6%.自伤行为、偶有自伤行为和无自伤行为中学生情绪管理能力得分差异有统计学意义(F=38.719,P<0.01);控制性别、学习阶段、是否独生子女、家庭经济状况、父母文化程度等变量后,多分类Logistic回归分析显示,情绪管理能力对自伤行为(OR=0.482,P<0.01)和偶有自伤行为(OR=0.730,P<0.01)有保护作用.结论 中学生情绪管理能力与自伤行为的发生具有相关性.可通过心理教育、心理辅导和心理弹性训练提升青少年的情绪管理能力,以减少自伤行为的发生.

  8. The Current Status, Problems and Recommendations on Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in China%自伤行为研究:现状、问题与建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江光荣; 于丽霞; 郑莺; 冯玉; 凌霄

    2011-01-01

    自我伤害行为指个体在没有明确自杀意图的情况下,故意、重复地改变或伤害自己的身体组织.这种行为虽不致死,但极具危险性.对自伤的诊断一直存在争议,争议的焦点主要是自伤与自杀、自伤与边缘型人格障碍的关系问题.从流行学调查结果看,国内普通青少年自伤比例高于西方,达36%~57%,但该行为在国内所受关注不多、相关研究甚少.影响自伤的危险因子,总体可分为早年创伤性经验和个体易感性两大类,后者包括情绪管理障碍、冲动性和生物学因素,但各因素对自伤的影响程度尚不清楚.从病因和病理学研究现状看,很多理论模型被提出来解释自伤的动机和原因,包括功能性模型、发展病理性模型和整合模型等.自伤领域的研究虽然在近lO年有飞跃性的增长,但仍然有很多问题值得进一步探讨,未来研究可以考虑进行自伤的分类研究、某些主题的细化研究、跨学科和跨文化研究等.

  9. Relations between childhood abuse and non-suicidal self-injury in middle school students%童年期虐待经历与中学生自伤行为的关联性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏静; 陈静; 万宇辉; 钟超; 胡晓; 陶芳标; 彭菲; 陈钰; 朱阿然

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨童年期虐待经历与中学生自我伤害行为的关系,为青少年自伤行为的防控提供参考.方法 采用分层整群抽样的方法,在贵阳市7所中学抽取4 617名中学生为研究对象,调查内容包括一般人口统计学指标、童年期虐待经历、自伤行为等.采用x2检验比较不同特征中学生自伤行为及童年期虐待检出率的差异,建立多因素Logistic回归模型分析童年期虐待经历对自伤行为的影响.结果 中学生自伤行为的检出率为44.3%,初中生(47.4%)高于高中生(41.0%),差异具有统计学意义(P<0.01).童年期情感虐待、躯体虐待、性虐待、情感忽视及躯体忽视的发生率依次为37.7%,16.8%,7.7%,61.4%和50.7%.家庭经济状况较差、学习成绩较差及有心理病理症状的中学生受虐情况较重,自伤行为发生率也较高,差异均有统计学意义(P值均<0.05).x2检验显示,任何一种童年期虐待经历都会增加自伤行为的发生(P值均<0.05).Logistic回归模型发现,童年期虐待(情感、躯体、性虐待)和忽视(情感、躯体)均会增加自伤行为的发生;且随着虐待类型数目的增加,自伤行为的发生风险呈增加趋势(P值均<0.01).结论 童年期虐待经历是中学生自我伤害行为发生的重要危险因素.加强对童年期虐待问题的重视和干预,可作为中学生自伤行为防控的重要举措.

  10. Non-suicidal self-injury and its related factor among college students in Chongqing%重庆市大学生非自杀性自伤及其影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周东东; 况利; 艾明; 牛亚娟; 费立鹏

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨重庆市大学生非自杀性自伤的流行病学及其相关危险因素.方法:采用分层整群随机抽样方法对重庆市9 808名在校大学生进行问卷调查,了解非自杀性自伤的发生情况及其与一般特征、生活事件量表(life event scale,LES)、外显攻击行为(modified overt aggression scale,MAOS)之间的关系.结果:重庆市大学生非自杀性自伤的发生率为3.7‰,其中性行为(P=0.034)、MAOS(P=0.000)、负性生活事件(P=0.001)等与对照组相比有统计学差异.经过多因素logistic回归分析得出指向身体攻击性(0R=3.12,95%CI=1.420~6.872)、恋人或夫妻之间发生矛盾(OR=4.56,95%CI=2.267~9.180)、学习问题(OR=2.59,95%CI=1.313~5.117)是非自杀性自伤的危险因素.结论:非自杀性自伤的独立危险因素为指向身体的攻击性高、恋人或夫妻之间发生矛盾及存在学习问题.

  11. THE ROLE OF PROOPIOMELANOCORTIN (POMC) IN SEQUENTIALLY DEPENDENT SELF-INJURIOUS BEHAVIORa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, Curt A; Touchette, Paul E; Marion, Sarah D; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    Self-injuring behavior (SIB) is a life-threatening behavior exhibited by many species, including humans, and has no known cause and no agreed upon treatment. The role of the stress axis in the maintenance of this mysterious behavior was examined in subjects with life-long SIB. Over a six-year period, forty hours of direct observations of behavior and the environment were recorded on palmtop computers while 36 residential subjects (28 target and 8 control subjects) conducted their daily activities. Blood samples were collected in morning and evening for all subjects and within minutes after a self-injuring act in 28 target subjects who exhibited SIB to determine levels of ACTH and B-endorphin (BE). Self-injuring events in the patient group were significantly sequentially dependent (i.e. the only predictor of a self-injuring act was an antecedent self-injuring act). Higher morning levels of BE relative to ACTH predicted [rdf=27=0.57, p<.001] the sequentially dependent pattern of SIB. This effect was validated in a subgroup re-tested several months later [rdf=22=0.60, p<.001]. A subgroup of seven subjects exhibiting sequentially dependent patterns were administered an opiate blocker (naltrexone) in a double-blind, crossover design with an additional 14 hours/week of observation for seven weeks. Naltrexone challenge interrupted the sequential pattern (improved behavior) in subjects with elevated BE immediately following SIB (r=0.85, p<0.01). The pattern of results supported the conclusion that the stress axis played a significant role in the maintenance of complex episodes of self-injury. PMID:18688808

  12. Therapist- and self-monitored DRO contingencies as a treatment for the self-injurious skin picking of a young man with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiger, Jeffrey H; Fisher, Wayne W; Bouxsein, Kelly J

    2009-01-01

    The use of differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) has decreased, at least partially due to the development of less effortful alternative behavioral interventions (e.g., noncontingent reinforcement; Vollmer, Iwata, Zarcone, Smith, & Mazaleski, 1993). The effort associated with DRO contingencies may be lessened by incorporating self-monitoring components in which clients are responsible for the delivery of reinforcers for their own behavior. The current study evaluates the effectiveness of DRO in the treatment of self-injury when implemented first by the therapist and subsequently by the client.

  13. Deliberate self-injury functions and their clinical correlates among adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziwiłłowicz, Wioletta; Lewandowska, Magdalena

    2017-04-30

    The aim of the study was to analyze the relationships between clinical variables (the severity of depression symptoms, feelings towards the body, dissociation, number and type of traumatic events) and deliberate self-injury functions. Moreover, we investigated whether the of group self-mutilating adolescents is internally diverse in terms of how important individual functions of self-mutilation are, and whether the subgroups singled out by these functions differ between each other in terms of clinical variables. The Inventory of Statements about Self-Injury was used. Characterizations of examined individuals and other research tools are included in our previous article (year, issue, pages). Associated with negative feelings towards the body are the functions of self-injuries (anti-dissociation, self-punishment) that can be described as interpersonal. High levels of depression symptoms (self-depreciation included) are mainly associated with the self-injury functions: self-punishment, anti-dissociation, establishing interpersonal boundaries. Affect regulation becomes more important as a function of self-inflicted injuries in cases of biological dysregulation and intense dissociative symptoms. The adolescents psychiatric inpatients are internally diverse in terms of dominant functions of self-injuries, which can be categorized into intra- and interpersonal. Intrapersonal functions dominate when an individual experiences severe depression, dissociative symptoms, and negative feelings towards the body. In cases of moderate intensity of depression, dissociative symptoms and negative feelings towards the body, both intrapersonal and interpersonal functions of self-mutilation are similarly important. Further research is required to explain the lowest severity of depression symptoms, dissociative symptoms and negative feelings towards the body co-occurs with no awareness of self-injuries functions.

  14. Nonsuicidal self-injury in adolescence: longitudinal course, trajectories, and intrapersonal predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrocas, Andrea L; Giletta, Matteo; Hankin, Benjamin L; Prinstein, Mitchell J; Abela, John R Z

    2015-02-01

    Although prevalence rates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) has been established throughout adolescence, little is known about the progression of NSSI, and consequently, about the risk factors for youth NSSI engagement. This study aimed to describe the overall longitudinal course of NSSI and the latent trajectory classes of NSSI in a population-based sample of adolescents using multi-wave data. Moreover, this study examined whether sex, lifetime history of depression, rumination, and negative attributional style predicted the longitudinal course of NSSI and trajectory group membership. Participants were 617 Chinese adolescents in Grades 10 through 12 (51.4 % girls). NSSI was assessed across eight waves of data. History of depression, rumination, and negative attributional style were assessed at baseline. Latent growth curve modeling revealed that only lifetime depression predicted the longitudinal course of NSSI from Grades 10 to 12, with depressed adolescents showing greater and more stable NSSI engagement over time than non-depressed adolescents. Group-based trajectory modeling yielded three distinct trajectory classes of NSSI engagement: low (69.2 %), moderate (26.1 %), and chronic (4.7 %). Negative attributional style distinguished adolescents in the chronic vs. low and moderate NSSI trajectory classes. Sex, rumination, and lifetime depression predicted membership in the chronic and/or moderate vs. low NSSI trajectory class. NSSI trajectory classes, based on frequency of NSSI, exist and are differentiated by sex, depression history, rumination, and negative attributional style. This study suggests that during this period of adolescence NSSI may be a relatively stable behavior, especially for some adolescents. Negative attributional style may be a salient risk factor for chronic NSSI engagement.

  15. The Age Related Prevalence of Aggression and Self-Injury in Persons with an Intellectual Disability: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Louise; Oliver, Chris

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse statistically published data regarding the age related prevalence of aggression and self-injury in persons with intellectual disability. Studies including prevalence data for aggression and/or self-injury broken down by age band were identified and relative risk analyses conducted to generate indices of age…

  16. Letter Writing as an Intervention in Family Therapy with Adolescents Who Engage in Nonsuicidal Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Rachel; Hinkle, Michelle Gimenez; Kress, Victoria White

    2010-01-01

    Family therapy can be an important component of a comprehensive treatment plan when counseling adolescents who engage in nonsuicidal self-injury. The authors provide a rationale for the use of letter writing as a therapeutic intervention when counseling families in which an adolescent engages in nonsuicidal self-injury. Descriptions of types of…

  17. Development of a Website for Educators Addressing How to Understand, Recognize, and Respond to Student Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorko, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Self-injury (SI) is defined as the act of deliberately destroying one's own body tissue without suicidal intent in a way that is not widely socially acceptable and is not as a result of mental retardation, autism, or other developmental delays. The review of the self-injury literature focused on the definition, prevalence, and other basic aspects…

  18. Analysis of Heart Rate and Self-Injury with and without Restraint in an Individual with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennett, Heather; Hagopian, Louis P.; Beaulieu, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    The relation between self-injury and heart rate was analyzed for an individual who appeared anxious while engaging in self-injury. The analysis involved manipulating the presence or absence of restraint while simultaneously measuring heart rate. The following findings were obtained and replicated: (a) when some form of restraint was applied, heart…

  19. Development of a Website for Educators Addressing How to Understand, Recognize, and Respond to Student Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorko, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    Self-injury (SI) is defined as the act of deliberately destroying one's own body tissue without suicidal intent in a way that is not widely socially acceptable and is not as a result of mental retardation, autism, or other developmental delays. The review of the self-injury literature focused on the definition, prevalence, and other basic aspects…

  20. The Role of Self-Injury in the Organisation of Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandman, C. A.; Kemp, A. S.; Mabini, C.; Pincus, D.; Magnusson, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Self-injuring acts are among the most dramatic behaviours exhibited by human beings. There is no known single cause and there is no universally agreed upon treatment. Sophisticated sequential and temporal analysis of behaviour has provided alternative descriptions of self-injury that provide new insights into its initiation and…

  1. Immigration, Suicidal Ideation and Deliberate Self-Injury in the Boston Youth Survey 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Guilherme; Azrael, Deborah; Almeida, Joanna; Johnson, Renee M.; Molnar, Beth E.; Hemenway, David; Miller, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and immigration-related correlates of deliberate self-injury (DSI) and suicidal ideation (SI) were estimated in a sample of Boston public high school students in 2006. Compared with U.S.-born youth, immigrant youth were not at increased risk for DSI or SI, even if they had experienced discrimination due to their ancestry. By…

  2. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: What Physical and Sport Educators Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Natasha P.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among children and youth suggests that increased awareness, attention, and training must be disseminated to frontline personnel. Physical and sport educators have an increased chance of identifying students who are currently engaging in NSSI because of the nature of their work. This…

  3. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: What Physical and Sport Educators Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Natasha P.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among children and youth suggests that increased awareness, attention, and training must be disseminated to frontline personnel. Physical and sport educators have an increased chance of identifying students who are currently engaging in NSSI because of the nature of their work. This…

  4. Nonsuicidal self-injury in adolescence : Longitudinal course, trajectories, and intrapersonal predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrocas, Andrea L.; Giletta, M.; Hankin, Benjamin L.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.; Abela, John R. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Although prevalence rates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) has been established throughout adolescence, little is known about the progression of NSSI, and consequently, about the risk factors for youth NSSI engagement. This study aimed to describe the overall longitudinal course of NSSI and the

  5. Self-Injury among Early Adolescents: Identifying Segments Protected and at Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Moya L.; Kaur, Ravneet

    2012-01-01

    Background: Self-injury has been described as a "silent school crisis," reflecting insufficient knowledge, confusion, lack of effective interventions, and the tendency for adults and youth to shy away from dealing directly with the issue. This purpose of this study was to identify distinct subgroups of youth who may be at increased risk…

  6. Self-Efficacy Pathways between Relational Aggression and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buser, Trevor J.; Peterson, Christina Hamme; Kearney, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The authors recruited college students (N = 648) and investigated relationships among academic and social self-efficacy, relational aggression from parents and peers, and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Results indicated that both types of self-efficacy were related inversely to NSSI. Academic self-efficacy mediated the relationship between…

  7. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in College Students: The Role of Perfectionism and Rumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Erica R.; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.

    2009-01-01

    A paucity of research exists examining personality and cognitive characteristics that may contribute to nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). The purpose of the current study was to clarify the contribution of perfectionism and rumination, along with depression and anxiety, to NSSI within a sample of 170 college students. Group comparisons revealed that…

  8. Self-Injurious Behaviour: Limbic Dysregulation and Stress Effects in an Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlmann, A. M.; Kies, S. D.; Turner, C. A.; Wolfman, S.; Lewis, M. H.; Devine, D. P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Self-injurious behaviour (SIB) is prevalent in neurodevelopmental disorders, but its expression is highly variable within, and between diagnostic categories. This raises questions about the factors that contribute to aetiology and expression of SIB. Expression of SIB is generally described in relation to social reinforcement. However,…

  9. Nonsuicidal self-injury and diminished pain perception: the role of emotion dysregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franklin, J.C.; Aaron, R.V.; Arthur, M.S.; Shorkey, S.P.; Prinstein, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is the deliberate destruction of one's own body tissue in the absence of suicidal intent (e.g., cutting or burning the skin). Previous studies have found that people with a history of NSSI display diminished pain perception. However, it remains unclear why this effect

  10. Examining the scope and patterns of deliberate self-injurious cutting content in popular social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Elizabeth M; Chou, Tommy; Golik, Alejandra; Cornacchio, Danielle; Sanchez, Amanda L; DeSerisy, Mariah; Comer, Jonathan S

    2017-09-01

    Social networking services (SNS) have rapidly become a central platform for adolescents' social interactions and media consumption patterns. The present study examined a representative sample of publicly accessible content related to deliberate self-injurious cutting across three SNS platforms: Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram. Data collection simulated searches for publicly available deliberate self-injury content on Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram. Over a six-month period at randomly generated time points, data were obtained by searching "#cutting" on each SNS platform and collecting the first 10 posts generated. Independent evaluators coded posts for presence of the following: (a) graphic content, (b) negative self-evaluations, (c) references to mental health terms, (d) discouragement of deliberate self-injury, and (e) recovery-oriented resources. Differences across platforms were examined. Data collection yielded a sample of 1,155 public posts (770 of which were related to mental health). Roughly 60% of sampled posts depicted graphic content, almost half included negative self-evaluations, only 9.5% discouraged self-injury, and Mental health professionals must recognize the rapidly changing landscape of adolescent media consumption, influences, and social interaction as they may pertain to self-harm patterns. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Nonsuicidal self-injury and diminished pain perception: the role of emotion dysregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franklin, J.C.; Aaron, R.V.; Arthur, M.S.; Shorkey, S.P.; Prinstein, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is the deliberate destruction of one's own body tissue in the absence of suicidal intent (e.g., cutting or burning the skin). Previous studies have found that people with a history of NSSI display diminished pain perception. However, it remains unclear why this effect

  12. Parents' Role in Early Adolescent Self-Injury: An Application of Self-Determination Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, A. Ann; Heath, Nancy L.; Rogers, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We applied self-determination theory to examine a model whereby perceived parental autonomy support directly and indirectly affects nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) through difficulties in emotion regulation. Method: 639 participants (53% female) with a mean age of 13.38 years (SD 0.51) completed the How I Deal with Stress Questionnaire…

  13. Differentiating Adolescent Self-Injury from Adolescent Depression: Possible Implications for Borderline Personality Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Sheila E.; Beauchaine, Theodore P.; Hsiao, Ray C.; Vasilev, Christina A.; Yaptangco, Mona; Linehan, Marsha M.; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Self-inflicted injury (SII) in adolescence marks heightened risk for suicide attempts, completed suicide, and adult psychopathology. Although several studies have revealed elevated rates of depression among adolescents who self injure, no one has compared adolescent self injury with adolescent depression on biological, self-, and informant-report…

  14. Self-Injurious Behaviour, Non-Interventionism and Practitioners' Needs: Implications for Training and Managerial Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntinas, Konstantinos M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present article is to critically analyse the literature concerning the factors that lead to non-interventionism towards self-injurious behaviour (SIB) in the field of intellectual disability and to make recommendations for the development of practice. It emerges that the limited behaviour analytic skills of practitioners impede the…

  15. Personality and non-suicidal deliberate self-harm: Trait differences among a non-clinical population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Seth A

    2009-08-30

    Limited information is available on understanding why particular individuals engage in non-suicidal deliberate self-harm (DSH), especially among non-clinical populations. An array of personality traits, such as those included in the five-factor model of personality, may further an understanding of DSH. The purpose of this study was to examine personality traits among non-clinical groups with or without a history of DSH. College students (N=238) completed self-report measures of DSH and personality. Both multivariate (MANOVA, discriminant analysis) and univariate (ANOVA) statistical procedures supported the hypothesis that those with a history of DSH (n=59) had significantly higher levels of neuroticism and openness to experience, and significantly lower levels of agreeableness and conscientiousness. Contrary to expectations, there were no differences in extraversion between the two groups. These results indicate personality differences among those with a history of DSH, which with additional research, may prove to be risk factors or targets of intervention for future DSH or collateral problems.

  16. RETRACTED: The Virtual Cutting Edge: Adolescent Self-injury and YouTube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garthe, C; Ouellette, L; Seamon, J P; Jones, J S

    2015-10-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy). This article has been retracted at the request of the Editor-in-Chief and Authors. We wish to retract the abstract "The Virtual Cutting Edge: Adolescent Self-injury and YouTube," published in the October 2015 issue of Annals. The abstract excessively borrowed from the text and methodology of a previous study published elsewhere.(1) All authors recognize the seriousness of this issue and apologize to the editors and readers of Annals. Jeffrey S. Jones, MD Chad Garthe, MD Lindsey Ouellette, MS Jason Seamon, DO Department of Emergency Medicine MSU College of Human Medicine Grand Rapids, MI 1. Lewis SP, Heath NL, St. Denis JM, et al. The scope of nonsuicidal self-injury on YouTube. Pediatrics. 2011;1127:e552-e557. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Nonsuicidal self-injury in sexual minority college students: a test of theoretical integration

    OpenAIRE

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J.; Hilt, Lori M.; Ehlinger, Peter P.; McMillan, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals identifying as a sexual minority report engaging in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) at substantially higher rates compared to their heterosexual peers. Given that NSSI is a known risk factor for suicide, it is important to understand the processes unique to being a sexual minority that increases risk for NSSI so that adequate prevention efforts can be established. The current study integrated Minority Stress Theory and the Interpersonal Theory of Suicide to test a model ...

  18. Internet Self-Injury Forums as Communities of Social-Cognitive Literacy Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Brett, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study provides an interpretive framework and empirical evidence supporting the proposition that internet forums devoted to intentional self-injury may fruitfully be conceptualized as communities of social-cognitive literacy practice. This conceptualization may facilitate the development of theory, research, and clinical practice involving individuals for whom the practice bears psychological meaning, while also providing theoretical surplus value for research into psychology,...

  19. Nonsuicidal self-injury and diminished pain perception: the role of emotion dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Joseph C; Aaron, Rachel V; Arthur, Michael S; Shorkey, S Paul; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2012-08-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is the deliberate destruction of one's own body tissue in the absence of suicidal intent (e.g., cutting or burning the skin). Previous studies have found that people with a history of NSSI display diminished pain perception. However, it remains unclear why this effect occurs. In the present study, we used a sample of participants with (n = 25) and without (n = 47) a history of NSSI to test the hypothesis that emotion dysregulation partially explains why NSSI is associated with diminished pain perception. Pain perception was quantified as pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain intensity ratings assessed during the cold pressor task. Nonsuicidal self-injury was associated with increased emotion dysregulation and diminished pain perception. Results showed that emotion dysregulation was correlated with diminished pain perception within both groups, demonstrating that this association exists regardless of NSSI history. Results also specified that emotion dysregulation partially accounted for the association between NSSI and pain tolerance but not other pain variables. Overall, results were consistent with the hypothesis that emotion dysregulation may increase NSSI risk in part by increasing the willingness to experience the pain involved in self-injury. Studies are needed to more directly investigate this hypothesis.

  20. The Relationship between the UPPS-P Impulsivity Dimensions and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Characteristics in Male and Female High-School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurence; Muehlenkamp, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the association between nonsuicidal self-injury characteristics, functions, and the UPPS-P impulsivity-related traits in high-school students using self-report questionnaires. More than 17% of the 613 students engaged in at least one type of NSSI behavior. Compared to male students, female students engaged more often in cutting and less in head banging. All NSSI behaviors were significantly related to Negative and Positive Urgency, that is, the tendency to act impulsive in the presence of negative/positive affect. Interactions between different UPPS-P impulsivity dimensions did not increase the percentage of explained variance in the different NSSI behaviors. Furthermore, severe cutting was negatively related to Lack of Premeditation. Different NSSI functions showed differential relationships with the five UPPS-P impulsivity dimensions.

  1. The Relationship between the UPPS-P Impulsivity Dimensions and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Characteristics in Male and Female High-School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Claes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the association between nonsuicidal self-injury characteristics, functions, and the UPPS-P impulsivity-related traits in high-school students using self-report questionnaires. More than 17% of the 613 students engaged in at least one type of NSSI behavior. Compared to male students, female students engaged more often in cutting and less in head banging. All NSSI behaviors were significantly related to Negative and Positive Urgency, that is, the tendency to act impulsive in the presence of negative/positive affect. Interactions between different UPPS-P impulsivity dimensions did not increase the percentage of explained variance in the different NSSI behaviors. Furthermore, severe cutting was negatively related to Lack of Premeditation. Different NSSI functions showed differential relationships with the five UPPS-P impulsivity dimensions.

  2. The role of interpersonal conflict and perceived social support in nonsuicidal self-injury in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brianna J; Cobb, Rebecca J; Gratz, Kim L; Chapman, Alexander L

    2016-05-01

    Although accumulating microlongitudinal research has examined emotion regulatory models of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), few studies have examined how interpersonal contingencies influence daily NSSI behavior. Participants with repeated NSSI (N = 60) provided daily ratings of perceived social support, interpersonal conflict, and NSSI urges and behaviors for 14 days. Consistent with interpersonal models of NSSI, we hypothesized that participants would be more likely to engage in NSSI on days when they experienced high levels of interpersonal conflict, that NSSI acts that were revealed to others would be followed by desirable interpersonal changes (i.e., greater support, less conflict), and that these interpersonal changes would, in turn, predict stronger NSSI urges and more frequent NSSI behavior. Consistent with hypotheses, daily conflict was associated with stronger same-day NSSI urges and greater likelihood of NSSI acts. Perceived support increased following NSSI acts that had been revealed to others, but not unrevealed NSSI acts. This perceived support was, in turn, associated with a stronger NSSI urges and greater likelihood of engaging in NSSI on the following day. Moreover, participants whose NSSI was revealed to others engaged in more total NSSI acts during the diary period than those whose NSSI was not revealed to others. Inconsistent with hypotheses, interpersonal conflict did not decrease following NSSI, regardless of whether or not these acts were revealed to others. Together, these results provide preliminary support for interpersonal reinforcement models of NSSI and highlight the importance of expanding research in this area to include interpersonal contingencies that may influence this behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. The Developmental Trajectory of Self-Injurious Behaviours in Individuals with Prader Willi Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren J. Rice

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we examined the nature and developmental trajectory of self-injurious behaviour in Prader Willi syndrome (PWS and autism spectrum disorder (ASD. The development of interventions is greatly aided by understanding gene to behaviour pathways, and this requires an accurate description of the behaviour phenotype, that is, which types and natural history of self-injurious behaviour are more common in PWS and ASD and which are shared with other forms of developmental disability. Self-injury displayed by individuals with PWS and individuals with ASD was compared with that reported in a group of individuals with intellectual disability due to mixed aetiology (ID group. Three self-injurious behaviours (head banging, skin-picking and hitting and/or biting self were measured on five occasions over 18 years using the Developmental Behaviour Checklist (DBC a well-validated caregiver report measure. Rates of skin picking were higher in individuals with PWS and hitting and/or biting self was higher in individuals with ASD compared to the ID group. Rates of head banging were similar across the three groups. Over time, skin-picking and head banging increased with age for individuals with ASD and hitting and/or biting self increased for the PWS group. In the PWS and mixed ID groups head banging decreased with age. These findings suggest that the typology and developmental trajectories of self-injurious behaviours differ between those with PWS and ASD.

  4. "Mauled by a Bear": narrative analysis of self-injury among adolescents in US news, 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bareiss, Warren

    2014-05-01

    Self-injury among adolescents has been widely documented in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Asia; however, news coverage of self-injury has not been examined. This study analyzes 78 news accounts of self-injury among adolescents in the United States from 2007 to 2012, using critical cultural studies as a theoretical foundation and a methodology informed by Kenneth Burke's dramatism. Narrative elements within the sample are examined in relationship to one another in order to reveal implicit meanings within the news stories. Looking across the sample, I then use a framework developed by Labov and Waletzky to examine a dominant meta-narrative that downplays social causes of self-injury-notably, various forms of trauma such as childhood sexual abuse-and instead frames self-injury as a personal choice. As a result, the remedy to the problem is not constructed as redress of contemporary pressures placed upon young people, but rather, as the responsibility of adolescents to conform to the social system that causes them to hurt themselves.

  5. Self-injurious behaviour in people with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Chris; Licence, Lucy; Richards, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    This review summarises the recent trends in research in the field of self-injurious behaviour in people with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder. New data on incidence, persistence and severity add to studies of prevalence to indicate the large scale of the clinical need. A number of person characteristics have been repeatedly identified in prevalence and cohort studies that: can be considered as risk markers (e.g. stereotyped behaviour, autism spectrum disorder) and indicate possible causal mechanisms (e.g. sleep disorder, anxiety). Studies have started to integrate traditional operant learning paradigms with known person characteristics and reviews and meta-analyses of applied behaviour analytic procedures can now inform practice. Despite these positive developments interventions and appropriate support falls far short of the required need. Expansions in applied research are warranted to develop and evaluate innovative service delivery models that can translate knowledge of risk markers and operant learning paradigms into widespread, low cost routine clinical practice. Alongside this, further pure research is needed to elucidate the direction of causality of implicated risk factors, in order to understand and intervene more effectively in self-injury.

  6. Impulsivity and nonsuicidal self-injury: A review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Chloe A; Willoughby, Teena; Heffer, Taylor

    2015-06-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI; direct self-injury without lethal intent) often is thought to be associated with impulse control problems. Recent research, however, offers conflicting results about whether impulsivity is a risk factor for NSSI engagement. To disentangle findings on the link between impulsivity and NSSI, an extensive review of the literature was conducted using several electronic databases (i.e., PsychInfo, PsychArticles, ERIC, CINAHL, and MEDLINE). In total, 27 studies that met the specific inclusion criteria were identified. Results of a meta-analysis revealed that individuals who engaged in NSSI self-reported greater impulsivity than individuals who did not engage in NSSI, and that this effect was most consistent for measures of negative urgency. In contrast, there was little evidence of an association between lab-based measures of impulsivity (e.g., Go/No-Go, Stop/Signal Task) and NSSI. Moreover, the link between impulsivity and NSSI found for self-report measures was sometimes eliminated when other risk factors for NSSI were controlled (e.g., abuse, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder). In addition to integrating findings, the present review provides several explanations for the discrepancies in findings between studies employing self-report versus lab-based measures of impulsivity. To conclude, several specific recommendations for future research directions to extend the literature on impulsivity and NSSI are offered.

  7. Internet use and web communication networks, sources of social support, and forms of suicidal and nonsuicidal self-injury among adolescents: different patterns between genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Fang-Yi; Yang, Hao-Jan

    2015-04-01

    The relationships of Internet use, web communication, and sources of social support with adolescent self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (SITBs) in Taiwan were investigated. The study sample of 391 12 to 18-year-olds was selected from nine public high schools. Findings show that girls are more likely to have SITBs, except for suicide gestures. Web communication is a risk factor for SITBs in boys but not in girls. Family support is protective in both genders. Support from friends is protective and support from significant others was a risk factor for suicide plans in girls. Support from virtual social communities can have both positive and negative effects on adolescent SITBs, with different effects by gender.

  8. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome: Disorder of Self-mutilating Behavior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jathar, Prasad; Panse, Amey M; Jathar, Madhura; Gawali, Pritesh N

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS), a rare inborn error of metabolism, is characterized by self-injurious behavior, which results in partial or total destruction of oral and perioral tissues and/ or fingers...

  9. Self-Injurious Behavior: An Animal Model of an Autism Endophenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    sympathetic arousal ( electrodermal reactivity) in response to normal levels of sensory stimulation has also been shown to predict sleep deficits in...related vulnerability to develop SIB. In addition, we investigated DARPP-32 expression and activation (phosphorylation) in pemoline-treated HR and LR...severe physical harm, and they interfere with all educational and socializing activities (5-7). In addition, SIB is extremely detrimental to

  10. Effects of reinforcement for alternative behavior during punishment of self-injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, R H; Iwata, B A; Conners, J; Roscoe, E M

    1999-01-01

    A number of variables influence the effectiveness of punishment and may determine the extent to which less intrusive forms of punishment may be used as alternatives to more intrusive interventions. For example, it has been suggested that response suppression during punishment may be facilitated if reinforcement is concurrently available for an alternative response. However, results of basic research demonstrating this finding have not been replicated with interventions more commonly prescribe...

  11. Explicit and inferred motives for nonsuicidal self-injurious acts and urges in borderline and avoidant personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snir, Avigal; Rafaeli, Eshkol; Gadassi, Reuma; Berenson, Kathy; Downey, Geraldine

    2015-07-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a perplexing phenomenon that may have differing motives. The present study used experience sampling methods (ESM) which inquired explicitly about the motives for NSSI, but also enabled a temporal examination of the antecedents/consequences of NSSI; these allow us to infer other motives which were not explicitly endorsed. Adults (n = 152, aged 18-65) with borderline personality disorder (BPD), avoidant personality disorder (APD), or no psychopathology participated in a 3-week computerized diary study. We examined 5 classes of explicit motives for engaging in NSSI, finding support primarily for internally directed rather than interpersonally directed ones. We then used multilevel regression to examine changes in affect, cognition, and behavior surrounding moments of NSSI acts/urges compared with control moments (i.e., without NSSI). We examined changes in 5 scales of inferred motives, designed to correspond to the 5 classes of explicit motives. The results highlight differing motives for NSSI among individuals with BPD and APD, with some similarities (mostly in the explicit motives) and some differences (mostly in the inferred motives) between the disorders. Despite their infrequent explicit endorsement, fluctuations in interpersonally oriented scales were found surrounding NSSI acts/urges. This highlights the need to continue attending to interpersonal aspects of NSSI in research and in clinical practice. Additionally, NSSI urges, like acts, were followed by decline in affective/interpersonal distress (although in a delayed manner). Thus, interventions that build distress tolerance and enhance awareness for affective changes, and for antecedent/consequence patterns in NSSI, could help individuals resist the urge to self-injure.

  12. Exploring application of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behaviour to self-injurious behaviour among women prisoners: Proposing a new model of understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireland, Jane L; York, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    The current study examines the application of capacity, psychological distress, coping and personality to an understanding of self-injurious behaviour, with a specific focus on testing the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Behaviour (IPTSB). One hundred and ninety women prisoners took part, completing a history questionnaire and measures of personality, coping styles and psychological distress. It was expected that self-injurious behaviour would be predicted by higher levels of emotional functioning difficulties, by an increased capacity to engage in such behaviours, by previous self-injurious behaviour, decreased levels of emotional stability and increased levels of emotional coping behaviour. Results supported the capacity component of the IPTSB, indicating that an increased history of self-injurious behaviour and of engagement in reckless behaviour were particular predictors. Increased psychological distress in some domains was also a predictor although the exact domain varied across the type of self-injurious engagement Increased levels of extraversion and decreased emotional coping predicted increased self-injurious engagement, although emotional coping only related to threats and cognition. The results point to the applicability of Interpersonal-Psychological Theory to understanding self-injurious behaviour and the importance of developing a revised model. The paper presents this in the form of the Integrated Model of Self-Injurious Activity.

  13. In Eating-Disordered Inpatient Adolescents, Self-Criticism Predicts Nonsuicidal Self-Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhaky, Liat; Shahar, Golan; Stein, Daniel; Fennig, Silvana

    2016-08-01

    We examined the role of depressive traits-self-criticism and dependency-in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal ideation among inpatient adolescents with eating disorders. In two studies (N = 103 and 55), inpatients were assessed for depressive traits, suicidal ideations, and NSSI. In Study 2, motivation for carrying out NSSI was also assessed. In both studies, depression predicted suicidal ideation and self-criticism predicted NSSI. In Study 2, depression and suicidal ideation also predicted NSSI. The automatic positive motivation for NSSI was predicted by dependency and depressive symptoms, and by a two-way interaction between self-criticism and dependency. Consistent with the "self-punishment model," self-criticism appears to constitute a dimension of vulnerability for NSSI.

  14. The scars of the inner critic: perfectionism and nonsuicidal self-injury in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Laurence; Soenens, Bart; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Vandereycken, Walter

    2012-05-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is quite common in eating disorder (ED) patients and we wondered whether this combined self-harming behaviour is related to perfectionism, a feature often found in ED patients. In addition, we examined associations between perfectionism and functions underlying NSSI and the possible mediating role of intrapersonal perfectionism in the association between perceived parental criticism and NSSI. In a sample of 95 ED patients, 38.9% reported at least one type of NSSI, and this subgroup reported significantly higher levels of parental criticism and evaluative concerns perfectionism (ECP) compared with ED patients without NSSI. ECP was positively related to the self-punishment and cry-for-help functions of NSSI. Finally, ECP was found to mediate the association between parental criticism and NSSI symptoms. Directions for future research and practical implications are discussed.

  15. The prevalence of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury (NSSI among high school students in relation to age and sex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Kądziela-Olech

    2015-08-01

    Conducting further research in the area of NSSI seems to be crucial due to chronicity and prevalence as well as the fact that numerous repeated self-injuries bringing relief or causing positive state of mind might indicate a mechanism similar to an addiction syndrome in adolescence.

  16. Spirituality/Religiosity, Life Satisfaction, and Life Meaning as Protective Factors for Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Victoria E.; Newgent, Rebecca A.; Whitlock, Janis; Mease, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that may protect or insulate people from engaging in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). College students (N = 14,385) from 8 universities participated in a web-based survey. Results of bivariate correlations and multiple regression revealed that spirituality/religiosity, life satisfaction, and life…

  17. Suicide Attempts and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents: Findings from the TORDIA Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Porta, Giovanna; Spirito, Anthony; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Greg; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Vitiello, Benedetto; Keller, Martin; Birmaher, Boris; McCracken, James; Mayes, Taryn; Berk, Michelle; Brent, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and prognostic significance of suicide attempts (SAs) and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents with treatment-resistant depression. Method: Depressed adolescents who did not improve with an adequate SSRI trial (N = 334) were randomized to a medication switch (SSRI or venlafaxine), with or without…

  18. Suicide Attempts and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in the Treatment of Resistant Depression in Adolescents: Findings from the TORDIA Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asarnow, Joan Rosenbaum; Porta, Giovanna; Spirito, Anthony; Emslie, Graham; Clarke, Greg; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Vitiello, Benedetto; Keller, Martin; Birmaher, Boris; McCracken, James; Mayes, Taryn; Berk, Michelle; Brent, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and prognostic significance of suicide attempts (SAs) and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents with treatment-resistant depression. Method: Depressed adolescents who did not improve with an adequate SSRI trial (N = 334) were randomized to a medication switch (SSRI or venlafaxine), with or without…

  19. A longitudinal investigation of the relation between nonsuicidal self-injury and spirituality/religiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Marie; Hamza, Chloe; Willoughby, Teena

    2017-04-01

    Despite increased research on factors that predict engagement in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), one factor that has been neglected is spirituality/religiosity. While some researchers suggest that spiritual/religious beliefs and practice may protect against aversive mental health outcomes, it also is possible that certain aspects of spirituality/religiosity - specifically doubt and questioning - may be distressing. In this study, we examined whether multiple dimensions of spirituality/religiosity, including the often-overlooked experience of doubt/questioning, were associated with engagement in NSSI among university students over time. Participants included 1,132 (70.5% female) first-year undergraduate students (Mean age=19.06, SD=1.05) from a Canadian university who were surveyed first in their freshman year, and again one year later. Auto-regressive cross-lagged analyses revealed a bidirectional relation between doubt/questioning and NSSI, where higher doubt/questioning predicted increased NSSI over time (after controlling for baseline depressive symptoms), and vice versa. There were no longitudinal associations between general spirituality/religiosity (i.e., general beliefs/practice) and NSSI. Our findings suggest questioning and doubt may be distressing for some individuals, and predict increased risk for NSSI as a form of coping. Further, higher NSSI may predict increases in questioning/doubt over time. However, the hypothesis that general spirituality/religiosity may protect against NSSI, was not supported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Body regard as a moderator of the relation between emotion dysregulation and nonsuicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J; Bagge, Courtney L; Tull, Matthew T; Gratz, Kim L

    2013-10-01

    Despite research documenting a strong association between emotion dysregulation and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), the moderators of this association have received little attention. Thus, it remains unclear why some individuals with heightened emotion dysregulation engage in NSSI and others do not. Body regard (i.e., how one perceives, experiences, and cares for the body) may be one such moderator, explaining the risk for NSSI among some individuals with emotion dysregulation. The current study used structural equation modeling within a sample of 398 undergraduates (26% reporting NSSI, mean frequency = 25.16, SD = 40.5) to test the interactive effect of emotion dysregulation and body regard on NSSI frequency when controlling for negative affect and borderline personality disorder symptoms. The interaction model provided a strong fit to the data and showed that emotion regulation was associated with NSSI only when low levels of body regard were present. Results suggest that body regard may be important to understanding who engages in NSSI within the context of emotion dysregulation. Possible mechanisms underlying the interaction between body regard and emotion dysregulation are discussed along with treatment and prevention implications.

  1. Defining and refining self-harm: a historical perspective on nonsuicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelotta, Cara

    2015-02-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a newly proposed diagnostic category in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Some contemporary historiography dismisses NSSI as a fiction of modern psychiatry. Although the exact definition and psychological meaning attributed to self-harm has not been static over history, there is a clear thread that connects Western asylum psychiatrists' thinking about self-harm to the current stand-alone diagnostic category of NSSI. Nineteenth-century psychiatrists identified a clinically meaningful difference between self-harm with and without the intent to die, between self-injurers who were psychotic and those who were not, and between self-injurers who made a single, serious mutilation and those who repetitively self-injured without causing permanent bodily damage. These same distinctions are apparent in the definition of NSSI. Thus, NSSI is a formalization of long-held observations about a category of people who repetitively self-injure without suicidal intent.

  2. Low implicit and explicit aversion toward self-cutting stimuli longitudinally predict nonsuicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Joseph C; Puzia, Megan E; Lee, Kent M; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2014-05-01

    There is a pressing need to improve the ability to identify individuals at risk for nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI; e.g., cutting or burning oneself); unfortunately, beyond prior NSSI, there are few powerful longitudinal predictors of NSSI. The present study addressed this limitation by investigating the ability of a novel factor--low aversion to self-cutting stimuli--to longitudinally predict NSSI in 49 individuals with a history of self-cutting. Results revealed that both low implicit and explicit aversion to self-cutting stimuli were significantly associated with future NSSI (rs = .32-.51), and that these associations were unique from several other theoretically important predictors, including prior NSSI, number of NSSI methods, implicit identification with self-cutting, self-prediction of future NSSI, emotion dysregulation, and therapy status. These findings are consistent with the notion that instinctive barriers (e.g., aversion to NSSI stimuli, pain) dissuade most people from engaging in NSSI, and that the erosion of these barriers may facilitate NSSI.

  3. An exploration of adolescent nonsuicidal self-injury and religious coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westers, Nicholas J; Rehfuss, Mark; Olson, Lynn; Wiemann, Constance M

    2014-01-01

    Many adolescents who engage in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) self-identify as religious, but the role of religion in their NSSI is not known. This exploratory study examined the relationship between religious coping and religiousness among adolescents who self-injure and the function of their NSSI. Thirty adolescents aged 12-19 years who had engaged in NSSI participated in an interview and completed questionnaires. Multiple regressions were used to examine the relationship between religious coping and NSSI, and Pearson correlations were used to assess the relationship between religiousness and function of NSSI. Greater use of positive religious coping was associated with lower likelihood of engaging in NSSI to rid oneself of unwanted emotions, whereas greater use of negative religious coping was associated with greater likelihood of engaging in NSSI for this reason as well as to avoid punishment or unwanted responsibility. Higher religiousness was associated with greater use of NSSI to communicate with or gain attention from others, whereas lower religiousness was associated with greater use of NSSI to relieve unwanted emotions. Having a greater understanding of how religious constructs are related to the various functions served by NSSI may inform treatment of this population, particularly among religious youth who self-injure.

  4. Perpetration, revictimization, and self-injury: traumatic reenactments of child sexual abuse in a nonclinical sample of South African adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Susan L; Collings, Steven J

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for traumatic reenactments of child sexual abuse experiences (perpetration, revictimization, and self-injury) were examined in a sample of 718 South African secondary school adolescents. Logistic regression analyses indicated that the most consistent predictors of reenactments were a history of child sexual abuse (rape and/or indecent assault) and respondents' gender, with males being significantly more likely than females to report perpetration (OR = 13.5) and females being more likely to report revictimization (OR = 3.2) and self-injury (OR = 2.5). An analysis restricted to respondents with a history of child sexual abuse indicated that negative abuse-related cognitions were the most consistent predictor of all forms of traumatic reenactment.

  5. Characterizing Interpersonal Difficulties Among Young Adults Who Engage in Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Using a Daily Diary

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Brianna J.; Wakefield, Matthew A.; Gratz, Kim L.; Chapman, Alexander L.

    2016-01-01

    Compared to people who have never engaged in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), people with a history of NSSI report multiple interpersonal problems. Theories propose that these interpersonal difficulties play a role in prompting and maintaining NSSI. The cross-sectional nature of most studies in this area limits our understanding of how day-to-day interpersonal experiences relate to the global interpersonal impairments observed among individuals with NSSI, and vice versa. This study compared yo...

  6. Testing the relations between impulsivity-related traits, suicidality, and nonsuicidal self-injury: a test of the incremental validity of the UPPS model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, Donald R; Miller, Joshua D; Miller, Drew J; Bornovalova, Marina A; Lejuez, C W

    2011-04-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has received significant attention as a predictor of suicidal behavior (SB) and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Despite significant promise, trait impulsivity has received less attention. Understanding the relations between impulsivity and SB and NSSI is confounded, unfortunately, by the heterogeneous nature of impulsivity. This study examined the relations among 4 personality pathways to impulsive behavior studied via the UPPS model of impulsivity and SB and NSSI in a residential sample of drug abusers (N = 76). In this study, we tested whether these 4 impulsivity-related traits (i.e., Negative Urgency, Sensation Seeking, Lack of Premeditation, and Lack of Perseverance) provide incremental validity in the statistical prediction of SB and NSSI above and beyond BPD; they do. We also tested whether BPD symptoms provide incremental validity in the prediction of SB and NSSI above and beyond these impulsivity-related traits; they do not. In addition to the main effects of Lack of Premeditation and Negative Urgency, we found evidence of a robust interaction between these 2 personality traits. The current results argue strongly for the consideration of these 2 impulsivity-related domains--alone and in interaction--when attempting to understand and predict SB and NSSI.

  7. Effects of perpetrator identity on suicidality and nonsuicidal self-injury in sexually victimized female adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Gulsen; Cakaloz, Burcu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Child sexual abuse and sexual dating violence victimization are common problems that are known to have long-term negative consequences. This study aimed to compare the sociodemographic, abuse-related, and clinical features of female adolescents who were sexually abused by different perpetrators, and identify the factors associated with suicidality and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) in these cases. Patients and methods Data of 254 sexually abused female adolescents between the ages of 12–18 years were evaluated. The cases were classified into three groups, namely “sexual dating violence”, “incest”, and “other child sexual abuse”, according to the identity of the perpetrator. The three groups were compared in terms of sociodemographic, abuse-related, and clinical features. Results Major depressive disorder was the most common psychiatric diagnosis, which was present in 44.9% of the cases. Among all victims, 25.6% had attempted suicide, 52.0% had suicidal ideation, and 23.6% had NSSI during the postabuse period. A logistic regression analysis revealed that attempted suicide was predicted by dating violence victimization (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =3.053; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.473, 6.330) and depression (AOR =2.238; 95% CI =1.226, 4.086). Dating violence victimization was also the strongest predictor of subsequent suicidal ideation (AOR =3.500; 95% CI =1.817, 6.741). In addition, revictimization was determined to be an important risk factor for both suicidal ideation (AOR =2.897; 95% CI =1.276, 6.574) and NSSI (AOR =3.847; 95% CI =1.899, 7.794). Conclusion Perpetrator identity and revictimization are associated with negative mental health outcomes in sexually victimized female adolescents. Increased risk of suicidality and NSSI should be borne in mind while assessing cases with dating violence and revictimization histories, in particular. PMID:27382291

  8. Perceived Parental Control, Self-Criticism, and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Among Adolescents: Testing the Reciprocal Relationships by a Three-Wave Cross-Lag Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jianing; Jiang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Mingqin; Du, Chao; Lin, Min-Pei; Leung, Freedom

    2016-07-19

    This study examined the prospective and reciprocal relationships among perceived parental control, self-criticism, and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). We also examined the mediating effect of self-criticism in the relationship between perceived parental control and NSSI. We aimed to find out whether perceived parental control and self-criticism acted as risk factors for NSSI, or consequences of NSSI, or both. A group of 3,600 Chinese adolescents (mean age = 14.63 years, 56.6% female) completed questionnaires, with measures assessing NSSI, self-criticism, and parental control. A cross-lag model was used to test the reciprocal relationships among variables at 3 time points with 6-month intervals. Perceived parental control and self-criticism did not reliably predict later NSSI, but NSSI predicted later perceived parental control and self-criticism. Findings of this study emphasize the adverse effects of NSSI, and shed light on the intervention efforts of this behavior.

  9. 心理病理症状在童年期虐待与医学生非自杀性自伤行为关联中的中介作用%Mediating effect of psychological symptoms on the relationship between childhood abuses and non-suicidal self-injuries among medical college students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何婷婷; 万宇辉; 张澄

    2016-01-01

    目的 分析心理病理症状在童年期虐待和医学生非自杀性自伤行为关联中的中介作用.方法 整群选取安徽省某医科院校4007名大一、大二在校医学生为研究对象,采用童年期虐待评定问卷、非自杀性自伤行为条目列表和心理亚健康自评问卷进行童年期虐待经历、自伤行为和心理病理症状等信息调查,使用Pearson相关、线性回归和Sobel检验分析三者间的关联.结果 童年期躯体、情感、性虐待、总体虐待评分与心理病理症状评分和自伤行为频率之间均呈显著正相关(P<0.01).心理病理症状在童年期各种虐待经历和自伤行为之间起到部分中介效应,Sobel检验显示中介效应具有统计学意义,中介效应占总效应的比例为8.33%~ 9.96%(男性)和6.06%~ 10.36%(女性)(P<0.01).控制年龄、家庭居住地、经济状况、独生子女状况、父母学历等混杂因素后仍存在中介效应,Sobel检验显示上述中介效应仍具有统计学意义,中介效应占总效应的比例为7.93 %~9.96%(男性)和6.10%~ 10.20%(女性)(P<0.05).结论 心理病理症状在童年期虐待经历和自伤行为的关联中起到部分中介作用,减缓医学生心理病理症状有助于预防和控制有童年期虐待经历者的自伤行为.

  10. Psychotic-Like Experiences and Nonsuidical Self-Injury in England: Results from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Ai; Stickley, Andrew; Haro, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the association between psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) in the general adult population. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the association using nationally-representative data from England. Methods Data from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey was analyzed. The sample consisted of 7403 adults aged ≥16 years. Five forms of PLEs (mania/hypomania, thought control, paranoia, strange experience, auditory hallucination) were assessed with the Psychosis Screening Questionnaire. The association between PLEs and NSSI was assessed by multivariable logistic regression. Hierarchical models were constructed to evaluate the influence of alcohol and drug dependence, common mental disorders, and borderline personality disorder symptoms on this association. Results The prevalence of NSSI was 4.7% (female 5.2% and male 4.2%), while the figures among those with and without any PLEs were 19.2% and 3.9% respectively. In a regression model adjusted for sociodemographic factors and stressful life events, most types of PLE were significantly associated with NSSI: paranoia (OR 3.57; 95%CI 1.96–6.52), thought control (OR 2.45; 95%CI 1.05–5.74), strange experience (OR 3.13; 95%CI 1.99–4.93), auditory hallucination (OR 4.03; 95%CI 1.56–10.42), and any PLE (OR 2.78; 95%CI 1.88–4.11). The inclusion of borderline personality disorder symptoms in the models had a strong influence on the association between PLEs and NSSI as evidenced by a large attenuation in the ORs for PLEs, with only paranoia continuing to be significantly associated with NSSI. Substance dependence and common mental disorders had little influence on the association between PLEs and NSSI. Conclusions Borderline personality disorder symptoms may be an important factor in the link between PLEs and NSSI. Future studies on PLEs and NSSI should take these symptoms into account. PMID:26700475

  11. Effects of perpetrator identity on suicidality and nonsuicidal self-injury in sexually victimized female adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unlu G

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gulsen Unlu, Burcu Cakaloz Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Pamukkale University, Denizli, Turkey Purpose: Child sexual abuse and sexual dating violence victimization are common problems that are known to have long-term negative consequences. This study aimed to compare the sociodemographic, abuse-related, and clinical features of female adolescents who were sexually abused by different perpetrators, and identify the factors associated with suicidality and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI in these cases. Patients and methods: Data of 254 sexually abused female adolescents between the ages of 12–18 years were evaluated. The cases were classified into three groups, namely “sexual dating violence”, “incest”, and “other child sexual abuse”, according to the identity of the perpetrator. The three groups were compared in terms of sociodemographic, abuse-related, and clinical features. Results: Major depressive disorder was the most common psychiatric diagnosis, which was present in 44.9% of the cases. Among all victims, 25.6% had attempted suicide, 52.0% had suicidal ideation, and 23.6% had NSSI during the postabuse period. A logistic regression analysis revealed that attempted suicide was predicted by dating violence victimization (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =3.053; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.473, 6.330 and depression (AOR =2.238; 95% CI =1.226, 4.086. Dating violence victimization was also the strongest predictor of subsequent suicidal ideation (AOR =3.500; 95% CI =1.817, 6.741. In addition, revictimization was determined to be an important risk factor for both suicidal ideation (AOR =2.897; 95% CI =1.276, 6.574 and NSSI (AOR =3.847; 95% CI =1.899, 7.794. Conclusion: Perpetrator identity and revictimization are associated with negative mental health outcomes in sexually victimized female adolescents. Increased risk of suicidality and NSSI should be borne in mind while assessing cases with dating

  12. It cuts both ways: an analysis of the psychological discourse on self-injury from a linguistic point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Vered

    2014-10-01

    This article proposes an analysis of the phenomenon of self-injury through the prism of current linguistic theories. The author uses the clinical distinctions made by Roman Jakobson between metonymic and metaphoric aphasia to suggest that the psychological community and those who harm themselves are participating in separate "language games." While the clinical "language game" is characterized by the dominance of metaphor and a conception stressing the hierarchy between metaphor and metonymy, the "language game" of self-mutilators is dominated by metonymy. The author explores the clinical implications of understanding the language game of those who injure themselves as metonymic.

  13. Childhood Abuse, Nonsuicidal Self-Injury, and Suicide Attempts: An Exploration of Gender Differences in Incarcerated Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Jenelle; Gobeil, Renee; Beaudette, Janelle N; Ritchie, Mary B; Brown, Shelley L; Smith, Hayden P

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between types of childhood abuse, suicide attempts, and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) was examined in a sample of 415 incarcerated adults (268 men, 147 women). Men and women were equally likely to experience childhood abuse, although women were more likely to report sexual abuse and men were more likely to report emotional neglect. Sexual abuse was the only type of abuse found to predict NSSI and suicide attempts in women. For men, physical abuse and physical neglect were significant predictors of NSSI and suicide attempts, respectively. Gender differences exist and should be examined in future research in this area.

  14. Differential Reinforcement of Communicative Behaviors (DRC): An Intervention for the Disruptive Behaviors of Developmentally Disabled Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, V. Mark; Carr, Edward G.

    A study, involving four developmentally disabled children who exhibited a variety of disruptive behaviors such as self-injury and tantrums, was conducted to assess the influence of task demands and adult attention on children's behaviors. The three experimental conditions were the "EASY 100" which consisted of an easy task on which children could…

  15. Self-Injury and Suicide Attempt in Relation with Trauma and Dissociation among Adolescents with Dissociative and Non-Dissociative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Filiz; Coşkun, Murat; Bozkurt, Hasan; Kaya, İlyas; Zoroğlu, Salih

    2017-03-01

    To explore the role of trauma and dissociation over self-injurious behaviors (SIB) and suicide attempts (SA) in adolescents. A total of 207 adolescents participated in the study. After conducting diagnostic interview, participants were divided into five groups as subjects with dissociative disorders (DD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders (AD), and a control group (CG) without any psychiatric disorder. ADHD, MDD and AD groups were considered as non-dissociative disorders (non-DD group) in the present study. There is no significant difference between groups in terms of number and age of the subjects (p>0.05). Among all participants SIB was reported in 32.2% of females (n=37) and 25% of males (n=23) while SA was reported in 29.6% of females (n=34) and 4.4% of males (n=4). Adolescents with DD were found to experience higher rates of SIB and SA than the other groups. Dissociation was the most important variable contributing to SIB and female gender was the most efficient variable for SA. Total trauma scores were also found to be significantly higher in DD group followed by non-DD and CG respectively. SIB and SA are complex behavioral problems which may be associated with many psychiatric factors. However higher level dissociation seems as an important mediating factor, even regardless of psychiatric diagnosis, in the development of SIB and SA. More research is needed to further explore the factors effective over SIB and SA in adolescents.

  16. DBS in the baso-lateral amygdala improves symptoms of autism and related self-injurious behaviourA case report and hypothesis on the pathogenesis of the disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker eSturm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We treated a thirteen year old boy for life-threatening self-injurious behavior (SIB and severe Kanner’s autism with Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS in the amygdaloid complex as well as in the supra-amygdaloid projection system. Two DBS-electrodes were placed in both structures of each hemisphere. The stimulation contacts targeted the paralaminar, the basolateral, the central amygdala as well as the supra-amygdaloid projection system. DBS was applied to each of these structures, but only stimulation of the baso-lateral part proved effective in improving SIB and core symptoms of the autism spectrum in the emotional, social and even cognitive domains over a follow up of now 24 months. These results, which have been gained for the first time in a patient, support hypotheses, according to which the amygdala may be pivotal in the pathogeneses of autism and point to the special relevance of the baso-lateral part.

  17. Management of Severe Developmental Regression in an Autistic Child with a 1q21.3 Microdeletion and Self-Injurious Blindness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cora Cravero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a young boy with nonverbal autism and intellectual disability, with a rare de novo 1q21.3 microdeletion. The patient had early and extreme self-injurious behaviours that led to blindness, complicated by severe developmental regression. A significant reduction in the self-injurious behaviours and the recovery of developmental dynamics were attained in a multidisciplinary neurodevelopmental inpatient unit. Improvement was obtained after managing all causes of somatic pains, using opiate blockers and stabilizing the patient’s mood. We offered both sensorimotor developmental approach with therapeutic body wrap and specific psychoeducation adapted to his blindness condition for improving his communication abilities.

  18. The Behavior Problems Inventory-Short Form for individuals with intellectual disabilities: Part II: reliability and validity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rojahn, J.; Rowe, E.W.; Sharber, A.C.; Hastings, R.P.; Matson, J.L.; Didden, H.C.M.; Kroes, D.B.H.; Dumont, E.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background The Behavior Problems Inventory-01 (BPI-01) is an informant-based behaviour rating instrument for intellectual disabilities (ID) with 49 items and three sub-scales: Self-injurious Behavior, Stereotyped Behavior and Aggressive/Destructive Behavior. The Behavior Problems Inventory-Short For

  19. The Acquired Capability for Lethal Self Injury: Case Studies of Plath’s The Bell Jar and Eugenides’ The Virgin Suicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Jafari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal theory developed by Joiner (2005 is based on the assumption that people die by suicide because they can-acquired capability-and because they want to- desire of suicide.  Desire to die arises from two specific psychological states: perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness.  The obtained ability of committing suicidal thoughts referred to the second segment of the approach consists of some specific factors, i.e., the person must be capable of doing some lethal activities courageously to put an end to the life; therefore, they present a fearless attitude towards death.  Another factor is endurance to face self-injuries pain acquired from the long painful experiences or probably stimulating and motivating situations.  In this paper, the researchers intended to present a Joinerian reading of Sylvia Plath’s only novel, the Bell Jar, and one of Jeffrey Eugenides’ prominent works, the Virgin Suicides.  In fact, this qualitative study would analyze the two selected novels (i.e., the Bell Jar and the Virgin Suicides by the use of the acquired capability for suicide to find out why one takes his/her life by his/her own hands.  Based on the findings, Loneliness, social isolation, and thwarted effectiveness can be the mental states that have inflicted an acute pain on the heroines, a pain that makes them ready to die by suicides.  Suicidal ideation and witnessing other’s suicidal behaviors, habituates the heroines to the concept of death and suicide.

  20. Mindful Parenting Decreases Aggression, Noncompliance, and Self-Injury in Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Winton, Alan S.W.; Fisher, Barbara C.; Wahler, Robert G.; McAleavey, Kristen; Singh, Judy; Sabaawi, Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    Parent-child transactions provide an important social context for the development of adaptive and problem behaviors in young children with autism. Teaching parents to develop alternative transactional pathways often leads to positive behavioral patterns in their children. We taught three parents the philosophy and practice of mindfulness in a…

  1. Problems in the Behavioural Treatment of Self-Injury in the Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Sara; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The treatment combined extinction of the injurious behavior and reinforcement of alternative behavior and was successful in the controlled hospital environment. However, an attempt to teach the parents to continue the treatment at home failed. Journal Availability: J. B. Lippincott Co., East Washington Square, Philadelphia, PA 19105 (Author/DLS)

  2. Risk for suicidal ideation and attempt among a primary care sample of adolescents engaging in nonsuicidal self-injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Abigail L; Singer, Jonathan; Conner, Bradley T; Calhoun, Shawna; Diamond, Guy

    2014-12-01

    One in five adolescents in the United States has engaged in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), one in eight have had serious thoughts of suicide, and one in 25 have attempted suicide. Research suggests that NSSI may increase risk for suicide attempt, yet little is known about the relationship between NSSI and suicidal ideation or attempts. In a primary care setting, 1,561 youth aged 14-24 years completed a brief, comprehensive, mental health screen as part of a routine well visit to determine which factors were most likely to predict suicidal ideation and attempt among youth engaging in NSSI. Results of recursive partitioning revealed that current depression and history of alcohol use best differentiated youth engaging in NSSI with low versus high risk for suicidal ideation and attempts. This simple algorithm is presented as a clinical screening tool that might aid medical providers in determining which youth would benefit from more intensive assessment and intervention.

  3. Dating violence victimization, dispositional aggression, and nonsuicidal self-injury among psychiatrically hospitalized male and female adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Christie J; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Swenson, Lance; Hower, Heather M; Wolff, Jennifer; Spirito, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the current study was to characterize the association between dating violence victimization and dispositional aggression in predicting nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among psychiatrically hospitalized male and female adolescents. One hundred fifty-five adolescents (ages 13-17) and their parents completed the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children clinical interview to assess NSSI and child abuse; adolescents completed self-report measures of aggression and dating violence victimization (verbal, physical, and sexual). Dating violence victimization and NSSI were found to be highly prevalent among both males and females in this psychiatric inpatient sample. Two moderational models were supported, wherein dating violence was associated with NSSI in the context of elevated trait anger in males and indirect aggression in females. Findings suggest that helping victims of dating violence acquire skills to address certain forms of dispositional aggression may attenuate NSSI.

  4. Self-Destructive Behavior in People with Dissociative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, Glenn N.; Chawla, Neharika; Van der Kolk, Bessel

    2002-01-01

    Study assesses self-destructive behavior in a group of inpatients who have dissociative disorders compared to those who report few dissociative symptoms. Results reveal that these patients more frequently engage in self-destructive behaviors, use more methods of self-injury, and begin to injure themselves at an earlier age then patients who do not…

  5. Skin-Picking in Individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome: Prevalence, Functional Assessment, and Its Comorbidity with Compulsive and Self-Injurious Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didden, Robert; Korzilius, Hubert; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Individuals with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are at increased risk for mental health and behaviour problems, such as skin-picking and compulsive behaviours. Prevalence and functional assessment of skin-picking, and its association with compulsive behaviour and self-injury, were investigated in a large group of individuals with PWS (n =…

  6. Trajectories of suicide ideation and nonsuicidal self-injury among adolescents in mainland China : Peer predictors, joint development, and risk for suicide attempts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giletta, M.; Prinstein, M.J.; Abela, J.R.Z.; Gibb, B.E.; Barrocas, A.L.; Hankin, B.L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study expanded knowledge about the development of suicide ideation and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents by investigating (a) peer experiences as predictors of trajectories of suicide ideation and NSSI, (b) the joint development of suicide ideation and NSSI, and (c)

  7. Recent Research on Aetiology, Development and Phenomenology of Self-Injurious Behaviour in People with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review and Implications for Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furniss, F.; Biswas, A. B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Behavioural interventions conceptualise self-injurious behaviour (SIB) as developing from early repetitive behaviours through acquisition of homeostatic functions in regulating stimulation and subsequent shaping into SIB through socially mediated or automatic operant reinforcement. Despite high success rates, such interventions rarely…

  8. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in an American Indian Reservation Community: Results from the White Mountain Apache Surveillance System, 2007-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwik, Mary F.; Barlow, Allison; Tingey, Lauren; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Goklish, Novalene; Walkup, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe characteristics and correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among the White Mountain Apache Tribe. NSSI has not been studied before in American Indian samples despite associated risks for suicide, which disproportionately affect American Indian youth. Method: Apache case managers collected data through a tribally…

  9. Trajectories of suicide ideation and nonsuicidal self-injury among adolescents in mainland China : Peer predictors, joint development, and risk for suicide attempts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giletta, M.; Prinstein, M.J.; Abela, J.R.Z.; Gibb, B.E.; Barrocas, A.L.; Hankin, B.L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study expanded knowledge about the development of suicide ideation and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents by investigating (a) peer experiences as predictors of trajectories of suicide ideation and NSSI, (b) the joint development of suicide ideation and NSSI, and (c) th

  10. Nonsuicidal self-injury in sexual minority college students: a test of theoretical integration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muehlenkamp, Jennifer J; Hilt, Lori M; Ehlinger, Peter P; McMillan, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    .... A total of 137 college students who identified as a sexual minority completed an anonymous on-line study assessing NSSI, suicidal thoughts/behaviors, and constructs of the minority stress and interpersonal theories...

  11. Positive Family Intervention for Severe Challenging Behavior I: A Multisite Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, V. Mark; Hieneman, Meme; Clarke, Shelley; Wang, Mo; Rinaldi, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was a multisite randomized clinical trial assessing the effects of adding a cognitive-behavioral intervention to positive behavior support (PBS). Fifty-four families who met the criteria of (a) having a child with a developmental disability, (b) whose child displayed serious challenging behavior (e.g., aggression, self-injury,…

  12. An Evaluation of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist for Children under Age 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jonathan D.; Huete, John M.; Fodstad, Jill C.; Chin, Michelle D.; Kurtz, Patricia F.

    2013-01-01

    Severe problem behaviors such as self-injury and aggression are frequently observed in young children under age 5 with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Although early identification of problem behavior is critical to effective intervention, there are few standardized measures available that identify severe problem behavior in…

  13. Questions about Behavioral Function (QABF): Adaptation and Validation of the Spanish Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo-Pinatella, David; Alomar-Kurz, Elisabeth; Font-Roura, Josep; Gine, Climent; Matson, Johnny L.; Cifre, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    People with intellectual disabilities (ID) often engage in problem behaviors, such as verbal or physical aggression, property destruction, or self-injury. These behaviors become a challenge for the families and for professionals. Functional behavioral assessment (FBA) is a method used to identify variables that influence or maintain challenging…

  14. Behavior Problems: Differences among Intellectually Disabled Adults with Co-Morbid Autism Spectrum Disorders and Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kimberly R. M.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2010-01-01

    Behavior problems such as aggression, property destruction, stereotypy, self-injurious behavior, and other disruptive behavior are commonly observed among adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and epilepsy residing at state-run facilities. However, it is unknown how these populations differ on behavior…

  15. Behavior Problems: Differences among Intellectually Disabled Adults with Co-Morbid Autism Spectrum Disorders and Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kimberly R. M.; Matson, Johnny L.

    2010-01-01

    Behavior problems such as aggression, property destruction, stereotypy, self-injurious behavior, and other disruptive behavior are commonly observed among adults with intellectual disabilities (ID), autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and epilepsy residing at state-run facilities. However, it is unknown how these populations differ on behavior…

  16. Reduction of Restraint of People with Intellectual Disabilities: An Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Don E.; Grossett, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    We used an organizational behavior management (OBM) approach to increase behavior intervention plans and decrease the use of mechanical restraint. First, recipients were tracked as a member of the priority group if they engaged in frequent self-injurious behavior or physical aggression toward others and/or if they had been placed in mechanical…

  17. Cognitive Vulnerability to Depression, Rumination, Hopelessness, and Suicidal Ideation: Multiple Pathways to Self-Injurious Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeannette M.; Alloy, Lauren B.; Abramson, Lyn Y.

    2006-01-01

    In order to advance the detection and prevention of suicide, recent research has focused on predictors of suicidal ideation and behavior such as negative cognitive styles, dysfunctional attitudes, hopelessness, and rumination. In this study the relationships among these risk factors in the context of the Attention Mediated Hopelessness (AMH)…

  18. Platelet serotonin concentration and suicidal behavior in combat related posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Zrnka; Henigsberg, Neven; Pivac, Nela; Nedic, Gordana; Borovecki, Andrea

    2008-02-15

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious and global problem, a psychiatric disorder that frequently occurs with different comorbidities, and is associated with a high suicide rate. Pathophysiologically, both PTSD and suicidal behavior are related to disturbances in the central serotonergic system. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) controls emotional behavior, anxiety, impulsivity and aggression, and nearly all known antidepressants and antianxiety drugs affect 5-HT transmission. Platelet 5-HT can be used as a limited peripheral marker of the central serotonergic synaptosomes, since it is related to particular basic psychopathological characteristics of several psychiatric disorders. Platelet 5-HT concentration has been reported to be similar in PTSD subjects and healthy controls, but suicidal patients across different psychiatric diagnoses have reduced platelet 5-HT concentration. This study examined platelet 5-HT concentration by the spectrofluorimetric method in male subjects: 73 suicidal and 47 non-suicidal veterans with current and chronic combat related PTSD, 45 suicidal and 30 non-suicidal comparative non-PTSD subjects and 147 healthy men. The presence of suicidal behavior (score=0, non-suicidal; scores > or =1, suicidal) was assessed with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 (HDRS). Platelet 5-HT concentration was significantly lower in suicidal PTSD and non-PTSD patients compared to non-suicidal patients or healthy controls. Since the majority of patients scored very low on item 3 of HDRS, no significant correlation between suicidal scores and platelet 5-HT concentration was found. These results show that reduced platelet 5-HT concentration is related to suicidal behavior in PTSD, and suggest that platelet 5-HT concentration might be used as a peripheral marker to predict suicidal behavior across psychiatric diagnoses.

  19. Proposed Diagnostic Criteria for the DSM-5 of Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Female Adolescents: Diagnostic and Clinical Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina In-Albon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI is included as conditions for further study in the DSM-5. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the proposed diagnostic criteria and the diagnostic and clinical correlates for the validity of a diagnostic entity. The authors investigated the characteristics of NSSI disorder and the proposed diagnostic criteria. A sample of 73 female inpatient adolescents and 37 nonclinical adolescents (aged 13 to 19 years was recruited. Patients were classified into 4 groups (adolescents with NSSI disorder, adolescents with NSSI without impairment/distress, clinical controls without NSSI, and nonclinical controls. Adolescents were compared on self-reported psychopathology and diagnostic cooccurrences. Results indicate that adolescents with NSSI disorder have a higher level of impairment than adolescents with other mental disorders without NSSI. Most common comorbid diagnoses were major depression, social phobia, and PTSD. There was some overlap of adolescents with NSSI disorder and suicidal behaviour and borderline personality disorder, but there were also important differences. Results further suggest that the proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria for NSSI are useful and necessary. In conclusion, NSSI is a highly impairing disorder characterized by high comorbidity with various disorders, providing further evidence that NSSI should be a distinct diagnostic entity.

  20. Dissociative, depressive, and PTSD symptom severity as correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidality in dissociative disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webermann, Aliya R; Myrick, Amie C; Taylor, Christina L; Chasson, Gregory S; Brand, Bethany L

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates whether symptom severity can distinguish patients diagnosed with dissociative identity disorder and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified with a recent history of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicide attempts from those patients without recent self-harm. A total of 241 clinicians reported on recent history of patient NSSI and suicide attempts. Of these clinicians' patients, 221 completed dissociative, depressive, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptomatology measures. Baseline cross-sectional data from a naturalistic and prospective study of dissociative disorder patients receiving community treatment were utilized. Analyses evaluated dissociative, depressive, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptom severity as methods of classifying patients into NSSI and suicide attempt groupings. Results indicated that dissociation severity accurately classified patients into NSSI and suicidality groups, whereas depression severity accurately classified patients into NSSI groups. These findings point to dissociation and depression severity as important correlates of NSSI and suicidality in patients with dissociative disorders and have implications for self-harm prevention and treatment.

  1. The relationship of psychological trauma and dissociative and posttraumatic stress disorders to nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidality: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Julian D; Gómez, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed research on the relationship between (a) exposure to psychological trauma and (b) nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidality (suicidal ideation [SI] and suicide attempts [SA]) in individuals with dissociative disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The review provides a context for the special issue of the Journal of Trauma & Dissociation on these topics. Exposure to childhood sexual abuse is the most consistent traumatic antecedent of self-harm, although traumatic violence in childhood (particularly physical abuse) and adulthood (particularly domestic violence) and exposure to multiple types of traumatic stressors also are associated with NSSI and SI/SA. Dissociative disorders and PTSD are consistently associated with increased NSSI and SA/SI. There is preliminary cross-sectional evidence that dissociation and posttraumatic stress disorders may mediate the relationship between psychological trauma and NSSI and SI/SA. Research on emotion dysregulation as a potential cross-cutting mechanism linking dissociation, PTSD, and self-harm is also reviewed. We conclude with a discussion of implications for clinical practice and future directions for scientific research.

  2. Nonsuicidal self-injury and interpersonal violence in U.S. veterans seeking help for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Patrick S; Van Voorhees, Elizabeth E; Elbogen, Eric B; Dedert, Eric A; Clancy, Carolina P; Hair, Lauren P; Hertzberg, Michael; Beckham, Jean C; Kimbrel, Nathan A

    2017-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) has been defined as deliberately damaging one's body tissue without conscious suicidal intent. NSSI is a robust predictor of suicidal ideation and attempts in adults. While NSSI has been associated with other-directed violence in adolescent populations, the link between NSSI and interpersonal violence in adults is less clear. The current study examined the cross-sectional relationship between NSSI and past-year interpersonal violence among 729 help-seeking veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Veterans who reported a recent history of engaging in cutting, hitting, or burning themselves were significantly more likely to report making violent threats and engaging in violent acts, including the use of a knife or gun, in the past year than veterans without NSSI. NSSI was uniquely associated with interpersonal violence after controlling for a variety of dispositional, historical, contextual, and clinical risk factors for violence, including age, race, socio-economic status, marital status, employment status, combat exposure, alcohol misuse, depression, PTSD symptom severity, and reported difficulty controlling violence. These findings suggest that clinicians working with veterans with PTSD should review NSSI history when conducting a risk assessment of violence.

  3. Late adolescent nonsuicidal self-injury: the roles of coping style, self-esteem, and personality pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawood, Chelsea Dean; Huprich, Steven K

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between late adolescent nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) and coping style, self-esteem, and personality pathology. Participants were 302 late adolescent (18-19-year-old) college students who completed questionnaires on self-esteem, coping style, personality disorder symptoms, and NSSI. Participants who engaged in NSSI reported more personality pathology, more maladaptive coping styles, less rational coping, and lower self-esteem than did non self-harming participants. As hypothesized, total NSSI correlated with several personality disorders, emotional coping style, and inversely related to self-esteem and adaptive coping styles. Regression equations tested several mediation models to determine whether self-esteem or coping style mediates the relationship between personality disorder symptoms and NSSI. Emotional coping and self-esteem each fully mediated the relationship between various personality disorders and NSSI in the anticipated direction. Results also indicate self-esteem, rational, detached, and emotional coping partially mediate the relationship between several personality disorders and NSSI.

  4. Effects of Vibroacoustic Music on Challenging Behaviors in Individuals with Autism and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Andersson, Gunilla; Viding, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Vibroacoustic music has been proposed to be an effective treatment for individuals with developmental disorders and challenging behaviors. The present study experimentally tested the effects of vibroacoustic music on self-injurious, stereotypical, and aggressive destructive behaviors in 20 individuals with autism spectrum disorders and…

  5. Treatment of Multiply Controlled Problem Behavior with Procedural Variations of Differential Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidert, Pamela L.; Iwata, Brian A.; Dozier, Claudia L.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the assessment and treatment of 2 children with autism spectrum disorder whose problem behaviors (self-injury, aggression, and disruption) were multiply controlled. Results of functional analyses indicated that the children's problem behaviors were maintained by both positive reinforcement (attention) and negative reinforcement (escape…

  6. Effects of Vibroacoustic Music on Challenging Behaviors in Individuals with Autism and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Andersson, Gunilla; Viding, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Vibroacoustic music has been proposed to be an effective treatment for individuals with developmental disorders and challenging behaviors. The present study experimentally tested the effects of vibroacoustic music on self-injurious, stereotypical, and aggressive destructive behaviors in 20 individuals with autism spectrum disorders and…

  7. Assessment, Behavioral Treatment, and Prevention of Pica: Clinical Guidelines and Recommendations for Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Don E.; McAdam, David

    2012-01-01

    Pica is a dangerous form of self-injurious behavior that occurs in people with developmental disabilities who are institutionalized. Studies also indicate that pica has led to the death of people with developmental disabilities. While a number of published studies have demonstrated that pica behavior can be decreased substantially with behavioral…

  8. Clinical Outcomes of Behavioral Treatments for Pica in Children with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Nathan A.; Simmons, Christina A.; Mevers, Joanna E.; Alvarez, Jessica P.

    2015-01-01

    Pica is a potentially deadly form of self-injurious behavior most frequently exhibited by individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities. Research indicates that pica can be decreased with behavioral interventions; however, the existing literature reflects treatment effects for small samples (n = 1-4) and the overall success of such…

  9. Behavioral and psychiatric manifestations in Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grados, Marco A; Alvi, Mustafa H; Srivastava, Siddharth

    2017-03-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare genetic syndrome with clinical manifestations due to multiple affected organ systems including limbs, gastrointestinal, skin, and central nervous systems. Although the genetic basis of CdLS is now uncovered, how behavioral manifestations are associated with genetic and brain differences are less well understood. The current focused review systematically describes the main behavioral observations to date in individuals with CdLS, which have a significant impact on quality of life and adaptive functioning. The CdLS behavioral phenotype includes autistic traits as a prominent feature; however, brain imaging studies, required to understand gene-brain-behavior connections in CdLS, are scarce. Moreover, autistic features in CdLS have a greater emphasis on repetitive behaviors, including self-injurious behaviors (SIB) and expressive communication deficits, different that the core social deficit seen in idiopathic autism. Current data strongly support the use of CdLS as a model disease for repetitive behaviors and associated developmental delay manifestations. Behavioral phenotype characteristics in CdLS point to a preponderance of repetitive clinical phenomena as well as expressive verbal deficits that ought to inform specific treatment approaches in CdLS. In particular, repetitive behaviors associated with self-injury are of high negative impact on the quality of life for individuals with CdLS and their families. Treatment approaches geared to manage repetitive behaviors and self-injurious behaviors in CdLS are required in this developmental condition.

  10. Stressful Life Events as a Predictor for Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Southern Chinese Adolescence: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jie; Yang, Wei; Ahmed, Niman Isse; Ma, Ying; Liu, Hui-Yan; Wang, Jia-Ji; Wang, Pei-Xi; Du, Yu-Kai; Yu, Yi-Zhen

    2016-03-01

    Stressful life events have been implicated in the etiology of kinds of psychopathology related to nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI); however, few studies have examined the association between NSSI and stressful life events directly in Chinese school adolescents. In this study, we aim to estimate the prevalence rate of NSSI and examine its association with stressful life events in Southern Chinese adolescents. A total sample of 4405 students with age ranged from 10 to 22 years was randomly selected from 12 schools in 3 cities of Guangdong Province, China. NSSI, stressful life events, self-esteem, emotional management, and coping methods were measured by structured questionnaires. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the association of NSSI with stressful life events. Results showed the 1 year self-reported NSSI was 29.2%, with 22.6% engaged in "minor" NSSI (including hitting self, pulling hair, biting self, inserting objects under nails or skin, picking at a wound) and 6.6% in "moderate/sever" NSSI (including cutting/carving, burning, self-tattooing, scraping, and erasing skin). Self-hitting (15.9%), pulling hair out (10.9%), and self-inserting objects under nails or skin picking areas to dram blood (18.3%) were the most frequent types of NSSI among adolescents. Results also showed that "Minor NSSI" was associated with stressful life events on interpersonal, loss and health adaption, and "moderate/severe NSSI" was associated with life events on interpersonal, health adaption in Southern Chinese adolescents, even after adjusted for sex, age, residence, self-esteem, coping style, and emotional management. Results further suggested stressful life events were significantly associated with less risk of NSSI in those who had good emotional management ability.

  11. Characterizing Interpersonal Difficulties Among Young Adults Who Engage in Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Using a Daily Diary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brianna J; Wakefield, Matthew A; Gratz, Kim L; Chapman, Alexander L

    2017-05-01

    Compared to people who have never engaged in nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI), people with a history of NSSI report multiple interpersonal problems. Theories propose that these interpersonal difficulties play a role in prompting and maintaining NSSI. The cross-sectional nature of most studies in this area limits our understanding of how day-to-day interpersonal experiences relate to the global interpersonal impairments observed among individuals with NSSI, and vice versa. This study compared young adults with (n=60) and without (n=56) recent, repeated NSSI on baseline and daily measures of interpersonal functioning during a 14-day daily diary study. Groups differed in baseline social anxiety, excessive reassurance seeking, and use of support seeking relative to other coping strategies, but did not differ in self-perceived interpersonal competence. In terms of day-to-day functioning, participants with (vs. without) NSSI had significantly less contact with their families and friends, perceived less support following interactions with friends, and were less likely to seek support to cope, regardless of level of negative affect. With the exception of contact with family members, these group differences in daily interpersonal functioning were accounted for by baseline levels of social anxiety and use of support seeking. Contrary to expectations, participants with NSSI had more frequent contact with their romantic partners, did not differ in perceptions of support in romantic relationships, and did not report more intense negative affect following negative interpersonal interactions. This study provides a novel test of recent interpersonal theories of NSSI using daily reports. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. 2011 Behavioral Health Risk Assessment Data Report (BH-RADR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, depression symptoms, and hazardous drinking behavior . Utilization of the Standarized...780.58, V69.4 Suicide and Self Injury E95, E95.9, E98, E989 Legend: BH- Behavioral Health; NOS – not otherwise specified Note: a Each code...81 Negative PHQ-8 and PCL-C 71 269 340 Total 106 315 421 Legend: BH- Behavioral Health; PC-PTSD - Primary Care Post-Traumatic Stress

  13. [Addictive behavior disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Daiki; Tsuchida, Hideto; Kitabayashi, Yurinosuke; Tani, Naosuke; Fukui, Kenji

    2007-10-01

    "Addiction" used to remind anyone of the use or abuse of chemical substances. In recent years, however, researchers and clinicians have begun to classify other excessive behaviors including gambling, eating shopping and self-injury into the addictive behavior. Above all, pathological gambling and bulimia nervosa patients often make trouble for psychiatrists and psychologists, not only for their family. On the other hand, the neural substrata underlying substance dependence have been revealed. Especially, it is implicated that the mesolimbic neuron plays a crucial role on the reward system. The recent studies suggest that reduced activation of the reward system might be related to the addictive behaviors such as pathological gambling, binge eating and sexual behavior. Further biological researches about the addictive behavior would help our deeper understanding of its disorders. As to the pharmacotherapy, many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in treating the addictive behaviors.

  14. A systematic review on the effect of exercise interventions on challenging behavior for people with intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogg-Groenendaal, M.; Hermans, H.; Claessens, B.J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Challenging behavior, such as aggressive or self-injurious behavior, is a major concern for the health and well-being of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and for their relatives, friends, and caregivers. The most common contemporary treatments have drawbacks, such as the advers

  15. A systematic review on the effect of exercise interventions on challenging behavior for people with intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogg-Groenendaal, M.; Hermans, H.; Claessens, B.J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Challenging behavior, such as aggressive or self-injurious behavior, is a major concern for the health and well-being of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) and for their relatives, friends, and caregivers. The most common contemporary treatments have drawbacks, such as the

  16. Using Analogue Functional Analysis to Measure Variations in Problem Behavior Rate and Function after Psychotropic Medication Changes: A Clinical Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdovinos, Maria G.; Nelson, Samantha M.; Kuhle, Jennifer L.; Dierks, Abigail M.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities are often prescribed psychotropic medication to treat behaviors such as aggression and self-injury. Evaluation of these medications is often based on caregiver report or changes in frequency of behavior. The purpose of this research was to characterize the rate and function of problem…

  17. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome: Disorder of Self-mutilating Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jathar, Prasad; Panse, Amey M; Jathar, Madhura; Gawali, Pritesh N

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS), a rare inborn error of metabolism, is characterized by self-injurious behavior, which results in partial or total destruction of oral and perioral tissues and/ or fingers. Persistent self-injurious behavior (biting the fingers, hands, lips, and cheeks; banging the head or limbs) is a hallmark of the disease. Prevention of self-mutilation raises significant difficulties. A case of a 10-month-old boy with aggressive behavior and severe lower lip injuries is presented. How to cite this article: Jathar P, Panse AM, Jathar M, Gawali PN. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome: Disorder of Self-mutilating Behavior. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):139-142.

  18. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome: Disorder of Self-mutilating Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panse, Amey M; Jathar, Madhura; Gawali, Pritesh N

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS), a rare inborn error of metabolism, is characterized by self-injurious behavior, which results in partial or total destruction of oral and perioral tissues and/ or fingers. Persistent self-injurious behavior (biting the fingers, hands, lips, and cheeks; banging the head or limbs) is a hallmark of the disease. Prevention of self-mutilation raises significant difficulties. A case of a 10-month-old boy with aggressive behavior and severe lower lip injuries is presented. How to cite this article: Jathar P, Panse AM, Jathar M, Gawali PN. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome: Disorder of Self-mutilating Behavior. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):139-142. PMID:27365935

  19. Behavioral Treatment of Chronic Skin-Picking in Individuals with Developmental Disabilities: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Russell; Didden, Robert; Machalicek, Wendy; Rispoli, Mandy; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio; Mulloy, Austin; Regester, April; Pierce, Nigel; Kang, Soyeon

    2010-01-01

    Skin-picking is a type of self-injurious behavior involving the pulling, scratching, lancing, digging, or gouging of one's own body. It is associated with social impairment, and increased medical and mental health concerns. While there are several reports showing that skin-picking is common in individuals with developmental disabilities, knowledge…

  20. Correlates of Cutting Behavior among Sexual Minority Youths and Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, N. Eugene; Laser, Julie; Nickels, Sarah J.; Wisneski, Hope

    2010-01-01

    Using secondary analyses of data from a sample of 265 sexual minority youths, the authors examined correlates of cutting behavior to determine whether patterns are similar to those found in studies of self-injury with community samples of predominately heterosexual youths. The sample consisted of youths who received services at an urban social…