WorldWideScience

Sample records for non-starter lactic acid

  1. Modelling the influence of metabolite diffusion on non-starter lactic acid bacteria growth in ripening Cheddar cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czárán, Tamás; Rattray, Fergal P.; Møller, Cleide O.de A.

    2018-01-01

    The influence of metabolite diffusion within the cheese matrix on growth of non-starter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) during Cheddar cheese ripening was mathematically modelled. The model was calibrated at a realistic range of diffusion of metabolites and the decay and growth parameters...

  2. Characterization of non-starter lactic acid bacteria in traditionally produced home-made Radan cheese during ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jokovic Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred thirteen non-starter lactic acid bacteria isolated from Radan cheese during ripening were identified with both a classical biochemical test and rep-PCR with (GTG5 primer. For most isolates, which belong to the Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paraplantarum and Enterococcus faecium, a phenotypic identification was in good agreement with rep-PCR identification. Lactococeus lactis subsp. lactis, Enterococcus faecium and subspecies from the Lenconostoc mesenteroides group were the dominant population of lactic acid bacteria in cheese until 10 days of ripening and only one Streptococcus thermophilus strain was isolated from the 5-day-old cheese sample. As ripening progressed, Lactobacillus plantarum became the predominant species together with the group of heterofermentative species of lactobacilli that could not be precisely identified with rep-PCR.

  3. Spray-dried adjunct cultures of autochthonous non-starter lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Guillermo H; Bergamini, Carina V; Audero, Gabriela; Páez, Roxana; Wolf, I Verónica; Perotti, M Cristina; Hynes, Erica R

    2017-08-16

    Spray-drying of lactic cultures provides direct-to-vat starters, which facilitate their commercialization and use. However, this process may alter the metabolic activity and deteriorate technological features. In this work, we assessed the influence of spray-drying on the survival and aroma production of two strains of mesophilic lactobacilli: Lactobacillus paracasei 90 and Lactobacillus plantarum 91, which have already been characterized as good adjunct cultures. The spray-drying was carried out using a laboratory scale spray and the dried cultures were monitored during the storage for the survival rate. The dried cultures were applied to two cheese models: sterile cheese extract and miniature soft cheese. The influence on the carbohydrate metabolism and the production of organic acids and volatile compounds was determined. Both strains retained high levels of viable counts in the powder after drying and during the storage at 5°C for twelve months. In addition, they also remained at high level in both cheese models during incubation or ripening. Similar profiles of carbohydrate fermentation and bioformation of volatile compounds were observed in the cheese extracts for each of the strains when tested as both fresh and dried cultures. In addition, the ability of Lb. paracasei 90 to increase the production of acetoin and diacetyl remarkably in cheese models was also confirmed for the spray-dried culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lactic acid test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  5. Lactic acid and lactates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, V.V.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to integrate the present state of knowledge on lactate metabolism in human and mammalian physiology as far as it could be subject to nutritional interventions. An integrated view on the nutritional, metabolic and physiological aspects of lactic acid and lactates might open a

  6. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  7. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are generally considered facultative anaerobic obligate fermentative bacteria. They are unable to synthesize heme. Some lactic acid bacteria are unable to form menaquinone as well. Both these components are cofactors of respiratory (electron transport) chains of prokaryotic

  8. 21 CFR 184.1061 - Lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Lactic acid. 184.1061 Section 184.1061 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1061 Lactic acid. (a) Lactic acid (C3H6O3, CAS Reg. Nos.: dl mixture, 598... hydrogen cyanide and subsequent hydrolysis to lactic acid. (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of...

  9. 21 CFR 582.1061 - Lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lactic acid. 582.1061 Section 582.1061 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1061 Lactic acid. (a) Product. Lactic acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  10. Biodegradable poly(lactic acid)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The fabrication of biodegradable poly(lactic acid) (PLA) microspheres containing total alkaloids of Caulis sinomenii was investigated. The formation, diameter, morphology and properties of the microspheres were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR), laser particle size analyser and scanning ...

  11. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  12. 21 CFR 862.1450 - Lactic acid test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lactic acid test system. 862.1450 Section 862.1450....1450 Lactic acid test system. (a) Identification. A lactic acid test system is a device intended to measure lactic acid in whole blood and plasma. Lactic acid measurements that evaluate the acid-base status...

  13. PHAGE RESISTANT LACTIC ACID BACTERIAL MUTANTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    Method of obtaining mutated lactic acid bacteria having a reduced susceptibility towards attack by bacteriophages, the method comprising mutating a gene involved in the pyrimidine metabolism, including pyrG encoding CTP synthetase. Such lactic acid bacteria are useful in starter cultures...

  14. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  15. Lactic acid bacteria: microbiological and functional aspects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lahtinen, Sampo

    2012-01-01

    "Updated with the substantial progress made in lactic acid and bacteria research since the third edition, this fourth volume discusses improved insights in genetics and new molecular biological techniques...

  16. Lignin poly(lactic acid) copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Johan Vilhelm; Chung, Yi-Lin; Li, Russell Jingxian; Waymouth, Robert; Sattely, Elizabeth; Billington, Sarah; Frank, Curtis W.

    2017-02-14

    Provided herein are graft co-polymers of lignin and poly(lactic acid) (lignin-g-PLA copolymer), thermoset and thermoplastic polymers including them, methods of preparing these polymers, and articles of manufacture including such polymers.

  17. Lactic acid fermentation of crude sorghum extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, W.A.; Lee, Y.Y.; Anthony, W.B.

    1980-04-01

    Crude extract from sweet sorghum supplemented with vetch juice was utilized as the carbohydrate source for fermentative production of lactic acid. Fermentation of media containing 7% (w/v) total sugar was completed in 60-80 hours by Lactobacillus plantarum, product yield averaging 85%. Maximum acid production rates were dependent on pH, initial substrate distribution, and concentration, the rates varying from 2 to 5 g/liter per hour. Under limited medium supplementation the lactic acid yield was lowered to 67%. The fermented ammoniated product contained over eight times as much equivalent crude protein (N x 6.25) as the original medium. Unstructured kinetic models were developed for cell growth, lactic acid formation, and substrate consumption in batch fermentation. With the provision of experimentally determined kinetic parameters, the proposed models accurately described the fermentation process. 15 references.

  18. Amino acids transport in lactic streptococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Arnold Jacob Mathieu

    1987-01-01

    Lactic streptococci are extremely fastidious bacteria. For growth an exogenous source of amino acids and other nutrients is essential. The amino acid requirement in milk is fulfilled by the milk-protein casein, which is degraded by sequential hydrolysis, involving proteases and peptidases. ... Zie:

  19. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J. -H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O' Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  20. Biotechnological Production of Lactic Acid and Its Recent Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jung Wee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid is widely used in the food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries and has received increased attention for use as a monomer for the production of biodegradable poly(lactic acid. It can be produced by either biotechnological fermentation or chemical synthesis, but the former route has received considerable interest recently, due to environmental concerns and the limited nature of petrochemical feedstocks. There have been various attempts to produce lactic acid efficiently from inexpensive raw materials. We present a review of lactic acid-producing microorganisms, raw materials for lactic acid production, fermentation approaches for lactic acid production, and various applications of lactic acid, with a particular focus on recent investigations. In addition, the future potentials and economic impacts of lactic acid are discussed.

  1. Novel Method of Lactic Acid Production by Electrodialysis Fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Hongo, Motoyoshi; Nomura, Yoshiyuki; Iwahara, Masayoshi

    1986-01-01

    In lactic acid fermentation by Lactobacillus delbrueckii, the produced lactic acid affected the lactic acid productivity. Therefore, for the purpose of alleviating this inhibitory effect, an electrodialysis fermentation method which can continuously remove produced lactic acid from the fermentation broth was applied to this fermentation process. As a result, the continuation of fermentation activity was obtained, and the productivity was three times higher than in non-pH-controlled fermentati...

  2. Lactic acid fermentation from refectory waste: Factorial design analysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-12

    Apr 12, 2012 ... method. At the end of the fermentation process, lactic acid exists in the complex medium of fermentation broth that contains whey proteins, biomass, salts and other impurities. Lactic acid is then recovered from this complex medium. Since the high cost of lactic acid purification process limits the utilization of ...

  3. Characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Algerian arid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diversity and density of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Algerian raw goats\\' milk in arid zones were studied by determination of morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical characteristics. 206 lactic acid bacterial strains were isolated, with 115 of them belonging to lactic acid cocci and others to the genus, ...

  4. Reactive extraction of lactic acid using alamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasewar, Kailas L.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Versteeg, Geert; Pangarkar, Vishwas G.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important commercial product and extracting it out of aqueous solution is a growing requirement in fermentation based industries and recovery from waste streams. The design of an amine extraction process requires (i) equilibrium and (ii) kinetic data for the acid–amine (solvent)

  5. Multidrug transporters in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazurkiewicz, P; Sakamoto, K; Poelarends, GJ; Konings, WN

    Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria possess several Multi-Drug Resistance systems (MDRs) that excrete out of the cell a wide variety of mainly cationic lipophilic cytotoxic compounds as well as many clinically relevant antibiotics. These MDRs are either proton/drug antiporters belonging to the major

  6. The proteolytic systems of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, Edmund R.S.; Mierau, Igor; Hagting, Anja; Poolman, Bert; Konings, Wil N.

    1996-01-01

    Proteolysis in dairy lactic acid bacteria has been studied in great detail by genetic, biochemical and ultrastructural methods. From these studies the picture emerges that the proteolytic systems of lactococci and lactobacilli are remarkably similar in their components and mode of action. The

  7. Proteolytic enzymes of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, J; Haandrikman, A

    The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria is essential for their growth in milk and contributes significantly to flavour development in fermented milk products where these microorganisms are used as starter cultures. The proteolytic system is composed of proteinases which initially cleave the

  8. Exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caggianiello, Graziano; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Spano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is able to produce capsular or extracellular polysaccharides, with various chemical compositions and properties. Polysaccharides produced by LAB alter the rheological properties of the matrix in which they are dispersed, leading to typically viscous and

  9. Characterization and ageing study of poly(lactic acid) films plasticized with oligomeric lactic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos, Nuria; Martino, Verónica P.; Jiménez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was melt-blended with a bio-based oligomeric lactic acid (OLA) plasticizer at different concentrations between 15 wt% and 25 wt% in order to enhance PLA ductility and to get a fully biodegradable material with potential application in films manufacturing. OLA was an efficient plasticizer for PLA, as it caused a significant decrease on glass transition temperature (Tg) while improving considerably ductile properties. Only one Tg value was observed in all cases and no ap...

  10. A method for the determination of D(-)-lactic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamer, C.J.A. van den; Elias, R.W.

    A method for the determination of D(—)-lactic acid is described. An acetone powder from Escherichia coli B in the presence of methylene blue oxidizes D(—)-lactic specifically. Oxygen consumption in a Warburg apparatus was used as a measure of the D(—)-lactic acid.

  11. Lactic acid production from xylose by Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunasundari, B.; Naresh, S.; Chu, J. E.

    2017-09-01

    Lactic acid is an important compound with a wide range of industrial applications. The present study tested the efficiency of xylose, as a sole carbon source to be converted to lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 15. To the best of our knowledge, limited information is available on the directed fermentation of xylose to lactic acid by this bacterium. The effects of different parameters such as temperature, pH, incubation time, agitation speed, concentrations of nitrogen and carbon sources on the lactic acid production were investigated statistically. It was found that the bacterium exhibited poor assimilation of xylose to lactic acid. Temperature, agitation rate and incubation time were determined to improve the lactic acid production slightly. The highest lactic acid yield obtained was 8.9% at 45°C, 300 RPM, 96 h, pH of 6.0 with carbon and nitrogen source concentrations were fixed at 5% w/v.

  12. Poly(Lactic Acid) Based Flexible Films

    OpenAIRE

    Fathilah binti Ali; Jamarosliza Jamaluddin; Arun Kumar Upadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is a biodegradable polymer which has good mechanical properties, however, its brittleness limits its usage especially in packaging materials. Therefore, in this work, PLA based polyurethane films were prepared by synthesizing with different types of isocyanates; methylene diisocyanate (MDI) and hexamethylene diisocyanates (HDI). For this purpose, PLA based polyurethane must have good strength and flexibility. Therefore, polycaprolactone which has b...

  13. Ultrasonic Monitoring of the Progress of Lactic Acid Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Kimura, Akihiro; Ohdaira, Etsuzo

    2003-05-01

    Promotion of lactic acid fermentation by ultrasonic irradiation has been attempted. It is possible to determine the progress of fermentation and production of a curd, i.e., yoghurt and or kefir, by measuring acidity using a pH meter. However, this method is inconvenient and indirect for the evaluation of the progress of lactic acid fermentation under anaerobic condition. In this study, an ultrasonic monitoring method for evaluating the progress of lactic acid fermentation was examined.

  14. Biopropionic acid production via molybdenumcatalyzed deoxygenation of lactic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korstanje, T.J.; Kleijn, H.; Jastrzebski, J.T.B.H.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    As the search for non-fossil based building blocks for the chemical industry increases, new methods for the deoxygenation of biomass-derived substrates are required. Here we present the deoxygenation of lactic acid to propionic acid, using a catalyst based on the non-noble and abundant metal

  15. Technological and economic potential of poly(lactic acid) and lactic acid derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, R.; Tsai, S.P.; Bonsignore, P.; Moon, S.H.; Frank, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    Lactic acid has been an intermediate-volume specialty chemical (world production {approximately}40,000 tons/yr) used in a wide range of food processing and industrial applications. lactic acid h,as the potential of becoming a very large volume, commodity-chemical intermediate produced from renewable carbohydrates for use as feedstocks for biodegradable polymers, oxygenated chemicals, plant growth regulators, environmentally friendly ``green`` solvents, and specially chemical intermediates. In the past, efficient and economical technologies for the recovery and purification of lactic acid from crude fermentation broths and the conversion of tactic acid to the chemical or polymer intermediates had been the key technology impediments and main process cost centers. The development and deployment of novel separations technologies, such as electrodialysis (ED) with bipolar membranes, extractive distillations integrated with fermentation, and chemical conversion, can enable low-cost production with continuous processes in large-scale operations. The use of bipolar ED can virtually eliminate the salt or gypsum waste produced in the current lactic acid processes. In this paper, the recent technical advances in tactic and polylactic acid processes are discussed. The economic potential and manufacturing cost estimates of several products and process options are presented. The technical accomplishments at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the future directions of this program at ANL are discussed.

  16. Heme and menaquinone induced electron transport in lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Brooijmans, Rob; Smit, Bart; Santos, Filipe; van Riel, Jan; de Vos, Willem M; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background For some lactic acid bacteria higher biomass production as a result of aerobic respiration has been reported upon supplementation with heme and menaquinone. In this report, we have studied a large number of species among lactic acid bacteria for the existence of this trait. Results Heme- (and menaquinone) stimulated aerobic growth was observed for several species and genera of lactic acid bacteria. These include Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacill...

  17. Selection of lactic acid bacteria able to ferment inulin hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian BASTON

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Eight homofermentative lactic acid bacteria isolates were tested for lactic acid production using chicory and Jerusalem artichoke hydrolysate as substrate. The pH, lactic acid yield and productivity were used to select the best homolactic bacteria for lactic acid production. The selected strains produced lactic acid at maximum yield after 24 hours of fermentation and the productivity was greater at 24 hours of fermentation. From all studied strains, Lb1 and Lb2 showed the best results regarding lactic acid yields andproductivity. After 48 hours of chicory and Jerusalem artichhoke hydrolysates fermentation, from all the studied strains, Lb2 produced the highest lactic acid yield (0.97%. Lb2 produced after 48 hours of fermentation the lowest pH value of 3.45±0.01. Lb2 showed greater lactic acid productivity compared to the other studied lactic acid bacteria, the highest values, 0.13 g·L-1·h-1fromJerusalem artichoke hydrolysate and 0.11g·L-1·h-1 from chicory hydrolysate, being produced after 24 hours of fermentation.

  18. Significant thermal energy reduction in lactic acid production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujtaba, Iqbal M.; Edreder, Elmahboub A.; Emtir, Mansour

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid is widely used as a raw material for the production of biodegradable polymers and in food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The global market for lactic acid is expected to reach 259 thousand metric tons by the year 2012. For batch production of lactic acid, the traditional process includes the following steps: (i) esterification of impure lactic acid with methanol in a batch reactor to obtain methyl lactate (ester), (ii) separation of the ester in a batch distillation, (iii) hydrolysis of the ester with water in a batch reactor to produce lactic acid and (iv) separation of lactic acid (in high purity) in a batch distillation. Batch reactive distillation combines the benefit of both batch reactor and batch distillation and enhances conversion and productivity (Taylor and Krishna, 2000 ; Mujtaba and Macchietto, 1997 ). Therefore, the first and the last two steps of the lactic acid production process can be combined together in batch reactive distillation () processes. However, distillation (batch or continuous) is an energy intensive process and consumes large amount of thermal energy (via steam). This paper highlights how significant (over 50%) reduction in thermal energy consumption can be achieved for lactic acid production process by carefully controlling the reflux ratio but without compromising the product specification. In this paper, only the simultaneous hydrolysis of methyl lactate ester and the separation of lactic acid using batch reactive distillation is considered.

  19. The possibility of lactic acid fermentation in the triticale stillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILICA MARKOVIĆ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Triticale stillage is a by-product of bioethanol production. A research study was conducted in order to see if triticale stillage is adequate for lactic acid bacteria growth and lactic acid fermentation. Three Lactobacillus strains: Lactobacillus fermentum NRRL-B-75624, Lactobacillus fermentum PL-1, and Lactobacillus plantarum PL-4 were taken into consideration. Lactic acid fermentation was monitored by measuring pH value and titratable acidity. Lactobacillus fermentum PL-1 had the greatest decrease of pH values and increase of titratable acidity so it was chosen for future work. During the research, it was investigated how nutrient composition of triticale stillage and CaCO3 can influence lactic acid fermentation and CaCO3 role in cell protection. The nutrient composition of triticale stillage was satisfactory for lactic acid fermentation. The addition of CaCO3 helped in lactic acid fermentation. Although the titratable acidity in the samples with CaCO3 was lower than in the samples without CaCO3, the number of viable cells was higher for the samples with CaCO3, which showed that CaCO3 protected lactic acid cells from inhibition by lactic acid.

  20. Beneficial effects of antioxidative lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisako Nakagawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is caused by exposure to reactive oxygen intermediates. The oxidative damage of cell components such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids one of the important factors associated with diabetes mellitus, cancers and cardiovascular diseases. This occurs as a result of imbalance between the generations of oxygen derived radicals and the organism’s antioxidant potential. The amount of oxidative damage increases as an organism ages and is postulated to be a major causal factor of senescence. To date, many studies have focused on food sources, nutrients, and components that exert antioxidant activity in worms, flies, mice, and humans. Probiotics, live microorganisms that when administered in adequate amounts provide many beneficial effects on the human health, have been attracting growing interest for their health-promoting effects, and have often been administered in fermented milk products. In particular, lactic acid bacteria (LAB are known to conferre physiologic benefits. Many studies have indicated the antioxidative activity of LAB. Here we review that the effects of lactic acid bacteria to respond to oxidative stress, is connected to oxidative-stress related disease and aging.

  1. [Regulating acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-07-04

    As cell factories, lactic acid bacteria are widely used in food, agriculture, pharmaceutical and other industries. Acid stress is one the important survival challenges encountered by lactic acid bacteria both in fermentation process and in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, the development of systems biology and metabolic engineering brings unprecedented opportunity for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and improving the acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria. This review addresses physiological mechanisms of lactic acid bacteria during acid stress. Moreover, strategies to improve the acid stress resistance of lactic acid were proposed.

  2. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1996-10-08

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer is described made from monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  3. Lactic acid Production with in situ Extraction in Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Ghafouri Taleghani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Lactic acid is widely used in the food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The major problems associated with lactic acid production are substrate and end-product inhibition, and by-product formation. Membrane technologyrepresents one of the most effective processes for lactic acid production. The aim of this work is to increase cell density and lactic acid productivity due to reduced inhibition effect of substrate and product in membrane bioreactor.Material and Methods: In this work, lactic acid was produced from lactose in membrane bioreactor. A laboratory scale membrane bioreactor was designed and fabricated. Five types of commercial membranes were tested at the same operating conditions (transmembrane pressure: 500 KPa and temperature: 25°C. The effects of initial lactose concentration and dilution rate on biomass growth, lactic acid production and substrate utilization were evaluated.Results and Conclusion: The high lactose retention of 79% v v-1 and low lactic acid retention of 22% v v-1 were obtained with NF1 membrane; therefore, this membrane was selected for membrane bioreactor. The maximal productivity of 17.1 g l-1 h-1 was obtainedwith the lactic acid concentration of 71.5 g l-1 at the dilution rate of 0.24 h−1. The maximum concentration of lactic acid was obtained at the dilution rate of 0.04 h−1. The inhibiting effect of lactic acid was not observed at high initial lactose concentration. The critical lactose concentration at which the cell growth severely hampered was 150 g l-1. This study proved that membrane bioreactor had great advantages such as elimination of substrate and product inhibition, high concentration of process substrate, high cell density,and high lactic acid productivity.Conflict of interest: There is no conflict of interest.

  4. Catalytic acetoxylation of lactic acid to 2-acetoxypropionic acid, en route to acrylic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerthuis, R.; Granollers, M.; Brown, D.R.; Salavagione, H.J.; Rothenberg, G.; Shiju, N.R.

    2015-01-01

    We present an alternative synthetic route to acrylic acid, starting from the platform chemical lactic acid and using heterogeneous catalysis. To improve selectivity, we designed an indirect dehydration reaction that proceeds via acetoxylation of lactic acid to 2-acetoxypropionic acid. This

  5. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences

  6. Enzymatic synthesis of 11C-pyruvic acid and 11C-L-lactic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.B.; Spolter, L.; Chang, C.C.; Cook, J.S.; Macdonald, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    L-Lactic acid is formed as the end product of glycolysis under anaerobic conditions in all cells, but this reaction is of special significance in the myocardium. L-Lactic acid is reversibly formed from and is in equilibrium with myocardial pyruvic acid, which is its sole metabolic pathway. 11 C-Pyruvic acid is synthesized from 11 C carbon dioxide using pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and coenzymes. The 11 C-pyruvic acid is then converted to 11 -L-lactic acid by lactic acid dehydrogenase. The availability of 11 C-pyruvic acid and 11 C-L-lactic acid will permit the in vivo investigation of lactate metabolism. (author)

  7. Towards lactic acid bacteria-based biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli, Roberto; Bosco, Francesca; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Bayer, Edward A; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-11-15

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have long been used in industrial applications mainly as starters for food fermentation or as biocontrol agents or as probiotics. However, LAB possess several characteristics that render them among the most promising candidates for use in future biorefineries in converting plant-derived biomass-either from dedicated crops or from municipal/industrial solid wastes-into biofuels and high value-added products. Lactic acid, their main fermentation product, is an attractive building block extensively used by the chemical industry, owing to the potential for production of polylactides as biodegradable and biocompatible plastic alternative to polymers derived from petrochemicals. LA is but one of many high-value compounds which can be produced by LAB fermentation, which also include biofuels such as ethanol and butanol, biodegradable plastic polymers, exopolysaccharides, antimicrobial agents, health-promoting substances and nutraceuticals. Furthermore, several LAB strains have ascertained probiotic properties, and their biomass can be considered a high-value product. The present contribution aims to provide an extensive overview of the main industrial applications of LAB and future perspectives concerning their utilization in biorefineries. Strategies will be described in detail for developing LAB strains with broader substrate metabolic capacity for fermentation of cheaper biomass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Modeling of lactic acid fermentation of leguminous plant juices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurkhno, R A; Validov, Sh Z; Boronin, A M; Naumova, R P

    2006-01-01

    Lactic acid fermentation of leguminous plant juices was modeled to provide a comparative efficiency assessment of the previously selected strains of lactic acid bacteria as potential components of starter cultures. Juices of the legumes fodder galega, red clover, and alfalfa were subjected to lactic acid fermentation in 27 variants of experiment. Local strains (Lactobacillus sp. RS 2, Lactobacillus sp. RS 3, and Lactobacillus sp. RS 4) and the collection strain Lactobacillus plantarum BS 933 appeared the most efficient (with reference to the rate and degree of acidogenesis, ratio of lactic and acetic acids, and dynamics of microflora) in fermenting fodder galega juice; Lactobacillus sp. RS 1, Lactobacillus sp. RS 2, Lactobacillus sp. RS 3, Lactobacillus sp. RS 4, and L. plantarum BS 933 were the most efficient for red clover juice. Correction of alfalfa juice fermentation using the tested lactic acid bacterial strains appeared inefficient, which is explainable by its increased protein content and a low level of the acids produced during fermentation.

  9. Lactic Acid Bacteria : embarking on 30 more years of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan; Johansen, Eric; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Teusink, Bas

    2014-01-01

    The 11th International Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria Lactic Acid Bacteria play important roles in the pro- duction of food and feed and are increasingly used as health-promoting probiotics. The incessant scientific interest in these microorganisms by academic research groups as well as by

  10. Heme and menaquinone induced electron transport in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.; Smit, B.; Santos, dos F.; Riel, van J.; Vos, de W.M.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: For some lactic acid bacteria higher biomass production as a result of aerobic respiration has been reported upon supplementation with heme and menaquinone. In this report, we have studied a large number of species among lactic acid bacteria for the existence of this trait.

  11. 9th International Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Poolman, Berend; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    What’s new in the field of lactic acid bacteria? The 9th International Symposium on Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB9) will take place 31 August to 4 September 2008 in Egmond aan Zee, The Netherlands. Traditionally, the triannual LAB symposium focuses on the themes of genetics, physiology, and applications

  12. Characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from poultry farms in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Lactobacilli strains, both isolated from faeces, produced higher amounts of cells and lactic acid from soils as compared to the lactococci strain isolated from feathers. L (+)-lactic acid is the only optical isomer for use in pharmaceutical and food industries because is only adapted to assimilate this form. The optical isomers ...

  13. Capillary microreactors for lactic acid extraction: experimental and modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanti, Susanti; Winkelman, Jozef; Schuur, Boelo; Heeres, Hero; Yue, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important biobased chemical and, among others, is used for the production of poly-lactic acid. Down-stream processing using state of the art technology is energy intensive and leads to the formation of large amounts of salts. In this presentation, experimental and modeling studies

  14. Flow cytometric assessment of viability of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunthof, C.J.; Bloemen, K.; Breeuwer, P.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    2001-01-01

    The viability of lactic acid bacteria is crucial for their applications as dairy starters and as probiotics. We investigated the usefulness of flow cytometry (FCM) for viability assessment of lactic acid bacteria. The esterase substrate carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA) and the dye exclusion DNA

  15. Bacteriocins and lactic acid bacteria - a minireview | Savadogo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fermentation of various foods by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is one of the oldest forms of biopreservation practised by mankind. Bacterial antagonism has been recognized for over a century but in recent years this phenomenon has received more scientific attention, particulary in the use of various strains of lactic acid bacteria.

  16. Screening and identification of lactic acid bacteria isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from sorghum (Sorghum bicolor. L.) silage were identified during different periods of evolution of sorghum silage in west Algeria. Morphological, physiological, biochemical and technological techniques were used to characterize lactic acid bacteria isolates. A total number of 27 ...

  17. Batch fermentative production of lactic acid from green- sugarcane juices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Serna Cock

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Juice from the CC85-92 variety of green (unburned sugar cane was tested as a suitable substrate in lactic-acid production. Fermentations were carried out with a homo-fermentative strain isolated from crops of the same variety of cane. Both the centrifugation pre-treatment and concentrated-nitrogen effects on substrate conversion, lactic-acid concentration and yield were evaluated. After a fermentation time of 48 h at 32° C with 5% of yeast extract as nitrogen source, 40,78 g/L of lactic-acid concentration, 0.58 g/g of product yield and 33% of substrate conversion were obtained. Centrifugation did not affect lactic acid production. Key words: Lactic acid, green sugar cane, Lactococcus lactis subs. lactis.

  18. Intensification of conversion of glucose to lactic acid : equilibria and kinetics for back extraction of lactic acid using trimethylamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasewar, Kailas L.; Heesink, A. Bert M.; Versteeg, Geert F.; Pangarkar, Vishwas G.

    2004-01-01

    Alamine 336 is an effective extractant for the recovery of lactic acid from aqueous solutions. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back extract lactic acid with a water soluble, volatile tertiary amine such as trimethyl amine. Equilibrium data are presented

  19. Intensification of conversion of glucose to lactic acid: equilibria and kinetics for back extraction of lactic acid using trimethylamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasewar, Kailas L.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Versteeg, Geert; Pangarkar, Vishwas G.

    2004-01-01

    Alamine 336 is an effective extractant for the recovery of lactic acid from aqueous solutions. An approach for regeneration and product recovery from such extracts is to back extract lactic acid with a water soluble, volatile tertiary amine such as trimethyl amine. Equilibrium data are presented

  20. Time related total lactic acid bacteria population diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-07

    Feb 7, 2011 ... the diversity and dynamics of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) population in fresh ..... combining morphological, biochemical and molecular data are important for ..... acid bacteria from fermented maize (Kenkey) and their interactions.

  1. Evaluation of different lactic acid bacterial strains for probiotic characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    B. Srinu,; T. Madhava Rao,; P. V. Mallikarjuna Reddy; K. Kondal Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to collect different Lactic acid bacterial strains from culture collection centers and screen their functional probiotic characteristics such as acid tolerance, bile tolerance, antibacterial activity and antibiotic sensitivity for their commercial use. Materials and Methods: Acid and bile tolerence of selected LAB(Lactic acid bacteria) was determined. The antibiotic resistance of Lactobacillus species was assessed using different antibiotic di...

  2. Microbial granulation for lactic acid production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Mo-Kwon; Hwang, Yuhoon

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the formation of microbial granules to boost the productivity of lactic acid (LA). The flocculated form of LA-producing microbial consortium, dominated by Lactobacillus sp. (91.5% of total sequence), was initially obtained in a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR), which...... increased, reaching 67 g L-fermenter−1h−1 at HRT 0.17 h. The size of LA-producing granules and hydrophobicity gradually increased with decrease in HRT, reaching 6.0 mm and 60%, respectively. These biogranules were also found to have high settling velocities and low porosities, ranging 2.69-4.73 cm s−1 and 0...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF VEGETABLE PUREES AND DRINKS BY LACTIC ACID FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    At. Kraevska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The object of this work was to investigate the possibility for development of vegetable purees and drinks by lactic acid fermentation. It was found that by the direct lactic acid fermentation of Lb.plantarum strain 226/1 the vitamin composition of vegetable purees is preserved and the biological value is increased. Drinks, prepared from fermented vegetable purees were remarkable with the pleasant lactic acid taste, the sucrose-acid composition was stable and balanced and they can be used both in the rational and in the dietary nutrition.

  4. L-Lactic Acid Production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 10863

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lívia Chemeli Senedese

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid has been shown to have the most promising application in biomaterials as poly(lactic acid. L. rhamnosus ATCC 10863 that produces L-lactic acid was used to perform the fermentation and molasses was used as substrate. A solution containing 27.6 g/L of sucrose (main composition of molasses and 3.0 g/L of yeast extract was prepared, considering the final volume of 3,571 mL (14.0% (v/v inoculum. Batch and fed batch fermentations were performed with temperature of 43.4°C and pH of 5.0. At the fed batch, three molasses feed were applied at 12, 24, and 36 hours. Samples were taken every two hours and the amounts of lactic acid, sucrose, glucose, and fructose were determined by HPLC. The sucrose was barely consumed at both processes; otherwise the glucose and fructose were almost entirely consumed. 16.5 g/L of lactic acid was produced at batch and 22.0 g/L at fed batch. Considering that lactic acid was produced due to the low concentration of the well consumed sugars, the final amount was considerable. The cell growth was checked and no substrate inhibition was observed. A sucrose molasses hydrolysis is suggested to better avail the molasses fermentation with this strain, surely increasing the L-lactic acid.

  5. Biodiversity and evolution of lactic acid bacteria in deferent periods ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    f e c

    2013-04-03

    Apr 3, 2013 ... Key words: Lactic acid bacteria, identification, silage, sorghum, evolution, amylolytic, .... milk was checked which indicates the presence of LAB (Sengun et ..... pH, temperature and salinity cannot be used as reference.

  6. Production of lactic acid from Starchy-based food substrates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2013-11-30

    Nov 30, 2013 ... are rather costly. This necessitated ... found application in many industries and various commercial ... and Sharpe (MRS) agar for total lactic acid bacteria ..... An Economic ... of Enzymes and Microbial Technology, 26: 87-. 107.

  7. Characterization And Identification Of Lactic Acid Bacteria From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    $hr3k

    2013-06-05

    , Pakistan. Accepted ... stands next to whole milk especially during summer. Dahi ... natural preservation. ... LAB is more varying and inconsistent as compared to ..... Interaction between probiotic lactic acid bacteria and canine.

  8. Mechanocatalytic Production of Lactic Acid from Glucose by Ball Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyang Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A solvent-free process was developed for the direct production of lactic acid from glucose in a mechanocatalytic process in the presence of Ba(OH2, and a moderate lactic acid yield of 35.6% was obtained. Glucose conversion and lactic acid formation were favorable at higher catalyst/glucose mass ratios. However, at relatively lower catalyst/glucose mass ratios, they were greatly inhibited, and the promotion of fructose formation was observed. The mechanocatalytic process was applicable for various carbohydrates such as C5 sugars, C6 sugars, and disaccharides with 20–36% lactic acid yields achieved. This work provides a new pathway for the production of value-added chemicals from biomass resources.

  9. Antimicrobial activities of lactic acid bacteria isolated from akamu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The partially purified inhibitory compounds were screened by agar spot assay method for antagonistic ... The partially purified compounds exhibited strong activity against ... Keywords: Bacteriocins, lactic acid bacteria (LAB), target organisms, ...

  10. original article antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of lactic acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    All the 57 tested lactic acid bacteria isolates were sensitive to Pencillin G (Pen, 10units), and ... resistance genes for Penicillin G and Erythromycin as indicated by the sensitivity of isolates. .... Antibiotic Susceptibility Test: The LAB isolates were ...

  11. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of lactic acid bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of lactic acid bacteria isolated from Azerbaijani traditional dairy products. ... yogurts were produced from bovine's milk and the Ganja yogurt from buffalo's milk. ... It was determined using biochemical tests and molecular methods that four ...

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Salad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the inhibitory capacity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) due to the action of antagonistic substances, 8 members of the LAB group namely, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus cellebiosuis, Lactobacillus delbruesckii, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides ...

  13. Characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from indigenous dahi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diversity and density of lactic acid bacteria from indigenous dahi were studied by the determination of morphological, cultural, physiological and biochemical characteristics. A total of 143 isolates were identified phenotypically and divided into three genera: Lactobacillus, Lactococcus and Streptococcus.

  14. Efficacy of Lactic Acid, Lactic Acid-Acetic Acid Blends, and Peracetic Acid To Reduce Salmonella on Chicken Parts under Simulated Commercial Processing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirex-Hernandez, Alejandra; Brashears, Mindy M; Sanchez-Plata, Marcos X

    2018-01-01

    The poultry processing industry has been undergoing a series of changes as it modifies processing practices to comply with new performance standards for chicken parts and comminuted poultry products. The regulatory approach encourages the use of intervention strategies to prevent and control foodborne pathogens in poultry products and thus improve food safety and protect human health. The present studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of antimicrobial interventions for reducing Salmonella on inoculated chicken parts under simulated commercial processing conditions. Chicken pieces were inoculated by immersion in a five-strain Salmonella cocktail at 6 log CFU/mL and then treated with organic acids and oxidizing agents on a commercial rinsing conveyor belt. The efficacy of spraying with six different treatments (sterile water, lactic acid, acetic acid, buffered lactic acid, acetic acid in combination with lactic acid, and peracetic acid) at two concentrations was evaluated on skin-on and skin-off chicken thighs at three application temperatures. Skinless chicken breasts were used to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of lactic acid and peracetic acid. The color stability of treated and untreated chicken parts was assessed after the acid interventions. The lactic acid and buffered lactic acid treatments produced the greatest reductions in Salmonella counts. Significant differences between the control and water treatments were identified for 5.11% lactic acid and 5.85% buffered lactic acid in both skin-on and skin-off chicken thighs. No significant effect of treatment temperature for skin-on chicken thighs was found. Lactic acid and peracetic acid were effective agents for eluting Salmonella cells attached to chicken breasts.

  15. Antifungal Poly(lactic acid) Films Containing Thymol and Carvone

    OpenAIRE

    Boonruang Kanchana; Chinsirikul Wannee; Hararak Bongkot; Kerddonfag Noppadon; Chonhenchob Vanee

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop antifungal poly(lactic acid) films for food packaging applications. The antifungal compounds, thymol and R-(-)-carvone were incorporated into poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-based polymer at 10, 15 and 20% by weight. Film converting process consists of three steps including melt blending, sheet extrusion and biaxial stretching. The incorporation of antifungal compounds into the polymer matrix resulted in decreased Tg and Tm, increased gas permeabilility, reduced ...

  16. Materials and methods for efficient lactic acid production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shengde; Ingram, Lonnie O& #x27; Neal; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Yomano, Lorraine; Grabar, Tammy B; Moore, Jonathan C

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides derivatives of Escherichia coli constructed for the production of lactic acid. The transformed E. coli of the invention are prepared by deleting the genes that encode competing pathways followed by a growth-based selection for mutants with improved performance. These transformed E. coli are useful for providing an increased supply of lactic acid for use in food and industrial applications.

  17. Exploitation of vegetables and fruits through lactic acid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cagno, Raffaella; Coda, Rossana; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2013-02-01

    Lactic acid fermentation represents the easiest and the most suitable way for increasing the daily consumption of fresh-like vegetables and fruits. Literature data are accumulating, and this review aims at describing the main features of the lactic acid bacteria to be used for fermentation. Lactic acid bacteria are a small part of the autochthonous microbiota of vegetables and fruits. The diversity of the microbiota markedly depends on the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of the plant matrix. Notwithstanding the reliable value of the spontaneous fermentation to stabilize and preserve raw vegetables and fruits, a number of factors are in favour of using selected starters. Two main options may be pursued for the controlled lactic acid fermentation of vegetables and fruits: the use of commercial/allochthonous and the use of autochthonous starters. Several evidences were described in favour of the use of selected autochthonous starters, which are tailored for the specific plant matrix. Pro-technological, sensory and nutritional criteria for selecting starters were reported as well as several functional properties, which were recently ascribed to autochthonous lactic acid bacteria. The main features of the protocols used for the manufacture of traditional, emerging and innovative fermented vegetables and fruits were reviewed. Tailored lactic acid bacteria starters completely exploit the potential of vegetables and fruits, which enhances the hygiene, sensory, nutritional and shelf life properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The impact of lactic acid bacteria on sourdough fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Dragiša S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The baking of sourdough breads represents one of the oldest biotechnological processes. Despite traditionality, sourdough bread has great potential because of its benefits. Sourdough is a mixture of flour and water that is dominated by a complex microflora composed of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria that are crucial in the preparation of bread dough. Lactic acid bacteria cause acidification by producing lactic acid that increases the shelf life of bread by preventing the growth of undesirable microorganisms and affects the nutritional value of bread by increasing the availability of minerals. In addition to these advantages, the use of sourdough fermentation also improves dough machinability, breadcrumb structure and the characteristic flavour of bread. Lactic acid bacteria in sourdough fermentation are well known representing both homofermentative and heterofermentative bacteria. They may originate from selected natural contaminants in the flour or from a starter culture containing one or more known species of lactic acid bacteria. Sourdough can be cultivated in bakeries or obtained from commercial suppliers. However, many bakeries in Europe still use spontaneously fermented sourdoughs, which have been kept metabolically active for decades by the addition of flour and water at regular intervals. The impact of lactic acid bacteria on sourdough fermentation and their influence on dough and bread quality was discussed on the basis of research and literature data.

  19. Heat capacity of poly(lactic acid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyda, M.; Bopp, R.C.; Wunderlich, B.

    2004-01-01

    The heat capacity of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is reported from T=(5 to 600) K as obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (d.s.c.) and adiabatic calorimetry. The heat capacity of solid PLA is linked to its group vibrational spectrum and the skeletal vibrations, the latter being described by a Tarasov equation with Θ 1 =574 K, Θ 2 =Θ 3 =52 K, and nine skeletal vibrations. The calculated and experimental heat capacities agree to ±3% between T=(5 and 300) K. The experimental heat capacity of liquid PLA can be expressed by C p (liquid)=(120.17+0.076T) J · K -1 · mol -1 and has been compared to the ATHAS Data Bank, using contributions of other polymers with the same constituent groups. The glass transition temperature of amorphous PLA occurs at T=332.5 K with a change in heat capacity of 43.8 J · K -1 · mol -1 . Depending on thermal history, semi-crystalline PLA has a melting endotherm between T=(418 and 432) K with variable heats of fusion. For 100% crystalline PLA, the heat of fusion is estimated to be (6.55 ± 0.02) kJ · mol -1 at T=480 K. With these results, the enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs function of crystalline and amorphous PLA were obtained. For semi-crystalline samples, one can check changes of crystallinity with temperature and judge the presence of rigid-amorphous fractions

  20. Antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulajić Snežana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on the antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria is still limited, possibly because of the large numbers of genera and species encountered in this group, as well as variances in their resistance spectra. The EFSA considers antibiotic resistances, especially transferable resistances, an important decision criterion for determining a strain's QPS status. There are no approved standards for the phenotypic or genotypic evaluation of antibiotic resistances in food isolates. Also, the choice of media is problematic, as well as the specification of MIC breakpoint values as a result of the large species variation and the possible resulting variation in MIC values between species and genera. The current investigations in this field showed that we might end up with a range of different species- or genus-specific breakpoint values that may further increase the current complexity. Another problem associated with safety determinations of starter strains is that once a resistance phenotype and an associated resistance determinant have been identified, it becomes difficult to show that this determinant is not transferable, especially if the resistance gene is not located on a plasmid and no standard protocols for showing genetic transfer are available. Encountering those problems, the QPS system should allow leeway for the interpretations of results, especially when these relate to the methodology for resistance phenotype determinations, determinations of MIC breakpoints for certain genera, species, or strains, the nondeterminability of a genetic basis of a resistance phenotype and the transferability of resistance genes.

  1. Zinc Binding by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Mrvčić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is an essential trace element in all organisms. A common method for the prevention of zinc deficiency is pharmacological supplementation, especially in a highly available form of a metalloprotein complex. The potential of different microbes to bind essential and toxic heavy metals has recently been recognized. In this work, biosorption of zinc by lactic acid bacteria (LAB has been investigated. Specific LAB were assessed for their ability to bind zinc from a water solution. Significant amount of zinc ions was bound, and this binding was found to be LAB species-specific. Differences among the species in binding performance at a concentration range between 10–90 mg/L were evaluated with Langmuir model for biosorption. Binding of zinc was a fast process, strongly influenced by ionic strength, pH, biomass concentration, and temperature. The most effective metal-binding LAB species was Leuconostoc mesenteroides (27.10 mg of Zn2+ per gram of dry mass bound at pH=5 and 32 °C, during 24 h. FT-IR spectroscopy analysis and electron microscopy demonstrated that passive adsorption and active uptake of the zinc ions were involved.

  2. Metabolite Profiles of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Grass Silage▿

    OpenAIRE

    Broberg, Anders; Jacobsson, Karin; Ström, Katrin; Schnürer, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The metabolite production of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on silage was investigated. The aim was to compare the production of antifungal metabolites in silage with the production in liquid cultures previously studied in our laboratory. The following metabolites were found to be present at elevated concentrations in silos inoculated with LAB strains: 3-hydroxydecanoic acid, 2-hydroxy-4-methylpentanoic acid, benzoic acid, catechol, hydrocinnamic acid, salicylic acid, 3-phenyllactic acid, 4-hydro...

  3. Longitudinal acoustic properties of poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, N G; Povey, M J W; Mather, M L; Morgan, S P

    2010-01-01

    Acoustics offers rich possibilities for characterizing and monitoring the biopolymer structures being employed in the field of biomedical engineering. Here we explore the rudimentary acoustic properties of two common biodegradable polymers: poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid). A pulse-echo technique is developed to reveal the bulk speed of sound, acoustic impedance and acoustic attenuation of small samples of the polymer across a pertinent temperature range of 0-70 0 C. The glass transition appears markedly as both a discontinuity in the first derivative of the speed of sound and a sharp increase in the acoustic attenuation. We further extend our analysis to consider the role of ethanol, whose presence is observed to dramatically modify the acoustic properties and reduce the glass transition temperature of the polymers. Our results highlight the sensitivity of acoustic properties to a range of bulk properties, including visco-elasticity, molecular weight, co-polymer ratio, crystallinity and the presence of plasticizers.

  4. Engineering strategies aimed at control of acidification rate of lactic acid bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Solem, Christian; Holm, Anders Koefoed

    2013-01-01

    The ability of lactic acid bacteria to produce lactic acid from various sugars plays an important role in food fermentations. Lactic acid is derived from pyruvate, the end product of glycolysis and thus a fast lactic acid production rate requires a high glycolytic flux. In addition to lactic acid......, alternative end products - ethanol, acetic acid and formic acid - are formed by many species. The central role of glycolysis in lactic acid bacteria has provoked numerous studies aiming at identifying potential bottleneck(s) since knowledge about flux control could be important not only for optimizing food...

  5. Genetics of the proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan

    1990-01-01

    The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria is of eminent importance for the rapid growth of these organisms in protein-rich media. The combined action of proteinases and peptidases provides the cell with small peptides and essential amino acids. The amino acids and peptides thus liberated have

  6. Microbial granulation for lactic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Mo-Kwon; Hwang, Yuhoon; Im, Wan-Taek; Yun, Yeo-Myeong; Park, Chul; Kim, Mi-Sun

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the formation of microbial granules to boost the productivity of lactic acid (LA). The flocculated form of LA-producing microbial consortium, dominated by Lactobacillus sp. (91.5% of total sequence), was initially obtained in a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR), which was fed with 2% glucose and operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 12 h and pH 5.0 ± 0.1 under a thermophilic condition (50°C). The mixed liquor in the CSTR was then transferred to an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASB). The fermentation performance and granulation process were monitored with a gradual decrease of HRT from 8.0 to 0.17 h, corresponding to an increase in the substrate loading from 60 to 2,880 g glucose L(-1) d(-1) . As the operation continued, the accumulation of biomass in the UASB was clearly observed, which changed from flocculent to granular form with decrease in HRT. Up to the HRT decrease to 0.5 h, the LA concentration was maintained at 19-20 g L(-1) with over 90% of substrate removal efficiency. However, further decrease of HRT resulted in a decrease of LA concentration with increase in residual glucose. Nevertheless, the volumetric LA productivity continuously increased, reaching 67 g L-fermenter (-1) h(-1) at HRT 0.17 h. The size of LA-producing granules and hydrophobicity gradually increased with decrease in HRT, reaching 6.0 mm and 60%, respectively. These biogranules were also found to have high settling velocities and low porosities, ranging 2.69-4.73 cm s(-1) and 0.39-0.92, respectively. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Stress Physiology of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Alegría, Ángel; Bron, Peter A.; de Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Lemos, José A.; Linares, Daniel M.; Ross, Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Varmanen, Pekka; Ventura, Marco; Zúñiga, Manuel; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are important starter, commensal, or pathogenic microorganisms. The stress physiology of LAB has been studied in depth for over 2 decades, fueled mostly by the technological implications of LAB robustness in the food industry. Survival of probiotic LAB in the host and the potential relatedness of LAB virulence to their stress resilience have intensified interest in the field. Thus, a wealth of information concerning stress responses exists today for strains as diverse as starter (e.g., Lactococcus lactis), probiotic (e.g., several Lactobacillus spp.), and pathogenic (e.g., Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp.) LAB. Here we present the state of the art for LAB stress behavior. We describe the multitude of stresses that LAB are confronted with, and we present the experimental context used to study the stress responses of LAB, focusing on adaptation, habituation, and cross-protection as well as on self-induced multistress resistance in stationary phase, biofilms, and dormancy. We also consider stress responses at the population and single-cell levels. Subsequently, we concentrate on the stress defense mechanisms that have been reported to date, grouping them according to their direct participation in preserving cell energy, defending macromolecules, and protecting the cell envelope. Stress-induced responses of probiotic LAB and commensal/pathogenic LAB are highlighted separately due to the complexity of the peculiar multistress conditions to which these bacteria are subjected in their hosts. Induction of prophages under environmental stresses is then discussed. Finally, we present systems-based strategies to characterize the “stressome” of LAB and to engineer new food-related and probiotic LAB with improved stress tolerance. PMID:27466284

  8. Decomposition and detoxification of aflatoxin B1 by lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiko, Visenuo; Edamana, Prasad; Mehta, Alka

    2016-04-01

    A degradation study of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) was carried out using a combination of physical and chemical methods. AFB1 was heated at 80 °C in the presence of acetic, citric and lactic acids for various time periods. The cytotoxicity of the degraded AFB1 and its products were determined by MTT assay. The results showed that among the three organic acids lactic acid was most efficient in degrading AFB1. Although complete degradation was not observed, up to 85% degradation of AFB1 was obtained when heated for 120 min. Degradation of AFB1 was confirmed by the reduced toxicity on HeLa cells using MTT assay. Treatment with lactic acid resulted in the conversion of AFB1 into two degradation products. These products were observed at lower retention factors of 0.63 and 0.38, which were identified as AFB2 and AFB2a, respectively. The cytotoxicity of AFB2a exhibited much reduced toxicity on HeLa cells compared to that of AFB1. The results have shown the efficiency of lactic acid in degrading AFB1. This study suggest that lactic acid may be considered for use in the food and feed industry since it is present naturally in food and is considered safe. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Compatible solutes in lactic acid bacteria subjected to water stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, E.P.W.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the research project described in this thesis was to investigate the protective effect of compatible solutes on tactic acid bacteria subjected to drying. Dried preparations of lactic acid bacteria are applied as starter cultures in feed and food industries. Dried starter

  10. Lactic Acid Bacterial Vaginosis among Outpatients in Addis Ababa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a polymicrobial syndrome in which a decrease in vaginal acidity and concentration of lactobacilli is accompanied by an increase of other pathogenic micro-organisms. The distribution of lactic acid bacteria in vaginal environment of Ethiopian women has not been documented.

  11. Selection of local extremophile lactic acid bacteria with high capacity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is related to the isolation and identification of strains of local thermophilic lactic acid bacteria belonging to the species, Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus. These bacteria can exist under extreme conditions of the digestive tract (acidity and high concentration of bile salts) and have a high ...

  12. Optimization of lactic acid production with immobilized Rhizopus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sule

    2012-04-26

    Apr 26, 2012 ... Lactic acid is the most widely utilized organic acid in the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetics and chemical industries. One of its most promising applications is for used biodegradable and ... polymer supports, by embedding with natural polymers like alginate gels and synthetic polymers (Tamada et al.,. 1992).

  13. Lactic acid fermentation of cassava dough into agbelima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoa-Awua, W K; Appoh, F E; Jakobsen, M

    1996-08-01

    The souring of cassava dough during fermentation into the fermented cassava meal, agbelima, was investigated. Four different types of traditional inocula were used to ferment the dough and increases in titrable acidity expressed as lactic acid from 0.31-0.38 to 0.78-0.91% (w/w) confirmed the fermentation to be a process of acidification. The microflora of all inocula and fermenting dough contained high counts of lactic acid bacteria, 10(8)-10(9) cfu/g in all inocula and 10(7)-10(8), 10(8)-10(9) and 10(9) cfu/g at 0, 24 and 48 h in all fermentations. Lactobacillus plantarum was the dominant species of lactic acid bacteria during all types of fermentation accounting for 51% of 171 representative isolates taken from various stages of fermentation. Other major lactic acid bacteria found were Lactobacillus brevis, 16%, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 15% and some cocci including Streptococcus spp. whose numbers decreased with fermentation time. The lactic acid bacteria were responsible for the souring of agbelima through the production of lactic acid. All L. plantarum, L. brevis and L. mesenteroides isolates examined demonstrated linamarase as well as other enzymatic activities but did not possess tissue degrading enzymes like cellulase, pectin esterase and polygalacturonase. The aroma profile of agbelima did not vary with the type of inoculum used and in all samples the build-up of aroma compounds were dominated by a non-identified low molecular weight alcohol, 1-propanol, isoamyl alcohol, ethyl acetate, 3-methyl-1-butanol and acetoin. Substantial reductions occurred in the levels of cyanogenic compounds present in cassava during fermentation into agbelima and detoxification was enhanced by the use of inoculum.

  14. Development of Poly (Lactic Acid) Nanocomposite Films by Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadbin, Susan; Naimian, Faranak; Akhavan, Azam; Hasanpoor, Sorour [Radiation Application Research School, Nuclear Science and Research Institute, North Kargar Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    Poly (lactic acid) and poly (lactic acid) -montmorillonite (MMT) nanocomposite films have been prepared by solvent casting method. Films were irradiated with 60Co radiation facility at various doses in the range of 5 to30 kGy. The effect of gamma irradiation on mechanical properties of neat PLA and nanocomposites is evaluated by the data obtained from tensile testing measurements. The degree of crosslinking is measured by gel content method. Thermal behavior of nanocomposites is studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA). The morphology of the nanocomposites is characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X ray diffraction. Structural changes in poly (lactic acid) are studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). (author)

  15. Development of Poly (Lactic Acid) Nanocomposite Films by Ionizing Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadbin, Susan; Naimian, Faranak; Akhavan, Azam; Hasanpoor, Sorour

    2009-01-01

    Poly (lactic acid) and poly (lactic acid) -montmorillonite (MMT) nanocomposite films have been prepared by solvent casting method. Films were irradiated with 60Co radiation facility at various doses in the range of 5 to30 kGy. The effect of gamma irradiation on mechanical properties of neat PLA and nanocomposites is evaluated by the data obtained from tensile testing measurements. The degree of crosslinking is measured by gel content method. Thermal behavior of nanocomposites is studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetry analysis (TGA). The morphology of the nanocomposites is characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X ray diffraction. Structural changes in poly (lactic acid) are studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). (author)

  16. Nucleotide Metabolism and its Control in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    Most metabolic reactions are connected through either their utilization of nucleotides or their utilization of nucleotides or their regulation by these metabolites. In this review the biosynthetic pathways for pyrimidine and purine metabolism in lactic acid bacteria are described including...... the interconversion pathways, the formation of deoxyribonucleotides and the salvage pathways for use of exogenous precursors. The data for the enzymatic and the genetic regulation of these pathways are reviewed, as well as the gene organizations in different lactic acid bacteria. Mutant phenotypes and methods...... for manipulation of nucleotide pools are also discussed. Our aim is to provide an overview of the physiology and genetics of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation that will facilitate the interpretation of data arising from genetics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in lactic acid bacteria....

  17. Production of L-lactic Acid from Biomass Wastes Using Scallop Crude Enzymes and Novel Lactic Acid Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Mitsunori; Nakamura, Kanami; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko

    In the present study, biomass waste raw materials including paper mill sludge, bamboo, sea lettuce, and shochu residue (from a distiller) and crude enzymes derived from inedible and discarded scallop parts were used to produce L-lactic acid for the raw material of biodegradable plastic poly-lactic acid. The activities of cellulase and amylase in the crude enzymes were 22 and 170units/L, respectively, and L-lactic acid was produced from every of the above mentioned biomass wastes, by the method of liquid-state simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) . The L-lactic acid concentrations produced from sea lettuce and shochu residue, which contain high concentration of starch were 3.6 and 9.3g/L, respectively, and corresponded to greater than 25% of the conversion of glucans contained in these biomass wastes. Furthermore, using the solid state SSF method, concentrations as high as 13g/L of L-lactic acid were obtained from sea lettuce and 26g/L were obtained from shochu residue.

  18. Lactic Acid and Biosurfactants Production from Residual Cellulose Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portilla Rivera, Oscar Manuel; Arzate Martínez, Guillermo; Jarquín Enríquez, Lorenzo; Vázquez Landaverde, Pedro Alberto; Domínguez González, José Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The increasing amounts of residual cellulose films generated as wastes all over the world represent a big scale problem for the meat industry regarding to environmental and economic issues. The use of residual cellulose films as a feedstock of glucose-containing solutions by acid hydrolysis and further fermentation into lactic acid and biosurfactants was evaluated as a method to diminish and revalorize these wastes. Under a treatment consisting in sulfuric acid 6% (v/v); reaction time 2 h; solid liquid ratio 9 g of film/100 mL of acid solution, and temperature 130 °C, 35 g/L of glucose and 49% of solubilized film was obtained. From five lactic acid strains, Lactobacillus plantarum was the most suitable for metabolizing the glucose generated. The process was scaled up under optimized conditions in a 2-L bioreactor, producing 3.4 g/L of biomass, 18 g/L of lactic acid, and 15 units of surface tension reduction of a buffer phosphate solution. Around 50% of the cellulose was degraded by the treatment applied, and the liqueurs generated were useful for an efficient production of lactic acid and biosurfactants using L. plantarum. Lactobacillus bacteria can efficiently utilize glucose from cellulose films hydrolysis without the need of clarification of the liqueurs.

  19. Lactose behaviour in the presence of lactic acid and calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayasinghe, Rangani; Vasiljevic, Todor; Chandrapala, Jayani

    2016-08-01

    Physical properties of lactose appeared influenced by presence of lactic acid in the system. Some other components such as Ca may further attenuate lactose behaviour and impact its phase transition. A model-based study was thus implemented with varying concentrations of Ca (0·12, 0·072 or 0·035% w/w) and lactic acid (0·05, 0·2, 0·4 or 1% w/w) in establishing the effects of these two main acid whey constituents on lactose phase behaviour. Concentrated solutions (50% w/w) containing lactose, lactic acid and Ca were analysed for thermal behaviour and structural changes by Differential Scanning Colorimetry (DSC) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), respectively. Presence of 1% (w/w) lactic acid and 0·12% (w/w) Ca in lactose solution significantly increased the evaporation enthalpy of water, delayed and increased the energy required for lactose crystallisation as compared to pure lactose. FTIR analysis indicated a strong hydration layer surrounding lactose molecules, restricting water mobility and/or inducing structural changes of lactose, hindering its crystallisation. The formation of calcium lactate, which restricts the diffusion of lactose molecules, is also partly responsible. It appears that Ca removal from acid whey may be a necessary step in improving the processability of acid whey.

  20. 40 CFR 180.1090 - Lactic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lactic acid; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1090 Lactic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Lactic acid (2-hydroxypropanoic acid) is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance when used as a plant growth...

  1. Lactic acid bacteria and the human gastrointestinal tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, H; Nørgaard, H; Mortensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This review summarises the effects of lactic acid bacteria on lactose malabsorption, bacterial/viral or antibiotic associated diarrhoea, and describes the impact of lactic acid bacteria on cancer and the fermentative products in the colon. RESULTS: Eight studies (including 78 patients......) demonstrated that lactase deficient subjects absorbed lactose in yogurt better than lactose in milk, while two studies (25 patients) did not support this. Two studies (22 patients) showed that unfermented acidophilus milk was absorbed better than milk, while six studies (68 patients) found no significant...

  2. Antifungal Poly(lactic acid Films Containing Thymol and Carvone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boonruang Kanchana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop antifungal poly(lactic acid films for food packaging applications. The antifungal compounds, thymol and R-(--carvone were incorporated into poly(lactic acid (PLA-based polymer at 10, 15 and 20% by weight. Film converting process consists of three steps including melt blending, sheet extrusion and biaxial stretching. The incorporation of antifungal compounds into the polymer matrix resulted in decreased Tg and Tm, increased gas permeabilility, reduced tensile strength and increased elongation at break of the antifungal PLA films.

  3. Neuropathic Pain Following Poly-L-Lactic Acid (Sculptra) Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrcek, Ivan; El-Sawy, Tarek; Chou, Eva; Allen, Theresa; Nakra, Tanuj

    Injectable fillers have become a prevalent means of facial rejuvenation and volume expansion. While typically well tolerated, serious complications have been reported. The authors present a case in which an otherwise healthy female with a history of multiple filler injections including poly-L-lactic acid, developed 3 weeks of neuropathic pain in the left temporal fossa following injection. To the best of the authors knowledge, neuropathic pain has not been reported as a complication following poly-L-lactic acid injection. The patient was treated with an injection of steroid and long-acting anesthetic with resolution of symptoms.

  4. ASIC3: A Lactic Acid Sensor for Cardiac Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.C. Immke

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Angina, the prototypic vasoocclusive pain, is a radiating chest pain that occurs when heart muscle gets insufficient blood because of coronary artery disease. Other examples of vasoocclusive pain include the acute pain of heart attack and the intermittent pains that accompany sickle cell anemia and peripheral artery disease. All these conditions cause ischemia � insufficient oxygen delivery for local metabolic demand — and this releases lactic acid as cells switch to anaerobic metabolism. Recent discoveries demonstrate that sensory neurons innervating the heart are richly endowed with an ion channel that is opened by, and perfectly tuned for, the lactic acid released by muscle ischemia[1,2].

  5. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria ? the fledgling cuckoos of the gut?

    OpenAIRE

    Berstad, Arnold; Raa, Jan; Midtvedt, Tore; Valeur, J?rgen

    2016-01-01

    It is tempting to look at bacteria from our human egocentric point of view and label them as either ‘good’ or ‘bad’. However, a microbial society has its own system of government – ‘microcracy’ – and its own rules of play. Lactic acid bacteria are often referred to as representatives of the good ones, and there is little doubt that those belonging to the normal intestinal flora are beneficial for human health. But we should stop thinking of lactic acid bacteria as always being ‘friendly’ – th...

  6. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria - the fledgling cuckoos of the gut?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstad, Arnold; Raa, Jan; Midtvedt, Tore; Valeur, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    It is tempting to look at bacteria from our human egocentric point of view and label them as either 'good' or 'bad'. However, a microbial society has its own system of government - 'microcracy' - and its own rules of play. Lactic acid bacteria are often referred to as representatives of the good ones, and there is little doubt that those belonging to the normal intestinal flora are beneficial for human health. But we should stop thinking of lactic acid bacteria as always being 'friendly' - they may instead behave like fledgling cuckoos.

  7. Preparation of lactic acid bacteria fermented wheat-yoghurt mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magala, Michal; Kohajdová, Zlatica; Karovičová, Jolana

    2013-01-01

    Tarhana, a wheat-yoghurt fermented mixture, is considered as a good source of saccharides, proteins, some vitamins and minerals. Moreover, their preparation is inexpensive and lactic acid fermentation offers benefits like product preservation, enhancement of nutritive value and sensory properties improvement. The aim of this work was to evaluate changes of some chemical parameters during fermentation of tarhana, when the level of salt and amount of yoghurt used were varied. Some functional and sensory characteristics of the fi nal product were also determined. Chemical analysis included determination of pH, titrable acidity, content of reducing saccharides, lactic, acetic and citric acid. Measured functional properties of tarhana powder were foaming capacity, foam stability, water absorption capacity, oil absorption capacity and emulsifying activity. Tarhana soups samples were evaluated for their sensory characteristics (colour, odor, taste, consistency and overall acceptability). Fermentation of tarhana by lactic acid bacteria and yeasts led to decrease in pH, content of reducing saccharides and citric acid, while titrable acidity and concentration of lactic and acetic acid increased. Determination of functional properties of tarhana powder showed, that salt absence and increased amount of yoghurt in tarhana recipe reduced foaming capacity and oil absorption capacity, whereas foam stability and water absorption capacity were improved. Sensory evaluation of tarhana soups showed that variations in tarhana recipe adversly affected sensory parameters of fi nal products. Variations in tarhana recipe (salt absence, increased proportion of yoghurt) led to changes in some chemical parameters (pH, titrable acidity, reducing saccharides, content of lactic, acetic and citric acid). Functional properties were also affected with changed tarhana recipe. Sensory characteristics determination showed, that standard tarhana fermented for 144 h had the highest overall acceptability.

  8. Influence of sodium chloride, pH, and lactic acid bacteria on anaerobic lactic acid utilization during fermented cucumber spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D; Franco, Wendy; Perez-Diaz, Ilenys; McFeeters, Roger F

    2012-07-01

    Cucumbers are preserved commercially by natural fermentations in 5% to 8% sodium chloride (NaCl) brines. Occasionally, fermented cucumbers spoil after the primary fermentation is complete. This spoilage has been characterized by decreases in lactic acid and a rise in brine pH caused by microbial instability. Objectives of this study were to determine the combined effects of NaCl and pH on fermented cucumber spoilage and to determine the ability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) spoilage isolates to initiate lactic acid degradation in fermented cucumbers. Cucumbers fermented with 0%, 2%, 4%, and 6% NaCl were blended into slurries (FCS) and adjusted to pH 3.2, 3.8, 4.3, and 5.0 prior to centrifugation, sterile-filtration, and inoculation with spoilage organisms. Organic acids and pH were measured initially and after 3 wk, 2, 6, 12, and 18 mo anaerobic incubation at 25 °C. Anaerobic lactic acid degradation occurred in FCS at pH 3.8, 4.3, and 5.0 regardless of NaCl concentration. At pH 3.2, reduced NaCl concentrations resulted in increased susceptibility to spoilage, indicating that the pH limit for lactic acid utilization in reduced NaCl fermented cucumbers is 3.2 or lower. Over 18 mo incubation, only cucumbers fermented with 6% NaCl to pH 3.2 prevented anaerobic lactic acid degradation by spoilage bacteria. Among several LAB species isolated from fermented cucumber spoilage, Lactobacillus buchneri was unique in its ability to metabolize lactic acid in FCS with concurrent increases in acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol. Therefore, L. buchneri may be one of multiple organisms that contribute to development of fermented cucumber spoilage. Microbial spoilage of fermented cucumbers during bulk storage causes economic losses for producers. Current knowledge is insufficient to predict or control these losses. This study demonstrated that in the absence of oxygen, cucumbers fermented with 6% sodium chloride to pH 3.2 were not subject to spoilage. However, lactic acid was degraded

  9. 49-60 Characterization of Lactic Acid Bacteria from Camel Milk and the

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reviwer

    bacteria in the food industry is the lactic acid bacteria. (LAB) which are used ... Weinberg et al., 2007) as well as for their preservative ... Food and Drug Administration FDA (2003). In the ... lactic acid bacteria species were characterized as fast.

  10. Potential of lactic acid bacteria as suppressors of wine allergies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yıldırım Hatice Kalkan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergens causes some symptoms as all asthma, allergic conjunctivitis, and allergic rhinitis. These symptoms are seen twice as many in women than in men. The major wine allergens reported in wines are endochitinase 4A and lipid-transfer protein (LTP. This review deal with possibilities of using lactic acid bacteria as suppressors of wine allergies. Phenolic compounds present in wines have not only antioxidant properties causing radical scavenging but also some special properties reported in many in vitro studies as regulating functions in inflammatory cells as mast cells. So what is the role of lactic acid bacteria in these cases? Lactic acid bacteria are used during malolactic fermentation step of wine production with purpose of malic acid reduction. During this bioconversion complex phenolic compounds could be hydrolysed by bacterial enzymes to their aglycone forms. Obtained aglycons could pass through the intestinal epithelium of human and allowed reduction of IgE antibody production by affecting Th1/ Th2 ratio. Considering different contents and quantities of phenols in different grape varieties and consequently in different wines more studies are required in order to determine which lactic acid bacteria and strains could be effective in suppressing wine allergens.

  11. Effects of lactic acid on astrocytes in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norenberg, M D; Mozes, L W; Gregorios, J B; Norenberg, L O

    1987-03-01

    Excessive tissue lactic acidosis is considered to be detrimental to the central nervous system (CNS) and may adversely affect recovery from anoxia, ischemia, trauma and epilepsy. Since astrocytes are believed to play a role in pH regulation in the CNS, we studied the effect of this acid on primary astrocyte cultures. Cells exposed to lactic acid showed chromatin clumping, an increase of lipid and dense bodies, a loss of polyribosomal clusters, slightly increased cytoplasmic lucency, swollen mitochondria and tangled intermediate filaments. These alterations progressed with lower pH and longer exposure. Irreversible changes occurred one to two hours after exposure at pH 6; after 30 to 60 minutes (min) at pH 5.5 and after ten to 30 min at pH 5. Comparable results were obtained with the use of other weak acids indicating that the observed changes were due to increased hydrogen ion concentration rather than secondary to lactate per se. Additionally, various concentrations of lactic acid adjusted to identical pH produced similar morphologic alterations. Thus, while lactic acid caused marked and at times irreversible alterations in astrocytes, severe and prolonged acidosis was required to produce such injurious effects. This relative resistance of astrocytes to acidosis is in keeping with their potential role in pH regulation in brain.

  12. The production of lactic acid on liquid distillery stillage by Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469

    OpenAIRE

    Đukić-Vuković, Aleksandra; Mojović, Ljiljana; Pejin, Dušanka; Vukašinović-Sekulić, Maja; Rakin, Marica; Nikolić, Svetlana; Pejin, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    The production of lactic acid on a liquid distillery stillage remaining after the bioethanol production on a mixture of waste bread and waste water from the production of wheat gluten was studied in this work. The lactic acid fermentation was performed with a probiotic lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469. During the fermentation, parameters such as the concentration of lactic acid (according to Taylor method), the concentration of reducing sugars (spectrophotometric method ...

  13. Antagonism Between Osmophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria and Yeasts in Brine Fermentation of Soy Sauce

    OpenAIRE

    Noda, Fumio; Hayashi, Kazuya; Mizunuma, Takeji

    1980-01-01

    Brine fermentation by osmophilic lactic acid bacteria and yeasts for long periods of time is essential to produce a good quality of shoyu (Japanese fermented soy sauce). It is well known that lactic acid fermentation by osmophilic lactic acid bacteria results in the depression of alcoholic fermentation by osmophilic yeasts, but the nature of the interaction between osmophilic lactic acid bacteria and yeasts in brine fermentation of shoyu has not been revealed. The inhibitory effect of osmophi...

  14. Lactic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without PDC or ADH deletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production of lactic acid from renewable sugars has received growing attention as lactic acid can be used for making renewable and bio-based plastics. However, most prior studies have focused on production of lactic acid from glucose despite cellulosic hydrolysates contain xylose as well as glucose....

  15. Lactic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without PDC or ADH deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Timothy L; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Kim, Soo Rin; Subramaniam, Vijay; Steffen, David; Skory, Christopher D; Jang, Ji Yeon; Yu, Byung Jo; Jin, Yong-Su

    2015-10-01

    Production of lactic acid from renewable sugars has received growing attention as lactic acid can be used for making renewable and bio-based plastics. However, most prior studies have focused on production of lactic acid from glucose despite that cellulosic hydrolysates contain xylose as well as glucose. Microbial strains capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose into lactic acid are needed for sustainable and economic lactic acid production. In this study, we introduced a lactic acid-producing pathway into an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting xylose. Specifically, ldhA from the fungi Rhizopus oryzae was overexpressed under the control of the PGK1 promoter through integration of the expression cassette in the chromosome. The resulting strain exhibited a high lactate dehydrogenase activity and produced lactic acid from glucose or xylose. Interestingly, we observed that the engineered strain exhibited substrate-dependent product formation. When the engineered yeast was cultured on glucose, the major fermentation product was ethanol while lactic acid was a minor product. In contrast, the engineered yeast produced lactic acid almost exclusively when cultured on xylose under oxygen-limited conditions. The yields of ethanol and lactic acid from glucose were 0.31 g ethanol/g glucose and 0.22 g lactic acid/g glucose, respectively. On xylose, the yields of ethanol and lactic acid were substrates.

  16. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.peter@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Rehli, Michael, E-mail: michael.rehli@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Singer, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.singer@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Renner-Sattler, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.renner-sattler@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Kreutz, Marina, E-mail: marina.kreutz@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  17. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, Katrin; Rehli, Michael; Singer, Katrin; Renner-Sattler, Kathrin; Kreutz, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors

  18. Isolation and screening of lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In aquaculture probiotic feeding could play a crucial role in developing microbial control strategies, since disease outbreaks are recognized as important constraints to aquaculture production and the fear of antibiotic resistance. In this study, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains from the intestinal tissue of African catfish Clarias ...

  19. Systems solutions by lactic acid bacteria: from paradigms to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, de W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are among the powerhouses of the food industry, colonize the surfaces of plants and animals, and contribute to our health and well-being. The genomic characterization of LAB has rocketed and presently over 100 complete or nearly complete genomes are available, many of which

  20. Thermal properties of poly (lactic acid)/milkweed composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currently, most polymer composites utilize petroleum-based materials that are non-degradable and difficult to recycle or incur substantial cost for disposal. Green composites can be used in nondurable limited applications. In order to determine the degree of compatibility between Poly (lactic Acid...

  1. Lactic Acid Bacteria Differentially Activate Natural Killer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    antigen presenting cells and T-cells. Bacteria translocating across the gastrointestinal mucosa are presumed to gain access to NK cell compartments, as consumption of certain strains of lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxic activity. On-going research in our lab aims...

  2. Identification of exopolysaccharides-producing lactic acid bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spacer region between 16S and 23 S rRNA genes of thirteen lactic acid bacteria strains from Burkina Faso fermented milk samples were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus fermentum, Streptococcus thermophilus, Pediococcus spp, ...

  3. Heme and menaquinone induced electron transport in lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Filipe

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For some lactic acid bacteria higher biomass production as a result of aerobic respiration has been reported upon supplementation with heme and menaquinone. In this report, we have studied a large number of species among lactic acid bacteria for the existence of this trait. Results Heme- (and menaquinone stimulated aerobic growth was observed for several species and genera of lactic acid bacteria. These include Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacilllus brevis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, Streptococcus entericus and Lactococcus garviae. The increased biomass production without further acidification, which are respiration associated traits, are suitable for high-throughput screening as demonstrated by the screening of 8000 Lactococcus lactis insertion mutants. Respiration-negative insertion-mutants were found with noxA, bd-type cytochrome and menaquinol biosynthesis gene-disruptions. Phenotypic screening and in silico genome analysis suggest that respiration can be considered characteristic for certain species. Conclusion We propose that the cyd-genes were present in the common ancestor of lactic acid bacteria, and that multiple gene-loss events best explains the observed distribution of these genes among the species.

  4. Synthesis of copolymer from lactic acid-polyethylene terephthalate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bio-plastic has been a need of the hour for the past few decades and the usage of lactic acid (LA) in the production of bio plastic opens a new ... of the environment and also helping in the production of bio-degradable plastics in the run.

  5. Lactic acid bacteria in a changing legislative environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feord, J.

    2002-01-01

    The benefits of using lactic acid bacteria in the food chain, both through direct consumption and production of ingredients, are increasingly recognised by the food industry and consumers alike. The regulatory environment surrounding these products is diverse, covering foods and food ingredients,

  6. Evaluation of the probiotic potential of lactic acid bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The probiotic-related characteristics of 55 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from the faeces of 3 - 6 months old breast-fed infants were determined. The API 50 CH and SDS-PAGE techniques were employed to ascertain the identity of the isolated strains. The predominant species among the isolated strains were ...

  7. GAS PERMEATION PROPERTIES OF POLY(LACTIC ACID). (R826733)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractThe need for the development of polymeric materials based on renewable resources has led to the development of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) which is being produced from a feedstock of corn rather than petroleum. The present study examines the permeation of nitrogen...

  8. Integrated production of lactic acid and biomass on distillery stillage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić-Vuković, Aleksandra P; Mojović, Ljiljana V; Vukašinović-Sekulić, Maja S; Nikolić, Svetlana B; Pejin, Jelena D

    2013-09-01

    The possibilities of parallel lactic acid and biomass production in batch and fed-batch fermentation on distillery stillage from bioethanol production were studied. The highest lactic acid yield and productivity of 92.3 % and 1.49 g L(-1) h(-1) were achieved in batch fermentation with initial sugar concentration of 55 g L(-1). A significant improvement of the process was achieved in fed-batch fermentation where the concentration of lactic acid was increased to 47.6 % and volumetric productivity for 21 % over the batch process. A high number of Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 viable cells of 10(9) CFU ml(-1) was attained at the end of fed-batch fermentation. The survival of 92.9 % of L. rhamnosus cells after 3 h of incubation at pH 2.5 validated that the fermentation media remained after lactic acid removal could be used as a biomass-enriched animal feed thus making an additional value to the process.

  9. Effects of supplementing lactic acid bacteria on fecal microbiota ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The results indicated that Lactobacillus plantarum strain L.p X3-2B increased fecal lactic acid bacteria(LAB) and Bifidobacterium while resisting the growth of harmful bacteria. Viable counts of LAB and Bifidobacterium reached 8 log cfu/mL after feeding for 14 days. Fecal pH in the control group was high in ...

  10. DRY COMPOSITION OF STARTER CULTURES FORM LACTIC ACID MICROORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    At. Kraevska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to investigate the possibility of producing of lyophilized lactic acid starter Lb. plantarum strain 226/1, designed for a starter culture in the production of pickles. The results of our studies demonstrate achievement of this goal by the specified process parameters.

  11. original article antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of lactic acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Abstract. Currently, the efficacies of antimicrobials have been threatened due to the development of resistance to antibiotics by some microorganisms. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from fermented products, may act as reservoir of antimicrobial resistance-genes that could be transferred to pathogens, either in the food matrix or ...

  12. Antibacterial Activity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), namely, Lactobacillus acidophilus 1, Lactobacillus acidophilus 2, Lactobacillus brevis 1, Lactobacillus rhamnosus 1, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 1, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis 2, Lactococcus raffinolactis 1, Pediococcus acidilactici 1, Pediococcus pentosaceus 1, and Pediococcus ...

  13. Differentiation studies of predominant lactic acid bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twelve isolates known as weakly amylolytic lactic acid bacteria were isolated from different time during growol fermentation, a cassava based product from Indonesia. Differentiation tests of these strains were performed using molecular and phenotypic characterization. 16S subunit of the ribosomal RNA and phenylalanyl ...

  14. Biomechanical comparison of osteosynthesis with poly‑L‑lactic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability of poly‑L‑lactic acid and titanium screws in the fixation of intracapsular condylar fractures, in 10 polyurethane hemimandibles. Materials and Methods: Artificial intracapsular fractures were created with a steel disk and electronic ...

  15. Time related total lactic acid bacteria population diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The total lactic acid bacterial community involved in the spontaneous fermentation of malted cowpea fortified cereal weaning food was investigated by phenotypically and cultivation independent method. A total of 74 out of the isolated 178 strains were Lactobacillus plantarum, 32 were Pediococcus acidilactici and over 60% ...

  16. Antifungal Capacity of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated From Salad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explores the use of lactic acid bacteria from fresh salad vegetables to inhibit fungal growth. The antifungal assay was done using the agar well diffusion method as reported by Schillinger and Lucke (1989). The largest zone of inhibition (25mm) was recorded by the antagonistic activity of the isolate identified to ...

  17. Controlled overproduction of proteins by lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Oscar P.; Ruyter, Pascalle G.G.A. de; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Vos, Willem M. de

    1997-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are widely used in industrial food fermentations, contributing to flavour, texture and preservation of the fermented products. Here we describe recent advances in the development of controlled gene expression systems, which allow the regulated overproduction of any desirable

  18. Heme and menaquinone induced electron transport in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooijmans, Rob; Smit, Bart; Santos, Filipe; van Riel, Jan; de Vos, Willem M; Hugenholtz, Jeroen

    2009-05-29

    For some lactic acid bacteria higher biomass production as a result of aerobic respiration has been reported upon supplementation with heme and menaquinone. In this report, we have studied a large number of species among lactic acid bacteria for the existence of this trait. Heme- (and menaquinone) stimulated aerobic growth was observed for several species and genera of lactic acid bacteria. These include Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacilllus brevis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, Streptococcus entericus and Lactococcus garviae. The increased biomass production without further acidification, which are respiration associated traits, are suitable for high-throughput screening as demonstrated by the screening of 8000 Lactococcus lactis insertion mutants. Respiration-negative insertion-mutants were found with noxA, bd-type cytochrome and menaquinol biosynthesis gene-disruptions. Phenotypic screening and in silico genome analysis suggest that respiration can be considered characteristic for certain species. We propose that the cyd-genes were present in the common ancestor of lactic acid bacteria, and that multiple gene-loss events best explains the observed distribution of these genes among the species.

  19. Statistical optimization of lactic acid production by Lactococcus lactis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The individual and interactive effects of a total inoculums size (% v/v), fermentation temperature and skim milk dry matter added (% w/v) on the lactic acid production by Lactococcus lactis LCL strain were studied by quadratic response surface methodology. The central composite design (CCD) was employed to determine ...

  20. Antibacterial activity and probiotic properties of some lactic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several lactic acid bacteria strains were screened for the production of antibacterial substances active against some pathogenic bacteria. The inhibitory mechanism was investigated and was shown to be dependant of bacteriocin production. The objective was to isolate LAB with antibacterial activity from raib and to select ...

  1. Repressive efficacy of lactic acid bacteria against the human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) namely Lactobacillus acidophilus NCIM 2287, Lactobacillus plantarum NCIM 2085, Lactobacillus helveticus NCIM 2126 and Lactococcus lactis NCIM 2114 were procured from the National Chemical Laboratory (NCL) Pune, India. These LAB cells were individually (107 cfu/ml) ...

  2. Antibacterial Activities of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Members of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known probiotics and have been reported to have antimicrobial properties. Although various researchers have documented the isolation of these bacteria from fruits and vegetables, studies on LAB associated with lettuce, cucumber and cabbage are limited and non-existing in ...

  3. Inhibition of aflatoxin-producing aspergilli by lactic acid bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of six lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolates were selected from five indigenously fermented cereal gruels and identified as Lactobacillus fermentum OYB, Lb. fermentum RS2, Lb. plantarum MW, Lb. plantarum YO, Lb. brevis WS3, and Lactococcus spp. RS3. Six aflatoxin-producing aspergilli were also selected from the ...

  4. Bacteriocin and cellulose production by lactic acid bacteria isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixteen colonies of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were selected and screened for their ability to produce bacteriocin by agar well diffusion method using the supernatant of centrifuged test cultures. Four isolates inhibited the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli. Lactobacillus plantarum (6) and Lactobacillus ...

  5. Electrospinnability of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Baldursdottir, Stefania G.; Aho, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: In this study, the electrospinnability of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) solutions was investigated, with a focus on understanding the influence of molecular weight of PLGA, solvent type and solvent composition on the physical properties of electrospun nanofibers. METHOD: Various s...

  6. Effect of lactic acid bacteria starter culture fermentation of cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of lactic acid fermentation of cassava on the chemical and sensory characteristic of fufu flour were investigated. Two strains of Lactobacillus plantarum were used as starter cultures for the fermentation of cassava to fufu for 96 h. The resultant wet fufu samples were dried at 65oC in a cabinet dryer for 48 h and ...

  7. Lactic acid and Lactates in Health and wellness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gertjan Schaafsma; Victor Schreurs

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to integrate the present state of knowledge on lactate metabolism in human and mammalian physiology as far as it could be subject to nutritional interventions. An integrated view on the nutritional, metabolic and physiological aspects of lactic acid and lactates might open a

  8. Kinetics and adsorption isotherm of lactic acid from fermentation broth onto activated charcoal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seankham Soraya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated charcoal was applied for the recovery of lactic acid in undissociated form from fermentation broth. Lactic acid was obtained from the fermentation of Lactobacillus casei TISTR 1340 using acid hydrolyzed Jerusalem artichoke as a carbon source. The equilibrium adsorption isotherm and kinetics for the lactic acid separation were investigated. The experimental data for lactic acid adsorption from fermentation broth were best described by the Freundlich isotherm and the pseudo-second order kinetics with R2 values of 0.99. The initial adsorption rate was 41.32 mg/g⋅min at the initial lactic acid concentration of 40 g/L.

  9. Chirality Matters: Synthesis and Consumption of the d-Enantiomer of Lactic Acid by Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC6803

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angermayr, S.A.; van der Woude, A.D.; Correddu, D.; Kern, R.; Hagemann, M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.

    2015-01-01

    Both enantiomers of lactic acid, l-lactic acid and d-lactic acid, can be produced in a sustainable way by a photosynthetic microbial cell factory and thus from CO2, sunlight, and water. Several properties of polylactic acid (a polyester of polymerized lactic acid) depend on the controlled blend of

  10. pH-, Lactic Acid-, and Non-Lactic Acid-Dependent Activities of Probiotic Lactobacilli against Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Fayol-Messaoudi, Domitille; Berger, Cédric N.; Coconnier-Polter, Marie-Hélène; Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Servin, Alain L.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism(s) underlying the antibacterial activity of probiotic Lactobacillus strains appears to be multifactorial and includes lowering of the pH and the production of lactic acid and of antibacterial compounds, including bacteriocins and nonbacteriocin, non-lactic acid molecules. Addition of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's minimum essential medium to the incubating medium delays the killing activity of lactic acid. We found that the probiotic strains Lactobacillus johnsonii La1, Lactobacill...

  11. Availability of lignocellulosic feedstocks for lactic acid production - Feedstock availability, lactic acid production potential and selection criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, R.R.C.

    2013-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to assess the worldwide availability and suitability of agricultural residues for lactic acid production, based on fermentation of carbohydrates. The study focuses on lignocellulosic biomass that is produced as a by-product of agricultural production. The

  12. Lactic Acid Yield Using Different Bacterial Strains, Its Purification, and Polymerization through Ring-Opening Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Orozco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale anaerobic fermentation was performed to obtain lactic acid from lactose, using five lactic acid bacteria: Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus bulgaricus, L. delbrueckii, L. plantarum, and L. delbrueckii lactis. A yield of 0.99 g lactic acid/g lactose was obtained with L. delbrueckii, from which a final concentration of 80.95 g/L aqueous solution was obtained through microfiltration, nanofiltration, and inverse osmosis membranes. The lactic acid was polymerized by means of ring-opening reactions (ROP to obtain poly-DL-lactic acid (PDLLA, with a viscosity average molecular weight (Mv of 19,264 g/mol.

  13. Bioconversion Using Lactic Acid Bacteria: Ginsenosides, GABA, and Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2017-05-28

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are used as fermentation starters in vegetable and dairy products and influence the pH and flavors of foods. For many centuries, LAB have been used to manufacture fermented foods; therefore, they are generally regarded as safe. LAB produce various substances, such as lactic acid, β-glucosidase, and β-galactosidase, making them useful as fermentation starters. Existing functional substances have been assessed as fermentation substrates for better component bioavailability or other functions. Representative materials that were bioconverted using LAB have been reported and include minor ginsenosides, γ-aminobutyric acid, equol, aglycones, bioactive isoflavones, genistein, and daidzein, among others. Fermentation mainly involves polyphenol and polysaccharide substrates and is conducted using bacterial strains such as Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus plantarum, and Bifidobacterium sp. In this review, we summarize recent studies of bioconversion using LAB and discuss future directions for this field.

  14. Enhanced L-(+)-lactic acid production by an adapted strain of Rhizopus oryzae using corncob hydrolysate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bai, Dongmei; Li, S.Z.; Liu, Z.L.

    2008-01-01

    -added production of a variety of bioproducts. Lactic acid can be used as a precursor for poly-lactic acid production. Although current industrial lactic acid is produced by lactic acid bacteria using enriched medium, production by Rhizopus oryzae is preferred due to its exclusive formation of the......-isomer and a simple nutrition requirement by the fungus. Production of-L-(+)-lactic acid by R. oryzae using xylose has been reported; however, its yield and conversion rate are poor compared with that of using glucose. In this study, we report an adapted R. oryzae strain HZS6 that significantly improved efficiency...... of substrate utilization and enhanced production of L-(+)-lactic acid from corncob hydrolysate. It increased L-(+)-lactic acid final concentration, yield, and volumetric productivity more than twofold compared with its parental strain. The optimized growth and fermentation conditions for Strain HZS6 were...

  15. Lactic acid peeling in superficial acne scarring in Indian skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Silonie

    2010-09-01

    Chemical peeling with both alpha and beta hydroxy acids has been used to improve acne scarring with pigmentation. Lactic acid, a mild alpha hydroxy acid, has been used in the treatment of various dermatological indications but no study is reported in acne scarring with pigmentation. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of full strength pure lactic acid 92% (pH 2.0) chemical peel in superficial acne scarring in Indian skin. Seven patients, Fitzpatrick skin type IV-V, in age group 20-30 years with superficial acne scarring were enrolled in the study. Chemical peeling was done with lactic acid at an interval of 2 weeks to a maximum of four peels. Pre- and post-peel clinical photographs were taken at every session. Patients were followed every month for 3 months after the last peel to evaluate the effects. At the end of 3 months, there was definite improvement in the texture, pigmentation, and appearance of the treated skin, with lightening of scars. Significant improvement (greater than 75% clearance of lesions) occurred in one patient (14.28%), good improvement (51-75% clearance) in three patients (42.84%), moderate improvement (26-50% clearance) in two patients (28.57%), and mild improvement (1-25% clearance) in one patient (14.28%). © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Evaluation of Petrifilm Lactic Acid Bacteria Plates for Counting Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagawa, Satomi; Ohshima, Chihiro; Takahashi, Hajime; Burenqiqige; Kikuchi, Misato; Sato, Fumina; Nakamura, Ayaka; Mohamed, Shimaa M; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2018-06-01

    Although lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are used widely as starter cultures in the production of fermented foods, they are also responsible for food decay and deterioration. The undesirable growth of LAB in food causes spoilage, discoloration, and slime formation. Because of these adverse effects, food companies test for the presence of LAB in production areas and processed foods and consistently monitor the behavior of these bacteria. The 3M Petrifilm LAB Count Plates have recently been launched as a time-saving and simple-to-use plate designed for detecting and quantifying LAB. This study compares the abilities of Petrifilm LAB Count Plates and the de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) agar medium to determine the LAB count in a variety of foods and swab samples collected from a food production area. Bacterial strains isolated from Petrifilm LAB Count Plates were identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis to confirm the specificity of these plates for LAB. The results showed no significant difference in bacterial counts measured by using Petrifilm LAB Count Plates and MRS medium. Furthermore, all colonies growing on Petrifilm LAB Count Plates were confirmed to be LAB, while yeast colonies also formed in MRS medium. Petrifilm LAB Count Plates eliminated the plate preparation and plate inoculation steps, and the cultures could be started as soon as a diluted food sample was available. Food companies are required to establish quality controls and perform tests to check the quality of food products; the use of Petrifilm LAB Count Plates can simplify this testing process for food companies.

  17. Accelerated fatigue of dentin with exposure to lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, D; Orrego, S; Majd, H; Ryou, H; Mutluay, M M; Xu, Hockin H K; Arola, D

    2013-11-01

    Composite restorations accumulate more biofilm than other dental materials. This increases the likelihood for the hard tissues supporting a restoration (i.e. dentin and enamel) to be exposed to acidic conditions beyond that resulting from dietary variations. In this investigation the fatigue strength and fatigue crack growth resistance of human coronal dentin were characterized within a lactic acid solution (with pH = 5) and compared to that of controls evaluated in neutral conditions (pH = 7). A comparison of the fatigue life distributions showed that the lactic acid exposure resulted in a significant reduction in the fatigue strength (p ≤ 0.001), and nearly 30% reduction in the apparent endurance limit (from 44 MPa to 32 MPa). The reduction in pH also caused a significant decrease (p ≤ 0.05) in the threshold stress intensity range required for the initiation of cyclic crack growth, and significant increase in the incremental rate of crack extension. Exposure of tooth structure to lactic acid may cause demineralization, but it also increases the likelihood of restored tooth failures via fatigue, and after short time periods. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA fingerprinting of lactic acid bacteria in sauerkraut fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plengvidhya, Vethachai; Breidt, Fredrick; Lu, Zhongjing; Fleming, Henry P

    2007-12-01

    Previous studies using traditional biochemical identification methods to study the ecology of commercial sauerkraut fermentations revealed that four species of lactic acid bacteria, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Lactobacillus brevis, were the primary microorganisms in these fermentations. In this study, 686 isolates were collected from four commercial fermentations and analyzed by DNA fingerprinting. The results indicate that the species of lactic acid bacteria present in sauerkraut fermentations are more diverse than previously reported and include Leuconostoc citreum, Leuconostoc argentinum, Lactobacillus paraplantarum, Lactobacillus coryniformis, and Weissella sp. The newly identified species Leuconostoc fallax was also found. Unexpectedly, only two isolates of P. pentosaceus and 15 isolates of L. brevis were recovered during this study. A better understanding of the microbiota may aid in the development of low-salt fermentations, which may have altered microflora and altered sensory characteristics.

  19. Radiation induced crystallinity damage in poly(L-lactic acid)

    CERN Document Server

    Kantoglu, O

    2002-01-01

    The radiation-induced crystallinity damage in poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) in the presence of air and in vacuum, is studied. From the heat of fusion enthalpy values of gamma irradiated samples, some changes on the thermal properties were determined. To identify these changes, first the glass transition temperature (T sub g) of L-lactic acid polymers irradiated to various doses in air and vacuum have been investigated and it is found that it is independent of irradiation atmosphere and dose. The fraction of damaged units of PLLA per unit of absorbed energy has been measured. For this purpose, SAXS and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used, and the radiation yield of number of damaged units (G(-u)) is found to be 0.74 and 0.58 for PLLA samples irradiated in vacuum and air, respectively.

  20. Potential Use of Gelidium amansii Acid Hydrolysate for Lactic Acid Production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Soo Jang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Galactose and glucose are the main monosaccharides produced from the saccharification of Gelidium amansii. They were hydrolysed with 3 % (by volume H2SO4 at 140 °C for 5 min and obtained at concentrations of 19.60 and 10.21 g/L, respectively. G. amansii hydrolysate (5 %, by mass per volume was used as a substrate for L(+-lactic acid production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The maximum lactic acid yield (YP/S was 42.03 % with optical purity of 84.54 %. Lactic acid produced from G. amansii hydrolysate can be applicable, among others, for the production of lactic acid esters, like ethyl or methyl lactate, and disinfectant in seaweed cultivation.

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Lactic Acid Bacteria from Inasua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferymon Mahulette

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Inasua is a traditionally product of wet salt fish fermentation produced by Teon, Nila and Serua (TNS Communities in Central Maluku, Indonesia. The community made this fermented fish to anticipate the lean time when fisherman could not go to sea.  The  fish that used as inasua raw material is demersal fishes that live around coral reefs, such as Samandar fish (Siganatus guttatus, Gala-gala fish (Lutjanus sp. and Sikuda fish (Lethrinus ornatus. The objective of the research was to isolate and characterize of bacterial indigenous in  Inasua from three producers in Seram Island. The measurement of pH from inasua samples were 5.9, 5.0 and 5.8, respectively. The highest number of lactic acid bacteria was found from  Gala – gala inasua was 2,5x107 cfu/g sample. Isolation of all isolates bacteria from inasua showed that a total of 7 isolates of bacteria was obtained  from Samadar inasua, 9 isolates from  Gala-gala inasua, and 7 isolates from  Sikuda inasua.  From a total of 23 isolates, only 6 isolates had characteristic as lactic acid bacteria that were Gram  positive, negative catalase, and cocci shape. The microscopic characteristics  of the isolates are coccid in pairs or uniforms which combine to form tetrads. Carbohydrate utilization test  of selected isolate by using API 50 CHB kit indicated that 13 carbohydrates are fermented by these isolates  after incubation for 48 hours. The research  was concluded that the dominant bacteria in inasua sample  is  cocci-lactic acid bacteria. Keywords : fermented fish, inasua, lactic acid bacteria, MRSA medium

  2. Lactic Acid Bacteria in Health and Disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevention of antibiotic associated diarrhoea, reduction in lactose intolerance, production of conjugated linoliec acid ..... Factor (TGF)-β2 in the breast milk of probiotic treated mothers ..... in amacunda than in ghee because heat clarification of.

  3. RECOVERY OF LACTIC ACID FROM AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUGAR COMPANY WASTEWATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Stepan; Edwin S. Olson; Richard E. Shockey; Bradley G. Stevens; John R. Gallagher

    2001-04-30

    This project has shown that the recovery of several valuable lactic acid products is both technically feasible and economically viable. One of the original objectives of this project was to recover lactic acid. However, the presence of a variety of indigenous bacteria in the wastewater stream and technical issues related to recovery and purification have resulted in the production of lactic acid esters. These esters could by hydrolyzed to lactic acid, but only with unacceptable product losses that would be economically prohibitive. The developed process is projected to produce approximately 200,000 lb per day of lactate esters from wastewater at a single factory at costs that compete with conventional solvents. The lactate esters are good solvents for polymers and resins and could replace acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, MIBK, and other polar solvents used in the polymer industry. Because of their low volatility and viscosity-lowering properties, they will be especially useful for inks for jet printers, alkyl resins, and high-solid paints. Owing to their efficiency in dissolving salts and flux as well as oils and sealants, lactate esters can be used in cleaning circuit boards and machine and engine parts. Unlike conventional solvents, lactate esters exhibit low toxicity, are biodegradable, and are not hazardous air pollutants. Another application for lactate esters is in the production of plasticizers. Severe health problems have been attributed to widely used phthalate ester plasticizers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture showed that replacement of these with inexpensive lactate esters is feasible, owing to their superior polymer compatibility properties. A very large market is projected for polymers prepared from lactic acid. These are called polylactides and are a type of polyester. Thermoplastics of this type have a variety of uses, including moldings, fibers, films, and packaging of both manufactured goods and food products. Polylactides form tough, orientable

  4. Bioconversion of renewable resources into lactic acid: an industrial view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, A K; Chaudhari, A B; Kothari, R M

    2011-03-01

    Lactic acid, an anaerobic product of glycolysis, can be theoretically produced by synthetic route; however, it is commercially produced by homo-fermentative batch mode of operations. Factors affecting its production and strategies improving it are considered while devising an optimized protocol. Although a hetero-fermentative mode of production exists, it is rarely used for commercial production. Attempts to use Rhizopus sp. for lactic acid production through either hetero-fermentative or thermophilic conditions were not economical. Since almost 70% of the cost of its production is accounted by raw materials, R & D efforts are still focused to find economically attractive agri-products to serve as sources of carbon and complex nitrogen inputs to meet fastidious nutrient needs for microbial growth and lactic acid production. Therefore, need exists for using multi-pronged strategies for higher productivity. Its present production and consumption scenario is examined. Its optically active isomers and chemical structure permit its use for the production of several industrially important chemicals, health products (probiotics), food preservatives, and bio-plastics. In addition, its salts and esters appear to have a variety of applications.

  5. Dynamic modeling of lactic acid fermentation metabolism with Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Euhlim; Lu, Mingshou; Park, Changhun; Park, Changhun; Oh, Han Bin; Lee, Sang Yup; Lee, Jinwon

    2011-02-01

    A dynamic model of lactic acid fermentation using Lactococcus lactis was constructed, and a metabolic flux analysis (MFA) and metabolic control analysis (MCA) were performed to reveal an intensive metabolic understanding of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The parameter estimation was conducted with COPASI software to construct a more accurate metabolic model. The experimental data used in the parameter estimation were obtained from an LC-MS/ MS analysis and time-course simulation study. The MFA results were a reasonable explanation of the experimental data. Through the parameter estimation, the metabolic system of lactic acid bacteria can be thoroughly understood through comparisons with the original parameters. The coefficients derived from the MCA indicated that the reaction rate of L-lactate dehydrogenase was activated by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and pyruvate, and pyruvate appeared to be a stronger activator of L-lactate dehydrogenase than fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. Additionally, pyruvate acted as an inhibitor to pyruvate kinase and the phosphotransferase system. Glucose 6-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate showed activation effects on pyruvate kinase. Hexose transporter was the strongest effector on the flux through L-lactate dehydrogenase. The concentration control coefficient (CCC) showed similar results to the flux control coefficient (FCC).

  6. Technology and economic assessment of lactic acid production and uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, R.; Tsai, S.P.

    1996-03-01

    Lactic acid has been an intermediate-volume specialty chemical (world production {approximately}50,000 tons/yr) used in a wide range of food-processing and industrial applications. Potentially, it can become a very large-volume, commodity-chemical intermediate produced from carbohydrates for feedstocks of biodegradable polymers, oxygenated chemicals, environmentally friendly ``green`` solvents, and other intermediates. In the past, efficient and economical technologies for the recovery and purification of lactic acid from fermentation broths and its conversion to the chemical or polymer intermediates had been the key technology impediments and main process cost centers. Development and deployment of novel separations technologies, such as electrodialysis with bipolar membranes, extractive and catalytic distillations, and chemical conversion, can enable low-cost production with continuous processes in large-scale operations. The emerging technologies can use environmentally sound lactic acid processes to produce environmentally useful products, with attractive process economics. These technology advances and recent product and process commercialization strategies are reviewed and assessed.

  7. Study of Lactic Acid Thermal Behavior Using Thermoanalytical Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Komesu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Actually, there is a growing interest in the biotechnological production of lactic acid by fermentation aiming to substitute fossil fuel routes. The development of an efficient method for its separation and purification from fermentation broth is very important to assure the economic viability of production. Due to its high reactivity and tendency to decompose at high temperatures, the study of lactic acid thermal behavior is essential for its separation processes and potential application. In the present study, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analyses showed endothermic peaks related to the process of evaporation. Data of thermogravimetry (TG/DTG were correlated to Arrhenius and Kissinger equations to provide the evaporation kinetic parameters and used to determine the vaporization enthalpy. Activation energies were 51.08 and 48.37 kJ·mol−1 and frequency values were 859.97 and 968.81 s−1 obtained by Arrhenius and Kissinger equations, respectively. Thermogravimetry, coupled with mass spectroscopy (TG-MS, provided useful information about decomposition products when lactic acid was heated at 573 K for approximately 30 min.

  8. Lactic acid bacteria as a cell factory for riboflavin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Kiran; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2016-07-01

    Consumers are increasingly becoming aware of their health and nutritional requirements, and in this context, vitamins produced in situ by microbes may suit their needs and expectations. B groups vitamins are essential components of cellular metabolism and among them riboflavin is one of the vital vitamins required by bacteria, plants, animals and humans. Here, we focus on the importance of microbial production of riboflavin over chemical synthesis. In addition, genetic abilities for riboflavin biosynthesis by lactic acid bacteria are discussed. Genetically modified strains by employing genetic engineering and chemical analogues have been developed to enhance riboflavin production. The present review attempts to collect the currently available information on riboflavin production by microbes in general, while placing greater emphasis on food grade lactic acid bacteria and human gut commensals. For designing riboflavin-enriched functional foods, proper selection and exploitation of riboflavin-producing lactic acid bacteria is essential. Moreover, eliminating the in situ vitamin fortification step will decrease the cost of food production. © 2015 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Salt-inducible promoter derivable from a lactic acid bacterium, and its use in a lactic acid bacterium for production of a desired protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Ledeboer, Adrianus Marinus

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a salt-inducible promoter present in SEQ ID NO: 10 and derivable from a lactic acid bacterium in isolation from the coding sequence normally controlled by said promoter in a wild-type lactic acid bacterium, with modifications and important parts thereof. Also provided are a

  10. The behavior and importance of lactic acid complexation in Talspeak extraction systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, Travis S.; Nilsson, Mikael; Nash, Kenneth L.

    2008-01-01

    Advanced partitioning of spent nuclear fuel in the UREX +la process relies on the TALSPEAK process for separation of fission-product lanthanides from trivalent actinides. The classic TALSPEAK utilizes an aqueous medium of both lactic acid and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid and the extraction reagent di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid in an aromatic diluent. In this study, the specific role of lactic acid and the complexes involved in the extraction of the trivalent actinides and lanthanides have been investigated using 14 C-labeled lactic acid. Our results show that lactic acid partitions between the phases in a complex fashion. (authors)

  11. Evaluation of different lactic acid bacterial strains for probiotic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Srinu,

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the present study was to collect different Lactic acid bacterial strains from culture collection centers and screen their functional probiotic characteristics such as acid tolerance, bile tolerance, antibacterial activity and antibiotic sensitivity for their commercial use. Materials and Methods: Acid and bile tolerence of selected LAB(Lactic acid bacteria was determined. The antibiotic resistance of Lactobacillus species was assessed using different antibiotic discs on de Mann Rogosa Sharpe broth (MRS agar plates seeded with the test probiotic organism. The antibacterial activity of LAB was assessed by using well diffusion method.Results: Among the six probiotic strains tested, all showed good survivability at high bile salt concentration (0.3 to 2.0 % oxgall and good growth at a low pH of 1.5 to 3.5. These probiotic species showed good survival abilities in acidic pH of 2.0 to 3.5 except Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspp. bulgaricus 281 which did not grown at pH of 2.0. Lactobacillus fermentum 141 was able to grow even at pH of 1.5 also. Among the six lactic acid species, Lactobacillus fermentum 141 (except Tetracycline, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspp. Bulgaricus 281 except (Cefpodoxime and all other LAB were resistant to all the antibiotics tested (Ampicillin, Nalidixic acid , Ciprofloxacin ,Co-Trimoxazole, Gentamicin and Cefpodoxime. All these probiotic organisms were screened for their in vitro inhibition ability against pathogenic microorganisms namely, E.coli ATCC (American type culture collection centre, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella paratyphi, Staphylococcus aureus. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspp. bulgaricus 281, Lactobacillus casei 297 and Lactobacillus fermentum 141 inhibited the growth of all the pathogenic bacteria used in the study. Conclusion: The study indicated Lactobacillus fermentum 141 and Lactobacillus casei 297 as potential functional probiotics for future in vivo studies for

  12. Catalytic Cracking of Lactide and Poly(Lactic Acid) to Acrylic Acid at Low Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrade, Frédéric G; van Krieken, Jan; Verkuijl, Bastiaan J V; Bouwman, Elisabeth

    2017-05-09

    Despite being a simple dehydration reaction, the industrially relevant conversion of lactic acid to acrylic acid is particularly challenging. For the first time, the catalytic cracking of lactide and poly(lactic acid) to acrylic acid under mild conditions is reported with up to 58 % yield. This transformation is catalyzed by strong acids in the presence of bromide or chloride salts and proceeds through simple S N 2 and elimination reactions. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  13. Volatile Compounds and Lactic Acid Bacteria in Spontaneous Fermented Sourdough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kam, W.Y.; Aida, W.M.W.; Sahilah, A.M.; Maskat, M.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the predominating lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in a spontaneous fermented wheat sourdough. At the same time, an investigation towards volatile compounds that were produced was also carried out. Lactobacillus plantarum has been identified as the dominant species of lactobacilli with characters of a facultative heterofermentative strain. The generated volatile compounds that were produced during spontaneous fermentation were isolated by solvent extraction method, analysed by gas chromatography (GC), and identified by mass spectrophotometer (MS). Butyric acid has been found to be the main volatile compound with relative abundance of 6.75 % and acetic acid at relative abundance of 3.60 %. Esters that were formed at relatively low amount were butyl formate (1.23 %) and cis 3 hexenyl propionate (0.05 %). Butanol was also found at low amount with relative abundance of 0.60 %. The carbohydrate metabolism of Lactobacillus plantarum may contributed to the production of acetic acid in this study via further catabolism activity on lactic acid that was produced. However, butyric acid was not the major product via fermentation by LAB but mostly carried out by the genus Clostridium via carbohydrate metabolism which needs further investigation. (author)

  14. Production of lactic acid from C6-polyols by alkaline hydrothermal reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Huazhen; Jin Fangming; Wu Bing; Cao Jianglin; Duan Xiaokun; Kishita, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Production of lactic acid from C6-polyols (Mannitol) under alkaline hydrothermal conditions was investigated. Experiments were performed to examine the difference in the production of lactic acid between C6-polyols and C3-polyols (glycerine), as well as C6-aldoses (glucose). Results showed that the yield of lactic acid from C6-polyols was lower than that from both glycerine and glucose. It indicated that long chain polyols might follow a different reaction pathway from that of glycerine. Further investigation is needed to clarify the reaction mechanism and improve the relatively low lactic acid acid yield from C6-polyols.

  15. Clinical Efficacy Comparison of Saccharomyces Boulardii and Lactic Acid as Probiotics in Acute Pediatric Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmat, Shakila; Shaukat, Fouzia; Asmat, Raheela; Bakhat, Hafiz Faiq Siddique Gul; Asmat, Tauseef M

    2018-03-01

    To compare the efficacy of Saccharomyces boulardii and lactic acid producing probiotics in addition to usual treatment regimen to cure diarrhea among children (6 months to 5 years of age). Randomized controlled trial. Department of Pediatrics, Sheikh Zayed Hospital, Lahore, from February to July 2015. Children suffering from acute diarrhea were orally administered Saccharomyces boulardii and lactic acid producing probiotics for 5 days. The efficacy of administered probiotics was monitored. Patients were given Saccharomyces boulardii and lactic acid producing probiotics randomly to remove the bias. Two hundred patients randomly selected for trials; out of which, 100 were treated with Saccharomyces boulardii while the other 100 were supplemented with lactic acid concomitantly along with conventional diarrhea treatment. Results indicated that Saccharomyces boulardii treatment group has significantly higher efficacy rate (45%) compared to lactic acid producing probiotics (26%). This study concluded that Saccharomyces boulardii has a better efficacy compared to lactic acid and may be adopted as a probiotic of choice.

  16. Screening for Direct Production of Lactic Acid from Rice Starch Waste by Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunasundari Balakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid recently became an important chemical where it is widely used in many industries such as food, cosmetic, chemical and pharmaceutical industry. The present study focuses on the screening for lactic acid production from rice starch waste using a thermophilic amylolytic bacterium, Geobacillus stearothermophilus. There is no information available on direct fermentation of lactic acid from rice starch waste using G. stearothermophilus. The effects of different parameters such as temperature, pH, incubation time, agitation speed, concentration of nitrogen and carbon sources on the lactic acid production were assessed. The highest concentration of lactic acid produced was 5.65 ± 0.07 g/L at operating conditions of 60°C, pH 5.5, 48 h, 200 rpm of agitation speed with 5% concentrations of both carbon and nitrogen source. The findings indicated that rice starch waste can be successfully converted to lactic acid by G. stearothermophilus.

  17. Lactic acid demineralization of shrimp shell and chitosan synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alewo Opuada AMEH

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of lactic acid was compared to hydrochloric acid for shrimp shell demineralization in chitosan synthesis. Five different acid concentrations were considered for the study: 1.5M, 3.0M, 4.5M, 6.0M and 7.5M. After demineralization, the shrimp shell were deproteinized and subsequently deacetylated to produce chitosan using sodium hydroxide solution. The synthesized chitosan samples were characterized using solubility, FTIR, SEM, XRD and viscosity. The SEM, FTIR and XRD analysis indicated that chitosan was synthesized with a high degree of deacetylation (83.18±2.11 when lactic acid was used and 84.2±5.00 when HCl was used. The degree of deacetylation and the molecular weight of the chitosan samples were also estimated. ANOVA analysis (at 95% confidence interval indicated that acid type and concentration did not significantly affect the solubility, degree of deacetylation, viscosity and molecular weight of the chitosan within the range considered.

  18. Lactic acid fermentation of dahlia tuber starch and waste using Lactobacillus bulgaricus: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praputri, E.; Sundari, E.; Martynis, M.; Agenta, P.

    2018-03-01

    Lactic acid fermentation of dahlia tuber starch and waste was performed by means of Lactobacillus bulgaricus through enzymatic hydrolysis followed by fermentation process. The effect of pH condition on lactic acid production was investigated during the process. The selected bacteria produced lactic acid after 24 hours of fermentation and the productivity was increase after 24 hours of fermentation. After 120 hours of fermentation, it was found that dahlia tuber starch can produce up to 16.18% of lactic acid, whereas lactic acid produced from dahlia tuber waste was only 0.40% at pH of 4. The lactic acid production increase significantly for pH 3.5 and 4 until 96 hours of fermentation, then slowed down. On the other hand, for pH 4.5 the lactic acid production increase until 48 hours of fermentation and then slowed down. The identification of fermentation product indicated that the lactic acid produced in this study was 16.20%, acidic, yellow and cloudy with pH 3.4 – 4.2. The density of lactic acid produced ranged between 1.21 to 1.25 gr/ml.

  19. Fabrication of high-performance poly(l-lactic acid)/lignin-graft-poly(d-lactic acid) stereocomplex films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Dai, Lin; Hu, Li-Qiu; Zhou, Wen-Qin; Si, Chuan-Ling

    2017-11-01

    The need for green renewable alternatives such as lignin to traditional fillers has driven recent interest in polylactic acid blend materials. Herein, lignin-graft-polylactic acid copolymers (LG-g-PDLA, LG-g-PDLLA, and LG-g-PLLA) have been synthesized via ring-opening polymerization of d-, dl-, and l-lactic acid. Then poly(l-lactic acid)/lignin-graft-polylactic acid (PLLA/LG-g-PDLA, /LG-g-PDLLA, and /LG-g-PLLA) complex films have been prepared. The results showed that, compared with LG-g-PDLA and LG-g-PLLA, a small amount of LG-g-PDLA addition could improve the crystallization rate, reduce the glass transition temperature and cold crystallization temperature of PLLA due to the stereocomplex crystallites. The thermal stability, tensile strength and strain of the stereocomplex films were also enhanced. Moreover, the PLLA/LG-g-PDLA films have good ultraviolet resistance and excellent biocompatibility. This study provides a green approach to design advanced polylactic acid-based blends with renewable natural resources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biotechnological conversion of spent coffee grounds into lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudeckova, H; Neureiter, M; Obruca, S; Frühauf, S; Marova, I

    2018-04-01

    This work investigates the potential bioconversion of spent coffee grounds (SCG) into lactic acid (LA). SCG were hydrolysed by a combination of dilute acid treatment and subsequent application of cellulase. The SCG hydrolysate contained a considerable amount of reducing sugars (9·02 ± 0·03 g l -1 , glucose; 26·49 ± 0·10 g l -1 galactose and 2·81 ± 0·07 g l -1 arabinose) and it was used as a substrate for culturing several lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and LA-producing Bacillus coagulans. Among the screened micro-organisms, Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCM 1825 was identified as the most promising producer of LA on a SCG hydrolysate. Despite the inhibitory effect exerted by furfural and phenolic compounds in the medium, reasonably high LA concentrations (25·69 ± 1·45 g l -1 ) and yields (98%) were gained. Therefore, it could be demonstrated that SCG is a promising raw material for the production of LA and could serve as a feedstock for the sustainable large-scale production of LA. Spent coffee grounds (SCG) represent solid waste generated in millions of tonnes by coffee-processing industries. Their disposal represents a serious environmental problem; however, SCG could be valorized within a biorefinery concept yielding various valuable products. Herein, we suggest that SCG can be used as a complex carbon source for the lactic acid production. © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. l-(+)-Lactic acid production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus B103 from dairy industry waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Marcela Piassi; Coelho, Luciana Fontes; Sass, Daiane Cristina; Contiero, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid, which can be obtained through fermentation, is an interesting compound because it can be utilized in different fields, such as in the food, pharmaceutical and chemical industries as a bio-based molecule for bio-refinery. In addition, lactic acid has recently gained more interest due to the possibility of manufacturing poly(lactic acid), a green polymer that can replace petroleum-derived plastics and be applied in medicine for the regeneration of tissues and in sutures, repairs and implants. One of the great advantages of fermentation is the possibility of using agribusiness wastes to obtain optically pure lactic acid. The conventional batch process of fermentation has some disadvantages such as inhibition by the substrate or the final product. To avoid these problems, this study was focused on improving the production of lactic acid through different feeding strategies using whey, a residue of agribusiness. The downstream process is a significant bottleneck because cost-effective methods of producing high-purity lactic acid are lacking. Thus, the investigation of different methods for the purification of lactic acid was one of the aims of this work. The pH-stat strategy showed the maximum production of lactic acid of 143.7g/L. Following purification of the lactic acid sample, recovery of reducing sugars and protein and color removal were 0.28%, 100% and 100%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. An integrated bioconversion process for the production of L-lactic acid from starchy feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, S.P.; Moon, S.H.

    1997-07-01

    The potential market for lactic acid as the feedstock for biodegradable polymers, oxygenated chemicals, and specialty chemicals is significant. L-lactic acid is often the desired enantiomer for such applications. However, stereospecific lactobacilli do not metabolize starch efficiently. In this work, Argonne researchers have developed a process to convert starchy feedstocks into L-lactic acid. The processing steps include starch recovery, continuous liquefaction, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. Over 100 g/L of lactic acid was produced in less than 48 h. The optical purity of the product was greater than 95%. This process has potential economical advantages over the conventional process.

  3. L-(+-Lactic acid production by Lactobacillus rhamnosus B103 from dairy industry waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Piassi Bernardo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lactic acid, which can be obtained through fermentation, is an interesting compound because it can be utilized in different fields, such as in the food, pharmaceutical and chemical industries as a bio-based molecule for bio-refinery. In addition, lactic acid has recently gained more interest due to the possibility of manufacturing poly(lactic acid, a green polymer that can replace petroleum-derived plastics and be applied in medicine for the regeneration of tissues and in sutures, repairs and implants. One of the great advantages of fermentation is the possibility of using agribusiness wastes to obtain optically pure lactic acid. The conventional batch process of fermentation has some disadvantages such as inhibition by the substrate or the final product. To avoid these problems, this study was focused on improving the production of lactic acid through different feeding strategies using whey, a residue of agribusiness. The downstream process is a significant bottleneck because cost-effective methods of producing high-purity lactic acid are lacking. Thus, the investigation of different methods for the purification of lactic acid was one of the aims of this work. The pH-stat strategy showed the maximum production of lactic acid of 143.7 g/L. Following purification of the lactic acid sample, recovery of reducing sugars and protein and color removal were 0.28%, 100% and 100%, respectively.

  4. Sensitive determination of D-lactic acid and L-lactic acid in urine by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, H; Marmy Conus, N; Steenhout, P; Béguin, A; Boulat, O

    2012-04-01

    D-lactic acid in urine originates mainly from bacterial production in the intestinal tract. Increased D-lactate excretion as observed in patients affected by short bowel syndrome or necrotizing enterocolitis reflects D-lactic overproduction. Therefore, there is a need for a reliable and sensitive method able to detect D-lactic acid even at subclinical elevation levels. A new and highly sensitive method for the simultaneous determination of L- and D-lactic acid by a two-step procedure has been developed. This method is based on the concentration of lactic acid enantiomers from urine by supported liquid extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The separation was achieved by the use of an Astec Chirobiotic™ R chiral column under isocratic conditions. The calibration curves were linear over the ranges of 2-400 and 0.5-100 µmol/L respectively for L- and D-lactic acid. The limit of detection of D-lactic acid was 0.125 µmol/L and its limit of quantification was 0.5 µmol/L. The overall accuracy and precision were well within 10% of the nominal values. The developed method is suitable for production of reference values in children and could be applied for accurate routine analysis. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. L-lactic acid production by Aspergillus brasiliensis overexpressing the heterologous ldha gene from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaud, Nadège; Rosso, Marie-Noëlle; Fabre, Nicolas; Crapart, Sylvaine; Herpoël-Gimbert, Isabelle; Sigoillot, Jean-Claude; Raouche, Sana; Levasseur, Anthony

    2015-05-03

    Lactic acid is the building block of poly-lactic acid (PLA), a biopolymer that could be set to replace petroleum-based plastics. To make lactic acid production cost-effective, the production process should be carried out at low pH, in low-nutrient media, and with a low-cost carbon source. Yeasts have been engineered to produce high levels of lactic acid at low pH from glucose but not from carbohydrate polymers (e.g. cellulose, hemicellulose, starch). Aspergilli are versatile microbial cell factories able to naturally produce large amounts of organic acids at low pH and to metabolize cheap abundant carbon sources such as plant biomass. However, they have never been used for lactic acid production. To investigate the feasibility of lactic acid production with Aspergillus, the NAD-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) responsible for lactic acid production by Rhizopus oryzae was produced in Aspergillus brasiliensis BRFM103. Among transformants, the best lactic acid producer, A. brasiliensis BRFM1877, integrated 6 ldhA gene copies, and intracellular LDH activity was 9.2 × 10(-2) U/mg. At a final pH of 1.6, lactic acid titer reached 13.1 g/L (conversion yield: 26%, w/w) at 138 h in glucose-ammonium medium. This extreme pH drop was subsequently prevented by switching nitrogen source from ammonium sulfate to Na-nitrate, leading to a final pH of 3 and a lactic acid titer of 17.7 g/L (conversion yield: 47%, w/w) at 90 h of culture. Final titer was further improved to 32.2 g/L of lactic acid (conversion yield: 44%, w/w) by adding 20 g/L glucose to the culture medium at 96 h. This strain was ultimately able to produce lactic acid from xylose, arabinose, starch and xylan. We obtained the first Aspergillus strains able to produce large amounts of lactic acid by inserting recombinant ldhA genes from R. oryzae into a wild-type A. brasiliensis strain. pH regulation failed to significantly increase lactic acid production, but switching nitrogen source and changing culture feed

  6. [Design of primers to DNA of lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashchevskiĭ, V V; Kovalenko, N K

    2003-01-01

    Primers LP1-LP2 to the gene 16S rRNA have been developed, which permit to differentiate lactic acid bacteria: Lactobacillus plantarum, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus. The strain-specific and species-specific differentiations are possible under different annealing temperature. Additional fragments, which are synthesized outside the framework of gene 16S rRNA reading, provide for the strain-specific type of differentiation, and the fragment F864 read in the gene 16S rRNA permits identifying L. plantarum.

  7. [Genetic stability of probiotic lactic acid bacteria--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyi; Bai, Mei; Zhang, Heping

    2014-04-04

    Growing attention has been focused on probiotic lactic acid bacteria because of their important health-promoting effects. Nowadays, probiotic-based products have become fashionable nutraceuticals of choice. Before a newly developed probiotic-based product is to be introduced into the industry, it is important to ensure not only the desirable properties of the probiotic strain but also a good genetic stability. This article firstly introduces the research methods for investigating genetic stability, followed by summarizing the latest research progress in China and overseas.

  8. Improvement of lactic acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a deletion of ssb1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinsuk J; Crook, Nathan; Sun, Jie; Alper, Hal S

    2016-01-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is an important renewable polymer, but current processes for producing its precursor, lactic acid, suffer from process inefficiencies related to the use of bacterial hosts. Therefore, improving the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce lactic acid is a promising approach to improve industrial production of lactic acid. As one such improvement required, the lactic acid tolerance of yeast must be significantly increased. To enable improved tolerance, we employed an RNAi-mediated genome-wide expression knockdown approach as a means to rapidly identify potential genetic targets. In this approach, several gene knockdown targets were identified which confer increased acid tolerance to S. cerevisiae BY4741, of which knockdown of the ribosome-associated chaperone SSB1 conferred the highest increase (52%). This target was then transferred into a lactic acid-overproducing strain of S. cerevisiae CEN.PK in the form of a knockout and the resulting strain demonstrated up to 33% increased cell growth, 58% increased glucose consumption, and 60% increased L-lactic acid production. As SSB1 contains a close functional homolog SSB2 in yeast, this result was counterintuitive and may point to as-yet-undefined functional differences between SSB1 and SSB2 related to lactic acid production. The final strain produced over 50 g/L of lactic acid in under 60 h of fermentation.

  9. Arginine- and Polyamine-Induced Lactic Acid Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gong

    Full Text Available Microbe-derived lactic acid protects women from pathogens in their genital tract. The purpose of this study was to determine lactic acid susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and identify potential acid resistance mechanisms present in this pathogen. Tested in vitro, lactic acid killed all 10 gonococcal strains analyzed in a low pH-dependent manner. Full inactivation occurred at pH 4.5. At low pH, lactic acid treatment resulted in the entry of the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide into the microbial cells, suggesting that hydrogen ions from lactic acid compromise the integrity of the bacterial cell wall/membrane. Most likely, hydrogen ions also inactivate intracellular proteins since arginine rendered significant protection against lactic acid presumably through action of the gonococcal arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme located in the bacterial cytoplasm. Surprisingly, arginine also lessened lactic acid-mediated cell wall/membrane disruption. This effect is probably mediated by agmatine, a triamine product of arginine decarboxylase, since agmatine demonstrated a stronger protective effect on GC than arginine at equal molar concentration. In addition to agmatine, diamines cadaverine and putrescine, which are generated by bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes, also induced significant resistance to lactic acid-mediated GC killing and cell wall/membrane disruption. These findings suggest that the arginine-rich semen protects gonococci through both neutralization-dependent and independent mechanisms, whereas polyamine-induced acid resistance contributes to the increased risk of gonorrhea in women with bacterial vaginosis.

  10. Enhanced D-lactic acid production from renewable resources using engineered Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixing; Vadlani, Praveen V; Kumar, Amit; Hardwidge, Philip R; Govind, Revathi; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    D-lactic acid is used as a monomer in the production of poly-D-lactic acid (PDLA), which is used to form heat-resistant stereocomplex poly-lactic acid. To produce cost-effective D-lactic acid by using all sugars derived from biomass efficiently, xylose-assimilating genes encoding xylose isomerase and xylulokinase were cloned into an L-lactate-deficient strain, Lactobacillus plantarum. The resulting recombinant strain, namely L. plantarum NCIMB 8826 ∆ldhL1-pLEM-xylAB, was able to produce D-lactic acid (at optical purity >99 %) from xylose at a yield of 0.53 g g(-1). Simultaneous utilization of glucose and xylose to produce D-lactic acid was also achieved by this strain, and 47.2 g L(-1) of D-lactic acid was produced from 37.5 g L(-1) glucose and 19.7 g L(-1) xylose. Corn stover and soybean meal extract (SBME) were evaluated as cost-effective medium components for D-lactic acid production. Optimization of medium composition using response surface methodology resulted in 30 % reduction in enzyme loading and 70 % reduction in peptone concentration. In addition, we successfully demonstrated D-lactic acid fermentation from corn stover and SBME in a fed-batch fermentation, which yielded 61.4 g L(-1) D-lactic acid with an overall yield of 0.77 g g(-1). All these approaches are geared to attaining high D-lactic acid production from biomass sugars to produce low-cost, highly thermostable biodegradable plastics.

  11. Phenolic Biotransformations during Conversion of Ferulic Acid to Vanillin by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanillin is widely used as food additive and as a masking agent in various pharmaceutical formulations. Ferulic acid is an important precursor of vanillin that is available in abundance in cell walls of cereals like wheat, corn, and rice. Phenolic biotransformations can occur during growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB, and their production can be made feasible using specialized LAB strains that have been reported to produce ferulic acid esterases. The present study aimed at screening a panel of LAB isolates for their ability to release phenolics from agrowaste materials like rice bran and their biotransformation to industrially important compounds such as ferulic acid, 4-ethyl phenol, vanillic acid, vanillin, and vanillyl alcohol. Bacterial isolates were evaluated using ferulic acid esterase, ferulic acid decarboxylase, and vanillin dehydrogenase assays. This work highlights the importance of lactic acid bacteria in phenolic biotransformations for the development of food grade flavours and additives.

  12. Phenolic biotransformations during conversion of ferulic acid to vanillin by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Baljinder; Chakraborty, Debkumar; Kumar, Balvir

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin is widely used as food additive and as a masking agent in various pharmaceutical formulations. Ferulic acid is an important precursor of vanillin that is available in abundance in cell walls of cereals like wheat, corn, and rice. Phenolic biotransformations can occur during growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and their production can be made feasible using specialized LAB strains that have been reported to produce ferulic acid esterases. The present study aimed at screening a panel of LAB isolates for their ability to release phenolics from agrowaste materials like rice bran and their biotransformation to industrially important compounds such as ferulic acid, 4-ethyl phenol, vanillic acid, vanillin, and vanillyl alcohol. Bacterial isolates were evaluated using ferulic acid esterase, ferulic acid decarboxylase, and vanillin dehydrogenase assays. This work highlights the importance of lactic acid bacteria in phenolic biotransformations for the development of food grade flavours and additives.

  13. Phenolic Biotransformations during Conversion of Ferulic Acid to Vanillin by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Baljinder; Kumar, Balvir

    2013-01-01

    Vanillin is widely used as food additive and as a masking agent in various pharmaceutical formulations. Ferulic acid is an important precursor of vanillin that is available in abundance in cell walls of cereals like wheat, corn, and rice. Phenolic biotransformations can occur during growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and their production can be made feasible using specialized LAB strains that have been reported to produce ferulic acid esterases. The present study aimed at screening a panel of LAB isolates for their ability to release phenolics from agrowaste materials like rice bran and their biotransformation to industrially important compounds such as ferulic acid, 4-ethyl phenol, vanillic acid, vanillin, and vanillyl alcohol. Bacterial isolates were evaluated using ferulic acid esterase, ferulic acid decarboxylase, and vanillin dehydrogenase assays. This work highlights the importance of lactic acid bacteria in phenolic biotransformations for the development of food grade flavours and additives. PMID:24066293

  14. Cocrystallization as a tool to solve deliquescence issues: The case of L-lactic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Maere d'Aertrycke, J. B.; Robeyns, K.; Willocq, J.; Leyssens, T.

    2017-08-01

    L-Lactic acid is an organic acid used in various fields such as food, cosmetic or pharmaceutical industry. It furthermore is the building-block of poly-lactic acid, a biodegradable and bioavailable polymer. Still, handling L-lactic acid under its solid form remains less straightforward mainly due to its deliquescent behavior, a phase transition from the solid to the dissolved state resulting from air humidity absorption. If several techniques are already known to avoid or reduce deliquescence, the use of cocrystallization in this context is still poorly investigated. In this paper, we investigate whether cocrystallization can be used as a suitable solution for deliquescence in the case of L-lactic acid. Out of 32 possible coformers tested, four were found to form cocrystals with L-lactic acid and the crystal structures of 1:1 L-lactic acid:D-tryptophan and 1:1 L-lactic acid:3-nitrobenzamide were determined. The hygroscopic behavior of these latter two was studied and compared to the behavior of pure L-lactic acid. Significant improvement was observed: dynamic vapor sorption at 25 °C revealed that water absorbed at 90% relative humidity dropped from 1.3157 g/gsample to 0.0017 g/gsample or 0.0299 g/gsample, with cocrystals of D-tryptophan and 3-nitrobenzamide respectively. This illustrates the effectiveness of cocrystallization as a tool to treat deliquescent materials.

  15. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria for applications in vegetarian food products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charernjiratrakul, W.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Total of 225 isolates of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from 152 samples of various fermented foods. The strains were investigated for their probiotic properties based on stability in bile salt (0.30% and high acidity (pH 3, growth under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, ability to grow without vitamin B12. According to the above criteria, 40 isolates were selected. Using an agar spot method, 16 isolates were able to inhibit Salmonella typhimurium, S. typhi, S. enteritidis, S. paratyphi and 4 strains of E. coli O157 : H7 as clear zone greater than 10 mm. Moreover, utilization of protein or fat or starch was also considered. Only 5 isolates were able to utilize protein and further selected for antibiotics sensitivity test. The selected isolates were susceptible to following antibiotics: ampicillin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin , kanamycin, tetracycline and vancomycin; however they were resistant to ceptazidime and norfloxacin. They all showed better growth in vegetarian medium (coconut juice medium than MRS medium both under static and shaking conditions. Five active isolates were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum LL13, LN18, LP11, LS35 and Pediococcus pentosaceus LT02 by API 50 CH system. All cultures grew well in carrot juice by reducing pH from 6.4 to below 4.0 after 24 h of fermentation at 35oC. The lactic cultures in fermented carrot juice lost their viability about 2 log cycles after 15 days of cold storage at 4oC.

  16. Facial volumetric correction with injectable poly-L-lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleggaar, Danny

    2005-11-01

    Polymers of lactic acid'have been widely used for many years in different types of medical devices, such as resorbable sutures, intrabone implants, and soft tissue implants. Injectable poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA; Sculptra), a synthetic, biodegradable polymer, has gained widespread popularity in Europe for the treatment of facial changes associated with aging. To provide background information on injectable PLLA and to describe clinical experience with its use in Europe for facial volume enhancement. Technique varies with site of injection. Generally, the product is implanted subcutaneously or intradermally in a series of treatments. No allergy testing is required. Based on experience in more than 2,500 patients, injectable PLLA has been used successfully for the correction of nasolabial folds, mid- and lower facial volume loss, jawline laxity, and other signs of facial aging. Correction lasts for 18 to 24 months in most patients. Injectable PLLA treatment provides an excellent and prolonged correction of a variety of facial wrinkles, depressions, and laxity with a minimally invasive procedure that does not require allergy testing or a recovery period.

  17. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria as an alternative to antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Ołdak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriocins are ribosomally synthesized, proteinaceous substances that inhibit the growth of closely related species through numerous mechanisms. The classification system used in this review divided bacteriocins into four sub-groups based on their size. Currently, there is extensive research focused on bacteriocins and their usage as a food preservative.The increasing incidence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens is one of the most pressing medical problems in recent years. Recently, the potential clinical application of LAB (Lactic Acid Bacteria bacteriocin has been the subject of investigations by many scientists.Bacteriocins can be considered in a sense as antibiotic, although they differ from conventional antibiotics in numerous aspects. The gene-encoded nature of bacteriocins makes them easily amenable through bioengineering to either increase their activity or specify target microorganism. Owing to this feature of bacteriocins, antibiotic therapy would become less damaging to the natural gut microflora, which is a common drawback of conventional antibiotic use. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria represent one of the most studied microbial defense systems and the idea of subjecting them to bioengineering to either increase antimicrobial activity or further specify their target microorganism is now a rapidly expanding field. This review aimed to present bacteriocins as a possible alternative to conventional antibiotics basic on latest scientific data.

  18. Probiotic properties of endemic strains of lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora N. Tkhruni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from various samples of matsun, yogurt and salted cheese from natural farms of Armenia were studied. They have high antimicrobial and probiotic activities, growth rate and differ by their resistance to enzymes. Supernatants of LAB retain bactericidal activity at рН 3.0-8.0 and inhibit growth of various microflora. The application of different methods of identification and LAB genotyping (API 50 CH, 16S rRNA sequencing, GS-PCR, RAPD PCR showed that isolated LAB evidenced a 99.9% similarity with L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum and L. pentosus species and coccoid forms of Streptococcus and Enterococcus species. It can be concluded, that some strains of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from dairy products from natural farms of Armenia, can be properly used for biopreservation of some foodstuffs. On the basis of experimental data, the LAB can be used as basis for obtaining the new products of functional nutrition.

  19. The use of lactic acid bacteria to reduce mercury bioaccessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadán-Piedra, C; Alcántara, C; Monedero, V; Zúñiga, M; Vélez, D; Devesa, V

    2017-08-01

    Mercury in food is present in either inorganic [Hg(II)] or methylmercury (CH 3 Hg) form. Intestinal absorption of mercury is influenced by interactions with other food components. The use of dietary components to reduce mercury bioavailability has been previously proposed. The aim of this work is to explore the use of lactic acid bacteria to reduce the amount of mercury solubilized after gastrointestinal digestion and available for absorption (bioaccessibility). Ten strains were tested by addition to aqueous solutions containing Hg(II) or CH 3 Hg, or to food samples, and submission of the mixtures to gastrointestinal digestion. All of the strains assayed reduce the soluble fraction from standards of mercury species under gastrointestinal digestion conditions (72-98%). However their effectiveness is lower in food, and reductions in bioaccessibility are only observed with mushrooms (⩽68%). It is hypothesized that bioaccessible mercury in seafood forms part of complexes that do not interact with lactic acid bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. SOLID AND LIQUID PINEAPPLE WASTE UTILIZATION FOR LACTIC ACID FERMENTATION USING Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The liquid and solid  pineapple wastes contain mainly sucrose, glucose, fructose and other nutrients. It therefore can potentially be used as carbon source for fermentation to produce organic acid. Recently, lactic acid has been considered to be an important raw material for production of biodegradable lactate polymer. The experiments were  carried out in batch fermentation using  the  liquid and solid pineapple wastes to produce lactic acid. The anaerobic fermentation of lactic acid were performed at 40 oC, pH 6, 5% inocolum and  50 rpm. Initially  results show that the liquid pineapple waste by  using Lactobacillus delbrueckii can be used as carbon source  for lactic acid fermentation. The production of lactic acid  are found to be 79 % yield, while only  56% yield was produced by using solid waste. 

  1. Purification of bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Lucila; Castellano, Patricia; Sesma, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    Bacteriocins are antibacterial substances of a proteinaceous nature that are produced by different bacterial species. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) produce biologically active peptides or protein complexes that display a bactericidal mode of action almost exclusively toward Gram-positive bacteria and particularly toward closely related species. Generally they are active against food spoilage and foodborne pathogenic microorganisms including Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes. There is an increased tendency to use natural occurring metabolites to prevent the growth of undesirable flora in foodstuffs. These metabolites could replace the use of chemical additives such as sorbic acid, sulfur dioxide, nitrite, nitrate, and others. For instance, bacteriocins produced by LAB may be promising for use as bio-preservaties. Bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria are typically cationic, hydrophobic peptides and differ widely in many characteristics including molecular weight, presence of particular groups of amino acids, pI, net positive charge, and post-translational modifications of certain amino acids. This heterogeneity within the LAB bacteriocins may explain the different procedures for isolation and purification developed so far. The methods most frequently used for isolation, concentration, and purification involve salt precipitation of bacteriocins from culture supernatants, followed by various combinations of gel filtration, ion-exchange chromatography, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). In this chapter, a protocol is described that combines several methods used in our laboratory for the purification of two cationic bacteriocins, Lactocin 705AL and Enterocin CRL10, produced by Lactobacillus casei CRL705 and Enterococcus mundtii CRL10, respectively.

  2. Metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for the production of nutraceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, J.; Sybesma, W.; Groot, M.N.; Wisselink, W.; Ladero, V.; Burgess, K.; Sinderen, van D.; Piard, J.C.; Eggink, G.; Smid, E.J.; Savoy, G.; Sesma, F.; Jansen, T.; Hols, P.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria display a relatively simple and well-described metabolism where the sugar source is converted mainly to lactic acid. Here we will shortly describe metabolic engineering strategies on the level of sugar metabolism, that lead to either the efficient re-routing of the lactococcal

  3. Treating Simple Tibia Fractures with Poly-DL-Lactic Acid Screw as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) absorbable screw as a ... fractures. Keywords: Simple tibia fracture, Fracture healing time Poly-DL-lactic acid, Poly-DL-Lactic Acid, ..... bilateral cortex of the bone due to the weak anti- ... Hu YL, Yuan WQ, Wang LF, Liu HF, Jin D. A prospective.

  4. Characterization of anti-listerial lactic acid bacteria isolated from Thai fermented fish products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Anya; Embarek, Peter Karim Ben; Wedell-Neergaard, C.

    1998-01-01

    Thai fermented fish products were screened for lactic acid bacteria capable of inhibiting Listeria sp. (Listeria innocua). Of 4150 assumed lactic acid bacteria colonies from MRS agar plates that were screened by an agar-overlay method 58 (1.4%) were positive. Forty four of these strains were...

  5. Influence of rice straw-derived dissolved organic matter on lactic acid fermentation by Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingxuan; Wang, Xiahui; Xue, Yiyun; Zhang, Tian-Ao; Li, Yuhao; Hu, Jiajun; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Zhang, Hongsheng; Gao, Min-Tian

    2018-01-31

    Rice straw can be used as carbon sources for lactic acid fermentation. However, only a small amount of lactic acid is produced even though Rhizopus oryzae can consume glucose in rice straw-derived hydrolysates. This study correlated the inhibitory effect of rice straw with rice straw-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM). Lactic acid fermentations with and without DOM were conducted to investigate the effect of DOM on lactic acid fermentation by R. oryzae. Fermentation using control medium with DOM showed a similar trend to fermentation with rice straw-derived hydrolysates, showing that DOM contained the major inhibitor of rice straw. DOM assay indicated that it mainly consisted of polyphenols and polysaccharides. The addition of polyphenols and polysaccharides derived from rice straw confirmed that lactic acid fermentation was promoted by polysaccharides and significantly inhibited by polyphenols. The removal of polyphenols also improved lactic acid production. However, the loss of polysaccharides during the removal of polyphenols resulted in low glucose consumption. This study is the first to investigate the effects of rice straw-derived DOM on lactic acid fermentation by R. oryzae. The results may provide a theoretical basis for identifying inhibitors and promoters associated with lactic acid fermentation and for establishing suitable pretreatment methods. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of different media on production of lactic acid from whey by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whey containing 50 g.l -1 lactose was fermented to lactic acid in batch process by Lactobacillus bulgaricus. The impact of 5 different media with change in volume percent of whey and nutrient was investigated at 32 ± 0.5°C. Substrate consumption and lactic acid production were determined at 0, 12, 24, 36, 48, 60 and 72 h.

  7. SLUG FLOW CAPILLARY MICROREACTORS FOR LACTIC ACID EXTRACTION: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND MASS TRANSFER MODELLING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanti, Susanti; Winkelman, Jozef; Schuur, Boelo; Heeres, Hero; Yue, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important commercial product and has been widely used for manufacturing biodegradable polymer. Current method of lactic acid isolation from fermentation broths is energy intensive and leads to the formation of large amounts of salts. Reactive liquid-liquid extraction has been

  8. Lactic acid fermentation of two sorghum varieties is not affected by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to investigate sorghum grain variety differences in lactic acid fermentation based on their differences in phenolic contents. The study wa s conductedas a 2 x 5 x 4 factorial design with three factors: Factor 1: Sorghum variety (white and red sorghum); Factor 2: Control treatment without lactic acid ...

  9. Hydrolytic breakdown of lactoferricin by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Moushumi; Somkuti, George A

    2010-02-01

    Lactoferricin is a 25-amino acid antimicrobial peptide fragment that is liberated by pepsin digestion of lactoferrin present in bovine milk. Along with its antibacterial properties, lactoferricin has also been reported to have immunostimulatory, antiviral, and anticarcinogenic effects. These attributes provide lactoferricin and other natural bioactive peptides with the potential to be functional food ingredients that can be used by the food industry in a variety of applications. At present, commercial uses of these types of compounds are limited by the scarcity of information on their ability to survive food processing environments. We have monitored the degradation of lactoferricin during its incubation with two types of lactic acid bacteria used in the yogurt-making industry, Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, with the aim of assessing the stability of this milk protein-derived peptide under simulated yogurt-making conditions. Analysis of the hydrolysis products isolated from these experiments indicates degradation of this peptide near neutral pH by lactic acid bacteria-associated peptidases, the extent of which was influenced by the bacterial strain used. However, the data also showed that compared to other milk-derived bioactive peptides that undergo complete degradation under these conditions, the 25-amino acid lactoferricin is apparently more resistant, with approximately 50% of the starting material remaining after 4 h of incubation. These findings imply that lactoferricin, as a natural milk protein-derived peptide, has potential applications in the commercial production of yogurt-like fermented dairy products as a multi-functional food ingredient.

  10. Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesković-Moračanin Slavica M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB have an essential role in the production of fermented products. With their metabolic activity, they influence the ripening processes - leading to desired sensory qualities while at the same time inhibiting the growth of undesired microorganisms. Because of their dominant role during fermentation and because of a long tradition of utilization, Lhave been designated as “safe microbiota”. Biological protection of LAB, as a naturally present and/or selected and intentionally added microflora, is realized through the production of non-specific (lactic acid, acetic acid and other volatile organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, diacetyl, etc and specific metabolites, bacteriocins. Bacteriocins are extracellularly released proteins or peptides which possess certain antibacterial activity towards certain types of microorganisms, usually related to the producing bacteria. Today, bacteriocins represent a very interesting potential for their application in the food industry. Their application can reduce the use of synthetic preservatives and/or the intensity of thermal treatment during food production consumer’s need for safe, fresh and minimally-processed food. With the intention of realizing this potential to the fullest, it is necessary to understand the nature of bacteriocins, their production mechanisms, regulations and actions, as well as the influence of external factors on the their antimicrobial activity. The composition of food, i.e. its characteristics (pH, temperature, ingredients and additives, types and quantities of epiphytic microbiota and the actual technological process used in production, can all influence the stability and activity of the added bacteriocins. The future research in this field should also aim to clarify this unknown aspect of the application of bacteriocins, to provide the necessary knowledge about the optimization of the external conditions and open up the possibility of discovering their new

  11. Betaine and beet molasses enhance L-lactic acid production by Bacillus coagulans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Xu

    Full Text Available Lactic acid is an important chemical with various industrial applications, and it can be efficiently produced by fermentation, in which Bacillus coagulans strains present excellent performance. Betaine can promote lactic acid fermentation as an effective osmoprotectant. Here, positive effect of betaine on fermentation by B. coagulans is revealed. Betaine could enhance lactic acid production by protecting l-LDH activity and cell growth from osmotic inhibition, especially under high glucose concentrations and with poor organic nitrogen nutrients. The fermentation with 0.05 g/L betaine could produce 17.9% more lactic acid compared to the fermentation without betaine. Beet molasses, which is rich in sucrose and betaine, was utilized in a co-feeding fermentation and raised the productivity by 22%. The efficient lactic acid fermentation by B. coagulans is thus developed by using betaine and beet molasses.

  12. Betaine and beet molasses enhance L-lactic acid production by Bacillus coagulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important chemical with various industrial applications, and it can be efficiently produced by fermentation, in which Bacillus coagulans strains present excellent performance. Betaine can promote lactic acid fermentation as an effective osmoprotectant. Here, positive effect of betaine on fermentation by B. coagulans is revealed. Betaine could enhance lactic acid production by protecting l-LDH activity and cell growth from osmotic inhibition, especially under high glucose concentrations and with poor organic nitrogen nutrients. The fermentation with 0.05 g/L betaine could produce 17.9% more lactic acid compared to the fermentation without betaine. Beet molasses, which is rich in sucrose and betaine, was utilized in a co-feeding fermentation and raised the productivity by 22%. The efficient lactic acid fermentation by B. coagulans is thus developed by using betaine and beet molasses.

  13. Metabolic strategies of beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria in beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Andreas J; Behr, Jürgen; von Kamp, Kristina; Vogel, Rudi F

    2016-01-04

    Beer contains only limited amounts of readily fermentable carbohydrates and amino acids. Beer spoilage lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have to come up with metabolic strategies in order to deal with selective nutrient content, high energy demand of hop tolerance mechanisms and a low pH. The metabolism of 26 LAB strains of 6 species and varying spoilage potentialwas investigated in order to define and compare their metabolic capabilities using multivariate statistics and outline possible metabolic strategies. Metabolic capabilities of beer spoilage LAB regarding carbohydrate and amino acids did not correlate with spoilage potential, but with fermentation type (heterofermentative/homofermentative) and species. A shift to mixed acid fermentation by homofermentative (hof) Pediococcus claussenii and Lactobacillus backii was observed as a specific feature of their growth in beer. For heterofermentative (hef) LAB a mostly versatile carbohydrate metabolism could be demonstrated, supplementing the known relevance of organic acids for their growth in beer. For hef LAB a distinct amino acid metabolism, resulting in biogenic amine production, was observed, presumably contributing to energy supply and pH homeostasis.

  14. Fermentation of aqueous plant seed extracts by lactic acid bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafner, D.W.; Beuchat, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of lactic acid bacterial fermentation on chemical and physical changes in aqueous extracts of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peanut (Arachis hypogea), soybean (Glycine max), and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) were studied. The bacteria investigated were Lactobacillus helveticus, L. delbrueckii, L. casei, L. bulgaricus, L. acidophilus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. Organisms were inoculated individually into all of the seed extracts; L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus were also evaluated together as inocula for fermenting the legume extracts. During fermentation, bacterial population and changes in titratable acidity, pH, viscosity, and color were measured over a 72 h period at 37 degrees C. Maximum bacterial populations, titratable acidity, pH, and viscosity varied depending upon the type of extract and bacterial strain. The maximum population of each organism was influenced by fermentable carbohydrates, which, in turn, influenced acid production and change in pH. Change in viscosity was correlated with the amount of protein and titratable acidity of products. Color was affected by pasteurization treatment and fermentation as well as the source of extract. In the extracts inoculated simultaneously with L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus, a synergistic effect resulted in increased bacterial populations, titratable acidity, and viscosity, and decreased pH in all the legume extracts when compared to the extracts fermented with either of these organisms individually. Fermented extracts offer potential as substitutes for cultured dairy products. 24 references.

  15. A perspective on Serum Lactic acid, Lactic Acidosis in a Critical Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agela A.Elbadri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the major surgical problems encountered in Libya. Lactic acidosis is a universal complication in breast cancer patients and can be considered a possible prognostic marker. Therefore, it will be beneficial to correctly understand and review the biochemistry underlying lactic acidosis and its possible significance as a prognostic marker in critical care patients, including breast cancer.

  16. The influence of brewers' yeast addition on lactic acid fermentation of brewers' spent grain hydrolysate by Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    OpenAIRE

    Pejin, Jelena; Radosavljević, Miloš; Kocić-Tanackov, Sunčica; Đukić-Vuković, Aleksandra; Mladenović, Dragana; Mojović, Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    In this study brewers' spent grain (BSG) hydrolysate was produced using optimal conditions. Hydrolysates were used for lactic acid fermentation by Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469. The aim of this study was to evaluate possibilities of the BSG hydrolysate utilization as a substrate for lactic acid fermentation as well as the effect of dry brewers' yeast (1.0, 3.0, and 5.0 %) addition in hydrolysate on lactic acid fermentation parameters (L-(+)-lactic acid and reducing sugars concentration an...

  17. M2-like macrophage polarization in high lactic acid-producing head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Toshimitsu; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Akazawa, Takashi; Sato, Katsuya; Kuze, Bunya; Mizuta, Keisuke; Hara, Akira; Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Inoue, Norimitsu; Ito, Yatsuji

    2017-06-01

    Reprogramming of glucose metabolism in tumor cells is referred to as the Warburg effect and results in increased lactic acid secretion into the tumor microenvironment. We have previously shown that lactic acid has important roles as a pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive mediator and promotes tumor progression. In this study, we examined the relationship between the lactic acid concentration and expression of LDHA and GLUT1, which are related to the Warburg effect, in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Tumors expressing lower levels of LDHA and GLUT1 had a higher concentration of lactic acid than those with higher LDHA and GLUT1 expression. Lactic acid also suppressed the expression of LDHA and GLUT1 in vitro. We previously reported that lactic acid enhances expression of an M2 macrophage marker, ARG1, in murine macrophages. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between the lactic acid concentration and polarization of M2 macrophages in HNSCC by measuring the expression of M2 macrophage markers, CSF1R and CD163, normalized using a pan-macrophage marker, CD68. Tumors with lower levels of CD68 showed a higher concentration of lactic acid, whereas those with higher levels of CSF1R showed a significantly higher concentration of lactic acid. A similar tendency was observed for CD163. These results suggest that tumor-secreted lactic acid is linked to the reduction of macrophages in tumors and promotes induction of M2-like macrophage polarization in human HNSCC. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  18. D-Lactic acid biosynthesis from biomass-derived sugars via Lactobacillus delbrueckii fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yixing; Vadlani, Praveen V

    2013-12-01

    Poly-lactic acid (PLA) derived from renewable resources is considered to be a good substitute for petroleum-based plastics. The number of poly L-lactic acid applications is increased by the introduction of a stereocomplex PLA, which consists of both poly-L and D-lactic acid and has a higher melting temperature. To date, several studies have explored the production of L-lactic acid, but information on biosynthesis of D-lactic acid is limited. Pulp and corn stover are abundant, renewable lignocellulosic materials that can be hydrolyzed to sugars and used in biosynthesis of D-lactic acid. In our study, saccharification of pulp and corn stover was done by cellulase CTec2 and sugars generated from hydrolysis were converted to D-lactic acid by a homofermentative strain, L. delbrueckii, through a sequential hydrolysis and fermentation process (SHF) and a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process (SSF). 36.3 g L(-1) of D-lactic acid with 99.8 % optical purity was obtained in the batch fermentation of pulp and attained highest yield and productivity of 0.83 g g(-1) and 1.01 g L(-1) h(-1), respectively. Luedeking-Piret model described the mixed growth-associated production of D-lactic acid with a maximum specific growth rate 0.2 h(-1) and product formation rate 0.026 h(-1), obtained for this strain. The efficient synthesis of D-lactic acid having high optical purity and melting point will lead to unique stereocomplex PLA with innovative applications in polymer industry.

  19. Amino acid catabolism and generation of volatiles by lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Tavaria, F. K.; Dahl, S.; Carballo, F. J.; Malcata, F. X.

    2002-01-01

    Twelve isolates of lactic acid bacteria, belonging to the Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, and Enterococcus genera, were previously isolated from 180- d-old Serra da Estrela cheese, a traditional Portuguese cheese manufactured from raw milk and coagulated with a plant rennet. These isolates were subsequently tested for their ability to catabolize free amino acids, when incubated independently with each amino acid in free form or with a mixture thereof. Attempts...

  20. Efficient production of l-lactic acid by an engineered Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense with broad substrate specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Efficient conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to optically pure lactic acid is a key challenge for the economical production of biodegradable poly-lactic acid. A recently isolated strain, Thermoanaerobacterium aotearoense SCUT27, is promising as an efficient lactic acid production bacterium from biomass due to its broad substrate specificity. Additionally, its strictly anaerobic and thermophilic characteristics suppress contamination from other microoragnisms. Herein, we report the significant improvements of concentration and yield in lactic acid production from various lignocellulosic derived sugars, achieved by the carbon flux redirection through homologous recombination in T. aotearoense SCUT27. Results T. aotearoense SCUT27 was engineered to block the acetic acid formation pathway to improve the lactic acid production. The genetic manipulation resulted in 1.8 and 2.1 fold increase of the lactic acid yield using 10 g/L of glucose or 10 g/L of xylose as substrate, respectively. The maximum l-lactic acid yield of 0.93 g/g glucose with an optical purity of 99.3% was obtained by the engineered strain, designated as LA1002, from 50 g/L of substrate, which is very close to the theoretical value (1.0 g/g of glucose). In particular, LA1002 produced lactic acid at an unprecedented concentration up to 3.20 g/L using 10 g/L xylan as the single substrate without any pretreatment after 48 h fermentation. The non-sterilized fermentative production of l-lactic acid was also carried out, achieving values of 44.89 g/L and 0.89 g/g mixed sugar for lactic acid concentration and yield, respectively. Conclusions Blocking acetic acid formation pathway in T. aotearoense SCUT27 increased l-lactic acid production and yield dramatically. To our best knowledge, this is the best performance of fermentation on lactic acid production using xylan as the sole carbon source, considering the final concentration, yield and fermentation time. In addition, it should be

  1. Cascade Production of Lactic Acid from Universal Types of Sugars Catalyzed by Lanthanum Triflate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dajiang; Kim, Kwang Ho; Sun, Jian; Simmons, Blake A; Singh, Seema

    2018-02-09

    Lignocellulosic biomass conversion into value-added platform chemicals in the non-toxic, water-tolerant Lewis acid, and water solutions bears the hallmark of green chemistry. Lactic acid derived from biomass is an important chemical building block for biodegradable polymers such as polylactide. Herein, a universal method of converting lignocellulosic sugars into lactic acid using catalytic amount of water-stable Lewis acid La(OTf) 3 is demonstrated. The lignocellulosic sugars studied in this work include 1) pyrolytic sugars from pyrolysis oil, and 2) sugars derived from ionic liquid (IL)-pretreated biomass. Under moderate conditions (250 °C, 1 h), levoglucosan (major pyrolytic sugar), glucose, and xylose were converted into lactic acid with carbon-based molar yields of 75, 74, and 61 %, respectively. Furthermore, roughly 49 mol % (based on levoglucosan) and 74 wt % (relative to pretreated biomass) of lactic acid were obtained from the conversion of pyrolytic sugars and sugar-rich fraction after lignin removal from switchgrass, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first reported conversion of pyrolytic sugar into lactic acid by chemocatalysis and also lignocellulosic sugars are converted into lactic acid without hydrolysis. This approach could potentially be extended to other lignocellulosic sugars after simple removal of lignin from biomass pretreatment, rendering moderate to high yields of lactic acid. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Anaerobic conversion of lactic acid to acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol by Lactobacillus buchneri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, SJWHO; Krooneman, J; Gottschal, JC; Spoelstra, SF; Faber, F; Driehuis, F

    The degradation of lactic acid under anoxic conditions was studied in several strains of Lactobacillus buchneri and in close relatives such as Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus kefir, and Lactobacillus hilgardii. Of these lactobacilli, L. buchneri and L. parabuchneri were able to degrade

  3. Anaerobic conversion of lactic acid to acetic acid and 1,2-propanediol by Lactobacillus buchneri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, S.; Krooneman, J.; Gottschal, J.C.; Spoelstra, S.F.; Faber, F.; Driehuis, F.

    2001-01-01

    The degradation of lactic acid under anoxic conditions was studied in several strains of Lactobacillus buchneri and in close relatives such as Lactobacillus parabuchneri, Lactobacillus kefir, and Lactobacillus hilgardii. Of these lactobacilli, L. buchneri and L. parabuchneri were able to degrade

  4. Nanosized Minicells Generated by Lactic Acid Bacteria for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huu Ngoc Nguyen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has the ability to target specific areas of the body, controlling the drug release and significantly increasing the bioavailability of active compounds. Organic and inorganic nanoparticles have been developed for drug delivery systems. Many delivery systems are through clinical stages for development and market. Minicell, a nanosized cell generated by bacteria, is a potential particle for drug delivery because of its size, safety, and biodegradability. Minicells produced by bacteria could drive therapeutic agents against cancer, microbial infection, and other diseases by targeting. In addition, minicells generated by lactic acid bacteria being probiotics are more interesting than others because of their benefits like safety, immunological improvement, and biodegradation. This review aims to highlight the stages of development of nanoparticle for drug delivery and discuss their advantages and limitations to clarify minicells as a new opportunity for the development of potential nanoparticle for drug delivery.

  5. NANOCOMPOSITES OF POLY(LACTIC ACID REINFORCED WITH CELLULOSE NANOFIBRILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Zhang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A chemo-mechanical method was used to prepare cellulose nanofibrils dispersed uniformly in an organic solvent. Poly(ethylene glycol (PEG 1000 was added to the matrix as a compatibilizer to improve the interfacial interaction between the hydrophobic poly(lactic acid (PLA and the hydrophilic cellulose nanofibrils. The composites obtained by solvent casting methods from N,N-Dimethylacetamide (DMAc were characterized by tensile testing machine, atomic force microscope (AFM, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. The tensile test results indicated that, by adding PEG to the PLA and the cellulose nanofibrils matrix, the tensile strength and the elongation rate increased by 56.7% and 60%, respectively, compared with the PLA/cellulose nanofibrils composites. The FT-IR analysis successfully showed that PEG improved the intermolecular interaction, which is based on the existence of inter-molecular hydrogen bonding among PLA, PEG, and cellulose nanofibrils.

  6. Temperature dependence of poly(lactic acid) mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chengbo; Guo, Huilong; Li, Jingqing

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of polymers are not only determined by their structures, but also related to the temperature field in which they are located. The yield behaviors, Young's modulus and structures of injection-molded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) samples after annealing at different temperatures....... The crystallinity increases with increasing annealing temperature and a' form crystal is formed when the annealing temperature is higher than 100 oC. The stretched samples with low crystallinity show the first yield at draw temperatures below the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the second yield above Tg....... For the samples annealed between 80 and 120 oC, a peculiar double yield appears when stretched within 50–60 oC and only the first or the second yield can be found at the lower and higher draw temperatures. The yield strain and yield stress together with Young's modulus were obtained and discussed in terms...

  7. Genomics of lactic acid bacteria: Current status and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2017-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used for the production of a variety of foods and feed raw materials where they contribute to flavor and texture of the fermented products. In addition, specific LAB strains are considered as probiotic due to their health-promoting effects in consumers. Recently, the genome sequencing of LAB is booming and the increased amount of published genomics data brings unprecedented opportunity for us to reveal the important traits of LAB. This review describes the recent progress on LAB genomics and special emphasis is placed on understanding the industry-related physiological features based on genomics analysis. Moreover, strategies to engineer metabolic capacity and stress tolerance of LAB with improved industrial performance are also discussed.

  8. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMahony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species.

  9. Phytase-active lactic acid bacteria from sourdoughs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nuobariene, Lina; Cizeikiene, Dalia; Gradzeviciute, Egle

    2015-01-01

    Whole-grain foods play an important role in human diet as they are relatively rich in minerals, however, the absorption of those minerals in human gut can be very low due to high content of the mineral binding phytate. Therefore, the object of this study was to identify phytase-active lactic acid...... bacteria (LAB) which could be used as a starter to increase mineral bioavailability in whole-meal bread. Hence, LAB isolates were isolated from Lithuanian sourdoughs, tested for phytase activity, and phytase active isolates were identified. Studies of phytase activity of the isolates were carried out...... at conditions optimal for leavening of bread dough (pH 5.5 and 30°C). The phytase active isolates belonged to the species Lactobacillus panis, Lactobacillus reuteri, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Pediococcus pentosaceus. Phytase activities of the tested LAB isolates were both extra- and intra...

  10. Antimicrobial Activity – The Most Important Property of Probiotic and Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaženka Kos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of industrially important lactic acid bacteria as starter cultures and probiotic bacteria is the main subject of this review. This activity has been attributed to the production of metabolites such as organic acids (lactic and acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, diacetyl, acetaldehyde, acetoine, carbon dioxide, reuterin, reutericyclin and bacteriocins. The potential of using bacteriocins of lactic acid bacteria, primarily used as biopreservatives, represents a perspective, alternative antimicrobial strategy for continuously increasing problem with antibiotic resistance. Another strategy in resolving this problem is an application of probiotics for different gastrointestinal and urogenital infection therapies.

  11. A Glutamic Acid-Producing Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Malaysian Fermented Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareian, Mohsen; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Bakar, Fatimah Abu; Mohamed, Abdul Karim Sabo; Forghani, Bita; Ab-Kadir, Mohd Safuan B.; Saari, Nazamid

    2012-01-01

    l-glutamaic acid is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and an important intermediate in metabolism. In the present study, lactic acid bacteria (218) were isolated from six different fermented foods as potent sources of glutamic acid producers. The presumptive bacteria were tested for their ability to synthesize glutamic acid. Out of the 35 strains showing this capability, strain MNZ was determined as the highest glutamic-acid producer. Identification tests including 16S rRNA gene sequencing and sugar assimilation ability identified the strain MNZ as Lactobacillus plantarum. The characteristics of this microorganism related to its glutamic acid-producing ability, growth rate, glucose consumption and pH profile were studied. Results revealed that glutamic acid was formed inside the cell and excreted into the extracellular medium. Glutamic acid production was found to be growth-associated and glucose significantly enhanced glutamic acid production (1.032 mmol/L) compared to other carbon sources. A concentration of 0.7% ammonium nitrate as a nitrogen source effectively enhanced glutamic acid production. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of glutamic acid production by lactic acid bacteria. The results of this study can be further applied for developing functional foods enriched in glutamic acid and subsequently γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) as a bioactive compound. PMID:22754309

  12. Opportunities, perspectives and limits in lactic acid production from waste and industrial by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Dragana D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In line with the goals of sustainable development and environmental protection today great attention is directed towards new technologies for waste and industrial by-products utilization. Waste products represent potentially good raw material for production other valuable products, such as bioethanol, biogas, biodiesel, organic acids, enzymes, microbial biomass, etc. Since the first industrial production to the present, lactic acid has found wide application in food, cosmetic, pharmaceutical and chemical industries. In recent years, the demand for lactic acid has been increasing considerably owing to its potential use as a monomer for the production of poly-lactic acid (PLA polymers which are biodegradable and biocompatible with wide applications. Waste and industrial by-products such are whey, molasses, stillage, waste starch and lignocellulosic materials are a good source of fermentable sugars and many other substances of great importance for the growth of microorganisms, such as proteins, minerals and vitamins. Utilization of waste products for production of lactic acid could help to reduce the total cost of lactic acid production and except the economic viability of the process offers a solution of their disposal. Fermentation process depends on chemical and physical nature of feedstocks and the lactic acid producer. This review describes the characteristics, abilities and limits of microorganisms involved in lactic acid production, as well as the characteristics and types of waste products for lactic acid production. The fermentation methods that have been recently reported to improve lactic acid production are summarized and compared. In order to improve processes and productivity, fed-batch fermentation, fermentation with immobilized cell systems and mixed cultures and opportunities of open (non-sterilized fermentation have been investigated.

  13. Highly efficient production of D-lactic acid from chicory-derived inulin by Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qianqian; Zang, Ying; Zhou, Jie; Liu, Peng; Li, Xin; Yong, Qiang; Ouyang, Jia

    2016-11-01

    Inulin is a readily available feedstock for cost-effective production of biochemicals. To date, several studies have explored the production of bioethanol, high-fructose syrup and fructooligosaccharide, but there are no studies regarding the production of D-lactic acid using inulin as a carbon source. In the present study, chicory-derived inulin was used for D-lactic acid biosynthesis by Lactobacillus bulgaricus CGMCC 1.6970. Compared with separate hydrolysis and fermentation processes, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) has demonstrated the best performance of D-lactic acid production. Because it prevents fructose inhibition and promotes the complete hydrolysis of inulin, the highest D-lactic acid concentration (123.6 ± 0.9 g/L) with a yield of 97.9 % was obtained from 120 g/L inulin by SSF. Moreover, SSF by L. bulgaricus CGMCC 1.6970 offered another distinct advantage with respect to the higher optical purity of D-lactic acid (>99.9 %) and reduced number of residual sugars. The excellent performance of D-lactic acid production from inulin by SSF represents a high-yield method for D-lactic acid production from non-food grains.

  14. The effect of delignification process with alkaline peroxide on lactic acid production from furfural residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Furfural residues produced from the furfural industry were investigated as a substrate for lactic acid production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF. Alkaline peroxide was used for delignification of furfural residues to improve the final lactic acid concentration. The residue was treated with 1.3% to 1.7% hydrogen peroxide at 80 °C for 1 h with a substrate concentration of 3.33%. SSF of furfural residues with different delignification degrees were carried out to evaluate the effect of delignification degree on lactic acid production. Using corn hydrolysates/ furfural residues as substrates, SSF with different media were carried out to investigate the effect of lignin on the interaction between enzymes and lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria had a negative effect on cellulase, thus resulting in the reduction of enzyme activity. Lignin and nutrients slowed down the decreasing trend of enzyme activity. A higher delignification resulted in a slower fermentation rate and lower yield due to degradation products of lignin and the effect of lignin on the interaction between enzymes and lactic acid bacteria. For the purpose of lactic acid production, a moderate delignification (furfural residues with the lignin content of 14.8% was optimum.

  15. Monascus ruber as cell factory for lactic acid production at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weusthuis, Ruud A; Mars, Astrid E; Springer, Jan; Wolbert, Emil Jh; van der Wal, Hetty; de Vrije, Truus G; Levisson, Mark; Leprince, Audrey; Houweling-Tan, G Bwee; Pha Moers, Antoine; Hendriks, Sjon Na; Mendes, Odette; Griekspoor, Yvonne; Werten, Marc Wt; Schaap, Peter J; van der Oost, John; Eggink, Gerrit

    2017-07-01

    A Monascus ruber strain was isolated that was able to grow on mineral medium at high sugar concentrations and 175g/l lactic acid at pH 2.8. Its genome and transcriptomes were sequenced and annotated. Genes encoding lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were introduced to accomplish lactic acid production and two genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) were knocked out to subdue ethanol formation. The strain preferred lactic acid to glucose as carbon source, which hampered glucose consumption and therefore also lactic acid production. Lactic acid consumption was stopped by knocking out 4 cytochrome-dependent LDH (CLDH) genes, and evolutionary engineering was used to increase the glucose consumption rate. Application of this strain in a fed-batch fermentation resulted in a maximum lactic acid titer of 190g/l at pH 3.8 and 129g/l at pH 2.8, respectively 1.7 and 2.2 times higher than reported in literature before. Yield and productivity were on par with the best strains described in literature for lactic acid production at low pH. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Stimulation of Lactic Acid Bacteria by a Micrococcus Isolate: Evidence for Multiple Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, K. R.; Wagner, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    Growth of, and rate of acid production by, six cultures of lactic acid bacteria were increased in the presence of Micrococcus isolate F4 or a preparation of its capsular material. Concentrations of hydrogen peroxide found in pure cultures of the lactic acid bacteria were not detectable, or were greatly reduced, in mixed culture with Micrococcus isolate F4. The capsular material was not as effective as whole cells in preventing accumulation of H2O2. Catalase stimulated growth of, and the rate of acid production by, the lactic acid bacteria, but not to the same extent as Micrococcus isolate F4 in some cultures. The existence of two mechanisms for micrococcal stimulation of the lactic acid bacteria is postulated. One mechanism involves removal of H2O2; the other has not been characterized. PMID:4199337

  17. Antimicrobial potential of triticale stillage after lactic acid fermentation with Lactobacillus fermentum PL-1

    OpenAIRE

    Kujundžić Žužana; Dimić Gordana R.; Markov Siniša L.; Kocić-Tanackov Sunčica D.; Mojović Ljiljana V.; Pejin Jelena D.; Marković Milica N.

    2013-01-01

    This study is concerned with the testing of antimicrobial activity of triticale stillage obtained after lactic fermentation by Lactobacillus fermentum PL-1. The antimicrobial tests were performed using the disc-diffusion and agar well diffusion methods. It was found that fermented triticale stillage after lactic acid fermentation exhibited an inhibitory effect towards tested Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria: Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis,...

  18. Lactic acid levels in pleural fluid from patients with bacterial pleuritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, T V

    1985-01-01

    Pleural fluid lactic acid estimations were carried out on 60 samples by gas-liquid chromatography. Lactic acid levels in 12 patients with bacterial pleural infection were statistically significantly higher (mean, 287 mg/dl; range, 135 to 482 mg/dl) than in 18 patients with malignancy (mean, 71 mg/dl; range, 24 to 157 mg/dl) and 30 other patients with pleural effusions (mean, 19 mg/dl; range, 10 to 57 mg/dl). The determination of pleural fluid lactic acid may help in differentiating between em...

  19. Breeding L(+)-lactic acid high productive mutant from xylose by nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yingge; Li Wen; Liu Dan; Fan Yonghong; Wang Dongmei; Zheng Zhiming; Yu Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain higher L(+)-lactic acid yield strain fermentating from xylose, the original strain Rhizopus oryzae RLC41-6 was mutated by 10keV N + ion implantation. A mutant strain RQ4012 was obtained. After 72h shake-flask cultivation, the concentration of L(+)-lactic acid reached 74.37g/L, and the productivity was 1.03g/(L.h). Its lactic acid yield was 160% higher than that of the original one, and the mutant strain has high genetic stability. (authors)

  20. pH-, Lactic acid-, and non-lactic acid-dependent activities of probiotic Lactobacilli against Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol-Messaoudi, Domitille; Berger, Cédric N; Coconnier-Polter, Marie-Hélène; Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Servin, Alain L

    2005-10-01

    The mechanism(s) underlying the antibacterial activity of probiotic Lactobacillus strains appears to be multifactorial and includes lowering of the pH and the production of lactic acid and of antibacterial compounds, including bacteriocins and nonbacteriocin, non-lactic acid molecules. Addition of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's minimum essential medium to the incubating medium delays the killing activity of lactic acid. We found that the probiotic strains Lactobacillus johnsonii La1, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus casei Shirota YIT9029, L. casei DN-114 001, and L. rhamnosus GR1 induced a dramatic decrease in the viability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium SL1344 mainly attributable to non-lactic acid molecule(s) present in the cell-free culture supernatant (CFCS). These molecules were more active against serovar Typhimurium SL1344 in the exponential growth phase than in the stationary growth phase. We also showed that the production of the non-lactic acid substance(s) responsible for the killing activity was dependent on growth temperature and that both unstable and stable substances with killing activity were present in the CFCSs. We found that the complete inhibition of serovar Typhimurium SL1344 growth results from a pH-lowering effect.

  1. Amino acids analysis during lactic acid fermentation by single strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L. salivarius alone showed relatively good assimilation of various amino acids that existed at only a little amounts in MRS media (Asn, Asp, Cit, Cys, Glu, His, Lys, Orn, Phe, Pro, Tyr, Arg, Ile, Leu, Met, Ser, Thr, Trp and Val), whereas Ala and Gly accumulated in L. salivarius cultures. P. acidilactici, in contrast, hydrolyzed the ...

  2. Acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa residue for ethanol and lactic acid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cuong Mai; Nguyen, Thanh Ngoc; Choi, Gyung Ja; Choi, Yong Ho; Jang, Kyoung Soo; Park, Youn-Je; Kim, Jin-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the acid hydrolysis of Curcuma longa waste, to obtain the hydrolysate containing lactic acid and ethanol fermentative sugars. A central composite design for describing regression equations of variables was used. The selected optimum condition was 4.91% sulphuric acid, 122.68°C and 50 min using the desirability function under the following conditions: the maximum reducing sugar (RS) yield is within the limited range of the 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and furfural concentrations. Under the condition, the obtained solution contained 144 g RS/L, 0.79 g furfural/L and 2.59 g HMF/L and was directly fermented without a detoxification step. The maximum product concentration, average productivity, RS conversion and product yield were 115.36 g/L, 2.88 g/L/h, 89.43% and 64% for L-lactic acid; 113.92 g/L, 2.59 g/L/h, 88.31% and 63.29% for D-lactic acid; and 55.03 g/L, 1.38 g/L/h, 42.66 and 30.57%, respectively, for ethanol using a 7-L jar fermenter. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Key volatile aroma compounds of lactic acid fermented malt based beverages - impact of lactic acid bacteria strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsogning Dongmo, Sorelle; Sacher, Bertram; Kollmannsberger, Hubert; Becker, Thomas

    2017-08-15

    This study aims to define the aroma composition and key aroma compounds of barley malt wort beverages produced from fermentation using six lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry-olfactometry and flame ionization detection was employed; key aroma compounds were determined by means of aroma extract dilution analysis. Fifty-six detected volatile compounds were similar among beverages. However, significant differences were observed in the concentration of individual compounds. Key aroma compounds (flavor dilution (FD) factors ≥16) were β-damascenone, furaneol, phenylacetic acid, 2-phenylethanol, 4-vinylguaiacol, sotolon, methional, vanillin, acetic acid, nor-furaneol, guaiacol and ethyl 2-methylbutanoate. Furthermore, acetaldehyde had the greatest odor activity value of up to 4266. Sensory analyses revealed large differences in the flavor profile. Beverage from L. plantarum Lp. 758 showed the highest FD factors in key aroma compounds and was correlated to fruity flavors. Therefore, we suggest that suitable LAB strain selection may improve the flavor of malt based beverages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria: production, purification, and food applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuyst, Luc; Leroy, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    In fermented foods, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) display numerous antimicrobial activities. This is mainly due to the production of organic acids, but also of other compounds, such as bacteriocins and antifungal peptides. Several bacteriocins with industrial potential have been purified and characterized. The kinetics of bacteriocin production by LAB in relation to process factors have been studied in detail through mathematical modeling and positive predictive microbiology. Application of bacteriocin-producing starter cultures in sourdough (to increase competitiveness), in fermented sausage (anti-listerial effect), and in cheese (anti-listerial and anti-clostridial effects), have been studied during in vitro laboratory fermentations as well as on pilot-scale level. The highly promising results of these studies underline the important role that functional, bacteriocinogenic LAB strains may play in the food industry as starter cultures, co-cultures, or bioprotective cultures, to improve food quality and safety. In addition, antimicrobial production by probiotic LAB might play a role during in vivo interactions occurring in the human gastrointestinal tract, hence contributing to gut health.

  5. Biodegradation of flax fiber reinforced poly lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Woven and nonwoven flax fiber reinforced poly lactic acid (PLA biocomposites were prepared with amphiphilic additives as accelerator for biodegradation. The prepared composites were buried in farmland soil for biodegradability studies. Loss in weight of the biodegraded composite samples was determined at different time intervals. The surface morphology of the biodegraded composites was studied with scanning electron microscope (SEM. Results indicated that in presence of mandelic acid, the composites showed accelerated biodegradation with 20–25% loss in weight after 50–60 days. On the other hand, in presence of dicumyl peroxide (as additive, biodegradation of the composites was relatively slow as confirmed by only 5–10% loss in weight even after 80–90 days. This was further confirmed by surface morphology of the biodegraded composites. We have attempted to show that depending on the end uses, we can add different amphiphilic additives for delayed or accelerated biodegradability. This work gives us the idea of biodegradation of materials from natural fiber reinforced PLA composites when discarded carelessly in the environment instead of proper waste disposal site.

  6. Transcriptional Response to Lactic Acid Stress in the Hybrid Yeast Zygosaccharomyces parabailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Merino, Raúl A; Kuanyshev, Nurzhan; Byrne, Kevin P; Varela, Javier A; Morrissey, John P; Porro, Danilo; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Branduardi, Paola

    2018-03-01

    Lactic acid has a wide range of applications starting from its undissociated form, and its production using cell factories requires stress-tolerant microbial hosts. The interspecies hybrid yeast Zygosaccharomyces parabailii has great potential to be exploited as a novel host for lactic acid production, due to high organic acid tolerance at low pH and a fermentative metabolism with a high growth rate. Here we used mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to analyze Z. parabailii 's transcriptional response to lactic acid added exogenously, and we explore the biological mechanisms involved in tolerance. Z. parabailii contains two homeologous copies of most genes. Under lactic acid stress, the two genes in each homeolog pair tend to diverge in expression to a significantly greater extent than under control conditions, indicating that stress tolerance is facilitated by interactions between the two gene sets in the hybrid. Lactic acid induces downregulation of genes related to cell wall and plasma membrane functions, possibly altering the rate of diffusion of lactic acid into cells. Genes related to iron transport and redox processes were upregulated, suggesting an important role for respiratory functions and oxidative stress defense. We found differences in the expression profiles of genes putatively regulated by Haa1 and Aft1/Aft2, previously described as lactic acid responsive in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Furthermore, formate dehydrogenase ( FDH ) genes form a lactic acid-responsive gene family that has been specifically amplified in Z. parabailii in comparison to other closely related species. Our study provides a useful starting point for the engineering of Z. parabailii as a host for lactic acid production. IMPORTANCE Hybrid yeasts are important in biotechnology because of their tolerance to harsh industrial conditions. The molecular mechanisms of tolerance can be studied by analyzing differential gene expression under conditions of interest and relating gene expression patterns

  7. Engineering CRISPR interference system in Klebsiella pneumoniae for attenuating lactic acid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingxuan; Zhao, Peng; Li, Ying; Xu, Lida; Tian, Pingfang

    2018-04-05

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a promising industrial species for bioproduction of bulk chemicals such as 1,3-propanediol, 2,3-butanediol and 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP). However, lactic acid is a troublesome by-product when optimizing for 3-HP production. Therefore, it is highly desirable to minimize lactic acid. Here, we show that lactic acid synthesis can be largely blocked by an engineered CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) system in K. pneumoniae. EGFP was recruited as a reporter of this CRISPRi system. Fluorescence assay of this CRISPRi system showed that enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression level was repressed by 85-90%. To further test this CRISPRi system, guide RNAs were designed to individually or simultaneously target four lactate-producing enzyme genes. Results showed that all lactate-producing enzyme genes were significantly repressed. Notably, D-lactate dehydrogenase (ldhA) was shown to be the most influential enzyme for lactic acid formation in micro-aerobic conditions, as inhibiting ldhA alone led to lactic acid level similar to simultaneously repressing four genes. In shake flask cultivation, the strain coexpressing puuC (an aldehyde dehydrogenase catalyzing 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde to 3-HP) and dCas9-sgRNA inhibiting ldhA produced 1.37-fold 3-HP relative to the reference strain. Furthermore, in bioreactor cultivation, this CRISPRi strain inhibiting ldhA produced 36.7 g/L 3-HP, but only generated 1 g/L lactic acid. Clearly, this engineered CRISPRi system largely simplified downstream separation of 3-HP from its isomer lactic acid, an extreme challenge for 3-HP bioprocess. This study offers a deep understanding of lactic acid metabolism in diverse species, and we believe that this CRISPRi system will facilitate biomanufacturing and functional genome studies of K. pneumoniae or beyond.

  8. Effect of different media on production of lactic acid from whey by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-05

    Jan 5, 2009 ... protein and 0.06% fat constituting an inexpensive and nutritionally rich raw material, high production rate and high yield for lactic acid fermentation. ... not a milk component, but a fermentation metabolite generated by certain ...

  9. Production of freeze-dried lactic acid bacteria starter culture for cassava fermentation into gari

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Yao, AA

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen lactic acid bacteria, eight Lactobacillus plantarum, three L. pentosus, two Weissella paramesenteroides, two L. fermemtum and one Leuconostoc mesenteroides ssp. mesenteroides were previously isolated from cassava fermentation and selected...

  10. Influence of starter culture of lactic acid bacteria on the shelf life of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of eight lactic acid bacteria were isolated from various fermented cereal gruels (ogi). They were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus casei, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Pediococcus acidilactici.

  11. A study on the effect of parameters on lactic acid production from whey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taleghani Hamidreza Ghafouri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In batch fermentation of whey, selection of suitable species at desired conditions such as substrate, product concentrations, temperature and inoculum size were investigated. Four Lactobacillus species and one Lactococcus species were screened for lactic acid production. Among them L. bulgaricus ATCC 11842 were selected for further studies. The optimal growth of the selected organism for variable size of inocula was examined. The results indicated that inoculum size had insignificant effect on the cell and lactic acid concentration. The effect of temperature was also studied at 32, 37, 42 and 47°C. Results showed that the concentration of cell dry weight increased with increment of temperature from 32 to 42°C. The maximum cell and lactic acid concentration was obtained at 42°C. The effect of initial substrate concentration on lactic acid production was also examined. The optimum initial lactose concentration was found to be 90 g/l.

  12. Lactic Acid Bacteria from Kefir Increase Cytotoxicity of Natural Killer Cells to Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Takuya; Sakamoto, Tatsuji; Nakagaki, Takenori; Nakano, Yoshihisa

    2018-03-27

    The Japanese fermented beverage, homemade kefir, contains six lactic acid bacteria: Lactococcus. lactis subsp. Lactis , Lactococcus . lactis subsp. Cremoris , Lactococcus. Lactis subsp. Lactis biovar diacetylactis , Lactobacillus plantarum , Leuconostoc meseuteroides subsp. Cremoris and Lactobacillus casei . In this study, we found that a mixture of the six lactic acid bacteria from kefir increased the cytotoxicity of human natural killer KHYG-1 cells to human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells and colorectal tumor HCT116 cells. Furthermore, levels of mRNA expression and secretion of IFN-γ (interferon gamma) increased in KHYG-1 cells that had been treated with the six lactic acid bacteria mixture from kefir. The results suggest that the six lactic acid bacteria mixture from kefir has strong effects on natural immunity and tumor cell cytotoxicity.

  13. Lactic acid production from Cellobiose and xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficient and rapid production of value-added chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass is an important step towards a sustainable society. Lactic acid, used for synthesizing the bioplastic polylactide, has been produced by microbial fermentation using primarily glucose. Lignocellulosic hydrolysates co...

  14. Lactic Acid Bacteria from Kefir Increase Cytotoxicity of Natural Killer Cells to Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Yamane

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese fermented beverage, homemade kefir, contains six lactic acid bacteria: Lactococcus. lactis subsp. Lactis, Lactococcus. lactis subsp. Cremoris, Lactococcus. Lactis subsp. Lactis biovar diacetylactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc meseuteroides subsp. Cremoris and Lactobacillus casei. In this study, we found that a mixture of the six lactic acid bacteria from kefir increased the cytotoxicity of human natural killer KHYG-1 cells to human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells and colorectal tumor HCT116 cells. Furthermore, levels of mRNA expression and secretion of IFN-γ (interferon gamma increased in KHYG-1 cells that had been treated with the six lactic acid bacteria mixture from kefir. The results suggest that the six lactic acid bacteria mixture from kefir has strong effects on natural immunity and tumor cell cytotoxicity.

  15. Mutually stimulating interactions between lactic acid bacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in sourdough fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieuwerts, Sander; Bron, Peter A.; Smid, Eddy J.

    2018-01-01

    Interactions between microorganisms are key to their performance in food habitats. Improved understanding of these interactions supports rational improvement of food fermentations. This study aimed at identifying interactions between lactic acid bacteria and yeast during sourdough fermentation.

  16. Optimization of lactic acid production from glucose using geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunasundari, Balakrishnan; Naresh, Sandrasekaran; Safie, Mohammad Farhan Mohd

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated the conversion efficiency of glucose to lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus strain 15. Six parameters (temperature, pH, incubation time, agitation speed, carbon and nitrogen concentrations) were screened to identify the most significant factors in affecting lactic acid production using glucose. Three most significant factors (temperature, pH and incubation time) were further optimized in this experiment to determine the optimal production of lactic acid. Numerical optimization gave the point prediction of lactic acid concentration produced at 9.95 g/L with the desirability of 0.979 at 40°C, pH 8.5, 24 h, 100 rpm with 5% glucose and 3% yeast extract.

  17. Kinetics of free radical decay reactions in lactic acid homo and copolymers irradiated to sterilization dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantoglu, O.; Ozbey, T.; Gueven, O.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of free radical decay reactions of poly(L-Lactic acid), poly(DL-Lactic acid) and random copolymer of lactic and glycolic acid have been investigated for decays taking place in air and in vacuum. The change in ESR lines of γ-irradiated polymers have been followed over a long time period. The decay has been found to follow neither simple first-order nor second-order kinetics. Various kinetic approaches including composite first or second-order mechanisms and diffusion-controlled first or second-order equations were determined to be also unsatisfactory. The decay of radicals in bulk irradiated lactic acid homo and copolymers was found to be best described when the second-order non-classical equation with time dependent rate constant approach was used. (Author)

  18. OPTIMIZATION OF VEGETABLE WASTES FOR LACTIC ACID PRODUCTION: A LABORATORY SCALE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailaja Daharbha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vegetables wastes are organic materials which are not utilized as vegetables and are discarded at all stages of production, processing and marketing. These wastes form a major part of municipal solid wastes and are cause of foul smell and growth of microorganisms due to their high organic contents. The vegetable wastes can be utilized in many different ways to produces different products. We have shown that they can be utilized for production of lactic acid using anaerobic digestion. The 2nd day was the optimum day for recovery of lactic acid while 1:1 ratio of slurry and water was found to the best ratio for production of lactic acid from vegetable wastes. Effect of salts on lactic acid was also studied and it was found that the production decreased in all the concentrations of salts.

  19. Lactic acid alleviates stress: good for female genital tract homeostasis, bad for protection against malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkin, Steven S

    2018-05-01

    Women are unique from all other mammals in that lactic acid is present at high levels in the vagina during their reproductive years. This dominance may have evolved in response to the unique human lifestyle and a need to optimally protect pregnant women and their fetuses from endogenous and exogenous insults. Lactic acid in the female genital tract inactivates potentially pathogenic bacteria and viruses, maximizes survival of vaginal epithelial cells, and inhibits inflammation that may be damaging to the developing fetus and maintenance of the pregnancy. In an analogous manner, lactic acid production facilitates survival of malignantly transformed cells, inhibits activation of immune cells, and prevents the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in response to tumor-specific antigens. Thus, the same stress-reducing properties of lactic acid that promote lower genital tract health facilitate malignant transformation and progression.

  20. Some features of transplutonium and rare earth elements extraction by HDEHP from lactic acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, V.M.; Lebedev, V.M.; Lebedeva, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanisms of transplutonium (TPE) and rare earth elements (REE) extraction by HDEHP from lactic acid solutions are analysed in the literature. On the base of the known expressions and experimental data the model for TPE and REE extraction by HDEHP from lactic acid, accounting lactic acid and metal extraction as MeA 3 x3HA, MeLA 2 x2HA and MeLA 2 complexes, is suggested. The expression, permitting to estimate quantitatively the effect of TPE and REE complexing with lactic acid and the extraction of complex forms on the distribution coefficient of the extracted metal, is obtained. Comparison of calculational data with experimental ones show their good coincidence that confirms the rightness of the model accepted for extraction

  1. Optimisation of lactic acid fermentation for improved vinegar flavour during rosy vinegar brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yujian; Guo, Jianna; Li, Yudong; Lin, Sen; Wang, Li; Li, Jianrong

    2010-06-01

    Rosy vinegar is a well-known traditional Chinese product whose flavour is affected by its lactic acid content. In this study, Lactobacillus bacteria were employed to increase the content of lactic acid during the ethanol fermentation stage. The optimised fermentation parameters were determined as an inoculation amount of 3% (v/v), a temperature of 30 degrees C and an initial pH value of 4.0. Fermentation under these optimal conditions resulted in an alcohol degree of 6.2% (v/v), a total acidity of 49.5 g L(-1) and a lactic acid content of 4.14 g L(-1). The content of lactic acid (4.14 g L(-1)), which approached the level achieved by solid state fermentation, was 3.56-fold higher than that in vinegar fermented without lactic acid bacteria (1.16 g L(-1)). The results indicate that mixed fermentation with Lactobacillus plantarum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains greatly increases the lactic acid content and improves the flavour of rosy vinegar. Copyright (c) 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Conversion of Aqueous Ammonia-Treated Corn Stover to Lactic Acid by Simultaneous Saccharification and Cofermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongming; Lee, Y. Y.; Elander, Richard T.

    Treatment of corn stover with aqueous ammonia removes most of the structural lignin, whereas retaining the majority of the carbohydrates in the solids. After treatment, both the cellulose and hemicellulose in corn stover become highly susceptible to enzymatic digestion. In this study, corn stover treated by aqueous ammonia was investigated as the substrate for lactic acid production by simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation (SSCF). A commercial cellulase (Spezyme-CP) and Lactobacillus pentosus American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 8041 (Spanish Type Culture Collection [CECT]-4023) were used for hydrolysis and fermentation, respectively. In batch SSCF operation, the carbohydrates in the treated corn stover were converted to lactic acid with high yields, the maximum lactic acid yield reaching 92% of the stoichiometric maximum based on total fermentable carbohydrates (glucose, xylose, and arabinose). A small amount of acetic acid was also produced from pentoses through the phosphoketolase pathway. Among the major process variables for batch SSCF, enzyme loading and the amount of yeast extract were found to be the key factors affecting lactic acid production. Further tests on nutrients indicated that corn steep liquor could be substituted for yeast extract as a nitrogen source to achieve the same lactic acid yield. Fed-batch operation of the SSCF was beneficial in raising the concentration of lactic acid to a maximum value of 75.0 g/L.

  3. Isolation and identification of indigenous lactic acid bacteria from North Sumatra river buffalo milk

    OpenAIRE

    Heni Rizqiati; Cece Sumantr; Ronny Rachman Noor; E. Damayanthi; E. I. Rianti

    2015-01-01

    Buffalo milk is a source of various lactic acid bacteria (LAB) which is potential as culture starter as well as the probiotic. This study was conducted to isolate and identify LAB from indigenous North Sumatra river buffalo milk. Lactic acid bacteria was isolated and grown in medium De Man Rogosa Sharpe Agar (MRSA). The isolation was conducted to obtain pure isolate. The identification of LAB was studied in terms of morphology, physiology, biochemistry and survival on low pH. Morphology test...

  4. Production of lactic acid from corn cobs through fermentation lactobacillus delbruekii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Z.; Anjum, M.; Zahoor, T.

    2007-01-01

    Corn cobs were used as the source of reducing sugars for conversion into lactic acid through fermentation by a local strain of Lactobacillus delbruekii, under varying parameters of time, temperature, pH and glucose concentration, The production of lactic acid significantly increased with increase in Ph, fermentation time and glucose concentration (1-5%) and was significantly high (8.40 g/1) at pH 6, while significantly low (7.67 g/1) at pH 5. (author)

  5. Inhibitory Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria against Moulds Associated with Spoilage of Bakery Products

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Adesina; A. O. Ojokoh; D. J. Arotupin

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the potentiality of LAB strains isolated from different fermented products to inhibit moulds associated with spoilage of bakery products. Methodology: Lactic acid bacterial (LAB) strains obtained from fermented products (“burukutu”, “pito”, yoghurt, and “iru”) were screened for antifungal activity against moulds (Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus repens and Penicillium sp.) isolated from spoilt bakery products. Inhibitory activities of the lactic acid...

  6. Cell immobilization for production of lactic acid biofilms do it naturally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagher, Suzanne F; Ragout, Alicia L; Siñeriz, Faustino; Bruno-Bárcena, José M

    2010-01-01

    Interest in natural cell immobilization or biofilms for lactic acid fermentation has developed considerably over the last few decades. Many studies report the benefits associated with biofilms as industrial methods for food production and for wastewater treatment, since the formation represents a protective means of microbial growth offering survival advantages to cells in toxic environments. The formation of biofilms is a natural process in which microbial cells adsorb to a support without chemicals or polymers that entrap the cells and is dependent on the reactor environment, microorganism, and characteristics of the support. These unique characteristics enable biofilms to cause chronic infections, disease, food spoilage, and devastating effects as in microbial corrosion. Their distinct resistance to toxicity, high biomass potential, and improved stability over cells in suspension make biofilms a good tool for improving the industrial economics of biological lactic acid production. Lactic acid bacteria and specific filamentous fungi are the main sources of biological lactic acid. Over the past two decades, studies have focused on improving the lactic acid volumetric productivity through reactor design development, new support materials, and improvements in microbial production strains. To illustrate the operational designs applied to the natural immobilization of lactic acid producing microorganisms, this chapter presents the results of a search for optimum parameters and how they are affected by the physical, chemical, and biological variables of the process. We will place particular emphasis upon the relationship between lactic acid productivity attained by various types of reactors, supports, media formulations, and lactic acid producing microorganisms. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Continuous D-lactic acid production by a novel thermotolerant Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis QU 41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yukihiro; Kaneko, Wataru; Sun, Yanqi; Shibata, Keisuke; Inokuma, Kentaro; Zendo, Takeshi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2011-03-01

    We isolated and characterized a D-lactic acid-producing lactic acid bacterium (D-LAB), identified as Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis QU 41. When compared to Lactobacillus coryniformis subsp. torquens JCM 1166 (T) and L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis JCM 1248 (T), which are also known as D-LAB, the QU 41 strain exhibited a high thermotolerance and produced D-lactic acid at temperatures of 50 °C and higher. In order to optimize the culture conditions of the QU 41 strain, we examined the effects of pH control, temperature, neutralizing reagent, and initial glucose concentration on D-lactic acid production in batch cultures. It was found that the optimal production of 20.1 g/l D-lactic acid was acquired with high optical purity (>99.9% of D-lactic acid) in a pH 6.0-controlled batch culture, by adding ammonium hydroxide as a neutralizing reagent, at 43 °C in MRS medium containing 20 g/l glucose. As a result of product inhibition and low cell density, continuous cultures were investigated using a microfiltration membrane module to recycle flow-through cells in order to improve D-lactic acid productivity. At a dilution rate of 0.87 h(-1), the high cell density continuous culture exhibited the highest D-lactic acid productivity of 18.0 g/l/h with a high yield (ca. 1.0 g/g consumed glucose) and a low residual glucose (<0.1 g/l) in comparison with systems published to date.

  8. Lactic Acid Bacteria from Kefir Increase Cytotoxicity of Natural Killer Cells to Tumor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takuya Yamane; Tatsuji Sakamoto; Takenori Nakagaki; Yoshihisa Nakano

    2018-01-01

    The Japanese fermented beverage, homemade kefir, contains six lactic acid bacteria: Lactococcus. lactis subsp. Lactis, Lactococcus. lactis subsp. Cremoris, Lactococcus. Lactis subsp. Lactis biovar diacetylactis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc meseuteroides subsp. Cremoris and Lactobacillus casei. In this study, we found that a mixture of the six lactic acid bacteria from kefir increased the cytotoxicity of human natural killer KHYG-1 cells to human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cell...

  9. Diversity and distribution of culturable lactic acid bacterial species in Indonesian Sayur Asin

    OpenAIRE

    Mangunwardoyo, Wibowo; Abinawanto,; Salamah, Andi; Sukara, Endang; Sulistiani,; Dinoto, Achmad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play important roles in processing of Sayur Asin (spontaneously fermented mustard). Unfortunately, information about LAB in Indonesian Sayur Asin, prepared by traditional manufactures which is important as baseline data for maintenance of food quality and safety, is unclear. The aim of this study was to describe the diversity and distribution of culturable lactic acid bacteria in Sayur Asin of Indonesia.Materials and Methods: Four Sayur As...

  10. Antioxidant activity of probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolated from Mongolian airag

    OpenAIRE

    E Uugantsetseg; B Batjargal

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to determine the antioxidant activity of probiotic lactic acid bacteria isolated from airag. In this study, 42 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from Mongolian airag. All isolates were identified by using morphological, biochemical and physiological methods. The isolated bacteria were studied for antagonistic effects on Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, 22 strains showed antibacterial activity. When we examined thei...

  11. Fabrication and characterization of novel multilayered structures by stereocomplexion of poly(D-lactic acid)/poly(L-lactic acid) and self-assembly of polyelectrolytes

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Dellacasa; Li Zhao; Gesheng Yang; Laura Pastorino; Gleb B. Sukhorukov

    2016-01-01

    The enantiomers poly(D-lactic acid) (PDLA) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) were alternately adsorbed directly on calcium carbonate (CaCO3) templates and on poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) multilayer precursors in order to fabricate a novel layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly. A single layer of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) was used as a linker between the (PDLA/PLLA)n stereocomplex and the cores with and without the polymeric (PSS/PAH)n/PLL multilayer precursor (PEM). N...

  12. Non-sterilized fermentation of high optically pure D-lactic acid by a genetically modified thermophilic Bacillus coagulans strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caili; Zhou, Cheng; Assavasirijinda, Nilnate; Yu, Bo; Wang, Limin; Ma, Yanhe

    2017-11-25

    Optically pure D-lactic acid (≥ 99%) is an important precursor of polylactic acid. However, there are relatively few studies on D-lactic acid fermentation compared with the extensive investigation of L-lactic acid production. Most lactic acid producers are mesophilic organisms. Optically pure D-lactic acid produced at high temperature not only could reduce the costs of sterilization but also could inhibit the growth of other bacteria, such as L-lactic acid producers. Thermophilic Bacillus coagulans is an excellent producer of L-lactic acid with capable of growing at 50 °C. In our previous study, the roles of two L-lactic acid dehydrogenases have been demonstrated in B. coagulans DSM1. In this study, the function of another annotated possible L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL3) was verified to be leucine dehydrogenase with an activity of 0.16 units (μmol/min) per mg protein. Furthermore, the activity of native D-lactate dehydrogenase was too low to support efficient D-lactic acid production, even under the control of strong promoter. Finally, an engineered B. coagulans D-DSM1 strain with the capacity for efficient production of D-lactic acid was constructed by deletion of two L-lactate dehydrogenases genes (ldhL1 and ldhL2) and insertion of the D-lactate dehydrogenase gene (LdldhD) from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus DSM 20081 at the position of ldhL1. This genetically engineered strain produced only D-lactic acid under non-sterilized condition, and finally 145 g/L of D-lactic acid was produced with an optical purity of 99.9% and a high yield of 0.98 g/g. This is the highest optically pure D-lactic acid titer produced by a thermophilic strain.

  13. Development of a new lactic acid bacterial inoculant for fresh rice straw silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Geun Kim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Effects of newly isolated Lactobacillus plantarum on the fermentation and chemical composition of fresh rice straw silage was evaluated in this study. Methods Lactic acid bacteria (LAB from good crop silage were screened by growing them in MRS broth and a minimal medium with low carbohydrate content. Selected LAB (LAB 1821 were Gram-positive, rods, catalase negative, and were identified to be Lactobacillus plantarum based on their biochemical characteristics and a 16S rRNA analysis. Fresh rice straw was ensiled with two isolated LAB (1821 and 1841, two commercial inoculants (HM/F and P1132 and no additive as a control. Results After 2 months of storage at ambient temperature, rice straw silages treated with additives were well-preserved, the pH values and butyric and acetic acid contents were lower, and the lactic acid content and lactic/acetic acid ratio were higher than those in the control (p0.05 effect on acid detergent fiber or neutral detergent fiber contents. Crude protein (CP content and in vitro DM digestibility (IVDMD increased after inoculation of LAB 1821 (p<0.05. Conclusion LAB 1821 increased the CP, IVDMD, lactic acid content and ratio of lactic acid to acetic acid in rice straw silage and decreased the pH, acetic acid, NH3-N, and butyric acid contents. Therefore, adding LAB 1821 improved the fermentation quality and feed value of rice straw silage.

  14. Characterization of the spoilage lactic acid bacteria in “sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalschne, Daneysa Lahis; Womer, Rute; Mattana, Ademir; Sarmento, Cleonice Mendes Pereira; Colla, Luciane Maria; Colla, Eliane

    2015-01-01

    The lactic acid bacteria are involved with food fermentation and in such cases with food spoilage. Considering the need to reduce the lactic acid bacteria growth in meat products, the aim of this work was to enumerated and investigated the lactic acid bacteria present on sliced vacuum-packed cooked ham stored at 4 °C and 8 °C for 45 days by phenotypic and molecular techniques. The quantification showed that the lactic acid bacteria were present from the first day with mean count of 1.98 log cfu/g for the four batches analyzed. The lactic acid bacteria grew rapidly on the samples, and plate counts around 7.59 log cfu/g and 8.25 log cfu/g were detected after 45 days of storage at 4 °C and 8 °C, respectively; storage temperatures studied showed significant influence on the microorganism in study growth. The predominant lactic acid bacteria associated with the spoilage samples at one day of storage includes Lactobacillus sp., the phenotypic overlap Leuconostoc / Weissella sp. and Enterococcus sp. At 45 days of storage at 4 and 8 °C the mainly specie was Lactobacillus curvatus , following by Lactobacillus sakei and Leuconostoc mesentereoides ; the Enterococcus sp. was not present in the samples. PMID:26221105

  15. Production of lactic acid from sucrose: strain selection, fermentation, and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunelli, Betânia H; Andrade, Rafael R; Atala, Daniel I P; Wolf Maciel, Maria Regina; Maugeri Filho, Francisco; Maciel Filho, Rubens

    2010-05-01

    Lactic acid is an important product arising from the anaerobic fermentation of sugars. It is used in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, chemical, and food industries as well as for biodegradable polymer and green solvent production. In this work, several bacterial strains were isolated from industrial ethanol fermentation, and the most efficient strain for lactic acid production was selected. The fermentation was conducted in a batch system under anaerobic conditions for 50 h at a temperature of 34 degrees C, a pH value of 5.0, and an initial sucrose concentration of 12 g/L using diluted sugarcane molasses. Throughout the process, pulses of molasses were added in order to avoid the cell growth inhibition due to high sugar concentration as well as increased lactic acid concentrations. At the end of the fermentation, about 90% of sucrose was consumed to produce lactic acid and cells. A kinetic model has been developed to simulate the batch lactic acid fermentation results. The data obtained from the fermentation were used for determining the kinetic parameters of the model. The developed model for lactic acid production, growth cell, and sugar consumption simulates the experimental data well.

  16. Laboratory evaluation of lactic acid on attraction of Culex spp. (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Sandra A; Bernier, Ulrich R; Kline, Daniel L

    2010-12-01

    The role of lactic acid was evaluated for attraction of Culex nigripalpus, Culex quinquefasciatus, Culex tarsalis, and Aedes aegypti in the laboratory using a dual-port olfactometer. When lactic acid was combined with chicken odor, attraction was increased for Cx. quinquefasciatus compared to chicken odor alone but not for Cx. nigripalpus, Cx. tarsalis, and Ae. aegypti. Lactic acid combined with hand odor did not change attraction of Cx. tarsalis and Ae. aegypti but decreased attraction of Cx. nigripalpus and Cx. quinquefasciatus. The addition of lactic acid to CO(2) increased attraction of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus but reduced attraction of Cx. nigripalpus and Cx. tarsalis. Use of commercial lactic acid baits with CO(2) resulted in a similar trend except for Cx. nigripalpus which showed no difference. A blend of lactic acid, acetone, and dimethyl disulfide was attractive to Ae. aegypti (63.4%) but elicited low responses by all Culex spp. (1.3-26.8%). Addition of the blend to CO(2) increased attraction of Ae. aegypti and Cx. quinquefasciatus but reduced attraction of Cx. nigripalpus and Cx. tarsalis. The mixture of compounds plus CO(2) was as attractive as a hand for Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. tarsalis, and Ae. aegypti. © 2010 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  17. Enhancement of L(+)-Lactic Acid Production of Immobilized Rhizopus Oryzae Implanted by Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yonghong; Yang Yingge; Zheng Zhiming; Li Wen; Wang Peng; Yao Liming; Yu Zengliang

    2008-01-01

    Immobilized Rhizopus oryzae culturing may be a solution to the inhibited production of L(+)-lactic acid in submerged fermentation, which is caused by aggregated mycelia floc. In the present study, a R. oryzae mutant (RL6041) with a 90% conversion rate of glucose into L-lactic acid was obtained by N + implantation under the optimized conditions of a beam energy of 15 keV and a dose of 2.6 x 10 15 ions/cm 2 . Using polyurethane foam as the immobilization matrix, the optimal L-lactic acid production conditions were determined as 4 mm polyurethane foam, 150 r/min, 50 g/L ∼ 80 g/L of initial glucose, 38 deg. C and pH 6.0. 15-cycle repeated productions of L-lactic acid by immobilized RL6041 were performed under the optimized culturing conditions and over 80% of the glucose was converted into L-lactic acid in 30 hours on average. The results show that immobilized RL6041 is a promising candidate for continuous L-lactic acid production.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM SUMBAWA MARE MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengah Sujaya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to isolate and characterize lactic acid bacteria (LAB from the Sumbawa mares milk The Isolation of LAB was conducted in Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS agar. The isolates were characterized by standard methods, such as Gram staining, cell morphology study and fermentation activities. The ability of the isolates to inhibit some pathogenic bacteria was studied by dual culture assay. Isolates showing the widest spectrum of inhibiting pathogenic bacteria were further identified using API 50 CHL. The results showed that Sumbawa mare milk was dominated by lactobacilli and weisella/leuconostoc. As many as 26 out 36 isolates belong to homofermentative lactobacilli and another 10 isolates belong to both heterofermentative lactobacilli and weissella or leuconostoc. Twenty four isolates inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli 25922, Shigela flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus 29213. Two promising isolates with the widest spectrum of inhibiting pathogenic bacteria, Lactobacillus sp. SKG34 and Lactobacillus sp. SKG49, were identified respectively as Lactobacillus rhamnosus SKG34 and Lactobacillus ramnosus SKG49. These two isolates were specific strains of the sumbawa mare milk and are very potential to be developed as probiotic for human.

  19. Optimization of β-galactosidase production from lactic acid bacteria

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    Carević Milica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available β-galactosidase, commonly known as lactase, represents commercially important enzyme that is prevalently used for lactose hydrolysis in milk and whey. To the date, it has been isolated from various sources. In this study different strains of lactic acid bacteria were assessed for their β-galactosidase productivity, and Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 resulted with the highest production potential. Thereafter, optimal conditions for accomplishing high yields of β-galactosidase activity were determined. Maximal specific activity (1.01 IU mL-1 was accomplished after 2 days shake flask culture fermentation (150 rpm at 37ºC, with modified Man Rogosa Sharpe culture broth using lactose (2.5% as sole carbon source. Finally, in order to intensify release of intracellular β-galactosidase different mechanical and chemical methods were conducted. Nevertheless, vortexing with quartz sand (150 μm as abrasive was proven to be the most efficient method of cell disruption. The optimum temperature of obtained β-galactosidase was 45°C and the optimum range pH 6.5-7.5.

  20. Poly (lactic acid organoclay nano composites for paper coating applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatcha Sonjui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly(lactic acid or PLA is a well-known biodegradable polymer derived from renewable resources such as corn strach, tapioca strach, and sugar cane. PLA is the most extensively utilized biodegradable polyester with potential to replace conventional petrochemical-based polymers. However, PLA has some drawbacks, such as brittleness and poor gas barrier properties. Nano composite polymers have experience and increasing interest due to their characteristics, especially in mechanical and thermal properties. The objectives of this research were to prepare PLA formulations using three different PLAs. The formulas giving high gloss coating film were selected to prepare nano composite film by incorporated with different amount of various types of organoclays. The physical properties of the PLA coating films were studied and it was found that the PLA 7000D with 0.1%w/w of Cloisite 30B provided decent viscosity for coating process. In addition, the nano composite coating films showed good physical properties such as high gloss, good adhesion, and good hardness. There is a possibility of using the obtained formulation as a paper coating film.

  1. Lactic acid bacteria in dried vegetables and spices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säde, Elina; Lassila, Elisa; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-02-01

    Spices and dried vegetable seasonings are potential sources of bacterial contamination for foods. However, little is known about lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in spices and dried vegetables, even though certain LAB may cause food spoilage. In this study, we enumerated LAB in 104 spices and dried vegetables products aimed for the food manufacturing industry. The products were obtained from a spice wholesaler operating in Finland, and were sampled during a one-year period. We picked isolates (n = 343) for species identification based on numerical analysis of their ribotyping patterns and comparing them with the corresponding patterns of LAB type strains. We found LAB at levels >2 log CFU/g in 68 (65%) of the samples, with the highest counts detected from dried onion products and garlic powder with counts ranging from 4.24 to 6.64 log CFU/g. The LAB identified were predominantly Weissella spp. (61%) and Pediococcus spp. (15%) with Weissella confusa, Weissella cibaria, Weissella paramesenteroides, Pediococcus acidilactici and Pediococcus pentosaceus being the species identified. Other species identified belonged to the genera of Enterococcus spp. (8%), Leuconostoc spp. (6%) and Lactobacillus spp. (2%). Among the LAB identified, Leuconostoc citreum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides and W. confusa have been associated with food spoilage. Our findings suggest that spices and dried vegetables are potential sources of LAB contamination in the food industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Degradation of Poly (lactic acid under Simulated Landfill Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chomnutcha Boonmee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the physical and chemical properties change of poly(lactic acid after burying in the mixture of soil and sludge under thermophilic (61 °C oxygen limited conditions were investigated using various analytical techniques. The environmental factors under these setting conditions and microbial activities accelerated the degradation process of PLA. Under tested conditions, PLA loss their weight about 90% at the burying time of 90 days. During the degradation process, PLA samples were continuously broken to small fragile fragments and showed the size less than 1 mm at the end of degradation test. Change of the surface morphology change was revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Many pores, cracks and irregular roughness were presented on the PLA surface. Thermal decomposition was decreased from 387.8 to 289.2 °C. The percentage of carbon content in molecular structure decreased from 49.46% to 45.42%. In addition, the Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR revealed the change of ester bonds. This study can be used for developing PLA waste management process.

  3. Adhesion Properties of Lactic Acid Bacteria on Intestinal Mucin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Nishiyama

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are Gram-positive bacteria that are natural inhabitants of the gastrointestinal (GI tracts of mammals, including humans. Since Mechnikov first proposed that yogurt could prevent intestinal putrefaction and aging, the beneficial effects of LAB have been widely demonstrated. The region between the duodenum and the terminal of the ileum is the primary region colonized by LAB, particularly the Lactobacillus species, and this region is covered by a mucus layer composed mainly of mucin-type glycoproteins. The mucus layer plays a role in protecting the intestinal epithelial cells against damage, but is also considered to be critical for the adhesion of Lactobacillus in the GI tract. Consequently, the adhesion exhibited by lactobacilli on mucin has attracted attention as one of the critical factors contributing to the persistent beneficial effects of Lactobacillus in a constantly changing intestinal environment. Thus, understanding the interactions between Lactobacillus and mucin is crucial for elucidating the survival strategies of LAB in the GI tract. This review highlights the properties of the interactions between Lactobacillus and mucin, while concomitantly considering the structure of the GI tract from a histochemical perspective.

  4. Separation of viable lactic acid bacteria from fermented milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Nishino

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms that provide health benefits to humans. Some lactic acid bacteria (LAB are probiotic organisms used in the production of fermented foods, such as yogurt, cheese, and pickles. Given their widespread consumption, it is important to understand the physiological state of LAB in foods such as yogurt. However, this analysis is complicated, as it is difficult to separate the LAB from milk components such as solid curds, which prevent cell separation by dilution or centrifugation. In this study, we successfully separated viable LAB from yogurt by density gradient centrifugation. The recovery rate was >90 %, and separation was performed until the stationary phase. Recovered cells were observable by microscopy, meaning that morphological changes and cell viability could be directly detected at the single-cell level. The results indicate that viable LAB can be easily purified from fermented milk. We expect that this method will be a useful tool for the analysis of various aspects of probiotic cells, including their enzyme activity and protein expression. Keywords: Food analysis, Microbiology

  5. Modification of azo dyes by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Díaz, I M; McFeeters, R F

    2009-08-01

    The ability of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus paracasei to modify the azo dye, tartrazine, was recently documented as the result of the investigation on red coloured spoilage in acidified cucumbers. Fourteen other lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were screened for their capability to modify the food colouring tartrazine and other azo dyes of relevance for the textile industry. Most LAB modified tartrazine under anaerobic conditions, but not under aerobic conditions in modified chemically defined media. Microbial growth was not affected by the presence of the azo dyes in the culture medium. The product of the tartrazine modification by LAB was identified as a molecule 111 daltons larger than its precursor by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. This product had a purple colour under aerobic conditions and was colourless under anaerobic conditions. It absorbed light at 361 and 553 nm. LAB are capable of anabolizing azo dyes only under anaerobic conditions. IMPACT AND SIGNIFICANCE OF THE STUDY: Although micro-organisms capable of reducing the azo bond on multiple dyes have been known for decades, this is the first report of anabolism of azo dyes by food related micro-organisms, such as LAB.

  6. Concurrent Lactic and Volatile Fatty Acid Analysis of Microbial Fermentation Samples by Gas Chromatography with Heat Pre-treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwin; WipaCharles; Cord-Ruwisch, Ralf

    2018-01-01

    Organic acid analysis of fermentation samples can be readily achieved by gas chromatography (GC), which detects volatile organic acids. However, lactic acid, a key fermentation acid is non-volatile and can hence not be quantified by regular GC analysis. However the addition of periodic acid to organic acid samples has been shown to enable lactic acid analysis by GC, as periodic acid oxidizes lactic acid to the volatile acetaldehyde. Direct GC injection of lactic acid standards and periodic acid generated inconsistent and irreproducible peaks, possibly due to incomplete lactic acid oxidation to acetaldehyde. The described method is developed to improve lactic acid analysis by GC by using a heat treated derivatization pre-treatment, such that it becomes independent of the retention time and temperature selection of the GC injector. Samples containing lactic acid were amended by periodic acid and heated in a sealed test tube at 100°C for at least 45 min before injecting it to the GC. Reproducible and consistent peaks of acetaldehyde were obtained. Simultaneous determination of lactic acid, acetone, ethanol, butanol, volatile fatty acids could also be accomplished by applying this GC method, enabling precise and convenient organic acid analysis of biological samples such as anaerobic digestion and fermentation processes. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. THE SEARCH AND PROPERTIES OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA PERSPECTIVE FOR BIOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naumenko О. V.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Search of biologically active Lactobacillus strains prospective for functional milk food production was the aim of the research. The study involved the lactic acid bacteria isolated from biological material of healthy humen and non- dairy lactic products. Using modern methodological approaches, the strains of lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus casei 302, Lactobacillus acidophilus 35 and Streptococcus thermophilus 21 having high level of biological activity were selected. High biological potential of selected cultures of lactic acid bacteria, which could provide stability for the technological process of production and essential characteristics of bacterial preparations and fermented their products, was set. In vitro the experiments demonstrated that selected strains had valuable production properties, namely the ability to reduce level of cholesterol and lactose during development in milk, were resistant to virulent bacteriophages and aggressive compounds of the gastrointestinal tract, and high adhesive and antagonistic activities as well.

  8. Electrospun poly(lactic acid) based conducting nanofibrous networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, S N; Bhattacharyya, D; Ray, S; Easteal, A J

    2009-01-01

    Multi-functionalised micro/nanostructures of conducting polymers in neat or blended forms have received much attention because of their unique properties and technological applications in electrical, magnetic and biomedical devices. Biopolymer-based conducting fibrous mats are of special interest for tissue engineering because they not only physically support tissue growth but also are electrically conductive, and thus are able to stimulate specific cell functions or trigger cell responses. They are effective for carrying current in biological environments and can thus be considered for delivering local electrical stimuli at the site of damaged tissue to promote wound healing. Electrospinning is an established way to process polymer solutions or melts into continuous fibres with diameter often in the nanometre range. This process primarily depends on a number of parameters, including the type of polymer, solution viscosity, polarity and surface tension of the solvent, electric field strength and the distance between the spinneret and the collector. The present research has included polyaniline (PANi) as the conducting polymer and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) as the biopolymer. Dodecylbenzene sulphonic acid (DBSA) doped PANi and PLLA have been dissolved in a common solvent (mixtures of chloroform and dimethyl formamide (DMF)), and the solutions successfully electrospun. DMF enhanced the dielectric constant of the solvent, and tetra butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) was used as an additive to increase the conductivity of the solution. DBSA-doped PANi/PLLA mat exhibits an almost bead-free network of nanofibres that have extraordinarily smooth surface and diameters in the range 75 to 100 nm.

  9. Vaginal pH and microbicidal lactic acid when lactobacilli dominate the microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, Deirdre E; Moench, Thomas R; Cone, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Lactic acid at sufficiently acidic pH is a potent microbicide, and lactic acid produced by vaginal lactobacilli may help protect against reproductive tract infections. However, previous observations likely underestimated healthy vaginal acidity and total lactate concentration since they failed to exclude women without a lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota, and also did not account for the high carbon dioxide, low oxygen environment of the vagina. Fifty-six women with low (0-3) Nugent scores (indicating a lactobacillus-dominated vaginal microbiota) and no symptoms of reproductive tract disease or infection, provided a total of 64 cervicovaginal fluid samples using a collection method that avoided the need for sample dilution and rigorously minimized aerobic exposure. The pH of samples was measured by microelectrode immediately after collection and under a physiological vaginal concentration of CO2. Commercial enzymatic assays of total lactate and total acetate concentrations were validated for use in CVF, and compared to the more usual HPLC method. The average pH of the CVF samples was 3.5 ± 0.3 (mean ± SD), range 2.8-4.2, and the average total lactate was 1.0% ± 0.2% w/v; this is a five-fold higher average hydrogen ion concentration (lower pH) and a fivefold higher total lactate concentration than in the prior literature. The microbicidal form of lactic acid (protonated lactic acid) was therefore eleven-fold more concentrated, and a markedly more potent microbicide, than indicated by prior research. This suggests that when lactobacilli dominate the vaginal microbiota, women have significantly more lactic acid-mediated protection against infections than currently believed. Our results invite further evaluations of the prophylactic and therapeutic actions of vaginal lactic acid, whether provided in situ by endogenous lactobacilli, by probiotic lactobacilli, or by products that reinforce vaginal lactic acid.

  10. Lactic acid bacteria: promising supplements for enhancing the biological activities of kombucha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nguyen Khoi; Dong, Ngan Thi Ngoc; Nguyen, Huong Thuy; Le, Phu Hong

    2015-01-01

    Kombucha is sweetened black tea that is fermented by a symbiosis of bacteria and yeast embedded within a cellulose membrane. It is considered a health drink in many countries because it is a rich source of vitamins and may have other health benefits. It has previously been reported that adding lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus) strains to kombucha can enhance its biological functions, but in that study only lactic acid bacteria isolated from kefir grains were tested. There are many other natural sources of lactic acid bacteria. In this study, we examined the effects of lactic acid bacteria from various fermented Vietnamese food sources (pickled cabbage, kefir and kombucha) on kombucha's three main biological functions: glucuronic acid production, antibacterial activity and antioxidant ability. Glucuronic acid production was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, antibacterial activity was assessed by the agar-well diffusion method and antioxidant ability was evaluated by determining the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging capacity. Four strains of food-borne pathogenic bacteria were used in our antibacterial experiments: Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19111, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739, Salmonella typhimurium ATCC 14028 and Bacillus cereus ATCC 11778. Our findings showed that lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from kefir are superior to those from other sources for improving glucuronic acid production and enhancing the antibacterial and antioxidant activities of kombucha. This study illustrates the potential of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus plantarum isolated from kefir as biosupplements for enhancing the bioactivities of kombucha.

  11. Release of Polyphenols Is the Major Factor Influencing the Bioconversion of Rice Straw to Lactic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingxuan; Xue, Yiyun; Hu, Jiajun; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Gao, Min-Tian

    2017-11-01

    In this study, we found that p-coumaric acid (p-CA), ferulic acid (FA), and condensed tannins were released from rice straw during saccharification. The presence of polyphenols prolonged the lag phase and lowered the productivity of lactic acid. p-CA was identified as a key inhibitor. Tannins had a lower inhibitory effect than p-CA; FA had little inhibitory effect. Acid, alkaline, and ball milling pretreatments elicited different levels of polyphenol release from rice straw. Due to the different levels of polyphenol release in the pretreatment step, the enzymatic hydrolysates contained different concentrations of polyphenols. Compared with fermentation with a synthetic medium, fermentation with the hydrolysates of ball-milled rice straw provided much lower productivity and yield of lactic acid due to the presence of polyphenols. Removal of these compounds played an important role in lactic acid fermentation. When rice straw was alkaline pretreated, the hydrolysates contained few phenolic compounds, resulting in high productivity and yield of lactic acid (1.8 g/L/h and 26.7 g/100 g straw), which were comparable to those in a synthetic medium. This indicates that there is a correlation between removal of phenolic compounds and efficiency in lactic acid fermentation.

  12. Lactic acid production by irradiated Bacillus NF17 and poly-L-lactate biopolymer formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tongpim, Saowanit; Poonsawat, Choosak; Khansawai, Paveena; Piadaeng, Nattaya

    2006-09-01

    This study was conducted to manipulate the thermo tolerant, lactic acid-producing bacteria, Bacillus coagulans strain NF 1 7, in the production of L-lactic acid and a bio polymer: poly-L-lactate. The bacterial isolate NF 1 7 kept in the culture collection of Khon Kaen University and could tolerate high temperature and produce lactic acid, was employed in this research work. Cell suspension of isolate NF 1 7 was exposed to gamma irradiation at various doses (1-5 KGy). The irradiated survivors were screened on the basis of forming larger colonies and clear zones than the parent strain NF 1 7 when grown on Glucose-Yeast extract-Peptone (GYP) containing CaCO 3 . We obtained 55 effective isolates which the isolate L5I2-14(5), designated as K 1 4, was chosen together with the parent strain NF 1 7 for fermentation experiments. Each bacterial strain was inoculated into GYP broth and incubated statically at 50 o C with daily pH neutralization. After 5 days of incubation, the isolate K 1 4 and NF 1 7 produced 9.71 g/l and 7.42 g/l of L-lactic acid, respectively with a small amount of D-lactic acid. Lactic acid production from sugar cane molasses by batch fermentation of Bacillus Sp. K 1 4 was carried out in a 7 l jar fermentor containing 5 l of fermentation medium. It was found that 20% molasses with the agitation speed of 100 rpm gave the highest yield of lactic acid. Poly-L-lactic acid was chemically polymerized by bulk polymerization process at 140 o C under 40 mmHg conditions. We could obtain the off-white polymer in a small amount of powder form. Improvement the yield of poly-L-lactic acid would be achieved by using polyisoprene-g-polyvinyl monomer to separate lactic acid from the fermenting liquid prior to polymerization processes

  13. Impact of lactic acid bacteria on conjugated linoleic acid content and atherogenic index of butter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Roufegari-Nejad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a study aimed to investigate the effect of lactic acid bacteria including Lactobacillus acidophilus and Sterptococcus thermophilus (as thermophilic culture, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, cremoris and diacetylactis, Leuconostoc citrovorum (as mesophilic culture, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Bifidobacterium lactis and a mixed culture of L.acidophilus, L. casei and B. lactis on fatty acid profile, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA and atherogenic index (AI of butter. Fatty acid analysis with gas chromatography indicated that application of thermophilic and mixed culture decreased the ratio of saturated to unsaturated fatty acid; whereas, the butters made with L. acidophilus had the highest content of CLA. Moreover, AI in the samples prepared with thermophilic cultures was the least. Sensory evaluation of the treatments revealed no significant differences (p> 0/05 in appearance and color. However, the butters prepared with thermophilic and mesophilic cultures had more desirable taste in comparison with the samples made with L. acidophilus, L. casei and B. lactis. From the nutritional point of view, the adverse effect of butter could be diminished via the application of selected lactic acid bacteria.

  14. From honeycomb- to microsphere-patterned surfaces of poly(lactic acid) and a starch-poly(lactic acid) blend via the breath figure method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Ana Rita C; Maniglio, Devid; Sousa, Nuno; Mano, João F; Reis, Rui L; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2017-01-26

    This study investigated the preparation of ordered patterned surfaces and/or microspheres from a natural-based polymer, using the breath figure and reverse breath figure methods. Poly(D,L-lactic acid) and starch poly(lactic acid) solutions were precipitated in different conditions - namely, polymer concentration, vapor atmosphere temperature and substrate - to evaluate the effect of these conditions on the morphology of the precipitates obtained. The possibility of fine-tuning the properties of the final patterns simply by changing the vapor atmosphere was also demonstrated here using a range of compositions of the vapor phase. Porous films or discrete particles are formed when the differences in surface tension determine the ability of polymer solution to surround water droplets or methanol to surround polymer droplets, respectively. In vitro cytotoxicity was assessed applying a simple standard protocol to evaluate the possibility to use these materials in biomedical applications. Moreover, fluorescent microscopy images showed a good interaction of cells with the material, which were able to adhere on the patterned surfaces after 24 hours in culture. The development of patterned surfaces using the breath figure method was tested in this work for the preparation of both poly(lactic acid) and a blend containing starch and poly(lactic acid). The potential of these films to be used in the biomedical area was confirmed by a preliminary cytotoxicity test and by morphological observation of cell adhesion.

  15. Acid and bile tolerance of spore-forming lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyronimus, B; Le Marrec, C; Sassi, A H; Deschamps, A

    2000-11-01

    Criteria for screening probiotics such as bile tolerance and resistance to acids were studied with 13 spore-forming lactic acid producing bacteria. Different strains of Sporolactobacillus, Bacillus laevolacticus, Bacillus racemilacticus and Bacillus coagulans grown in MRS broth were subjected to low pH conditions (2, 2.5 and 3) and increasing bile concentrations. Among these microorganisms, Bacillus laevolacticus DSM 6475 and all Sporolactobacillus strains tested except Sporolactobacillus racemicus IAM 12395, were resistant to pH 3. Only Bacillus racemilacticus and Bacillus coagulans strains were tolerant to bile concentrations over 0.3% (w/v).

  16. Characteristics of immobilized lactobacillus delbrueckii in a liquid-solid fluidized bed bioreactor for lactic acid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Henian; Seki, M.; Furusaki, S. [The Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-04-20

    A fluidized bed bioreactor was employed for lactic acid production using immobilized cells. First, the cell release rate was discussed. A liquid-solid fluidized bed reactor with immobilized cells was used to perform continuous lactic acid fermentation without any operational problems. The performance of the reactor was investigated under different conditions. Cell release rate and contribution of free cells to lactic acid production were studied quantitatively. The results showed that under low gel holdup and low dilution rate conditions, free cells played a significant role in lactic acid production. However, increasing solid holdup decreased the free cell concentration in the broth due to high lactic acid concentration and also decreased the contribution of the free cells to lactic acid production. The effects of growth nutrients on reactor performance were investigated. 16 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-lactic acid nanocarrier-based degradable hydrogels for restoring the vaginal microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Sujata Sundara; Turovskiy, Yevgeniy; Singh, Yashveer; Chikindas, Michael L.; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) display reduced vaginal acidity, which make them susceptible to associated infections such as HIV. In the current study, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) nanocarrier-based degradable hydrogels were developed for the controlled release of lactic acid in the vagina of BV-infected women. PEG-lactic acid (PEG-LA) nanocarriers were prepared by covalently attaching lactic acid to 8-arm PEG-SH via cleavable thioester bonds. PEG-LA nanocarriers with 4 copies of lactic acid per molecule provided controlled release of lactic acid with a maximum release of 23% and 47% bound lactic acid in phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) and acetate buffer (AB, pH 4.3), respectively. The PEG nanocarrier-based hydrogels were formed by cross-linking the PEG-LA nanocarriers with 4-arm PEG-NHS via degradable thioester bonds. The nanocarrier-based hydrogels formed within 20 min under ambient conditions and exhibited an elastic modulus that was 100-fold higher than the viscous modulus. The nanocarrier-based degradable hydrogels provided controlled release of lactic acid for several hours; however, a maximum release of only 10%–14% bound lactic acid was observed possibly due to steric hindrance of the polymer chains in the cross-linked hydrogel. In contrast, hydrogels with passively entrapped lactic acid showed burst release with complete release within 30 min. Lactic acid showed antimicrobial activity against the primary BV pathogen Gardnerella vaginalis with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 3.6 mg/ml. In addition, the hydrogels with passively entrapped lactic acid showed retained antimicrobial activity with complete inhibition G. vaginalis growth within 48 h. The results of the current study collectively demonstrate the potential of PEG nanocarrier-based hydrogels for vaginal administration of lactic acid for preventing and treating BV. PMID:25223229

  18. Examination of Lactic Acid Bacteria to Secretion of Bacteriocins

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    Maira Urazova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacteriocins produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB have the potential to cover a very broad field of applications, including the food industry and the medical sector. In the food industry, bacteriocinogenic LAB strains can be used as starter cultures, co-cultures, and bioprotective cultures, which would be used to improve food quality and safety. In the medical sector, bacteriocins of probiotic LAB might play a role in interactions, which take place in human gastrointestinal tract, and contribute to gut health. The aim of this study was the examine the effect of LAB antimicrobial activity. Methods: LAB were isolated from different commercial and home made products, such as kazy and sour cream. To screen for bacteriocin producing LAB, we used an agar diffusion bioassay, described in a previous study by Dr. Yang, with three modifications in cell-free supernatant (CFS. First we had a clear supernatant, second we adjusted the CFS to pH 6.0 to eliminate acids antimicrobial effects, and third the CFS pH 6.0 was treated with catalase to exclude the action of H2O2 and confirm action of bacteriocin-like substances. Pathogenic S.marcescens, E. coli, S.aureus cultures were used as indicators. Results: Screening of 95 strains of LAB through deferred antagonism to six indicator cultures showed that all of the selected strains had a high value of antibacterial activity. However, CFS of only 50 strains retained their antimicrobial activity, and 10 of them lost this activity in the second modification of CFS with pH 6.0 to test culture S.marcescens, which confirmed the acidic nature of antimicrobial activity of CFS. Lb.rhamnosus (P-1, Lb.fermentum (N-6, and Lc.lactis (7M lost antibacterial activity in the presence of the catalase. All modifications of CFS of three strains: Lb.pentosus (16al, Lb.pentosus (P-2, and Pediococcusacidilactici (8 retained inhibitory activity to E.coli and S. aureus. Supernatants of only Lactococcusgarvieae (10a and

  19. Systems biology of lactic acid bacteria: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusink, Bas; Bachmann, Herwig; Molenaar, Douwe

    2011-08-30

    Understanding the properties of a system as emerging from the interaction of well described parts is the most important goal of Systems Biology. Although in the practice of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) physiology we most often think of the parts as the proteins and metabolites, a wider interpretation of what a part is can be useful. For example, different strains or species can be the parts of a community, or we could study only the chemical reactions as the parts of metabolism (and forgetting about the enzymes that catalyze them), as is done in flux balance analysis. As long as we have some understanding of the properties of these parts, we can investigate whether their interaction leads to novel or unanticipated behaviour of the system that they constitute. There has been a tendency in the Systems Biology community to think that the collection and integration of data should continue ad infinitum, or that we will otherwise not be able to understand the systems that we study in their details. However, it may sometimes be useful to take a step back and consider whether the knowledge that we already have may not explain the system behaviour that we find so intriguing. Reasoning about systems can be difficult, and may require the application of mathematical techniques. The reward is sometimes the realization of unexpected conclusions, or in the worst case, that we still do not know enough details of the parts, or of the interactions between them. We will discuss a number of cases, with a focus on LAB-related work, where a typical systems approach has brought new knowledge or perspective, often counterintuitive, and clashing with conclusions from simpler approaches. Also novel types of testable hypotheses may be generated by the systems approach, which we will illustrate. Finally we will give an outlook on the fields of research where the systems approach may point the way for the near future.

  20. Interactions between Cooccurring Lactic Acid Bacteria in Honey Bee Hives.

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    Rokop, Z P; Horton, M A; Newton, I L G

    2015-10-01

    In contrast to the honey bee gut, which is colonized by a few characteristic bacterial clades, the hive of the honey bee is home to a diverse array of microbes, including many lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this study, we used culture, combined with sequencing, to sample the LAB communities found across hive environments. Specifically, we sought to use network analysis to identify microbial hubs sharing nearly identical operational taxonomic units, evidence which may indicate cooccurrence of bacteria between environments. In the process, we identified interactions between noncore bacterial members (Fructobacillus and Lactobacillaceae) and honey bee-specific "core" members. Both Fructobacillus and Lactobacillaceae colonize brood cells, bee bread, and nectar and may serve the role of pioneering species, establishing an environment conducive to the inoculation by honey bee core bacteria. Coculture assays showed that these noncore bacterial members promote the growth of honey bee-specific bacterial species. Specifically, Fructobacillus by-products in spent medium supported the growth of the Firm-5 honey bee-specific clade in vitro. Metabolic characterization of Fructobacillus using carbohydrate utilization assays revealed that this strain is capable of utilizing the simple sugars fructose and glucose, as well as the complex plant carbohydrate lignin. We tested Fructobacillus for antibiotic sensitivity and found that this bacterium, which may be important for establishment of the microbiome, is sensitive to the commonly used antibiotic tetracycline. Our results point to the possible significance of "noncore" and environmental microbial community members in the modulation of honey bee microbiome dynamics and suggest that tetracycline use by beekeepers should be limited. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. [Cloning and gene expression in lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarenko, V M; Beliavskaia, V A

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of using the genera Lactobacillus and Lactococcus as vector representatives is widely discussed at present. The prospects of the construction of recombinant bacteria are closely connected with the solution of a number of problems: the level of the transcription of cloned genes, the effectiveness of the translation of heterologous mRNA, the stability of protein with respect to bacterial intracellular proteases, the method by protein molecules leave the cell (by secretion or as the result of lysis). To prevent segregation instability, the construction of vector molecules on the basis of stable cryptic plasmids found in wild strains of lactic acid bacteria was proposed. High copying plasmids with low molecular weight were detected in L. plantarum and L. pentosus strains. Several plasmids with molecular weights of 1.7, 1.8 and 2.3 kb were isolated from bacterial cells to be used as the basis for the construction of vector molecules. Genes of chloramphenicol- and erythromycin-resistance from Staphylococcus aureus plasmids were used as marker genes ensuring cell transformation. The vector plasmids thus constructed exhibited high transformation activity in the electroporation of different strains, including L. casei, L. plantarum, L. acidophilus, L. fermentum and L. brevis which could be classified with the replicons of a wide circle of hosts. But the use of these plasmids was limited due to the risk of the uncontrolled dissemination of recombinant plasmids. L. acidophilus were also found to have strictly specific plasmids with good prospects of being used as the basis for the creation of vectors, incapable of dissemination. In addition to the search of strain-specific plasmids, incapable of uncontrolled gene transmission, the use of chromosome-integrated heterologous genes is recommended in cloning to ensure the maximum safety.

  2. Selection of Lactic Acid Bacteria as Probiotic Candidate for Chicken

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    F. Hamida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB regarded as safe microorganisms; they can naturally live in gastrointestinal tract, so appropriately used as a probiotic for chicken. This study aimed to select six isolates of LAB (E1223, E3, E4, E5, E7, and E8 to obtain the isolates potentially as probiotic candidate for chicken. The six isolates were derived from spontaneous fermented corn obtained from Laboratory of Animal Biotechnology and Biomedical, PPSHB, Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia. LAB isolates were tested their susceptibility to antibiotics (bambermycin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline then were examined in vitro for their tolerance to gastrointestinal pH (2, 3, 4, and 7.2 and 0.5% bile salt condition, antimicrobial activity against Salmonella enteritidis and Enterococcus casseliflavus, and ability to adhere to chicken ileal cells. The results showed the isolates E5, E7, and E8 were sensitive to tetracycline and chloramphenicol, they could survive at pH 2, 3, 4, and 7.2, could survive at 0.5% bile salts, produced antimicrobial activity, and able to adhere to ileal cells (9.40±0.00 Log CFU/cm2 of E8 and were significantly (P<0.05 higher than those of control (5.30±0.14 Log CFU/cm2. In conclusion, this study showed that isolate E8 had better potential compared to isolates E5 and E7 in most in vitro assays as a probiotic candidate for chicken. E5, E7, and E8 were closely related with Pediococcus pentosaceus based on 16S rRNA gene.

  3. L: (+)-Lactic acid production from non-food carbohydrates by thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Mark S; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-05-01

    Lactic acid is used as an additive in foods, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics, and is also an industrial chemical. Optically pure lactic acid is increasingly used as a renewable bio-based product to replace petroleum-based plastics. However, current production of lactic acid depends on carbohydrate feedstocks that have alternate uses as foods. The use of non-food feedstocks by current commercial biocatalysts is limited by inefficient pathways for pentose utilization. B. coagulans strain 36D1 is a thermotolerant bacterium that can grow and efficiently ferment pentoses using the pentose-phosphate pathway and all other sugar constituents of lignocellulosic biomass at 50°C and pH 5.0, conditions that also favor simultaneous enzymatic saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of cellulose. Using this bacterial biocatalyst, high levels (150-180 g l(-1)) of lactic acid were produced from xylose and glucose with minimal by-products in mineral salts medium. In a fed-batch SSF of crystalline cellulose with fungal enzymes and B. coagulans, lactic acid titer was 80 g l(-1) and the yield was close to 80%. These results demonstrate that B. coagulans can effectively ferment non-food carbohydrates from lignocellulose to L: (+)-lactic acid at sufficient concentrations for commercial application. The high temperature fermentation of pentoses and hexoses to lactic acid by B. coagulans has these additional advantages: reduction in cellulase loading in SSF of cellulose with a decrease in enzyme cost in the process and a reduction in contamination of large-scale fermentations.

  4. Strategies for improving production performance of probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici viable cell by overcoming lactic acid inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Majdiah; Ariff, Arbakariya B; Wasoh, Helmi; Kapri, Mohd Rizal; Halim, Murni

    2017-11-27

    Lactic acid bacteria are industrially important microorganisms recognized for fermentative ability mostly in their probiotic benefits as well as lactic acid production for various applications. Fermentation conditions such as concentration of initial glucose in the culture, concentration of lactic acid accumulated in the culture, types of pH control strategy, types of aeration mode and different agitation speed had influenced the cultivation performance of batch fermentation of Pediococcus acidilactici. The maximum viable cell concentration obtained in constant fed-batch fermentation at a feeding rate of 0.015 L/h was 6.1 times higher with 1.6 times reduction in lactic acid accumulation compared to batch fermentation. Anion exchange resin, IRA 67 was found to have the highest selectivity towards lactic acid compared to other components studied. Fed-batch fermentation of P. acidilactici coupled with lactic acid removal system using IRA 67 resin showed 55.5 and 9.1 times of improvement in maximum viable cell concentration compared to fermentation without resin for batch and fed-batch mode respectively. The improvement of the P. acidilactici growth in the constant fed-batch fermentation indicated the use of minimal and simple process control equipment is an effective approach for reducing by-product inhibition. Further improvement in the cultivation performance of P. acidilactici in fed-bath fermentation with in situ addition of anion-exchange resin significantly helped to enhance the growth of P. acidilactici by reducing the inhibitory effect of lactic acid and thus increasing probiotic production.

  5. Lactic acid fermentation of human urine to improve its fertilizing value and reduce odour emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, N; Ronteltap, M; Boincean, B; Wernli, M; Zubcov, E; Bagrin, N; Borodin, N; Lens, P N L

    2017-08-01

    During storage of urine, urea is biologically decomposed to ammonia, which can be lost through volatilization and in turn causes significant unpleasant smell. In response, lactic acid fermentation of urine is a cost-effective technique to decrease nitrogen volatilization and reduce odour emissions. Fresh urine (pH = 5.2-5.3 and NH 4 + -N = 1.2-1.3 g L -1 ) was lacto-fermented for 36 days in closed glass jars with a lactic acid bacterial inoculum from sauerkraut juice and compared to untreated, stored urine. In the lacto-fermented urine, the pH was reduced to 3.8-4.7 and the ammonium content by 22-30%, while the pH of the untreated urine rose to 6.1 and its ammonium content increased by 32% due to urea hydrolysis. The concentration of lactic acid bacteria in lacto-fermented urine was 7.3 CFU ml -1 , suggesting that urine is a suitable growth medium for lactic acid bacteria. The odour of the stored urine was subjectively perceived by four people to be twice as strong as that of lacto-fermented samples. Lacto-fermented urine induced increased radish germination compared to stored urine (74-86% versus 2-31%). Adding a lactic acid bacterial inoculum to one week old urine in the storage tanks in a urine-diverting dry toilet reduced the pH from 8.9 to 7.7 after one month, while the ammonium content increased by 35%, probably due to the high initial pH of the urine. Given that the hydrolyzed stale urine has a high buffering capacity, the lactic acid bacterial inoculum should be added to the urine storage tank of a UDDT before urine starts to accumulate there to increase the efficiency of the lactic acid fermentation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from raw goat milk and effect of farming practices on the dominant species of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormo, Hélène; Ali Haimoud Lekhal, Djamila; Roques, C

    2015-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria, in particular Lactococcus lactis, play a decisive role in the cheese making process and more particularly in lactic cheeses which are primarily produced on goat dairy farms. The objective of this study was therefore to identify the main lactic acid bacteria found in raw goats' milk from three different regions in France and evaluate if certain farming practices have an effect on the distribution of species of lactic acid bacteria in the various milk samples. Identification at genus or species level was carried out using phenotypic tests and genotypic methods including repetitive element REP-PCR, species-specific PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The distribution of the main bacterial species in the milk samples varied depending on farms and their characteristics. Out of the 146 strains identified, L. lactis was the dominant species (60% of strains), followed by Enterococcus (38%) of which Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Within the species L. lactis, L. lactis subsp lactis was detected more frequently than L. lactis subsp cremoris (74% vs. 26%). The predominance of L. lactis subsp cremoris was linked to geographical area studied. It appears that the animals' environment plays a role in the balance between the dominance of L. lactis and enterococci in raw goats' milk. The separation between the milking parlor and the goat shed (vs no separation) and only straw in the bedding (vs straw and hay) seems to promote L. lactis in the milk (vs enterococci). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation of Sugar Beet Pulp with Mixed Bacterial Cultures for Lactic Acid and Propylene Glycol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Berlowska

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Research into fermentative production of lactic acid from agricultural by-products has recently concentrated on the direct conversion of biomass, whereby pure sugars are replaced with inexpensive feedstock in the process of lactic acid production. In our studies, for the first time, the source of carbon used is sugar beet pulp, generated as a by-product of industrial sugar production. In this paper, we focus on the simultaneous saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass and fermentation of lactic acid, using mixed cultures with complementary assimilation profiles. Lactic acid is one of the primary platform chemicals, and can be used to synthesize a wide variety of useful products, including green propylene glycol. A series of controlled batch fermentations was conducted under various conditions, including pretreatment with enzymatic hydrolysis. Inoculation was performed in two sequential stages, to avoid carbon catabolite repression. Biologically-synthesized lactic acid was catalytically reduced to propylene glycol over 5% Ru/C. The highest lactic acid yield was obtained with mixed cultures. The yield of propylene glycol from the biological lactic acid was similar to that obtained with a water solution of pure lactic acid. Our results show that simultaneous saccharification and fermentation enables generation of lactic acid, suitable for further chemical transformations, from agricultural residues.

  8. New trends and challenges in lactic acid production on renewable biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić-Vuković Aleksandra J.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid is a relatively cheap chemical with a wide range of applications: as a preservative and acidifying agent in food and dairy industry, a monomer for biodegradable poly-lactide polymers (PLA in pharmaceutical industry, precursor and chemical feedstock for chemical, textile and leather industries. Traditional raw materials for fermentative production of lactic acid, refined sugars, are now being replaced with starch from corn, rice and other crops for industrial production, with a tendency for utilization of agro industrial wastes. Processes based on renewable waste sources have ecological (zero CO2 emission, eco-friendly by-products and economical (cheap raw materials, reduction of storage costs advantages. An intensive research interest has been recently devoted to develop and improve the lactic acid production on more complex industrial by-products, like thin stillage from bioethanol production, corncobs, paper waste, straw etc. Complex and variable chemical composition and purity of these raw materials and high nutritional requirements of Lare the main obstacles in these production processes. Media supplementation to improve the fermentation is an important factor, especially from an economic point of view. Today, a particular challenge is to increase the productivity of lactic acid production on complex renewable biomass. Several strategies are currently being explored for this purpose such as process integration, use of Lwith amylolytic activity, employment of mixed cultures of Land/or utilization of genetically engineered microorganisms. Modern techniques of genetic engineering enable construction of microorganisms with desired characteristics and implementation of single step processes without or with minimal pre-treatment. In addition, new bioreactor constructions (such as membrane bioreactors, utilization of immobilized systems are also being explored. Electrodialysis, bipolar membrane separation process, enhanced filtration

  9. D-lactic acid interferes with the effects of platelet activating factor on bovine neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, P; Conejeros, I; Carretta, M D; Concha, C; Jara, E; Tadich, N; Hidalgo, M A; Burgos, R A

    2011-11-15

    D-lactic acidosis occurs in ruminants, such as cattle, with acute ruminal acidosis caused by ingestion of excessive amounts of highly fermentable carbohydrates. Affected animals show clinical signs similar to those of septic shock, as well as acute laminitis and liver abscesses. It has been proposed that the inflammatory response and susceptibility to infection could both be caused by the inhibition of phagocytic mechanisms. To determine the effects of d-lactic acid on bovine neutrophil functions, we pretreated cells with different concentrations of D-lactic acid and measured intracellular pH using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) and calcium flux using FLUO-3 AM-loaded neutrophils. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using a luminol chemiluminescence assay, and MMP-9/gelatinase-B granule release was measured by zymography. CD11b and CD62L/l-selectin expression, changes in cell shape, superoxide anion production, phagocytosis of Escherichia coli-Texas red bioparticles, and apoptosis were all measured using flow cytometry. Our results demonstrated that D-lactic acid reduced ROS production, CD11b upregulation and MMP-9 release in bovine neutrophils treated with 100 nM platelet-activating factor (PAF). D-lactic acid induced MMP-9 release and, at higher concentrations, upregulated CD11b expression, decrease L-selectin expression, and induces late apoptosis. We concluded that D-lactic acid can interfere with neutrophil functions induced by PAF, leading to reduced innate immune responses during bacterial infections. Moreover, the increase of MMP-9 release and CD11b expression induced by 10mM D-lactic acid could promote an nonspecific neutrophil-dependent inflammatory reaction in cattle with acute ruminal acidosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypolipidemic effects of lactic acid bacteria fermented cereal in rats

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    Banjoko Immaculata

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objectives of the present study were to investigate the efficacy of the mixed culture of Lactobacillus acidophilus (DSM 20242, Bifidobacterium bifidum (DSM 20082 and Lactobacillus helveticus (CK60 in the fermentation of maize and the evaluation of the effect of the fermented meal on the lipid profile of rats. Methods Rats were randomly assigned to 3 groups and each group placed on a Diet A (high fat diet into which a maize meal fermented with a mixed culture of Lb acidophilus (DSM 20242, B bifidum (DSM 20082 and Lb helveticus (CK 60 was incorporated, B (unfermented high fat diet or C (commercial rat chow respectively after the first group of 7 rats randomly selected were sacrificed to obtain the baseline data. Thereafter 7 rats each from the experimental and control groups were sacrificed weekly for 4 weeks and the plasma, erythrocytes, lipoproteins and organs of the rats were assessed for cholesterol, triglyceride and phospholipids. Results Our results revealed that the mixed culture of Lb acidophilus (DSM 20242, B bifidum (DSM 20082 and Lb helveticus (CK 60 were able to grow and ferment maize meal into ‘ogi’ of acceptable flavour. In addition to plasma and hepatic hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia, phospholipidosis in plasma, as well as cholesterogenesis, triglyceride constipation and phospholipidosis in extra-hepatic tissues characterized the consumption of unfermented hyperlipidemic diets. However, feeding the animals with the fermented maize diet reversed the dyslipidemia. Conclusion The findings of this study indicate that consumption of mixed culture lactic acid bacteria (Lb acidophilus (DSM 20242, Bifidobacterium bifidum (DSM 20082 and Lb helveticus (CK 60 fermented food results in the inhibition of fat absorption. It also inhibits the activity of HMG CoA reductase. This inhibition may be by feedback inhibition or repression of the transcription of the gene encoding the enzyme via activation of the

  11. Effects of acetic acid and lactic acid on physicochemical characteristics of native and cross-linked wheat starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzoobi, Mahsa; Beparva, Paniz

    2014-03-15

    The effects of two common organic acids; lactic and acetic acids (150 mg/kg) on physicochemical properties of native and cross-linked wheat starches were investigated prior and after gelatinization. These acids caused formation of some cracks and spots on the granules. The intrinsic viscosity of both starches decreased in the presence of the acids particularly after gelatinization. Water solubility increased while water absorption reduced after addition of the acids. The acids caused reduction in gelatinization temperature and enthalpy of gelatinization of both starches. The starch gels became softer, less cohesive, elastic and gummy when acids were added. These changes may indicate the degradation of the starch molecules by the acids. Cross-linked wheat starch was more resistant to the acids. However, both starches became more susceptible to the acids after gelatinization. The effect of lactic acid on physicochemical properties of both starches before and after gelatinization was greater than acetic acid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria and Propionic Acid Bacteria using FTIR Spectroscopy and Artificial Neural Networks

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    Beata Nalepa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, lactic acid bacteria and propionic acid bacteria have been identified at the genus level with the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Bacterial strains of the genera Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Streptococcus and Propionibacterium were analyzed since they deliver health benefits and are routinely used in the food processing industry. The correctness of bacterial identification by ANNs and FTIR was evaluated at two stages. At first stage, ANNs were tested based on the spectra of 66 reference bacterial strains. At second stage, the evaluation involved 286 spectra of bacterial strains isolated from food products, deposited in our laboratory collection, and identified by genus-specific PCR. ANNs were developed based on the spectra and their first derivatives. The most satisfactory results were reported for the probabilistic neural network, which was built using a combination of W5W4W3 spectral ranges. This network correctly identified the genus of 95 % of the lactic acid bacteria and propionic acid bacteria strains analyzed.

  13. Determination of dissociation constants or propionic acid and lactic acid (2-hydroxypropionic acid) by potentiometry and conductometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeeduddin; Khanzada, A.W.K.

    2004-01-01

    Dissociation constants of propionic acid and 2-hydroxypropionic acid (lactic acid) have been studied at different temperatures between 25 to 50 deg. C interval. Propionic acid is analyzed by conductometry while 2-hydroxypropionic acid is analyzed by potentiometry. Both investigated compounds are symmetrical carboxylic acids having same length of carbon chain but are markedly different in ionic behavior. We were interested to see how the hydroxyl group (-OH) induction in propionic acid affects on pKa values of 2-hydroxypropionic acid. We observed that as temperature increases pKa values increase. The increase is observed for both the investigated compounds. PKa values of 2-hydroxypropionic acid are lower as compared to propionic acid because of electron withdrawing (-OH). (author)

  14. Detoxification of Sap from Felled Oil Palm Trunks for the Efficient Production of Lactic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunasundari, Balakrishnan; Arai, Takamitsu; Sudesh, Kumar; Hashim, Rokiah; Sulaiman, Othman; Stalin, Natra Joseph; Kosugi, Akihiko

    2017-09-01

    The availability of fermentable sugars in high concentrations in the sap of felled oil palm trunks and the thermophilic nature of the recently isolated Bacillus coagulans strain 191 were exploited for lactic acid production under non-sterile conditions. Screening indicated that strain 191 was active toward most sugars including sucrose, which is a major component of sap. Strain 191 catalyzed a moderate conversion of sap sugars to lactic acid (53%) with a productivity of 1.56 g/L/h. Pretreatment of oil palm sap (OPS) using alkaline precipitation improved the sugar fermentability, providing a lactic acid yield of 92% and productivity of 2.64 g/L/h. To better characterize potential inhibitors in the sap, phenolic, organic, and mineral compounds were analyzed using non-treated sap and saps treated with activated charcoal and alkaline precipitation. Phthalic acid, 3,4-dimethoxybenzoic acid, aconitic acid, syringic acid, and ferulic acid were reduced in the sap after treatment. High concentrations of Mg, P, K, and Ca were also precipitated by the alkaline treatment. These results suggest that elimination of excess phenolic and mineral compounds in OPS can improve the fermentation yield. OPS, a non-food resource that is readily available in bulk quantities from plantation sites, is a promising source for lactic acid production.

  15. Utilization of Encapsulated CaCO_3 in Liquid Core Capsules for Improving Lactic Acid Fermentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boon-Beng, Lee; Nurul Ainina Zulkifli

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for food fermentation due to its fermentative ability to improve and enhance the quality of the end food products. However, the performance of LAB is affected as fermentation time elapsed because the microbial growth is inhibited by its end product, for example lactic acid. In this study, a new approach was introduced to reduce the product inhibition effect using CaCO_3 which is encapsulated in spherical liquid core capsules of diameter 3.5 mm and 3.6 mm produced through extrusion dripping method. The results showed that the pH and lactic acid concentration of LAB fermentation was well maintained by the capsules. The results of the fermentation conducted to control pH and lactic acid concentration using the capsules were better than those of the control set and comparable with that of the free CaCO_3 set. In addition, the viable cell concentration of L. casei shirota was high at the end of fermentation when the fermentation was conducted using the capsules. The results of this study suggested that the capsules have high potential to be applied for pH and lactic acid level control in LAB fermentation for various productions. (author)

  16. Batch fermentation of whey ultra filtrate by Lactobacillus helveticus for lactic acid production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, D; Goulet, J; Le Duy, Q

    1986-06-01

    Cheese whey ultrafiltrate (WU) was used as the carbon source for the production of lactic acid by batch fermentation with Lactobacillus helveticus strain milano. The fermentation was conducted in a 400 ml fermentor at an agitation rate of 200 revolutions per minute and under conditions of controlled temperature (42 degrees C) and pH. In the whey ultrafiltrate-corn steep liquor (WU-CSL) medium, the optimal pH for fermentation was 5.9. Inoculum propagated in skim milk (SM) medium or in lactose synthetic (LS) medium resulted in the best performance in fermentation (in terms of growth, lactic acid production, lactic acid yield and maximum productivity of lactic acid), as compared to that propagated in glucose synthetic (GS) medium. The yeast extract ultrafiltrate (YEU) used as the nitrogen/growth factor source in the WU medium at 1.5% (w/v) gave the highest maximum productivity of lactic acid of 2.70 g/l-h, as compared to the CSL and the tryptone ultrafiltrate (TU). 27 references.

  17. Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation of Lactic Acid from Empty Fruit Bunch at High Solids Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursia Hassan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of value-added chemicals from the bioconversion of lignocellulose biomass has been considered a promising venture. In this study, microwave, alkali-pretreated empty fruit bunch (EFB was used as the substrate, utilizing pelletized filamentous Rhizopus oryzae NRRL 395 and cellulolytic enzymes for lactic acid production in a fed-batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF process. Insoluble solids generally do not affect the SSF process until a certain concentration is exceeded. To achieve a high lactic acid concentration in the broth, a high solids loading was required to allow a higher rate of glucose conversion. However, the results revealed a decrease in the final lactic acid yield when running SSF at a massive insoluble solids level. High osmotic pressure in the medium led to poor cellular performance and caused the Rhizopus oryzae pellets to break down, affecting the lactic acid production. To improve the process performance, a fed-batch operation mode was used. The fed-batch operation was shown to facilitate higher lactic acid yield, compared with the SSF batch mode. Enzyme feeding, as well as substrate feeding, was also investigated as a means of enabling a higher dry matter content, with a high glucose conversion in SSF of cellulose-rich EFB.

  18. Characterization of lactic acid bacteria from local cow´s milk kefir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, YS; Yulvizar, C.; Mazhitov, B.

    2018-03-01

    One of products from milk fermentation is kefir. It is made by adding kefir grains which are composed of lactic acid bacteria and yeast into milk. The lactic acid bacteria are a group of bacteria that produce antimicrobial substances and able to inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria. In this research, the lactic acid bacteria were isolated from Aceh local cow`s milk kefir to determine the genus of the isolates. The methods used in the characterization of lactic acid bacteria are colony morphology, cell morphology, and biochemical tests which includes a catalase test; 5%, 6.5%, and 10% salt endurance tests; 37°C and 14°C temperature endurance tests, SIM test, TSIA test, MR-VP test, and O/F test. Of the four isolates found from the cow’s milk kefir, two isolates were confirmed as lactic acid bacteria (isolates SK-1 and SK-4). Both isolates are Gram positive bacteria, and have negative catalase activity. From the observations of colony morphology, cell morphology, and biochemical tests, it was found that the genus of SK-1 is Lactobacillus and the genus of SK-4 is Enterococcus.

  19. Production of D- and L-Lactic Acid by Mono- and Mixed Cultures of Lactobacillus sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonija Trontel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Batch cultivation of monoculture of Lactobacillus sp. and two–strain mixed culture of Lactobacillus sp. and Lactobacillus amylovorus DSM 20531T was carried out with the aim of producing L-(+- and D-(–/L-(+-lactic acid to be implemented in poly(lactic acid polymer production. Metabolic capacity of two Lactobacillus strains to ferment different carbon sources (glucose, sucrose or soluble starch during cultivation in MRS medium at 40 °C, in a laboratory-scale stirred tank bioreactor was defined. Lactobacillus sp. showed similar affinity towards mono- and disaccharide substrates, which were homofermentatively converted mostly to L-(+-lactic acid. L. amylovorus DSM 20531T has been characterized as a D/L-lactate producer and it is capable of conducting simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. Due to the interaction of Lactobacillus sp. with L. amylovorus DSM 20531T, starch was hydrolysed and fermented to the mixture of L-(+- and D-(–-lactic acid. Modified Luedeking-Piret kinetics used for the description of substrate utilization, growth of mono- and mixed cultures and production of lactic acid stereoisomers showed good agreement with experimental data.

  20. Production of L-lactic acid from metabolically engineered strain of Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 29007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Laxmi Prasad; Lee, Sang Jun; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2017-07-01

    In this study, L-lactic acid production was investigated from metabolically engineered strain of E. aerogenes ATCC 29007. The engineered strain E. aerogenes SUMI01 (Δpta) was generated by the deletion of phosphate acetyltransferase (pta) gene from the chromosome of E. aerogenes ATCC 29007 and deletion was confirmed by colony PCR. Under the optimized fermentation conditions, at 37°C and pH 6 for 84h, the L-lactic acid produced by engineered strain E. aerogenes SUMI01 (Δpta) in flask fermentation using 100g/L mannitol as the carbon source was 40.05g/L as compared to that of the wild type counterpart 20.70g/L. At the end of the batch fermentation in bioreactor the production of L-lactic acid reached to 46.02g/L and yield was 0.41g/g by utilizing 112.32g/L mannitol. This is the first report regarding the production of L-lactic acid from Enterobacter species. We believe that this result may provide valuable guidelines for further engineering Enterobacter strain for the improvement of L-lactic acid production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Isolation of lactic acid bacteria with potential protective culture characteristics from fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Nurul Huda; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2015-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are also known as beneficial microorganisms abundantly found in fermented food products. In this study, lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fresh cut fruits obtained from local markets. Throughout the isolation process from 11 samples of fruits, 225 presumptive lactic acid bacteria were isolated on MRS agar medium. After catalase and oxidase tests, 149 resulted to fit the characteristics of lactic acid bacteria. Further identification using Gram staining was conducted to identify the Gram positive bacteria. After this confirmation, the fermentation characteristics of these isolates were identified. It was found that 87 (58.4%) isolates were heterofermentative, while the rest of 62 (41.6%) are homofermentative lactic acid bacteria. Later, all these isolates were investigated for the ability to inhibit growth of Staphylococcus aureus using agar spot assay method. Seven (4.7%) isolates showed strong antagonistic capacity, while 127 (85.2%) and 8 (5.4%) isolates have medium and weak antagonistic capacity, respectively. The other 7 (4.7%) isolates indicated to have no antagonistic effect on S. aureus. Results support the potential of LAB isolated in this study which showed strong antagonistic activity against S. aureus may be manipulated to become protective cultures in food products. While the homofermentative or heterofermentative LAB can be utilized in fermentation of food and non-food products depending on the by-products required during the fermentation.

  2. Phylogenomic reconstruction of lactic acid bacteria: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are important in the food industry for the production of fermented food products and in human health as commensals in the gut. However, the phylogenetic relationships among LAB species remain under intensive debate owing to disagreements among different data sets. Results We performed a phylogenetic analysis of LAB species based on 232 genes from 28 LAB genome sequences. Regardless of the tree-building methods used, combined analyses yielded an identical, well-resolved tree topology with strong supports for all nodes. The LAB species examined were divided into two groups. Group 1 included families Enterococcaceae and Streptococcaceae. Group 2 included families Lactobacillaceae and Leuconostocaceae. Within Group 2, the LAB species were divided into two clades. One clade comprised of the acidophilus complex of genus Lactobacillus and two other species, Lb. sakei and Lb. casei. In the acidophilus complex, Lb. delbrueckii separated first, while Lb. acidophilus/Lb. helveticus and Lb. gasseri/Lb. johnsonii were clustered into a sister group. The other clade within Group 2 consisted of the salivarius subgroup, including five species, Lb. salivarius, Lb. plantarum, Lb. brevis, Lb. reuteri, Lb. fermentum, and the genera Pediococcus, Oenococcus, and Leuconostoc. In this clade, Lb. salivarius was positioned most basally, followed by two clusters, one corresponding to Lb. plantarum/Lb. brevis pair and Pediococcus, and the other including Oenococcus/Leuconostoc pair and Lb. reuteri/Lb. fermentum pair. In addition, phylogenetic utility of the 232 genes was analyzed to identify those that may be more useful than others. The genes identified as useful were related to translation and ribosomal structure and biogenesis (TRSB, and a three-gene set comprising genes encoding ultra-violet resistance protein B (uvrB, DNA polymerase III (polC and penicillin binding protein 2B (pbpB. Conclusions Our phylogenomic analyses

  3. Optimization of a biomimetic poly-(lactic acid) ligament scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehlin, Andrew F.

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee, often requiring orthopedic reconstruction using autograft or allograph tissue, both with significant disadvantages. As a result, tissue engineering an ACL replacement graft has been heavily investigated. The present study attempts to replicate the morphology and mechanical properties of the ACL using a nanomatrix composite of highly-aligned poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fibers with various surface and biochemical modifications. Additionally, this study attempts to recreate the natural mineralization gradient found at the ACL enthesis onto the scaffold, capable of inducing a favorable cellular response in vitro. Unidirectional electrospinning was used to create nanofibers of PLA, followed by an induced degradation of the nanofibers via 0.25M NaOH hydrolysis. The effects of the unidirectional electrospinning as well as the effects of NaOH hydrolysis on fiber alignment, fiber diameter, surface morphology, crystallinity, in vitro swelling, immobilization of fibrin, and mechanical properties were investigated, resulting in a modified morphology correlating to the microstructure of native ligament tissue with similar mechanical properties. Furthering the development of the PLA nanomatrix composite, a bioinkjet printer was used to immobilize nanoparticulate hydroxyapatite (HANP) on the surface of the scaffold. A series of 300pL droplets of HANP bioink were printed over a gradient pattern mimetic of (and spatially corresponding to) the mineralization gradient found over the microanatomy at the ACL enthesis. Proliferation and differentiation response of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in vitro was assessed on a variety of conditions and combinations of the PLA nanofiber scaffold surface modifications (inclusive and exclusive of HANP, fibrin, and various time dependent NaOH treatments). It was found that a combinatory effect of the HANP gradient with fibrin on 20 minute NaOH treated PLA

  4. Evaluation of ginsenoside bioconversion of lactic acid bacteria isolated from kimchi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyeon Park

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Ginsenoside Rg5 concentration of five LABs have ranged from ∼2.6 μg/mL to 6.5 μg/mL and increased in accordance with the incubation periods. Our results indicate that the enzymatic activity along with acidic condition contribute to the production of minor ginsenoside from lactic acid bacteria.

  5. Microbial export of lactic and 3-hydroxypropanoic acid : implications for industrial fermentation processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maris, AJA; Konings, WN; Pronk, Jack T.; Dijken, J.P. van

    2004-01-01

    Lactic acid and 3-hydroxypropanoic acid are industrially relevant microbial products. This paper reviews the current knowledge on export of these compounds from microbial cells and presents a theoretical analysis of the bioenergetics of different export mechanisms. It is concluded that export can be

  6. Equilibria and kinetics for reactive extraction of lactic acid using Alamine 336 in decanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasewar, Kailas L.; Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Versteeg, Geert; Pangarkar, Vishwas G.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important commercial product and extracting this from aqueous solution is a growing requirement in fermentation-based industries. The design of an amine extraction process requires (i) equilibrium and (ii) kinetic data for the acid-amine (solvent) system used. The equilibrium

  7. Preservation of acidified cucumbers with a natural preservative combination of fumaric acid and allyl isothiocyanate that target lactic acid bacteria and yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Without the addition of preservative compounds cucumbers acidified with 150 mM acetic acid with pH adjusted to 3.5 typically undergo fermentation by lactic acid bacteria. Fumaric acid (20 mM) inhibited growth of Lactobacillus plantarum and the lactic acid bacteria present on fresh cucumbers, but sp...

  8. LPMOs in cellulase mixtures affect fermentation strategies for lactic acid production from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gerdt; Kalyani, Dayanand Chandrahas; Horn, Svein Jarle

    2017-03-01

    Enzymatic catalysis plays a key role in the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals such as lactic acid. In the last decade, the efficiency of commercial cellulase cocktails has increased significantly, in part due to the inclusion of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs). However, the LPMOs' need for molecular oxygen to break down cellulose demands reinvestigations of process conditions. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of lactic acid production from steam-exploded birch using an LPMO-containing cellulase cocktail in combination with lactic acid bacteria, investigating both separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). While the SSF set up generally has been considered to be more efficient because it avoids sugar accumulation which may inhibit the cellulases, the SHF set up in our study yielded 26-32% more lactic acid than the SSF. This was mainly due to competition for oxygen between LPMOs and the fermenting organisms in the SSF process, which resulted in reduced LPMO activity and thus less efficient saccharification of the lignocellulosic substrate. By means of aeration it was possible to activate the LPMOs in the SSF, but less lactic acid was produced due to a shift in metabolic pathways toward production of acetic acid. Overall, this study shows that lactic acid can be produced efficiently from lignocellulosic biomass, but that the use of LPMO-containing cellulase cocktails in fermentation processes demands re-thinking of traditional process set ups due to the requirement of oxygen in the saccharification step. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 552-559. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Screening local Lactobacilli from Iran in terms of production of lactic acid and identification of superior strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Soleimanifard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lactobacilli are a group of lactic acid bacteria that their final product of fermentation is lactic acid. The objective of this research is selection of local Lactobacilli producing L (+ lactic acid. Materials and methods: In this research the local strains were screened based on the ability to produce lactic acid. The screening was performed in two stages. The first stage was the titration method and the second stage was the enzymatic method. The superior strains obtained from titration method were selected to do enzymatic test. Finally, the superior strains in the second stage (enzymatic which had the ability to produce L(+ lactic acid were identified by biochemical tests. Then, molecular identification of strains was performed by using 16S rRNA sequencing. Results: In this study, the ability of 79 strains of local Lactobacilli in terms of production of lactic acid was studied. The highest and lowest rates of lactic acid production was 34.8 and 12.4 mg/g. Superior Lactobacilli in terms of production of lactic acid ability of producing had an optical isomer L(+, the highest levels of L(+ lactic acid were with 3.99 and the lowest amount equal to 1.03 mg/g. The biochemical and molecular identification of superior strains showed that strains are Lactobacillus paracasei. Then the sequences of 16S rRNA of superior strains were reported in NCBI with accession numbers KF735654، KF735655، KJ508201and KJ508202. Discussion and conclusion: The amounts of lactic acid production by local Lactobacilli were very different and producing some of these strains on available reports showed more products. The results of this research suggest the use of superior strains of Lactobacilli for production of pure L(+ lactic acid.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Mun Su [University of Florida, Gainesville; Moritz, Brelan E. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Patel, Milind [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ou, Mark [University of Florida, Gainesville; Harbrucker, Roberta [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ingram, Lonnie O. [University of Florida; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T. [University of Florida

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer- ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this spo- rogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attrac- tive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi- cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome se- quence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  12. Lactic Acid Bacteria Exopolysaccharides in Foods and Beverages: Isolation, Properties, Characterization, and Health Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Kieran M; Zannini, Emanuele; Coffey, Aidan; Arendt, Elke K

    2018-03-25

    Exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria are a diverse group of polysaccharides produced by many species. They vary widely in their molecular, compositional, and structural characteristics, including mechanisms of synthesis. The physiochemical properties of these polymers mean that they can be exploited for the sensorial and textural enhancement of a variety of food and beverage products. Traditionally, lactic acid bacteria exopolysaccharides have an important role in fermented dairy products and more recently are being applied for the improvement of bakery products. The health benefits that are continually being associated with these polysaccharides enable the development of dual function, added-value, and clean-label products. To fully exploit and understand the functionality of these exopolysaccharides, their isolation, purification, and thorough characterization are of great importance. This review considers each of the above factors and presents the current knowledge on the importance of lactic acid bacteria exopolysaccharides in the food and beverage industry.

  13. A Consistent Methodology Based Parameter Estimation for a Lactic Acid Bacteria Fermentation Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spann, Robert; Roca, Christophe; Kold, David

    2017-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are used in many industrial applications, e.g. as starter cultures in the dairy industry or as probiotics, and research on their cell production is highly required. A first principles kinetic model was developed to describe and understand the biological, physical, and chemical...... mechanisms in a lactic acid bacteria fermentation. We present here a consistent approach for a methodology based parameter estimation for a lactic acid fermentation. In the beginning, just an initial knowledge based guess of parameters was available and an initial parameter estimation of the complete set...... of parameters was performed in order to get a good model fit to the data. However, not all parameters are identifiable with the given data set and model structure. Sensitivity, identifiability, and uncertainty analysis were completed and a relevant identifiable subset of parameters was determined for a new...

  14. Lactic acid production on liquid distillery stillage by Lactobacillus rhamnosus immobilized onto zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić-Vuković, Aleksandra P; Mojović, Ljiljana V; Jokić, Bojan M; Nikolić, Svetlana B; Pejin, Jelena D

    2013-05-01

    In this study, lactic acid and biomass production on liquid distillery stillage from bioethanol production with Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 was studied. The cells were immobilized onto zeolite, a microporous aluminosilicate mineral and the lactic acid production with free and immobilized cells was compared. The immobilization allowed simple cell separation from the fermentation media and their reuse in repeated batch cycles. A number of viable cells of over 10(10) CFU g(-1) of zeolite was achieved at the end of fourth fermentation cycle. A maximal process productivity of 1.69 g L(-1), maximal lactic acid concentration of 42.19 g L(-1) and average yield coefficient of 0.96 g g(-1) were achieved in repeated batch fermentation on the liquid stillage without mineral or nitrogen supplementation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) isolated from Indonesian shrimp paste (terasi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalia, U.; Sumardianto; Agustini, T. W.

    2018-02-01

    Shrimp paste was one of fermented products, popular as a taste enhancer in many dishes. The processing of shrimp paste was natural fermentation, depends on shrimp it self and the presence of salt. The salt inhibits the growth of undesirable microorganism and allows the salt-tolerant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to ferment the protein source to lactic acids. The objectives of this study were to characterize LAB isolated from Indonesian shrimp paste or "Terasi" with different times of fermentation (30, 60 and 90 days). Vitech analysis showed that there were four strains of the microorganism referred to as lactic acid bacteria (named: LABS1, LABS2, LABS3 and LABS4) with 95% sequence similarity. On the basis of biochemical, four isolates represented Lactobacillus, which the name Lactobacillus plantarum is proposed. L.plantarum was play role in resulting secondary metabolites, which gave umami flavor in shrimp paste.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Mun Su; Moritz, Brélan E.; Xie, Gary; Glavina del Rio, T.; Dalin, E.; Tice, H.; Bruce, D.; Goodwin, L.; Chertkov, O.; Brettin, T.; Han, C.; Detter, C.; Pitluck, S.; Land, Miriam L.; Patel, Milind; Ou, Mark; Harbrucker, Roberta; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 and ferments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 °C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemicellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome sequence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed. PMID:22675583

  17. Influence of Heavy Metal Powders on Rheological Properties of Poly(Lactic Acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, S. M.; Gefle, O. S.; Amitov, E. T.; Berchuk, D. Yu.; Zhuravlev, D. V.

    2017-08-01

    Main properties of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and composite materials on its basis filled with tungsten and lead powders are investigated. An anomalous decrease of the viscosity of melts of poly(lactic acid)/tungsten and poly(lactic acid)/lead composites is detected. The methods of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and IR spectroscopy are used for investigation. It is shown that the temperature at which the composites filled with tungsten and lead begin to melt decreases by more than 8 and 3°C in comparison with neat PLA. Our investigations show impossibility of preparing radiation resistant polymer composites based on PLA filled with tungsten and lead powders.

  18. Fermentation of Prefermented and Extruded Rice Flour by Lactic Acid Bacteria from Sikhae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, C. H.; Min, K. C.; Souane, M.

    1992-01-01

    of prefermentation of rice flour in solid-state with Bacillus laevolacticus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, extrusion cooking and addition of soymilk as the substrate of lactic acid fermentation were tested. Extrusion cooking and prefermentation of rice increased the soluble solid and sugar contents before malt......The acid- and flavor-forming properties of Lactobacillus plantarum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides isolated from Sikhae, a Korean traditional lactic acid fermented fish product, were examined and compared to those of Lactobacillus casei and Lactococcus lactis subsp. diacetylactis DRC3. The effects...... digestion. The amount of sugar consumption during lactic fermentation varied with the type of bacteria. Leuconostoc mesenteroides(sikhae) and Lactobacillus plantarum(sikhae) increased up to 6 times of original cell number by 24 hrs of fermentation in rice + soymilk substrate, but Lactococcus lactis...

  19. Comparative analysis of microbial community of novel lactic acid fermentation inoculated with different undefined mixed cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shaobo; Gliniewicz, Karol; Mendes-Soares, Helena; Settles, Matthew L; Forney, Larry J; Coats, Erik R; McDonald, Armando G

    2015-03-01

    Three undefined mixed cultures (activated sludge) from different municipal wastewater treatment plants were used as seeds in a novel lactic acid fermentation process fed with potato peel waste (PPW). Anaerobic sequencing batch fermenters were run under identical conditions to produce predominantly lactic acid. Illumina sequencing was used to examine the 16S rRNA genes of bacteria in the three seeds and fermenters. Results showed that the structure of microbial communities of three seeds were different. All three fermentation products had unique community structures that were dominated (>96%) by species of the genus Lactobacillus, while members of this genus constituted undefined mixed cultures were robust and resilient, which provided engineering prospects for the microbial utilization of carbohydrate wastes to produce lactic acid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mass transfer behavior in lactic acid fermentation using immobilized lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H.; Seki, M.; Furusaki, S. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-08-20

    We performed simulation studies on mass transfer behavior for immobilized cells in lactic acid fermentation using the mathematical model developed previously. The simulations pointed to an unusual result; that lactate ion diffuses into the bead center from outside during the batch fermentation and the startup period of the continuous fermentation, whereas free lactic acid and protons diffuse in the opposite direction. This phenomenon is caused by the addition of base to keep pH constant in the broth. Also, using an appropriate buffer to control pH in the broth can reduce the inward diffusion of lactate ion and improve the productivity of lactic acid. A singular mass transfer phenomenon is expected to take place in other production processes using immobilized cells (or enzyme), where alkali solution is added to broth to keep pH constant. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Production of lactic acid from hemicellulose extracts by Bacillus coagulans MXL-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Sara L; Bischoff, Kenneth M; van Heiningen, Adriaan R P; van Walsum, G Peter

    2010-08-01

    Bacillus coagulans MXL-9 was found capable of growing on pre-pulping hemicellulose extracts, utilizing all of the principle monosugars found in woody biomass. This organism is a moderate thermophile isolated from compost for its pentose-utilizing capabilities. It was found to have high tolerance for inhibitors such as acetic acid and sodium, which are present in pre-pulping hemicellulose extracts. Fermentation of 20 g/l xylose in the presence of 30 g/l acetic acid required a longer lag phase but overall lactic acid yield was not diminished. Similarly, fermentation of xylose in the presence of 20 g/l sodium increased the lag time but did not affect overall product yield, though 30 g/l sodium proved completely inhibitory. Fermentation of hot water-extracted Siberian larch containing 45 g/l total monosaccharides, mainly galactose and arabinose, produced 33 g/l lactic acid in 60 h and completely consumed all sugars. Small amounts of co-products were formed, including acetic acid, formic acid, and ethanol. Hemicellulose extract formed during autohydrolysis of mixed hardwoods contained mainly xylose and was converted into lactic acid with a 94% yield. Green liquor-extracted hardwood hemicellulose containing 10 g/l acetic acid and 6 g/l sodium was also completely converted into lactic acid at a 72% yield. The Bacillus coagulans MXL-9 strain was found to be well suited to production of lactic acid from lignocellulosic biomass due to its compatibility with conditions favorable to industrial enzymes and its ability to withstand inhibitors while rapidly consuming all pentose and hexose sugars of interest at high product yields.

  2. Characterization of airag collected in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia with emphasis on isolated lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Suk-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Airag, alcoholic sour-tasting beverage, has been traditionally prepared by Mongolian nomads who naturally ferment fresh mares' milk. Biochemical and microbiological compositions of airag samples collected in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia and physiological characteristics of isolated lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Protein composition and biochemical composition were determined using sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Lactic acid bacteria were identified based on nucleotide sequence of 16S rRNA gene. Carbohydrate fermentation, acid survival, bile resistance and acid production in skim milk culture were determined. Equine whey proteins were present in airag samples more than caseins. The airag samples contained 0.10-3.36 % lactose, 1.44-2.33 % ethyl alcohol, 1.08-1.62 % lactic acid and 0.12-0.22 % acetic acid. Lactobacillus (L.) helveticus were major lactic acid bacteria consisting of 9 isolates among total 18 isolates of lactic acid bacteria. L. helveticus survived strongly in PBS, pH 3.0 but did not grow in MRS broth containing 0.1 % oxgall. A couple of L. helveticus isolates lowered pH of skim milk culture to less than 4.0 and produced acid up to more than 1.0 %. Highly variable biochemical compositions of the airag samples indicated inconsistent quality due to natural fermentation. Airag with low lactose content should be favorable for nutrition, considering that mares' milk with high lactose content has strong laxative effect. The isolates of L. helveticus which produced acid actively in skim milk culture might have a major role in production of airag.

  3. Characterization of airag collected in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia with emphasis on isolated lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk-Ho Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airag, alcoholic sour-tasting beverage, has been traditionally prepared by Mongolian nomads who naturally ferment fresh mares’ milk. Biochemical and microbiological compositions of airag samples collected in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia and physiological characteristics of isolated lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Methods Protein composition and biochemical composition were determined using sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Lactic acid bacteria were identified based on nucleotide sequence of 16S rRNA gene. Carbohydrate fermentation, acid survival, bile resistance and acid production in skim milk culture were determined. Results Equine whey proteins were present in airag samples more than caseins. The airag samples contained 0.10–3.36 % lactose, 1.44–2.33 % ethyl alcohol, 1.08–1.62 % lactic acid and 0.12–0.22 % acetic acid. Lactobacillus (L. helveticus were major lactic acid bacteria consisting of 9 isolates among total 18 isolates of lactic acid bacteria. L. helveticus survived strongly in PBS, pH 3.0 but did not grow in MRS broth containing 0.1 % oxgall. A couple of L. helveticus isolates lowered pH of skim milk culture to less than 4.0 and produced acid up to more than 1.0 %. Conclusion Highly variable biochemical compositions of the airag samples indicated inconsistent quality due to natural fermentation. Airag with low lactose content should be favorable for nutrition, considering that mares’ milk with high lactose content has strong laxative effect. The isolates of L. helveticus which produced acid actively in skim milk culture might have a major role in production of airag.

  4. Correlation between working positions and lactic acid levels with musculoskeletal complaints among dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiory Dioptis Putriwijaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal complaints have been common for dentists since their body is unknowingly often in inappropriate positions when caring for patients. For example, they bend towards patients, suddenly move, and then rotate from one side to another. The repetitive movements are done in long term. High activities and sufficient recovery time can cause a buildup of lactic acid in their blood leading to obstruction of the energy intake from the aerobic system in their muscle cells, resulting in fatigue. As a result, such conditions trigger decreased muscle performances. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the correlation between working positions and lactic acid levels with the risk of musculoskeletal disorders among dentists at Public Health Centers in Surabaya. Method: This research was an analytical observational research using cross sectional approach. Sampling technique used in this research was cluster random sampling with nineteen samples. To evaluate the working positions of those samples, a rapid entire body assessment (REBA method was used. Meanwhile, to observe the musculoskeletal disorders of those samples, a Nordic body map was used. Data obtained then were analyzed using Pearson correlation test with a significance level (p<0.05. Result: Results of data analysis using the Pearson correlation test showed that the significance value obtained was 0.036. It indicates that there was a correlation between the working positions and the lactic acid levels with the musculoskeletal disorders in those dentists. The results of the Pearson correlation test also revealed that there was a correlation between the working positions and the lactic acid levels among those dentists with a significance value of 0.025. Conclusion: It may be concluded that the wrong body positions during working can increase lactic acid level in the body of dentists. The increased level of lactic acid then can affect their muscles, leading to the high risk of

  5. Amino acid catabolism and generation of volatiles by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavaria, F K; Dahl, S; Carballo, F J; Malcata, F X

    2002-10-01

    Twelve isolates of lactic acid bacteria, belonging to the Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, and Enterococcus genera, were previously isolated from 180-d-old Serra da Estrela cheese, a traditional Portuguese cheese manufactured from raw milk and coagulated with a plant rennet. These isolates were subsequently tested for their ability to catabolize free amino acids, when incubated independently with each amino acid in free form or with a mixture thereof. Attempts were made in both situations to correlate the rates of free amino acid uptake with the numbers of viable cells. When incubated individually, leucine, valine, glycine, aspartic acid, serine, threonine, lysine, glutamic acid, and alanine were degraded by all strains considered; arginine tended to build up, probably because of transamination of other amino acids. When incubated together, the degradation of free amino acids by each strain was dependent on pH (with an optimum pH around 6.0). The volatiles detected in ripened Serra da Estrela cheese originated mainly from leucine, phenylalanine, alanine, and valine, whereas in vitro they originated mainly from valine, phenylalanine, serine, leucine, alanine, and threonine. The wild strains tested offer a great potential for flavor generation, which might justify their inclusion in a tentative starter/nonstarter culture for that and similar cheeses.

  6. Water-lactose behavior as a function of concentration and presence of lactic acid in lactose model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayasinghe, Rangani; Vasiljevic, Todor; Chandrapala, Jayani

    2015-12-01

    The presence of high amounts of lactic acid in acid whey restricts its ability to be further processed because lactose appears to remain in its amorphous form. A systematic study is lacking in this regard especially during the concentration step. Hence, the main aim of the study was to establish the structure and behavior of water molecules surrounding lactose in the presence of 1% (wt/wt) lactic acid at a concentration up to 50% (wt/wt). Furthermore, the crystallization nature of freeze-dried lactose with or without lactic acid was established using differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Two mechanisms were proposed to describe the behavior of water molecules around lactose molecules during the concentration of pure lactose and lactose solutions with lactic acid. Pure lactose solution exhibited a water evaporation enthalpy of ~679 J·g(-1), whereas lactose+ lactic acid solution resulted in ~965 J·g(-1) at a 50% (wt/wt) concentration. This indicates a greater energy requirement for water removal around lactose in the presence of lactic acid. Higher crystallization temperatures were observed with the presence of lactic acid, indicating a delay in crystallization. Furthermore, less crystalline lactose (~12%) was obtained in the presence of lactic acid, indicating high amorphous nature compared with pure lactose where ~50% crystallinity was obtained. The Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed that the strong hydration layer consisting lactic acid and H3O(+) ions surrounded lactose molecules via strong H bonds, which restricted water mobility, induced a change in structure of lactose, or both, creating unfavorable conditions for lactose crystallization. Thus, partial or complete removal of lactic acid from acid whey may be the first step toward improving the ability of acid whey to be processed. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Direct lactic acid fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke tuber extract using Lactobacillus paracasei without acidic or enzymatic inulin hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hwa-Young; Ryu, Hee-Kyoung; Park, Kyung-Min; Lee, Eun Gyo; Lee, Hongweon; Kim, Seon-Won; Choi, Eui-Sung

    2012-06-01

    Lactic acid fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke tuber was performed with strains of Lactobacillus paracasei without acidic or enzymatic inulin hydrolysis prior to fermentation. Some strains of L. paracasei, notably KCTC13090 and KCTC13169, could ferment hot-water extract of Jerusalem artichoke tuber more efficiently compared with other Lactobacillus spp. such as L. casei type strain KCTC3109. The L. paracasei strains could utilize almost completely the fructo-oligosaccharides present in Jerusalem artichoke. Inulin-fermenting L. paracasei strains produced c.a. six times more lactic acid compared with L. casei KCTC3109. Direct lactic fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke tuber extract at 111.6g/L of sugar content with a supplement of 5 g/L of yeast extract by L. paracasei KCTC13169 in a 5L jar fermentor produced 92.5 ce:hsp sp="0.25"/>g/L of lactic acid with 16.8 g/L fructose equivalent remained unutilized in 72 h. The conversion efficiency of inulin-type sugars to lactic acid was 98% of the theoretical yield. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antimicrobial properties of lactic acid bacteria isolated from uruguayan artisan cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Fraga Cotelo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Uruguayan artisan cheese is elaborated with raw milk and non-commercial starters. The associated native microbiota may include lactic acid bacteria and also potentially pathogenic bacteria. Lactic acid bacteria were isolated from artisan cheese, raw milk, and non-commercial starter cultures, and their potential bacteriocin production was assessed. A culture collection of 509 isolates was obtained, and five isolates were bacteriocin-producers and were identified as Enterococcus durans,Lactobacillus casei, and Lactococcus lactis. No evidence of potential virulence factors were found in E. durans strains. These are promising results in terms of using these native strains for cheese manufacture and to obtain safe products.

  9. Isolation, enumeration, molecular identification and probiotic potential evaluation of lactic acid bacteria isolated from sheep milk

    OpenAIRE

    Acurcio, L.B.; Souza, M.R.; Nunes, A.C.; Oliveira, D.L.S.; Sandes, S.H.C.; Alvim, L.B.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria species were molecularly identified in milk from Lacaune, Santa Inês and crossbred sheep breeds and their in vitro probiotic potential was evaluated. The species identified were Enterococcus faecium (56.25%), E. durans (31.25%) and E. casseliflavus (12.5%). No other lactic acid bacteria species, such as lactobacilli, was identified. Most of the isolated enterococci were resistant to gastric pH (2.0) and to 0.3% oxgall. All tested enterococci were resistant to ceftazidime,...

  10. Synergistic Extraction of Lactic Acid with Tri-n-Octylamine and Try-n-Butylphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Michiaki.; Yuba, Seiji.; Kondo, Kazuo. (Doshisha University, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science (Japan))

    1998-12-01

    Synergistic extraction system of lactic acid is examined to develop to in situ extractive fermentation process. The addition of try-n-butyl phosphate(TBP) to the extraction system of lactic acid(HA) with tri-n-actylamine(TOA) diluted by hexane causes a large synergism. Extraction reaction with the mixed extractant is interpreted quite well based on the formation of mixed complex, HA[center dot]TOA[center dot]2TBP. Though the addition of hexane solution containing TBP and TOA to the culture of Lactobacillus rhamnosus results in low lactate production, some lactate is produced. (author)

  11. Synergistic Extraction of Lactic Acid with Tri-n-Octylamine and Try-n-Butylphosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Michiaki.; Yuba, Seiji.; Kondo, Kazuo. [Doshisha University, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science (Japan)

    1998-12-01

    Synergistic extraction system of lactic acid is examined to develop to in situ extractive fermentation process. The addition of try-n-butyl phosphate(TBP) to the extraction system of lactic acid(HA) with tri-n-actylamine(TOA) diluted by hexane causes a large synergism. Extraction reaction with the mixed extractant is interpreted quite well based on the formation of mixed complex, HA{center_dot}TOA{center_dot}2TBP. Though the addition of hexane solution containing TBP and TOA to the culture of Lactobacillus rhamnosus results in low lactate production, some lactate is produced. (author)

  12. Non Invasive Microwave Sensor for the Detection of Lactic Acid in Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goh, J H; Mason, A; Al-Shamma'a, A I; Field, M; Shackcloth, M; Browning, P

    2011-01-01

    This research involves the use of a low power microwave sensor for analysis of lactic acid in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), an indicator of neurological impairment during aortic aneurysm surgery which could provide the basis for improved treatment regimes and better quality of care with more efficient use of resources. This paper presents initial work using standard lactate curves in water followed by lactate in s ynthetic CSF . A multi-modal spectral signature has been defined for lactate, forming the basis for subsequent development of microwave sensor platform that is able to detect concentrations of lactic acid in CSF of volumes less than 1ml.

  13. Probiotic lactic acid bacteria – the fledgling cuckoos of the gut?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Berstad

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is tempting to look at bacteria from our human egocentric point of view and label them as either ‘good’ or ‘bad’. However, a microbial society has its own system of government – ‘microcracy’ – and its own rules of play. Lactic acid bacteria are often referred to as representatives of the good ones, and there is little doubt that those belonging to the normal intestinal flora are beneficial for human health. But we should stop thinking of lactic acid bacteria as always being ‘friendly’ – they may instead behave like fledgling cuckoos.

  14. Plasmids from Food Lactic Acid Bacteria: Diversity, Similarity, and New Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Cui

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasmids are widely distributed in different sources of lactic acid bacteria (LAB as self-replicating extrachromosomal genetic materials, and have received considerable attention due to their close relationship with many important functions as well as some industrially relevant characteristics of the LAB species. They are interesting with regard to the development of food-grade cloning vectors. This review summarizes new developments in the area of lactic acid bacteria plasmids and aims to provide up to date information that can be used in related future research.

  15. Plasmids from Food Lactic Acid Bacteria: Diversity, Similarity, and New Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanhua; Hu, Tong; Qu, Xiaojun; Zhang, Lanwei; Ding, Zhongqing; Dong, Aijun

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids are widely distributed in different sources of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as self-replicating extrachromosomal genetic materials, and have received considerable attention due to their close relationship with many important functions as well as some industrially relevant characteristics of the LAB species. They are interesting with regard to the development of food-grade cloning vectors. This review summarizes new developments in the area of lactic acid bacteria plasmids and aims to provide up to date information that can be used in related future research. PMID:26068451

  16. Lactobacilli inactivate Chlamydia trachomatis through lactic acid but not H2O2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gong

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus species dominate the microbiome in the lower genital tract of most reproductive-age women. Producing lactic acid and H2O2, lactobacilli are believed to play an important role in prevention of colonization by and growth of pathogens. However, to date, there have been no reported studies characterizing how lactobacilli interact with Chlamydia trachomatis, a leading sexually transmitted bacterium. In this report, we demonstrate inactivation of C. trachomatis infectivity by culture media conditioned by Lactobacillus crispatus, L. gasseri and L. jensenii, known to be dominating organisms in the human vaginal microbiome. Lactobacillus still cultures produced lactic acid, leading to time- and concentration-dependent killing of C. trachomatis. Neutralization of the acidic media completely reversed chlamydia killing. Addition of lactic acid into Lactobacillus-unconditioned growth medium recapitulated the chlamydiacidal activity of conditioned media. The H2O2 concentrations in the still cultures were found to be comparable to those reported for the cervicovaginal fluid, but insufficient to inactivate chlamydiae. Aeration of Lactobacillus cultures by shaking markedly induced H2O2 production, but strongly inhibited Lactobacillus growth and lactic acid production, and thus severely affected acidification, leading to significantly reduced chlamydiacidal efficiency. These observations indicate lactobacilli inactivate chlamydiae primarily through maintaining acidity in a relatively hypoxic environment in the vaginal lumen with limited H2O2, which is consistent with the notion that women with higher vaginal pH are more prone to sexually transmitted C. trachomatis infection. In addition to lactic acid, formic acid and acetic acid also exhibited potent chlamydiacidal activities. Taken together, our findings imply that lowering the vaginal pH through engineering of the vaginal microbiome and other means will make women less susceptible to C

  17. Feasibility of converting lactic acid to ethanol in food waste fermentation by immobilized lactate oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Hong-zhi; Xing, Yi; Yu, Miao; Wang, Qunhui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Residue lactic acid in food waste could be converted to pyruvic acid. • Calcium alginate immobilized the lactate oxidase with high pH and thermal stability. • Immobilized enzyme could convert 70% lactic acid to pyruvic acid. • Ethanol yield could be increased by 20% with lactate oxidase added. - Abstract: Adoption of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) into ethanol fermentation from food waste can replace the sterilization process. However, LAB inoculation will convert part of the substrate into lactic acid (LA), not ethanol. This study adopted lactate oxidase to convert the produced LA to pyruvate, and then ethanol fermentation was carried out. The immobilization enzyme was utilized, and corresponding optimum conditions were determined. Results showed that calcium alginate could successfully immobilize the enzyme and improve pH and thermal stability. The optimum pH and temperature were 6.2 and 55 °C, respectively. The utilization of immobilized enzyme with catalytic time of 5 h could convert 70% LA to pyruvate, and the addition of enzyme increased the ethanol yield by 20% more than that of the control. The process could be applied in food waste storage and can help in reducing carbon source consumption

  18. Lactic acid bacteria population dynamics during spontaneous fermentation of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) roots in brine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardali, Eleni; Paramithiotis, Spiros; Papadelli, Marina; Mataragas, Marios; Drosinos, Eleftherios H

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the microecosystem development and the dynamics of the lactic acid bacteria population during spontaneous fermentation of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) roots in brine at 20 and 30 °C. In both temperatures, lactic acid bacteria prevailed the fermentation; as a result, the pH value was reduced to ca. 3.6 and total titrable acidity increased to ca. 0.4% lactic acid. Enterococci population increased and formed a secondary microbiota while pseudomonads, Enterobacteriaceae and yeasts/molds populations were below enumeration limit already before the middle of fermentation. Pediococcus pentosaceus dominated during the first days, followed by Lactobacillus plantarum that prevailed the fermentation until the end. Lactobacillus brevis was also detected during the final days of fermentation. A succession at sub-species level was revealed by the combination of RAPD-PCR and rep-PCR analyses. Glucose and fructose were the main carbohydrates detected in brine and were metabolized into lactic acid, acetic acid and ethanol.

  19. Effects of selected lactic acid bacteria on the characteristics of amaranth sourdough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekle, Mario; Houben, Andreas; Mitzscherling, Martin; Becker, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    As the processing of amaranth in baked goods is challenging, the use of sourdough fermentation is a promising possibility to exploit the advantages of this raw material. In this study the fermentation properties of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paralimentarius and Lactobacillus helveticus in amaranth-based sourdough were examined in order to validate them as starter cultures. pH, total titratable acidity (TTA) and lactic/acetic acid ratio of the sourdough and sensory properties of the resulting wheat bread were evaluated using fermentation temperatures of 30 and 35 °C. While fermentation pH, TTA and lactic acid concentration showed small variations with the use of L. plantarum and L. paralimentarius, L. helveticus reached the most intensive acidification after initial adaptation to the substrate. Acetic acid production was independent of lactic acid metabolism. Furthermore, the lactic/acetic acid ratio exceeded recommendation by 10-35 times (fermentation quotient 25-82). Sensory evaluation showed no significant differences between the two fermentation temperatures but differences among the three micro-organisms. The results provide relevant information on the fermentation properties required of a customised starter for amaranth flour. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Prolonged local anesthetic action through slow release from poly (lactic acid co castor oil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolsky-Papkov, Marina; Golovanevski, Ludmila; Domb, Abraham J; Weiniger, Carolyn F

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate a new formulation of bupivacaine loaded in an injectable fatty acid based biodegradable polymer poly(lactic acid co castor oil) in prolonging motor and sensory block when injected locally. The polyesters were synthesized from DL: -lactic acid and castor oil with feed ratio of 4:6 and 3:7 w/w. Bupivacaine was dispersed in poly(fatty ester) liquid and tested for drug release in vitro. The polymer p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 loaded with 10% bupivacaine was injected through a 22G needle close to the sciatic nerve of ICR mice and the duration of sensory and motor nerve blockade was measured. The DL: -lactic acid co castor oil p(DLLA:CO) 3:7 released 65% of the incorporated bupivacaine during 1 week in vitro. Single injection of 10% bupivacaine loaded into this polymer caused motor block that lasted 24 h and sensory block that lasted 48 h. Previously we developed a ricinoleic acid based polymer with incorporated bupivacaine which prolonged anesthesia to 30 h. The new polymer poly(lactic acid co castor oil) 3:7 provides slow release of effective doses of the incorporated local anesthetic agent and prolongs anesthesia to 48 h.

  1. Effect of Pyruvate Decarboxylase Knockout on Product Distribution Using Pichia pastoris (Komagataella phaffii) Engineered for Lactic Acid Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Nadiele T M; Mulder, Kelly C L; Nicola, André Moraes; Carvalho, Lucas S; Menino, Gisele S; Mulinari, Eduardo; Parachin, Nádia S

    2018-02-16

    Lactic acid is the monomer unit of the bioplastic poly-lactic acid (PLA). One candidate organism for lactic acid production is Pichia pastoris , a yeast widely used for heterologous protein production. Nevertheless, this yeast has a poor fermentative capability that can be modulated by controlling oxygen levels. In a previous study, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was introduced into P. pastoris, enabling this yeast to produce lactic acid. The present study aimed to increase the flow of pyruvate towards the production of lactic acid in P. pastoris . To this end, a strain designated GLp was constructed by inserting the bovine lactic acid dehydrogenase gene (LDHb) concomitantly with the interruption of the gene encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC). Aerobic fermentation, followed by micro-aerophilic culture two-phase fermentations, showed that the GLp strain achieved a lactic acid yield of 0.65 g/g. The distribution of fermentation products demonstrated that the acetate titer was reduced by 20% in the GLp strain with a concomitant increase in arabitol production: arabitol increased from 0.025 g/g to 0.174 g/g when compared to the GS115 strain. Taken together, the results show a significant potential for P. pastoris in producing lactic acid. Moreover, for the first time, physiological data regarding co-product formation have indicated the redox balance limitations of this yeast.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of novel multilayered structures by stereocomplexion of poly(D-lactic acid/poly(L-lactic acid and self-assembly of polyelectrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Dellacasa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The enantiomers poly(D-lactic acid (PDLA and poly(L-lactic acid (PLLA were alternately adsorbed directly on calcium carbonate (CaCO3 templates and on poly(styrene sulfonate (PSS and poly(allylamine hydrochloride (PAH multilayer precursors in order to fabricate a novel layer-by-layer (LBL assembly. A single layer of poly(L-lysine (PLL was used as a linker between the (PDLA/PLLAn stereocomplex and the cores with and without the polymeric (PSS/PAHn/PLL multilayer precursor (PEM. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC were used to characterize the chemical composition and molecular weight of poly(lactic acid polymers. Both multilayer structures, with and without polymeric precursor, were firstly fabricated and characterized on planar supports. A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR and ellipsometry were used to evaluate the thickness and mass of the multilayers. Then, hollow, spherical microcapsules were obtained by the removal of the CaCO3 sacrificial template. The chemical composition of the obtained microcapsules was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and wide X-ray diffraction (WXRD analyses. The microcapsule morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM measurements. The experimental results confirm the successful fabrication of this innovative system, and its full biocompatibility makes it worthy of further characterization as a promising drug carrier for sustained release.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of novel multilayered structures by stereocomplexion of poly(D-lactic acid)/poly(L-lactic acid) and self-assembly of polyelectrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gesheng; Pastorino, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Summary The enantiomers poly(D-lactic acid) (PDLA) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) were alternately adsorbed directly on calcium carbonate (CaCO3) templates and on poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) multilayer precursors in order to fabricate a novel layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly. A single layer of poly(L-lysine) (PLL) was used as a linker between the (PDLA/PLLA)n stereocomplex and the cores with and without the polymeric (PSS/PAH)n/PLL multilayer precursor (PEM). Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) were used to characterize the chemical composition and molecular weight of poly(lactic acid) polymers. Both multilayer structures, with and without polymeric precursor, were firstly fabricated and characterized on planar supports. A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and ellipsometry were used to evaluate the thickness and mass of the multilayers. Then, hollow, spherical microcapsules were obtained by the removal of the CaCO3 sacrificial template. The chemical composition of the obtained microcapsules was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide X-ray diffraction (WXRD) analyses. The microcapsule morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. The experimental results confirm the successful fabrication of this innovative system, and its full biocompatibility makes it worthy of further characterization as a promising drug carrier for sustained release. PMID:26925356

  4. In vitro Degradation of Butanediamine-Grafted Poly(DL-Lactic acids)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The degradation of butanediamine-grafted poly(DL-lactic acid) polymers (BDPLAs) in vitro together with PDLLA and maleic anhydride-grafted poly(DL-lactic acid) polymers (MPLAs) was investigated by observation of the changes of the pH value of incubation media, and weight loss ratio during degradation duration of 12 weeks. The results reveal that the acidity of PDLLA degradation products was weakened or neutralized by grafting butanediamine onto PDLLA. A uniform degradation of BDPLAs was observed in comparison with an acidity-induced auto-accelerating degradation featured by PDLLA and MPLAs. The biodegradation behaviors of BDPLAs can be adjusted by controlling the content of BDA. BDPLAs might be a new derivative of PDLLA-based biodegradable materials for medical applications without acidity-caused irritations and acidity-induced auto-accelerating degradation behavior as that of PDLLA.

  5. Sustainable production of acetaldehyde from lactic acid over the carbon catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Congming; Peng, Jiansheng; Li, Xinli; Zhai, Zhanjie; Gao, Hejun; Liao, Yunwen [China West Normal University, Nanchong (China); Bai, Wei; Jiang, Ning [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu (China)

    2016-01-15

    The synthesis of acetaldehyde from lactic acid over the carbon material catalysts was investigated. The carbon materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy for morphologic features, by X-ray diffraction for crystal phases, by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for functional group structures, by N2 sorption for specific surface area and by ammonia temperature-programed desorption for acidity, respectively. Among the tested carbon catalysts, mesoporous carbon displayed the most excellent catalytic performance. By acidity analysis, the medium acidity is a crucial factor for catalytic performance: more medium acidity favored the formation of acetaldehyde from lactic acid. To verify, we compared the catalytic performance of fresh activated carbon with that of the activated carbon treated by nitric acid. Similarly, the modified activated carbon also displayed better activity due to a drastic increase of medium acidity amount. However, in contrast to fresh carbon nanotube, the treated sample displayed worse activity due to decrease of medium acidity amount. The effect of reaction temperature and time on stream on the catalytic performance was also investigated. Under the optimal reaction conditions, 100% lactic acid conversion and 91.6% acetaldehyde selectivity were achieved over the mesoporous carbon catalyst.

  6. Antimicrobial potential of triticale stillage after lactic acid fermentation with Lactobacillus fermentum PL-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kujundžić Žužana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the testing of antimicrobial activity of triticale stillage obtained after lactic fermentation by Lactobacillus fermentum PL-1. The antimicrobial tests were performed using the disc-diffusion and agar well diffusion methods. It was found that fermented triticale stillage after lactic acid fermentation exhibited an inhibitory effect towards tested Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria: Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis. The triticale stillage without addition of CaCO3 before fermentation showed a stronger antimicrobial effect in comparison with the triticale stillage with added CaCO3. Triticale stillage after lactic acid fermentation did not show any antifungal effect on the growth of tested moulds (Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium brevicompactum, and Fusarium subglutinans. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-31017

  7. OBTAINING OF PROTEIC BIOMASS BY CULTIVATION OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ON GRAPE MARC DIFFUSION SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian BUTU

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article are presented the researches made in order to obtain protein biomass with the aid of lactic bacteria grown on an economically medium, achieved by using secondary products from the winery: marc and wine yeast. Therefore, there were cultivated two strains of Lactobacillus sp. on five different growth medium. The protein biosynthesis and evolution of lactic fermentation were monitored by determining the optical density (OD of the culture at a wavelength λ = 600 nm and by counting the colony forming units (CFU by serial dilutions and seeding on plates and by determination of lactic acid obtained. The results showed that the fermentation medium represented by diffusion solution of the marc, enriched with peptone is economically profitable compared to other culture media containing peptone, yeast extract, glucose, minerals, amino acids and vitamins presented in the literature.

  8. The influence of stress conditions on the growth of selected lactic acid bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bok, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the effects of certain stress conditions on selected lactic acid bacteria. Where recontamination occurred, lactic acid bacteria was already the dominant bacterial group, with counts of higher than 10 6 /g in vacuum-packaged 'shelf stable' meat products after 1 week storage at 25 and 37 degrees Celsius respectively. Some of the isolates were capable of growing at a pH of 3,9. The minimum pH for growth of a specific culture was dependant on the type of acid that was used to lower the pH. Lactic and acetic acid had the highest inhibitory action. Hydrochloric and citric acid showed similar inhibitory effects, while the effects when using ascorbic acid or gluconic acid for lowering the pH were also fairly similar. Increase in the activity of certain lactic acid bacteria was noticed where the ratio of undissociated to dissociated citric acid in the medium was increased. After exceeding a concentration of 0,048 moles/l undissosiated citric acid in the medium, the activity of the majority of cultures was progressively inhibited. This phenomenon was also found with acetic acid for certain cultures. Selected lactic acid bacteria were resistant to an water activity (a (sub w)) of 0,94 in MRS broth, where NaCl or glycerol was used as a humectant. The minimum a (sub w) for growth was dependent on the type of humectant used. Concentrations of sodium benzoate and potassium sorbate were necessary to inhibit the majority of strains. The % inhibition by sodium benzoate and methyl paraben did not significantly change with a lowering in the pH of the growth medium. Except in the case of lactic acid, the different acids used to lower the pH of the medium did not have a significant effect on the % inhibition by the chemical preservatives. For the cocci, gamma D 10 values of between 0,82 and 1,29 kGy were recorded, whereas the lactobacilli were less resistant to gamma rays, with D 10 values of between 0,21 and 0,54 kGy

  9. Physico-chemical parameter for production of lactic acid or ethanol of (corynebacterium glutamicum) bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos, Angelica; Garcia, Lina Marcela; Astudillo, Myriam; Lopez Galan, Jorge Enrique; Florez Pardo, Luz Marina.

    2011-01-01

    The interest to obtain products for the bio-fuel industry from renewable resources has directed research to find resistant and costs-effective biotechnological systems. Corynebacterium glutamicum, is a microorganism used to produce amino acids, that grows in wide variety of substrates and its resistance during fermentation to pH, temperature, osmotic pressure variations and alcohol aggregate, renders this organism a suitable candidate to improve by genetic modifications lactic acid and ethanol synthesis. However, some aspects of its physiology remain unknown, such us increase lactic acid and ethanol production from C5 and C6 sugars. For this reason, the main aim in our work was to identify the most important variables with impact on culture and the best culture conditions to produce lactic acid or ethanol in batch culture. To achieve this objective, eight variables were tested in culture using a statistical model. The best culture conditions were obtained and tested in a bacth bioreactor system. Temperature, biotin and glucose concentration were the variables with most impact (p - 1 , 16 g/l of lactic acid was obtained after 15 h of culture with an efficiency of 32%. High glucose consumption was observed during bacterial growth, which leads to low concentration of substrate for the production process; this suggests a culture feeding at the end of exponential growth phase, which can increase the production yield.

  10. The inhibitory activity of Lactic acid bacteria isolated from fresh cow cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevijo Zdolec

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria are the constituent part of milk microbial flora that could influence the safety of dairy products due production of organic acids, hydrogen peroxide, carbon dioxide and bacteriocins. Taking this in consideration, the objective of this study was to investigate the composition of lactic acid bacteria population in fresh cow cheeses taken from local markets, as well as their antimicrobial capacity. Lactic acid bacteria counts were determined according to ISO 1524:1998 method, biochemical determination using API 50 CHL system, and inhibitory activity against L. monocytogenes NCTC 10527 by agar well diffusion assay. Lactic acid bacteria count in fresh cow cheeses (n=10 ranged from 5.87 to 8.38 log10 CFU g-1. Among 52 MRS isolates collected, 61.54 % were assigned to the Lactococcus lactis subsp. Lactis species, 23.07 % Lactobacillus helveticus, 11.54 % Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris and 3.85 % Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides. Antilisterial activity was found in 18 isolates.

  11. Lactic acid production from wheat straw hemicellulose hydrolysate by Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus brevis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garde, Arvid; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil; Schmidt, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid production by Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus pentosus on a hemicellulose hydrolysate (HH) of wet-oxidized wheat straw was evaluated. The potential of 11-12 g/l fermentable sugars was released from the HH through either enzymatic or acidic pretreatment. Fermentation of added......% of the theoretical maximum yield after enzymatic, or acid treatment of HH, respectively. Individually, neither of the two strains were able to fully utilize the relatively broad spectra of sugars released by the acid and enzyme treatments; however, lactic acid production increased to 95% of the theoretical maximum...... yield by co-inoculation of both strains. Xylulose was the main sugar released after enzymatic treatment of HH with Celluclast(R). Lb. brevis was able to degrade xylobiose, but was unable to assimilate xylulose, whereas Lb. pentosus was able to assimilate xylulose but unable to degrade xylobiose. (C...

  12. Capillary isoelectric focusing-useful tool for detection and quantification of lactic acid bacteria in milk

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, F.; Horká, Marie; Holá, V.; Mlynariková, K.; Dráb, V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 12 (2016), s. 3251-3257 ISSN 1936-9751 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-29916A Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : capillary isoelectric focusing * enterococcus * isoelectric point * lactic acid bacteria Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.038, year: 2016

  13. Competitive selection of lactic acid bacteria that persist in the human oral cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, J.; Marco, M.L.; Kingma, F.; Noordman, W.M.; Rademaker, J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) might offer opportunities as oral probiotics provided candidate strains persist in the mouth. After intake of a mixture of 69 LAB, strains of Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus salivarius were especially recovered. Coaggregation with other microbes is likely not a

  14. Systems biology and metabolic engineering of lactic acid bacteria for improved fermented foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flahaut, N.A.L.; Vos, de W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria have long been used in industrial dairy and other food fermentations that make use of their metabolic activities leading to products with specific organoleptic properties. Metabolic engineering is a rational approach to steer fermentations toward the production of desired

  15. Plasmids replicatable in Bacillus subtilis, E. coli and lactic acid streptococcus bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, Jan; Maat, Jan; van der Vossen, Josephus Mauritius; Venema, Gerard

    1997-01-01

    The claimed invention is drawn to a recombinant plasmid which can replicate in Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, and lactic acid Streptococcus bacteria comprising the replication of origin from Streptococcus cremoris plasmid pWV01 as its origin of replication, in addition to coding marker genes

  16. Use of Lactic Acid Bacteria as Probiotic for Promoting Growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Lactic acid bacteria strains isolated from O. niloticus were evaluated for their probiotic activity. The strain which showed the greatest promise as probiotics was selected for growth study. Oreochromis niloticus (mean weight 18.11±0.12g) were randomly distributed to five treatments representing probiotic inclusion level at ...

  17. Optimization of probiotic and lactic acid production by Lactobacillus plantarum in submerged bioreactor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinques, Graziela Brusch; do Carmo Peralba, Maria; Ayub, Marco Antônio Záchia

    2010-02-01

    Biomass and lactic acid production by a Lactobacillus plantarum strain isolated from Serrano cheese, a microorganism traditionally used in foods and recognized as a potent probiotic, was optimized. Optimization procedures were carried out in submerged batch bioreactors using cheese whey as the main carbon source. Sequential experimental Plackett-Burman designs followed by central composite design (CCD) were used to assess the influence of temperature, pH, stirring, aeration rate, and concentrations of lactose, peptone, and yeast extract on biomass and lactic acid production. Results showed that temperature, pH, aeration rate, lactose, and peptone were the most influential variables for biomass formation. Under optimized conditions, the CCD for temperature and aeration rate showed that the model predicted maximal biomass production of 14.30 g l(-1) (dw) of L. plantarum. At the central point of the CCD, a biomass of 10.2 g l(-1) (dw), with conversion rates of 0.10 g of cell g(-1) lactose and 1.08 g lactic acid g(-1) lactose (w/w), was obtained. These results provide useful information about the optimal cultivation conditions for growing L. plantarum in batch bioreactors in order to boost biomass to be used as industrial probiotic and to obtain high yields of conversion of lactose to lactic acid.

  18. Lactic acid bacteria as antigen delivery vehicles for oral immunization purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, P.H.; Leer, R.J.; Shaw, M.; Heijne Den Bak-Glashouwer, M.J.; Tielen, F.D.; Smit, E.; Martinez, B.; Jore, J.; Conway, P.L.

    1998-01-01

    In vaccination programmes in which large numbers of subjects are involved, the oral route of administration is more convenient as compared to the more frequently used parenteral route. This is particularly relevant when vaccines are to be applied in less industrialized countries. Lactic acid

  19. [Poly-L-lactic-acid filling of facial lipoatrophy in HIV+ patients under tritherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiéry, G; Coulet, O; Adam, S; Guyot, L

    2008-04-01

    Facial lipoatrophy is one of the complications of antiretroviral therapy in HIV+ patients. Poly-L-lactic-acid filling can compensate this atrophy. This treatment has been completely covered by social security since 2005. The filling technique is described in this article.

  20. Morphology and thermal degradation study of poly(lactic acid)/synthetic mica composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, D.H.S.; Dias, M.L.

    2010-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/synthetic mica composites has been little studied in the literature. In this work, an organophilic synthetic mica was used to prepare PLA nanocomposites. The composites were obtained at an internal mixer containing 3, 5, 7 and 10 wt% of mica. The materials were analyzed by x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and gel permeation chromatography. (author)

  1. lactic acid production by Lactobacillus SMI8 using corn steep liquor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-11-02

    Nov 2, 2009 ... terized by a greater resistance to high temperatures, ... Bacterial strain selection was based on the greatest .... The model predicted a maximal response of 41.38 g/L of lactic acid ... Using a mathematical model furnished the.

  2. Analyses of Dynamics in Dairy Products and Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria Population by Molecular Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytül Sofu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB with different ecological niches are widely seen in fermented meat, vegetables, dairy products and cereals as well as in fermented beverages. Lactic acid bacteria are the most important group of bacteria in dairy industry due to their probiotic characteristics and fermentation agents as starter culture. In the taxonomy of the lactic acid bacteria; by means of rep-PCR, which is the analysis of repetitive sequences that are based on 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene sequence, it is possible to conduct structural microbial community analyses such as Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP analysis of DNA fragments of different sizes cut with enzymes, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD polymorphic DNA amplified randomly at low temperatures and Amplified Fragment-Length Polymorphism (AFLP-PCR of cut genomic DNA. Besides, in the recent years, non-culture-based molecular methods such as Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE, Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE, Thermal Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TGGE, and Fluorescence In-situ Hybridization (FISH have replaced classical methods once used for the identification of LAB. Identification of lactic acid bacteria culture independent regardless of the method will be one of the most important methods used in the future pyrosequencing as a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS techniques. This paper reviews molecular-method based studies conducted on the identification of LAB species in dairy products.

  3. TECHNOLOGICAL AND FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF LACTIC ACID BACTERIA: THE IMPORTANCE OF THESE MICROORGANISMS FOR FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda de Souza Motta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eacters of coccus or rods Gram-positive, catalase negative, non-sporulating, which produce lactic acid as the major end product during the fermentation of carbohydrates. When applied on food, provides beneficial effects to consumers through its functional and technological properties. With this the present review article, explore the potential application of lactic acid bacteria in food. The following genera are considered the principal lactic acid bacteria: Aerococcus, Carnobacterium, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Oenococcus, Pediococcus, Streptococcus, Tetragenococcus, Vagococcus and Weissella. These cultures have been used as starter or adjunct cultures for the fermentation of foods and beverages due to their contributions to the sensorial characteristics of these products and by microbiological stability. Their probiotic properties have also been investigated. More recent studies by indigenous cultures have received increased attention in light of the search for isolated cultures of a given raw material and a certain region. These microorganisms are being investigated for its functional and technological potential that may be applied in product development with its own characteristics and designation of origin. Those properties will be discussed in the present review in order to highlight the performance of these bacteria and the high degree of control over the fermentation process and standardization of the final product. The use of autochthonous cultures will be considered due the increase of studies of new cultures of lactic acid bacteria isolated of milk and meat of distinct products.

  4. Culture-independent analysis of lactic acid bacteria diversity associated with mezcal fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez-Zapata, J A; Rojas-Herrera, R A; Rodríguez-Luna, I C; Larralde-Corona, C P

    2010-11-01

    Mezcal is an alcoholic beverage obtained from the distillation of fermented juices of cooked Agave spp. plant stalks (agave must), and each region in Mexico with denomination of origin uses defined Agave species to prepare mezcal with unique organoleptic characteristics. During fermentation to produce mezcal in the state of Tamaulipas, not only alcohol-producing yeasts are involved, but also a lactic acid bacterial community that has not been characterized yet. In order to address this lack of knowledge on this traditional Mexican beverage, we performed a DGGE-16S rRNA analysis of the lactic acid bacterial diversity and metabolite accumulation during the fermentation of a typical agave must that is rustically produced in San Carlos County (Tamaulipas, Mexico). The analysis of metabolite production indicated a short but important malolactic fermentation stage not previously described for mezcal. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the 16S rRNA genes showed a distinctive lactic acid bacterial community composed mainly of Pediococcus parvulus, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus composti, Lactobacillus parabuchneri, and Lactobacillus plantarum. Some atypical genera such as Weissella and Bacillus were also found in the residual must. Our results suggest that the lactic acid bacteria could strongly be implicated in the organoleptic attributes of this traditional Mexican distilled beverage.

  5. Engineering of thermotolerant Bacillus coagulans for production of D(-)-lactic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingzhao; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-12-02

    Genetically modified microorganisms having the ability to produce D(-)-lactic acid at temperatures between 30.degree. C. and 55.degree. C. are provided. In various embodiments, the microorganisms may have the chromosomal lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) gene and/or the chromosomal acetolactate synthase (alsS) gene inactivated. Exemplary microorganisms for use in the disclosed methods are Bacillus spp., such as Bacillus coagulans.

  6. Use of the alr gene as a food-grade selection marker in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, P.A.; Benchimol, M.G.; Lambert, J.; Palumbo, E.; Deghorain, M.; Delcour, J.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Hols, P.

    2002-01-01

    Both Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus plantarum contain a single alr gene, encoding an alanine racemase (EC 5.1.1.1), which catalyzes the interconversion of D-alanine and L-alanine. The alr genes of these lactic acid bacteria were investigated for their application as food-grade selection

  7. Effect of different fermentation parameters on L-lactic acid production from liquid distillery stillage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djukić-Vuković, Aleksandra P; Mojović, Ljiljana V; Vukašinović-Sekulić, Maja S; Rakin, Marica B; Nikolić, Svetlana B; Pejin, Jelena D; Bulatović, Maja L

    2012-09-15

    Expansion of lactic acid applications, predominantly for the preparation of biodegradable polymers increased the research interest for new, economically favourable production processes. Liquid stillage from bioethanol production can be an inexpensive, valuable source of nutrients for growth of lactic acid bacteria. Utilisation of residual biomass with spent fermentation media as a functional animal feed can greatly influence the process value and its ecological aspect. In this paper, the kinetics of lactic acid and biomass production on liquid stillage by Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469 was studied. In addition, the impact of temperature, inoculum concentration, shaking and pH control by addition of CaCO(3) was evaluated. Maximal lactic acid yield of 73.4%, as well as high biomass production (3×10(8) CFU ml(-1)) were achieved under selected conditions (41°C, 5% (v/v) of inoculum, 1% (w/v) of CaCO(3), initial pH of 6.5 and shaking rate of 90 rpm). These results were achieved without supplementation of the stillage with nitrogen or mineral sources. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hydrogenation of Lactic Acid to 1,2-propanediol over Ru-based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, K.; Huang, X.; Pidko, E.A.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2018-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of lactic acid to 1,2-propanediol with supported Ru catalysts in water was investigated. The influence of catalyst support (activated carbon, γ-Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, and CeO2) and promoters (Pd, Au, Mo, Re, Sn) on the catalytic performance was evaluated. Catalytic tests

  9. Lactic acid bacteria active during the fermentation of wheat silage in small scale silos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, N.J.; Parker, J.A.; Moon, L.C.; Ely, L.O.

    1981-01-01

    Wheat was ensiled and periodically analyzed for lactic acid bacteria present. Initially Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus cellobiosus and Streptococcus lactis predominated. After two to four days enterococci including S. faecium and S. bovis were present in high populations as well as Lactobacillus plantarum. It was concluded that mixed populations of enterococci and L. plantarum are active in the successful fermentation of wheat silage.

  10. Catalytic Conversion of Dihydroxyacetone to Lactic Acid Using Metal Salts in Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasrendra, Carolus B.; Fachri, Boy A.; Makertihartha, I. Gusti B. N.; Adisasmito, Sanggono; Heeres, Hero J.

    2011-01-01

    We herein present a study on the application of homogeneous catalysts in the form of metal salts on the conversion of trioses, such as dihydroxyacetone (DHA), and glyceraldehyde (GLY) to lactic acid (LA) in water. A wide range of metal salts (26 in total) were examined. Al(III) salts were identified

  11. Starch/fiber/poly(lactic acid) foam and compressed foam composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Composites of starch, fiber, and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were made using a foam substrate formed by dehydrating starch or starch/fiber gels. PLA was infiltrated into the dry foam to provide better moisture resistance. Foam composites were compressed into plastics using force ranging from 4-76MPa. Te...

  12. Lignin-coated cellulose nanocrystals as promising nucleating agent for poly(lactic acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anju Gupta; William Simmons; Gregory T. Schueneman; Eric A. Mintz

    2016-01-01

    We report the effect of lignin-coated cellulose nanocrystals (L-CNCs) on the crystallization behavior of poly(lactic acid) (PLA). PLA/L-CNC nanocomposites were prepared by melt mixing, and the crystallization behavior of PLA was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry. Isothermal crystallization data were analyzed using Avrami and Lauritzen–Hoffman...

  13. [Composition diversity of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) community Al2 used for alfalfa silage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Fen; Gao, Li-Juan; Yang, Hong-Yan; Wang, Wei-Dong; Cui, Zong-Jun

    2006-10-01

    Alfalfa is the most important forage grass that is difficult to ensile for good quality. Using silage inoculants are the important way for preservation of alfalfa silage. Through continuous restricted subcultivation, a lactic acid bacteria (LAB) community Al2 was selected from well-fermented alfalfa silage. Plate isolation and Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE), construction of 16S rDNA clone library were used to identify the composition diversity of Al2 community, with 7 strains detected, and they were all belonged to Lactobacillus. The composition ratios of the 7 strains were 55.21%, 19.79%, 14.58%, 3.13%, 3.13%, 3.13%, 1.03% according to 16S rDNA clone library. Al2-1i, Al2-2i, Al2-3i, corresponding to L. plantarum (99.9%), L. kimchii (99.4%), L. farciminis (100%) were detected by plate isolation. Among 3 isolates, Al2-1i had the highest ability of dropping pH and producing lactic acid, and the amount of lactic acid was reach to 18g/L at 24h cultivated in MRS media. The ability of dropping pH and producing lactic acid of Al2-3i was the lowest. From DGGE profiles, the dominant strains in Al2 community were L. plantarum and L. kimchii. L. plantarum was detected during the whole process, and L. kimchii was detected in the later phase.

  14. Regulation of the activity of lactate dehydrogenases from four lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feldman-Salit, A.; Hering, S.; Messiha, H.L.; Veith, N.; Cojocaru, V.; Sieg, A.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Kreikemeyer, B.; Wade, R.C.; Fiedler, T.

    2013-01-01

    Despite high similarity in sequence and catalytic properties, the l-lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) display differences in their regulation that may arise from their adaptation to different habitats. We combined experimental and computational approaches to investigate the

  15. Treating Simple Tibia Fractures with Poly-DL-Lactic Acid Screw as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the curative effect of poly-DL-lactic acid (PDLLA) absorbable screw as a locked intramedullary nail for simple tibia fractures. Methods: In this study, 35 patients treated with the PDLLA screw were observed, and another 35 patients treated with a traditional locking intramedullary nail were treated as ...

  16. Equilibria and kinetics for reactive extraction of lactic acid using Alamine 336 in decanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasewar, Kailas L.; Heesink, A. Bert M.; Versteeg, Geert F.; Pangarkar, Vishwas G.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important commercial product and extracting this from aqueous solution is a growing requirement in fermentation-based industries. The design of an amine extraction process requires (i) equilibrium and (ii) kinetic data for the acid–amine (solvent) system used. The equilibrium

  17. Solution blow spun Poly(lactic acid)/Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose nanofibers with antimicrobial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanofibers containing hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and tetracycline hydrochloride (THC) were solution blow spun from two different solvents, chloroform/acetone (CA, 80:20 v/v) and 2,2,2-triflouroethanol (TFE). The diameter distribution, chemical, thermal, thermal stab...

  18. Reactive extraction of lactic acid using alamine 336 in MIBK : equilibria and kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wasewar, Kailas L.; Heesink, A. Bert M.; Versteeg, Geert F.; Pangarkar, Vishwas G.

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid is an important commercial product and extracting it out of aqueous solution is a growing requirement in fermentation based industries and recovery from waste streams. The design of an amine extraction process requires (i) equilibrium and (ii) kinetic data for the acid–amine (solvent)

  19. Lactic Acid Extraction and Mass Transfer Characteristics in Slug Flow Capillary Microreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanti, S.; Winkelman, J.G.N.; Schuur, Boelo; heeres, h.j.; Yue, J.

    2016-01-01

    Capillary microreactors operated under the slug flow regime were investigated for the separation of lactic acid from the aqueous phase using liquid–liquid reactive extraction. The experiments were performed at a 1:1 flow ratio of the aqueous to organic phases in a setup consisting of an inlet Y-type

  20. Multiscale Modeling of Poly(lactic acid) Production: From Reaction Conditions to Rheology of Polymer Melt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zubov, Alexandr; Sin, Gürkan

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is a fully biodegradable bioplastic with promising market potential. The paper deals with systematic development and analysis of the modeling framework allowing direct mapping between PLLA production process conditions and rheological properties of the polymer ...

  1. Antagonistic effect of chosen lactic acid bacteria strains on Salmonella species in meat and fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomółka-Pawlicka, M; Uradziński, J

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine of influence of 15 strains of lactic acid bacteria on the growth of 7 Salmonella spp. strains in model set-ups, and in meat and ripened fermented sausages. The investigations were performed within the framework of three alternate stages which differed in respect to the products studied, the number of Lactobacillus spp. strains and, partly, methodological approach. The ratio between lactic acid bacteria and Salmonella strains studied was, depending on the alternate, 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1, respectively. The investigations also covered the water activity (a(w)) and pH of the tested products. The results obtained are shown in 12 figures and suggest that all the lactic acid bacteria strains used within the framework of the model set-ups showed antagonistic effect on all the Salmonella spp. strains. However, these abilities were not observed with respect to some lactic acid bacteria strains in meat and fermented sausage. The temperature and length of the incubation period of sausages, but not a(w) and pH, were found to have a distinct influence on the antagonistic interaction between the bacteria.

  2. Determination of lactic acid bacteria in Kaºar cheese and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) arise in Kaşar cheese, an artisanal pasta filata cheese produced in Turkey from raw milk without starter addition or pasteurized milk with starter culture. In this study, 13 samples of Kaşar cheese that were produced from raw milk were used as reference materials. LAB were characterized by using ...

  3. Effect of lactic acid bacteria on the textural properties of an edible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effects of different components and the addition of probiotic bacteria of lactic acid bacteria (LAB, Lactobacillus casei) on the physicochemical and textural characteristics of edible films using a response surface Box-Behnken design. The edible films were made of the following ...

  4. The cell membrane and the struggle for life of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, WN

    The major life-threatening event for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in their natural environment is the depletion of their energy sources and LAB can survive such conditions only for a short period of time. During periods of starvation LAB can exploit optimally the potential energy sources in their

  5. Sandwich-Architectured Poly(lactic acid)-Graphene Composite Food Packaging Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goh, Kunli; Heising, Jenneke K.; Yuan, Yang; Karahan, Huseyin E.; Wei, Li; Zhai, Shengli; Koh, Jia Xuan; Htin, Nanda M.; Zhang, Feimo; Wang, Rong; Fane, Anthony G.; Dekker, Matthijs; Dehghani, Fariba; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable food packaging promises a more sustainable future. Among the many different biopolymers used, poly(lactic acid) (PLA) possesses the good mechanical property and cost-effectiveness necessary of a biodegradable food packaging. However, PLA food packaging suffers from poor water vapor

  6. Effects of cultivation conditions on folate production by lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sybesma, W.; Starrenburg, M.; Tijsseling, L.; Hoefnagel, M.H.N.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2003-01-01

    A variety of lactic acid bacteria were screened for their ability to produce folate intracellularly and/or extracellularly. Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Leuconostoc spp. all produced folate, while most Lactobacillus spp., with the exception of Lactobacillus plantarum, were not

  7. Diversity, vitality and activities of intestinal lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria assessed by molecular approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaughan, E.E.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Ben-Amor, K.; Vos, de W.M.

    2005-01-01

    While lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria have been scientifically important for over a century, many of these are marketed today as probiotics and have become a valuable and rapidly expanding sector of the food market that is leading functional foods in many countries. The human

  8. Survival and growth of probiotic lactic acid bacteria in refrigerated pickle products

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined 10 lactic acid bacteria that have been previously characterized for commercial use as probiotic cultures, mostly for dairy products, including 1 Pediococcus and 9 Lactobacilli. Our objectives were to develop a rapid procedure for determining the long-term survivability of these cultures ...

  9. Biodegradable Poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-Based Micro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... drug encapsulation efficiency and release profile of PLGA mico/nanoparticles. The current knowledge of protein instability during preparation, storage and release from PLGA micro/nanoparticles and protein stabilization approaches has also been discussed in this review. Keywords: Poly(D, L-lactic-co-glycolic acid), ...

  10. Isolation of Lactic Acid Bacteria with High Biological Activity from Local Fermented Dairy Products

    OpenAIRE

    B. Munkhtsetseg; M. Margad-Erdene; B. Batjargal

    2009-01-01

    The thirty-two strains of lactic acid bacteria were isolated from the Mongolian traditional fermented dairy products, among them 25 strains show antimicrobial activity against test microorganisms including Escherichia coli , Staphylococcus aureus , Enterococcus faecalis , Pseudom о nas aeruginosa . Protease sensitivity assay demonstrated that the antimicrobial substances produced by isolates А 23, Т 2 are bacterio...

  11. Characterization of airag collected in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia with emphasis on isolated lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Suk-Ho Choi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Airag, alcoholic sour-tasting beverage, has been traditionally prepared by Mongolian nomads who naturally ferment fresh mares’ milk. Biochemical and microbiological compositions of airag samples collected in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia and physiological characteristics of isolated lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Methods Protein composition and biochemical composition were determined using sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatograp...

  12. Blends of low molecular weight of poly lactic acid (PLA) with gondorukem (gum rosin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaavessina, Mujtahid; Distantina, Sperisa; Chafidz, Achmad; Utama, Aditya; Anggraeni, Venisa Mega Puteri

    2018-02-01

    The utilization of plastic was increasing as well as the increasing its demand in wide range application. Consequently, the number of plastic litter will increase and make more serious environmental problems. This research concerns to minimize waste problems by designing biodegradable plastic. In this research, biodegradable plastic was made of poly lactic acid (PLA) and gondorukem (Gum rosin, Resina colophonium) as the plasticizer. The effect of gondorukem towards PLA properties such as rheology and degradability was investigated. The research divided into two steps: (i) the polycondensation of lactic acid (LA) and (ii) modification of obtained poly lactic acid. In the first step, polycondensation was done in N2 atmosphere (138°C) for 30 hours and added 0.1 %w of SnCl2 as catalyst. Bulk modification was conducted by blending of gondurukem in varied weight (0.5, 1, and 2 g in 10 g of PLA). Furthermore, the modified PLA was analyzed its molecular structure, biodegradability and rheological property. The presence of gondorukem enhanced the biodegradability of poly lactic acid. Gondorukem could act as the plasticizer. It is confirmed that the complex viscosity of PLA melt decreased upon the addition of gondorukem

  13. Fracture behavior of highly toughened poly(lactic acid)/ethylene-co-vinyl acetate blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Q.; Feng, Y.; Wang, R.; Ma, P.

    2018-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is brittle which restricts the range of its applications. The toughness of PLA was effectively improved in this work by incorporation of rubber grade ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVM). For example, the elongation at break of PLA increased by about 50 times after the addition of

  14. Lactic acid bacteria in the quality improvement and depreciation of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonvaud-Funel, A

    1999-01-01

    The winemaking process includes two main steps: lactic acid bacteria are responsible for the malolactic fermentation which follows the alcoholic fermentation by yeasts. Both types of microorganisms are present on grapes and on cellar equipment. Yeasts are better adapted to growth in grape must than lactic acid bacteria, so the alcoholic fermentation starts quickly. In must, up to ten lactic acid bacteria species can be identified. They belong to the Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc and Oenococcus genera. Throughout alcoholic fermentation, a natural selection occurs and finally the dominant species is O. oeni, due to interactions between yeasts and bacteria and between bacteria themselves. After bacterial growth, when the population is over 10(6) CFU/ml, malolactic transformation is the obvious change in wine composition. However, many other substrates can be metabolized. Some like remaining sugars and citric acid are always assimilated by lactic acid bacteria, thus providing them with energy and carbon. Other substrates such as some amino acids may be used following pathways restricted to strains carrying the adequate enzymes. Some strains can also produce exopolysaccharides. All these transformations greatly influence the sensory and hygienic quality of wine. Malic acid transformation is encouraged because it induces deacidification. Diacetyl produced from citric acid is also helpful to some extent. Sensory analyses show that many other reactions change the aromas and make malolactic fermentation beneficial, but they are as yet unknown. On the contrary, an excess of acetic acid, the synthesis of glucane, biogenic amines and precursors of ethylcarbamate are undesirable. Fortunately, lactic acid bacteria normally multiply in dry wines; moreover some of these activities are not widespread. Moreover, the most striking trait of wine lactic acid bacteria is their capacity to adapt to a hostile environment. The mechanisms for this are not yet completely elucidated

  15. Lactic acid production on brewers' spent grain hydrolysate by lactobacillus Rhamnosus and Lactobacillus fermentum

    OpenAIRE

    Pejin, Jelena; Mojović, Ljiljana; Kocić-Tanackov, Sunčica; Radosavljević, Miloš; Đukić-Vuković, Aleksandra; Nikolić, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    Brewers' spent grain (BSG) is the major by-product of the brewing industry, representing around 85% of the total by-products generated. Per 100 L of beer produced 20 kg of brewer's spent grain are obtained. BSG is a lignocellulosic material and due to its high content of protein and fibre, it can also serve as a raw material in biotechnology i.e. in lactic acid production. In this study brewer's spent grain hydrolysate was produced using optimal conditions. Hydrolysates were used for lactic a...

  16. Modelling the effects of lactic acid, sodium benzoate and temperature on the growth of Candida maltosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valík, Ľ; Ačai, P; Liptáková, D

    2017-11-01

    The growth of the oxidatively imperfect yeast Candida maltosa Komagata, Nakase et Katsuya was studied experimentally and modelled mathematically in relation to sodium benzoate and lactic acid concentrations at different temperatures. Application of gamma models for the growth rate resulted in determination of cardinal temperature parameters for the growth environment containing lactic acid or sodium benzoate (T min  = 0·7/1·3°C, T max  = 45·3/45·0°C, T opt  = 36·1/37·0°C, μ opt  = 0·88/0·96 h -1 ) as well as the maximal lactic acid concentration for growth (1·9%) or sodium benzoate (1397 mg kg -1 ). Based on the model, the times to reach the density of C. maltosa at the level of 10 5  CFU per ml can be determined at each combination of storage temperature and preservative concentration. The approach used in this study can broaden knowledge of the microbiological quality of fermented milk products during storage as well as the preservation efficacy of mayonnaise dressing for storage and consumption. The strain of Candida maltosaYP1 was originally isolated from air filters that ensured clean air overpressure in yoghurt fermentation tanks. Its growth in contaminated yoghurts manifested outwardly through surface growth, assimilation lactic acid and slight production of carbon dioxide. This was the opportunity to model the effects of lactic acid and sodium benzoate on growth and predict its behaviour in foods. The approach used in this study provides knowledge about microbiological quality development during storage of the fermented milk products as well as some preserved foods for storage and consumption. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Lactic Acid Production from Pretreated Hydrolysates of Corn Stover by a Newly Developed Bacillus coagulans Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting; Qiao, Hui; Zheng, Zhaojuan; Chu, Qiulu; Li, Xin; Yong, Qiang; Ouyang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    An inhibitor-tolerance strain, Bacillus coagulans GKN316, was developed through atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) mutation and evolution experiment in condensed dilute-acid hydrolysate (CDH) of corn stover. The fermentabilities of other hydrolysates with B. coagulans GKN316 and the parental strain B. coagulans NL01 were assessed. When using condensed acid-catalyzed steam-exploded hydrolysate (CASEH), condensed acid-catalyzed liquid hot water hydrolysate (CALH) and condensed acid-catalyzed sulfite hydrolysate (CASH) as substrates, the concentration of lactic acid reached 45.39, 16.83, and 18.71 g/L by B. coagulans GKN316, respectively. But for B. coagulans NL01, only CASEH could be directly fermented to produce 15.47 g/L lactic acid. The individual inhibitory effect of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), vanillin, syringaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde (pHBal) on xylose utilization by B. coagulans GKN316 was also studied. The strain B. coagulans GKN316 could effectively convert these toxic inhibitors to the less toxic corresponding alcohols in situ. These results suggested that B. coagulans GKN316 was well suited to production of lactic acid from undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysates. PMID:26863012

  18. Lactic Acid Production from Pretreated Hydrolysates of Corn Stover by a Newly Developed Bacillus coagulans Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting; Qiao, Hui; Zheng, Zhaojuan; Chu, Qiulu; Li, Xin; Yong, Qiang; Ouyang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    An inhibitor-tolerance strain, Bacillus coagulans GKN316, was developed through atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) mutation and evolution experiment in condensed dilute-acid hydrolysate (CDH) of corn stover. The fermentabilities of other hydrolysates with B. coagulans GKN316 and the parental strain B. coagulans NL01 were assessed. When using condensed acid-catalyzed steam-exploded hydrolysate (CASEH), condensed acid-catalyzed liquid hot water hydrolysate (CALH) and condensed acid-catalyzed sulfite hydrolysate (CASH) as substrates, the concentration of lactic acid reached 45.39, 16.83, and 18.71 g/L by B. coagulans GKN316, respectively. But for B. coagulans NL01, only CASEH could be directly fermented to produce 15.47 g/L lactic acid. The individual inhibitory effect of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), vanillin, syringaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde (pHBal) on xylose utilization by B. coagulans GKN316 was also studied. The strain B. coagulans GKN316 could effectively convert these toxic inhibitors to the less toxic corresponding alcohols in situ. These results suggested that B. coagulans GKN316 was well suited to production of lactic acid from undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

  19. Lactic Acid Production from Pretreated Hydrolysates of Corn Stover by a Newly Developed Bacillus coagulans Strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Jiang

    Full Text Available An inhibitor-tolerance strain, Bacillus coagulans GKN316, was developed through atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP mutation and evolution experiment in condensed dilute-acid hydrolysate (CDH of corn stover. The fermentabilities of other hydrolysates with B. coagulans GKN316 and the parental strain B. coagulans NL01 were assessed. When using condensed acid-catalyzed steam-exploded hydrolysate (CASEH, condensed acid-catalyzed liquid hot water hydrolysate (CALH and condensed acid-catalyzed sulfite hydrolysate (CASH as substrates, the concentration of lactic acid reached 45.39, 16.83, and 18.71 g/L by B. coagulans GKN316, respectively. But for B. coagulans NL01, only CASEH could be directly fermented to produce 15.47 g/L lactic acid. The individual inhibitory effect of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF, vanillin, syringaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde (pHBal on xylose utilization by B. coagulans GKN316 was also studied. The strain B. coagulans GKN316 could effectively convert these toxic inhibitors to the less toxic corresponding alcohols in situ. These results suggested that B. coagulans GKN316 was well suited to production of lactic acid from undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

  20. Study of mixed Ca-Zn hydroxyapatite surface modified by lactic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Thouraya; Aissa, Abdallah; Bac, Christophe Goze; Rachdi, Férid; Debbabi, Mongi

    2012-07-01

    The new hybrid inorganic-organic composites, Ca(10-x)Znx(PO4)6(OH)2-lactic acid, at different amounts of zinc and lactic acid were prepared by dissolution of the organic compound in an hydroxyapatite suspension. They were characterized by XRD, IR, MAS NMR (13C and 1H) and chemical analysis. The crystallinity was slightly affected by the presence of organic fragments. IR and (13C and 1H) MAS NMR measurements indicate that the carboxylic groups of the acid interact with calcium and zinc ions of hydroxyapatite surface. Chemical analysis displays that zinc promotes the acid grafting. A mechanism of surface modification is proposed based on the obtained results.

  1. Study of mixed Ca-Zn hydroxyapatite surface modified by lactic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turki, Thouraya; Aissa, Abdallah [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Bac, Christophe Goze [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR 5221 CNRS/UM2, Universite Montpellier 2, Place E. Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier (France); Rachdi, Ferid, E-mail: Ferid.Rachdi@univ-montp2.fr [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb, UMR 5221 CNRS/UM2, Universite Montpellier 2, Place E. Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier (France); Debbabi, Mongi [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Materiaux, Faculte des Sciences de Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia)

    2012-07-01

    The new hybrid inorganic-organic composites, Ca{sub (10-x)}Zn{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}-lactic acid, at different amounts of zinc and lactic acid were prepared by dissolution of the organic compound in an hydroxyapatite suspension. They were characterized by XRD, IR, MAS NMR ({sup 13}C and {sup 1}H) and chemical analysis. The crystallinity was slightly affected by the presence of organic fragments. IR and ({sup 13}C and {sup 1}H) MAS NMR measurements indicate that the carboxylic groups of the acid interact with calcium and zinc ions of hydroxyapatite surface. Chemical analysis displays that zinc promotes the acid grafting. A mechanism of surface modification is proposed based on the obtained results.

  2. Study of mixed Ca-Zn hydroxyapatite surface modified by lactic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turki, Thouraya; Aissa, Abdallah; Bac, Christophe Goze; Rachdi, Férid; Debbabi, Mongi

    2012-01-01

    The new hybrid inorganic-organic composites, Ca (10-x) Zn x (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 -lactic acid, at different amounts of zinc and lactic acid were prepared by dissolution of the organic compound in an hydroxyapatite suspension. They were characterized by XRD, IR, MAS NMR ( 13 C and 1 H) and chemical analysis. The crystallinity was slightly affected by the presence of organic fragments. IR and ( 13 C and 1 H) MAS NMR measurements indicate that the carboxylic groups of the acid interact with calcium and zinc ions of hydroxyapatite surface. Chemical analysis displays that zinc promotes the acid grafting. A mechanism of surface modification is proposed based on the obtained results.

  3. Antibacterial Activity of Some Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from an Algerian Dairy Product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezaini, A.; Bouras, A.D.; Mezaini, A.; Chihib, N.; Nedjar-Arroume, N.; Hornez, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the antibacterial effect of 20 lactic acid bacteria isolates from a traditional cheese was investigated. 6 isolates showed antibacterial effect against Gram positive bacteria. Streptococcus thermophilus T2 strain showed the wide inhibitory spectrum against the Gram positive bacteria. Growth and bacitracin production profiles showed that the maximal bacitracin production, by S. thermophilus T2 cells, was measured by the end of the late-log phase (90 AU ml -1 ) with a bacterio cine production rate of 9.3 (AU ml -1 ) h -1 . In addition, our findings showed that the bacitracin, produced by S. thermophilus T2, was stable over a wide ph range (4-8); this indicates that such bacitracin may be useful in acidic as well as non acidic food. This preliminarily work shows the potential application of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria to improve safety of traditional fermented food.

  4. Separation of Am, Cm from Pm by elution chromatography with DTPA-lactic acid mixed solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Liansheng; Zhang Zuyi; Zhong Jiahua

    1988-01-01

    The effect of various factors on the separation of Am and Cm from Pm in the cation exchange-DPTA (diethylenetiaminepenlaacetic acid)-lactic acid system is studied, such as the concentration of DTPA, pH of the eluant, temperature and flow rate. Separation results show that the recovery of Am and Cm is 99.18% and the decontamination factor of Am, Cm from Pm is 431

  5. A sulfuric-lactic acid process for efficient purification of fungal chitosan with intact molecular weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, Mitra; Zamani, Akram; Karimi, Keikhosro

    2014-02-01

    The most recent method of fungal chitosan purification, i.e., two steps of dilute sulfuric acid treatment, pretreatment of cell wall at room temperature for phosphate removal and extraction of chitosan from the phosphate free cell wall at high temperature, significantly reduces the chitosan molecular weight. This study was aimed at improvement of this method. In the pretreatment step, to choose the best conditions, cell wall of Rhizopus oryzae, containing 9% phosphate, 10% glucosamine, and 21% N-acetyl glucosamine, was treated with sulfuric, lactic, acetic, nitric, or hydrochloric acid, at room temperature. Sulfuric acid showed the best performance in phosphate removal (90%) and cell wall recovery (89%). To avoid depolymerisation of chitosan, hot sulfuric acid extraction was replaced with lactic acid treatment at room temperature, and a pure fungal chitosan was obtained (0.12 g/g cell wall). Similar pretreatment and extraction processes were conducted on pure shrimp chitosan and resulted in a chitosan recovery of higher than 87% while the reduction of chitosan viscosity was less than 15%. Therefore, the sulfuric-lactic acid method purified the fungal chitosan without significant molecular weight manipulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition in phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Czarnota, G.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.; Kasprzyk, G.; Gumolka, L.; Staedter, W.

    1993-01-01

    The 13 C kinetic isotope effect fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid (LA) of natural isotopic composition by concentrated phosphoric acids (PA) and by 85% H 3 PO 4 has been studied in the temperature interval of 60-150 deg C. The values of the 13 C (1) isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid in 100% H 3 PO 4 , in pyrophosphoric acid and in more concentrated phosphoric acids are intermediate between the values calculated assuming that the C (1)- OH bond is broken in the rate-controlling step of dehydration and those calculated for rupture of the carbon-carbon bond in the transition state. In the temperature interval of 90-130 deg C the experimental 13 C fractionation factors determined in concentrated PA approach quite closely the 13 C fractionation corresponding to C (2)- C (1) bond scission. The 13 C (1) kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of LA in 85% orthophosphoric acid in the temperature range of 110-150 deg C coincide with the 13 C isotope effects calculated assuming that the frequency corresponding to the C (1) -OH vibration is lost in the transition state of decarbonylation. A change of the mechanism of decarbonylation of LA in going from concentrated PA medium to 85% H 3 PO 4 has been suggested. A possible secondary 18 O and a primary 18 O kinetic isotope effect in decarbonylation of lactic acid in phosphoric acids media have been discussed, too. (author) 21 refs.; 3 tabs

  7. Survival and Growth of Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria in Refrigerated Pickle Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Sicun; Breidt, Fred; Price, Robert; Pérez-Díaz, Ilenys

    2017-01-01

    We examined 10 lactic acid bacteria that have been previously characterized for commercial use as probiotic cultures, mostly for dairy products, including 1 Pediococcus and 9 Lactobacilli. Our objectives were to develop a rapid procedure for determining the long-term survivability of these cultures in acidified vegetable products and to identify suitable cultures for probiotic brined vegetable products. We therefore developed assays to measure acid resistance of these cultures to lactic and acetic acids, which are present in pickled vegetable products. We used relatively high acid concentrations (compared to commercial products) of 360 mM lactic acid and 420 mM acetic acid to determine acid resistance with a 1 h treatment. Growth rates were measured in a cucumber juice medium at pH 5.3, 4.2, and 3.8, at 30 °C and 0% to 2% NaCl. Significant differences in acid resistance and growth rates were found among the 10 cultures. In general, the acid resistant strains had slower growth rates than the acid sensitive strains. Based on the acid resistance data, selected cultures were tested for long-term survival in a simulated acidified refrigerated cucumber product. We found that one of the most acid resistant strains (Lactobacillus casei) could survive for up to 63 d at 4 °C without significant loss of viability at 10 8 CFU/mL. These data may aid in the development of commercial probiotic refrigerated pickle products. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  8. Amylolytic Enzymes Acquired from L-Lactic Acid Producing Enterococcus faecium K-1 and Improvement of Direct Lactic Acid Production from Cassava Starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unban, Kridsada; Kanpiengjai, Apinun; Takata, Goro; Uechi, Keiko; Lee, Wen-Chien; Khanongnuch, Chartchai

    2017-09-01

    An amylolytic lactic acid bacterium isolate K-1 was isolated from the wastewater of a cassava starch manufacturing factory and identified as Entercoccus faecium based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. An extracellular α-amylase was purified to homogeneity and the molecular weight of the purified enzyme was approximately 112 kDa with optimal pH value and temperature measured of 7.0 and 40 °C, respectively. It was stable at a pH range of 6.0-7.0, but was markedly sensitive to high temperatures and low pH conditions, even at a pH value of 5. Ba 2+ , Al 3+ , and Co 2+ activated enzyme activity. This bacterium was capable of producing 99.2% high optically pure L-lactic acid of 4.3 and 8.2 g/L under uncontrolled and controlled pH at 6.5 conditions, respectively, in the MRS broth containing 10 g/L cassava starch as the sole carbon source when cultivated at 37 °C for 48 h. A control pH condition of 6.5 improved and stabilized the yield of L-lactic acid production directly from starch even at a high concentration of starch at up to 150 g/L. This paper is the first report describing the properties of purified α-amylase from E. faecium. Additionally, pullulanase and cyclodextrinase activities were also firstly recorded from E. faecium K-1.

  9. THE EFFECTS OF INOCULANT LACTIC ACID BACTERIA ON THE FERMENTATION AND AEROBIC STABILITY OF SUNFLOWER SILAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisun Koc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the effects of actic acid bacterial inoculant on the fermentation and aerobic stability of sunflower silages. Sunflower was harvested at the milk stage. Inoculant-1174 (Pioneer®,USA was used as homofermentative lactic acid bacterial inoculant. Inoculant was applied 6.00 log10 cfu/g silage levels. Silages with no additive served as controls. After treatment, the chopped sunflower was ensiled in the PVC type laboratory silos. Three silos for each group were sampled for chemical and microbiological analysis on days 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 56 after ensiling. At the end of the ensiling period, all silages were subjected to an aerobic stability test for 14 days. Neither inoculant improved the fermentation parameters of sunflower silages. At the end of the ensiling period, inoculant increased lactic acid bacteria (LAB and decreased yeast and mould numbers of silages. Inoculant treatment did not affect aerobic stability of silages.

  10. Antibacterial Activity of Some Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from an Algerian Dairy Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkader Mezaini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the antibacterial effect of 20 lactic acid bacteria isolates from a traditional cheese was investigated. 6 isolates showed antibacterial effect against Gram positive bacteria. Streptococcus thermophilus T2 strain showed the wide inhibitory spectrum against the Gram positive bacteria. Growth and bacteriocin production profiles showed that the maximal bacteriocin production, by S. thermophilus T2 cells, was measured by the end of the late-log phase (90 AU ml−1 with a bacteriocine production rate of 9.3 (AU ml−1 h−1. In addition, our findings showed that the bacteriocin, produced by S. thermophilus T2, was stable over a wide pH range (4–8; this indicates that such bacteriocin may be useful in acidic as well as nonacidic food. This preliminarily work shows the potential application of autochthonous lactic acid bacteria to improve safety of traditional fermented food.

  11. Effects of a series of acidic drugs on L-lactic acid transport by the monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yat Hei; Belanger, Francois; Lu, Jennifer; Turgeon, Jacques; Michaud, Veronique

    2018-03-07

    Drug-induced myopathy is a serious side effect that often requires removal of a medication from a drug regimen. For most drugs, the underlying mechanism of drug-induced myopathy remains unclear. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) mediate L-lactic acid transport, and inhibition of MCTs may potentially lead to perturbation of L-lactic acid accumulation and muscular disorders. Therefore, we hypothesized that L-lactic acid transport may be involved in the development of drug-induced myopathy. The aim of this study was to assess the inhibitory potential of 24 acidic drugs on L-lactic acid transport using breast cancer cell lines Hs578T and MDA-MB-231, which selectively express MCT1 and MCT4, respectively. The influx transport of L-lactic acid was minimally inhibited by all drugs tested. The efflux transport was next examined: loratadine (IC50: 10 and 61 µM) and atorvastatin (IC50: 78 and 41 µM) demonstrated the greatest potency for inhibition of L-lactic acid efflux by MCT1 and MCT4, respectively. Acidic drugs including fluvastatin, cerivastatin, simvastatin acid, lovastatin acid, irbesartan and losartan exhibited weak inhibitory potency on L-lactic acid efflux. Our results suggest that some acidic drugs, such as loratadine and atorvastatin, can inhibit the efflux transport of L-lactic acid. This inhibition may cause an accumulation of intracellular L-lactic acid leading to acidification and muscular disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Taurocholate Deconjugation and Cholesterol Binding by Indigenous Dadih Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    USMAN PATO

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available High serum cholesterol levels have been associated with an increased risk for human coronary heart disease. Lowering of serum cholesterol has been suggested to prevent the heart disease. To reduce serum cholesterol levels one may consumed diet supplementat of fermented dairy product such as dadih. Lactic acid bacteria present in dadih may alter serum cholesterol by directly bind to dietary cholesterol and/or deconjugation of bile salts. Acid and bile tolerance, deconjugation of sodium taurocholate, and the cholesterol-binding ability of lactic acid bacteria from dadih were examined. Among ten dadih lactic acid bacteria tested, six strains namely I-11, I-2775, K-5, I-6257, IS-7257, and B-4 could bind cholesterol and deconjugate sodium taurocholate. However, the last four strains were very sensitive to bile. Therefore, Lactobacillus fermentum I-11 and Leuconostoc lactis subsp. lactis I-2775 those were tolerant to acid and oxgall (bile and deconjugated sodium taurocholate and bound cholesterol could be recommended as probiotic to prevent coronary heart disease.

  13. Stereocomplexation of low molecular weight poly(L-lactic acid) and high molecular weight poly(D-lactic acid), radiation crosslinking PLLA/PDLA stereocomplexes and their characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quynh, Tran Minh; Mai, Hoang Hoa; Lan, Pham Ngoc

    2013-01-01

    Poly(L-lactic acid)s (PLLAx) were synthesized from L-lactic acid by polycondensation. Different stereocomplexes were also obtained with equimolar mixtures of synthesized PLLAx and a commercial PDLA. The stereocomplexes were crosslinked with triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) by gamma irradiation. Crosslinking density increased with radiation doses, the heavier the crosslinking network, the lower its swelling degree. The crosslinking structures were introduced in the stereocomplexes inhibiting the mobility for crystallization of PLLA molecules. Thermal and mechanical properties of PLA stereocomplexes were remarkably enhanced by radiation induced crosslinking. PLA stereocomplex does not seem to be degraded by PLLA degrading microorganisms existing in compost at room temperature, but the synthesized PLLA was significantly degraded. - Highlights: ► Complete PLA stereocomplex was obtained from synthesized PLLA and a commercial PDLA. ► Melting temperature of stereocomplex were much improved by gamma irradiation. ► Crosslinking network inhibited the mobility of polymeric chains for crystallization. ► Biodegradability of PLLA was reduced by stereocomplexation and crosslinking.

  14. Plasma surface modification of poly (L-lactic acid) and poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) films for improvement of nerve cells adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorasani, M.T.; Mirzadeh, H.; Irani, S.

    2008-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) plasma treatment in O 2 was applied to modify the surface of poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA) and poly (D,L-lactic acid-coglycolic acid) (PLGA) as biodegradable polymers. The surface structure, morphology, wettability and surface chemistry of treated films were characterized by water drop contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical invert microscope, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and ATIR-FTIR spectroscopy. The cell affinity of the oxygen plasma treated film was evaluated by nervous tissue B65 cell culture in stationary conditions. The results showed that the hydrophilicity increased greatly after O 2 plasma treatment. The results showed that improved cell adhesion was attributed to the combination of surface chemistry and surface wettability during plasma treatment. Cell culture results showed that B65 nervous cell attachment and growth on the plasma treated PLLA was much higher than an unmodified sample and PLGA. Surface hydrophilicity and chemical functional groups with high polar component play an important role in enhancing cell attachment and growth

  15. Optimization of Preparation Techniques for Poly(Lactic Acid-Co-Glycolic Acid) Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birnbaum, Duane T.; Kosmala, Jacqueline D.; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa [Biogel Technology, Inc. (United States)], E-mail: lisabp@biogeltech.com

    2000-06-15

    Microparticles and nanoparticles of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) are excellent candidates for the controlled release of many pharmaceutical compounds because of their biodegradable nature. The preparation of submicron PLAGA particles poses serious challenges that are not necessarily present when preparing microparticles. We have evaluated several combinations of organic solvents and surfactants used in the formulation of PLAGA nanoparticles. Critical factors such as the ability to separate the nanoparticles from the surfactant, the ability to re-suspend the nanoparticles after freeze-drying, formulation yield and nanoparticle size were studied. The smallest particles were obtained using the surfactant/solvent combination of sodium dodecyl sulfate and ethyl acetate (65 nm) and the largest particles were obtained using poly(vinyl alcohol) and dichloromethane (466 nm). However, the optimal nanoparticles were produced using either acetone or ethyl acetate as the organic solvent and poly(vinyl alcohol) or human serum albumin as the surfactant. This is because the most critical measure of performance of these nanoparticles proved to be their ability to re-suspend after freeze-drying.

  16. Optimization of Preparation Techniques for Poly(Lactic Acid-Co-Glycolic Acid) Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnbaum, Duane T.; Kosmala, Jacqueline D.; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2000-01-01

    Microparticles and nanoparticles of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) are excellent candidates for the controlled release of many pharmaceutical compounds because of their biodegradable nature. The preparation of submicron PLAGA particles poses serious challenges that are not necessarily present when preparing microparticles. We have evaluated several combinations of organic solvents and surfactants used in the formulation of PLAGA nanoparticles. Critical factors such as the ability to separate the nanoparticles from the surfactant, the ability to re-suspend the nanoparticles after freeze-drying, formulation yield and nanoparticle size were studied. The smallest particles were obtained using the surfactant/solvent combination of sodium dodecyl sulfate and ethyl acetate (65 nm) and the largest particles were obtained using poly(vinyl alcohol) and dichloromethane (466 nm). However, the optimal nanoparticles were produced using either acetone or ethyl acetate as the organic solvent and poly(vinyl alcohol) or human serum albumin as the surfactant. This is because the most critical measure of performance of these nanoparticles proved to be their ability to re-suspend after freeze-drying

  17. Optimization of Preparation Techniques for Poly(Lactic Acid-Co-Glycolic Acid) Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Duane T.; Kosmala, Jacqueline D.; Brannon-Peppas, Lisa

    2000-06-01

    Microparticles and nanoparticles of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLAGA) are excellent candidates for the controlled release of many pharmaceutical compounds because of their biodegradable nature. The preparation of submicron PLAGA particles poses serious challenges that are not necessarily present when preparing microparticles. We have evaluated several combinations of organic solvents and surfactants used in the formulation of PLAGA nanoparticles. Critical factors such as the ability to separate the nanoparticles from the surfactant, the ability to re-suspend the nanoparticles after freeze-drying, formulation yield and nanoparticle size were studied. The smallest particles were obtained using the surfactant/solvent combination of sodium dodecyl sulfate and ethyl acetate (65 nm) and the largest particles were obtained using poly(vinyl alcohol) and dichloromethane (466 nm). However, the optimal nanoparticles were produced using either acetone or ethyl acetate as the organic solvent and poly(vinyl alcohol) or human serum albumin as the surfactant. This is because the most critical measure of performance of these nanoparticles proved to be their ability to re-suspend after freeze-drying.

  18. Electrospun Poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) Scaffolds for Skin Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbar, Sangamesh G.; Nukavarapu, Syam Prasad; James, Roshan; Nair, Lakshmi S.; Laurencin, Cato T.

    2008-01-01

    Electrospun fiber matrices composed of scaffolds of varying fiber diameters were investigated for potential application of severe skin loss. Few systematic studies have been performed to examine the effect of varying fiber diameter electrospun fiber matrices for skin regeneration. The present study reports the fabrication of poly[lactic acid-co-glycolic acid] (PLAGA) matrices with fiber diameters of 150–225, 200–300, 250–467, 500–900, 600–1200, 2500–3000 and 3250–6000 nm via electrospinning. All fiber matrices found to have a tensile modulus from 39.23 ± 8.15 to 79.21 ± 13.71 MPa which falls in the range for normal human skin. Further, the porous fiber matrices have porosity between 38–60 % and average pore diameters between 10–14µm. We evaluated the efficacy of these biodegradable fiber matrices as skin substitutes by seeding them with human skin fibroblasts (hSF). Human skin fibroblasts acquired a well spread morphology and showed significant progressive growth on fiber matrices in the 350–1100 nm diameter range. Collagen type III gene expression was significantly up-regulated in hSF seeded on matrices with fiber diameters in the range of 350–1100 nm. Based on the need, the proposed fiber skin substitutes can be successfully fabricated and optimized for skin fibroblast attachment and growth. PMID:18639927

  19. Biodegradable poly (lactic acid-co-glycolic acid scaffolds as carriers for genetically-modified fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Perisic

    Full Text Available Recent advances in gene delivery into cells allow improved therapeutic effects in gene therapy trials. To increase the bioavailability of applied cells, it is of great interest that transfected cells remain at the application site and systemic spread is minimized. In this study, we tested clinically used biodegradable poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA scaffolds (Vicryl & Ethisorb as transient carriers for genetically modified cells. To this aim, we used human fibroblasts and examined attachment and proliferation of untransfected cells on the scaffolds in vitro, as well as the mechanical properties of the scaffolds at four time points (1, 3, 6 and 9 days of cultivation. Furthermore, the adherence of cells transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF165 and also VEGF165 protein secretion were investigated. Our results show that human fibroblasts adhere on both types of PLGA scaffolds. However, proliferation and transgene expression capacity were higher on Ethisorb scaffolds most probably due to a different architecture of the scaffold. Additionally, cultivation of the cells on the scaffolds did not alter their biomechanical properties. The results of this investigation could be potentially exploited in therapeutic regiments with areal delivery of transiently transfected cells and may open the way for a variety of applications of cell-based gene therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  20. Gamma-aminobutyric acid fermentation with date residue by a lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus brevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Momoko; Yamane, Daisuke; Funato, Kouichi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2018-03-01

    Dates are commercially consumed as semi-dried fruit or processed into juice and puree for further food production. However, the date residue after juice and puree production is not used, although it appears to be nutrient enriched. Here, date residue was fermented by a lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus brevis, which has been generally recognized as safe. Through degradation of sodium glutamate added to the residue during the fermentation, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which reduces neuronal excitability, was produced at the conversion rate of 80-90% from glutamate. In order to achieve this GABA production level, pretreatment of the date residue with carbohydrate-degrading enzymes, i.e., cellulase and pectinase, was necessary. All ingredients used for this GABA fermentation were known as being edible. These results provide us with a solution for the increasing commercial demand for GABA in food industry with the use of date residue that has been often discarded. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Electrochemical L-lactic acid sensor based on immobilized ZnO nanorods with lactate oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain; Shah, Syed Muhammad Usman Ali; Khun, Kimleang; Willander, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    In this work, fabrication of gold coated glass substrate, growth of ZnO nanorods and potentiometric response of lactic acid are explained. The biosensor was developed by immobilizing the lactate oxidase on the ZnO nanorods in combination with glutaraldehyde as a cross linker for lactate oxidase enzyme. The potentiometric technique was applied for the measuring the output (EMF) response of l-lactic acid biosensor. We noticed that the present biosensor has wide linear detection range of concentration from 1 × 10(-4)-1 × 10(0) mM with acceptable sensitivity about 41.33 ± 1.58 mV/decade. In addition, the proposed biosensor showed fast response time less than 10 s, a good selectivity towards l-lactic acid in presence of common interfering substances such as ascorbic acid, urea, glucose, galactose, magnesium ions and calcium ions. The present biosensor based on immobilized ZnO nanorods with lactate oxidase sustained its stability for more than three weeks.

  2. Isolation and identification of lactic acid bacteria from traditional dairy products of Kleibar, Heris and Varzaghan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Narimani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are dietary supplements of live microorganisms which when consumed in adequate amounts, can have a beneficial effect on the host. Among all bacteria, lactic acid bacteria are the most common type that has been introduced as probiotics. These bacteria are present in dairy products and produce lactic acid during the fermentation process. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify the probiotics from microbial flora of milk and traditional yogurt in Kaleibar, Heris and Varzaghan areas. In this study, lactic acid bacteria were isolated by culture and identified based on biochemical properties and resistant to stomach acid and bile salts were evaluated. Then, for more accurate identification of the isolates, the 16S rRNA genes of Lactobacilli were amplified with specific primers and the purified PCR product was sent for sequencing. According to our results, 17 strains of Lactobacilli and 6 strains of Enterococci were reported in Kaleibar, Heris and Varzaghan areas which could be a good candidate for further investigation as probiotic.

  3. Population dynamics of mixed cultures of yeast and lactic acid bacteria in cider conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Roseli Dierings

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the malolactic bioconversion in low acidity cider, according Brazilian conditions. The apple must was inoculated with Saccharomyces cerevisiae or S. cerevisiae with Oenococcus oeni. The control contained the indigenous microorganisms. Fermentation assays were carried out with clarified apple must from the Gala variety. At the beginning of fermentation, there was a fast growth of the non-Saccharomyces yeast population. Competitive inhibition occurred in all the assays, either with inoculated or indigenous populations of the yeast. The lactic acid bacteria count was ca. 1.41·10²CFU/mL at the beginning and 10(6CFU/mL after yeast cells autolysis. The lactic bacteria O. oeni reached the highest population (10(7CFU/mL when added to the apple must after the decline of the yeast. The malic acid was totally consumed during the alcoholic fermentation period (80.0 to 95.5 % and lactic acid was still synthesized during the 35 days of malolactic fermentation. These results could be important in order to achieve a high quality brut, or sec cider obtained from the dessert apple must.

  4. Electrochemical L-Lactic Acid Sensor Based on Immobilized ZnO Nanorods with Lactate Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimleang Khun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, fabrication of gold coated glass substrate, growth of ZnO nanorods and potentiometric response of lactic acid are explained. The biosensor was developed by immobilizing the lactate oxidase on the ZnO nanorods in combination with glutaraldehyde as a cross linker for lactate oxidase enzyme. The potentiometric technique was applied for the measuring the output (EMF response of L-lactic acid biosensor. We noticed that the present biosensor has wide linear detection range of concentration from 1 × 10−4–1 × 100 mM with acceptable sensitivity about 41.33 ± 1.58 mV/decade. In addition, the proposed biosensor showed fast response time less than 10 s, a good selectivity towards L-lactic acid in presence of common interfering substances such as ascorbic acid, urea, glucose, galactose, magnesium ions and calcium ions. The present biosensor based on immobilized ZnO nanorods with lactate oxidase sustained its stability for more than three weeks.

  5. Probiotic potential of noni juice fermented with lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chung-Yi; Ng, Chang-Chai; Su, Hsuan; Tzeng, Wen-Sheng; Shyu, Yuan-Tay

    2009-01-01

    The present study assesses the feasibility of noni as a raw substrate for the production of probiotic noni juice by lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacilluscasei and Lactobacillus plantarum) and bifidobacteria (Bifidobacteriumlongum). Changes in pH, acidity, sugar content, cell survival and antioxidant properties during fermentation were monitored. All tested strains grew well on noni juice, reaching nearly 10⁹ colony-forming units/ml after 48 h fermentation. L.casei produced less lactic acid than B.longum and L. plantarum. After 4 weeks of cold storage at 4°C, B.longum and L. plantarum survived under low-pH conditions in fermented noni juice. In contrast, L.casei exhibited no cell viability after 3 weeks. Moreover, noni juice fermented with B.longum had a high antioxidant capacity that did not differ significantly (P <0.05) from that of lactic acid bacteria. Finally, we found that B.longum and L. plantarum are optimal probiotics for fermentation with noni juice.

  6. Compositional characteristics of commercial yoghurt based on quantitative determination of viable lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niketić Gordana B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoghurt quality is particularly difficult to standardize because of the many forms, varieties, manufacturing methods, ingredients and consumer preferences that exist. Since these factors will always play an important role, it is unlikely that a uniform yoghurt quality concept will ever emerge, such as has been developed for other dairy products. There are a number of common denominators, however that have bearing on yoghurt quality. Since a number of producers are recognized within the broad category entitled yoghurt. This situation makes yoghurt an interesting, challenging, but also a confusing area to work in. The present investigation was undertaken to isolate from commercial yoghurt the strains involved in its manufacture and determine the characteristics of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp.bulgaricus. This study is concerned with the lactic acid bacteria (L.delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus growth in yoghurt from involving different procedures and with the determination of the number of lactic acid bacteria in dependence of the temperature and acidity in the period of storage. Predominant samples of yoghurt were with 11-107/ml lactic acid lactococci (44.28%.

  7. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF LACTIC ACID PRODUCING BACTERIA FROM CAMEL MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toqeer Ahmad, Rashida Kanwal, Izhar Hussain Athar1, Najam Ayub

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria (LAB were isolated from camel milk by culturing the camel milk on specific media and pure culture was obtained by sub culturing. Purification of culture was confirmed by Gram's staining and identified by different bio-chemical tests. Camel milk contains lactic acid producing bacteria including Strpptococci such as S. cremoris and S. lactis and Lactobacilli such as L. acidophilus L. acidophilus grows more rapidly in camel milk than others as its growth is supported by camel milk. A variety of food can be preserved by lactic acid fermentation, so starter culture was prepared from strains which were isolated from camel milk. Camel and buffalo's milk cheese was prepared by using starter culture. The strains isolated from camel milk were best for acid production and can coagulate the milk in less lime. Camel milk cheese was prepared and compared with buffalo's milk cheese. It is concluded that cheese can be prepared successfully from camel milk and better results can be obtained by coagulating milk with starter culture.

  8. Metabolism of Fructophilic Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from the Apis mellifera L. Bee Gut: Phenolic Acids as External Electron Acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Pasquale; Addante, Rocco; Pontonio, Erica; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) are strongly associated with the gastrointestinal tracts (GITs) of Apis mellifera L. worker bees due to the consumption of fructose as a major carbohydrate. Seventy-seven presumptive lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from GITs of healthy A. mellifera L. adults, which were collected from 5 different geographical locations of the Apulia region of Italy. Almost all of the isolates showed fructophilic tendencies: these isolates were identified as Lactobacillus kunkeei (69%) or Fructobacillus fructosus (31%). A high-throughput phenotypic microarray targeting 190 carbon sources was used to determine that 83 compounds were differentially consumed. Phenotyping grouped the strains into two clusters, reflecting growth performance. The utilization of phenolic acids, such as p-coumaric, caffeic, syringic, or gallic acids, as electron acceptors was investigated in fructose-based medium. Almost all FLAB strains showed tolerance to high phenolic acid concentrations. p-Coumaric acid and caffeic acid were consumed by all FLAB strains through reductases or decarboxylases. Syringic and gallic acids were partially metabolized. The data collected suggest that FLAB require external electron acceptors to regenerate NADH. The use of phenolic acids as external electron acceptors by the 4 FLAB showing the highest phenolic acid reductase activity was investigated in glucose-based medium supplemented with p-coumaric acid. Metabolic responses observed through a phenotypic microarray suggested that FLAB may use p-coumaric acid as an external electron acceptor, enhancing glucose dissimilation but less efficiently than other external acceptors such as fructose or pyruvic acid. IMPORTANCE Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) remain to be fully explored. This study intends to link unique biochemical features of FLAB with their habitat. The quite unique FLAB phenome within the group lactic acid bacteria (LAB) may have practical relevance

  9. Separation and purification of lactic acid. Thermal catalytic depolymerization of poly-lactic acid into lactide; Hakkoho nyusan no bunri seisei ni kansuru kenkyu. Pori nyusan no rakuchido eno sesshokuteki netsukai jugo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, M.; Hirama, Y.; Liew, M. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-05-10

    A new separation and purification method for lactic acid from fermentation broth is proposed by which poly-lactic acid produced from unpurified lactic acid is catalytically depolymerized into lactide fractions then further purified into lactide. In the present study, thermal depolymerization catalysts were investigated for commercial use. Iron catalysts, especially metallic iron, and ferrous oxide and lactate, were found to provide almost the same catalytic activity and lactide composition in depolymerization products and those in tin octoate and antimony oxide catalysts. Ferrous oxide was also applied to depolymerize poly-lactic acid derived form unpurified lactic acid to compare catalytic activity and lactide composition and was confirmed to show results similar to those of pure polymer. Based on these findings, it is concluded that iron catalysts can be used commercially. Furthermore, catalytic depolymerization of poly-lactic acids with different molecular weights were studied. Polymers with Mw 5,000-10,000 were found to be better for production of lactide, based on the behavior of depolymerization and lactide content in the product. 5 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Characterisation and biochemical properties of predominant lactic acid bacteria from fermenting cassava for selection as starter cultures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kostinek, M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 375 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from fermenting cassava in South Africa, Benin, Kenya and Germany, and were characterised by phenotypic and genotypic tests. These could be divided into five main groups comprising strains...

  11. Effect of the Talc Filler on Structural, Water Vapor Barrier and Mechanical Properties of Poly(lactic acid) Composites.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buzarovska, A.; Bogoeva-Gaceva, G.; Fajgar, Radek

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 2 (2016), s. 181-188 ISSN 0334-6447 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : composites * packaging * poly (lactic acid) Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.658, year: 2016

  12. Highly efficient production of optically pure l-lactic acid from corn stover hydrolysate by thermophilic Bacillus coagulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kedong; Hu, Guoquan; Pan, Liwei; Wang, Zichao; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Yanwei; Ruan, Zhiyong; He, Mingxiong

    2016-11-01

    A thermophilic strain Bacillus coagulans (NBRC 12714) was employed to produce l-lactic acid from corn stover hydrolysate in membrane integrated continuous fermentation. The strain NBRC 12714 metabolized glucose and xylose by the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway (EMP) and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), producing l-lactic acid with optical purity >99.5%. The overall l-lactic acid titer of 92g/l with a yield of 0.91g/g and a productivity of 13.8g/l/h were achieved at a dilution rate of 0.15h(-1). The productivity obtained was 1.6-fold than that of conventional continuous fermentation without cell recycling, and also was the highest among the relevant studies ever reported. These results indicated that the process developed had great potential for economical industrial production of l-lactic acid from lignocellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Screening of lactic acid bacteria from Indonesia reveals glucansucrase and fructansucrase genes in two different Weissella confusa strains from soya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, Amarila; Radji, Maksum; Kralj, Slavko; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2009-01-01

    Homopolysaccharide (glucan and fructan) synthesis from sucrose by sucrase enzymes in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been well studied in the genera Leuconostoc, Streptococcus and Lactobacillus. This study aimed to identify and characterize genes encoding glucansucrase/glucosyltransferase (GTF) and

  14. Selection of the Strain Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 43121 and Its Application to Brewers' Spent Grain Conversion into Lactic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Rossana; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo; Vandenberghe, Luciana Porto de Souza; Woiciechowski, Adenise Lorenci; Ionata, Elena; Marcolongo, Loredana; Faraco, Vincenza

    2015-01-01

    Six Lactobacillus strains were analyzed to select a bacterium for conversion of brewers' spent grain (BSG) into lactic acid. Among the investigated strains, L. acidophilus ATCC 43121 showed the highest yield of lactic acid production (16.1 g/L after 48 hours) when grown in a synthetic medium. It was then analyzed for its ability to grow on the hydrolysates obtained from BSG after acid-alkaline (AAT) or aqueous ammonia soaking (AAS) pretreatment. The lactic acid production by L. acidophilus ATCC 43121 through fermentation of the hydrolysate from AAS treated BSG was 96% higher than that from the AAT treated one, although similar yields of lactic acid per consumed glucose were achieved due to a higher (46%) glucose consumption by L. acidophilus ATCC 43121 in the AAS BSG hydrolysate. It is worth noting that adding yeast extract to the BSG hydrolysates increased both the yield of lactic acid per substrate consumed and the volumetric productivity. The best results were obtained by fermentation of AAS BSG hydrolysate supplemented by yeast extract, in which the strain produced 22.16 g/L of lactic acid (yield of 0.61 g/g), 27% higher than the value (17.49 g/L) obtained in the absence of a nitrogen source. PMID:26640784

  15. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. LACTIC ACID BACTERIA FLORA OF KONYA KUFLU CHEESE: A TRADITIONAL CHEESE FROM KONYA PROVINCE IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziba Guley

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the lactic acid bacteria flora of mature Konya Kuflu cheese. Konya Kuflu cheese is a traditional blue cheese which is produced from raw milk without starter culture addition and mould growth occurs in uncontrolled conditions during its ripening. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB isolated from 9 mature Konya Kuflu cheese samples were investigated using a combination of conventional biochemical tests, API test kits, and molecular approaches. For some isolates, different results were obtained according to the identification technique. The overall LAB profile of Konya Kuflu cheese samples revealed that Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus paracasei/Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus plantarum, Enterococcus faecium, and Enterococcus faecalis are the predominant species. In addition, 1 Pediococcus parvulus and 1 Enterococcus durans were also identified.

  17. Biodegradability and Biocompatibility Study of Poly(Chitosan-g-lactic Acid Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Zhang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A biodegradable, biocompatible poly(chitosan-g-lactic acid (PCLA scaffold was prepared and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The PCLA scaffold was obtained by grafting lactic acid (LA onto the amino groups on chitosan (CS without a catalyst. The PCLA scaffolds were characterized by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The biodegradabilty was determined by mass loss in vitro, and degradation in vivo as a function of feed ratio of LA/CS. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC culture experiments and histological examination were performed to evaluate the PCLA scaffolds’ biocompatibility. The results indicated that PCLA was promising for tissue engineering application.

  18. Glucose and D-Allulose contained medium to support the growth of lactic acid bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Baarri, A. N.; Legowo, A. M.; Pramono, Y. B.; Sari, D. I.; Pangestika, W.

    2018-01-01

    Monosaccharide has been known as support agent for the growth of lactic acid bacteria. However the combination among monosaccharides for supporting the living of bacteria has not been understood well. This research was done for analyzing the combination glucose and D-allulose for the growth of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Streptococcus thermophillus. The NaCl medium containing glucose and D-allulose was used to analyse the growth of bacteria. The study showed that glucose and D-allulose have been detected as supportive agent to L. acidophilus and S. thermophillus specifically. As conclusion, glucose and D-allulose supported the growth of lactic acid bacteria equally. This finding might provide the beneficial information for industry to utilize D-allulose as well as glucose.

  19. Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) based nanocomposites-a novel way of drug-releasing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chen; Lv Gang; Pan Chao; Song Min; Wu Chunhui; Guo Dadong; Wang Xuemei; Chen Baoan; Gu Zhongze

    2007-01-01

    In this communication, poly(lactic acid) nanofibers have been fabricated by electrospinning and then poly(lactic acid) (PLA) based nanocomposites have been prepared by accumulating anticancer drug daunorubicin on PLA nanofibers combined with TiO 2 nanoparticles. Our atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser-scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) studies demonstrate that the respective drug molecules could be readily self-assembled on the surface of the blends of nano-TiO 2 with PLA polymer nanocomposites, which could further efficiently facilitate the drug permeation and accumulation on the target leukemia K562 cells. Besides, the respective new nanocomposites have good biocompatibility, ease of surface chemistry modification and very high surface area, which may afford the possibility for their promising application in pharmacology and biomedical engineering areas. (communication)

  20. Improving lead adsorption through chemical modification of wheat straw by lactic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Ruimin; Wang, Minxiang; Bu, Qingwei; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Yanli

    2018-01-01

    This work describes the creation of a new cellulosic material derived from wheat straw modified by lactic acid for adsorption of lead in aqueous solution, called 0.3LANS (the concentration of the lactic acid were 0.3mol/L). Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of initial pH value, contact time, adsorbent dose, initial concentration and temperature. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Elemental analysis, BET surface area and Scanning electron micrographs (SEM) analysis were used to investigate the chemical modification. Adsorption isotherm models namely, Langmuir, Freundlich were used to analyse the equilibrium data, and the Langmuir isotherm model provided the best correlation, means that the adsorption was chemical monolayer adsorption and the adsorption capacity qm was increased with increasing temperature, and reached 51.49mg/g for 0.3LANS at 35°C, showing adsorption was exothermic.

  1. Lactic acid production from acidogenic fermentation of fruit and vegetable wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Hailing; Zheng, Mingyue; Wang, Kaijun

    2015-09-01

    This work focused on the lactic acid production from acidogenic fermentation of fruit and vegetable wastes treatment. A long term completely stirred tank reactor (CSTR) lasting for 50 days was operated at organic loading rate (OLR) of 11 gVS/(L d) and sludge retention time (SRT) of 3 days with pH controlled at 4.0 (1-24 day) and 5.0 (25-50 day). The results indicated that high amount of approximately 10-20 g/L lactic acid was produced at pH of 4.0 and the fermentation type converted from coexistence of homofermentation and heterofermentation into heterofermentation. At pH of 5.0, the hydrolysis reaction was improved and the total concentration of fermentation products increased up to 29.5 g COD/L. The heterofermentation was maintained, however, bifidus pathway by Bifidobacterium played an important role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of antibiotic resistance of lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional Turkish fermented dairy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erginkaya, Z; Turhan, E U; Tatlı, D

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the antibiotic resistance (AR) of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from traditional Turkish fermented dairy products was investigated. Yogurt, white cheese, tulum cheese, cokelek, camız cream and kefir as dairy products were collected from various supermarkets. Lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus spp., Streptococcus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., and Enterecoccus spp. were isolated from these dairy products. Lactobacillus spp. were resistant to vancomycin (58%), erythromycin (10.8%), tetracycline (4.3%), gentamicin (28%), and ciprofloxacin (26%). Streptococcus spp. were resistant to vancomycin (40%), erythromycin (10%), chloramphenicol (10%), gentamicin (20%), and ciprofloxacin (30%). Bifidobacterium spp. were resistant to vancomycin (60%), E 15 (6.6%), gentamicin (20%), and ciprofloxacin (33%). Enterococcus spp. were resistant to vancomycin (100%), erythromycin (100%), rifampin (100%), and ciprofloxacin (100%). As a result, LAB islated from dairy products in this study showed mostly resistance to vancomycin.

  3. Selection of bacteriocin producer strains of lactic acid bacteria from a dairy environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasagno, M; Beoleito, V; Sesma, F; Raya, R; Font de Valdez, G; Eraso, A

    2002-01-01

    Two strains showing bacteriocin production were selected from a total of 206 lactic acid bacteria isolated from samples of milk, milk serum, whey and homemade cheeses in Southern Cordoba, Argentina. This property was detected by means of well diffusion assays. The strains were identified as Enterococcus hirae and Enterococcus durans. The protein nature of those substances was proved by showing their sensitivity to type IV and XXV proteases, papaine, trypsin, pepsin and K proteinase. The bacteriocins inhibited the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringes and two strains of Staphylococcus aureus, an A-enterotoxin and a B-enterotoxin producers. All of these bacteria are common pathogens usually associated with food borne diseases (ETA). These lactic acid bacteria or their bacteriocins could be suitable candidates for food preservation and specially useful in the our regional dairy industry.

  4. Hydroxycinnamic acids used as external acceptors of electrons: an energetic advantage for strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filannino, Pasquale; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria; Di Cagno, Raffaella

    2014-12-01

    The metabolism of hydroxycinnamic acids by strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (19 strains) was investigated as a potential alternative energy route. Lactobacillus curvatus PE5 was the most tolerant to hydroxycinnamic acids, followed by strains of Weissella spp., Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides, for which the MIC values were the same. The highest sensitivity was found for Lactobacillus rossiae strains. During growth in MRS broth, lactic acid bacteria reduced caffeic, p-coumaric, and ferulic acids into dihydrocaffeic, phloretic, and dihydroferulic acids, respectively, or decarboxylated hydroxycinnamic acids into the corresponding vinyl derivatives and then reduced the latter compounds to ethyl compounds. Reductase activities mainly emerged, and the activities of selected strains were further investigated in chemically defined basal medium (CDM) under anaerobic conditions. The end products of carbon metabolism were quantified, as were the levels of intracellular ATP and the NAD(+)/NADH ratio. Electron and carbon balances and theoretical ATP/glucose yields were also estimated. When CDM was supplemented with hydroxycinnamic acids, the synthesis of ethanol decreased and the concentration of acetic acid increased. The levels of these metabolites reflected on the alcohol dehydrogenase and acetate kinase activities. Overall, some biochemical traits distinguished the common metabolism of strictly heterofermentative strains: main reductase activity toward hydroxycinnamic acids, a shift from alcohol dehydrogenase to acetate kinase activities, an increase in the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, and the accumulation of supplementary intracellular ATP. Taken together, the above-described metabolic responses suggest that strictly heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria mainly use hydroxycinnamic acids as external acceptors of electrons. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Poly(Lactic Acid) Hemodialysis Membranes with Poly(Lactic Acid)-block-Poly(2-Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate) Copolymer As Additive: Preparation, Characterization, and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lijing; Liu, Fu; Yu, Xuemin; Xue, Lixin

    2015-08-19

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) hemodialysis membranes with enhanced antifouling capability and hemocompatibility were developed using poly(lactic acid)-block-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PLA-PHEMA) copolymers as the blending additive. PLA-PHEMA block copolymers were synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation (RAFT) polymerization from aminolyzed PLA. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) were applied to characterize the synthesized products. By blending PLA with the amphiphilic block copolymer, PLA/PLA-PHEMA membranes were prepared by nonsolvent induced phase separation (NIPS) method. Their chemistry and structure were characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results revealed that PLA/PLA-PHEMA membranes with high PLA-PHEMA contents exhibited enhanced hydrophilicity, water permeability, antifouling and hemocompatibility. Especially, when the PLA-PHEMA concentration was 15 wt %, the water flux of the modified membrane was about 236 L m(-2) h(-1). Its urea and creatinine clearance was more than 0.70 mL/min, lysozyme clearance was about 0.50 mL/min, BSA clearance was as less as 0.31 mL/min. All the results suggest that PLA-PHEMA copolymers had served as effective agents for optimizing the property of PLA-based membrane for hemodialysis applications.

  6. Styrene-Assisted Maleic Anhydride Grafted Poly(lactic acid as an Effective Compatibilizer for Wood Flour/Poly(lactic acid Bio-Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Du

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of styrene-assisted maleic anhydride-grafted poly(lactic acid (PLA-g-St/MAH on the interfacial properties of wood flour/poly(lactic acid (PLA bio-composites. PLA-g-St/MAH was synthesized by free-radical melt grafting using styrene as a comonomer and dicumyl peroxide as an initiator. The structure of PLA-g-St/MAH was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Wood flour/PLA composites were prepared by compression molding using PLA-g-St/MAH as a compatibilizer. The effects of PLA-g-St/MAH on the rheological and mechanical properties, as well as on the fractured surface morphology of the composites were investigated. Results indicated that storage modulus, complex viscosity, equilibrium torque, and shear heat were significantly increased. The mechanical properties of the wood flour/PLA composites were also significantly increased after the addition of PLA-g-St/MAH. The maximum values were achieved at the loading rate of 3 wt % because of the improved interfacial adhesion between the wood flour and the PLA matrix.

  7. Characterization of Phytochemicals and Antioxidant Activities of Red Radish Brines during Lactic Acid Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu Jing

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Red radish (Raphanus L. pickles are popular appetizers or spices in Asian-style cuisine. However, tons of radish brines are generated as wastes from industrial radish pickle production. In this study, we evaluated the dynamic changes in colour properties, phenolics, anthocyanin profiles, phenolic acid composition, flavonoids, and antioxidant properties in radish brines during lactic acid fermentation. The results showed that five flavonoids detected were four anthocyanins and one kaempferol derivative, including pelargonidin-3-digluoside-5-glucoside derivatives acylated with p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, p-coumaric and manolic acids, or ferulic and malonic acids. Amounts ranged from 15.5–19.3 µg/mL in total monomeric anthocyanins, and kaempferol-3,7-diglycoside (15–30 µg/mL. 4-Hydroxy-benzoic, gentisic, vanillic, syringic, p-coumaric, ferulic, sinapic and salicylic acids were detected in amounts that varied from 70.2–92.2 µg/mL, whereas the total phenolic content was 206–220 µg/mL. The change in colour of the brine was associated with the accumulation of lactic acid and anthocyanins. The ORAC and Fe2+ chelation capacity of radish brines generally decreased, whereas the reducing power measured as FRAP values was increased during the fermentation from day 5 to day 14. This study provided information on the phytochemicals and the antioxidative activities of red radish fermentation waste that might lead to further utilization as nutraceuticals or natural colorants.

  8. Effect of lactic acid suppositories compared with oral metronidazole and placebo in bacterial vaginosis: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeke, A J; Dekker, J H; van Eijk, J T; Kostense, P J; Bezemer, P D

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the effect of lactic acid locally, metronidazole orally and placebo in women with bacterial vaginosis. DESIGN--Randomised clinical trial. SETTING--30 general practices in the Netherlands. PATIENTS--125 women consulting the general practitioner for symptomatic bacterial vaginosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Duration of subjective symptoms, recurrence of symptoms, clinically diagnosed cure, adverse events. RESULTS--Survival analysis showed a significantly faster disappearance of symptoms in the metronidazole category compared with both lactic acid and placebo (p = 0.0005 metronidazole v placebo, p = 0.0002 metronidazole v lactic acid p = 0.6521 lactic acid v placebo [The stratified Mantel Cox test]). The median duration until absence of symptoms was 21 days for metronidazole and 80 days for placebo. Disappearance of symptoms did not occur in 50% of the lactic acid group in 90 days. Recurrence rates of symptoms were similar over the treatment categories (p = 0.13 metronidazole v placebo and p = 0.12 lactic acid v placebo). After 2 weeks cure rates (cure defined as less than three of four clinical criteria present) were 83%, 49% and 47% for metronidazole, lactic acid and placebo category respectively. At that time cure rates (cure defined as none of three clinical criteria present) were 10%, 0% and 3%. After four weeks and three months these figures were: 55%, 20%, 20% and 64%, 28%, 28%. No differences in adverse events were found between the three interventions. CONCLUSIONS--Lactic acid suppositories are ineffective, metronidazole capsules are effective on signs and symptoms in bacterial vaginosis. A considerable proportion of the patients recover without active medication. PMID:8244360

  9. Corrected: The influence of brewers' yeast addition on lactic acid fermentation of brewers' spent grain hydrolysate by Lactobacillus rhamnosus

    OpenAIRE

    Pejin, Jelena; Radosavljević, Miloš; Kocić-Tanackov, Sunčica; Đukić-Vuković, Aleksandra; Mladenović, Dragana; Mojović, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Brewers' spent grain (BSG) hydrolysates were used for lactic acid (LA) fermentation by Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 7469. The aim of this study was to evaluate possibilities of the BSG hydrolysate utilization as a substrate for LA fermentation as well as the effect of dry brewers' yeast addition in hydrolysate on lactic acid fermentation parameters (L-(+)-LA and reducing sugar concentration and number of viable cell-viability). Very high L. rhamnosus ATCC 7469 cell viability was achieved in a...

  10. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid drug delivery systems through transdermal pathway: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Naves, Lucas; Dhand, Chetna; Almeida, Luis; Rajamani, Lakshminarayanan; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Soares, Gra?a

    2017-01-01

    In past few decades, scientists have made tremendous advancement in the field of drug delivery systems (DDS), through transdermal pathway, as the skin represents a ready and large surface area for delivering drugs. Efforts are in progress to design efficient transdermal DDS that support sustained drug release at the targeted area for longer duration in the recommended therapeutic window without producing side-effects. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) is one of the most promising Food and ...

  11. Effect of Ultrasonic Frequency on Lactic Acid Fermentation Promotion by Ultrasonic Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tadayuki; Ohdaira, Etsuzo; Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi

    2004-05-01

    The authors have been researching the promotion of lactic acid fermentation by ultrasonic irradiation. In the past research, it was proven that ultrasonic irradiation is effective in the process of fermentation, and the production of yoghurt and kefir was promoted. In this study, the effect of the ultrasonic frequency in this fermentation process was examined. In the frequency range of this study, it was found that the action of fermentation promotion was exponentially proportionate to the irradiated ultrasonic frequency.

  12. Physicochemical Characteristic of Fermented Goat Milk Added with Different Starters Lactic Acid Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Anif Mukaromah Wati; Mei Jen Lin; Lilik Eka Radiati

    2018-01-01

    Development of traditional food including dadih to be commercial fermented milk was needed to achieve efficiency and effective of products. Dadih with natural starter needs to be changed with starters because starters can be produced commercially. This study aims to evaluate physicochemical characteristic of fermented goat milk that added with different starters Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) isolated from dadih. The materials used for this research were starters LAB that isolated from dadih. In ...

  13. Novel bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria (LAB): various structures and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Rodney H; Zendo, Takeshi; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriocins are heat-stable ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides produced by various bacteria, including food-grade lactic acid bacteria (LAB). These antimicrobial peptides have huge potential as both food preservatives, and as next-generation antibiotics targeting the multiple-drug resistant pathogens. The increasing number of reports of new bacteriocins with unique properties indicates that there is still a lot to learn about this family of peptide antibiotics. In this review, we...

  14. Biocompatibility of poly(lactic acid) with incorporated graphene-based materials

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Artur Moreira; Moreira, Susana Margarida Gomes; Gonçalves, Inês; Gama, F. M.; Mendes, Adélio; Magalhães, Fernão D.

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of graphene-based materials has been shown to improve mechanical properties of poly(lactic acid) (PLA). In this work, PLA films and composite PLA films incorporating two graphene-based materials – graphene oxide (GO) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNP) – were prepared and characterized regarding not only biocompatibility, but also surface topography, chemistry and wettability. The presence of both fillers changed the films surface topography, increasing the roughness, and modif...

  15. Plasticized Biodegradable Poly(lactic acid) Based Composites Containing Cellulose in Micro- and Nanosize

    OpenAIRE

    Halász, Katalin; Csóka, Levente

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the characteristics of thermal processed poly(lactic acid) composites. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG400), microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), and ultrasound-treated microcrystalline cellulose (USMCC) were used in 1, 3, and 5 weight percents to modify the attributes of PLA matrix. The composite films were produced by twin screw extrusion followed by film extrusion. The manufactured PLA-based films were characterized by tensile testing, differential scanning calorim...

  16. Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) Based Tear Resistant and Biodegradable Flexible Films by Blown Film Extrusion

    OpenAIRE

    Norma Mallegni; Thanh Vu Phuong; Maria-Beatrice Coltelli; Patrizia Cinelli; Andrea Lazzeri

    2018-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was melt mixed in a laboratory extruder with poly(butylene adipate-co-terephthalate) (PBAT) and poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) in the presence of polypropylene glycol di glycidyl ether (EJ400) that acted as both plasticizer and compatibilizer. The process was then scaled up in a semi-industrial extruder preparing pellets having different content of a nucleating agent (LAK). All of the formulations could be processed by blowing extrusion and the obtained films showed me...

  17. Diversity of lactic acid bacteria on organic flours and application of isolates in sourdough fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Stanzer, Damir; Ivanuša, Ines; Kazazić, Snježana; Hanousek Čiča, Karla; Mrvčić, Jasna

    2017-01-01

    Organic farming preserves biodiversity and organic products can be the source of many microbial species. The species diversity in organically grown wheat, spelt and rye was investigated in order to find strains suitable for sourdough fermentation. Colonies representing various morphological appearances were isolated and catalase-negative colonies were identified by mass spectrometer Microflex LT ™ MALDI-TOF. The fermentation products (lactic, acetic, formic and phenyllactic acid) were determi...

  18. Reversible surface binding of cadmium and lead by lactic acid and bifidobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teemu, Halttunen; Seppo, Salminen; Jussi, Meriluoto; Raija, Tahvonen; Kalle, Lertola

    2008-07-15

    Extensive cadmium and lead contamination of water has been reported to occur locally as a result of human activities. Lactic acid bacteria have been reported to remove cadmium and lead from water. The aim of this work was to clarify the mechanisms of cadmium and lead removal from water. In addition, the effect of other metals, reversibility of binding and recyclability of the biomass was assessed. Based on our earlier data, the two most promising lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus fermentum ME3 and Bifidobacterium longum 46, were selected for these experiments. The results showed that the presence of other cationic metals and blocking of carboxyl and phosphoryl groups reduced cadmium and lead removal. These results suggest involvement of electrostatic interactions in cadmium and lead removal, and support our earlier findings. Transmission electron micrographs showed large deposits of lead on the bacterial surface suggesting formation of metallic lead precipitates. Both cadmium and lead removal were reversible processes established by full recovery of removed metal after desorption with dilute solutions of EDTA and HNO(3). Resorption capacity of both biomasses tested was reduced after regeneration with 10 mM EDTA and 15 mM HNO(3). Taken together, the results suggest involvement of several reversible mechanisms such as ion exchange and precipitation in cadmium and lead binding by lactic acid bacteria. The results show that specific lactic acid bacteria have the potential for removal of cadmium and lead from water although reduction in resorption capacity after regeneration of the biomass may form a problem. Since the studies so far have mainly focused on removal of single metals from pure water, metal removal in conditions of natural waters should be assessed in further experiments.

  19. Lactic acid bacteria affect serum cholesterol levels, harmful fecal enzyme activity, and fecal water content

    OpenAIRE

    Chung Myung; Shin Hea; Lee Kyung; Kim Mi; Baek Eun; Jang Seok; Lee Do; Kim Jin; Lee Kang; Ha Nam

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are beneficial probiotic organisms that contribute to improved nutrition, microbial balance, and immuno-enhancement of the intestinal tract, as well as lower cholesterol. Although present in many foods, most trials have been in spreads or dairy products. Here we tested whether Bifidobacteria isolates could lower cholesterol, inhibit harmful enzyme activities, and control fecal water content. Methods In vitro culture experiments were performed to ...

  20. Alteration of the Canine Small-Intestinal Lactic Acid Bacterium Microbiota by Feeding of Potential Probiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Manninen, Titta J. K.; Rinkinen, Minna L.; Beasley, Shea S.; Saris, Per E. J.

    2006-01-01

    Five potentially probiotic canine fecal lactic acid bacterium (LAB) strains, Lactobacillus fermentum LAB8, Lactobacillus salivarius LAB9, Weissella confusa LAB10, Lactobacillus rhamnosus LAB11, and Lactobacillus mucosae LAB12, were fed to five permanently fistulated beagles for 7 days. The survival of the strains and their potential effects on the indigenous intestinal LAB microbiota were monitored for 17 days. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) demonstrated that the five fed LAB ...

  1. Current status and emerging role of glutathione in food grade lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Pophaly Sarang; Singh Rameshwar; Pophaly Saurabh; Kaushik Jai K; Tomar Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have taken centre stage in perspectives of modern fermented food industry and probiotic based therapeutics. These bacteria encounter various stress conditions during industrial processing or in the gastrointestinal environment. Such conditions are overcome by complex molecular assemblies capable of synthesizing and/or metabolizing molecules that play a specific role in stress adaptation. Thiols are important class of molecules which contribute towards stres...

  2. Lactic acid bacteria active during the fermentation of wheat silage in small scale silos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, N.J.; Moon, L.C.; Ely, L.O.; Parker, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Wheat was ensiled and periodically analyzed for lactic acid bacteria present. Initially Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus cellobiosus and Streptococcus lactis predominated. After two to four days enterococci including S. faecium and S. bovis were present in high populations as well as Lactobacillus plantarum. It was concluded that mixed populations of enterococci and L. plantarum are active in the successful fermentation of wheat silage. (Refs. 5).

  3. Methods and materials for the production of L-lactic acid in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben [Jordan, MN; Rajgarhia, Vineet [Minnetonka, MN; Suominen, Pirkko [Maple Grove, MN

    2009-05-19

    Recombinant yeast are provided having, in one aspect, multiple exogenous LDH genes integrated into the genome, while leaving native PDC genes intact. In a second aspect, recombinant yeast are provided having an exogenous LDH gene integrated into its genome at the locus of a native PDC gene, with deletion of the native PDC gene. The recombinant yeast are useful in fermentation process for producing lactic acid.

  4. Complete genome sequence of probiotic Bacillus coagulans HM-08: A potential lactic acid producer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guoqiang; Gao, Pengfei; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-06-20

    Bacillus coagulans HM-08 is a commercialized probiotic strain in China. Its genome contains a 3.62Mb circular chromosome with an average GC content of 46.3%. In silico analysis revealed the presence of one xyl operon as well as several other genes that are correlated to xylose utilization. The genetic information provided here may help to expand its future biotechnology potential in lactic acid production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Combination of Poly(lactic) Acid and Starch for Biodegradable Food Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    Muller, Justine; Gonz?lez-Mart?nez, Chelo; Chiralt, Amparo

    2017-01-01

    The massive use of synthetic plastics, in particular in the food packaging area, has a great environmental impact, and alternative more ecologic materials are being required. Poly(lactic) acid (PLA) and starch have been extensively studied as potential replacements for non-degradable petrochemical polymers on the basis of their availability, adequate food contact properties and competitive cost. Nevertheless, both polymers exhibit some drawbacks for packaging uses and need to be adapted to th...

  6. Self-assembling properties of lactic acid derivative with several ester linkages in the molecular core

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pramanik, A.; Das, M.K.; Das, B.; Hamplová, Věra; Kašpar, Miroslav; Bubnov, Alexej

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 7 (2015), s. 745-757 ISSN 0141-1594 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-14133S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14007 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101204; AV ČR(CZ) M100101211 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : lactic acid derivative * ferroelectric liquid crystal * self-assembling * spontaneous polarization * birefringence * phase transition Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials Impact factor: 0.858, year: 2015

  7. Bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria: purification, properties and use as biopreservatives

    OpenAIRE

    Parada,José Luis; Caron,Carolina Ricoy; Medeiros,Adriane Bianchi P.; Soccol,Carlos Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Biopreservation systems in foods are of increasing interest for industry and consumers. Bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacteria and/or their isolated bacteriocins are considered safe additives (GRAS), useful to control the frequent development of pathogens and spoiling microorganisms in foods and feed. The spreading of bacterial antibiotic resistance and the demand for products with fewer chemicals create the necessity of exploring new alternatives, in order to reduce the abusive use of therap...

  8. Poly(Lactic Acid) Filled with Cassava Starch-g-Soybean Oil Maleate

    OpenAIRE

    Kiangkitiwan, Nopparut; Srikulkit, Kawee

    2013-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid), PLA, is a biodegradable polymer, but its applications are limited by its high cost and relatively poorer properties when compared to petroleum-based plastics. The addition of starch powder into PLA is one of the most promising efforts because starch is an abundant and cheap biopolymer. However, the challenge is the major problem associated with poor interfacial adhesion between the hydrophilic starch granules and the hydrophobic PLA, leading to poorer mechanical properties....

  9. CONVERSION OF PINEAPPLE JUICE WASTE INTO LACTIC ACID IN BATCH AND FED – BATCH FERMENTATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Mochamad Busairi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pineapple juice waste contains valuable components, which are mainly sucrose, glucose, and fructose. Recently, lactic acid has been considered to be an important raw material for the production of biodegradable lactide polymer. The fermentation experiments were carried out in a 3 litres fermentor (Biostat B Model under anaerobic condition with stirring speed of 50 rpm, temperature at 40oC, and pH of 6.00. Effect of feed concentration on lactic acid production, bacterial growth, substrate utilisation and productivity was studied. The results obtained from fed- batch culture fermentation showed that the maximum lactic acid productivity was 0.44 g/L.h for feed concentration of 90 g/L at 48 hours. Whereas the lactic acid productivity obtained from fed-batch culture was twice and half fold higher than that of batch culture productivity.  Buangan jus nanas mengandung komponen yang berharga terutama sukrosa, glukosa, dan fruktosa. Asam laktat adalah bahan baku yang terbaru dan penting untuk dibuat sebagai polimer laktat yang dapat terdegradasi oleh lingkungan. Percobaan dilakukan pada fermentor 3 liter (Model Biostat B di bawah kondisi anaerob dengan kecepatan pengadukan 50 rpm, temperatur 40oC, dan pH 6,00. Pengaruh konsentrasi umpan terhadap produksi asam laktat, pertumbuhan mikroba, pengggunaan substrat dan produktivitas telah dipelajari. Hasil yang didapatkan pada fermentasi dengan menggunakan sistem fed-batch menunjukkan bahwa produktivitas asam laktat maksimum adalah 0.44 g/L,jam dengan konsentrasi umpan, 90 g/L pada waktu 48 jam. Bahkan produktivitas asam laktat yang didapat pada kultur fed-batch lebih tinggi 2,5 kali dari pada proses menggunakan sistem batch

  10. [Lactic acid bacteria proteinase and quality of fermented dairy products--A review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Lanwei; Han, Xue

    2015-12-04

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) could synthesize cell envelope proteinase with weak activity, which primarily degrades casein. In addition to its crucial role in the rapid growth of LAB in milk, LAB proteinases are also of industrial importance due to their contribution to the formation of texture and flavor of many fermented dairy products. The proteolytic system, properties of proteinase, the degradation product of casein and its effect on the quality of fermented dairy products were reviewed in this manuscript.

  11. Mixed cultures of Kimchi lactic acid bacteria show increased cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ufuoma

    production and amino acid release among the tested bacteria. W. koreensis 521 ... production of fermented food products, such as yogurt, cheese, sauerkraut and ... habits, stress and excessive dieting (Kapka-Skrzypczak et al., 2012). Mixed ...

  12. RECOVERY OF LACTIC ACID FROM AMERICAN CRYSTAL SUGAR COMPANY WASTEWATER; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel J, Stepan; Edwin S, Olson; Richard E, Shockey; Bradley G, Stevens; John R, Gallagher

    2001-01-01

    This project has shown that the recovery of several valuable lactic acid products is both technically feasible and economically viable. One of the original objectives of this project was to recover lactic acid. However, the presence of a variety of indigenous bacteria in the wastewater stream and technical issues related to recovery and purification have resulted in the production of lactic acid esters. These esters could by hydrolyzed to lactic acid, but only with unacceptable product losses that would be economically prohibitive. The developed process is projected to produce approximately 200,000 lb per day of lactate esters from wastewater at a single factory at costs that compete with conventional solvents. The lactate esters are good solvents for polymers and resins and could replace acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, MIBK, and other polar solvents used in the polymer industry. Because of their low volatility and viscosity-lowering properties, they will be especially useful for inks for jet printers, alkyl resins, and high-solid paints. Owing to their efficiency in dissolving salts and flux as well as oils and sealants, lactate esters can be used in cleaning circuit boards and machine and engine parts. Unlike conventional solvents, lactate esters exhibit low toxicity, are biodegradable, and are not hazardous air pollutants. Another application for lactate esters is in the production of plasticizers. Severe health problems have been attributed to widely used phthalate ester plasticizers. The U.S. Department of Agriculture showed that replacement of these with inexpensive lactate esters is feasible, owing to their superior polymer compatibility properties. A very large market is projected for polymers prepared from lactic acid. These are called polylactides and are a type of polyester. Thermoplastics of this type have a variety of uses, including moldings, fibers, films, and packaging of both manufactured goods and food products. Polylactides form tough, orientable

  13. Isolation and identification of indigenous lactic acid bacteria from North Sumatra river buffalo milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni Rizqiati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Buffalo milk is a source of various lactic acid bacteria (LAB which is potential as culture starter as well as the probiotic. This study was conducted to isolate and identify LAB from indigenous North Sumatra river buffalo milk. Lactic acid bacteria was isolated and grown in medium De Man Rogosa Sharpe Agar (MRSA. The isolation was conducted to obtain pure isolate. The identification of LAB was studied in terms of morphology, physiology, biochemistry and survival on low pH. Morphology tests were conducted by Gram staining and cell forming; physiology tests were conducted for growing viability at pH 4.5 and temperature at 45oC; whereas biochemistry tests were conducted for CO2, dextran and NH3 productions. Determination of LAB species was conducted using Analytical Profile Index (API test CHL 50. Results of identification showed that 41 isolates were identified as LAB with Gram-positive, catalase-negative, rod and round shaped characteristics. Resistance test done to low pH (pH 2 for the lactic acid bacteria showed decrease of bacteria viability up to1.24±0.68 log cfu/ml. The resistant isolates at low pH were L12, L16, L17, L19, L20, M10, P8, S3, S19 and S20. Identification with API test CHL 50 for 10 isolates showed that four isolates were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum, L. brevis, L. pentosus and Lactococuslactis.

  14. Molecular diversity of lactic acid bacteria on ileum broiler chicken fed by bran and bran fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baniyah, Laelatul; Nur Jannah, Siti; Rukmi, Isworo; Sugiharto

    2018-05-01

    Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) is a digestive tract microflora that have a positive role in poultry health. The number and diversity of LAB in the digestive tract affected by several factors, among them was the kind of feed. The purpose of this research was to know diversity of Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) ileum broiler’s after feeding with prebiotic bran and Rhizopus oryzae fermented bran which was added to commercial feed. As much as 15 broilers were used to determine the diversity of LAB. All broilers were fed using commercial feed. The control used commercial feed no addition of bran or fermented bran, and commercial feed with fermented bran and nonfermented bran were as a treatment. To determine the diversity of LAB, T-RFLP method was applied. The Hae III and Msp I were used as restriction enzymes. The number of phylotype, relative abundance, Shannon diversity index (H '), evenness (E), and Dominance (D) were examined. The results indicated that the addition of prebiotic bran on commercial feed showed a higher diversity of lactic acid bacteria on broiler’s ileum, compared with control and addition of Rhizopus oryzae fermented bran. LAB group that dominates in the ileum is Lactobacillus sp. and L. delbruecii subs bulgaricus.

  15. Production of lactic acid from whey using Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M. Rojas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to determine the proper growth conditions of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus for the production of lactic acid using serum as substract. This serum was obtain from the department of Cesar, Colombia. Lactic acid is the result of the extraction and purification of fermentation broths in which bacteria Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus are used, which are usually used for the production of yogurt. The substrate was supplemented with yeast extract, ammonium phosphate as a nitrogen source, and calcium carbonate as a neutralizer, in order to optimize the consumption, by the bacteria, of the main carbohydrate present in serum (lactose. During the fermentation (up to 72 h the inoculums concentration, and temperature were controlled. Purification consisted in esterification, filtration of solids formed during the reaction, and removing of water by evaporation and nitrogen influx. Finally, lactic acid was obtained with 78,0% purity (36.7 g/L, which was characterized by infrared spectroscopy

  16. Lactic Acid Fermentation, Urea and Lime Addition: Promising Faecal Sludge Sanitizing Methods for Emergency Sanitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Catherine; Malambo, Dennis Hanjalika; Perez, Maria Eliette Gonzalez; Nobela, Happiness Ngwanamoseka; de Pooter, Lobke; Spit, Jan; Hooijmans, Christine Maria; de Vossenberg, Jack van; Greya, Wilson; Thole, Bernard; van Lier, Jules B; Brdjanovic, Damir

    2015-10-29

    In this research, three faecal sludge sanitizing methods-lactic acid fermentation, urea treatment and lime treatment-were studied for application in emergency situations. These methods were investigated by undertaking small scale field trials with pit latrine sludge in Blantyre, Malawi. Hydrated lime was able to reduce the E. coli count in the sludge to below the detectable limit within 1 h applying a pH > 11 (using a dosage from 7% to 17% w/w, depending faecal sludge alkalinity), urea treatment required about 4 days using 2.5% wet weight urea addition, and lactic acid fermentation needed approximately 1 week after being dosed with 10% wet weight molasses (2 g (glucose/fructose)/kg) and 10% wet weight pre-culture (99.8% pasteurised whole milk and 0.02% fermented milk drink containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota). Based on Malawian prices, the cost of sanitizing 1 m³ of faecal sludge was estimated to be €32 for lactic acid fermentation, €20 for urea treatment and €12 for hydrated lime treatment.

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Films Extruded of Polyethylene/Chitosan Modified with Poly(lactic acid)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz-Castillo, Jesús Manuel; Rodríguez-Félix, Dora Evelia; Grijalva-Monteverde, Heriberto; Lizárraga-Laborín, Lauren Lucero; Castillo-Ortega, María Mónica; del Castillo-Castro, Teresa; Rodríguez-Félix, Francisco; Herrera-Franco, Pedro Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The use of mixtures of synthetic and natural polymers is a potential option to reduce the pollution by plastic waste. In this work, the method for the chemical modification of chitosan with poly(lactic acid) was developed; then, the preparation of films of blends of polyethylene and chitosan-poly(lactic acid) produced by an extrusion method using polyethylene-graft maleic anhydride as a compatibilizer. It was possible to obtain films with a maximum content of 20 wt% and 30 wt%, chitosan, with and without compatibilizer, respectively. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed a homogeneous surface on all films. The addition of the compatibilizer had a significant effect on the mechanical properties of the films, such as an increase in Young’s modulus and a decrease in the elongation at break; additionally, the compatibilizer promotes thermal degradation in a single step and gives the film a slight increase in thermal resistance. These results are attributed to an improved interaction in the interface of polyethylene and chitosan-poly(lactic acid), promoted by the compatibilizer. PMID:28787928

  18. Production of D-lactic acid from sugarcane bagasse using steam-explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Chizuru; Okumura, Ryosuke; Asakawa, Ai; Asada, Chikako; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated the production of D-lactic acid from unutilized sugarcane bagasse using steam explosion pretreatment. The optimal steam pressure for a steaming time of 5 min was determined. By enzymatic saccharification using Meicellase, the highest recovery of glucose from raw bagasse, 73.7%, was obtained at a steam pressure of 20 atm. For residue washed with water after steam explosion, the glucose recovery increased up to 94.9% at a steam pressure of 20 atm. These results showed that washing with water is effective in removing enzymatic reaction inhibitors. After steam pretreatment (steam pressure of 20 atm), D-lactic acid was produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii NBRC 3534 from the enzymatic hydrolyzate of steam-exploded bagasse and washed residue. The conversion rate of D-lactic acid obtained from the initial glucose concentration was 66.6% for the hydrolyzate derived from steam-exploded bagasse and 90.0% for that derived from the washed residue after steam explosion. These results also demonstrated that the hydrolyzate of steam-exploded bagasse (without washing with water) contains fermentation inhibitors and washing with water can remove them.

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Films Extruded of Polyethylene/Chitosan Modified with Poly(lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Manuel Quiroz-Castillo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of mixtures of synthetic and natural polymers is a potential option to reduce the pollution by plastic waste. In this work, the method for the chemical modification of chitosan with poly(lactic acid was developed; then, the preparation of films of blends of polyethylene and chitosan-poly(lactic acid produced by an extrusion method using polyethylene-graft maleic anhydride as a compatibilizer. It was possible to obtain films with a maximum content of 20 wt% and 30 wt%, chitosan, with and without compatibilizer, respectively. Scanning electron microscope (SEM analysis showed a homogeneous surface on all films. The addition of the compatibilizer had a significant effect on the mechanical properties of the films, such as an increase in Young’s modulus and a decrease in the elongation at break; additionally, the compatibilizer promotes thermal degradation in a single step and gives the film a slight increase in thermal resistance. These results are attributed to an improved interaction in the interface of polyethylene and chitosan-poly(lactic acid, promoted by the compatibilizer.

  20. Lactic acid production from unmatured banana peel and flesh through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed BELMAKKI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish a process of lactic acid (LA production from two different kinds of african organic waste i.e. peel and flesh of un-matured banana by using as model strain Lactobacillus bp Pentosus AH 239. The bioconversion of glucose contained in the biomass to LA was performed following the Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF process. The Separated Hydrolysis and Fermentation (SHF was also applied in this study to compare the efficiency of both process. The results showed that the enzymatic hydrolysis yield was significantly improved in case of SSF recording a rate of hydrolysis in the range of 82%-90% against 52%-61% under SHF conditions. The results showed also that SSF give more efficient lactic acid production with a yield above of 90%, and a high concentration up to 50 g/L. Due to its performance, the SSF process for the lactic acid production could be an important way of bioconversion for lignocellulosic residues in Africa. The optimization of this process need to be adapted for African context and for its development on an industrial scale.